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Sample records for electron laser technology

  1. Laser Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  2. MIMO based optical phased array technology with electronic beam steering for laser radar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Neha; Zmuda, Henry

    2010-04-01

    This paper will address the analysis and design of an electronically scanned phased array laser radar (ladar) system utilizing the techniques of multi-input multi-output (MIMO) array design. MIMO radar is has attracted much attention recently from both researchers and practitioners alike due to its significant potential for advancing the state-of-the-art RF radar technology. The laser radar architecture presented stands to gain significant inroads on the ability to apply RF array processing methods to laser radar systems in several ways. Specifically, using MIMO array design concepts, it is shown that the resolution of the ladar array can substantially exceed the diffraction limited resolution of a conventional array. Additionally, the use of array methods provides the capability to electronically steer the aperture, thus avoiding the mechanical beam scanning methods generally encountered in laser radar systems. Finally, by using an array of radiators, an increase in total radiated power is achieved, relieving the power burden on a single laser. The problems traditionally encountered in applying conventional array techniques to laser/detector arrays, for example, the inability to achieve half-wavelength spacing or the surfacing of source coherence issues, actually work to one's advantage when viewed in the MIMO paradigm. It is anticipated that the successful implementation of this system will significantly advance the state-of-the-art of laser radar capabilities for high speed imaging, target detection, tracking, and signature analysis.

  3. Laser microprocessing technologies for automotive, flexible electronics, and solar energy sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikumb, Suwas; Bathe, Ravi; Knopf, George K.

    2014-10-01

    Laser microprocessing technologies offer an important tool to fulfill the needs of many industrial sectors. In particular, there is growing interest in applications of these processes in the manufacturing areas such as automotive parts fabrication, printable electronics and solar energy panels. The technology is primarily driven by our understanding of the fundamental laser-material interaction, process control strategies and the advancement of significant fabrication experience over the past few years. The wide-ranging operating parameters available with respect to power, pulse width variation, beam quality, higher repetition rates as well as precise control of the energy deposition through programmable pulse shaping technologies, enables pre-defined material removal, selective scribing of individual layer within a stacked multi-layer thin film structure, texturing of material surfaces as well as precise introduction of heat into the material to monitor its characteristic properties are a few examples. In this research, results in the area of laser surface texturing of metals for added hydrodynamic lubricity to reduce friction, processing of ink-jet printed graphene oxide for flexible printed electronic circuit fabrication and scribing of multi-layer thin films for the development of photovoltaic CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) interconnects for solar panel devices will be discussed.

  4. High-power free-electron lasers-technology and future applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socol, Yehoshua

    2013-03-01

    Free-electron laser (FEL) is an all-electric, high-power, high beam-quality source of coherent radiation, tunable - unlike other laser sources - at any wavelength within wide spectral region from hard X-rays to far-IR and beyond. After the initial push in the framework of the “Star Wars” program, the FEL technology benefited from decades of R&D and scientific applications. Currently, there are clear signs that the FEL technology reached maturity, enabling real-world applications. E.g., successful and unexpectedly smooth commissioning of the world-first X-ray FEL in 2010 increased in one blow by more than an order of magnitude (40×) wavelength region available by FEL technology and thus demonstrated that the theoretical predictions just keep true in real machines. Experience of ordering turn-key electron beamlines from commercial companies is a further demonstration of the FEL technology maturity. Moreover, successful commissioning of the world-first multi-turn energy-recovery linac demonstrated feasibility of reducing FEL size, cost and power consumption by probably an order of magnitude in respect to previous configurations, opening way to applications, previously considered as non-feasible. This review takes engineer-oriented approach to discuss the FEL technology issues, keeping in mind applications in the fields of military and aerospace, next generation semiconductor lithography, photo-chemistry and isotope separation.

  5. Optical electronic measuring systems and laser technologies for scientific and industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugui, Yuri V.; Bazin, Vladimir S.; Finogenov, Leonid V.; Makarov, Sergei N.; Verkhogliad, Alexander G.

    2006-11-01

    The novel results of the R and D activity of TDI SIE SB RAS in the field of the optical measuring technologies, as well as laser technologies for solving actual problems are presented. The metrological characterization of a perspective Fresnel method for high precision measuring the dimensions of objects is investigated. An optoelectronic noncontact method using diffractive optical element (DOE) for the 3D inspection of article holes is presented. A structured light method and system testing results for noncontact inspection of wire wear and its defects for train electro-supply network are discussed. For permanent noncontact bearing position inspection of oil-drilling platforms on Sakhalin coast, Russia) under extreme temperatures (+/- 40°C) we have developed optical-electronic method and system SAKHALIN. Multifunctional laser technological system LSP-2000 equipped by two Nd-YAG lasers was developed for cutting, welding and surface micro profiling with ablation process (working range of 3 x 3 x 0.6 m 3, positioning error less than 10 μm). Safety of Russian nuclear reactors takes 100 % noncontact 3D dimensional inspection of all parts of fuel assemblies, including grid spacers. Results of development and testing the specialized high productive laser measuring machine, based on structured illumination, for 3D inspection of grid spacers with micron resolution are presented. For safety increasing of Russian railways TDI SIE has developed and produced automatic laser diagnostic system COMPLEX for inspection of geometric parameters of wagon wheel pairs for running train (speed up to 60 km/hr.), which is used successfully on Russian railways.

  6. Application of FPGA technology for control of superconducting TESLA cavities in free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2006-10-01

    Contemporary fundamental research in physics, biology, chemistry, pharmacology, material technology and other uses frequently methods basing on collision of high energy particles or penetration of matter with ultra-short electromagnetic waves. Kinetic energy of involved particles, considerably greater than GeV, is generated in accelerators of unique construction. The paper presents a digest of working principles of accelerators. There are characterized research methods which use accelerators. A method to stabilize the accelerating EM field in superconducting (SC) resonant cavity was presented. An example was given of usage of TESLA cavities in linear accelerator propelling the FLASH free electron laser (FEL) in DESY, Hamburg. Electronic and photonic control system was debated. The system bases on advanced FPGA circuits and cooperating fast DSP microprocessor chips. Examples of practical solutions were described. Test results of the debated systems in the real-time conditions were given.

  7. Laser Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Amoco Laser Company, a subsidiary of Amoco Corporation, has developed microlasers for the commercial market based on a JPL concept for optical communications over interplanetary distances. Lasers emit narrow, intense beams of light or other radiation. The beams transmit communication signals, drill, cut or melt materials or remove diseased body tissue. The microlasers cover a broad portion of the spectrum, and performance is improved significantly. Current applications include medical instrumentation, color separation equipment, telecommunications, etc.

  8. FREE-ELECTRON LASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.; Vaughan, D.

    1986-04-01

    We can now produce intense, coherent light at wavelengths where no conventional lasers exist. The recent successes of devices known as free-electron lasers mark a striking confluence of two conceptual developments that themselves are only a few decades old. The first of these, the laser, is a product of the fifties and sixties whose essential characteristics have made it a staple resource in almost every field of science and technology. In a practical sense, what defines a laser is its emission of monochromatic, coherent light (that is, light of a single wavelength, with its waves locked in step) at a wavelength in the infrared, visible, or ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum. A second kind of light, called synchrotron radiation, is a by-product of the age of particle accelerators and was first observed in the laboratory in 1947. As the energies of accelerators grew in the 1960s and 70s, intense, incoherent beams of ultraviolet radiation and x--rays became available at machines built for high-energy physics research. Today, several facilities operate solely as sources of synchrotron light. Unlike the well-collimated monochromatic light emitted by lasers, however, this incoherent radiation is like a sweeping searchlight--more accurately, like the headlight of a train on a circular track--whose wavelengths encompass a wide spectral band. Now, in several laboratories around the world, researchers have exploited the physics of these two light sources and have combined the virtues of both in a single contrivance, the free-electron laser, or FEL (1). The emitted light is laserlike in its narrow, sharply peaked spectral distribution and in its phase coherence, yet it can be of a wavelength unavailable with ordinary lasers. Furthermore, like synchrotron radiation, but unlike the output of most conventional lasers, the radiation emitted by free-electron lasers can be tuned, that is, its wavelength can be easily varied across a wide range. The promise of this

  9. Laser technologies in biophotonics

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkatov, A N; Priezzhev, A V; Tuchin, Valerii V

    2012-05-31

    This and the following issues of Quantum Electronics comprise articles reflecting the state of the art of laser technologies both currently applied and promising for application in biomedical research. Rapid development of biophotonics that we witness nowadays is due to a number of factors. These include the new results in basic studies of the interaction of laser radiation with biological tissues and cells, essential progress in the field of development of means for delivery, detection and imaging of optical radiation, and implementation of novel computer- and nanotechnologies.

  10. Catalac free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1982-01-01

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  11. Catalac free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-12-12

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac is described. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator, or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  12. Free-Electron Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brau, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of free-electron lasers as a source of coherent radiation over a broad range of wavelengths from the far-infrared to the far-ultraviolet regions of the spectrum. Discusses some applications of these lasers, including medicine and strategic defense. (TW)

  13. The TESLA Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossbach, Jörg

    1997-05-01

    The TESLA Free Electron Laser makes use of the high quality electron beam that can be provided by the superconducting TESLA linac to drive a single pass free electron laser (FEL) at wavelengths far below the visible. To reach a wavelength of 6 nanometers, the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) currently under construction at DESY will be extended to 1 GeV beam energy. Because there are no mirrors and seed-lasers in this wavelength regime, the principle of Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE) will be employed. A first test of both the principle and technical components is foreseen at a photon wavelength larger than 42 nanometers. With respect to linac technology, the key prerequisite for such single-pass, high-gain FELs is a high intensity, diffraction limited, electron beam to be generated and accelerated without degradation. Key components are RF guns with photocathodes, bunch compressors, and related diagnostics. The status of design and construction as well as both electron and photon beam properties will be discussed. Once proven in the micrometer to nanometer regime, the SASE FEL scheme is considered applicable down to Angstrom wavelengths. It is pointed out that this latter option is particularly of interest in context with the construction of a linear collider, which requires very similar beam parameters. The status of conceptual design work on such a coherent X-ray user facility integrated into the TESLA linear collider design will be briefly sketched.

  14. International Seminar on Laser and Opto-Electronic Technology in Industry: State-of-the-Art Review, Xiamen, People's Republic of China, June 25-28, 1986, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Jingtang; Pryputniewicz, Ryszard J.

    Various papers on the state of the art in laser and optoelectronic technology in industry are presented. Individual topics addressed include: wavelength compensation for holographic optical element, optoelectronic techniques for measurement and inspection, new optical measurement methods in Western Europe, applications of coherent optics at ISL, imaging techniques for gas turbine development, the Rolls-Royce experience with industrial holography, panoramic holocamera for tube and borehole inspection, optical characterization of electronic materials, optical strain measurement of rotating components, quantitative interpretation of holograms and specklegrams, laser speckle technique for hydraulic structural model test, study of holospeckle interferometry, common path shearing fringe scanning interferometer, and laser interferometry applied to nondestructive testing of tires.

  15. Circular free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Kurnit, Norman A.; Cooper, Richard K.

    1984-01-01

    A high efficiency, free electron laser utilizing a circular relativistic electron beam accelerator and a circular whispering mode optical waveguide for guiding optical energy in a circular path in the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator such that the circular relativistic electron beam and the optical energy are spatially contiguous in a resonant condition for free electron laser operation. Both a betatron and synchrotron are disclosed for use in the present invention. A free electron laser wiggler is disposed around the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator for generating a periodic magnetic field to transform energy from the circular relativistic electron beam to optical energy.

  16. FREE ELECTRON LASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, W.B.; Sessler, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) uses a high quality relativistic beam of electrons passing through a periodic magnetic field to amplify a copropagating optical wave (1-4). In an oscillator configuration, the light is stored between the mirrors of an open optical resonator as shown in Figure 1. In an amplifier configuration, the optical wave and an intense electron beam pass through the undulator field to achieve high gain. In either case, the electrons must overlap the optical mode for good coupling. Typically, the peak electron beam current varies from several amperes to many hundreds of amperes and the electron energy ranges from a few MeV to a few GeV. The electrons are the power source in an FEL, and provide from a megawatt to more than a gigawatt flowing through the resonator or amplifier system. The undulator resonantly couples the electrons to the transverse electrical field of the optical wave in vacuum. The basic mechanism of the coherent energy exchange is the bunching of the electrons at optical wavelengths. Since the power source is large, even small coupling can result in a powerful laser. Energy extraction of 5% of the electron beam energy has already been demonstrated. The electron beam quality is crucial in maintaining the coupling over a significant interaction distance and of central importance to all FEL systems is the magnetic undulator. The peak undulator field strength is usually several kG and can be constructed from coil windings or permanent magnets. In the top part of Figure 2, the Halbach undulator design is shown for one period. The field can be achieved, to a good approximation, using permanent magnets made out of rare earth compounds; a technique developed by K. Halbach (5), and now employed in most undulators. The undulator wavelength is in the range of a few centimeters and the undulator length extends for a few meters, so that there are several hundred periods for the interaction (6-8). The polarization of the undulator can be either

  17. Free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Villa, Francesco

    1990-01-01

    A high gain, single-pass free electron laser formed of a high brilliance electron injector source, a linear accelerator which imparts high energy to the electron beam, and an undulator capable of extremely high magnetic fields, yet with a very short period. The electron injector source is the first stage (gap) of the linear accelerator or a radial line transformer driven by fast circular switch. The linear accelerator is formed of a plurality of accelerating gaps arranged in series. These gaps are energized in sequence by releasing a single pulse of energy which propagates simultaneously along a plurality of transmission lines, each of which feeds the gaps. The transmission lines are graduated in length so that pulse power is present at each gap as the accelerated electrons pass therethrough. The transmission lines for each gap are open circuited at their ends. The undualtor has a structure similar to the accelerator, except that the transmission lines for each gap are substantially short circuited at their ends, thus converting the electric field into magnetic field. A small amount of resistance is retained in order to generate a small electric field for replenishing the electron bunch with the energy lost as it traverses through the undulator structure.

  18. Towards possible opportunities in nuclear materials science and technology at an X-ray free electron laser research facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froideval, A.; Badillo, A.; Bertsch, J.; Churakov, S.; Dähn, R.; Degueldre, C.; Lind, T.; Paladino, D.; Patterson, B. D.

    2011-09-01

    Spectroscopy and imaging of condensed matter have benefited greatly from the availability of intense X-ray beams from synchrotron sources, both in terms of spatial resolution and of elemental specificity. The advent of the X-ray free electron laser (X-ray FEL) provides the additional features of ultra-short pulses and high transverse coherence, which greatly expand possibilities to study dynamic processes and to image non-crystalline materials. The proposed SwissFEL facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute is one of at present four X-ray FEL projects worldwide and is scheduled to go into operation in the year 2017. This article describes a selection of problems in nuclear materials science and technology that would directly benefit from this and similar X-ray FEL sources. X-ray FEL-based experiments are proposed to be conducted on nuclear energy-related materials using single-shot X-ray spectroscopy, coherent X-ray scattering and/or X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy in order to address relevant scientific questions such as the evolution in time of the irradiation-induced damage processes, the deformation processes in nuclear materials, the ion diffusion processes in the barrier systems of geological repositories, the boiling heat transfer in nuclear reactors, as well as the structural characterization of graphite dust in advanced nuclear reactors and clay colloid aggregates in the groundwater near a radioactive waste repository.

  19. Electron tunnel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waltman, S. B.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1989-01-01

    The recent development of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy technology allows the application of electron tunneling to position detectors for the first time. The vacuum tunnel junction is one of the most sensitive position detection mechanisms available. It is also compact, simple, and requires little power. A prototype accelerometer based on electron tunneling, and other sensor applications of this promising new technology are described.

  20. High Power Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2004-04-12

    FEL Oscillators have been around since 1977 providing not only a test bed for the physics of Free Electron Lasers and electron/photon interactions but as a workhorse of scientific research. The characteristics that have driven the development of these sources are the desire for high peak and average power, high pulse energies, wavelength tunability, timing flexibility, and wavelengths that are unavailable from more conventional laser sources. User programs have been performed using such sources encompassing medicine, biology, solid state research, atomic and molecular physics, effects of non-linear fields, surface science, polymer science, pulsed laser vapor deposition, to name just a few. Recently the incorporation of energy recovery systems has permitted extension of the average power capabilities to the kW level and beyond. Development of substantially higher power systems with applications in defense and security is believed feasible with modest R&D efforts applied to a few technology areas. This paper will discuss at a summary level the physics of such devices, survey existing and planned facilities, and touch on the applications that have driven the development of these popular light sources.

  1. Electronics Engineering Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Univ., Atlanta. Dept. of Vocational and Career Development.

    This guide offers information and procedures necessary to train electronics engineering technicians. Discussed first are the rationale and objectives of the curriculum. The occupational field of electronics engineering technology is described. Next, a curriculum model is set forth that contains information on the standard electronics engineering…

  2. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  3. Rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-11-02

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser are provided which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  4. Space electronics technology summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An overview is given of current electronics R and D activities, potential future thrusts, and related NASA payoffs. Major increases in NASA mission return and significant concurrent reductions in mission cost appear possible through a focused, long range electronics technology program. The overview covers: guidance assessments, navigation and control, and sensing and data acquisition processing, storage, and transfer.

  5. Laser Welding in Electronic Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The laser has proven its worth in numerous high reliability electronic packaging applications ranging from medical to missile electronics. In particular, the pulsed YAG laser is an extremely flexible and versatile too] capable of hermetically sealing microelectronics packages containing sensitive components without damaging them. This paper presents an overview of details that must be considered for successful use of laser welding when addressing electronic package sealing. These include; metallurgical considerations such as alloy and plating selection, weld joint configuration, design of optics, use of protective gases and control of thermal distortions. The primary limitations on use of laser welding electronic for packaging applications are economic ones. The laser itself is a relatively costly device when compared to competing welding equipment. Further, the cost of consumables and repairs can be significant. These facts have relegated laser welding to use only where it presents a distinct quality or reliability advantages over other techniques of electronic package sealing. Because of the unique noncontact and low heat inputs characteristics of laser welding, it is an ideal candidate for sealing electronic packages containing MEMS devices (microelectromechanical systems). This paper addresses how the unique advantages of the pulsed YAG laser can be used to simplify MEMS packaging and deliver a product of improved quality.

  6. Free Electron Lasers - Proceedings of the Beijing Fel Seminar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiaer; Xie, Jialin; Du, Xiangwan; Zhao, Kui

    1989-03-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface to the Series * Preface * Seminar Opening Speech * Seminar Closing Address * SECTION 1. RF LINAC BASED FEL * Richard H. Pantell * Free-Electron Lasers * Gas-Loading the FEL * High-Efficiency, High-Power Free-Electron Lasers * A Tunable Submillimeter-to-Far-Infrared Coherent Radiation Source * Kwok-Chi Dominic Chan * Recent Results from the Los Alamos Free Electron Laser * Short-Range Wakefield Effects in RF-Based Free-Electron Laser * Long-Range Wakefield Effects in RF-Based Free-Electron Laser * High-Brightness Injectors For RF-Driven Free-Electron Lasers * Computer Codes for Wakefield Analysis in RF-Based Free-Electron Laser * George R. Neil * The TRW RF Accelerator FEL Program * Superconducting Linac FEL Technology * Design Considerations of RF Oscillators * Chun-Ching Shih * Development of Multicomponent Wiggler Free Electron Lasers * Free Electron Laser Resonator * SECTION 2. INDUCTION LINAC BASED FEL * Richard J. Briggs * Overview of FEL Development with Induction Linacs at LLNL * Overview of Linear Induction Accelerators * High Current Electron-Beam Transport in Induction Linacs * Thaddeus J. Orzechowski * An Introduction to the Physics of High-Gain Free-Electron Lasers * Harmonics and Optical Guiding in Free Electron Lasers * The Electron Laser Facility: A millimeter Wave Free-Electron Laser Amplifier * The Electron Laser Facility: Measurement of Modes, Harmonics, Parametric Dependence, and Phase Shift * Paladin: A 10.6 μm Free-Electron Laser Amplifier * Aspects of Linear Induction Accelerator Technology * List of Participants

  7. Laser peening of metals- enabling laser technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.; Daly, J.; Harrisson, J.

    1997-11-13

    Laser peening, a surface treatment for metals, employs laser induced shocks to create deep and intense residual stresses in critical components. In many applications this technology is proving to be superior to conventional treatments such as shot peening. The laser peening process has generated sufficiently impressive results to move it from a laboratory demonstration phase into a significant industrial process. However until now this evolution has been slowed because a laser system meeting the average power requirements for a high throughput process has been lacking.

  8. Japan's electronic packaging technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tummala, Rao R.; Pecht, Michael

    1995-02-01

    The JTEC panel found Japan to have significant leadership over the United States in the strategic area of electronic packaging. Many technologies and products once considered the 'heart and soul' of U.S. industry have been lost over the past decades to Japan and other Asian countries. The loss of consumer electronics technologies and products is the most notable of these losses, because electronics is the United States' largest employment sector and is critical for growth businesses in consumer products, computers, automobiles, aerospace, and telecommunications. In the past there was a distinction between consumer and industrial product technologies. While Japan concentrated on the consumer market, the United States dominated the industrial sector. No such distinction is anticipated in the future; the consumer-oriented technologies Japan has dominated are expected to characterize both domains. The future of U.S. competitiveness will, therefore, depend on the ability of the United States to rebuild its technological capabilities in the area of portable electronic packaging.

  9. Japan's electronic packaging technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tummala, Rao R.; Pecht, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The JTEC panel found Japan to have significant leadership over the United States in the strategic area of electronic packaging. Many technologies and products once considered the 'heart and soul' of U.S. industry have been lost over the past decades to Japan and other Asian countries. The loss of consumer electronics technologies and products is the most notable of these losses, because electronics is the United States' largest employment sector and is critical for growth businesses in consumer products, computers, automobiles, aerospace, and telecommunications. In the past there was a distinction between consumer and industrial product technologies. While Japan concentrated on the consumer market, the United States dominated the industrial sector. No such distinction is anticipated in the future; the consumer-oriented technologies Japan has dominated are expected to characterize both domains. The future of U.S. competitiveness will, therefore, depend on the ability of the United States to rebuild its technological capabilities in the area of portable electronic packaging.

  10. Progress toward the Wisconsin Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, Joseph; Eisert, D; Fisher, M V; Green, M A; Jacobs, K; Kleman, K J; Kulpin, J; Rogers, G C; Lawler, J E; Yavuz, D; Legg, R

    2011-03-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison/Synchrotron Radiation Center is advancing its design for a seeded VUV/soft X-ray Free Electron Laser facility called WiFEL. To support this vision of an ultimate light source, we are pursuing a program of strategic R&D addressing several crucial elements. This includes development of a high repetition rate, VHF superconducting RF electron gun, R&D on photocathode materials by ARPES studies, and evaluation of FEL facility architectures (e.g., recirculation, compressor scenarios, CSR dechirping, undulator technologies) with the specific goal of cost containment. Studies of high harmonic generation for laser seeding are also planned.

  11. Free electron laser designs for laser amplification

    DOEpatents

    Prosnitz, Donald; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method for laser beam amplification by means of free electron laser techniques. With wiggler magnetic field strength B.sub.w and wavelength .lambda..sub.w =2.pi./k.sub.w regarded as variable parameters, the method(s) impose conditions such as substantial constancy of B.sub.w /k.sub.w or k.sub.w or B.sub.w and k.sub.w (alternating), coupled with a choice of either constant resonant phase angle or programmed phase space "bucket" area.

  12. Inverse free electron laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Sandweiss, J.; van Steenbergen, A. )

    1992-07-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e[sup [minus

  13. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; van Steenbergen, A. ); Sandweiss, J. )

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e[sup [minus

  14. Laser technologies in ophthalmic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atezhev, V. V.; Barchunov, B. V.; Vartapetov, S. K.; Zav’yalov, A. S.; Lapshin, K. E.; Movshev, V. G.; Shcherbakov, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    Excimer and femtosecond lasers are widely used in ophthalmology to correct refraction. Laser systems for vision correction are based on versatile technical solutions and include multiple hard- and software components. Laser characteristics, properties of laser beam delivery system, algorithms for cornea treatment, and methods of pre-surgical diagnostics determine the surgical outcome. Here we describe the scientific and technological basis for laser systems for refractive surgery developed at the Physics Instrumentation Center (PIC) at the Prokhorov General Physics Institute (GPI), Russian Academy of Sciences.

  15. Thermo electronic laser energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, L. K.; Rasor, N. S.

    1976-01-01

    The thermo electronic laser energy converter (TELEC) is described and compared to the Waymouth converter and the conventional thermionic converter. The electrical output characteristics and efficiency of TELEC operation are calculated for a variety of design variables. Calculations and results are briefly outlined. It is shown that the TELEC concept can potentially convert 25 to 50 percent of incident laser radiation into electric power at high power densities and high waste heat rejection temperatures.

  16. Advances in femtosecond laser technology

    PubMed Central

    Callou, Thais Pinheiro; Garcia, Renato; Mukai, Adriana; Giacomin, Natalia T; de Souza, Rodrigo Guimarães; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond laser technology has become widely adopted by ophthalmic surgeons. The purpose of this study is to discuss applications and advantages of femtosecond lasers over traditional manual techniques, and related unique complications in cataract surgery and corneal refractive surgical procedures, including: LASIK flap creation, intracorneal ring segment implantation, presbyopic treatments, keratoplasty, astigmatic keratotomy, and intrastromal lenticule procedures. PMID:27143847

  17. Advances in femtosecond laser technology.

    PubMed

    Callou, Thais Pinheiro; Garcia, Renato; Mukai, Adriana; Giacomin, Natalia T; de Souza, Rodrigo Guimarães; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond laser technology has become widely adopted by ophthalmic surgeons. The purpose of this study is to discuss applications and advantages of femtosecond lasers over traditional manual techniques, and related unique complications in cataract surgery and corneal refractive surgical procedures, including: LASIK flap creation, intracorneal ring segment implantation, presbyopic treatments, keratoplasty, astigmatic keratotomy, and intrastromal lenticule procedures. PMID:27143847

  18. NASA Space Laser Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Over the next two decades, the number of space based laser missions for mapping, spectroscopy, remote sensing and other scientific investigations will increase several fold. The demand for high wall-plug efficiency, low noise, narrow linewidth laser systems to meet different systems requirements that can reliably operate over the life of a mission will be high. The general trends will be for spatial quality very close to the diffraction limit, improved spectral performance, increased wall-plug efficiency and multi-beam processing. Improved spectral performance will include narrower spectral width (very near the transform limit), increased wavelength stability and or tuning (depending on application) and lasers reaching a wider range of wavelengths stretching into the mid-infrared and the near ultraviolet. We are actively developing high efficiency laser transmitter and high-sensitivity laser receiver systems that are suitable for spaceborne applications.

  19. Laser dye technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, P R

    1999-09-01

    The author has worked with laser dyes for a number of years. A first interest was in the Navy blue-green program where a flashlamp pumped dye laser was used as an underwater communication and detection device. It made use of the optical window of sea-water--blue for deep ocean, green for coastal water. A major activity however has been with the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The aim here has been enriching isotopes for the nuclear fuel cycle. The tunability of the dye laser is utilized to selectively excite one isotope in uranium vapor, and this isotope is collected electrostatically as shown in Figure 1. The interests in the AVLIS program have been in the near ultra-violet, violet, red and deep-red.

  20. Electron beam pumped semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Electron-beam-pumped semiconductor ultra-violet optical sources (ESUVOSs) are disclosed that use ballistic electron pumped wide bandgap semiconductor materials. The sources may produce incoherent radiation and take the form of electron-beam-pumped light emitting triodes (ELETs). The sources may produce coherent radiation and take the form of electron-beam-pumped laser triodes (ELTs). The ELTs may take the form of electron-beam-pumped vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (EVCSEL) or edge emitting electron-beam-pumped lasers (EEELs). The semiconductor medium may take the form of an aluminum gallium nitride alloy that has a mole fraction of aluminum selected to give a desired emission wavelength, diamond, or diamond-like carbon (DLC). The sources may be produced from discrete components that are assembled after their individual formation or they may be produced using batch MEMS-type or semiconductor-type processing techniques to build them up in a whole or partial monolithic manner, or combination thereof.

  1. Future Applications of Electronic Technology to Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Arthur J.; And Others

    Developments in electronic technology that have improved and linked together telecommunication and computers are discussed, as well as their use in instruction, implications of this use, and associated issues. The first section briefly describes the following developments: microcomputers and microprocessors, bubble memory, lasers, holography,…

  2. Fluxless laser soldering for electronic packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Keicher, D.M.

    1991-12-31

    Conventional soldering typically requires the use of reactive fluxes to promote wetting. The resulting flux residues are removed primarily with halogenated or chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents. With the mandated phaseout of CFCs by the year 2000, there has been a concentrated effort to develop alternative, environmentally compatible manufacturing and cleaning technologies that will satisfy the restrictions placed on CFCs, but still yield high quality product. Sandia National Laboratories is currently evaluating a variety of alternative fluxless soldering technologies which can be applied to electronic packaging. Laser soldering in a controlled atmosphere has shown great potential as an environmentally compatible process. The effects of laser heating with a 100 watt CW Nd:YAG laser, joint design, and base/filler metal reactions on achieving fluxless wetting with good metallurgical bonds were examined. Satisfactory Ni-Au plated Kovar{reg_sign} solder joints were made with 80In-15Pb-5Ag and 63Sn-37Pb (wt. %) solder alloys in a slightly reducing cover gas. Wetting generally increased with increasing laser power, decreasing laser beam spot size, and decreasing part travel speed. The materials and processing interaction effects are identified and discussed.

  3. Fluxless laser soldering for electronic packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F M; Keicher, D M

    1991-01-01

    Conventional soldering typically requires the use of reactive fluxes to promote wetting. The resulting flux residues are removed primarily with halogenated or chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents. With the mandated phaseout of CFCs by the year 2000, there has been a concentrated effort to develop alternative, environmentally compatible manufacturing and cleaning technologies that will satisfy the restrictions placed on CFCs, but still yield high quality product. Sandia National Laboratories is currently evaluating a variety of alternative fluxless soldering technologies which can be applied to electronic packaging. Laser soldering in a controlled atmosphere has shown great potential as an environmentally compatible process. The effects of laser heating with a 100 watt CW Nd:YAG laser, joint design, and base/filler metal reactions on achieving fluxless wetting with good metallurgical bonds were examined. Satisfactory Ni-Au plated Kovar{reg sign} solder joints were made with 80In-15Pb-5Ag and 63Sn-37Pb (wt. %) solder alloys in a slightly reducing cover gas. Wetting generally increased with increasing laser power, decreasing laser beam spot size, and decreasing part travel speed. The materials and processing interaction effects are identified and discussed.

  4. Combination free electron and gaseous laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Rockwood, Stephen D.; Stein, William E.

    1980-01-01

    A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

  5. Combination free-electron and gaseous laser

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, C.A.; Rockwood, S.D.; Stein, W.E.

    1981-06-08

    A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages is described. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

  6. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Vansteenbergen, A.; Sandweiss, J.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e(-) beam and the 10(exp 11) Watt CO2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a approximately 1.5 percent/cm tapered period configuration. The CO2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power CW CO2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  7. Inverse free electron laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Sandweiss, J.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1992-07-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e- beam and the 1011 Watt CO2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP), and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a ≊1.5%/cm tapered period configuration. The CO2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power cw CO2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  8. Laser technology in automotive lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altingöz, Ceren

    2014-03-01

    The last few years have seen something of a revolution in automotive lighting facilitated by a range of new photonics advances. The lighting industry as a whole is moving rapidly from the incandescent and gas discharge based technologies that dominated the 20th century to solid state technology in the form of Light Emitting Diodes (LED) which are a point source light, Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLED) which are an area source light and at the edge the increasing use of lasers with different functional applications. In this paper I will focus on this edge technology of lasers as they are still trying to find their right place in automotive lighting. To better analyze their potential, the working principle of a laser will be explained, laser types used in automotive lighting, their application methods, advantages and disadvantages of their usage will be declared, application examples from the current trials of some leading automotive industry research groups will be given and finalization will be with an overall view of the possible future laser applications in the field of automotive lighting.

  9. Laser remanufacturing technology and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shiyun; Xu, Binshi; Wang, Zhijian; Ma, Yunzhe; Liu, Weihong

    2008-03-01

    Remanufacture engineering, which has become an important way to sustainable society progress, and its recent development were introduced. Laser remanufacturing technology utilizes high energy density laser beam to remanufacture the worn or failed components. As laser processing is important and advanced technology for remanufacturing, laser remanufacturing was introduced on connotation, characteristics and technical sorts. Research and application status of laser remanufacturing was reviewed, and two laser remanufacturing examples were described to show that laser remanufacturing can solve the difficult problems in equipment maintenance and remanufacturing. It pointed out that the main problems of laser remanufacturing technology for further developing lies in high power laser system, laser remanufacturing technique or processing, supports from government and enterprises. It stated out the developing trends of laser remanufacturing technology, and showed that laser remanufacturing can bring great economic and social benefits.

  10. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, Leland G.; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  11. LASER-ELECTRON COMPTON INTERACTION IN PLASMA CHANNELS

    SciTech Connect

    POGORELSKY,I.V.

    1998-10-01

    A concept of high intensity femtosecond laser synchrotron source (LSS) is based on Compton backscattering of focused electron and laser beams. The short Rayleigh length of the focused laser beam limits the length of interaction to a few picoseconds. However, the technology of the high repetition rate high-average power picosecond lasers required for high put through LSS applications is not developed yet. Another problem associated with the picosecond laser pulses is undesirable nonlinear effects occurring when the laser photons are concentrated in a short time interval. To avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering, the laser beam has to be split, and the required hard radiation flux is accumulated over a number of consecutive interactions that complicates the LSS design. In order to relieve the technological constraints and achieve a practically feasible high-power laser synchrotron source, we propose to confine the laser-electron interaction region in the extended plasma channel. This approach permits to use nanosecond laser pulses instead of the picosecond pulses. That helps to avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering regime and allows to utilize already existing technology of the high-repetition rate TEA CO{sub 2} lasers operating at the atmospheric pressure. We demonstrate the advantages of the channeled LSS approach by the example of the prospective polarized positron source for Japan Linear Collider.

  12. FPGA technology application in a fast measurement and control system for the TESLA superconducting cavity of a FLASH free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2007-08-01

    Contemporary basic research in physics, biology, chemistry, pharmacology, material technology and other branches uses methods based on sample penetration (and the effect measurement) with pulsed ultra-short EM waves of very high beam intensity. This paper is an overview of a free electron laser (FEL) used in such methods. A method for the stabilization of the EM field in a superconducting 'TESLA' cavity accelerator for electrons is presented. This requires precise measurements of the field. The SC accelerator is a basic part of the FEL. The given example concerns the FLASH machine in DESY. The presented, high power EM field stabilization system is based on FPGA circuits with embedded fast hardware multiplication blocks. Examples of a few families of such new generation practically designed and constructed system realizations are given. The system is referred to as the SIMCON (from the microwave superconducting cavity SIMulator and CONtroller). SIMCONs consist of either single-module, multi-module configurable or multichannel distributed units. The SIMCON system stabilizes the EM field by a very fast feedback loop with an adaptation process, supplemented with a feed-forward. The following are presented: a parametric hardware description (firmware) in the form of behavioural VHDL algorithms; implementation results in VirtexIIPro circuits; examples of measurements of high power EM field stability performed under the nominal conditions of accelerator work.

  13. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; van Steenbergen, A.; Sandweiss, J.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e{sup {minus}} beam and the 10{sup 11} Watt CO{sub 2} laser beam of BNL`s Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a {approximately} 1.5 %/cm tapered period configuration. The CO{sub 2} laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power cw CO{sub 2} laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  14. Microscale technology electronics cooling overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golliher, Eric L.

    2002-01-01

    NASA requirements and subsequent technology solutions for high heat flux electronics are generally different that those for the terrestrial applications. Unlike terrestrial operations. NASA spacecraft have limited opportunities for air cooling, for example, and must rely on less efficient thermal radiation to reject heat to space. The terrestrial commercial electronics industry, as well as other Government agencies, is investing in advanced technologies for electronics cooling at the microscale. This paper gives a brief summary of metrics used in high heat flux electronics cooling, the difference between solutions developed for terrestrial requirements and those for space, and a short description of challenges as well as possible solutions for space-based high heat flux electronics cooling. The argument is made that high heat flux electronics cooling is indeed a core technology required by NASA, since the thermal and other environmental requirements are unique to NASA space missions and are not addressed by current terrestrial electronics cooling technology development projects. .

  15. Toward attosecond electron pulses using ultra-intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varin, Charles; Fortin, Pierre-Louis; Piché, Michel

    2008-06-01

    In many countries around the world, ultra-intense laser facilities are being built. These state-of-the-art lasers are intended for innovative medical and technological applications, as well as for basic experiments at the frontiers of fundamental science. Laser particle acceleration is a promising new endeavor. Recently developed schemes using radially polarized beams could help in reaching unprecedentedly short electron pulse durations, well in the attosecond range and potentially in the subattosecond range.

  16. Laser frequency modulation with electron plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, T. J.; Latorre, V. R.

    1972-01-01

    When laser beam passes through electron plasma its frequency shifts by amount proportional to plasma density. This density varies with modulating signal resulting in corresponding modulation of laser beam frequency. Necessary apparatus is relatively inexpensive since crystals are not required.

  17. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION, FREE ELECTRON LASER, APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY, ETC.: Operating the SDUV-FEL with the echo-enabled harmonic generation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-Hui; Deng, Hai-Xiao; Gu, Qiang; Li, Dong-Guo; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Zhen-Tang

    2009-08-01

    Using the recently proposed echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) free-electron laser (FEL) scheme, it is shown that operating the Shanghai deep ultraviolet FEL (SDUV-FEL) with single-stage to higher harmonics is very promising, with higher frequency up-conversion efficiency, higher harmonic selectivity and lower power requirement of the seed laser. The considerations on a proof-of-principle experiment and expected performance in SDUV-FEL are given.

  18. Economic technology of laser cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedin, Alexander V.; Shilov, Igor V.; Vassiliev, Vladimir V.; Malov, Dmitri V.; Peskov, Vladimir N.

    2000-02-01

    The laser cutting of color metals and alloys by a thickness more than 2 mm has significant difficulties due to high reflective ability and large thermal conduction. We made it possible to raise energy efficiency and quality of laser cutting by using a laser processing system (LPS) consisting both of the YAG:Nd laser with passive Q-switching on base of LiF:F2- crystals and the CO2 laser. A distinctive feature of the LPS is that the radiation of different lasers incorporated in a coaxial beam has simultaneously high level of peak power (more than 400 kW in a TEM00 mode) and significant level of average power (up to 800 W in a TEM01 mode of the CO2 laser). The application of combined radiation for cutting of an aluminum alloy of D16 type made it possible to decrease the cutting energy threshold in 1.7 times, to increase depth of treatment from 2 up to 4 mm, and velocity from 0.015 up to 0.7 m/min, and also to eliminate application of absorptive coatings. At cutting of steels the velocity of treatment was doubled, and also an oxygen flow was eliminated from the technological process and replaced by the air. The obtained raise of energy efficiency and quality of cutting is explained by an essential size reducing of a formed penetration channel and by the shifting of a thermal cutting mode from melting to evaporation. The evaluation of interaction efficiency of a combined radiation was produced on the basis of non-stationary thermal-hydrodynamic model of a heating source moving as in the cutting direction, and also into the depth of material.

  19. Electronics. Education for Technology Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb. Dept. of Technology.

    This electronics curriculum is intended to provide instructors of electronics with a useful guide for relating important new technological advances to the vocational classroom. The competency-based learning activity guides are written to be used with any electronics equipment available at the secondary and postsecondary levels. Instructors must…

  20. XUV/VUV free-electron laser oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.C.; Newnam, B.E.; Cooper, R.K.; Comly, J.C. Jr.

    1984-04-01

    It is shown, from computations based on a detailed theoretical model, that modest improvements in electron beam and optical mirror technologies will enable a free-electron laser, driven by an rf linear accelerator, to operate in the 50 to 200-nm range of optical wavelengths. 10 references.

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT LASER TOUCH AND TECHNOLOGIES, LLC LASER TOUCH MODEL LT-B512

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of Laser Touch model LT-B512 targeting device manufactured by Laser Touch and Technologies, LLC, for manual spray painting operations. The relative transfer efficiency (TE) improved an avera...

  2. GBFEL-TIE (Ground-Based Free Electron Laser Technology Experiment) sample survey on White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico: The NASA, Stallion, and Orogrande Alternatives. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Seaman, T.J.; Doleman, W.H.

    1988-09-30

    Three locations on White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, are under consideration as alternatives for the proposed Ground-Based Free-Electron Laser Technology Integration Experiment (GBFEL-TIE). The study conducted jointly by Prewitt and Associates, Inc., and the Office of Contract Archeology, was designed to provide input into the GBFEL-TIE Draft Environmental Impact Statement concerning the potential impact of the proposed project on cultural resources in each of the alternatives. The input consists of a series of predictions based on data gathered from two sources: (1) a cultural resource sample survey (15%) of two alternatives conducted as part of this study, and (2) from a previous survey of the third alternative. A predictive model was devleoped and applied using these data that estimated the potential impact of the GBFEL-TIE facility on the cultural resources within each alternative. The predictions indicate that the NASA alternatives, by far, the least favorable location for the facility followed by the Orogrande and Stallion Alternatives.

  3. Single electron beam rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Stein, W.E.; Rockwood, S.D.

    1981-02-11

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which uses rf feedback to enhance efficiency are described. Rf energy is extracted from a single electron beam by decelerating cavities and energy is returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns, such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, resonant feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to reduce the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  4. High Frequency Electronic Packaging Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, M.; Lowry, L.; Lee, K.; Kolawa, E.; Tulintseff, A.; Shalkhauser, K.; Whitaker, J.; Piket-May, M.

    1994-01-01

    Commercial and government communication, radar, and information systems face the challenge of cost and mass reduction via the application of advanced packaging technology. A majority of both government and industry support has been focused on low frequency digital electronics.

  5. Multifrequency, single pass free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Szoke, Abraham; Prosnitz, Donald

    1985-01-01

    A method for simultaneous amplification of laser beams with a sequence of frequencies in a single pass, using a relativistic beam of electrons grouped in a sequence of energies corresponding to the sequence of laser beam frequencies. The method allows electrons to pass from one potential well or "bucket" to another adjacent bucket, thus increasing efficiency of trapping and energy conversion.

  6. The SLAC polarized electron source laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, J.

    1995-10-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) has operated a polarized photocathode electron source and titanium sapphire laser for high energy physics collisions for over 6,500 hours of nearly continuous operation. The laser system for the source has demonstrated > 98.5% total uptime for the duration of the experiment. The laser system uses a pair of titanium sapphire oscillators pumped by frequency doubled YAG lasers to produce 2ns, 250 {micro}J pulses at wavelengths from 740nm to 870nm.

  7. Separating Isotopes With Laser And Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, Sandor

    1989-01-01

    Need for second laser eliminated. In scheme for separation of isotopes, electrons of suitable kinetic energy ionize specific isotope excited by laser beam in magnetic field. Ionization by electron beams cheap and efficient in comparison to ionization by laser beams, and requires no special technical developments. Feasibility of new scheme demonstrated in selective ionization of Ba138, making possible separation of isotope from Ba isotopes of atomic weight 130, 132, 134, 135, 136, and 137.

  8. Electron tunnel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, T. W.; Waltman, S. B.; Reynolds, J. K.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers designed and constructed a novel electron tunnel sensor which takes advantage of the mechanical properties of micro-machined silicon. For the first time, electrostatic forces are used to control the tunnel electrode separation, thereby avoiding the thermal drift and noise problems associated with piezoelectric actuators. The entire structure is composed of micro-machined silicon single crystals, including a folded cantilever spring and a tip. The application of this sensor to the development of a sensitive accelerometer is described.

  9. Benchmarking foreign electronics technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bostian, C.W.; Hodges, D.A.; Leachman, R.C.; Sheridan, T.B.; Tsang, W.T.; White, R.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report has been drafted in response to a request from the Japanese Technology Evaluation Center`s (JTEC) Panel on Benchmarking Select Technologies. Since April 1991, the Competitive Semiconductor Manufacturing (CSM) Program at the University of California at Berkeley has been engaged in a detailed study of quality, productivity, and competitiveness in semiconductor manufacturing worldwide. The program is a joint activity of the College of Engineering, the Haas School of Business, and the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, under sponsorship of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and with the cooperation of semiconductor producers from Asia, Europe and the United States. Professors David A. Hodges and Robert C. Leachman are the project`s Co-Directors. The present report for JTEC is primarily based on data and analysis drawn from that continuing program. The CSM program is being conducted by faculty, graduate students and research staff from UC Berkeley`s Schools of Engineering and Business, and Department of Economics. Many of the participating firms are represented on the program`s Industry Advisory Board. The Board played an important role in defining the research agenda. A pilot study was conducted in 1991 with the cooperation of three semiconductor plants. The research plan and survey documents were thereby refined. The main phase of the CSM benchmarking study began in mid-1992 and will continue at least through 1997. reports are presented on the manufacture of integrated circuits; data storage; wireless technology; human-machine interfaces; and optoelectronics. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  10. Demodulator electronics for laser vibrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dudzik, G.; Waz, A. T.; Kaczmarek, P. R.; Antonczak, A. J.; Sotor, J. Z.; Krzempek, K.; Sobon, G.; Abramski, K. M.

    2012-06-13

    One of the most important parts of a fiber-laser vibrometer is demodulation electronic section. The distortion, nonlinearity, offset and added noise of measured signal come from electronic circuits and they have direct influence on finale measuring results. Two main parameters of an investigated vibrating object: velocity V(t) and displacement s(t), influence of detected beat signals. They are: the Doppler frequency deviation f(t) and phase shift {phi}(t), respectively. Because of wide range of deviations it is difficult to use just one demodulator. That is the reason why we use three different types of demodulators. The first one is the IQ demodulator, which is the most sensitive one and its output is proportional to the displacement. Each IQ channel is sampled simultaneously by an analog to digital converter (ADC) integrated in a digital signal processor (DSP). The output signals from the two FM demodulators are proportional to the frequency deviation of heterodyne signals. They are sensitive directly to the velocity of the object. The main disadvantage of scattered light interferometry system is a ''speckle effect'', appearing in relatively large amplitude fluctuation of a heterodyne signal. To minimize ''speckle effect'' influence on quality of beat signals we applied the automatic gain control (AGC) system. Data acquisition, further signal processing (e.g. vibration frequency spectra) and presentation of results is realized by PC via USB interface.

  11. Demodulator electronics for laser vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudzik, G.; Waz, A. T.; Kaczmarek, P. R.; Antonczak, A. J.; Sotor, J. Z.; Krzempek, K.; Sobon, G.; Abramski, K. M.

    2012-06-01

    One of the most important parts of a fiber-laser vibrometer is demodulation electronic section. The distortion, nonlinearity, offset and added noise of measured signal come from electronic circuits and they have direct influence on finale measuring results. Two main parameters of an investigated vibrating object: velocity V(t) and displacement s(t), influence of detected beat signals. They are: the Doppler frequency deviation f(t) and phase shift φ(t), respectively. Because of wide range of deviations it is difficult to use just one demodulator. That is the reason why we use three different types of demodulators. The first one is the IQ demodulator, which is the most sensitive one and its output is proportional to the displacement. Each IQ channel is sampled simultaneously by an analog to digital converter (ADC) integrated in a digital signal processor (DSP). The output signals from the two FM demodulators are proportional to the frequency deviation of heterodyne signals. They are sensitive directly to the velocity of the object. The main disadvantage of scattered light interferometry system is a "speckle effect", appearing in relatively large amplitude fluctuation of a heterodyne signal. To minimize "speckle effect" influence on quality of beat signals we applied the automatic gain control (AGC) system. Data acquisition, further signal processing (e.g. vibration frequency spectra) and presentation of results is realized by PC via USB interface.

  12. Isotope separation by laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Wolfgang

    2002-03-01

    Isotope separation processes operate on very small differences, given either by the Quotient of masses with the same number of electrons or by their mass difference. When separating isotopes of light elements in mass quantities, thermodynamic processes accounting for the quotient, either in diffusion, chemical reactivity or distillation are used. For heavy elements those quotients are very small. Therefore they need a large number of separation steps. Large plants with high energy consumption result from that. As uranium isotope separation is the most important industrial field, alternatives, taking account for the mass difference, as e.g. gas centrifuges, have been developed. They use only a fraction of the energy input, but need a very large number of machines, as the individual throughput is small. Since it was discovered, that molecules of high symmetry like Uranium-Hexafluoride as a deep-cooled gas stream can be ionized by multiple photon excitation, this process was studied in detail and in competition to the selective ionization of metal vapors, as already demonstrated with uranium. The paper reports about the principles of the laser excitation for both processes, the different laboratory scale and prototypical plants built, the difficulties with materials, as far as the metal vapor laser separation is concerned, and the difficulties experienced in the similarity in molecular spectra. An overview of the relative economic merits of the different processes and the auspices in a saturated market for uranium isotope separation, together with other potential markets for molecular laser separation, is contained in the conclusions.

  13. Laser Phase Errors in Seeded Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, D.; Fry, A.; Stupakov, G.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2012-04-17

    Harmonic seeding of free electron lasers has attracted significant attention as a method for producing transform-limited pulses in the soft x-ray region. Harmonic multiplication schemes extend seeding to shorter wavelengths, but also amplify the spectral phase errors of the initial seed laser, and may degrade the pulse quality and impede production of transform-limited pulses. In this paper we consider the effect of seed laser phase errors in high gain harmonic generation and echo-enabled harmonic generation. We use simulations to confirm analytical results for the case of linearly chirped seed lasers, and extend the results for arbitrary seed laser envelope and phase.

  14. Skylab electronic technological advancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornback, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes three electronic devices designed for use in the Skylab airlock module: the teleprinter system, the quartz crystal microbalance contamination monitor (QCM), and the speaker. Design considerations, operation, characteristics, and system development are described for these systems, with accompanying diagrams, graphs, and photographs. The teleprinter is a thermal dot printer used to produce hard copy messages by electrically heating print elements in contact with heat-sensitive paper. The QCM was designed to estimate contamination buildup on optical surfaces of the earth resources experiment package. A vibrating quartz crystal is used as a microbalance relating deposited mass to shifts in the crystal's resonant frequency. Audio devices provide communication between crew members and between crew and STDN, and also provide audible alarms, via the caution and warning system, of out-of-limit-conditions.

  15. High temperature electronics technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dening, J. C.; Hurtle, D. E.

    1984-03-01

    This report summarizes the barrier metallization developments accomplished in a program intended to develop 300 C electronic controls capability for potential on-engine aircraft engine application. In addition, this report documents preliminary life test results at 300 C and above and discusses improved design practices required for high temperature integrated injection logic semiconductors. Previous Phase 1 activities focused on determining the viability of operating silicon semiconductor devices over the -55 C to +300 C temperature range. This feasibility was substantiated but the need for additional design work and process development was indicated. Phase 2 emphasized the development of a high temperature metallization system as the primary development need for high temperature silicon semiconductor applications.

  16. Technology and applications of ultrafast fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Marion; Hellerer, Thomas; Stuhler, Juergen

    2011-11-01

    We briefly review the key technology of modern fiber based femtosecond laser sources summarizing advantages and disadvantages of different mode-locking solutions. A description of possible extensions of a FemtoFiber-type modelocked Er-doped fiber laser oscillator (1560 nm) reveals the flexibility with respect to wavelength coverage (488 nm .. 2200 nm) and pulse duration (10 fs .. 10 ps). The resulting FemtoFiber family and its versions for instrument integration allow one to use these state-of-the-art light sources in many important applications, e.g. THz spectroscopy and microscopy. We show that, depending on the fiber laser model and the THz emitter, THz radiation can be produced with 4-10 THz bandwidth and detected with up to 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Electronically controlled optical scanning (ECOPS) - a unique method for fast, precise and comfortable sampling of the THz pulse or other pump-probe experiments - is described and recommended for efficient data acquisition. As examples for modern microscopy with ultrafast fiber lasers we present results of two-photon fluorescence, coherent microscopy techniques (SHG/THG/CARS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM).

  17. Technology and applications of ultrafast fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Marion; Hellerer, Thomas; Stuhler, Juergen

    2012-03-01

    We briefly review the key technology of modern fiber based femtosecond laser sources summarizing advantages and disadvantages of different mode-locking solutions. A description of possible extensions of a FemtoFiber-type modelocked Er-doped fiber laser oscillator (1560 nm) reveals the flexibility with respect to wavelength coverage (488 nm .. 2200 nm) and pulse duration (10 fs .. 10 ps). The resulting FemtoFiber family and its versions for instrument integration allow one to use these state-of-the-art light sources in many important applications, e.g. THz spectroscopy and microscopy. We show that, depending on the fiber laser model and the THz emitter, THz radiation can be produced with 4-10 THz bandwidth and detected with up to 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Electronically controlled optical scanning (ECOPS) - a unique method for fast, precise and comfortable sampling of the THz pulse or other pump-probe experiments - is described and recommended for efficient data acquisition. As examples for modern microscopy with ultrafast fiber lasers we present results of two-photon fluorescence, coherent microscopy techniques (SHG/THG/CARS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM).

  18. Free electron laser physical process code (FELPPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Chan, K.C.D.; Schmitt, M.J.

    1995-02-01

    Even at the conceptual level, the strong coupling between subsystem elements complicates the understanding and design of a free electron laser (FEL). Given the requirements for high-performance FELS, the coupling between subsystems must be included to obtain a realistic picture of the potential operational capability. The concept of an Integrated Numerical Experiment (INEX) was implemented to accurately calculate the coupling between the FEL subsystems. During the late 1980`s, the INEX approach was successfully applied to a large number of accelerator and FEL experiments. Unfortunately, because of significant manpower and computational requirements, the integrated approach is difficult to apply to trade-off and initial design studies. However, the INEX codes provided a base from which realistic accelerator, wiggler, optics, and control models could be developed. The Free Electron Laser Physical Process Code (FELPPC) includes models developed from the INEX codes, provides coupling between the subsystem models, and incorporates application models relevant to a specific study. In other words, FELPPC solves the complete physical process model using realistic physics and technology constraints. FELPPC can calculate complex FEL configurations including multiple accelerator and wiggler combinations. When compared with the INEX codes, the subsystem models have been found to be quite accurate over many orders-of-magnitude. As a result, FELPPC has been used for the initial design studies of a large number of FEL applications: high-average-power ground, space, plane, and ship based FELS; beacon and illuminator FELS; medical and compact FELS; and XUV FELS.

  19. Free electron laser with masked chicane

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Dinh C.; Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) is provided with an accelerator for outputting electron beam pulses; a buncher for modulating each one of the electron beam pulses to form each pulse into longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons; and a wiggler for generating coherent light from the longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons. The electron beam buncher is a chicane having a mask for physically modulating the electron beam pulses to form a series of electron beam bunches for input to the wiggler. In a preferred embodiment, the mask is located in the chicane at a position where each electron beam pulse has a maximum dispersion.

  20. Intense Laser Ionization and Acceleration of Electrons in Highly-Charged Ions Using Vortex Laser Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Liang-Wen; Vikartofsky, Andrew; Starace, Anthony F.

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in laser technology have led to the development of high-power petawatt lasers, making possible laser intensities of the order of 1022 W /cm2 . An electron in a highly-charged ion can be ionized in a laser field at its peak intensity and swiftly accelerated to GeV energies. Our prior investigation of laser acceleration of electrons using linearly-polarized Gaussian beams (with zero orbital angular momentum) has revealed that the final-state energies and ejection angles of the electrons depend on the initial target ion positions relative to the laser focus. We report here recent simulations of laser ionization and acceleration of electrons using linearly-polarized vortex laser beams (i.e., Laguerre-Gaussian beams), which carry orbital angular momentum and can spin microscopic objects. These simulations show that the inherent spiral phase structure of the vortex beams leads to improved final-state energy and ejection angle distributions of the electrons. This work is supported in part by DOE, Office of Science, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, under Grant No. DE-FG02-96ER14646.

  1. Direct longitudinal laser acceleration of electrons in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajo, Sergio; Nanni, Emilio A.; Wong, Liang Jie; Moriena, Gustavo; Keathley, Phillip D.; Laurent, Guillaume; Miller, R. J. Dwayne; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2016-02-01

    Compact laser-driven accelerators are pursued heavily worldwide because they make novel methods and tools invented at national laboratories widely accessible in science, health, security, and technology [V. Malka et al., Principles and applications of compact laser-plasma accelerators, Nat. Phys. 4, 447 (2008)]. Current leading laser-based accelerator technologies [S. P. D. Mangles et al., Monoenergetic beams of relativistic electrons from intense laser-plasma interactions, Nature (London) 431, 535 (2004); T. Toncian et al., Ultrafast laser-driven microlens to focus and energy-select mega-electron volt protons, Science 312, 410 (2006); S. Tokita et al. Single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction with a laser-accelerated sub-MeV electron pulse, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 111911 (2009)] rely on a medium to assist the light to particle energy transfer. The medium imposes material limitations or may introduce inhomogeneous fields [J. R. Dwyer et al., Femtosecond electron diffraction: "Making the molecular movie,", Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 364, 741 (2006)]. The advent of few cycle ultraintense radially polarized lasers [S. Carbajo et al., Efficient generation of ultraintense few-cycle radially polarized laser pulses, Opt. Lett. 39, 2487 (2014)] has ushered in a novel accelerator concept [L. J. Wong and F. X. Kärtner, Direct acceleration of an electron in infinite vacuum by a pulsed radially polarized laser beam, Opt. Express 18, 25035 (2010); F. Pierre-Louis et al. Direct-field electron acceleration with ultrafast radially polarized laser beams: Scaling laws and optimization, J. Phys. B 43, 025401 (2010); Y. I. Salamin, Electron acceleration from rest in vacuum by an axicon Gaussian laser beam, Phys. Rev. A 73, 043402 (2006); C. Varin and M. Piché, Relativistic attosecond electron pulses from a free-space laser-acceleration scheme, Phys. Rev. E 74, 045602 (2006); A. Sell and F. X. Kärtner, Attosecond electron bunches accelerated and compressed by radially polarized laser

  2. Laser science and technology update - 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H L; Powell, H T

    1999-09-23

    The Laser Science and Technology (LS and T) Program's mission is to provide advanced solid-state laser and optics technologies for the Laboratory, government, and industry. The primary activities of LS and T in 1998 have been threefold--to complete the laser technology development and laser component testing for the ICF/NIF Program, to develop advanced solid-state laser systems and optical components for the Department of Defense (DoD) and DOE, and to address the needs of other government agencies and U.S. industry. After a four-year campaign, the LS and T Program achieved timely completion of the laser development effort for the NIF in 1998. This effort includes the special laser and component development, integrated performance testing on Beamlet, and detailed design and cost optimization using computation codes. Upon completing the Title II design review, the focus of the LS and T support effort has been shifted toward NIF laser hardware acquisition and deployment. The LS and T team also continued to develop advanced high-power solid-state laser technology for both the U.S. government and industrial partners. Progress was also made in several new areas: (a) diode-pumped solid-state laser drivers for high-energy-density physics and inertial fusion energy; (b) high-average-power femtosecond and nanosecond lasers for materials processing; and (c) femtosecond lasers for the generation of advanced light sources.

  3. Research of laser stealth performance test technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen-xing; Shi, Sheng-bing; Han, Fu-li; Wu, Yan-lin; Song, Chun-yan

    2014-09-01

    Laser stealth is an important way of photoelectric stealth weapons systems. According to operational principle of laser range finder, we actively explore and study the stealth performance approval testing technology of laser stealth materials, and bring forward and establish the stealth performance field test methods of stealth efficiency evaluation. Through contrastive test of two kinds of materials, the method is correct and effective.

  4. Laser Ponderomotive Electron-Positron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2004-12-07

    Relativistic ultrahigh laser fields can produce plasmas through quantum mechanical tunneling ionization mechanism, and accelerate produced electrons and ions to generate a relativistic electron beam and energetic ions in plasmas. This process will be followed by creation of electron-positron pairs through interaction of relativistic electrons with a Coulomb field of a nucleus in plasma ions or a strong laser field. In a relativistic strong laser field, the longitudinal accelerating force exerted on an electron is proportional to the square of the electric field, whereas the transverse quivering force is just linearly proportional to it. This is essence of the relativistic ponderomotive acceleration that dominantly produces energetic particles in interaction of ultraintese laser fields with particle beams and plasma. Therefore a tightly focused laser field can accelerate an electron-positron bunch longitudinally up to a remarkable energy and at the same time confines it transversely in the superposed ponderomotive potential of an intense ultrashort laser pulse. Here we propose acceleration and focusing of the electron-positron pair beam by the ponderomotive acceleration scheme to compose a high energy electron-positron collider with very high luminosity.

  5. One Micron Laser Technology Advancements at GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the advancements made in one micron laser technology at Goddard Space Flight Center. It includes information about risk factors that are being addressed by GSFC, and overviews of the various programs that GSFC is currently managing that are using 1 micron laser technology.

  6. Resonant Laser Incisions: Molecular Targets Using the Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, Lou; Bryant, Grady; Ossoff, Robert H.

    1996-03-01

    Laser ablation of tissue for medical incisions is normally concerned with the energy absorption and the subsequent vaporization of intracellular water. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, we have identified specific non-water resonances within tissues. Then, using the Vanderbilt Free Electron Laser (wavelength tunable from 2 to 10 microns) and our Computer Assisted Surgical Techniques program (to standardize the laser delivery), we have targeted specific molecular resonances for laser incisions and tissue removal. Using both acute and chronic studies, we can map out the resonant action spectrum to improve surgical outcomes. We have modeled these ablation mechanisms and working to establish the link between these ablation mechanisms and wound healing. This work has been supported, in part, by a grant from the Department of Defense, Medical Free Electron Laser Program, ONR Grant #N000149411023.

  7. Electronic Technology. Technical Committee Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This Technical Committee Report prepared by industry representatives in Idaho lists the skills currently necessary for an employee in that state to obtain a job in electronic technology, retain a job once hired, and advance in that occupational field. (Task lists are grouped according to duty areas generally used in industry settings, and are used…

  8. Electronics reliability and measurement technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A summary is presented of the Electronics Reliability and Measurement Technology Workshop. The meeting examined the U.S. electronics industry with particular focus on reliability and state-of-the-art technology. A general consensus of the approximately 75 attendees was that "the U.S. electronics industries are facing a crisis that may threaten their existence". The workshop had specific objectives to discuss mechanisms to improve areas such as reliability, yield, and performance while reducing failure rates, delivery times, and cost. The findings of the workshop addressed various aspects of the industry from wafers to parts to assemblies. Key problem areas that were singled out for attention are identified, and action items necessary to accomplish their resolution are recommended.

  9. Laser-ultrasonic technologies for medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, Vladimir P.; Latyshev, Alexei S.

    1999-06-01

    This review tackles the problem of further developing laser- ultrasonic medical technologies and gives the comparison of different laser and ultrasound combinations. The features of combined influence on biotissue are explicated with due regard for mechanic, ultrasonic (US), and thermal effects. The review present the effect of self-cleaning an optical fiber tip from the laser destruction products of biotissue, the result of research on the possibility of laser-US technology applications in endoscopy, and the ways of suppressing unwanted bending oscillations. Various spheres and peculiarities of applying laser-US technologies are discussed, including microsurgery, cosmetology, transcutaneous drug delivery, and the treatment of chronic prostatitis and infected wounds. Furthermore, the analysis of transcutaneous drug delivery methods employing a portable pulsed Er:YAG laser is presented. Drug diffusion has been shown to be enhanced under acoustic and US effects. The photo-vacuum drug injection mechanism recently suggested is discussed. It turned out that laser-US technology can be suitable for both impregnating the photosensitizer in local photodynamic therapy procedures and conducting microsurgery operations involving drug injection. Treatment of infectious processes based on the bactericidal action of photosensitizers and ultrasound due to the cavitation effect in solutions is described. An additional therapeutic effect can be achieved via the US intermingling of solutions with their simulations illumination by a matrix of red lasers or light diodes. An outlook on further developing laser-US technology and the ways of its apparatus realization are considered.

  10. Electronically tunable aperiodic distributed feedback terahertz lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, O. P.; Chakraborty, S.; Khairuzzaman, Md.; Folland, T.; Gholinia, A.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2013-05-01

    Focussed ion beam milling can be used to introduce aperiodic distributed feedback (ADFB) gratings into fully packaged, operational terahertz (THZ) quantum cascade lasers to achieve electronically controlled, discretely tunable laser emission. These aperiodic gratings—designed using computer-generated hologram techniques—consist of multiple slits in the surface plasmon waveguide, distributed along the length of the laser cavity. Tuning behaviour and output power in ADFB lasers operating around 2.9 THz are investigated with a variety of slit dimensions and grating scales. Mode selectivity and grating losses are found to be strongly dependent on milling depth into the upper waveguide layers, dramatically increasing as the metallic layers are penetrated, then rising more slowly with deeper milling into the laser active region. Grating scale and placement along the laser cavity length are also shown to influence mode selection.

  11. Laser-driven electron beamlines generated by coupling laser-plasma sources with conventional transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Antici, P.; Benedetti, C.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.

    2012-08-15

    Laser-driven electron beamlines are receiving increasing interest from the particle accelerator community. In particular, the high initial energy, low emittance, and high beam current of the plasma based electron source potentially allow generating much more compact and bright particle accelerators than what conventional accelerator technology can achieve. Using laser-generated particles as injectors for generating beamlines could significantly reduce the size and cost of accelerator facilities. Unfortunately, several features of laser-based particle beams need still to be improved before considering them for particle beamlines and thus enable the use of plasma-driven accelerators for the multiple applications of traditional accelerators. Besides working on the plasma source itself, a promising approach to shape the laser-generated beams is coupling them with conventional accelerator elements in order to benefit from both a versatile electron source and a controllable beam. In this paper, we perform start-to-end simulations to generate laser-driven beamlines using conventional accelerator codes and methodologies. Starting with laser-generated electrons that can be obtained with established multi-hundred TW laser systems, we compare different options to capture and transport the beams. This is performed with the aim of providing beamlines suitable for potential applications, such as free electron lasers. In our approach, we have analyzed which parameters are critical at the source and from there evaluated different ways to overcome these issues using conventional accelerator elements and methods. We show that electron driven beamlines are potentially feasible, but exploiting their full potential requires extensive improvement of the source parameters or innovative technological devices for their transport and capture.

  12. Ultrashort laser pulse driven inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. T.; Anderson, S. G.; Anderson, G.; Betts, S.; Fisher, S.; Tremaine, A.; Musumeci, P.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the ultrashort pulse high gradient inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which demonstrated gradients exceeding 200 MV /m using a 4 TW 100 fs long 800 nm Ti :Sa laser pulse. Due to the short laser and electron pulse lengths, synchronization was determined to be one of the main challenges in this experiment. This made necessary the implementation of a single-shot, nondestructive, electro-optic sampling based diagnostics to enable time-stamping of each laser accelerator shot with <100 fs accuracy. The results of this experiment are expected to pave the way towards the development of future GeV-class IFEL accelerators.

  13. Optical wavelength modulation in free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mabe, R.M.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    An attribute of the free electron laser (FEL) is the continuous tunability of the optical wavelength by modulation of the electron beam energy. The variation of the wavelength and power of the optical beam is studied as a function of FEL operating parameters. These results will be applied to the Stanford SCA FEL and Boeing FEL.

  14. Vacuum electron acceleration by an intense laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.X.; Ho, Y.K.; Yuan, X.Q.; Kong, Q.; Sessler, A.M.; Esarey, E.; Nishida, Y.

    2001-01-12

    Using 3D test particle simulations, the characteristics and essential conditions under which an electron, in a vacuum laser beam, can undergo a capture and acceleration scenario (CAS). When a{sub 0} {approx}> 100 the electron can be captured and violently accelerated to energies {approx}> 1 GeV, with an acceleration gradient {approx}> 10 GeV/cm, where a{sub 0} = eE{sub 0}/m{sub e}{omega}c is the normalized laser field amplitude. The physical mechanism behind the CAS is that diffraction of the focused laser beam leads to a slowing down of the effective wave phase velocity along the captured electron trajectory, such that the electron can be trapped in the acceleration phase of the wave for a longer time and thus gain significant energy from the field.

  15. An Exact Formulation of Laser Assisted Electron Emission on a Biased Metal Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Ang, L. K.; Shiffler, D.; Jensen, K. L.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven ultrafast electron emission is important to free electron lasers (FELs), laser acceleration of relativistic electrons, and ultrafast electron diffraction. It would enable exciting technological development on four-dimensional (4D) time-resolved electron microscopy. We constructed an analytic solution for the highly nonlinear electron emission from a metal surface that is exposed to both a dc biased electric field and a single frequency laser field. The solution is valid for arbitrary combinations of dc electric field, laser electric field, laser frequency, metal work function and Fermi level. Various emission mechanisms, such as multiphoton absorption or emission, optical or dc field emission, are all included in this single formulation. The time-dependent emission current reveals that intense current modulation may be possible even with a low intensity laser, by merely increasing the applied dc bias. This work was supported by AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-14-1-0309.

  16. Long range coherence in free electron lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    The simple free electron laser (FEL) design uses a static, periodic, transverse magnetic field to undulate relativistic electrons traveling along its axis. This allows coupling to a co-propagating optical wave and results in bunching to produce coherent radiation. The advantages of the FEL are continuous tunability, operation at wavelengths ranging from centimeters to angstroms, and high efficiency resulting from the fact that the interaction region only contains light, relativistic electrons, and a magnetic field. Theoretical concepts and operational principles are discussed.

  17. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  18. Lasers in dentistry: new possibilities with advancing laser technology?

    PubMed

    Frentzen, M; Koort, H J

    1990-12-01

    Although there are a considerable number of published papers on the role of laser treatment in dentistry, a critical review shows that laser technology is used only by specialists in a small therapeutic field. Most lasers are heat-producing devices converting electromagnetic energy into thermal energy. These lasers find uses in oral surgery for cutting or coagulating soft tissues or in the welding of dental prostheses. More recently, new types of lasers have offered non-thermal modes of tissue interaction, called photoablation, photodisruption and photochemical effects. Basic and clinical research is being carried out into the application of these devices in dentistry. However, much development will be required before lasers can replace conventional surgical methods for treating oral cancer or indeed replace the conventional bur for excavating carious lesions. PMID:2276829

  19. Laser Science & Technology Program Annual Report - 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H-L

    2001-03-20

    The Laser Science and Technology (LS&T) Program Annual Report 2001 provides documentation of the achievements of the LLNL LS&T Program during the April 2001 to March 2002 period using three formats: (1) an Overview that is a narrative summary of important results for the year; (2) brief summaries of research and development activity highlights within the four Program elements: Advanced Lasers and Components (AL&C), Laser Optics and Materials (LO&M), Short Pulse Laser Applications and Technologies (SPLAT), and High-Energy Laser System and Tests (HELST); and (3) a compilation of selected articles and technical reports published in reputable scientific or technology journals in this period. All three elements (Annual Overview, Activity Highlights, and Technical Reports) are also on the Web: http://laser.llnl.gov/lasers/pubs/icfq.html. The underlying mission for the LS&T Program is to develop advanced lasers, optics, and materials technologies and applications to solve problems and create new capabilities of importance to the Laboratory and the nation. This mission statement has been our guide for defining work appropriate for our Program. A major new focus of LS&T beginning this past year has been the development of high peak power short-pulse capability for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). LS&T is committed to this activity.

  20. Program to research laser-driven thermionic electron sources for free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-01-01

    This is the Final Report on the research and development of high brightness pulse laser driven thermionic electron sources. Enhanced coupling of electron beam energies to radiative fields in accelerator-driven free-electron lasers requires injector cathodes of higher brightness than is possible with conventional dispenser cathodes or plasma-forming field emitters. Cesiated refractory surfaces and dispenser cathodes which are pulse laser heated may offer such an increase in brightness, by the emission of monoenergetic beams of electrons at high current densities. The studies were designed to investigate the emission characteristics of both of these types of thermionic cathodes.

  1. Increasing Laser Stability with Improved Electronic Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troxel, Daylin; Bennett, Aaron; Erickson, Christopher J.; Jones, Tyler; Durfee, Dallin S.

    2010-03-01

    We present several electronic instruments developed to implement an ultra-stable laser lock. These instruments include a high speed, low noise homodyne photo-detector; an ultrahigh stability, low noise current driver with high modulation bandwidth and digital control; a high-speed, low noise PID controller; a low-noise piezo driver; and a laser diode temperature controller. We will present the theory of operation for these instruments, design and construction techniques, and essential characteristics for each device.

  2. Free electron lasers driven by linear induction accelerators: High power radiation sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orzechowski, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    The technology of Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and linear induction accelerators (LIAs) is addressed by outlining the following topics: fundamentals of FELs; basic concepts of linear induction accelerators; the Electron Laser Facility (a microwave FEL); PALADIN (an infrared FEL); magnetic switching; IMP; and future directions (relativistic klystrons). This presentation is represented by viewgraphs only.

  3. Research aims at development of laser-guided electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozicharow, E.

    1985-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense is conducting a technology development program that may result in the stationing of a laser-guided electron beam weapon, at ionospheric altitudes of 80-600 km, for the interception and destruction of Soviet ICBMs at ranges of more than 1000 miles. This research program is pursuing the principle of ion-focused propagation, which resolves the problem of atmospheric beam scattering by ionizing a channel in the atmospheric medium with a laser. Also discussed is the development status of space-based particle beams and lasers, ground-based laser systems employing orbiting mirror platforms for beam aiming, and nuclear device-powered directed energy weapons.

  4. Comparison of compact visible laser technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, Gary T.

    1990-04-01

    Technological advances in the field of compact visible laser sources are reviewed. Red laser diodes are considered first, and it is pointed out that they are visible to the human eye, but with a reduced brightness; these devices are expected to fall in price and play a major role in higher-density optical data-storage systems as well as bar-code scanners and laser printers. Diode-pumped solid-state lasers are then outlined, and direct diode doubling is discussed. Two major advances in this area, the availability of nonlinear materials and the availability of single longitudinal mode laser diodes with powers of 100 mW, are discussed. In the area of blue laser diodes, emphasis is placed on the material of choice ZnSe.

  5. Extension Learners' Use of Electronic Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenthner, Joseph F.; Swan, Benjamin G.

    2011-01-01

    Extension clientele use electronic technology for entertainment, communication, and business. Educational programs that use electronic technology can enhance learning. To learn more about use of electronic technology among Extension clientele, we surveyed 80 university students and 135 potato farmers. We found that the farmers were likely to use…

  6. Performance Testing in Electronic Technology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Bert; Pedersen, Joe F.

    This set of 21 performance tests in electronics technology was developed on the basis of a review of commercial and noncommercial instructional materials dealing with electronics technology. The tests, which were reviewed by a group of community college instructors and an advisory committee for electronics technology, address the following…

  7. Biophysics applications of free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Robert H.

    1993-07-01

    There has been a significant financial effort poured into the technology of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) over the last 15 years or so. Much of that money was spent in the hopes that the FEL would be a key element in the Strategic Defense Initiative, but a small fraction of money was allocated for the Medical FEL program. The Medical FELs program was aimed at exploring how the unique capabilities of the FEL could be utilized in medical applications. Part of the Medical FEl effort has been in clinical applications, but some of the effort has also been put into exploring applications of the FEL for fundamental biological physics. It is the purpose of this brief text to outline some of the fundamental biophysics I have done, and some plans we have for the future. Since the FEL is (still) considered to be an avant garde device, the reader should not be surprised to find that much of the work proposed here is also rather radical and avant garde.

  8. Soviet free-electron laser research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassel, S.

    1985-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate free-electron laser (FEL) research and development in the Soviet Union and to compare it with the corresponding activity in the U.S. In presenting this material, the intention is to acquaint U.S. researchers with the objectives, techniques, and results of their Soviet counterparts, as well as to provide the broad context of this area of Soviet R&D that consists of the organization, facilities, personalities, and leadership involved. The U.S. Soviet comparison has focused on the experimental programs, the most important area of this new technology. Section 2 compares individual experiments conducted by the USSR and the United States. In Section 3 the history of the theoretical development of FEL is presented, providing an insight into the conceptual issues that shaped FEL research in both countries. The remainder of the report is devoted primarily to the Soviet side of FEL research. Section 4 describes the organizational features of this research in terms of the performer institutes and leadership, focusing on the role of the Academy of Sciences, USSR. Section 5 analyzes the scientific objectives of Soviet FEL research, for the most part as discussed by Soviet reviewers of their research program. Section 6 presents conclusions.

  9. Optical Undulators for Free Electron Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, James; Bisognano, Joseph; Bosch, Robert; Green, Michael; Jacobs, Kenneth; Yavuz, Deniz

    2014-05-01

    Free Electron Lasers (FELs) in the x-ray region are opening new research directions in AMO physics and other fields, but beam time is quite limited at these expensive facilities. There are conceptual designs for much less expensive soft x-ray FELs using sheared pulses from Table Top Terawatt (T3) lasers as optical undulators. A nearly co-propagating laser pulse can be angle tuned to yield soft x-rays, and shearing the pulse can optimize use of the laser photons. Undulator K values near unity are available from T3 lasers, and angle tuning provides almost arbitrary effective undulator periods. A combination of these optical undulator ideas with pre-``micro-bunching'' at a photocathode followed by electron beam emittance exchange can reduce the energy needed from the T3 laser. A combination of a nearly co-propagating optical undulator with a Bragg-reflection diamond mirror cavity may lower the cost of an x-ray frequency comb for metrology.

  10. European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (EXFEL): local implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    European X-Ray FEL - free electron laser is under construction in DESY Hamburg. It is scheduled to be operational at 2015/16 at a cost more than 1 billion Euro. The laser uses SASE method to generate x-ray light. It is propelled by an electron linac of 17,5GeV energy and more than 2km in length. The linac uses superconducting SRF TESLA technology working at 1,3 GHz in frequency. The prototype of EXFEL is FLASH Laser (200 m in length), where the "proof of principle" was checked, and from the technologies were transferred to the bigger machine. The project was stared in the nineties by building a TTF Laboratory -Tesla Test Facility. The EXFEL laser is a child of a much bigger teraelectronovolt collider project TESLA (now abandoned in Germany but undertaken by international community in a form the ILC). A number of experts and young researchers from Poland participate in the design, construction and research of the FLASH and EXFEL lasers.

  11. Rippled beam free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a TM.sub.0n mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and, a solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  12. Rippled beam free electron Laser Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1998-04-21

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a T{sub 0n} mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and . A solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  13. Laser printed interconnects for flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pique, Alberto; Beniam, Iyoel; Mathews, Scott; Charipar, Nicholas

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) can be used to generate microscale 3D structures for interconnect applications non-lithographically. The laser printing of these interconnects takes place through aggregation of voxels of either molten metal or dispersed metallic nanoparticles. However, the resulting 3D structures do not achieve the bulk conductivity of metal interconnects of the same cross-section and length as those formed by wire bonding or tab welding. It is possible, however, to laser transfer entire structures using a LIFT technique known as lase-and-place. Lase-and-place allows whole components and parts to be transferred from a donor substrate onto a desired location with one single laser pulse. This talk will present the use of LIFT to laser print freestanding solid metal interconnects to connect individual devices into functional circuits. Furthermore, the same laser can bend or fold the thin metal foils prior to transfer, thus forming compliant 3D structures able to provide strain relief due to flexing or thermal mismatch. Examples of these laser printed 3D metallic bridges and their role in the development of next generation flexible electronics by additive manufacturing will be presented. This work was funded by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) through the Naval Research Laboratory Basic Research Program.

  14. Laser-induced electron capture mass spectrometry

    PubMed

    Wang; Giese

    2000-02-15

    Two techniques are reported for detection of electrophorederivatized compounds by laser-induced electron capture time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LI-EC-TOF-MS). In both cases, a nitrogen laser is used to induce the electron capture. The analyte is deposited in a matrix consisting of a compound with a low ionization potential such as benzo[ghi]perylene in the first technique, where the electron for electron capture apparently comes from this matrix. In the second technique, the analyte is deposited on a silver surface in the absence of matrix. It seems that "monoenergetic" ions instantly desorb from the target surface in the latter case, since the peak width in the continuous extraction mode essentially matches the pulse width of the laser (4 ns). Ten picomoles of 3-O-(pentafluorobenzyl)-alpha-estradiol were detected at a S/N > or = 50, where the spot size of the laser was approximately 0.25% of the sample spot. It is attractive that simple conditions can enable sensitive detection of electrophores on routine TOF-MS equipment. The technique can be anticipated to broaden the range of analytes in both polarity and size that can be detected by EC-MS relative to the range for GC/EC-MS. PMID:10701262

  15. Electronic Subsystems For Laser Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Catherine; Maruschak, John; Patschke, Robert; Powers, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Electronic subsystems of free-space laser communication system carry digital signals at 650 Mb/s over long distances. Applicable to general optical communications involving transfer of great quantities of data, and transmission and reception of video images of high definition.

  16. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  17. Inverse free electron lasers and laser wakefield acceleration driven by CO2 lasers.

    PubMed

    Kimura, W D; Andreev, N E; Babzien, M; Ben-Zvi, I; Cline, D B; Dilley, C E; Gottschalk, S C; Hooker, S M; Kusche, K P; Kuznetsov, S V; Pavlishin, I V; Pogorelsky, I V; Pogosova, A A; Steinhauer, L C; Ting, A; Yakimenko, V; Zigler, A; Zhou, F

    2006-03-15

    The staged electron laser acceleration (STELLA) experiment demonstrated staging between two laser-driven devices, high trapping efficiency of microbunches within the accelerating field and narrow energy spread during laser acceleration. These are important for practical laser-driven accelerators. STELLA used inverse free electron lasers, which were chosen primarily for convenience. Nevertheless, the STELLA approach can be applied to other laser acceleration methods, in particular, laser-driven plasma accelerators. STELLA is now conducting experiments on laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). Two novel LWFA approaches are being investigated. In the first one, called pseudo-resonant LWFA, a laser pulse enters a low-density plasma where nonlinear laser/plasma interactions cause the laser pulse shape to steepen, thereby creating strong wakefields. A witness e-beam pulse probes the wakefields. The second one, called seeded self-modulated LWFA, involves sending a seed e-beam pulse into the plasma to initiate wakefield formation. These wakefields are amplified by a laser pulse following shortly after the seed pulse. A second e-beam pulse (witness) follows the seed pulse to probe the wakefields. These LWFA experiments will also be the first ones driven by a CO(2) laser beam. PMID:16483952

  18. Rippled-beam free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-10-01

    The authors describe a new microwave generation mechanism involving a scalloping annular electron beam. The beam interacts with the axial electric field of a TM{sub 0n} mode in a smooth circular waveguide through the axial free-electron laser interaction, in which the beam ripple period is synchronous with the phase slippage of the rf mode relative to the electron beam. Due to nonlinearities in the orbit equation, the interaction can be made autoresonant, where the phase and amplitude of the gain is independent of the beam energy.

  19. Acoustic analog of a free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zavtrak, S.T.

    1995-12-31

    As well known, at the present time there are many types of laser the operation of which is based on the stimulated emission of light by an active medium. Lasers are generators of coherent electromagnetic waves in the range from ultraviolet to submillimeters. But acoustic analogs of such devices have not been created up to now in spite of the progress in laser technology. Meanwhile, an acoustic laser could have a lot of interesting applications. Recently a theoretical scheme for an acoustic laser was proposed by the present author. A liquid dielectric with dispersed particles was considered as an active medium. The pumping was created by an oscillating electric field deforming dispersed particle volumes. Different types of oils or distilled water can serve as a liquid dielectric with gas bubbles as dispersed particles. Gas bubbles in water can be created by an electrolysis. The phase bunching of the initially incoherent emitters (gas bubbles) was realized by acoustic radiation forces. This scheme is an analog of the free-electron laser (FEL). It was shown that two types of losses must be overcome for the beginning of a generation. The first type results from the energy dissipation in the active medium and the second one is caused by radiation losses at the boundaries of the resonator. The purposes of this report are: (1) to discuss the analogies between the acoustic laser and FEL; (2) to propose an effective scheme of an acoustic laser with a mechanical pumping (by a piezoelectric emitter of the piston type); (3) to consider the schemes of acoustic lasers with the different types of the resonators (rectangular and cylindrical); (4) to discuss the possibility of the creation of an impact acoustic laser (5) to discuss the experimental works which are planned to be carried out in cooperation with prof. L.A. Crum.

  20. Advances in tunable powerful lasers: The advanced free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, S.; Sheffield, R.

    1993-12-31

    In the past several decades, remarkable progress in laser science and technology has made it possible to obtain laser light from the ultra-violet to the far infra-red from a variety of laser types, and at power levels from milliwatts to kilowatts (and, some day, megawatts). However, the availability of tunable lasers at ``high`` power (above a few tens of watts) is more limited. Figure 1, an assessment of the availability of tunable lasers, shows the covered range to be about 400 to 2000 nanometers. A variety of dye lasers cover the visible and near infra red, each one of which is tunable over approximately a 10% range. In the same region, the TI:saphire laser is adjustable over a 20 to 25% range. And finally, optical parametric oscillators can cover the range from about 400 nanometers out to about 2000 nm (even farther at reduced energy output). The typical output energy per pulse may vary from a few to one hundred millijoules, and since repetition rates of 10 to 100 Hertz are generally attainable, average output powers of tens of watts are possible. In recent years, a new approach to powerful tunable lasers -- the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) -- has emerged. In this paper we will discuss advances in FEL technology which not only enable tunability at high average power over a very broad range of wavelengths, but also make this device more usable. At present, that range is about one micron to the far infra red; with extensions of existing technology, it should be extendable to the vacuum ultra violet region.

  1. The Mercury Laser Advances Laser Technology for Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbers, C A; Caird, J; Moses, E

    2009-01-21

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is on target to demonstrate 'breakeven' - creating as much fusion-energy output as laser-energy input. NIF will compress a tiny sphere of hydrogen isotopes with 1.8 MJ of laser light in a 20-ns pulse, packing the isotopes so tightly that they fuse together, producing helium nuclei and releasing energy in the form of energetic particles. The achievement of breakeven will culminate an enormous effort by thousands of scientists and engineers, not only at Livermore but around the world, during the past several decades. But what about the day after NIF achieves breakeven? NIF is a world-class engineering research facility, but if laser fusion is ever to generate power for civilian consumption, the laser will have to deliver pulses nearly 100,000 times faster than NIF - a rate of perhaps 10 shots per second as opposed to NIF's several shots a day. The Mercury laser (named after the Roman messenger god) is intended to lead the way to a 10-shots-per-second, electrically-efficient, driver laser for commercial laser fusion. While the Mercury laser will generate only a small fraction of the peak power of NIF (1/30,000), Mercury operates at higher average power. The design of Mercury takes full advantage of the technology advances manifest in its behemoth cousin (Table 1). One significant difference is that, unlike the flashlamp-pumped NIF, Mercury is pumped by highly efficient laser diodes. Mercury is a prototype laser capable of scaling in aperture and energy to a NIF-like beamline, with greater electrical efficiency, while still running at a repetition rate 100,000 times greater.

  2. Laser Science and Technology Program Update 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H L; Hackel, L A

    2002-01-01

    The Laser Science and Technology (LS&T) Program's mission is to develop advanced solid-state lasers, optics, materials technologies, and applications to solve problems and create new capabilities of importance to the Nation and the Laboratory. A top, near-term priority is to provide technical support to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to ensure activation success. LS&T provides the NIF Programs with core competencies and supports its economic viability. The primary objectives of LS&T activities in fiscal year (FY) 2001 have been threefold: (1) to support deployment of hardware and to enhance lasers and optics performance for NIF, (2) to develop advanced solid-state laser systems and optical components for the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Department of Defense (DoD), and (3) to invent, develop, and deliver improved concepts and hardware for other government agencies and U.S. industry. Special efforts have also been devoted to building and maintaining our capabilities in three technology areas: high-power solid-state lasers, high-power optical materials, and applications of advanced lasers.

  3. Demonstration of acceleration of relativistic electrons at a dielectric microstructure using femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Wootton, Kent P; Wu, Ziran; Cowan, Benjamin M; Hanuka, Adi; Makasyuk, Igor V; Peralta, Edgar A; Soong, Ken; Byer, Robert L; Joel England, R

    2016-06-15

    Acceleration of electrons using laser-driven dielectric microstructures is a promising technology for the miniaturization of particle accelerators. Achieving the desired GV m-1 accelerating gradients is possible only with laser pulse durations shorter than ∼1  ps. In this Letter, we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of acceleration of relativistic electrons at a dielectric microstructure driven by femtosecond duration laser pulses. Using this technique, an electron accelerating gradient of 690±100  MV m-1 was measured-a record for dielectric laser accelerators. PMID:27304266

  4. Demonstration of acceleration of relativistic electrons at a dielectric microstructure using femtosecond laser pulses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wootton, Kent P.; Wu, Ziran; Cowan, Benjamin M.; Hanuka, Adi; Makasyuk, Igor V.; Peralta, Edgar A.; Soong, Ken; Byer, Robert L.; England, R. Joel

    2016-06-02

    Acceleration of electrons using laser-driven dielectric microstructures is a promising technology for the miniaturization of particle accelerators. Achieving the desired GV m–1 accelerating gradients is possible only with laser pulse durations shorter than ~1 ps. In this Letter, we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of acceleration of relativistic electrons at a dielectric microstructure driven by femtosecond duration laser pulses. Furthermore, using this technique, an electron accelerating gradient of 690±100 MV m–1 was measured—a record for dielectric laser accelerators.

  5. The story of laser brazing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Peter; Dierken, Roland

    2012-03-01

    This article gives an overview on the development of laser brazing technology as a new joining technique for car body production. The story starts with fundamental research work at German institutes in 1993, continues with the first implementations in automobile production in 1998, gives examples of applications since then and ends with an outlook. Laser brazing adapted design of joints and boundary conditions for a safe processing are discussed. Besides a better understanding for the sensitivity of the process against joint irregularities and misalignment, the key to successful launch was an advanced system technology. Different working heads equipped with wire feeding device, seam tracking system or tactile sensors for an automated teaching are presented in this paper. Novel laser heads providing a two beam technology will allow improved penetration depth of the filler wire and a more ecological processing by means of energy consumption.

  6. Fibre laser component technology for 2-micron laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, G.; Robertson, A.

    2014-05-01

    We report on recent developments in fibre laser component technology for use in 2-micron laser systems. A range of `building block' components has been built to allow novel fibre laser architectures that exploit the advantages of fibre lasers based on Thulium and Holmium active fibres. Fibre lasers operating around 2-microns are becoming widely used in an increasing number of applications, which is driving the need for components that can operate reliably at high powers and also integrate easily with other components. To that end, we have designed and built a range of fused fibre, acousto-optic and magneto-optic devices that can be readily integrated into a range of novel fibre laser systems. Research has been carried out into improving fused fibre technology for components operating at 2um wavelengths. Side-coupled feed through combiners have been developed with signal losses as low as 0.02dB and kilowatt level end-coupled pump couplers. Alongside this a range of taps, splitters and WDMs have been developed which allows for the implementation of a variety of laser architectures. Optical isolators based on new Faraday materials have been developed, providing over 30dB isolation, low insertion loss and 30W power handling in a fibre-in, fibre-out version. New cell designs and materials for Acousto-Optic devices have been researched leading to the development of fibre-coupled Acousto-Optic Modulators (AOM) and allows for the realisation of all fibre Thulium and Holmium Q-switched and pulsed fibre lasers. Novel Acousto-Optic Tunable Filters (AOTF) designs have been realised to produce narrow resolution AOTFs and zero-shift AOTFs.

  7. following an electron bunch for free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    A video artist's ultra-slow-motion impression of an APEX-style electron gun firing a continuous train of electron bunches into a superconducting linear accelerator (in reality this would happen a million times a second). As they approach the speed of light the bunches contract, maintaining beam quality. After acceleration, the electron bunches are diverted into one or more undulators, the key components of free electron lasers. Oscillating back and forth in the changing magnetic field, they create beams of structured x-ray pulses. Before entering the experimental areas the electron bunches are diverted to a beam dump. (Animation created by Illumina Visual, http://www.illuminavisual.com/, for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Music for this excerpt, "Feeling Dark (Behind The Mask)" is by 7OOP3D http://ccmixter.org/files/7OOP3D/29126 and is licensed under a Creative Commons license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)

  8. High power free-electron laser concepts and problems

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.C.

    1995-03-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) have long been thought to offer the potential of high average power operation. That potential exists because of several unique properties of FELs, such as the removal of ``waste heat`` at the velocity of light, the ``laser medium`` (the electron beam) is impervious to damage by very high optical intensitites, and the technology of generating very high average power relativistic electron beams. In particular, if one can build a laser with a power extraction efficiency 11 which is driven by an electron beam of average Power P{sub EB}, one expects a laser output power of P{sub L} = {eta} P{sub EB}. One approach to FEL devices with large values of {eta} (in excess of 10 %) is to use a ``tapered`` (or nonuniform) wiggler. This approach was followed at several laboratories during the FEL development Program for the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) project. In this paper, we review some concepts and technical requirements for high-power tapered-wiggler FELs driven by radio-frequency linear accelerators (rf-linacs) which were developed during the SDI project. Contributions from three quite different technologies - rf-accelerators, optics, and magnets - are needed to construct and operate an FEL oscillator. The particular requirements on these technologies for a high-power FEL were far beyond the state of the art in those areas when the SDI project started, so significant advances had to be made before a working device could be constructed. Many of those requirements were not clearly understood when the project started, but were developed during the course of the experimental and theoretical research for the project. This information can be useful in planning future high-power FEL projects.

  9. ICESat-2 laser technology readiness level evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawruk, Nicholas W.; Burns, Patrick M.; Edwards, Ryan E.; Wysocki, Theodore; VanTuijl, Andre; Litvinovitch, Viatcheslav; Sullivan, Edward; Hovis, Floyd E.

    2015-02-01

    We report on the completion of the space qualification testing program for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite 2 (ICESat-2) program. This paper describes the final performance results of the fully integrated (laser and electronics) flight laser system with an emphasis on the system design evolution from a breadboard demonstration to a fully space-qualified laser system. The 532 nm ICESat-2 laser transmitter generates diffraction limited pulse energies of 1 mJ, pulsewidths of < 1.5 ns, and 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency and has minimum lifetime of 1 trillion pulses on-orbit. A combination of engineering design units and correlated structural thermal optical analysis was used to systematically improve reliability and performance over the operating environment. The laser system qualification and acceptance test programs included electromagnetic interference (EMI), vibration, and thermal vacuum (TVAC) testing. This paper presents key laser performance results and lessons learned on the multi-year laser development to facilitate future space-qualified laser developments, improve reliability, and increase performance.

  10. Oceanographic applications of laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoge, F. E.

    Oceanographic activities with the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) for the past several years have primarily been focussed on using active (laser induced pigment fluorescence) and concurrent passive ocean color spectra to improve existing ocean color algorithms for estimating primary production in the world's oceans. The most significant results were the development of a technique for selecting optimal passive wavelengths for recovering phytoplankton photopigment concentration and the application of this technique, termed active-passive correlation spectroscopy (APCS), to various forms of passive ocean color algorithms. Included in this activity is use of airborne laser and passive ocean color for development of advanced satellite ocean color sensors. Promising on-wavelength subsurface scattering layer measurements were recently obtained. A partial summary of these results are shown.

  11. Oceanographic applications of laser technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.

    1988-01-01

    Oceanographic activities with the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) for the past several years have primarily been focussed on using active (laser induced pigment fluorescence) and concurrent passive ocean color spectra to improve existing ocean color algorithms for estimating primary production in the world's oceans. The most significant results were the development of a technique for selecting optimal passive wavelengths for recovering phytoplankton photopigment concentration and the application of this technique, termed active-passive correlation spectroscopy (APCS), to various forms of passive ocean color algorithms. Included in this activity is use of airborne laser and passive ocean color for development of advanced satellite ocean color sensors. Promising on-wavelength subsurface scattering layer measurements were recently obtained. A partial summary of these results are shown.

  12. Femtosecond laser ablation of gold interdigitated electrodes for electronic tongues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoli, Alexandra; de Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Filho, José A.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Riul, Antonio; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Correa, Daniel S.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic tongue (e-tongue) sensors based on impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a potential technology to evaluate the quality and chemical composition of food, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. E-tongues usually employ transducers based on metal interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) coated with a thin layer of an active material, which is capable of interacting chemically with several types of analytes. IDEs are usually produced by photolithographic methods, which are time-consuming and costly, therefore, new fabrication technologies are required to make it more affordable. Here, we employed femtosecond laser ablation with pulse duration of 50 fs to microfabricate gold IDEs having finger width from 2.3 μm up to 3.2 μm. The parameters used in the laser ablation technique, such as light intensity, scan speed and beam spot size have been optimized to achieve uniform IDEs, which were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of gold IDEs fabricated by laser ablation were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, and compared to those produced by conventional photolithography. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation is a promising alternative to conventional photolithography for fabricating metal IDEs for e-tongue systems.

  13. Design Alternatives for a Free Electron Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, K; Bosch, R A; Eisert, D; Fisher, M V; Green, M A; Keil, R G; Kleman, K J; Kulpin, J G; Rogers, G C; Wehlitz, R; Chiang, T; Miller, T J; Lawler, J E; Yavuz, D; Legg, R A; York, R C

    2012-07-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison is continuing design efforts for a vacuum ultraviolet/X-ray Free Electron Laser facility. The design incorporates seeding the FEL to provide fully coherent photon output at energies up to {approx}1 keV. The focus of the present work is to minimize the cost of the facility while preserving its performance. To achieve this we are exploring variations in the electron beam driver for the FEL, in undulator design, and in the seeding mechanism. Design optimizations and trade-offs between the various technologies and how they affect the FEL scientific program will be presented.

  14. Smith-Purcell free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, K.J.; Walsh, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The term Smith-Purcell free electron laser can be employed generally to describe any coherent radiation source in which a diffraction grating is used to couple an electron beam with the electromagnetic field. To date, most practical developments of this concept have focused on devices which operate in the millimeter spectral regime. In this paper construction of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser operating in the far-infrared (FIR) region using a novel resonator cavity design and the electron beam from a low energy (0.5-5 MeV) radio-frequency accelerator will be discussed. A tunable source in this region would have many applications and since the beam energy is low, the small size and low overall cost of such a device would make it a laboratory instrument. Current projects which are progressing towards developing a FIR source are the programs at Stanford and CREOL. Both of these projects are using permanent magnet undulators to couple the electron beam with the electromagnetic field. An alternative approach is to use an electron beam passing over a diffraction grating as the radiating mechanism. This phenomenon is known as Smith-Purcell radiation and was first demonstrated for incoherent emission at visible wavelengths. The addition of feedback enhances the stimulated component of the emission which leads to the growth of coherence. Recent calculations for spontaneous emission have shown that the wiggler parameter and the grating efficiency are analogous. This result has important implications for the development of a Smith-Purcell FEL because a grating based free-electron laser would offer a greater range of tunability at a lower cost than its wiggler based counterpart.

  15. Laser Science and Technology Program Update 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, L A; Chen, H L

    2003-03-01

    The Laser Science and Technology (LS&T) Program's mission is to develop advanced lasers, optics, materials technologies, and applications to solve problems and create new capabilities of importance to the nation and the Laboratory. A top, near-term priority is to provide technical support in the deployment and upgrade of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Our other program activities synergistically develop technologies that are of interest to the NIF Directorate but outside the scope of the NIF funding. The primary objectives of LS&T activities in 2002 have been fourfold--(a) to support deployment of hardware and to enhance laser and optics performance for NIF, (b) to develop high-energy petawatt laser science and technology for the Department of Energy (DOE), (c) to develop advanced solid-state laser systems and optical components for the Department of Defense (DoD), and to invent develop, and deliver improved concepts and hardware for other government agencies and industry. Special efforts have been devoted to building and maintaining our capabilities in three technology areas: high-power short-pulse solid-state lasers, high-power optical materials, and applications of advanced lasers. LS&T activities during 2002 focused on seven major areas: (1) NIF Project--LS&T led major advances in the deployment of NIF Final Optics Assembly (FOA) and the development of 3{omega} optics processing and treatment technologies to enhance NIF's operations and performance capabilities. (2) Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP)--LS&T personnel continued development of ultrashort-pulse lasers and high-power, large-aperture optics for applications in SSP, extreme-field science and national defense. To enhance the high-energy petawatt (HEPW) capability in NIF, LS&T continued development of advanced compressor-grating and front-end laser technologies utilizing optical-parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA). (3) High-energy-density physics and inertial fusion energy

  16. Polarization in free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Papadichev, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Polarization of electromagnetic radiation is required very often in numerous scientific and industrial applications: studying of crystals, molecules and intermolecular interaction high-temperature superconductivity, semiconductors and their transitions, polymers and liquid crystals. Using polarized radiation allows to obtain important data (otherwise inaccessible) in astrophysics, meteorology and oceanology. It is promising in chemistry and biology for selective influence on definite parts of molecules in chain synthesis reactions, precise control of various processes at cell and subcell levels, genetic engineering etc. Though polarization methods are well elaborated in optics, they can fail in far-infrared, vacuum-ultraviolet and X-ray regions because of lack of suitable non-absorbing materials and damaging of optical elements at high specific power levels. Therefore, it is of some interest to analyse polarization of untreated FEL radiation obtained with various types of undulators, with and without axial magnetic field. The polarization is studied using solutions for electron orbits in various cases: plane or helical undulator with or without axial magnetic field, two plane undulators, a combination of right- and left-handed helical undulators with equal periods, but different field amplitudes. Some examples of how a desired polarization (elliptical circular or linear) can be obtained or changed quickly, which is necessary in many experiments, are given.

  17. Laser-Hybrid welding, an innovative technology to join automotive body parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieben, Manuel; Brunnecker, Frank

    The design of Tail lamps has been changed dramatically since cars built. At modern lamps, the lenses are absolutely transparent and allow a direct view onto the weld seam. Conventional welding technologies, such as vibration and hot plate welding cannot compete with this demand. Focused on this targeted application, LPKF Laser & Electronics AG has developed in cooperation with the Bavarian Laser Centre a unique Laser welding technology called hybrid welding.

  18. Inverse free-electron laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, C.; Campisi, R.

    1982-01-01

    We first describe the basic physical properties of an inverse free-electron laser and make an estimate of the order of magnitude of the accelerating field obtainable with such a system; then apply the general ideas to the design of an actual device and through this example we give a more accurate evaluation of the fundamental as well as the technical limitations that this acceleration scheme imposes.

  19. Laser system for a subpicosecond electron linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, R. A.

    1998-09-25

    At the Argonne Chemistry Division efforts are underway to develop a sub-picosecond electron beam pulse radiolysis facility for chemical studies. The target output of the accelerator is to generate electron pulses that can be adjusted from 3nC in .6ps to 100nC in 45ps. In conjunction with development of the accelerator a state-of-the-art ultrafast laser system is under construction that will drive the linac's photocathode and provide probe pulses that are tunable from the UV to IR spectral regions.

  20. Z-discharge free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schep, T.J.; Bazylev, V.A.; Tulupov, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    A new kind of plasma based free-electron laser is proposed. An electromagnetic wave is generated by a relativistic electron beam moving along a stabilised z-discharge. The radiation wavelength is determined by the discharge current and the relativistic factor of the beam. It is shown that the interaction is based on two bunching mechanisms. One is due to the dependency of the longitudinal beam velocity on the energy of the electrons (inertial bunching). The second mechanism leads to azimuthal bunching and is related to the energy dependence of the oscillation frequency of electrons in the magnetic field of the discharge. At certain conditions both bunching mechanisms tend to compensate their mutual action and the system has an autoresonance. Near these conditions a high efficiency and, therefore, a high output power can be reached.

  1. Controlling electron energy distributions for plasma technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark

    2009-10-01

    The basic function of low temperature plasmas in society benefiting technologies is to channel power into specific modes of atoms and molecules to excite desired states or produce specified radicals. This functionality ultimately depends on the ability to craft an electron energy distribution (EED) to match cross sections. Given electric fields, frequencies, gas mixtures and pressures, predicting EEDs and excitation rates can in large part be reliably done. The inverse problem, specifying the conditions that produce a given EED, is less well understood. Early strategies to craft EEDs include adjusting gas mixtures, such as the rare gas-Hg mixtures in fluorescent lamps, and externally sustained discharges, such as electron-beam sustained plasmas for molecular lasers. More recent strategies include spiker-sustainer circuitry which produces desired EEDs in non-self-sustained plasmas; and adjusting frequency in capacitively coupled plasmas. In this talk, past strategies for customizing EEDs in low pressure plasmas will be reviewed and prospects for improved control of plasma kinetics will be discussed using results from 2-dimensional computer models.

  2. Laser light scattering instrument advanced technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this advanced technology development (ATD) project has been to provide sturdy, miniaturized laser light scattering (LLS) instrumentation for use in microgravity experiments. To do this, we assessed user requirements, explored the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware, and both coordinated and participated in the hardware and software advances needed for a flight hardware instrument. We have successfully breadboarded and evaluated an engineering version of a single-angle glove-box instrument which uses solid state detectors and lasers, along with fiber optics, for beam delivery and detection. Additionally, we have provided the specifications and written verification procedures necessary for procuring a miniature multi-angle LLS instrument which will be used by the flight hardware project which resulted from this work and from this project's interaction with the laser light scattering community.

  3. Medical free-electron laser: fact or fiction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, James P.; Ponikvar, Donald R.

    1994-07-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) has long been proposed as a flexible tool for a variety of medical applications, and yet the FEL has not seen widespread acceptance in the medical community. The issues have been the laser's size, cost, and complexity. Unfortunately, research on applications of FELs has outpaced the device development efforts. This paper describes the characteristics of the FEL, as they have been demonstrated in the U.S. Army's FEL technology development program, and identifies specific medical applications where demonstrated performance levels would suffice. This includes new photodynamic therapies for cancer and HIV treatment, orthopedic applications, tissue welding applications, and multiwavelength surgical techniques. A new tunable kilowatt class FEL device is described, which utilizes existing hardware from the U.S. Army program. An assessment of the future potential, based on realistic technology scaling is provided.

  4. Laser-boosted lightcraft technology demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, J. C.; Morales, C.; Smith, W. L.; Myrabo, L. N.

    1990-01-01

    The detailed description and performance analysis of a 1.4 meter diameter Lightcraft Technology Demonstator (LTD) is presented. The launch system employs a 100 MW-class ground-based laser to transmit power directly to an advanced combined-cycle engine that propels the 120 kg LTD to orbit - with a mass ratio of two. The single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) LTD machine then becomes an autonomous sensor satellite that can deliver precise, high quality information typical of today's large orbital platforms. The dominant motivation behind this study is to provide an example of how laser propulsion and its low launch costs can induce a comparable order-of-magnitude reduction in sensor satellite packaging costs. The issue is simply one of production technology for future, survivable SSTO aerospace vehicles that intimately share both laser propulsion engine and satellite functional hardware.

  5. Electron acceleration by femtosecond laser interaction with micro-structured plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goers, Andy James

    Laser-driven accelerators are a promising and compact alternative to RF accelerator technology for generating relativistic electron bunches for medical, scientific, and security applications. This dissertation presents three experiments using structured plasmas designed to advance the state of the art in laser-based electron accelerators, with the goal of reducing the energy of the drive laser pulse and enabling higher repetition rate operation with current laser technology. First, electron acceleration by intense femtosecond laser pulses in He-like nitrogen plasma waveguides is demonstrated. Second, significant progress toward a proof of concept realization of quasi-phasematched direct acceleration (QPM-DLA) is presented. Finally, a laser wakefield accelerator at very high plasma density is studied, enabling relativistic electron beam generation with ˜10 mJ pulse energies. Major results from these experiments include: • Acceleration of electrons up to 120 MeV from an ionization injected wakefield accelerator driven in a 1.5 mm long He-like nitrogen plasma waveguide • Guiding of an intense, quasi-radially polarized femtosecond laser pulse in a 1 cm plasma waveguide. This pulse provides a strong drive field for the QPM-DLA concept. • Wakefield acceleration of electrons up to ˜10 MeV with sub-terawatt, ˜10 mJ pulses interacting with a thin (˜200 mum), high density (>1020 cm-3) plasma. • Observation of an intense, coherent, broadband wave breaking radiation flash from a high plasma density laser wakefield accelerator. The flash radiates > 1% of the drive laser pulse energy in a bandwidth consistent with half-cycle (˜1 fs) emission from violent unidirectional acceleration of electron bunches from rest. These results open the way to high repetition rate (>˜kHz) laser-driven generation of relativistic electron beams with existing laser technology.

  6. Application of conventional laser technology to gamma-gamma colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, C.E.; Kurnit, N.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.

    1995-02-01

    A future e{sup {minus}}e{sup +} (electron-positron) linear collider can be configured with perhaps minimal modification to serve as an {gamma}-{gamma} (gamma-gamma) or a e{sup {minus}}-{gamma} collider. This is accomplished by Compton-backscattering low energy photons (from a laser source) off of the high-energy electron beams prior to the crossing of the electron beams. However, to be competitive with the e{sup {minus}}e{sup +} configuration, the luminosity cannot be compromised in the process. This requires that the laser source deliver a sufficient number of photons per pulse with a pulse format and rate matching that of the electron beams. As it turns out, this requires an average optical power of 5 to 15 kW from the laser which is beyond the current state of the art. In this paper, the authors address how to generate the required pulse format and how the high average power requirement can be met with conventional laser technology. They also address concerns about the survivability of mirrors located near the interaction point. Finally, they list a program of research and development which addresses some of the unknowns in such a system.

  7. NOVEL LASER ABLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SURFACE DECONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to develop a novel Laser Ablation Decontamination in Liquid (LADIL) technology for surface decontamination and safe removal of radioactive and/or toxic contaminants. It aims to achieve more efficient surface decontamination without secondary conta...

  8. Innovative Laser Ablation Technology for Surface Decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Winston C. H.

    2003-06-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a novel laser ablation in liquid for surface decontamination. It aims to achieve more efficient surface decontamination without secondary contamination. Another aim is to make this surface decontamination technology becomes economically feasible for large scale decontamination.

  9. 3D Laser Scanning in Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Jim

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional laser scanner can be used as a tool for design and problem solving in technology education. A hands-on experience can enhance learning by captivating students' interest and empowering them with creative tools. (Author/JOW)

  10. Generation of ultrashort electron bunches by colliding laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, C B; Lee, P B; Wurtele, J S; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    1999-05-01

    A proposed laser-plasma-based relativistic electron source [E. Esarey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2682 (1997)] using laser-triggered injection of electrons is investigated. The source generates ultrashort electron bunches by dephasing and trapping background plasma electrons undergoing fluid oscillations in an excited plasma wake. The plasma electrons are dephased by colliding two counterpropagating laser pulses which generate a slow phase velocity beat wave. Laser pulse intensity thresholds for trapping and the optimal wake phase for injection are calculated. Numerical simulations of test particles, with prescribed plasma and laser fields, are used to verify analytic predictions and to study the longitudinal and transverse dynamics of the trapped plasma electrons. Simulations indicate that the colliding laser pulse injection scheme has the capability to produce relativistic femtosecond electron bunches with fractional energy spread of order a few percent and normalized transverse emittance less than 1 mm mrad using 1 TW injection laser pulses. PMID:11969588

  11. Generation of ultrashort electron bunches by colliding laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Lee, P. B.; Wurtele, J. S.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    1999-07-12

    A proposed laser-plasma based relativistic electron source [E. Esarey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2682 (1997)] using laser triggered injection of electrons is investigated. The source generates ultrashort electron bunches by dephasing and trapping background plasma electrons undergoing fluid oscillations in an excited plasma wake. The plasma electrons are dephased by colliding two counter-propagating laser pulses which generate a slow phase velocity beat wave. Laser pulse intensity thresholds for trapping and the optimal wake phase for injection are calculated. Numerical simulations of test particles, with prescribed plasma and laser fields, are used to verify analytic predictions and to study the longitudinal and transverse dynamics of the trapped plasma electrons. Simulations indicate that the colliding laser pulse injection scheme has the capability to produce relativistic femtosecond electron bunches with fractional energy spread of order a few percent and normalized transverse emittance less than 1 mm mrad using 1 TW injection laser pulses.

  12. Free electron laser for a mildly relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, H.S.

    1983-08-01

    One of the most basic instabilities which characterize a relativistic electron beam propagating through a helical wiggler (or undulator) magnetic field is the free electron laser instability. This instability has been extensively investigated in recent years with particular emphasis on applications involving high power microwave radiation. Previous theoretical studies of this instability have tended to result in the conclusion that high energy beams with a relativistic factor much greater than 1 are required to generate high frequency microwave radiation. Beams with this high a relativistic factor have proven to be highly unsuited, however, to compact and practical microwave tubes. To this end, for a relativistic electron beam propagating through a dielectric loaded waveguide, this paper presents a method for the bandwidth and frequency enhancement of the free electron laser instability which makes use of a mild (less than 1.5) relativistic factor. It demonstrates that the instability bandwidth and frequency can be greatly enhanced for specified values of the beam energy and wiggler wavelength if the dielectric constant and the thickness of the dielectric material are appropriately selected. The paper also presents a new scheme for a broad bandwidth microwave amplifier.

  13. All-Optical Laser-Wakefield Electron Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Umstadter, Donald P.

    2003-07-01

    Demonstrated the principle of optical control of laser accelerators, namely, that one laser pulse could modify the properties (e.g., emittance and electron number) of an electron beam accelerated by a separate but synchronized laser pulse. Another recent highlight was that, using our new 30-fs 10-TW laser system, we accelerated with a laser accelerator an electron beam with a record low divergence (0.2 degrees). This is more than 100 times lower than the 30-degree divergence that was reported recently by a French group using a laser with similar parameters.

  14. Emerging ps-TW CO{sub 2} laser technology for high energy physics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1998-02-01

    A brief overview of laser acceleration techniques and a comparative analysis of the picosecond terawatt (ps-TW) CO{sub 2} laser technology versus T{sup 3} solid state lasers for prospective HEP applications. Special attention is given to two laser accelerator schemes. The first one is the far-field staged laser accelerator, STELLA, which is under exploration at the ATF using a CO{sub 2} laser. The second is a laser wakefield accelerator where ps-TW CO{sub 2} lasers have a great potential. Inverse to the laser accelerator, a prospective monochromatic x-ray source feasible at the ATF will also utilize a 50 MeV subpicosecond electron beam and the first ps-TW CO{sub 2} laser, PITER I.

  15. Laser driven electron acceleration in vacuum, gases and plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, P.; Esarey, E.; Krall, J.

    1996-04-19

    This paper discusses some of the important issues pertaining to laser acceleration in vacuum, neutral gases and plasmas. The limitations of laser vacuum acceleration as they relate to electron slippage, laser diffraction, material damage and electron aperture effects, are discussed. An inverse Cherenkov laser acceleration configuration is presented in which a laser beam is self guided in a partially ionized gas. Optical self guiding is the result of a balance between the nonlinear self focusing properties of neutral gases and the diffraction effects of ionization. The stability of self guided beams is analyzed and discussed. In addition, aspects of the laser wakefield accelerator are presented and laser driven accelerator experiments are briefly discussed.

  16. Vacuum laser acceleration of relativistic electrons using plasma mirror injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thévenet, M.; Leblanc, A.; Kahaly, S.; Vincenti, H.; Vernier, A.; Quéré, F.; Faure, J.

    2016-04-01

    Accelerating particles to relativistic energies over very short distances using lasers has been a long-standing goal in physics. Among the various schemes proposed for electrons, vacuum laser acceleration has attracted considerable interest and has been extensively studied theoretically because of its appealing simplicity: electrons interact with an intense laser field in vacuum and can be continuously accelerated, provided they remain at a given phase of the field until they escape the laser beam. But demonstrating this effect experimentally has proved extremely challenging, as it imposes stringent requirements on the conditions of injection of electrons in the laser field. Here, we solve this long-standing experimental problem by using a plasma mirror to inject electrons in an ultraintense laser field, and obtain clear evidence of vacuum laser acceleration. With the advent of petawatt lasers, this scheme could provide a competitive source of very high charge (nC) and ultrashort relativistic electron beams.

  17. Radiation-Reaction Trapping of Electrons in Extreme Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, L. L.; Pukhov, A.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Shen, B. F.; Akli, K.

    2014-04-01

    A radiation-reaction trapping (RRT) of electrons is revealed in the near-QED regime of laser-plasma interaction. Electrons quivering in laser pulse experience radiation reaction (RR) recoil force by radiating photons. When the laser field reaches the threshold, the RR force becomes significant enough to compensate for the expelling laser ponderomotive force. Then electrons are trapped inside the laser pulse instead of being scattered off transversely and form a dense plasma bunch. The mechanism is demonstrated both by full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using the QED photonic approach and numerical test-particle modeling based on the classical Landau-Lifshitz formula of RR force. Furthermore, the proposed analysis shows that the threshold of laser field amplitude for RRT is approximately the cubic root of laser wavelength over classical electron radius. Because of the pinching effect of the trapped electron bunch, the required laser intensity for RRT can be further reduced.

  18. An Inverse Free-Electron-Laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.C.; van Steenbergen, A.; Ulc, S.; Woodle, M.; Sandweiss, J.; Fang, Jyan-Min

    1993-08-01

    Recent work at BNL on electron acceleration using the Inverse Free-Electron Laser (IFEL) has considered a low-energy, high-gradient, multi-stage linear accelerator. Experiments are planned at BNL`s Accelerator Test Facility using its 50-MeV linac and 100-GW CO{sub 2} laser. We have built and tested a fast-excitation wiggler magnet with constant field, tapered period, and overall length of 47 cm. Vanadium-Permendur ferromagnetic laminations are stacked in alternation with copper, eddy-current-induced, field reflectors to achieve a 1.4-T peak field with a 4-mm gap and a typical period of 3 cm. The laser beam will pass through the wiggler in a low-loss, dielectric-coated stainless-steel, rectangular waveguide. The attenuation and transverse mode has been measured in waveguide sections of various lengths, with and without the dielectric. Results of 1-D and 3-D IFEL simulations, including wiggler errors, will be presented for several cases: the initial, single-module experiment with {Delta}E = 39 MeV, a four-module design giving {Delta}E = 100 MeV in a total length of 2 m, and an eight-module IFEL with {Delta}E = 210 MeV.

  19. Airborne laser communication technology and flight test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Li-xin; Zhang, Li-zhong; Li, Xiao-ming; Li, Ying-chao; Jiang, Hui-lin

    2015-11-01

    Reconnaissance aircraft is an important node of the space-air-ground integrated information network, on which equipped with a large number of high-resolution surveillance equipment, and need high speed communications equipment to transmit detected information in real time. Currently RF communication methods cannot meet the needs of communication bandwidth. Wireless laser communication has outstanding advantages high speed, high capacity, security, etc., is an important means to solve the high-speed information transmission of airborne platforms. In this paper, detailed analysis of how the system works, the system components, work processes, link power and the key technologies of airborne laser communication were discussed. On this basis, a prototype airborne laser communications was developed, and high-speed, long-distance communications tests were carried out between the two fixed-wing aircraft, and the airborne precision aiming, atmospheric laser communication impacts on laser communication were tested. The experiments ultimately realize that, the communication distance is 144km, the communication rate is 2.5Gbps. The Airborne laser communication experiments provide technical basis for the application of the conversion equipment.

  20. Novel Laser Ablation Technology for Surface Decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chung H.

    2004-06-01

    Laser ablation for surface cleaning has been pursued for the removal of paint on airplanes. It has also been pursued for the cleaning of semiconductor surfaces. However, all these approaches have been pursued by laser ablation in air. For highly contaminated surface, laser ablation in air can easily cause secondary contamination. Thus it is not suitable to apply to achieve surface decontamination for DOE facilities since many of these facilities have radioactive contaminants on the surface. Any secondary contamination will be a grave concern. The objective of this project is to develop a novel technology for laser ablation in liquid for surface decontamination. It aims to achieve more efficient surface decontamination without secondary contamination and to evaluate the economic feasibility for large scale surface decontamination with laser ablation in liquid. When laser ablation is pursued in the solution, all the desorbed contaminants will be confined in liquid. The contaminants can be precipitated and subsequently contained in a small volume for disposal. It can reduce the risk of the decontamination workers. It can also reduce the volume of contaminants dramatically.

  1. Laser-boosted lightcraft technology demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonison, M.; Myrabo, Leik; Chen, S.; Decusatis, C.; Kusche, K.; Minucci, M.; Moder, J.; Morales, C.; Nelson, C.; Richard, J.

    1989-01-01

    The ultimate goal for this NASA/USRA-sponsored 'Apollo Lightcraft Project' is to develop a revolutionary manned launch vehicle technology that can potentially reduce payload transport costs by a factor of 1000 below the space shuttle orbiter. The Rensellaer design team proposes to utilize advanced, highly energetic, beamed-energy sources (laser, microwave) and innovative combined-cycle (airbreathing/rocket) engines to accomplish this goal. This year's effort, the detailed description and performance analysis of an unmanned 1.4-m Lightcraft Technology Demonstrator (LTD) drone, is presented. The novel launch system employs a 100-MW-class ground-based laser to transmit power directly to an advanced combined-cycle engine that propels the 120-kg LTD to orbit, with a mass ratio of two. The single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) LTD machine then becomes an autonomous sensor satellite that can deliver precise, high-quality information typical of today's large orbital platforms. The dominant motivation behind this study is to provide an example of how laser propulsion and its low launch costs can induce a comparable order-of-magnitude reduction in sensor satellite packaging costs. The issue is simply one of production technology for future, survivable SSTO aerospace vehicles that intimately share both laser propulsion engine and satellite functional hardware. A mass production cost goal of 10(exp 3)/kg for the LTD vehicle is probably realizable.

  2. Picosecond DPSS laser technology for OPCPA pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaupel, Andreas; Bodnar, Nathan; Webb, Benjamin; Shah, Lawrence; Richardson, Martin

    2014-02-01

    We present the design and challenges of a diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) system to amplify picosecond pulses to high pulse energies and high average powers. We discuss our implemented solutions to mitigate thermal effects and present the obtained performance of the picosecond pulse amplification at the multi-10-MW level. Our here presented picosecond DPSS laser is well suited for pumping an optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA) system. Several laser technologies have been employed to pump OPCPA systems and we show how our DPSS system compares in performance to the other approaches.

  3. New Electronic Technologies for Facilitating Differentiated Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalise, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    With electronic technologies, differentiated instruction has the same meaning as in traditional instruction, but different tools are available for teachers to help students learn. Electronic technologies for differentiated instruction can add powerful new types of media inclusion, levels of interactivity, and response actions. This rapidly…

  4. Electron transport estimated from electron spectra using electron spectrometer in LFEX laser target experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, T.; Hata, M.; Matsuo, K.; Kojima, S.; Arikawa, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Sakagami, H.; Sunahara, A.; Nagatomo, H.; Johzaki, T.; Yogo, A.; Morace, A.; Zhang, Z.; Shiraga, H.; Sakata, S.; Nagai, T.; Abe, Y.; Lee, S.; Nakai, M.; Nishimura, H.; Azechi, H.; FIREX group; GXII-LFEX group

    2016-05-01

    Hot electrons which are generated from targets irradiated by a high-intense laser are measured by two electron spectrometers (ESMs). However, total electron energy observed by the ESM is only less than 1%. Hot electrons are confined by self-fields due to the huge current. When an external magnetic field of several hundred Tesla is applied during the laser irradiation on targets, the ESM signals always increase. In the simulation, the same result can be obtained. The reason is that the Alfvén limit can be mitigated due to the external longitudinal magnetic field.

  5. Electron accleration using high power laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmudin, Zulfikar

    1998-04-01

    The 30 TW Nd:Glass Vulcan laser has been used to extensively study the Forward Raman Scatter instability in plasmas. This instability is of interest since it produces large amplitude relativistic plasma waves, which can trap and accelerate plasma electrons to high energies. Recently we have accelerated particles up to 100 MeV with this process. This is beyond the expected classical dephasing energy, for the plasma waves in our experiment which have a Lorentz factor γ ≈ 7. The greater acceleration has been attributed to the dynamics of the beam loading process of the plasma waves due to wavebreaking. By imaging the small angle Thomson scattered light from an orthogonally injected probe beam, we observe the dimensions of the accelerating plasma wave. It is seen that electron energies are almost independent of the length of the plasma wave. This is because the dephasing length is of the order of the Rayleigh length (≈ 100 μm). However the plasma wave is seen to extend to lengths as great as 3.5 mm. This is indicative of a high intensity being present throughout the length of the gas jet used, and indicates the presence of channelling of the laser beam. However the unstable nature of FRS, means that it is unsuitable for next generation high energy particle acclerators. For this we require much more controllable acceleration over greater distances. This can be achieved with the laser wakefield accelerator. For this purpose we have also been performing experiments at the LULI short pulse facility at Ecole Polytechnique. In these experiments we have been able to accelerate large numbers of injected electrons at 3 MeV to 4 MeV and above, after carefully taking into consideration sources of noise.

  6. Acousto-optic filter for electronic laser tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.

    1972-01-01

    Electronically tunable lithium niobate filter utilizes acoustic-optic diffraction for tuning laser to desired frequencies. Filter placed inside laser cavity diffracts incident optical signal of one polarization into orthogonal polarization by collinearly propagating acoustic beam to desired wavelength.

  7. Advances in solid state laser technology for space and medical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in laser technology and their potential for medical applications are discussed. Gas discharge lasers, dye lasers, excimer lasers, Nd:YAG lasers, HF and DF lasers, and other commonly used lasers are briefly addressed. Emerging laser technology is examined, including diode-pumped lasers and other solid state lasers.

  8. Kinetic theory of free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hafizi, B.; Roberson, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a relativistic kinetic theory of free electron lasers (FELs). The growth rate, efficiency, filling factor and radius of curvature of the radiation wave fronts are determined. We have used the theory to examine the effects of beam compression on growth rate. The theory has been extended to include self field effects on FEL operation. These effects are particularly important in compact, low voltage FELs. The surprising result is that the self field contribution to the beam quality is opposite to the emittance contribution. Hence self fields can improve beam quality, particularly in compact, low voltage FELs.

  9. The free electron laser: conceptual history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madey, John; Scully, Marlan O.; Sprangle, Phillip

    2016-08-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) has lived up to its promise as given in (Madey 1971 J. Appl. Phys. 42 1906) to wit: ‘As shall be seen, finite gain is available …from the far-infrared through the visible region …with the further possibility of partially coherent radiation sources in the x-ray region’. In the present paper we review the history of the FEL drawing liberally (and where possible literally) from the original sources. Coauthors, Madey, Scully and Sprangle were involved in the early days of the subject and give a first hand account of the subject with an eye to the future.

  10. Electron acceleration driven by ultrashort and nonparaxial radially polarized laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Marceau, Vincent; April, Alexandre; Piché, Michel

    2012-07-01

    Exact closed-form solutions to Maxwell's equations are used to investigate the acceleration of electrons in vacuum driven by ultrashort and nonparaxial radially polarized laser pulses. We show that the threshold power above which significant acceleration takes place is greatly reduced by using a tighter focus. Moreover, electrons accelerated by tightly focused single-cycle laser pulses may reach around 80% of the theoretical energy gain limit, about twice the value previously reported with few-cycle paraxial pulses. Our results demonstrate that the direct acceleration of electrons in vacuum is well within reach of current laser technology. PMID:22743415

  11. Monitoring structure movement with laser tracking technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazzetti, Luigi; Giussani, Alberto; Roncoroni, Fabio; Previtali, Mattia

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the use of laser tracking technology for structure monitoring. In this field the use of this precise instrument is innovative and therefore new investigations are needed for civil structures, especially for applications carried out during unstable environmental conditions. On the other hand, as laser trackers are today very used in industrial applications aimed at collecting data at high speed with precisions superior to +/-0.05 mm, they seem quite promising for those civil engineering applications where numerous geodetic tools, often coupled with mechanical and electrical instruments, are usually used to inspect structure movements. This work illustrates three real civil engineering monitoring applications where laser tracking technology was used to detect object movements. The first one is a laboratory testing for the inspection of a beam (bending moment and shear). The second experiment is the stability inspection of a bridge. The last experiment is one of the first attempts where laser trackers tried to substitute traditional high precision geometric leveling for monitoring an important historical building: the Cathedral of Milan. The achieved results, pro and contra along with some practical issues are described.

  12. X-ray Free-electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Feldhaus, J.; Arthur, J.; Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC

    2007-02-23

    In a free-electron laser (FEL) the lasing medium is a high-energy beam of electrons flying with relativistic speed through a periodic magnetic field. The interaction between the synchrotron radiation that is produced and the electrons in the beam induces a periodic bunching of the electrons, greatly increasing the intensity of radiation produced at a particular wavelength. Depending only on a phase match between the electron energy and the magnetic period, the wavelength of the FEL radiation can be continuously tuned within a wide spectral range. The FEL concept can be adapted to produce radiation wavelengths from millimeters to Angstroms, and can in principle produce hard x-ray beams with unprecedented peak brightness, exceeding that of the brightest synchrotron source by ten orders of magnitude or more. This paper focuses on short-wavelength FELs. It reviews the physics and characteristic properties of single-pass FELs, as well as current technical developments aiming for fully coherent x-ray radiation pulses with pulse durations in the 100 fs to 100 as range. First experimental results at wavelengths around 100 nm and examples of scientific applications planned on the new, emerging x-ray FEL facilities are presented.

  13. An XUV/VUV free-electron laser oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, J. C.; Newnam, B. E.; Cooper, R. K.; Comly, J. C., Jr.

    Problems regarding the extension of free-electron laser technology from the visible and near infrared region, where such devices are currently operating, to the ultraviolet have recently been extensively discussed. It was found that significant technical problems must be overcome before free-electron lasers (FELs) can be operated in the VUV (100-200 nm) and the XUV (50-100). However, the present lack of other intense and tunable sources of coherent radiation at these wavelengths together with the intrinsic properties of FELs make the development of such devices potentially very rewarding. The properties of FELs include continuous tunability in wavelength and output in the form of a train of picosecond pulses. An investigation is conducted regarding the feasibility of an operation of a FEL in the XUV/VUV regions, taking into account a theoretical model. It is found that modest improvements in electron beam and optical mirror technologies will make the design of a FEL for operation in the 50-200-nm range of optical wavelength possible.

  14. Enhancement of electron energy to the multi-GeV regime by a dual-stage laser-wakefield accelerator pumped by petawatt laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Taek; Pae, Ki Hong; Cha, Hyuk Jin; Kim, I Jong; Yu, Tae Jun; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Jeong, Tae Moon; Lee, Jongmin

    2013-10-18

    Laser-wakefield acceleration offers the promise of a compact electron accelerator for generating a multi-GeV electron beam using the huge field gradient induced by an intense laser pulse, compared to conventional rf accelerators. However, the energy and quality of the electron beam from the laser-wakefield accelerator have been limited by the power of the driving laser pulses and interaction properties in the target medium. Recent progress in laser technology has resulted in the realization of a petawatt (PW) femtosecond laser, which offers new capabilities for research on laser-wakefield acceleration. Here, we present a significant increase in laser-driven electron energy to the multi-GeV level by utilizing a 30-fs, 1-PW laser system. In particular, a dual-stage laser-wakefield acceleration scheme (injector and accelerator scheme) was applied to boost electron energies to over 3 GeV with a single PW laser pulse. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the multi-GeV electron generation from the dual-stage laser-wakefield accelerator driven by PW laser pulses. PMID:24182273

  15. Ultrafast laser inscription: science today, technology tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, D.; Ramsay, W. T.; Willoughby, N. A.; Paterson, L.; Kar, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    Recent advances in the field of ultrafast laser inscription provide ample evidence underscoring the potential of this technique in fabricating novel and previously unthinkable 2D and 3D photonic and optofluidic platforms enabling current sensor, diagnostics, monitoring and biochemical research to scale new heights. In addition to meeting the demands for compact, active waveguide devices designed for diverse applications such as optical metrology, non-linear microscopy and astrophotonics, this technology facilitates the integration of microfluidics with integrated optics which creates a powerful technology for the manufacture of custom lab-on-chip devices with advanced functionality. This paper highlights the capabilities of ultrafast laser inscription in fabricating novel 3D microfluidic devices aimed for biomedical applications.

  16. Characteristics of the MIT microwiggler for free electron laser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Catravas, P.; Stoner, R.; Bekefi, G.

    1995-12-31

    We report work on the development of microwiggler technology for free electron laser research. The MIT microwiggler is a pulsed electromagnet with 70 periods of 8.8 mm each which generates a peak on-axis field of 4.2 kG. The wiggler is characterized by extensive tunability. We developed a novel tuning regimen to control 140 degrees of freedom afforded by the individually tunable half periods and achieved an rms spread in the peak amplitudes of 0.08%. This is the lowest attained to date in any sub-cm period wiggler. The microwiggler design and comprehensive measurements of its characteristics will be described.

  17. Ultrashort pulsed laser technology development program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manke, Gerald C.

    2014-10-01

    The Department of Navy has been pursuing a technology development program for advanced, all-fiber, Ultra Short Pulsed Laser (USPL) systems via Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) programs. Multiple topics have been published to promote and fund research that encompasses every critical component of a standard USPL system and enable the demonstration of mJ/pulse class systems with an all fiber architecture. This presentation will summarize published topics and funded programs.

  18. Solar pumped laser technology options for space power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of long-range options for in-space laser power transmission is presented. The focus is on the new technology and research status of solar-pumped lasers and their solar concentration needs. The laser options include gas photodissociation lasers, optically-pumped solid-state lasers, and blackbody-pumped transfer lasers. The paper concludes with a summary of current research thrusts.

  19. Electron microscopy of compound oxide laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakins, Daniel E.; LeBret, Joel B.; Norton, M. G.; Bahr, David F.; Dumm, John Q.

    2003-06-01

    Oxide single crystals, such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and yttrium orthovanadate (YVO4), are important host crystals for solid-state laser applications. These crystals are often grown by the Czochralski process and are doped with neodymium during growth. The microstructure of the resultant crystal affects the overall laser performance and it is necessary to be able to characterize grown-in defects in the material. Scanning electron microscopy has been used to examine the fracture surfaces of YAG and has shown the presence of microscopic voids, which act as stress concentrators and in some cases appear to be the cause of fracture. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to characterize various defects in both YAG and YVO4 crystals. The defects found depend on the growth conditions, specifically the Nd concentration in the crystal and the position within the boule. One of the most common defects identified in both materials were microscopic spherical particles. In YAG these particles appeared to be located primarily in the core regions and analysis of high resolution images indicate that they are due to regions that are both compositionally and orientationally different from the matrix phase. Direct observation of dislocations in YVO4 was made using TEM. In YAG only indirect evidence for dislocations could be found from the observation of river marks on fracture surfaces.

  20. Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, Roy; Neil, George

    2007-02-01

    The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

  1. Picosecond electron-optic diagnostics in laser studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, A. M.

    The papers included in this volume provide an overview of research aimed at the development of methods and instrumentation for ultrahigh-speed electron-optic detection and of their applications in laser physics, laser fusion, fiber-optic communication, picosecond spectroscopy, and photobiology. Topics discussed include the physics of a picosecond electron-optic converter, the aberration theory for cathode lenses, picosecond and subpicosecond laser sources, and a beam deflection system for a subpicosecond electron-optic converter.

  2. Laser-driven electron acceleration in an inhomogeneous plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rong; Cheng, Li-Hong; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2015-12-15

    We study the laser-driven electron acceleration in a transversely inhomogeneous plasma channel. We find that, in inhomogeneous plasma channel, the developing of instability for electron acceleration and the electron energy gain can be controlled by adjusting the laser polarization angle and inhomogeneity of plasma channel. That is, we can short the accelerating length and enhance the energy gain in inhomogeneous plasma channel by adjusting the laser polarization angle and inhomogeneity of the plasma channel.

  3. Applications of laser printing for organic electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaporte, Ph.; Ainsebaa, A.; Alloncle, A.-P.; Benetti, M.; Boutopoulos, C.; Cannata, D.; Di Pietrantonio, F.; Dinca, V.; Dinescu, M.; Dutroncy, J.; Eason, R.; Feinaugle, M.; Fernández-Pradas, J.-M.; Grisel, A.; Kaur, K.; Lehmann, U.; Lippert, T.; Loussert, C.; Makrygianni, M.; Manfredonia, I.; Mattle, T.; Morenza, J.-L.; Nagel, M.; Nüesch, F.; Palla-Papavlu, A.; Rapp, L.; Rizvi, N.; Rodio, G.; Sanaur, S.; Serra, P.; Shaw-Stewart, J.; Sones, C. L.; Verona, E.; Zergioti, I.

    2013-03-01

    The development of organic electronic requires a non contact digital printing process. The European funded e-LIFT project investigated the possibility of using the Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique to address this field of applications. This process has been optimized for the deposition of functional organic and inorganic materials in liquid and solid phase, and a set of polymer dynamic release layer (DRL) has been developed to allow a safe transfer of a large range of thin films. Then, some specific applications related to the development of heterogeneous integration in organic electronics have been addressed. We demonstrated the ability of LIFT process to print thin film of organic semiconductor and to realize Organic Thin Film Transistors (OTFT) with mobilities as high as 4 10-2 cm2.V-1.s-1 and Ion/Ioff ratio of 2.8 105. Polymer Light Emitting Diodes (PLED) have been laser printed by transferring in a single step process a stack of thin films, leading to the fabrication of red, blue green PLEDs with luminance ranging from 145 cd.m-2 to 540 cd.m-2. Then, chemical sensors and biosensors have been fabricated by printing polymers and proteins on Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices. The ability of LIFT to transfer several sensing elements on a same device with high resolution allows improving the selectivity of these sensors and biosensors. Gas sensors based on the deposition of semiconducting oxide (SnO2) and biosensors for the detection of herbicides relying on the printing of proteins have also been realized and their performances overcome those of commercial devices. At last, we successfully laser-printed thermoelectric materials and realized microgenerators for energy harvesting applications.

  4. Free electron lasers with small period wigglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonsen, T. M., Jr.; Booske, J. H.; Destler, W. W.; Granatstein, V. L.; Mayergoyz, I. D.; Ott, E.

    1989-05-01

    Progress of research on a short period wiggler (SPW) free electron laser (FEL) with a sheet electron beam is reviewed. Most of the recent work has concentrated on addressing thermal engineering issued in the device. This particular emphasis was particularly stimulated by an evaluation by Panel XXI for the Magnetic Fusion Advisory Committee which stated that there are serious thermal management engineering uncertainties in the electron gun, the microwave cavity, and the wiggler that will need to be addressed for CW operation. In the panel's judgment, these thermal problems are likely to be insurmountable for fusion applications. In fact, recent experimental and theoretical results challenge this judgment. For example, our most recent conceptual designs involve small-to-negligible RF losses in the cavity walls. In addition, we have convincingly established that for electron beams of quality achievable with thermionic Pierce guns, body currents should be negligible to nonexistent, thus ensuring a thermally stable cavity. These discoveries, as well as other research progress, are reviewed in detail in the following report. Plans are described for a pulsed (100 ns) proof-of-principle lasing experiment to be conducted during the remainder of this fiscal year. In addition, we present a revised statement of work and budget for the follow-on year of the current grant. These proposed tasks will address the remaining risk issues for an ERCH source based on the SPW sheet-beam FEL. Upon the completion of those tasks, sufficient information will exist to confidently assess the feasibility of the proposed concept.

  5. Diffraction Properties of Periodic Lattices under Free Electron Laser Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rajkovic, I.; Busse, G.; Hallmann, J.; More, R.; Petri, M.; Quevedo, W.; Krasniqi, F.; Rudenko, A.; Tschentscher, T.; Stojanovic, N.; Duesterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Tolkiehn, M.; Techert, S.

    2010-03-26

    In this Letter, we report the pioneering use of free electron laser radiation for the investigation of periodic crystalline structures. The diffraction properties of silver behenate single nanocrystals (5.8 nm periodicity) with the dimensions of 20 nmx20 nmx20 {mu}m and as powder with grain sizes smaller than 200 nm were investigated with 8 nm free electron laser radiation in single-shot modus with 30 fs long free electron laser pulses. This work emphasizes the possibility of using soft x-ray free electron laser radiation for these crystallographic studies on a nanometer scale.

  6. Synchronization of sub-picosecond electron and laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Le Sage, G. P.

    1999-07-12

    Sub-picosecond laser-electron synchronization is required to take full advantage of the experimental possibilities arising from the marriage of modern high intensity lasers and high brightness electron beams in the same laboratory. Two particular scenarios stand out in this regard, injection of ultra-short electron pulses in short wavelength laser-driven plasma accelerators, and Compton scattering of laser photons from short electron pulses. Both of these applications demand synchronization, which is sub-picosecond, with tens of femtosecond synchronization implied for next generation experiments. The design of a microwave timing modulator system is now being investigated in more detail.

  7. Synchronization of sub-picosecond electron and laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Le Sage, G.P.

    1999-07-01

    Sub-picosecond laser-electron synchronization is required to take full advantage of the experimental possibilities arising from the marriage of modern high intensity lasers and high brightness electron beams in the same laboratory. Two particular scenarios stand out in this regard, injection of ultra-short electron pulses in short wavelength laser-driven plasma accelerators, and Compton scattering of laser photons from short electron pulses. Both of these applications demand synchronization, which is sub-picosecond, with tens of femtosecond synchronization implied for next generation experiments. The design of a microwave timing modulator system is now being investigated in more detail. (AIP) {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Electronic packaging: new results in singulation by Laser Microjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Frank; Sibailly, Ochelio; Richerzhagen, Bernold

    2004-07-01

    Cutting electronic packages that are produced in a matrix array fashion is an important process and deals with the ready-to-use devices. Thus an increase in the singulation yield is directly correlated to an increase in benefit. Due to the usage of different substrate materials, the saws encounter big problems in terms of lifetime and constancy of cut quality in these applications. Today"s equipment manufacturers are not yet in the position to propose an adequate solution for all types of packages. Compared to classical laser cutting, the water-jet guided laser technology minimizes the heat damages in any kind of sample. This new material processing method consists in guiding a laser beam inside a hair thin, lowpressure water-jet by total internal reflection, and is applied to package singulation since two years approximately. Using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser guided by a water jet, an LTCC-ceramics based package is singulated according to a scribe and break process. Speeds of 2-10 mm/s are reached in the LTTC and 40 mm/s in the mold compound. The process is wear-free and provides very good edge quality of the LTCC and the mold compound as well as reliable separation of the packages.

  9. Electron Weibel Instability Mediated Laser Driven Electromagnetic Collisionless Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qing; Mima, Kunioki; Cai, Hong-Bo; Taguchi, Toshihiro; Nagatomo, Hideo; He, X. T.

    2015-11-01

    As a fundamental nonlinear structure, collisionless shock is widely studied in astrophysics. Recently, the rapidly-developing laser technology provides a good test-bed to study such shock physics in laboratory. In addition, the laser driven shock ion acceleration is also interested due to its potential applications. We explore the effect of external parallel magnetic field on the collisionless shock formation and resultant particle acceleration by using the 2D3V PIC simulations. We show that unlike the electrostatic shock generated in the unmagnetized plasma, the shock generated in the weakly-magnetized laser-driven plasma is mostly electromagnetic (EM)-like with higher Mach number. The generation mechanism is due to the stronger transverse magnetic field self-generated at the nonlinear stage of the electron Weibel instability which drastically scatters particles and leads to higher energy dissipation. Simulation results also suggest more ions are reflected by this EM shock and results in larger energy transfer rate from the laser to ions, which is of advantage for applications such as neutron production and ion fast ignition.

  10. Electro-Optical Laser Technology. Curriculum Utilization. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nawn, John H.

    This report describes a program to prepare students for employment as laser technicians and laser operators and to ensure that they have the necessary skills required by the industry. The objectives are to prepare a curriculum and syllabus for an associate degree program in Electro-Optical Laser Technology. The 2-year Electro-Optical Laser program…

  11. Aerosol Imaging with a Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sebastien; Chapman, Henry N.; Marchesini, Stefano; Barty, Anton; Benner, W.Henry Rohner, Urs; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Bajt, Sasa; Woods, Bruce; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; Hajdu, Janos; Schulz, Joachim; /DESY

    2011-08-22

    Lasers have long played a critical role in the advancement of aerosol science. A new regime of ultrafast laser technology has recently be realized, the world's first soft xray free electron laser. The Free electron LASer in Hamburg, FLASH, user facility produces a steady source of 10 femtosecond pulses of 7-32 nm x-rays with 10{sub 12} photons per pulse. The high brightness, short wavelength, and high repetition rate (>500 pulses per second) of this laser offers unique capabilities for aerosol characterization. Here we use FLASH to perform the highest resolution imaging of single PM2.5 aerosol particles in flight to date. We resolve to 35 nm the morphology of fibrous and aggregated spherical carbonaceous nanoparticles that existed for less than two milliseconds in vacuum. Our result opens the possibility for high spatialand time-resolved single particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science.

  12. Multiwave hybrid laser processing of micrometer scale features for flexible electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, J.; Sukhman, Y.; Miller, D.; Oropeza, M.; Risser, C.

    2016-03-01

    MultiWave HybridTM laser processing allows two or more laser wavelengths to be combined into a single beam. This technology has been shown to be advantageous for laser cutting composite and laminate materials, where the individual components have different optical or physical properties. In this work we will explore the application of MultiWave Hybrid technology to the fabrication of flexible electronic circuits. The advantages of using multiple laser wavelengths for manufacturing steps, such as opening vias through a KaptonTM insulator to an underlying copper conductor, will be demonstrated. Several rapid prototyping processes for flexible electronic circuits will be reviewed. These involve selective ablation of conductive materials to pattern an interconnect layer without the need for a costly and time consuming photolithography process. We will also investigate a process for producing laser induced graphene (LIG) from a commercially available polymer substrate.

  13. Synchrotron Facilities and Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Vaclav, Vylet; Liu, James; /SLAC

    2007-12-21

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle travels along a curved trajectory. Initially encountered as a nuisance around orbits of high energy synchrotron accelerators, it gradually became an indispensable research tool in many applications: crystallography, X-ray lithography, micromechanics, structural biology, microprobe X-ray experiments, etc. So-called first generation SR sources were exploiting SR in parasitic mode at electron accelerators built to study particle collisions. The second generation of SR sources was the first facilities solely devoted to SR production. They were optimized to achieve stable high currents in the accelerator ring to achieve substantially higher photon flux and to provide a large number of SR beam lines for users. Third generation sources were further optimized for increased brilliance, i.e. with photons densely packed into a beam of very small cross-sectional area and minimal angular divergence (see the Appendix for more detailed definitions of flux, brightness and brilliance) and makes extensive use of the insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators. Free Electron Lasers (FELs), the fourth generation SR sources, open new research possibilities by offering extremely short pulses of extremely bright and coherent radiation. The number of SR sources around the world now probably exceeds 100. These facilities vary greatly in size, energy of the electron (or positron) beams, range of photon energies and other characteristics of the photon beams produced. In what follows we will concentrate on describing some common aspects of SR facilities, their operation modes and specific radiation protection aspects.

  14. Comparison study of in vivo dose response to laser-driven versus conventional electron beam.

    PubMed

    Oppelt, Melanie; Baumann, Michael; Bergmann, Ralf; Beyreuther, Elke; Brüchner, Kerstin; Hartmann, Josefin; Karsch, Leonhard; Krause, Mechthild; Laschinsky, Lydia; Leßmann, Elisabeth; Nicolai, Maria; Reuter, Maria; Richter, Christian; Sävert, Alexander; Schnell, Michael; Schürer, Michael; Woithe, Julia; Kaluza, Malte; Pawelke, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    The long-term goal to integrate laser-based particle accelerators into radiotherapy clinics not only requires technological development of high-intensity lasers and new techniques for beam detection and dose delivery, but also characterization of the biological consequences of this new particle beam quality, i.e. ultra-short, ultra-intense pulses. In the present work, we describe successful in vivo experiments with laser-driven electron pulses by utilization of a small tumour model on the mouse ear for the human squamous cell carcinoma model FaDu. The already established in vitro irradiation technology at the laser system JETI was further enhanced for 3D tumour irradiation in vivo in terms of beam transport, beam monitoring, dose delivery and dosimetry in order to precisely apply a prescribed dose to each tumour in full-scale radiobiological experiments. Tumour growth delay was determined after irradiation with doses of 3 and 6 Gy by laser-accelerated electrons. Reference irradiation was performed with continuous electron beams at a clinical linear accelerator in order to both validate the dedicated dosimetry employed for laser-accelerated JETI electrons and above all review the biological results. No significant difference in radiation-induced tumour growth delay was revealed for the two investigated electron beams. These data provide evidence that the ultra-high dose rate generated by laser acceleration does not impact the biological effectiveness of the particles. PMID:25600561

  15. THE PHYSICS AND PROPERTIES OF FREE - ELECTRON LASERS.

    SciTech Connect

    KRINSKY,S.

    2002-05-06

    We present an introduction to the operating principles of free-electron lasers, discussing the amplification process, and the requirements on the electron beam necessary to achieve desired performance.

  16. Further remarks on electron beam pumping of laser materials.

    PubMed

    Klein, C A

    1966-12-01

    This article demonstrates that recently completed studies on the energy dissipation of kilovolt electron beams in solids provide readily applicable methods for assessing the situation in electron beam pumped lasers. PMID:20057662

  17. Wiggler plane focusing in a linear free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Scharlemann, Ernst T.

    1988-01-01

    Free electron laser apparatus that provides a magnetic centering force to turn or focus a non-axial electron toward the longitudinal axis as desired. The focusing effect is provided by wiggler magnet pole faces that are approximately parabolically shaped.

  18. Free electron laser using Rf coupled accelerating and decelerating structures

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    A free electron laser and free electron laser amplifier using beam transport devices for guiding an electron beam to a wiggler of a free electron laser and returning the electron beam to decelerating cavities disposed adjacent to the accelerating cavities of the free electron laser. Rf energy is generated from the energy depleted electron beam after it emerges from the wiggler by means of the decelerating cavities which are closely coupled to the accelerating cavities, or by means of a second bore within a single set of cavities. Rf energy generated from the decelerated electron beam is used to supplement energy provided by an external source, such as a klystron, to thereby enhance overall efficiency of the system.

  19. Laser space communication experiment: Modulator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, F. E.

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented of a contractual program to develop the modulator technology necessary for a 10.6 micron laser communication system using cadmium telluride as the modulator material. The program consisted of the following tasks: (1) The growth of cadmium telluride crystals of sufficient size and purity and with the necessary optical properties for use as laser modulator rods. (2) Develop a low loss antireflection coating for the cadmium telluride rods. (3) Design and build a modulator capable of 300 MHz modulation. (4) Develop a modulator driver capable of a data rate of 300 MBits/sec, 12 W rms output power, and 40 percent efficiency. (5) Assemble and test the modulator system. All design goals were met and the system was built and tested.

  20. Experimental demonstration of distributed feedback semiconductor lasers based on reconstruction-equivalent-chirp technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingsi; Wang, Huan; Chen, Xiangfei; Yin, Zuowei; Shi, Yuechun; Lu, Yanqing; Dai, Yitang; Zhu, Hongliang

    2009-03-30

    In this paper we report, to the best of our knowledge, the first experimental realization of distributed feedback (DFB) semiconductor lasers based on reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technology. Lasers with different lasing wavelengths are achieved simultaneously on one chip, which shows a potential for the REC technology in combination with the photonic integrated circuits (PIC) technology to be a possible method for monolithic integration, in that its fabrication is as powerful as electron beam technology and the cost and time-consuming are almost the same as standard holographic technology. PMID:19333287

  1. Electron beam switched discharge for rapidly pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Pleasance, Lyn D.; Murray, John R.; Goldhar, Julius; Bradley, Laird P.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for electrical excitation of a laser gas by application of a pulsed voltage across the gas, followed by passage of a pulsed, high energy electron beam through the gas to initiate a discharge suitable for laser excitation. This method improves upon current power conditioning techniques and is especially useful for driving rare gas halide lasers at high repetition rates.

  2. Wavelength modulation in free electron lasers. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkley, W.R.

    1995-03-01

    The optical wavelength of a Free Electron Laser (FEL) is dependent on the input electron beam energy. So, as the energy of this beam varies, the optical wavelength from the laser will vary as well. In many applications, this effect may be unwanted and in others, it may be desirable. At the Stanford University Superconducting Free Electron Laser Facility, a feedback mechanism has been implemented to study the effects of electron beam energy fluctuation. Here, numerical techniques are used to study optical wavelength modulation caused by electron beam energy modulation where the amplitude modulation is within the gain spectrum bandwidth of the FEL.

  3. Electronics Technology. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Guy

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of 20 terminal objectives for a basic electronics technology course. The materials were developed for a two-semester course (2 hours daily) designed to include instruction in basic electricity and electronic fundamentals, and to develop skills and…

  4. Electronics Troubleshooting. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lodahl, Dan

    This learning module for a postsecondary electronics course in solid state circuits is designed to help teachers lead students through electronics troubleshooting. The module is intended to be used for a second-semester technical college course for electromechanical technology majors. The module introduces students to semiconductor devices and…

  5. Femtosecond laser-induced electronic plasma at metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhaoyang; Mao, Samuel S.

    2008-08-04

    We develop a theoretical analysis to model plasma initiation at the early stage of femtosecond laser irradiation of metal surfaces. The calculation reveals that there is a threshold intensity for the formation of a microscale electronic plasma at the laser-irradidated metal surface. As the full width at half maximum of a laser pulse increases from 15 to 200 fs, the plasma formation threshold decreases by merely about 20%. The dependence of the threshold intensity on laser pulse width can be attributed to laser-induced surface electron emission, in particular due to the effect of photoelectric effect.

  6. Electronic Devices and Systems. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Centre-Southwest, Waco, TX.

    This course in electronic devices and systems is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in…

  7. The Medical Free Electron Laser Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Charles L.

    1989-08-01

    We owe the development of the free electron laser (FEL) to Dr. John M.J. Madey, formerly of Stanford University, and now at Duke University. In the early years of the research that lead ultimately to the device that actually produced coherent light, Dr. Madey had to work diligently to procure adequate funding for his FEL project. Sometimes it is much more difficult to find the appropriate funding source then it is to actually perform the research. After working with various basic research organizations, the Office of Naval Research, the Army Research Organization, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and others, to develop and test the basic scientific principles of the FEL, Dr. Madey looked to the future of the device. The FEL is indeed one of the principal defensive directed energy weapons under development in the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). However, Dr. Madey felt that the FEL could and should be used in the medical arena. The unique capabilities of the FEL certainly lend themselves to enhancing the practice of medicine which already uses lasers in the treatment of disease and in surgery. Dr. Madey and several physicians who also felt that the FEL belonged at least in medical research traveled to Washington, D.C., to visit the Congress and acquaint them with the potential of the FEL.

  8. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Baca, D.M.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cheairs, R.B.; Fortgang, C.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Kinross-Wright, J.; McCann, S.W.; Meier, K.L.; Plato, J.G.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.; Sigler, F.E.; Timmer, C.A.; Warren, R.W.; Weber, M.E.; Wilson, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30{degrees} bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere.

  9. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Baca, D.M.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cheairs, R.B.; Fortgang, C.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Kinross-Wright, J.; McCann, S.W.; Meier, K.L.; Plato, J.G.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.; Sigler, F.E.; Timmer, C.A.; Warren, R.W.; Weber, M.E.; Wilson, W.L.

    1992-09-01

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30{degrees} bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere.

  10. Laser-induced resonant structure in electron-atom scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flegel, A. V.; Frolov, M. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2009-11-01

    Orders of magnitude increases are predicted in the cross sections for electron-atom scattering accompanied by absorption or emission of n laser photons for incident electron energies at which the electron, by emitting μ laser photons, can be captured by the atom to form a negative ion. Resonance enhancements are most significant in the plateau region (n gg μ) of the scattered electron spectrum, whose shape is predicted to replicate that of the ion's (n + μ)-photon detachment spectrum.

  11. Modelling elliptically polarised free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, J. R.; Campbell, L. T.; Freund, H. P.; McNeil, B. W. J.

    2016-06-01

    A model of a free electron laser (FEL) operating with an elliptically polarised undulator is presented. The equations describing the FEL interaction, including resonant harmonic radiation fields, are averaged over an undulator period and generate a generalised Bessel function scaling factor, similar to that of planar undulator FEL theory. Comparison between simulations of the averaged model with those of an unaveraged model show very good agreement in the linear regime. Two unexpected results were found. Firstly, an increased coupling to harmonics for elliptical rather than planar polarisarised undulators. Secondly, and thought to be unrelated to the undulator polarisation, a significantly different evolution between the averaged and unaveraged simulations of the harmonic radiation evolution approaching FEL saturation.

  12. Recent progress of the Los Alamos advanced free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.; Feldman, D.W.; Goldstein, J.C.; Gierman, S.M.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Kong, S.H.; Plato, J.G.; Russell, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    Many industrial and research applications can benefit from the availability of a compact, user-friendly, broadly tunable and high average power free electron laser (FEL). Over the past four years, the Los Alamos Advanced FEL has been built with these design goals. The key to a compact FEL is the integration of advanced beam technologies such as a high-brightness photoinjector, a high-gradient compact linac, and permanent magnet beamline components. These technologies enable the authors to shrink the FEL size yet maintain its high average power capability. The Advanced FEL has been in operation in the near ir (4-6 {mu}m) since early 1993. Recent results of the Advanced FEL lasing at saturation and upgrades to improve its average power are presented.

  13. Frontiers of free-electron laser science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucksbaum, Philip; Möller, Thomas; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2013-08-01

    The special issue 'Frontiers of free-electron laser (FEL) science ' will highlight the achievement in AMO physics enabled by fourth generation light sources, i.e., short wavelength FELs in Europe, Japan and the USA. AMO physics at these FELs now covers a broad energy range from a few tens of eV to a few tens of keV. The key questions in this new field concern the nature of the interactions of intense FEL pulses with matter and the description of strong-field short-wavelength ionization dynamics. What are the dominant mechanisms of light absorption and electron emission in this new regime? What contrast mechanisms can enhance imaging with superintense pulses? How are the concepts of nonlinear optics altered at short wavelengths? Time-resolved studies are ideal to address many of these issues. The basic techniques of ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy have now been extended to FELs, both with multiple FEL pulses and with synchronized optical and FEL pulses. The methods for timing synchronization of FEL pulses to optical laser-induced phenomena, including streaking, cross correlations and other time tools are now enabling new studies of time-resolved phenomena. A broad interdisciplinary research field has been formed, which extends the borders of AMO science into biology, chemical dynamics and plasma physics. Three review articles in this special issue summarize the performances of the fourth generation FEL light sources at FLASH, LCLS and SACLA/SCSS and the first years of research performed there. The contributing authors report on new experimental methods, instrumentations, including the endstation for AMO physics at a newly launched seeded FEL facility FERMI in Elettra, and theoretical tools. The present compilation of results is by no means complete. Examples of exciting research achieved at the new facilities in Europe, Japan and the USA are presented in separate sections. We expect that this collection will be a resource for the rapidly expanding scientific

  14. Ignition feedback regenerative free electron laser (FEL) amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Kwang-Je; Zholents, Alexander; Zolotorev, Max

    2001-01-01

    An ignition feedback regenerative amplifier consists of an injector, a linear accelerator with energy recovery, and a high-gain free electron laser amplifier. A fraction of the free electron laser output is coupled to the input to operate the free electron laser in the regenerative mode. A mode filter in this loop prevents run away instability. Another fraction of the output, after suitable frequency up conversion, is used to drive the photocathode. An external laser is provided to start up both the amplifier and the injector, thus igniting the system.

  15. Laser Ignition Technology for Bi-Propellant Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Matt; Bossard, John; Early, Jim; Trinh, Huu; Dennis, Jay; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of laser ignition technology for bipropellant rocket engines applications. The objectives of this project include: (1) the selection test chambers and flows; (2) definition of the laser ignition setup; (3) pulse format optimization; (4) fiber optic coupled laser ignition system analysis; and (5) chamber integration issues definition. The testing concludes that rocket combustion chamber laser ignition is imminent. Support technologies (multiplexing, window durability/cleaning, and fiber optic durability) are feasible.

  16. High repetition rate relativistic electron beam generation from intense laser solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batson, Thomas; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Thomas, Alexander; Krushelnick, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Relativistic electron beams have wide-ranging applications in medicine, materials science, and homeland security. Recent advances in short pulse laser technology have enabled the production of very high focused intensities at kHz rep rates. Consequently this has led to the generation of high flux sources of relativistic electrons - which is a necessary characteristic of these laser plasma sources for any potential application. In our experiments, through the generation of a plasma by focusing a 5 × 1018 W/cm2, 500 Hz, Ti:Sapphire laser pulse onto a fused silica target, we have measured electrons ejected from the target surface having energies in excess of an MeV. The spectrum of these electrons, as well as the spatial divergence of the resulting beam, was also measured with respect to incident laser angle, prepulse timing and focusing conditions. The experimental results are compared to particle in cell simulations.

  17. CW silver ion laser with electron beam excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernsman, B.; Prabhuram, T.; Lewis, K.; Gonzalez, F.; Villagran, M.

    1988-08-01

    A CW laser power of 140 mW was obtained in the 840.39-nm transition of Ag II by electron-beam excitation. The electron-beam excited metal-vapor ion laser is capable of operating using metals with high vaporization temperatures, and is of interest for generation of CW coherent radiation in the 220-260-nm spectral region.

  18. Two-dimensional optimization of free-electron-laser designs

    DOEpatents

    Prosnitz, D.; Haas, R.A.

    1982-05-04

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers are described that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a synchronous electron at an optimal transverse radius r > 0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  19. Two-dimensional optimization of free electron laser designs

    DOEpatents

    Prosnitz, Donald; Haas, Roger A.

    1985-01-01

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a "synchronous electron" at an optimal transverse radius r>0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  20. Laser and electron cooling of relativistic stored beams

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, G.; Schroeder, S.; Klein, R.; Boos, N.; Grieser, R.; Hoog, I.; Krieg, M.; Merz, P. ); Kuehl, T.; Neumann, R. ); Balykin, V.; Grieser, M.; Habs, D.; Jaeschke, E.; Petrich, W.; Schwalm, D.; Steck, M.; Wanner, B.; Wolf, A. )

    1991-08-05

    Laser cooling of ions at relativistic energies was first observed at the TSR storage ring in Heidelberg. A {sup 7}Li{sup +} ion beam moving at 6.4% the speed of light was overlapped with resonant co- and counter-propagating laser beams. The longitudinal temperatures were found to pass below 190 mK. Limits and applications of laser cooled relativistic ion beams are discussed. Laser cooling and electron cooling of the ion beam were combined.

  1. Optimizing chirped laser pulse parameters for electron acceleration in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Akhyani, Mina; Jahangiri, Fazel; Niknam, Ali Reza; Massudi, Reza

    2015-11-14

    Electron dynamics in the field of a chirped linearly polarized laser pulse is investigated. Variations of electron energy gain versus chirp parameter, time duration, and initial phase of laser pulse are studied. Based on maximizing laser pulse asymmetry, a numerical optimization procedure is presented, which leads to the elimination of rapid fluctuations of gain versus the chirp parameter. Instead, a smooth variation is observed that considerably reduces the accuracy required for experimentally adjusting the chirp parameter.

  2. Rippled beam free-electron laser amplifier using the axial free-electron laser interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-05-01

    A new microwave generation mechanism involving a scalloping annular electron beam is discussed. The beam interacts with the axial electric field of a TM{sub 0n} mode in a smooth circular waveguide through the axial free-electron laser interaction, in which the beam ripple period is synchronous with the phase slippage of the rf mode relative to the electron beam. In this paper, we analyze the ripple motion of the electron beam and derive the dispersion relation describing the exponential growth of the rf mode. We calculate the gain for a nominal design and as a function of beam current and ripple amplitude, and show that power gain on the order of 30 dB/m of interaction is achievable. We additionally demonstrate that, under the right conditions, the interaction is autoresonant. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Overview of laser technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, G. K.; Cremers, D. A.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has had a long history of involvement in laser sciences and has been recognized both for its large laser programs and smaller scale developments in laser technology and applications. The first significant program was with the Rover nuclear-based rocket propulsion system in 1968 to study laser initiated fusion. From here applications spread to programs in laser isotope separation and development of large lasers for fusion. These programs established the technological human resource base of highly trained laser physicists, engineers, and chemists that remain at the Laboratory today. Almost every technical division at Los Alamos now has some laser capability ranging from laser development, applications, studies on nonlinear processes, modeling and materials processing. During the past six years over eight R&D-100 Awards have been received by Los Alamos for development of laser-based techniques and instrumentation. Outstanding examples of technology developed include LIDAR applications to environmental monitoring, single molecule detection using fluorescence spectroscopy, a laser-based high kinetic energy source of oxygen atoms produced by a laser-sustained plasma, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for compositional, analysis, thin film high temperature superconductor deposition, multi-station laser welding, and direct metal deposition and build-up of components by fusing powder particles with a laser beam.

  4. Overview of laser technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, G.K.; Cremers, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has had a long history of involvement in laser sciences and has been recognized both for its large laser programs and smaller scale developments in laser technology and applications. The first significant program was with the Rover nuclear-based rocket propulsion system in 1968 to study laser initiated fusion. From here applications spread to programs in laser isotope separation and development of large lasers for fusion. These programs established the technological human resource base of highly trained laser physicists, engineers, and chemists that remain at the Laboratory today. Almost every technical division at Los Alamos now has some laser capability ranging from laser development, applications, studies on nonlinear processes, modeling and materials processing. During the past six years over eight R&D-100 Awards have been received by Los Alamos for development of laser-based techniques and instrumentation. Outstanding examples of technology developed include LIDAR applications to environmental monitoring, single molecule detection using fluorescence spectroscopy, a laser-based high kinetic energy source of oxygen atoms produced by a laser-sustained plasma, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for compositional, analysis, thin film high temperature superconductor deposition, multi-station laser welding, and direct metal deposition and build-up of components by fusing powder particles with a laser beam.

  5. An open-source laser electronics suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisenti, Neal C.; Reschovsky, Benjamin J.; Barker, Daniel S.; Restelli, Alessandro; Campbell, Gretchen K.

    2016-05-01

    We present an integrated set of open-source electronics for controlling external-cavity diode lasers and other instruments in the laboratory. The complete package includes a low-noise circuit for driving high-voltage piezoelectric actuators, an ultra-stable current controller based on the design of, and a high-performance, multi-channel temperature controller capable of driving thermo-electric coolers or resistive heaters. Each circuit (with the exception of the temperature controller) is designed to fit in a Eurocard rack equipped with a low-noise linear power supply capable of driving up to 5 A at +/- 15 V. A custom backplane allows signals to be shared between modules, and a digital communication bus makes the entire rack addressable by external control software over TCP/IP. The modular architecture makes it easy for additional circuits to be designed and integrated with existing electronics, providing a low-cost, customizable alternative to commercial systems without sacrificing performance.

  6. UCLA infrared free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, James W.; Hartman, Steven C.; Park, Sanghyun; Pellegrini, Claudio; Rosenzweig, James B.; Smolin, J. A.; Barletta, W. A.; Cline, David B.; Cooper, Richard K.; Kolonko, J.; Davis, J. G.; Hairapetian, G.; Joshi, Chand J.; Luhmann, Neville C., Jr.; Ivanchenkov, S. N.; Khlebnikov, A. S.; Varfolomeev, A. A.

    1992-05-01

    A compact 20 MeV linac with an RF laser-driven electron gun will drive a high-gain (10 cm gain length), 10.6 micrometers wavelength FEL amplifier, operating in the SASE mode. FEL physics in the high-gain regime will be studied, including start-up from noise, optical guiding, sidebands, saturation, and superradiance, with emphasis on the effects important for future short wavelength operation of FEL's. The hybrid undulator, designed and built at the Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy in the U.S.S.R., has forty periods, each 1.5 cm long. The magnetic material is a hybrid combination of SmCo5 blocks and Nd-Fe-B blocks, with vanadium-permendur yokes. The gap distance between pole-tips is fixed at 5 mm. On axis the peak value of the completed undulator's magnetic field was measured to be 7.3 kGauss (+/- 0.25%). Measurements during the conditioning phase of the RF gun for the electron beam's peak dark-current show 6 mA without the longitudinal magnetic focusing field in the gun and 34 mA with the focusing field active. The peak current from photoemission is calculated to be 200 A.

  7. Tenth Biennial Coherent Laser Radar Technology and Applications Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The tenth conference on coherent laser radar technology and applications is the latest in a series beginning in 1980 which provides a forum for exchange of information on recent events current status, and future directions of coherent laser radar (or lidar or lader) technology and applications. This conference emphasizes the latest advancement in the coherent laser radar field, including theory, modeling, components, systems, instrumentation, measurements, calibration, data processing techniques, operational uses, and comparisons with other remote sensing technologies.

  8. Fast Electron Deposition in Laser Shock Compressed Plastic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, T. A.; Ellwi, S.; Batani, D.; Bernardinello, A.; Masella, V.; Koenig, M.; Benuzzi, A.; Krishnan, J.; Pisani, F.; Djaoui, A.; Norreys, P.; Neely, D.; Rose, S.; Key, M. H.; Fews, P.

    1998-08-01

    We present the first results of fast electron deposition in a laser shock compressed plasma. The interaction of a 3 ps, 15 J laser pulse with solid polyethylene targets is used to produce fast electrons on one side of foil targets and a 2 ns duration laser pulse is used to drive a shock wave into the target from the opposite side. Kα emission from chlorine fluor buried layers is used to measure the electron transport. The hot electron range in the shock compressed plastic is found to be approximately twice as large as the range in the solid density plastic.

  9. Kinetic Electrostatic Electron Nonlinear Waves in Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afeyan, Bedros

    2004-11-01

    A new type of coherent self-sustaining nonlinear kinetic wave has been discovered, well below the plasma frequency, which we call Kinetic Electrostatic Electron Nonlinear (KEEN) waves. Vlasov-Poisson and Vlasov-Maxwell simulations where KEEN waves were excited by ponderomotive forces of short duration, generated by the beating of counter-propagating lasers of the appropriate colors [1-2], show that these waves persist without decay well after the driving fields are turned off. The resulting phase space vortical structures are reminiscent in certain respects to BGK modes proposed in 1957 [3]. However, KEEN waves are not stationary and higher harmonics which are an essential part of their make up have wider and wider frequency content. KEEN waves constitute a generalization and clarification of concepts previously invoked to help explain stimulated electron acoustic wave scattering in the presence of SRS [4,5]. However, in the case of KEEN waves, no flattened (zero slope) electron velocity distribution function need be invoked and no single mode behavior is observed. There is a threshold drive which is necessary in order to create KEEN waves. A reduced model based on a phase space coupled mode theory with 3-4 modes will be shown to capture the phase locked multimode nonlinear nature of KEEN waves. We have also successfully completed a series of experiments to generate via optical mixing and observe via 4ω Thomson scattering KEEN waves on Trident at LANL. Our latest results from this campaign will be shown. [1] B. Afeyan, et al., "Kinetic Electrostatic " Proc. IFSA Conf. (2004). [2] B. Afeyan, et al., submitted to PRL (2004) [3] I. Bernstein et al., Phys. Rev. 108. 546 (1957). [4] D. S. Montgomery et al., PRL 87, 155001 (2001). [5] H. A, Rose and D. A. Russell, Phys. Plasmas 8, 4784 (2001).

  10. Terawatt Picosecond CO(sub 2) Laser Technology for High Energy Physics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I. V.

    1998-07-05

    Demonstration of ultra-high acceleration gradients in the SM LWFA experiments put a next objective for the laser accelerator development to achieve a low-emittance monochromatic acceleration over extended interaction distances. The emerging picosecond terawatt (ps-TW) CO{sub 2} laser technology helps to meet this strategic goal. Among the considered examples are: the staged electron laser accelerator (STELLA) experiment, which is being conducted at the Brookhaven ATF, and the plasma-channeled LWFA. The long-wavelength and high average power capabilities of CO{sub 2} lasers maybe utilized also for generation of intense x-ray and gamma radiation through Compton back-scattering of the laser beams off relativistic electrons. We discuss applications of ps-TW CO{sub 2} lasers for a tentative {gamma}-{gamma} (or {gamma}-lepton) collider and generation of polarized positron beams.

  11. Synchronization of Sub-Picosecond Electron and Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Le Sage G.P.

    2000-08-15

    Sub-picosecond laser-electron synchronization is required to take full advantage of the experimental possibilities arising from the marriage of modern high intensity lasers and high brightness electron beams in the same laboratory. Two particular scenarios stand out in this regard, injection of ultra-short electron pulses in short wavelength laser-driven plasma accelerators, and Compton scattering of laser photons from short electron pulses. Both of these applications demand synchronization, which is subpicosecond, with tens of femtosecond synchronization implied for next-generation experiments. Typically, an RF electron accelerator is synchronized to a short pulse laser system by detecting the repetition signal of a laser oscillator, adjusted to an exact subharmonic of the linac RF frequency, and multiplying or phase locking this signal to produce the master RF clock. Pulse-to-pulse jitter characteristic of self-mode-locked laser oscillators represents a direct contribution to the ultimate timing jitter between a high intensity laser focus and electron beam at the interaction point, or a photocathode drive laser in an RF photoinjector. This timing jitter problem has been addressed most seriously in the context of the RF photoinjector, where the electron beam properties are sensitive functions of relative timing jitter. The timing jitter achieved in synchronized photocathode drive laser systems is near, or slightly below one picosecond. The ultimate time of arrival jitter of the beam at the photoinjector exit is typically a bit smaller than the photocathode drive-laser jitter due to velocity compression effects in the first RF cell of the gun. This tendency of the timing of the electron beam arrival at a given spatial point to lock to the RF lock is strongly reinforced by use of magnetic compression.

  12. High power semiconductor laser beam combining technology and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijun; Tong, Cunzhu; Peng, Hangyu; Zhang, Jun

    2013-05-01

    With the rapid development of laser applications, single elements of diode lasers are not able to meet the increasing requirements on power and beam quality in the material processing and defense filed, whether are used as pumping sources or directly laser sources. The coupling source with high power and high beam quality, multiplexed by many single elements, has been proven to be a promising technical solution. In this paper, the authors review the development tendency of efficiency, power, and lifetime of laser elements firstly, and then introduce the progress of laser beam combining technology. The authors also present their recent progress on the high power diode laser sources developed by beam combining technology, including the 2600W beam combining direct laser source, 1000W fiber coupled semiconductor lasers and the 1000W continuous wave (CW) semiconductor laser sources with beam quality of 12.5×14[mm. mrad]2.

  13. In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Nicholas A.; Magel, Gregory A.; Hartfield, Cheryl D.; Moore, Thomas M.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Rack, Philip D.

    2012-07-15

    Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {mu}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

  14. In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Nicholas; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Prof. Philip; Moore, Tom; Magel, Greg; Hartfield, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {micro}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

  15. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION, FREE ELECTRON LASER, APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY, ETC.: X-ray beam hardening correction for measuring density in linear accelerator industrial computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ri-Feng; Wang, Jue; Chen, Wei-Min

    2009-07-01

    Due to X-ray attenuation being approximately proportional to material density, it is possible to measure the inner density through Industrial Computed Tomography (ICT) images accurately. In practice, however, a number of factors including the non-linear effects of beam hardening and diffuse scattered radiation complicate the quantitative measurement of density variations in materials. This paper is based on the linearization method of beam hardening correction, and uses polynomial fitting coefficient which is obtained by the curvature of iron polychromatic beam data to fit other materials. Through theoretical deduction, the paper proves that the density measure error is less than 2% if using pre-filters to make the spectrum of linear accelerator range mainly 0.3 MeV to 3 MeV. Experiment had been set up at an ICT system with a 9 MeV electron linear accelerator. The result is satisfactory. This technique makes the beam hardening correction easy and simple, and it is valuable for measuring the ICT density and making use of the CT images to recognize materials.

  16. Free Electron Laser Theory Using Two Times Green Function Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2002-04-01

    In this paper, we present a quatum theory for free electron laser obtained by firstly using the Two time's Green Function method developed by Matsubara for solid physics theory. The dispersion relation for the laser photon obtained is limited to the case of low intensity of the laser due to the decoupling the correlation function in low order. For the analysis of the self-amplified emission (SASE), the high intensity laser radiation which strongly affect the trajectory of the free electron is involved, the use of the classical approximation for laser can formulate the laser radiation with multiple frequency. To get the quantum effects in the high intensity laser, use of the perturbation theory, and the expansion methods of state function using the coherent, squeeze and super-radiant states have discussed.

  17. Physics of laser-driven plasma-based electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-07-15

    Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators, which are capable of supporting fields in excess of 100 GV/m, are reviewed. This includes the laser wakefield accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator, plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses, and highly nonlinear regimes. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse diffraction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, and beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Experiments demonstrating key physics, such as the production of high-quality electron bunches at energies of 0.1-1 GeV, are summarized.

  18. Advanced thermal management technologies for defense electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloschock, Kristen P.; Bar-Cohen, Avram

    2012-05-01

    Thermal management technology plays a key role in the continuing miniaturization, performance improvements, and higher reliability of electronic systems. For the past decade, and particularly, the past 4 years, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has aggressively pursued the application of micro- and nano-technology to reduce or remove thermal constraints on the performance of defense electronic systems. The DARPA Thermal Management Technologies (TMT) portfolio is comprised of five technical thrust areas: Thermal Ground Plane (TGP), Microtechnologies for Air-Cooled Exchangers (MACE), NanoThermal Interfaces (NTI), Active Cooling Modules (ACM), and Near Junction Thermal Transport (NJTT). An overview of the TMT program will be presented with emphasis on the goals and status of these efforts relative to the current State-of-the-Art. The presentation will close with future challenges and opportunities in the thermal management of defense electronics.

  19. The European XFEL Free Electron Laser at DESY

    ScienceCinema

    Weise, Hans [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Germany

    2009-09-01

    The European X-ray Free-Electron laser Facility (XFEL) is going to be built in an international collaboration at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Germany, and the Technical Design Report was published in 2006. The official project is expected for summer 2007. This new facility will offer photon beams at wavelengths as short as 1 angstrom with highest peak brilliance being more than 100 million times higher than present day synchrotron radiation sources. The radiation has a high degree of transverse coherence and the pulse duration is reduced from {approx}100 picoseconds (typ. for SR light sources) down to the {approx}10 femtosecond time domain. The overall layout of the XFEL will be described. This includes the envisaged operation parameters for the linear accelerator using superconducting TESLA technology. The complete design is based on the actually operated FLASH free-electron laser at DESY. Experience with the operation during first long user runs at wavelengths from 30 to 13 nm will be described in detail.

  20. Laser Assisted Free-Free Transition in Electron - Atom Collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Free-free transition is studied for electron-Hydrogen atom system in ground state at very low incident energies in presence of an external homogeneous, monochromatic and linearly polarized laser field. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a non perturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange, short range as well as of the long range interactions. Laser assisted differential as well as elastic total cross sections are calculated for single photon absorption/emission in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the laser assisted cross sections as compared to the field free situations. Significant difference is noted in the singlet and the triplet cross sections.

  1. Quasi-monoenergetic laser-plasma acceleration of electrons to 2 GeV

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Fazel, Neil; Li, Zhengyan; Yi, S. A.; Zhang, Xi; Henderson, Watson; Chang, Y.-Y.; Korzekwa, R.; Tsai, H.-E.; Pai, C.-H.; Quevedo, H.; Dyer, G.; Gaul, E.; Martinez, M.; Bernstein, A. C.; Borger, T.; Spinks, M.; Donovan, M.; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.; Ditmire, T.; Downer, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators of only a centimetre’s length have produced nearly monoenergetic electron bunches with energy as high as 1 GeV. Scaling these compact accelerators to multi-gigaelectronvolt energy would open the prospect of building X-ray free-electron lasers and linear colliders hundreds of times smaller than conventional facilities, but the 1 GeV barrier has so far proven insurmountable. Here, by applying new petawatt laser technology, we produce electron bunches with a spectrum prominently peaked at 2 GeV with only a few per cent energy spread and unprecedented sub-milliradian divergence. Petawatt pulses inject ambient plasma electrons into the laser-driven accelerator at much lower density than was previously possible, thereby overcoming the principal physical barriers to multi-gigaelectronvolt acceleration: dephasing between laser-driven wake and accelerating electrons and laser pulse erosion. Simulations indicate that with improvements in the laser-pulse focus quality, acceleration to nearly 10 GeV should be possible with the available pulse energy. PMID:23756359

  2. Laser-Electron-Gamma-Source. Progress report, July 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Fineman, B.; Giordano, G.; Kistner, OC.; Matone, G.; Sandorfi, A.M.; Schaerf, C.; Thorn, C.E.; Ziegler, W.

    1986-07-01

    When completed, the Laser Electron Gamma Source (LEGS) is expected to provide intense beams of monochromatic and polarized (circular or linear) gamma rays with energies up to 500 MeV. The gamma-ray beams will be produced by Compton backscattering uv laser light from the electrons circulating in a storage ring. Progress with installation of the facility is described, particularly the Ar-ion laser and tagging spectrometer. Tests of the tagging spectrometer coponents is reported, and a second laser is described for higher energy operation. Estimates are given of expected beam parameters. Experimental equipment for the planned research projects to be carried out at the LEGS facility is discussed. (LEW)

  3. Advanced metaheuristic algorithms for laser optimization in optical accelerator technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomizawa, Hiromitsu

    2011-10-01

    Lasers are among the most important experimental tools for user facilities, including synchrotron radiation and free electron lasers (FEL). In the synchrotron radiation field, lasers are widely used for experiments with Pump-Probe techniques. Especially for X-ray-FELs, lasers play important roles as seed light sources or photocathode-illuminating light sources to generate a high-brightness electron bunch. For future accelerators, laser-based techonologies such as electro-optic (EO) sampling to measure ultra-short electron bunches and optical-fiber-based femtosecond timing systems have been intensively developed in the last decade. Therefore, controls and optimizations of laser pulse characteristics are strongly required for many kinds of experiments and improvement of accelerator systems. However, people believe that lasers should be tuned and customized for each requirement manually by experts. This makes it difficult for laser systems to be part of the common accelerator infrastructure. Automatic laser tuning requires sophisticated algorithms, and the metaheuristic algorithm is one of the best solutions. The metaheuristic laser tuning system is expected to reduce the human effort and time required for laser preparations. I have shown some successful results on a metaheuristic algorithm based on a genetic algorithm to optimize spatial (transverse) laser profiles, and a hill-climbing method extended with a fuzzy set theory to choose one of the best laser alignments automatically for each machine requirement.

  4. Nonlinear pulse evolution in seeded free-electron laser amplifiers and in free-electron laser cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Giannessi, L.; Musumeci, P.; Spampinati, S.

    2005-08-15

    The advances in laser technology have made available very short and intense laser pulses which can be used to seed a high-gain single-pass free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier. With these seed pulses, a regime of the FEL interaction where the radiation evolution is simultaneously dominated by nonlinear effects (saturation) and time-dependent effects (slippage) can be explored. This regime is characterized by the propagation of a solitary wavelike pulse where the power of the optical wave grows quadratically with time, its pulse length decreases and the spectral bandwidth increases. We analyze the interplay between the field and particle dynamics of this propagation regime which was studied before and termed super-radiance. Furthermore we analyze the properties of the strong higher-order harmonic emission from this wave and its behavior when propagating in a cascade FEL. The super-radiant pulse is indeed capable of passing through the stages of a cascade FEL and to regenerate itself at the wavelength of the higher-order harmonic. The optical pulse obtained is shorter than a cooperation length and is strongly chirped in frequency, thus allowing further longitudinal compression down to the attosecond time scale.

  5. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  6. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Edward M.; Rosen, Mordecai D.

    1989-01-01

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  7. Application of CO2 laser for electronic components soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascorro-Pantoja, J.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Nieto-Pérez, M.; Gonzalez-Mota, R.; Rosales-Candelas, I.

    2011-10-01

    Laser provides a high controllable and localized spot for soldering joint formation and this is a valuable tool in Sn/Pb Soldering process on electronic industry, in recent years, laser beam welding has become an emerging welding technique, the use of laser in welding area is a high efficiency method. A 60 Watts CO2 continuous laser was used on this study, during welding experimental results indicated the laser could significantly improve speed and weld quality. In this work, the welding interactions of CO2 laser with Sn/Pb wire have been investigated in details through varying the energy ratios of laser. And at the same time, the effect of distance from laser spot to material.

  8. Nuclear pumped electronic transition laser studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. M.; Helmick, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    An experiment is proposed that should yield unambiguous absolute results on the production efficiency of rare gas excimers from fission fragments. Laser threshold efficiency is parameterized and calculations indicate that some lasers can be operated using relatively simple experimental apparatus adjacent to GODIVA. Operation of a KrF excimer laser adjacent to GODIVA appears to be possible, although the neutron pulse width is not well matched to the laser pulse duration. However, calculation indicates that KrF excimer laser output on the order of a joule may be possible.

  9. Generation of ultrashort electron bunches by colliding laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C.B.; Lee, P.B.; Wurtele, J.S.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    1999-07-01

    A proposed laser-plasma based relativistic electron source [E. Esarey {ital et al.}, Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 79}, 2682 (1997)] using laser triggered injection of electrons is investigated. The source generates ultrashort electron bunches by dephasing and trapping background plasma electrons undergoing fluid oscillations in an excited plasma wake. The plasma electrons are dephased by colliding two counter-propagating laser pulses which generate a slow phase velocity beat wave. Laser pulse intensity thresholds for trapping and the optimal wake phase for injection are calculated. Numerical simulations of test particles, with prescribed plasma and laser fields, are used to verify analytic predictions and to study the longitudinal and transverse dynamics of the trapped plasma electrons. Simulations indicate that the colliding laser pulse injection scheme has the capability to produce relativistic femtosecond electron bunches with fractional energy spread of order a few percent and normalized transverse emittance less than 1 mm mrad using 1 TW injection laser pulses. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Generation of ultrashort electron bunches by colliding laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C.B.; Lee, P.B.; Wurtele, J.S.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    1999-05-01

    A proposed laser-plasma-based relativistic electron source [E. Esarey {ital et al}., Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 79}, 2682 (1997)] using laser-triggered injection of electrons is investigated. The source generates ultrashort electron bunches by dephasing and trapping background plasma electrons undergoing fluid oscillations in an excited plasma wake. The plasma electrons are dephased by colliding two counterpropagating laser pulses which generate a slow phase velocity beat wave. Laser pulse intensity thresholds for trapping and the optimal wake phase for injection are calculated. Numerical simulations of test particles, with prescribed plasma and laser fields, are used to verify analytic predictions and to study the longitudinal and transverse dynamics of the trapped plasma electrons. Simulations indicate that the colliding laser pulse injection scheme has the capability to produce relativistic femtosecond electron bunches with fractional energy spread of order a few percent and normalized transverse emittance less than 1 mm mrad using 1 TW injection laser pulses. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}