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Sample records for electron impact collision

  1. Electron Impact Collision Strength in Si IX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noman, Hala; Gokce, Y.; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil

    2016-05-01

    Results from work in progress under Iron Project on the electron impact excitation collision strengths and rate coefficients for transitions between the fine-structure levels of the 2s2 2p2 , 2 s 2p3 , 2p4 , 2s2 2 p 3 s , 2s2 2 p 3 p , and 2s2 2 p 3 d configurations in Si IX will be presented. The fine structure collision strength has been calculated at very fine energy mesh using relativistic effects in Breit-Pauli R-matrix method. Maxwellian averaged collision strengths have been tabulated for all possible transitions among all 46 enrgy levels. We made comparisions of our results with the previously reported results in the literature and found significant differences in low the temperature range (Te < 106 K) for few of the transitions. The correction to the previous reported values results due to more extensive expansion for Si IX target states.

  2. Electron impact collision strengths in Ne VII

    SciTech Connect

    Di, L.; Shi, J.R.; Zhao, G.

    2012-07-15

    The lines of Ne VII have been observed in many astronomical objects, and some transitions from high energy levels were observed both in Seyfert galaxies and stellar coronae. Thus, the atomic data for these transitions are important for modeling. Using the code FAC we calculated the collision strengths based on the distorted-wave method with large configuration interactions included. The Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths covering the typical temperature range of astronomical and laboratory hot plasmas are presented. We extend the calculation of the energy levels to n=4 and 5. The energy levels, wavelengths, spontaneous transition rates, weighted oscillator strengths, and effective collision strengths were reported. Compared with the results from experiment or previous theoretical calculations a general agreement is found. It is found that the resonance effects are important in calculating the effective collision strengths.

  3. Electron impact collision strengths for excitation of highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, D.H. . Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics)

    1990-08-20

    The principle task given us by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to perform under Subcontract 6181405 was to develop a method and corresponding computer programs to make very rapid, yet accurate, fully relativistic and quasirelativistic calculations of cross sections or collision strengths for electron impact excitation of highly charged ions with any value for the nuclear charge number Z. Also while this major code development was being done we were asked to calculate cross sections of interest using our previous rapid, more approximate codes, which used hydrogenic basis functions and screening constants with both the electron-electron Coulomb interaction and relativistic interactions included by perturbation theory. We were also asked to determine the branching ratio for ionization to various final states in complex cases, where two or more states corresponding to the final configuration of the ion were possible.

  4. Electron impact excitation collision strengths for extreme ultraviolet lines of Fe VII

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, S. S.; Zatsarinny, O. E-mail: oleg.zatsarinny@drake.edu

    2014-06-10

    Extensive calculations have been performed for electron impact excitation collision strengths and oscillator strengths for the Fe VII extreme ultraviolet lines of astrophysical importance. The collision strengths for fine-structure transitions are calculated in the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix approach. The target wavefunctions have been calculated in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals. The close-coupling expansion includes 189 fine-structure levels of Fe VII belonging to terms of the ground 3p {sup 6}3d {sup 2} and excited 3p {sup 5}3d {sup 3}, 3p {sup 6}3d4l, 3p {sup 6}3d5s, and 3p {sup 6}3d5p configurations. The effective collision strengths are determined from the electron excitation collision strengths by integration over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. The effective collision strengths are provided for 17766 fine-structure transitions at electron temperatures from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} K. Our results normally agree with the previous R-matrix frame-transformation calculations by Witthoeft and Badnell. However, there are important differences for some transitions with the previous calculations. The corrections to the previous results are mainly due to more extensive expansions for the Fe VII target states.

  5. Electron impact collision strengths in Si IX, Si X, and Si XI

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Guiyun; Zhao Gang . E-mail: gzhao@bao.ac.cn; Zeng Jiaolong

    2007-05-15

    Electron impact collision strengths among 560 levels of Si IX, 320 levels of Si X, and 350 levels of Si XI have been calculated using the Flexible Atomic Code of Gu [M.F. Gu, Astrophys. J. 582 (2003) 1241]. Collision strengths {omega} at 10 scattered electron energies, namely 10, 50, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1500, and 2000 eV, are reported. Assuming a Maxwellian energy distribution, effective collision strengths Y are obtained on a finer electron temperature grid of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 MK, which covers the typical temperature range of astrophysical hot plasmas. Additionally, radiative rates A and weighted oscillator strengths gf are given for the more probable transitions among these levels. Comparisons of our results with available predictions reported in earlier literature are made and the accuracy of the data is assessed. Most transitions exhibit a good agreement, but large differences in gf appear for a few cases, which are due to the different configuration interactions included in different theoretical calculations. For excitations among levels of the ground and lower excited configurations, large discrepancies of Y may have resulted from the consideration of resonance effects in earlier works.

  6. Calculation of Ground State Rotational Populations for Kinetic Gas Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules including Electron-Impact Excitation and Wall Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Farley

    2010-08-19

    A model has been developed to calculate the ground-state rotational populations of homonuclear diatomic molecules in kinetic gases, including the effects of electron-impact excitation, wall collisions, and gas feed rate. The equations are exact within the accuracy of the cross sections used and of the assumed equilibrating effect of wall collisions. It is found that the inflow of feed gas and equilibrating wall collisions can significantly affect the rotational distribution in competition with non-equilibrating electron-impact effects. The resulting steady-state rotational distributions are generally Boltzmann for N≥3, with a rotational temperature between the wall and feed gas temperatures. The N=0,1,2 rotational level populations depend sensitively on the relative rates of electron-impact excitation versus wall collision and gas feed rates.

  7. Effective collision strengths for electron impact excitations in S II. [Plasma torus of Io

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, S.S.; Henry, R.J.W.; Nakazaki, S.

    1987-02-01

    Electron impact collision strengths for forbidden, semiforbidden, and allowed transitions in S II calculated using the R-matrix method are presented. Configuration interaction wave functions are used to represent the six target states included in the calculation. At low impact energies the collision strengths are dominated by resonances for several transitions. The contribution from higher partial waves is obtained in the close-coupling approximation with exchange terms omitted. Results are presented for the effective collision strengths over a wide temperature range (5000-150,000 K) of astrophysical interest. The present results for the 4S(0) yields 2P(0) transition are 20-30 percent lower than previous calculations, while for the 4S(0) yields 2D(0) transition they are in good agreement. The results are approximately 30 percent higher than those of Ho and Henry (1983) for the 4S(0) yields 2P(0) transition at 80,000 K, and the difference between the two results increases with decreasing temperatures (under 80,000 K). 38 references.

  8. Electron-impact excitation collision strengths and theoretical line intensities for transitions in S III

    SciTech Connect

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Hudson, C. E.; Keenan, F. P.

    2014-01-01

    We present Maxwellian-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of S III over a wide range of electron temperatures of astrophysical importance, log T{sub e} (K) = 3.0-6.0. The calculation incorporates 53 fine-structure levels arising from the six configurations—3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}, 3s3p {sup 3}, 3s {sup 2}3p3d, 3s {sup 2}3p4s, 3s {sup 2}3p4p, and 3s {sup 2}3p4d—giving rise to 1378 individual lines and is undertaken using the recently developed RMATRX II plus FINE95 suite of codes. A detailed comparison is made with a previous R-matrix calculation and significant differences are found for some transitions. The atomic data are subsequently incorporated into the modeling code CLOUDY to generate line intensities for a range of plasma parameters, with emphasis on allowed ultraviolet extreme-ultraviolet emission lines detected from the Io plasma torus. Electron density-sensitive line ratios are calculated with the present atomic data and compared with those from CHIANTI v7.1, as well as with Io plasma torus spectra obtained by Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer. The present line intensities are found to agree well with the observational results and provide a noticeable improvement on the values predicted by CHIANTI.

  9. Electron-atom /molecule/ collision processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.

    1980-01-01

    Electron-atom (molecule) collision processes at low and intermediate energies, from near threshold to a few hundred electron volts, are discussed. Attention is given to experimental techniques and procedures, electron impact cross sections, impact excitation and electron-atom scattering in laser fields. Specific examples are presented that illustrate various experimental techniques and interpretations of observations.

  10. Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainstein, Pablo D.; Lima, Marco Aurelio P.; Miraglia, Jorge E.; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-11-01

    ionization of fixed in space deuterium molecules / T. Weber ... [et al.]. Coherence and intramolecular scattering in molecular photoionization / U. Becker. Experimental observation of interatomic coulombic decay in neon dimers / T. Jahnke ... [et al.]. Ionization by short UV laser pulses: secondary ATI peaks of the electron spectrum / V. D. Rodríguez, E. Cormier and R. Gayet. Molecular frame photoemission in photoionization of H[symbol] and D[symbol]: the role of dissociation on autoionization of the Q[symbol] and Q[symbol] doubly excited states / D. Dowek, M. Lebech and J. C. Houver. 3p photoemission of 3d transition metals - atoms, molecules and clusters / M. Martins -- Collisions involving electrons. Spin-resolved collisions of electrons with atoms and molecules / G. F. Hanne. Calculation of ionization and excitation processes using the convergent close-coupling method / D. V. Fursa, I. Bray and A. T. Stelbovics. The B-spline R-matrix method for electron and photon collisions with atoms and ions / O. Zatsarinny and K. Bartschat. Absolute angle-differential cross sections for excitation of neon atoms electrons of energy 16.6-19.2 eV / M. Allan ... [et al.]. Studies of QED and nuclear size effects with highly charged ions in an EBIT / J. R. Crespo López-Urrutia ... [et al.]. Recombination of astrophysically relevant ions: Be-like C, N, and O / M. Fogle ... [et al.]. Dissociation and excitation of molecules and molecular ions by electron impact / A. E. Orel and J. Royal state-selective X-ray study of the radiative recombination of U[symbol] ions with cooling electrons / M. Pajek ... [et al.]. Electron collisions with trapped, metastable helium / L. J. Uhlmann ... [et al.]. Non-dipole effects in electron and photon impact ionization / N. L. S. Martin. Electron driven processes in atmospheric behaviour / L. Campbell, M. J. Brunger and P. J. 0. Teubner. Calculation of excitation and ionization for electron-molecule collisions at intermediate energies / J. D. Gorfinkiel

  11. Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainstein, Pablo D.; Lima, Marco Aurelio P.; Miraglia, Jorge E.; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-11-01

    ionization of fixed in space deuterium molecules / T. Weber ... [et al.]. Coherence and intramolecular scattering in molecular photoionization / U. Becker. Experimental observation of interatomic coulombic decay in neon dimers / T. Jahnke ... [et al.]. Ionization by short UV laser pulses: secondary ATI peaks of the electron spectrum / V. D. Rodríguez, E. Cormier and R. Gayet. Molecular frame photoemission in photoionization of H[symbol] and D[symbol]: the role of dissociation on autoionization of the Q[symbol] and Q[symbol] doubly excited states / D. Dowek, M. Lebech and J. C. Houver. 3p photoemission of 3d transition metals - atoms, molecules and clusters / M. Martins -- Collisions involving electrons. Spin-resolved collisions of electrons with atoms and molecules / G. F. Hanne. Calculation of ionization and excitation processes using the convergent close-coupling method / D. V. Fursa, I. Bray and A. T. Stelbovics. The B-spline R-matrix method for electron and photon collisions with atoms and ions / O. Zatsarinny and K. Bartschat. Absolute angle-differential cross sections for excitation of neon atoms electrons of energy 16.6-19.2 eV / M. Allan ... [et al.]. Studies of QED and nuclear size effects with highly charged ions in an EBIT / J. R. Crespo López-Urrutia ... [et al.]. Recombination of astrophysically relevant ions: Be-like C, N, and O / M. Fogle ... [et al.]. Dissociation and excitation of molecules and molecular ions by electron impact / A. E. Orel and J. Royal state-selective X-ray study of the radiative recombination of U[symbol] ions with cooling electrons / M. Pajek ... [et al.]. Electron collisions with trapped, metastable helium / L. J. Uhlmann ... [et al.]. Non-dipole effects in electron and photon impact ionization / N. L. S. Martin. Electron driven processes in atmospheric behaviour / L. Campbell, M. J. Brunger and P. J. 0. Teubner. Calculation of excitation and ionization for electron-molecule collisions at intermediate energies / J. D. Gorfinkiel

  12. Electron-electron collisions at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Siegfried; Reyzl, Ingrid

    2001-07-01

    Electron-electron collisions at the future TESLA linear collider is a promising complement to e+e- collisions. A critical issue for the physics potential of this option is the achievable luminosity. For e+e- collisions, the pinch effect enhances the luminosity, while due to the repelling forces for e-e- collisions, the luminosity is significantly reduced and is more sensitive to beam separations. This report discusses the e-e- option for TESLA and the expected luminosity.

  13. Cross sections of electron capture and electron capture ionization versus the impact parameter in collisions of a proton with multielectron atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrosimov, V. V.; Basalaev, A. A.; Ogurtsov, G. N.; Panov, M. N.

    2014-05-01

    The absolute differential cross sections of scattering of hydrogen atoms resulting from an electron capture and an electron capture ionization are measured for collisions of 4.5- and 11-keV protons with argon and xenon atoms. The range of scattering angles is 0°-2°. From the scattering differential cross section found experimentally, the probabilities of single-electron capture and electron capture ionization as a function of the impact parameter are calculated. The dependences of the incident particle scattering angle on the impact parameter (deviation function) for interactions with Ar and Xe atoms are calculated in terms of classical mechanics using the Moliére—Yukawa potential to describe the interaction of atomic particles. Analysis is given to the probabilities of electron capture and electron capture ionization versus the impact parameter and to the distribution of the electron density on different electron shells in a target atom versus a distance to the core. It is concluded that only electrons from the outer shell of the target atom are involved in the process of electron capture ionization. The cross section of electron capture ionization is calculated in the proton energy range 5-20 keV.

  14. Effective Collision Strengths for Electron Impact Excitation of Inelastic Transitions in S III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    We have calculated electron collisional excitation strengths for all electric dipole forbidden, semi-forbidden, and allowed transitions among the lowest 17 LS states 3s(exp 2)3p(exp 2) P-3, D-1, S-1, 3s3p(exp 3)S-5(exp 0), D-3(exp 0), P-3(exp 0), P-1(exp 0), S-3(exp 0), D-1(exp 0), 3S(exp 2)3p3d D-1(exp 0), F-3(exp 0), P-3(exp 0), D-3(exp 0), F-3(exp 0), P-1(exp 0), and 3S(exp 2)3p4S P-3(exp 0), P-l(exp 0) of S III using the R-matrix method. These S m states are represented by fairly extensive configuration-interaction wave functions that yield excited state energies in close agreement with recent laboratory measurements. Rydberg series of resonances converging to the excited state thresholds are explicitly included in the scattering calculation. The effective collision strengths are determined assuming Maxwellian distribution of electron energies. These are listed over a wide temperature range ([0.5-10] x 10(exp 4) K) and compared, where possible, with other available calculations. Subject headings: atomic data - atomic processes

  15. Electron-electron interactions in fast neutral-neutral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, R.D. ); Manson, S.T. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1992-11-01

    Differential electron emission is studied for 50--500 keV H[sup +] and H atom impact on helium. Using the first Born formulation, it is shown that projectile electron-target electron interactions are expected to dominate the differential cross sections for low energy target electron emission induced by fast neutral projectile impact on any target. Measurements of the 15[degrees] electron emission were made in order to investigate this prediction. For low impact energies, a constant ratio between the hydrogen atom and proton impact cross sections was found for emitted electron velocities less than half the projectile velocity, V[sub p] But as the collision energy increased, for electron velocities less than 0.25 V[sub p], the cross section ratio increased as the emitted electron velocity decreased. This is interpreted as a signature of projectile electron-target electron interactions becoming dominant for distant collisions between neutral particles.

  16. Electron-electron interactions in fast neutral-neutral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, R.D.; Manson, S.T.

    1992-11-01

    Differential electron emission is studied for 50--500 keV H{sup +} and H atom impact on helium. Using the first Born formulation, it is shown that projectile electron-target electron interactions are expected to dominate the differential cross sections for low energy target electron emission induced by fast neutral projectile impact on any target. Measurements of the 15{degrees} electron emission were made in order to investigate this prediction. For low impact energies, a constant ratio between the hydrogen atom and proton impact cross sections was found for emitted electron velocities less than half the projectile velocity, V{sub p} But as the collision energy increased, for electron velocities less than 0.25 V{sub p}, the cross section ratio increased as the emitted electron velocity decreased. This is interpreted as a signature of projectile electron-target electron interactions becoming dominant for distant collisions between neutral particles.

  17. ELECTRON-IMPACT EXCITATION OF Cr II: A THEORETICAL CALCULATION OF EFFECTIVE COLLISION STRENGTHS FOR OPTICALLY ALLOWED TRANSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wasson, I. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we present electron-impact excitation collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for the complicated iron-peak ion Cr II. We consider specifically the allowed lines for transitions from the 3d {sup 5} and 3d {sup 4}4s even parity configuration states to the 3d {sup 4}4p odd parity configuration levels. The parallel suite of R-Matrix packages, RMATRX II, which have recently been extended to allow for the inclusion of relativistic effects, were used to compute the collision cross sections. A total of 108 LS{pi}/280 J{pi} levels from the basis configurations 3d {sup 5}, 3d {sup 4}4s, and 3d {sup 4}4p were included in the wavefunction representation of the target including all doublet, quartet, and sextet terms. Configuration interaction and correlation effects were carefully considered by the inclusion of seven more configurations and a pseudo-corrector 4d-bar type orbital. The 10 configurations incorporated into the Cr II model thus listed are 3d {sup 5}, 3d {sup 4}4s, 3d {sup 4}4p, 3d {sup 3}4s {sup 2}, 3d {sup 3}4p {sup 2}, 3d {sup 3}4s4p, 3d{sup 4}4d-bar, 3d{sup 3}4s4d-bar, 3d{sup 3}4p4d-bar, and 3d{sup 3}4d-bar{sup 2}, constituting the largest Cr II target model considered to date in a scattering calculation. The Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths are computed for a wide range of electron temperatures 2000-100,000 K which are astrophysically significant. Care has been taken to ensure that the partial wave contributions to the collision strengths for these allowed lines have converged with 'top-up' from the Burgess-Tully sum rule incorporated. Comparisons are made with the results of Bautista et al. and significant differences are found for some of the optically allowed lines considered.

  18. Interpreting the Hydrogen IR Lines Impact of Improved Electron Collision Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybilla, Norbert; Butler, Keith

    We evaluate the effect of variations in the electron-impact excitation cross sections on the non-LTE line formation for hydrogen in early-type stars. While the Balmer lines are basically unaffected by the choice of atomic data, the Brackett and Pfund series members allow us to discriminate between the different models. Non-LTE calculations based on the widely-used approximations of Mihalas, Heasley & Auer and of Johnson fail to simultaneously reproduce the observed optical and IR spectra over the entire parameter range. Instead, we recommend a reference model using data from ab-initio calculations up to principal quantum number n≤7 for quantitative work. This model is of general interest due to the ubiquity of the hydrogen spectrum.

  19. Electron Collisions with Large Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKoy, Vincent

    2006-10-01

    In recent years, interest in electron-molecule collisions has increasingly shifted to large molecules. Applications within the semiconductor industry, for example, require electron collision data for molecules such as perfluorocyclobutane, while almost all biological applications involve macromolecules such as DNA. A significant development in recent years has been the realization that slow electrons can directly damage DNA. This discovery has spurred studies of low-energy collisions with the constituents of DNA, including the bases, deoxyribose, the phosphate, and larger moieties assembled from them. In semiconductor applications, a key goal is development of electron cross section sets for plasma chemistry modeling, while biological studies are largely focused on understanding the role of localized resonances in inducing DNA strand breaks. Accurate calculations of low-energy electron collisions with polyatomic molecules are computationally demanding because of the low symmetry and inherent many-electron nature of the problem; moreover, the computational requirements scale rapidly with the size of the molecule. To pursue such studies, we have adapted our computational procedure, known as the Schwinger multichannel method, to run efficiently on highly parallel computers. In this talk, we will present some of our recent results for fluorocarbon etchants used in the semiconductor industry and for constituents of DNA and RNA. In collaboration with Carl Winstead, California Institute of Technology.

  20. Newly appreciated roles for electrons in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    Since the previous Debrecen workshop on High-Energy Ion-Atom Collisions there have been numerous experiments and substantial theoretical developments in the fields of fast ion-atom and ion- solid collisions concerned with explicating the previously largely underappreciated role of electrons as ionizing and exciting agents in such collisions. Examples to be discussed include the double electron ionization problem in He; transfer ionization by protons in He; double excitation in He; backward scattering of electrons in He; the role of electron-electron interaction in determining beta parameters for ELC; projectile K ionization by target electrons; electron spin exchange in transfer excitation; electron impact ionization in crystal channels; resonant coherent excitation in crystal channels; excitation and dielectronic recombination in crystal channels; resonant transfer and excitation; the similarity of recoil ion spectra observed in coincidence with electron capture vs. electron loss; and new research on ion-atom collisions at relativistic energies.

  1. Electron collisions with coherently prepared atomic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Trajmar, S.; Kanik, I.; LeClair, L.R.; Khakoo, M.S.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D.; Csanak, G.

    1998-02-01

    The subject of electron scattering by laser-excited atoms is briefly reviewed. To demonstrate some aspects of these electron collision processes, the authors describe the procedures and the results of a joint experimental and theoretical study concerning elastic scattering by coherently excited {sup 138}Ba (...6s6p {sup 1}P{sub 1}) atoms. Examples of experimental and theoretical collision parameters and magnetic sublevel differential cross sections for elastic scattering are given and compared. The convergent close coupling calculations (with the neglect of spin-orbit interaction) are in good agreement with experiment at 20 eV impact energy and 10, 15 and 20{degree} scattering angles and can be expected to yield reliable integral magnetic sublevel and alignment creation cross sections. The role of these quantities in plasma polarization spectroscopy is pointed out.

  2. Electron impact excitation of Mg VIII . Collision strengths, transition probabilities and theoretical EUV and soft X-ray line intensities for Mg VIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Keenan, F. P.

    2013-08-01

    Context. Mg viii emission lines are observed in a range of astronomical objects such as the Sun, other cool stars and in the coronal line region of Seyfert galaxies. Under coronal conditions Mg viii emits strongly in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray spectral regions which makes it an ideal ion for plasma diagnostics. Aims: Two theoretical atomic models, consisting of 125 fine structure levels, are developed for the Mg viii ion. The 125 levels arise from the 2s22p, 2s2p2, 2p3, 2s23s, 2s23p, 2s23d, 2s2p3s, 2s2p3p, 2s2p3d, 2p23s, 2p23p and 2p23d configurations. Electron impact excitation collision strengths and radiative transition probabilities are calculated for both Mg viii models, compared with existing data, and the best model selected to generate a set of theoretical emission line intensities. The EUV lines, covering 312-790 Å, are compared with existing solar spectra (SERTS-89 and SUMER), while the soft X-ray transitions (69-97 Å) are examined for potential density diagnostic line ratios and also compared with the limited available solar and stellar observational data. Methods: The R-matrix codes Breit-Pauli RMATRXI and RMATRXII are utilised, along with the PSTGF code, to calculate the collision strengths for two Mg viii models. Collision strengths are averaged over a Maxwellian distribution to produce the corresponding effective collision strengths for use in astrophysical applications. Transition probabilities are also calculated using the CIV3 atomic structure code. The best data are then incorporated into the modelling code CLOUDY and line intensities generated for a range of electron temperatures and densities appropriate to solar and stellar coronal plasmas. Results: The present effective collision strengths are compared with two previous calculations. Good levels of agreement are found with the most recent, but there are large differences with the other for forbidden transitions. The resulting line intensities compare favourably with the

  3. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

  4. Multielectron transitions resulting from interactions between target and projectile electrons in ionizing collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, S.T. ); DuBois, R.D. )

    1992-12-01

    Interactions between target and projectile electrons leading to ionization of one of the collision partners and simultaneous excitation of the other are investigated for fast clothed-particle--clothed-particle collisions. For H-atom impact, the first Born approximation is used to demonstrate that the low-energy-electron emission is dominated by electron-electron rather than by electron-nucleus interaction processes. For a broad class of structured particle collision systems, the electron-electron interaction is shown to play an important, non-neglibible, role. Doubly differential cross sections for energetic H-He collisions illustrate this point.

  5. Electron-exchange collisions with molecular open-shell targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtkötter, I.; Hanne, G. F.

    2009-08-01

    Low-energy electron-exchange collisions with the simple open-shell molecules O2 , NO, and NO2 have been investigated by measuring the change in electron-spin polarization after scattering polarized electrons from unpolarized molecules with energies between 8 and 20 eV and scattering angles up to 130° . Results for elastic collisions with O2 and NO are compared with existing theories where the agreement is fair. Direct observation of spin-exchange collisions is obtained for elastic scattering from NO2 and for electron-impact excitation of O2 (6.1 eV energy loss). It is also shown that the results may be influenced by spin-orbit interaction, which was assumed to be negligible in previous studies.

  6. Electron-Atom Collisions in Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Electron-atom collisions in gases are an aspect of atomic physics. Three experiments in this field employing a thyratron are described: (i) the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, (ii) the excitation and ionization potentials of xenon and (iii) the ion-electron recombination after interrupting the electric discharge.

  7. Electron-Nitrogen Collision Processes Relevant to Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Electron-N2 collisions play an important role in the nitrogen-rich upper atmospheres of Titan, Triton, and Earth. Modeling these processes requires accurate laboratory data. Despite the recognized importance of such data, there remained an unsatisfactory degree of consensus among much of the available laboratory collision cross section data. To address this situation, our group has devoted considerable effort over the past decade to improve the status of low energy electron collision data. In doing so, we have measured direct excitation cross sections for at least 17 electronic states of neutral N2 and a variety of key UV emission cross sections. Here we review the result of this effort, highlighting how the picture of electron collision processes has evolved, where consensus has been reached and where discrepancies still exist. New electron energy-loss measurements will be presented for excitation of the valence states, with finely spaced (<1eV) impact energy increments in the threshold-to-peak region where excitation is not in proportion to the Franck-Condon factors. These data are novel in that they include measurements at fixed electron scattering angles, differential in impact energy over a range of scattering angle. Also, new near-threshold integral cross sections are provided and compared to existing data.

  8. Molecular Dissociation Induced by Electron Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Andreas

    2009-05-01

    Free electrons can efficiently break molecules or molecular ions in low-energy collisions by the processes of dissociative recombination or attachment. These processes make slow electrons efficient chemical agents in many environments. For dissociative recombination, in particular, studies of the underlying reaction paths and mechanisms have become possible on a uniquely elementary level in recent years both for theory and experiment. On the experimental side, collisions can be prepared at resolved collision energies down to the meV (10 Kelvin) level, increasingly gaining control also over the initial molecular quantum level, and individual events are detected and kinematically analyzed by fast-beam coincidence fragment imaging. Experiments are reported from the ion cooler ring TSR in Heidelberg. Stored beams of molecular ions cooled in their external and internal degrees of freedom are collinearly merged with intense and cold electron beams from cryogenic GaAs photocathodes, recently shown to yield fast cooling of the center-of-mass motion also for heavy and correspondingly slow molecular ion beams. To reconstruct the molecular fragmentation events multiparticle imaging can now be used systematically with collision energies set a wide range, especially aiming at specific electron capture resonances. Thus, for CF^+ it is found that the electronic state of the C fragment (^3P or ^1D) switches resonantly when the collision energy is changed by only a small fraction. As a new powerful tool, an energy-sensitive multi-strip surface-barrier detector (EMU) has been set up to measure with near-unity efficiency the masses of all fragments together with their hit positions in high-multiplicity events. Among many uses, this device allows internal molecular excitations to be derived for individual chemical channels in polyatomic fragmentation. New results will be presented in particular on the breakup of the hydronium ion (D3O^+).

  9. Dynamics of electronically inelastic collisions from 3D Doppler measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Suits, A.G.; de Pujo, P.; Sublemontier, O.; Visticot, J.; Berlande, J.; Cuvellier, J.; Gustavsson, T.; Mestdagh, J.; Meynadier, P. ); Lee, Y.T. )

    1991-11-25

    Flux-velocity contour maps were obtained for the inelastic collision process Ba({sup 1}{ital P}{sub 1})+O{sub 2}N{sub 2}{r arrow}Ba({sup 3}{ital P}{sub 2})+O{sub 2}N{sub 2} from Doppler scans of scattered Ba({sup 3}{ital P}{sub 2}) taken over a range of probe laser directions in a crossed-beam experiment. Collision with O{sub 2} resulted in sharply forward scattered Ba({sup 3}{ital P}{sub 2}), with efficient conversion of inital electronic energy into O{sub 2} internal energy and little momentum transfer. Collision with N{sub 2} was dominated by wide-angle scattering with most of the available electronic energy appearing in product translation. The results suggest the importance of large-impact-parameter collisions and a near-resonant energy transfer in the case of O{sub 2}, while for N{sub 2} close collisions dominate despite the presence of an analogous near-resonant channel. The results represent the first direct experimental demonstration of a near-resonant quenching process.

  10. Progress in Computational Electron-Molecule Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rescigno, Tn

    1997-10-01

    The past few years have witnessed tremendous progress in the development of sophisticated ab initio methods for treating collisions of slow electrons with isolated small molecules. Researchers in this area have benefited greatly from advances in computer technology; indeed, the advent of parallel computers has made it possible to carry out calculations at a level of sophistication inconceivable a decade ago. But bigger and faster computers are only part of the picture. Even with today's computers, the practical need to study electron collisions with the kinds of complex molecules and fragments encountered in real-world plasma processing environments is taxing present methods beyond their current capabilities. Since extrapolation of existing methods to handle increasingly larger targets will ultimately fail as it would require computational resources beyond any imagined, continued progress must also be linked to new theoretical developments. Some of the techniques recently introduced to address these problems will be discussed and illustrated with examples of electron-molecule collision calculations we have carried out on some fairly complex target gases encountered in processing plasmas. Electron-molecule scattering continues to pose many formidable theoretical and computational challenges. I will touch on some of the outstanding open questions.

  11. Theory of Electron-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Donald C

    2009-10-02

    Collisions of electrons with atoms and ions play a crucial role in the modeling and diagnostics of fusion plasmas. In the edge and divertor regions of magnetically confined plasmas, data for the collisions of electrons with neutral atoms and low charge-state ions are of particular importance, while in the inner region, data on highly ionized species are needed. Since experimental measurements for these collisional processes remain very limited, data for such processes depend primarily on the results of theoretical calculations. Over the period of the present grant (January 2006 - August 2009), we have made additional improvements in our parallel scattering programs, generated data of direct fusion interest and made these data available on The Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center Web site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In addition, we have employed these data to do collsional-radiative modeling studies in support of a variety of experiments with magnetically confined fusion plasmas.

  12. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Methane

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young Yoon, Jung-Sik; Cho, Hyuck; Itikawa, Yukikazu; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-06-15

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with methane (CH{sub 4}) molecules. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2014.

  13. Pair production and electron capture in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. J.; Mullan, J. V.; McCann, J. F.; Crothers, D. S.

    2001-06-01

    Results are presented for simulations of electron-positron pair production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions leading to electron capture and positron ejection. We apply a two-center relativistic continuum distorted-wave model to represent the electron or positron dynamics during the collision process. The results are compared with experimental cross-section data for La57+ and Au79+ impact on gold, silver, and copper targets. The theory is in good agreement with experiment for La57+ impact, verifying the result that the process increases in importance with both collision energy and target atomic number, and improves upon previous simulations of this process.

  14. Laser-Phase Dependence for Electron Capture in Laser-Assisted Proton -- Hydrogen Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederhausen, Thomas; Thumm, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    We calculate electron capture probabilities for ion--atom collisions in a strong laser field (5x10^13 W/cm^2) by numerically solving the 3-dimensional time--dependent Schr"odinger equation. For circularly polarized laser fields and an impact energy of 1.2 keV, we find a substantial modification of the electronic dynamics in the p--H collision system as compared to field-free collisions. In particular, we observe a strong dependence on the laser phase and the impact parameter for electron capture, which can be explained using semi-classical arguments.

  15. Electron-ion collision operator in strong electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraiman, Gennadiy; Balakin, Alexey

    2012-10-01

    The pair electron-ion collision operator is found for the kinetic equation describing the one-particle drift distribution in strong electromagnetic fields [1]. The pair collisions are studied under the conditions when the oscillation velocity of an electron driven by an external electromagnetic wave is much larger than the electron drift velocity. The operator is presented in the Boltzmann form and describes collisions with both small and large changes of the particle momentum. In contrast with the Landau collision operator, which describes diffusion in the momentum space, the collision operator that we propose describes a new and very important effect, namely, Coulomb attraction of a wave-driven oscillating electron to an ion due to multiple returns of the electron to the same ion. This effect leads to a large increase of the collision cross-section of electron-ion collisions in strong laser fields, to increased efficiency of the Joule heating in plasma, to the generation of fast electrons through e-i collisions, etc. [4pt] [1] A. A. Balakin and G. M. Fraiman, Electron-ion collision operator in strong electromagnetic fields, EPL 93, 35001 (2011).

  16. Single electron capture in fast ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milojević, Nenad

    2014-12-01

    Single-electron capture cross sections in collisions between fast bare projectiles and heliumlike atomic systems are investigated by means of the four-body boundary-corrected first Born (CB1-4B) approximation. The prior and post transition amplitudes for single charge exchange encompassing symmetric and asymmetric collisions are derived in terms of twodimensional real integrals in the case of the prior form and five-dimensional quadratures for the post form. The dielectronic interaction V12 = 1/r12 = 1/|r1 - r2| explicitly appears in the complete perturbation potential Vf of the post transition probability amplitude T+if. An illustrative computation is performed involving state-selective and total single capture cross sections for the p - He (prior and post form) and He2+, Li3+Be4+B5+C6+ - He (prior form) collisions at intermediate and high impact energies. We have also studied differential cross sections in prior and post form for single electron transfer from helium by protons. The role of dynamic correlations is examined as a function of increased projectile energy. Detailed comparisons with the measurements are carried out and the obtained theoretical cross sections are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data.

  17. Entanglement creation in electron-electron collisions at solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feder, R.; Giebels, F.; Gollisch, H.

    2015-08-01

    For spin-polarized low-energy electrons impinging on a crystalline surface, an important reaction channel is the collision with a bound valence electron of opposite spin, followed by the emission of a correlated electron pair with antiparallel spins. While primary and valence electrons are not entangled, the screened Coulomb interaction generates spin entanglement between the two outgoing electrons. As a quantitative measure of this entanglement, we calculated a modified von Neumann entropy in terms of direct and exchange transition matrix elements. For coplanar symmetric setups with equal energies of antiparallel-spin electrons, maximal entanglement is analytically shown to occur quite universally, irrespective of the choice of the primary electron energy, the outgoing electron energy, and polar emission angle, and even of the choice of the surface system. Numerical results for Fe(110) and Cu(111) demonstrate first that strong entanglement can persist for unequal energies and second that an overall entanglement reduction due to nonentangled parallel-spin electrons can be avoided for ferromagnetic and even for nonmagnetic surfaces.

  18. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Carbon Monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2015-03-15

    Cross section data are collected and reviewed for electron collisions with carbon monoxide. Collision processes included are total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational, vibrational and electronic states, ionization, and dissociation. For each process, recommended values of the cross sections are presented, when possible. The literature has been surveyed through to the end of 2013.

  19. Vibrational and Electronic Energy Transfer and Dissociation of Diatomic Molecules by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At high altitudes and velocities equal to or greater than the geosynchronous return velocity (10 kilometers per second), the shock layer of a hypersonic flight will be in thermochemical nonequilibrium and partially ionized. The amount of ionization is determined by the velocity. For a trans atmospheric flight of 10 kilometers per second and at an altitude of 80 kilometers, a maximum of 1% ionization is expected. At a velocity of 12 - 17 kilometer per second, such as a Mars return mission, up to 30% of the atoms and molecules in the flow field will be ionized. Under those circumstances, electrons play an important role in determining the internal states of atoms and molecules in the flow field and hence the amount of radiative heat load and the distance it takes for the flow field to re-establish equilibrium. Electron collisions provide an effective means of transferring energy even when the electron number density is as low as 1%. Because the mass of an electron is 12,760 times smaller than the reduced mass of N2, its average speed, and hence its average collision frequency, is more than 100 times larger. Even in the slightly ionized regime with only 1% electrons, the frequency of electron-molecule collisions is equal to or larger than that of molecule-molecule collisions, an important consideration in the low density part of the atmosphere. Three electron-molecule collision processes relevant to hypersonic flows will be considered: (1) vibrational excitation/de-excitation of a diatomic molecule by electron impact, (2) electronic excitation/de-excitation, and (3) dissociative recombination in electron-diatomic ion collisions. A review of available data, both theory and experiment, will be given. Particular attention will be paid to tailoring the molecular physics to the condition of hypersonic flows. For example, the high rotational temperatures in a hypersonic flow field means that most experimental data carried out under room temperatures are not applicable. Also

  20. Low-energy electron collisions with biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent

    2012-11-01

    We report recent progress in applying the Schwinger multichannel computational method to the interactions of slow electrons with biomolecules. Calculations on constituents of DNA, including nucleobases, phosphate esters, and models of the backbone sugar, have provided insight into the nature of the low-energy shape resonances, and thereby into possible sites and mechanisms for electron attachment that may lead to strand-breaking. At the same time, more approximate calculations on larger assemblies such as nucleosides and deoxyadenosine monophosphate indicate how the resonance properties of the subunits will or will not persist in DNA itself. We are pursuing a similar strategy for another major class of biomolecules, the proteins, by beginning with fixed-nuclei studies of the constituent amino acids; here we present preliminary results for the simplest amino acid, glycine. We also describe efforts directed at an improved understanding electron collisions with alcohols, which, in addition to basic scientific interest, may prove useful in the modeling of ignition and combustion within biofuel-powered engines.

  1. Collision and impact simulations including porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Willy; Jutzi, Martin

    2007-05-01

    We present a numerical tool based on the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) method which can be used to model impacts and collisions involving small solid bodies in a strength-dominated regime. This method was already successfully tested at different scales. At small scales, the method was validated by simulating laboratory impacts. Our model predicts shapes, locations and velocities of the largest fragment with hight accuracy (Benz and Asphaug, 1994). A natural laboratory for studying collision physics at larger scales is provided by the twenty or more asteroid families identified in the asteroid belt. By simulating classes of collisions, our model was able to reproduce the main characteristics of such families (e.g. Michel et al. 2003). Spacecraft missions and ground-based observations are providing increasing evidence that many or even most asteroids are porous (Housenand Holsapple 2003). Porosity may also play an important role in the formation of planets as the dissipative properties of porous media will enhance the collisional sticking mechanism required to build planetesimals. We have developed a numerical model suitable for the calculation of shock dynamics and fracture In porous media. It is based on the so called P-alpha model (Herrmann 1969) which was adapted for implementation in our SPH impact code (Jutzi 2004). We are now capable of performing SPH simulations including fracture AND porosity and can report some very encouraging results. References: Benz and Asphaug (1994), Icarus 107, 98-116 Herrmann W. (1969), J. Appl. Phys. 40, 2490-2499 Michel P., Benz W, Richardson D.C. (2003), Nature 421, 608-611 Housen K.R. and Holsapple K.A., (2003) Icarus 163, 102- 119 Jutzi M. (2004), Diploma thesis, University of Bern.

  2. Determination of electron-nucleus collisions geometry with forward neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.; Aschenauer, E.; Lee, J. H.

    2014-12-29

    There are a large number of physics programs one can explore in electron-nucleus collisions at a future electron-ion collider. Collision geometry is very important in these studies, while the measurement for an event-by-event geometric control is rarely discussed in the prior deep-inelastic scattering experiments off a nucleus. This paper seeks to provide some detailed studies on the potential of tagging collision geometries through forward neutron multiplicity measurements with a zero degree calorimeter. As a result, this type of geometry handle, if achieved, can be extremely beneficial in constraining nuclear effects for the electron-nucleus program at an electron-ion collider.

  3. Will Allis Prize Talk: Electron Collisions - Experiment, Theory and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, and molecules represent one of the very early topics of quantum mechanics. In spite of the field's maturity, a number of recent developments in detector technology (e.g., the ``reaction microscope'' or the ``magnetic-angle changer'') and the rapid increase in computational resources have resulted in significant progress in the measurement, understanding, and theoretical/computational description of few-body Coulomb problems. Close collaborations between experimentalists and theorists worldwide continue to produce high-quality benchmark data, which allow for thoroughly testing and further developing a variety of theoretical approaches. As a result, it has now become possible to reliably calculate the vast amount of atomic data needed for detailed modelling of the physics and chemistry of planetary atmospheres, the interpretation of astrophysical data, optimizing the energy transport in reactive plasmas, and many other topics - including light-driven processes, in which electrons are produced by continuous or short-pulse ultra-intense electromagnetic radiation. In this talk, I will highlight some of the recent developments that have had a major impact on the field. This will be followed by showcasing examples, in which accurate electron collision data enabled applications in fields beyond traditional AMO physics. Finally, open problems and challenges for the future will be outlined. I am very grateful for fruitful scientific collaborations with many colleagues, and the long-term financial support by the NSF through the Theoretical AMO and Computational Physics programs, as well as supercomputer resources through TeraGrid and XSEDE.

  4. Electron-impact spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.

    1990-01-01

    The methods of electron impact spectroscopy and cross section measurements are discussed and compared to optical spectroscopy. A brief summary of the status of this field and the available data is given.

  5. Electron collisions with hydrogen-bonded complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, T. C.; Sanchez, S. d'A.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.

    2011-12-15

    We investigated elastic collisions of low-energy electrons with the hydrogen-bonded formic-acid dimer, formamide dimer, and formic-acid-formamide complex. We focused on how the {pi}{sup *} shape resonances of the isolated monomers are affected when bonded to another molecule. The scattering cross sections were computed with the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials in the static-exchange and static-exchange-plus-polarization approximations, for energies ranging from 1 to 6 eV. The present results support the existence of two low-lying {pi}{sup *} shape resonances for the formic-acid dimer, as suggested in previous theoretical and experimental studies. We also found low-lying {pi}{sup *} shape resonances for the formamide dimer and for the formic-acid-formamide complex. For the dimers, the presence of a center of inversion is key to understanding how these resonances arise from linear combinations of the {pi}{sup *} anion states of the respective monomers. For the formic-acid-formamide complex, the resonances are more localized on each unit, lying at lower energies with respect to the isolated monomers. The present results suggest that if there is no delocalization of the {pi}{sup *} resonances over the pair for hydrogen-bonded molecules, then their positions would lie below those of the units.

  6. Low-energy electron collisions with thiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Lima, M. A. P.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2013-05-01

    We report on elastic integral, momentum transfer, and differential cross sections for collisions of low-energy electrons with thiophene molecules. The scattering calculations presented here used the Schwinger multichannel method and were carried out in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations for energies ranging from 0.5 eV to 6 eV. We found shape resonances related to the formation of two long-lived π* anion states. These resonant structures are centered at the energies of 1.00 eV (2.85 eV) and 2.82 eV (5.00 eV) in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) approximation and belong to the B1 and A2 symmetries of the C2v point group, respectively. Our results also suggest the existence of a σ* shape resonance in the B2 symmetry with a strong d-wave character, located at around 2.78 eV (5.50 eV) as obtained in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) calculation. It is worth to mention that the results obtained at the static-exchange plus polarization level of approximation for the two π* resonances are in good agreement with the electron transmission spectroscopy results of 1.15 eV and 2.63 eV measured by Modelli and Burrow [J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 5721 (2004), 10.1021/jp048759a]. The existence of the σ* shape resonance is in agreement with the observations of Dezarnaud-Dandiney et al. [J. Phys. B 31, L497 (1998), 10.1088/0953-4075/31/11/004] based on the electron transmission spectra of dimethyl(poly)sulphides. A comparison among the resonances of thiophene with those of pyrrole and furan is also performed and, altogether, the resonance spectra obtained for these molecules point out that electron attachment to π* molecular orbitals is a general feature displayed by these five-membered heterocyclic compounds.

  7. Electron impact ionization of glycolaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptasinska, Sylwia; Denifl, Stephan; Scheier, Paul; Märk, Tilmann D.

    2005-05-01

    Positive ion formation upon electron impact ionization of the monomeric and dimeric form of glycolaldehyde is studied with high electron energy resolution. In the effusive neutral beam of evaporated monomeric glycolaldehyde some ions with a mass larger than the monomer indicate the presence of weakly bound neutral dimers. The yield of all ions that originate from the electron impact ionization of these neutral dimers exhibit a strong temperature dependence that can be interpreted as being due to the formation of dimers via three body collisions and thermal decomposition of the dimeric form back into monomers at higher temperatures. Ion efficiency curves are measured and analyzed for the 10 most abundant product cations of monomeric glycolaldehyde. The appearance energies of the parent ion signals of the monomer and dimer of glycolaldehyde (10.2 and 9.51 eV, respectively) are lower than the appearance energy of the parent cation of the more complex sugar deoxyribose that was recently determined to be 10.51 eV.

  8. Mutual neutralization in H+ - H- collisions by electron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mančev, Ivan; Milojević, Nenad; Belkić, Dževad

    2013-07-01

    State-selective and total cross-sections for single-electron capture from H- by H+ covering the incident energy range from 10 to 3000 keV are computed by means of the four-body boundary corrected first Born (CB1-4B) approximation. A crucial connection between the Coulomb-distorted asymptotic state in the entrance channel and the pertinent perturbation, which causes the transition in the H+ - H- collisions, is consistently used in our computations of the “prior” version of cross-sections. The obtained results from the CB1-4B method clearly outperform the earlier findings by the close-coupling methods for the same problem. Comparisons with the available measurements are carried out and excellent agreement with the CB1 method is recorded down to impact energies as low as 10 keV.

  9. Coincidence measurements of electron capture and loss in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, R.D.

    1990-09-01

    Collisions between fast, fully stripped projectiles and atomic targets predominantly result in target electrons being ejected to the continuum. For fast partially stripped projectiles which bring weakly bound electrons into the collision, projectile ionization can also contribute to the observed electron spectra. At lower impact velocities, electron capture by the projectile ion becomes important and higher order processes, often referred to as transfer ionization, can be a significant source of free electrons. In recent years, coincidence techniques have been used to evaluate the relative importance of electron capture and loss in free electron production, to separate the capture and loss contributions from those resulting from target ionization alone, and to provide more detailed information about electron capture and loss mechanisms than is available from total cross section measurements. A brief survey of these experiments will be presented. 23 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.

    1989-03-01

    Research in atomic physics at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Super-HILAC and Bevalac accelerators on multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions is described. Experiments have studied various aspects of the charge-transfer, ionization, and excitation processes. Examples of processes in which electron correlation plays a role are resonant transfer and excitation and Auger-electron emission. Processes in which electron behavior can generally be described as uncorrelated include ionization and charge transfer in high-energy ion-atom collisions. A variety of experiments and results for energies from 1 MeV/u to 420 MeV/u are presented. 20 refs., 15 figs.

  11. The role of prompt electrons in the post-collision effect in fast ion - atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Víkor, Gy; Ricz, S.; Kövér, Á.; Gulyás, L.; Pelicon, P.; Sulik, B.

    1997-10-01

    The influence of the post-collision Coulomb effect of direct-electrons on the Auger-line energy shift has been studied in fast proton - atom collisions. KLL and LMM Auger spectra of neon and krypton target have been measured and analysed with high precision. The semiclassical theory of the post-collision interaction (PCI) has been extended to include the effect of both the receeding projectile ion and the ejected prompt electron. Experimental and theoretical line-energy shifts exhibit a reasonable agreement in the entire angular range of the Auger emission. In a narrow cone around 0953-4075/30/19/020/img9, the line-energy shift is influenced mainly by the PCI with the projectile ion, while at backward angles, it is predominantly governed by the ejected electron - Auger - electron interaction.

  12. Dynamical resonant electron capture in atom surface collisions: H- formation in H-Al(111) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. G.; Teillet-Billy, D.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    1992-05-01

    The formation of H- ion by grazing-angle collisions of hydrogen on an Al(111) surface is investigated with the newly developed coupled angular mode method. The capture process involves a dynamical resonant process induced by the collision velocity. All the resonance properties of the H- level in front of an Al(111) surface are determined: position, width, and angular distribution of ejected electrons. The results are shown to account for the recent observations on H- formation by Wyputta, Zimny, and Winter.

  13. On the quantum Landau collision operator and electron collisions in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daligault, Jérôme

    2016-03-01

    The quantum Landau collision operator, which extends the widely used Landau/Fokker-Planck collision operator to include quantum statistical effects, is discussed. The quantum extension can serve as a reference model for including electron collisions in non-equilibrium dense plasmas, in which the quantum nature of electrons cannot be neglected. In this paper, the properties of the Landau collision operator that have been useful in traditional plasma kinetic theory and plasma transport theory are extended to the quantum case. We outline basic properties in connection with the conservation laws, the H-theorem, and the global and local equilibrium distributions. We discuss the Fokker-Planck form of the operator in terms of three potentials that extend the usual two Rosenbluth potentials. We establish practical closed-form expressions for these potentials under local thermal equilibrium conditions in terms of Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein integrals. We study the properties of linearized quantum Landau operator, and extend two popular approximations used in plasma physics to include collisions in kinetic simulations. We apply the quantum Landau operator to the classic test-particle problem to illustrate the physical effects embodied in the quantum extension. We present useful closed-form expressions for the electron-ion momentum and energy transfer rates. Throughout the paper, similarities and differences between the quantum and classical Landau collision operators are emphasized.

  14. Electron-impact excitation of holmium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Yu M

    2000-06-30

    The electron-impact excitation of holmium atoms was studied by the method of extended crossing beams. The cross sections and the optical excitation functions were obtained for odd levels of Ho I, including the 22014 cm{sup -1} laser level. Over 99% of the atoms were shown to reside in the ground level prior to collisions with electrons. Also measured were the excitation cross sections for six even levels, which presumably participate in the formation of inversion population in a gas-discharge holmium vapour laser. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  15. Three-body-fragmentation dynamics of CO24 + investigated by electron collisions at an impact energy of 500 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enliang; Shan, Xu; Shen, Zhenjie; Li, Xingyu; Gong, Maomao; Tang, Yaguo; Chen, Xiangjun

    2015-12-01

    Fragmentation of CO24 + induced by electron impact at the energy of 500 eV is studied using a momentum imaging spectrometer. It is found that CO24 + decays mainly through two three-body-fragmentation channels: CO24 +→O++C2 ++O+ (121) and CO24 +→O2 ++C++O+ (211). The fragmentation dynamics of these two channels are analyzed using Dalitz plots and Newton diagrams. In channel (121) CO24 + dissociates mainly through linear and molecular bending fragmentation, while the asynchronous breakup mechanism dominates channel (211). The distributions of momentum correlation angles between ionic fragments and the kinetic energy releases are obtained. Based on the Coulomb explosion model, the bond angle and the bond length of CO24 + before fragmentation are reconstructed. The experimental most probable values of the O-C-O bond angle are 172∘ and 171∘ for channel (121) and (211), which agree quite well with that of the neutral CO2 molecule (172 .5∘) . The reconstructed values of C-O bond length, 1.20 Å and 1.13 Å from channel (121) and channel (211), are also inconsistent with the equilibrium value of the neutral CO2 molecule (1.16 Å).

  16. Experimental apparatus for measurements of electron impact excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafyatis, G. P.; Kohl, J. L.; Gardner, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    An ion beam apparatus for the absolute measurement of collision cross sections in singly and multiply charged ions is described. An inclined electron and ion beams arrangement is used. Emitted photons from the decay of collision produced excited states are collected by a mirror and imaged onto a photomultiplier. Absolute measurements of the electron impact excitation of the 2s-2p transition in C(3+) were used to demonstrate the reliability of the apparatus.

  17. Collisions of low-energy electrons with cyclohexane

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2014-12-28

    We report calculated cross sections for elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by cyclohexane (c-C{sub 6}H{sub 12}). We employed the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with norm-conserving pseudopotentials in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations, for impact energies up to 30 eV. We compare our calculated integral cross section with experimental total cross sections available in the literature. We also compare our calculated differential cross sections (DCSs) with experimental results for benzene and experimental and theoretical results for 1,4-dioxane, in order to investigate the similarities between those molecules under electron collisions. Although benzene is a cyclic six-carbon molecule, as cyclohexane, we found that the differential cross sections of the latter are more similar to those of 1,4-dioxane than those of benzene. These similarities suggest that the geometry may play an important role in the behavior of the DCSs of these molecules. Our integral cross section displays a broad structure at around 8.5 eV, in agreement with the total cross section experimental data of 8 eV and vibrational excitation data of 7.5 eV. The present integral cross section also shows the presence of a Ramsauer-Townsend minimum at around 0.12 eV. In general, our integral cross section shows a qualitative agreement with the experimental total cross section.

  18. Database for inelastic collisions of sodium atoms with electrons, protons, and multiply charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Igenbergs, K.; Schweinzer, J.; Bray, I.; Bridi, D.; Aumayr, F.

    2008-11-15

    The available experimental and theoretical cross section data for inelastic collision processes of ground (3s) and excited (3p, 4s, 3d, 4p, 5s, 4d, and 4f) state Na atoms with electrons, protons, and multiply charged ions have been collected and critically assessed. In addition to existing data, electron-impact cross sections, for both excitation and ionization, have been calculated using the convergent close-coupling approach. In the case of proton-impact cross section, the database was enlarged by new atomic-orbital close-coupling calculations. Both electron-impact and proton-impact processes include excitation from the ground state and between excited states (n = 3-5). For electron-impact, ionization from all states is also considered. In the case of proton-impact electron loss, cross sections (the sum of ionization and single-electron charge transfer) are given. Well-established analytical formulae used to fit cross sections, published by Wutte et al. and Schweinzer et al. for collisions with lithium atoms, were adapted to sodium. The 'recommended cross sections' for the processes considered have been critically evaluated and fitted using the adapted analytical formulae. For each inelastic process the fit parameters determined are tabulated. We also present the assessed data in graphical form. The criteria for comprehensively evaluating the accuracy of the experimental data, theoretical calculations, and procedures used in determining the recommended cross sections are discussed.

  19. Determination of Electron Collision Cross Sections Set for Tetramethysilane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordage, Marie-Claude

    2007-12-01

    A swarm analysis technique based on the solution of the Boltzmann equation is used to derive low energy electron collision cross sections for tetramethylsilane (TMS). The calculated swarm parameters with this first available cross sections set is consistent with measured values of the swarm parameters. Calculations of transport parameters in mixtures of TMS with argon are also presented.

  20. Electron Collision Cross Sections for the Cl2 Molecule from Electron Transport Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuan, Do Anh; Jeon, Byung-Hoon

    2011-08-01

    The measured electron transport coefficients (electron drift velocity, Townsend first ionization coefficient, electron attachment coefficient, and density-normalized effective ionization coefficient) in pure Cl2 have been analyzed to derive the currently best available electron collision cross section set of the elastic and inelastic electron collision cross sections for the Cl2 molecule using an electron swarm study and a two-term approximation of the Boltzmann equation for energy. The electron transport coefficients calculated using the derived cross sections are consistent with the experimental data over a wide range of E/N values (ratio of the electric field E to the neutral number density N). The present electron collision cross section set for the Cl2 molecule is the best available so far for quantitative numerical modeling plasma discharges for processing procedures with materials containing Cl2 molecules.

  1. Inelastic collisions of positrons with one-valence-electron targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Raouf, Mohamed Assad

    1990-01-01

    The total elastic and positronium formation cross sections of the inelastic collisions between positrons and various one-valence-electron atoms, (namely hydrogen, lithium, sodium, potassium and rubidium), and one-valence-electron ions, (namely hydrogen-like, lithium-like and alkaline-earth positive ions) are determined using an elaborate modified coupled-static approximation. Special attention is devoted to the behavior of the Ps cross sections at the energy regions lying above the Ps formation thresholds.

  2. Factors Influencing Pediatric Injury in Side Impact Collisions

    PubMed Central

    Arbogast, Kristy B.; Moll, Elisa K.; Morris, Shannon D.; Anderko, Rebecca L.; Durbin, Dennis R.; Winston, Flaura K.

    2000-01-01

    Side impacts collisions pose a great risk to children in crashes but information about the injury mechanisms is limited. The heights and weights of children vary widely and as a result, the injury patterns may vary across the pediatric age range. This study involves a case series of children in side impact collisions who were identified through Partners for Child Passenger Safety, a large child-focused crash surveillance system. The aim of the current study was to use in-depth crash investigations to identify injury mechanisms to children in side impact collisions. 93 children in 55 side impact crashes were studied. 23% (n=22) of the children received an AIS ≥2 (clinically significant) injury. In these 22 children, head (39%), extremity (22%), and abdominal injuries (17%) were the most common significant injuries. The cases revealed that serious injuries occur even in minor crashes. Cases that illustrate body region-specific injury mechanisms are discussed. PMID:11558098

  3. Mutual electron detachment in collisions between negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, R.; Melchert, F.; Krüdener, S.; Meuser, S.; Petri, S.; Benner, M.; Salzborn, E.

    1992-10-01

    Employing the crossed-beams technique, we have measured absolute cross sections for mutual electron detachment in collisions between two negative ions H-+X-→H0+X0+2e-(X-:B-, H-,Cu-,O-,Au-,F-) in the CM-energy range between a few keV and about 100 keV. The results obtained appear not to obey a simple scaling with negative ion binding energies. For H-+H--collisions also the single detachment reaction H-+H-→H0+... has been investigated.

  4. Role of electron-electron collisions in high field conduction in Nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, V. V.

    2015-06-01

    Role of electron-electron collisions in semiconductors is to exchange energy and momentum among the conduction electrons and to express the electron distribution in terms of electron temperature and electron drift velocity. This role takes particular importance when the external electric field produces large disparities in the energy distribution of electrons. Such disparities are introduced in polar semiconductors such as Nitrides. Electron-electron collisions give rise to heating or cooling of the electron gas. Heating is widely accepted but cooling in steady state and transient currents is new as is shown in this paper. It is also shown that the overshooting of electron velocity in transient currents in Nitrides is related to the electron cooling.

  5. Semiclassical theory of electronically nonadiabatic transitions in molecular collision processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, K. S.; George, T. F.

    1979-01-01

    An introductory account of the semiclassical theory of the S-matrix for molecular collision processes is presented, with special emphasis on electronically nonadiabatic transitions. This theory is based on the incorporation of classical mechanics with quantum superposition, and in practice makes use of the analytic continuation of classical mechanics into the complex space of time domain. The relevant concepts of molecular scattering theory and related dynamical models are described and the formalism is developed and illustrated with simple examples - collinear collision of the A+BC type. The theory is then extended to include the effects of laser-induced nonadiabatic transitions. Two bound continuum processes collisional ionization and collision-induced emission also amenable to the same general semiclassical treatment are discussed.

  6. Spectroscopic diagnostics of electron-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, A.

    1991-01-01

    Progress from May 1, 1987 to April 30, 1991 is summarized in two Progress Reports that are reproduced in Appendix A, and in attached publications. Since then, we have completed manuscript preparations and publications of earlier observations, while carrying out a high energy-resolution measurement of electron collisional excitations in sodium. The results of the latter experiment have not been prepared for publication, and the manuscript is included as Appendix B. An additional manuscript, describing the unique high-current electron monochromator developed for this experiment, is in preparation and not enclosed. All additional results and conclusions of our work under the contract are now available in four publications that are attached at the back of this report. Consequently, we will elaborate on those only to note that we have achieved our proposed goals, with the full detail proposed but at a slightly slower pace than we had hoped.

  7. Relativistic collision rate calculations for electron-air interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, G.; Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1993-12-01

    The most recent data available on differential cross sections for electron-air interactions are used to calculate the avalanche, momentum transfer, and energy loss rates that enter into the fluid equations. Data for the important elastic, inelastic, and ionizing processes are generally available out to electron energies of 1--10 keV. Prescriptions for extending these cross sections to the relativistic regime are presented. The angular dependence of the cross sections is included where data are available as is the doubly differential cross section for ionizing collisions. The collision rates are computed by taking moments of the Boltzmann collision integrals with the assumption that the electron momentum distribution function is given by the Juettner distribution function which satisfies the relativistic H- theorem and which reduces to the familiar Maxwellian velocity distribution in the nonrelativistic regime. The distribution function is parameterized in terms of the electron density, mean momentum, and thermal energy and the rates are therefore computed on a two dimensional grid as a function of mean kinetic energy and thermal energy.

  8. Relativistic collision rate calculations for electron-air interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, G.; Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1992-12-16

    The most recent data available on differential cross sections for electron-air interactions are used to calculate the avalanche, momentum transfer, and energy loss rates that enter into the fluid equations. Data for the important elastic, inelastic, and ionizing processes are generally available out to electron energies of 1--10 kev. Prescriptions for extending these cross sections to the relativistic regime are presented. The angular dependence of the cross sections is included where data is available as is the doubly differential cross section for ionizing collisions. The collision rates are computed by taking moments of the Boltzmann collision integrals with the assumption that the electron momentum distribution function is given by the Juettner distribution function which satisfies the relativistic H- theorem and which reduces to the familiar Maxwellian velocity distribution in the nonrelativistic regime. The distribution function is parameterized in terms of the electron density, mean momentum, and thermal energy and the rates are therefore computed on a two-dimensional grid as a function of mean kinetic energy and thermal energy.

  9. Electronic excitation of ground state atoms by collision with heavy gas particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1993-01-01

    Most of the important chemical reactions which occur in the very high temperature air produced around space vehicles as they enter the atmosphere were investigated both experimentally and theoretically, to some extent at least. One remaining reaction about which little is known, and which could be quite important at the extremely high temperatures that will be produced by the class of space vehicles now contemplated - such as the AOTV - is the excitation of bound electron states due to collisions between heavy gas particles. Rates of electronic excitation due to free electron collisions are known to be very rapid, but because these collisions quickly equilibrate the free and bound electron energy, the approach to full equilibrium with the heavy particle kinetic energy will depend primarily on the much slower process of bound electron excitation in heavy particle collisions and the subsequent rapid transfer to free electron energy. This may be the dominant mechanism leading to full equilibrium in the gas once the dissociation process has depleted the molecular states so the transfer between molecular vibrational energy and free electron energy is no longer available as a channel for equilibration of free electron and heavy particle kinetic energies. Two mechanisms seem probable in electronic excitation by heavy particle impact. One of these is the collision excitation and deexcitation of higher electronic states which are Rydberg like. A report, entitled 'Semi-Classical Theory of Electronic Excitation Rates', was submitted previously. This presented analytic expressions for the transition probabilities, assuming that the interaction potential is an exponential repulsion with a perturbation ripple due to the dipole-induced dipole effect in the case of neutral-neutral collisions, and to the ion-dipole interaction in the case of ion-neutral collisions. However the above may be, there is little doubt that excitation of ground state species by collision occurs at the

  10. Influence of electron-ion collisions on Buneman instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostomyan, Eduard

    2016-07-01

    Buneman instability (BI) [1] has been found to play a role in many scenarios in space physics and geophysics. It has also been invoked to explain many phenomena in the earth ionosphere [2] and in the solar chromosphere [3]. In double-layer and collisionless shock physics the same instability has been found responsible in formation of nonlinear structures [4]. In situations where an electron beam enters plasma, like in the fast ignition scenario for inertial fusion [5], Buneman modes are excited and play essential role [6]. BI is caused by motion of plasma electrons against ions. However, up to now investigations on BI did not take into account influence collisions in plasma (for quantum case a paper has recently appeared [7]). Influence of collisions may be very important especially in dense fully ionized plasma with long distance character of interaction. Particularly collisions lead to energy dissipation with an array of ensuing effects e.g. change of the instability physical nature to that of dissipative type [8]. Due to role of BI in various processes in space (and laboratory) plasma necessity of the consideration is long overdue. Absence of investigations on a problem along with its importance may be explained by its complexity only. For given case correct consideration should be based on solution of transport equation with collisional term. In fully ionized plasma correct description of collisions is given by Landau collision integral (LCI) [9]. This is very complex formation. It greatly complicates transport equation and actually makes it intractable. Since its formulation in 1936, there is very little literature on solution of the transport equation with LCI. Almost all successful attempts to accommodate influence of collisions on various processes in plasma are based on BGK model [10]. This model is much simpler. However in fully ionized plasma usage LCI is more appropriate as it is designed for system with long distance character of particle interaction

  11. Electron Collisions in a Magneto-Optical Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dech, Jeffery Michael

    Measurements of the multiple ionization cross section ratios of Cesium were performed with ion time-of-flight (TOF) spectroscopy with a magneto-optical trap (MOT) apparatus, updating the previous measurement which dates back almost a century. Results are presented for collisions at energies of 50 eV to 120 eV. With a MOT, experiments can be performed with trapped, cold atomic targets which allow for unparalleled accuracy and experiments with signicant excited state target fractions above those achievable in most atomic beam experiments. A basic overview of optical cooling trapping, electron collision and atomic phenomena are presented. Experimental studies of electrons with Argon and Cesium targets were performed, measuring the multiple ionization ratios with ion TOF spectroscopy. The experimental apparatus and analysis methods are described in detail. Results are compared with previous measurements of multiple ionization ratios for both targets. Agreement within experimental error is found with the results of Tate and Smith across the energy range.

  12. Electron capture processes in Li2+ + H collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ling Ling; Liu, Ling; Wang, Jian Guo; Janev, Ratko K.; Buenker, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    The electron capture processes in Li2 + + H collisions have been investigated by using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling method and the two-center atomic-orbital close-coupling method in the energy ranges of 10-8-10 keV/u and 0.1-300 keV/u, respectively. The capture to singlet and triplet systems of states of Li+(1 s,n l 2S + 1L) is considered separately. Total, n,S-resolved and n,l,S-resolved electron capture cross sections are calculated and compared with the results of available experimental and theoretical studies. The present calculations show that the n = 2 shell of Li+ is the main capture channel for all energies considered in both the singlet and triplet case. While for collision energies E> 5 keV/u, the cross sections for capture to the n = 2 manifold are of the same order of magnitude for both the singlet and triplet states (with the 2 p capture cross section being dominant), for energies below ~5 keV/u the cross sections for capture to the n = 2 triplet manifold is significantly (more than three orders of magnitude at 0.1 keV/u) larger than that for capture to the n = 2 singlet manifold of states (with the 2 s capture cross section being dominant). The capture dynamics at low collision energies is discussed in considerable detail, revealing the important role of rotational couplings in population of l> 0 capture states. The elastic scattering processes have been studied as well in the energy range of 10-8-1 keV/u. The calculated elastic scattering cross section is much larger than the electron capture cross section in both the singlet and triplet case. However, as the collision energy increases, the difference between the elastic and electron capture cross sections decreases rapidly.

  13. Collisions of Electrons with Atomic Oxygen: Current Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. V.; Kanik, I.; Tayal, S. S.

    2005-01-01

    In 1990, two significant reviews of electron-atomic-oxygen collision processes were published. Since that time, a large volume of both experimental and theoretical research into these processes has occurred. These data are reviewed and recommendations regarding existing data sets and future research in this area are made. Attention is given to the challenges associated with handling atomic oxygen in terms of both experiment and theory.

  14. Dependence of elastic hadron collisions on impact parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procházka, Jiří; Lokajíček, Miloš V.; Kundrát, Vojtěch

    2016-05-01

    Elastic proton-proton collisions represent probably the greatest ensemble of available measured data, the analysis of which may provide a large amount of new physical results concerning fundamental particles. It is, however, necessary to analyze first some conclusions concerning pp collisions and their interpretations differing fundamentally from our common macroscopic experience. It has been argued, e.g., that elastic hadron collisions have been more central than inelastic ones, even if any explanation of the existence of so different processes, i.e., elastic and inelastic (with hundreds of secondary particles) collisions, under the same conditions has not been given until now. The given conclusion has been based on a greater number of simplifying mathematical assumptions (already done in earlier calculations), without their influence on physical interpretation being analyzed and entitled; the corresponding influence has started to be studied in the approach based on the eikonal model. The possibility of a peripheral interpretation of elastic collisions will be demonstrated and the corresponding results summarized. The arguments will be given on why no preference may be given to the mentioned centrality against the standard peripheral behaviour. The corresponding discussion on the contemporary description of elastic hadronic collision in dependence on the impact parameter will be summarized and the justification of some important assumptions will be considered.

  15. Bare- and Dressed-Ion Impact Collisions from Neon Atoms Studied Within a Nonperturbative Mean-Field Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Gerald; Kirchner, Tom

    We study electron removal processes in collisions of bare and dressed doubly charged ions with neon atoms in the 20 keV/u to 1 MeV/u impact energy regime. The many-electron problem is represented by a single mean field, which in the case of dressed-ion impact includes the projectile electrons. Moreover, the same basis is used to propagate all active orbitals thereby ensuring orthogonality at all times and allowing for a final-state analysis in terms of standard Slater determinantal wave functions. The same approach was used in a recent work for B2+ -Ne collisions [Phys. Rev. A 88 012712], in which we examined the role of the projectile electrons for target-recoil-charge-state production. The present study expands on that work by considering additional collision channels and comparing results of equicharged dressed and bare ions in order to shed more light on the role of the projectile electrons.

  16. Convergent Close-Coupling Approach to Electron-Atom Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Igor; Stelbovics, Andris

    2007-01-01

    It was with great pleasure and honour to accept the invitation to make a presentation at the symposium celebrating the life-long work of Aaron Temkin and Richard Drachman. The work of Aaron Temkin was particularly influential on our own during the development of the CCC method for electron-atom collisions. There are a number of key problems that need to be dealt with when developing a general computational approach to such collisions. Traditionally, the electron energy range was subdivided into the low, intermediate, and high energies. At the low energies only a finite number of channels are open and variational or close-coupling techniques could be used to obtain accurate results. At high energies an infinite number of discrete channels and the target continuum are open, but perturbative techniques are able to yield accurate results. However, at the intermediate energies perturbative techniques fail and computational approaches need to be found for treating the infinite number of open channels. In addition, there are also problems associated with the identical nature of electrons and the difficulty of implementing the boundary conditions for ionization processes. The beauty of the Temkin-Poet model of electron-hydrogen scattering is that it simplifies the full computational problem by neglecting any non-zero orbital angular momenta in the partial-wave expansion, without loosing the complexity associated with the above-mentioned problems. The unique nature of the problem allowed for accurate solution leading to benchmark results which could then be used to test the much more general approaches to electron-atom collision problems. The immense value of the Temkin-Poet model is readily summarised by the fact that the initial papers of Temkin and Poet have been collectively cited around 250 times to date and are still being cited in present times. Many of the citations came from our own work during the course of the development of the CCC method, which we now describe.

  17. Electron capture and fragmentation in Ar11+ + CO collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Itzhak, I.; Wells, E.; Stöckli, M. P.; Tawara, H.; Carnes, K. D.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between 32.2, 130.5 and 570.5 keV Ar11+ ions and CO molecules have been studied using the Macdonald Laboratory CRYEBIS. Coincidence time of flight was used to detect all recoil ions originating from each molecule and a position sensitive detector was used to determine final projectile charge states. Single-and double-electron capture cross-sections are much larger than those for ionization at these collision energies. The dominant recoil channel associated with the Ar10+ final charge state is the CO+ molecular ion. The main ion-pair channel is the C+ + O+ dissociation of CO2+ while the relative yields of higher charge states of the transient COq+ fall off rapidly. The dissociated ions corresponding to charge states up to CO4+ were detected in coincidence with Ar10+ (and Ar9+), indicating that multielectron capture followed by autoionization occurs.

  18. Coulomb collisions in the Boltzmann equation for electrons in low-temperature gas discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelaar, G. J. M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates the effects of electron-electron and electron-ion Coulomb collisions on the electron distribution function and transport coefficients obtained from the Boltzmann equation for simple dc gas discharge conditions. Expressions are provided for the full Coulomb collision terms acting on both the isotropic and anisotropic parts of the electron distribution function, which are then incorporated in the freeware Boltzmann equation solver BOLSIG+. Different Coulomb collision effects are demonstrated and discussed on the basis of BOLSIG+  results for argon gas. It is shown that the anisotropic part of the electron-electron collision term, neglected in previous work, can in certain cases have a large effect on the electron mobility and is essential when describing the transition towards the Coulomb-collision dominated regime characterized by Spitzer transport coefficients. Finally, a brief overview is presented of the discharge conditions for which different Coulomb collision effects occur in different gases.

  19. Electron Impact Excitation Of Ti XIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, F. P.

    2012-05-01

    Emission lines of Ti XIX are important for the modeling and diagnostics of lasing, fusion and astrophysical plasmas, for which atomic data are required for a variety of parameters, such as energy levels, radiative rates (A- values), and excitation rates or equivalently the effective collision strengths (Υ), which are obtained from the electron impact collision strengths (Ω). Experimentally, energy levels are available for Ti XIX on the NIST website, but there is paucity for accurate collisional atomic data. Therefore, here we report a complete set of results (namely energy levels, radiative rates, and effective collision strengths) for all transitions among the lowest 98 levels of Ti XIX. These levels belong to the (1s2) 2s2, 2s2p, 2p2, 2s3l, 2p3l, 2s4l, and 2p4l configurations. Finally, we also report the A- values for four types of transitions, namely electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1), and magnetic quadrupole (M2), because these are also required for plasma modeling. For our calculations of wavefunctions, we have adopted the fully relativistic GRASP code, and for the calculations of Ω, the Dirac atomic R-matrix code (DARC) of PH Norrington and IP Grant. Additionally, parallel calculations have also been performed with the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) of Gu, so that all atomic parameters can be rigorously assessed for accuracy.

  20. Electron impact exctation of Al X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti; Keenan, Francis

    2013-05-01

    Emission lines of Al ions, including Al X, are important for the modeling and diagnostics of lasing, fusion and astrophysical plasmas, for which atomic data are required for a variety of parameters, such as energy levels, radiative rates (A- values), and excitation rates or equivalently the effective collision strengths (Υ), which are obtained from the electron impact collision strengths (Ω). Experimentally, energy levels are available for Al X on the NIST website, but there is paucity for accurate collisional atomic data. Therefore, here we report a complete set of results (namely energy levels, radiative rates, and effective collision strengths) for all transitions among the lowest 98 levels of Al X. These levels belong to the (1s2) 2s2, 2s2p, 2p2, 2s3 l, 2p3 l, 2s4 l, and 2p4 l configurations. Finally, we also report the A- values for four types of transitions, namely electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1), and magnetic quadrupole (M2), because these are also required for plasma modeling. For our calculations of wavefunctions, we have adopted the fully relativistic GRASP code, and for the calculations of Ω, the Dirac atomic R-matrix code (DARC) of PH Norrington and IP Grant. Additionally, parallel ca

  1. Electron Impact Exciation of Fe IX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayal, Swaraj; Zatsarinny, Oleg

    2015-05-01

    Transition probabilities and electron impact excitation collision strengths and rates for astrophysically important extreme ultraviolet lines of Fe IX are calculated. The 322 fine-structure levels of the 3s2 3p6 , 3s2 3p5 3 d , 3 s 3p6 3 d , 3s2 3p5 4 s , and 3s2 3p4 3d2 configurations are included in our calculations. The collision strengths have been calculated using the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix method for all fine-structure transitions among the 322 levels. The mass, Darwin, and spin-orbit relativistic effects are included in the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian in the scattering calculation. The one-body and two-body relativistic operators are included in the multi-configuration Hartree-Fock calculations of transition probabilities. Several sets of non-orthogonal spectroscopic and correlation radial orbitals are used to obtain accurate description of Fe IX levels and to represent the scattering functions. The calculated excitation energies are in very good agreement with experiment and represents an improvement over the previous calculations. The present collision strengths show reasonable agreement with the previously available R-matrix and distorted-wave calculations. This research is supported by NASA grant from the Solar and Heliophysics Program.

  2. Electron excitation collision strengths for positive atomic ions: a collection of theoretical data

    SciTech Connect

    Merts, A.L.; Mann, J.B.; Robb, W.D.; Magee, N.H. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    This report contains data on theoretical and experimental cross sections for electron impact excitation of positive atomic ions. It is an updated and corrected version of a preliminary manuscript which was used during an Atomic Data Workshop on Electron Excitation of Ions held at Los Alamos in November 1978. The current status of quantitative knowledge of collisional excitation collision strengths is shown for highly stripped ions where configuration mixing, relativistic and resonance effects may be important. The results show a reasonably satisfactory state for first-row isoelectronic ions and indicate that a considerable amount of work remains to be done for second-row and heavier ions.

  3. Synergy of Electronic Excitations and Elastic Collision Spikes in Sputtering of Heavy Metal Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, T.; Barnes, A.V.; Hamza, A.V.; Schneider, D.H.; Banks, J.C.; Doyle, B.L.

    1998-05-01

    The emission of secondary ions and neutrals from uranium oxide has been measured for impact of highly charged, heavy ions. Total ablation rates and secondary ion yields increase strongly with projectile charge. The dependencies on projectile charge (16{lt}q{lt}70) , impact energy (10 keV{lt}E{sub kin }{lt}1 MeV) , and projectile mass of secondary ion yields demonstrate the presence of an interaction regime where electronic excitation by charge neutralization and elastic collision spikes combine synergistically. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Electronic excitation of CO by positron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Euclimar P. da; Varella, Marcio T. do N; Lima, Marco A. P.

    2005-12-15

    We report calculated cross sections for the electronic excitation of carbon monoxide by positron impact. The calculations were carried out with the Schwinger multichannel method and included six collision channels, namely the ground (X {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +}) and five electronically excited (A {sup 1}{pi}, I {sup 1}{sigma}{sup -} and D {sup 1}{delta}) states. Present calculated excitation cross sections to the A {sup 1}{pi} state did not present any resonant features, being in this sense consistent with previous calculations for the isoelectronic nitrogen molecule. The experimental a {sup 1}{pi}{sub g} excitation cross section of N{sub 2} presented a resonantlike structure which would also be expected in the A {sup 1}{pi} excitation of CO. We discuss possible reasons for the disagreement between experiment and theory.

  5. Single electrons from heavy-flavor decays in collisions at.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2006-01-27

    The invariant differential cross section for inclusive electron production in p+p collisions at [FORMULA: SEE TEXT] has been measured by the PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider over the transverse momentum range 0.4electron spectrum from semileptonic decays of hadrons carrying heavy flavor, i.e., charm quarks or, at high , bottom quarks, is determined via three independent methods. The resulting electron spectrum from heavy-flavor decays is compared to recent leading and next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations. The total cross section of charm quark-antiquark pair production is determined to be [FORMULA: SEE TEXT]. PMID:16486684

  6. Nonlinear regime of electrostatic waves propagation in presence of electron-electron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2015-04-15

    The effects are presented of including electron-electron collisions in self-consistent Eulerian simulations of electrostatic wave propagation in nonlinear regime. The electron-electron collisions are approximately modeled through the full three-dimensional Dougherty collisional operator [J. P. Dougherty, Phys. Fluids 7, 1788 (1964)]; this allows the elimination of unphysical byproducts due to reduced dimensionality in velocity space. The effects of non-zero collisionality are discussed in the nonlinear regime of the symmetric bump-on-tail instability and in the propagation of the so-called kinetic electrostatic electron nonlinear (KEEN) waves [T. W. Johnston et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 042105 (2009)]. For both cases, it is shown how collisions work to destroy the phase-space structures created by particle trapping effects and to damp the wave amplitude, as the system returns to the thermal equilibrium. In particular, for the case of the KEEN waves, once collisions have smoothed out the trapped particle population which sustains the KEEN fluctuations, additional oscillations at the Langmuir frequency are observed on the fundamental electric field spectral component, whose amplitude decays in time at the usual collisionless linear Landau damping rate.

  7. ZERO IMPACT PARAMETER WHITE DWARF COLLISIONS IN FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, W. P.; Athanassiadou, T.; Timmes, F. X.

    2012-11-01

    We systematically explore zero impact parameter collisions of white dwarfs (WDs) with the Eulerian adaptive grid code FLASH for 0.64 + 0.64 M {sub Sun} and 0.81 + 0.81 M {sub Sun} mass pairings. Our models span a range of effective linear spatial resolutions from 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} to 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} cm. However, even the highest resolution models do not quite achieve strict numerical convergence, due to the challenge of properly resolving small-scale burning and energy transport. The lack of strict numerical convergence from these idealized configurations suggests that quantitative predictions of the ejected elemental abundances that are generated by binary WD collision and merger simulations should be viewed with caution. Nevertheless, the convergence trends do allow some patterns to be discerned. We find that the 0.64 + 0.64 M {sub Sun} head-on collision model produces 0.32 M {sub Sun} of {sup 56}Ni and 0.38 M {sub Sun} of {sup 28}Si, while the 0.81 + 0.81 M {sub Sun} head-on collision model produces 0.39 M {sub Sun} of {sup 56}Ni and 0.55 M {sub Sun} of {sup 28}Si at the highest spatial resolutions. Both mass pairings produce {approx}0.2 M {sub Sun} of unburned {sup 12}C+{sup 16}O. We also find the 0.64 + 0.64 M {sub Sun} head-on collision begins carbon burning in the central region of the stalled shock between the two WDs, while the more energetic 0.81 + 0.81 M {sub Sun} head-on collision raises the initial post-shock temperature enough to burn the entire stalled shock region to nuclear statistical equilibrium.

  8. Rotational And Rovibrational Energy Transfer In Electron Collisions With Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuemmel, Helmar T.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Air flows around a hypervelocity reentry vehicle undergo dissociation, rovibrational excitation and ionization. More specifically the air, initially 80% N2 and 20% O2, in the shock layer consists of species such as N, O, N2, O2, NO, N+, O+, N+, O+, NO+ and 2 free electrons. It was pointed out in multi temperature models'' that the temperature of the rotational energy modes and the gas-kinetic translational temperature are quickly equilibrated by a few collisions and rise rapidly to high temperatures as 50000K before falling off to equilibrium value of 10000K. Contrary, the electronic and vibrational temperatures state energy distributions remain low (less than 15000K) because of the slow equilibration. Electron vibrational energy transfer is thought to play a crucial role in such a ionizing flow regime since chemical reaction rates and dissociation depend strongly on the vibrational temperatures. Modeling of these flowfields in principle require the rovibrational excitation and de-excitation cross section data for average electron energies from threshold up to several eV (leV=11605.4 K). In this lecture we focus on theoretical description of rotational effects i.e. energy transfer of electrons to molecules such that the molecular rotational (vojo goes to voj) or vibrational and rotational (v(sub 0)j(sub 0) goes to vj) states are changed. Excitation and de-excitation of electronic states was discussed in a previous talk at this conference.

  9. Electronic spin-flipping collisions of hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zygelman, B.

    2010-03-15

    We present a unified multichannel approach to calculate electron spin-exchange and spin-flipping transition cross sections for collisions of H with H, H with T, and T with T. We use the theory to calculate the hyperfine quenching cross sections for collision energies that range from 1 mK to thermal temperatures. We show that spin-flipping transitions are induced by the splitting of the b {sup 3{Sigma}}{sub u} Born-Oppenheimer potential via the long-range magnetic interactions among electrons. We find that the spin-flipping cross sections in the tritium dimer are about a magnitude larger than that predicted by mass scaling the H-H cross sections. For the former, we show that the spin-exchange cross sections are several magnitudes larger, at cold temperatures, than that of the hydrogen system. We compare the results of the multichannel approach with those obtained using approximate methods such as the degenerate internal-state, the elastic, and Born approximations and discuss their respective range of validity.

  10. Absorption effects in electron-sulfur-dioxide collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, L. E.; Sugohara, R. T.; Santos, A. S. dos; Lee, M.-T.; Iga, I.; Souza, G. L. C. de; Homem, M. G. P.; Michelin, S. E.; Brescansin, L. M.

    2011-09-15

    A joint experimental-theoretical study on electron-SO{sub 2} collisions in the low and intermediate energy range is reported. More specifically, experimental elastic differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections in absolute scale are measured in the 100-1000 eV energy range using the relative-flow technique. Calculated elastic differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections as well as grand-total and total absorption cross sections are also presented in the 1-1000 eV energy range. A complex optical potential is used to represent the electron-molecule interaction dynamics, whereas the Schwinger variational iterative method combined with the distorted-wave approximation is used to solve the scattering equations. Comparison of the present results is made with the theoretical and experimental results available in the literature.

  11. Vlasov simulations of electron-ion collision effects on damping of electron plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, J. W.; Brunner, S.; Berger, R. L.; Tran, T. M.

    2016-03-01

    Collisional effects can play an essential role in the dynamics of plasma waves by setting a minimum damping rate and by interfering with wave-particle resonances. Kinetic simulations of the effects of electron-ion pitch angle scattering on Electron Plasma Waves (EPWs) are presented here. In particular, the effects of such collisions on the frequency and damping of small-amplitude EPWs for a range of collision rates and wave phase velocities are computed and compared with theory. Both the Vlasov simulations and linear kinetic theory find the direct contribution of electron-ion collisions to wave damping significantly reduced from that obtained through linearized fluid theory. To our knowledge, this simple result has not been published before. Simulations have been carried out using a grid-based (Vlasov) approach, based on a high-order conservative finite difference method for discretizing the Fokker-Planck equation describing the evolution of the electron distribution function. Details of the implementation of the collision operator within this framework are presented. Such a grid-based approach, which is not subject to numerical noise, is of particular interest for the accurate measurements of the wave damping rates.

  12. Fluorine Auger-electron production in collisions of H+ and Li2+ with fluorocarbon targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinpaugh, J. L.; Toburen, L. H.; Justiniano, E. L. B.

    1999-12-01

    Relative and absolute cross sections are presented for fluorine KLL Auger-electron production in collisions of 2.0-MeV H+ and 0.5-MeV/amu Li2+ with various fluorocarbon targets. Auger yields were measured for molecular targets of CH3F, CH2F2, C2H2F2, CHF3, CF4, C2F6, and C4F8. The fluorine Auger cross sections for these collision systems were found to be independent of the chemical environment, i.e., the atomic cross sections were found to obey additivity for these molecules. This is in contrast to recently reported fluorine K-shell ionization cross sections found for He+ impact on fluorocarbon targets, where the atomic cross sections were found to differ by up to a factor of 3.

  13. Target electron ionization in Li2+-Li collisions: A multi-electron perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śpiewanowski, M. D.; Gulyás, L.; Horbatsch, M.; Kirchner, T.

    2015-05-01

    The recent development of the magneto-optical trap reaction-microscope has opened a new chapter for detailed investigations of charged-particle collisions from alkali atoms. It was shown that energy-differential cross sections for ionization from the outer-shell in O8+-Li collisions at 1500 keV/amu can be readily explained with the single-active-electron approximation. Understanding of K-shell ionization, however, requires incorporating many-electron effects. An ionization-excitation process was found to play an important role. We present a theoretical study of target electron removal in Li2+-Li collisions at 2290 keV/amu. The results indicate that in outer-shell ionization a single-electron process plays the dominant part. However, the K-shell ionization results are more difficult to interpret. On one hand, we find only weak contributions from multi-electron processes. On the other hand, a large discrepancy between experimental and single-particle theoretical results indicate that multi-electron processes involving ionization from the outer shell may be important for a complete understanding of the process. Work supported by NSERC, Canada and the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund.

  14. Study on optimal impact damper using collision of vibrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Yoshio; Komatsuzaki, Toshihiko; Kitayama, Satoshi; Takasaki, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an impact damper which consists of multiple vibrators installed on a main structure and dissipates the vibrational energy by collisions between the vibrators. Transient vibration of the main system subject to an impact rapidly converges to zero by the impact damper. DE (Differential Evolution) method which is one of the optimization methods is employed to determine mass and spring constant of the every vibrators to maximize damping effect. We discuss the effect of a coefficient of restitution of vibrators, a ratio of total mass of the vibrators to the main structure mass and the number of the vibrators on the damping performance. The damping effect of the impact damper with three vibrators is demonstrated experimentally.

  15. Single electron capture measurements in collisions of K+ on N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcón, F. B.; Fuentes, B. E.; Martínez, H.; Yousif, F. B.

    2014-08-01

    Absolute total charge transfer cross sections have been measured for K+-N2 collisions, at impact energies between 1.0 and 3.5 keV. The charge transfer cross sections show a monotonic increasing behaviour as a function of the incident energy. Agreement with other groups is observed as the present measurements extend to lower energies. A semi-empirical calculation shows a similar behaviour to the present data with respect to the electron capture cross sections as a function of energy.

  16. Single ionization of helium by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, I.; Fursa, D. V.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Stelbovics, A. T.

    2010-06-15

    We suggest that the problem of single ionization of helium by electron impact, leaving the ion in the ground state, has been solved theoretically for the full range of kinematics and collision geometries of practical interest. Following the emphasis on the study of out-of-plane geometries where the cross sections are very small [Schulz et al., Nature 422, 48 (2003)], we find that the convergent close-coupling calculations, in either a frozen- or a multicore treatment of the target, are in excellent agreement with the available measurements. Curiously, some systematic discrepancies are identified for some in-plane cases where the cross sections are an order of magnitude larger. Further measurements are required to resolve these discrepancies. If subsequent measurements confirm the present calculations, then we would have a strong case that the problem has been solved.

  17. Collision-Based Computing Using Single-Electron Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shunsuke; Oya, Takahide

    2012-06-01

    A single-electron (SE) device based on “collision-based computing (CBC)” is proposed for information processing. CBC is an analog computing in which input signals behave like billiard balls, and the goals of moving balls are regarded as output positions. The proposed SE device consists of arrayed SE oscillators with coupling capacitor between each pair. An SE oscillator is a threshold decision device which can be used as a reaction-diffusion (RD) model, a kind of the analog computation model. The RD model can express the various behaviors of an excited wave, e.g., “moving at a constant velocity” and “disappearing due to collision”. These behaviors are also important for CBC. We designed basic SE-CBC circuits and a full adder as an application, and evaluated their operation by Monte-Carlo computer simulation. The results indicate that this circuit is useful for configuring various types of logical circuits.

  18. The Screening Effect in Electromagnetic Production of Electron Positron Pairs in Relativistic Nucleus-Atom Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jianshi; Derrickson, J. H.; Parnell, T. A.; Strayer, M. R.

    1999-01-01

    We study the screening effects of the atomic electrons in the electromagnetic production of electron-positron pairs in relativistic nucleus-atom collisions for fixed target experiments. Our results are contrasted with those obtained in bare collisions, with particular attention given to its dependence on the beam energy and the target atom.

  19. Shape resonances in low-energy-electron collisions with halopyrimidines

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2013-12-07

    We report calculated cross sections for elastic collisions of low-energy electrons with halopyrimidines, namely, 2-chloro, 2-bromo, and 5-bromopyrimidine. We employed the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials to compute the cross sections in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization levels of approximation for energies up to 10 eV. We found four shape resonances for each molecule: three of π* nature localized on the ring and one of σ* nature localized along the carbon–halogen bond. We compared the calculated positions of the resonances with the electron transmission spectroscopy data measured by Modelli et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 115, 10775 (2011)]. In general the agreement between theory and experiment is good. In particular, our results show the existence of a π* temporary anion state of A{sub 2} symmetry for all three halopyrimidines, in agreement with the dissociative electron attachment spectra also reported by Modelli et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 115, 10775 (2011)].

  20. Quasiclassical Methods for Ion Collisions with Two-Electron Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, James S.

    1996-05-01

    Results of two generalizations of the classical-trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method will be reported. The first is the model, termed CTMC-KW, originally proposed by Kirschbaum and Wilets(C. L. Kirschbaum and L. Wilets, Phys. Rev. A 21), 834 (1980). that achieves quasiclassical stability of multi-electron atoms via effective potentials motivated by the Heisenberg and Pauli principles. It was recently shown that this model gives fairly accurate binding energies for all atoms.(J. S. Cohen, Phys. Rev. A 51), 266 (1995) The second is a new model, termed CTMC-eb, that achieves stability via constraining potentials imposing lower bounds on the one-electron energies. The latter model is closer in spirit to the original CTMC method. Applications are made to single and double electron transfer and ionization cross sections for collisions of H^+, He^2+, and Li^3+ ions with the helium atom. All possible rearrangement processes are treated simultaneously and consistently. The cross sections will be compared with accurate experimental values.

  1. Employment Impact of Electronic Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecker, Daniel E.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic business is stimulating employment in some sectors across industries, such as computer-related and customer service occupations, and diminishing employment in others, such as administrative support and marketing/sales. Similarly, employment impacts will vary by industry. (Contains 56 notes and references.) (SK)

  2. Collision lifetimes and impact statistics of near-Earth asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottke, W. F., Jr.; Nolan, M. C.; Greenberg, R.

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the lifetimes of Near-Earth asteroids (NEA's) by directly computing the collision probabilities with other asteroids and with the terrestrial planets. We compare these to the dynamical lifetimes, and to collisional lifetimes assumed by other workers. We discuss the implications of the differences. The lifetimes of NEA's are important because, along with the statistics of craters on the Earth and Moon, they help us to compute the number of NEA's and the rate at which new NEA's are brought to the vicinity of the Earth. Assuming that the NEA population is in steady-state, the lifetimes determine the flux of new bodies needed to replenish the population. Earlier estimates of the lifetimes ignored (or incompletely accounted for) the differences in the velocities of asteroids as they move in their orbits, so our results differ from (for example) Greenberg and Chapman (1983, Icarus 55, 455) and Wetherill (1988, Icarus 76, 1) by factors of 2 to 10. We have computed the collision rates and relative velocities of NEA's with each other, the main-belt asteroids, and the terrestrial planets, using the corrected method described by Bottke et. al. (1992, GRL, in press). We find that NEA's typically have shorter collisional lifetimes than do main-belt asteroids of the same size, due to their high eccentricities, which typically give them aphelia in the main belt. Consequently, they spend a great deal of time in the main belt, and are moving much slower than the bodies around them, making them 'sitting ducks' for impacts with other asteroids. They cross the paths of many objects, and their typical collision velocities are much higher (10-15 km/s) than the collision velocities (5 km/s) among objects within the main belt. These factors combine to give them substantially shorter lifetimes than had been previously estimated.

  3. Modeling Charge Transfer in Fullerene Collisions via Real-Time Electron Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jakowski, Jacek; Irle, Stephan; Sumpter, Bobby G; Morokuma, Keiji

    2012-06-01

    An approach for performing real-time dynamics of electron transfer in a prototype redox reaction that occurs in reactive collisions between neutral and ionic fullerenes is discussed. The quantum dynamical simulations show that the electron transfer occurs within 60 fs directly preceding the collision of the fullerenes, followed by structural changes and relaxation of electron charge. The consequences of real-time electron dynamics are fully elucidated for the far from equilibrium processes of collisions between neutral and multiply charged fullerenes. PMID:26285634

  4. Theoretical and experimental investigation of electron collisions with acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homem, M. G. P.; Iga, I.; da Silva, L. A.; Ferraz, J. R.; Machado, L. E.; de Souza, G. L. C.; da Mata, V. A. S.; Brescansin, L. M.; Lucchese, R. R.; Lee, M.-T.

    2015-09-01

    We report a joint theoretical-experimental investigation on elastic electron scattering by acetone in the low- and intermediate-energy regions. More specifically, experimental differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections are given in the 30-800 eV and 10∘-120∘ ranges. Theoretical cross sections are reported in the 1-500 eV interval. The experimental differential cross sections were determined using a crossed electron-beam-molecular-beam geometry, whereas the absolute values of the cross sections were obtained using the relative-flow technique. Theoretically, a complex optical potential derived from a Hartree-Fock molecular wave function was used to represent the collision dynamics, and a single-center expansion method combined with the Padé approximant technique was used to solve the scattering equations. Our experimental cross-section data are in generally good agreement with the present calculated data. Also, our calculated grand-total and total absorption cross sections are in good agreement with the experimental results reported in the literature. Nevertheless, our calculations have revealed a strong shape resonance in the 2B2 scattering channel not clearly seen in the experimental results. Possible reasons for this fact are also discussed.

  5. Collisions of low-energy electrons with isopropanol

    SciTech Connect

    Bettega, M. H. F.; Winstead, C.; McKoy, V.; Jo, A.; Gauf, A.; Tanner, J.; Hargreaves, L. R.; Khakoo, M. A.

    2011-10-15

    We report measured and calculated cross sections for elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by isopropanol (propan-2-ol). The experimental data were obtained using the relative flow technique with helium as the standard gas and a thin aperture as the collimating target gas source, which permits use of this method without the restrictions imposed by the relative flow pressure conditions on helium and the unknown gas. The differential cross sections were measured at energies of 1.5, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 10, 15, 20, and 30 eV and for scattering angles from 10 deg. to 130 deg. The cross sections were computed over the same energy range employing the Schwinger multichannel method in the static-exchange plus polarization approximation. Agreement between theory and experiment is very good. The present data are compared with previously calculated and measured results for n-propanol, the other isomer of C{sub 3}H{sub 7}OH. Although the integral and momentum transfer cross sections for the isomers are very similar, the differential cross sections show a strong isomeric effect: In contrast to the f-wave behavior seen in scattering by n-propanol, d-wave behavior is observed in the cross sections of isopropanol. These results corroborate our previous observations in electron collisions with isomers of C{sub 4}H{sub 9}OH.

  6. Accurate measurements of the collision stopping powers for 5 to 30 MeV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, Miller Shawn

    Accurate knowledge of electron stopping powers is crucial for accurate radiation dosimetry and radiation transport calculations. Current values for stopping powers are based on a theoretical model, with estimated uncertainties of 0.5-1% (1σ) for electron energies greater than 100 keV. This work presents the first measurements of electron collision stopping powers capable of testing the theoretical values within these stated uncertainties. A large NaI spectrometer was used to measure the change in electron energy when an absorbing disk of known thickness was placed in an electron beam. Monte Carlo simulations of the experiment were performed to account for the effects of surrounding materials. Energy differences between the calculated and measured spectra were used to determine corrections to the soft collision component of the theoretical stopping powers employed by the Monte Carlo simulations. Four different elemental materials were studied: Be, Al, Cu, and Ta. This provided a wide range of atomic numbers and densities over which to test the theory. In addition, stopping powers were measured for graphite (both standard and pyrolytic), A-150 tissue equivalent plastic, C-552 air equivalent plastic, and water. The incident electron energies ranged from 5 to 30 MeV. Generally, the measured stopping powers agree with the theoretical values within the experimental uncertainties, which range from 0.4% to 0.7% (1σ). Aluminum, however, exhibits a 0.7% discrepancy at higher electron energies. Furthermore, these measurements have established that the grain density stopping power is appropriate for graphite, contrary to the recommendations of ICRU Report 37. This removes a 0.2% uncertainty in air kerma calibrations, and impacts on dosimetric quantities determined via graphite calorimetry, such as ɛG for Fricke dosimetry and (W/ e)air for ion chamber measurements.

  7. Relativistic electronic dressing in laser-assisted electron-hydrogen elastic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Attaourti, Y.; Manaut, B.; Makhoute, A.

    2004-06-01

    We study the effects of the relativistic electronic dressing in laser-assisted electron-hydrogen atom elastic collisions. We begin by considering the case when no radiation is present. This is necessary in order to check the consistency of our calculations and we then carry out the calculations using the relativistic Dirac-Volkov states. It turns out that a simple formal analogy links the analytical expressions of the unpolarized differential cross section without laser and the unpolarized differential cross section in the presence of a laser field.

  8. PREFACE: XXVIth International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orel, Ann; Starace, Anthony F.; Nikolić, Dragan; Berrah, Nora; Gorczyca, Thomas W.; Kamber, Emanuel Y.; Tanis, John A.

    2009-12-01

    The XXVIth International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions was held on the campus of Western Michigan University (WMU) in Kalamazoo during 22-28 July 2009. Kalamazoo, the home of a major state university amid pleasant surroundings, was a delightful place for the conference. The 473 scientific participants, 111 of whom were students, had many fruitful discussions and exchanges that contributed to the success of the conference. Participants from 43 countries made the conference truly international in scope. The 590 abstracts that were presented on the first four days formed the heart of the conference and provided ample opportunity for discussion. This change, allowing the conference to end with invited talks, was a departure from the format used at previous ICPEAC gatherings in which the conferences ended with a poster session. The abstracts were split almost equally between the three main conference areas, i.e., photonic, electronic, and atomic collisions, and the posters were distributed across the days of the conference so that approximately equal numbers of abstracts in the different areas were scheduled for each day. Of the total number of presented abstracts, 517 of these are included in this proceedings volume, the first time that abstracts have been published by ICPEAC. There were 5 plenary lectures covering the different areas of the conference: Paul Corkum (University of Ottawa) talked on attosecond physics with atoms and molecules, Serge Haroche (Collège de France) on non-destructive photon counting, Toshiyuki Azuma (Tokyo Metropolitan University) on resonant coherent excitation of highly-charged ions in crystals, Eva Lindroth (Stockholm University) on atomic structure effects, and Alfred Müller (Justus Liebig University) on resonance phenomena in electron- and photon-ion collisions. Two speakers gave very illuminating public lectures that drew many people from the local area, as well as conference participants: Patricia Dehmer

  9. Improved atomic data for electron-transport predictions by the codes TIGER and TIGERP. I. Inner-shell ionization by electron collision

    SciTech Connect

    Peek, J.M.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    The inner-shell ionization data for electron-target collisions now in use in the TIGER and TIGERP electron-transport codes are extracted and compared with other data for these processes. The TIGER cross sections for K-shell ionization by electron collisions are found to be seriously in error for large-Z targets and incident electron energies greater than 1 MeV. A series of TIGER and TIGERP runs were carried out with and without improved K-shell electron ionization cross section data replacing that now in use. The relative importance of electron-impact and photon ionization of the various subshells was also extracted from these runs. In general, photon ionization dominated in the examples studied so the sensitivity of many predicted properties to errors in the electron-impact subshell ionization data was not large. However, some differences were found and, as all possible applications were not covered in this study, it is recommended that these electron-impact data now in TIGER and TIGERP be replaced. Cross section data for the processes under study are reviewed and those that are most suitable for this application are identified. 19 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Femtosecond laser field induced modifications of electron-transfer processes in Ne{sup +}-He collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhenzhong; Chen Deying; Fan Rongwei; Xia Yuanqin

    2012-01-02

    We demonstrate the presence of femtosecond laser induced charge transfer in Ne{sup +}-He collisions. Electron transfer in ion-atom collisions is considerably modified when the collision is embedded in a strong laser field with the laser intensity of {approx}10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The observed anisotropy of the He{sup +} angular distribution confirms the prediction of early work that the capture probability varies significantly with the laser polarization angle.

  11. Electron Capture Processes Following Collisions of He^2+ Ions with Molecular Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Haija, O.

    2005-05-01

    Energy-gain spectra, absolute state-selective and total cross sections have been measured for single-electron capture processes in collisions of He^2+ ions with O2, H2O, CO2, N2, and NH3 at impact energies between 100 eV and 1600 eV and scattering angles between 0^o and 6^o using the translational energy-gain spectroscopy (TES) technique. As apparent from the translational energy-gain measurements, single-electron capture (SEC) from O2 and H2O proceeds by both dissociative and non-dissociative channels, whereas for N2 and CO2 only dissociative SEC has been observed. However, for NH3 the non-dissociative SEC channel is found to be predominantly populated. Total cross sections have also been compared with available measurements and theoretical calculations based on Landua-Zener model and Demkov model.

  12. Single-electron exchange in H–H and He+–H collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizan, Sh; Shojaei, F.; Fathi, R.

    2016-07-01

    The prior version of the four-body Born distorted wave (BDW-4B) approximation is formulated and used to study single-electron capture in H–H and He+–H collisions. The total cross sections are obtained in terms of six-dimensional numerical quadratures at intermediate and high impact energies. The role of dynamic dielectronic correlation is investigated as a function of impact energy. The results of the total cross sections for the post version of the BDW-4B method are also reported and the post–prior discrepancy is estimated. Comparisons of the present results with the available experimental data are made and good agreement is obtained.

  13. Autoionization in electron - helium collisions: an (e, 2e) investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samardzic, O.; Campbell, L.; Brunger, M. J.; Kheifets, A. S.; Weigold, E.

    1997-10-01

    In this (e, 2e) study into the n = 2 autoionization resonances of helium we present results for the triple differential cross sections (TDCS) at an incident energy of 80 eV. The scattered-electron angle is 0953-4075/30/19/024/img8 and the range of ejected-electron scattering angles are between 0953-4075/30/19/024/img9 and 0953-4075/30/19/024/img10. The measured coincidence ejected-electron spectra are analysed in terms of the Shore - Balashov parametrization to obtain the direct TDCS 0953-4075/30/19/024/img11 and the resonance parameters 0953-4075/30/19/024/img12 and 0953-4075/30/19/024/img13 for the 0953-4075/30/19/024/img14 and 0953-4075/30/19/024/img15 resonances as a function of the ejected-electron momentum. As in our previous studies (1995 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 28 728, 1997 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 30 3267) these derived parameters are compared with the results of a calculation based within the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) framework. The post-collision-interaction (PCI) related energy shift 0953-4075/30/19/024/img16 was also determined in the present experiments. Given the somewhat lower beam energy of this work compared to our earlier investigations (94.6 - 99.6 eV), we had anticipated that we would see larger PCI effects and that our DWBA calculation would prove to be too simplistic to provide a realistic description of the reaction mechanism. In fact, the calculated parameters 0953-4075/30/19/024/img17 agree quite well with the experimental results, both indicating strong correlations between the resonance amplitudes and the direct ionization amplitudes. Furthermore, 0953-4075/30/19/024/img16 was, to within the uncertainties in the data, found to be zero across the entire range of ejected-electron momenta studied.

  14. Target electron ionization in Li2+-Li collisions: A multi-electron perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śpiewanowski, M. D.; Gulyás, L.; Horbatsch, M.; Goullon, J.; Ferreira, N.; Hubele, R.; de Jesus, V. L. B.; Lindenblatt, H.; Schneider, K.; Schulz, M.; Schuricke, M.; Song, Z.; Zhang, S.; Fischer, D.; Kirchner, T.

    2015-04-01

    Target electron removal in Li2+-Li collisions at 2290 keV/amu is studied experimentally and theoretically for ground and excited lithium target configurations. It is shown that in outer-shell ionization a single-electron process plays the dominant part. However, the K-shell ionization results are more difficult to interpret. According to our calculations, the process is shown to be strongly single-particle like. On one hand, a high resemblance between theoretical single-particle ionization and exclusive inner-shell ionization is demonstrated, and contributions from multi-electron processes are found to be weak. On the other hand, it is indicated by the discrepancy between experimental and single-particle theoretical results that multi-electron processes involving ionization from the outer-shell may play a crucial role.

  15. Shifts in electron capture to the continuum at low collision energies: Enhanced role of target postcollision interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, M. B.; McGrath, C.; Luna, H.; Crothers, D.S.F.; O'Rourke, S.F.C.; Gilbody, H.B.; Illescas, Clara; Riera, A.; Pons, B.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of electron velocity distributions emitted at 0 deg. for collisions of 10- and 20-keV H{sup +} incident ions on H{sub 2} and He show that the electron capture to the continuum cusp formation, which is still possible at these low impact energies, is shifted to lower momenta than its standard position (centered on the projectile velocity), as recently predicted. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations reproduce the observations remarkably well, and indicate that a long-range residual interaction of the electron with the target ion after ionization is responsible for the shifts, which is a general effect that is enhanced at low nuclear velocities.

  16. Differential electron-Cu5+ elastic scattering cross sections extracted from electron emission in ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C.; Hagmann, S.; Bhalla, C. P.; Grabbe, S. R.; Cocke, C. L.; Richard, P.

    1999-04-01

    We present a method of deriving energy and angle-dependent electron-ion elastic scattering cross sections from doubly differential cross sections for electron emission in ion-atom collisions. By analyzing the laboratory frame binary encounter electron production cross sections in energetic ion-atom collisions, we derive projectile frame differential cross sections for electrons elastically scattered from highly charged projectile ions in the range between 60° and 180°. The elastic scattering cross sections are observed to deviate strongly from the Rutherford cross sections for electron scattering from bare nuclei. They exhibit strong Ramsauer-Townsend electron diffraction in the angular distribution of elastically scattered electrons, providing evidence for the strong role of screening played in the collision. Experimental data are compared with partial-wave calculations using the Hartree-Fock model.

  17. Ringing After a High-Energy Collision: Ambipolar Oscillations During Impact Plasma Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    High-velocity impacts on the Moon and other airless bodies deliver energy and material to the lunar surface and exosphere. The target and i mpactor material may become vaporized and ionized to form a collision al plasma that expands outward and eventually becomes collisionless. In the present work, kinetic simulations of the later collision less stage of impact plasma expansion are performed. Attention is paid to characterizing "ambipolar oscillations" in which thermodynamic distur bances propagate outward to generate "ringing" within the expanding e lectron cloud, which could radiate an electromagnetic signature of lo cal plasma conditions. The process is not unlike a beam-plasma intera ction, with the perturbing electron population in the present case ac ting as a highly thermal "beam" that resonates along the expanding de nsity gradient. Understanding the electromagnetic aspects of impact p lasma expansion could provide insight into the lasting effects of nat ural, impact-generated currents on airless surfaces and charging haza rds to human exploration infrastructure and instrumentation.

  18. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions. Progress report, June 15, 1992--June 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1995-08-01

    The research program of Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom, ion-ion, and ion-molecule collisions. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-core interaction can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. Winter has focussed on intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He{sup +} collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), in which many electron states are strongly coupled during the collision and a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. Alston has concentrated on higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies), or asymmetric collision systems, for which the coupling of the projectile is weaker with, however, many more target states being coupled together so that high-order perturbation theory is essential. Several calculations by Winter and Alston are described, as set forth in the original proposal.

  19. The effect of electron collisions on rotational excitation of cometary water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Xingfa; Mumma, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    The e-H2O collisional rate for exciting rotational transitions in cometary water is evaluated for conditions found in Comet Halley. The e-H2O collisional rate exceeds that for excitation by neutral-neutral collisions at distances exceeding 3000 km from the cometary nucleus, in the case of the O sub 00 yields 1 sub 11 transition. The estimates are based on theoretical and experimental studies of e-H2O collisions, on ion and electron parameters acquired in-situ by instruments on the Giotto and Vega spacecraft, and on results obtained from models of the cometary ionosphere. The contribution of electron collisions may explain the need for large water-water cross-sections in models which neglect the effect of electrons. The importance of electron collisions is enhanced for populations of water molecules in regions where their rotational lines are optically thick.

  20. Recent measurements concerning uranium hexafluoride-electron collision processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.; Chutjian, A.; Srivastava, S.; Williams, W.; Cartwright, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    Scattering of electrons by UF6 molecules was studied at impact energies ranging from 5 to 100 eV and momentum transfer, elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections were determined. The measurements also yielded spectroscopic information which made possible to extend the optical absorption cross sections from 2000 angstroms to 435 angstroms. It was found that UF6 is a very strong absorber in the vacuum UV region. No transitions were found to lie below the onset of the optically detected 3.0 eV feature.

  1. Electron collisions with the CH{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}O complex

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, T. C.; Lima, M. A. P.; Canuto, S.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2009-12-15

    We report cross sections for elastic collisions of low-energy electrons with the CH{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}O complex. We employed the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials in the static-exchange and in the static-exchange-polarization approximations for energies from 0.1 to 20 eV. We considered four different hydrogen-bonded structures for the complex that were generated by classical Monte Carlo simulations. Our aim is to investigate the effect of the water molecule on the pi* shape resonance of formaldehyde. Previous studies reported a pi* shape resonance for CH{sub 2}O at around 1 eV. The resonance positions of the complexes appear at lower energies in all cases due to the mutual polarization between the two molecules. This indicates that the presence of water may favor dissociation by electron impact and may lead to an important effect on strand breaking in wet DNA by electron impact.

  2. Impact fracture experiments simulating interstellar grain-grain collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann; Chang, Sherwood; Dickinson, J. Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Oxide and silicate grains condensing during the early phases of the formation of the solar system or in the outflow of stars are exposed to high partial pressures of the low-z elements H, C, N and O and their simple gaseous compounds. Though refractory minerals are nominally anhydrous and non-carbonate, if they crystallize in the presence of H2O, N2 and CO or CO2 gases, they dissolve traces of the gaseous components. The question arises: How does the presence of dissolved gases or gas components manifest itself when grain-grain collisions occur. What are the gases emitted when grains are shattered during a collision event. Researchers report on fracture experiments in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV, approximately less than 10 to the -8th power mbar) designed to measure (by means of a quadrupole mass spectrometer, QMS, with microns to ms time resolution) the emission of gases and vapors during and after impact (up to 1.5 sec). Two terrestrial materials were chosen which represent structural and compositional extremes: olivine (San Carlos, AZ), a densely packed Mg-Fe(2+) silicate from the upper mantle, available as 6 to 12 mm single crystals, and obsidian (Oregon), a structurally open, alkaline-SiO2-rich volcanic glass. In the olivine crystals OH- groups have been identified spectroscopically, as well as H2 molecules. Obsidian is a water-rich glass containing OH- besides H2O molecules. Olivine from the mantle often contains CO2, either as CO2-rich fluid in fluid inclusions or structurally dissolved or both. By analogy to synthetic glasses CO2 in the obsidian may be present in form of CO2 molecules in voids of molecular dimensions, or as carbonate anions, CO3(2-). No organic molecules have been detected spectroscopically in either material. Results indicate that refractory oxide/silicates which contain dissolved traces of the H2O and CO/CO2 components but no spectroscopically detectable traces of organics may release complex H-C-O (possibly H-C-N-O) molecules upon fracture

  3. Impact fracture experiments simulating interstellar grain-grain collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Friedemann; Chang, Sherwood; Dickinson, J. Thomas

    1990-04-01

    Oxide and silicate grains condensing during the early phases of the formation of the solar system or in the outflow of stars are exposed to high partial pressures of the low-z elements H, C, N and O and their simple gaseous compounds. Though refractory minerals are nominally anhydrous and non-carbonate, if they crystallize in the presence of H2O, N2 and CO or CO2 gases, they dissolve traces of the gaseous components. The question arises: How does the presence of dissolved gases or gas components manifest itself when grain-grain collisions occur. What are the gases emitted when grains are shattered during a collision event. Researchers report on fracture experiments in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV, approximately less than 10 to the -8th power mbar) designed to measure (by means of a quadrupole mass spectrometer, QMS, with microns to ms time resolution) the emission of gases and vapors during and after impact (up to 1.5 sec). Two terrestrial materials were chosen which represent structural and compositional extremes: olivine (San Carlos, AZ), a densely packed Mg-Fe(2+) silicate from the upper mantle, available as 6 to 12 mm single crystals, and obsidian (Oregon), a structurally open, alkaline-SiO2-rich volcanic glass. In the olivine crystals OH- groups have been identified spectroscopically, as well as H2 molecules. Obsidian is a water-rich glass containing OH- besides H2O molecules. Olivine from the mantle often contains CO2, either as CO2-rich fluid in fluid inclusions or structurally dissolved or both. By analogy to synthetic glasses CO2 in the obsidian may be present in form of CO2 molecules in voids of molecular dimensions, or as carbonate anions, CO3(2-). No organic molecules have been detected spectroscopically in either material. Results indicate that refractory oxide/silicates which contain dissolved traces of the H2O and CO/CO2 components but no spectroscopically detectable traces of organics may release complex H-C-O (possibly H-C-N-O) molecules upon fracture

  4. Electron impact excitation of helium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao-Ying; Zeng, De-Ling; Gao, Xiang; Li, Jia-Ming

    2015-08-01

    A method to deal with the electron impact excitation cross sections of an atom from low to high incident energies are presented. This method combines the partial wave method and the first Born approximation (FBA), i.e., replacing the several lowest partial wave cross sections of the total cross sections within FBA by the corresponding exact partial wave cross sections. A new set of codes are developed to calculate the FBA partial wave cross sections. Using this method, the convergent e-He collision cross sections of optical-forbidden and optical-allowed transitions at low to high incident energies are obtained. The calculation results demonstrate the validity and efficiency of the method. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB921501 and 2013CB922200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274035, 11275029, 11328401, 11371218, 11474031, 11474032, and 11474034), and the Foundation of Development of Science and Technology of Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant Nos. 2013A0102005 and 2014A0102005).

  5. Two-dimensional model of resonant electron collisions with diatomic molecules and molecular cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vana, Martin; Hvizdos, David; Houfek, Karel; Curik, Roman; Greene, Chris H.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2016-05-01

    A simple model for resonant collisions of electrons with diatomic molecules with one electronic and one nuclear degree of freedom (2D model) which was solved numerically exactly within the time-independent approach was used to probe the local complex potential approximation and nonlocal approximation to nuclear dynamics of these collisions. This model was reformulated in the time-dependent picture and extended to model also electron collisions with molecular cations, especially with H2+.This model enables an assessment of approximate methods, such as the boomerang model or the frame transformation theory. We will present both time-dependent and time-independent results and show how we can use the model to extract deeper insight into the dynamics of the resonant collisions.

  6. R-matrix calculations of differential and integral cross sections for low-energy electron collisions with ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, M. M.; Brigg, W. J.; Tennyson, J.

    2012-08-01

    Electron collisions with C2H5OH are studied up to impact energies of 10 eV using several theoretical models. Calculated differential cross sections suggest that the extrapolation to low angles used to extend experimental data and hence give integral cross sections significantly underestimates the large, dipole-driven forward scattering cross section. An improved set of values for the rotationally-unresolved elastic cross section is proposed; the corresponding rotationally resolved cross sections are also presented. Static exchange plus polarisation calculations find a very broad shape resonance in each of the 2A' and 2A'' symmetries in the 7 eV collision region however no resonance at lower energies, in qualitative agreement with the interpretation of some but not all dissociative electron attachment measurements.

  7. Pathways for nonsequential and sequential fragmentation of CO2 3 + investigated by electron collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enliang; Shan, Xu; Shen, Zhenjie; Gong, Maomao; Tang, Yaguo; Pan, Yi; Lau, Kai-Chung; Chen, Xiangjun

    2015-05-01

    We report nonsequential and sequential fragmentation dynamics of CO2 3 + investigated by electron collision at an impact energy of 500 eV. The dissociation mechanisms are clearly distinguished by combined use of the Dalitz plot together with momentum correlation spectra. The angular distributions and kinetic-energy releases (KERs) of different fragmentation processes are obtained. The dissociation channels of higher excited states of the CO2 3 + molecular ion are opened, which are quite different from the previous studies of heavy-ion collision [N. Neumann, D. Hant, L. Ph. H. Schmidt, J. Titze, T. Jahnke, A. Czasch, M. S. Schöffler, K. Kreidi, O. Jagutzki, H. Schmidt-Böcking, and R. Dörner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 103201 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.103201] and intense laser field [C. Wu, C. Wu, D. Song, H. Su, Y. Yang, Z. Wu, X. Liu, H. Liu, M. Li, Y. Deng, Y. Liu, L.-Y. Peng, H. Jiang, and Q. Gong, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 103601 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.103601]. By analyzing KERs together with the help of potential-energy curves exploration at the multireference configuration interaction level, we conclude that the sequential fragmentation occurs in the 2Π ,4Π , and 2Σ+ states of the CO2 3 + ion. The bond length and bond angle are also determined based on the linear fragmentation, indicating that electron impact fragmentation is a potential method to precisely reconstruct the geometry of neutral molecules.

  8. Multiple electron processes of He and Ne by proton impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhin, Pavel Nikolaevich; Montenegro, Pablo; Quinto, Michele; Monti, Juan; Fojon, Omar; Rivarola, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    A detailed investigation of multiple electron processes (single and multiple ionization, single capture, transfer-ionization) of He and Ne is presented for proton impact at intermediate and high collision energies. Exclusive absolute cross sections for these processes have been obtained by calculation of transition probabilities in the independent electron and independent event models as a function of impact parameter in the framework of the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state theory. A binomial analysis is employed to calculate exclusive probabilities. The comparison with available theoretical and experimental results shows that exclusive probabilities are needed for a reliable description of the experimental data. The developed approach can be used for obtaining the input database for modeling multiple electron processes of charged particles passing through the matter.

  9. PREFACE: XXVII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, I. D.; van der Hart, H. W.; McCann, J. F.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    2012-11-01

    The XXVII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions was held at Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland, 27 July - 2 August 2011. Members of the Local Organising Committee were drawn from the School of Mathematics and Physics of Queen's University Belfast, the School of Physical Sciences at Dublin City University, the School of Physics at University College Dublin and the Department of Experimental Physics at the National University of Ireland, Maynooth. The Conference was attended by 566 participants with contributions from 54 countries. The meeting attracted 786 contributed papers for presentation in the poster sessions. The conference included 20 Special Reports selected from the contributed papers, and these are included in part 1 of this volume. During the meeting a total of 65 Progress Reports were also presented, and the authors invited to submit written versions of their talks (see Part 1). Of the total number of contributed papers, 663 are included as refereed abstracts in parts 2 to 15 of this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Part 1 of this volume includes detailed write-ups of the majority of plenary lectures, progress reports and special reports, constituting a comprehensive tangible record of the meeting, and is additionally published in hard-copy as the Conference Proceedings. There were 5 plenary lectures given by Margaret Murnane on Ultrafast processes in atomic dynamics; Chris Greene on Few-body highly-correlated dynamics; Michael Allan on Electron-molecule collisions; Yasunori Yamazaki on Antiproton and positron collisions and Thomas Stöhlker on Relativistic ion collisions. Ian Spielman, winner of the IUPAP Young Scientist Prize for 2011, gave a special lecture entitled Modifying interatomic interactions using Raman coupling: a tale of slowly colliding Bose-Einstein condensates. In addition an evening public lecture by Mike Baillie on How precise tree-ring dating raises issues concerning the

  10. Close-coupling calculations of fine-structure excitation of Ne II due to H and electron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, Phillip C.; Cumbee, Renata; Wang, Qianxia; Loch, Stuart; Pindzola, Michael; Schultz, David R.; Buenker, Robert; McLaughlin, Brendan; Ballance, Connor

    2016-06-01

    Fine-structure transitions within the ground term of ions and neutral atoms dominate the cooling in a variety of molecular regions and also provide important density and temperature diagnostics. While fine-structure rates due to electron collisions have been studied for many systems, data are generally sparse for elements larger than oxygen, at low temperatures, and for collisions due to heavy particles. We provide rate coefficients for H collisions for the first time. The calculations were performed using the quantum molecular-orbital close-coupling approach and the elastic approximation. The heavy-particle collisions use new potential energies for the lowest-lying NeH+ states computed with the MRDCI method. The focus of the electron-impact calculations is to provide fine-structure excitation rate coefficients down to 10 K. We compare with previous calculations at higher temperatures (Griffin et al. 2001), and use a range of calculations to provide an estimate of the uncertainty on our recommended rate coefficients. A brief discussion of astrophysical applications is also provided.Griffin, D.C., et al., 2001, J. Phys. B, 34, 4401This work partially supported by NASA grant No. NNX15AE47G.

  11. Influence of electron collisions with N_2(A ^3Σ_u^+) metastables in the nitrogen afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Vasco; Sá, Paulo A.; Loureiro, Jorge

    2003-10-01

    In this work we present a study of the influence of electron collisions with metastable molecules N_2(A ^3Σ_u^+) during the afterglow of a nitrogen microwave discharge operating at ω/2π=433 MHz and p=3.3 Torr, in a tube with radius R=1.9 cm. In particular, we discuss i) the effect of superelastic collisions e+N_2(A)arrow e+N_2(X) in the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and consequently in the electron impact excitation rate coefficients; and ii) the importance of the stepwise excitation processes e+N_2(A)arrow e+N_2(B,C) in the heavy-particle kinetics. This is an important issue since the concentrations of both N_2(A) metastables and electrons initially decrease in the afterglow, but then raise and pass through pronounced maxima, whose origin is in collisions involving very high vibration levels of ground-state molecules (v≥ 38) and N(^4S) atoms. [1] V. Guerra, P. A. Sá and J. Loureiro, accepted for publication in Plasma Sources Sci. and Technol.

  12. Impact characteristics of a vehicle population in low speed front to rear collisions.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Naoya; Simms, Ciaran K; Wood, Denis P

    2015-06-01

    Rear impact collisions are mostly low severity, but carry a very high societal cost due to reported symptoms of whiplash and related soft tissue injuries. Given the difficulty in physiological measurement of damage in whiplash patients, there is a significant need to assess rear impact severity on the basis of vehicle damage. This paper presents fundamental impact equations on the basis of an equivalent single vehicle to rigid barrier collision in order to predict relationships between impact speed, maximum dynamic crush, mean and peak acceleration, time to common velocity and vehicle stiffness. These are then applied in regression analysis of published staged low speed rear impact tests. The equivalent mean and peak accelerations are linear functions of the collision closing speed, while the time to common velocity is independent of the collision closing speed. Furthermore, the time to common velocity can be used as a surrogate measure of the normalized vehicle stiffness, which provides opportunity for future accident reconstruction. PMID:25795922

  13. Pumice-pumice collisions and the effect of the impact angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnoli, B.; Manga, M.

    2003-06-01

    Using a high-speed video camera, we studied oblique collisions of lapilli-size pumice cylinders (with no rotation before impact) on flat pumice targets. Our results show that the rebound angle, the ratios of the components of velocities and the energy loss vary with the impact angle. In particular, in collisions with an average yaw angle approximately equal to zero, we observed relatively larger rebound angles at small and large impact angles and smaller values in between (the angles are measured from the horizontal surfaces of the targets). We observed also that the ratio of the normal components of velocities decreases and the ratio of the horizontal components increases when the impact angle increases. Furthermore, the ratio of the kinetic energy after to that before collisions, in general, decreases when the impact angle increases. Thus, our experiments reveal features that could be useful in modelling pumice-pumice collisions in geophysical flows.

  14. B -spline R -matrix-with-pseudostates calculations for electron collisions with aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedeon, Viktor; Gedeon, Sergej; Lazur, Vladimir; Nagy, Elizabeth; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2015-11-01

    A systematic study of angle-integrated cross sections for electron scattering from neutral aluminum is presented. The calculations cover elastic scattering, excitation of the 14 states (3 s2n p ) P2o (n =3 ,4 ,5 ,6 ) , (3 s2n s ) 2S (n =4 ,5 ,6 ) , (3 s2n d ) 2D (n =3 ,4 ) , (3 s 3 p2)P,24,2D,2S , and (3 s24 f ) F2o , as well as electron impact ionization. The sensitivity of the results to changes in the theoretical model is checked by comparing predictions from a variety of approximations, including a large-scale model with over 500 continuum pseudostates. The current results are believed to be accurate at the few-percent level and should represent a sufficiently extensive set of electron collision data for most modeling applications involving neutral aluminum.

  15. Influence of renormalization shielding on the electron-impact ionization process in dense partially ionized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-04-15

    The renormalization shielding effects on the electron-impact ionization of hydrogen atom are investigated in dense partially ionized plasmas. The effective projectile-target interaction Hamiltonian and the semiclassical trajectory method are employed to obtain the transition amplitude as well as the ionization probability as functions of the impact parameter, the collision energy, and the renormalization parameter. It is found that the renormalization shielding effect suppresses the transition amplitude for the electron-impact ionization process in dense partially ionized plasmas. It is also found that the renormalization effect suppresses the differential ionization cross section in the peak impact parameter region. In addition, it is found that the influence of renormalization shielding on the ionization cross section decreases with an increase of the relative collision energy. The variations of the renormalization shielding effects on the electron-impact ionization cross section are also discussed.

  16. Few electron transitions in atomic collisions. Final report, September 1, 1992--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, J.

    1997-04-01

    During the past three years we have evaluated probabilities and cross sections for few and multiple electron transitions in atomic collisions. Our studies included interactions of atoms and molecules with incident protons, bare ions, electrons, positrons, anti-protons, ions carrying electrons and photons. We also: studied the inter-relation between collisions with charged particles and collisions involving various processes with photons. This work has complemented various studies of collisions of atoms with charged particles and with photons as well as more general efforts to understand the nature of multi-electron systems. Our aim has been to begin with relatively simple two electron systems and to focus on fast processes in which there is too little time for complicated processes to occur. We have used a variety of computational techniques, but we emphasize those appropriate for fast collisions in which we hope to obtain insight into the physical nature of the process itself. We generally considered systems in which experimental data was available.

  17. Head on collision of multi-solitons in an electron-positron-ion plasma having superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Kaushik; Chatterjee, Prasanta Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2014-10-15

    The head-on collision and overtaking collision of four solitons in a plasma comprising superthermal electrons, cold ions, and Boltzmann distributed positrons are investigated using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) together with Hirota's method. PLK method yields two separate Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations where solitons obtained from any KdV equation move along a direction opposite to that of solitons obtained from the other KdV equation, While Hirota's method gives multi-soliton solution for each KdV equation all of which move along the same direction where the fastest moving soliton eventually overtakes the other ones. We have considered here two soliton solutions obtained from Hirota's method. Phase shifts acquired by each soliton due to both head-on collision and overtaking collision are calculated analytically.

  18. Standard line broadening impact theory for hydrogen including penetrating collisions.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, S; Poquérusse, A

    2005-10-01

    In recent years there has been significant interest in the emission spectra from high-density plasmas, as manifested by a number of experiments. At these high densities short range (small impact parameter) interactions become important and these cannot be adequately handled by the standard theory, whose predictions depend on some cutoffs, necessary to preserve unitarity, the long range approximation, and to ensure the validity of a semiclassical picture. Very recently, as a result of a debate concerning the broadening of isolated ion lines, the importance of penetration of bound electron wave functions by plasma electrons has been realized. By softening the interaction, penetration makes perturbative treatments more valid. The penetration effect has now been included analytically into the standard theory. It turns out that the integrations may be done in closed form in terms of the modified Bessel functions K0 and K1. This work develops the new theory and applies it to experimental measurements. PMID:16383542

  19. Electron impact excitation of Kr XXVIII

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, K.M.; Keenan, F.P.; Lawson, K.D.

    2011-05-15

    Collision strengths ({Omega}) are calculated for all 6328 transitions among the lowest 113 levels belonging to the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 5},2s2p{sup 6},2s{sup 2}2p{sup 4}3l,2s2p{sup 5}3l, and 2p{sup 6}3l configurations of fluorine-like krypton, Kr XXVIII, using the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code. All partial waves with angular momentum J{<=}40 are included, sufficient for the convergence of {Omega} for forbidden transitions. For allowed transitions a top-up is employed to obtain converged values of {Omega} up to an energy of 400 Ryd. Resonances in the thresholds region are resolved on a narrow energy mesh, and results for effective collision strengths (Y) are obtained after averaging the values of {Omega} over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. Values of Y are reported over a wide temperature range below 10{sup 7.1}K, and the accuracy of the results is assessed. In addition, effective collision strengths are listed for the temperature range 7.0{<=}logT{sub e}(K){<=}9.0, obtained from non-resonant collision strengths generated with the FAC code.

  20. Evaluation of screening length corrections for interaction potentials in impact-collision ion scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Wataru

    2013-10-01

    Since in impact-collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS) data analysis the interaction potential represented by the screening length as the screening effect is not satisfactorily established up to the present, we introduce commonly the correction factor in the screening length. Previously, Yamamura, Takeuchi and Kawamura (YTK) have suggested the theory taking the shell effect of electron distributions into account for the correction factor to Firsov screening length in the Moliere potential. The application of YTK theory to the evaluation of screening length corrections for the interaction potentials in ICISS manifested that the screening length corrections calculated by the YTK theory agree almost with those determined by simulations or numerical calculations in ICISS and its variants data analyses, being superior to the evaluation of screening length corrections with the O'Connor and Biersack (OB) formula.

  1. Electron impact induced light emission from zinc atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvejanovic, Danica

    2009-10-01

    Experimental studies of electron impact excitation of zinc atom are rare, primarily due to experimental difficulties. However, zinc is an interesting target because of possible applications in light sources. Also, due to its position in periodic table, zinc is an interesting case for the fundamental understanding of momentum couplings and the role of electron correlations in complex metal atoms. Recent experimental investigations have indicated the existence of highly correlated scattering mechanisms via formation of negative ion resonances and Post Collision Interaction (PCI) in the decay of autoionizing states. These can significantly modify energy dependence of the emission cross sections at low impact energies and the studies of photon emission offer a sensitive way to investigate electron correlations. Specifically, in the lowest autoionizing region of zinc, i.e. between 10 and 15 eV, both the cross sections and polarization of emitted light are affected by the formation of short lived negative ions and PCI effects. These are associated with excitation of one of the sub-valence 3d electrons and complex correlations between inner 3d and outer excited electrons in the target and also with the slow electron released into continuum, need to be included in modeling. Also the scattering of the spin polarized electrons has shown significant spin effects when excitation proceeds via negative ion resonances. Emission cross sections and comparison with theory would be discussed at the conference.

  2. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-08-04

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Importantmore » swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.« less

  3. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. It is shown that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.

  4. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-08-04

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.

  5. On The Effect of Electron Collisions in the Excitation of Cometary HCN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, Amy J.; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Schloerb, F. Peter; Combi, Michael R.; Hansen, Kenneth C.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2004-01-01

    The electron-HCN collision rate for the excitation of rotational transitions of the HCN molecule is evaluated in comets C/1995 01 (Hale-Bopp) and C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake). Based on theoretical models of the cometary atmosphere, we show that collisions with electrons can provide a significant excitation mechanism for rotational transitions in the HCN molecule. Computed values of the cross section sigma(sub e-HCN) can be as high as 1.3 x cm2, more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than the commonly assumed HCN-H2O cross section. For the ground rotational transitions of HCN, the electron-HCN collision rate is found to exceed the HCN-H2O collision rate at distances greater than 3000 km from the cometary nucleus of Hale-Bopp and 1000 km from that of Hyakutake. Collisional excitation processes dominate over radiative excitation processes up to a distance of 160,000 km from the cometary nucleus of Hale-Bopp and 50,000 km from that of Hyakutake. Excitation models that neglect electron collisions can underestimate the HCN gas production rates by as much as a factor of 2.

  6. A New Apparatus for Studies of Low Energy Electron Collisions with Nucleotide Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duron, Jessica; Hargreaves, Leigh

    Low-energy electrons, the most copiously produced by-product of radiation cancer therapy, have been shown to be a strong driver of DNA damage in living cells [1]. Quantitative data describing these collisions are presently rare due to technological challenges in performing electron scattering measurements from the nucleobases, e.g. uracil, thymine, guanine, etc. These challenges include the low-vapor pressure of commercial samples (which are powders at room temperature), and the difficulty in making accurate flow measurements from heated gas sources, required to establish the absolute scale of the measured data. Based on techniques pioneered in positron collision physics [2], a new apparatus is presently undergoing commissioning at the California State University Fullerton, which aims to address these issues. We will make the first cross-section measurements for slow (E0 < 30eV) electron collisions with nucleotides. We will report design parameters and ongoing progress in the commissioning of this new experiment.

  7. Exact analytical solutions of continuity equation for electron beams precipitating in Coulomb collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranskis, R. R.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2014-06-10

    The original continuity equation (CE) used for the interpretation of the power law energy spectra of beam electrons in flares was written and solved for an electron beam flux while ignoring an additional free term with an electron density. In order to remedy this omission, the original CE for electron flux, considering beam's energy losses in Coulomb collisions, was first differentiated by the two independent variables: depth and energy leading to partial differential equation for an electron beam density instead of flux with the additional free term. The analytical solution of this partial differential continuity equation (PDCE) is obtained by using the method of characteristics. This solution is further used to derive analytical expressions for mean electron spectra for Coulomb collisions and to carry out numeric calculations of hard X-ray (HXR) photon spectra for beams with different parameters. The solutions revealed a significant departure of electron densities at lower energies from the original results derived from the CE for the flux obtained for Coulomb collisions. This departure is caused by the additional exponential term that appeared in the updated solutions for electron differential density leading to its faster decrease at lower energies (below 100 keV) with every precipitation depth similar to the results obtained with numerical Fokker-Planck solutions. The effects of these updated solutions for electron densities on mean electron spectra and HXR photon spectra are also discussed.

  8. Backscattering of fast electrons from solids within a multiple collision model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukanic, J.; Davidovic, D. M.

    2008-07-01

    Reflection of electrons from solids is treated by the approximate analytic solution of the linearized transport equation. Scattering of electrons on target atoms is determined by the screened Coulomb interaction and the energy loss due to interaction with target electrons is defined by Bethe- Bloch formula. The anisotropic P_3 approximation of the collision integral is utilized and the Bolzmann transport equation is Laplace transformed in relative path length and solved by applying the DP0 technique. The approach is applicable in a wide range of electron energy --from several tens of keV to several MeV- and for materials where the mean number of collisions of an electron with target atoms during slowing down is large. Analytic expressions for energy distribution of backscattered electrons as well as for the particle and energy reflection coefficients were derived. Comparison of our results with data of the computational bipartition model is presented.

  9. Metastable Oxygen Production by Electron-Impact of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, J. D.; Malone, C. P.; Johnson, P. V.; Kanik, I.

    2014-12-01

    Electron-impact excitation processes involving atomic and molecular oxygen are important in atmospheric interactions. The production of long-lived metastable O(1S) and O(1D) through electron impact of oxygen-containing molecules plays a significant role in the dynamics of planetary atmospheres (Earth, Mars, Europa, Io, Enceladus) and cometary bodies (Hale-Bopp). The electron-impact excitation channels to O(1S) and O(1D) are important for determining energy partitioning and dynamics. To reliably model natural phenomena and interpret observational data, the accurate determination of underlying collision processes (cross sections, dissociation dynamics) through fundamental experimental studies is essential. The detection of metastable species in laboratory experiments requires a novel approach. Typical radiative de-excitation detection techniques cannot be performed due to the long-lived nature of excited species, and conventional particle detectors are insensitive to the low internal energies O(1S) and O(1D). We have recently constructed an apparatus to detect and characterize metastable oxygen production by electron impact using the "rare gas conversion technique." Recent results will be presented, including absolute excitation functions for target gases O2, CO, CO2, and N2O. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Financial support through NASA's OPR, PATM, and MFRP programs, as well as the NASA Postdoctoral Program (NPP) are gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Absolute cross sections for electron loss, electron capture, and multiple ionization in collisions of Li2+ with argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losqui, A. L. C.; Zappa, F.; Sigaud, G. M.; Wolff, W.; Sant'Anna, M. M.; Santos, A. C. F.; Luna, H.; Melo, W. S.

    2014-02-01

    Exclusive absolute cross sections for the electron loss and capture processes, accompanied by target multiple ionization and pure target multiple ionization, as well as total electron loss and capture cross sections, in collisions of Li2+ with Ar have been measured in the 0.5-3.5 MeV energy range. The experimental data of the total electron loss cross section are compared with theoretical results based on the plane-wave Born approximation and the free-collision model, and with the available experimental data. Some discrepancies are observed when comparing the experimental data with the theoretical models, which can be attributed to the competitive mechanisms that lead to electron loss. The dependences of the single-capture and transfer-ionization processes on the projectile charge state are similar to those observed for collisions between other low-charged light ions and noble-gas targets. The same behaviour is observed when one compares the present data for the single- and double-ionization cross sections with those for He2+ projectiles on Ar. These facts indicate that the dynamics of the collision does not seem to depend on the projectile species, so that few-electron projectiles may act as structureless point charges in the intermediate- to high-velocity regime.

  11. Solid state effects in electron emission from atomic collisions near surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, C.O.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Minniti, R.; Elston, S.B.

    1996-10-01

    We present a brief progress report of recent studies of the ejected electron spectra arising from glancing-angle ion-surface scattering involving collision energies of hundreds of keV/u. A broad range of electron energies and emission angles is analyzed containing prominent structures such as the convoy electron peak and the binary ridge. Particular emphasis is placed on the search for signatures of dynamic image interactions and multiple scattering near surfaces. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Accurate calculation of phase shifts for electron collisions with positive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gien, T. T.

    2003-06-01

    The Harris-Nesbet variational method was considered for the calculation of phase shifts of electron collisions with hydrogen-like ions (Li2+, Be3+, and B4+). Calculations were carried out for both singlet and triplet scattering. Very accurate results of phase shift of electron collisions with these ionic targets were obtained for the first time for partial waves of L up to six. The phase shifts that we obtained for low partial wave (S, P, and D) scattering were compared with those available in the literature by a few other research groups employing different numerical methods.

  13. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology.

    PubMed

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J

    2016-06-28

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology-based society. PMID:27317740

  14. Secondary Collisions Following a Traffic Barrier Impact: Frequency, Factors, and Occupant Risk

    PubMed Central

    Gabauer, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    This study has investigated secondary collisions following an initial barrier impact in tow-away level crashes. The analysis included 2026 barrier impact cases that were selected from 12-years of in-depth crash data available through the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) / Crashworthiness Data System (CDS). Secondary collisions were found to occur in approximately one-third of tow-away level crashes where a traffic barrier was the first object struck. Secondary crashes were found to primarily involve an impact to another vehicle, an impact to another barrier, or a rollover; tree and pole impacts were found to represent a much smaller proportion of secondary impacts. Through a detailed analysis of vehicle trajectory, this study supports previous research suggesting secondary collision risk is substantial even for vehicles not ultimately involved in a secondary collision. Compared to a single barrier impact, the occurrence of a secondary collision was found to increase the risk of serious occupant injury by a factor of 3.5, equivalent to the serious injury risk difference found between a belted and unbelted occupant in a traffic barrier crash. PMID:21050605

  15. Measurement and analysis of electron-neutral collision frequency in the calibrated cutoff probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K. H.; You, S. J.; Kim, D. W.; Na, B. K.; Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; Chang, H. Y.

    2016-03-01

    As collisions between electrons and neutral particles constitute one of the most representative physical phenomena in weakly ionized plasma, the electron-neutral (e-n) collision frequency is a very important plasma parameter as regards understanding the physics of this material. In this paper, we measured the e-n collision frequency in the plasma using a calibrated cutoff-probe. A highly accurate reactance spectrum of the plasma/cutoff-probe system, which is expected based on previous cutoff-probe circuit simulations [Kim et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 131502 (2011)], is obtained using the calibrated cutoff-probe method, and the e-n collision frequency is calculated based on the cutoff-probe circuit model together with the high-frequency conductance model. The measured e-n collision frequency (by the calibrated cutoff-probe method) is compared and analyzed with that obtained using a Langmuir probe, with the latter being calculated from the measured electron-energy distribution functions, in wide range of gas pressure.

  16. Non-convoy electron emission in ion metal surface collisions at grazing incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiarena, M. L.

    2005-05-01

    In this work we calculate the electron emission due to the process of electron loss to the continuum by the projectile in fast grazing incidence ion-metal collisions. The combined effect of the projectile nucleus, its induced image charge and the surface potential on the emitted electron, is included starting from the calculated continuum wave function via the enhancement factor. We will call this model the Surface Continuum Distorted Wave (SCDW) Model. The electron emission predicted by the SCDW model, even when in this first calculation we only include the electron loss effect, describes the position of the peak and the relative intensities for higher observation angles.

  17. The contribution of electron collisions to rotational excitations of cometary water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Xingfa; Mumma, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The e-H2O collisional rate for exciting rotational transitions in cometary water is evaluated for conditions found in comet Halley during the Giotto spacecraft encounter. In the case of the O(sub 00) yields 1(sub 11) rotational transition, the e-H2O collisional rate exceeds that for excitation by neutral-neutral collisions at distances exceeding 3000 km from the cometary nucleus. Thus, the rotational temperature of the water molecule in the intermediate coma may be controlled by collisions with electrons rather than with neutral collisions, and the rotational temperature retrieved from high resolution infrared spectra of water in comet Halley may reflect electron temperatures rather than neutral gas temperature in the intermediate coma.

  18. Electron-Impact-Induced Emission Cross Sections of Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noren, C.; Kanik, I.; James, G. K.; Ajello, J. M.; Khakoo, M. A.

    1998-05-01

    One cannot overstate the importance of ultraviolet (UV) lines of neutral atomic oxygen. For example, the atomic oxygen resonance transition at 130.4 nm is a prominent emission feature in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectrum of the Earth's aurora and dayglow as well as the atmospheres of Venus and Mars. In this poster, we present our measurements of the electron-impact emission cross sections of the 130.4 nm atomic oxygen feature from threshold to 100 eV impact energy. A high-density atomic oxygen beam, created by a microwave discharge source, was intersected at a right angle by a magnetically focused electron beam. A 0.2m UV spectrometer system was used in the present measurements. It consists of an electron-impact collision chamber in tandem with an UV spectrometer equipped with a CsI coated channel electron multiplier detector. Emitted photons corresponding to radiative decay of collisionally excited state of the 130.4 nm atomic oxygen feature were detected.

  19. State-of-the-Art Experimental Techniques and Results for Low Energy Electron Collisions with Simple Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckman, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Electron collisions with simple molecular systems (diatomics and small polyatomics) play an important role in most discharge-based devices and environments. Even in cases where large precursor molecules are involved, say for example in a plasma processing environment, dissociation and dissociative attachment lead to the production of smaller molecules, perhaps radicals, whose interactions can then play an important part in the dynamics of the discharge. This paper will attempt to describe the current state of the art for measurements of processes such as elastic scattering, rotational, vibrational and electronic excitation, dissociative attachment, and ionization of small molecular species by electron impact. Examples of absolute cross sections that arise from such measurements will be provided and compared, where possible, with contemporary theoretical calculations. The collaboration between experiment and theory is of critical importance in the context of ``Plasma Data Exchange,'' as benchmarked theory will play an significant role in providing data for the many, perhaps majority, of processes that cannot be easily measured.

  20. CLASSICAL MODEL FOR ELECTRONICALLY NON-ADIABATIC COLLISION PROCESSES: RESONANCE EFFECTS IN ELECTRONIC-VIBRATIONAL ENERGY TRANSFER

    SciTech Connect

    Orel, Ann E.; Miller, William H.

    1980-11-01

    A recently developed classical model for electronically nonadiabatic collision processes is applied to electronic-vibrational energy transfer in a collinear atom~diatom system, A + BC(v=1) + A*+ BC(v=0), which closely resembles Br-H{sub 2}. This classical model, which treats electronic as well as heavy particle (i.e., translation, rotation, and vibration) degrees of freedom by classical mechanics, is found to describe the resonance features in this process reasonably well. The usefulness of the approach is that it allows one to extend standard Monte Carlo classical trajectory methodology to include electronically non-adiabatic processes in a dynamically consistent way,

  1. Exclusive processes in electron-ion collisions in the dipole formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Cazaroto, E. R.; Navarra, F. S.; Carvalho, F.; Goncalves, V. P.

    2013-03-25

    We compare the predictions of two saturation models for production of vector mesons and of photons in electron-ion collisions. The models considered are the b-CGC and the rcBK. The calculations were made in the kinematical range of the LHeC and of the future eRHIC.

  2. Measurement of doubly differential electron distributions induced by atomic collisions: Apparatus and related instrumental effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, G.; Suárez, S.; Fregenal, D.; Focke, P.; Meckbach, W.

    1996-05-01

    We describe the experimental setup at Centro Atómico Bariloche for the measurement of doubly differential electron distributions, in energy and angle of emission, induced by atomic collisions. We present detailed information about the performance of the equipment including a discussion of instrumental effects that could have affected the measured spectra.

  3. Finite-Element Z-Matrix Calculation of Electron-N2 Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    1999-01-01

    The finite element Z-matrix method has been applied in a multichannel study of e-N2 Collisions for electron energies from threshold to 30 eV. General agreement is obtained comparing with existing experimental and theoretical data. Some discrepancies are also found.

  4. Absolute angle-differential elastic cross sections for electron collisions with diacetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.; Winstead, C.; McKoy, V.

    2011-06-15

    We report measured and calculated differential elastic cross sections for collisions of low-energy electrons with diacetylene (1,3-butadiyne). A generally satisfactory agreement between theory and experiment has been found. The calculated cross sections provide interesting insight into the underlying resonant structure.

  5. Electron impact excitation of Kr XXXII

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, K.M. Keenan, F.P.; Lawson, K.D.

    2009-09-15

    Collision strengths ({omega}) have been calculated for all 7750 transitions among the lowest 125 levels belonging to the 2s{sup 2}2p,2s2p{sup 2},2p{sup 3},2s{sup 2}3l,2s2p3l, and 2p{sup 2}3l configurations of boron-like krypton, Kr XXXII, for which the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code has been adopted. All partial waves with angular momentum J{<=}40 have been included, sufficient for the convergence of {omega} for forbidden transitions. For allowed transitions, a top-up has been included in order to obtain converged values of {omega} up to an energy of 500 Ryd. Resonances in the thresholds region have been resolved in a narrow energy mesh, and results for effective collision strengths (Y) have been obtained after averaging the values of {omega} over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. Values of Y are reported over a wide temperature range below 10{sup 7.3}K, and the accuracy of the results is assessed. Values of Y are also listed in the temperature range 7.3{<=}logT{sub e}(K){<=}9.0, obtained from the nonresonant collision strengths from the Flexible Atomic Code.

  6. Studies of electron correlation effects in multicharged ion atom collisions involving double capture

    SciTech Connect

    Stolterfoht, N.; Sommer, K.; Griffin, D.C.; Havener, C.C.; Huq, M.S.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Swenson, J.K.; Meyer, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    We review measurements of L-Coster Kronig and Auger electron production in slow, multicharged collision systems to study electron correlation effects in the process of double electron capture. The n/sup /minus/3/ law was confirmed for the production of the Coster-Kronig configurations 1s/sup 2/2pn/ell/ (n greater than or equal to 6) in O/sup 6 +/ + He collisions. Enhancement of high angular momentum /ell/ in specific 1s/sup 2/2pn/ell/ configurations was observed by means of high-resolution measurements of the Coster-Kronig lines. The importance of electron correlation effects in couplings of potential energy curves leading to the 1s/sup 2/2pn/ell/ configurations is verified by means of Landau-Zener model calculations. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Computational Study of Electron-Molecule Collisions Related to Low-Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Partridge, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Computational study of electron-molecule collisions not only complements experimental measurements, but can also be used to investigate processes not readily accessible experimentally. A number of ab initio computational methods are available for these types of calculations. Here we describe a recently developed technique, the finite element Z-matrix method, Analogous to the R-matrix, method, it partitions the space into regions and employs real matrix elements. However, unlike the implementation of the R-matrix method commonly used in atomic and molecular physics, the Z-matrix method is fully variational. In the present implementation, a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians is used to represent the continuum electron, thus offering full flexibility without imposing fixed boundary conditions. Numerical examples include the electron-impact dissociation of N2 via the metastable A3Su+ state, a process which may be important in the lower thermosphere, and the dissociation of the CF radical, a process of interest to plasma etching. To understand the dissociation pathways, large scale quantum chemical calculations have been carried out for all target states which dissociate to the lowest five limits in the case of N2, and to the lowest two limits in the case of CF. For N2, the structural calculations clearly show the preference for predissociation if the initial state is the ground X1 Sg+ state, but direct dissociation appears to be preferable if the initial state is the A3Su+ state. Multi-configuration SCF target functions are used in the collisional calculation.

  8. The dynamics of electronic to vibrational, rotational, and translational energy transfer in collision of Ba( sup 1 P sub 1 ) with diatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Suits, A.G.; de Pujo, P.; Sublemontier, O.; Visticot, J.; Berlande, J.; Cuvellier, J.; Gustavsson, T.; Mestdagh, J.; Meynadier, P. ); Lee, Y.T. )

    1992-09-15

    Doppler measurements taken over a range of probe-laser angles in a crossed-beam experiment were used, in conjunction with forward convolution analysis, to obtain flux--velocity contour maps for Ba({sup 3}{ital P}{sub 2}) produced in a collision of Ba({sup 1}{ital P}{sub 1}) with H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NO. The contour maps suggest a general model for the dynamics of this process in which large impact parameter collisions result in a near-resonant transfer of initial electronic energy into final vibrational energy, while close collisions produce sideways scattering and effectively couple electronic energy to translation. The molecular collision partners fall into two categories: for one group, comprising O{sub 2} and NO, the existence of a well-defined molecular anion with favorable Franck--Condon factors linking excited vibrational levels to the ground vibrational state of the neutral results in greatly enhanced coupling for the near-resonant process. Molecules for which there exist no stable anions, such as N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}, represent a second category. The electronically inelastic collision for this group is instead dominated by the nonresonant process yielding the ground vibrational state and large translational energy release.

  9. Electron-ion collisions. [Basic physics of inelastic processes of excitation, ionization, and recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    This discussion concentrates on basic physics aspects of inelastic processes of excitation, ionization, and recombination that occur during electron-ion collisions. Except for cases of illustration along isoelectronic sequences, only multicharged (at least +2) ions will be specifically discussed with some emphasis of unique physics aspects associated with ionic charge. The material presented will be discussed from a primarily experimental viewpoint with most attention to electron-ion interacting beams experiments.

  10. Laser Assisted Free-Free Transition in Electron - Atom Collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Free-free transition is studied for electron-Hydrogen atom system in ground state at very low incident energies in presence of an external homogeneous, monochromatic and linearly polarized laser field. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a non perturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange, short range as well as of the long range interactions. Laser assisted differential as well as elastic total cross sections are calculated for single photon absorption/emission in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the laser assisted cross sections as compared to the field free situations. Significant difference is noted in the singlet and the triplet cross sections.

  11. Effect of electron collisions on transport coefficients induced by the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bendib, A.; Tahraoui, A.; Bendib, K.; Mohammed El Hadj, K.; Hueller, S.

    2005-03-01

    The transport coefficients of fully ionized plasmas under the influence of a high-frequency electric field are derived solving numerically the electron Fokker-Planck equation using a perturbation method, parametrized as a function of the electron mean-free-path {lambda}{sub ei} compared to the spatial scales L. The isotropic and anisotropic contributions of the inverse bremsstrahlung heating are considered. Electron-electron collision terms are kept in the analysis, which allows us to consider with sufficient accuracy to describe plasmas with arbitrary atomic number Z. Practical numerical fits of the transport coefficients are proposed as functions of Z and the collisionality parameter {lambda}{sub ei}/L.

  12. Electron collisions in the trapped gyro-Landau fluid transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staebler, G. M.; Kinsey, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    Accurately modeling electron collisions in the trapped gyro-Landau fluid (TGLF) equations has been a major challenge. Insights gained from numerically solving the gyrokinetic equation have lead to a significant improvement of the low order TGLF model. The theoretical motivation and verification of this model with the velocity-space gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] will be presented. The improvement in the fidelity of TGLF to GYRO is shown to also lead to better prediction of experimental temperature profiles by TGLF for a dedicated collision frequency scan.

  13. Electron collisions in the trapped gyro-Landau fluid transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Staebler, G. M.; Kinsey, J. E.

    2010-12-15

    Accurately modeling electron collisions in the trapped gyro-Landau fluid (TGLF) equations has been a major challenge. Insights gained from numerically solving the gyrokinetic equation have lead to a significant improvement of the low order TGLF model. The theoretical motivation and verification of this model with the velocity-space gyrokinetic code GYRO[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] will be presented. The improvement in the fidelity of TGLF to GYRO is shown to also lead to better prediction of experimental temperature profiles by TGLF for a dedicated collision frequency scan.

  14. Influence of the nonlinear dynamic plasma screening on the electron-dust collision in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, Dae-Han; Jung, Young-Dae

    2012-05-07

    The nonlinear dynamic plasma screening effects on the elastic electron-dust grain collision are investigated in dusty plasmas. The results show that the nonlinear dynamic screening effect significantly increases the magnitude of the eikonal phase shift. It is also found that the magnitude of the phase shift decreases with an increase of the thermal energy. In addition, it is found that the differential eikonal cross section shows the oscillatory behavior, and the oscillating peaks approach to the collision center with increasing thermal energy. It is also found that the total eikonal cross section decreases with an increase of the thermal energy.

  15. Signatures of the electron saddle swaps mechanism in the photon spectra following charge-exchange collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otranto, Sebastian

    2014-10-01

    During the last few years, several experimental and theoretical studies have focused on state selective charge exchange processes between charged ions and alkali metals. These data are of particular importance for the tokamak nuclear fusion reactor program, since diagnostics on the plasma usually rely on charge-exchange spectroscopy. In this sense, alkali metals, have been proposed as potential alternatives to excited hydrogen/deuterium for which laboratory experiments are not feasible at present. In this talk, we present our recent work involving ion collisions with alkali metals. Oscillatory structures in the angular differential charge-exchange cross sections obtained using the MOTRIMS technique are correctly described by classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations. These oscillations are found to originate from the number of swaps the electron undergoes around the projectile-target potential saddle before capture takes place and are very prominent at impact energies below 10 keV/amu. Moreover, cross sections of higher order of differentiability also indicate that the swaps leave distinctive signatures in the (n,l)-state selective cross sections and in the photon line emission cross sections. Oscillatory structures for the x-ray hardness ratio parameter are also predicted. In collaboration with Ronnie Hoekstra, Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen and Ronald Olson, Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology.

  16. Effect of electron-nuclei interaction on internuclear motions in slow ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.

    2015-10-01

    The electron-nuclei interaction affects the internuclear motion in slow ion-atom collisions, which in turn affects theoretical results for the cross sections of various collision processes. The results are especially sensitive to the details of the internuclear dynamics in the presence of a strong isotope effect on the cross sections, as is the case, e.g., for the charge transfer in low-energy collisions of He2+ with H, D, and T. By considering this system as an example, we show that internuclear trajectories defined by the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potential in the entrance collision channel, which effectively accounts for the electron-nuclei interaction, are in much better agreement with trajectories obtained in the ab initio electron-nuclear dynamics approach [R. Cabrera-Trujillo et al., Phys. Rev. A 83, 012715 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.83.012715] than the corresponding Coulomb trajectories. We also show that the use of the BO trajectory instead of the Coulomb trajectory in the calculations of the charge-transfer cross sections within the adiabatic approach improves the agreement of the results with ab initio calculations.

  17. Electron-impact double ionization of magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, M.J.; El-Marji, B.; Doering, J.P.; Moore, J.H.; Coplan, M.A.; Cooper, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Electron-impact double-ionization cross sections differential in the angles of the two ejected electrons have been measured at impact energies of 422 and 1052 eV. The energies of the ejected electrons were fixed at 100 eV each. The cross sections are very different at the two incident energies. At 1052 eV the ejected electrons are preferentially found in the forward direction with respect to the incident beam. At 422 eV they are found in the forward and backward directions with approximately equal probability. The 422-eV cross sections are largest when the incident-electron and ejected-electron momentum vectors lie in a common plane. The observations are discussed in the context of several models for double ionization. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Distortion effects in electron excitation of hydrogen atoms by impact of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, C.A.; Rivarola, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    Electron excitation from the fundamental state of hydrogen atoms by impact of bare ions is studied at intermediate and high collision velocities. Total cross sections for final {ital np} states by impact of protons, alpha particles, and He{sup +} ions are calculated using the symmetric eikonal approximation and compared with experimental data. This comparison supports the existence of distortion effects recently predicted by Bugacov and co-workers [Phys. Rev. A {bold 47}, 1052 (1993)]. The validity of scaling laws is analyzed.

  19. Cross Sections for Electron Impact Excitation of Ions Relevant to Planetary Atmospheres Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, Swaraj S.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research grant was to calculate accurate oscillator strengths and electron collisional excitation strengths for inelastic transitions in atomic species of relevance to Planetary Atmospheres. Large scale configuration-interaction atomic structure calculations have been performed to obtain oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for transitions among the fine-structure levels and R-matrix method has been used in the calculations of electron-ion collision cross sections of C II, S I, S II, S III, and Ar II. A number of strong features due to ions of sulfur have been detected in the spectra of Jupiter satellite Io. The electron excitation cross sections for the C II and S II transitions are studied in collaboration with the experimental atomic physics group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. There is excellent agreement between experiment and theory which provide an accurate and broad-base test of the ability of theoretical methods used in the calculation of atomic processes. Specifically, research problems have been investigated for: electron impact excitation cross sections of C II: electron impact excitation cross sections of S III; energy levels and oscillator strengths for transitions in S III; collision strengths for electron collisional excitation of S II; electron impact excitation of inelastic transitions in Ar II; oscillator strengths of fine-structure transitions in neutral sulfur; cross sections for inelastic scattering of electrons from atomic nitrogen; and excitation of atomic ions by electron impact.

  20. Bound-free electron-positron pair production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Senguel, M. Y.; Gueclue, M. C.; Fritzsche, S.

    2009-10-15

    The bound-free electron-positron pair production is considered for relativistic heavy ion collisions. In particular, cross sections are calculated for the pair production with the simultaneous capture of the electron into the 1s ground state of one of the ions and for energies that are relevant for the relativistic heavy ion collider and the large hadron colliders. In the framework of perturbation theory, we applied Monte Carlo integration techniques to compute the lowest-order Feynman diagrams amplitudes by using Darwin wave functions for the bound states of the electrons and Sommerfeld-Maue wave functions for the continuum states of the positrons. Calculations were performed especially for the collision of Au+Au at 100 GeV/nucleon and Pb+Pb at 3400 GeV/nucleon.

  1. Energy levels, transition probabilities, and electron impact excitations for La XXX

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, J.Y. . E-mail: jyzhong@aphy.iphy.ac.cn; Zhao, G.; Zhang, J.

    2006-09-15

    energy levels, spontaneous radiative decay rates, and electron impact collision strengths are calculated for La XXX. The data refer to 107 fine-structure levels belonging to the configurations (1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6})3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 9}4l, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5}3d{sup 10}4l, and 3s3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10}4l (l = s, p, d, f). The collision strengths are calculated with a 20-collision-energy grid in terms of the energy of the scattered electron between 10 and 10,000 eV by using the distorted-wave approximation. Effective collision strengths are obtained at seven electron temperatures: T {sub e} (eV) = 10, 100, 300, 500, 800, 1000, and 1500 by integrating the collision strengths over a Maxwellian electron distribution. Coupled with these atomic data, a hydrodynamic code MED103 can be used to simulate the Ni-like La X-ray laser at 8.8 nm.

  2. Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Section Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 107 Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Section Database (Web, free access)   This is a database primarily of total ionization cross sections of molecules by electron impact. The database also includes cross sections for a small number of atoms and energy distributions of ejected electrons for H, He, and H2. The cross sections were calculated using the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model, which combines the Mott cross section with the high-incident energy behavior of the Bethe cross section. Selected experimental data are included.

  3. Electron impact excitation of SF6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.; Chutjian, A.

    1977-01-01

    A study of the electron impact energy-loss spectrum of SF6 under both optical (low scattering angle, high impact energy) and non-optical conditions (high scattering angle, low impact energy) has revealed a number of electronic excitation processes. With the help of theoretical calculations, several of these transitions have been assigned and approximate cross sections associated with four features have been determined. In addition, a strong resonance at 12 eV has been observed in both elastic and vibrationally inelastic (delta E = 0.092 eV) channels.

  4. Compilation of Electron-Neutral Collision Data in Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Gorur Govinda

    2009-10-01

    Data on electron-neutral interaction are required and indispensable in several areas of research including Power systems, Plasma applications, material scientists, Chemistry, and even biological processes. The data are generally classified under cross sections for various elastic and inelastic processes, swarm properties including transport parameters and growth coefficients. A large number of reviews and compilations for a limited number of gases have been previously published in the literature by other researchers. In this presentation the author has compiled, over a period of twenty years or so, data for most of the molecules, if not for all, studied for the electron energy range (0-1000 eV) For each target particle about sixteen quantities have been classified to the extent that data are available, provided in tabular and graphical formats. The data are updated on a continuous basis till publication time.

  5. Impact excitation of neon atoms by heated seed electrons in filamentary plasma gratings.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liping; Li, Wenxue; Zhou, Hui; Ding, Liang'en; Zeng, Heping

    2013-02-15

    We demonstrate impact ionization and dissociative recombination of neon (Ne) atoms by means of seeded-electron heating and subsequent electron-atom collisions in an ultraviolet plasma grating, allowing for a substantial fraction of the neutral Ne atomic population to reside in high-lying excited states. A buffer gas with relatively low ionization potential (nitrogen or argon) was used to provide high-density seed electrons. A three-step excitation model is verified by the fluorescence emission from the impact excitation of Ne atoms. PMID:23455081

  6. Application of the Convergent Close-Coupling method to collisions of electrons, positrons, and protons with light atomic and molecular targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Igor

    2015-09-01

    The Convergent Close-Coupling (CCC) method for electron-atom collisions has been applied successfully for around two decades for quasi one- and two-electron atomic targets. The underlying engine is the complete Laguerre basis for treating to convergence the target discrete and continuous spectra via a square-integrable approach, together with a formulation of the close-coupling equations in momentum space. The method has continued to be extended, and now incorporates collisions with positrons with allowance for positronium formation. This is a major advancement because it addresses the complexity associated with treating multi-center collision problems. These techniques have then been readily transferred to collisions with protons, where charge-exchange can be a substantial scattering outcome. The latter also required a move to solving the CCC equations using an impact parameter formalism. Most recently, in addition to the extension of the variety of projectiles, the collision targets have been generalized to molecules. Presently, just the H2+and the H2 molecules have been implemented. In the talk a broad range of applications of the CCC method will be discussed and future developments will be indicated. coauthors: A. S. Kadyrov, D.V. Fursa, I. Abdurakhmanov, M. Zammit.

  7. Vlasov Simulation of the Effects of Collisions on the Damping of Electron Plasma Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Jeff; Berger, Richard; Chapman, Thomas; Brunner, Stephan; Tran, T.

    2015-11-01

    Kinetic simulation of two dimensional plasma waves through direct discretization of the Vlasov equation may be particularly attractive for situations where minimal numerical fluctuation levels are desired, such as when measuring growth rates of plasma wave instabilities. In many cases collisional effects can be important to the evolution of plasma waves because they both set a minimum damping rate for plasma waves and can scatter particles out of resonance through pitch angle scattering. Here we present Vlasov simulations of evolving electron plasma waves (EPWs) in plasmas of varying collisionality. We consider first the effects of electron-ion pitch angle collisions on the frequency and damping, Landau and collisional, of small-amplitude EPWs for a range of collision rates. In addition, the wave phase velocities are extracted from the simulation results and compared with theory. For this study we use the Eulerian-based kinetic code LOKI that evolves the Vlasov-Poisson system in 2+2-dimensional phase space. We then discuss extensions of the collision operator to include thermalization. Discretization of these collision operators using 4th order accurate conservative finite-differencing will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the LDRD program at LLNL under project tracking code 15-ERD-038.

  8. Complete data acquisition and analysis system for low-energy electron-molecule collision studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Pamir; Nandi, Dhananjay

    2015-09-01

    A complete data acquisition system has been developed that can work with any personal computer irrespective of the operating system installed on it. The software can be used in low and intermediate electron-energy collision studies with ground-state molecules in gas phase using a combination of RS-232, GPIB, and USB-interfaced devices. Various tabletop instruments and nuclear instrumentation module (NIM) -based electronics have been interfaced and have communicated with the software, which is based on LabVIEW. This is tested with dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and polar dissociation studies to oxygen molecule and successfully used in a DEA study of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide.

  9. TlII excitation cross-sections in collisions of slow electrons with thallium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Yu M.

    2016-09-01

    Excitation of a singly-charged thallium ion in electron collisions with thallium atoms has been studied experimentally. Seventy excitation cross sections have been measured at an exciting electron energy of 30 eV. Ten optical excitation functions (OEFs) have been recorded in the incident electron energy range of 0–200 eV. For seven TlII spectral series, the dependence of excitation cross-sections on the principal quantum numbers of upper levels has been studied. A comparison of findings with data from preceding publications is presented.

  10. Grazing incidence collisions of fast protons with insulators: electron emission around the convoy peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldazábal, I.; Ponce, V. H.; Arnau, A.

    2004-08-01

    A general model to calculate electron spectra in grazing incidence ion-surface collisions is presented. It is based on the use of atomic form factors for projectile ionization and incoherent scattering functions for the target. The model is applicable for arbitrary systems whose electrons can be described by localized atomic orbitals, like ionic crystals. For 100 keV protons on LiF surfaces we find that the projectile electron contribution to the convoy peak is larger than the contribution from target ionization.

  11. Electron collisions with 1-butene and 2-methylpropene molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, A. R.; Freitas, T. C.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we report integral and differential cross sections for the elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by C4H8 isomers, namely 1-butene and 2-methylpropene. The scattering cross sections were obtained using the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials, in the static-exchange and in the static-exchange plus polarization approximations, for energies of the incident electron ranging from 0.5 eV to 15 eV. Our calculations indicate that the 1-butene molecule has a resonance in the A″ symmetry at around 2.1 eV, in agreement with the experimental data of 2.3 eV as reported by Mozejko et al (2012 J. Phys. B 45 145203). The 2-methylpropene molecule has a resonance in the B2 symmetry, located at around 2.8 eV and also in good agreement with the experimental results of Mozejko et al around 2.4 eV. We also report differential cross sections around the energy of the broad structure present in the integral cross sections of both molecules, and discuss their oscillatory behavior in terms of the type of the molecular chain.

  12. The linear algebraic method for electron-molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.A.; Schneider, B.I.

    1995-09-01

    In order to find numerical solutions to many problems in physics, chemistry and engineering it is necessary to place the equations of motion (classical or quantal) of the variables of dynamical interest on a discrete mesh. The formulation of scattering theory in quantum mechanics is no exception and leads to partial differential or integral equations which may only be solved on digital computers. Typical approaches introduce a numerical grid or basis set expansion of the scattering wavefunction in order to reduce `the problem to the solution of a set of algebraic equations. Often it is more convenient to deal with the scattering matrix or phase amplitude rather than the wavefunction but the essential features of the numerics are unchanged. In this section we will formulate the Linear Algebraic Method (LAM) for electron-atom/molecule scattering for a simple, one-dimensional radial potential. This will illustrate the basic approach and enable the uninitiated reader to follow the subsequent discussion of the general, multi-channel, electron-molecule formulation without undue difficulty. We begin by writing the Schroedinger equation for the s-wave scattering of a structureless particle by a short-range, local potential.

  13. A new semiclassical decoupling scheme for electronic transitions in molecular collisions - Application to vibrational-to-electronic energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.-W.; Lam, K. S.; Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1980-01-01

    A new semiclassical decoupling scheme (the trajectory-based decoupling scheme) is introduced in a computational study of vibrational-to-electronic energy transfer for a simple model system that simulates collinear atom-diatom collisions. The probability of energy transfer (P) is calculated quasiclassically using the new scheme as well as quantum mechanically as a function of the atomic electronic-energy separation (lambda), with overall good agreement between the two sets of results. Classical mechanics with the new decoupling scheme is found to be capable of predicting resonance behavior whereas an earlier decoupling scheme (the coordinate-based decoupling scheme) failed. Interference effects are not exhibited in P vs lambda results.

  14. Single electron impact ionization of the methane molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouamoud, Mammar; Sahlaoui, Mohammed; Benmansour, Nour El Houda; Atomic and Molecular Collisions Team

    2014-10-01

    Triply differential cross sections (TDCS) results of electron-impact ionization of the inner 2a1 molecular orbital of CH4 are presented in the framework of the Second Born Approximation and compared with the experimental data performed in coplanar asymmetric geometry. The cross sections are averaged on the random orientations of the molecular target for accurate comparison with experiments and are compared also with the theoretical calculations of the Three Coulomb wave (3CW) model. Our results are in good agreement with experiments and 3CW results in the binary peak. In contrast the Second Born Approximation yields a significant higher values compared to the 3CW results for the recoil peak and seems to describe suitably the recoil region where higher order effects can occur with the participation of the recoiling ion in the collision process.

  15. Electron-ion collision-frequency for x-ray Thomson scattering in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Two methods are presented to calculate the electron-ion collision-frequency in dense plasmas using an average-atom model. The first one is based on the Kubo-Greenwood approach. The second one uses the Born and Lenard-Balescu approximations. The two methods are used to calculate x-ray Thomson scattering spectra. Illustrations are shown for dense beryllium and aluminum plasmas. Comparisons with experiment are presented in the case of an x-ray Thomson scattering spectrum.

  16. On the continuous spectrum electromagnetic radiation in electron-fullerene collision

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M.Y.

    1995-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the electromagnetic radiation spectrum in electron-fullerene collisions is dominated by a huge maximum of multielectron nature, similar to that already predicted and observed in photoabsorption. Due to coherence, the intensity of this radiation is much stronger than the sum of the intensities of isolated atoms. Experimental detection of such radiation would be of great importance for understanding the mechanism of its formation and for investigating fullerene structures. A paper describing these results was published.

  17. Electron-ion collision spectroscopy: Lithium-like xenon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, D.; Brandau, C.; Harman, Z.; Kozhuharov, C.; Böhm, S.; Bosch, F.; Fritzsche, S.; Jacobi, J.; Kieslich, S.; Knopp, H.; Nolden, F.; Shi, W.; Stachura, Z.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, Th.; Schippers, S.; Müller, A.

    2015-01-01

    The resonant process of dielectronic recombination (DR) has been applied as a spectroscopic tool to investigate intra-L -shell excitations 2 s -2 pj in Li-like 136Xe51+ . The experiments were carried out at the electron cooler of the Experimental Storage Ring of the GSI-Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany. The observed center-of-mass energy range (0-505 eV) covers all resonances associated with the 2 s +e-→(2p1/2n lj) J and (2p3/2n lj) J DR processes. Energies and strengths of isolated 2 p1 /2n and 2 p3 /2n DR-resonance groups were obtained for principal quantum numbers n up to 43 and 36, respectively. The 2 s -2 p1 /2 and 2 s -2 p3 /2 excitation energies were deduced to be 119.816(42) eV and 492.174(52) eV. The excitation energies are compared with previous measurements of other groups and with recent QED calculations. In addition, the experimental spectra and extracted resonance strengths are compared with multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations. Measurements and theory are found to be in good agreement with each other.

  18. Electron-ion collision rates in noble gas clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, R.; Roy, A. C.

    2012-05-01

    We report a theoretical analysis of electron-ion collision rates in xenon gas clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses. The present analysis is based on the eikonal approximation (EA), the first Born approximation (FBA) and the classical (CL) methods. The calculations are performed using the plasma-screened Rogers potential introduced by Moll et al. [J. Phys. B. 43, 135103 (2010)] as well as the Debye potential for a wide range of experimental parameters. We find that the magnitudes of electron-ion collision frequency obtained in the EA do not fall as rapidly with the kinetic energy of electrons as in the FBA and CL methods for higher charge states of xenon ion (Xe8+ and Xe14+). Furthermore, EA shows that the effect of the inner structure of ion is most dominant for the lowest charge state of xenon ion (Xe1+). In the case of the present effective potential, FBA overestimates the CL results for all three different charge states of xenon, whereas for the Debye potential, both the FBA and CL methods predict collision frequencies which are nearly close to each other.

  19. Stationary electron velocity distribution function in crossed electric and magnetic fields with collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Shagayda, Andrey

    2012-08-15

    Analytical studies and numerical simulations show that the electron velocity distribution function in a Hall thruster discharge with crossed electric and magnetic fields is not Maxwellian. This is due to the fact that the mean free path between collisions is greater than both the Larmor radius and the characteristic dimensions of the discharge channel. However in numerical models of Hall thrusters, a hydrodynamic approach is often used to describe the electron dynamics, because discharge simulation in a fully kinetic approach requires large computing resources and is time consuming. A more accurate modeling of the electron flow in the hydrodynamic approximation requires taking into account the non-Maxwellian character of the distribution function and finding its moments, an approach that reflects the properties of electrons drifting in crossed electric and magnetic fields better than the commonly used Euler or Navier-Stokes approximations. In the present paper, an expression for the electron velocity distribution function in rarefied spatially homogeneous stationary plasma with crossed electric and magnetic fields and predominance of collisions with heavy particles is derived in the relaxation approximation. The main moments of the distribution function including longitudinal and transversal temperatures, the components of the viscous stress tensor, and of the heat flux vector are calculated. Distinctive features of the hydrodynamic description of electrons with a strongly non-equilibrium distribution function and the prospects for further development of the proposed approach for calculating the distribution function in spatially inhomogeneous plasma are discussed.

  20. Electron transfer and bond-forming reactions following collisions of I2+ with CO and CS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, James D.; Parkes, Michael A.; Price, Stephen D.

    2015-08-01

    Collisions between I2+ and CO have been investigated using time-of-flight mass spectrometry at a range of centre-of-mass collision energies between 0.5 and 3.0 eV. Following I2++CO collisions, we detect I++CO+ from a single-electron transfer reaction and IO++C+ from bond-forming reactivity. Reaction-window calculations, based on Landau-Zener theory, have been used to rationalise the electron transfer reactivity and computational chemistry has been used to explore the [I-CO]2+ potential energy surface to account for the observation of IO+. In addition, collisions between I2+ and CS2 have been investigated over a range of centre-of-mass collision energies between 0.8 and 6.0 eV. Both single- and double-electron transfer reactions are observed in the I2+/CS2 collision system, an observation again rationalised by reaction-window theory. The monocations IS+ and IC+ are also detected following collisions of I2+ with CS2, and these ions are clearly products from a bond-forming reaction. We present a simple model based on the structure of the [I-CS2]2+ collision complex to rationalise the significantly larger yield of IS+ than IC+ in this bond-forming process.

  1. Electron-Photon Polarization Correlation Study of Neon, Argon and Krypton Excitation by Electron Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shuanghai

    1993-01-01

    The electron impact excitation of the 3s ^' (1/2) ^0_1 state in neon, the 4s^' (1/2) ^0_1 state in argon and the 5s (3/2) ^0_1 state in krypton have been studied using the electron-photon polarization correlation technique. The two linear coherence parameters P_1 and P_2 have been measured and the alignment angle gamma and the linear polarization P ^+_{rm lin} of the angular part of the collisionally induced excited state charge cloud were extracted from the measured P _1 and P_2 parameters. We measured P_1 and P_2 in neon at an impact energy of 50 eV, in argon at impact energies of 50 eV, 40 eV, 30 eV and 25 eV, and in krypton at impact energies of 50 eV and 30 eV and electron scattering angles up to 55^circ in all cases. A comparison with theoretical predictions from first-order perturbative theories such as a Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) and a First Order Many Body Theory (FOMBT) was made. At 50 eV in neon and argon, the agreement between experiment and theory is generally good at small scattering angles up to 25^circ and somewhat poorer at larger scattering angles. At 50 eV in krypton, the agreement between experiment and theory is generally good at scattering angles up to 40 ^circ. The measurements in argon (40 eV, 30 eV, and 25 eV) generally follow the trend of the theoretical predictions, but it was found that the experimentally measured coherence parameters appear to be shifted towards larger scattering angles compared to the theoretical predictions as the impact energy is decreased. At 30 eV in krypton, very good agreement between experiment and theory was found over the entire range of electron scattering angles (up to 55^circ). The level of agreement between experiment and theory indicates that the DWBA and FOMBT appear to provide a better description of the collision process for a more complex target. We also found that the alignment angle gamma is the parameter which is perhaps least sensitive to the details of the collision.

  2. Forward electron production in heavy ion-atom and ion-solid collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A.

    1984-01-01

    A sharp cusp in the velocity spectrum of electrons, ejected in ion-atom and ion-solid collisions, is observed when the ejected electron velocity vector v/sub e/ matches that of the emergent ion vector v/sub p/ in both speed and direction. In ion-atom collisions, the electrons originate from capture to low-lying, projectile-centered continuum states (ECC) for fast bare or nearly bare projectiles, and from loss to those low-lying continuum states (ELC) when loosely bound projectile electrons are available. Most investigators now agree that ECC cusps are strongly skewed toward lower velocities, and exhibit full widths half maxima roughly proportional to v/sub p/ (neglecting target-shell effects, which are sometimes strong). A close examination of recent ELC data shows that ELC cusps are instead nearly symmetric, with widths nearly independent on v/sub p/ in the velocity range 6 to 18 a.u., a result only recently predicted by theory. Convoy electron cusps produced in heavy ion-solid collisions at MeV/u energies exhibit approximately velocity-independent widths very similar to ELC cusp widths. While the shape of the convoy peaks is approximately independent of projectile Z, velocity, and of target material, it is found that the yields in polycrystalline targets exhibit a strong dependence on projectile Z and velocity. While attempts have been made to link convoy electron production to binary ECC or ELC processes, sometimes at the last layer, or alternatively to a solid-state wake-riding model, our measured dependences of cusp shape and yield on projectile charge state and energy are inconsistent with the predictions of available theories. 10 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  3. Ionization Cross Sections and Dissociation Channels of DNA Bases by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    Free secondary electrons are the most abundant secondary species in ionizing radiation. Their role in DNA damage, both direct and indirect, is an active area of research. While indirect damage by free radicals, particularly by the hydroxyl radical generated by electron collision with water. is relatively well studied, damage by direct electron collision with DNA is less well understood. Only recently Boudaiffa et al. demonstrated that electrons at energies well below ionization thresholds can induce substantial yields of single- and double-strand breaks in DNA by a resonant, dissociative attachment process. This study attracted renewed interest in electron collisions with DNA, especially in the low energy region. At higher energies ionization becomes important. While Monte Carlo track simulations of radiation damage always include ionization, the probability of dissociative ionization, i.e., simultaneous ionization and dissociation, is ignored. Just like dissociative attachment, dissociative ionization may be an important contributor to double-strand breaks since the radicals and ions produced by dissociative ionization, located in the vicinity of the DNA coil, can readily interact with other parts of the DNA. Using the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) formulation, we calculated the ionization cross sections of the four DNA bases, adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine, by electrons at energies from threshold to 1 KeV. The present calculation gives cross sections approximately 20% lower than the results by Bemhardt and Paretzke using the Deutsch-Mark and Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) formalisms. The difference is most likely due to the lack of a shielding term in the dipole potential used in the Deutsch-Mark and BEB formalisms. The dissociation channels of ionization for the bases are currently being studied.

  4. Measurements of single-electron detachment cross-sections for Cu- and Ag- in collision with He and N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuemei; Wu, Shimin; Li, Guangwu; Lu, Fuquan; Tang, Jiayong; Yang, Fujia

    2001-12-01

    Electron detachment of negative ions, in collision with a static gas target, is known to be one of the most fundamental processes occurring in negative-ion-atom collisions. The experimental results of cross-section data for transition element ions in collision with gases are of great interest not only for their potential application value, but also as a challenge to a theoretical study of complex negative ions in collision with atoms or molecules. In the present work, the single-electron detachment (SED) cross-sections for Cu- and Ag- in collision with He, N2 have been obtained in the energy region of 10-30 keV. By using a single-particle detector for both neutral atoms and ions, the experimental uncertainty of the results is improved in this work.

  5. CLASSICAL TRAJECTORY MODELS FOR ELECTRONICALLY NON-ADIABATIC COLLISION PROCESSES: A CLASSICAL VALENCE BOND MODEL FOR ELECTRONIC DEGREES OF FREEDOM

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, William H.; Orel, Ann E.

    1980-11-01

    A classical interpretation of the Dirac-Van Vleck spin version of valence bond theory is used to obtain a classical model for electronic degrees of freedom within the valence bond framework. The approach is illustrated by deriving the explicit forms of the classical Hamiltonians, involving electronic and heavy particle degrees of freedom, for the H-H{sub 2}, F-H{sub 2} , and O-H{sub 2} systems. It is also shown how the initial conditions for both electronic and heavy particle degrees of freedom are chosen to carry out a classical trajectory simulation of collision processes. The attractive feature of this model is that it is as eaaily applicable to electronically non-adiabatic processes as it is to adiabatic ones.

  6. Making a meaningful impact: modelling simultaneous frictional collisions in spatial multibody systems

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Thomas K.; Sherman, Michael A.; Delp, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Impacts are instantaneous, computationally efficient approximations of collisions. Current impact models sacrifice important physical principles to achieve that efficiency, yielding qualitative and quantitative errors when applied to simultaneous impacts in spatial multibody systems. We present a new impact model that produces behaviour similar to that of a detailed compliant contact model, while retaining the efficiency of an instantaneous method. In our model, time and configuration are fixed, but the impact is resolved into distinct compression and expansion phases, themselves comprising sliding and rolling intervals. A constrained optimization problem is solved for each interval to compute incremental impulses while respecting physical laws and principles of contact mechanics. We present the mathematical model, algorithms for its practical implementation, and examples that demonstrate its effectiveness. In collisions involving materials of various stiffnesses, our model can be more than 20 times faster than integrating through the collision using a compliant contact model. This work extends the use of instantaneous impact models to scientific and engineering applications with strict accuracy requirements, where compliant contact models would otherwise be required. An open-source implementation is available in Simbody, a C++ multibody dynamics library widely used in biomechanical and robotic applications.

  7. Beauty production in pp collisions at √{ s} = 2.76 TeV measured via semi-electronic decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.

    2014-11-01

    The ALICE Collaboration at the LHC reports measurement of the inclusive production cross section of electrons from semi-leptonic decays of beauty hadrons with rapidity | y | < 0.8 and transverse momentum 1 collisions at √{ s} = 2.76 TeV. Electrons not originating from semi-electronic decay of beauty hadrons are suppressed using the impact parameter of the corresponding tracks. The production cross section of beauty decay electrons is compared to the result obtained with an alternative method which uses the distribution of the azimuthal angle between heavy-flavour decay electrons and charged hadrons. Perturbative QCD predictions agree with the measured cross section within the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. The integrated visible cross section, σb→e = 3.47 ± 0.40 (stat)-1.33+1.12 (sys) ± 0.07 (norm) μb, was extrapolated to full phase space using Fixed Order plus Next-to-Leading Log (FONLL) calculations to obtain the total b b bar production cross section, σbbbar = 130 ± 15.1 (stat)-49.8+42.1 (sys)-3.1+3.4 (extr) ± 2.5 (norm) ± 4.4 (BR) μb.

  8. Generation of quantum-electrodynamic cascades in oblique collisions of ultrarelativistic electrons with an intense laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, A. A.; Fedotov, A. M.; Narozhnyi, N. B.

    2016-04-01

    Quantum-electrodynamic cascade generation is numerically simulated for the case of the oblique collision of a beam of ultrarelativistic electrons with the field of two counterpropagating, focused, circularly polarised laser pulses. It is shown that although the 'collapse and revival' effect is observed at any value of the collision angle, the multiplicity of the cascade essentially depends on this angle and is maximal in the configuration, when the electron beam hits the focus perpendicularly to the optical axis of the laser pulses.

  9. Nonlinear dynamics of cold magnetized non-relativistic plasma in the presence of electron-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Biswajit; Sinha, Anjana; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2015-09-15

    A numerical study is presented of the nonlinear dynamics of a magnetized, cold, non-relativistic plasma, in the presence of electron-ion collisions. The ions are considered to be immobile while the electrons move with non-relativistic velocities. The primary interest is to study the effects of the collision parameter, external magnetic field strength, and the initial electromagnetic polarization on the evolution of the plasma system.

  10. The effect of q-distributed electrons on the head-on collision of ion acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Uday Narayan; Chatterjee, Prasanta; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2012-01-15

    The head-on collision of ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) in two component plasma comprising nonextensive distributed electrons is investigated. Two opposite directional Kortewg-de-vries (KdV) equations are derived and the phase shift due to collision is obtained using the extended version of Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method. Different ranges of nonextensive parameter q are considered and their effects on phase shifts are observed. It is found that the presence of nonextensive distributed electrons plays a significant role on the nature of collision of ion acoustic solitary waves.

  11. Will Allis Prize for the Study of Ionized Gases Lecture: Electron and Photon Collisions with Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Philip G.

    2012-06-01

    After a brief historical introduction this talk will review the broad range of collision processes involving electron and photon collisions with atoms and molecules that are now being considered. Their application in the analysis of astronomical spectra, atmospheric observations and laboratory plasmas will be considered. The talk will review the R-matrix computational method which has been widely used by international collaborations and by other scientists in the field to obtain accurate scattering amplitudes and cross sections of importance in these applications. Results of some recent calculations of electron and photon collisions with atoms and molecules will be presented. In conclusion some challenges for future research will be briefly discussed.

  12. Electron-impact excitation of nitric oxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. J.; Zipf, E. C.

    1972-01-01

    The absolute cross sections for the excitation of the nitrosyl cation Baer-Miescher bands, two nitric oxide bands, and several atomic nitrogen multiplets in the vacuum UV by electron impact on NO have been measured over an energy range extending from threshold to 300 eV. The variation of the dipole transition moment for the nitrosyl cation band system was also determined.

  13. Boltzmann equation analysis of electron-molecule collision cross sections in water vapor and ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Yousfi, M.; Benabdessadok, M.D.

    1996-12-01

    Sets of electron-molecule collision cross sections for H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} have been determined from a classical technique of electron swarm parameter unfolding. This deconvolution method is based on a simplex algorithm using a powerful multiterm Boltzmann equation analysis established in the framework of the classical hydrodynamic approximation. It is well adapted for the simulation of the different classes of swarm experiments (i.e., time resolved, time of flight, and steady state experiments). The sets of collision cross sections that exist in the literature are reviewed and analyzed. Fitted sets of cross sections are determined for H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} which exhibit features characteristic of polar molecules such as high rotational excitation collision cross sections. The hydrodynamic swarm parameters (i.e., drift velocity, longitudinal and transverse diffusion coefficients, ionization and attachment coefficients) calculated from the fitted sets are in excellent agreement with the measured ones. These sets are finally used to calculate the transport and reaction coefficients needed for discharge modeling in two cases of typical gas mixtures for which experimental swarm data are very sparse or nonexistent (i.e., flue gas mixtures and gas mixtures for rf plasma surface treatment). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Recent advances in vibro-impact dynamics and collision of ocean vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Raouf A.

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of ship impacts and collisions takes different approaches depending on the emphasis of each discipline. For example, dynamicists, physicist, and mathematicians are dealing with developing analytical models and mappings of vibro-impact systems. On the other hand, naval architects and ship designers are interested in developing design codes and structural assessments due to slamming loads, liquid sloshing impact loads in liquefied natural gas tanks and ship grounding accidents. The purpose of this review is to highlight the main differences of the two disciplines. It begins with a brief account of the theory of vibro-impact dynamics based on modeling and mapping of systems experiencing discontinuous changes in their state of motion due to collision. The main techniques used in modeling include power-law phenomenological modeling, Hertzian modeling, and non-smooth coordinate transformations originally developed by Zhuravlev and Ivanov. In view of their effectiveness, both Zhuravlev and Ivanov non-smooth coordinate transformations will be described and assessed for the case of ship roll dynamics experiencing impact with rigid barriers. These transformations have the advantage of converting the vibro-impact oscillator into an oscillator without barriers such that the corresponding equation of motion does not contain any impact term. One of the recent results dealing with the coefficient of restitution is that its value monotonically decreases with the impact velocity and not unique but random in nature. Slamming loads and grounding events of ocean waves acting on the bottom of high speed vessels will be assessed with reference to the ship structural damage. It will be noticed that naval architects and marine engineers are treating these problems using different approaches from those used by dynamicists. The problem of sloshing impact in liquefied natural gas cargo and related problems will be assessed based on the numerical and experimental results. It is

  15. Electron impact study of potassium hydroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vuskovic, L.; Trajmar, S.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to measure the sum of the elastic, rotational and vibrational scattering of electrons by KOH at low impact energies (5 to 20 eV) at angles from 10 to 120 deg. Energy loss spectra taken in the 0 to 18 eV range using an electron impact spectrometer are used to identify the species contributing to electric scattering. At temperatures between 300 and 500 C, only inelastic spectral features belonging to water are detected, while at temperatures from 500 to 800 C strong atomic K lines, indicative of molecular dissociation, and H2 energy loss features become prominent. No features attributable to KOH, the KOH dimer, O2 or potassium oxides were observed, due to the effects of the dissociation products, and it is concluded that another technique will have to be developed in order to measure electron scattering by KOH.

  16. On the relativistic and nonrelativistic electron descriptions in high-energy atomic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitkiv, A. B.

    2007-07-01

    We consider the relativistic and nonrelativistic descriptions of an atomic electron in collisions with point-like charged projectiles moving at relativistic velocities. We discuss three different forms of the fully relativistic first-order transition amplitude. Using the Schrödinger-Pauli equation to describe the atomic electron we establish the correct form of the nonrelativistic first-order transition amplitude. We also show that the so-called semi-relativistic treatment, in which the Darwin states are used to describe the atomic electron, is in fact fully equivalent to the nonrelativistic consideration. The comparison of results obtained with the relativistic and nonrelativistic electron descriptions shows that the latter is accurate within 20-30% up to Za<~ 50-60, where Za is the atomic nuclear charge.

  17. Elastic and absorption cross sections for electron-nitrous oxide collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.-T.; Iga, I.; Homem, M. G.; Machado, L. E.; Brescansin, L. M.

    2002-06-01

    In this work, we present a joint theoretical-experimental study on electron-N2O collisions in the intermediate energy range. More specifically, calculated and measured elastic differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections, as well as calculated total and absorption cross sections are reported. The measurements were performed using a crossed electron-beam-molecular-beam geometry. The angular distribution of the scattered electrons was converted to absolute cross sections using the relative-flow technique. Theoretically, a complex optical potential is used to represent the electron-molecule interaction dynamics in the present calculation. The Schwinger variational iterative method combined with the distorted-wave approximation is used to solve the scattering equations. The comparison of the present calculated results with the measured results as well as with the existing experimental and theoretical data shows good agreement.

  18. Studies of electron-polyatomic-molecule collisions Applications to e-CH4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lima, M. A. P.; Gibson, T. L.; Mckoy, V.; Huo, W. M.

    1985-01-01

    The first application of the Schwinger multichannel formulation to low-energy electron collisions with a nonlinear polyatomic target is reported. Integral and differential cross sections are obtained for e-CH4 collisions from 3 to 20 eV at the static-plus-exchange interaction level. In these studies, the exchange potential is directly evaluated and not approximated by local models. An interesting feature of the small-angle differential cross section is ascribed to polarization effects and not reproduced at the static-plus-exchange level. These differential cross sections are found to be in reasonable agreement with existing measurements at 7.5 eV and higher energies.

  19. New Accurate Oscillator Strengths and Electron Excitation Collision Strengths for N1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    The nonorthogonal orbitals technique in a multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach is used to calculate oscillator strengths and transition probabilities of N(I) lines. The relativistic effects are allowed by means of Breit-Pauli operators. The length and velocity forms of oscillator strengths show good agreement for most transitions. The B-spline R-matrix with pseudostates approach has been used to calculate electron excitation collision strengths and rates. The nonorthogonal orbitals are used for an accurate description of both target wave functions and the R-matrix basis functions. The 24 spectroscopic bound and autoionizing states together with 15 pseudostates are included in the close-coupling expansion. The collision strengths for transitions between fine-structure levels are calculated by transforming the LS-coupled K-matrices to K-matrices in an intermediate coupling scheme. Thermally averaged collision strengths have been determined by integrating collision strength over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies over a temperature range suitable for the modeling of astrophysical plasmas. The oscillator strengths and thermally averaged collision strengths are presented for transitions between the fine-structure levels of the 2s(sup 2)p(sup 3) (sup 4)S(sup 0), (sup 2)D(sup 0), (sup 2)P(sup 0), 2s2p(sup 4) (sup 4)P, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3s (sup 4)P, and (sup 2)P terms and from these levels to the levels of the 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3p (sup 2)S(sup 0), (sup 4)D(sup 0), (sup 4)P(sup 0), (sup 4)S(sup 0), (sup 2)D(sup 0), (sup 2)P(sup 0),2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3s(sup 2)D, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)4s(sup 4)P, (sup 2)P, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3d(sup 2)P, (sup 4)F,(sup 2)F,(sup 4)P, (sup 4)D, and (sup 2)D terms. Thermally averaged collision strengths are tabulated over a temperature range from 500 to 50,000 K.

  20. Dust productivity and impact collision of the asteroid (596) Scheila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neslusan, L.; Ivanova, O.; Husarik, M.; Svoren, J.; Krisandova, Z. Seman

    2016-06-01

    Photometric observations of asteroid (596) Scheila were obtained during and after its 2010 outburst. The estimated radius of the body (spherical approximation of the asteroidal body) was 51.2±3.0 km and 50.6±3.0 km for different methods. The ejected dust mass from the asteroid ranged from 2.5 ×107 to 3.4 ×107 kg for different methods. An impact mechanism for triggering Scheila's activity is discussed. A few days before the impact, Scheila passed through the corridors of two potential cometary streams.

  1. Comprehensive rate coefficients for electron-collision-induced transitions in hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Vrinceanu, D.; Onofrio, R.; Sadeghpour, H. R. E-mail: onofrior@gmail.com

    2014-01-01

    Energy-changing electron-hydrogen atom collisions are crucial to regulating the energy balance in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas and are relevant to the formation of stellar atmospheres, recombination in H II clouds, primordial recombination, three-body recombination, and heating in ultracold and fusion plasmas. Computational modeling of electron-hydrogen collision has been attempted through quantum mechanical scattering state-to-state calculations of transitions involving low-lying energy levels in hydrogen (with principal quantum number n < 7) and at large principal quantum numbers using classical trajectory techniques. Analytical expressions are proposed that interpolate the current quantum mechanical and classical trajectory results for electron-hydrogen scattering in the entire range of energy levels for nearly the entire temperature range of interest in astrophysical environments. An asymptotic expression for the Born cross section is interpolated with a modified expression previously derived for electron-hydrogen scattering in the Rydberg regime using classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations. The derived formula is compared to existing numerical data for transitions involving low principal quantum numbers, and the dependence of the deviations on temperature is discussed.

  2. Benchmark Calculations of Electron-Impact Differential Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, I.; Bostock, C. J.; Fursa, D. V.; Hines, C. W.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Stelbovics, A. T.

    2011-05-11

    The calculation of electron-atom excitation and ionization cross section is considered in both the non-relativistic and relativistic scattering theory. We consider electron collisions with H, He, Cs, and Hg. Differential cross sections for elastic scattering and ionization are presented.

  3. Collisions Between Small Bodies In A Planetary System: Disruption Regime At High Impact Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, P.; Benz, W.; Tanga, P.; Richardson, D. C.

    Collisions play a major role in the formation of planetary systems, since planetary growth occurs by collisional accretion of small bodies at low relative velocities. How- ever, once the masses of planetesimals are high enough, their relative velocities in- crease due to their mutual perturbations and eventually, collisions occur at high impact speed. In this regime, the planetary growth is prevented and a disruptive phase begins, like in the current asteroid belt of our Solar System, and probably in other systems. Here, we present new simulations of high speed collisions between small bodies which take into account the production of gravitationally reaccumulated bodies. We have de- velopped a procedure which divides the process into two phases. Using a 3D SPH hydrocode, the fragmentation of the solid target through crack propagation is first computed. Then the simulation of the gravitational evolution and possible reaccumu- lation of the resulting new fragments is performed using the parallel N-body code pkdgrav. Our first simulations succeeded in reproducing fundamental properties of some well-identified asteroid families, showing the reliability of our method. We have now made some improvements by including the possibility of fragments bouncing (in- stead of strictly merging) when collisions occur at high speed during the gravitational phase. We present thus new simulations in three different impact regimes, from highly catastrophic to barely disruptive, and compare them with previous ones in which col- lisions between fragments resulted always in their merger. This comparison shows for each regime that the fundamental outcome properties remain statistically unchanged. We also observe the natural production of satellite systems around some fragments. We plan to continue our investigations using this procedure, and to improve upon the modelling of fundamental physical effects during collisions. We will then also inves- tigate the efficiency of planetary accretion

  4. Ionization of glycerin molecule by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavilopulo, A. N.; Shpenik, O. B.; Markush, P. P.; Kontrosh, E. E.

    2015-07-01

    The methods and results of studying the yield of positive ions produced due to direct and dissociative electron impact ionization of the glycerin molecule are described. The experiment is carried out using two independent setups, namely, a setup with a monopole mass spectrometer employing the method of crossing electron and molecular beams and a setup with a hypocycloidal electron spectrometer with the gas-filled cell. The mass spectra of the glycerin molecule are studied in the range of mass numbers of 10-95 amu at various temperatures. The energy dependences of the effective cross sections of the glycerin molecular ions produced by a monoenergetic electron beam are obtained and analyzed; using these dependences, the appearance energies of fragment ions are determined. The dynamics of the glycerin molecule fragment ions formation is investigated in the temperature range of 300-340 K.

  5. An experimental investigation of the dissociative ionization process of argon cluster ions induced by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Ma, X.; Yan, S.; Xu, S.; Zhang, S.; Zhu, X.; Li, B.; Feng, W.; Qian, D.; Zhang, R.; Guo, D.; Wen, W.; Zhang, D.; Yang, J.; Zhao, D.; Liu, H.

    2014-04-01

    Utilizing the Cold Target Recoil Ions Momentum Spectrometer (COLTRIMS), dissociative ionization of argon cluster was experimentally investigated by electron impact. The recoil ions produced both in the pure ionization process and the dissociative ionization channels are measured with collision energies from 100 and 1000 eV. The ratios of the dimer ions from pure ionization (Ar2P+) and the dimer ions from small cluster dissociation (Ar+2D) to the atomic argon ion (Ar+) in different stagnation pressures were obtained.

  6. Aligned breakup of heavy nuclear systems as a new type of deep inelastic collisions at small impact parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczynski, J.; Swiderski, L.; Pagano, A.; Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; La Guidara, E.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Amorini, F.; Anzalone, A.; Cavallaro, S.; Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.; Maiolino, C.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Auditore, L.

    2010-06-15

    An interesting process of violent reseparation of a heavy nuclear system into three or four fragments of comparable size was recently observed in {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au collisions at 15 MeV/nucleon. Combined analysis of the binary deep inelastic events and the ternary and quaternary breakup events demonstrates that the newly observed ternary and quaternary reactions belong to the same wide class of deep inelastic collisions as the conventional (binary) damped reactions. It is shown that the ternary and quaternary breakup reactions occur at extremely inelastic collisions corresponding to small impact parameters, while more peripheral collisions lead to well-known binary deep inelastic reactions.

  7. Signatures of quantum radiation reaction in laser-electron-beam collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Zepf, M.

    2015-09-15

    Electron dynamics in the collision of an electron beam with a high-intensity focused ultrashort laser pulse are investigated using three-dimensional QED particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, and the results are compared with those calculated by classical Landau and Lifshitz PIC simulations. Significant differences are observed from the angular dependence of the electron energy distribution patterns for the two different approaches, because photon emission is no longer well approximated by a continuous process in the quantum radiation-dominated regime. The stochastic nature of photon emission results in strong signatures of quantum radiation-reaction effects under certain conditions. We show that the laser spot size and duration greatly influence these signatures due to the competition of QED effects and the ponderomotive force, which is well described in the classical approximation. The clearest signatures of quantum radiation reaction are found in the limit of large laser spots and few cycle pulse durations.

  8. Elastic cross sections for electron-ketenylidene (C{sub 2}O) collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, M.M.; Lee, M.-T.; Michelin, S.E.

    2004-05-01

    In this work we report on a theoretical study on elastic electron collisions with ketenylidene radicals in the low and intermediate energy range. Calculated differential and momentum transfer cross sections for the e{sup -}-C{sub 2}O collision are reported in the (1-500)-eV range. A complex optical potential composed by static, exchange, correlation-polarization plus absorption contributions, derived from a fully molecular wave function, is used to describe the interaction dynamics. The Schwinger variational iterative method combined with the distorted-wave approximation is applied to calculate scattering amplitudes. Comparison made between our calculated cross sections with the theoretical and experimental results for elastic e{sup -}-N{sub 2}O collisions has revealed remarkable similarity for incident energies equal to 20 eV and above. Also, two shape resonances located at around 3 eV and 4.5 eV are observed and identified as due to the {sup 2}{pi} and the {sup 4}{pi} scattering channels, respectively.

  9. Proton emission following multiple electron capture in slow N{sup 7+}+HCl collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Fremont, F.; Martina, D.; Kamalou, O.; Sobocinski, P.; Chesnel, J.-Y.; McNab, I.R.; Bennett, F.R.

    2005-04-01

    Collisions between 98-keV N{sup 7+} ions and a HCl target have been investigated experimentally. The kinetic-energy distribution of fragment H{sup +} ions originating from multiple electron capture was detected at angles in the range 20 deg. -160 deg. with respect to the incident beam direction. Proton energies as large as 100 eV were observed, and calculations made in the simple Coulomb explosion model suggest that up to seven target electrons may be involved during the collision. Using the Landau-Zener model, we show that the N{sup 7+} projectile mainly captures outer-shell electrons from HCl. From the experimental data we derived multiple-capture cross sections which we compared with results from a model calculation made using the classical over-barrier model and also with a semiempirical scaling law. For the specific case of double capture, several structures appeared, which were assigned using ab initio calculations to states of HCl{sup 2+}.

  10. Calculations on Electron Capture in Low Energy Ion-Molecule Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Stancil, P.C.; Zygelman, B.; Kirby, K.

    1997-12-31

    Recent progress on the application of a quantal, molecular-orbital, close-coupling approach to the calculation of electron capture in collisions of multiply charged ions with molecules is discussed. Preliminary results for single electron capture by N{sup 2+} with H{sub 2} are presented. Electron capture by multiply charged ions colliding with H{sub 2} is an important process in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. It provides a recombination mechanism for multiply charged ions in x-ray ionized astronomical environments which may have sparse electron and atomic hydrogen abundances. In the divertor region of a tokamak fusion device, charge exchange of impurity ions with H{sub 2} plays a role in the ionization balance and the production of radiative energy loss leading to cooling, X-ray and ultraviolet auroral emission from Jupiter is believed to be due to charge exchange of O and S ions with H{sub 2} in the Jovian atmosphere. Solar wind ions interacting with cometary molecules may have produced the x-rays observed from Comet Hyakutake. In order to model and understand the behavior of these environments, it is necessary to obtain total, electronic state-selective (ESS), and vibrational (or rotational) state-selective (VSS) capture cross sections for collision energies as low as 10 meV/amu to as high as 100 keV/amu in some instances. Fortunately, charge transfer with molecular targets has received considerable experimental attention. Numerous measurements have been made with flow tubes, ion traps, and ion beams. Flow tube and ion trap studies generally provide information on rate coefficients for temperatures between 800 K and 20,000 K. In this article, we report on the progress of our group in implementing a quantum-mechanical Molecular Orbital Close Coupling (MOCC) approach to the study of electron capture by multiply charged ions in collisions with molecules. We illustrate this with a preliminary investigation of Single Electron Capture (SEC) by N{sup 2+} with H

  11. Total single electron capture cross sections for collisions of multicharged ions with He atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmanian, M.; Shojaei, F.; Fathi, R.

    2016-09-01

    The three-body boundary corrected Born distorted wave method is utilized to compute the total cross sections for single electron capture in the collisions of the fast ions ({{{H}}}1+, He{}2+, Li{}3+, {{{B}}}5+ and {{{C}}}6+) with helium targets in their ground states. Both post and prior forms of the transition amplitude are obtained in terms of two-dimensional integrals and the total cross sections are computed via three-dimensional numerical integrations. The present results show reasonable agreement with the measurements and three- and four-body theoretical computations, especially at higher incident energies.

  12. Electron-H2 Collisions Studied Using the Finite Element Z-Matrix Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Brown, David; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We have applied the Z-matrix method, using a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians, to study e-H2 elastic and inelastic collisions. Special attention is paid to the quality of the basis set and the treatment of electron correlation. The calculated cross sections are invariant, to machine accuracy, with respect to the choice of parameters a, b, d, e as long as they satisfy Equation (3). However, the log derivative approach, i.e., the choice a = -e = 1, b = d = 0 appears to converge slightly faster than other choices. The cross sections agree well with previous theoretical results. Comparison will be made with available experimental data.

  13. Interatomic Coulombic decay as a new source of low energy electrons in slow ion-dimer collisions.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, W; Matsumoto, J; Leredde, A; Fléchard, X; Gervais, B; Guillous, S; Hennecart, D; Méry, A; Rangama, J; Zhou, C L; Shiromaru, H; Cassimi, A

    2015-01-23

    We provide the experimental evidence that the single electron capture process in slow collisions between O^{3+} ions and neon dimer targets leads to an unexpected production of low-energy electrons. This production results from the interatomic Coulombic decay process, subsequent to inner-shell single electron capture from one site of the neon dimer. Although pure one-electron capture from the inner shell is expected to be negligible in the low collision energy regime investigated here, the electron production due to this process overtakes by 1 order of magnitude the emission of Auger electrons by the scattered projectiles after double-electron capture. This feature is specific to low charge states of the projectile: similar studies with Xe^{20+} and Ar^{9+} projectiles show no evidence of inner-shell single-electron capture. The dependence of the process on the projectile charge state is interpreted using simple calculations based on the classical over the barrier model. PMID:25658997

  14. Acceleration and deceleration of convoy electrons in grazing-ion surface collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravielle, M. S.; Miraglia, J. E.

    2003-04-01

    Convoy-electron emission produced by grazing-ion surface scattering is studied in the framework of the distorted-wave theory. We develop a model, here named field distorted-wave (FDW) approximation, to describe the effect of the surface interaction on the electronic transition. In the model, the action of the surface field on the ejected electron is seen as an additional momentum transfer that depends on the projectile position. We apply the FDW approximation to analyze electron distributions for 100 keV protons impinging on LiF(100) and Al(111) surfaces, which are insulator and metal materials, respectively. In the case of metals, the dynamic screening of the projectile is included in the Jost function corresponding to the final state. As experimentally observed, energy spectra of forward-ejected electrons display a prominent structure associated with the convoy-electron emission. We find that the maximum of the convoy-electron distribution is decelerated for LiF and accelerated for Al, with respect to its position in ion-atom collisions, in quantitative agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Collision integral in the kinetic equation for a rarefied electron gas with allowance for its spin polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Sasorov, P. V.; Fomin, I. V.

    2015-06-15

    The collision integral in the kinetic equation for a rarefied spin-polarized gas of fermions (electrons) is derived. The collisions between these fermions and the collisions with much heavier particles (ions) forming a randomly located stationary background (gas) are taken into account. An important new circumstance is that the particle-particle scattering amplitude is not assumed to be small, which could be obtained, for example, in the first Born approximation. The derived collision integral can be used in the kinetic equation, including that for a relatively cold rarefied spin-polarized plasma with a characteristic electron energy below α{sup 2}m{sub e}c{sup 2}, where α is the fine-structure constant.

  16. Radiative double electron capture in collisions of fully-stripped fluorine ions with thin carbon foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkafrawy, Tamer Mohammad Samy

    Radiative double electron capture (RDEC) is a one-step process in ion-atom collisions occurring when two target electrons are captured to a bound state of the projectile simultaneously with the emission of a single photon. The emitted photon has approximately double the energy of the photon emitted due to radiative electron capture (REC), which occurs when a target electron is captured to a projectile bound state with simultaneous emission of a photon. REC and RDEC can be treated as time-reversed photoionization (PI) and double photoionization (DPI), respectively, if loosely-bound target electrons are captured. This concept can be formulated with the principle of detailed balance, in which the processes of our interest can be described in terms of their time-reversed ones. Fully-stripped ions were used as projectiles in the performed RDEC experiments, providing a recipient system free of electron-related Coulomb fields. This allows the target electrons to be transferred without interaction with any of the projectile electrons, enabling accurate investigation of the electron-electron interaction in the vicinity of electromagnetic field. In this dissertation, RDEC was investigated during the collision of fully-stripped fluorine ions with a thin carbon foil and the results are compared with the recent experimental and theoretical studies. In the current work, x rays associated with projectile charge-changing by single and double electron capture and no charge change by F9+ ions were observed and compared with recent work for O8+ ions and with theory. Both the F 9+ and O8+ ions had energies in the ˜MeV/u range. REC, in turn, was investigated as a means to compare with the theoretical predictions of the RDEC/REC cross section ratio. The most significant background processes including various mechanisms of x-ray emission that may interfere with the energy region of interest are addressed in detail. This enables isolation of the contributions of REC and RDEC from the

  17. Dynamic screening and wake effects on electronic excitation in ion-solid and ion-surface collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J. . Dept. of Physics Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1991-01-01

    The collective electronic response in a solid effectively alters ionic and atomic potentials giving rise to dynamic screening and to a wake'' of density fluctuations trailing ions as they propagate through the solid. The presence of dynamic screening modifies electronic excitation processes of projectiles in ion-solid collisions as compared to binary ion-atom collisions. We review recent theoretical and experimental studies directed at the search for and identification of signatures of dynamic screening and wake effects. Examples include the formation of excited projectile bound states under channeling conditions, radiative electron capture, the search for wake riding'' electrons in antiproton-solid collisions, and the neutralization of highly charged ions near surfaces. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Collisions of carbon and oxygen ions with electrons, H, H/sub 2/ and He: Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Phaneuf, R.A.; Janev, R.K.; Pindzola, M.S.

    1987-02-01

    This report provides a handbook for fusion research of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for collisions of carbon and oxygen ions with electrons, hydrogen atoms and molecules, and helium atoms. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical, and parametrized form. Processes considered include exciation, ionization, and charge exchange at collision energies appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  19. Observation of interatomic Coulombic decay and electron-transfer-mediated decay in high-energy electron-impact ionization of Ar2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, S.; Zhang, P.; Ma, X.; Xu, S.; Li, B.; Zhu, X. L.; Feng, W. T.; Zhang, S. F.; Zhao, D. M.; Zhang, R. T.; Guo, D. L.; Liu, H. P.

    2013-10-01

    We measured the kinetic energy distributions of the fragment ions of doubly and quadruply ionized argon dimers using 3000 eV electron impact. For the dissociation of (Ar2)2+, the peak that indicates radiative charge transfer is observed, where the outer-shell ionization (dominant in highly charged ion collision) and the inner-shell ionization (preferential in x-ray experiments) have approximately equal contributions. For the dissociation of (Ar2)4+, the interatomic Coulombic decay and electron-transfer-mediated decay are first observed in the electron-impact process.

  20. Nonequilibrium dynamics of photoexcited electrons in graphene: Collinear scattering, Auger processes, and the impact of screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomadin, Andrea; Brida, Daniele; Cerullo, Giulio; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Polini, Marco

    2013-07-01

    We present a combined analytical and numerical study of the early stages (sub-100-fs) of the nonequilibrium dynamics of photoexcited electrons in graphene. We employ the semiclassical Boltzmann equation with a collision integral that includes contributions from electron-electron (e-e) and electron-optical phonon interactions. Taking advantage of circular symmetry and employing the massless Dirac fermion (MDF) Hamiltonian, we are able to perform an essentially analytical study of the e-e contribution to the collision integral. This allows us to take particular care of subtle collinear scattering processes—processes in which incoming and outgoing momenta of the scattering particles lie on the same line—including carrier multiplication (CM) and Auger recombination (AR). These processes have a vanishing phase space for two-dimensional MDF bare bands. However, we argue that electron-lifetime effects, seen in experiments based on angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, provide a natural pathway to regularize this pathology, yielding a finite contribution due to CM and AR to the Coulomb collision integral. Finally, we discuss in detail the role of physics beyond the Fermi golden rule by including screening in the matrix element of the Coulomb interaction at the level of the random phase approximation (RPA), focusing in particular on the consequences of various approximations including static RPA screening, which maximizes the impact of CM and AR processes, and dynamical RPA screening, which completely suppresses them.

  1. Excited-state evolution probed by convoy-electron emission in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takabayashi, Y.; Ito, T.; Azuma, T.; Komaki, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Tawara, H.; Takada, E.; Murakami, T.; Seliger, M.; Tökési, K.; O. Reinhold, C.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2003-10-01

    We present a joint experimental and theoretical study of convoy-electron emission resulting from highly-charged-ion transport through carbon foils at moderately relativistic speeds. Energy spectra of electrons ejected at 0° have been measured for 390 MeV/u hydrogen-like Ar17+ ions and 460 MeV/u (β=v/c=0.74,γ=1.49) Fe25+ (1s), Fe24+ (1s2), and Fe23+ (1s22s) incident on carbon foils with thicknesses from 25 to 8700 μg/cm2. Due to this unprecedented wide range of thicknesses, the sequential excitation and ionization of initially deeply bound electrons to highly excited states and continuum states can be followed in considerable detail. The analysis of the spectra is aided by simulations based on the classical transport theory which has been extended to relativistic energies and to multielectron projectiles. The motion of the projectile electron inside the solid target is calculated taking into account the Coulomb potential of the projectile ion and the multiple stochastic collisions with target cores and target electrons. Different phases of the convoy-electron emissions can be disentangled: direct ejection to the continuum, the transient buildup of an excited-state wave packet followed by ionization, and postionization modification of the continuum spectrum. We find good agreement between experiment and simulation for the evolution of charge states and the emission spectrum.

  2. Scaling of cross sections in fast collisions between few electron system

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, R.D.; Manson, S.T.

    1993-05-01

    Doubly differential cross sections for 0.5 MeV/u hydrogen and helium projectiles colliding with helium have been measured. In order to investigate how projectile electrons influence the ionization cross sections, 15{degrees} electron emission for isotachic H, H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +}, He and He{sup +} impact are compared to results for proton impact. These data demonstrate the importance of two-center electron-electron interactions for very low energy electron emission. The role of screening by the projectile electrons emerges clearly at intermediate energies. In the binary encounter region, ionization by H{sub 2}{sup +} is twice the proton result; H{sub 3}{sup +} is three times the proton result. The data are discussed in terms of available theoretical models.

  3. Spin-resolved electron capture cross sections for C5+-H collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. Y.; Liu, L.; Wang, J. G.; Janev, R. K.

    2015-10-01

    The charge transfer process in C5+-H collisions has been theoretically studied using the two-center atomic orbital close-coupling method in the energy interval from 0.1 to 300 keV u-1. The interaction of active electron with the projectile ion is represented by model potentials different for the singlet and triplet systems of C4+(1snl) states. The results of the present calculations are compared with other theoretical results and experimental measurements and good agreement is obtained for the total spin-averaged cross sections in the overlapping energy range. For the spin-resolved cross sections, we found that the present total and n-shell electron capture cross sections are also in good agreement with the results of other theoretical studies in the overlapping energy range for both the singlet and triplet cases. Good overall agreement has been obtained with the results of other authors for the nl-state-selective cross sections, except for the capture to 3p and 4p singlet states at the low collision energies.

  4. Band-structure-based collisional model for electronic excitations in ion-surface collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Faraggi, M.N.; Gravielle, M.S.; Alducin, M.; Silkin, V.M.; Juaristi, J.I.

    2005-07-15

    Energy loss per unit path in grazing collisions with metal surfaces is studied by using the collisional and dielectric formalisms. Within both theories we make use of the band-structure-based (BSB) model to represent the surface interaction. The BSB approach is based on a model potential and provides a precise description of the one-electron states and the surface-induced potential. The method is applied to evaluate the energy lost by 100 keV protons impinging on aluminum surfaces at glancing angles. We found that when the realistic BSB description of the surface is used, the energy loss obtained from the collisional formalism agrees with the dielectric one, which includes not only binary but also plasmon excitations. The distance-dependent stopping power derived from the BSB model is in good agreement with available experimental data. We have also investigated the influence of the surface band structure in collisions with the Al(100) surface. Surface-state contributions to the energy loss and electron emission probability are analyzed.

  5. A scaling law for energy transfer by inelastic electron-molecule collisions in mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienkowski, G. K.

    1976-01-01

    The equation governing the electron energy distribution in the presence of a spatially uniform electric field in a weakly ionized gas was reformulated into an integral equation for the logarithmic slope of the distribution function. For gas mixtures in which the dominant electron energy loss mechanism is by vibrational excitation of the molecules, this equation is suitable for approximate analysis and exact numerical solution by iteration. Superelastic collisions are easily included in this formulation, and do not seriously effect the convergence of the numerical scheme. The approximate analytical results are only qualitatively correct, but suggest appropriate parameters which correlate the exact numerical results very well. The distribution function as well as certain gross properties such as net energy transfer into vibration, mean energy, and drift velocity depend primarily on a single nondimensional parameter involving only E/N and the cross sections.

  6. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma accelerators and electron-neutral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo E.; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2001-10-01

    We present 2-D simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented particle-in-cell code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approx}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approx}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory and fluid simulations. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications of XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling relativistic electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  7. ON THE COMPETITION BETWEEN RADIAL EXPANSION AND COULOMB COLLISIONS IN SHAPING THE ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION: KINETIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, S.; Matteini, L.; Pantellini, F.

    2012-12-01

    We present numerical simulations of the solar wind using a fully kinetic model which takes into account the effects of particle's binary collisions in a quasi-neutral plasma in spherical expansion. Starting from an isotropic Maxwellian velocity distribution function for the electrons, we show that the combined effect of expansion and Coulomb collisions leads to the formation of two populations: a collision-dominated cold and dense population almost isotropic in velocity space and a weakly collisional, tenuous field-aligned and antisunward drifting population generated by mirror force focusing in the radially decreasing magnetic field. The relative weights and drift velocities for the two populations observed in our simulations are in excellent agreement with the relative weights and drift velocities for both core and strahl populations observed in the real solar wind. The radial evolution of the main moments of the electron velocity distribution function is in the range observed in the solar wind. The electron temperature anisotropy with respect to the magnetic field direction is found to be related to the ratio between the collisional time and the solar wind expansion time. Even though collisions are found to shape the electron velocity distributions and regulate the properties of the strahl, it is found that the heat flux is conveniently described by a collisionless model where a fraction of the electron thermal energy is advected at the solar wind speed. This reinforces the currently largely admitted fact that collisions in the solar wind are clearly insufficient to force the electron heat flux obey the classical Spitzer-Haerm expression where heat flux and temperature gradient are proportional to each other. The presented results show that the electron dynamics in the solar wind cannot be understood without considering the role of collisions.

  8. Electron-impact ionization of helium: A comprehensive experiment benchmarks theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X.; Pflueger, T.; Senftleben, A.; Xu, S.; Dorn, A.; Ullrich, J.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D.V.; Colgan, J.; Pindzola, M.S.

    2011-05-15

    Single ionization of helium by 70.6-eV electron impact is studied in a comprehensive experiment covering a major part of the entire collision kinematics and the full 4{pi} solid angle for the emitted electron. The absolutely normalized triple-differential experimental cross sections are compared with results from the convergent close-coupling (CCC) and the time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC) theories. Whereas excellent agreement with the TDCC prediction is only found for equal energy sharing, the CCC calculations are in excellent agreement with essentially all experimentally observed dynamical features, including the absolute magnitude of the cross sections.

  9. Theoretical investigation of electron transfer and detachment processes in low energy H- + Li and Li- + H collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Lin, X. H.; Yan, B.; Wang, J. G.; Janev, R. K.

    2016-02-01

    The charge exchange and collisional detachment processes in H- + Li and Li- + H collisions have been studied by using the quantal molecular orbital close-coupling (QMOCC) method in the energy ranges of about 0.12-1000 eV u-1 and 0.1 meV-1000 eV, respectively, and the inelastic collision cross sections and rate coefficients have been computed and presented. It is found that the electron transfer process in the H- + Li and Li- + H collisions is due to the Demkov coupling between the 12Σ+ and 22Σ+ states at internuclear distances of about 15a0. The collisional electron detachment in the considered collision system is due to the excitation of the remaining six states, which are all unstable against autodetachment. These states are populated through a series of Landau-Zener couplings of the 22Σ+ state with upper 2Σ+ states and by the rotational 2Σ+-2Π couplings at small internuclear distances. The cross sections for electron transfer in H- + Li and Li- + H collisions in the energy range of 10-1000 eV u-1 attain values in the range of 10-16-10-15 cm2 (reaching their maximum values of about 5 × 10-15 cm2 at 500-600 eV u-1), while the values of the corresponding electron detachment cross sections in this energy range attain generally smaller values.

  10. Electron emission in H sup 0 --atom collisions: A coincidence study of the angular dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Heil, O.; Maier, R.; Kuzel, M.; Groeneveld, K.O. . Inst. fuer Kernphysik); DuBois, R.D. )

    1990-10-01

    Differential electron emission occurring as the result of fast hydrogen atom impact on helium and argon targets has been studied using standard non-coincidence and emitted electron-ionized projectile coincidence techniques. Impact energies were 0.5 and 1 MeV; electron emission was measured between approximately 20 and 2000 eV for selected laboratory emission angles ranging from 0{degree} to 180{degree}. These data demonstrate the importance of simultaneous target-projectile ionization as was previously observed for energetic He{sup +} impact. The experimental data for the helium target, when compared to PWBA calculations using hydrogenic wave functions, indicate good agreement with theory for projectile ionization and, indirectly, reasonably good agreement for target ionization. Simultaneous target-projectile ionization events were not included in the model. The argon data are compared with more sophisticated calculations for electron loss. These comparisons indicate the importance of second order effects at large emission angles.

  11. Electron capture in collisions of Al2+ ions with He atoms at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, A.; Sato, H.; Gu, J. P.; Hirsch, G.; Buenker, R. J.; Kimura, M.

    2001-09-01

    Electron capture resulting from collisions of Al2+ ions with He atoms from 0.15 to 1000 keV/u is investigated using a molecular-orbital representation within a semiclassical frame. Molecular electronic states and corresponding couplings are determined by the ALCHEMY program. Sixteen molecular states all connecting to single-electron-capture processes are included, and hence radial and rotational couplings among these channels are fully considered. The trajectory effect arising from the straight-line, Coulomb, and ground-state potential trajectories for electron-capture and excitation processes is carefully assessed. The electron-capture cross section by ground-state Al2+(2S) ions slowly increases before it reaches a maximum of 1.3×10-16 cm2 at 100 keV/u. Those for metastable Al2+(2P) ions sharply increase with increasing energy, and reach a peak at 1 keV/u with a value of 1.5×10-16 cm2. The earlier experimental data are found to be larger by an order of magnitude although their energy dependence is in good accord with the present result. Excitation cross sections for both the ground and metastable states are found to be much larger by a factor of 2-3 than corresponding capture cross sections above 1 keV/u although they become comparable below this energy.

  12. Ion formation upon electron collisions with valine embedded in helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, Nikolaus; Ralser, Stefan; Renzler, Michael; Harnisch, Martina; Kaiser, Alexander; Denifl, Stefan; Böhme, Diethard K.; Scheier, Paul

    2016-04-01

    We report here experimental results for the electron ionization of large superfluid helium nanodroplets with sizes of about 105 atoms that are doped with valine and clusters of valine. Spectra of both cations and anions were monitored with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (mass resolution >4000). Clear series of peaks with valine cluster sizes up to at least 40 and spaced by the mass of a valine molecule are visible in both the cation and anion spectra. Ion efficiency curves are presented for selected cations and anions at electron energies up to about 40 eV and these provide insight into the mode of ion formation. The measured onset of 24.59 eV for cations is indicative of valine ionization by He+ whereas broad resonances at 2, 10 and 22 eV (and beyond) in the formation of anions speak to the occurrence of various modes of dissociative electron attachment by collisions with electrons or He*- and the influence of droplet size on the relative importance of these processes. Comparisons are also made with gas phase results and these provide insight into a matrix effect within the superfluid helium nanodroplet. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  13. Doubly differential cross sections of collision-produced forward electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Elston, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    The velocity space distribution of electrons emitted near the forward direction from collisions involving fast, highly stripped oxygen ions with gaseous and solid targets is presented and described in terms of multipole moments of the ejected charge distribution, which permits direct comparison with recent theory. The results are from a novel apparatus permitting rapid and efficient data acquisition by employing position-sensitive electron detection to combine angle definition with conventional electrostatic spectrometry. Excellent agreement is obtained between distribution observed for electron loss to projectile continuum processes and recent theory in the case of argon targets; less favorable results for simpler helium targets may indicate the need for theoretical study of higher order inelastic processes in that case. The multipole content observed with a solid target is consistent with a conceptual model of convoy electron production dominated by electron loss from the projectile within the bulk of the target and may signify the importance of steady-state production of excited states within the bulk solid. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Spin-resolved state-selective electron capture in C5+-H collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. H.; Wang, J. G.; Janev, R. K.

    2016-09-01

    The electron capture processes in the C5+(1s)+H(1s) collision system are investigated by the quantum-mechanical molecular orbital close-coupling (QMOCC) method in the energy range of 10‑5–10 keV u‑1. Accurate molecular structure calculations are performed by the ab initio multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction method. The electron translational effects are included in the calculations. The total and spin-resolved state-selective cross sections are presented and compared with the available experimental and theoretical data. The present results have a good agreement with the experimental measurements. Our calculations show that the electron translation factors play a very important role for energies above 0.1 keV u‑1 leading to significant differences between the present and the previous QMOOC cross section results of Nolte et al 2012 (J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 45 245202). The effects of the core electron also cannot be ignored below 2 keV u‑1. Model potential calculations, in which the core electron is treated as frozen, cannot give accurate spin-resolved cross sections.

  15. Electron Attachment in Low-Energy Electron Elastic Collisions with Au and Pt Atoms: Identification of Excited Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msezane, A. Z.; Eure, A.; Felfli, Z.; Sokolovski, D.

    2009-11-01

    The recent Regge-pole methodology has been benchmarked [1] on the accurately measured binding energies of the excited Ge= and Sn= anions [2] through the binding energies (BEs) extracted from the Regge-pole calculated elastic total cross sections (TCSs). Here the methodology is applied together with a Thomas-Fermi type potential that incorporates the vital core polarization interaction to investigate the possibility of forming excited Au= and Pt= anions in low-energy electron elastic collisions with Au and Pt atoms. From the positions of the characteristic extremely narrow resonances in the total cross sections, we extract the binding energies of the excited Au= and Pt= anions formed as Regge resonances during the collisions. The angular life of the complexes thus formed is used to differentiate the stable excited bound states of the anions from the shape resonances [3]. The BEs for the excited Au= and Pt= anions are found to be 0.475eVand 0.543eV, respectively, challenging both theory and experiment to verify. [1] A. Msezane et al, Phys. Rev. A, Submitted (2009) [2] M. Scheer et al, Phys. Rev. A 58, 2844 (1998) [3] Z. Felfli et al, Phys. Rev. A 79, 012714 (2009)

  16. Excitation of atomic nitrogen by electron impact.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. J.; Zipf, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    Measurement of the absolute cross sections for the excitation of a number of N I multiplets by electron impact on atomic nitrogen. Two of these cross sections - 1134 and 1200 A - are found to be large, reaching 2.0 x 10 to the minus 16th and 2.5 x 10 to the minus 16th sq cm at their peaks, respectively. The presence of vibrationally excited molecular nitrogen in the discharged gas is confirmed, and its effect on the measurements is discussed. The ratio of the oscillator strengths of the 1200- and 1134-A resonance transitions is measured to be 2.6 plus or minus 0.3.

  17. Electron-impact-induced tryptophan molecule fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamuliene, Jelena; Romanova, Liudmila G.; Vukstich, Vasyl S.; Papp, Alexander V.; Snegursky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    The fragmentation of a gas-phase tryptophan molecule by a low-energy (<70 eV) electron impact was studied both experimentally and theoretically. Various positively charged fragments were observed and analyzed. A special attention was paid to the energy characteristics of the ionic fragment yield. The geometrical parameters of the initial molecule rearrangement were also analyzed. The fragmentation observed was due to either a simple bond cleavage or more complex reactions involving molecular rearrangements. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Elementary Processes with Atoms and Molecules in Isolated and Aggregated States", edited by Friedrich Aumayr, Bratislav Marinkovic, Stefan Matejcik, John Tanis and Kurt H. Becker.

  18. Absolute cross sections for projectile electron loss accompanied by target multiple ionization in collisions of He+ with noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Sigaud, G. M.; Melo, W. S.; Sant'Anna, M. M.; Montenegro, E. C.

    2011-02-01

    Absolute cross sections for projectile electron loss accompanied by target multiple ionization in collisions between He+ ions and noble gases have been measured for energies between 1.0 and 3.5 MeV. The data have been compared with other absolute cross sections that exist in the literature for the same projectile, and with calculations for the screening mode (nucleus-electron interaction) using both perturbative (plane-wave Born approximation (PWBA)) and non-perturbative (extended classical-impulse free-collision model, sudden approximation and coupled-channel method) approaches, and for the antiscreening mode (electron-electron interaction) within the PWBA. The energy dependence of the average number of active electrons for the antiscreening has been described by means of a simple function, which is 'universal' for noble gases but projectile dependent. A previously developed method has been employed to obtain the number of active electrons for each target subshell in the high-velocity regime.

  19. Low-Energy Electrons Emitted in Ion Collisions with Thin Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Michael; Kozhuharov, Christophor; Durante, Marco; Hagmann, Siegbert; Kraft, Gerhard; Lineva, Natallia

    The realistic description of radiation damage after charged particle passage is an ongoing issue for both radiotherapy as well as space applications. In both areas of applied radiological science, living as well as nonliving matter is exposed to ionizing radiation, and it is of vital interest to predict the responses of structures like cells, detectors or electronic devices. In ion beam radiotherapy, for example, the Local Effect Model (LEM) is being used to calculate radiobiological effects with so far unprecedented versatility. This has been shown in the GSI radiotherapy pilot project and consequently this model has become the "industry standard" for treatment planning in subsequent commercial ion radiotherapy sites. The model has also been extended to nonliving matter, i.e. to describe the response of solid state detectors such as TLDs and films. A prerequisite for this model (and possibly similar ones) is the proper description of microscopic track structure and energy deposition. In particular, the area at a very low distance (¡20 nm) from the ion path needs special attention due to the locally very high dose and the rather limited experimental evidence for the shape of the dose distribution. The dose distribution at low distances is inevitably associated with the creation and transport of low-energy (sub-keV) electrons. While some data, elementary cross sections as well as dose distributions, exist for gaseous media, i.e. under single collision conditions, experimental data for the condensed phase are scarce. We have, therefore, launched a project aimed at systematic research of the energy and angular distributions of low-energy (sub-keV) electrons emitted from solids. These investigations com-prise creation as well as transport of low-energy electrons under multiple collision conditions and hence require accounting for the properties of the target, both bulk and surface, i.e. for the inherent inhomogeneity of the thickness and for the surface roughness. To

  20. Biochemical and endocrine responses to impact and collision during elite Rugby League match play.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Christopher P; Lovell, Dale I; Gass, Gregory C

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the prematch and short-term postmatch biochemical and endocrine responses to the intensity, number, and distribution of impacts associated with collisions during elite Rugby League match play. Seventeen elite male Rugby League players each provided blood and saliva samples 24 hours prematch, 30 minutes prematch, 30 minutes postmatch, and then at 24-hour intervals for a period of 5 days postmatch to determine plasma creatine kinase concentration ([CK]) and salivary cortisol concentration ([sCort]). The intensity, number, and distribution of impact forces experienced by players during match play were recorded using portable global positioning systems (GPSs). The change in the dependent variables at each sample collection time was compared to 24 hours prematch and 30-minute prematch measures. The [CK] and [sCort] increased significantly (p < 0.05) during match play. Significant correlations (p < 0.05) were observed between the number of hit-ups and peak [CK] 24 hours postmatch, 48 hours postmatch, and 72 hours postmatch (p < 0.05). The number of impacts recorded in zone 5 (8.1-10.0G) and zone 6 (>10.1G) during match play was significantly correlated (p < 0.05) to [CK] 30 minutes postmatch, 24 hours post, 48 hours post, and 72 hours postmatch. The GPS was able to provide data on the intensity, number, and distribution of impacts resulting from collisions during match play. Elite Rugby League match play resulted in significant skeletal muscle damage and was highly dependent on the number of heavy collisions >8.1G. [CK] remained elevated 120 hours postmatch identifying that at least 5 days modified activity is required to achieve full recovery after elite Rugby League match play. PMID:21602645

  1. Cross sections for 14-eV e-H{sub 2} resonant collisions: Dissociative electron attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Celiberto, R.; Janev, R. K.; Wadehra, J. M.; Laricchiuta, A.

    2009-07-15

    The dissociative electron attachment (DEA) process in electron-H{sub 2} molecule collisions, involving the {sup 2}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} excited electronic Rydberg state of molecular hydrogen ion H{sub 2}{sup -}, is investigated theoretically. The DEA cross section has been calculated within the local complex potential approximation. The convoluted cross section, which presents a peak located at the incident energy of about 14 eV, compares favorably with available experimental data.

  2. Ionization cross-sections for the production of positive ions from H2O by electron impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; Iga, I.; Srivastava, S. K.

    1995-01-01

    Water is present in the atmospheres of 6 of the 9 planets. Cross section values for the direct and partial ionization of H2O by electron impact have been measured and compared with previously published data. The present measurements have been carried out from thresholds to 1 KeV by utilizing a crossed electron beam and molecular beam collision geometry and an improved ion extraction technique.

  3. Coincidence measurements of electron-impact coherence parameters for e-He scattering in the full range of scattering angles

    SciTech Connect

    Klosowski, Lukasz; Piwinski, Mariusz; Dziczek, Dariusz; Pleskacz, Katarzyna; Chwirot, Stanislaw

    2009-12-15

    Electron impact coherence parameters for inelastic e-He scattering have been measured for the excitation to the 2 {sup 1}P{sub 1} state at collision energy of 100 eV. The experiment was conducted using angular correlation electron-photon coincidence technique with a magnetic angle changer allowing measurements in full range of scattering angles. The results are compared with other experimental data and theoretical predictions available for this collisional system.

  4. Electron-impact vibrational excitation of cyclopropane

    SciTech Connect

    Čurík, R. Čársky, P.; Allan, M.

    2015-04-14

    We report a very detailed test of the ab initio discrete momentum representation (DMR) method of calculating vibrational excitation of polyatomic molecules by electron impact, by comparison of its results with an extensive set of experimental data, covering the entire range of scattering angles from 10{sup ∘} to 180{sup ∘} and electron energies from 0.4 to 20 eV. The DMR calculations were carried out by solving the two-channel Lippmann-Schwinger equation in the momentum space, and the interaction between the scattered electron and the target molecule was described by exact static-exchange potential corrected by a density functional theory (DFT) correlation-polarization interaction that models target’s response to the field of incoming electron. The theory is found to quantitatively reproduce the measured spectra for all normal modes, even at the difficult conditions of extreme angles and at low energies, and thus provides full understanding of the excitation mechanism. It is shown that the overlap of individual vibrational bands caused by limited experimental resolution and rotational excitation must be properly taken into account for correct comparison of experiment and theory. By doing so, an apparent discrepancy between published experimental data could be reconciled. A substantial cross section is found for excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν{sub 4} of A{sub 1}{sup ″} symmetry by the 5.5 eV A{sub 2}{sup ′} resonance, surprisingly because the currently accepted selection rules predict this process to be forbidden. The DMR theory shows that the excitation is caused by an incoming electron in an f-wave of A{sub 2}{sup ′} symmetry which causes excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν{sub 4} of the A{sub 1}{sup ″} symmetry and departs in p- and f-waves of A{sub 2}{sup ″} symmetry.

  5. Electron-impact excitation of neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballance, Connor; Griffin, Don

    2004-05-01

    A number of convergent close-coupling and R-matrix with pseudo-state (RMPS) calculations on H-like, He-like, Li-like, and Be-like ions have demonstrated that coupling to the target continuum can have large effects on the electron-impact excitation cross sections of neutral and low-charge species. However, no one has yet attempted such advanced calculations on a system as complex as neutral neon. We report on a series of RMPS calculations of electron-impact excitation of Ne using recently developed parallel Breit-Pauli (BP) R-matrix programs. Our largest calculation was a BP calculation with 235 spectroscopic and pseudo levels in the close-coupling expansion. Although the results of this calculation clearly reveal the importance of coupling to the target continuum in this atom, the pseudo-state expansion is not yet sufficiently complete to provide reliable cross sections for energies above the ionization limit. However, this is the largest BP calculation that can be performed with present computer resources. Thus, we have also carried out a series of RMPS calculations in LS coupling with different pseudo-state expansions. Comparisons of these results have allowed us to determine the approximate size of the pseudo-state expansion required to achieve convergence in future BP calculations for neon.

  6. Electron-Impact Induced Fluorescence Cross Sections of Atomic Oxygen Important to Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noren, C.; Kanik, I.; James, G. K.; Ajello, J. M.

    1997-10-01

    There is a severe lack of available experimental cross section data, especially in the low energy regime, for electron-atom collisions involving neutral species such as OI, NI, CI, etc. This situation is in imbalance with the wealth of observational data currently available from UV spectrographs (IUE, HST, Copernicus, Voyager etc.). One cannot overstate the importance of ultraviolet (UV) lines of neutral oxygen, which is the third most abundant element within normal stars. In this poster we present the preliminary measurements of the emission cross sections of the atomic oxygen 1304-ÅEUV triplet lines resulting from low energy electron impact. A high density atomic oxygen beam, created by a microwave discharge source, was intersected at a right angle by a magnetically focused electron beam. A 0.2m Acton spectrometer in tandem with a CsI coated channel electron multiplier was used to analyze the resulting EUV lines emitted perpendicular to both the atomic and electron beams.

  7. Electron-impact dissociative double ionization of N2 and CO: Dependence of transition probability on impact energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A.; Kumar, P.; Banerjee, S. B.; Subramanian, K. P.; Bapat, B.

    2016-04-01

    We present an experimental and computational analysis of dissociative double ionization of N2 and CO molecules under electron impact. Experiments are performed at three energies, viz. 1, 3, and 5 keV, in order to observe the effect of impact energy on the dissociative ionization kinematics. We compare the kinetic energy release (KER) distributions of the charge symmetric dissociation channels of N22 + and CO2 + at these impact energies. An approximately linear trend between the transition energy and the expected KER values is inferred on the basis of the calculated potential energy curves of the dications. Experimentally, the normalized differential KER cross sections for these channels show an increasing trend in the low KER range and a decreasing trend in the high KER range as the electron-impact energy is increased. This observation indicates that the transition probability for excitation to different molecular ion states is not only a function of energy difference between the ground and excited states, but also a complicated function of the impact energy. In addition, nature of the observed trend in the differential KER cross sections differs significantly from their differential transition probability, which are calculated using inelastic collision model for fast-electron-impact case.

  8. Collisions between low-energy electrons and small polyatomic targets of biological relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, Leigh

    2016-05-01

    Over the last decade, cross section measurements and calculations for DNA prototype molecules have received significant attention from the collisions community, due to the potential applications of this data in modelling electron transport through biological matter with a view to improving radiation dosimetry. Such data are additionally interesting from a fundamental aspect, as small carbon-based molecules are ideal targets for considering effects including target conformation, long-range dynamical interactions and coupling effects between the various degrees of freedom on the scattering properties of the target. At the California State University Fullerton, we have made a series of measurements of the elastic, vibrationally inelastic and electronically inelastic cross sections for a variety of small polyatomic targets, including water and the basic alcohols, ethylene, toluene and several fluorinated alkanes. These processes are important in a range of applications, primarily for modelling electron transport and thermalization, and energy deposition to a biological media. The data were obtained using a high resolution electron energy-loss spectrometer, operating in a crossed beam configuration with a moveable aperture gas source. The gas source design facilitates both an expedient and highly accurate method of removing background signal, and removes uncertainties from the data due to uncertainties in the beam profile. We have also performed scattering calculations employing the Schwinger Multichannel method, in collaboration with the California institute of technology, to compare with our measurements. In this talk, I will present an overview of our recent data and future research plans.

  9. Ionization Cross Sections and Dissociation Channels of the DNA Sugar-Phosphate Backbone by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher; Huo, Winifred M.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in living cells are not caused by the highly energetic incident radiation, but rather are induced by less energetic secondary species generated, the most abundant of which are free electrons.' The secondary electrons will further react to cause DNA damage via indirect and direct mechanisms. Detailed knowledge of these mechanisms is ultimately important for the development of global models of cellular radiation damage. We are studying one possible mechanism for the formation cf DNA strand breaks involving dissociative ionization of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone induced by secondary electron co!lisions. We will present ionization cross sections at electron collision energies between threshold and 10 KeV using the improved binary encounter dipole (iBED) formulation' Preliminary results of the possible dissociative ionization pathways will be presented. It is speculated that radical fragments produced from the dissociative ionization can further react, providing a possible mechanism for double strand breaks and base damage.

  10. Observation of Exclusive Electron-Positron Production in Hadron-Hadron Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.

    2006-11-01

    We present the first observation of exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} production in hadron-hadron collisions, using p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV taken by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 532 pb{sup -1}. We require the absence of any particle signatures in the detector except for an electron and a positron candidate, each with transverse energy E{sub T} > 5 GeV and pseudorapidity |{eta}| < 2. With these criteria, 16 events are observed compared to a background expectation of 1.9 {+-} 0.3 events. These events are consistent in cross section and properties with the QED process p{bar p} {yields} p + e{sup +}e{sup -} + {bar p} through two-photon exchange. The measured cross section is 1.6{sub -0.3}{sup +0.5}(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst) pb. This agrees with the theoretical prediction of 1.71 {+-} 0.01 pb.

  11. Kinetic parameters, collision rates, energy exchanges and transport coefficients of non-thermal electrons in premixed flames at sub-breakdown electric field strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; El Morsli, Mbark

    2014-01-01

    The effects of an electric field on the collision rates, energy exchanges and transport properties of electrons in premixed flames are investigated via solutions to the Boltzmann kinetic equation. The case of high electric field strength, which results in high-energy, non-thermal electrons, is analysed in detail at sub-breakdown conditions. The rates of inelastic collisions and the energy exchange between electrons and neutrals in the reaction zone of the flame are characterised quantitatively. The analysis includes attachment, ionisation, impact dissociation, and vibrational and electronic excitation processes. Our results suggest that Townsend breakdown occurs for E/N = 140 Td. Vibrational excitation is the dominant process up to breakdown, despite important rates of electronic excitation of CO, CO2 and N2 as well as impact dissociation of O2 being apparent from 50 Td onwards. Ohmic heating in the reaction zone is found to be negligible (less than 2% of peak heat release rate) up to breakdown field strengths for realistic electron densities equal to 1010 cm-3. The observed trends are largely independent of equivalence ratio. In the non-thermal regime, electron transport coefficients are insensitive to mixture composition and approximately constant across the flame, but are highly dependent on the electric field strength. In the thermal limit, kinetic parameters and transport coefficients vary substantially across the flame due to the spatially inhomogeneous concentration of water vapour. A practical approach for identifying the plasma regime (thermal versus non-thermal) in studies of electric field effects on flames is proposed.

  12. Thermodynamic model for electron emission and negative- and positive-ion formation in keV molecular collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhász, Z.

    2016-08-01

    A statistical-type model is developed to describe the ion production and electron emission in collisions of (molecular) ions with atoms. The model is based on the Boltzmann population of the bound electronic energy levels of the quasimolecule formed in the collision and the discretized continuum. The discretization of the continuum is implemented by a free-electron gas in a box model assuming an effective square potential of the quasimolecule. The temperature of the electron gas is calculated by taking into account a thermodynamically adiabatic process due to the change of the effective volume of the quasimolecule as the system evolves. The system may undergo a transition with a small probability from the discretized continuum to the states of the complementary continuum. It is assumed that these states are decoupled from the thermodynamic time development. The decoupled states overwhelmingly determine the yield of the asymptotically observed fragment ions. The main motivation of this work is to describe the recently observed H- ion production in O H++Ar collisions. The obtained differential cross sections for H- formation, cation production, and electron emission are close to the experimental ones. Calculations for the atomic systems O++Ar and H++Ar are also in reasonable agreement with the experiments indicating that the model can be applied to a wide class of collisions.

  13. Electron Impact Ionization of C_2F_6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iga, Ione; Pereira Sanches, Ivana; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar

    2001-10-01

    Besides CF_4, perfluoroethane, C_2F_6, is also one of the fluorocarbon compounds most frequently used in plasma processing applications. Consequently, the knowledge of the ionization properties of C_2F6 is clearly of interest in order to model the plasma-chemical reactions. Nevertheless, only few partial ionization-cross-section measurements [1,2] for this molecule were reported in the literature. Also, the energy range covered in these studies was very limited (below 120 eV). Recently, we have studied these properties. More specifically, partial ionization cross sections (PICS) for the fragments: C^+, F^+, CF^+, CF_2^+, CF_3^+ and C_2F_5^+, produced by electron impact on C_2F_6, were measured in a single-collision condition from near ionization threshold to 1000 eV. In addition, total ionization cross sections (TICS) are also obtained by summing up the PICS's. The comparison of our measured PICS and derived TICS with available data [1-4] will be presented during the Conference. [1] H. U. Poll, J. Meischner, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 27 (1987) 359. [2] C. Q. Jiao, A Garscadden, P. D. Haaland, Chem. Phys. Lett. 310 (1999) 52. [3] H. Nishimura, W. M. Huo, M. A Ali and Y -K. Kim, J. Chem. Phys. 110 (1999) 3811. [4] L. G. Christophorou and J. K. Olthoff, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 27 (1998) 1 and references therein.

  14. Lunar Dust Grain Charging by Electron Impact: Complex Role of Secondary Electron Emissions in Space Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; LeClair, A. C.; Spann, J. F.

    2010-08-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEEs). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 μm size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEEs discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  15. LUNAR DUST GRAIN CHARGING BY ELECTRON IMPACT: COMPLEX ROLE OF SECONDARY ELECTRON EMISSIONS IN SPACE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; LeClair, A. C.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.

    2010-08-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEEs). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 {mu}m size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEEs discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  16. Lunary Dust Grain Charging by Electron Impact: Complex Role of Secondary Electron Emissions in Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Crave, P. D.; LeClair, A.; Spann, J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEES). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/ planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 m size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEES discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  17. Single electrons from semileptonic charm meson decays in p+p collisions at 200GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinhua

    2003-10-01

    The suppression of quarkonium production is predicted as one of the characteristics of a potential phase transition of nuclear matter from confined to deconfined quarks and gluons. The measurement of open charm production in pp collisions provides an important baseline for charmonium measurements in dAu as well as heavy ion collisions. There, various competing nuclear effects such as shadowing, heavy quark energy loss, color screening, and charm recombination need to be disentangled. The PHENIX experiment has collected samples of pp collisions at 200 GeV in the last two runs at RHIC. Special converter runs were taken to directly measure electrons from photonic sources. Particles carrying open charm can be studied by the contributions from their semileptonic decays, e.g. Darrow eKν, to single electron spectra. Following this approach, we will present the current status of the analysis of run2 and run3 data.

  18. Studies of electron-molecule collisions - Applications to e-H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brescansin, L. M.; Lima, M. A. P.; Gibson, T. L.; Mckoy, V.; Huo, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Elastic differential and momentum transfer cross sections for the elastic scattering of electrons by H2O are reported for collision energies from 2 to 20 eV. These fixed-nuclei static-exchange cross sections were obtained using the Schwinger variational approach. In these studies the exchange potential is directly evaluated and not approximated by local models. The calculated differential cross sections, obtained with a basis set expansion of the scattering wave function, agree well with available experimental data at intermediate and larger angles. As used here, the results cannot adequately describe the divergent cross sections at small angles. An interesting feature of the calculated cross sections, particularly at 15 and 20 eV, is their significant backward peaking. This peaking occurs in the experimentally inaccessible region beyond a scattering angle of 120 deg. The implication of this feature for the determination of momentum transfer cross sections is described.

  19. Calculation of rotationally inelastic processes in electron collisions with CO{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gianturco, F.A.; Stoeckling, T.

    1997-03-01

    The rotational excitation of the title linear polyatomic target, treated as a rigid rotor is computed using a fully {ital ab initio} interaction potential recently employed to obtain integral elastic cross sections [Gianturco and Stoecklin, J. Phys. B {bold 29}, 3933 (1996)] and to unravel several resonances in the low-energy region. The present study looks at the rotationally inelastic processes which can occur in the energy range across the long-lived shape resonance at 3.9 eV and finds that the resonant process strongly enhances the overall efficiency of the rotational excitation by the electron projectile, as shown by the computed values of the average rotational energy transfers. Angular distributions are also evaluated at different collision energies and compared with earlier calculations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Production of doubly charmed tetraquarks with exotic color configurations in electron-positron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, Tetsuo; Liu, Yan-Rui; Oka, Makoto; Sudoh, Kazutaka; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2013-04-01

    Structure and production of doubly charmed tetraquarks Tcc (cc ubardbar) are studied from the viewpoint of color configurations. Based on the diquark correlation, the tetraquark Tcc with I (JP) = 0 (1+) is considered to be stable against strong decay. We discuss that the mixing probability of color antitriplet and sextet cc components in Tcc is suppressed by 1 / mc2, so the two configurations are separately realized in the heavy quark limit. Utilizing the nonrelativistic QCD framework, we evaluate the production cross sections of Tcc in electron-positron collisions. The momentum dependence of the cross section of color antitriplet is found to be different from that of sextet, which can be used to discriminate the color structure of the Tcc states in experimental measurements.

  1. Low-Energy Electron Capture in Collisions of C3+ with He

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Qi, Y. Y.; Yan, J.; Wang, J. G.; Li, Y.; Buenker, R. J.; Kato, D.; Krstic, Predrag S

    2009-01-01

    Charge transfer processes due to collisions of ground-state C{sup 3+}(1s{sup 2}2s {sup 2}S) ions with He atoms are studied using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling method for energies in the range 10{sup -4}-2 x 10{sup 3} eV/u. The ab initio adiabatic potentials and radial couplings utilized in the calculations are obtained from the multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction approach. Total and state-selective single-electron capture cross sections and rate coefficients are calculated and compared with the available experimental and theoretical data. A good agreement is found between the measured cross sections and the present calculations. However, the previous calculations of total rate coefficients using the Landau-Zener model are one to two orders of magnitude smaller than the present results.

  2. Assessment of plasma impedance probe for measuring electron density and collision frequency in a plasma with spatial and temporal gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Mark A. King, Lyon B.

    2014-05-15

    Numerical simulations and experimental measurements were combined to determine the ability of a plasma impedance probe (PIP) to measure plasma density and electron collision frequency in a plasma containing spatial gradients as well as time-varying oscillations in the plasma density. A PIP is sensitive to collision frequency through the width of the parallel resonance in the Re[Z]-vs.-frequency characteristic, while also being sensitive to electron density through the zero-crossing of the Im[Z]-vs.-frequency characteristic at parallel resonance. Simulations of the probe characteristic in a linear plasma gradient indicated that the broadening of Re[Z] due to the spatial gradient obscured the broadening due to electron collision frequency, preventing a quantitative measurement of the absolute collision frequency for gradients considered in this study. Simulation results also showed that the PIP is sensitive to relative changes in electron collision frequency in a spatial density gradient, but a second broadening effect due to time-varying oscillations made collision frequency measurements impossible. The time-varying oscillations had the effect of causing multiple zero-crossings in Im[Z] at parallel resonance. Results of experiments and simulations indicated that the lowest-frequency zero-crossing represented the lowest plasma density in the oscillations and the highest-frequency zero-crossing represented the highest plasma density in the oscillations, thus the PIP probe was found to be an effective tool to measure both the average plasma density as well as the maximum and minimum densities due to temporal oscillations.

  3. Assessment of plasma impedance probe for measuring electron density and collision frequency in a plasma with spatial and temporal gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Mark A.; King, Lyon B.

    2014-05-01

    Numerical simulations and experimental measurements were combined to determine the ability of a plasma impedance probe (PIP) to measure plasma density and electron collision frequency in a plasma containing spatial gradients as well as time-varying oscillations in the plasma density. A PIP is sensitive to collision frequency through the width of the parallel resonance in the Re[Z]-vs.-frequency characteristic, while also being sensitive to electron density through the zero-crossing of the Im[Z]-vs.-frequency characteristic at parallel resonance. Simulations of the probe characteristic in a linear plasma gradient indicated that the broadening of Re[Z] due to the spatial gradient obscured the broadening due to electron collision frequency, preventing a quantitative measurement of the absolute collision frequency for gradients considered in this study. Simulation results also showed that the PIP is sensitive to relative changes in electron collision frequency in a spatial density gradient, but a second broadening effect due to time-varying oscillations made collision frequency measurements impossible. The time-varying oscillations had the effect of causing multiple zero-crossings in Im[Z] at parallel resonance. Results of experiments and simulations indicated that the lowest-frequency zero-crossing represented the lowest plasma density in the oscillations and the highest-frequency zero-crossing represented the highest plasma density in the oscillations, thus the PIP probe was found to be an effective tool to measure both the average plasma density as well as the maximum and minimum densities due to temporal oscillations.

  4. Electron swarm parameters in CF3I and a set of electron collision cross sections for the CF3I molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Motohiro; Nakamura, Yoshiharu

    2010-04-01

    Electron swarm parameters (the electron drift velocity, the longitudinal diffusion coefficient, the ionization and attachment coefficients and the effective ionization coefficient) in pure CF3I were measured in the range of E/N over 140-1000 Td. These swarm parameters were analysed using a Boltzmann equation analysis, and a set of electron collision cross sections for the CF3I molecule was derived so that it was consistent with the measured electron swarm parameters in CF3I. The present set of electron collision cross sections of CF3I derived was used to calculate the limiting E/N values in CF3I-N2 mixtures to confirm that the results of the calculation agreed well with the recent experimental results.

  5. Petawatt laser-driven wakefield accelerator: All-optical electron injection via collision of laser pulses and radiation cooling of accelerated electron bunches.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, Serguei; Avitzour, Yoav; Yi, S. Austin; Shvets, Gennady

    2007-11-01

    We explore an electron injection into the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) using nearly head-on collision of the petawatt ultrashort (˜30 fs) laser pulse (driver) with a low- amplitude laser (seed) beam of the same duration and polarization. To eliminate the threat to the main laser amplifier we consider two options: (i) a frequency-shifted seed and (ii) a seed pulse propagating at a small angle to the axis. We show that the emission of synchrotron radiation due to betatron oscillations of trapped and accelerated electrons results in significant transverse cooling of quasi- monoenergetic accelerated electrons (with energies above 1 GeV). At the same time, the energy losses due to the synchrotron emission preserve the final energy spread of the electron beam. The ``dark current'' due to the electron trapping in multiple wake buckets and the effect of beam loading (wake destruction at the instant of beams collision) are discussed.

  6. Rotational transitions induced by collisions of HD+ ions with low-energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motapon, O.; Pop, N.; Argoubi, F.; Mezei, J. Zs; Epee, M. D. Epee; Faure, A.; Telmini, M.; Tennyson, J.; Schneider, I. F.

    2014-07-01

    A series of computations based on multichannel quantum defect theory have been performed in order to produce the cross sections of rotational transitions (excitations Ni+-2→ Ni+, deexcitations Ni+ → Ni+-2, with Ni+=2 to 10) and of their competitive process, the dissociative recombination, induced by collisions of HD+ ions with electrons in the energy range 10-5 to 0.3 eV. Maxwell anisotropic rate coefficients, obtained from these cross sections in the conditions of the Heidelberg Test Storage Ring (TSR) experiments (kBTt=2.8 meV and kBTl=45 μeV), have been reported for those processes in the same electronic energy range. Maxwell isotropic rate coefficients have been presented as well for electronic temperatures up to a few hundred Kelvins. Very good overall agreement is found between our results for rotational transitions and the former theoretical computations as well as with experiment. Furthermore, due to the full rotational computations performed, the accuracy of the resulting dissociative recombination cross sections is improved considerably.

  7. Measurement of beauty-hadron decay electrons in Pb-Pb collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 2.76 TeV with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völk, Martin; ALICE Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The ALICE Collaboration at the LHC studies heavy-ion collisions to investigate the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Heavy quarks (charm and beauty) are effective probes for this purpose. Both their energy loss in the medium as well as their possible thermalization yield information about the medium properties. In ALICE, the reconstruction of exclusive decays is currently accessible for charm, but not for beauty hadrons. For hadrons with beauty valence quarks a promising strategy is the measurement of their decay electrons. To separate these from the background electrons (mainly from charm hadron decays, photon conversions or light-meson decays) the large decay length of beauty hadrons can be utilized. It leads to a relatively large typical impact parameter of the decay electrons. By comparing the impact parameter distribution of the signal electrons with those from the background sources, the signal can be statistically separated from the background. For this purpose a maximum likelihood fit is employed using impact parameter distribution templates from simulations. The resulting nuclear modification factor for electrons from beauty-hadron decays shows a sizeable suppression for pT > 3 GeV/c, albeit still with large uncertainties.

  8. Shifts of the spectral lines of He(+) produced by electron collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unnikrishnan, K.; Callaway, J.; Oza, D. H.

    1990-01-01

    The shifts of the Ly-alpha, Ly-beta, and H-alpha lines of He(+) in a plasma, produced by electron scattering from radiating ions are calculated. Electron densities in the neighborhood of 10 to the 17th/cu cm and plasma temperatures from 1 to 6 eV are considered. The calculation is made in the impact approximation, and is based on a six-state close-coupling computation of the scattering matrices, into which an optical potential has been inserted. Small red shifts of the lines are obtained. The contribution of electron scattering to the linewidths is also considered.

  9. Electron density and collision frequency of microwave resonant cavity produced discharges. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McColl, W.; Brooks, C.; Brake, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    This progress report consists of an article, the abstract of which follows, and apparently the references and vita from a proposal. A review of perturbation diagnostics applied to microwave resonant cavity discharges is presented. The classical microwave perturbation technique examines the shift in the resonant frequency and cavity quality factor of the resonant cavity caused by low electron density discharges. However, modifications presented here allow the analysis to be applied to discharges with electron densities beyond the limit predicted by perturbation theory. An {open_quote}exact{close_quote} perturbation analysis is presented which models the discharge as a separate dielectric, thereby removing the restrictions on electron density imposed by the classical technique. The {open_quote}exact{close_quote} method also uses measurements of the shifts in the resonant conditions of the cavity. Thirdly, an electromagnetic analysis is presented which uses a characteristic equation, based upon Maxwell`s laws, and predicts the discharge conductivity based upon measurements of a complex axial wave number. By allowing the axial wave number of the electromagnetic fields to be complex, the fields are experimentally and theoretically shown to be spatially attenuated. The diagnostics are applied to continuous-wave microwave (2.45 GHz) discharges produced in an Asmussen resonant cavity. Double Langmuir probes, placed directly in the discharge at the point where the radial electric field is zero, act as a comparison with the analytic diagnostics. Microwave powers ranging from 30 to 100 watts produce helium and nitrogen discharges with pressures ranging from 0.5 to 6 torr. Analysis of the data predicts electron temperatures from 5 to 20 eV, electron densities from 10{sup 11} to 3 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}, and collision frequencies from 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 11} sec{sup {minus}1}.

  10. Angular dependence of electron emission induced by grazing-ion surface collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravielle, M. S.; Miraglia, J. E.; Otero, G. G.; Sánchez, E. A.; Grizzi, O.

    2004-04-01

    In this work, electron emission spectra produced by impact of fast protons on Al(111) surfaces are theoretically and experimentally studied. Contributions coming from the different electronic sources of the metal—atomic inner shells and valence band—are analyzed as a function of the angle of electron emission. In the forward direction, the inner-shell ionization process is the dominant mechanism. The valence emission, instead, becomes important when the ejection angle is separated from the specular-reflection direction. In both angular regions, theoretical and experimental values are in reasonable agreement. The energy shift and broadening of the convoy electron peak at glancing observation angles are well described by the present model, which takes into account the influence of the induced surface field on the ionized electron.

  11. Coincidence measurements between fragment ions and the number of emitted electrons in heavy ion collisions with polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, T.; Majima, T.; Kishimoto, T.; Tsuchida, H.; Itoh, A.

    2012-11-01

    We have studied multiple ionization and multifragmentation of a chlorofluorocarbon molecule, CH2FCF3, induced by collisions of 580-keV C+ ions. Coincidence measurements of product ions and the number of emitted electrons from CH2FCF3 were performed under charge-changing conditions of C+ → Cq+ (q = 0, 2, 3). A fully inclusive measurement regardless of outgoing projectile charge state was also performed by making coincidence with a pulsed ion beam. Mass distributions of fragment ions and number distributions of emitted electrons were both found to change greatly according to charge-changing conditions. Highly multiple ionization emitting up to about 10 electrons was observed in electron loss collisions.

  12. Accuracy of Theoretical Calculations for Electron-Impact Ionization of atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madison, Don

    2015-09-01

    In the last two decades, there have been several close-coupling approaches developed which can accurately calculate the triply differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of effective one and two electron atoms. The agreement between experiment and theory is not particularly good for more complicated atoms and molecules. Very recently, a B-spline R-matrix with pseudostates (BSRPS) approach was used to investigate low energy electron impact ionization of neon and very good agreement with experiment was found. The perturbative 3-body distorted wave (3DW) approach which includes the exact final state electron-electron interaction (post collision interaction - PCI) gave comparably good agreement with experiment. For ionization of molecules, there have been numerous studies of high-energy electron impact. These studies are called EMS (Electron Momentum Spectroscopy) and they were very valuable in determining the accuracy of molecular wavefunctions since the measured cross sections were proportional to the momentum space molecular wavefunction. More recently, lower energy collisions have started to be measured and these cross sections are much more difficult for theory since the detailed kinematics of the experiment become important. So far, the only close coupling calculation reported for ionization of molecules is the time-dependent close-coupling calculation (TDCC) which has been developed for ionization of H2 and it yields relative good agreement with experiment. Again the molecular 3-body distorted wave (M3DW) gave equally good agreement with experiment. For polyatomic molecules, the only theory available is the M3DW. In this talk, I will show the current status of agreement between experiment and theory for low and intermediate energy single ionization of atoms and molecules. Work supported by the NSF and XSEDE.

  13. Dissociative Ionization of Benzene by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred; Dateo, Christopher; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of the dissociative ionization (DI) of benzene from the low-lying ionization channels. Our approach makes use of the fact that electron motion is much faster than nuclear motion and DI is treated as a two-step process. The first step is electron-impact ionization resulting in an ion with the same nuclear geometry as the neutral molecule. In the second step the nuclei relax from the initial geometry and undergo unimolecular dissociation. For the ionization process we use the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model. For the unimolecular dissociation step, we study the steepest descent reaction path to the minimum of the ion potential energy surface. The path is used to analyze the probability of unimolecular dissociation and to determine the product distributions. Our analysis of the dissociation products and the thresholds of the productions are compared with the result dissociative photoionization measurements of Feng et al. The partial oscillator strengths from Feng et al. are then used in the iBED cross section calculations.

  14. Evidence of strong projectile-target-core interaction in single ionization of neon by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, S.; Zhang, P.; Xu, S.; Ma, X.; Zhang, S. F.; Zhu, X. L.; Feng, W. T.; Liu, H. P.

    2010-11-15

    The momentum distributions of recoil ions were measured in the single ionization of neon by electron impact at incident energies between 80 and 2300 eV. It was found that there are a noticeable number of recoil ions carrying large momenta, and the relative contributions of these ions becomes more pronounced with the further decrease of incident electron energy. These observed behaviors indicate that there is a strong projectile-target-core interaction in the single-ionization reaction. By comparing our results with those of electron-neon elastic scattering, we concluded that the elastic scattering of the projectile electron on the target core plays an important role at low and intermediate collision energies.

  15. Electron capture from Ni surface resulting from H+ ion impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Reiko; Suzuki, Reiko; Sato, Hiroshi; Kimura, Mineo

    1998-10-01

    Electron capture from Cu and Co surfaces by H+ and He+ ion bombardment has been investigated theoretically by using the molecular representation. Since an experimental condition was that the incoming particle was introduced on the surface with a large angle, the binary collision would be satisfied. We have obtained electronic states of the colliding pair by the ALCHEMY, and the scattering dynamics was solved by using the semiclassical close coupling treatment. We have included trajectories of compete recoils of the projectile through the coupling of electronic and nuclear motions. The preliminary result obtained shed much light on the understanding of the experimental finding.

  16. Influence of electron correlations on double-capture process in proton-helium collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoda, Ghavaminia; Ebrahim, Ghanbari-Adivi

    2015-07-01

    The first-order correct-boundary Coulomb-Born distorted-wave approximation is used to study the double-electron capture by protons from the ground-state helium atoms at intermediate and high impact energies. The differential double capture cross sections are obtained as a function of the projectile scattering angle and the total cross sections as a function of the impact energy. In the considered range of impact energy, our calculation shows that although the results are not so sensitive to the static inter-electronic correlations in the initial channel, the strong final-state correlations have a large effect on the magnitudes of the double capture cross sections. The calculated differential and integral cross sections are compared with their available experimental values. The comparison shows a good agreement between the present calculations and the measurements. The comparison of the integral cross sections shows that the present approach is compatible with other theories.

  17. Observation of a large electric dipole moment produced in electron-transfer collisions of H/sup +/ on He

    SciTech Connect

    Havener, C.C.; Westerveld, W.B.; Risley, J.S.; Tolk, N.H.; Tully, J.C.

    1982-04-05

    The measured intensity and polarization of Balmer-alpha radiation resulting from (40--80)-keV collisions of H/sup +/ on He exhibited a strong dependence with electric fields applied axially along the beam direction. With use of a density matrix formalism the collisionally produced electric dipole moment for the n = 3 state was found to be large, reaching 4.4ea/sub 0/ at the lowest collision energy. The center of the electron cloud distribution was found to lag behind the proton.

  18. Electron emission in collisions of fast highly charged bare ions with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Abhoy; Mandal, Chittranjan; Purkait, Malay

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the electron emission from ground state helium atom in collision with fast bare heavy ions at intermediate and high incident energies. In the present study, we have applied the present three-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-3B) model and the previously adopted four-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-4B). To represent the active electron in the helium atom in the 3C-3B model, the initial bound state wavefunction is chosen to be hydrogenic with an effective nuclear charge. The wavefunction for the ejected electron in the exit channel has been approximated to be a Coulomb continuum wavefunction with same effective nuclear charge. Effectively the continuum-continuum correlation effect has been considered in the present investigation. Here we have calculated the energy and angular distribution of double differential cross sections (DDCS) at low and high energy electron emission from helium atom. The large forward-backward asymmetry is observed in the angular distribution which is explained in terms of the two-center effect (TCE). Our theoretical results are compared with available experimental results as well as other theoretical calculations based on the plain wave Born approximation (PWBA), continuum-distorted wave (CDW) approximation, continuum-distorted wave eikonal-initial state (CDW-EIS) approximation, and the corresponding values obtained from the 3C-4B model [S. Jana, R. Samanta, M. Purkait, Phys. Scr. 88, 055301 (2013)] respectively. It is observed that the four-body version of the present investigation produces results which are in better agreement with experimental observations for all cases.

  19. Nuclear modification of electron spectra and implications for heavy quark energy loss in Au+Au collisions at [FORMULA: SEE TEXT].

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2006-01-27

    The PHENIX experiment has measured midrapidity ([FORMULA: SEE TEXT]) transverse momentum spectra ([FORMULA: SEE TEXT]) of electrons as a function of centrality in Au+Au collisions at [FORMULA: SEE TEXT]. Contributions from photon conversions and from light hadron decays, mainly Dalitz decays of pi0 and eta mesons, were removed. The resulting nonphotonic electron spectra are primarily due to the semileptonic decays of hadrons carrying heavy quarks. Nuclear modification factors were determined by comparison to nonphotonic electrons in p+p collisions. A significant suppression of electrons at high pT is observed in central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial energy loss of heavy quarks. PMID:16486687

  20. Halogenation effects on electron collisions with CF3Cl, CF2Cl2, and CFCl3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, T. C.; Lopes, A. R.; Azeredo, A. D.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2016-04-01

    We report differential and integral elastic cross sections for low-energy electron collisions with CF3Cl, CF2Cl2, and CFCl3 molecules for energies ranging from 0.1 eV to 30 eV. The calculations were performed using the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations. The influence of the permanent electric dipole moment on the cross sections was included using the Born closure scheme. A very good agreement between our calculations and the experimental results of Jones [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 813 (1986)], Mann and Linder [J. Phys. B 25, 1621 (1992); 25, 1633 (1992)] and Hoshino et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 214305 (2013)] was found. We also compare our results with the calculations of Beyer et al. [Chem. Phys. 255, 1 (2000)] using the R-matrix method, where we find good agreement with respect to the location of the resonances, and with the calculations of Hoshino et al. using the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule, where we find qualitative agreement at energies above 20 eV. Additional electronic structure calculations were carried out in order to help in the interpretation of the scattering results. The stabilization the lowest σ∗ resonance due to the exchange of fluorine by chlorine atoms (halogenation effect) follows a simple linear relation with the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals and can be considered as a signature of the halogenation effect.

  1. Elastic cross sections for low-energy electron collisions with tetrahydropyran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza Barbosa, Alessandra; Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2016-02-01

    We report on calculated elastic cross sections for low-energy electron collisions with the cyclic ether tetrahydropyran (C5H10O). The calculations were carried out with the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with norm-conserving pseudopotentials in the static-exchange-polarization approximation for energies up to 20 eV. Our cross sections are compared with previous results obtained for cyclohexane and 1,4-dioxane, since the three molecules present similar structures. The calculated differential cross sections for these three molecules present similarities, except at low scattering angles, where the differential cross sections of tetrahydropyran present a sharp increase due to the permanent dipole moment of the molecule. The similarities observed in the cross sections reveal that the molecular geometry plays an important role in the description of scattering process. We also compared our calculated elastic integral cross section for tetrahydropyran with experimental total cross sections data available in the literature and found a good qualitative agreement between both results. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  2. Smart electronics and sensors for IVHS and automobile collision warning antenna systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of using electronically steerable antennas for health monitoring of civil structures and early warning of collapsing bridges to the approaching vehicles is presented. These antennas can also be used in automobile collision warning systems. These antennas are lightweight, low volume, low profile and conformal. They have low fabrication costs and are easily mass produced. They are thin and do not perturb the aerodynamics of a host automobile. Linear, circular, and dual polarization are achieved with simple changes in feed position. Beam steering is accomplished by varying the relative phase between radiating elements. In planar array, both horizontal and vertical beam can be combined to provide full scanning capabilities. Tunable ceramic phase shifters are used in these antennas. The dielectric properties of the ferroelectric material are changed by a bias voltage. In the case of health monitoring of civil structures, these antennas are used in conjunction with ferroelectric sensors. The sensors are fabricated with interdigital transducers printed on a piezoelectric polymer or ceramic type film. They are in turn mounted onto an ultra thin Penn State's novel RF antenna. The wave form measurements may be monitored at a remote location via the antenna in the sensors and the electronically steerable antenna outlined above.

  3. Analysis of density effects in plasmas and their influence on electron-impact cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkhiri, M.; Poirier, M.

    2014-12-01

    Density effects in plasmas are analyzed using a Thomas-Fermi approach for free electrons. First, scaling properties are determined for the free-electron potential and density. For hydrogen-like ions, the first two terms of an analytical expansion of this potential as a function of the plasma coupling parameter are obtained. In such ions, from these properties and numerical calculations, a simple analytical fit is proposed for the plasma potential, which holds for any electron density, temperature, and atomic number, at least assuming that Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics is applicable. This allows one to analyze perturbatively the influence of the plasma potential on energies, wave functions, transition rates, and electron-impact collision rates for single-electron ions. Second, plasmas with an arbitrary charge state are considered, using a modified version of the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) package with a plasma potential based on a Thomas-Fermi approach. Various methods for the collision cross-section calculations are reviewed. The influence of plasma density on these cross sections is analyzed in detail. Moreover, it is demonstrated that, in a given transition, the radiative and collisional-excitation rates are differently affected by the plasma density. Some analytical expressions are proposed for hydrogen-like ions in the limit where the Born or Lotz approximation applies and are compared to the numerical results from the FAC.

  4. Electron emission and molecular fragmentation during hydrogen and deuterium ion impact on carbon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qayyum, A.; Schustereder, W.; Mair, C.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.; Cernusca, S.; Winter, HP.; Aumayr, F.

    2003-03-01

    Molecular fragmentation and electron emission during hydrogen ion impact on graphite surfaces has been investigated in the eV to keV impact energy region typical for fusion edge plasma conditions. As a target surface graphite tiles for the Tokamak experiment Tore Supra in CEA-Cadarache/France and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) have been used. For both surfaces studied, the experimentally observed threshold for electron emission is at about 50 eV/amu impact energy. Electron emission from the high conductivity side of the carbon tile is 15-20% less as compared to its low conductivity side, whereas results for HOPG are generally between these two cases. Deuterium and hydrogen ions are almost equally effective in liberating electrons from graphite when comparing results for the same impact velocity. Surface-induced dissociation of deuterium ions D 3+ upon impact on Tore Supra graphite tiles, in the collision energy range of 20-100 eV, produced only atomic fragment ions D +. The other possible fragment ion D 2+ could not be observed.

  5. Single-Nanoparticle Collision Events: Tunneling Electron Transfer on a Titanium Dioxide Passivated n-Silicon Electrode.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyun S; Bard, Allen J

    2015-11-01

    Single-nanoparticle collisions were observed on an n-type silicon electrode (600 μm diameter) passivated by a thin layer of amorphous TiO2, where the current steps occurred by tunneling electron transfer. The observed collision frequency was in reasonable agreement with that predicted from theory. The isolated electrode, after a collision experiment, with a Pt/TiO2/n-Si architecture was shown to retain the photoelectrochemical properties of n-Si without photocorrosion or current decay. The Pt/TiO2/n-Si electrode produced 19 mA cm(-2) of photocurrent density under 100 mW cm(-2) irradiation from a xenon lamp during oxygen evolution without current fading for over 12 h. PMID:26377039

  6. Grazing Ion-Surface Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravielle, M. S.

    Electron emission after grazing ion-surface collisions is studied for high impact velocities. We have focused on glancing angles of electron emission where the dominant mechanism is the ionization from atomic bound states. To describe this process, we introduce a quantum model called field distorted-wave (FDW) approximation, which takes into account the effect of the surface interaction on the electronic transition. The FDW model is applied to analyze electron distributions produced by impact of protons on Al and LiF surfaces, which are metal and insulator materials respectively. In the case of metals, we also evaluate the contibution coming from the valence band by employing the binary collisional formalism. Calculated electron emission yields are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data. We find that the maximum of the convoy electron distribution is accelerated for Al and decelerated for LiF, with respect to its position in ion-atom collisions, in quantitative accordance with experiments.

  7. Picturing electron capture to the continuum in the transfer ionization of intermediate-energy He2+ collisions with argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. T.; Ma, X.; Zhang, S. F.; Zhu, X. L.; Akula, Susmitha; Madison, D. H.; Li, B.; Qian, D. B.; Feng, W. T.; Guo, D. L.; Liu, H. P.; Yan, S. C.; Zhang, P. J.; Xu, S.; Chen, X. M.

    2013-01-01

    Electron emission occurring in transfer ionization for He2+ collisions with argon has been investigated using cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy. The double differential cross sections for electron capture to the continuum of the projectile (cusp-shaped electrons) are presented for collision energies from 17.5 to 75 keV/u. For an energy of 30 keV/u, we find a maximum in the experimental ratio of the cusp-shaped electron yield to the total electron yield. This result is explained in terms of the velocity matching between the projectile ion and the electron initially bound to the target. One of the important issues for double electron transitions is the role of electron-electron correlation. If this correlation is weak, then the transfer-ionization process can be viewed as two separate sequential processes. If this correlation is strong, then the transfer-ionization process would happen simultaneously and not sequentially. Our experimental and theoretical results indicate that correlation is weak and that the first step is target ionization followed by charge capture.

  8. Expression of a momentum-transfer scattering at an inelastic collision on electron transport in a collisional plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makabe, Toshiaki

    2015-09-01

    An expression for the inelastic momentum-transfer scattering on the collision integral of the Boltzmann equation is derived in order to reflect the effect of the inelastic collision of an electron with a molecule on the electron kinetics in gases and collisional plasmas. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to formulate the effect of the momentum-transfer scattering of an inelastic collision. The present procedure is a traditional one in which the Boltzmann equation of electrons is expanded by the Spherical-harmonics in velocity space. It is shown that the effect of the inelastic momentum-transfer on the electron transport is expressed only when we consider the first anisotropic part of the velocity distribution in the expanded Boltzmann equation. In addition, case studies are performed by considering the dependence of the scattering angle and the magnitude distribution. The influence of the inelastic momentum-transfer scattering on the electron transport should be further investigated, particularly in the case of a Ramsauer gas having the relation Qvib (v) >Qm (v) in the vicinity of the Ramsauer-minimum in SiH4, CH4, and CF4 etc.

  9. Electron-impact ionization of W27 +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pindzola, M. S.; Loch, S. D.

    2016-06-01

    Electron-impact ionization cross sections for W27 + are calculated using a semirelativistic configuration-average distorted-wave (CADW) method. Calculations for direct ionization, excitation autoionization, and branching ratios are compared with recent calculations by Jonauskas et al. [Phys. Rev. A 91, 012715 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.012715], who used fully relativistic subconfiguration-average distorted-wave (SCADW) and level-to-level distorted-wave (LLDW) methods. Reasonable agreement is found between the CADW and the recent LLDW calculations for direct ionization of the 4 l (l =0 -1 ,3 ) subshells, but not the 4 d subshell, and between the CADW and recent SCADW-LLDW calculations for excitation autoionization of the 4 l (l =0 -2 ) subshells. Reasonable agreement is also found between the CADW and the recent SCADW calculations, including branching ratios, but both differ from the recent LLDW calculations. Additional CADW calculations are made for excitation autoionization, including branching ratios involving the important 3 l (l =1 -2 ) subshells, not examined by Jonauskas et al. [Phys. Rev. A 91, 012715 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.012715].

  10. Electron-Impact Ionization of Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report a study of the total ionization of CH_4 by electron impact and its dissociative ionization from the ^2T_2 channel. The calculation of the total ionization cross section uses the improved Binary-Encounter-Dipole model (iBED).(W. A Huo, Phys. Rev. A (submitted for publication).) The dipole Born cross section in the model is expressed in terms of a three-term representation and the optical oscillator strengths are taken from Backx and Van der Wiel.(C. Backx and M. J. Van der Wiel, I Phys. B 18) 3020 (1975). The nuclear dynamics for the dissociation of the ^2T_2 channel is studied using the statistical model. A search of the potential energy surface of the ^2T_2 state of CH_4^+ shows two minima, of C_2v and C_3v symmetries, in agreement with earlier calculations. ((a) K. Takeshita, J. Chem. Phys. 86), 329 (1987). (b) R. F. Frey and E. R. Davidson, J. Chem. Phys. 88, 1775 (1988). The dissociation of the CH_4^+ to CH_3^+ + H goes through a saddle point. Comparison with recent experimental data will be presented and the role of Jahn-Teller effect discussed.

  11. PREFACE: XXVIII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Guoqing; Cai, Xiaohong; Ding, Dajun; Ma, Xinwen; Zhao, Yongtao

    2014-04-01

    The 28th International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (XXVIII ICPEAC) was held by the Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMP) on 24-30 July, 2013 in Lanzhou, China. The 444 conference participants came from 37 countries and/or regions. Five plenary lectures, more than 80 progress reports and special reports had been arranged according to the decision of the ICPEAC International General Committee. Meanwhile, more than 650 abstracts were selected as poster presentations. Before the conference, three highly distinguished scientists, Professor Joachim Burgdöorfer, Professor Hossein Sadeghpour and Professor Yasunori Yamazaki, presented tutorial lectures with the support of the IMP Branch of Youth Innovation Promotion Association, CAS (IMP-YIPA). During the conference, Professor Jianwei Pan from University of Sciences and Technology in China presented an enlightening public lecture on quantum communication. Furthermore, 2013 IUPAP Young Scientist Prize was awarded to Dr T Jahnke from Johann Wolfgang Goethe University of Germany. The Sheldon Datz Prize for an Outstanding Young Scientist Attending ICPEAC was awarded to Dr Diogo Almeida from University of Fribourg of Switzerland. As a biannual academic conference, ICPEAC is one of the most important international conferences on atomic and molecular physics. The topic of the conference covers the recent progresses in photonic, electronic, atomic, ionic, molecular, cluster collisions with matter. With a history back to 1958, ICPEAC came to China for the very first time. IMP has been preparing the conference six years before, ever since the ICPEAC International General Committee made the decision to hold the XXVIII ICPEAC in Lanzhou. This proceedings includes the papers of the two plenary lectures, 40 progress reports, 17 special reports and 337 posters, which were reviewed and revised according to the comments of the referees. The Local Organizing Committee would like to

  12. Satellite Collision Modeling with Physics-Based Hydrocodes: Debris Generation Predictions of the Iridium-Cosmos Collision Event and Other Impact Events

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, H K; Miller, W O; Levatin, J L; Pertica, A J; Olivier, S S

    2010-09-06

    Satellite collision debris poses risks to existing space assets and future space missions. Predictive models of debris generated from these hypervelocity collisions are critical for developing accurate space situational awareness tools and effective mitigation strategies. Hypervelocity collisions involve complex phenomenon that spans several time- and length-scales. We have developed a satellite collision debris modeling approach consisting of a Lagrangian hydrocode enriched with smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), advanced material failure models, detailed satellite mesh models, and massively parallel computers. These computational studies enable us to investigate the influence of satellite center-of-mass (CM) overlap and orientation, relative velocity, and material composition on the size, velocity, and material type distributions of collision debris. We have applied our debris modeling capability to the recent Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 collision event. While the relative velocity was well understood in this event, the degree of satellite CM overlap and orientation was ill-defined. In our simulations, we varied the collision CM overlap and orientation of the satellites from nearly maximum overlap to partial overlap on the outermost extents of the satellites (i.e, solar panels and gravity boom). As expected, we found that with increased satellite overlap, the overall debris cloud mass and momentum (transfer) increases, the average debris size decreases, and the debris velocity increases. The largest predicted debris can also provide insight into which satellite components were further removed from the impact location. A significant fraction of the momentum transfer is imparted to the smallest debris (< 1-5mm, dependent on mesh resolution), especially in large CM overlap simulations. While the inclusion of the smallest debris is critical to enforcing mass and momentum conservation in hydrocode simulations, there seems to be relatively little interest in their

  13. Satellite Collision Modeling with Physics-Based Hydrocodes: Debris Generation Predictions of the Iridium-Cosmos Collision Event and Other Impact Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, H.; Miller, W.; Levatin, J.; Pertica, A.; Olivier, S.

    2010-09-01

    Satellite collision debris poses risks to existing space assets and future space missions. Predictive models of debris generated from these hypervelocity collisions are critical for developing accurate space situational awareness tools and effective mitigation strategies. Hypervelocity collisions involve complex phenomenon that spans several time and length-scales. We have developed a satellite collision debris modeling approach consisting of a Lagrangian hydrocode enriched with smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), advanced material failure models, detailed satellite mesh models, and massively parallel computers. These computational studies enable us to investigate the influence of satellite center-of-mass (CM) overlap and orientation, relative velocity, and material composition on the size, velocity, and material type distributions of collision debris. We have applied our debris modeling capability to the recent Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 collision event. While the relative velocity was well understood in this event, the degree of satellite CM overlap and orientation was ill-defined. In our simulations, we varied the collision CM overlap and orientation of the satellites from nearly maximum overlap to partial overlap on the outermost extents of the satellites (i.e, solar panels and gravity boom). As expected, we found that with increased satellite overlap, the overall debris cloud mass and momentum (transfer) increases, the average debris size decreases, and the debris velocity increases. The largest predicted debris can also provide insight into which satellite components were further removed from the impact location. A significant fraction of the momentum transfer is imparted to the smallest debris (< 1-5mm, dependent on mesh resolution), especially in large CM overlap simulations. While the inclusion of the smallest debris is critical to enforcing mass and momentum conservation in hydrocode simulations, there seems to be relatively little interest in their

  14. Electron Collision Cross Sections for the Tetraethoxysilane Molecule and Electron Transport Coefficients in Tetraethoxysilane--O2 and Tetraethoxysilane--Ar Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuan, Do Anh; Jeon, Byung-Hoon

    2012-06-01

    A consistent set of low energy electron collision cross sections for tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) molecule has been derived from the measured electron transport coefficients (electron drift velocity W, density-normalized longitudinal diffusion coefficient \\mathit{ND}L, ratio of the longitudinal diffusion coefficient to the electron mobility DL/μ, and Townsend first ionization coefficient α/N) in pure TEOS molecule and those calculated by using an electron swarm study and a two-term approximation of the Boltzmann equation for energy. The electron transport coefficients calculated using the derived set are consistent with the experimental data over a wide range of E/N values (ratio of the electric field E to the neutral number density N). The present set of electron collision cross sections for the TEOS molecule, therefore, is the best available so far for quantitative numerical modeling plasma discharges for processing procedures with materials containing TEOS molecules. Electron transport coefficients in TEOS--O2 and TEOS--Ar mixtures were also calculated and analysed in the E/N range of 1--1000 and 0.01--1000 Td (1 Td = 10-17 V\\cdotcm2), respectively. The Townsend first ionization coefficients were consistent with the available experimental data for the TEOS--O2 mixtures. The W, \\mathit{ND}L, DL/μ, α/N, and electron attachment coefficient η/N in these binary mixtures were the first calculated over almost the entire part of the present E/N range.

  15. Impact of electron irradiation on electron holographic potentiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J. B.; Niermann, T.; Lehmann, M.; Berger, D.; Knauer, A.; Weyers, M.; Koslow, I.; Kneissl, M.

    2014-09-01

    While electron holography in the transmission electron microscope offers the possibility to measure maps of the electrostatic potential of semiconductors down to nanometer dimensions, these measurements are known to underestimate the absolute value of the potential, especially in GaN. We have varied the dose rates of electron irradiation over several orders of magnitude and observed strong variations of the holographically detected voltages. Overall, the results indicate that the electron beam generates electrical currents within the specimens primarily by the photovoltaic effect and due to secondary electron emission. These currents have to be considered for a quantitative interpretation of electron holographic measurements, as their negligence contributes to large parts in the observed discrepancy between the measured and expected potential values in GaN.

  16. Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in Si II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, Francis P.

    2014-07-01

    Energies for the lowest 56 levels, belonging to the 3s2 3p, 3s 3p2, 3p3, 3s2 3d, 3s 3p 3d, 3s2 4ℓ and 3s2 5ℓ configurations of Si II, are calculated using the General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package (GRASP) code. Analogous calculations have also been performed (for up to 175 levels) using the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC). Furthermore, radiative rates are calculated for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions. Extensive comparisons are made with available theoretical and experimental energy levels, and the accuracy of the present results is assessed to be better than 0.1 Ryd. Similarly, the accuracy for radiative rates (and subsequently lifetimes) is estimated to be better than 20 per cent for most of the (strong) transitions. Electron impact excitation collision strengths are also calculated, with the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code (DARC), over a wide energy range up to 13 Ryd. Finally, to determine effective collision strengths, resonances are resolved in a fine energy mesh in the thresholds region. These collision strengths are averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution and results listed over a wide range of temperatures, up to 105.5 K. Our data are compared with earlier R-matrix calculations and differences noted, up to a factor of 2, for several transitions. Although scope remains for improvement, the accuracy for our results of collision strengths and effective collision strengths is assessed to be about 20 per cent for a majority of transitions.

  17. Electron impact ionization cross sections of beryllium-tungsten clusters*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukuba, Ivan; Kaiser, Alexander; Huber, Stefan E.; Urban, Jan; Probst, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We report calculated electron impact ionization cross sections (EICSs) of beryllium-tungsten clusters, BenW with n = 1,...,12, from the ionization threshold to 10 keV using the Deutsch-Märk (DM) and the binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) formalisms. The positions of the maxima of DM and BEB cross sections are mostly close to each other. The DM cross sections are more sensitive with respect to the cluster size. For the clusters smaller than Be4W they yield smaller cross sections than BEB and vice versa larger cross sections than BEB for clusters larger than Be6W. The maximum cross section values for the singlet-spin groundstate clusters range from 7.0 × 10-16 cm2 at 28 eV (BeW) to 54.2 × 10-16 cm2 at 43 eV (Be12W) for the DM cross sections and from 13.5 × 10-16 cm2 at 43 eV (BeW) to 38.9 × 10-16 cm2 at 43 eV (Be12W) for the BEB cross sections. Differences of the EICSs in different isomers and between singlet and triplet states are also explored. Both the DM and BEB cross sections could be fitted perfectly to a simple expression used in modeling and simulation codes in the framework of nuclear fusion research. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2015-60583-7

  18. The FEM-R-Matrix Approach: Use of Mixed Finite Element and Gaussian Basis Sets for Electron Molecule Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuemmel, Helmar T.; Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    For the calculation of electron molecule collision cross sections R-matrix methods automatically take advantage of the division of configuration space into an inner region (I) bounded by radius tau b, where the scattered electron is within the molecular charge cloud and the system is described by an correlated Configuration Interaction (CI) treatment in close analogy to bound state calculations, and an outer region (II) where the scattered electron moves in the long-range multipole potential of the target and efficient analytic methods can be used for solving the asymptotic Schroedinger equation plus boundary conditions.

  19. Analysis and simulation for a model of electron impact excitation/deexcitation and ionization/recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Bokai; Caflisch, Russel E.; Barekat, Farzin; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2015-10-15

    This paper describes a kinetic model and a corresponding Monte Carlo simulation method for excitation/deexcitation and ionization/recombination by electron impact in a plasma free of external fields. The atoms and ions in the plasma are represented by continuum densities and the electrons by a particle distribution. A Boltzmann-type equation is formulated and a corresponding H-theorem is formally derived. An efficient Monte Carlo method is developed for an idealized analytic model of the excitation and ionization collision cross sections. To accelerate the simulation, the reduced rejection method and binary search method are used to overcome the singular rate in the recombination process. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the method on spatially homogeneous problems. The evolution of the electron distribution function and atomic states is studied, revealing the possibility under certain circumstances of system relaxation towards stationary states that are not the equilibrium states, a potential non-ergodic behavior.

  20. Electronic management: Exploring its impact on small business

    SciTech Connect

    Bewayo, E.D.

    1994-12-31

    Macworld magazine recently reported that more than one in five companies eavesdrops electronically on its employees. Electronic eavesdropping is one name given to electronic management Besides being known as electronic eaves-dropping, electronic management also goes by electronic monitoring, electronic supervision, electronic snooping, electronic sweat-shopping, electronic surveillance, electronic Big Brothering, and computerized performance monitoring. Some of these labels connote negative things about electronic management, and relate to applications of electronic management to extreme and unreasonable levels. In the rest of this paper the terms electronic management and electronic monitoring will be used interchangeably. In this paper we discuss the impacts of electronic management, positive and negative, on workplaces, with emphasis on small businesses. This small business emphasis is partly because of the author`s research interests, and partly because most of what has been written on electronic management has been based on large business contexts. This large business bias has been partly due to the fact that the early inroads of electronic management were almost exclusively limited to large companies--beginning with telephone service observation in the late 1800s. However, now with the growing affordability and, consequently, the proliferation of electronic technology (especially the computer), electronic management is no longer the monopoly of large corporations. Electronic management has now reached restaurants, drug stores, liquor stores, convenience stores, and trucking companies. And in some industries, e.g., banking, every business, regardless of size, uses electronic monitoring.

  1. COLLISIONS BETWEEN GRAVITY-DOMINATED BODIES. II. THE DIVERSITY OF IMPACT OUTCOMES DURING THE END STAGE OF PLANET FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Sarah T.; Leinhardt, Zoee M. E-mail: zoe.leinhardt@bristol.ac.uk

    2012-05-20

    Numerical simulations of the stochastic end stage of planet formation typically begin with a population of embryos and planetesimals that grow into planets by merging. We analyzed the impact parameters of collisions leading to the growth of terrestrial planets from recent N-body simulations that assumed perfect merging and calculated more realistic outcomes using a new analytic collision physics model. We find that collision outcomes are diverse and span all possible regimes: hit-and-run, merging, partial accretion, partial erosion, and catastrophic disruption. The primary outcomes of giant impacts between planetary embryos are approximately evenly split between partial accretion, graze-and-merge, and hit-and-run events. To explore the cumulative effects of more realistic collision outcomes, we modeled the growth of individual planets with a Monte Carlo technique using the distribution of impact parameters from N-body simulations. We find that fewer planets reached masses >0.7 M{sub Earth} using the collision physics model compared to simulations that assumed every collision results in perfect merging. For final planets with masses >0.7 M{sub Earth}, 60% are enriched in their core-to-mantle mass fraction by >10% compared to the initial embryo composition. Fragmentation during planet formation produces significant debris ({approx}15% of the final mass) and occurs primarily by erosion of the smaller body in partial accretion and hit-and-run events. In partial accretion events, the target body grows by preferentially accreting the iron core of the projectile and the escaping fragments are derived primarily from the silicate mantles of both bodies. Thus, the bulk composition of a planet can evolve via stochastic giant impacts.

  2. Effective collision strengths for excitation and de-excitation of nebular [O III] optical and infrared lines with κ distributed electron energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, P. J.; Sochi, Taha

    2015-05-01

    We present effective collision strengths for electron excitation and de-excitation of the 10 forbidden transitions between the five lowest energy levels of the astronomically abundant doubly ionized oxygen ion, O2+. The raw collision strength data were obtained from an R-matrix intermediate coupling calculation using the Breit-Pauli relativistic approximation published previously by the authors. The effective collision strengths were calculated with κ-distributed electron energies and are tabulated as a function of the electron temperature and κ.

  3. 4-HNE Adduct Stability Characterized by Collision-Induced Dissociation and Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Kristofer S.; Kellersberger, Katherine A.; Gomez, Jose D.; Petersen, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) alters numerous proteomic and genomic processes. Understanding chemical mechanisms of 4-HNE interactions with biomolecules and their respective stabilities may lead to new discoveries in biomarkers for numerous diseases of oxidative stress. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) MS/MS were utilized to examine the stability of a 4-HNE-Cys Michael adduct. CID conditions resulted in the neutral loss of 4-HNE, also known as a retro-Michael addition reaction (RMA). Consequently, performing ETD fragmentation on this same adduct did not result in RMA. Interestingly, 4-HNE adduct reduction via sodium borohydride (NaBH4) treatment stabilized against the CID induced RMA. In a direct comparison of three forms of 4-HNE adducts, computational modeling revealed sizeable shifts in the shape and orientation of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) density around the 4-HNE-Cys moiety. These findings demonstrate that ETD MS/MS analysis can be used to improve the detection of 4-HNE-protein modifications by preventing RMA reactions from occurring. PMID:22404378

  4. Electron collisions with small esters: A joint experimental-theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, G. L. C.; da Silva, L. A.; de Sousa, W. J. C.; Sugohara, R. T.; Iga, I.; dos Santos, A. S.; Machado, L. E.; Homem, M. G. P.; Brescansin, L. M.; Lucchese, R. R.; Lee, M.-T.

    2016-03-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation on elastic electron scattering by two small esters, namely, methyl formate and ethyl acetate, is reported. Experimental differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections are given in the 30-1000 eV and 10∘-120∘ ranges. The relative-flow technique was used to determine such quantities. Particularly for methyl formate, a theoretical study was also carried out in the 1-500 eV range. A complex optical potential derived from a Hartree-Fock molecular wave function was used to represent the collision dynamics, whereas the Padé approximation was used to solve the scattering equations. In addition, calculations based on the framework of the independent-atom model (IAM) were also performed for both targets. In general, there is good agreement between our experimental data and the present theoretical results calculated using the Padé approximation. The theoretical results using the IAM also agree well with the experimental data at 200 eV and above. Moreover, for methyl formate, our calculations reveal a 2A'' (π*) resonance at about 3.0 eV and a σ*-type resonance centered at about 8.0 eV in the 2A' scattering channel. The π* resonance is also seen in other targets containing a carbonyl group.

  5. Elastic cross sections for low-energy electron collisions with tetrahydropyran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2016-02-01

    We report on calculated elastic cross sections for low-energy electron collisions with the cyclic ether tetrahydropyran (C5H10O). The calculations were carried out with the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with norm-conserving pseudopotentials in the static-exchange-polarization approximation for energies up to 20 eV. Our cross sections are compared with previous results obtained for cyclohexane and 1,4-dioxane, since the three molecules present similar structures. The calculated differential cross sections for these three molecules present similarities, except at low scattering angles, where the differential cross sections of tetrahydropyran present a sharp increase due to the permanent dipole moment of the molecule. The similarities observed in the cross sections reveal that the molecular geometry plays an important role in the description of scattering process. We also compared our calculated elastic integral cross section for tetrahydropyran with experimental total cross sections data available in the literature and found a good qualitative agreement between both results.

  6. Resonances and threshold effects in low-energy electron collisions with methyl halides

    SciTech Connect

    Gallup, Gordon A.; Fabrikant, Ilya I.

    2007-03-15

    Cross sections for elastic and inelastic electron collisions with CH{sub 3}X (X=Cl,Br,I) molecules are calculated. For the lowest partial wave, the resonance R-matrix theory, and for the higher partial waves, the theory of scattering by dipolar plus polarization potential, are used. It is shown that the rotationally elastic scattering amplitude for a polar molecule in the fixed-nuclei approximation is logarithmically divergent for the forward direction, and a closure formula is derived to speed up the convergence at small angles. In treating the nuclear motion, only C-X stretch vibrations are taken into account. The dipole moment as a function of the C-X distance is modeled by a function incorporating the experimental value of the molecular dipole moments at the equilibrium distance and the derivatives of the dipole moments extracted from the experimental data on infrared intensities. This is supplemented by ab initio calculations of the dipole moment function for CH{sub 3}Br using the multiconfigurational valence bond method. The results for scattering cross sections show pronounced features caused by vibrational Feshbach resonances and threshold cusps. The features are most noticeable at the v=6, 7, and 8 thresholds in CH{sub 3}Cl, at the v=3 and 4 thresholds in CH{sub 3}Br, and at the v=1 threshold in CH{sub 3}I.

  7. Ionization and electron-capture cross sections for single- and multiple-electron removal from H2O by Li3 + impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, H.; Wolff, W.; Montenegro, E. C.; Tavares, André C.; Lüdde, H. J.; Schenk, G.; Horbatsch, M.; Kirchner, T.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report experimental and theoretical ionization and electron-capture cross sections for single-, double- and triple-electron removal from H2O by Li3 + impact at energies ranging from 0.75 to 5.8 MeV. The experiment was carried out by selecting both the final charge state of the projectile and the ejected fragments in coincidence to obtain cross sections associated with ionization and electron-capture channels. The ionic fragments and the emitted electrons produced under single-collision conditions were collected by a time-of-flight spectrometer with single-hit (e.g., OH++H0 ) and double-hit events (e.g., OH++H+ ) properly discriminated. For the one- and two-electron removal cases, the calculations based on the basis generator method for orbital propagation agree well with the experiment for most of the collision channels studied. Auger-electron emission after vacancy production in the inner 2 a1 orbital of H2O is shown to have a substantial effect on the final charge-state distributions over the entire impact-energy interval.

  8. Fragmentation of the adenine and guanine molecules induced by electron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Minaev, B. F. E-mail: boris@theochem.kth.se; Shafranyosh, M. I.; Svida, Yu. Yu; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, I. I.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A.

    2014-05-07

    Secondary electron emission is the most important stage in the mechanism of radiation damage to DNA biopolymers induced by primary ionizing radiation. These secondary electrons ejected by the primary electron impacts can produce further ionizations, initiating an avalanche effect, leading to genome damage through the energy transfer from the primary objects to sensitive biomolecular targets, such as nitrogenous bases, saccharides, and other DNA and peptide components. In this work, the formation of positive and negative ions of purine bases of nucleic acids (adenine and guanine molecules) under the impact of slow electrons (from 0.1 till 200 eV) is studied by the crossed electron and molecular beams technique. The method used makes it possible to measure the molecular beam intensity and determine the total cross-sections for the formation of positive and negative ions of the studied molecules, their energy dependences, and absolute values. It is found that the maximum cross section for formation of the adenine and guanine positive ions is reached at about 90 eV energy of the electron beam and their absolute values are equal to 2.8 × 10{sup −15} and 3.2 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2}, respectively. The total cross section for formation of the negative ions is 6.1 × 10{sup −18} and 7.6 × 10{sup −18} cm{sup 2} at the energy of 1.1 eV for adenine and guanine, respectively. The absolute cross-section values for the molecular ions are measured and the cross-sections of dissociative ionization are determined. Quantum chemical calculations are performed for the studied molecules, ions and fragments for interpretation of the crossed beams experiments.

  9. Electron impact mass spectrometry of oxindole, pseudoindoxyle and indolenine derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, J. Gonzalo; Urrutia, Anahí; Canoira, Laureano

    1997-02-01

    The electron impact mass spectra of 22 compounds, grouped in five series, containing the oxindole, pseudoindoxyle and indolenine rings, some of them with potential pharmacological interest, have been studied, and their fragmentation patterns have been proposed on the basis of metastable studies, accurate mass measurements and fragmentation schemes upon electron impact of structurally related alkaloids.

  10. Projectile energy and atomic number dependence of electron capture from pair production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, A.; Gould, Harvey; Feinberg, B.; Bossingham, R.; Meyerhof, W. E.

    1994-10-01

    We report the first measurement of the energy dependence of electron capture from electron-positron pair production in relativistic heavy ion collisions. For a La57+ beam incident on Au, Ag, and Cu targets at energies of 0.405, 0.956, and 1.3 GeV/u we find that the cross sections for capture from pair production and the free pair production process increase with increasing collision energy at similar rates. Combining with uranium data reported previously gives a projectile atomic number dependence for 0.956 GeV/u ions on a Au target of Z6.54+/-0.65p for capture from pair production and Z1.53+/-0.80p for the free pair production process.

  11. Effect of collective response on electron capture and excitation in collisions of highly charged ions with fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Kadhane, U; Misra, D; Singh, Y P; Tribedi, Lokesh C

    2003-03-01

    Projectile deexcitation Lyman x-ray emission following electron capture and K excitation has been studied in collisions of bare and Li-like sulphur ions (of energy 110 MeV) with fullerenes (C(60)/C(70)) and different gaseous targets. The intensity ratios of different Lyman x-ray lines in collisions with fullerenes are found to be substantially lower than those for the gas targets, both for capture and excitation. This has been explained in terms of a model based on "solidlike" effect, namely, wakefield induced stark mixing of the excited states populated via electron capture or K excitation: a collective phenomenon of plasmon excitation in the fullerenes under the influence of heavy, highly charged ions. PMID:12689221

  12. Electron impact cross section measurements related to 'nuclear pumping'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.

    1979-01-01

    In direct nuclear pumped lasers the high energy fission fragments generate a large number of secondary electrons and these electrons are mainly responsible for achieving the population inversion in the lasing media. Laboratory measurements concerned with these electron impact processes are summarized and new results are presented on rare gases, N2, CO, CF3I and UF6.

  13. Excitation and ionization of highly charged ions by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, D.H.

    1989-11-15

    Two approaches for very rapid calculation of atomic data for high temperature plasma modeling have been developed. The first uses hydrogenic basis states and has been developed and applied in many papers discussed in previous progress reports. Hence, it is only briefly discussed here. The second is a very rapid, yet accurate, fully relativistic approach that has been developed over the past two or three years. It is described in more detail. Recently it has been applied to large scale production of atomic data. Specifically, it has been used to calculate relativistic distorted wave collision strengths and oscillator strengths for the following: all transitions from the ground level to the n=3 and 4 excited levels in the 71 Neon-like ions with nuclear charge number Z in the range 22 {le} Z {le} 92; all transitions among the 2s{sub {1/2}}, 2p{sub {1/2}} and 2p{sub 3/2} levels and from them to all nlj levels with n=3,4 and 5 in the 85 Li-like ions with 8 {le} Z {le} 92; all transitions among the 3s{sub {1/2}}, 3p{sub 3/2}, 3d{sub 3/2} and 3d{sub 5/2} levels and from them to all nlj levels with n=4 and 5 in the 71 Na-like ions with 22 {le} Z {le} 92; and all transitions among 4s{sub {1/2}}, 4p{sub {1/2}}, 4p{sub 3/2}, 4d{sub 3/2}, 4d{sub 5/2}, 4f{sub 5/2} and 4f{sub 7/2} levels and from them to all nlj levels with n=5 in the 33 Cu-like ions with 60 {le} Z {le} 92. Also the program has been extended to give cross-sections for excitation to specific magnetic sublevels of the target ion by an electron beam and very recently it has been extended to give relativistic distorted wave cross sections for ionization of highly charged ions by electron impact.

  14. The behavior of beams of relativistic non-thermal electrons under the influence of collisions and synchrotron losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mctiernan, James M.; Petrosian, Vahe

    1989-01-01

    For many astrophysical situations, such as in solar flares or cosmic gamma-ray bursts, continuum gamma rays with energies up to hundreds of MeV were observed, and can be interpreted to be due to bremsstrahlung radiation by relativistic electrons. The region of acceleration for these particles is not necessarily the same as the region in which the radiation is produced, and the effects of the transport of the electrons must be included in the general problem. Hence it is necessary to solve the kinetic equation for relativistic electrons, including all the interactions and loss mechanisms relevant at such energies. The resulting kinetic equation for non-thermal electrons, including the effects of Coulomb collisions and losses due to synchrotron emission, was solved analytically in some simple limiting cases, and numerically for the general cases including constant and varying background plasma density and magnetic field. New approximate analytic solutions are presented for collision dominated cases, for small pitch angles and all energies, synchrotron dominated cases, both steady-state and time dependent, for all pitch angles and energies, and for cases when both synchrotron and collisional energy losses are important, but for relativistic electrons. These analytic solutions are compared to the full numerical results in the proper limits. These results will be useful for calculation of spectra and angular distribution of the radiation (x rays, gamma-rays, and microwaves) emitted via synchrotron or bremsstrahlung processes by the electrons. These properties and their relevance to observations will be observed in subsequent papers.

  15. Experimental study on impact disruption of porous asteroids: Effects of oblique impact and multiple collisions on impact strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Minami; Takano, Shota; Matsue, Kazuma; Arakawa, Masahiko

    2015-08-01

    Most of asteroids would have pores and a plenty of pre-cracks in their interiors, and the pre-cracks could be formed by multiple impacts at various impact angles. Porosity and pre-cracks are important physical properties controlling the impact strength. Okamoto and Arakawa (2009) did impact experiments of porous gypsum spheres to obtain the impact strength of porous asteroids, but they carried out only single impact experiments on the same target at head-on. In this study, we conducted oblique impact and multiple impacts on porous gypsum and examined the effects of impact angle and pre-cracks on the impact strength.We carried out impact experiments by using the one-stage He gas gun and the two-stage H2 gas gun at Kobe University. The impact velocities were <200 m/s (low-vi) and >3 km/s (high-vi). Targets were porous gypsum spheres with the porosity of 55% and the diameters of 7 or 12 cm. The projectiles were a porous gypsum sphere with the diameter of 2.5 cm at low-vi or a polycarbonate sphere with the diameter of 4.7 cm at high-vi. The impact angle changed from 15° to 90°, and the projectile was impacted on the same target for 2-15 times. The impact phenomena were observed by a high-speed digital video camera to measure the fragment velocities.The oblique impact experiments showed that the impact strength did not depend on the impact angle θ between 45° and 90°, and obtained to be ~2000 J/kg, while it drastically changed at the θ from 15° to 30°. We reanalyzed our results by using the effective energy density defined as Qsin2θ, where Q is the energy density, and found that most of the results were consistent with the results of head-on impacts. The multiple impacts showed that the impact strength of pre-impacted targets was larger than that of intact targets in the case of low-vi. This might be caused by the compaction of the target surface. In the case of high-vi, the impact strength of pre-impacted targets was smaller than that of intact targets. This

  16. Operational Impact of Improved Space Tracking on Collision Avoidance in the Future LEO Space Debris Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibert, D.; Borgeson, D.; Peterson, G.; Jenkin, A.; Sorge, M.

    2010-09-01

    Even if global space policy successfully curtails on orbit explosions and ASAT demonstrations, studies indicate that the number of debris objects in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) will continue to grow solely from debris on debris collisions and debris generated from new launches. This study examines the threat posed by this growing space debris population over the next 30 years and how improvements in our space tracking capabilities can reduce the number of Collision Avoidance (COLA) maneuvers required keep the risk of operational satellite loss within tolerable limits. Particular focus is given to satellites operated by the Department of Defense (DoD) and Intelligence Community (IC) in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The following debris field and space tracking performance parameters were varied parametrically in the experiment to study the impact on the number of collision avoidance maneuvers required: - Debris Field Density (by year 2009, 2019, 2029, and 2039) - Quality of Track Update (starting 1 sigma error ellipsoid) - Future Propagator Accuracy (error ellipsoid growth rates - Special Perturbations in 3 axes) - Track Update Rate for Debris (stochastic) - Track Update Rate for Payloads (stochastic) Baseline values matching present day tracking performance for quality of track update, propagator accuracy, and track update rate were derived by analyzing updates to the unclassified Satellite Catalog (SatCat). Track update rates varied significantly for active payloads and debris and as such we used different models for the track update rates for military payloads and debris. The analysis was conducted using the System Effectiveness Analysis Simulation (SEAS) an agent based model developed by the United States Air Force Space Command’s Space and Missile Systems Center to evaluate the military utility of space systems. The future debris field was modeled by The Aerospace Corporation using a tool chain which models the growth of the 10cm+ debris field using high fidelity

  17. Lead-Free Electronics: Impact for Space Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Pb is used as a constituent in solder alloys used to connect and attach electronic parts to printed wiring boards (PWBs). Similar Pbbearing alloys are electroplated or hot dipped onto the terminations of electronic parts to protect the terminations and make them solderable. Changing to Pb-free solders and termination finishes has introduced significant technical challenges into the supply chain. Tin/lead (Sn/Pb) alloys have been the solders of choice for electronics for more than 50 years. Pb-free solder alloys are available but there is not a plug-in replacement for 60/40 or 63/37 (Sn/Pb) alloys, which have been the industry workhorses.

  18. Atomic Oxygen Emission Cross Sections resulting from Electron Impact in the FUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noren, C.; Kanik, I.; James, G. K.; Khakoo, M. A.

    1998-10-01

    The atomic oxygen emissions from astronomical sources provide valuable (perhaps unique) information on densities, gas dynamics, etc. of the atmospheres of the planets and their satellites. For example, the atomic oxygen resonance transition at 130.4 nm is a prominent emission feature in the vacuum ultraviolet spectrum of the Earth's aurora and day glow as well as the atmospheres of Europa, Ganymede, Mars and Venus. In this poster we present our measurements of the electron impact emission cross sections of the 130.4 nm atomic oxygen feature from threshold to 1000 eV impact energy. A high density atomic oxygen beam, created by a microwave discharge source, was intersected at right angles by a magnetically focused electron beam. The experimental apparatus consists of an electron impact collision chamber in tandem with a 0.2m UV spectrometer equipped with a CsI coated channel electron multiplier detector. Emitted photons corresponding to radiative decay of collisionally excited state of the 130.4 nm atomic oxygen feature were detected.

  19. Cross sections for electron capture and excitation in collisions of Liq+ (q=1, 2, 3) with atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Li, X. Y.; Wang, J. G.; Janev, R. K.

    2014-06-01

    The two-center atomic orbital close-coupling method is employed to study electron capture and excitation reactions in collisions of Liq+ (q = 1-3) ions with ground state atomic hydrogen in the ion energy range from 0.1 keV/u to 300 keV/u, where u is the atomic mass unit. The interaction of the active electron with the projectile ions (Li+, Li2+) is represented by a model potential. Total and state-selective cross sections for charge transfer and excitation processes are calculated and compared with data from other sources when available.

  20. F + H2 collisions on two electronic potential energy surfaces - Quantum-mechanical study of the collinear reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, I. H.; Baer, M.; George, T. F.

    1979-01-01

    Collinear quantum calculations are carried out for reactive F + H2 collisions on two electronic potential energy surfaces. The resulting transmission and reflection probabilities exhibit much greater variation with energy than single-surface studies would lead us to anticipate. Transmission to low-lying product channels is increased by orders of magnitude by the presence of the second surface; however, branching ratios among product states are found to be independent of the initial electronic state of the reactants. These apparently contradictory aspects of the calculation are discussed and a tentative explanation put forward to resolve them.

  1. Electronic shell model contemplation of the dissociation dynamics of Al 8+: a collision-induced dissociation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingólfsson, Oddur; Takeo, Harutoshi; Nonose, Shinji

    1999-10-01

    For the collision-induced dissociation of small cationic aluminum clusters, the release of Al + is known to dominate. An exception is Al 8+, where we find the neutral atom evaporation to be energetically favorable, and to couple strongly with the Al + release. These experimental results are discussed in the frame of the Clemenger-Nilsson electronic shell model. We find the electronic shell model to offer a consistent interpretation of the energy dependence of the dissociation dynamics of Al 8+, if the crucial role of collisional deformation is taken into account.

  2. PREFACE: XXIX International Conference on Photonic, Electronic, and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, C.; Rabadán, I.; García, G.; Méndez, L.; Martín, F.

    2015-09-01

    The 29th International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (XXIX ICPEAC) was held at the Palacio de Congresos ''El Greco'', Toledo, Spain, on 22-28 July, 2015, and was organized by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) and the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC). ICPEAC is held biannually and is one of the most important international conferences on atomic and molecular physics. The topic of the conference covers the recent progresses in photonic, electronic, and atomic collisions with matter. With a history back to 1958, ICPEAC came to Spain in 2015 for the very first time. UAM and CSIC had been preparing the conference for six years, ever since the ICPEAC International General Committee made the decision to hold the XXIX ICPEAC in Toledo. The conference gathered 670 participants from 52 countries and attracted 854 contributed papers for presentation in poster sessions. Among the latter, 754 are presented in issues 2-12 of this volume of the Journal of Physics Conference Series. In addition, five plenary lectures, including the opening one by the Nobel laureate Prof. Ahmed H. Zewail and the lectures by Prof. Maciej Lewenstein, Prof. Paul Scheier, Prof. Philip H. Bucksbaum, and Prof. Stephen J. Buckman, 62 progress reports and 26 special reports were presented following the decision of the ICPEAC International General Committee. Detailed write-ups of most of the latter are presented in issue 1 of this volume, constituting a comprehensive tangible record of the meeting. On the occasion of the International Year of Light (IYL2015) and with the support of the Fundación Española para la Ciencia y la Tecnología (FECYT), the program was completed with two public lectures delivered by the Nobel laureate Prof. Serge Haroche and the Príncipe de Asturias laureate Prof. Pedro M. Echenique on, respectively, ''Fifty years of laser revolutions in physics'rquot; and ''The sublime usefulness of useless science''. Also a

  3. Independent-electron analysis of the x-ray spectra from single-electron capture in Ne10 + collisions with He, Ne, and Ar atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Anthony C. K.; Kirchner, Tom

    2015-09-01

    We present a theoretical study on the x-ray spectra from single-electron capture in 4.54 keV/amu Ne10 +-He, -Ne, and -Ar collisions. Single-particle capture probabilities were calculated using the two-center basis generator method within the independent electron model. In this framework we investigated the effects of a time-dependent screening potential that models target response on capture cross sections and x-ray spectra. Excellent agreement is shown with the previously measured relative cross sections and x-ray spectra and calculations based on the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method using the no-response single-particle electron capture probabilities in a multinomial single-electron capture analysis. Our results demonstrate the importance of using this consistent statistical analysis of single-electron capture within the independent electron model; a requirement that a previous calculation for the same collision problem using the two-center atomic-orbital close-coupling method may not have considered.

  4. Electron Collision Cross Sections for the BF3 Molecule and Electron Transport Coefficients in BF3--Ar and BF3--SiH4 Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hien, Pham Xuan; Jeon, Byung-Hoon; Tuan, Do Anh

    2013-03-01

    A consistent set of low-energy electron collision cross sections for the boron trifluoride (BF3) molecule has been derived from the measured electron transport coefficients for a pure BF3 molecule using an electron swarm study and a two-term approximation of the Boltzmann equation for energy. The electron transport coefficients, which were calculated using the derived set, are consistent with the experimental data over a wide range of E/N values (ratio of the electric field E to the neutral number density N). The present set of electron collision cross sections for the BF3 molecule, therefore, is the best available so far for the quantitative numerical modeling of plasma discharges for processing procedures with materials containing BF3 molecules. The electron-transport coefficients for BF3--Ar and BF3--SiH4 mixtures were also calculated and analyzed in a wide range of E/N ratios for the first time. The presence of a remarkable synergism in the Townsend first ionization coefficient has been pointed out in BF3--SiH4 mixtures.

  5. Electron collision cross sections for the TMS molecule and electron transport coefficients in TMS-Ar and TMS-O2 mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hien, Pham Xuan; Tuan, Do Anh; Jeon, Byung-Hoon

    2012-07-01

    A consistent set of low-energy electron-collision cross sections for the tetramethylsilane (TMS) molecule has been derived from the measured electron transport coefficients for a pure TMS molecule by using an electron swarm study and a two-term approximation of the Boltzmann equation for energy. The electron transport coefficients, which were calculated by using the derived set, are consistent with the experimental data over a wide range of E/N values (ratio of the electric field E to the neutral number density N). The present set of electron collision cross sections for the TMS molecule, therefore, is the best available so far for quantitative numerical modeling of plasma discharges for processing procedures with materials containing TMS molecules. The electron-transport coefficients in TMS-Ar and TMS-O2 mixtures were also calculated and analyzed in a wide range of E/N ratios for the first time. The presence of a remarkable synergism in the Townsend first ionization coefficient has been pointed out in the TMS-O2 mixtures.

  6. Rotational and translational effects in collisions of electronically excited diatomic hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosley, David R.

    1988-01-01

    Collisional quenching and vibrational energy proceed competitively with rotational energy transfer for several excited states of the diatomic radicals OH, NH, and CH. This occurs for a wide variety of molecular collision partners. This phenomenon permits the examination of the influence of rotational motion on the collision dynamics of these theoretically tractable species. Measurements can also be made as a function of temperature, i.e., collision velocity. In OH (sup 2 sigma +), both vibrational transfer and quenching are found to decrease with an increase in rotational level, while quenching decreases with increasing temperature. This behavior indicates that for OH, anisotropic attractive forces govern the entrance channel dynamics for these collisions. The quenching of NH (sup 3 pi sub i) by many (although not all) collision partners also decreases with increasing rotational and translational energy, and NH (sup 1 pi) behaves much like OH (sup 2 sigma +). However, the quenching of CH (sup 2 delta) appears to decrease with increasing rotation but increases with increasing temperature, suggesting in this case anisotropic forces involving a barrier or repulsive wall. Such similarities and differences should furnish useful comparisons with both simple and detailed theoretical pictures of the appropriate collision dynamics.

  7. Correlations with Non-Photonic Electrons in√ sNN = 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions in STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkelberger, Lloyd Edward, Jr.

    At sufficiently high temperatures and densities quarks and gluons exist in a deconfined state called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). QGP existed in the Universe shortly after the Big Bang, and today is created in accelerator based experiments which collide heavy nuclei at high energies. Results from these experiments point to a hot, dense and strongly interacting state of deconfined quarks and gluons. The study of heavy flavor probes (those originating from c and b quarks) is an active area of research in heavy ion collisions. Heavy quarks are produced in the initial hard scatterings of collisions and thus are sensitive to the entire evolution of the medium. They also potentially have different sensitivity to medium induced energy loss compared to light flavors. This dissertation investigates the interactions of heavy flavor quarks with the medium by studying correlations between electrons from heavy flavor decays and hadrons. At high transverse momentum, the direction of the electron is highly correlated with the direction of the parent heavy flavor meson. We look for evidence of energy loss in the QGP as well as jet induced effects on the medium. We present electron-hadron correlations from Au+Au collisions in a wide range of centrality bins as well as correlations from p+p. The datasets used are the best currently available due to high statistics and low material in the detector. We also investigate the dependence on the orientation of the trigger particle to the event plane to look for path length dependent effects on the correlation as well as non-flow contributions to electron electron v2.

  8. Electron-impact excitation of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    A review of electron-ion beam experiments is given. Techniques, difficulties, and present trends in this area are discussed. Measured cross sections are compared with theoretical results and the current level of agreement is assessed. 74 references. (WHK)

  9. Ionization yield in xenon due to electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayashankar

    1982-04-01

    The ionization yield in xenon for complete energy degradation of electrons with initial energy up to 1 keV has been calculated by solving the generalized Fowler equation. The expression for the energy spectrum of secondary electrons from the O shell was obtained by using the empirical scaling functions to weight the Williams-Weizsäcker cross section for glancing collisions and the Mott cross section for knock-on collisions. The total ionization and excitation cross sections were taken from the recent evaluation reported by De Heer et al. Contributions from the inner-shell ionization and the Auger process were explicitly taken into account. The results are expressed in terms of the quantity W, the mean energy required to produce an ion pair. The W value is found to decrease with increasing incident energy, finally approaching a constant value of 23.1 eV for electrons with an energy above 200 eV. The results are generally in good agreement with the available experimental work.

  10. Electron impact vibrational excitation of methyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaamini, Ahmad; Hargreaves, Leigh; Khakoo, Murtadha

    2016-05-01

    Low energy differential cross sections and excitation functions for vibrational excitation of CH3 Cl are presented for five vibrational features in the electron energy loss spectrum of this molecule. Electron energies range from 1 eV to 15 eV and scattering angles from 10o to 125o. Results will be compared to existing data for CH3 Cl in the literature. Funded by a NSF-AMOP-RUI Grant.

  11. Electron impact polarization of atomic spectral lines. I - A general theoretical scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fineschi, Silvano; Degl'innocenti, Egidio L.

    1992-01-01

    A suitable theoretical scheme able to describe, in a wide variety of astrophysical situations, the phenomenon of atomic line polarization by electron impact is developed. Starting from the general principles of quantum mechanics and assuming the Born approximation, the rate equations for the density matrix elements of a multilevel atomic system, interacting with a nonrelativistic electron beam having any kind of angular distribution, are derived in full generality. The resulting theory generalizes the previous ones by accounting for the collisional rates and the cross sections concerning both inelastic and superelastic collisions (in any geometrical situation), and, moreover, by taking into account the coherences among Zeeman sublevels split by a magnetic field. As an example of particular relevance, the general formulas derived in the first sections of the paper are subsequently particularized to the case of the electric dipole interaction.

  12. Processes involving electron capture and multiple ionization in collisions of fast H+ and He2+ ions with lead atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCartney, P. C. E.; Shah, M. B.; Geddes, J.; Gilbody, H. B.

    1999-12-01

    A crossed-beam technique incorporating time-of-flight analysis and coincidence counting of the collision products has been used to study Pbq+ formation with q up to 8 in collisions between ground-state Pb atoms and H+ and He2+ ions within the range 50-600 keV amu-1. The separate cross sections for simple charge transfer, transfer ionization, and pure ionization leading to the formation of Pbq+ ions have been obtained and the relative importance of these processes has been established. Accurate measurements and rigorous theoretical descriptions of these multielectron processes in such heavy atoms are difficult and data are still very limited. The present measurements have been designed to extend our previous studies of multiple ionization of a few selected heavy metal atoms and to provide a further check on the extent to which the main collision processes can be described quantitatively in terms of simple models based on an independent electron description. In our previous work with Fe, Cu, and Ga atoms using the same experimental approach, we were able to describe the formation of multiply charged ions through both transfer ionization and pure ionization with a high degree of success using an independent electron model. However, the present results for Pb show that the success of this simple approach is much more limited for these much heavier atoms.

  13. Electron impact excitation of highly charged sodium-like ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaha, M.; Davis, J.

    1978-01-01

    Optical transition probabilities and electron collision strengths for Ca X, Fe XVI, Zn XX, Kr XXVI and Mo XXXII are calculated for transitions between n equal to 3 and n equal to 4 levels. The calculations neglect relativistic effects on the radial functions. A semi-empirical approach provides wave functions of the excited states; a distorted wave function without exchange is employed to obtain the excitation cross sections. The density dependence of the relative intensities of certain emission lines in the sodium isoelectronic sequence is also discussed.

  14. Formation and reshuffling of disulfide bonds in bovine serum albumin demonstrated using tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced and electron-transfer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, Ine; Lagrain, Bert; Scherf, Katharina A; Lambrecht, Marlies A; Koehler, Peter; Delcour, Jan A

    2015-01-01

    Thermolysin hydrolyzates of freshly isolated, extensively stored (6 years, 6 °C, dry) and heated (60 min, 90 °C, in excess water) bovine serum albumin (BSA) samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography (LC) electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) using alternating electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). The positions of disulfide bonds and free thiol groups in the different samples were compared to those deduced from the crystal structure of native BSA. Results revealed non-enzymatic posttranslational modifications of cysteine during isolation, extensive dry storage, and heating. Heat-induced extractability loss of BSA was linked to the impact of protein unfolding on the involvement of specific cysteine residues in intermolecular and intramolecular thiol-disulfide interchange and thiol oxidation reactions. The here developed approach holds promise for exploring disulfide bond formation and reshuffling in various proteins under conditions relevant for chemical, biochemical, pharmaceutical and food processing. PMID:26193081

  15. Modeling the electron-impact dissociation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowski, Marcin; Vikár, Anna; Mayes, Maricris Lodriguito; Bencsura, Ákos; Lendvay, György; Schatz, George C.

    2012-12-01

    The product yield of the electron-impact dissociation of methane has been studied with a combination of three theoretical methods: R-matrix theory to determine the electronically inelastic collisional excitation cross sections, high-level electronic structure methods to determine excited states energies and derivative couplings, and trajectory surface hopping (TSH) calculations to determine branching in the dissociation of the methane excited states to give CH3, CH2, and CH. The calculations involve the lowest 24 excited-state potential surfaces of methane, up to the ionization energy. According to the R-matrix calculations, electron impact preferentially produces triplet excited states, especially for electron kinetic energies close to the dissociation threshold. The potential surfaces of excited states are characterized by numerous avoided and real crossings such that the TSH calculations show rapid cascading down to the lowest excited singlet or triplet states, and then slower the dissociation of these lowest states. Product branching for electron-impact dissociation was therefore estimated by combining the electron-impact excitation cross sections with TSH product branching ratios that were obtained from the lowest singlet and triplet states, with the singlet dissociation giving a comparable formation of CH2 and CH3 while triplet dissociation gives CH3 exclusively. The overall branching in electron-impact dissociation is dominated by CH3 over CH2. A small branching yield for CH is also predicted.

  16. Single-electron capture processes in slow collisions of He{sup 2+} ions with O{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Haija, O.; Kamber, E.Y.; Ferguson, S.M.; Stolterfoht, N.

    2005-10-15

    Using the translational energy-gain spectroscopy technique, we have measured the energy-gain spectra and absolute total cross sections for single-electron capture (SEC) in collisions of He{sup 2+} ions with O{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} at laboratory impact energies between 25 and 400 eV/amu. The measured spectra for the He{sup 2+}-N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} collision systems show that the dominant reaction channel is due to dissociative transfer ionization (i.e., SEC accompanied by ionization of the molecular target ion). In the case of the He{sup 2+}-NH{sub 3} collision system, nondissociative single-electron capture into n=2 states of He{sup +} with production of NH{sub 3}{sup +} in the ground state is predominantly populated. These processes are observed to be the dominant reaction channels over the entire impact energy region studied and at laboratory scattering angles between 0 deg. and 8 deg. The energy dependence of total cross sections for SEC are also measured and found to slowly increase with increasing impact energies. The measured cross sections are also compared with the available measurements and theoretical results based on the Demkov and Landau-Zener models.

  17. Isomer and Fluorination Effects among Fluorine Substituted Hydrocarbon C3/C4 Molecules in Electron Impact Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, U. R.; Joshipura, K. N.

    2015-05-01

    Electron collision processes are very important in both man-made and natural plasmas, for determining the energy balances and transport properties of electrons. Electron -molecule scattering leading to ionization represents one of the most fundamental processes in collision physics. In the gas phase, the total efficiency of the process is described by the absolute total electron impact ionization cross section. Carbon based materials are some of the widely used materials for a divertor plate and magnetically confined fusion devices. In the ``ITER,'' it is very important for steady state operation to have an estimate of the lifetime of carbon plasma facing components. Apart from fusion plasma relevance, the present theoretical study is very important in modeling and controlling other electron assisted processes in many areas. Hydrocarbons play an important role for plasma diagnostics as impurities in the Tokamak fusion divertor, as seed gases for the production of radicals and ions in low temperature plasma processing. Fluorine substituted hydrocarbons (perfluorocarbons) are important as reactants in plasma assisted fabrication processes. In the present work, we have calculated total ionization cross sections Qion for C3/C4 Hydrocarbon isomers by electron impact, and comparisons are made mutually to observe isomer effect. Comparisons are also made by substituting H atom by F atom and revealing fluorination effect. The present calculations are quite significant owing to the lack of experimental data, with just an isolated previous theoretical work in some cases.

  18. Collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms I. Package outline and high energy code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, Jakub; Houfek, Karel

    2014-11-01

    Being motivated by the applied researchers’ persisting need for accurate scattering data for the collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms, we developed a computer package-Hex-that is designed to provide trustworthy results for all basic discrete and continuous processes within non-relativistic framework. The package consists of several computational modules that implement different methods, valid for specific energy regimes. Results of the modules are kept in a common database in the unified form of low-level scattering data (partial-wave T-matrices) and accessed by an interface program which is able to produce various derived quantities like e.g. differential and integral cross sections. This article is the first one of a series of articles that are concerned with the implementation and testing of the modules. Here we give an overview of their structure and present (a) the command-line interface program hex-db that can be also easily compiled into a derived code or used as a backend for a web-page form and (b) simple illustrative module specialized for high energies, hex-dwba, that implements distorted and plane wave Born approximation. Catalogue identifier: AETH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data etc.: 30367 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data etc.: 232032 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++11 Operating system: Any system with a C++11 compiler (e.g. GCC 4.8.1; tested on OpenSUSE 13.1 and Windows 8). RAM: Test run 3 MiB. CPC Library Classification: 2.4 Electron scattering External libraries:GSL [49], FFTW3[52], SQLite3 [46]. All of the libraries are open-source and maintained. Nature of problem: Extraction of derived (observable) quantities from partial

  19. Multicrossing Landau-Zener and close-coupling calculations of electron transfer in ? collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundsgaard, M. F. V.; Nielsen, S. E.; Rudolph, H.; Hansen, J. P.

    1998-07-01

    Cross sections for electron capture from Li(2s,2p) by proton impact have been calculated for energies in the range 10 eV-10 keV within the atomic orbital close-coupling (AO-CC) and the multicrossing Landau-Zener (MLZ) one-electron models. For the excited Li(2p) target the long-range mixing of the magnetic sublevels has been included in the MLZ calculations by means of a locking-radius model. The MLZ approximation to the AO-CC calculations is found to be appropriate at energies of about 10 eV. When diagonalizing the effective electronic Hamiltonian within the close-coupling basis a non-physical potential curve is disclosed. The cross section for 0953-4075/31/14/018/img7 capture from Li(2s) in particular is shown to be sensitive to this curve for energies below 50 eV. It is demonstrated how this problem is eliminated by including a pseudo-Li(1s) state in the AO-CC basis set.

  20. Electron-impact scattering by arsine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jaspreet; Goswami, Biplab; Gupta, Dhanoj; Antony, Bobby

    2014-07-01

    We present elastic cross sections for electron interactions with arsine (AsH3) in gas phase over an extensive energy range from 0.5 to 5000 eV by combining two computational methods. The ab initio R-matrix method is employed for low-energy computations up to 15 eV and the intermediate to high-energy calculations were performed using the spherical complex optical potential (SCOP) method. The elastic cross section computed through the R matrix and SCOP formalism shows consistency at crossover energy (11-12 eV) and gives reasonable accord with the available data. Besides elastic cross sections, the differential cross section at low and intermediate incident electron energies is reported. The electronic excitation cross section is also reported at low energies. Shape resonance is observed at around 2.4 eV due to the formation of a transient negative ion state.

  1. Influence of electron-neutral collisions on the Compton scattering cross section and the Salpeter structure factor in warm collisional plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-03-01

    The electron-neutral collision effects on the Compton scattering process are investigated in warm collisional plasmas. The Compton scattering cross section in warm collisional plasmas is obtained by the Salpeter structure factor with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the plasma dielectric function as a function of the electron-neutral collision frequency, Debye length, and wave number. It is shown that the influence of electron-neutral collision strongly suppresses the Compton scattering cross section in warm collisional plasmas. It is also found that the electron-neutral collision effect on the differential Compton scattering cross section is more significant in forward scattering directions. We show that the differential Compton scattering cross section has a maximum at the scattering angle φ = π / 2 . In addition, we find that the electron-neutral collision effect on the total Compton scattering cross section increases with increasing Debye length and wave number. The variation of the Compton scattering cross section due to the change of collision frequency and plasma parameters is also discussed.

  2. Influence of electron-neutral collisions on the Compton scattering cross section and the Salpeter structure factor in warm collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-03-15

    The electron-neutral collision effects on the Compton scattering process are investigated in warm collisional plasmas. The Compton scattering cross section in warm collisional plasmas is obtained by the Salpeter structure factor with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the plasma dielectric function as a function of the electron-neutral collision frequency, Debye length, and wave number. It is shown that the influence of electron-neutral collision strongly suppresses the Compton scattering cross section in warm collisional plasmas. It is also found that the electron-neutral collision effect on the differential Compton scattering cross section is more significant in forward scattering directions. We show that the differential Compton scattering cross section has a maximum at the scattering angle φ=π/2. In addition, we find that the electron-neutral collision effect on the total Compton scattering cross section increases with increasing Debye length and wave number. The variation of the Compton scattering cross section due to the change of collision frequency and plasma parameters is also discussed.

  3. Threshold law for electron-atom impact ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temkin, A.

    1982-01-01

    A derivation of the explicit form of the threshold law for electron impact ionization of atoms is presented, based on the Coulomb-dipole theory. The important generalization is made of using a dipole function whose moment is the dipole moment formed by an inner electron and the nucleus. The result is a modulated quasi-linear law for the yield of positive ions which applies to positron-atom impact ionization.

  4. Collision-energy-resolved Penning ionization electron spectroscopy of p-benzoquinone: Study of electronic structure and anisotropic interaction with He*(2 3S) metastable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Naoki; Okamura, Kohji; Ohno, Koichi

    2004-06-01

    Collision energy dependence of partial ionization cross sections (CEDPICS) of p-benzoquinone with He*(2 3S) metastable atoms indicates that interaction potentials between p-benzoquinone and He*(2 3S) are highly anisotropic in the studied collision energy range (100-250 meV). Attractive interactions were found around the C=O groups for in-plane and out-of-plane directions, while repulsive interactions were found around CH bonds and the benzenoid ring. Assignment of the first four ionic states of p-benzoquinone and an analogous methyl-substituted compound was examined with CEDPICS and anisotropic distributions of the corresponding two nonbonding oxygen orbitals (nO+,nO-) and two πCC orbitals (πCC+,πCC-). An extra band that shows negative CEDPICS was observed at ca. 7.2 eV in Penning ionization electron spectrum.

  5. Electron impact multiple ionization cross sections of heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jiaolong; Liu, Pengfei; Dai, Jiayu; Yuan, Jianmin

    2014-05-01

    Cross sections of electron impact ionization are important in modeling both astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. For heavy ions, accurate determination of this microscopic physical quantity is difficult due to the complex atomic structure. At high incident electron energy, inner-shell excitation and ionization processes can occur, which will result in complicated decay including Auger and radiative decay processes. For deep inner-shell excitation and ionization, cascaded Auger processes are very likely. Under conditions of collisional ionization equilibrium, the balance of electron-ion recombination and electron impact single ionization determines the charge state distribution (CSD). Accurate CSD, which in turn determined by accurate cross sections, is very important in a wide regime of spectroscopic diagnostics to infer the physical conditions of plasmas such as the electron temperature, electron density, and elemental abundance. As an illustrative example, the cross sections from the ground configuration of Sn13+ in forming Sn13+, -Sn16+ are reported in detail. The contributions from the electron impact excitation, electron impact ionization and resonant excitation processes are included.

  6. Electronic Impact of Inclusions in Diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, E.M.; Smedley, J.; Raghothamachar, B.; Gaowei, M.; Keister, J.W.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Dudley, M.; Wu, Q.

    2010-04-07

    X-ray topography data are compared with photodiode responsivity maps to identify potential candidates for electron trapping in high purity, single crystal diamond. X-ray topography data reveal the defects that exist in the diamond material, which are dominated by non-electrically active linear dislocations. However, many diamonds also contain defects configurations (groups of threading dislocations originating from a secondary phase region or inclusion) in the bulk of the wafer which map well to regions of photoconductive gain, indicating that these inclusions are a source of electron trapping which affect the performance of diamond X-ray detectors. It was determined that photoconductive gain is only possible with the combination of an injecting contact and charge trapping in the near surface region. Typical photoconductive gain regions are 0.2 mm across; away from these near-surface inclusions the device yields the expected diode responsivity.

  7. Single impacts of keV fullerene ions on free standing graphene: Emission of ions and electrons from confined volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhoturov, Stanislav V.; Geng, Sheng; Czerwinski, Bartlomiej; Young, Amanda E.; Delcorte, Arnaud; Schweikert, Emile A.

    2015-10-01

    We present the first data from individual C60 impacting one to four layer graphene at 25 and 50 keV. Negative secondary ions and electrons emitted in transmission were recorded separately from each impact. The yields for Cn- clusters are above 10% for n ≤ 4, they oscillate with electron affinities and decrease exponentially with n. The result can be explained with the aid of MD simulation as a post-collision process where sufficient vibrational energy is accumulated around the rim of the impact hole for sputtering of carbon clusters. The ionization probability can be estimated by comparing experimental yields of Cn- with those of Cn0 from MD simulation, where it increases exponentially with n. The ionization probability can be approximated with ejecta from a thermally excited (3700 K) rim damped by cluster fragmentation and electron detachment. The experimental electron probability distributions are Poisson-like. On average, three electrons of thermal energies are emitted per impact. The thermal excitation model invoked for Cn- emission can also explain the emission of electrons. The interaction of C60 with graphene is fundamentally different from impacts on 3D targets. A key characteristic is the high degree of ionization of the ejecta.

  8. Single impacts of keV fullerene ions on free standing graphene: Emission of ions and electrons from confined volume

    SciTech Connect

    Verkhoturov, Stanislav V.; Geng, Sheng; Schweikert, Emile A.; Czerwinski, Bartlomiej; Young, Amanda E.; Delcorte, Arnaud

    2015-10-28

    We present the first data from individual C{sub 60} impacting one to four layer graphene at 25 and 50 keV. Negative secondary ions and electrons emitted in transmission were recorded separately from each impact. The yields for C{sub n}{sup −} clusters are above 10% for n ≤ 4, they oscillate with electron affinities and decrease exponentially with n. The result can be explained with the aid of MD simulation as a post-collision process where sufficient vibrational energy is accumulated around the rim of the impact hole for sputtering of carbon clusters. The ionization probability can be estimated by comparing experimental yields of C{sub n}{sup −} with those of C{sub n}{sup 0} from MD simulation, where it increases exponentially with n. The ionization probability can be approximated with ejecta from a thermally excited (3700 K) rim damped by cluster fragmentation and electron detachment. The experimental electron probability distributions are Poisson-like. On average, three electrons of thermal energies are emitted per impact. The thermal excitation model invoked for C{sub n}{sup −} emission can also explain the emission of electrons. The interaction of C{sub 60} with graphene is fundamentally different from impacts on 3D targets. A key characteristic is the high degree of ionization of the ejecta.

  9. Electron impact induced anion production in acetylene.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Ewelina; Čadež, Iztok; Krishnakumar, E; Mason, Nigel J

    2014-02-28

    A detailed experimental investigation of electron induced anion production in acetylene, C2H2, in the energy range between 1 and 90 eV is presented. The anions are formed by two processes in this energy range: dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and dipolar dissociation (DD). DEA in C2H2 is found to lead to the formation of H(-) and C2(-)/C2H(-) through excitation of resonances in the electron energy range 1-15 eV. These anionic fragments are formed with super thermal kinetic energy and reveal no anisotropy in the angular distributions. DD in C2H2 leads to the formation of H(-), C(-)/CH(-) and C2(-)/C2H(-) with threshold energies of 15.7, 20.0 and 16.5 eV respectively. The measured anion yields have been used to calculate anion production rates for H(-), C(-)/CH(-) and C2(-)/C2H(-) in Titan's ionosphere. PMID:24343432

  10. Safety impacts due to the incompatibility of SUVs, minivans, and pickup trucks in two-vehicle collisions.

    PubMed

    Fredette, Marc; Mambu, Lema Sikoti; Chouinard, Aline; Bellavance, François

    2008-11-01

    This research sets out to estimate the effects of vehicle incompatibility on the risk of death or major injury to drivers involved in two-vehicle collisions. Based on data for 2,999,395 drivers, logistic regression was used to model the risk of driver death or major injury (defined has being hospitalized). Our analyses show that pickup trucks, minivans and sport utility vehicles (SUVs) are more aggressive than cars for the driver of the other vehicle and more protective for their own drivers. The effect of the pickups is more pronounced in terms of aggressivity. The point estimates are comparable to those in the Toy and Hammitt study [Toy, E.L., Hammitt, J.K., 2003. Safety impacts of SUVs, minivans, and pickup trucks in two-vehicle crashes. Risk Analysis 23, 641-650], but, in contrast to that study, we are now able to establish that a greater number of these effects are statistically significant with a larger sample size. Like vehicle mass and type, other characteristics of drivers and the circumstances of the collision influence the driver's condition after impact. Male drivers, older drivers, drivers who are not wearing safety belts, collisions occurring in a higher speed zone and head-on collisions significantly increase the risk of death. Except for the driver's sex, all of these categories are also associated with an increased risk of death or of being hospitalized after being involved in a two-vehicle collision. For this risk, a significant increase is associated with female drivers. PMID:19068305

  11. Multiply differential cross section for the total (e, 3e) K-shell vacancy creation of lithium by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjari, B.; Lahmidi, N.; Dorn, A.; Joulakian, B.

    2007-01-01

    Hollow Li2+(2s) production in a collision between a fast electron and a neutral lithium target is studied theoretically by a procedure which determines the fully-differential cross section of the corresponding (e, 3e) process. The calculated cross sections are obtained within the framework of the first Born approximation. The two slow emitted electrons in the continuum are described by the fully correlated three Coulomb interactions (3C). The results are compared to those of the double ionization of lithium resulting in a residual Li2+(1s). The comparison between these two channels is essential to get precious indication of the different mechanisms in double ionization of a three-electron target and to observe directly electronic correlation, which is the main cause of the double ionization by fast electron impact.

  12. Classical treatment of the electron emission from collisions of uracil molecules with fast protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkadi, L.

    2015-12-01

    The electron emission from the uracil molecule induced by fast proton impact has been investigated using the classical-trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method. Applying the independent-particle model, the full three-body dynamics of the projectile, an active electron, and the molecule core is considered. The interactions with the molecule core are described by a multicenter potential built from screened atomic potentials. Double and single differential, as well as total ionization cross sections are calculated and compared with the predictions of the first Born approximation with correct boundary conditions (CB1), the continuum-distorted-wave-eikonal-initial-state (CDW-EIS) approach, as well as the combined classical-trajectory Monte Carlo-classical over-the-barrier (CTMC-COB) model. The effect of the molecular treatment of the ionization by the multicenter potential is analyzed by simplified CTMC calculations in which the ionization cross section of the uracil is determined as a linear combination of the contributions of the constituent atoms of the molecule.

  13. Single electron yields from semileptonic charm and bottom hadron decays in Au +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Midori, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nukariya, A.; Nyanin, A. S.; Obayashi, H.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Voas, B.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The PHENIX Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured open heavy flavor production in minimum bias Au +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV via the yields of electrons from semileptonic decays of charm and bottom hadrons. Previous heavy flavor electron measurements indicated substantial modification in the momentum distribution of the parent heavy quarks owing to the quark-gluon plasma created in these collisions. For the first time, using the PHENIX silicon vertex detector to measure precision displaced tracking, the relative contributions from charm and bottom hadrons to these electrons as a function of transverse momentum are measured in Au +Au collisions. We compare the fraction of electrons from bottom hadrons to previously published results extracted from electron-hadron correlations in p +p collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV and find the fractions to be similar within the large uncertainties on both measurements for pT>4 GeV/c . We use the bottom electron fractions in Au +Au and p +p along with the previously measured heavy flavor electron RA A to calculate the RA A for electrons from charm and bottom hadron decays separately. We find that electrons from bottom hadron decays are less suppressed than those from charm for the region 3

  14. Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in He-like Ga XXX, Ge XXXI, As XXXII, Se XXXIII and Br XXXIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, Francis P.

    2013-04-01

    We report calculations of energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation cross sections and rates for transitions in He-like Ga XXX, Ge XXXI, As XXXII, Se XXXIII and Br XXXIV. The grasp (general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package) is adopted for calculating energy levels and radiative rates. For determining the collision strengths, and subsequently the excitation rates, the Dirac atomic R-matrix code (darc) is used. Oscillator strengths, radiative rates and line strengths are reported for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions among the lowest 49 levels of each ion. Additionally, theoretical lifetimes are provided for all 49 levels of the above five ions. Collision strengths are averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution and the effective collision strengths obtained listed over a wide temperature range up to 108 K. Comparisons are made with similar data obtained using the flexible atomic code (fac) to highlight the importance of resonances, included in calculations with darc, in the determination of effective collision strengths. Discrepancies between the collision strengths from darc and fac, particularly for some forbidden transitions, are also discussed. Finally, discrepancies between the present results for effective collision strengths with the darc code and earlier semi-relativistic R-matrix data are noted over a wide range of electron temperatures for many transitions in all ions.

  15. Electron-Impact Ionization of Mg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boivin, R. F.; Srivastava, S. K.

    1997-01-01

    A pulsed crossed beam technique is used to measure inonization cross-sections of metallic atoms. Relative values of cross-sections of single, double and triple inonization of magnesium have been successfully measured with good accuracy over the o-700 eV range. Absolute values of cross sections have been obtained by normalization to a theoretical value at high electron energy. Results are compared to previously published values and, for single inonization in particular, a comparison with theoretical cross-extions is perfomed.

  16. Dissociative Ionization of Pyridine by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher; Huo, Winifred; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In order to understand the damage of biomolecules by electrons, a process important in radiation damage, we undertake a study of the dissociative ionization (DI) of pyridine (C5H5N) from the low-lying ionization channels. The methodology used is the same as in the benzene study. While no experimental DI data are available, we compare the dissociation products from our calculations with the dissociative photoionization measurements of Tixier et al. using dipole (e, e(+) ion) coincidence spectroscopy. Comparisons with the DI of benzene is also made so as to understand the difference in DI between a heterocyclic and an aromatic molecule.

  17. Electronic bolus design impacts on administration.

    PubMed

    Hentz, F; Umstätter, C; Gilaverte, S; Prado, O R; Silva, C J A; Monteiro, A L G

    2014-06-01

    Electronic identification of animals has become increasingly important worldwide to improve and ensure traceability. In warm and hot climates, such as Brazil, boluses can have advantages over ear tags as the internal devices reduce the risks of ear tag losses, tissue damage, and lesions on the ear. Electronic boluses, however, are often perceived as having negative characteristics, including reported difficulties of administration in small ruminants. This paper describes the factors associated with bolus design that affect the swallowing of a bolus in sheep. Other factors that might influence bolus swallowing time have also been considered. In addition, the effect of bolus design on its performance was evaluated. A total of 56 Suffolk ewes were used to assess the ease of administration and retention of 3 types of electronic ruminal boluses (mini, 11.5 × 58.0 mm and 21.7 g; small, 14.8 × 48.5 mm and 29.5 g; standard, 19.3 × 69.8 mm and 74.4 g) during a whole productive year, including pregnancy and lamb suckling. Ewe age (5.6 ± 2.3 yr) and weight (85.07 ± 8.2 kg BW) were recorded, as well as time for bolus swallowing. The deglutition of the bolus and any resulting blockages in the esophagus were monitored by visual observations. Retention and readability of the boluses were regularly monitored for d 1, wk 1, mo 1, and every mo until 1 yr. Time for bolus swallowing differed substantially with bolus type and was greater (P < 0.05) for the standard bolus (32.8 ± 6.9 s) when compared to small and mini boluses, which did not differ (8.5 ± 2.0 vs. 9.2 ± 2.7 s; P > 0.05). The bolus o.d. and length were positively correlated with swallowing time (P < 0.01). The ewe weight was negatively correlated with swallowing time (P < 0.05). At 6 mo all electronic boluses showed 100% retention rate, and at 12 mo, bolus retention was 100%, 94.5%, and 100% for mini, small, and standard boluses, respectively (P > 0.05). At 12 mo, all boluses showed 100% readability, except for

  18. Electron's anomalous magnetic-moment effects on electron-hydrogen elastic collisions in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Elhandi, S.; Taj, S.; Attaourti, Y.; Manaut, B.; Oufni, L.

    2010-04-15

    The effect of the electron's anomalous magnetic moment on the relativistic electronic dressing for the process of electron-hydrogen atom elastic collisions is investigated. We consider a laser field with circular polarization and various electric field strengths. The Dirac-Volkov states taking into account this anomaly are used to describe the process in the first order of perturbation theory. The correlation between the terms coming from this anomaly and the electric field strength gives rise to the strong dependence of the spinor part of the differential cross section (DCS) with respect to these terms. A detailed study has been devoted to the nonrelativistic regime as well as the moderate relativistic regime. Some aspects of this dependence as well as the dynamical behavior of the DCS in the relativistic regime have been addressed.

  19. Production of metastable Ar[sup +] ions by electron-impact ionization of Ar measured by translational-energy spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kamber, E.Y. ); Enos, C.S.; Brenton, A.G. )

    1993-07-01

    The translational-energy-spectroscopy technique has been used to measure the apparent ionization-excitation functions for the metastable states 3 [sup 4]D, 3[ital d] [sup 4]F, 3[ital d] [sup 2]F, and 3[ital d][prime] [sup 2][ital F] of an Ar[sup +] ion beam extracted from an electron-impact ion source. The initial states were identified from the measured energy loss in the translational-energy spectra for single-electron stripping from ground-state and metastable Ar[sup +] ions in collisions with O[sub 2]. This technique provides an alternative method of selectivity in the study of electron-impact ionization and excitation processes.

  20. Measurement of the Bottom Quark Contribution to Nonphotonic Electron Production in p+p Collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Pruthi, N. K.; Ahammed, Z.; Dong, X.; Grebenyuk, O.; Hjort, E.; Jacobs, P.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Klein, S. R.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Ploskon, M. A.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Ritter, H. G.; Rose, A.

    2010-11-12

    The contribution of B meson decays to nonphotonic electrons, which are mainly produced by the semileptonic decays of heavy-flavor mesons, in p+p collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV has been measured using azimuthal correlations between nonphotonic electrons and hadrons. The extracted B decay contribution is approximately 50% at a transverse momentum of p{sub T{>=}}5 GeV/c. These measurements constrain the nuclear modification factor for electrons from B and D meson decays. The result indicates that B meson production in heavy ion collisions is also suppressed at high p{sub T}.

  1. Electron-hadron correlations in pp collisions at {radical}(s) = 2.76TeV with the ALICE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    De Oliveira Filho, Elienos P.; Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration

    2013-03-25

    In this work we are studying the relative beauty to charm production in pp collisions at {radical}(s) = 2.76TeV, through correlations between electrons from heavy-flavour decay and charged hadrons, with the ALICE detector at the LHC. This study represents a baseline for the analysis in heavy-ion collisions where heavy flavour production is a powerful tool to study the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP).

  2. Electron-impact excitation of the low-lying electronic states of formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.

    1974-01-01

    Electron-impact excitation has been observed at incident electron energies of 10.1 and 20.1 eV to the first five excited electronic states of formaldehyde lying at and below the 1B2 state at 7.10 eV. These excitations include two new transitions in the energy-loss range 5.6-6.2 eV and 6.7-7.0 eV which have been detected for the first time, either through electron-impact excitation or photon absorption. The differential cross sections of these new excitations are given at scattering angles between 15 and 135 deg. These cross-section ratios peak at large scattering angles - a characteristic of triplet - singlet excitations. The design and performance of the electron-impact spectrometer used in the above observations is outlined and discussed.

  3. Electron-atom collision studies using optically state-selected beams. Final report, May 15, 1991--May 14, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, M.H.; McClelland, J.J.

    1998-03-15

    As stated in the original proposal, the goal of the project has been to perform electron-scattering experiments on a few model systems with emphasis on resolving all the quantum-state variables possible. The purpose of these experimental studies has been to provide a set of measurements of unprecedented accuracy and completeness that can be used as benchmarks for comparison with theoretical calculations. During the period covered by this report, the work has concentrated on measuring low-energy electron scattering from sodium and chromium. Sodium provides an ideal one-electron test case, since it has a single loosely bound valence electron, making it approachable by even the most complex electron scattering calculations. In addition, the atom has a strong optical transition from the 3{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} ground state to the 3{sup 2}P{sub 3/2} excited state whose wavelength (589 nm) matches the peak output of the laser dye rhodamine 6G. Thus optical pumping techniques can be readily applied in the laboratory, leading to either a population of ground state atoms in which the spin of the valence electron is oriented either up or down in the laboratory, or a spin polarized pure angular momentum state of the excited 3{sup 2}P{sub 3/2} state. Such an excited state makes possible superelastic scattering, where the internal energy of the atom is transferred to the electron during the collision. This turns out to be a very efficient way to study the inelastic scattering process. Unlike sodium, chromium provides an extremely exacting test for theoretical methods because of its very complex electronic structure, not because it is simple. With a valence configuration consisting of five electrons in a half-filled 3d shell, plus another electron in a 4s shell, this atom provides a test case that can challenge even the simplest approximations.

  4. Radiative rates and electron impact excitation rate coefficients for Ne-like selenium, Se XXV

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K.; Chen, C.Y. Huang, M.; Wang, Y.S.; Zou, Y.M.

    2011-07-15

    In this article we report calculations of energy levels, radiative rates, electron impact collision strengths, and effective collision strengths for transitions among the 241 fine-structure levels arising from 2l{sup 8} and 2l{sup 7}n{sup '}l{sup '} (n{sup '{<=}}6 and l{sup '{<=}}n{sup '}-1) configurations of Ne-like Se XXV using the Flexible Atomic Code. Energy levels and radiative rates are calculated within the relativistic configuration-interaction method. Direct excitation collision strengths are calculated using the relativistic distorted-wave approximation and high-energy collision strengths are obtained in the relativistic plane-wave approximation. Resonance contributions through the relevant Na-like doubly-excited configurations 2l{sup 7}n'l'n''l'' (3{<=}n'{<=}7, l'{<=}n'-1, n'{<=}n''{<=}50, and l''{<=}8) are explicitly taken into account via the independent-process and isolated-resonance approximation using distorted waves. Resonant stabilizing transitions and possibly important radiative decays from the resonances toward low-lying autoionizing levels are considered. In addition, the resonance contributions from Na-like 2l{sup 6}3l'3l'''n''' (n'''=3-6) configurations are included and found to be predominant for many transitions among the singly-excited states in Ne-like Se XXV. We present the radiative rates, oscillator strengths, and line strengths for all electric dipole, magnetic dipole, electric quadrupole, magnetic quadrupole, electric octopole, and magnetic octopole transitions among the 241 levels. The effective collision strengths are reported for all 28920 transitions among the 241 levels over a wide temperature range up to 10 keV. To assess the reliability and accuracy of the present collisional data, we have performed a 27-state close-coupling calculation, employing the Dirac R-matrix theory. The results from the close-coupling calculation and the independent-process calculation for the identical target states are found to be in good agreement

  5. Extension of charge-state-distribution calculations for ion-solid collisions towards low velocities and many-electron ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamour, E.; Fainstein, P. D.; Galassi, M.; Prigent, C.; Ramirez, C. A.; Rivarola, R. D.; Rozet, J.-P.; Trassinelli, M.; Vernhet, D.

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge of the detailed evolution of the whole charge-state distribution of projectile ions colliding with targets is required in several fields of research such as material science and atomic and nuclear physics but also in accelerator physics, and in particular in regard to the several foreseen large-scale facilities. However, there is a lack of data for collisions in the nonperturbative energy domain and that involve many-electron projectiles. Starting from the etacha model we developed [Rozet et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. B 107, 67 (1996), 10.1016/0168-583X(95)00800-4], we present an extension of its validity domain towards lower velocities and larger distortions. Moreover, the system of rate equations is able to take into account ions with up to 60 orbital states of electrons. The computed data from the different new versions of the etacha code are compared to some test collision systems. The improvements made are clearly illustrated by 28.9 MeV u-1P b56 + ions, and laser-generated carbon ion beams of 0.045 to 0.5 MeV u-1 , passing through carbon or aluminum targets, respectively. Hence, those new developments can efficiently sustain the experimental programs that are currently in progress on the "next-generation" accelerators or laser facilities.

  6. Head-on collision of two ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas with electrons described by Tsallis distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merriche, Abderrzak; Ait Gougam, Leila; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2016-01-01

    The problem of the head-on collision of two ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) is addressed in electronegative plasmas with a nonextensive electron velocity distribution. Our plasma model is inspired from the experimental studies of Ichiki et al. (2001). Using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) perturbation method, the phase shifts of the head-on collision are obtained. Analytical and numerical results reveal that the magnitude of the phase shift of the IASWs depends sensitively on the number density ratios μ and υ, the mass ratio σ as well as the nonextensive parameter q. For a given mass ratio σ ≃ 0.27 (Ar+ - SF6-), the magnitude of the phase shift increases with an increase of the nonextensive parameter q. An increase of the electron-to-positive ion density ratio μ lowers the phase shift, a trend which is much perceptible for q > 1. As σ increases [ σ ≃ 0.89 (Xe+ - SF6-) ], the phase shift becomes larger.

  7. Experimental and Theoretical Fully differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of phenol molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Esam; Jones, D.; Silva, G.; Chiari, L.; Neves, R.; Lopes, M.; Brunger, M.; Ning, C.; Madison, D.

    2014-10-01

    Experimental and theoretical Fully Differential Cross Sections (FDCS) are presented for 250 eV electron impact ionization of the highest and next highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMO and NHOMO). Theoretical results are compared with experiment for in plane scattering with projectile scattering angles of 5°, 10°, and 15°. Different theoretical models are examined - the molecular 3 body distorted wave (M3DW), and the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA), with the effects of the post collision interaction (PCI) treated either exactly or with the Ward-Macek approximations. These approximations show good agreement with experimental data for binary peaks. However, for the recoil peak region, experiment finds a noticeable peak while theory predicts no peak. No recoil peak suggests no (or very weak) nuclear scattering, so we have investigated the importance of nuclear scattering by moving the nuclei closer to the center of mass. Work supported by NSF and the XSEDE.

  8. A (e,2e +ion) study of low-energy electron-impact ionization of THF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Esam; Ren, Xueguang; Ning, Chuangang; Dorn, Alexander; Madison, Don

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the Fully Differential Cross Sections (FDCS) for electron impact induced ionization of THF (C4H8O) by low-energy (Eo = 26 eV) for three different orbital states of the highest, next highest, and next-next highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMO, NHOMO, and Next NHOMO). Theoretical results are compared with experiment for in plane scattering with projectile scattering angles of 15°, 25°, 35°, and 50°. Different theoretical models are examined - the molecular 3 body distorted wave (M3DW), and the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA), with the effects of the post collision interaction (PCI) treated either exactly or with the Ward-Macek approximations. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1068237 and XSEDE resources provided by the Texas Advanced Computing Center (Grant No. TG-MCA07S029).

  9. Energy and angle differential cross sections for the electron-impact double ionization of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, James P; Pindzola, M S; Robicheaux, F

    2008-01-01

    Energy and angle differential cross sections for the electron-impact double ionization of helium are calculated using a non-perturbative time-dependent close-coupling method. Collision probabilities are found by projection of a time evolved nine dimensional coordinate space wave function onto fully antisymmetric products of spatial and spin functions representing three outgoing Coulomb waves. At an incident energy of 106 eV, we present double energy differential cross sections and pentuple energy and angle differential cross sections. The pentuple energy and angle differential cross sections are found to be in relative agreement with the shapes observed in recent (e,3e) reaction microscope experiments. Integration of the differential cross sections over all energies and angles yields a total ionization cross section that is also in reasonable agreement with absolute crossed-beams experiments.

  10. Electron impact excitation of the Ne II and Ne III fine structure levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Loch, S. D.; Pindzola, M. S.; Cumbee, R.; Stancil, P. C.; Ballance, C. P.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    Electron impact excitation cross sections and rate coefficients of the low lying levels of the Ne II and Ne III ions are of great interest in cool molecular environments including young stellar objects, photodissociation regions, active galactic nuclei, and X-ray dominated regions. We have carried out details computations for cross sections and rate coefficients using the Dirac R-matrix codes (DARC), the Breit-Pauli R-matrix codes (BP) and the Intermediate Coupling Frame Transformation (ICFT) codes, for both Ne II and Ne III. We also compare our results with previous calculations. We are primarily interested in rate coefficients in the temperature range below 1000 K, and the focus is on obtaining the most accurate rate coefficients for those temperatures. We present both a recommended set of effective collision strengths and an indication of the uncertainties on these values. Work at Auburn University and UGA partly supported by NASA Grant NNX15AE47G.

  11. Observations of Density and Electron neutral collision frequency in the nighttime E-region during the E-winds Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, C.; Ward, J.; Carlson, C.; Earle, G.

    2004-12-01

    Four Utah State University Plasma Impedance Probes (PIP) were part of NASA's Sequential Rocket Study of Descending Layers in the E-Region (E-Winds). The payloads were launched at 11:19 pm, 1:41 am, 2:50 am and 3:07 am on June 30 and July 1, 2003 from Wallops Island, Virginia into the nighttime D and E-regions. These instruments provided observations of electron density and electron collision frequencies along the trajectory of the rockets. The neutral winds were measured with simultaneous TMA releases. The rockets flew into nighttime intermediate layers located between 100 to 225 km in altitude. The analysis of flight data shows a considerable amount of variability in these layers over a relativity small temporal and spatial scales. This paper presents a overview of these multi-point measurements of the mid latitude ionosphere in the context of the geomagnetic activity during the flights.

  12. Satellite splat II: an inelastic collision with a surface-launched projectile and the maximum orbital radius for planetary impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Philip R.; Mungan, Carl E.

    2016-07-01

    Starting with conservation of energy and angular momentum, we derive a convenient method for determining the periapsis distance of an orbiting object, by expressing its velocity components in terms of the local circular speed. This relation is used to extend the results of our previous paper, examining the effects of an adhesive inelastic collision between a projectile launched from the surface of a planet (of radius R) and an equal-mass satellite in a circular orbit of radius r s. We show that there is a maximum orbital radius r s ≈ 18.9R beyond which such a collision cannot cause the satellite to impact the planet. The difficulty of bringing down a satellite in a high orbit with a surface-launched projectile provides a useful topic for a discussion of orbital angular momentum and energy. The material is suitable for an undergraduate intermediate mechanics course.

  13. Two-electron transfer and ionization mechanism in 80-keV/u Ne8 + on He collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. T.; Feng, W. T.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhang, S. F.; Guo, D. L.; Gao, Y.; Qian, D. B.; Xu, S.; Yan, S. C.; Zhang, P.; Huang, Z. K.; Wang, H. B.; Hai, B.; Zhao, D. M.; Ma, X.

    2016-03-01

    Autoionization decay from doubly excited states of Ne6 +[1 s23 l n l (n =3 ,4 ,5 )] (symmetric configurations) as well as the Coster-Kronig transition from doubly excited states of Ne6 +[1 s22 p n l (n ⩾7 ) ] (asymmetric configurations) are observed in the transfer ionization reaction channel of 80 keV/u Ne8 +-He collisions. It has been predicted that the formation of symmetric configurations results from uncorrelated double-electron capture processes [Z. Chen and C. D. Lin, Phys. Rev. A 48, 1298 (1993), 10.1103/PhysRevA.48.1298], and the formation of asymmetric configurations probably results from correlated double-electron capture caused by the dynamical electron-correlation effects which are attributed to small internuclear distances. However, previous experimental measurements were not able to obtain information about the dependence on internuclear distance which can be reflected in the transversal recoil-ion momentum. In this work, we measure the recoil-ion momentum in coincidence with the ejected electron velocity and find that the observed transverse recoil-ion momentum is smaller for the formation of symmetric Ne6 +[1 s23 l n l (n =3 ,4 ,5 ) ] states than the formation of asymmetric Ne6 +[1 s22 p n l (n ⩾7 ) ] states. Since large momentum transfer occurs for small internuclear distances (strong electron-electron interactions) and small momentum transfer occurs for large internuclear distances (weak electron-electron interactions), the results indicate that dynamical electron correlation is important for the formation of the asymmetric states.

  14. Electron impact spectroscopy. [for atom and molecule quantum state investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.

    1980-01-01

    The concepts of electron impact spectroscopy are discussed, comparing the electron spectroscopy techniques with those of the optical spectroscopy. The main advantage of the electron spectroscopy is to be found in the elimination of optical selection rules in excitation processes and the ability to scan the spectrum from the infrared to the X-ray region. The range of the method is indicated through a review of several examples, including electron impact excitation of Ba and rotational excitation of H2. The sensitivity of the method is demonstrated by vibrational excitation spectrum of N2. It is shown that the application of the method to the inner-shell excitation allows to obtain information about molecular species which are not commonly available, while spectroscopy of negative ions yields information about their energy and symmetry properties. However, the techniques are still under development and more data are expected to become available in the coming years.

  15. VUV study of electron impact dissociative excitation of thymine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiessen, C. J.; Trocchi, J. A.; Hein, J. D.; Dech, J.; Kedzierski, W.; McConkey, J. W.

    2016-06-01

    Dissociative excitation of thymine following electron impact was studied in the energy range up to 430 eV. Emissions in the vacuum ultra-violet spectral region below 150 nm were studied and found to be dominated by the hydrogen Lyman series. Emission cross section data reveal that Lyman-α excitation displays a broad maximum at an electron impact energy of 160 eV. The probability of extracting other excited atoms from the parent molecule is found to be insignificant. Possible excitation and dissociation mechanisms in the parent molecule are discussed.

  16. Electron-impact study of PO2 using the R-matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharadvaja, Anand; Kaur, Savinder; Baluja, K. L.

    2013-06-01

    The R-matrix approach is used to study the electron scattering from PO2 radical at low electron impact energies. The elastic scattering phenomenon is studied in static-exchange, one-state and many-states close-coupling approximation. The elastic differential cross sections, corresponding momentum-transfer cross sections, and collision frequency are calculated in the one-state configuration interaction approximation only. Calculations reveal a stable bound state of PO2- having symmetry 1A1, a configuration of ⋯8a12,⋯2b12,⋯5b22,⋯1a22, and vertical electron affinity of 2.94 eV. The excited state of anion PO2- having symmetry 3B1 is also just bound relative to the ground state of PO2 at its equilibrium geometry. The shape, core-excited, and Feshbach resonances are analyzed in different symmetries up to 7 eV. The partial waves up to l=4 are used to represent continuum electron. The converged cross sections are obtained for the partial waves having l greater than 4 by applying Born correction. Certain interesting spectroscopic properties of radical are also reported.

  17. Strong asymmetry of the electron-loss-to-continuum cusp of multielectron U28 + projectiles in near-relativistic collisions with gaseous targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, P.-M.; Hagmann, S.; Monti, J. M.; Rivarola, R. D.; Blumenhagen, K.-H.; Brandau, C.; Chen, W.; DuBois, R. D.; Gumberidze, A.; Guo, D. L.; Lestinsky, M.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.; Spillmann, U.; Trotsenko, S.; Weber, G.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2016-04-01

    The process of electron-loss to the continuum (ELC) has been studied for the collision systems U28 ++H2 at a collision energy of 50 MeV/u, U28 ++N2 at 30 MeV/u, and U28 ++Xe at 50 MeV/u. The energy distributions of cusp electrons emitted at an angle of 0∘ with respect to the projectile beam were measured using a magnetic forward-angle electron spectrometer. For these collision systems far from equilibrium charge state, a significantly asymmetric cusp shape is observed. The experimental results are compared to calculations based on first-order perturbation theory, which predict an almost symmetric cusp shape. Some possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed.

  18. Measurement of single electrons and implications for charm production in Au+Au collisions at square root[s(NN)] = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; Van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2002-05-13

    Transverse momentum spectra of electrons from Au+Au collisions at square root[s(NN)] = 130 GeV have been measured at midrapidity by the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The spectra show an excess above the background from photon conversions and light hadron decays. The electron signal is consistent with that expected from semileptonic decays of charm. The yield of the electron signal dN(e)/dy for p(T) > 0.8 GeV/c is 0.025+/-0.004(stat)+/-0.010(syst) in central collisions, and the corresponding charm cross section is 380+/-60(stat)+/-200(syst) microb per binary nucleon-nucleon collision. PMID:12005627

  19. Electron-Impact Ionization and Dissociative Ionization of Biomolecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2006-01-01

    It is well recognized that secondary electrons play an important role in radiation damage to humans. Particularly important is the damage of DNA by electrons, potentially leading to mutagenesis. Molecular-level study of electron interaction with DNA provides information on the damage pathways and dominant mechanisms. Our study of electron-impact ionization of DNA fragments uses the improved binary-encounter dipole model and covers DNA bases, sugar phosphate backbone, and nucleotides. An additivity principle is observed. For example, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3(sup prime)- and C5 (sup prime)-deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 5%. Investigation of tandem double lesion initiated by electron-impact dissociative ionization of guanine, followed by proton reaction with the cytosine in the Watson-Crick pair, is currently being studied to see if tandem double lesion can be initiated by electron impact. Up to now only OH-induced tandem double lesion has been studied.

  20. The role of electron-impact vibrational excitation in electron transport through gaseous tetrahydrofuran

    SciTech Connect

    Duque, H. V.; Do, T. P. T.; Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au; Jones, D. B. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au

    2015-03-28

    In this paper, we report newly derived integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact vibrational excitation of tetrahydrofuran (THF) at intermediate impact energies. These cross sections extend the currently available data from 20 to 50 eV. Further, they indicate that the previously recommended THF ICS set [Garland et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 062712 (2013)] underestimated the strength of the electron-impact vibrational excitation processes. Thus, that recommended vibrational cross section set is revised to address those deficiencies. Electron swarm transport properties were calculated with the amended vibrational cross section set, to quantify the role of electron-driven vibrational excitation in describing the macroscopic swarm phenomena. Here, significant differences of up to 17% in the transport coefficients were observed between the calculations performed using the original and revised cross section sets for vibrational excitation.

  1. Unilateral atlanto-axial fractures in near side impact collisions: An under recognized entity in cervical trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lozen, Andrew M.; Pace, Jonathan; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A.; Cusick, Joseph F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Nearside impact collisions presenting with lateral mass fractures of atlanto-axial vertebrae contralateral to the impact site represents a rare fracture pattern that does not correlate with previously described injury mechanism. We describe our clinical experience with such fractures and propose a novel description of biomechanical forces involved in this unique injury pattern. The findings serve to alert clinicians to potentially serious consequences of associated unrecognized and untreated vertebral artery injury. Material and Methods: In addition to describing our clinical experience with three of these fractures, a review of Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) database was conducted to further characterize such fractures. A descriptive analysis of three recent lateral mass fractures of the atlanto-axial segment is coupled with a review of the CIREN database. A total of 4047 collisions were screened for unilateral fractures of atlas or axis. Information was screened for side of impact and data regarding impact velocity, occupant injuries and use of restraints. Results: Following screening of unilateral fractures of atlas and axis for direct side impacts, 41 fractures were identified. Cross referencing these cases for occurrence contralateral to side of impact identified four such fractures. Including our recent clinical experience, seven injuries were identified: Five C1 and two C2 fractures. Velocity ranged from 14 to 43 km/h. Two associated vertebral artery injuries were identified. Conclusions: Complexity of the atlanto-axial complex is responsible for a sequence of events that define load application in side impacts. This study demonstrates the vulnerability of vertebral artery to injury under unique translational forces and supports the use or routine screening for vascular injury. Diminished sensitivity of plain radiography in identifying these injuries suggests that computerized tomography should be used in all patients

  2. Electron collisions with phenol: Total, integral, differential, and momentum transfer cross sections and the role of multichannel coupling effects on the elastic channel

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Romarly F. da; Oliveira, Eliane M. de; Lima, Marco A. P.; Bettega, Márcio H. F.; Varella, Márcio T. do N.; Jones, Darryl B.; Brunger, Michael J.; Blanco, Francisco; Colmenares, Rafael; and others

    2015-03-14

    We report theoretical and experimental total cross sections for electron scattering by phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). The experimental data were obtained with an apparatus based in Madrid and the calculated cross sections with two different methodologies, the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR), and the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP). The SMCPP method in the N{sub open}-channel coupling scheme, at the static-exchange-plus-polarization approximation, is employed to calculate the scattering amplitudes at impact energies ranging from 5.0 eV to 50 eV. We discuss the multichannel coupling effects in the calculated cross sections, in particular how the number of excited states included in the open-channel space impacts upon the convergence of the elastic cross sections at higher collision energies. The IAM-SCAR approach was also used to obtain the elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) and for correcting the experimental total cross sections for the so-called forward angle scattering effect. We found a very good agreement between our SMCPP theoretical differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections and experimental data for benzene (a molecule differing from phenol by replacing a hydrogen atom in benzene with a hydroxyl group). Although some discrepancies were found for lower energies, the agreement between the SMCPP data and the DCSs obtained with the IAM-SCAR method improves, as expected, as the impact energy increases. We also have a good agreement among the present SMCPP calculated total cross section (which includes elastic, 32 inelastic electronic excitation processes and ionization contributions, the latter estimated with the binary-encounter-Bethe model), the IAM-SCAR total cross section, and the experimental data when the latter is corrected for the forward angle scattering effect [Fuss et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 042702 (2013)].

  3. Electronic quenching of O({sup 1}D) by Xe: Oscillations in the product angular distribution and their dependence on collision energy

    SciTech Connect

    Garofalo, Lauren A.; Smith, Mica C.; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H.; Boering, Kristie A.; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2015-08-07

    The dynamics of the O({sup 1}D) + Xe electronic quenching reaction was investigated in a crossed beam experiment at four collision energies. Marked large-scale oscillations in the differential cross sections were observed for the inelastic scattering products, O({sup 3}P) and Xe. The shape and relative phases of the oscillatory structure depend strongly on collision energy. Comparison of the experimental results with time-independent scattering calculations shows qualitatively that this behavior is caused by Stueckelberg interferences, for which the quantum phases of the multiple reaction pathways accessible during electronic quenching constructively and destructively interfere.

  4. Collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms II. Low-energy program using the method of the exterior complex scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, Jakub; Houfek, Karel

    2014-11-01

    While collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms pose a well studied and in some sense closed problem, there is still no free computer code ready for “production use”, that would enable applied researchers to generate necessary data for arbitrary impact energies and scattering transitions directly if absent in on-line scattering databases. This is the second article on the Hex program package, which describes a new computer code that is, with a little setup, capable of solving the scattering equations for energies ranging from a fraction of the ionization threshold to approximately 100 eV or more, depending on the available computational resources. The program implements the exterior complex scaling method in the B-spline basis. Catalogue identifier: AETI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 44 440 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 322 643 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++11. Computer: Any. Operating system: Any system with a C++11 compiler (e.g. GCC 4.8.1; tested on OpenSUSE 13.1 and Windows 8). Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Parallelized by OpenMP and MPI. RAM: Depending on input; 4.9 GiB for the test run. Classification: 2.4. External routines: GSL [1], HDF5 [2], UMFPACK [3], FFTW3 [4], optionally with OpenBLAS [5]. Nature of problem: Solution of the two-particle Schrödinger equation in central field. Solution method: The two-electron states are expanded into angular momentum eigenstates, which gives rise to the coupled bi-radial equations. The bi-radially dependent solution is then represented in a B-spline basis, which transforms the set of equations into a large matrix equation in this basis. The boundary condition

  5. Electron-impact excitation of H-like Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni for applications in modeling X-ray astrophysical sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malespin, C.; Ballance, C. P.; Pindzola, M. S.; Witthoeft, M. C.; Kallman, T. R.; Loch, S. D.

    2011-02-01

    Context. Accurate atomic data for the less abundance Fe-peak elements are required for use in X-ray astrophysical studies. Aims: We calculate high quality electron-impact excitation collision strengths and effective collision strengths for hydrogenic Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni. Methods: We use the Dirac R-matrix method, the intermediate coupling frame transformation R-matrix method, the semi-relativistic distorted-wave method and the fully-relativistic distorted-wave method to calculate collision strengths for each of the ions. The ADAS collisional-radiative codes are used to produce photon emissivity coefficients for each ion. Results: Results are presented for atomic energy levels, spontaneous emission coefficients, electron-impact excitation collision strengths and associated effective collision strengths for each of the five species under consideration. We find relativistic effects can contribute an approximate 10% increase to the background cross section in relation to semi-relativistic collision calculations. We also confirm that radiation damping plays a prominent role for certain near threshold resonances. In order check the integration of our results within collisional-radiative modeling codes, we have used the ADAS package for some preliminary modeling of photon emissivities. The atomic data shall be made available online through the OPEN-ADAS site and the CFADC database Final datasets for each ion are only available in electronic form at CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/526/A115

  6. Recent research directions in Fribourg: nuclear dynamics in resonances revealed by 2-dimensional EEL spectra, electron collisions with ionic liquids and electronic excitation of pyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Michael; Regeta, Khrystyna; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D.; Mašín, Zdeněk; Grimme, Stefan; Bannwarth, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    The article briefly reviews three subjects recently investigated in Fribourg: (i) electron collisions with surfaces of ionic liquids, (ii) two-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra and (iii) resonances in absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of unsaturated compounds. Electron energy loss spectra of four ionic liquids revealed a number of excited states, including triplet states. A solution of a dye in an ionic liquid showed an energy-loss band of the solute, but not in all ionic liquids. 2D spectra reveal state-to-state information (given resonance to given final state) and are shown to be an interesting means to gain insight into dynamics of nuclear motion in resonances. Absolute cross sections for pyrimidine are reported as a function of scattering angle and as a function of electron energy. They reveal resonant structure which was reproduced very nicely by R-matrix calculations. The calculation provided an assignment of the resonances which reveals common patterns in compounds containing double bonds.

  7. Electron-impact ionization and electron attachment cross sections of radicals important in transient gaseous discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Long C.; Srivastava, Santosh K.

    1990-01-01

    Electron-impact ionization and electron attachment cross sections of radicals and excited molecules were measured using an apparatus that consists of an electron beam, a molecular beam and a laser beam. The information obtained is needed for the pulse power applications in the areas of high power gaseous discharge switches, high energy lasers, particle beam experiments, and electromagnetic pulse systems. The basic data needed for the development of optically-controlled discharge switches were also investigated. Transient current pulses induced by laser irradiation of discharge media were observed and applied for the study of electron-molecule reaction kinetics in gaseous discharges.

  8. Low impact to fixed cell processing aiming transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barth, Ortrud Monika; Silva, Marcos Alexandre Nunes da; Barreto-Vieira, Debora Ferreira

    2016-06-01

    In cell culture, cell structures suffer strong impact due to centrifugation during processing for electron microscope observation. In order to minimise this effect, a new protocol was successfully developed. Using conventional reagents and equipments, it took over one week, but cell compression was reduced to none or the lowest deformation possible. PMID:27276186

  9. Electron impact ionization of Ar/sup 8 +/

    SciTech Connect

    Defrance, P.; Rachafi, S.; Jureta, J.; Meyer, F.; Chantrenne, S.

    1986-01-01

    Absolute electron impact ionization cross-sections have been measured for the Neon-like Ar/sup 8 +/ in the energy range from below the threshold for the metastable state to 2500 eV. No contribution of metastable states is observed. The results are well reproduced by the Distorted Wave Born Approximation. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Electron impact excitation coefficients for laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J.; Kepple, P. C.; Blaha, M.

    1976-01-01

    Electron impact excitation rate coefficients have been obtained for a number of transitions in highly ionized ions of interest to astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. The calculations were done using the method of distorted waves. Results are presented for various transitions in highly ionized Ne, Na, Al, Si, A, Ca, Ni and Fe.

  11. Low impact to fixed cell processing aiming transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Ortrud Monika; da Silva, Marcos Alexandre Nunes; Barreto-Vieira, Debora Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    In cell culture, cell structures suffer strong impact due to centrifugation during processing for electron microscope observation. In order to minimise this effect, a new protocol was successfully developed. Using conventional reagents and equipments, it took over one week, but cell compression was reduced to none or the lowest deformation possible. PMID:27276186

  12. Electron-impact ionization of hydrogenlike ions in QED theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, H.-L.; Chang, J.-C.; Hsiao, J.-T.; Lin, S.-F.; Huang, K.-N.

    2010-04-15

    Relativistic cross sections for electron-impact ionization including quantum electrodynamic effects are studied for hydrogenlike ions in the two-potential formalism. Results are compared with other theoretical calculations and experimental data. Effects of the transverse-photon interaction as well as vacuum polarization potential between charges are analyzed. Systematic behaviors along the H-isoelectronic sequence are summarized.

  13. Effective collision strengths for optically allowed transitions among degenerate levels of hydrogenic ions with 2{<=}Z{<=}30

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, K.; Aggarwal, K.M.; Akita, K.; Igarashi, A.; Keenan, F.P.; Nakazaki, S.

    2010-09-15

    The Coulomb-Born approximation is used to calculate electron-impact excitation collision strengths and effective collision strengths for optically allowed transitions among degenerate fine-structure levels of hydrogenic ions with 2{<=}Z{<=}30 and n{<=}5. Collision strengths are calculated over a wide range of energies up to E{sub j}/Z{sup 2}=10Ryd. Effective collision strengths are obtained over a wide temperature range up to 10{sup 8}K by integrating the collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities.

  14. MEASURING NEBULAR TEMPERATURES: THE EFFECT OF NEW COLLISION STRENGTHS WITH EQUILIBRIUM AND {kappa}-DISTRIBUTED ELECTRON ENERGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, David C.; Dopita, Michael A.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Palay, Ethan

    2013-08-15

    In this paper we develop tools for observers to use when analyzing nebular spectra for temperatures and metallicities, with two goals: to present a new, simple method to calculate equilibrium electron temperatures for collisionally excited line flux ratios, using the latest atomic data; and to adapt current methods to include the effects of possible non-equilibrium ''{kappa}'' electron energy distributions. Adopting recent collision strength data for [O III], [S III], [O II], [S II], and [N II], we find that existing methods based on older atomic data seriously overestimate the electron temperatures, even when considering purely Maxwellian statistics. If {kappa} distributions exist in H II regions and planetary nebulae as they do in solar system plasmas, it is important to investigate the observational consequences. This paper continues our previous work on the {kappa} distribution. We present simple formulaic methods that allow observers to (1) measure equilibrium electron temperatures and atomic abundances using the latest atomic data, and (2) to apply simple corrections to existing equilibrium analysis techniques to allow for possible non-equilibrium effects. These tools should lead to better consistency in temperature and abundance measurements, and a clearer understanding of the physics of H II regions and planetary nebulae.

  15. Influence of Electron Molecule Resonant Vibrational Collisions over the Symmetric Mode and Direct Excitation-Dissociation Cross Sections of CO2 on the Electron Energy Distribution Function and Dissociation Mechanisms in Cold Pure CO2 Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Pietanza, L D; Colonna, G; Laporta, V; Celiberto, R; D'Ammando, G; Laricchiuta, A; Capitelli, M

    2016-05-01

    A new set of electron-vibrational (e-V) processes linking the first 10 vibrational levels of the symmetric mode of CO2 is derived by using a decoupled vibrational model and inserted in the Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function (eedf). The new eedf and dissociation rates are in satisfactory agreement with the corresponding ones obtained by using the e-V cross sections reported in the database of Hake and Phelps (H-P). Large differences are, on the contrary, found when the experimental dissociation cross sections of Cosby and Helm are inserted in the Boltzman equation. Comparison of the corresponding rates with those obtained by using the low-energy threshold energy, reported in the H-P database, shows differences up to orders of magnitude, which decrease with the increasing of the reduced electric field. In all cases, we show the importance of superelastic vibrational collisions in affecting eedf and dissociation rates either in the direct electron impact mechanism or in the pure vibrational mechanism. PMID:27064438

  16. Influence of electron–ion collisions in plasma on the electron energy gain using the TE11 mode inside an elliptical waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdoli-Arani, A.; Basiry, M. J.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of electron–ion collisions in plasma on the electron energy gain and total energy of an externally injected electron inside an elliptical waveguide, including collisional plasma using the transverse electric mode, is investigated. It is noted that microwave radiation is used for excitations of the TE11 even mode in the configuration. The electromagnetic field components of the TE11 mode in the considered waveguide are obtained and graphically presented. It is seen that the strength of the fields reduces in the collisional plasma. Furthermore, the deflection angle, energy gain of the electron and total energy of the electron due to the mode are obtained. It is illustrated that electron–ion collisions in plasma reduce the energy gain and total energy of electrons injected into the elliptical waveguide.

  17. A probabilistic model for hydrokinetic turbine collision risks: exploring impacts on fish.

    PubMed

    Hammar, Linus; Eggertsen, Linda; Andersson, Sandra; Ehnberg, Jimmy; Arvidsson, Rickard; Gullström, Martin; Molander, Sverker

    2015-01-01

    A variety of hydrokinetic turbines are currently under development for power generation in rivers, tidal straits and ocean currents. Because some of these turbines are large, with rapidly moving rotor blades, the risk of collision with aquatic animals has been brought to attention. The behavior and fate of animals that approach such large hydrokinetic turbines have not yet been monitored at any detail. In this paper, we conduct a synthesis of the current knowledge and understanding of hydrokinetic turbine collision risks. The outcome is a generic fault tree based probabilistic model suitable for estimating population-level ecological risks. New video-based data on fish behavior in strong currents are provided and models describing fish avoidance behaviors are presented. The findings indicate low risk for small-sized fish. However, at large turbines (≥5 m), bigger fish seem to have high probability of collision, mostly because rotor detection and avoidance is difficult in low visibility. Risks can therefore be substantial for vulnerable populations of large-sized fish, which thrive in strong currents. The suggested collision risk model can be applied to different turbine designs and at a variety of locations as basis for case-specific risk assessments. The structure of the model facilitates successive model validation, refinement and application to other organism groups such as marine mammals. PMID:25730314

  18. A Probabilistic Model for Hydrokinetic Turbine Collision Risks: Exploring Impacts on Fish

    PubMed Central

    Hammar, Linus; Eggertsen, Linda; Andersson, Sandra; Ehnberg, Jimmy; Arvidsson, Rickard; Gullström, Martin; Molander, Sverker

    2015-01-01

    A variety of hydrokinetic turbines are currently under development for power generation in rivers, tidal straits and ocean currents. Because some of these turbines are large, with rapidly moving rotor blades, the risk of collision with aquatic animals has been brought to attention. The behavior and fate of animals that approach such large hydrokinetic turbines have not yet been monitored at any detail. In this paper, we conduct a synthesis of the current knowledge and understanding of hydrokinetic turbine collision risks. The outcome is a generic fault tree based probabilistic model suitable for estimating population-level ecological risks. New video-based data on fish behavior in strong currents are provided and models describing fish avoidance behaviors are presented. The findings indicate low risk for small-sized fish. However, at large turbines (≥5 m), bigger fish seem to have high probability of collision, mostly because rotor detection and avoidance is difficult in low visibility. Risks can therefore be substantial for vulnerable populations of large-sized fish, which thrive in strong currents. The suggested collision risk model can be applied to different turbine designs and at a variety of locations as basis for case-specific risk assessments. The structure of the model facilitates successive model validation, refinement and application to other organism groups such as marine mammals. PMID:25730314

  19. Impact direction effect on serious-to-fatal injuries among drivers in near-side collisions according to impact location: focus on thoracic injuries.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xinghua; Ma, Chunsheng; Hu, Jingwen; Zhou, Qing

    2012-09-01

    Occupant injury in real world vehicle accidents can be significantly affected by a set of crash characteristics, of which impact direction and impact location (or damage location) in general scale interval (e.g., frontal impact is frequently defined as general damage to vehicle frontal end with impact angle range of 11-1 o'clock) have been identified to associate with injury outcome. The effects of crash configuration in more specific scale of interval on the injury characteristics have not been adequately investigated. This paper presents a statistical analysis to investigate the combined effects of specific impact directions and impact locations on the serious-to-fatal injuries of driver occupants involved in near-side collisions using crash data from National Automotive Sampling System-Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) for the calendar years of 1995-2005. The screened injury dataset is categorized by three impact locations (side front, side center and side distributed) and two impact directions (oblique impact at 10 o'clock and pure lateral impact at 9 o'clock), resulting in six crash configurations in total. The weighted counts and the risks of different types of injuries in each subgroup are calculated, with which the relative risks along with 95% confidence intervals under oblique impacts versus lateral impacts in each impact location category are computed. Accordingly, the most frequent injury patterns, the risks and the coded-sources of serious thoracic injuries in different crash configurations are identified. The approach adopted in the present study provides new perspectives into occupant injury outcomes and associated mechanism. Results of the analyses reveal the importance of consideration of the crash configurations beyond the scope of existing side-impact regulatory tests and stress the necessity of vehicle crashworthiness and restraint system design in omni-direction to better protect occupants in real-world crash scenarios. PMID:22664710

  20. Electron-impact excitation of the low-lying electronic states of HCN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Tanaka, H.; Srivastava, S. K.; Wicke, B. G.

    1977-01-01

    The first study of the low-energy electron-impact excitation of low-lying electronic transitions in the HCN molecule is reported. Measurements were made at incident electron energies of 11.6 and 21.6 eV in the energy-loss range of 3-10 eV, and at scattering angles of 20-130 deg. Inelastic scattering spectra were placed on the absolute cross-section scale by determining first the ratio of inelastic-to-elastic scattering cross sections, and then separately measuring the absolute elastic scattering cross section. Several new electronic transitions are observed which are intrinsically overlapped in the molecule itself. Assignments of these electronic transitions are suggested. These assignments are based on present spectroscopic and cross-sections measurements, high-energy electron scattering spectra, optical absorption spectra, and ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

  1. Review of electron impact excitation cross sections for copper atom

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, N.W.; Hazi, A.U.

    1982-02-01

    Excitation of atomic copper by electron impact plays an important role in the copper vapor laser and accurate cross sections are needed for understanding and modeling laser performance. During the past seven years, there have been several attempts to normalize the relative elastic and inelastic cross sections measured by Trajmar and coworkers. However, each of these efforts have yielded different cross sections, and the uncertainty in the correct normalization of the data has been a source of confusion and concern for the kinetic modeling efforts. This difficulty has motivated us to review previous work on the electron impact excitation of copper atom and to perform new calculations of the inelastic cross sections using the impact parameter method. In this memorandum we review the previous attempts to normalize the experimental data and provide a critical assessment of the accuracy of the resulting cross sections. We also present new theoretical cross sections for the electron impact excitation of the /sup 2/S ..-->.. /sup 2/P/sup 0/ and /sup 2/S ..-->.. /sup 2/D transitions in copper. When the experimental cross sections are renormalized to the results of the impact parameter calculations, they are a factor of three smaller than those published in the latest paper of Trajmar et. al. At impact energies above 60 eV the excitation cross sections obtained with the impact parameter method agree well with the results of the very recent, unpublished, close-coupling calculations of Henry. This agreement suggests that the present normalization of the experimental cross sections is probably the most reliable one obtained to date.

  2. Centrality Dependence of Charm Production from a Measurement of Single Electrons in Au+Au Collisions at √(sNN)=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, S. S.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Alexander, J.; Amirikas, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Aronson, S. H.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, R.; Babintsev, V.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhagavatula, S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Borel, H.; Borenstein, S.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bruner, N.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camard, X.; Chai, J.-S.; Chand, P.; Chang, W. C.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Constantin, P.; D'Enterria, D. G.; David, G.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Devismes, A.; Dietzsch, O.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Du Rietz, R.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Efremenko, Y. V.; El Chenawi, K.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Ewell, L.; Fields, D. E.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fox, B. D.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fung, S.-Y.; Garpman, S.; Ghosh, T. K.; Glenn, A.; Gogiberidze, G.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Guryn, W.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hamagaki, H.; Hansen, A. G.; Hartouni, E. P.; Harvey, M.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, N.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Heuser, J. M.; Hibino, M.; Hill, J. C.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Ichihara, T.; Ikonnikov, V. V.; Imai, K.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Jacak, B. V.; Jang, W. Y.; Jeong, Y.; Jia, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Johnson, S. C.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kang, J. H.; Kapoor, S. S.; Katou, K.; Kelly, S.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, E.; Kim, G.-B.; Kim, H. J.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Kiyoyama, K.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Koehler, D.; Kohama, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kuberg, C. H.; Kurita, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Ladygin, V.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, S.; Leitch, M. J.; Li, X. H.; Lim, H.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, Y.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mao, Y.; Martinez, G.; Marx, M. D.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McGaughey, P. L.; Melnikov, E.; Messer, F.; Miake, Y.; Milan, J.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, R. E.; Mishra, G. C.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Mühlbacher, F.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Nakamura, T.; Nandi, B. K.; Nara, M.; Newby, J.; Nilsson, P.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Okada, K.; Ono, M.; Onuchin, V.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P.; Pantuev, V. S.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J.; Parmar, A.; Pate, S. F.; Peitzmann, T.; Peng, J.-C.; Peresedov, V.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Plasil, F.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosnet, P.; Ryu, S. S.; Sadler, M. E.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, M.; Sakai, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanfratello, L.; Santo, R.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schutz, Y.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Shaw, M. R.; Shea, T. K.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shiina, T.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Sivertz, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sullivan, J. P.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tamai, M.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarján, P.; Tepe, J. D.; Thomas, T. L.; Tojo, J.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuruoka, H.; Tuli, S. K.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; van Hecke, H. W.; Velkovska, J.; Velkovsky, M.; Veszprémi, V.; Villatte, L.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Volkov, M. A.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, Y.; White, S. N.; Wohn, F. K.; Woody, C. L.; Xie, W.; Yang, Y.; Yanovich, A.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, G. R.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, S. J.; Zolin, L.

    2005-03-01

    The PHENIX experiment has measured midrapidity transverse momentum spectra (0.4electrons as a function of centrality in Au+Au collisions at √(sNN)=200 GeV. Contributions from photon conversions and Dalitz decays of light neutral mesons are measured by introducing a thin (1.7% X0) converter into the PHENIX acceptance and are statistically removed. The subtracted nonphotonic electron spectra are primarily due to the semileptonic decays of hadrons containing heavy quarks, mainly charm at lower pT. For all centralities, the charm production cross section is found to scale with the nuclear overlap function, TAA. For minimum-bias collisions the charm cross section per binary collision is Ncc¯/TAA=622±57(stat)±160(syst) μb.

  3. Centrality dependence of charm production from a measurement of single electrons in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2005-03-01

    The PHENIX experiment has measured midrapidity transverse momentum spectra (0.4electrons as a function of centrality in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. Contributions from photon conversions and Dalitz decays of light neutral mesons are measured by introducing a thin (1.7% X0) converter into the PHENIX acceptance and are statistically removed. The subtracted nonphotonic electron spectra are primarily due to the semileptonic decays of hadrons containing heavy quarks, mainly charm at lower p(T). For all centralities, the charm production cross section is found to scale with the nuclear overlap function, T(AA). For minimum-bias collisions the charm cross section per binary collision is N(cc )/T(AA)=622+/-57(stat)+/-160(syst) microb. PMID:15783878

  4. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in collisions between protons and the ions N6+ and O7+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Coupled-state cross sections are being determined for electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in collisions between keV-energy protons and the hydrogenic ions N6+ and O7+, extending early and more recent work on the less highly charged target ions He+, Li2+, Be3+, B4+, and C5+. As in the more recent work, a basis of 60 Sturmians on each center is being used, and in a second calculation, a basis of 280 Sturmians on the target nucleus and a single 1 s function on the proton is being used. The extent to which high-energy scaling rules with target nuclear charge Z are valid is being examined further for transfer to the ground state, total transfer, and ionization, as well as for excitation and individual-state processes at intermediate energies near where the cross sections peak.

  5. Precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.E.; SLD Collaboration

    1994-03-01

    A precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry (A{sub LR}) for Z boson production by e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions has been attained at the Slac Linear Collider with the SLD detector. We describe this measurement for the 1993 data run, emphasizing the significant improvements in polarized beam operation which took place for this run, where the luminosity-weighted electron beam polarization averaged 62.6 {plus_minus} 1.2 %. Preliminary 1993 results for A{sub LR} are presented. When combined with the (less precise) 1992 result, the preliminary result for the effective weak mixing angle is sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W {sup eff}} = 0.2290 {plus_minus} 0.0010.

  6. Comparison of collision-induced dissociation and electron-induced dissociation of phillyrin using FT-ICR MS.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhenguang; Lin, Zhiwei; Mu, Yingdi; Yan, Dong

    2016-10-01

    Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry using collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron capture dissociation (ECD) at high mass resolution was first applied to investigate the characteristic fragment ions of phillyrin. The CID experimental results demonstrated the elemental composition of fragment ions unambiguously, so a reasonable fragmentation pathway of phillyrin was proposed. The ECD fragmentation mechanism was believed to be fundamentally different from the CID method. ECD could be used not only in the biological field but also as a powerful complement to the structural identification of small molecular compounds. The characteristic fragmentation pathways were helpful in analyzing and interpreting the stability and property of the parent ion. PMID:27258687

  7. Electron capture in very low energy collisions of multicharged ions with H and D in merged beams

    SciTech Connect

    Havener, C.C.; Meyer, F.W.; Phaneuf, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    An ion-atom merged-beams technique is being used to measure total absolute electron-capture cross sections for multicharged ions in collisions with H (or D) in the energy range between 0.1 and 1000 eV/amu. Comparison between experiment and theory over such a large energy range constitutes a critical test for both experiment and theory. Total capture cross-section measurements for O{sup 3+} H(D) and O{sup 5+} + H(D) are presented and compared to state selective and differential cross section calculations. Landau-Zener calculations show that for O{sup 5+} the sharp increase in the measured cross section below 1 eV/amu is partly due to trajectory effects arising from the ion-induced dipole interaction between the reactants. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Impact and implications of the Afro-Eurasian collision south of Cyprus from reflection seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimke, Jennifer; Ehrhardt, Axel

    2014-06-01

    The Cyprus Arc in the Eastern Mediterranean represents the active collision front between the African and Eurasian (Anatolian) Plates. Along the Cyprus Arc, the Eratosthenes Seamount is believed to have been blocking the northward motion of the African Plate since the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene. Based on a dense grid of 2D reflection seismic profiles covering the Eratosthenes Seamount and western Levant Basin offshore Cyprus, new observations regarding the Cyprus Arc collision front at the triple transition zone Eratosthenes Seamount-Levant Basin-Hecataeus Rise are presented. The data show that the Levant Basin is filled with ~ 10 km of sediments of Early Mesozoic (probably Jurassic) to Plio-Quaternary age with only a localized deformation affecting the Miocene-Oligocene rock units. The sediments onlap directly against the steep eastern flank of the Eratosthenes Seamount to the west and the southern flank of the Hecataeus Rise to the north. The sediments show no deformation that could be associated with collision and are undeformed even very close to the two prominent structures. Pinching out of the Base Miocene reflector in the Levant Basin due to onlapping of the Middle Miocene reflector indicates uplift of the Eratosthenes Seamount and the Hecataeus Rise. In contrast to the Messinian Evaporites north of the Eratosthenes Seamount, the salt in the Levant Basin, even close to the Hecataeus Rise, is tectonically undeformed. It is proposed that the Eratosthenes Seamount, the western Levant Basin and the Hecataeus Rise act as one tectonic unit. This implies that the collision front is located north of this unit and that the Hecataeus Rise shields the sediments south of it from deformation associated with collision of the African and Anatolian Plates.

  9. METHES: A Monte Carlo collision code for the simulation of electron transport in low temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabie, M.; Franck, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a freely available MATLAB code for the simulation of electron transport in arbitrary gas mixtures in the presence of uniform electric fields. For steady-state electron transport, the program provides the transport coefficients, reaction rates and the electron energy distribution function. The program uses established Monte Carlo techniques and is compatible with the electron scattering cross section files from the open-access Plasma Data Exchange Project LXCat. The code is written in object-oriented design, allowing the tracing and visualization of the spatiotemporal evolution of electron swarms and the temporal development of the mean energy and the electron number due to attachment and/or ionization processes. We benchmark our code with well-known model gases as well as the real gases argon, N2, O2, CF4, SF6 and mixtures of N2 and O2.

  10. Electron, Ion and Atom Collisions Leading to Anomalous Doppler Broadening in Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran Lj.; Stojanović, Vladimir D.; Nikitović, Željka D.

    2007-09-01

    DC high E/N swarm experiment (self sustained discharge operating in the Townsend regime) may be modeled directly and exactly as it does not require self consistent calculation of the electric field and is thus open to a simple Monte Carlo simulation that may include complexity at the level of representation of collisional events. Thus such an experiment operating under swarm conditions is the best way to test the mechanism of generation of anomalously large Doppler broadening that was often observed in low pressure discharges. In this paper we show revised results of modeling of Doppler profiles by using a well tested Monte Carlo procedure and revised models of heavy particle collisions. In particular we study the importance of fast H2 and fast H particles, the effect of different models of angular distribution of particles scattered of the surface and of the molecules and we study the role of the energy losses due to vibrational excitation.

  11. Identification of Family Non-universal Gauge Bosons in High-energy Electron-positron Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bagneid, Ali A.; Althubiti, Numa A.

    2011-10-27

    We examine effects on measurable observables in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions resulting from the existence of additional neutral gauge bosons originating in extensions of the standard model. In particular, we consider family non-universal neutral gauge bosons occurring in the minimal supersymmetric standard model and in the Sp(6){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} model, as well as other theoretically motivated popular neutral gauge bosons. We show how the proper employment of the generation-dependent couplings of the extra gauge boson, and the appropriate adjustment of the beam polarization, not only improved the identification of the models but also enhanced the discovery potential of the family non-universal extra gauge bosons.

  12. Identification of Family Non-universal Gauge Bosons in High-energy Electron-positron Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagneid, Ali A.; Althubiti, Numa A.

    2011-10-01

    We examine effects on measurable observables in e+e- collisions resulting from the existence of additional neutral gauge bosons originating in extensions of the standard model. In particular, we consider family non-universal neutral gauge bosons occurring in the minimal supersymmetric standard model and in the Sp(6)L ⊗ U(1)Y model, as well as other theoretically motivated popular neutral gauge bosons. We show how the proper employment of the generation-dependent couplings of the extra gauge boson, and the appropriate adjustment of the beam polarization, not only improved the identification of the models but also enhanced the discovery potential of the family non-universal extra gauge bosons.

  13. High-Energy Electron-Ion and Photon-Ion Collisions: Status and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, Timothy R.

    2010-01-01

    Non-LTE plasmas are ubiquitous in objects studied in the UV and X-ray energy bands. Collisional and photoionization cross sections for atoms and ions are fundamental to our ability to model such plasmas. Modeling is key in the X-ray band, where detector properties and limited spectral resolution limit the ability to measure model-independent line strengths, or other spectral features. Much of the motivation for studying such collisions and many of the tools, are not new. However, the motivation for such studies and their applications, have been affected by the advent of X-ray spectroscopy with the gratings on Chandra and XMM-Newton. In this talk I will review this motivation and describe the tools currently in use for such studies. I will also describe some current unresolved problems and the likely future needs for such data.

  14. Semirelativistic model for ionization of atomic hydrogen by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Attaourti, Y.; Taj, S.; Manaut, B.

    2005-06-15

    We present a semirelativistic model for the description of the ionization process of atomic hydrogen by electron impact in the first Born approximation by using the Darwin wave function to describe the bound state of atomic hydrogen and the Sommerfeld-Maue wave function to describe the ejected electron. This model, accurate to first order in Z/c in the relativistic correction, shows that, even at low kinetic energies of the incident electron, spin effects are small but not negligible. These effects become noticeable with increasing incident electron energies. All analytical calculations are exact and our semirelativistic results are compared with the results obtained in the nonrelativistic Coulomb Born approximation both for the coplanar asymmetric and the binary coplanar geometries.

  15. Research gaps related to the environmental impacts of electronic cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hoshing

    2014-01-01

    Objective To consider the research gaps related to the environmental impacts of electronic cigarettes due to their manufacture, use and disposal. Methods Literature searches were conducted through December 2013. Studies were included in this review if they related to the environmental impacts of e-cigarettes. Results Scientific information on the environmental impacts of e-cigarette manufacturing, use and disposal is very limited. No studies formally evaluated the environmental impacts of the manufacturing process or disposal of components, including batteries. Four studies evaluated potential exposure to secondhand e-cigarette aerosol, an indication of impacts on indoor air quality. A 2010 survey of six e-cigarette models found that none of the products provided disposal instructions for spent cartridges containing nicotine. Notably, some e-cigarette manufacturers claim their e-cigarettes are ‘eco-friendly’ or ‘green’, despite the lack of any supporting data or environmental impact studies. Some authors argue that such advertising may boost sales and increase e-cigarette appeal, especially among adolescents. Conclusions Little is known about the environmental impacts of e-cigarettes, and a number of topics could be further elucidated by additional investigation. These topics include potential environmental impacts related to manufacturing, use and disposal. The environmental impacts of e-cigarette manufacturing will depend upon factory size and the nicotine extracting method used. The environmental impacts of e-cigarette use will include chemical and aerosol exposure in the indoor environment. The environmental impacts of disposal of e-cigarette cartridges (which contain residual nicotine) and disposal of e-cigarettes (which contain batteries) represent yet another environmental concern. PMID:24732165

  16. Electron-positron production in ultra-peripheral heavy-ion collisions with the STAR experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Vladimir Borisovitch

    2003-08-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of the cross-section of the purely electromagnetic production of e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs accompanied by mutual nuclear Coulomb excitation AuAu {yields} Au*Au* + e{sup +}e{sup -}, in ultra-peripheral gold-gold collisions at RHIC at the center-of-mass collision energy of {radical}S{sub NN} = 200 GeV per nucleon. These reactions were selected by detecting neutron emission by the excited gold ions in the Zero Degree Calorimeters. The charged tracks in the e{sup +}e{sup -} events were reconstructed with the STAR Time Projection Chamber. The detector acceptance limits the kinematical range of the observed e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs; therefore the measured cross-section is extrapolated to 4{pi} with the use of Monte Carlo simulations. We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation for ultra-peripheral e{sup +}e{sup -} production at RHIC based on the Equivalent Photon Approximation, the lowest-order QED e{sup +}e{sup -} production cross-section by two real photons and the assumption that the mutual nuclear excitations and the e{sup +}e{sup -} production are independent (EPA model). We compare our experimental results to two models: the EPA model and a model based on full QED calculation of the e{sup +}e{sup -} production, taking the photon virtuality into account. The measured differential cross-section d{sigma}/dM{sub inv} (M{sub inv} - e{sup +}e{sup -} invariant mass) agrees well with both theoretical models. The measured differential cross-section d{sigma}/dp{sub {perpendicular}}{sup tot} (p{sub {perpendicular}}{sup tot} - e{sup +}e{sup -} total transverse momentum) favors the full QED calculation over the EPA model.

  17. Electron impact excitation rate coefficients for P-like Ni XIV

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K.; Shanghai EBIT Lab, Institute of Modern Physics, Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 ; Yan, J.; Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 ; Huang, M.; Shanghai EBIT Lab, Institute of Modern Physics, Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 ; Li, C.Y.; Zeng, J.L.; Chen, C.Y.; Wang, Y.S.; Zou, Y.M.; Shanghai EBIT Lab, Institute of Modern Physics, Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433

    2012-07-15

    We have calculated the atomic data including electron impact excitations and radiative decays among the lowest 143 fine-structure levels arising from 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}, 3s3p{sup 4}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}3d, 3p{sup 5}, 3s3p{sup 3}3d, and 3s{sup 2}3p3d{sup 2} configurations in P-like Ni XIV. Direct excitation collision strengths are calculated employing the relativistic distorted-wave method. Resonances are included via the isolated resonance approximation using distorted-waves. Resonance contributions from S-like [3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}, 3s3p{sup 4}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}3d,3p{sup 5}, 3s3p{sup 3}3d,3s{sup 2}3p3d{sup 2}, 3p{sup 4}3d,3s3p{sup 2}3d{sup 2},3s{sup 2}3d{sup 3}]n{sup Prime }l{sup Prime} complex series are taken into account. Effective collision strengths are reported over an electron temperature range of 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5}-1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} K. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiative and collisional atomic data are presented for the lowest 143 fine-structure levels in P-like Ni XIV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calculations are performed using the FAC package. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Resonances enhance significantly a large amount of transitions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Resonances play an important role of level population and line intensity ratios.

  18. Research of the relationship of pedestrian injury to collision speed, car-type, impact location and pedestrian sizes using human FE model (THUMS Version 4).

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ryosuke; Katsuhara, Tadasuke; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Yasuki, Tsuyoshi

    2012-10-01

    Injuries in car to pedestrian collisions are affected by various factors such as the vehicle body type, pedestrian body size and impact location as well as the collision speed. This study aimed to investigate the influence of such factors taking a Finite Element (FE) approach. A total of 72 collision cases were simulated using three different vehicle FE models (Sedan, SUV, Mini-Van), three different pedestrian FE models (AM50, AF05, AM95), assuming two different impact locations (center and the corner of the bumper) and at four different collision speeds (20, 30, 40 and 50 km/h). The impact kinematics and the responses of the pedestrian model were validated against those in the literature prior to the simulations. The relationship between the collision speed and the predicted occurrence of head and chest injuries was examined for each case, analyzing the impact kinematics of the pedestrian against the vehicle body and resultant loading to the head and the chest. Strain based indicators were used in the simulation model to estimate skeletal injury (bony fracture) and soft tissue (brain and internal organs) injury. The study results primarily showed that the injury risk became higher with the collision speed, but was also affected by the combination of the factors such as the pedestrian size and the impact location. The study also discussed the injury patterns and trends with respect to the factors examined. In all of the simulated conditions, the model did not predict any severe injury at a collision speed of 20 km/h. PMID:23625564

  19. Tetrapositive plutonium, neptunium, uranium, and thorium coordination complexes: chemistry revealed by electron transfer and collision induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng; Gibson, John K

    2014-04-17

    The Pu(4+), Np(4+), and U(4+) ions, which have large electron affinities of ∼34.6, ∼33.6, and ∼32.6 eV, respectively, were stabilized from solution to the gas phase upon coordination by three neutral tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide ligands (TMOGA). Both collision induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of Pu(TMOGA)3(4+) reveal the propensity for reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III), by loss of TMOGA(+) in CID and by simple electron transfer in ETD. The reduction of Pu(IV) is in distinct contrast to retention of Th(IV) in both CID and ETD of Th(TMOGA)3(4+), where only the C-Oether bond cleavage product was observed. U(TMOGA)3(4+) behaves similarly to Th(TMOGA)3(4+) upon CID and ETD, while the fragmentation patterns of Np(TMOGA)3(4+) lie between those of Pu(TMOGA)3(4+) and U(TMOGA)3(4+). It is notable that the gas-phase fragmentation behaviors of these exceptional tetrapositive complexes parallel fundamental differences in condensed phase chemistry within the actinide series, specifically the tendency for reduction from the IV to III oxidation states. PMID:24660979

  20. Differential cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran at intermediate impact energies

    SciTech Connect

    Do, T. P. T.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au; Jones, D. B. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au

    2015-03-28

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran, at intermediate incident electron energies (15-50 eV) and over the 10°-90° scattered electron angular range. These measurements extend the available DCS data for vibrational excitation for this species, which have previously been obtained at lower incident electron energies (≤20 eV). Where possible, our data are compared to the earlier measurements in the overlapping energy ranges. Here, quite good agreement was generally observed where the measurements overlapped.

  1. Final Report for "Accurate Numerical Models of the Secondary Electron Yield from Grazing-incidence Collisions".

    SciTech Connect

    Seth A Veitzer

    2008-10-21

    Effects of stray electrons are a main factor limiting performance of many accelerators. Because heavy-ion fusion (HIF) accelerators will operate in regimes of higher current and with walls much closer to the beam than accelerators operating today, stray electrons might have a large, detrimental effect on the performance of an HIF accelerator. A primary source of stray electrons is electrons generated when halo ions strike the beam pipe walls. There is some research on these types of secondary electrons for the HIF community to draw upon, but this work is missing one crucial ingredient: the effect of grazing incidence. The overall goal of this project was to develop the numerical tools necessary to accurately model the effect of grazing incidence on the behavior of halo ions in a HIF accelerator, and further, to provide accurate models of heavy ion stopping powers with applications to ICF, WDM, and HEDP experiments.

  2. Calculation of Electron Swarm Parameters of SF6/N2 in a Uniform Field Using an Improved Monte Carlo Collision Simulation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Pfeiffer, W.; Kouzichine, N.; Qiu, Yuchang; Kuffel, E.; Li, Kenli

    2008-02-01

    The electron swarm parameters of SF6/N2 are calculated in the present study using an improved Monte Carlo collision simulation method (MCS). And some improved sampling techniques are also adopted. The simulation results show that the improved simulation method can provide more accurate results.

  3. First-principles investigation of the dissociation and coupling of methane on small copper clusters: Interplay of collision dynamics and geometric and electronic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Jithin J.; Mushrif, Samir H.

    2015-05-01

    Small metal clusters exhibit unique size and morphology dependent catalytic activity. The search for alternate minimum energy pathways and catalysts to transform methane to more useful chemicals and carbon nanomaterials led us to investigate collision induced dissociation of methane on small Cu clusters. We report here for the first time, the free energy barriers for the collision induced activation, dissociation, and coupling of methane on small Cu clusters (Cun where n = 2-12) using ab initio molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The collision induced activation of the stretching and bending vibrations of methane significantly reduces the free energy barrier for its dissociation. Increase in the cluster size reduces the barrier for dissociation of methane due to the corresponding increase in delocalisation of electron density within the cluster, as demonstrated using the electron localisation function topology analysis. This enables higher probability of favourable alignment of the C-H stretching vibration of methane towards regions of high electron density within the cluster and makes higher number of sites available for the chemisorption of CH3 and H upon dissociation. These characteristics contribute in lowering the barrier for dissociation of methane. Distortion and reorganisation of cluster geometry due to high temperature collision dynamics disturb electron delocalisation within them and increase the barrier for dissociation. Coupling reactions of CHx (x = 1-3) species and recombination of H with CHx have free energy barriers significantly lower than complete dehydrogenation of methane to carbon. Thus, competition favours the former reactions at high hydrogen saturation on the clusters.

  4. Electron-impact ionization of helium with large energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, I.; Fursa, D. V.; Stelbovics, A. T.

    2006-09-15

    We consider the recently measured case of 730 eV electron-impact ionization of the ground state of helium with 205 and 500 eV coplanar outgoing electrons by Catoire et al. [J. Phys. B 39, 2827 (2006)]. These measurements, which are on a relative scale, show some unexpected structure and variation from the second-order distorted-wave Born approximation R-matrix and Brauner-Briggs-Klar theories. Using the convergent close-coupling method we provide an improved agreement with experiment, but some discrepancies still remain.

  5. Electron-Impact Total Ionization Cross Sections of Hydrocarbon Ions

    PubMed Central

    Irikura, Karl K.; Kim, Yong-Ki; Ali, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    The Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model for electron-impact total ionization cross sections has been applied to CH2+, CH3+, CH4+, C2H2+, C2H4+, C2H6+ and H3O+. The cross sections for the hydrocarbon ions are needed for modeling cool plasmas in fusion devices. No experimental data are available for direct comparison. Molecular constants to generate total ionization cross sections at arbitrary incident electron energies using the BEB formula are presented. A recent experimental result on the ionization of H3O+ is found to be almost 1/20 of the present theory at the cross section peak.

  6. Ionization of the glycerin molecule by the electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavilopulo, A. N.; Shpenik, O. B.; Markush, P. P.; Kontrosh, E. E.

    2014-10-01

    The paper describes experimental method for and presents the results of studying positive ion yields produced due to direct and dissociative electron-impact ionization of the glycerin molecule. The mass spectra of the glycerin molecule are studied in the range of mass numbers of 10-95 amu at different temperatures. The energy dependences of the ionization efficiency cross sections of the glycerin molecule ions produced by a monoenergetic electron beam are analyzed; using these dependences, the appearance energies of fragment ions are determined. The dynamics of fragment ion formation is investigated in the temperature range of 300-340 K.

  7. Tectonic impact of anatexis on collision zones dynamics : insights from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrousse, Loic; Duretz, Thibault; Gerya, Taras

    2013-04-01

    Partial melting reactions constitute a first order weakening process in the continental crust involed in collision zones. It can act as a possible decoupling mechanism within the lithosphere and therefore influence the dynamics of continental subduction-collision. The Western Gneiss Region, Norwegian Caledonides, exhibits a direct relationship between eclogites occurrences and partial melting textures in the surrounding gneiss. This fact implies that partial melting is associated with part of the exhumation of High Pressure (HP) rocks. Several metamorphic reactions produce silicate melts at different PT conditions, depending mainly on the availability of aqueous fluids. Even if most of the partial melting textures observed in hot orogens relate to water-absent dehydration melting, evidences of water-present partial melting of gneiss and eclogites at HP in the Western Gneiss Region, suggest that water-present melting reactions may play a role in fostering HP metamorphic rocks exhumation. Another question arising from experimental rheological studies relies in quantifying the amount of liquid phase necessary to trigger strength drops of migmatites (i.e. the Rheologically Critical Melt Percentage, RCMP). Proposed values span from very low percentages close to 1% up to 20-30%, when migmatites turn to diatexites. In this study, we employ lithospheric scale numerical experiments, to compare the effects of water-present or dehydration partial melting reactions on continental collision systems. The two-dimensional thermo-mechanical experiments explore the extent of melt-weakening by allowing a wide range viscosity variations (9 orders of magnitude). The model set-up is representative of the Scandian collision and its sensitivity to the initial Moho temperature, the value of RCMP, and the buoyancy of the extracted melts, was investigated.

  8. Relativistic model of secondary-electron energy spectra in electron-impact ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H. ); Manson, S.T. )

    1991-10-01

    A relativistic model for differential electron-impact-ionization cross sections that allows the energy spectrum of secondary electrons to be calculated over a wide range of primary-electron energies is presented. The semiempirical method requires only experimental total ionization cross sections and optical oscillator strengths for the target species of interest, but other information, if available, can be incorporated to make the formulation still more accurate. Results for ionization of helium indicate that the lower limit on primary-electron energy for application of the model is about 100 eV. The simple analytic form of the model facilitates investigation of the regions of the secondary-electron energy spectrum where relativistic effects are important.

  9. Massive black hole binaries from runaway collisions: the impact of metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, Michela

    2016-07-01

    The runaway collision scenario is one of the most promising mechanisms to explain the formation of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) in young dense star clusters. On the other hand, the massive stars that participate in the runaway collisions lose mass by stellar winds. In this paper, we discuss new N-body simulations of massive (6.5 × 104 M⊙) star clusters, in which we added upgraded recipes for stellar winds and supernova explosion at different metallicity. We follow the evolution of the principal collision product (PCP), through dynamics and stellar evolution, till it forms a stellar remnant. At solar metallicity, the mass of the final merger product spans from few solar masses up to ˜30 M⊙. At low metallicity (0.01-0.1 Z⊙) the maximum remnant mass is ˜250 M⊙, in the range of IMBHs. A large fraction (˜0.6) of the PCPs are not ejected from the parent star cluster and acquire stellar or black hole (BH) companions. Most of the long-lived binaries hosting a PCP are BH-BH binaries. We discuss the importance of this result for gravitational wave detection.

  10. Massive black hole binaries from runaway collisions: the impact of metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, Michela

    2016-04-01

    The runaway collision scenario is one of the most promising mechanisms to explain the formation of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) in young dense star clusters. On the other hand, the massive stars that participate in the runaway collisions lose mass by stellar winds. In this paper, we discuss new N-body simulations of massive (6.5 × 104 M⊙) star clusters, in which we added upgraded recipes for stellar winds and supernova explosion at different metallicity. We follow the evolution of the principal collision product (PCP), through dynamics and stellar evolution, till it forms a stellar remnant. At solar metallicity, the mass of the final merger product spans from few solar masses up to ˜30 M⊙. At low metallicity (0.01 - 0.1 Z⊙) the maximum remnant mass is ˜250 M⊙, in the range of IMBHs. A large fraction (˜0.6) of the PCPs are not ejected from the parent star cluster and acquire stellar or black hole (BH) companions. Most of the long-lived binaries hosting a PCP are BH-BH binaries. We discuss the importance of this result for gravitational wave detection.

  11. Impact of Short-Range Forces on Defect Production from High-Energy Collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stoller, R. E.; Tamm, A.; Béland, L. K.; Samolyuk, G. D.; Stocks, G. M.; Caro, A.; Slipchenko, L. V.; Osetsky, Yu. N.; Aabloo, A.; Klintenberg, M.; et al

    2016-04-25

    Primary radiation damage formation in solid materials typically involves collisions between atoms that have up to a few hundred keV of kinetic energy. The distance between two colliding atoms can approach 0.05 nm during these collisions. At such small atomic separations, force fields fitted to equilibrium properties tend to significantly underestimate the potential energy of the colliding dimer. To enable molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collisions, it is common practice to use a screened Coulomb force field to describe the interactions and to smoothly join this to the equilibrium force field at a suitable interatomic spacing. But, there is nomore » accepted standard method for choosing the parameters used in the joining process, and our results prove that defect production is sensitive to how the force fields are linked. A new procedure is presented that involves the use of ab initio calculations to determine the magnitude and spatial dependence of the pair interactions at intermediate distances, along with systematic criteria for choosing the joining parameters. Results are presented for the case of nickel, which demonstrate the use and validity of the procedure.« less

  12. Impact of Short-Range Forces on Defect Production from High-Energy Collisions.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R E; Tamm, A; Béland, L K; Samolyuk, G D; Stocks, G M; Caro, A; Slipchenko, L V; Osetsky, Yu N; Aabloo, A; Klintenberg, M; Wang, Y

    2016-06-14

    Primary radiation damage formation in solid materials typically involves collisions between atoms that have up to a few hundred keV of kinetic energy. During these collisions, the distance between two colliding atoms can approach 0.05 nm. At such small atomic separations, force fields fitted to equilibrium properties tend to significantly underestimate the potential energy of the colliding dimer. To enable molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collisions, it is common practice to use a screened Coulomb force field to describe the interactions and to smoothly join this to the equilibrium force field at a suitable interatomic spacing. However, there is no accepted standard method for choosing the parameters used in the joining process, and our results prove that defect production is sensitive to how the force fields are linked. A new procedure is presented that involves the use of ab initio calculations to determine the magnitude and spatial dependence of the pair interactions at intermediate distances, along with systematic criteria for choosing the joining parameters. Results are presented for the case of nickel, which demonstrate the use and validity of the procedure. PMID:27110927

  13. Measurement of the di-electron mass spectrum in 12C+12C collisions at 2 AGeV by HADES

    SciTech Connect

    Sudol, Malgorzata

    2006-07-11

    The High Acceptance DiElectron Spectrometer (HADES) has been constructed at the SIS accelerator (GSI, Darmstadt) to investigate electron-positron pairs produced in proton, pion and heavy-ion induced reactions. The physics programme of HADES is focused on in-medium properties of light vector mesons. In this contribution the HADES experiment is outlined and first results obtained for 12C + 12C collisions at 2 AGeV are presented.

  14. Attosecond electron thermalization in laser-induced nonsequential multiple ionization: hard versus glancing collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Figueira de Morisson Faria, C.; Becker, W.

    2008-02-01

    A recollision-based largely classical statistical model of laser-induced nonsequential multiple (N-fold) ionization of atoms is further explored. Upon its return to the ionic core, the first-ionized electron interacts with the other N- 1 bound electrons either through a contact or a Coulomb interaction. The returning electron may leave either immediately after this interaction or join the other electrons to form a thermalized complex which leaves the ion after the delay Δt, which is the sum of a thermalization time and a possible additional dwell time. Good agreement with the available triple and quadruple ionization data in neon and argon is obtained with the contact scenario and delays of Δt=0.17 T and 0.265 T, respectively, with T the laser period.

  15. Two-electron transitions in slow collisions of N{sup 3+} ions with H{sub 2} and He

    SciTech Connect

    Kamber, E.Y.; Akgungor, K,; Leather, C.; Brenton, A.G.

    1996-05-01

    High-resolution translational energy-gain spectra for single-electron capture by N{sup 3+} ions from H{sub 2} and He have been measured at laboratory impact energies between 6 and 15 keV. At an impact energy of 6 keV, the energy-gain spectra indicate that the dominant reaction channels are due to transfer excitation into the 2s2p{sup 2} states of N{sup 2+} from the (2s{sup 2} {sup 1}S) ground state N{sup 3+} ions. As the impact energy is increased, capture into 2s2p{sup 2} states of N{sup 2+} remains dominant, but contributions from pure single-electron capture processes from both the ground state and the (2s({sup 2}S)2p {sup 3}P) metastable state of N{sup 3+} are significantly increased. These results show the cross section for transfer excitation to be larger than the cross section for pure single-electron capture at the lower impact energies investigated, but decreases with increasing impact energy. The translational energy-gain spectra are interpreted qualitatively in terms of the reaction windows, which are calculated using the single-crossing Landau-Zener model and the extended version of the classical over-barrier model. Total and state-selective cross sections have also been measured and will be presented and compared with available measurements and theoretical calculations.

  16. Kinematically complete study of electron transfer and rearrangement processes in slow Ar16 +-Ne collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Y.; Ginzel, R.; Krauß, A.; Bernitt, S.; Schöffler, M.; Kühnel, K. U.; López-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Moshammer, R.; Cai, X.; Ullrich, J.; Fischer, D.

    2014-11-01

    The complete kinematics of single- and double-electron capture from neon to Ar16 + was measured with a reaction microscope at a projectile energy of 3.2 keV/u (velocity vp=0.36 a.u.). Not only the change of the electronic binding energies (the Q value) and the projectile scattering angles, but also (in the case of auto-ionization) the three-dimensional momentum vectors of the emitted electrons were determined. For single-electron capture, the Q -value spectrum shows strong population of both n =7 and 8 states on the projectile, and weak contributions to n =6 and 9 are also observed. In the case of double-electron capture, auto-ionizing double capture (ADC) dominates and the populations of (n ,n') =(5 ,7 ) ,(6 ,6 ),(6 ,7 ) and (6 ,8 ) are observed, while true double capture (TDC) populates the (5 ,7 ) state and asymmetric states of (5 ,n') with n'>10 . The experimental cross sections for Auger decay with the electron energy Ee plotted as a function of the Q value suggest the occurrence of target excitation accompanying the population of configurations (5 ,7 ) and (6 ,6 ) . No essential difference is found in the differential cross sections for ADC and TDC, and the angular distributions suggest that two-step processes dominate the double capture.

  17. Electron impact excitation of autoionising states of krypton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S. K.; Trajmar, S.

    1978-01-01

    Energy-loss spectra of krypton in the region between 21 and 29 eV have been obtained at electron impact energies of 30, 60 and 100 eV. For each energy, the angular distribution of intensities has been measured at 5, 10 and 15 deg scattering angles. Assignments of spectral features found in this region are suggested and a comparison is made with previous measurements.

  18. The revolution in SiGe: impact on device electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harame, D. L.; Koester, S. J.; Freeman, G.; Cottrel, P.; Rim, K.; Dehlinger, G.; Ahlgren, D.; Dunn, J. S.; Greenberg, D.; Joseph, A.; Anderson, F.; Rieh, J.-S.; Onge, S. A. S. T.; Coolbaugh, D.; Ramachandran, V.; Cressler, J. D.; Subbanna, S.

    2004-03-01

    SiGe is having a major impact in device electronics. The most mature application is the SiGe BiCMOS technology which is in production throughout the world. The areas of most rapid growth are in CMOS where SiGe is being considered for a wide variety of elements including raised S/D, poly-SiGe Gates, in buffer layers to create a tensile strained Si layer, and as the conducting channel in MODFETs.

  19. Experimental determination of the current density of the H(n = 3) state produced in electron-transfer collisions of H/sup +/ on He

    SciTech Connect

    Havener, C.C.; Rouze, N.; Westerveld, W.B.; Risley, J.S.

    1984-09-10

    Four signals characterizing the Balmer-alpha radiation resulting from 40--80-keV collisions of H/sup +/ on He were measured as a function of an applied transverse electric field. Detailed analysis allowed the axially symmetric density matrix of the H(n = 3) atom formed in the collision to be obtained. The imaginary parts of the off-diagonal density matrix elements are presented as the distribution of the electronic current density in the atom. One of the first-order moments /sub z//sup s/ of the current distribution is given.

  20. Formation and reshuffling of disulfide bonds in bovine serum albumin demonstrated using tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced and electron-transfer dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, Ine; Lagrain, Bert; Scherf, Katharina A.; Koehler, Peter; Delcour, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    Thermolysin hydrolyzates of freshly isolated, extensively stored (6 years, 6 °C, dry) and heated (60 min, 90 °C, in excess water) bovine serum albumin (BSA) samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography (LC) electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) using alternating electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). The positions of disulfide bonds and free thiol groups in the different samples were compared to those deduced from the crystal structure of native BSA. Results revealed non-enzymatic posttranslational modifications of cysteine during isolation, extensive dry storage, and heating. Heat-induced extractability loss of BSA was linked to the impact of protein unfolding on the involvement of specific cysteine residues in intermolecular and intramolecular thiol-disulfide interchange and thiol oxidation reactions. The here developed approach holds promise for exploring disulfide bond formation and reshuffling in various proteins under conditions relevant for chemical, biochemical, pharmaceutical and food processing. PMID:26193081

  1. Dependence of the multiplicities of secondary particles on the impact parameter in collisions of high-energy neon and iron nuclei with photoemulsion nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudkin, V. E.; Kovalev, E. E.; Nefedov, N. A.; Antonchik, V. A.; Bogdanov, S. D.; Kosmach, V. F.; Likhachev, A. YU.; Benton, E. V.; Crawford, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    A method is proposed for finding the dependence of mean multiplicities of secondaries on the nucleus-collision impact parameter from the data on the total interaction ensemble. The impact parameter has been shown to completely define the mean characteristics of an individual interaction event. A difference has been found between experimental results and the data calculated in terms of the cascade-evaporation model at impact-parameter values below 3 fm.

  2. Dependence of the multiplicities of secondary particles on the impact parameter in collisions of high-energy neon and iron nuclei with photoemulsion nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudkin, V. E.; Kovalev, E. E.; Nefedov, N. A.; Antonchik, V. A.; Bogdanov, S. D.; Kosmach, V. F.; Benton, E. V.; Crawford, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    A method is proposed for finding the dependence of mean multiplicities of secondaries on the nucleus-collision impact parameter from the data on the total interaction ensemble. The impact parameter has been shown to completely define the mean characteristics of an individual interaction event. A difference has been found between experimental results and the data calculated in terms of the cascade-evaporation model at impact-parameter values below 3 fm.

  3. Fragmentation of the POPOP molecule by electron-impact ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, L. G.; Zavilopulo, A. N.; Shpenik, O. B.; Kukhto, A. V.; Agafonova, A. S.

    2008-07-01

    Single and dissociative ionizations of the POPOP molecule by electron impact in the gas phase are studied using mass spectroscopy. Fragmentation pathways of the molecule are proposed taking into account the common system of conjugated π-electrons and heteroatoms in the POPOP molecule. The appearance thresholds for certain fragments of the molecule are determined based on experimentally measured ionization cross sections as functions of the ionizing electron energy. An ion with m/z = 144 [C9H6ON]+ that is complementary to a fragment with m/z = 220 [C13H10ON]+ (present in the NIST mass spectrum database) is found for the first time in the mass spectrum of POPOP. Its appearance threshold is determined (Eap = 9.48 eV).

  4. Electron impact ionization of cycloalkanes, aldehydes, and ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Antony, Bobby

    2014-08-07

    The theoretical calculations of electron impact total ionization cross section for cycloalkane, aldehyde, and ketone group molecules are undertaken from ionization threshold to 2 keV. The present calculations are based on the spherical complex optical potential formalism and complex scattering potential ionization contribution method. The results of most of the targets studied compare fairly well with the recent measurements, wherever available and the cross sections for many targets are predicted for the first time. The correlation between the peak of ionization cross sections with number of target electrons and target parameters is also reported. It was found that the cross sections at their maximum depend linearly with the number of target electrons and with other target parameters, confirming the consistency of the values reported here.

  5. On the role of fluctuations, cathode placement, and collisions on the transport of electrons in the near-field of Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. W.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2010-09-15

    The performance of Hall thrusters can be highly sensitive to the position and operational parameters of the external cathode, hinting that the electron transport in the near-field is strongly dependent on the emitted electrons' initial properties. In addition, the plasma plumes of Hall discharges often exhibit fluctuations which are expected to alter electron trajectories. By implementing recent near-field plasma potential measurements made on a low-power Hall thruster in 3D electron-trajectory simulations, it is shown that electron transport from the external cathode to the thruster channel is strongly sensitive to cathode parameters including position, orientation, and electron emission divergence. Periodic, low-frequency (i.e., 25 kHz) plasma potential fluctuations reduce electron transport to the channel of the thruster by more than 65% compared to the transport achieved with static 3D fields and substantially homogenize the electron density distribution. Additional gas-phase collisions are found to have only marginal effects, even when prescribed to occur at exaggerated rates (reaching 10 MHz). The three-dimensionality of the E and B fields, together with electron-wall collisions, appear to be important drivers of cross-field transport in this region of the discharge, yielding sufficient levels of electron transport to the channel without invoking plasma turbulence.

  6. Windowless Far-Ultraviolet Electron Impact Calibration Lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, K.; McCandliss, S. R.; Pelton, R.

    2002-12-01

    We present preliminary results from a windowless calibration lamp for determining wavelength solutions and detector flat-fielding at far-ultraviolet wavelengths. This lamp produces free electrons from a filament, accelerating them toward a tungsten target by an applied voltage ( 200 - 2000 V). An emission line spectrum is produced by electrons impacting the residual gas molecules present and continuous emission is produced by bremsstrahlung as the electrons collide with the target. The emission line spectrum can be modified to provide a rich wavelength coverage by introducing different species, and spectra of H2, N2, O2, CO2, HD, and Ar have been measured at modest spectral resolution (1 Å) across the far-UV bandpass (900 - 1400 Å). The long wavelength tail of the x-ray bremsstrahlung continuum falling in this bandpass can be used to make detector flat-field measurements. The lamp is robust and compact, housed in a mini-conflat cube and operates at the ambient vacuum compatible with microchannel plate operation. It is scheduled to be tested on an upcoming sounding rocket flight. We present initial results of both electron impact and bremsstrahlung spectra and adaptability to space-based instrumentation. This work is supported by NASA grant NAG5-5315 to The Johns Hopkins University.

  7. Interruption of electronically excited Xe dimer formation by the photoassociation of Xe(6s[3/2]2)-Xe(5p6 1S0) thermal collision pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvin, T. C.; Wagner, C. J.; Eden, J. G.

    2016-06-01

    The diatomic collisional intermediate responsible for the formation of an electronically excited molecule by teratomic recombination has been observed in both the spectral and temporal domains by laser spectroscopy. We report experiments demonstrating thermal Xe(6s[3/2]2)-Xe(5p6 1S0) atomic collision pairs to be the immediate precursor to the formation of Xe 2∗ ( a 3 Σu + , A 1 Σu +) by the three body process: Xe∗(6s) + 2Xe ⟶ Xe 2∗ + Xe, where the asterisk denotes an excited electronic state. Photoassociating Xe(6s)-Xe atomic pairs by free ⟵ free transitions of the collision complex interrupts the production of the electronically excited Xe dimer, thereby suppressing Xe2 spontaneous emission in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, λ ˜ 172 nm, A 1 Σu + → X 1 Σg +). Intercepting Xe(6s)-Xe pairs before the complex is stabilized by the arrival of the third atom in the teratomic collision process selectively depletes the pair population in a specific Franck-Condon region determined by the probe laser wavelength (λ). Measurements of the variation of VUV emission suppression with λ provide a spectral signature of the [Xe(6s[3/2]2) - Xe(1S0)]∗ complex and map the probe laser wavelength onto the thermal energy (ɛ″) of the incoming collision pairs.

  8. K-shell and total ionization cross sections following electron-molecule collisions: An empirical scaling law

    SciTech Connect

    Fremont, F.; Hajaji, A.; Chesnel, J.-Y.

    2006-11-15

    Collisions between electrons and various molecular targets (H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 3}H{sub 4}, N{sub 2}) at projectile energies above the K-shell ionization threshold of the molecule have been investigated experimentally. From electron emission spectra, relative total ionization cross section {sigma}{sub t} and K-shell ionization cross section {sigma}{sub K} are determined. The ratio {sigma}{sub K}/{sigma}{sub t} is then deduced for each target as a function of the projectile energy and compared with those evaluated in the case of atomic targets. Strong differences between atomic and molecular targets are observed in the slope of the ratio at the highest projectile energies. These differences are explained using the well-known Kim-Rudd formula developed for atomic targets. In the projectile energy range we explored, we develop a simple empirical scaling law for the ratio {sigma}{sub K}/{sigma}{sub t} as a function of the projectile energy.

  9. Electron collisions with cesium atoms - benchmark calculations and application to modeling an excimer-pumped alkali laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Babaeva, Natalia; Kushner, Mark

    2014-10-01

    The B-spline R-matrix (BSR) with pseudostates method was employed to describe electron collisions with cesium atoms. Over 300 states were kept in the close-coupling expansion, including a large number of pseudostates to model the effect of the Rydberg spectrum and the ionization continuum on the results for transitions between the discrete physical states of interest. Predictions for elastic scattering, excitation, and ionization for incident energies up to 200 eV are presented and compared to previous results [2,3] and experimental data. Our data were used to model plasma formation in the excimer-pumped alkali laser, XPAL, operating on the Cs (62P3 / 2 , 1 / 2 --> (62S1 / 2) (852nm and 894nm) transitions. At sufficiently high operating temperature, pump power, and repetition rate, plasma formation in excess of 1014--1015cm-3 occurs. This may reduce laser output power by electron collisional mixing of the upper and lower laser levels. Work supported by the NSF under PHY-1068140, PHY-1212450, and the XSEDE allocation PHY-090031 (OZ, KB), and by the DoD High Energy Laser Multidisciplinary Research Initiative (NYB, MJK).

  10. Electron collisions with cesium atoms—benchmark calculations and application to modeling an excimer-pumped alkali laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-06-01

    The B-spline R-matrix (BSR) with pseudostates method is employed to describe electron collisions with cesium atoms. Over 300 states are kept in the close-coupling expansion, including a large number of pseudostates to model the effect of the Rydberg spectrum and, most importantly, the ionization continuum on the results for transitions between the discrete physical states of interest. Predictions for elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitation and ionization are presented for incident energies up to 200 eV and compared with results from previous calculations and available experimental data. In a second step, the results are used to model plasma formation in an excimer-pumped alkali laser operating on the Cs (62P3/2,1/2 → 62S1/2) (852 nm and 894 nm) transitions. At sufficiently high operating temperature of a Cs-Ar containing quartz cell, pump power, and repetition rate, plasma formation in excess of 1014-1015 cm-3 occurs. This may reduce laser output power by electron collisional mixing of the upper and lower laser levels.

  11. Quantum scattering studies of electronically inelastic collisions of N + 2(X 2Sigma + g, A 2Pi u) with He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berning, Andreas; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    1994-02-01

    The potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the three lowest electronic states of the system N+2+He have been computed using accurate multiconfiguration-reference configuration (MRCI) wave functions and a large basis set. The approach of the He atom leads to nonadiabatic mixing of the A 2Πu(A') and X 2Σ+g(A') states of N+2. The three adiabatic interaction potentials have been transformed into a set of four diabatic potentials, one of which describes the collision-induced nonadiabatic coupling between the two A' states. The computed potentials have been fitted to analytical functions and used in quantum scattering calculations for electronically inelastic transitions between individual rovibrational levels of the A 2Πu and the X 2Σ+g states of N+2. Our results are compared to transitions observed experimentally by Katayama and co-workers between the rotational levels of the A,v=3 and 4 and X,v=6, 7, and 8 vibrational manifolds. In general, good agreement is found for transitions between nearly isoenergetic vibrational states. However, for transitions which traverse large energy gaps, we obtained cross sections which are several orders of magnitude smaller than experimentally observed. Inclusion of the vibrational degree of freedom of the N+2 molecule in the scattering calculations was found to have only an insignificant effect on the transition probabilities.

  12. Detection of fragments arising from >10 GeV electron-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Moltz, D.M. ); Griffioen, K.A. . Dept. of Physics); van Bibber, K. )

    1992-11-01

    Much is understood about the interaction of both high energy electrons with nucleons and lower energy electrons with nucleons and nuclei. Although a number of experiments involving high energy inelastic scattering of electrons from quarks bound in nuclei have been performed, many interpretations of the data are still discussed. A project called PEGASYS was conceived at PEP to further investigate this physics. Unfortunately, the termination of PEP operations curtailed this experiment and much of the physics remains unexplored. In this paper we present some details of one proposed part of this project (tagged nuclear structure functions) and some considerations made in designing a detector suitable for observing very low momentum nuclear fragements around a cold-cluster gas target.

  13. Ab initio calculations on collisions of low energy electrons with polyatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, T.N.

    1991-08-01

    The Kohn variational method is one of simplest, and oldest, techniques for performing scattering calculations. Nevertheless, a number of formal problems, as well as practical difficulties associated with the computation of certain required matrix elements, delayed its application to electron--molecule scattering problems for many years. This paper will describe the recent theoretical and computational developments that have made the complex'' Kohn variational method a practical tool for carrying out calculations of low energy electron--molecule scattering. Recent calculations on a number of target molecules will also be summarized. 41 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Resonance enhanced electron impact excitation for P-like Cu XV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuang; Yan, Jun; Li, Chuan-Ying; Huang, Min; Chen, Chong-Yang

    2015-11-01

    Employing both the Dirac R-matrix and the relativistic distorted wave with independent process and isolated resonance approaches, we report resonance enhanced electron impact excitation data (specifically, effective collision strengths) among the lowest 41 levels from the n = 3 configurations of Cu XV. The results show that the latter approach can obtain resonance contributions reasonably well for most excitations of Cu XV, though a comparison between the two approaches shows that the close-coupling effects are truly significant for rather weak excitations, especially for two-electron excitations from the 3s3p4 to 3s23p23d configuration. Resonance contributions are significant (more than two orders of magnitude) for many excitations and dramatically influence the line intensity ratios associated with density diagnostics. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11076009 and 11374062), the Chinese Association of Atomic and Molecular Data, the Chinese National Fusion Project for ITER (Grant No. 2015GB117000), and the Leading Academic Discipline Project of Shanghai, China (Grant No. B107).

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Electron impact for OV and OVI levels (Elabidi+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elabidi, H.; Sahal-Brechot, S.

    2013-11-01

    Radiative atomic and electron impact excitation data for OV and OVI ions have been calculated. The radiative atomic data have been calculated with the AUTOSTRUCTURE code. Besides the one-body and the two-body fine structure interactions, the two-body non-fine structure operators of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian, namely contact spin-spin, two-body Darwin and orbit-orbit are incorporated in AUTOSTRUCTURE. The scattering problem has been treated in the Breit-Pauli distorted wave approximation using the same code AUTOSTRUCTURE. The OV atomic calculations have been extended from 46 to 92 levels. We have calculated excitation cross sections for the OV 2s2-2s2p and the OVI 2s-2p transitions at energies near the corresponding excitation threshold regions. We have also calculated collision strengths for transitions from the most important levels for collisional excitation at electron energies up to 120Ry for OV and up to 140Ry for OVI. Our results have been compared with the available theoretical/experimental ones and a satisfactory agreement have been found between them. (9 data files).

  16. Excitation cross-sections by electron impact for O V and O VI levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elabidi, H.; Sahal-Bréchot, S.

    2013-12-01

    Radiative atomic and electron impact excitation data for O V and O VI ions have been calculated. The radiative atomic data have been calculated with the AUTOSTRUCTURE code. Besides the one-body and the two-body fine structure interactions, the two-body non-fine structure operators of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian, namely contact spin-spin, two-body Darwin and orbit-orbit are incorporated in AUTOSTRUCTURE. The scattering problem has been treated in the Breit-Pauli distorted wave approximation using the same code AUTOSTRUCTURE. The O V atomic calculations have been extended from 46 to 92 levels. We have calculated excitation cross-sections for the O V 2s2-2s2p and the O VI 2s-2p transitions at energies near the corresponding excitation threshold regions. We have also calculated collision strengths for transitions from the most important levels for collisional excitation at electron energies up to 120 Ry for O V and up to 140 Ry for O VI. Our results have been compared with the available theoretical/experimental ones and a satisfactory agreement has been found between them.

  17. Multiple-electron removal and molecular fragmentation of CO by fast F4+ impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Itzhak, I.; Ginther, S. G.; Carnes, K. D.

    1993-04-01

    Multiple-electron removal from and molecular fragmentation of carbon monoxide molecules caused by collisions with 1-MeV/amu F4+ ions were studied using the coincidence time-of-flight technique. In these collisions, multiple-electron removal of the target molecule is a dominant process. Cross sections for the different levels of ionization of the CO molecule during the collision were determined. The relative cross sections of ionization decrease with increasing number of electrons removed in a similar way as seen in atomic targets. This behavior is in agreement with a two-step mechanism, where first the molecule is ionized by a Franck-Condon ionization and then the molecular ion dissociates. Most of the highly charged intermediate states of the molecule dissociate rapidly. Only CO+ and CO2+ molecular ions have been seen to survive long enough to be detected as molecular ions. The relative cross sections for the different breakup channels were evaluated for collisions in which the molecule broke into two charged fragments as well as for collisions where only a single charged molecular ion or fragment were produced. The average charge state of each fragment resulting from COQ+-->Ci++Oj+ breakup increases with the number of electrons removed from the molecule approximately following the relationship i¯=j¯=Q/2 as long as K-shell electrons are not removed. This does not mean that the charge-state distribution is exactly symmetric, as, in general, removing electrons from the carbon fragment is slightly more likely than removing electrons from the oxygen due to the difference in binding energy. The cross sections for molecular breakup into a charged fragment and a neutral fragment drop rapidly with an increasing number of electrons removed.

  18. Laser-assisted free-free transition in electron-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2011-06-15

    The free-free transition is studied for an electron-hydrogen atom system in the ground state at very low incident energies in the presence of an external homogeneous, monochromatic, and linearly polarized laser field. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser field in a nonperturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the initial and final channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron-exchange interactions, short-range interactions, as well as of long-range interactions. The laser-assisted differential as well as total elastic cross sections are calculated for single-photon absorption or emission in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the laser-assisted cross sections as compared to the field-free situations. A significant difference is noted in the singlet and the triplet cross sections.

  19. Comparison of positronium, positron and electron collisions with hydrogen at low velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Reeth, P.; Woods, Denton; Ward, S. J.; Humberston, J. W.

    2016-06-01

    Recent experimental findings indicate that at equal velocity electron and ortho-positronium scattering cross sections are similar over a wide range of velocities and targets where both elastic and inelastic processes can take place. We present a comparative study of positronium, positron and electron elastic scattering from atomic hydrogen in order to investigate if a similar behaviour occurs for this target at low velocities where inelastic channels are closed. We calculate elastic cross sections for the three projectiles using Kohn-type variational methods which allows us to make a detailed study of the differences and similarities. We find a qualitative similarity in the spin-weighted elastic integrated cross sections for positronium and electron scattering and a good agreement between the singlet integrated cross sections. However, this agreement does extend to the low velocity region and where the agreement is found in the integrated cross sections we show that it is not present in the individual partial waves cross sections. Interestingly, given the agreement we find in the singlet integrated cross section for electron and positronium scattering, when comparing the overall shapes of the corresponding singlet differential cross sections we find different angular and velocity dependencies.

  20. Two-dimensional spectra of electron collisions with acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile reveal nuclear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Regeta, K. Allan, M.

    2015-05-14

    Detailed experimental information on the motion of a nuclear packet on a complex (resonant) anion potential surface is obtained by measuring 2-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra. The cross section is plotted as a function of incident electron energy, which determines which resonant anion state is populated, i.e., along which normal coordinate the wave packet is launched, and of the electron energy loss, which reveals into which final states each specific resonant state decays. The 2D spectra are presented for acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile, at the incident energy range 0.095-1.0 eV, where the incoming electron is temporarily captured in the lowest π{sup ∗} orbital. The 2D spectra reveal selectivity patterns with respect to which vibrations are excited in the attachment and de-excited in the detachment. Further insight is gained by recording 1D spectra measured along horizontal, vertical, and diagonal cuts of the 2D spectrum. The methyl group in methacrylonitrile increases the resonance width 7 times. This converts the sharp resonances of acrylonitrile into boomerang structures but preserves the essence of the selectivity patterns. Selectivity of vibrational excitation by higher-lying shape resonances up to 8 eV is also reported.

  1. Electron emission spectra of thermal collisions of He metastable atoms with Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces: Evidence for Penning ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, S.; Sasaki, K.; Sogo, M.; Aoki, M.; Morikawa, Y.

    2009-10-01

    Electron emission spectra obtained by thermal collisions of He∗(2S1 and 2S3 ) atoms with Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces were measured to clarify the electronically excited atom-metal interactions. It has been recognized that the metastable atoms de-excite on ordinary noble- and transition-metal surfaces via resonance ionization (RI) followed by Auger neutralization (AN) without no indication of Penning ionization (PI). Our data show that this traditional criterion partially breaks down in the He∗-Au(111) collision system. The local electronic states near the surface were examined by first-principles calculations using density functional theory. It reveals that the itinerant sp states are significantly spilled out toward the vacuum compared to the localized 5d states, and their asymptotic features play a crucial role in determining the branching ratio between PI and RI+AN .

  2. Electron emission spectra of thermal collisions of He metastable atoms with Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces: Evidence for Penning ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, S.; Sasaki, K.; Sogo, M.; Aoki, M.; Morikawa, Y.

    2009-10-15

    Electron emission spectra obtained by thermal collisions of He*(2{sup 1}S and 2{sup 3}S) atoms with Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces were measured to clarify the electronically excited atom-metal interactions. It has been recognized that the metastable atoms de-excite on ordinary noble- and transition-metal surfaces via resonance ionization (RI) followed by Auger neutralization (AN) without no indication of Penning ionization (PI). Our data show that this traditional criterion partially breaks down in the He*-Au(111) collision system. The local electronic states near the surface were examined by first-principles calculations using density functional theory. It reveals that the itinerant sp states are significantly spilled out toward the vacuum compared to the localized 5d states, and their asymptotic features play a crucial role in determining the branching ratio between PI and RI+AN.

  3. Angular momentum transfer and polarization degree of ions with one-valence electron by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Kenichi; Kai, Takeshi; Nakazaki, Shinobu; Igarashi, Akinori

    2009-04-01

    We carry out the R-matrix calculations for electron-impact excitations of ions with one valence electron. The integral cross sections and polarization degree are obtained for the excitation process from the ground state to the first 2P° state of Li2+, B2+ and Al2+ as functions of electron incident energy. The differential cross sections and angular momentum transfer are also shown at non-resonant low-energy points. As for the angular momentum transfer (L⊥) at small scattering angles, they are negative for B2+ and Al2+, while it is positive for Li2+. Thus L⊥ of doubly charged ions with one-valence electron is not simple.

  4. Integral cross sections for electron impact excitation of vibrational and electronic states in phenol.

    PubMed

    Neves, R F C; Jones, D B; Lopes, M C A; Blanco, F; García, G; Ratnavelu, K; Brunger, M J

    2015-05-21

    We report on measurements of integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of composite vibrational modes and electronic-states in phenol, where the energy range of those experiments was 15-250 eV. There are currently no other results against which we can directly compare those measured data. We also report results from our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction computations, namely, for the inelastic ICS (all discrete electronic states and neutral dissociation) and the total ionisation ICS. In addition, for the relevant dipole-allowed excited electronic states, we also report f-scaled Born-level and energy-corrected and f-scaled Born-level (BEf-scaled) ICS. Where possible, our measured and calculated ICSs are compared against one another with the general level of accord between them being satisfactory to within the measurement uncertainties. PMID:26001459

  5. Integral cross sections for electron impact excitation of vibrational and electronic states in phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Neves, R. F. C.; Jones, D. B.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Ratnavelu, K.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-05-21

    We report on measurements of integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of composite vibrational modes and electronic-states in phenol, where the energy range of those experiments was 15–250 eV. There are currently no other results against which we can directly compare those measured data. We also report results from our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction computations, namely, for the inelastic ICS (all discrete electronic states and neutral dissociation) and the total ionisation ICS. In addition, for the relevant dipole-allowed excited electronic states, we also report f-scaled Born-level and energy-corrected and f-scaled Born-level (BEf-scaled) ICS. Where possible, our measured and calculated ICSs are compared against one another with the general level of accord between them being satisfactory to within the measurement uncertainties.

  6. Perceiving Collision Impacts in Alzheimer’s Disease: The Effect of Retinal Eccentricity on Optic Flow Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam-Gyoon

    2015-01-01

    The present study explored whether the optic flow deficit in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) reported in the literature transfers to different types of optic flow, in particular, one that specifies collision impacts with upcoming surfaces, with a special focus on the effect of retinal eccentricity. Displays simulated observer movement over a ground plane toward obstacles lying in the observer’s path. Optical expansion was modulated by varying τ˙. The visual field was masked either centrally (peripheral vision) or peripherally (central vision) using masks ranging from 10° to 30° in diameter in steps of 10°. Participants were asked to indicate whether their approach would result in “collision” or “no collision” with the obstacles. Results showed that AD patients’ sensitivity to τ˙ was severely compromised, not only for central vision but also for peripheral vision, compared to age- and education-matched elderly controls. The results demonstrated that AD patients’ optic flow deficit is not limited to radial optic flow but includes also the optical pattern engendered by τ˙. Further deterioration in the capacity to extract τ˙ to determine potential collisions in conjunction with the inability to extract heading information from radial optic flow would exacerbate AD patients’ difficulties in navigation and visuospatial orientation. PMID:26635603

  7. (abstract)Electron Impact Emission Cross Sections for Modeling UV Auroral and Dayglow Observations of the Upper Atmospheres of Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, J. M.; Shemansky, D. E.; James, G.; Kanik, I.; Slevin, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    In the upper atmospheres of the Jovian and Terrestrial planets a dominant mechanism for energy transfer occurs through electron collisional processes with neutral species leading to UV radiation. In response to the need for accurate collision cross sections to model spectroscopic observations of planetary systems, JPL has measured in the laboratory emission cross sections and medium resolution spectra of H, H(sub 2), N(sub 2), SO(sub 2), and other important planetary gases.Voyager and International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spacecraft have established that band systems of H(sub 2) and N(sub 2) are the dominant UV molecular emissions in the solar system produced by electron impact. Applications of our data to models of Voyager, IUE, Galileo, and Hubble Space Telescope observations of the planets will be described.

  8. Effect of the Mo/ller interaction on electron-impact ionization of high-Z hydrogenlike ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, D. L.; Reed, K. J.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of the Mo/ller interaction in relativistic distorted-wave calculations of cross sections for electron-impact ionization of high-Z hydrogenlike ions. We found that the Mo/ller interaction significantly increases the cross section for hydrogenlike uranium, and brings our calculated results into very good agreement with experimental results reported by Marrs, Elliott, and Knapp [Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 4082 (1994)]. We found similar increases in the cross sections for other hydrogenlike ions. Our results also show that these effects become important at much lower collision energy than previously reported [D. L. Moores and M. S. Pindzola, Phys. Rev. A 41, 3603 (1990)]. With the Mo/ller interaction included, our cross sections for these ions are in good agreement with preliminary results obtained in recent experiments on the electron-beam ion trap (EBIT).

  9. Effect of the Moller interaction on electron-impact ionization of high-[ital Z] hydrogenlike ions

    SciTech Connect

    Moores, D.L. ); Reed, K.J. )

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of the Moller interaction in relativistic distorted-wave calculations of cross sections for electron-impact ionization of high-[ital Z] hydrogenlike ions. We found that the Moller interaction significantly increases the cross section for hydrogenlike uranium, and brings our calculated results into very good agreement with experimental results reported by Marrs, Elliott, and Knapp [Phys. Rev. Lett. [bold 72], 4082 (1994)]. We found similar increases in the cross sections for other hydrogenlike ions. Our results also show that these effects become important at much lower collision energy than previously reported [D. L. Moores and M. S. Pindzola, Phys. Rev. A [bold 41], 3603 (1990)]. With the Moller interaction included, our cross sections for these ions are in good agreement with preliminary results obtained in recent experiments on the electron-beam ion trap (EBIT).

  10. The impact of short-range forces on high-energy atom collisions in displacement cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolyuk, German; Stoller, Roger; Tamm, Artur; Beland, Laurent; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Caro, Alfredo; Slipchenko4, Lyudmila; Osetskiy, Yury; Aabloo, Alvo; Klintenberg, Mattias; Wang, Yang

    Simulation of primary radiation damage formation in solid materials involves collisions between atoms with a few hundred keV of kinetic energy. As a result, during these collisions, the distance between two colliding atoms can approach 0.05 nm. For such small atomic separations, interatomic potentials significantly underestimate the potential energy. The common practice involves using a screened Coulomb pair potential to describe the high-energy interactions and to smoothly join this to the equilibrium potential. However, there is no standard method for choosing the joining parameters and defect production during cascade evolution has been shown to be sensitive to how the joining is done. We developed a new procedure, which includes the use of ab initio, calculations to determine the pair interactions at intermediate distances, together with systematic criteria for choosing the joining parameters. Results are presented for the case of nickel. Research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, ``Center for Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution''.

  11. Spectroscopic diagnostics of electron-atom collisions. Final report, May 1, 1987--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, A.

    1991-12-31

    Progress from May 1, 1987 to April 30, 1991 is summarized in two Progress Reports that are reproduced in Appendix A, and in attached publications. Since then, we have completed manuscript preparations and publications of earlier observations, while carrying out a high energy-resolution measurement of electron collisional excitations in sodium. The results of the latter experiment have not been prepared for publication, and the manuscript is included as Appendix B. An additional manuscript, describing the unique high-current electron monochromator developed for this experiment, is in preparation and not enclosed. All additional results and conclusions of our work under the contract are now available in four publications that are attached at the back of this report. Consequently, we will elaborate on those only to note that we have achieved our proposed goals, with the full detail proposed but at a slightly slower pace than we had hoped.

  12. Electroweak measurements in electron-positron collisions at W-boson-pair energies at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; DELPHI Collaboration; L3 Collaboration; OPAL Collaboration; LEP Electroweak Working Group 1

    2013-11-01

    Electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the electron-positron collider LEP at CERN from 1995 to 2000 are reported. The combined data set considered in this report corresponds to a total luminosity of about 3 fb-1 collected by the four LEP experiments ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 GeV to 209 GeV.

  13. Absolute electron-impact total ionization cross sections of chlorofluoromethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Roberto; Sierra, Borja; Redondo, Carolina; Rayo, María N. Sánchez; Castaño, Fernando

    2004-12-01

    An experimental study is reported on the electron-impact total ionization cross sections (TICSs) of CCl4, CCl3F, CCl2F2, and CClF3 molecules. The kinetic energy of the colliding electrons was in the 10-85 eV range. TICSs were obtained as the sum of the partial ionization cross sections of all fragment ions, measured and identified in a linear double focusing time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The resulting TICS profiles—as a function of the electron-impact energy—have been compared both with those computed by ab initio and (semi)empirical methods and with the available experimental data. The computational methods used include the binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) modified to include atoms with principal quantum numbers n⩾3, the Deutsch and Märk (DM) formalism, and the modified additivity rule (MAR). It is concluded that both modified BEB and DM methods fit the experimental TICS for (CF4), CClF3, CCl2F2, CCl3F, and CCl4 to a high accuracy, in contrast with the poor accord of the MAR method. A discussion on the factors influencing the discrepancies of the fittings is presented.

  14. On the minimum electron transport coefficients in tokamaks in the range of low collision frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Merezhkin, V. G.

    2009-06-15

    There are two close empirical scalings, namely, the T-11 and neo-Alcator ones, that provide correct estimates for the energy confinement time in tokamaks in ohmic heating regimes in the linear part of the dependence {tau}{sub E}(n-bar{sub e}) in the range of low values of n-bar{sub e} and <{nu}{sub e}{sup *}> {<=} 1. The similar character of electron energy confinement in this range, which expands with increasing magnetic field B{sub 0}, has stimulated the search for dimensionless parameters and simple physical models that would explain the experimentally observed dependences {chi}{sub e} {approx} 1/n{sub e} and {tau}{sub Ee} {approx} n-bar{sub e}. In 1987, T. Okhawa showed that the experimental data were satisfactorily described by the formula {chi}{sub eperpendicular} = (c{sup 2}/{omega}{sub pe}{sup 2}){nu}{sub e}/qR, in deriving of which the random spatial leap along the radius r on the electron trajectory was assumed to be the same as that in the coefficient of the poloidal field diffusion, while the repetition rate of these leaps was assumed to be {nu}{sub e}/qR. In 2004, J. Callen took into account the decrease in the fraction of transient electrons with increasing toroidal ratio {epsilon} = r/R and corrected the coefficient c{sup 2}/{omega}{sub pe}{sup 2} in Okhawa equation by the factor {sigma}{sub ||} {sup Sp}/{sigma}{sub ||}{sup neo}. If one takes into account this correction and assumes that the frequency of the stochastic process is equal to the reciprocal of the half-period of rotation of a trapped electron along its banana trajectory, then the resulting expression for {chi}{sub eperpendicular} will coincide with the T-11 scaling: {chi}{sub e}{sup an} {infinity} {epsilon}{sup 1.75}(T{sub e}/A{sub i}){sup 0.5}/(n{sub e}qR) at Ai = 1. If the same stochastic process also involves ions, it may result in the opening of the orbit of a trapped ion at the distance {approx}(c/{omega}{sub pe})(m{sub i}/m{sub e}){sup 1/4}. In this case, the calculated coefficient

  15. Measurement of electrons from heavy-flavour hadron decays in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.

    2016-03-01

    The production of electrons from heavy-flavour hadron decays was measured as a function of transverse momentum (pT) in minimum-bias p-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV using the ALICE detector at the LHC. The measurement covers the pT interval 0.5 electrons from background sources was subtracted using an invariant mass approach. The nuclear modification factor RpPb was calculated by comparing the pT-differential invariant cross section in p-Pb collisions to a pp reference at the same centre-of-mass energy, which was obtained by interpolating measurements at √{ s} = 2.76 TeV and √{ s} = 7 TeV. The RpPb is consistent with unity within uncertainties of about 25%, which become larger for pT below 1 GeV / c. The measurement shows that heavy-flavour production is consistent with binary scaling, so that a suppression in the high-pT yield in Pb-Pb collisions has to be attributed to effects induced by the hot medium produced in the final state. The data in p-Pb collisions are described by recent model calculations that include cold nuclear matter effects.

  16. A Miniaturized Plasma Impedance Probe For Ionospheric Absolute Electron Density and Electron-Neutral Collision Frequency Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, S.; Rao, A. J.; Jayaram, M.; Hamoui, M. E.; Spencer, E. A.; Winstead, C.

    2008-12-01

    A fully integrated, low power, miniaturized Plasma Impedance Probe (PIP) is developed for small satellite constellation missions to create a map of electron density in the ionosphere. Two alternative methods for deriving plasma parameters from impedance measurements are discussed. The first method employs a frequency sweep technique, while the second employs a pulse based technique. The pulse based technique is a new method that leads to faster measurements. The two techniques necessitate different specifications for the front end analog circuit design. Unlike previous PIP designs, the integrated PIP performs direct voltage/current sampling at the probe's terminal. The signal processing tasks are performed by an off-chip FPGA to compute the impedance of the probe in the surrounding plasma. The new design includes self- calibration algorithms in order to increase the accuracy and reliability of the probe for small satellite constellation missions. A new feature included in this instrument is that the plasma parameters are derived from impedance measurements directly on the FPGA, significantly reducing the bandwith of telemetered data down to ground.

  17. Glow discharge electron impact ionization source for miniature mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Song, Qingyu; Noll, Robert J; Duncan, Jason; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2007-05-01

    A glow discharge electron impact ionization (GDEI) source was developed for operation using air as the support gas. An alternative to the use of thermoemission from a resistively heated filament electron source for miniature mass spectrometers, the GDEI source is shown to have advantages of long lifetime under high-pressure operation and low power consumption. The GDEI source was characterized using our laboratory's handheld mass spectrometer, the Mini 10. The effects of the discharge voltage and pressure were investigated. Design considerations are illustrated with calculations. Performance is demonstrated in a set of experimental tests. The results show that the low power requirements, mechanical ruggedness, and quality of the data produced using the small glow discharge ion source make it well-suited for use with a portable handheld mass spectrometer. PMID:17441220

  18. Low-energy electron-impact ionization of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Schow, E.; Hazlett, K.; Childers, J. G.; Medina, C.; Vitug, G.; Khakoo, M. A.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D. V.

    2005-12-15

    Normalized doubly differential cross sections for the electron-impact ionization of helium at low energies are presented. The data are taken at the incident electron energies of 26.3, 28.3, 30.3, 32.5, 34.3, 36.5, and 40.7 eV and for scattering angles of 10 deg. -130 deg. The measurements involve the use of the moveable target method developed at California State University Fullerton to accurately determine the continuum background in the energy-loss spectra. Normalization of experimental data is made on a relative scale to well-established experimental differential cross sections for excitation of the n=2 manifold of helium and then on an absolute scale to the well-established total ionization cross sections of Shah et al. [J. Phys. B 21, 2751 (1988)]. Comparisons are made with available experimental data and the results of the convergent close-coupling theory.

  19. Electron-impact ionization of Se2+ and Se3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pindzola, M. S.; Loch, S. D.

    2016-06-01

    Electron-impact ionization cross sections for Se2+ and Se3+ are calculated using a semi-relativistic configuration-average distorted-wave (CADW) method. Good agreement between the CADW calculations and recent experimental measurements are found for the single ionization of Se2+ from threshold to 500 eV and for the double ionization of Se2+ from threshold to 225 eV. Good agreement between the CADW calculations and recent experimental measurements are also found for the single ionization of Se3+ from threshold to 200 eV and for the double ionization of Se3+ near the peak of the cross section at 350 eV. Disagreements at other incident electron energies may be due to the complexity of the ionization pathways for low charged Se atomic ions, the various theoretical approximations, and the difficulty in measuring relatively small double ionization events.

  20. Electron impact excitation of argon in the extreme vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mentall, J. E.; Morgan, H. D.

    1976-01-01

    Polarization-free excitation cross sections in the extreme vacuum ultraviolet have been measured for electron impact on Ar. Observed spectral features were those lines of Ar I and Ar II which lie between 700 and 1100 A. Excitation functions were measured for the Ar I resonance line at 1048 A and the Ar II resonance line at 920 A. Peak cross sections for these two lines were found to be (39.4 plus or minus 7.9) x 10 to the -18th and (6.9 plus or minus 1.4) x 10 to the -18th, respectively. At low energies, excitation of the Ar II resonance line is dominated by an electron exchange transition.