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Sample records for electron microscopy tem

  1. Application of particle analysis to transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DaPonte, J.; Sadowski, T.; Broadbridge, C. C.; Day, D.; Lehman, A. H.; Krishna, D.; Marinella, L.; Munhutu, P.; Sawicki, M.

    2007-04-01

    Nanoparticles, particles with a diameter of 1-100 nanometers (nm), are of interest in many applications including device fabrication, quantum computing, and sensing because their size may give them properties that are very different from bulk materials. Further advancement of nanotechnology cannot be obtained without an increased understanding of nanoparticle properties such as size (diameter) and size distribution frequently evaluated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the past, these parameters have been obtained from digitized TEM images by manually measuring and counting many of these nanoparticles, a task that is highly subjective and labor intensive. More recently, computer imaging particle analysis has emerged as an objective alternative by counting and measuring objects in a binary image. This paper will describe the procedures used to preprocess a set of gray scale TEM images so that they could be correctly thresholded into binary images. This allows for a more accurate assessment of the size and frequency (size distribution) of nanoparticles. Several preprocessing methods including pseudo flat field correction and rolling ball background correction were investigated with the rolling ball algorithm yielding the best results. Examples of particle analysis will be presented for different types of materials and different magnifications. In addition, a method based on the results of particle analysis for identifying and removing small noise particles will be discussed. This filtering technique is based on identifying the location of small particles in the binary image and removing them without affecting the size of other larger particles.

  2. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) investigations of ancient Egyptian cosmetic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, C.; Walter, P.; Castaing, J.; Penhoud, P.; Veyssière, P.

    The processing technologies available during the time of ancient Egypt are of present concern to the field of Archaeology and Egyptology. Materials characterization is the best tool for establishing the processing history of archaeological objects. In this study, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used, in addition to other techniques, for phase identification and study of the microstructure and characteristic defect structures in ancient Egyptian cosmetic powders. These powders generally consist of a mix of Pb-containing mineral phases: galena (PbS), cerussite (PbCO3), and phosgenite (Pb2Cl2CO3), among others. Modern materials are fabricated according to recipes found in ancient texts to mimic the processing of ancient times and to compare with the archaeological specimens. In particular, a comparison between the dislocation structures of PbS crystals deformed in the laboratory and PbS from archaeological specimens from the collections of the Louvre Museum is presented .

  3. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of minerals in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Kuang-Chien

    1982-01-01

    Minerals in eight coals from different mines were characterized in the micron-size range by using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Specimens were thinned by ion-milling wafers cut from these coals; a cold stage cooled by liquid nitrogen was used to reduce thermal degradation of the minerals by the ion-beam. Different mineral compounds were observed in different coals. The major minerals are clays, sulfides, oxides, carbonates and some minor-element-bearing phosphates. Clays (kaolinite, illite and others) have been most commonly found as either flat sheets or round globules. Iron sulfide was mostly found in the No. 5 and No. 6 coals from Illinois, distributed as massive polycrystals, as clusters of single crystals (framboids) or as isolated single crystals with size range down to some 0.25 microns. Other sulfides and some oxides were found in other coals with particle size as small as some 200 angstroms. Quartz, titanium oxides and many other carbonates and phosphate compounds were also characterized. Brief TEM work in the organic mass of coal was also introduced to study the nature of the coal macerals.

  4. SEM, TEM and SLEEM (scanning low energy electron microscopy) of CB2 steel after creep testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasl, J.; Mikmeková, Š.; Jandová, D.

    2014-03-01

    The demand to produce electrical power with higher efficiency and with lower environmental pollution is leading to the use of new advanced materials in the production of power plant equipment. To understand the processes taking place in parts produced from these materials during their operation under severe conditions (such as high temperature, high stress, and environmental corrosion) requires detailed evaluation of their substructure. It is usually necessary to use transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, this method is very exacting and time-consuming. So there is an effort to use new scanning electron microscopy techniques instead of TEM. One of them is scanning low energy electron microscopy (SLEEM). This paper deals with an assessment of the possibility to use SLEEM for describing the substructure of creep resistant steel CB2 after long-term creep testing. In the SLEEM images more information is contained about the microstructure of the material in comparison with standard scanning electron microscopy. Study of materials using slow and very slow electrons opens the way to better understanding their microstructures.

  5. Comparison of preparation techniques for nuclear materials for transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

    SciTech Connect

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel; Madden, James W.; Miller, Brandon D; Cole, James I; Gan, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Preparation of highly radioactive and irradiated nuclear fuels and materials for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is conjoined with a set of unique challenges, including but not limited to personnel radiation exposure and contamination. The paper evaluates three specimen preparation techniques for preparation of irradiated materials and determines which technique yields to the most reliable characterization of radiation damage microstructure. Various specimen preparation artifacts associated with each technique are considered and ways of minimizing these artifacts are addressed.

  6. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) Sample Preparation of Si(1-x)Gex in c-Plane Sapphire Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Choi, Sang H.; Bae, Hyung-Bin; Lee, Tae Woo

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration-invented X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods, including the total defect density measurement method and the spatial wafer mapping method, have confirmed super hetero epitaxy growth for rhombohedral single crystalline silicon germanium (Si1-xGex) on a c-plane sapphire substrate. However, the XRD method cannot observe the surface morphology or roughness because of the method s limited resolution. Therefore the authors used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with samples prepared in two ways, the focused ion beam (FIB) method and the tripod method to study the structure between Si1-xGex and sapphire substrate and Si1?xGex itself. The sample preparation for TEM should be as fast as possible so that the sample should contain few or no artifacts induced by the preparation. The standard sample preparation method of mechanical polishing often requires a relatively long ion milling time (several hours), which increases the probability of inducing defects into the sample. The TEM sampling of the Si1-xGex on sapphire is also difficult because of the sapphire s high hardness and mechanical instability. The FIB method and the tripod method eliminate both problems when performing a cross-section TEM sampling of Si1-xGex on c-plane sapphire, which shows the surface morphology, the interface between film and substrate, and the crystal structure of the film. This paper explains the FIB sampling method and the tripod sampling method, and why sampling Si1-xGex, on a sapphire substrate with TEM, is necessary.

  7. Structural characterization of hard materials by transmission electron microscopy (TEM): Diamond-Silicon Carbide composites and Yttria-stabilized Zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon Seok

    2008-10-01

    Diamond-Silicon Carbide (SiC) composites are excellent heat spreaders for high performance microprocessors, owing to the unparalleled thermal conductivity of the former component. Such a combination is obtained by the infiltration of liquid silicon in a synthetic diamond compact, where a rigid SiC matrix forms by the reaction between the raw materials. As well as the outstanding thermal properties, this engineered compound also retains the extreme hardness of the artificial gem. This makes it difficult to perform structural analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), for it is not possible to produce thin foils out of this solid by conventional polishing methods. For the first time, a dual-beam focused ion beam (FIB) instrument successfully allowed site-specific preparation of electron-transparent specimens by the lift-out technique. Subsequent TEM studies revealed that the highest concentration of structural defects occurs in the vicinity of the diamond-SiC interfaces, which are believed to act as the major barriers to the transport of thermal energy. Diffraction contrast analyses showed that the majority of the defects in diamond are isolated perfect screw or 60° dislocations. On the other hand, SiC grains contain partial dislocations and a variety of imperfections such as microtwins, stacking faults and planar defects that are conjectured to consist of antiphase (or inversion) boundaries. Clusters of nanocrystalline SiC were also observed at the diamond-SiC boundaries, and a specific heteroepitaxial orientation relationship was discovered for all cubic SiC that grows on diamond {111} facets. Yttria-stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) is the most common electrolyte material for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. It is an ionic conductor in which charge transfer is achieved by the transport of oxygen ions (O 2-). Like the diamond composite above, it is hard and brittle, and difficult to make into electron transparent TEM samples. Provided an effective

  8. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations of Mn-oxide rich cathodic material from spent disposable alkaline batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Krekeler, Mark P.S.

    2008-11-15

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to investigate the spent cathodic material of a single common brand of disposable alkaline batteries. Mn-oxide particles are anhedral and irregular in shape and compose an estimated 99-95% of the <10 {mu}m size fraction of sample material. Diameters of particles vary widely and typically are between 50 nm and 3 {mu}m; however, most particles are approximately 200-400 nm in diameter. Chemical composition varies for Mn-oxide particles with concentrations being SiO{sub 2} (0.00-1.52 wt%), TiO{sub 2} (0.49-4.58 wt%), MnO (65.85-92.06 wt%), ZnO (1.00-7.53 wt%), K{sub 2}O (4.97-20.48 wt%) and SO{sub 3} (0.43-2.21 wt%). Discrete prismatic zinc crystals occur and vary from a maximum of approximately 0.8 {mu}m long x 0.15 {mu}m wide, to 100 nm long x 20 nm wide. Titanium metal was also observed in samples and composes approximately 0.25-1.0% of the <10 {mu}m size fraction of sample material. Results of this study suggest that battery components may be recycled in some special applications. Examples are low energy-low material requirement products such as paint pigments and Zn nanoparticles. This investigation provides detailed constraints on the nature of spent cathodic materials to improve existing recycling methods and develop new technologies.

  9. Visualising reacting single atoms under controlled conditions: Advances in atomic resolution in situ Environmental (Scanning) Transmission Electron Microscopy (E(S)TEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyes, Edward D.; Gai, Pratibha L.

    2014-02-01

    Advances in atomic resolution Environmental (Scanning) Transmission Electron Microscopy (E(S)TEM) for probing gas-solid catalyst reactions in situ at the atomic level under controlled reaction conditions of gas environment and temperature are described. The recent development of the ESTEM extends the capability of the ETEM by providing the direct visualisation of single atoms and the atomic structure of selected solid state heterogeneous catalysts in their working states in real-time. Atomic resolution E(S)TEM provides a deeper understanding of the dynamic atomic processes at the surface of solids and their mechanisms of operation. The benefits of atomic resolution-E(S)TEM to science and technology include new knowledge leading to improved technological processes with substantial economic benefits, improved healthcare, reductions in energy needs and the management of environmental waste generation.

  10. Electron Microscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Reviews technical aspects of structure determination in biological electron microscopy (EM). Discusses low dose EM, low temperature microscopy, electron energy loss spectra, determination of mass or molecular weight, and EM of labeled systems. Cites 34 references. (CS)

  11. TEM study of continuous precipitation in Mg-9 wt%Al-1 wt%Zn alloy[Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Celotto, S.

    2000-05-11

    The development of continuous precipitate morphology in heat-treated Mg-9 wt%Al-1 wt%Zn alloy (AZ91) for a range of ageing temperatures is investigated in detail using TEM. The matrix/precipitate orientation relationships (ORs), sizes, shapes and the number of precipitates per unit volume (N{sub V}) are described for ageing at temperatures from 70 to 300 C. Most of the continuous precipitates have a Burgers OR and are plate-shaped with the primary habit plane parallel to the basal plane of the matrix. These precipitates are initially lozenge-shaped plates that elongate with time at temperature to become long laths. Two other smaller populations of precipitates that have ORs different from the Burgers OR are also present. These precipitates are rod-shaped with their long direction either perpendicular to or inclined to the basal plane. The relationship between the continuous precipitate morphology and the hardness response is discussed and comparisons are made with high-strength aluminum alloys.

  12. First ultrastructural data on the human tapeworm Taenia asiatica eggs by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM).

    PubMed

    Galán-Puchades, M Teresa; Yang, Yichao; Marcilla, Antonio; Choe, Seongjun; Park, Hansol; Osuna, Antonio; Eom, Keeseon S

    2016-09-01

    Humans are definitive hosts of three species of the Taenia genus, namely Taenia solium, Taenia saginata and Taenia asiatica. The relative novelty of the latter explains the lack of knowledge concerning certain relevant aspects related to this parasite, such as its definite geographical distribution and whether its eggs can infect humans or not. So far, only the eggs of T. solium are known to be infective for humans, producing cysticercosis. Although eggs contain the infective stage, the oncosphere, there is a lack of research on the ultrastructure of eggs of human taeniids. We show, for the first time, the ultrastructure of eggs of T. asiatica by means of SEM and TEM analyses. We detected all the envelopes, namely the egg shell, vitelline layer, outer embryophoric membrane, embryophore, granular layer, basal membrane, oncospheral membrane and oncospheral tegument. Hooks surrounded by myofibrils and glycogen-like particles, the two types of secretory granules of the penetration glands, as well as several nuclei and mitochondria were also revealed in the oncospheres. In addition to the already known structures in eggs from other Taenia species, the presence of two types of small vesicles is described herein, possibly corresponding to exosomes and ectosomes because of their shape and size, which could participate in the host/parasite intercellular communication. PMID:27277232

  13. The Application of High-Resolution Electron Microscopy to Problems in Solid State Chemistry: The Exploits of a Peeping TEM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyring, LeRoy

    1980-01-01

    Describes methods for using the high-resolution electron microscope in conjunction with other tools to reveal the identity and environment of atoms. Problems discussed include the ultimate structure of real crystalline solids including defect structure and the mechanisms of chemical reactions. (CS)

  14. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) Observations of Female Oocytes From Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae): Antibiotic Jinggangmycin (JGM)-Induced Stimulation of Reproduction and Associated Changes in Hormone Levels.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bing; You, Lin-Lin; Wu, You; Ding, Jun; Ge, Lin-Quan; Wu, Jin-Cai

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the agricultural antibiotic jinggangmycin (JGM) stimulates reproduction in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens Stål and that the stimulation of brown planthopper reproduction induced by JGM is regulated by the fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) genes. However, a key issue in the stimulation of reproduction induced by pesticides involves the growth and development of oocytes. Therefore, the present study investigated oocyte changes via transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and changes in hormone levels (juvenile hormones (JH) and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20 E)) in JGM-treated females. TEM observations showed that the size of the lipid droplets in the oocytes of JGM-treated females, compared with those in the oocytes of the control females, significantly reduced by 32.6 and 29.8% at 1 and 2 d after emergence (1 and 2 DAE), respectively. In addition, the JH levels of JGM-treated females at 1 and 2 DAE were increased by 49.7 and 45.7%, respectively, whereas 20 E levels decreased by 36.0 and 30.0%, respectively. We conclude that JGM treatments lead to substantial changes in lipid metabolism, which are directly and indirectly related to stimulation of reproduction of brown planthopper together with our previous findings. PMID:27247297

  15. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) Observations of Female Oocytes From Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae): Antibiotic Jinggangmycin (JGM)-Induced Stimulation of Reproduction and Associated Changes in Hormone Levels

    PubMed Central

    You, Lin-Lin; Wu, You; Ding, Jun; Ge, Lin-Quan; Wu, Jin-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the agricultural antibiotic jinggangmycin (JGM) stimulates reproduction in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens Stål and that the stimulation of brown planthopper reproduction induced by JGM is regulated by the fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) genes. However, a key issue in the stimulation of reproduction induced by pesticides involves the growth and development of oocytes. Therefore, the present study investigated oocyte changes via transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and changes in hormone levels (juvenile hormones (JH) and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20 E)) in JGM-treated females. TEM observations showed that the size of the lipid droplets in the oocytes of JGM-treated females, compared with those in the oocytes of the control females, significantly reduced by 32.6 and 29.8% at 1 and 2 d after emergence (1 and 2 DAE), respectively. In addition, the JH levels of JGM-treated females at 1 and 2 DAE were increased by 49.7 and 45.7%, respectively, whereas 20 E levels decreased by 36.0 and 30.0%, respectively. We conclude that JGM treatments lead to substantial changes in lipid metabolism, which are directly and indirectly related to stimulation of reproduction of brown planthopper together with our previous findings. PMID:27247297

  16. Laboratory Investigation of the Growth and Crystal Structure of Nitric Acid Hydrates by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A great deal of recent laboratory work has focussed on the characterization of the nitric acid hydrates, thought to be present in type I Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs). Phase relationships and vapor pressure measurements (1-3) and infrared characterizations (4-5) have been made. However, the observed properties of crystalline solids (composition, melting point, vapor pressure, surface reactivity, thermodynamic stability, extent of solid solution with other components, etc.) are controlled by their crystal structure. The only means of unequivocal structural identification for crystalline solids is diffraction (using electrons, X-rays, neutrons, etc.). Other observed properties of crystalline solids, such as their infrared spectra, their vapor pressure as a function of temperature, etc. yield only indirect information about what phases are present, their relative proportions, or whether they are crystalline or amorphous.

  17. Observation of in vivo DNA in Ice Embedded whole Cyanobacterial Cells by Hilbert Differential Contrast Transmission Electron Microscopy (HDC-TEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Yasuko; Nitta, Koji; Nagayama, Kuniaki

    HDC-TEM has opened a way to visualize the ultrastructure of ice embedded whole cells. The extraordinary advantage of this technique is that it exhibits structures close to the living state while retaining all the in vivo molecular constituents undisturbed. We attempted to identify in vivo DNA by incorporation of BrdU, which conferred electron density to newly synthesized DNA in ice embedded cyanobacterial cells. Localization of Br in the electron dense area in the identical cell was investigated by electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI). Br was also appeared to be associated with polyphosphate bodies, which would indicate a close relationship between newly synthesized DNA and polyphosphate bodies. While ESI indicates the DNA localization, high resolution HDC-TEM reveals the fine fibrous structures in situ. The combination of ESI with HDC-TEM will be extremely useful to study the in vivo dynamics of DNA synthesis, and its structural and conformational changes close to the living state at high resolution.

  18. [Comparison of interfaces between a NiCr alloy and various dental ceramics using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and 3-point bending test].

    PubMed

    Hegedüs, Csaba; Daróczi, Lajos; Deák, György; Beke, Dezsö

    2003-12-01

    Several methods (e.g. tensile strength, shear bond strength) have been used in testing metal-ceramic bonds. However, in the interface, structural and analytical investigations can be applied in determining the chemical and phase structure of substances making up the bond. The aim of the present study is to assess the interface between Wiron 99 (Bego) alloy and Vision (Wohlwend) VITA VMK68 (Vita), Carat (Dentsply/DeTrey) ceramic using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and 3-point bending test. In the case of NiCr alloys, morphologically similar but structurally varying phases developed in all of the ceramics. In each case, a Cr2O3 layer consisting of small crystals (10-20 nm) was noticed with a series of underlying bubble-like amorphous inclusions. The exact three dimensional (3D) location of these structures and their relation to the glass-phase of the ceramic, as well as its role in the nanomechanical anchoring of the ceramic are still to be clarified. The values of debonding stress were 41.67 +/- 5.01 MPa, 52.89 +/- 8.06 MPa and 56.58 +/- 10.21 MPa for Carat, VITA VMK68 ceramic and Vision, respectively. These parameters do not present significant difference at p > or = 0.05 among the three types of ceramics. Based on our measurements it is highly likely that the micromorphology of interface is basically determined by the composition of the alloy while in the chemical composition of the newly developed phases the ceramic and the parameters of firing (temperature, magnitude of vacuum and firing time) play an important role. Values of cracking and morphological resemblance suggest that the superficial micromorphological and nanomorphological structures, acting as mechanical anchoring elements, play an important role in fixing the ceramic. PMID:14971264

  19. Characterization of the (0110) {alpha}-Ti/{gamma}-TiH interface using high-resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, M.M.; Howe, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    Precipitation of {gamma}-TiH in {alpha}-Ti-H alloys involves a hcp {r_arrow} fct lattice transformation with hydrogen as an interstitial diffusing element. Results obtained from a previous TEM study have shown that the lengthening rate of {gamma}-TiH is diffusionally controlled at 25{degrees}C, and possibly interfacially controlled at temperatures of 50{degrees}C and higher. Therefore, it is essential to ascertain the presence or absence of hydrogen atoms at the interface. TEM foils from a 800 ppm wt.% Ti-H alloy were analyzed using high-resolution TEM and image simulations in order to determine the effects of hydrogen on high-resolution images of the {alpha}-Ti/{gamma}-TiH interface, and EELS was used to determine the whether the hydride structure was fully formed up to the interface.

  20. Structural characterization and gas reactions of small metal particles by high resolution in-situ TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and TED (Transmission Electron Diffraction)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.

    1987-01-01

    The detection and size analysis of small metal particles supported on amorphous substrates becomes increasingly difficult when the particle size approaches that of the phase contrast background structures of the support. An approach of digital image analysis, involving Fourier transformation of the original image, filtering, and image reconstruction was studied with respect to the likelihood of unambiguously detecting particles of less than 1 nm diameter on amorphous substrates from a single electron micrograph.

  1. Structural Characterization and Gas Reactions of Small Metal Particles by High Resolution In-situ TEM and TED. [Transmission Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.

    1985-01-01

    A commercial electron microscope with flat-plate upper pole piece configuration of the objective lens and top entry specimen introduction was modified to obtain 5 x 10 to the minus 10th power mbar pressure at the site of the specimen while maintaining the convenience of a specimen airlock system that allows operation in the 10 to the 10th power mbar range within 15 minutes after specimen change. The specimen chamber contains three wire evaporation sources, a specimen heater, and facilities for oxygen or hydrogen plasma treatment to clean as-introduced specimens. Evacuation is achieved by dural differential pumping, with fine entrance and exit apertures for the electron beam. With the microscope operating at .000001 mbar, the first differential pumping stage features a high-speed cryopump operating in a stainless steel chamber that can be mildly baked and reaches 1 x 10 to the minus 8th power mbar. The second stage, containing the evaporation sources and a custom ionization gauge within 10 cm from the specimen, is a rigorously uncompromised all-metal uhv-system that is bakable to above 200 C throughout and is pumped with an 80-liter ion pump. Design operating pressures and image quality (resolution of metal particles smaller than 1 nm in size) was achieved.

  2. Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-10-12

    Dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM) combines the benefits of high spatial resolution electron microscopy with the high temporal resolution of ultrafast lasers. The incorporation of these two components into a single instrument provides a perfect platform for in situ observations of material processes. However, previous DTEM applications have focused on observing structural changes occurring in samples exposed to high vacuum. Therefore, in order to expand the pump-probe experimental regime to more natural environmental conditions, in situ gas and liquid chambers must be coupled with Dynamic TEM. This chapter describes the current and future applications of in situ liquid DTEM to permit time-resolved atomic scale observations in an aqueous environment, Although this chapter focuses mostly on in situ liquid imaging, the same research potential exists for in situ gas experiments and the successful integration of these techniques promises new insights for understanding nanoparticle, catalyst and biological protein dynamics with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution.

  3. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-01

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM.

  4. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-27

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM. PMID:27215823

  5. A quantitative study of the microstructure and crystallographic fiber texture in nickel electrodeposits used in radio-frequency MEMS switches, including a new transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique for polycrystalline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantwell, Patrick R.

    The microstructure of electrodeposited nickel films in radio-frequency (RF) microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) switches has been quantitatively studied to inform and validate multi-scale, multi-physics computer simulations that aim to predict the lifetime and failure mechanisms of the RF MEMS switches. The RF MEMS switches are currently under study at the Purdue University center for the Prediction of Reliability, Integrity, and Survivability of Microsystems (PRISM). An array of microstructural characterization techniques including focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy have be used to study the nickel film and to quantify grain size and crystallographic texture and provide information about elemental impurities and surface roughness and impurity elements. Particular emphasis has been placed on quantifying the crystallographic fiber texture of the polycrystalline nickel film as a function of film height within a single specimen using a new transmission electron microscopy (TEM) microtexture method. The TEM method employs a special type of plan view TEM sample and uses hollow cone dark field (HCDF) TEM imaging to spatially map the orientation of individual crystallites at discrete film heights. A trend of increasing 001 fiber texture with film height was discovered, which has implications for the elastic behavior of the MEMS device. The method can be applied to study fiber texture evolution as a function of height in polycrystalline films to gather data that may elucidate fundamental film growth mechanisms. The method is explained in detail. It is well-known that the elastic properties of polycrystalline thin films used in MEMS devices can deviate from bulk isotropic values and become directionally-dependent if a crystallographic texture is present. Hence, the ability to predict the actual anisotropic elastic properties of textured films is important for MEMS design and

  6. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by inmore » this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.« less

  7. Novel freestanding nanotube devices for combining TEM and electron diffraction with Raman and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Jannik C.; Obergfell, Dirk; Roth, Siegmar; Paillet, Matthieu; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Neumann, Anita; Duesberg, Georg

    2005-09-27

    A versatile procedure for combining high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction with Raman spectroscopy and transport measurements on the very same nanotube is presented. For this we prepare free-standing structures on the corner of a substrate by electron beam lithography and an etching process. Further, this procedure makes possible a TEM quality control of nanotubes grown directly on the substrate.

  8. Electron Microscopy of Natural and Epitaxial Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posthill, J. B.; George, T.; Malta, D. P.; Humphreys, T. P.; Rudder, R. A.; Hudson, G. C.; Thomas, R. E.; Markunas, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiconducting diamond films have the potential for use as a material in which to build active electronic devices capable of operating at high temperatures or in high radiation environments. Ultimately, it is preferable to use low-defect-density single crystal diamond for device fabrication. We have previously investigated polycrystalline diamond films with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and homoepitaxial films with SEM-based techniques. This contribution describes some of our most recent observations of the microstructure of natural diamond single crystals and homoepitaxial diamond thin films using TEM.

  9. Instability of nanoscale metallic particles under electron irradiation in TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. Y.; Zhang, S. G.; Xia, M. X.; Li, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    The stability of nano metallic glass under electron beam in transmission electron microscope (TEM) was investigated. The most common voltage of TEM used in metallic materials characterization was either 200 kV or 300 kV. Both situations were investigated in this work. An amorphous metallic particle with a dimension of a few hundred nanometers was tested under 300 keV electron irradiation. New phase decomposed from the parent phase was observed. Moreover, a crystal particle with the same composition and dimension was tested under 200 keV irradiation. Decomposition process also occurred in this situation. Besides, crystal orientation modification was observed during irradiation. These results proved that the electron beam in TEM have an effect on the stability of nanoscale samples during long time irradiation. Atomic displacement was induced and diffusion was enhanced by electron irradiation. Thus, artifacts would be induced when a nanoscale metallic sample was characterized in TEM.

  10. Dopant profiling in the TEM, progress towards quantitative electron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, David; Truche, Robert; Chabli, Amal; Twitchett-Harrison, Alison C.; Midgley, Paul A.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2007-09-26

    Off-axis electron holography has been used to characterise the dopant potential in GaAs p-n junctions. We show that the measured potential across the junctions is affected by both FIB specimen preparation and by charging in the TEM and suggest methods that can be used to minimise these problems.

  11. Electron microscopy study of zeolite ZK-14; a synthetic chabazite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartlidge, S.; Wessicken, R.; Nissen, H.-U.

    1983-03-01

    The defect structure of zeolite (K+, TMA+) — ZK-14, a synthetic chabazite, has been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). SEM together with TEM bright field (BF) and dark field (DF) micrographs indicate that the hexagonal, platelet ZK-14 crystals are built up of crystalline blocks joined by twinning along (00.1). High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) reveals faulting of the ideal AABBCC single 6-ring stacking sequence of ZK-14. This is consistent with an observed line broadening in its X-ray powder diffraction profile. Channel apertures are imaged, even for thick specimens.

  12. Soil microstructure and electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, P.; Fryer, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the process of comparing Martian soils with terrestial soils, high resolution electron microscopy and associated techniques should be used to examine the finer soil particles, and various techniques of electron and optical microscopy should be used to examine the undisturbed structure of Martian soils. To examine the structure of fine grained portions of the soil, transmission electron microscopy may be required. A striking feature of many Martian soils is their red color. Although the present-day Martian climate appears to be cold, this color is reminiscent of terrestial tropical red clays. Their chemical contents are broadly similar.

  13. Electronic Blending in Virtual Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maybury, Terrence S.; Farah, Camile S.

    2010-01-01

    Virtual microscopy (VM) is a relatively new technology that transforms the computer into a microscope. In essence, VM allows for the scanning and transfer of glass slides from light microscopy technology to the digital environment of the computer. This transition is also a function of the change from print knowledge to electronic knowledge, or as…

  14. Phase velocity of the TEM (1,0)+TEM (0,1) mode laser and electron accelerations in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L.; Kong, Q.; Ho, Y. K.; Wang, P. X.; Xu, J. J.; Lin, D.; Kawata, S.

    2007-04-01

    Unlike at any single TEM (n, m) mode laser, there is a subluminous phase velocity region located along the central region of a TEM (1,0)+TEM (0,1) mode laser. In conjunction with the high longitudinal electric field in this region, it forms another acceleration channel, which also locates inside the transverse ponderomotive potential trap. Through simulation, it is found that relativistic electrons injected into this acceleration channel can stand at the acceleration phase for a long time and be synchronously accelerated to high energies. Also, the accelerated electrons can be well confined inside the trap avoiding the transverse scattering problem.

  15. Plasma Cleaning and Its Applications for Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isabell, Thomas C.; Fischione, Paul E.; O'Keefe, Catherine; Guruz, Murat U.; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    1999-03-01

    The effectiveness of applying a high-frequency, low-energy, reactive gas plasma for the removal of hydrocarbon contamination from specimens and components for electron microscopy has been investigated with a variety of analytical techniques. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of specimens that have been plasma cleaned shows an elimination of the carbonaceous contamination from the specimen. With extended cleaning times the removal of existing carbon contamination debris due to previously conducted microanalysis is shown. Following plasma cleaning, specimens may be examined in the electron microscope for several hours without exhibiting evidence of recontamination. The effectiveness of plasma cleaning is not limited to applications for TEM specimens. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) specimens that have been plasma cleaned likewise show an elimination of carbonaceous contamination. Furthermore, other electron microscopy parts and accessories, such as aperture strips, specimen clamping rings, and Wehnelts, among others, can benefit from plasma cleaning.

  16. Four-dimensional electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-04-01

    The discovery of the electron over a century ago and the realization of its dual character have given birth to one of the two most powerful imaging instruments: the electron microscope. The electron microscope's ability to resolve three-dimensional (3D) structures on the atomic scale is continuing to affect different fields, including materials science and biology. In this Review, we highlight recent developments and inventions made by introducing the fourth dimension of time in electron microscopy. Today, ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) enables a resolution that is 10 orders of magnitude better than that of conventional microscopes, which are limited by the video-camera rate of recording. After presenting the central concept involved, that of single-electron stroboscopic imaging, we discuss prototypical applications, which include the visualization of complex structures when unfolding on different length and time scales. The developed UEM variant techniques are several, and here we illucidate convergent-beam and near-field imaging, as well as tomography and scanning-pulse microscopy. We conclude with current explorations in imaging of nanomaterials and biostructures and an outlook on possible future directions in space-time, 4D electron microscopy. PMID:20378810

  17. Four-Dimensional Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-04-01

    The discovery of the electron over a century ago and the realization of its dual character have given birth to one of the two most powerful imaging instruments: the electron microscope. The electron microscope’s ability to resolve three-dimensional (3D) structures on the atomic scale is continuing to affect different fields, including materials science and biology. In this Review, we highlight recent developments and inventions made by introducing the fourth dimension of time in electron microscopy. Today, ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) enables a resolution that is 10 orders of magnitude better than that of conventional microscopes, which are limited by the video-camera rate of recording. After presenting the central concept involved, that of single-electron stroboscopic imaging, we discuss prototypical applications, which include the visualization of complex structures when unfolding on different length and time scales. The developed UEM variant techniques are several, and here we illucidate convergent-beam and near-field imaging, as well as tomography and scanning-pulse microscopy. We conclude with current explorations in imaging of nanomaterials and biostructures and an outlook on possible future directions in space-time, 4D electron microscopy.

  18. Electron microscopy of electromagnetic waveforms.

    PubMed

    Ryabov, A; Baum, P

    2016-07-22

    Rapidly changing electromagnetic fields are the basis of almost any photonic or electronic device operation. We report how electron microscopy can measure collective carrier motion and fields with subcycle and subwavelength resolution. A collimated beam of femtosecond electron pulses passes through a metamaterial resonator that is previously excited with a single-cycle electromagnetic pulse. If the probing electrons are shorter in duration than half a field cycle, then time-frozen Lorentz forces distort the images quasi-classically and with subcycle time resolution. A pump-probe sequence reveals in a movie the sample's oscillating electromagnetic field vectors with time, phase, amplitude, and polarization information. This waveform electron microscopy can be used to visualize electrodynamic phenomena in devices as small and fast as available. PMID:27463670

  19. Electron microscopy of electromagnetic waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, A.; Baum, P.

    2016-07-01

    Rapidly changing electromagnetic fields are the basis of almost any photonic or electronic device operation. We report how electron microscopy can measure collective carrier motion and fields with subcycle and subwavelength resolution. A collimated beam of femtosecond electron pulses passes through a metamaterial resonator that is previously excited with a single-cycle electromagnetic pulse. If the probing electrons are shorter in duration than half a field cycle, then time-frozen Lorentz forces distort the images quasi-classically and with subcycle time resolution. A pump-probe sequence reveals in a movie the sample’s oscillating electromagnetic field vectors with time, phase, amplitude, and polarization information. This waveform electron microscopy can be used to visualize electrodynamic phenomena in devices as small and fast as available.

  20. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-02-20

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  1. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-05-30

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  2. Electron Diffraction Using Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bendersky, Leonid A.; Gayle, Frank W.

    2001-01-01

    Electron diffraction via the transmission electron microscope is a powerful method for characterizing the structure of materials, including perfect crystals and defect structures. The advantages of electron diffraction over other methods, e.g., x-ray or neutron, arise from the extremely short wavelength (≈2 pm), the strong atomic scattering, and the ability to examine tiny volumes of matter (≈10 nm3). The NIST Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory has a history of discovery and characterization of new structures through electron diffraction, alone or in combination with other diffraction methods. This paper provides a survey of some of this work enabled through electron microscopy.

  3. Electron microscopy of compound oxide laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakins, Daniel E.; LeBret, Joel B.; Norton, M. G.; Bahr, David F.; Dumm, John Q.

    2003-06-01

    Oxide single crystals, such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and yttrium orthovanadate (YVO4), are important host crystals for solid-state laser applications. These crystals are often grown by the Czochralski process and are doped with neodymium during growth. The microstructure of the resultant crystal affects the overall laser performance and it is necessary to be able to characterize grown-in defects in the material. Scanning electron microscopy has been used to examine the fracture surfaces of YAG and has shown the presence of microscopic voids, which act as stress concentrators and in some cases appear to be the cause of fracture. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to characterize various defects in both YAG and YVO4 crystals. The defects found depend on the growth conditions, specifically the Nd concentration in the crystal and the position within the boule. One of the most common defects identified in both materials were microscopic spherical particles. In YAG these particles appeared to be located primarily in the core regions and analysis of high resolution images indicate that they are due to regions that are both compositionally and orientationally different from the matrix phase. Direct observation of dislocations in YVO4 was made using TEM. In YAG only indirect evidence for dislocations could be found from the observation of river marks on fracture surfaces.

  4. Correlative Fluorescence and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schirra, Randall T.; Zhang, Peijun

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (CFEM) is a multimodal technique that combines dynamic and localization information from fluorescence methods with ultrastructural data from electron microscopy, to give new information about how cellular components change relative to the spatiotemporal dynamics within their environment. In this review, we will discuss some of the basic techniques and tools of the trade for utilizing this attractive research method, which is becoming a very powerful tool for biology labs. The information obtained from correlative methods has proven to be invaluable in creating consensus between the two types of microscopy, extending the capability of each, and cutting the time and expense associate with using each method separately for comparative analysis. The realization of the advantages of these methods in cell biology have led to rapid improvement in the protocols and have ushered in a new generation of instruments to reach the next level of correlation – integration. PMID:25271959

  5. Quantitative characterization of electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ruskin, Rachel S.; Yu, Zhiheng; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2013-01-01

    A new generation of direct electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) promises significant improvement over previous detectors in terms of their modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). However, the performance of these new detectors needs to be carefully monitored in order to optimize imaging conditions and check for degradation over time. We have developed an easy-to-use software tool, FindDQE, to measure MTF and DQE of electron detectors using images of a microscope’s built-in beam stop. Using this software, we have determined the DQE curves of four direct electron detectors currently available: the Gatan K2 Summit, the FEI Falcon I and II, and the Direct Electron DE-12, under a variety of total dose and dose rate conditions. We have additionally measured the curves for the Gatan US4000 and TVIPS F416 scintillator-based cameras. We compare the results from our new method with published curves. PMID:24189638

  6. High-resolution imaging by scanning electron microscopy of semithin sections in correlation with light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koga, Daisuke; Kusumi, Satoshi; Shodo, Ryusuke; Dan, Yukari; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we introduce scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of semithin resin sections. In this technique, semithin sections were adhered on glass slides, stained with both uranyl acetate and lead citrate, and observed with a backscattered electron detector at a low accelerating voltage. As the specimens are stained in the same manner as conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the contrast of SEM images of semithin sections was similar to TEM images of ultrathin sections. Using this technique, wide areas of semithin sections were also observed by SEM, without the obstruction of grids, which was inevitable for traditional TEM. This study also applied semithin section SEM to correlative light and electron microscopy. Correlative immunofluorescence microscopy and immune-SEM were performed in semithin sections of LR white resin-embedded specimens using a FluoroNanogold-labeled secondary antibody. Because LR white resin is hydrophilic and electron stable, this resin is suitable for immunostaining and SEM observation. Using correlative microscopy, the precise localization of the primary antibody was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and SEM. This method has great potential for studies examining the precise localization of molecules, including Golgi- and ER-associated proteins, in correlation with LM and SEM. PMID:26206941

  7. Correlative Light- and Electron Microscopy Using Quantum Dot Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Killingsworth, Murray C; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-01-01

    A method is described whereby quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles can be used for correlative immunocytochemical studies of human pathology tissue using widefield fluorescence light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To demonstrate the protocol we have immunolabeled ultrathin epoxy sections of human somatostatinoma tumor using a primary antibody to somatostatin, followed by a biotinylated secondary antibody and visualization with streptavidin conjugated 585 nm cadmium-selenium (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs). The sections are mounted on a TEM specimen grid then placed on a glass slide for observation by widefield fluorescence light microscopy. Light microscopy reveals 585 nm QD labeling as bright orange fluorescence forming a granular pattern within the tumor cell cytoplasm. At low to mid-range magnification by light microscopy the labeling pattern can be easily recognized and the level of non-specific or background labeling assessed. This is a critical step for subsequent interpretation of the immunolabeling pattern by TEM and evaluation of the morphological context. The same section is then blotted dry and viewed by TEM. QD probes are seen to be attached to amorphous material contained in individual secretory granules. Images are acquired from the same region of interest (ROI) seen by light microscopy for correlative analysis. Corresponding images from each modality may then be blended to overlay fluorescence data on TEM ultrastructure of the corresponding region. PMID:27584907

  8. Self-labelling enzymes as universal tags for fluorescence microscopy, super-resolution microscopy and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liss, Viktoria; Barlag, Britta; Nietschke, Monika; Hensel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Research in cell biology demands advanced microscopy techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy (FM), super-resolution microscopy (SRM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an approach to combine data on the dynamics of proteins or protein complexes in living cells with the ultrastructural details in the low nanometre scale. To correlate both data sets, markers functional in FM, SRM and TEM are required. Genetically encoded markers such as fluorescent proteins or self-labelling enzyme tags allow observations in living cells. Various genetically encoded tags are available for FM and SRM, but only few tags are suitable for CLEM. Here, we describe the red fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) as a multimodal marker for CLEM. TMR is used as fluorochrome coupled to ligands of genetically encoded self-labelling enzyme tags HaloTag, SNAP-tag and CLIP-tag in FM and SRM. We demonstrate that TMR can additionally photooxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) to an osmiophilic polymer visible on TEM sections, thus being a marker suitable for FM, SRM and TEM. We evaluated various organelle markers with enzymatic tags in mammalian cells labelled with TMR-coupled ligands and demonstrate the use as efficient and versatile DAB photooxidizer for CLEM approaches. PMID:26643905

  9. Self-labelling enzymes as universal tags for fluorescence microscopy, super-resolution microscopy and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liss, Viktoria; Barlag, Britta; Nietschke, Monika; Hensel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Research in cell biology demands advanced microscopy techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy (FM), super-resolution microscopy (SRM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an approach to combine data on the dynamics of proteins or protein complexes in living cells with the ultrastructural details in the low nanometre scale. To correlate both data sets, markers functional in FM, SRM and TEM are required. Genetically encoded markers such as fluorescent proteins or self-labelling enzyme tags allow observations in living cells. Various genetically encoded tags are available for FM and SRM, but only few tags are suitable for CLEM. Here, we describe the red fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) as a multimodal marker for CLEM. TMR is used as fluorochrome coupled to ligands of genetically encoded self-labelling enzyme tags HaloTag, SNAP-tag and CLIP-tag in FM and SRM. We demonstrate that TMR can additionally photooxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) to an osmiophilic polymer visible on TEM sections, thus being a marker suitable for FM, SRM and TEM. We evaluated various organelle markers with enzymatic tags in mammalian cells labelled with TMR-coupled ligands and demonstrate the use as efficient and versatile DAB photooxidizer for CLEM approaches. PMID:26643905

  10. Collaboration at the Nanoscale: Exploring Viral Genetics with Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duboise, S. Monroe; Moulton, Karen D.; Jamison, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    The Maine Science Corps is a project sponsored by the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Graduate Teaching Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12 ) program. Through this program, the University of Southern Maine's (USM) virology and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) research group provides high school teachers and students in rural areas with…

  11. Transmission Kikuchi diffraction and transmission electron forescatter imaging of electropolished and FIB manufactured TEM specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Zieliński, W. Płociński, T.; Kurzydłowski, K.J.

    2015-06-15

    We present a study of the efficiency of the utility of scanning electron microscope (SEM)-based transmission methods for characterizing grain structure in thinned bulk metals. Foils of type 316 stainless steel were prepared by two methods commonly used for transmission electron microscopy — double-jet electropolishing and focused ion beam milling. A customized holder allowed positioning of the foils in a configuration appropriate for both transmission electron forward scatter diffraction, and for transmission imaging by the use of a forescatter detector with two diodes. We found that both crystallographic orientation maps and dark-field transmitted images could be obtained for specimens prepared by either method. However, for both methods, preparation-induced artifacts may affect the quality or accuracy of transmission SEM data, especially those acquired by the use of transmission Kikuchi diffraction. Generally, the quality of orientation data was better for specimens prepared by electropolishing, due to the absence of ion-induced damage. - Highlights: • The transmission imaging and diffraction techniques are emerging in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as promising new field of materials characterization. • The manuscript titled: “Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction and Transmission Electron Forescatter Imaging of Electropolished and FIB Manufactured TEM Specimens” documents how different specimen thinning procedures can effect efficiency of transmission Kikuchi diffraction and transmission electron forescatter imaging. • The abilities to make precision crystallographic orientation maps and dark-field images in transmission was studied on electropolished versus focus ion beam manufactured TEM specimens. • Depending on the need, electropolished and focused ion beam technique may produce suitable specimens for transmission imaging and diffraction in SEM.

  12. Quantitative characterization of electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruskin, Rachel S; Yu, Zhiheng; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2013-12-01

    A new generation of direct electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) promises significant improvement over previous detectors in terms of their modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). However, the performance of these new detectors needs to be carefully monitored in order to optimize imaging conditions and check for degradation over time. We have developed an easy-to-use software tool, FindDQE, to measure MTF and DQE of electron detectors using images of a microscope's built-in beam stop. Using this software, we have determined the DQE curves of four direct electron detectors currently available: the Gatan K2 Summit, the FEI Falcon I and II, and the Direct Electron DE-12, under a variety of total dose and dose rate conditions. We have additionally measured the curves for the Gatan US4000 and TVIPS TemCam-F416 scintillator-based cameras. We compare the results from our new method with published curves. PMID:24189638

  13. Spectroscopic imaging in electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Stephen J; Colliex, C.

    2012-01-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, multiple signals can be simultaneously collected, including the transmitted and scattered electron signals (bright field and annular dark field or Z-contrast images), along with spectroscopic signals such as inelastically scattered electrons and emitted photons. In the last few years, the successful development of aberration correctors for the electron microscope has transformed the field of electron microscopy, opening up new possibilities for correlating structure to functionality. Aberration correction not only allows for enhanced structural resolution with incident probes into the sub-angstrom range, but can also provide greater probe currents to facilitate mapping of intrinsically weak spectroscopic signals at the nanoscale or even the atomic level. In this issue of MRS Bulletin, we illustrate the power of the new generation of electron microscopes with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy. We show the mapping of elemental distributions at atomic resolution and also the mapping of electronic and optical properties at unprecedented spatial resolution, with applications ranging from graphene to plasmonic nanostructures, and oxide interfaces to biology.

  14. Direct Detectors for Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, R. N.; Moldovan, G.; Kirkland, A. I.

    2014-06-01

    There is interest in improving the detectors used to capture images in transmission electron microscopy. Detectors with an improved modulation transfer function at high spatial frequencies allow for higher resolution in images at lower magnification, which leads to an increased effective field of view. Detectors with improved detective quantum efficiency are important for low dose applications. One way in which these performance enhancements can be achieved is through direct detection, where primary electrons are converted directly into suitable electrical signals by the detector rather than relying on an indirect electron to photon conversion before detection. In this paper we present the characterisation of detector performance for a number of different direct detection technologies, and compare these technologies to traditional indirect detectors. Overall our results show that direct detection enables a significant improvement in all aspects of detector performance.

  15. Nanocrystal size distribution analysis from transmission electron microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Sebille, Martijn; van der Maaten, Laurens J. P.; Xie, Ling; Jarolimek, Karol; Santbergen, Rudi; van Swaaij, René A. C. M. M.; Leifer, Klaus; Zeman, Miro

    2015-12-01

    We propose a method, with minimal bias caused by user input, to quickly detect and measure the nanocrystal size distribution from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images using a combination of Laplacian of Gaussian filters and non-maximum suppression. We demonstrate the proposed method on bright-field TEM images of an a-SiC:H sample containing embedded silicon nanocrystals with varying magnifications and we compare the accuracy and speed with size distributions obtained by manual measurements, a thresholding method and PEBBLES. Finally, we analytically consider the error induced by slicing nanocrystals during TEM sample preparation on the measured nanocrystal size distribution and formulate an equation to correct this effect.We propose a method, with minimal bias caused by user input, to quickly detect and measure the nanocrystal size distribution from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images using a combination of Laplacian of Gaussian filters and non-maximum suppression. We demonstrate the proposed method on bright-field TEM images of an a-SiC:H sample containing embedded silicon nanocrystals with varying magnifications and we compare the accuracy and speed with size distributions obtained by manual measurements, a thresholding method and PEBBLES. Finally, we analytically consider the error induced by slicing nanocrystals during TEM sample preparation on the measured nanocrystal size distribution and formulate an equation to correct this effect. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06292f

  16. Probing Structural and Electronic Dynamics with Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Plemmons, DA; Suri, PK; Flannigan, DJ

    2015-05-12

    In this Perspective, we provide an overview,of the field of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM). We begin by briefly discussing the emergence of methods for probing ultrafast structural dynamics and the information that can be obtained. Distinctions are drawn between the two main types a probes for femtosecond (fs) dynamics fast electrons and X-ray photons and emphasis is placed on hour the nature of charged particles is exploited in ultrafast electron-based' experiments:. Following this, we describe the versatility enabled by the ease with which electron trajectories and velocities can be manipulated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM): hardware configurations, and we emphasize how this is translated to the ability to measure scattering intensities in real, reciprocal, and energy space from presurveyed and selected rianoscale volumes. Owing to decades of ongoing research and development into TEM instrumentation combined with advances in specimen holder technology, comprehensive experiments can be conducted on a wide range of materials in various phases via in situ methods. Next, we describe the basic operating concepts, of UEM, and we emphasize that its development has led to extension of several of the formidable capabilities of TEM into the fs domain, dins increasing the accessible temporal parameter spade by several orders of magnitude. We then divide UEM studies into those conducted in real (imaging), reciprocal (diffraction), and energy (spectroscopy) spate. We begin each of these sections by providing a brief description of the basic operating principles and the types of information that can be gathered followed by descriptions of how these approaches are applied in UM, the type of specimen parameter space that can be probed, and an example of the types of dynamics that can be resolved. We conclude with an Outlook section, wherein we share our perspective on some future directions of the field pertaining to continued instrument development and

  17. Electron microscopy of pharmaceutical systems.

    PubMed

    Klang, Victoria; Valenta, Claudia; Matsko, Nadejda B

    2013-01-01

    During the last decades, the focus of research in pharmaceutical technology has steadily shifted towards the development and optimisation of nano-scale drug delivery systems. As a result, electron microscopic methods are increasingly employed for the characterisation of pharmaceutical systems such as nanoparticles and microparticles, nanoemulsions, microemulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles, different types of vesicles, nanofibres and many more. Knowledge of the basic properties of these systems is essential for an adequate microscopic analysis. Classical transmission and scanning electron microscopic techniques frequently have to be adapted for an accurate analysis of formulation morphology, especially in case of hydrated colloidal systems. Specific techniques such as environmental scanning microscopy or cryo preparation are required for their investigation. Analytical electron microscopic techniques such as electron energy-loss spectroscopy or energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are additional assets to determine the elemental composition of the systems, but are not yet standard tools in pharmaceutical research. This review provides an overview of pharmaceutical systems of interest in current research and strategies for their successful electron microscopic analysis. Advantages and limitations of the different methodological approaches are discussed and recent findings of interest are presented. PMID:22921788

  18. Transmission electron microscopy of a model crystalline organic, theophylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattle, J.; S'ari, M.; Hondow, N.; Abellán, P.; Brown, A. P.; Brydson, R. M. D.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to analyse the diffraction patterns of the model crystalline organic theophylline to investigate beam damage in relation to changing accelerating voltage, sample temperature and TEM grid support films. We find that samples deposited on graphene film grids have the longest lifetimes when also held at -190 °C and imaged at 200 kV accelerating voltage. Finally, atomic lattice images are obtained in bright field STEM by working close to the estimated critical electron dose for theophylline.

  19. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by in this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.

  20. Correlative Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doory; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Sigal, Yaron M.; Babcock, Hazen P.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence light microscopy and electron microscopy allows the imaging of spatial distributions of specific biomolecules in the context of cellular ultrastructure. Recent development of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allows the location of molecules to be determined with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. However, correlative super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) still remains challenging because the optimal specimen preparation and imaging conditions for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and EM are often not compatible. Here, we have developed several experiment protocols for correlative stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and EM methods, both for un-embedded samples by applying EM-specific sample preparations after STORM imaging and for embedded and sectioned samples by optimizing the fluorescence under EM fixation, staining and embedding conditions. We demonstrated these methods using a variety of cellular targets. PMID:25874453

  1. Electron microscopy and forensic practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrlý, Marek; Turková, Ivana

    2013-05-01

    Electron microanalysis in forensic practice ranks among basic applications used in investigation of traces (latents, stains, etc.) from crime scenes. Applying electron microscope allows for rapid screening and receiving initial information for a wide range of traces. SEM with EDS/WDS makes it possible to observe topography surface and morphology samples and examination of chemical components. Physical laboratory of the Institute of Criminalistics Prague use SEM especially for examination of inorganic samples, rarely for biology and other material. Recently, possibilities of electron microscopy have been extended considerably using dual systems with focused ion beam. These systems are applied mainly in study of inner micro and nanoparticles , thin layers (intersecting lines in graphical forensic examinations, analysis of layers of functional glass, etc.), study of alloys microdefects, creating 3D particles and aggregates models, etc. Automated mineralogical analyses are a great asset to analysis of mineral phases, particularly soils, similarly it holds for cathode luminescence, predominantly colour one and precise quantitative measurement of their spectral characteristics. Among latest innovations that are becoming to appear also at ordinary laboratories are TOF - SIMS systems and micro Raman spectroscopy with a resolution comparable to EDS/WDS analysis (capable of achieving similar level as through EDS/WDS analysis).

  2. Four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lobastov, Vladimir A.; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2005-01-01

    Electron microscopy is arguably the most powerful tool for spatial imaging of structures. As such, 2D and 3D microscopies provide static structures with subnanometer and increasingly with ångstrom-scale spatial resolution. Here we report the development of 4D ultrafast electron microscopy, whose capability imparts another dimension to imaging in general and to dynamics in particular. We demonstrate its versatility by recording images and diffraction patterns of crystalline and amorphous materials and images of biological cells. The electron packets, which were generated with femtosecond laser pulses, have a de Broglie wavelength of 0.0335 Å at 120 keV and have as low as one electron per pulse. With such few particles, doses of few electrons per square ångstrom, and ultrafast temporal duration, the long sought after but hitherto unrealized quest for ultrafast electron microscopy has been realized. Ultrafast electron microscopy should have an impact on all areas of microscopy, including biological imaging. PMID:15883380

  3. RANKING TEM CAMERAS BY THEIR RESPONSE TO ELECTRON SHOT NOISE

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Patricia; Bean, Derek; Typke, Dieter; Li, Xueming; Nogales, Eva; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate two ways in which the Fourier transforms of images that consist solely of randomly distributed electrons (shot noise) can be used to compare the relative performance of different electronic cameras. The principle is to determine how closely the Fourier transform of a given image does, or does not, approach that of an image produced by an ideal camera, i.e. one for which single-electron events are modeled as Kronecker delta functions located at the same pixels where the electrons were incident on the camera. Experimentally, the average width of the single-electron response is characterized by fitting a single Lorentzian function to the azimuthally averaged amplitude of the Fourier transform. The reciprocal of the spatial frequency at which the Lorentzian function falls to a value of 0.5 provides an estimate of the number of pixels at which the corresponding line-spread function falls to a value of 1/e. In addition, the excess noise due to stochastic variations in the magnitude of the response of the camera (for single-electron events) is characterized by the amount to which the appropriately normalized power spectrum does, or does not, exceed the total number of electrons in the image. These simple measurements provide an easy way to evaluate the relative performance of different cameras. To illustrate this point we present data for three different types of scintillator-coupled camera plus a silicon-pixel (direct detection) camera. PMID:23747527

  4. Thin dielectric film thickness determination by advanced transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Diebold, A.C.; Foran, B.; Kisielowski, C.; Muller, D.; Pennycook, S.; Principe, E.; Stemmer, S.

    2003-09-01

    High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) has been used as the ultimate method of thickness measurement for thin films. The appearance of phase contrast interference patterns in HR-TEM images has long been confused as the appearance of a crystal lattice by non-specialists. Relatively easy to interpret crystal lattice images are now directly observed with the introduction of annular dark field detectors for scanning TEM (STEM). With the recent development of reliable lattice image processing software that creates crystal structure images from phase contrast data, HR-TEM can also provide crystal lattice images. The resolution of both methods was steadily improved reaching now into the sub Angstrom region. Improvements in electron lens and image analysis software are increasing the spatial resolution of both methods. Optimum resolution for STEM requires that the probe beam be highly localized. In STEM, beam localization is enhanced by selection of the correct aperture. When STEM measurement is done using a highly localized probe beam, HR-TEM and STEM measurement of the thickness of silicon oxynitride films agree within experimental error. In this paper, the optimum conditions for HR-TEM and STEM measurement are discussed along with a method for repeatable film thickness determination. The impact of sample thickness is also discussed. The key result in this paper is the proposal of a reproducible method for film thickness determination.

  5. PLS photoemission electron microscopy beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Tai-Hee; Kim, Ki-jeong; Hwang, C. C.; Rah, S.; Park, C. Y.; Kim, Bongsoo

    2001-07-01

    The performance of a recently commissioned beamline at the Pohang Light Source (PLS) is described. The beamline, which is located at 4B1 at PLS, is a Varied Line Spacing (VLS) Plane Grating Monochromator (PGM) beamline. VLS PGM has become very popular because of the simple scanning mechanism and the fixed exit slit. The beamline which takes 3 mrad horizontal beam fan from bending magnet, covers the energy range 200-1000 eV for Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Magnetic Circular Dichroism (MCD) experiments. Simplicity of the optics and high flux with medium resolution were the design goals for these applications. The beamline consists of a horizontal focusing mirror, a vertical focusing mirror, VLS plane grating and exit slit. The source of PLS could be used as a virtual entrance slit because of its small size and stability. The flux and the resolution of the beamline at the experimental station have been measured using an ion chamber and a calibrated photodiode. Test images of PEEM from a standard sample were taken to illustrate the further performance of the beamline and PEEM station.

  6. Electron microscopy of legionella and legionella-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Gary; Garduño, Rafael A

    2013-01-01

    Those investigators who study the morphology of Legionella and Legionella-infected cells have greatly benefited from the superior resolution afforded by electron microscopy (EM). It can also be said with confidence that EM will continue to reveal as yet to be discovered features of this fascinating intracellular pathogen. In this chapter we detail our practical experience in the application of three transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques to the study of Legionella: conventional ultrastructural analysis, immuno-gold labeling, and negative staining. Each of these techniques has particular, well-defined applications, which are discussed in the context of our in-house developed methods. We invite researchers to try the methods given here in the study of Legionella, and adopt TEM as part of their research tools arsenal. PMID:23150403

  7. Transmission electron microscopy of mercury metal.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Dalaver H; Sougrat, Rachid

    2016-09-01

    Transmission electron microcopy (TEM) analysis of liquid metals, especially mercury (Hg), is difficult to carry out because their specimen preparation poses a daunting task due to the unique surface properties of these metals. This paper reports a cryoTEM study on Hg using a novel specimen preparation technique. Hg metal is mixed with water using sonication and quenched in liquid ethane cryogen. This technique permits research into the morphological, phase and structural properties of Hg at nanoscale dimensions. PMID:27018645

  8. Laboratory design for high-performance electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Turner, John H.; Hetherington, Crispin J.D.; Cullis, A.G.; Carragher, Bridget; Jenkins, Ron; Milgrim, Julie; Milligan,Ronald A.; Potter, Clinton S.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.; Degenhardt, Lynn; Sides, William H.

    2004-04-23

    Proliferation of electron microscopes with field emission guns, imaging filters and hardware spherical aberration correctors (giving higher spatial and energy resolution) has resulted in the need to construct special laboratories. As resolutions improve, transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) and scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) become more sensitive to ambient conditions. State-of-the-art electron microscopes require state-of-the-art environments, and this means careful design and implementation of microscope sites, from the microscope room to the building that surrounds it. Laboratories have been constructed to house high-sensitive instruments with resolutions ranging down to sub-Angstrom levels; we present the various design philosophies used for some of these laboratories and our experiences with them. Four facilities are described: the National Center for Electron Microscopy OAM Laboratory at LBNL; the FEGTEM Facility at the University of Sheffield; the Center for Integrative Molecular Biosciences at TSRI; and the Advanced Microscopy Laboratory at ORNL.

  9. Analytical transmission electron microscopy in materials science

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, H.L.

    1980-01-01

    Microcharacterization of materials on a scale of less than 10 nm has been afforded by recent advances in analytical transmission electron microscopy. The factors limiting accurate analysis at the limit of spatial resolution for the case of a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy are examined in this paper.

  10. Fast electron microscopy via compressive sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Kurt W; Anderson, Hyrum S; Wheeler, Jason W

    2014-12-09

    Various technologies described herein pertain to compressive sensing electron microscopy. A compressive sensing electron microscope includes a multi-beam generator and a detector. The multi-beam generator emits a sequence of electron patterns over time. Each of the electron patterns can include a plurality of electron beams, where the plurality of electron beams is configured to impart a spatially varying electron density on a sample. Further, the spatially varying electron density varies between each of the electron patterns in the sequence. Moreover, the detector collects signals respectively corresponding to interactions between the sample and each of the electron patterns in the sequence.

  11. Analysis of Electron Beam Damage of Crystalline Pharmaceutical Materials by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S'ari, M.; Cattle, J.; Hondow, N.; Blade, H.; Cosgrove, S.; Brydson, R. M.; Brown, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the impact of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and low dose electron diffraction on ten different crystalline pharmaceutical compounds, covering a diverse chemical space and with differing physical properties. The aim was to establish if particular chemical moieties were more susceptible to damage within the electron beam. We have measured crystalline diffraction patterns for each and indexed nine out of ten of them. Characteristic electron dosages are reported for each material, with no apparent correlation between chemical structure and stability within the electron beam. Such low dose electron diffraction protocols are suitable for the study of pharmaceutical compounds.

  12. The future of electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yimei; Durr, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Seeing is believing. So goes the old adage and seen evidence is undoubtedly satisfying because it can be interpreted easily, though not always correctly. For centuries, humans have developed such instruments as telescopes that observe the heavens and microscopes that reveal bacteria and viruses. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner for their foundational work on superresolution fluorescence microscopy in which they overcame the Abbe diffraction limit for the resolving power of conventional light microscopes. (See Physics Today, December 2014, page 18.) That breakthrough enabled discoveries in biological research and testifies to the importance of modern microscopy.

  13. The future of electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Yimei; Durr, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Seeing is believing. So goes the old adage and seen evidence is undoubtedly satisfying because it can be interpreted easily, though not always correctly. For centuries, humans have developed such instruments as telescopes that observe the heavens and microscopes that reveal bacteria and viruses. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner for their foundational work on superresolution fluorescence microscopy in which they overcame the Abbe diffraction limit for the resolving power of conventional light microscopes. (See Physics Today, December 2014, page 18.) That breakthrough enabled discoveries in biological research and testifiesmore » to the importance of modern microscopy.« less

  14. In Situ Electron Microscopy of Lactomicroselenium Particles in Probiotic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Gabor; Pinczes, Gyula; Pinter, Gabor; Pocsi, Istvan; Prokisch, Jozsef; Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy was used to test whether or not (a) in statu nascendi synthesized, and in situ measured, nanoparticle size does not differ significantly from the size of nanoparticles after their purification; and (b) the generation of selenium is detrimental to the bacterial strains that produce them. Elemental nano-sized selenium produced by probiotic latic acid bacteria was used as a lactomicroselenium (lactomicroSel) inhibitor of cell growth in the presence of lactomicroSel, and was followed by time-lapse microscopy. The size of lactomicroSel produced by probiotic bacteria was measured in situ and after isolation and purification. For these measurements the TESLA BS 540 transmission electron microscope was converted from analog (aTEM) to digital processing (dTEM), and further to remote-access internet electron microscopy (iTEM). Lactobacillus acidophilus produced fewer, but larger, lactomicroSel nanoparticles (200–350 nm) than Lactobacillus casei (L. casei), which generated many, smaller lactomicroSel particles (85–200 nm) and grains as a cloudy, less electrodense material. Streptococcus thermophilus cells generated selenoparticles (60–280 nm) in a suicidic manner. The size determined in situ in lactic acid bacteria was significantly lower than those measured by scanning electron microscopy after the isolation of lactomicroSel particles obtained from lactobacilli (100–500 nm), but higher relative to those isolated from Streptococcus thermopilus (50–100 nm). These differences indicate that smaller lactomicroSel particles could be more toxic to the producing bacteria themselves and discrepancies in size could have implications with respect to the applications of selenium nanoparticles as prebiotics. PMID:27376279

  15. In Situ Electron Microscopy of Lactomicroselenium Particles in Probiotic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Gabor; Pinczes, Gyula; Pinter, Gabor; Pocsi, Istvan; Prokisch, Jozsef; Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy was used to test whether or not (a) in statu nascendi synthesized, and in situ measured, nanoparticle size does not differ significantly from the size of nanoparticles after their purification; and (b) the generation of selenium is detrimental to the bacterial strains that produce them. Elemental nano-sized selenium produced by probiotic latic acid bacteria was used as a lactomicroselenium (lactomicroSel) inhibitor of cell growth in the presence of lactomicroSel, and was followed by time-lapse microscopy. The size of lactomicroSel produced by probiotic bacteria was measured in situ and after isolation and purification. For these measurements the TESLA BS 540 transmission electron microscope was converted from analog (aTEM) to digital processing (dTEM), and further to remote-access internet electron microscopy (iTEM). Lactobacillus acidophilus produced fewer, but larger, lactomicroSel nanoparticles (200-350 nm) than Lactobacillus casei (L. casei), which generated many, smaller lactomicroSel particles (85-200 nm) and grains as a cloudy, less electrodense material. Streptococcus thermophilus cells generated selenoparticles (60-280 nm) in a suicidic manner. The size determined in situ in lactic acid bacteria was significantly lower than those measured by scanning electron microscopy after the isolation of lactomicroSel particles obtained from lactobacilli (100-500 nm), but higher relative to those isolated from Streptococcus thermopilus (50-100 nm). These differences indicate that smaller lactomicroSel particles could be more toxic to the producing bacteria themselves and discrepancies in size could have implications with respect to the applications of selenium nanoparticles as prebiotics. PMID:27376279

  16. Transmission electron microscopy of polymer blends and block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Enrique Daniel

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of soft matter is a field that warrants further investigation. Developments in sample preparation, imaging and spectroscopic techniques could lead to novel experiments that may further our understanding of the structure and the role structure plays in the functionality of various organic materials. Unlike most hard materials, TEM of organic molecules is limited by the amount of radiation damage the material can withstand without changing its structure. Despite this limitation, TEM has been and will be a powerful tool to study polymeric materials and other soft matter. In this dissertation, an introduction of TEM for polymer scientists is presented. The fundamentals of interactions of electrons with matter are described using the Schrodinger wave equation and scattering cross-sections to fully encompass coherent and incoherent scattering. The intensity, which is the product of the wave function and its complex conjugate, shows no perceptible change due to the sample. Instead, contrast is generated through the optical system of the microscope by removing scattered electrons or by generating interference due to material-induced phase changes. Perhaps the most challenging aspect of taking TEM images, however, is sample preparation, because TEM experiments require materials with approximately 50 nm thickness. Although ultramicrotomy is a well-established powerful tool for preparing biological and polymeric sections for TEM, the development of cryogenic Focused Ion Beam may enable unprecedented cross-sectional TEM studies of polymer thin films on arbitrary substrates with nanometer precision. Two examples of TEM experiments of polymeric materials are presented. The first involves quantifying the composition profile across a lamellar phase obtained in a multicomponent blend of saturated poly(butadiene) and poly(isobutylene), stabilized by a saturated poly(butadiene) copolymer serving as a surfactant, using TEM and self

  17. Observations of Nanobubble Dynamics with Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Meera Kanakamma; Arora, Manish; Mirsaidov, Utkur; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2013-11-01

    Recent developments in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) allow the imaging of liquids with high spatial resolution. Here we report on novel studies of water trapped between two monolayers of graphene sheets. The geometry prevents evaporation of the liquid into the low pressure environment of the TEM while providing excellent electron-optical properties for investigations. The graphene sheets are supported by a conventional TEM grid. We report on the nucleation of bubbles, the coalescence between neighbouring bubbles, rupture of thin liquid filaments, and their slow shrinkage. At a dose rate of 100-155 e-Å-2s-1 these events are observed conveniently at video frame rate. The correlation with the local electron beam dose rate suggests that the radiolysis induced by the electron beam is the main driving force for most events. In general, we observed bubbles with lateral sizes between 20 nm and 100 nm and estimated heights between 6 nm and 30 nm. Likely, the bubbles connect both graphene sheets. In the absence of the electron beam the nanobubbles do not dissolve completely but surprisingly remain stable for even up to one hour. This resembles the stability of surface attached nanobubbles.

  18. Photoemission electron microscopy of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, Sebastian; Wardini, Jenna; Fitzgerald, J. P. S.; Word, Robert C.; Kevek, Josh; Minot, Ethan; Koenenkamp, Rolf

    2012-10-01

    A study of chemical vapor deposited graphene on copper foil is conducted using an aberration-corrected photoemission electron microscope (PEEM). We demonstrate the efficacy such a PEEM has in identifying multi-layer graphene, defects and cracking. A model is developed to describe the observed reduction in photoemission rate where electrons originate from the copper foil and scatter through the graphene. A survey of several multi-layer feature line profiles demonstrates the reduced photoemission rate as the number of graphene layers increases. A mean-free-path length of l=3.8±0.8 nm is inferred assuming the layer spacing in graphene is δz=0.35 nm. The PEEM's high spatial resolution and surface sensitivity combined with no electron beam damage are promising for characterizing biosensors and other nanoscale graphene devices.

  19. Analysis of environmental particles by atomic force microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mavrocordatos, D; Pronk, W; Boiler, M

    2004-01-01

    Due to their large specific surface and their abundance, micro and nano particles play an important role in the transport of micropollutants in the environment. Natural particles are usually composed of a mixture of inorganic amorphous or crystalline material (mainly FeOOH, Fe(x)Oy, Mn(x)Oy and clays) and organic material (humics and polysaccharides). They all tend to occur as very small particles (1-1,000 nm in diameter). Most natural amorphous particles are unstable and tend to transform with time towards more crystalline forms, either by aging or possibly, by dissolution and re-crystallization. Such transformations affect the fate of sorbed micropollutants and the scavenging properties are therefore changed. As these entities are sensitive to dehydration (aggregation, changes in the morphology), it is highly important to observe their morphology in their natural environment and understand their composition at the scale of the individual particles. Also for the understanding and optimization of water treatment technologies, the knowledge of the occurrence and behavior of nano-particles is of high importance. Some of the possible particle analysis methods are presented: aggregation processes, biomineralization, bacterial adhesion, biofilms in freshwaters, ferrihydrite as heavy metals remover from storm water. These examples demonstrate the capabilities and focus of the microscopes. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows to analyze the particles in their own environment, meaning in air or in the water. Thus, native aspects of particles can be observed. As well, forces of interactions between particles or between particles and other surfaces such as membranes will be highly valuable data. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and for higher lateral resolution, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) allow measurement of the morphology and composition. Especially, TEM coupled with Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (TEM-EELS) is a powerful technique for elemental analysis

  20. Resolution measures in molecular electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Penczek, Pawel A.

    2011-01-01

    Resolution measures in molecular electron microscopy provide means to evaluate quality of macromolecular structures computed from sets of their two-dimensional line projections. When the amount of detail in the computed density map is low there are no external standards by which the resolution of the result can be judged. Instead, resolution measures in molecular electron microscopy evaluate consistency of the results in reciprocal space and present it as a one-dimensional function of the modulus of spatial frequency. Here we provide description of standard resolution measures commonly used in electron microscopy. We point out that the organizing principle is the relationship between these measures and the Spectral Signal-to-Noise Ratio of the computed density map. Within this framework it becomes straightforward to describe the connection between the outcome of resolution evaluations and the quality of electron microscopy maps, in particular, the optimum filtration, in the Wiener sense, of the computed map. We also provide a discussion of practical difficulties of evaluation of resolution in electron microscopy, particularly in terms of its sensitivity to data processing operations used during structure determination process in single particle analysis and in electron tomography. PMID:20888958

  1. Annular dark field transmission electron microscopy for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Koeck, Philip J B

    2016-02-01

    Recently annular dark field (ADF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been advocated as a means of recording images of biological specimens with better signal to noise ratio (SNR) than regular bright field images. I investigate whether and how such images could be used to determine the three-dimensional structure of proteins given that an ADF aperture with a suitable pass-band can be manufactured and used in practice. I develop an approximate theory of ADF-TEM image formation for weak amplitude and phase objects and test this theory using computer simulations. I also test whether these simulated images can be used to calculate a three-dimensional model of the protein using standard software and discuss problems and possible ways to overcome these. PMID:26656466

  2. Electron microscopy analysis of microstructure of postannealed aluminum nitride template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jesbains; Kuwano, Noriyuki; Rijal Jamaludin, Khairur; Mitsuhara, Masatoshi; Saito, Hikaru; Hata, Satoshi; Suzuki, Shuhei; Miyake, Hideto; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa; Fukuyama, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The microstructure of an AlN template after high-temperature annealing was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The AlN template was prepared by depositing an AlN layer of about 200 nm thickness on a sapphire (0001) substrate by metal–organic vapor phase epitaxy. The AlN template was annealed under (N2 + CO) atmosphere at 1500–1650 °C. TEM characterization was conducted to investigate the microstructural evolution, revealing that the postannealed AlN has a two-layer structure, the upper and lower layers of which exhibit Al and N polarities, respectively. It has been confirmed that postannealing is an effective treatment for controlling the microstructure.

  3. Electron Microscopy Characterization of Hybrid Metallic Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindo, Daisuke; Akase, Zentaro

    In order to understand the excellent properties of nanoscale hybridized materials, it is very important to investigate the microstructures and interfaces of these materials at the nanometer scale. In this chapter, we present the basic principles of transmission electron microscopy and its applications to these materials. In addition to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM) and high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), analytical electron microscopy, including energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron energyloss spectroscopy (EELS) as well as elemental mapping methods using these spectroscopy techniques will be presented. Also, the electron holographic technique for characterization of magnetic fields of nanohybridized materials will be explained. In addition to electron microscopic observation techniques, recently developed specimen preparation techniques, which are indispensable for obtaining homogeneous and thin films of nanohybridized materials, will be presented. In particular, a focused ion beam (FIB) method will be emphasized. The nanohybridized materials discussed in this chapter include carbon-based core-shell structure, nanocrystalline soft magnetic materials, nanocomposite magnets, and high-T c superconducting oxides. Application data will be provided in order to explain the usefulness of these analytical techniques for characterization of nanohybridized materials.

  4. Electron Microscopy of the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Leeson, T. S.

    1965-01-01

    The use of the electron microscope has added much to our knowledge of the cell. The fine structure of the component parts of the nucleus and the cytoplasm is described, and their functions are indicated. The nature and structural modifications of the plasma membrane are illustrated with particular reference to function. To illustrate the interrelationships of the nucleus and cytoplasm, the theory of protein secretion is discussed, the secretion of a particular protein or polypeptide being determined by a particular nucleotide sequence in the desoxyribonucleic acid of a chromosome, that is, by a gene. This information is transferred from nucleus to cytoplasm. It is in the cytoplasm that the majority of the work is performed while the nucleus directs the work of the cell. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 21Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 25Fig. 26 PMID:5829410

  5. Environmental scanning electron microscopy gold immunolabeling in cell biology.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Francesco; Papale, Ferdinando; Barbarisi, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Immunogold labeling (IGL) technique has been utilized by many authors in combination with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to obtain the identification/localization of receptors and antigens, both in cells and tissues. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) represents an important tool in biomedical research, since it does not require any severe processing of the sample, lowering the risk of generating artifacts and interfere with the IGL procedure. The absence of metal coating could yield further advantages for our purpose as the labeling detection is based on the atomic number difference between nanogold spheres and the biological material. Using the gaseous secondary electron detector, compositional contrast is easily revealed by the backscattered electron component of the signal. In spite of this fact, only few published papers present a combination of ESEM and IGL. Hereby we present our method, optimized to improve the intensity and the specificity of the labeling signal, in order to obtain a semiquantitative evaluation of the labeling signal.In particular, we used a combination of IGL and ESEM to detect the presence of a protein on the cell surface. To achieve this purpose, we chose as an experimental system 3T3 Swiss albino mouse fibroblasts and galectin-3. PMID:23027021

  6. Electron Microscopy and Luminescence Study of Defects in Semiconductor Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Fiona Jane

    1990-03-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Dislocations and defects in semiconductor silicon have been the subject of much research in the last thirty years. However, to date some of the mechanisms involved in the nucleation and growth of oxidation induced defects remain uncertain, as does the origin of luminescence lines in heat treated and dislocated material. Defects introduced into silicon single crystals by three different mechanisms have been examined using Cathodoluminescence (CL), Photoluminescence (PL) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The mechanisms employed were heat treatments, electron irradiation and plastic deformation. The CL system at Bristol had previously been developed for the study of II-VI and III-V semiconductors, the subsequent addition of the near infra-red detector enabled the luminescence from silicon to be studied. The first phase of this thesis explores the capability of the CL system in detecting and spatially resolving luminescence from silicon using the Germanium detector. The second phase involved the study of different defect systems with the aim of studying luminescence emitted from TEM thin samples. Transmission Electron Microscopy was used to examine large scale defects nucleated after single and multiple medium and high temperature anneals. Electron irradiation damage introduced in the 300kV TEM was studied in the CL system. The threshold energy for silicon displacement via 'knock-on' interactions was found to be 155keV. Dislocation related D line luminescence in plastically deformed silicon was examined using both PL and CL spectroscopy. D line emission from thermally annealed silicon, previously thought to be associated with energy states at the Si-SiO _{rm x} interface, was spatially resolved in the CL system. D line emission was detected close to the cleaved edges of samples studied.

  7. Optical microscopy versus scanning electron microscopy in urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Marickar, Y M Fazil; Lekshmi, P R; Varma, Luxmi; Koshy, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Stone analysis is incompletely done in many clinical centers. Identification of the stone component is essential for deciding future prophylaxis. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) still remains a distant dream for routine hospital work. It is in this context that optical microscopy is suggested as an alternate procedure. The objective of this article was to assess the utility of an optical microscope which gives magnification of up to 40x and gives clear picture of the surface of the stones. In order to authenticate the morphological analysis of urinary stones, SEM and elemental distribution analysis were performed. A total of 250 urinary stones of different compositions were collected from stone clinic, photographed, observed under an optical microscope, and optical photographs were taken at different angles. Twenty-five representative samples among these were gold sputtered to make them conductive and were fed into the SEM machine. Photographs of the samples were taken at different angles at magnifications up to 4,000. Elemental distribution analysis (EDAX) was done to confirm the composition. The observations of the two studies were compared. The different appearances of the stones under optical illuminated microscopy were mostly standardized appearances, namely bosselations of pure whewellite, spiculations of weddellite, bright yellow colored appearance of uric acid, and dirty white amorphous appearance of phosphates. SEM and EDAX gave clearer pictures and gave added confirmation of the stone composition. From the references thus obtained, it was possible to confirm the composition by studying the optical microscopic pictures. Higher magnification capacity of the SEM and the EDAX patterns are useful to give reference support for performing optical microscopy work. After standardization, routine analysis can be performed with optical microscopy. The advantage of the optical microscope is that, it

  8. Active Pixel Sensors for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denes, P.; Bussat, J.-M.; Lee, Z.; Radmillovic, V.

    2007-09-01

    The technology used for monolithic CMOS imagers, popular for cell phone cameras and other photographic applications, has been explored for charged particle tracking by the high-energy physics community for several years. This technology also lends itself to certain imaging detector applications in electron microscopy. We have been developing such detectors for several years at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and we and others have shown that this technology can offer excellent point-spread function, direct detection and high readout speed. In this paper, we describe some of the design constraints peculiar to electron microscopy and summarize where such detectors could play a useful role.

  9. [Pili annulati. A scanning electron microscopy study].

    PubMed

    Lalević-Vasić, B; Polić, D

    1988-01-01

    A case of ringed hair studied by light and electron microscopy is reported. The patient, a 20-year old girl, had been presenting with the hair abnormality since birth. At naked eye examination the hairs were dry, 6 to 7 cm long, and they showed dull and shining areas giving the scalp hair a scintillating appearance (fig. 1). Several samples of hair were taken and examined by light microscopy under white and polarized light. Hair shafts and cryo-fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS. 1. Light microscopy. Lesions were found in every hair examined. There were abnormal, opaque and fusiform areas alternating with normal areas all along the hair shaft (fig. 2). The abnormal areas resulted from intracortical air-filled cavities. Fractures similar to those of trichorrhexis nodosa were found in the opaque areas of the distal parts of the hairs. 2. Scanning electron microscopy. A. Hair shaft surface. The abnormal areas showed a longitudinal, "curtain-like" folding of the cuticular cells which had punctiform depressions on their surface and worn free edges (fig. 4, 5, 6); trichorrhexis-type fractures were seen in the distal parts of the hair shafts (fig. 7, 8). Normal areas regularly presented with longitudinal, superficial, short and non-systematized depressions (fig. 9); the cuticular cells were worn, and there were places where the denuded cortex showed dissociated cortical fibres (fig. 10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3415147

  10. Wet electron microscopy with quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Timp, Winston; Watson, Nicki; Sabban, Alon; Zik, Ory; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-09-01

    Wet electron microscopy (EM) is a new imaging method with the potential to allow higher spatial resolution of samples. In contrast to most EM methods, it requires little time to perform and does not require complicated equipment or difficult steps. We used this method on a common murine macrophage cell line, IC-21, in combination with various stains and preparations, to collect high resolution images of the actin cytoskeleton. Most importantly, we demonstrated the use of quantum dots in conjunction with this technique to perform light/electron correlation microscopy. We found that wet EM is a useful tool that fits into a niche between the simplicity of light microscopy and the high spatial resolution of EM. PMID:16989089

  11. Recent developments of the in situ wet cell technology for transmission electron microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Li, Chang; Cao, Hongling

    2015-03-01

    In situ wet cells for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allow studying structures and processes in a liquid environment with high temporal and spatial resolutions, and have been attracting increasing research interests in many fields. In this review, we highlight the structural and functional developments of the wet cells for TEM and STEM. One of the key features of the wet cells is the sealing technique used to isolate the liquid sample from the TEM/STEM vacuum environments, thus the existing in situ wet cells are grouped by different sealing methods. In this study, the advantages and shortcomings of each type of in situ wet cells are discussed, the functional developments of different wet cells are presented, and the future trends of the wet cell technology are addressed. It is suggested that in the future the in situ wet cell TEM/STEM technology will have an increasing impact on frontier nanoscale research.

  12. The rapidly changing face of electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, John Meurig; Leary, Rowan K.; Eggeman, Alexander S.; Midgley, Paul A.

    2015-07-01

    This short but wide-ranging review is intended to convey to chemical physicists and others engaged in the interfaces between solid-state chemistry and solid-state physics the growing power and extensive applicability of multiple facets of the technique of electron microscopy.

  13. Microstructural studies of dental amalgams using analytical transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooghan, Tejpal Kaur

    Dental amalgams have been used for centuries as major restorative materials for decaying teeth. Amalgams are prepared by mixing alloy particles which contain Ag, Sn, and Cu as the major constituent elements with liquid Hg. The study of microstructure is essential in understanding the setting reactions and improving the properties of amalgams. Until the work reported in this dissertation, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) were used commonly to analyze amalgam microstructures. No previous systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study has been performed due to sample preparation difficulties and composite structure of dental amalgams. The goal of this research was to carry out detailed microstructural and compositional studies of dental amalgams. This was accomplished using the enhanced spatial resolution of the TEM and its associated microanalytical techniques, namely, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) and micro-microdiffraction (mumuD). A new method was developed for thinning amalgam samples to electron transparency using the "wedge technique." Velvalloy, a low-Cu amalgam, and Tytin, a high-Cu amalgam, were the two amalgams characterized. Velvalloy is composed of a Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) matrix surrounding unreacted Agsb3Sn (gamma) particles. In addition, hitherto uncharacterized reaction layers between Agsb3Sn(gamma)/Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb2)\\ and\\ Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) were observed and analyzed. An Ag-Hg-Sn (betasb1) phase was clearly identified for the first time. In Tytin, the matrix consists of Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1) grains. Fine precipitates of Cusb6Snsb5\\ (etasp') are embedded inside the gammasb1 and at the grain boundaries. These precipitates are responsible for the improved creep resistance of Tytin compared to Velvalloy. The additional Cu has completely eliminated the gammasb

  14. Possibilities and limitations of advanced transmission electron microscopy for carbon-based nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt, Carla; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2015-01-01

    Summary A major revolution for electron microscopy in the past decade is the introduction of aberration correction, which enables one to increase both the spatial resolution and the energy resolution to the optical limit. Aberration correction has contributed significantly to the imaging at low operating voltages. This is crucial for carbon-based nanomaterials which are sensitive to electron irradiation. The research of carbon nanomaterials and nanohybrids, in particular the fundamental understanding of defects and interfaces, can now be carried out in unprecedented detail by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (AC-TEM). This review discusses new possibilities and limits of AC-TEM at low voltage, including the structural imaging at atomic resolution, in three dimensions and spectroscopic investigation of chemistry and bonding. In situ TEM of carbon-based nanomaterials is discussed and illustrated through recent reports with particular emphasis on the underlying physics of interactions between electrons and carbon atoms. PMID:26425406

  15. Photon-induced near field electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Tae; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2013-09-01

    Ultrafast electron microscopy in the space and time domains utilizes a pulsed electron probe to directly map structural dynamics of nanomaterials initiated by an optical pump pulse, in imaging, di raction, spectroscopy, and their combinations. It has demonstrated its capability in the studies of phase transitions, mechanical vibrations, and chemical reactions. Moreover, electrons can directly interact with photons via the near eld component of light scattering by nanostructures, and either gain or lose light quanta discretely in energy. By energetically selecting those electrons that exchanged photon energies, we can map this photon-electron interaction, and the technique is termed photon-induced near eld electron microscopy (PINEM). Here, we give an account of the theoretical understanding of PINEM. Experimentally, nanostructures such as a sphere, cylinder, strip, and triangle have been investigated. Theoretically, time-dependent Schrodinger and Dirac equations for an electron under light are directly solved to obtain analytical solutions. The interaction probability is expressed by the mechanical work done by an optical wave on a traveling electron, which can be evaluated analytically by the near eld components of the Rayleigh scattering for small spheres and thin cylinders, and numerically by the discrete dipole approximation for other geometries. Application in visualization of plasmon elds is discussed.

  16. Chemistry of coal from electron microscopy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, C.A.; Hsieh, K.C.; Fraser, H.

    1986-04-01

    Well established techniques of analytical electron microscopy have applications to the chemistry of coal. The techniques use one or another of several interactions which occur when electrons are incident on a specimen. Two such interactions are discussed in this paper: 1: X-ray emission spectroscopy and 2: Electron energy loss spectroscopy. Both methods are used in the study of metallic and ceramic systems. The principles of the technique are illustrated by applications to metallic and ceramic systems; initial applications to coal are then described.

  17. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of corroded metal waste forms.

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, N. L.

    2005-04-15

    This report documents the results of analyses with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and selected area electron diffraction (ED) of samples of metallic waste form (MWF) materials that had been subjected to various corrosion tests. The objective of the TEM analyses was to characterize the composition and microstructure of surface alteration products which, when combined with other test results, can be used to determine the matrix corrosion mechanism. The examination of test samples generated over several years has resulted in refinements to the TEM sample preparation methods developed to preserve the orientation of surface alteration layers and the underlying base metal. The preservation of microstructural spatial relationships provides valuable insight for determining the matrix corrosion mechanism and for developing models to calculate radionuclide release in repository performance models. The TEM results presented in this report show that oxide layers are formed over the exposed steel and intermetallic phases of the MWF during corrosion in aqueous solutions and humid air at elevated temperatures. An amorphous non-stoichiometric ZrO{sub 2} layer forms at the exposed surfaces of the intermetallic phases, and several nonstoichiometric Fe-O layers form over the steel phases in the MWF. These oxide layers adhere strongly to the underlying metal, and may be overlain by one or more crystalline Fe-O phases that probably precipitated from solution. The layer compositions are consistent with a corrosion mechanism of oxidative dissolution of the steel and intermetallic phases. The layers formed on the steel and intermetallic phases form a continuous layer over the exposed waste form, although vertical splits in the layer and corrosion in pits and crevices were seen in some samples. Additional tests and analyses are needed to verify that these layers passivate the underlying metals and if passivation can break

  18. Electron microscopy of gold nanoparticles at atomic resolution

    PubMed Central

    Azubel, Maia; Koivisto, Jaakko; Malola, Sami; Bushnell, David; Hura, Greg L.; Koh, Ai Leen; Tsunoyama, Hironori; Tsukuda, Tatsuya; Pettersson, Mika; Häkkinen, Hannu; Kornberg, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    Structure determination of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is necessary for understanding their physical and chemical properties, and only one AuNP larger than 1 nm in diameter, an Au102NP, has been solved to atomic resolution. Whereas the Au102NP structure was determined by X-ray crystallography, other large AuNPs have proved refractory to this approach. Here we report the structure determination of an Au68NP at atomic resolution by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (AC-TEM), performed with the use of a minimal electron dose, an approach that should prove applicable to metal NPs in general. The structure of the Au68NP was supported by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and by comparison of observed infrared (IR) absorption spectra with calculations by density functional theory (DFT). PMID:25146285

  19. In situ TEM/SEM electronic/mechanical characterization of nano material with MEMS chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuelin, Wang; Tie, Li; Xiao, Zhang; Hongjiang, Zeng; Qinhua, Jin

    2014-08-01

    Our investigation of in situ observations on electronic and mechanical properties of nano materials using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) with the help of traditional micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology has been reviewed. Thanks to the stability, continuity and controllability of the loading force from the electrostatic actuator and the sensitivity of the sensor beam, a MEMS tensile testing chip for accurate tensile testing in the nano scale is obtained. Based on the MEMS chips, the scale effect of Young's modulus in silicon has been studied and confirmed directly in a tensile experiment using a transmission electron microscope. Employing the nanomanipulation technology and FIB technology, Cu and SiC nanowires have been integrated into the tensile testing device and their mechanical, electronic properties under different stress have been achieved, simultaneously. All these will aid in better understanding the nano effects and contribute to the designation and application in nano devices.

  20. Assessment of the contribution of electron microscopy to nanoparticle characterization sampled with two cascade impactors.

    PubMed

    Noël, Alexandra; L'Espérance, Gilles; Cloutier, Yves; Plamondon, Philippe; Boucher, Julie; Philippe, Suzanne; Dion, Chantal; Truchon, Ginette; Zayed, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the contribution of electron microscopy to the characterization of nanoparticles and compared the degree of variability in sizes observed within each stage when sampled by two cascade impactors: an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) and a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI). A TiO(2) nanoparticle (5 nm) suspension was aerosolized in an inhalation chamber. Nanoparticles sampled by the impactors were collected on aluminum substrates or TEM carbon-coated copper grids using templates, specifically designed in our laboratories, for scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) analysis, respectively. Nanoparticles were characterized using both SEM and TEM. Three different types of diameters (inner, outer, and circular) were measured by image analysis based on count and volume, for each impactor stage. Electron microscopy, especially TEM, is well suited for the characterization of nanoparticles. The MOUDI, probably because of the rotation of its collection stages, which can minimize the resuspension of particles, gave more stable results and smaller geometric standard deviations per stage. Our data suggest that the best approach to estimate particle size by electron microscopy would rely on geometric means of measured circular diameters. Overall, the most reliable data were provided by the MOUDI and the TEM sampling technique on carbon-coated copper grids for this specific experiment. This study indicates interesting findings related to the assessment of impactors combined with electron microscopy for nanoparticle characterization. For future research, since cascade impactors are extensively used to characterize nano-aerosol exposure scenarios, high-performance field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) should also be considered. PMID:23356435

  1. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented. PMID:25475529

  2. Pushing the envelope of in situ transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ramachandramoorthy, Rajaprakash; Bernal, Rodrigo; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2015-05-26

    Recent major improvements to the transmission electron microscope (TEM) including aberration-corrected electron optics, light-element-sensitive analytical instrumentation, sample environmental control, and high-speed and sensitive direct electron detectors are becoming more widely available. When these advances are combined with in situ TEM tools, such as multimodal testing based on microelectromechanical systems, key measurements and insights on nanoscale material phenomena become possible. In particular, these advances enable metrology that allows for unprecedented correlation to quantum mechanics and the predictions of atomistic models. In this Perspective, we provide a summary of recent in situ TEM research that has leveraged these new TEM capabilities as well as an outlook of the opportunities that exist in the different areas of in situ TEM experimentation. Although these advances have improved the spatial and temporal resolution of TEM, a critical analysis of the various in situ TEM fields reveals that further progress is needed to achieve the full potential of the technology. PMID:25942405

  3. TEM, HRTEM, electron holography and electron tomography studies of gamma' and gamma'' nanoparticles in Inconel 718 superalloy.

    PubMed

    Dubiel, B; Kruk, A; Stepniowska, E; Cempura, G; Geiger, D; Formanek, P; Hernandez, J; Midgley, P; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A

    2009-11-01

    The aim of the study was the identification of gamma' and gamma'' strengthening precipitates in a commercial nickel-base superalloy Inconel 718 (Ni-19Fe-18Cr-5Nb-3Mo-1Ti-0.5Al-0.04C, wt %) using TEM dark-field, HRTEM, electron holography and electron tomography imaging. To identify gamma' and gamma'' nanoparticles unambiguously, a systematic analysis of experimental and theoretical diffraction patterns were performed. Using HRTEM method it was possible to analyse small areas of precipitates appearance. Electron holography and electron tomography techniques show new possibilities of visualization of gamma' and gamma'' nanoparticles. The analysis by means of different complementary TEM methods showed that gamma'' particles exhibit a shape of thin plates, while gamma' phase precipitates are almost spherical. PMID:19903242

  4. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  5. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Hiram Larangeira de; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques E; Castro, Luis Antonio Suita de

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  6. New Technique for Successful Thermal Barrier Coating Specimen Preparation for Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brickey; Lee

    2000-05-01

    Reliability of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) hinges on the adhesion of a thermally grown oxide scale to an insulative ceramic topcoat and an underlying metallic bondcoat. The width of the scale and its interfaces makes transmission electron microscopy (TEM) an appropriate tool for its analysis. However, specimen preparation has proven to be a challenging obstacle leading to a dearth of TEM research on TBCs. A new approach to cross-section TBC TEM specimen preparation is described. The principal advantages of this technique are reproducibility, reduced specimen damage, and time savings resulting from decreased ion milling. This technique has been successfully applied to numerous TBC specimens with various thermal histories. PMID:10790492

  7. In situ study of the growth of two-dimensional palladium dendritic nanostructures using liquid-cell electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guomin; Jiang, Yingying; Lin, Fang; Zhang, Hui; Jin, Chuanhong; Yuan, Jun; Yang, Deren; Zhang, Ze

    2014-08-28

    We investigated the growth of two-dimensional (2D) palladium dendritic nanostructures (DNSs) using in situ liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Detailed in situ and ex situ high-resolution scanning TEM (S/TEM) characterization and fractal dimension analyses reveal that the diffusion-limited aggregation and direct atomic deposition are responsible for the growth of palladium dendritic nanostructures. PMID:24938863

  8. Electron microscopy investigations of nanoparticles for cancer diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Ai Leen

    This dissertation concerns electron microscopy characterization of magnetic (MNP) and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles for in-vitro cancer diagnostic applications. Electron microscopy is an essential characterization tool owing to its (sub) nanometer spatial resolution. Structural information about the nanoparticles can be obtained using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which can in turn be correlated to their physical characteristics. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) has excellent depth of field and can be effectively utilized to obtain high resolution information about nanoparticles binding onto cell surfaces. Part One of this thesis focuses on MNPs for bio-sensing and detection applications. As a preliminary study, chemically-synthesized, commercially-available iron oxide nanoparticles were compared against their laboratory-synthesized counterparts to assess their suitability for this application. The motivation for this initial study came about due to the lack of published data on commercially available iron oxide nanoparticles. TEM studies show that the latter are "beads" composed of multiple iron oxide cores encapsulated by a polymer shell, with large standard deviations in core diameter. Laboratory-synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles, on the other hand, are single core particles with small variations in diameter and therefore are expected to be better candidates for the required application. A key limitation in iron oxide nanoparticles is their relatively weak magnetic signals. The development of high moment Synthetic Anti-Ferromagnetic (SAF) nanoparticles aims to overcome this issue. SAFs are a novel class of MNPs fabricated using nanoimprint lithography, direct deposition of multilayer structure and final suspension into liquid medium (water). TEM analyses of cross-section specimens reveal that the SAFs possess characteristics similar to those of sputtered magnetic multilayer thin films. Their layered structure is

  9. Characterization of polysilicon films by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, D.R.; Headley, T.J.; Medernach, J.W.; Geyling, F.

    1993-11-12

    Samples of chemically-vapor-deposited micrometer and sub-micrometer-thick films of polysilicon were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in cross-section and by Raman spectroscopy with illumination at their surface. TEM and Raman spectroscopy both find varying amounts of polycrystalline and amorphous silicon in the wafers. Raman spectra obtained using blue, green and red excitation wavelengths to vary the Raman sampling depth are compared with TEM cross-sections of these films. Films showing crystalline columnar structures in their TEM micrographs have Raman spectra with a band near 497 cm{sup {minus}1} in addition to the dominant polycrystalline silicon band (521 cm{sup {minus}1}). The TEM micrographs of these films have numerous faulted regions and fringes indicative of nanometer-scale silicon structures, which are believed to correspond to the 497cm{sup {minus}1} Raman band.

  10. Electron microscopy study of direct laser deposited IN718

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, R.G.; Huang, Z.W.; Li, H.Y.; Mitchell, I.; Baxter, G.; Bowen, P.

    2015-08-15

    The microstructure of direct laser deposited (DLD) IN718 has been investigated in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results confirm that the dendrite core microstructure can be linked to the cooling rate experienced during the deposition. A ~ 100 μm wide δ partially dissolved region in the IN718 substrate was observed close to the substrate/deposit boundary. In the deposited IN718, γ/Laves eutectic constituent is the predominant minor microconstituent. Irregular and regular (small) (Nb,Ti)C carbides and a mixture of the carbides and Laves were observed. Most M{sub 3}B{sub 2} borides were nucleated around a (Nb,Ti)C carbide. Needles of δ phase precipitated from the Laves phase were also observed. A complex constituent (of Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″, and γ matrix) is reported in IN718 for the first time. The formation of α-Cr particles could be related to Cr rejection during the formation and growth of Cr-depleted δ phase. - Highlights: • Secondary phases in IN718 deposits were identified using electron diffraction and EDS. • MC, M{sub 3}B{sub 2}, γ/Laves eutectic and γ/NbC/Laves eutectic were observed. • Needle-like δ phases were precipitated from the Laves phase. • A complex constituent (Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″ and γ) was reported for the first time.

  11. Correlative super-resolution fluorescence and metal replica transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sochacki, Kem A.; Shtengel, Gleb; van Engelenburg, Schuyler B.; Hess, Harald F.; Taraska, Justin W.

    2014-01-01

    Super-resolution localization microscopy is combined with a complementary imaging technique, transmission electron microscopy of metal replicas, to locate proteins on the landscape of the cellular plasma membrane at the nanoscale. Robust correlation on the scale of 20 nm is validated by imaging endogenous clathrin (with 2D and 3D PALM/TEM) and the method is further used to find the previously unknown 3D position of epsin on clathrin coated structures. PMID:24464288

  12. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Modulation of Transport in Graphene Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A; Qi, Zhengqing John; Crook, Alexander; Ahn, Jae-Hyuk; Johnson, A T Charlie; Drndić, Marija

    2016-04-26

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) electronic transport measurements in nanoscale systems have been previously confined to two-electrode configurations. Here, we use the focused electron beam of a TEM to fabricate a three-electrode geometry from a continuous 2D material where the third electrode operates as side gate in a field-effect transistor configuration. Specifically, we demonstrate TEM nanosculpting of freestanding graphene sheets into graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with proximal graphene side gates, together with in situ TEM transport measurements of the resulting GNRs, whose conductance is modulated by the side-gate potential. The TEM electron beam displaces carbon atoms from the graphene sheet, and its position is controlled with nanometer precision, allowing the fabrication of GNRs of desired width immediately prior to each transport measurement. We also model the corresponding electric field profile in this three-terminal geometry. The implementation of an in situ TEM three-terminal platform shown here further extends the use of a TEM for device characterization. This approach can be easily generalized for the investigation of other nanoscale systems (2D materials, nanowires, and single molecules) requiring the correlation of transport and atomic structure. PMID:27010816

  13. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Modulation of Transport in Graphene Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) electronic transport measurements in nanoscale systems have been previously confined to two-electrode configurations. Here, we use the focused electron beam of a TEM to fabricate a three-electrode geometry from a continuous 2D material where the third electrode operates as side gate in a field-effect transistor configuration. Specifically, we demonstrate TEM nanosculpting of freestanding graphene sheets into graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with proximal graphene side gates, together with in situ TEM transport measurements of the resulting GNRs, whose conductance is modulated by the side-gate potential. The TEM electron beam displaces carbon atoms from the graphene sheet, and its position is controlled with nanometer precision, allowing the fabrication of GNRs of desired width immediately prior to each transport measurement. We also model the corresponding electric field profile in this three-terminal geometry. The implementation of an in situ TEM three-terminal platform shown here further extends the use of a TEM for device characterization. This approach can be easily generalized for the investigation of other nanoscale systems (2D materials, nanowires, and single molecules) requiring the correlation of transport and atomic structure. PMID:27010816

  14. High-contrast en bloc staining of neuronal tissue for field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Juan Carlos; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Hayworth, Kenneth J; Schalek, Richard; Lichtman, Jeff W; Smith, Stephen J; Buchanan, JoAnn

    2012-02-01

    Conventional heavy metal poststaining methods on thin sections lend contrast but often cause contamination. To avoid this problem, we tested several en bloc staining techniques to contrast tissue in serial sections mounted on solid substrates for examination by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Because FESEM section imaging requires that specimens have higher contrast and greater electrical conductivity than transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples, our technique uses osmium impregnation (OTO) to make the samples conductive while heavily staining membranes for segmentation studies. Combining this step with other classic heavy metal en bloc stains, including uranyl acetate (UA), lead aspartate, copper sulfate and lead citrate, produced clean, highly contrasted TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) samples of insect, fish and mammalian nervous systems. This protocol takes 7-15 d to prepare resin-embedded tissue, cut sections and produce serial section images. PMID:22240582

  15. High contrast hollow-cone dark field transmission electron microscopy for nanocrystalline grain size quantification.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bo; Sun, Tik; Warren, Andrew; Heinrich, Helge; Barmak, Katayun; Coffey, Kevin R

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we describe hollow-cone dark field (HCDF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging, with a slightly convergent beam, as an improved technique that is suitable to form high contrast micrographs for nanocrystalline grain size quantification. We also examine the various factors that influence the HCDF TEM image quality, including the conditions of microscopy (alignment, focus and objective aperture size), the properties of the materials imaged (e.g., atomic number, strain, defects), and the characteristics of the TEM sample itself (e.g., thickness, ion milling artifacts). Sample preparation was found to be critical and an initial thinning by wet etching of the substrate (for thin film samples) or tripod polishing (for bulk samples), followed by low-angle ion milling was found to be the preferred approach for preparing high-quality electron transparent samples for HCDF imaging. PMID:20018512

  16. Immunogold Labeling for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Martin W; Fišerová, Jindřiška

    2016-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopes are useful biological tools that can be used to image the surface of whole organisms, tissues, cells, cellular components, and macromolecules. Processes and structures that exist at surfaces can be imaged in pseudo, or real 3D at magnifications ranging from about 10× to 1,000,000×. Therefore a whole multicellular organism, such as a fly, or a single protein embedded in one of its cell membranes can be visualized. In order to identify that protein at high resolution, or to see and quantify its distribution at lower magnifications, samples can be labeled with antibodies. Any surface that can be exposed can potentially be studied in this way. Presented here is a generic method for immunogold labeling for scanning electron microscopy, using two examples of specimens: isolated nuclear envelopes and the cytoskeleton of mammalian culture cells. Various parameters for sample preparation, fixation, immunogold labeling, drying, metal coating, and imaging are discussed so that the best immunogold scanning electron microscopy results can be obtained from different types of specimens. PMID:27515090

  17. Development of a novel straining holder for transmission electron microscopy compatible with single tilt-axis electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Miyazaki, H; Gondo, T; Miyazaki, S; Murayama, M; Hata, S

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a newly designed straining specimen holder for in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) compatible with high-angle single tilt-axis electron tomography. The holder can deform a TEM specimen under tensile stress with the strain rate between 1.5 × 10(-6) and 5.2 × 10(-3) s(-1). We have also confirmed that the maximum tilt angle of the specimen holder reaches ±60° with a rectangular shape aluminum specimen. The new specimen holder, termed as 'straining and tomography holder', will have wide range potential applications in materials science. PMID:25904643

  18. Electron Microscopy of Young Candida albicans Chlamydospores

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sara E.; Spurlock, Ben O.; Michaels, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    One- to three-day-old cultures of Candida albicans bearing chlamydospores were grown and harvested by a special technique, free of agar, and prepared for ultramicrotomy and electron microscopy. These young chlamydospores exhibited a subcellular structure similar to that of the yeast phase, e.g., cytoplasmic membrane, ribosomes, and mitochondria. Other structural characteristics unique to chlamydospores were a very thick, layered cell wall, the outer layer of which was continuous with the outer layer of the suspensor cell wall and was covered by hair-like projections; membrane bound organelles; and large lipoid inclusions. Only young chlamydospores less than 3 to 4 days old exhibited these ultrastructural characteristics. Images PMID:4368664

  19. Electron microscopy methods for studying plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Alison J; Prior, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopy allows direct visualization of the underlying organization of cell surface components on a nano-scale. Immuno-gold labelling of isolated plasma membranes generates point patterns that enable mapping of protein and lipid distributions. 2D spatial statistics reveals the extent to which these distributions are clustered or dispersed and allows the extent of co-localization between different cell surface components to be precisely determined. This approach has been successfully applied to the study of signalling network organization and the consequences of physiological changes in modulating cell surface function. PMID:25331134

  20. Conventional transmission electron microscopy imaging beyond the diffraction and information limits.

    PubMed

    Rosenauer, Andreas; Krause, Florian F; Müller, Knut; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten

    2014-08-29

    There are mainly two complementary imaging modes in transmission electron microscopy (TEM): Conventional TEM (CTEM) and scanning TEM (STEM). In the CTEM mode the specimen is illuminated with a plane electron wave, and the direct image formed by the objective lens is recorded in the image plane. STEM is based on scanning the specimen surface with a focused electron beam and collecting scattered electrons with an extended disk or ring-shaped detector. Here we show that combination of CTEM imaging with STEM illumination generally allows extending the point resolution of CTEM imaging beyond the diffraction limit. This new imaging mode improves imaging characteristics, is more robust against chromatic aberration, exhibits direct structural imaging with superior precision, visualizes light elements with excellent contrast, and even allows us to overcome the conventional information limit of a microscope. PMID:25215995

  1. Feature Adaptive Sampling for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Tim; Engstler, Michael; Pauly, Christoph; Trampert, Patrick; de Jonge, Niels; Mücklich, Frank; Slusallek, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the image acquisition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was introduced. The method used adaptively increased pixel-dwell times to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in areas of high detail. In areas of low detail, the electron dose was reduced on a per pixel basis, and a-posteriori image processing techniques were applied to remove the resulting noise. The technique was realized by scanning the sample twice. The first, quick scan used small pixel-dwell times to generate a first, noisy image using a low electron dose. This image was analyzed automatically, and a software algorithm generated a sparse pattern of regions of the image that require additional sampling. A second scan generated a sparse image of only these regions, but using a highly increased electron dose. By applying a selective low-pass filter and combining both datasets, a single image was generated. The resulting image exhibited a factor of ≈3 better SNR than an image acquired with uniform sampling on a Cartesian grid and the same total acquisition time. This result implies that the required electron dose (or acquisition time) for the adaptive scanning method is a factor of ten lower than for uniform scanning. PMID:27150131

  2. Feature Adaptive Sampling for Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dahmen, Tim; Engstler, Michael; Pauly, Christoph; Trampert, Patrick; de Jonge, Niels; Mücklich, Frank; Slusallek, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the image acquisition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was introduced. The method used adaptively increased pixel-dwell times to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in areas of high detail. In areas of low detail, the electron dose was reduced on a per pixel basis, and a-posteriori image processing techniques were applied to remove the resulting noise. The technique was realized by scanning the sample twice. The first, quick scan used small pixel-dwell times to generate a first, noisy image using a low electron dose. This image was analyzed automatically, and a software algorithm generated a sparse pattern of regions of the image that require additional sampling. A second scan generated a sparse image of only these regions, but using a highly increased electron dose. By applying a selective low-pass filter and combining both datasets, a single image was generated. The resulting image exhibited a factor of ≈3 better SNR than an image acquired with uniform sampling on a Cartesian grid and the same total acquisition time. This result implies that the required electron dose (or acquisition time) for the adaptive scanning method is a factor of ten lower than for uniform scanning. PMID:27150131

  3. Feature Adaptive Sampling for Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Tim; Engstler, Michael; Pauly, Christoph; Trampert, Patrick; de Jonge, Niels; Mücklich, Frank; Slusallek, Philipp

    2016-05-01

    A new method for the image acquisition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was introduced. The method used adaptively increased pixel-dwell times to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in areas of high detail. In areas of low detail, the electron dose was reduced on a per pixel basis, and a-posteriori image processing techniques were applied to remove the resulting noise. The technique was realized by scanning the sample twice. The first, quick scan used small pixel-dwell times to generate a first, noisy image using a low electron dose. This image was analyzed automatically, and a software algorithm generated a sparse pattern of regions of the image that require additional sampling. A second scan generated a sparse image of only these regions, but using a highly increased electron dose. By applying a selective low-pass filter and combining both datasets, a single image was generated. The resulting image exhibited a factor of ≈3 better SNR than an image acquired with uniform sampling on a Cartesian grid and the same total acquisition time. This result implies that the required electron dose (or acquisition time) for the adaptive scanning method is a factor of ten lower than for uniform scanning.

  4. Direct Observation of Wet Biological Samples by Graphene Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungwon; Park, Hyesung; Ercius, Peter; Pegoraro, Adrian F; Xu, Chen; Kim, Jin Woong; Han, Sang Hoon; Weitz, David A

    2015-07-01

    Recent development of liquid phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) enables the study of specimens in wet ambient conditions within a liquid cell; however, direct structural observation of biological samples in their native solution using TEM is challenging since low-mass biomaterials embedded in a thick liquid layer of the host cell demonstrate low contrast. Furthermore, the integrity of delicate wet samples is easily compromised during typical sample preparation and TEM imaging. To overcome these limitations, we introduce a graphene liquid cell (GLC) using multilayer graphene sheets to reliably encapsulate and preserve biological samples in a liquid for TEM observation. We achieve nanometer scale spatial resolution with high contrast using low-dose TEM at room temperature, and we use the GLC to directly observe the structure of influenza viruses in their native buffer solution at room temperature. The GLC is further extended to investigate whole cells in wet conditions using TEM. We also demonstrate the potential of the GLC for correlative studies by TEM and fluorescence light microscopy imaging. PMID:26065925

  5. Scanning electron microscopy studies of bacterial cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinger, Tracy; Blust, Brittni; Calabrese, Joseph; Tzolov, Marian

    2012-02-01

    Scanning electron microscopy is a powerful tool to study the morphology of bacteria. We have used conventional scanning electron microscope to follow the modification of the bacterial morphology over the course of the bacterial growth cycle. The bacteria were fixed in vapors of Glutaraldehyde and ruthenium oxide applied in sequence. A gold film of about 5 nm was deposited on top of the samples to avoid charging and to enhance the contrast. We have selected two types of bacteria Alcaligenes faecalis and Kocuria rhizophila. Their development was carefully monitored and samples were taken for imaging in equal time intervals during their cultivation. These studies are supporting our efforts to develop an optical method for identification of the Gram-type of bacterial cultures.

  6. Electron Microscopy of Botrytis cinerea Conidia

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Patricia M.; Sjaholm, Virginia E.; Sommer, N. F.

    1966-01-01

    Buckley, Patricia M. (University of California, Davis), Virginia E. Sjaholm, and N. F. Sommer. Electron microscopy of Botrytis cinerea conidia. J. Bacteriol. 91:2037–2044. 1966.—Sections of germinating and nongerminating Botrytis cinerea conidia were examined with an electron microscope. Uranyl acetate or lead citrate provided contrast between membranes and cytoplasm. Membrane-bounded, dense inclusions previously unreported in dormant spores were termed “storage bodies.” Whorled structures, spherules, granules, and membrane loops were seen within these inclusions. The various forms assumed by the enclosed materials closely resemble phospholipid inclusions described for other cells. It is suggested that the inclusions provide material for the assembly of membranous organelles during germination. Utilization of the stored material apparently results in extensive vacuolization in advanced germinants. Images PMID:5949251

  7. Imaging the Endothelial Glycocalyx In Vitro by Rapid Freezing/Freeze Substitution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ebong, Eno E; Macaluso, Frank P; Spray, David C; Tarbell, John M

    2011-01-01

    Objective Recent publications questioned the validity of endothelial cell (EC) culture studies of glycocalyx (GCX) function, due to findings that GCX in vitro may be substantially thinner than in vivo. The assessment of thickness differences is complicated by GCX collapse during dehydration for traditional electron microscopy. We measured in vitro GCX thickness using rapid freezing/freeze substitution transmission electron microscopy (RF/FS-TEM), taking advantage of high spatial resolution provided by TEM and the capability to stably preserve the GCX in its hydrated configuration by RF/FS. Methods and Results Bovine aortic and rat fat pad endothelial cells (BAEC and RFPEC) were subjected to conventional- or RF/FS-TEM. Conventionally preserved BAEC GCX was ~0.040 μm in thickness. RF/FS-TEM revealed impressively thick BAEC GCX of ~11 μm and RFPEC GCX of ~5 μm. RF/FS-TEM also discerned GCX structure and thickness variations due to heparinase III enzyme treatment and extracellular protein removal, respectively. Immunoconfocal studies confirmed that the in vitro GCX is several microns thick and is comprised of extensive and well integrated heparan sulfate, hyaluronic acid, and protein layers. Conclusions New observations by RF/FS-TEM reveal substantial GCX layers on cultured EC, supporting their continued use for fundamental studies of GCX and its function in the vasculature. PMID:21474821

  8. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF HELIUM BEARING FUSION WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tosten, M; Michael Morgan, M

    2008-12-12

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was conducted to characterize the helium bubble distributions in tritium-charged-and-aged 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel fusion welds containing approximately 150 appm helium-3. TEM foils were prepared from C-shaped fracture toughness test specimens containing {delta} ferrite levels ranging from 4 to 33 volume percent. The weld microstructures in the low ferrite welds consisted mostly of austenite and discontinuous, skeletal {delta} ferrite. In welds with higher levels of {delta} ferrite, the ferrite was more continuous and, in some areas of the 33 volume percent sample, was the matrix/majority phase. The helium bubble microstructures observed were similar in all samples. Bubbles were found in the austenite but not in the {delta} ferrite. In the austenite, bubbles had nucleated homogeneously in the grain interiors and heterogeneously on dislocations. Bubbles were not found on any austenite/austenite grain boundaries or at the austenite/{delta} ferrite interphase interfaces. Bubbles were not observed in the {delta} ferrite because of the combined effects of the low solubility and rapid diffusion of tritium through the {delta} ferrite which limited the amount of helium present to form visible bubbles.

  9. Transmission electron microscopy characterisation of 0-D nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Stuart Matthew

    When materials are scaled down to the nanometre level, a change in physical behaviour is frequently observed. In so-called 0-D nanomaterials (nanoparticles), these unique nanoscale properties are most abundant and are usually linked to either a change in (electronic) structure of the material or to the dominating influence of the particle surface at the nanometre scale. In this doctoral work the nanoscale properties of several nanoparticle systems have been studied using advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Every material that was studied required for its solution a unique approach and a host of transmission electron microscopy techniques. The title of this doctoral work can be freely translated as "retrieving quantitatively the maximal and most accurate chemical, structural and morphological information from nanoparticles by advanced transmission electron microscopy, to uncover and explain their unique properties". Chapter 1 gives a brief general introduction to the world of nanomaterials and nanotechnology in general and more specifically to 0-D nanomaterials (nanoparticles). The unique properties and potential applications of these materials are described. The production of 0-D nanomaterials is not covered in this chapter, as this is an extremely broad field to cover in only a few pages. Instead, the production method for each of the materials is left to the detailed chapters that follow. In Chapter 2 the main transmission electron microscopy techniques used to characterise the materials in the further chapters are described together with the microscopes used to perform these techniques and their parameters of operation. Again, the sample-specific setups are listed in the detailed chapters that follow. Chapter 3 covers all work carried out on luminescent detonation nanodiamond powder for drug delivery and bio-medical imaging applications. Specific attention is paid to the morphology, surface chemistry and nitrogen incorporation of detonation

  10. A Correlative Method for Imaging Identical Regions of Samples by Micro-CT, Light Microscopy, and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sengle, Gerhard; Tufa, Sara F.; Sakai, Lynn Y.; Zulliger, Martin A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a method in which a precise region of interest within an intact organism is spatially mapped in three dimensions by non-invasive micro-computed X-ray tomography (micro-CT), then further evaluated by light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tissues are prepared as if for TEM including osmium fixation, which imparts soft tissue contrast in the micro-CT due to its strong X-ray attenuation. This method may therefore be applied to embedded, archived TEM samples. Upon selection of a two-dimensional (2-D) projection from a region of interest (ROI) within the three-dimensional volume, the epoxy-embedded sample is oriented for microtomy so that the sectioning plane is aligned with the micro-CT projection. Registration is verified by overlaying LM images with 2-D micro-CT projections. Structures that are poorly resolved in the micro-CT may be evaluated at TEM resolution by observing the next serial ultrathin section, thereby accessing the same ROI by all three imaging techniques. We compare white adipose tissue within the forelimbs of mice harboring a lipid-altering mutation with their littermate controls. We demonstrate that individual osmium-stained lipid droplets as small as 15 µm and separated by as little as 35 µm may be discerned as separate entities in the micro-CT, validating this to be a high-resolution, non-destructive technique for evaluation of fat content. PMID:23264636

  11. Electron Microscopy of Chromatophores of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, K. D.

    1965-01-01

    Gibson, K. D. (St. Mary's Hospital Medical School, London, England). Electron microscopy of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides. J. Bacteriol. 90:1059–1072. 1965.—Fixed and stained chromatophores and whole cells of anaerobically grown Rhodopseudomonas spheroides were examined in thin sections in the electron microscope. Both purified chromatophores and intracellular membrane-bound vesicles had exactly the same appearance, namely that of spheres or ellipsoids with a thin electron-dense shell surrounding an electron-lucent interior. The distribution of diameters in the two types of structure was also found to be the same, and was compatible with a normal distribution, with a mean of 570 A and a standard deviation 40 A. Negatively stained chromatophores appeared like discs or collapsed spheres. The presence of invaginations of the cytoplasmic membrane in this species was confirmed, and a new structure resembling a twin chromatophore was observed. The bearing of these results on theories of the origin of chromatophores is discussed, and it is concluded that they offer some support for each one of the three main theories about the origin of particulate organelles. Images PMID:5847796

  12. Direct observation of defect structure in protein crystals by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Devaud, G; Furcinitti, P S; Fleming, J C; Lyon, M K; Douglas, K

    1992-01-01

    We have examined the structure of S-layers isolated from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). From the AFM images, we were able to directly observe individual dimers of the crystal, defects in the crystal structure, and twin boundaries. We have identified two types of boundaries, one defined by a mirror plane and the other by a glide plane. This work shows that twin boundaries are highly structured regions that are directly related to the organization of units within each crystal domain. Projection maps from TEM images have shown that there are significant differences in the final average maps has allowed us to relate high magnification views obtained by AFM to the relatively high resolution information obtained by electron microscopy and image processing. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:1420904

  13. Studying synapses in human brain with array tomography and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Kevin R.; Smith, Colin; Wright, Ann K.; Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Pooler, Amy M.; Koffie, Robert; Bastin, Mark E.; Bak, Thomas H.; Abrahams, Sharon; Kopeikina, Katherine J.; McGuone, Declan; Frosch, Matthew P.; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Spires-Jones, Tara L.

    2013-01-01

    Postmortem studies of synapses in human brain are problematic due to the axial resolution limit of light microscopy and the difficulty preserving and analyzing ultrastructure with electron microscopy. Array tomography overcomes these problems by embedding autopsy tissue in resin and cutting ribbons of ultrathin serial sections. Ribbons are imaged with immunofluorescence, allowing high-throughput imaging of tens of thousands of synapses to assess synapse density and protein composition. The protocol takes approximately 3 days per case, excluding image analysis, which is done at the end of the study. Parallel processing for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using a protocol modified to preserve structure in human samples allows complimentary ultrastructural studies. Incorporation of array tomography and TEM into brain banking is a potent way of phenotyping synapses in well-characterized clinical cohorts to develop clinico-pathological correlations at the synapse level. This will be important for research in neurodegenerative disease, developmental diseases, and psychiatric illness. PMID:23787894

  14. In-situ Isotopic Analysis at Nanoscale using Parallel Ion Electron Spectrometry: A Powerful New Paradigm for Correlative Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yedra, Lluís; Eswara, Santhana; Dowsett, David; Wirtz, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic analysis is of paramount importance across the entire gamut of scientific research. To advance the frontiers of knowledge, a technique for nanoscale isotopic analysis is indispensable. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is a well-established technique for analyzing isotopes, but its spatial-resolution is fundamentally limited. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is a well-known method for high-resolution imaging down to the atomic scale. However, isotopic analysis in TEM is not possible. Here, we introduce a powerful new paradigm for in-situ correlative microscopy called the Parallel Ion Electron Spectrometry by synergizing SIMS with TEM. We demonstrate this technique by distinguishing lithium carbonate nanoparticles according to the isotopic label of lithium, viz. (6)Li and (7)Li and imaging them at high-resolution by TEM, adding a new dimension to correlative microscopy. PMID:27350565

  15. In-situ Isotopic Analysis at Nanoscale using Parallel Ion Electron Spectrometry: A Powerful New Paradigm for Correlative Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yedra, Lluís; Eswara, Santhana; Dowsett, David; Wirtz, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic analysis is of paramount importance across the entire gamut of scientific research. To advance the frontiers of knowledge, a technique for nanoscale isotopic analysis is indispensable. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is a well-established technique for analyzing isotopes, but its spatial-resolution is fundamentally limited. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is a well-known method for high-resolution imaging down to the atomic scale. However, isotopic analysis in TEM is not possible. Here, we introduce a powerful new paradigm for in-situ correlative microscopy called the Parallel Ion Electron Spectrometry by synergizing SIMS with TEM. We demonstrate this technique by distinguishing lithium carbonate nanoparticles according to the isotopic label of lithium, viz. 6Li and 7Li and imaging them at high-resolution by TEM, adding a new dimension to correlative microscopy. PMID:27350565

  16. FEI's direct electron detector developments: Embarking on a revolution in cryo-TEM.

    PubMed

    Kuijper, Maarten; van Hoften, Gerald; Janssen, Bart; Geurink, Rudolf; De Carlo, Sacha; Vos, Matthijn; van Duinen, Gijs; van Haeringen, Bart; Storms, Marc

    2015-11-01

    In early 2011 FEI Company launched the "Falcon", its first commercial direct electron detector product intended for application in 3-D electron microscopy in the life sciences. In this paper we discuss the principle of direct electron detection and its implementation in Falcon cameras. We describe the signal formation in the sensor and its impact on the detection quantum efficiency (DQE) of the sensor. Insights into the signal formation led us to improved camera designs. Three significant improvements are discussed. (1) Back thinning of the sensor. This is implemented in the second-generation Falcon (Falcon 2), where the sensor thickness is reduced to 50 μm, and in the latest generation Falcon 3 detector with further back-thinning down to 30 μm. (2) The introduction of electron counting, a signal processing technology implemented in Falcon 3. (3) Dose fractionation mode, which allows the user to access intermediate results during the illumination of the sample. PMID:26431895

  17. Cryogenic-temperature electron microscopy direct imaging of carbon nanotubes and graphene solutions in superacids.

    PubMed

    Kleinerman, O; Parra-Vasquez, A Nicholas G; Green, M J; Behabtu, N; Schmidt, J; Kesselman, E; Young, C C; Cohen, Y; Pasquali, M; Talmon, Y

    2015-07-01

    Cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a powerful tool for imaging liquid and semiliquid systems. While cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) is a standard technique in many fields, cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) is still not that widely used and is far less developed. The vast majority of systems under investigation by cryo-EM involve either water or organic components. In this paper, we introduce the use of novel cryo-TEM and cryo-SEM specimen preparation and imaging methodologies, suitable for highly acidic and very reactive systems. Both preserve the native nanostructure in the system, while not harming the expensive equipment or the user. We present examples of direct imaging of single-walled, multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphene, dissolved in chlorosulfonic acid and oleum. Moreover, we demonstrate the ability of these new cryo-TEM and cryo-SEM methodologies to follow phase transitions in carbon nanotube (CNT)/superacid systems, starting from dilute solutions up to the concentrated nematic liquid-crystalline CNT phases, used as the 'dope' for all-carbon-fibre spinning. Originally developed for direct imaging of CNTs and graphene dissolution and self-assembly in superacids, these methodologies can be implemented for a variety of highly acidic systems, paving a way for a new field of nonaqueous cryogenic electron microscopy. PMID:25818279

  18. New innovations for contrast enhancement in electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, A.

    In this study two techniques for producing and improving contrast in Electron Microscopy are discussed. The first technique deals with the production of secondary contrast in a Variable Pressure SEM under poor vacuum conditions using the specimen current signal. A review of the prior work in this field shows that the presence of the gas ions in the microscope column results in the amplification of the specimen current signal which is enriched in secondary content. The focus of this study is to establish practical conditions for imaging samples in the microscope using specimen current with gas amplification. This is done by understanding the different variables in the microscope which affect the image formation process and then finding out optimum conditions for obtaining the best possible image, i.e., the image most enhanced in secondary contrast. A few 'real life' samples analyzed using this technique show that the gas amplified specimen current images contain secondary information and, in some cases, provide clear advantages to imaging with conventional secondary and backscattered detectors. The second technique dealing with the production of phase contrast in the TEM for extremely thin, electron transparent samples, is analyzed. A review of the literature regarding prior work in the field shows that, while the theoretical aspects of production of phase contrast in the TEM using a phase plate are well understood, there have been problems in practically implementing this in the microscope. One major assumption with most of the studies is that a fiber, partially coated with gold, results in the formation of point charges which is an essential requirement for symmetrically shifting the phase of the electron beam. The focus of this portion of the dissertation is to image the type of fields associated with such a phase plate using the technique of electron holography. It is found that there are two types of fields associated with a phase plate of this sort. One is a

  19. MULTISLICE SIMULATION OF TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF HELIUM BUBBLES IN IRON

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Bo; Edwards, Danny J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Odette, George R.; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2011-04-17

    The objective of this task is to establish the size correlation between transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaged helium (He) bubbles and the actual bubbles in an iron (Fe) matrix. SUMMARY The results of this simulation study show that the size of TEM imaged He bubbles, represented by the inner diameter of the first dark Fresnel ring under defocused condition (Din), deviated from the actual bubble size (Do). Din was found to be larger than Do when imaged with a highly incoherent electron beam, but smaller than Do if the beam is coherent. The deviation of Din from Do increases with increasing defocus. On the other hand, the electron beam accelerating voltage, bubble size, bubble position, and TEM sample thickness do not significantly affect the value of D0/Do. This study also suggests that He bubbles can be differentiated from argon (Ar) bubbles by differences in Fresnel contrast.

  20. Analysis of catalytic gas products using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and residual gas analysis for operando transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin K; Crozier, Peter A

    2014-06-01

    Operando transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of catalytic reactions requires that the gas composition inside the TEM be known during the in situ reaction. Two techniques for measuring gas composition inside the environmental TEM are described and compared here. First, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, both in the low-loss and core-loss regions of the spectrum was utilized. The data were quantified using a linear combination of reference spectra from individual gasses to fit a mixture spectrum. Mass spectrometry using a residual gas analyzer was also used to quantify the gas inside the environmental cell. Both electron energy-loss spectroscopy and residual gas analysis were applied simultaneously to a known 50/50 mixture of CO and CO2, so the results from the two techniques could be compared and evaluated. An operando TEM experiment was performed using a Ru catalyst supported on silica spheres and loaded into the TEM on a specially developed porous pellet TEM sample. Both techniques were used to monitor the conversion of CO to CO2 over the catalyst, while simultaneous atomic resolution imaging of the catalyst was performed. PMID:24815065

  1. High voltage electron microscopy of lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Moran, H.

    1973-01-01

    Lunar pyroxenes from Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15 were investigated. The iron-rich and magnesium-rich pyroxene specimens were crushed to a grain size of ca. 50 microns and studied by a combination of X-ray and electron diffraction, electron microscopy, 57 Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography techniques. Highly ordered, uniform electron-dense bands, corresponding to exsolution lamellae, with average widths of ca. 230A to 1000A dependent on the source specimen were observed. These were?qr separated by wider, less-dense interband spacings with average widths of ca. 330A to 3100A. In heating experiments, splitting of the dense bands into finer structures, leading finally to obliteration of the exsolution lamellae was recorded. The extensive exsolution is evidence for significantly slower cooling rates, or possibly annealing, at temperatures in the subsolidus range, adding evidence that annealing of rock from the surface of the moon took place at ca. 600 C. Correlation of the band structure with magnetic ordering at low temperatures and iron clustering within the bands was studied.

  2. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C44H90 paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol.

  3. Hexamethyldisilazane for scanning electron microscopy of Gastrotricha.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, R; Litvaitis, M K

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated treatment with hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) as an alternative to critical-point drying (CPD) for preparing microscopic Gastrotricha for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We prepared large marine (2 mm) and small freshwater (100 microm) gastrotrichs using HMDS as the primary dehydration solvent and compared the results to earlier investigations using CPD. The results of HMDS dehydration are similar to or better than CPD for resolution of two important taxonomic features: cuticular ornamentation and patterns of ciliation. The body wall of both sculpted (Lepidodermella) and smooth (Dolichodasys) gastrotrichs retained excellent morphology as did the delicate sensory and locomotory cilia. The only unfavorable result of HMDS dehydration was an occasional coagulation of gold residue when the solvent had not fully evaporated before sputter-coating. We consider HMDS an effective alternative for preparing of gastrotrichs for SEM because it saves time and expense compared to CPD. PMID:10810982

  4. Electric fields in Scanning Electron Microscopy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arat, K. T.; Bolten, J.; Klimpel, T.; Unal, N.

    2016-03-01

    The electric field distribution and charging effects in Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were studied by extending a Monte-Carlo based SEM simulator by a fast and accurate multigrid (MG) based 3D electric field solver. The main focus is on enabling short simulation times with maintaining sufficient accuracy, so that SEM simulation can be used in practical applications. The implementation demonstrates a gain in computation speed, when compared to a Gauss-Seidel based reference solver is roughly factor of 40, with negligible differences in the result (~10-6 𝑉). In addition, the simulations were compared with experimental SEM measurements using also complex 3D sample, showing that i) the modelling of e-fields improves the simulation accuracy, and ii) multigrid method provide a significant benefit in terms of simulation time.

  5. Scanning electron microscopy of tinea nigra*

    PubMed Central

    Guarenti, Isabelle Maffei; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Leitão, Aline Hatzenberger; Rocha, Nara Moreira; Silva, Ricardo Marques e

    2014-01-01

    Tinea nigra is a rare superficial mycosis caused by Hortaea werneckii. This infection presents as asymptomatic brown to black maculae mostly in palmo-plantar regions. We performed scanning electron microscopy of a superficial shaving of a tinea nigra lesion. The examination of the outer surface of the sample showed the epidermis with corneocytes and hyphae and elimination of fungal filaments. The inner surface of the sample showed important aggregation of hyphae among keratinocytes, which formed small fungal colonies. The ultrastructural findings correlated with those of dermoscopic examination - the small fungal aggregations may be the dark spicules seen on dermoscopy - and also allowed to document the mode of dissemination of tinea nigra, showing how hyphae are eliminated on the surface of the lesion. PMID:24770516

  6. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Advances in cryogenic transmission electron microscopy for the characterization of dynamic self-assembling nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Newcomb, Christina J.; Moyer, Tyson J.; Lee, Sungsoo S.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2012-01-01

    Elucidating the structural information of nanoscale materials in their solvent-exposed state is crucial, as a result, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) has become an increasingly popular technique in the materials science, chemistry, and biology communities. Cryo-TEM provides a method to directly visualize the specimen structure in a solution-state through a thin film of vitrified solvent. This technique complements X-ray, neutron, and light scattering methods that probe the statistical average of all species present; furthermore, cryo-TEM can be used to observe changes in structure over time. In the area of self-assembly, this tool has been particularly powerful for the characterization of natural and synthetic small molecule assemblies, as well as hybrid organic–inorganic composites. In this review, we discuss recent advances in cryogenic TEM in the context of self-assembling systems with emphasis on characterization of transitions observed in response to external stimuli. PMID:23204913

  8. A pnCCD-based, fast direct single electron imaging camera for TEM and STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryll, H.; Simson, M.; Hartmann, R.; Holl, P.; Huth, M.; Ihle, S.; Kondo, Y.; Kotula, P.; Liebel, A.; Müller-Caspary, K.; Rosenauer, A.; Sagawa, R.; Schmidt, J.; Soltau, H.; Strüder, L.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a new camera that is based on a pnCCD sensor for applications in scanning transmission electron microscopy. Emerging new microscopy techniques demand improved detectors with regards to readout rate, sensitivity and radiation hardness, especially in scanning mode. The pnCCD is a 2D imaging sensor that meets these requirements. Its intrinsic radiation hardness permits direct detection of electrons. The pnCCD is read out at a rate of 1,150 frames per second with an image area of 264 x 264 pixel. In binning or windowing modes, the readout rate is increased almost linearly, for example to 4000 frames per second at 4× binning (264 x 66 pixel). Single electrons with energies from 300 keV down to 5 keV can be distinguished due to the high sensitivity of the detector. Three applications in scanning transmission electron microscopy are highlighted to demonstrate that the pnCCD satisfies experimental requirements, especially fast recording of 2D images. In the first application, 65536 2D diffraction patterns were recorded in 70 s. STEM images corresponding to intensities of various diffraction peaks were reconstructed. For the second application, the microscope was operated in a Lorentz-like mode. Magnetic domains were imaged in an area of 256 x 256 sample points in less than 37 seconds for a total of 65536 images each with 264 x 132 pixels. Due to information provided by the two-dimensional images, not only the amplitude but also the direction of the magnetic field could be determined. In the third application, millisecond images of a semiconductor nanostructure were recorded to determine the lattice strain in the sample. A speed-up in measurement time by a factor of 200 could be achieved compared to a previously used camera system.

  9. Dynamics of Soft Nanomaterials Captured by Transmission Electron Microscopy in Liquid Water

    PubMed Central

    Proetto, Maria T.; Rush, Anthony M.; Chien, Miao-Ping; Baeza, Patricia Abellan; Patterson, Joseph P.; Thompson, Matthew P.; Olson, Norman H.; Moore, Curtis E.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Andolina, Christopher; Millstone, Jill; Howell, Stephen B.; Browning, Nigel D.; Evans, James E.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of synthetic polymeric nanoparticles with emphasis on capturing motion in a solvated, aqueous state. The nanoparticles studied were obtained from the direct polymerization of a Pt(II)-containing monomer. The resulting structures provided sufficient contrast for facile imaging in situ. We contend that this technique will quickly become essential in the characterization of analogous systems, especially where dynamics are of interest in the solvated state. We describe the preparation of the synthetic micellar nanoparticles together with their characterization and motion in liquid water with comparison to conventional electron microscopy analyses. PMID:24422495

  10. Image restoration in cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Penczek, Pawel A

    2010-01-01

    Image restoration techniques are used to obtain, given experimental measurements, the best possible approximation of the original object within the limits imposed by instrumental conditions and noise level in the data. In molecular electron microscopy (EM), we are mainly interested in linear methods that preserve the respective relationships between mass densities within the restored map. Here, we describe the methodology of image restoration in structural EM, and more specifically, we will focus on the problem of the optimum recovery of Fourier amplitudes given electron microscope data collected under various defocus settings. We discuss in detail two classes of commonly used linear methods, the first of which consists of methods based on pseudoinverse restoration, and which is further subdivided into mean-square error, chi-square error, and constrained based restorations, where the methods in the latter two subclasses explicitly incorporates non-white distribution of noise in the data. The second class of methods is based on the Wiener filtration approach. We show that the Wiener filter-based methodology can be used to obtain a solution to the problem of amplitude correction (or "sharpening") of the EM map that makes it visually comparable to maps determined by X-ray crystallography, and thus amenable to comparative interpretation. Finally, we present a semiheuristic Wiener filter-based solution to the problem of image restoration given sets of heterogeneous solutions. We conclude the chapter with a discussion of image restoration protocols implemented in commonly used single particle software packages. PMID:20888957

  11. Post-ion beam induced degradation of copper layers in transmission electron microscopy specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, F.; Richard, O.; Bender, H.; Vandervorst, W.

    2015-11-01

    Copper containing transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimens frequently show corrosion after focused ion beam (FIB) preparation. This paper reveals that the corrosion product is a Cu-S phase growing over the specimen surface. The layer is identified by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and lattice spacing indexing of power spectra patterns. The corrosion process is further studied by TEM on cone-shaped specimens, which are intentionally stored after FIB preparation with S flakes for short time. Furthermore, a protective method against corrosion is developed by varying the time in the FIB vacuum and the duration of a subsequent plasma cleaning.

  12. Fluctuation Electron Microscopy of Amorphous and Polycrystalline Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezikyan, Aram

    Fluctuation Electron Microscopy (FEM) has become an effective materials' structure characterization technique, capable of probing medium-range order (MRO) that may be present in amorphous materials. Although its sensitivity to MRO has been exercised in numerous studies, FEM is not yet a quantitative technique. The holdup has been the discrepancy between the computed kinematical variance and the experimental variance, which previously was attributed to source incoherence. Although high-brightness, high coherence, electron guns are now routinely available in modern electron microscopes, they have not eliminated this discrepancy between theory and experiment. The main objective of this thesis was to explore, and to reveal, the reasons behind this conundrum. The study was started with an analysis of the speckle statistics of tilted dark-field TEM images obtained from an amorphous carbon sample, which confirmed that the structural ordering is sensitively detected by FEM. This analysis also revealed the inconsistency between predictions of the source incoherence model and the experimentally observed variance. FEM of amorphous carbon, amorphous silicon and ultra nanocrystalline diamond samples was carried out in an attempt to explore the conundrum. Electron probe and sample parameters were varied to observe the scattering intensity variance behavior. Results were compared to models of probe incoherence, diffuse scattering, atom displacement damage, energy loss events and multiple scattering. Models of displacement decoherence matched the experimental results best. Decoherence was also explored by an interferometric diffraction method using bilayer amorphous samples, and results are consistent with strong displacement decoherence in addition to temporal decoherence arising from the electron source energy spread and energy loss events in thick samples. It is clear that decoherence plays an important role in the long-standing discrepancy between experimental FEM and its

  13. Advanced electron microscopy characterization of multimetallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Subarna Raj

    Research in noble metal nanoparticles has led to exciting progress in a versatile array of applications. For the purpose of better tailoring of nanoparticles activities and understanding the correlation between their structures and properties, control over the composition, shape, size and architecture of bimetallic and multimetallic nanomaterials plays an important role on revealing their new or enhanced functions for potentials application. Advance electron microscopy techniques were used to provide atomic scale insights into the structure-properties of different materials: PtPd, Au-Au3Cu, Cu-Pt, AgPd/Pt and AuCu/Pt nanoparticles. The objective of this work is to understand the physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials and describe synthesis, characterization, surface properties and growth mechanism of various bimetallic and multimetallic nanoparticles. The findings have provided us with novel and significant insights into the physical and chemical properties of noble metal nanoparticles. Different synthesis routes allowed us to synthesize bimetallic: Pt-Pd, Au-Au3Cu, Cu-Pt and trimetallic: AgPd/Pt, AuCu/Pt, core-shell and alloyed nanoparticles with monodispersed sizes, controlled shapes and tunable surface properties. For example, we have synthesized the polyhedral PtPd core-shell nanoparticles with octahedral, decahedral, and triangular plates. Decahedral PtPd core-shell structures are novel morphologies for this system. For the first time we fabricated that the Au core and Au3Cu alloyed shell nanoparticles passivated with CuS2 surface layers and characterized by Cs-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The analysis of the high-resolution micrographs reveals that these nanoparticles have decahedral structure with shell periodicity, and that each of the particles is composed by Au core and Au3Cu ordered superlattice alloyed shell surrounded by CuS 2 surface layer. Additionally, we have described both experimental and theoretical methods of

  14. Characterization of multilayer nitride coatings by electron microscopy and modulus mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Pemmasani, Sai Pramod; Rajulapati, Koteswararao V.; Ramakrishna, M.; Valleti, Krishna; Gundakaram, Ravi C.; Joshi, Shrikant V.

    2013-07-15

    This paper discusses multi-scale characterization of physical vapour deposited multilayer nitride coatings using a combination of electron microscopy and modulus mapping. Multilayer coatings with a triple layer structure based on TiAlN and nanocomposite nitrides with a nano-multilayered architecture were deposited by Cathodic arc deposition and detailed microstructural studies were carried out employing Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, Electron Backscattered Diffraction, Focused Ion Beam and Cross sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy in order to identify the different phases and to study microstructural features of the various layers formed as a result of the deposition process. Modulus mapping was also performed to study the effect of varying composition on the moduli of the nano-multilayers within the triple layer coating by using a Scanning Probe Microscopy based technique. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt on modulus mapping of cathodic arc deposited nitride multilayer coatings. This work demonstrates the application of Scanning Probe Microscopy based modulus mapping and electron microscopy for the study of coating properties and their relation to composition and microstructure. - Highlights: • Microstructure of a triple layer nitride coating studied at multiple length scales. • Phases identified by EDS, EBSD and SAED (TEM). • Nanolayered, nanocomposite structure of the coating studied using FIB and TEM. • Modulus mapping identified moduli variation even in a nani-multilayer architecture.

  15. Challenges and strategies of surface modification of electrogalvanized coatings for electron microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Jantaping, Narin; Banjongprasert, Chaiyasit; Chairuangsri, Torranin; Patakham, Ussadawut; Boonyongmaneerat, Yuttanant

    2016-07-01

    Despite wide usage of electrogalvanized coatings in various applications, characterization studies on their micro/crystal structure, and the understanding of how they correspondingly affect the properties, such as corrosion, are rather limited. This is mainly attributed to some difficulties in preparing and examining the zinc coating layers, owing to their intrinsically low corrosion resistance and refined nano-scaled crystallite size. This study aims to examine such challenges systematically and propose some mitigation strategies. Particularly, sample preparation processes, including surface finishing for metallography and sample thinning processes are explored. Furthermore, a range of electron microscopy techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron back scattered diffractometry (EBSD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are investigated in relation to the achievable clarity of microstructural details of electrogalvanized coatings. PMID:27180069

  16. Detection of pharmaceutical crystals in polymer particles by transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricarte, Ralm; Hillmyer, Marc; Lodge, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    The use of solid dispersions, blends of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and a polymer excipient, may significantly enhance the dissolution performance of a poorly water soluble drug. However, the polymer's role in inhibiting API crystallization within the solid dispersion is not well understood. One of the main challenges in elucidating this mechanism is the difficulty of detecting small amounts of API crystals (less than 5 volume percent) within the polymer matrix. In this work, we explore the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to characterize the crystallinity of griseofulvin (GF) in hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS) solid dispersions. Using both real-space images and electron diffraction patterns from TEM, GF crystals in the HPMCAS matrix were unambiguously identified with nanometer resolution and with a crystal detection sensitivity superior to both wide-angle X-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry. TEM shows great potential for characterizing even trace API crystallinity in solid polymeric dispersions.

  17. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of auto catalyst and cobalt germanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haiping

    The modern ceria-zirconia based catalysts are used in automobiles to reduce exhaust pollutants. Cobalt germanides have potential applications as electrical contacts in the future Ge-based semiconductor devices. In this thesis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to study the atomic scale interactions between metallic nanostructures and crystalline substrates in the two material systems mentioned above. The model catalyst samples consisted of precious metal nano-particles (Pd, Rh) supported on the surface of (Ce,Zr)O2 thin films. The response of the microstructure of the metal-oxide interface to the reduction and oxidation treatments was investigated by cross-sectional high resolution TEM. Atomic detail of the metal-oxide interface was obtained. It was found that Pd and Rh showed different sintering and interaction behaviors on the oxide surface. The preferred orientation of Pd particles in this study was Pd(111)//CZO(111). Partial encapsulation of Pd particles by reduced (Ce,Zr)O 2 surface was observed and possible mechanisms of the encapsulation were discussed. The characteristics of the metal-oxide interaction depend on the properties of the oxide, as well as their relative orientation. The results provide experimental evidence for understanding the thermodynamics of the equilibrium morphology of a solid particle supported on a solid surface that is not considered as inert. The reaction of Co with Ge to form epitaxial Co5Ge7 was studied by in situ ultra-high vacuum (UHV) TEM using two methods. One was reactive deposition of Co on Ge, in which the Ge substrate was maintained at 350°C during deposition. The other method was solid state reaction, in which the deposition of Co on Ge was carried out at room temperature followed by annealing to higher temperatures. During reactive deposition, the deposited Co reacted with Ge to form nanosized 3D Co 5Ge7 islands. During solid state reaction, a continuous epitaxial Co5Ge7 film on the (001) Ge

  18. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) as an approach for nanoparticle detection inside cells.

    PubMed

    Havrdova, M; Polakova, K; Skopalik, J; Vujtek, M; Mokdad, A; Homolkova, M; Tucek, J; Nebesarova, J; Zboril, R

    2014-12-01

    When developing new nanoparticles for bio-applications, it is important to fully characterize the nanoparticle's behavior in biological systems. The most common techniques employed for mapping nanoparticles inside cells include transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). These techniques entail passing an electron beam through a thin specimen. STEM or TEM imaging is often used for the detection of nanoparticles inside cellular organelles. However, lengthy sample preparation is required (i.e., fixation, dehydration, drying, resin embedding, and cutting). In the present work, a new matrix (FTO glass) for biological samples was used and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) to generate images comparable to those obtained by TEM. Using FE-SEM, nanoparticle images were acquired inside endo/lysosomes without disruption of the cellular shape. Furthermore, the initial steps of nanoparticle incorporation into the cells were captured. In addition, the conductive FTO glass endowed the sample with high stability under the required accelerating voltage. Owing to these features of the sample, further analyses could be performed (material contrast and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS)), which confirmed the presence of nanoparticles inside the cells. The results showed that FE-SEM can enable detailed characterization of nanoparticles in endosomes without the need for contrast staining or metal coating of the sample. Images showing the intracellular distribution of nanoparticles together with cellular morphology can give important information on the biocompatibility and demonstrate the potential of nanoparticle utilization in medicine. PMID:25173605

  19. Multiple correlative immunolabeling for light and electron microscopy using fluorophores and colloidal metal particles.

    PubMed

    Kandela, Irawati K; Bleher, Reiner; Albrecht, Ralph M

    2007-10-01

    Multiple correlative immunolabeling permits colocalization of molecular species for sequential observation of the same sample in light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM). This technique allows rapid evaluation of labeling via LM, prior to subsequent time-consuming preparation and observation with transmission electric microscopy (TEM). The procedure also yields two different complementary data sets. In LM, different fluorophores are distinguished by their respective excitation and emission wavelengths. In EM, colloidal metal nanoparticles of different elemental composition can be differentiated and mapped by energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy with electron spectroscopic imaging. For the highest level of spatial resolution in TEM, colloidal metal particles were conjugated directly to primary antibodies. For LM, fluorophores were conjugated to secondary antibodies, which did not affect the spatial resolution attainable by fluorescence microscopy but placed the fluorophore at a sufficient distance from the metal particle to limit quenching of the fluorescence signal. It also effectively kept the fluorophore at a sufficient distance from the colloidal metal particles, which resulted in limiting quenching of the fluorescent signal. Two well-defined model systems consisting of myosin and alpha-actinin bands of skeletal muscle tissue and also actin and alpha-actinin of human platelets in ultrathin Epon sections were labeled using both fluorophores (Cy2 and Cy3) as markers for LM and equally sized colloidal gold (cAu) and colloidal palladium (cPd) particles as reporters for TEM. Each sample was labeled by a mixture of conjugates or labels and observed by LM, then further processed for TEM. PMID:17652267

  20. High-Resolution Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (HREELS) Using a Monochromated TEM/STEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sai, Z. R.; Bradley, J. P.; Erni, R.; Browning, N.

    2005-01-01

    A 200 keV FEI TF20 XT monochromated (scanning) transmission electron microscope funded by NASA's SRLIDAP program is undergoing installation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Instrument specifications in STEM mode are Cs =1.0 mm, Cc =1.2 mm, image resolution =0.18 nm, and in TEM mode Cs =1.3 mm, Cc =1.3 mm, information limit =0.14 nm. Key features of the instrument are a voltage-stabilized high tension (HT) supply, a monochromator, a high-resolution electron energy-loss spectrometer/energy filter, a high-resolution annular darkfield detector, and a solid-state x-ray energy-dispersive spectrometer. The high-tension tank contains additional sections for 60Hz and high frequency filtering, resulting in an operating voltage of 200 kV plus or minus 0.005V, a greater than 10-fold improvement over earlier systems. The monochromator is a single Wien filter design. The energy filter is a Gatan model 866 Tridiem-ERS high resolution GIF spec d for less than or equal to 0.15 eV energy resolution with 29 pA of current in a 2 nm diameter probe. 0.13 eV has already been achieved during early installation. The x-ray detector (EDAX/Genesis 4000) has a take-off angle of 20 degrees, an active area of 30 square millimeters, and a solid angle of 0.3 steradians. The higher solid angle is possible because the objective pole-piece allows the detector to be positioned as close as 9.47 mm from the specimen. The voltage-stabilized HT supply, monochromator and GIF enable high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS) with energy resolution comparable to synchrotron XANES, but with approximately 100X better spatial resolution. The region between 0 and 100 eV is called the low-loss or valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) region where features due to collective plasma oscillations and single electron transitions of valence electrons are observed. Most of the low-loss VEELS features we are detecting are being observed for the first time in IDPs. A major focus of

  1. Electron microscopy of seed-storage globulins.

    PubMed

    Tulloch, P A; Blagrove, R J

    1985-09-01

    The quaternary structures of a range of seed globulins, including examples of both the so-called 7 S and 11 S types, have been examined by electron microscopy. The legume 7 S proteins, phaseolin (bean), beta-conglycinin (soybean), and vicilin (pea), appear as flat discs of diameter ca. 8.5 nm and thickness ca. 3.5 nm formed by association of three subunit domains. Phaseolin converts to an 18 S tetramer at acid pH, and images recorded under these conditions suggest that four of the 7 S protomer discs associate to form the faces of a regular tetrahedron. The classical 11 S seed globulins, cucurbitin (pumpkin) and legumin (pea), are approximately spherical molecules of diameter ca. 8.8 nm composed of six subunits. In contrast, the hexameric 10 S storage protein from lupin seed, conglutin gamma, appears toroidal in shape with outer diameter ca. 10.3 nm and thickness ca. 2.2 nm. These results indicate that constraints imposed on seed proteins by their role in sustaining the germinating plant may have allowed a variety of different globulin structures to accumulate in the protein-storage bodies of seeds. PMID:4037802

  2. Imaging Cytoskeleton Components by Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Svitkina, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a complex of detergent-insoluble components of the cytoplasm playing critical roles in cell motility, shape generation, and mechanical properties of a cell. Fibrillar polymers—actin filaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments—are major constituents of the cytoskeleton, which constantly change their organization during cellular activities. The actin cytoskeleton is especially polymorphic, as actin filaments can form multiple higher order assemblies performing different functions. Structural information about cytoskeleton organization is critical for understanding its functions and mechanisms underlying various forms of cellular activity. Because of the nanometer-scale thickness of cytoskeletal fibers, electron microscopy (EM) is a key tool to determine the structure of the cytoskeleton. This article describes application of rotary shadowing (or metal replica) EM for visualization of the cytoskeleton. The procedure is applicable to thin cultured cells growing on glass coverslips and consists of detergent extraction of cells to expose their cytoskeleton, chemical fixation to provide stability, ethanol dehydration and critical point drying to preserve three-dimensionality, rotary shadowing with platinum to create contrast, and carbon coating to stabilize replicas. This technique provides easily interpretable three-dimensional images, in which individual cytoskeletal fibers are clearly resolved, and individual proteins can be identified by immunogold labeling. More importantly, replica EM is easily compatible with live cell imaging, so that one can correlate the dynamics of a cell or its components, e.g., expressed fluorescent proteins, with high resolution structural organization of the cytoskeleton in the same cell. PMID:26498781

  3. Hollow cone illumination for fast TEM, and outrunning damage with electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, J. C. H.; Subramanian, G.; Musumeci, P.

    2015-11-01

    We consider the possibility of imaging individual bioparticles using snapshot diffraction from femotsecond pulses, using a 3 MeV electron beam, based on the recent experimental performance of these coherent beams. Assuming that radiation damage can be outrun using 100 fs pulses (or less), we find that a sufficient number of electrons are scattered per particle only if the beam diameter can be matched to that of the particle (e.g. a virus), about three orders of magnitude smaller than has currently been demonstrated (and limited by space-charge effects). We then propose the use of the hollow-cone illumination mode for fast transmission electron microscope imaging, because it can provide full-field atomic resolution imaging despite the use of the large incoherent annular source required for an efficient photocathode, so that coherent illumination is not needed for high-resolution imaging. Reciprocity arguments are used to compare this full-field mode with data aquisition times and source brightness in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

  4. Structural analysis of nano structured carbon by transmission electron microscopy and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshida, K.; Murata, M.; Fujiwara, K.; Itaya, T.; Yanagisawa, T.; Kimura, K.; Nakazawa, T.; Kim, Y. A.; Endo, M.; Kim, B.-H.; Yang, K. S.

    2013-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is one of the highest resolution analysis methods of materials. The three dimensional recognition of the materials is difficult by TEM because the observation data is projection images through the materials. In this study, space structure of carbon nanotubes loaded with metal particles was analyzed by three dimensional TEM (3D-TEM) [1,2]. The nano structured carbons are also observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) with Cs corrector. Cup-stack type carbon nanotubes (CSCNTs) loaded with Pt particles (2-3 nm in diameter) prepared by GSI Creos Corporation were analyzed by these methods. Pt particles are bound selectively to the edges of hexagonal carbon layers of inside and outer surface of CSCNTs efficiently and can be expected to work well as catalysts of electrodes of fuel cell. It is sometimes difficult that the nano sized area is analyzed by selected area electron diffraction (SAD) because the selected area aperture cannot be so small. The HRTEM and image processing technique give similar results of SAD when it works and revealed to be useful to analyze nano structured carbons.

  5. Tissue and cellular localization of tannins in Tunisian dates (Phoenix dactylifera L.) by light and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hammouda, Hédi; Alvarado, Camille; Bouchet, Brigitte; Kalthoum-Chérif, Jamila; Trabelsi-Ayadi, Malika; Guyot, Sylvain

    2014-07-16

    A histological approach including light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to provide accurate information on the localization of condensed tannins in the edible tissues and in the stone of date fruits (Phoenix dactylifera L.). Light microscopy was carried out on fresh tissues after staining by 4-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMACA) for a specific detection of condensed tannins. Thus, whether under light microscopy or transmission electron microscopy (TEM), results showed that tannins are not located in the epidermis but more deeply in the mesocarp in the vacuole of very large cells. Regarding the stones, tannins are found in a specific cell layer located at 50 μm from the sclereid cells of the testa. PMID:24987926

  6. Plasticity mechanisms in ultrafine grained freestanding aluminum thin films revealed by in-situ transmission electron microscopy nanomechanical testing

    SciTech Connect

    Idrissi, Hosni; Kobler, Aaron; Amin-Ahmadi, Behnam; Schryvers, Dominique; Coulombier, Michael; Pardoen, Thomas; Galceran, Montserrat; Godet, Stéphane; Kübel, Christian

    2014-03-10

    In-situ bright field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) nanomechanical tensile testing and in-situ automated crystallographic orientation mapping in TEM were combined to unravel the elementary mechanisms controlling the plasticity of ultrafine grained Aluminum freestanding thin films. The characterizations demonstrate that deformation proceeds with a transition from grain rotation to intragranular dislocation glide and starvation plasticity mechanism at about 1% deformation. The grain rotation is not affected by the character of the grain boundaries. No grain growth or twinning is detected.

  7. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Itokawa Regolith Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Berger, E. L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In a remarkable engineering achievement, the JAXA space agency successfully recovered the Hayabusa space-craft in June 2010, following a non-optimal encounter and sur-face sampling mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa. These are the first direct samples ever obtained and returned from the surface of an asteroid. The Hayabusa samples thus present a special op-portunity to directly investigate the evolution of asteroidal sur-faces, from the development of the regolith to the study of the effects of space weathering. Here we report on our preliminary TEM measurements on two Itokawa samples. Methods: We were allocated particles RA-QD02-0125 and RA-QD02-0211. Both particles were embedded in low viscosity epoxy and thin sections were prepared using ultramicrotomy. High resolution images and electron diffraction data were ob-tained using a JEOL 2500SE 200 kV field-emission scanning-transmission electron microscope. Quantitative maps and anal-yses were obtained using a Thermo thin-window energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectrometer. Results: Both particles are olivine-rich (Fo70) with µm-sized inclusions of FeS and have microstructurally complex rims. Par-ticle RA-QD02-0125 is rounded and has numerous sub-µm grains attached to its surface including FeS, albite, olivine, and rare melt droplets. Solar flare tracks have not been observed, but the particle is surrounded by a continuous 50 nm thick, stuctur-ally disordered rim that is compositionally similar to the core of the grain. One of the surface adhering grains is pyrrhotite show-ing a S-depleted rim (8-10 nm thick) with nanophase Fe metal grains (<5 nm) decorating the outermost surface. The pyrrhotite displays a complex superstructure in its core that is absent in the S-depleted rim. Particle RA-QD02-0211 contains solar flare particle tracks (2x109 cm-2) and shows a structurally disordered rim 100 nm thick. The track density corresponds to a surface exposure of 103-104 years based on the track production rate

  8. Schottky Barrier mapping of the W/Si diode using ballistic electron emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durcan, Christopher; Balsano, Robert; Pieniazek, Nicholas; Labella, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    The Schottky barrier of the W/Si(001) diode was investigated and spatially mapped at the nanoscale using ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) and ballistic hole emission microscopy (BHEM). The miscibility of tungsten and silicon creates a thin silicide upon deposition with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) showing the changes in the silicide over several weeks. Using standard current voltage measurements there is no change in the charge transport across the diode during this time period. However, BEEM measurements do show dramatic changes to the transport of ballistic electrons over time with nanoscale resolution. Time dependent Schottky barrier maps are generated over a 1 μm x 1 μm area and provide valuable insight to the barrier height homogeneity, defect formation, and interfacial effects occurring in the diode.

  9. Structural examination of lithium niobate ferroelectric crystals by combining scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremova, P. V.; Ped'ko, B. B.; Kuznecova, Yu. V.

    2016-02-01

    The structure of lithium niobate single crystals is studied by a complex technique that combines scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. By implementing the piezoresponse force method on an atomic force microscope, the domain structure of lithium niobate crystals, which was not revealed without electron beam irradiation, is visualized

  10. Electron Microscopy Localization and Characterization of Functionalized Composite Organic-Inorganic SERS Nanoparticles on Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Ai Leen; Shachaf, Catherine M.; Elchuri, Sailaja; Nolan, Garry P.; Sinclair, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of electron microscopy as a powerful characterization tool to identify and locate antibody-conjugated composite organic-inorganic (COINs) surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles on cells. U937 leukemia cells labeled with antibody CD54-conjugated COINs were characterized in their native, hydrated state using wet Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and in their dehydrated state using high-resolution SEM. In both cases, the backscattered electron detector (BSE) was used to detect and identify the silver constituents in COINs due to its high sensitivity to atomic number variations within a specimen. The imaging and analytical capabilities in the SEM were further complemented by higher resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) images and Scanning Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) data to give reliable and high-resolution information about nanoparticles and their binding to cell surface antigens. PMID:18995965

  11. Characterization of microbially Fe(III)-reduced nontronite: Environmental cell-transmission electron microscopy study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, J.-W.; Furukawa, Y.; Daulton, T.L.; Lavoie, D.; Newell, S.W.

    2003-01-01

    Microstructural changes induced by the microbial reduction of Fe(III) in nontronite by Shewanella oneidensis were studied using environmental cell (EC)-transmission electron microscopy (TEM), conventional TEM, and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Direct observations of clays by EC-TEM in their hydrated state allowed for the first time an accurate and unambiguous TEM measurement of basal layer spacings and the contraction of layer spacing caused by microbial effects, most likely those of Fe(III) reduction. Non-reduced and Fe(III)-reduced nontronite, observed by EC-TEM, exhibited fringes with mean d001 spacings of 1.50 nm (standard deviation, ?? = 0.08 nm) and 1.26 nm (?? = 0.10 nm), respectively. In comparison, the same samples embedded with Nanoplast resin, sectioned by microtome, and observed using conventional TEM, displayed layer spacings of 1.0-1.1 nm (non-reduced) and 1.0 nm (reduced). The results from Nanoplast-embedded samples are typical of conventional TEM studies, which have measured nearly identical layer spacings regardless of Fe oxidation state. Following Fe(III) reduction, both EC- and conventional TEM showed an increase in the order of nontronite selected area electron diffraction patterns while the images exhibited fewer wavy fringes and fewer layer terminations. An increase in stacking order in reduced nontronite was also suggested by XRD measurements. In particular, the ratio of the valley to peak intensity (v/p) of the 1.7 nm basal 001 peak of ethylene glycolated nontronite was measured at 0.65 (non-reduced) and 0.85 (microbially reduced).

  12. Ballistic-electron-emission Microscopy of Semiconductor Heterostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, L. Douglas; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh

    1997-01-01

    Balistic-electron-emission microscopy has developed from its beginning as a probe of Schottky barriers into a powerful nanometer-scale method for characterizing semiconductor interfaces and hot-electron transport.

  13. Definitive support by transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and electron density maps for the formation of a BCC lattice from poly[N-[3,4,5-tris(n-dodecan-1-yloxy)benzoyl]ethyleneimine].

    PubMed

    Duan, H; Hudson, S D; Ungar, G; Holerca, M N; Percec, V

    2001-10-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED), and electron density maps (EDM) experiments were carried out on a poly[N-[3,4,5-tris(n-dodecan-1-yloxy)benzoyl]ethyleneimine] [poly[(3,4,5)12G1-Oxz

  14. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria. PMID:25358460

  15. Correlative electron and fluorescence microscopy of magnetotactic bacteria in liquid: toward in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Woehl, Taylor J; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria. PMID:25358460

  16. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.

  17. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.

  18. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip windowmore » surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.« less

  19. Imaging Bioorthogonal Groups in Their Ultrastructural Context with Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    van Elsland, Daphne M; van Kasteren, Sander I

    2016-08-01

    Spitting image: Herein a recent paper on the imaging of bioorthogonal groups using three-dimensional electron microscopy is discussed. The work has demonstrated electron microscopy imaging as a technique suitable for gaining structural information on bioorthogonal groups in their cellular context. PMID:27346592

  20. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-01-01

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80-400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50-220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts. PMID:26552934

  1. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-01-01

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80–400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50–220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts. PMID:26552934

  2. TEM observation of the heat-affected zone in electron beam welded superalloy Inconel 713C

    SciTech Connect

    Lachowicz, Maciej Dudzinski, Wlodzimierz; Podrez-Radziszewska, Marzena

    2008-05-15

    The paper presents results of microstructural observations and phase analysis of electron-beam-welded fusion zones in superalloy Inconel 713C using transmission electron microscopy. In the fusion zone, a 90% fraction of fine-grained {gamma}' precipitates was found, with sizes up to 30 nm. No dislocations were observed in the precipitates or at the {gamma}-{gamma}' interface. Primary, undissolved inclusions of {gamma}' were found in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). In the HAZ, a very high concentration of dislocations was found at the {gamma}-{gamma}' boundaries, as well as inside the {gamma}' particles and in the {gamma} solid solution. The increased dislocation density indicates loss of coherence of that phase and the creation of a semi-coherent boundary, and is related to dissolution of the particles and intensified diffusion through the interphase {gamma}-{gamma}' boundary. The lattice misfit coefficient {delta}a/a between the {gamma}' particles and {gamma} solution in the HAZ indicates negative values from - 0.20% to - 0.06%. The presence of semi-coherent boundaries and the negative lattice misfit coefficient leads to dislocation locking and can result in cracking in the HAZ.

  3. Rendering graphene supports hydrophilic with non-covalent aromatic functionalization for transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pantelic, Radosav S.; Fu, Wangyang; Schoenenberger, Christian; Stahlberg, Henning

    2014-03-31

    Amorphous carbon films have been routinely used to enhance the preparation of frozen-hydrated samples for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), either in retaining protein concentration, providing mechanical stability or dissipating sample charge. However, strong background signal from the amorphous carbon support obstructs that of the sample, and the insulating properties of thin amorphous carbon films preclude any efficiency in dispersing charge. Graphene addresses the limitations of amorphous carbon. Graphene is a crystalline material with virtually no phase or amplitude contrast and unparalleled, high electrical carrier mobility. However, the hydrophobic properties of graphene have prevented its routine application in Cryo-TEM. This Letter reports a method for rendering graphene TEM supports hydrophilic—a convenient approach maintaining graphene's structural and electrical properties based on non-covalent, aromatic functionalization.

  4. Dynamics of soft Nanomaterials captured by transmission electron microscopy in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Proetto, Maria T.; Rush, Anthony M.; Chien, Miao-Ping; Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Patterson, Joseph P.; Thompson, Matthew P.; Olson, Norman H.; Moore, Curtis E.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Andolina, Christopher; Millstone, Jill; Howell, Stephen B.; Browning, Nigel D.; Evans, James E.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.

    2014-01-14

    In this paper we present in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of soft, synthetic nanoparticles with a comparative analysis using conventional TEM methods. This comparison is made with the simple aim of describing what is an unprecedented example of in situ imaging by TEM. However, we contend the technique will quickly become essential in the characterization of analogous systems, especially where dynamics are of interest in the solvated state. In this case, particles were studied which were obtained from the direct polymerization of an oxaliplatin analog, designed for an ongoing program in novel chemotherapeutic delivery systems. The resulting nanoparticles provided sufficient contrast for facile imaging in situ, and point toward key design parameters that enable this new characterization approach for organic nanomaterials. We describe the preparation of the synthetic micellar nanoparticles to- gether with their characterization in liquid water.

  5. On the role of inelastic scattering in phase-plate transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hettler, Simon; Wagner, Jochen; Dries, Manuel; Oster, Marco; Wacker, Christian; Schröder, Rasmus R; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2015-08-01

    The phase contrast of Au nanoparticles on amorphous-carbon films with different thicknesses is analyzed using an electrostatic Zach phase plate in a Zeiss 912 Ω transmission electron microscope with in-column energy filter. Specifically, unfiltered and plasmon-filtered phase-plate transmission electron microscopy (PP TEM) images are compared to gain insight in the role of coherence after inelastic scattering processes. A considerable phase-contrast contribution resulting from a combined elastic-inelastic scattering process is found in plasmon-filtered PP TEM images. The contrast reduction compared to unfiltered images mainly originates from zero-order beam broadening caused by the inelastic scattering process. The effect of the sequence of the elastic and inelastic scattering processes is studied by varying the position of the nanoparticles, which can be either located on top or at the bottom of the amorphous-carbon film with respect to the incident electron beam direction. PMID:25879156

  6. Graphene-enabled electron microscopy and correlated super-resolution microscopy of wet cells

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Michal; Hauser, Margaret; Li, Wan; Moon, Seonah; Xu, Ke

    2015-01-01

    The application of electron microscopy to hydrated biological samples has been limited by high-vacuum operating conditions. Traditional methods utilize harsh and laborious sample dehydration procedures, often leading to structural artefacts and creating difficulties for correlating results with high-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Here, we utilize graphene, a single-atom-thick carbon meshwork, as the thinnest possible impermeable and conductive membrane to protect animal cells from vacuum, thus enabling high-resolution electron microscopy of wet and untreated whole cells with exceptional ease. Our approach further allows for facile correlative super-resolution and electron microscopy of wet cells directly on the culturing substrate. In particular, individual cytoskeletal actin filaments are resolved in hydrated samples through electron microscopy and well correlated with super-resolution results. PMID:26066680

  7. Quantitative Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.

    Electronic and nanostructured materials have been investigated using advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques. The first topic is the microstructure of Ga and Sb-doped ZnO. Ga-doped ZnO is a candidate transparent conducting oxide material. The microstructure of GZO thin films grown by MBE under different growth conditions and different substrates were examined using various electron microscopy (EM) techniques. The microstructure, prevalent defects, and polarity in these films strongly depend on the growth conditions and substrate. Sb-doped ZnO nanowires have been shown to be the first route to stable p-type ZnO. Using Z-contrast STEM, I have showed that an unusual microstructure of Sb-decorated head-to-head inversion domain boundaries and internal voids contain all the Sb in the nanowires and cause the p-type conduction. InGaN thin films and InGaN / GaN quantum wells (QW) for light emitting diodes are the second topic. Low-dose Z-contrast STEM, PACBED, and EDS on InGaN QW LED structures grown by MOCVD show no evidence for nanoscale composition variations, contradicting previous reports. In addition, a new extended defect in GaN and InGaN was discovered. The defect consists of a faceted pyramid-shaped void that produces a threading dislocation along the [0001] growth direction, and is likely caused by carbon contamination during growth. Non-rigid registration (NRR) and high-precision STEM of nanoparticles is the final topic. NRR is a new image processing technique that corrects distortions arising from the serial nature of STEM acquisition that previously limited the precision of locating atomic columns and counting the number of atoms in images. NRR was used to demonstrate sub-picometer precision in STEM images of single crystal Si and GaN, the best achieved in EM. NRR was used to measure the atomic surface structure of Pt nanoacatalysts and Au nanoparticles, which revealed new bond length variation phenomenon of surface atoms. In

  8. Silicon Nitride Windows for Electron Microscopy of Whole Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ring, E. A.; Peckys, D. B.; Dukes, M. J.; Baudoin, J. P.; de Jonge, N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Silicon microchips with thin electron transparent silicon nitride windows provide a sample support that accommodates both light-, and electron microscopy of whole eukaryotic cells in vacuum or liquid, with minimum sample preparation steps. The windows are robust enough that cellular samples can be cultured directly onto them, with no addition of a supporting film, and no need to embed or section the sample, as is typically required in electron microscopy. By combining two microchips, a microfluidic chamber can be constructed for the imaging of samples in liquid in the electron microscope. We provide microchip design specifications, a fabrication outline, instructions on how to prepare them for biological samples, and examples of images obtained using different light-, and electron microscopy modalities. The use of these microchips is particularly advantageous for correlative light-, and electron microscopy. PMID:21770941

  9. Transmission electron microscopy study of Listeria monocytogenes serotype 1/2a cells exposed to sublethal heat stress and carvacrol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the morphological changes that occurred in Listeria monocytogenes serotype 1/2a cells as visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after exposure to sublethal heat stress at 48°C for 60 min and in combination with lethal concentration of carv...

  10. Correlative Light Electron Microscopy: Connecting Synaptic Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Begemann, Isabell; Galic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Many core paradigms of contemporary neuroscience are based on information obtained by electron or light microscopy. Intriguingly, these two imaging techniques are often viewed as complementary, yet separate entities. Recent technological advancements in microscopy techniques, labeling tools, and fixation or preparation procedures have fueled the development of a series of hybrid approaches that allow correlating functional fluorescence microscopy data and ultrastructural information from electron micrographs from a singular biological event. As correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) approaches become increasingly accessible, long-standing neurobiological questions regarding structure-function relation are being revisited. In this review, we will survey what developments in electron and light microscopy have spurred the advent of correlative approaches, highlight the most relevant CLEM techniques that are currently available, and discuss its potential and limitations with respect to neuronal and synapse-specific applications. PMID:27601992

  11. Correlative Light Electron Microscopy: Connecting Synaptic Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Begemann, Isabell; Galic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Many core paradigms of contemporary neuroscience are based on information obtained by electron or light microscopy. Intriguingly, these two imaging techniques are often viewed as complementary, yet separate entities. Recent technological advancements in microscopy techniques, labeling tools, and fixation or preparation procedures have fueled the development of a series of hybrid approaches that allow correlating functional fluorescence microscopy data and ultrastructural information from electron micrographs from a singular biological event. As correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) approaches become increasingly accessible, long-standing neurobiological questions regarding structure-function relation are being revisited. In this review, we will survey what developments in electron and light microscopy have spurred the advent of correlative approaches, highlight the most relevant CLEM techniques that are currently available, and discuss its potential and limitations with respect to neuronal and synapse-specific applications. PMID:27601992

  12. Transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering studies of different damage structures in P/sup +/ implanted Si

    SciTech Connect

    Sadana, D.K.; Stratham, M.; Washburn, J.; Booker, G.R.

    1980-11-01

    Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and MeV He/sup +/ channelling methods have been used to examine different damage structures present under the color bands visible at the surface of a high-dose-rate P/sup +/ implanted (111) Si implanted to a dose of 7.5 x 10/sup 15/ ions/cm/sup 2/. TEM and channelling results obtained from individual colored regions showed a good qualitative correlation in that discrete damage layers observed in the cross-sectional TEM micrographs appeared as discrete peaks in the channelled spectra. The mean depths of the damage layers obtained from these two methods were in agreement. However, the widths of the deeper lying damage layers calculated from the channelling measurements were always greater than the widths observed by TEM. An empirical method based on subtraction of dechannelling background in the channelling spectra gave damage layer widths that were in close agreement with the TEM results.

  13. Ion-induced electron emission microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Barney L.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Weller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    An ion beam analysis system that creates multidimensional maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the secondary electrons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted secondary electrons are collected in a strong electric field perpendicular to the sample surface and (optionally) projected and refocused by the electron lenses found in a photon emission electron microscope, amplified by microchannel plates and then their exact position is sensed by a very sensitive X Y position detector. Position signals from this secondary electron detector are then correlated in time with nuclear, atomic or electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these secondary electrons in the fit place.

  14. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  15. High Speed, Radiation Hard CMOS Pixel Sensors for Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Doering, Dionisio; Joseph, John; Krieger, Brad

    CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors are currently being established as the technology of choice for new generation digital imaging systems in Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). A careful sensor design that couples μm-level pixel pitches with high frame rate readout and radiation hardness to very high electron doses enables the fabrication of direct electron detectors that are quickly revolutionizing high-resolution TEM imaging in material science and molecular biology. This paper will review the principal characteristics of this novel technology and its advantages over conventional, optically-coupled cameras, and retrace the sensor development driven by the Transmission Electron Aberration corrected Microscope (TEAM) project at the LBNL National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), illustrating in particular the imaging capabilities enabled by single electron detection at high frame rate. Further, the presentation will report on the translation of the TEAM technology to a finer feature size process, resulting in a sensor with higher spatial resolution and superior radiation tolerance currently serving as the baseline for a commercial camera system.

  16. Microscopic techniques bridging between nanoscale and microscale with an atomically sharpened tip - field ion microscopy/scanning probe microscopy/ scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tomitori, Masahiko; Sasahara, Akira

    2014-11-01

    Over a hundred years an atomistic point of view has been indispensable to explore fascinating properties of various materials and to develop novel functional materials. High-resolution microscopies, rapidly developed during the period, have taken central roles in promoting materials science and related techniques to observe and analyze the materials. As microscopies with the capability of atom-imaging, field ion microscopy (FIM), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can be cited, which have been highly evaluated as methods to ultimately bring forward the viewpoint of reductionism in materials science. On one hand, there have been difficulties to derive useful and practical information on large (micro) scale unique properties of materials using these excellent microscopies and to directly advance the engineering for practical materials. To make bridges over the gap between an atomic scale and an industrial engineering scale, we have to develop emergence science step-by-step as a discipline having hierarchical structures for future prospects by combining nanoscale and microscale techniques; as promising ways, the combined microscopic instruments covering the scale gap and the extremely sophisticated methods for sample preparation seem to be required. In addition, it is noted that spectroscopic and theoretical methods should implement the emergence science.Fundamentally, the function of microscope is to determine the spatial positions of a finite piece of material, that is, ultimately individual atoms, at an extremely high resolution with a high stability. To define and control the atomic positions, the STM and AFM as scanning probe microscopy (SPM) have successfully demonstrated their power; the technological heart of SPM lies in an atomically sharpened tip, which can be observed by FIM and TEM. For emergence science we would like to set sail using the tip as a base. Meanwhile, it is significant

  17. Phase contrast in high resolution electron microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rose, H.H.

    1975-09-23

    This patent relates to a device for developing a phase contrast signal for a scanning transmission electron microscope. The lens system of the microscope is operated in a condition of defocus so that predictable alternate concentric regions of high and low electron density exist in the cone of illumination. Two phase detectors are placed beneath the object inside the cone of illumination, with the first detector having the form of a zone plate, each of its rings covering alternate regions of either higher or lower electron density. The second detector is so configured that it covers the regions of electron density not covered by the first detector. Each detector measures the number of electrons incident thereon and the signal developed by the first detector is subtracted from the signal developed by the record detector to provide a phase contrast signal. (auth)

  18. Micromechanisms of brittle fracture: STM, TEM and electron channeling analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerberich, W.W.

    1997-01-01

    The original thrust of this grant was to apply newly developed techniques in scanning tunneling and transmission electron microscopy to elucidate the mechanism of brittle fracture. This grant spun-off several new directions in that some of the findings on bulk structural materials could be utilized on thin films or intermetallic single crystals. Modeling and material evaluation efforts in this grant are represented in a figure. Out of this grant evolved the field the author has designated as Contact Fracture Mechanics. By appropriate modeling of stress and strain distribution fields around normal indentations or scratch tracks, various measures of thin film fracture or decohesion and brittle fracture of low ductility intermetallics is possible. These measures of fracture resistance in small volumes are still evolving and as such no standard technique or analysis has been uniformly accepted. For brittle ceramics and ceramic films, there are a number of acceptable analyses such as those published by Lawn, Evans and Hutchinson. For more dissipative systems involving metallic or polymeric films and/or substrates, there is still much to be accomplished as can be surmised from some of the findings in the present grant. In Section 2 the author reviews the funding history and accomplishments associated mostly with bulk brittle fracture. This is followed by Section 3 which covers more recent work on using novel techniques to evaluate fracture in low ductility single crystals or thin films using micromechanical probes. Basically Section 3 outlines how the recent work fits in with the goals of defining contact fracture mechanics and gives an overview of how the several examples in Section 4 (the Appendices) fit into this framework.

  19. Transmission electron microscopy as an orthogonal method to characterize protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Joyce J.; Pardeshi, Neha N.; Mulder, Anke M.; Mulligan, Sean K.; Quispe, Joel; On, Kathy; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S.; Carpenter, John F.; Schneemann, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of protein-based therapeutics is a challenging problem in the biopharmaceutical industry. Of particular concern are implications for product efficacy and clinical safety due to potentially increased immunogenicity of the aggregates. We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to characterize biophysical and morphological features of antibody aggregates formed upon controlled environmental stresses. TEM results were contrasted with results obtained in parallel by independent methods, including size exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering, microflow imaging and nanoparticle tracking. For TEM, stressed samples were imaged by negative staining and in the frozen-hydrated state. In both cases, aggregates appeared amorphous but differed in fine structural detail. Specifically, negatively stained aggregates were compact and consisted of smaller globular structures that had a notable three dimensional character. Elements of the native IgG structure were retained, suggesting that the aggregates were not assembled from denatured protein. In contrast, aggregates in frozen-hydrated samples appeared as extended, branched protein networks with large surface area. Using multiple scales of magnification, a wide range of particle sizes was observed and semi-quantitatively characterized. The detailed information provided by TEM extended observations obtained with the independent methods, demonstrating the suitability of TEM as a complementary approach to submicron particle analysis. PMID:25231267

  20. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Iron Metal in Almahata Sitta Ureilite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Yubuta, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Aoyagi, Y.; Yasuhara, A.; Mihira, T.; Zolensky, M. E.; Goodrich, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    Almahata Sitta (AS) is a polymict breccia mainly composed of variable ureilite lithologies with small amounts of chondritic lithologies [1]. Fe metal is a common accessory phase in ureilites, but our earlier study on Fe metals in one of AS fragments (#44) revealed a unique mineralogy never seen in other ureilites [2,3]. In this abstract we report detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on these metal grains to better understand the thermal history of ureilites. We prepared FIB sections of AS#44 by JEOL JIB-4000 from the PTS that was well characterized by SEM-EBSD in our earlier study [2]. The sections were then observed by STEM (JEOL JEM- 2100F). One of the FIB sections shows a submicron-sized symplectic intergrown texture composed of Fe metal (kamacite), Fe carbide (cohenite), Fe phosphide (schreibersite), and Fe sulfide (troilite). Each phase has an identical SAED pattern in spite of its complex texture, suggesting co-crystallization of all phases. This is probably caused by shock re-melting of pre-existing metal + graphite to form a eutectic-looking texture. The other FIB section is mostly composed of homogeneous Fe metal (93 wt% Fe, 5 wt% Ni, and 2 wt% Si), but BF-STEM images exhibited the presence of elongated lathy grains (approx. 2 microns long) embedded in the interstitial matrix. The SAED patterns from these lath grains could be indexed by alpha-Fe (bcc) while interstitial areas are gamma-Fe (fcc). The elongated alpha-Fe grains show tweed-like structures suggesting martensite transformation. Such a texture can be formed by rapid cooling from high temperature where gamma-Fe was stable. Subsequently alpha-Fe crystallized, but gamma-Fe remained in the interstitial matrix due to quenching from high temperature. This scenario is consistent with very rapid cooling history of ureilites suggested by silicate mineralogy.

  1. Nanowire growth kinetics in aberration corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yi-Chia; Panciera, Federico; Reuter, Mark C; Stach, Eric A; Ross, Frances M

    2016-04-14

    We visualize atomic level dynamics during Si nanowire growth using aberration corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy, and compare with lower pressure results from ultra-high vacuum microscopy. We discuss the importance of higher pressure observations for understanding growth mechanisms and describe protocols to minimize effects of the higher pressure background gas. PMID:27041654

  2. [Electron microscopy study of artificial vitreous gel].

    PubMed

    Ehgartner, E M; Schmut, O; Hofmann, H

    1986-04-01

    Artificial gels prepared from Cu2+-ions and hyaluronic acid were studied in the electron microscope and compared with the native vitreous body. Additionally, the authors attempted to produce transparent gels from the native constituents of the vitreous body, namely collagen and hyaluronic acid. Mixing of solutions of these constituents formed no gels but white precipitates. The ultrastructure of these precipitates was also studied in the electron microscope. PMID:3723971

  3. Photoemission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum’s magnetosome chains

    SciTech Connect

    Keutner, Christoph; von Bohlen, Alex; Berges, Ulf; Espeter, Philipp; Schneider, Claus M.; Westphal, Carsten

    2014-10-07

    Magnetotactic bacteria are of great interdisciplinary interest, since a vast field of applications from magnetic recording media to medical nanorobots is conceivable. A key feature for a further understanding is the detailed knowledge about the magnetosome chain within the bacteria. We report on two preparation procedures suitable for UHV experiments in reflective geometry. Further, we present the results of scanning electron microscopy, as well as the first photoemission electron microscopy experiments, both accessing the magnetosomes within intact magnetotactic bacteria and compare these to scanning electron microscopy data from the literature. From the images, we can clearly identify individual magnetosomes within their chains.

  4. High resolution electron microscopy and spectroscopy of ferritin in thin window liquid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Canhui; Qiao, Qiao; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Klie, Robert

    2014-03-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has seen a dramatic increase in interest in recent years with the commercial development of liquid and gas stages. High-resolution TEM characterization of samples in a liquid environment remains limited by radiation damage and loss of resolution due to the thick window-layers required by the in-situ stages. We introduce thin-window static-liquid cells that enable sample imaging with atomic resolution and electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy with 1.3 nm resolution. Using this approach, atomic and electronic structures of biological samples such as ferritin is studied via in-situ transmission electron microscopy experiments. Ferritin in solution is encapsulated using the static liquid cells with reduced window thickness. The integrity of the thin window liquid cell is maintained by controlling the electron dose rate. Radiation damage of samples, such as liquid water and protein, is quantitatively studied to allow precision control of radiation damage level within the liquid cells. Biochemical reactions, such as valence change of the iron in a functioning ferritin, is observed and will be quantified. Relevant biochemical activity: the release and uptake of Fe atoms through the channels of ferritin protein shell is also imaged at atomic resolution. This work is funded by Michigan Technological University. The UIC JEOL JEM-ARM200CF is supported by an MRI-R2 grant from the National Science Foundation (Grant No. DMR-0959470).

  5. Recent Advances in Electron Tomography: TEM and HAADF-STEM Tomography for Materials Science and IC Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kubel, C; Voigt, A; Schoenmakers, R; Otten, M; Su, D; Lee, T; Carlsson, A; Engelmann, H; Bradley, J

    2005-11-09

    Electron tomograph tomography is a well y well-established technique for three-dimensional structure determination of (almost) amorphous specimens in life science applications. With the recent advances in nanotechnology and the semiconductor industry, there is also an increasing need for high-resolution 3D structural information in physical sciences. In this paper, we evaluate the capabilities and limitations of TEM and HAADF-STEM tomography for the 3D structural characterization of partially crystalline to highly crystalline materials. Our analysis of catalysts, a hydrogen storage material, and different semiconductor devices shows that features with a diameter as small as 1-2 nm can be resolved in 3D by electron tomography. For partially crystalline materials with small single crystalline domains, TEM tomography provides reliable 3D structural information. HAADF-STEM tomography is more versatile and can also be used for high-resolution 3D imaging of highly crystalline materials such as semiconductor devices.

  6. Revealing Dynamic Processes of Materials in Liquids Using Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Kai-Yang; Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2012-01-01

    The recent development for in situ transmission electron microscopy, which allows imaging through liquids with high spatial resolution, has attracted significant interests across the research fields of materials science, physics, chemistry and biology. The key enabling technology is a liquid cell. We fabricate liquid cells with thin viewing windows through a sequential microfabrication process, including silicon nitride membrane deposition, photolithographic patterning, wafer etching, cell bonding, etc. A liquid cell with the dimensions of a regular TEM grid can fit in any standard TEM sample holder. About 100 nanoliters reaction solution is loaded into the reservoirs and about 30 picoliters liquid is drawn into the viewing windows by capillary force. Subsequently, the cell is sealed and loaded into a microscope for in situ imaging. Inside the TEM, the electron beam goes through the thin liquid layer sandwiched between two silicon nitride membranes. Dynamic processes of nanoparticles in liquids, such as nucleation and growth of nanocrystals, diffusion and assembly of nanoparticles, etc., have been imaged in real time with sub-nanometer resolution. We have also applied this method to other research areas, e.g., imaging proteins in water. Liquid cell TEM is poised to play a major role in revealing dynamic processes of materials in their working environments. It may also bring high impact in the study of biological processes in their native environment. PMID:23287885

  7. Simultaneous cathodoluminescence and electron microscopy cytometry of cellular vesicles labeled with fluorescent nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Sounderya; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Tizei, Luiz H G; Fang, Chia-Yi; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Le Cam, Eric; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Treussart, François; Kociak, Mathieu

    2016-06-01

    Light and Transmission Electron Microscopies (LM and TEM) hold potential in bioimaging owing to the advantages of fast imaging of multiple cells with LM and ultrastructure resolution offered by TEM. Integrated or correlated LM and TEM are the current approaches to combine the advantages of both techniques. Here we propose an alternative in which the electron beam of a scanning TEM (STEM) is used to excite concomitantly the luminescence of nanoparticle labels (a process known as cathodoluminescence, CL), and image the cell ultrastructure. This CL-STEM imaging allows obtaining luminescence spectra and imaging ultrastructure simultaneously. We present a proof of principle experiment, showing the potential of this technique in image cytometry of cell vesicular components. To label the vesicles we used fluorescent diamond nanocrystals (nanodiamonds, NDs) of size ≈150 nm coated with different cationic polymers, known to trigger different internalization pathways. Each polymer was associated with a type of ND with a different emission spectrum. With CL-STEM, for each individual vesicle, we were able to measure (i) their size with nanometric resolution, (ii) their content in different ND labels, and realize intracellular component cytometry. In contrast to the recently reported organelle flow cytometry technique that requires cell sonication, CL-STEM-based image cytometry preserves the cell integrity and provides a much higher resolution in size. Although this novel approach is still limited by a low throughput, the automatization of data acquisition and image analysis, combined with improved intracellular targeting, should facilitate applications in cell biology at the subcellular level. PMID:27216436

  8. Coupled study by TEM/EELS and STM/STS of electronic properties of C- and CN-nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong; Lagoute, Jérôme; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Girard, Yann; Lauret, Jean-Sébastien; Arenal, Raul; Ducastelle, François; Rousset, Sylvie; Loiseau, Annick

    2011-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes are the focus of considerable research efforts due to their fascinating physical properties. They provide an excellent model system for the study of one-dimensional materials and molecular electronics. The chirality of nanotubes can lead to very different electronic behaviour, either metallic or semiconducting. Their electronic spectrum consists of a series of Van Hove singularities defining a bandgap for semiconducting tubes and molecular orbitals at the corresponding energies. A promising way to tune the nanotubes electronic properties for future applications is to use doping by heteroatoms. Here we report on the experimental investigation of the role of many-body interactions in nanotube bandgaps, the visualization in direct space of the molecular orbitals of nanotubes and the properties of nitrogen doped nanotubes using scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy as well as electron energy loss spectroscopy.

  9. 3D motion of DNA-Au nanoconjugates in graphene liquid cell electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Smith, Jessica M; Park, Jungwon; Kim, Kwanpyo; Ho, Davy; Rasool, Haider I; Zettl, Alex; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2013-09-11

    Liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can probe and visualize dynamic events with structural or functional details at the nanoscale in a liquid medium. Earlier efforts have focused on the growth and transformation kinetics of hard material systems, relying on their stability under electron beam. Our recently developed graphene liquid cell technique pushed the spatial resolution of such imaging to the atomic scale but still focused on growth trajectories of metallic nanocrystals. Here, we adopt this technique to imaging three-dimensional (3D) dynamics of soft materials instead, double strand (dsDNA) connecting Au nanocrystals as one example, at nanometer resolution. We demonstrate first that a graphene liquid cell can seal an aqueous sample solution of a lower vapor pressure than previously investigated well against the high vacuum in TEM. Then, from quantitative analysis of real time nanocrystal trajectories, we show that the status and configuration of dsDNA dictate the motions of linked nanocrystals throughout the imaging time of minutes. This sustained connecting ability of dsDNA enables this unprecedented continuous imaging of its dynamics via TEM. Furthermore, the inert graphene surface minimizes sample-substrate interaction and allows the whole nanostructure to rotate freely in the liquid environment; we thus develop and implement the reconstruction of 3D configuration and motions of the nanostructure from the series of 2D projected TEM images captured while it rotates. In addition to further proving the nanoconjugate structural stability, this reconstruction demonstrates 3D dynamic imaging by TEM beyond its conventional use in seeing a flattened and dry sample. Altogether, we foresee the new and exciting use of graphene liquid cell TEM in imaging 3D biomolecular transformations or interaction dynamics at nanometer resolution. PMID:23944844

  10. Entanglement-assisted electron microscopy based on a flux qubit

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Hiroshi; Nagatani, Yukinori

    2014-02-10

    A notorious problem in high-resolution biological electron microscopy is radiation damage caused by probe electrons. Hence, acquisition of data with minimal number of electrons is of critical importance. Quantum approaches may represent the only way to improve the resolution in this context, but all proposed schemes to date demand delicate control of the electron beam in highly unconventional electron optics. Here we propose a scheme that involves a flux qubit based on a radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device, inserted in a transmission electron microscope. The scheme significantly improves the prospect of realizing a quantum-enhanced electron microscope for radiation-sensitive specimens.

  11. Electron microscopy - A glimpse into the future.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Moran, H.

    1972-01-01

    A forecast attempt is presented on future advances in electron microscopic studies of membrane systems. A review of recent advances and present trends is followed by a discussion of prerequisites to further progress. Special attention is given to research areas of particular promise.

  12. Quantitative Phase Retrieval in Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Robert Alexander

    Phase retrieval in the transmission electron microscope offers the unique potential to collect quantitative data regarding the electric and magnetic properties of materials at the nanoscale. Substantial progress in the field of quantitative phase imaging was made by improvements to the technique of off-axis electron holography. In this thesis, several breakthroughs have been achieved that improve the quantitative analysis of phase retrieval. An accurate means of measuring the electron wavefront coherence in two-dimensions was developed and pratical applications demonstrated. The detector modulation-transfer function (MTF) was assessed by slanted-edge, noise, and the novel holographic techniques. It was shown the traditional slanted-edge technique underestimates the MTF. In addition, progress was made in dark and gain reference normalization of images, and it was shown that incomplete read-out is a concern for slow-scan CCD detectors. Last, the phase error due to electron shot noise was reduced by the technique of summation of hologram series. The phase error, which limits the finest electric and magnetic phenomena which can be investigated, was reduced by over 900 % with no loss of spatial resolution. Quantitative agreement between the experimental root-mean-square phase error and the analytical prediction of phase error was achieved.

  13. Electron microscopy of frozen hydrated sections of vitreous ice and vitrified biological samples.

    PubMed

    McDowall, A W; Chang, J J; Freeman, R; Lepault, J; Walter, C A; Dubochet, J

    1983-07-01

    The preparation and high resolution observation of frozen hydrated thin sections has been studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and STEM) on model systems, including pure water, protein solutions, catalase crystals, myelin sheath and various tissues. The state of the ice is determined by electron diffraction. Mass measurement in the electron microscope is used to determine section thickness and control hydration. An adequate depth of vitrified material for sectioning can be obtained from many biological suspensions or untreated tissues. Frozen hydrated sections around 100 nm thick can be produced under optimal conditions from vitreous ice or from vitrified biological samples. Sectioning, transfer and observation in the electron microscope is feasible without alteration of the sample hydration or its initial vitrification. Biological structures can be preserved and observed down to 10 nm. Under favourable working conditions, specimen compression during sectioning and electron beam damage are the factors limiting high resolution observations. PMID:6350598

  14. Investigation of resins suitable for the preparation of biological sample for 3-D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kizilyaprak, Caroline; Longo, Giovanni; Daraspe, Jean; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-02-01

    In the last two decades, the third-dimension has become a focus of attention in electron microscopy to better understand the interactions within subcellular compartments. Initially, transmission electron tomography (TEM tomography) was introduced to image the cell volume in semi-thin sections (∼ 500 nm). With the introduction of the focused ion beam scanning electron microscope, a new tool, FIB-SEM tomography, became available to image much larger volumes. During TEM tomography and FIB-SEM tomography, the resin section is exposed to a high electron/ion dose such that the stability of the resin embedded biological sample becomes an important issue. The shrinkage of a resin section in each dimension, especially in depth, is a well-known phenomenon. To ensure the dimensional integrity of the final volume of the cell, it is important to assess the properties of the different resins and determine the formulation which has the best stability in the electron/ion beam. Here, eight different resin formulations were examined. The effects of radiation damage were evaluated after different times of TEM irradiation. To get additional information on mass-loss and the physical properties of the resins (stiffness and adhesion), the topography of the irradiated areas was analysed with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Further, the behaviour of the resins was analysed after ion milling of the surface of the sample with different ion currents. In conclusion, two resin formulations, Hard Plus and the mixture of Durcupan/Epon, emerged that were considerably less affected and reasonably stable in the electron/ion beam and thus suitable for the 3-D investigation of biological samples. PMID:25433274

  15. Electron Microscopy of Biological Materials at the Nanometer Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourkoutis, Lena Fitting; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2012-08-01

    Electron microscopy of biological matter uses three different imaging modalities: (a) electron crystallography, (b) single-particle analysis, and (c) electron tomography. Ideally, these imaging modalities are applied to frozen-hydrated samples to ensure an optimal preservation of the structures under scrutiny. Cryo-electron microscopy of biological matter has made important advances in the past decades. It has become a research tool that further expands the scope of structural research into unique areas of cell and molecular biology, and it could augment the materials research portfolio in the study of soft and hybrid materials. This review addresses how researchers using transmission electron microscopy can derive structural information at high spatial resolution from fully hydrated specimens, despite their sensitivity to ionizing radiation, despite the adverse conditions of high vacuum for samples that have to be kept in aqueous environments, and despite their low contrast resulting from weakly scattering building blocks.

  16. Intriguing transmission electron microscopy images observed for perpendicularly oriented cylindrical microdomains of block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnogi, Hiroshi; Isshiki, Toshiyuki; Sasaki, Sono; Sakurai, Shinichi

    2014-08-01

    Intriguing images of dislocation structures were observed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique for hexagonally packed cylindrical microdomains in a block copolymer (polystyrene-block-polyethylenebutylene-block-polystyrene triblock copolymer) film. The polystyrene (PS) cylinders were embedded in the polyethylenebutylene (PEB) matrix and oriented perpendicular to the surface of the thin section for the TEM observations. In order to understand such strange dislocation structures, we applied an image processing technique using two-dimensional Fourier transform (FT) and inverse Fourier transform (IFT) methods. It was found that these intriguing images were not ascribed to real dislocation structures but were fake ones due to the moiré effect caused by the overlapping of hexagons with a slightly mismatched orientation. Furthermore, grain boundaries in the ultrathin section can be identified by image processing using FT and IFT methods.Intriguing images of dislocation structures were observed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique for hexagonally packed cylindrical microdomains in a block copolymer (polystyrene-block-polyethylenebutylene-block-polystyrene triblock copolymer) film. The polystyrene (PS) cylinders were embedded in the polyethylenebutylene (PEB) matrix and oriented perpendicular to the surface of the thin section for the TEM observations. In order to understand such strange dislocation structures, we applied an image processing technique using two-dimensional Fourier transform (FT) and inverse Fourier transform (IFT) methods. It was found that these intriguing images were not ascribed to real dislocation structures but were fake ones due to the moiré effect caused by the overlapping of hexagons with a slightly mismatched orientation. Furthermore, grain boundaries in the ultrathin section can be identified by image processing using FT and IFT methods. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c

  17. Atomic-Resolution 3D Electron Microscopy with Dynamic Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Meisheng, Hu

    2005-02-15

    Achievement of atomic-resolution electron-beam tomography will allow determination of the three-dimensional structure of nanoparticles (and other suitable specimens) at atomic resolution. Three-dimensional reconstructions will yield ''section'' images that resolve atoms overlapped in normal electron microscope images (projections), resolving lighter atoms such as oxygen in the presence of heavier atoms, and atoms that lie on non-lattice sites such as those in non-periodic defect structures. Lower-resolution electron microscope tomography has been used to produce reconstructed 3D images of nanoparticles [1] but extension to atomic resolution is considered not to be straightforward. Accurate three-dimensional reconstruction from two-dimensional projections generally requires that intensity in the series of 2-D images be a monotonic function of the specimen structure (often specimen density, but in our case atomic potential). This condition is not satisfied in electron microscopy when specimens with strong periodicity are tilted close to zone-axis orientation and produce ''anomalous'' image contrast because of strong dynamic diffraction components. Atomic-resolution reconstructions from tilt series containing zone-axis images (with their contrast enhanced by strong dynamical scattering) can be distorted when the stronger zone-axis images overwhelm images obtained in other ''random'' orientations in which atoms do not line up in neat columns. The first demonstrations of 3-D reconstruction to atomic resolution used five zone-axis images from test specimens of staurolite consisting of a mix of light and heavy atoms [2,3]. Initial resolution was to the 1.6{angstrom} Scherzer limit of a JEOL-ARM1000. Later experiments used focal-series reconstruction from 5 to 10 images to produce staurolite images from the ARM1000 with resolution extended beyond the Scherzer limit to 1.38{angstrom} [4,5]. To obtain a representation of the three-dimensional structure, images were obtained

  18. Correlated light and electron microscopy: ultrastructure lights up!

    PubMed

    de Boer, Pascal; Hoogenboom, Jacob P; Giepmans, Ben N G

    2015-06-01

    Microscopy has gone hand in hand with the study of living systems since van Leeuwenhoek observed living microorganisms and cells in 1674 using his light microscope. A spectrum of dyes and probes now enable the localization of molecules of interest within living cells by fluorescence microscopy. With electron microscopy (EM), cellular ultrastructure has been revealed. Bridging these two modalities, correlated light microscopy and EM (CLEM) opens new avenues. Studies of protein dynamics with fluorescent proteins (FPs), which leave the investigator 'in the dark' concerning cellular context, can be followed by EM examination. Rare events can be preselected at the light microscopy level before EM analysis. Ongoing development-including of dedicated probes, integrated microscopes, large-scale and three-dimensional EM and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy-now paves the way for broad CLEM implementation in biology. PMID:26020503

  19. Multimodal dyes: toward correlative two-photon and electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolze, Frédéric; Ftouni, Hussein; Nicoud, Jean-François; Leoni, Piero; Schwab, Yannick; Rehspringer, Jean-Luc; Mafouana, Rodrigues R.

    2013-03-01

    Nowadays, many crucial biological questions involve the observation of biological samples at different scales. Thus, optical microscopy can be associated to magnetic nuclear imaging allowing access to data from the cellular to the organ level, or can be associated to electron microscopy to reach the sub cellular level. We will describe here the design, synthesis and characterization of new bimodal probes, which can be used as dye in two-photon excited microscopy (TPEM) and electron dense markers in scanning and transmission electron microscopy (EM). In a first part, we will describe new molecular dyes with small organic systems grafted on metal atoms (Pt, Au). Such systems show good twophoton induced fluorescence and two-photon images of HeLa cells will be presented. In a second part, we will present hybrid organic-inorganic fluorescent systems with diketopyrrolopyrole-based dye grafted on iron oxide-silica core shell nanoparticles by peptide bond. Such systems present high two-photon absorption cross sections and good fluorescence quantum yields. These nanoparticles are rapidly internalized in HeLa cells and high quality two-photon images were performed with low laser power. Then we will present our results on correlative light-electron microscopy were twophoton and electron microscopy (both scanning and transmission) images were obtained on the same biological sample.

  20. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for themore » analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.« less

  1. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for the analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.

  2. Double-twist cylinders in liquid crystalline cholesteric blue phases observed by transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shu; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Kawata, Yuto; Kuwahara, Ryusuke; Nishi, Ryuji; Ozaki, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Cholesteric blue phases are liquid crystalline phases in which the constituent rod-like molecules spontaneously form three-dimensional, helical structures. Despite theoretical predictions that they are composed of cylindrical substructures within which the liquid crystal molecules are doubly twisted, real space observation of the arrangement of such structures had not been performed. Through transmission electron microscopy of photopolymerized blue phases with controlled lattice plane orientations, we report real space observation and comparison of the lattice structures of blue phases I and II. The two systems show distinctly different contrasts, reflecting the theoretically predicted, body centred and simple cubic arrangement of the double-twist cylinders. Transmission electron microscopy also reveals different tendencies of the two blue phases to align on unidirectionally rubbed surfaces. We thus show that TEM observation of alignment-controlled, photopolymerized liquid crystals can be a powerful tool to investigate complex liquid crystalline order. PMID:26530779

  3. Double-twist cylinders in liquid crystalline cholesteric blue phases observed by transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shu; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Kawata, Yuto; Kuwahara, Ryusuke; Nishi, Ryuji; Ozaki, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Cholesteric blue phases are liquid crystalline phases in which the constituent rod-like molecules spontaneously form three-dimensional, helical structures. Despite theoretical predictions that they are composed of cylindrical substructures within which the liquid crystal molecules are doubly twisted, real space observation of the arrangement of such structures had not been performed. Through transmission electron microscopy of photopolymerized blue phases with controlled lattice plane orientations, we report real space observation and comparison of the lattice structures of blue phases I and II. The two systems show distinctly different contrasts, reflecting the theoretically predicted, body centred and simple cubic arrangement of the double-twist cylinders. Transmission electron microscopy also reveals different tendencies of the two blue phases to align on unidirectionally rubbed surfaces. We thus show that TEM observation of alignment-controlled, photopolymerized liquid crystals can be a powerful tool to investigate complex liquid crystalline order. PMID:26530779

  4. Double-twist cylinders in liquid crystalline cholesteric blue phases observed by transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shu; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Kawata, Yuto; Kuwahara, Ryusuke; Nishi, Ryuji; Ozaki, Masanori

    2015-11-01

    Cholesteric blue phases are liquid crystalline phases in which the constituent rod-like molecules spontaneously form three-dimensional, helical structures. Despite theoretical predictions that they are composed of cylindrical substructures within which the liquid crystal molecules are doubly twisted, real space observation of the arrangement of such structures had not been performed. Through transmission electron microscopy of photopolymerized blue phases with controlled lattice plane orientations, we report real space observation and comparison of the lattice structures of blue phases I and II. The two systems show distinctly different contrasts, reflecting the theoretically predicted, body centred and simple cubic arrangement of the double-twist cylinders. Transmission electron microscopy also reveals different tendencies of the two blue phases to align on unidirectionally rubbed surfaces. We thus show that TEM observation of alignment-controlled, photopolymerized liquid crystals can be a powerful tool to investigate complex liquid crystalline order.

  5. Three-Dimensional Microstructure of a Polymer-Dispersed Liquid Crystal Observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierron, Jean; Tournier-Lasserve, Valérie; Sopena, Pierre; Boudet, Alain; Sixou, Pierre; Mitov, Michel

    1995-11-01

    A film consisting of an amorphous photo-crosslinkable polymer matrix and a dispersion of microinclusions of a cholesteric polymer was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The polymerization procedure of the blend provides a composite with many small nodules of spherical or ellipsoidal shapes, with sizes between 0.4 and 6 μm. The cholesteric stratification is well evidenced in transmission electron microscopy by dark lines due to diffraction contrast. The 3D organization was reconstructed by the observation of successive ultramicrotomed sections. Six types of nodules were distinguished according to the number of defects (foci or disclination lines), among which only three had already been observed and theoretically calculated. The confined geometry inherent in the size of the nodules, close to the cholesteric pitch, is responsible of these unexpected structures. In these conditions, the surface forces are in tight competition with the cholesteric elastic forces.

  6. Electron tomography of HEK293T cells using scanning electron microscope-based scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    You, Yun-Wen; Chang, Hsun-Yun; Liao, Hua-Yang; Kao, Wei-Lun; Yen, Guo-Ji; Chang, Chi-Jen; Tsai, Meng-Hung; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2012-10-01

    Based on a scanning electron microscope operated at 30 kV with a homemade specimen holder and a multiangle solid-state detector behind the sample, low-kV scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is presented with subsequent electron tomography for three-dimensional (3D) volume structure. Because of the low acceleration voltage, the stronger electron-atom scattering leads to a stronger contrast in the resulting image than standard TEM, especially for light elements. Furthermore, the low-kV STEM yields less radiation damage to the specimen, hence the structure can be preserved. In this work, two-dimensional STEM images of a 1-μm-thick cell section with projection angles between ±50° were collected, and the 3D volume structure was reconstructed using the simultaneous iterative reconstructive technique algorithm with the TomoJ plugin for ImageJ, which are both public domain software. Furthermore, the cross-sectional structure was obtained with the Volume Viewer plugin in ImageJ. Although the tilting angle is constrained and limits the resulting structural resolution, slicing the reconstructed volume generated the depth profile of the thick specimen with sufficient resolution to examine cellular uptake of Au nanoparticles, and the final position of these nanoparticles inside the cell was imaged. PMID:23026379

  7. Individual Particle Analysis of Ambient PM 2.5 Using Advanced Electron Microscopy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald J. Keeler; Masako Morishita

    2006-12-31

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate a combination of advanced electron microscopy techniques that can be effectively used to identify and characterize individual particles and their sources. Specific techniques to be used include high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), STEM energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), and energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM). A series of ambient PM{sub 2.5} samples were collected in communities in southwestern Detroit, MI (close to multiple combustion sources) and Steubenville, OH (close to several coal fired utility boilers). High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) -imaging showed a series of nano-metal particles including transition metals and elemental composition of individual particles in detail. Submicron and nano-particles with Al, Fe, Ti, Ca, U, V, Cr, Si, Ba, Mn, Ni, K and S were observed and characterized from the samples. Among the identified nano-particles, combinations of Al, Fe, Si, Ca and Ti nano-particles embedded in carbonaceous particles were observed most frequently. These particles showed very similar characteristics of ultrafine coal fly ash particles that were previously reported. By utilizing HAADF-STEM, STEM-EDX, and EF-TEM, this investigation was able to gain information on the size, morphology, structure, and elemental composition of individual nano-particles collected in Detroit and Steubenville. The results showed that the contributions of local combustion sources - including coal fired utilities - to ultrafine particle levels were significant. Although this combination of advanced electron microscopy techniques by itself can not identify source categories, these techniques can be utilized as complementary analytical tools that are capable of providing detailed information on individual particles.

  8. Photon-induced near-field electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barwick, Brett; Flannigan, David J; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2009-12-17

    In materials science and biology, optical near-field microscopies enable spatial resolutions beyond the diffraction limit, but they cannot provide the atomic-scale imaging capabilities of electron microscopy. Given the nature of interactions between electrons and photons, and considering their connections through nanostructures, it should be possible to achieve imaging of evanescent electromagnetic fields with electron pulses when such fields are resolved in both space (nanometre and below) and time (femtosecond). Here we report the development of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM), and the associated phenomena. We show that the precise spatiotemporal overlap of femtosecond single-electron packets with intense optical pulses at a nanostructure (individual carbon nanotube or silver nanowire in this instance) results in the direct absorption of integer multiples of photon quanta (nhomega) by the relativistic electrons accelerated to 200 keV. By energy-filtering only those electrons resulting from this absorption, it is possible to image directly in space the near-field electric field distribution, obtain the temporal behaviour of the field on the femtosecond timescale, and map its spatial polarization dependence. We believe that the observation of the photon-induced near-field effect in ultrafast electron microscopy demonstrates the potential for many applications, including those of direct space-time imaging of localized fields at interfaces and visualization of phenomena related to photonics, plasmonics and nanostructures. PMID:20016598

  9. New and unconventional approaches for advancing resolution in biological transmission electron microscopy by improving macromolecular specimen preparation and preservation.

    SciTech Connect

    Massover, W.; Materials Science Division

    2011-02-01

    Resolution in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) now is limited by the properties of specimens, rather than by those of instrumentation. The long-standing difficulties in obtaining truly high-resolution structure from biological macromolecules with TEM demand the development, testing, and application of new ideas and unconventional approaches. This review concisely describes some new concepts and innovative methodologies for TEM that deal with unsolved problems in the preparation and preservation of macromolecular specimens. The selected topics include use of better support films, a more protective multi-component matrix surrounding specimens for cryo-TEM and negative staining, and, several quite different changes in microscopy and micrography that should decrease the effects of electron radiation damage; all these practical approaches are non-traditional, but have promise to advance resolution for specimens of biological macromolecules beyond its present level of 3-10 {angstrom} (0.3-1.0 nm). The result of achieving truly high resolution will be a fulfillment of the still unrealized potential of transmission electron microscopy for directly revealing the structure of biological macromolecules down to the atomic level.

  10. The development of field-emission scanning electron microscopy for imaging biological surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pawley, J

    1997-08-01

    This article traces the important milestones in the development of high-resolution, field-emission, scanning electron microscopes (SEM). Such instruments are now capable of producing images of the surfaces of biological specimens that rival, in terms of resolution and contrast, those produced by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Even though one of the first instruments to produce a useful transmission electron microscope image was, in fact, an early scanning microscope, TEM reached its full potential for biological imaging almost 30 years sooner than did SEM. The main reason for this slow rate of development is the dependence of any scanning technique on source brightness. The only suitable electron source was the field-emission source, originally developed in the 1930's. Making this into a stable and reliable electron source for microscopy required many technical barriers to be overcome. An additional delay may have been caused by the great success that attended the introduction of early SEM instruments. These instruments which employed heated, tungsten hairpin cathodes, were inexpensive and reliable, but they that were also far from optimal in terms of optical performance. Their market success may have engendered the sense of inertia and complacency that further delayed the introduction of low aberrations objective lenses and field-emission sources for almost 20 years after they were first introduced to electron microscopy. In addition, the fact that these early SEMs accustomed users to operating with a much higher beam voltage than was either necessary or wise, lead many to assume that the SEM was incapable of producing high-resolution images of biological surfaces. This left them open to fascination with newer ahd slower techniques that, on balance, were less suitable than optimized SEM for most of their imaging needs. In parallel to these developments in instrumentation, major improvements were also made in the way that the specimen surface

  11. Characterization of dielectric breakdown behavior by in situ transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, Cecile Semana

    Dielectric breakdown (BD) is the loss of capacitance upheld by an insulating material through defect formation and charge trapping. Dielectric BD is well-studied in the framework of reliability physics for semiconductor applications, and presents itself as a viable mechanism during materials processing by electric field assisted sintering (EFAS). So far a mechanistic understanding of dielectric BD is incomplete due to the limitations in nanoscale defect characterization techniques. The recent development of novel in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) capabilities enables the atomic-scale characterization of dielectric BD mechanisms, which was the subject of this dissertation. As the technology of semiconductor devices moves toward the sub-25 nm technology the electronic properties of gate oxide layers are affected eventually leading to device failure by dielectric BD. This study aimed to provide a systematic approach of simultaneous imaging and local application of electrical stress using in situ TEM by contacting an electrically biased Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM) probe directly to the TEM sample. This experimental setup therefore allows a correlation of electrical signatures with defect structure evolution. In situ TEM experiments carried out with a single SiO2-based field effect transistor resulted to catastrophic failure of the dielectric layer consistent with descriptions of soft dielectric breakdown (SBD) and hard dielectric breakdown (HBD). A variety of in situ TEM techniques was further utilized to investigate whether electric field induced dielectric breakdown may contribute to densification of metallic powder particles during EFAS. In situ heating and STM-TEM experiments were systematically applied to separately study thermal and athermal effects during densification, respectively. Nanometric metal powders used for sintering typically possess surface oxides that affect the thermodynamics and kinetics of neck formation during the initial

  12. Electron microscopy of biomaterials based on hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Suvorova, E. I. Klechkovskaya, V. V.; Komarov, V. F.; Severin, A. V.; Melikhov, I. V.; Buffat, P. A.

    2006-10-15

    Three types of biomaterials based on hydroxyapatite are synthesized and investigated. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals or microcrystals precipitated from low-temperature aqueous solutions serve as the initial material used for preparing spherical porous granules approximately 300-500 {mu}m in diameter. Sintering of hydroxyapatite crystals at a temperature of 870 deg. C for 2 h or at 1000 deg. C (for 3 h) + 1200 deg. C (for 2 h) brings about the formation of solid ceramics with different internal structures. According to the electron microscopic data, the ceramic material prepared at 870 deg. C is formed by agglomerated hydroxyapatite nanocrystals, whereas the ceramics sintered at 1200 deg. C (with a bending strength of the order of 100 MPa) are composed of crystal blocks as large as 2 {mu}m. It is established that all the biomaterials have a single-phase composition and consist of the hydroxyapatite with a structure retained up to a temperature of 1200 deg. C.

  13. Contributed Review: Review of integrated correlative light and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, F. J.; Otto, C.

    2015-01-15

    New developments in the field of microscopy enable to acquire increasing amounts of information from large sample areas and at an increased resolution. Depending on the nature of the technique, the information may reveal morphological, structural, chemical, and still other sample characteristics. In research fields, such as cell biology and materials science, there is an increasing demand to correlate these individual levels of information and in this way to obtain a better understanding of sample preparation and specific sample properties. To address this need, integrated systems were developed that combine nanometer resolution electron microscopes with optical microscopes, which produce chemically or label specific information through spectroscopy. The complementary information from electron microscopy and light microscopy presents an opportunity to investigate a broad range of sample properties in a correlated fashion. An important part of correlating the differences in information lies in bridging the different resolution and image contrast features. The trend to analyse samples using multiple correlated microscopes has resulted in a new research field. Current research is focused, for instance, on (a) the investigation of samples with nanometer scale distribution of inorganic and organic materials, (b) live cell analysis combined with electron microscopy, and (c) in situ spectroscopic and electron microscopy analysis of catalytic materials, but more areas will benefit from integrated correlative microscopy.

  14. Contributed Review: Review of integrated correlative light and electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, F. J.; Otto, C.

    2015-01-01

    New developments in the field of microscopy enable to acquire increasing amounts of information from large sample areas and at an increased resolution. Depending on the nature of the technique, the information may reveal morphological, structural, chemical, and still other sample characteristics. In research fields, such as cell biology and materials science, there is an increasing demand to correlate these individual levels of information and in this way to obtain a better understanding of sample preparation and specific sample properties. To address this need, integrated systems were developed that combine nanometer resolution electron microscopes with optical microscopes, which produce chemically or label specific information through spectroscopy. The complementary information from electron microscopy and light microscopy presents an opportunity to investigate a broad range of sample properties in a correlated fashion. An important part of correlating the differences in information lies in bridging the different resolution and image contrast features. The trend to analyse samples using multiple correlated microscopes has resulted in a new research field. Current research is focused, for instance, on (a) the investigation of samples with nanometer scale distribution of inorganic and organic materials, (b) live cell analysis combined with electron microscopy, and (c) in situ spectroscopic and electron microscopy analysis of catalytic materials, but more areas will benefit from integrated correlative microscopy.

  15. Studying The Kinetics Of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation With In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mcdowell, Matthew T.; Ryu, Ill; Lee, Seokwoo; Wang, Chong M.; Nix, William D.; Cui, Yi

    2012-11-27

    Silicon is an attractive high-capacity anode material for Li-ion batteries, but a comprehensive understanding of the massive ~300% volume change and fracture during lithiation/delithiation is necessary to reliably employ Si anodes. Here, in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the lithiation of crystalline Si nanoparticles reveals that the reaction slows down as it progresses into the particle interior. Analysis suggests that this behavior is due to the influence of mechanical stress at the reaction front on the driving force for the reaction. These experiments give insight into the factors controlling the kinetics of this unique reaction.

  16. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of microstructural features of Al-Li-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avalos-Borja, M.; Pizzo, P. P.; Larson, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of aluminum-lithium-copper alloys was conducted. The principal purpose is to characterize the nature, size, and distribution of stringer particles which result from the powder metallurgy (P/M) processing of these alloys. Microstructural features associated with the stringer particles are reported that help explain the stress corrosion susceptibility of the powder metallurgy-processed Al-Li-Cu alloys. In addition, matrix precipitation events are documented for a variety of heat treatments and process variations. Hot rolling is observed to significant alter the nature of matrix precipitation, and the observations are correlated with concomitant mechanical property variations.

  17. Unraveling irradiation induced grain growth with in situ transmission electron microscopy and coordinated modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bufford, D. C.; Abdeljawad, F. F.; Foiles, S. M.; Hattar, K.

    2015-11-09

    Nanostructuring has been proposed as a method to enhance radiation tolerance, but many metallic systems are rejected due to significant concerns regarding long term grain boundary and interface stability. This work utilized recent advancements in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to quantitatively characterize the grain size, texture, and individual grain boundary character in a nanocrystalline gold model system before and after in situ TEM ion irradiation with 10 MeV Si. The initial experimental measurements were fed into a mesoscale phase field model, which incorporates the role of irradiation-induced thermal events on boundary properties, to directly compare the observed and simulated grain growth with varied parameters. The observed microstructure evolution deviated subtly from previously reported normal grain growth in which some boundaries remained essentially static. In broader terms, the combined experimental and modeling techniques presented herein provide future avenues to enhance quantification and prediction of the thermal, mechanical, or radiation stability of grain boundaries in nanostructured crystalline systems.

  18. Unraveling irradiation induced grain growth with in situ transmission electron microscopy and coordinated modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufford, D. C.; Abdeljawad, F. F.; Foiles, S. M.; Hattar, K.

    2015-11-01

    Nanostructuring has been proposed as a method to enhance radiation tolerance, but many metallic systems are rejected due to significant concerns regarding long term grain boundary and interface stability. This work utilized recent advancements in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to quantitatively characterize the grain size, texture, and individual grain boundary character in a nanocrystalline gold model system before and after in situ TEM ion irradiation with 10 MeV Si. The initial experimental measurements were fed into a mesoscale phase field model, which incorporates the role of irradiation-induced thermal events on boundary properties, to directly compare the observed and simulated grain growth with varied parameters. The observed microstructure evolution deviated subtly from previously reported normal grain growth in which some boundaries remained essentially static. In broader terms, the combined experimental and modeling techniques presented herein provide future avenues to enhance quantification and prediction of the thermal, mechanical, or radiation stability of grain boundaries in nanostructured crystalline systems.

  19. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy study: preparation of vesicular dispersions by quenching microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Lee, H S; Morrison, E D; Zhang, Q; McCormick, A V

    2016-09-01

    We previously showed that long-lived nanoemulsions, seeming initially vesicular, might be prepared simply by diluting and cooling (quenching) warm microemulsions with n-hexadecane with precooled water. In this paper, we confirm that these systems are vesicular dispersions when fresh, and they can be made with similar structures and compositional dependence using alkanes with chain lengths ranging from octane to hexadecane. The nanostructures of fresh nanoemulsions are imaged with cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). We confirm that water-continuous microemulsions give simple dispersions of vesicles (sometimes unilamellar), typically less than 100 nm in diameter; these systems can avoid separation for over 2 months. Selected samples were also prepared using halogenated alkanes to create additional contrast in the cryo-TEM, allowing us to confirm that the oil is located in the observed vesicular structures. PMID:26937849

  20. Transmission electron microscopy specimen preparation perpendicular to the long axis of high aspect ratio features

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, R. B.; Anciso, A.; Jones, P. J.; Glenn, A. L.; Williams, B. L.; Sridhar, S.; Arshad, S.

    2009-11-15

    A new variation of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen preparation is introduced. By thinning a tall high aspect ratio structure perpendicular to the long dimension (i.e., from the side) rather than from perpendicular to the short dimension (either the top or the bottom), it is possible to obtain a more uniformly thin TEM specimen over the entire long dimension of the structure. This article will describe the rational for this variation in specimen preparation. The necessary modifications of four different specimen preparation methods (in situ lift-out, traditional H-bar, ex situ lift-out, and tripod polishing) will be discussed and images of specimens obtained by both of these first two methods will be shown. Additional potential advantages and other applications of this specimen preparation method will be covered.

  1. Preparation of cross-sectional specimens of ceramic thermal barrier coatings for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Unal, O; Heuer, A H; Mitchell, T E

    1990-04-01

    During the microstructural examination of ceramic thermal barrier coatings by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), initial efforts for the preparation of cross-sectional thin foils from interface regions by conventional means were mostly failures. Delamination of the Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 ceramic coating from the nickel-base alloy substrate sometimes occurred during fine polishing at around 80 microns thickness but mostly occurred during dimpling. Because of this sensitivity, special techniques for mechanical handling were developed so that ion milling could give thin enough regions of the metal-ceramic interface. TEM showed convincingly that the highly fragile nature of the coatings is in fact due to the extensive porosity at the interface developed as a result of heat treatment. PMID:2332805

  2. Transmission electron microscopy sample preparation protocols for the ultrastructural study of cysts of free-living protozoa.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, Ellen; Baré, Julie; Claeys, Myriam; Chavatte, Natascha; Bert, Wim; Sabbe, Koen; Houf, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    Cysts of free-living protozoa have an impact on the ecology and epidemiology of bacteria because they may act as a transmission vector or shelter the bacteria against hash environmental conditions. Detection and localization of intracystic bacteria and examination of the en- and excystment dynamics is a major challenge because no detailed protocols for ultrastructural analysis of cysts are currently available. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is ideally suited for those analyses; however, conventional TEM protocols are not satisfactory for cysts of free-living protozoa. Here we report on the design and testing of four protocols for TEM sample preparation of cysts. Two protocols, one based on chemical fixation in coated well plates and one on high-pressure freezing, were selected as the most effective for TEM-based ultrastructural studies of cysts. Our protocols will enable improved analysis of cyst structure and a better understanding of bacterial survival mechanisms in cysts. PMID:25861930

  3. Study of inelastic mean free path of metal nanostructures using energy filtered transmission electron microscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, T; Bardhan, M; Bhattacharya, M; Satpati, B

    2015-06-01

    We report a simple method for measuring the inelastic mean free path of nanostructures of known geometry using energy filtered transmission electron microscopy imaging. The mean free path of inelastic electrons was measured by using systems having known symmetry, such as cylindrical or cubic, combined with Poisson statistics without employing the knowledge of microscope parameters, namely the convergence angle and the collection angle. Having inherent symmetry of such systems, their absolute thickness can be measured from their two-dimensional projection images. We have calculated mean free path of inelastic scattering of electrons in gold, silver and nickel doing case study research by employing gold nanorod, silver nanocube and nickel nanorod lying on a carbon-coated TEM grid at two different electron energies (viz. 200 and 300 keV) following this alternative approach. Results obtained using such alternative approach were verified using microscope parameters. PMID:25787717

  4. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Cometary Residues from Micron-Sized Craters in the Stardust Al-Foils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leroux, Hugues; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Dai, Zu Rong; Graham, Giles A.; Troadec, David; Bradley, John P.; Teslich, Nick; Borg, Janet; Kearsley, Anton T.; Horz, Friedrich

    2008-01-01

    We report Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) investigations of micro-craters that originated from hypervelocity impacts of comet 81P/Wild 2 dust particles on the aluminium foil of the Stardust collector. The craters were selected by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and then prepared by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) milling techniques in order to provide electron transparent cross-sections for TEM studies. The crater residues contain both amorphous and crystalline materials in varying proportions and compositions. The amorphous component is interpreted as resulting from shock melting during the impact and the crystalline phases as relict minerals. The latter show evidence for shock metamorphism. Based on the residue morphology and the compositional variation, the impacting particles are inferred to have been dominated by mixtures of submicron olivine, pyroxene and Fe-sulfide grains, in agreement with prior results of relatively coarse-grained mineral assemblages in the aerogel collector.

  5. Persistent misconceptions about incoherence in electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, D

    2011-06-01

    Incoherence in electron microscopic imaging occurs when during the observation the microscope and the object are subject to fluctuations. In order to speed up the computer simulation of the images, approximations are used that are considered as valid. In this paper we will question the validity of these approximations and show that in specific cases they can lead to erroneous results. It is shown in particular in the case of one single vibrating atom that the thermal diffuse scattering that causes the signal in HAADF STEM is not only dependent on Z but also on the mean square displacement of the atom so that it can even be large for light atoms in soft matter, provided the right HAADF aperture is used. In HREM imaging the diffuse scattering leaks out of the coherent (elastic) wave and is redistributed in the background. This might explain the mismatch in elastic contrast (Stobbs factor) especially for crystals with a thickness beyond the extinction distance, where also the HAADF signal saturates and the elastic (coherent) component vanishes. PMID:21664551

  6. Electron microscopy of low iodinated thyroglobulin molecules.

    PubMed

    Berg, G; Ekholm, R

    1975-04-29

    Thyroglobulin molecules were studied in the electron microscope with negative staining technique. In a first series of experiments samples of thyroglobulin varying in iodine content from 0.5 to 0.03% were prepared from the thyroids of mice and rats kept on iodine-poor diets. All samples contained thyroglobulin molecules of the normal ovoid shape, not deviating in size or shape from molecules obtained from normal thyroids. However, in addition, another type of molecule having a cylindrical shape was observed in all samples. The proportion of these cylindrical molecules increased from a few per cent in the moderately iodine-poor thyroglobulin samples to more than 80% in the highly iodine-deficient thyroglobulin (0.03%). In a second series of experiments extremely iodine-poor thyroglobulin (smaller than 0.005%) was obtained from propylthiouracil-treated rats. In these preparations practically all molecules had a cylindrical shape. These samples also contained smaller particles interpreted to be dissociation products. The cylindrical molecules were of two types, one appearing compact and measuring 250 times 135 A (length times diameter) and the other appearing porous and having a length of 145 and a diameter of 205 A. It is concluded that the cylindrical molecules represent non- or low-iodinated thyroglobulin and it is suggested that the porous cylindrical molecule is an unfolded form of the compact cylinder. PMID:1138879

  7. Micro-CT scouting for transmission electron microscopy of human tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Morales, A G; Stempinski, E S; Xiao, X; Patel, A; Panna, A; Olivier, K N; McShane, P J; Robinson, C; George, A J; Donahue, D R; Chen, P; Wen, H

    2016-07-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides sub-nanometre-scale details in volumetric samples. Samples such as pathology tissue specimens are often stained with a metal element to enhance contrast, which makes them opaque to optical microscopes. As a result, it can be a lengthy procedure to find the region of interest inside a sample through sectioning. We describe micro-CT scouting for TEM that allows noninvasive identification of regions of interest within a block sample to guide the sectioning step. In a tissue pathology study, a bench-top micro-CT scanner with 10 μm resolution was used to determine the location of patches of the mucous membrane in osmium-stained human nasal scraping samples. Once the regions of interest were located, the sample block was sectioned to expose that location, followed by ultra-thin sectioning and TEM to inspect the internal structure of the cilia of the membrane epithelial cells with nanometre resolution. This method substantially reduced the time and labour of the search process from typically 20 sections for light microscopy to three sections with no added sample preparation. PMID:26854176

  8. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy method and studies of implant damage in single crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, D.P.; Kuryliw, E.; Siebein, K.; Jones, K.S.; Chodelka, R.; Elliman, R.

    2006-07-15

    Few transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of single crystal diamond have been reported, most likely due to the time and difficulty involved in sample preparation. A method is described for creating a TEM cross section of single crystal diamond using a focused ion beam and in situ lift-out. The method results in samples approximately 10 {mu}m long by 3 {mu}m deep with an average thickness of 100-300 nm. The total time to prepare a cross-sectional TEM sample of diamond is less than 5 h. The method also allows for additional thinning to facilitate high resolution TEM imaging, and can be applied to oddly shaped diamond samples. This sample preparation technique has been applied to the study of ion implantation damage in single crystal diamond and its evolution upon annealing. High-pressure-high-temperature diamonds were implanted with Si{sup +} at an energy of 1 MeV and a temperature of 30 deg. C. One sample, with a (110) surface, was implanted with a dose of 1x10{sup 14} Si cm{sup -2} and annealed at 950 deg. C for 10 and 40 min. No significant defect formation or evolution was discernible by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Another sample, with a (100) orientation, was implanted with 1 MeV at 1x10{sup 15} Si cm{sup -2} and annealed at 1050 deg. C for 10 min. Prior to annealing, a heavily damaged but still crystalline region was observed. Upon annealing, the sample showed no signs of conversion either to an amorphous form of carbon or to graphite. This is unexpected as the energy and dose are above the previously reported graphitization threshold for diamond. Higher annealing temperatures and possibly a high vacuum will be required for future study of defect formation, evolution, and phase transformations in ion-implanted single crystal diamond.

  9. Review on electron microscopy in taxonomy and biology of parasitic Nemathelminthes.

    PubMed

    Jamjoom, Manal B

    2007-04-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) proved a very helpful means that solved a lot of information in different scientific aspects. EM is a very good tool in the hospitals and research centers. It was aimed to pile up available information on the biology in the descriptive morphology of nematodes and their immature stages by scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. Watson (1965a, b) studied Euchromadora vulgaris and Ascaris sp. by using TEM respectively. Lee (1969) investigated the ultra-structure of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis by SEM & TEM, as well as some nematodes by TEM (Lee, 1972). The topography of the adult Baylisascaris procyonis caudal end was illustrated by Snyder (1989). Male tail relatively long, smoothly attenuated, with a small button-like or mucronate termination. Pre-anal papillae situated ventrally in 2 slightly divergent and somewhat irregularly spaced rows. Anterior and posterior to anus 2 slightly raised roughened patches consisting of several rows of small spines. Just anterior to anus along outer margin of pre-anal roughened patch, a large double medio-ventral papilla. Five pairs of post-anal papillae with first pair just posterior to anus doubled and 4 pairs more closely associated in a group near tail end. Second pair with doubled papillae; but, in a few specimens fused as if 2 single closely associated papillae. Three pair single. Fourth pair of caudal papillae phasmids and in centers of each a ringed pore-like opening. Male spicules with a highly sculptured surface with a pincher-like terminal end. PMID:17580570

  10. Electron microscopy of the amphibian model systems Xenopus laevis and Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Thomas; Berger, Jürgen; Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela; Kretschmar, Susanne; Cerny, Robert; Schwarz, Heinz; Löfberg, Jan; Piendl, Thomas; Epperlein, Hans H

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter we provide a set of different protocols for the ultrastructural analysis of amphibian (Xenopus, axolotl) tissues, mostly of embryonic origin. For Xenopus these methods include: (1) embedding gastrulae and tailbud embryos into Spurr's resin for TEM, (2) post-embedding labeling of methacrylate (K4M) and cryosections through adult and embryonic epithelia for correlative LM and TEM, and (3) pre-embedding labeling of embryonic tissues with silver-enhanced nanogold. For the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) we present the following methods: (1) SEM of migrating neural crest (NC) cells; (2) SEM and TEM of extracellular matrix (ECM) material; (3) Cryo-SEM of extracellular matrix (ECM) material after cryoimmobilization; and (4) TEM analysis of hyaluronan using high-pressure freezing and HABP labeling. These methods provide exemplary approaches for a variety of questions in the field of amphibian development and regeneration, and focus on cell biological issues that can only be answered with fine structural imaging methods, such as electron microscopy. PMID:20869532

  11. Photon gating in four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohammed T.; Liu, Haihua; Baskin, John Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) is a pivotal tool for imaging of nanoscale structural dynamics with subparticle resolution on the time scale of atomic motion. Photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM), a key UEM technique, involves the detection of electrons that have gained energy from a femtosecond optical pulse via photon–electron coupling on nanostructures. PINEM has been applied in various fields of study, from materials science to biological imaging, exploiting the unique spatial, energy, and temporal characteristics of the PINEM electrons gained by interaction with a “single” light pulse. The further potential of photon-gated PINEM electrons in probing ultrafast dynamics of matter and the optical gating of electrons by invoking a “second” optical pulse has previously been proposed and examined theoretically in our group. Here, we experimentally demonstrate this photon-gating technique, and, through diffraction, visualize the phase transition dynamics in vanadium dioxide nanoparticles. With optical gating of PINEM electrons, imaging temporal resolution was improved by a factor of 3 or better, being limited only by the optical pulse widths. This work enables the combination of the high spatial resolution of electron microscopy and the ultrafast temporal response of the optical pulses, which provides a promising approach to attain the resolution of few femtoseconds and attoseconds in UEM. PMID:26438835

  12. Three dimensional reconstruction by electron microscopy in the life sciences: An introduction for cell and tissue biologists.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Kildare; Girard-Dias, Wendell; Attias, Marcia; de Souza, Wanderley; Ramos, Isabela

    2015-01-01

    Early applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in the life sciences have contributed tremendously to our current understanding at the subcellular level. Initially limited to two-dimensional representations of three-dimensional (3D) objects, this approach has revolutionized the fields of cellular and structural biology-being instrumental for determining the fine morpho-functional characterization of most cellular structures. Electron microscopy has progressively evolved towards the development of tools that allow for the 3D characterization of different structures. This was done with the aid of a wide variety of techniques, which have become increasingly diverse and highly sophisticated. We start this review by examining the principles of 3D reconstruction of cells and tissues using classical approaches in TEM, and follow with a discussion of the modern approaches utilizing TEM as well as on new scanning electron microscopy-based techniques. 3D reconstruction techniques from serial sections and (cryo) electron-tomography are examined, and the recent applications of focused ion beam-scanning microscopes and serial-block-face techniques for the 3D reconstruction of large volumes are discussed. Alternative low-cost techniques and more accessible approaches using basic transmission or field emission scanning electron microscopes are also examined. PMID:25652003

  13. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Electron microscopy observations of resids obtained from coal liquefaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Sande, J.B.

    1992-11-01

    The study demonstrated the feasibility of using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) spectroscopy accompanied by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy for the examination of the (THF)-insoluble portion of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. The technique was able to determine the distribution, morphology and elemental composition of dispersed catalyst components in the insoluble portion of the distillation resids. An attempt was made to use transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on these samples; however, detailed compositional information could not be obtained. Further development of STEM and EDX as aids to process development are justified based on these results.

  14. Cryogenic Electron Microscopy Studies: Structure and Formation of Self-assembled Nanostructures in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Seung

    Cryogenic electron microscopy (Cryo-EM) techniques are among the most powerful to characterize self-assembling soft materials (colloids, polymers, and microemulsions, etc.) at the nanometer scale, without any need for implicit models or assumptions about the structure. We can even visualize structure under dynamic conditions, capturing each stage of development. In this thesis, cryo-EM has been used to investigate the formation and structure of a variety of self-assembling soft materials. Visualization is complemented by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering, and conductivity measurements. In each case, cryo-EM provides new insights, not otherwise available, into the nanostructure development. Self-assembly phenomena at the molecular level are critical to the performance of tremendous number of applied systems ranging from personal care products to industrial products. To evaluate these self-assembled materials, multiple characterization techniques are required. We investigated aggregation behavior of cesium dodecyl sulfate (CsDS) ionic surfactant in aqueous solution. Coupled with the real space data from cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and the inverse space data from SAXS, the experimental result of CsDS in aqueous solution gave a new insight in CsDS micellar structures and their development as a function of concentration. Cryo-TEM showed the presence of the liquid-like hydrocarbon core in the CsDS micelles and relatively thick shell structures at a low CsDS concentration. The core-shell sphere structure micelle shifted to core-shell cylindrical micelle structure at high concentration. The morphology and structure of paclitaxel silicate (PTX) prodrug, encapsulated with amphiphilic poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) diblock copolymers were studied. The six different silicate PTX prodrug candidates were characterized with cryo-TEM. Direct imaging with cryo-TEM illustrated structure of prodrug

  15. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  16. Imaging Hydrated Microbial Extracellular Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Buck, Edgar C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-02-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryo-electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in the collapse of hydrated gel-like EPS into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  17. The CryoCapsule: Simplifying correlative light to electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Heiligenstein, Xavier; Heiligenstein, Jérôme; Delevoye, Cédric; Hurbain, Ilse; Bardin, Sabine; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Régnier, Gilles; Salamero, Jean; Antony, Claude; Raposo, Graca

    2014-01-01

    Correlating complementary multiple scale images of the same object is a straightforward means to decipher biological processes. Light and electron microscopy are the most commonly used imaging techniques, yet despite their complementarity, the experimental procedures available to correlate them are technically complex. We designed and manufactured a new device adapted to many biological specimens, the CryoCapsule, that simplifies the multiple sample preparation steps, which at present separate live cell fluorescence imaging from contextual high-resolution electron microscopy, thus opening new strategies for full correlative light to electron microscopy. We tested the biological application of this highly optimized tool on three different specimens: the in-vitro Xenopus laevis mitotic spindle, melanoma cells over-expressing YFP-langerin sequestered in organized membranous subcellular organelles and a pigmented melanocytic cell in which the endosomal system was labeled with internalized fluorescent transferrin. PMID:24533564

  18. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: comparative analysis by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dohnalkova, Alice C; Marshall, Matthew J; Arey, Bruce W; Williams, Kenneth H; Buck, Edgar C; Fredrickson, James K

    2011-02-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigation of microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations, and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions by conventional electron microscopy approaches with imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding the nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment. PMID:21169451

  19. Fibrillar polysaccharides in marine macromolecular organic matter as imaged by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Santschi, P.H.; Balnois, E.; Wilkinson, K.J.; Zhang, J.; Buffle, J.; Guo, L.

    1998-07-01

    A consensus is now emerging that the structure of organic macromolecules will determine their function in aquatic systems. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are highly complementary techniques for the study of natural colloids and can, when used together, reveal complementary information about the relative abundance and structures of aquatic macromolecules and colloids. In this study, colloid samples from the Gulf of Mexico and Middle Atlantic Bight of nominal sizes 1--200 nm were collected by cross-flow ultrafiltration, diafiltered, and freeze-dried. Rehydrated colloids were analyzed in parallel by AFM and TEM using standardized techniques. Results from estuarine, surface-, and deep-water samples show that an important fraction of colloidal organic matter (COM) consists of fibrillar material, which is rich in polysaccharides and fresher (i.e., has a younger radiocarbon age) than the bulk COM. This result is important because COM makes up 30--70% of oceanic and estuarine nominally dissolved organic matter. Other microparticles appear to be quasi-spherical, often attached to the fibrils like pearls. In the surface waters of the Gulf of Mexico, Middle Atlantic Bight, and Trinity River, fibrils with diameters of 1--3 nm and lengths of 100--2,000 nm were predominant. Although fibrils were also observed in samples from the benthic nepheloid layer in the Gulf of Mexico (1,600 m) and Middle Atlantic Bight (2,600 m), a much greater heterogeneity of colloid and macromolecule shapes and sizes was observed in these deeper waters.

  20. Microscopy with slow electrons: from LEEM to XPEEM

    ScienceCinema

    Bauer, Ernst [Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona, United States

    2010-01-08

    The short penetration and escape depth of electrons with energies below 1 keV make them ideally suited for the study of surfaces and ultrathin films. The combination of the low energy electrons and the high lateral resolution of a microscope produces a powerful method for the characterization of nanostructures on bulk samples, in particular if the microscope is equipped with an imaging energy filter and connected to a synchrotron radiation source. Comprehensive characterization by imaging, diffraction, and spectroscope of the structural, chemical, and magnetic properties is then possible. The Talk will describe the various imaging techniques in using reflected and emitted electrons in low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM), with an emphasis on magnetic materials with spin-polarized LEEM and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism PEEM. The talk with end with an outlook on future possibilities.

  1. Simultaneous Correlative Scanning Electron and High-NA Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liv, Nalan; Zonnevylle, A. Christiaan; Narvaez, Angela C.; Effting, Andries P. J.; Voorneveld, Philip W.; Lucas, Miriam S.; Hardwick, James C.; Wepf, Roger A.; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2013-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is a unique method for investigating biological structure-function relations. With CLEM protein distributions visualized in fluorescence can be mapped onto the cellular ultrastructure measured with electron microscopy. Widespread application of correlative microscopy is hampered by elaborate experimental procedures related foremost to retrieving regions of interest in both modalities and/or compromises in integrated approaches. We present a novel approach to correlative microscopy, in which a high numerical aperture epi-fluorescence microscope and a scanning electron microscope illuminate the same area of a sample at the same time. This removes the need for retrieval of regions of interest leading to a drastic reduction of inspection times and the possibility for quantitative investigations of large areas and datasets with correlative microscopy. We demonstrate Simultaneous CLEM (SCLEM) analyzing cell-cell connections and membrane protrusions in whole uncoated colon adenocarcinoma cell line cells stained for actin and cortactin with AlexaFluor488. SCLEM imaging of coverglass-mounted tissue sections with both electron-dense and fluorescence staining is also shown. PMID:23409024

  2. Helium ion microscopy and energy selective scanning electron microscopy - two advanced microscopy techniques with complementary applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenburg, C.; Jepson, M. A. E.; Boden, Stuart A.; Bagnall, Darren M.

    2014-06-01

    Both scanning electron microscopes (SEM) and helium ion microscopes (HeIM) are based on the same principle of a charged particle beam scanning across the surface and generating secondary electrons (SEs) to form images. However, there is a pronounced difference in the energy spectra of the emitted secondary electrons emitted as result of electron or helium ion impact. We have previously presented evidence that this also translates to differences in the information depth through the analysis of dopant contrast in doped silicon structures in both SEM and HeIM. Here, it is now shown how secondary electron emission spectra (SES) and their relation to depth of origin of SE can be experimentally exploited through the use of energy filtering (EF) in low voltage SEM (LV-SEM) to access bulk information from surfaces covered by damage or contamination layers. From the current understanding of the SES in HeIM it is not expected that EF will be as effective in HeIM but an alternative that can be used for some materials to access bulk information is presented.

  3. Non parametric denoising methods based on wavelets: Application to electron microscopy images in low exposure time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumia, Sid Ahmed; Messali, Zoubeida; Ouahabi, Abdeldjalil; Trepout, Sylvain; Messaoudi, Cedric; Marco, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The 3D reconstruction of the Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and Energy Filtering TEM images (EFTEM) hampered by the noisy nature of these images, so that their alignment becomes so difficult. This noise refers to the collision between the frozen hydrated biological samples and the electrons beam, where the specimen is exposed to the radiation with a high exposure time. This sensitivity to the electrons beam led specialists to obtain the specimen projection images at very low exposure time, which resulting the emergence of a new problem, an extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This paper investigates the problem of TEM images denoising when they are acquired at very low exposure time. So, our main objective is to enhance the quality of TEM images to improve the alignment process which will in turn improve the three dimensional tomography reconstructions. We have done multiple tests on special TEM images acquired at different exposure time 0.5s, 0.2s, 0.1s and 1s (i.e. with different values of SNR)) and equipped by Golding beads for helping us in the assessment step. We herein, propose a structure to combine multiple noisy copies of the TEM images. The structure is based on four different denoising methods, to combine the multiple noisy TEM images copies. Namely, the four different methods are Soft, the Hard as Wavelet-Thresholding methods, Bilateral Filter as a non-linear technique able to maintain the edges neatly, and the Bayesian approach in the wavelet domain, in which context modeling is used to estimate the parameter for each coefficient. To ensure getting a high signal-to-noise ratio, we have guaranteed that we are using the appropriate wavelet family at the appropriate level. So we have chosen âĂIJsym8âĂİ wavelet at level 3 as the most appropriate parameter. Whereas, for the bilateral filtering many tests are done in order to determine the proper filter parameters represented by the size of the filter, the range parameter and the

  4. Non parametric denoising methods based on wavelets: Application to electron microscopy images in low exposure time

    SciTech Connect

    Soumia, Sid Ahmed; Messali, Zoubeida; Ouahabi, Abdeldjalil; Trepout, Sylvain E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr Messaoudi, Cedric E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr Marco, Sergio E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr

    2015-01-13

    The 3D reconstruction of the Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and Energy Filtering TEM images (EFTEM) hampered by the noisy nature of these images, so that their alignment becomes so difficult. This noise refers to the collision between the frozen hydrated biological samples and the electrons beam, where the specimen is exposed to the radiation with a high exposure time. This sensitivity to the electrons beam led specialists to obtain the specimen projection images at very low exposure time, which resulting the emergence of a new problem, an extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This paper investigates the problem of TEM images denoising when they are acquired at very low exposure time. So, our main objective is to enhance the quality of TEM images to improve the alignment process which will in turn improve the three dimensional tomography reconstructions. We have done multiple tests on special TEM images acquired at different exposure time 0.5s, 0.2s, 0.1s and 1s (i.e. with different values of SNR)) and equipped by Golding beads for helping us in the assessment step. We herein, propose a structure to combine multiple noisy copies of the TEM images. The structure is based on four different denoising methods, to combine the multiple noisy TEM images copies. Namely, the four different methods are Soft, the Hard as Wavelet-Thresholding methods, Bilateral Filter as a non-linear technique able to maintain the edges neatly, and the Bayesian approach in the wavelet domain, in which context modeling is used to estimate the parameter for each coefficient. To ensure getting a high signal-to-noise ratio, we have guaranteed that we are using the appropriate wavelet family at the appropriate level. So we have chosen âĂIJsym8âĂİ wavelet at level 3 as the most appropriate parameter. Whereas, for the bilateral filtering many tests are done in order to determine the proper filter parameters represented by the size of the filter, the range parameter and the

  5. Ultrastructural Analysis of Drosophila Ovaries by Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hurd, Thomas R; Sanchez, Carlos G; Teixeira, Felipe K; Petzold, Chris; Dancel-Manning, Kristen; Wang, Ju-Yu S; Lehmann, Ruth; Liang, Feng-Xia A

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster ovary is a powerful, genetically tractable system through which one can elucidate the principles underlying cellular function and organogenesis in vivo. In order to understand the intricate process of oogenesis at the subcellular level, microscopic analysis with the highest possible resolution is required. In this chapter, we describe the preparation of ovaries for ultrastructural analysis using transmission electron microscopy and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy. We discuss and provide protocols for chemical fixation of Drosophila ovaries that facilitate optimal imaging with particular attention paid to preserving and resolving mitochondrial membrane morphology and structure. PMID:26324436

  6. Surface morphology of Trichinella spiralis by scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.W.; Ledbetter, M.C.

    1980-02-01

    The surface morphology of larval and adult Trichinella spiralis was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of fixed, dried, and metal-coated specimens. The results are compared with those found earlier by various investigators using light and transmission electron microscopy. Some morphological features reported here are revealed uniquely by SEM. These include the pores of the cephalic sense organs, the character of secondary cuticular folds, variations of the hypodermal gland cell openings or pores, and the presence of particles on the copulatory bell.

  7. Ultrastructural Analysis of Drosophila Ovaries by Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Thomas R.; Sanchez, Carlos G.; Teixeira, Felipe K.; Petzold, Chris; Dancel-Manning, Kristen; Wang, Ju-Yu S.; Lehmann, Ruth; Liang, Feng-Xia A.

    2016-01-01

    i. Summary The Drosophila melanogaster ovary is a powerful, genetically tractable system through which one can elucidate the principles underlying cellular function and organogenesis in vivo. In order to understand the intricate process of oogenesis at the subcellular level, microscopic analysis with the highest possible resolution is required. In this chapter, we describe the preparation of ovaries for ultrastructural analysis using transmission electron microscopy and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy. We discuss and provide protocols for chemical fixation of Drosophila ovaries that facilitate optimal imaging with particular attention paid to preserving and resolving mitochondrial membrane morphology and structure. PMID:26324436

  8. Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Helium Bubbles in Aged Plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A J; Wall, M A; Zocco, T G; Blobaum, K M

    2004-11-02

    The self-irradiation damage generated by alpha decay of plutonium results in the formation of lattice defects, helium, and uranium atoms. Over time, microstructural evolution resulting from the self-irradiation may influence the physical and mechanical properties of the material. In order to assess microstructural changes, we have developed and applied procedures for the specimen preparation, handling, and transmission electron microscopy characterization of Pu alloys. These transmission electron microscopy investigations of Pu-Ga alloys ranging in age up to 42-years old reveal the presence of nanometer-sized helium bubbles. The number density of bubbles and the average size have been determined for eight different aged materials.

  9. Directed evolution of APEX2 for electron microscopy and proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Stephanie S.; Martell, Jeffrey D.; Kamer, Kimberli J.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Ting, Alice Y.

    2014-01-01

    APEX is an engineered peroxidase that functions both as an electron microscopy tag, and as a promiscuous labeling enzyme for live-cell proteomics. Because the limited sensitivity of APEX precludes applications requiring low APEX expression, we used yeast display evolution to improve its catalytic efficiency. Our evolved APEX2 is far more active in cells, enabling the superior enrichment of endogenous mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins and the use of electron microscopy to resolve the sub-mitochondrial localization of calcium uptake regulatory protein MICU1. PMID:25419960

  10. Imaging of magnetic and electric fields by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zweck, Josef

    2016-10-12

    Nanostructured materials become more and more a part of our daily life, partly as self-assembled particles or artificially patterned. These nanostructures often possess intrinsic magnetic and/or electric fields which determine (at least partially) their physical properties. Therefore it is important to be able to measure these fields reliably on a nanometre scale. A rather common instrument for the investigation of these fields is the transmission electron microscope as it offers high spatial resolution. The use of an electron microscope to image electric and magnetic fields on a micron down to sub-nanometre scale is treated in detail for transmission electron microscopes (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEM). The formation of contrast is described for the most common imaging modes, the specific advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed and examples are given. In addition, the experimental requirements for the use of the techniques described are listed and explained. PMID:27536873

  11. Visualization of BrdU-labelled DNA in cyanobacterial cells by Hilbert differential contrast transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nitta, K; Nagayama, K; Danev, R; Kaneko, Y

    2009-05-01

    We have attempted to observe the native shape of DNA in rapidly frozen whole cyanobacterial cells through 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and visualization with a Hilbert differential contrast transmission electron microscopy (HDC TEM). The incorporation of BrdU into the DNA of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 was confirmed with fluorescently labelled anti-BrdU antibodies and through EDX analysis of ultra-thin sections. HDC TEM observed cells that had incorporated BrdU into their DNA exhibited electron dense areas at the location corresponding to fluorescently labelled BrdU. Since various strings and strands were observed in high contrast with the HDC TEM, we conclude that the method promises to allow us to identify and understand bulk structural changes of the in vivo DNA and the nucleoid through observation at high resolution. PMID:19397740

  12. Nanoparticle suspensions enclosed in methylcellulose: a new approach for quantifying nanoparticles in transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Christian; Asadi, Jalal; Pliotas, Christos; Ferguson, Sophie; Sherry, Lee; Marius, Phedra; Tello, Javier; Jackson, David; Naismith, James; Lucocq, John Milton

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles are of increasing importance in biomedicine but quantification is problematic because current methods depend on indirect measurements at low resolution. Here we describe a new high-resolution method for measuring and quantifying nanoparticles in suspension. It involves premixing nanoparticles in a hydrophilic support medium (methylcellulose) before introducing heavy metal stains for visualization in small air-dried droplets by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The use of methylcellulose avoids artifacts of conventional negative stain-TEM by (1) restricting interactions between the nanoparticles, (2) inhibiting binding to the specimen support films and (3) reducing compression after drying. Methylcellulose embedment provides effective electron imaging of liposomes, nanodiscs and viruses as well as comprehensive visualization of nanoparticle populations in droplets of known size. These qualities facilitate unbiased sampling, rapid size measurement and estimation of nanoparticle numbers by means of ratio counting using a colloidal gold calibrant. Specimen preparation and quantification take minutes and require a few microliters of sample using only basic laboratory equipment and a standard TEM. PMID:27141843

  13. Assessment of microcrystal quality by transmission electron microscopy for efficient serial femtosecond crystallography.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Christopher O; Kovaleva, Elena G; Fu, Xiaofeng; Stevenson, Hilary P; Brewster, Aaron S; DePonte, Daniel P; Baxter, Elizabeth L; Cohen, Aina E; Calero, Guillermo

    2016-07-15

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) employing high-intensity X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources has enabled structural studies on microcrystalline protein samples at non-cryogenic temperatures. However, the identification and optimization of conditions that produce well diffracting microcrystals remains an experimental challenge. Here, we report parallel SFX and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments using fragmented microcrystals of wild type (WT) homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (HPCD) and an active site variant (H200Q). Despite identical crystallization conditions and morphology, as well as similar crystal size and density, the indexing efficiency of the diffraction data collected using the H200Q variant sample was over 7-fold higher compared to the diffraction results obtained using the WT sample. TEM analysis revealed an abundance of protein aggregates, crystal conglomerates and a smaller population of highly ordered lattices in the WT sample as compared to the H200Q variant sample. While not reported herein, the 1.75 Å resolution structure of the H200Q variant was determined from ∼16 min of beam time, demonstrating the utility of TEM analysis in evaluating sample monodispersity and lattice quality, parameters critical to the efficiency of SFX experiments. PMID:26944553

  14. Nanoparticle suspensions enclosed in methylcellulose: a new approach for quantifying nanoparticles in transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Christian; Asadi, Jalal; Pliotas, Christos; Ferguson, Sophie; Sherry, Lee; Marius, Phedra; Tello, Javier; Jackson, David; Naismith, James; Lucocq, John Milton

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles are of increasing importance in biomedicine but quantification is problematic because current methods depend on indirect measurements at low resolution. Here we describe a new high-resolution method for measuring and quantifying nanoparticles in suspension. It involves premixing nanoparticles in a hydrophilic support medium (methylcellulose) before introducing heavy metal stains for visualization in small air-dried droplets by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The use of methylcellulose avoids artifacts of conventional negative stain-TEM by (1) restricting interactions between the nanoparticles, (2) inhibiting binding to the specimen support films and (3) reducing compression after drying. Methylcellulose embedment provides effective electron imaging of liposomes, nanodiscs and viruses as well as comprehensive visualization of nanoparticle populations in droplets of known size. These qualities facilitate unbiased sampling, rapid size measurement and estimation of nanoparticle numbers by means of ratio counting using a colloidal gold calibrant. Specimen preparation and quantification take minutes and require a few microliters of sample using only basic laboratory equipment and a standard TEM. PMID:27141843

  15. Attosecond electron pulses for 4D diffraction and microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Peter; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2007-01-01

    In this contribution, we consider the advancement of ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy to cover the attosecond time domain. The concept is centered on the compression of femtosecond electron packets to trains of 15-attosecond pulses by the use of the ponderomotive force in synthesized gratings of optical fields. Such attosecond electron pulses are significantly shorter than those achievable with extreme UV light sources near 25 nm (≈50 eV) and have the potential for applications in the visualization of ultrafast electron dynamics, especially of atomic structures, clusters of atoms, and some materials. PMID:18000040

  16. Characterizing inorganic crystals grown on organic self-assembled bilayers with scanning probe and electron microscopies.

    PubMed

    Prado, Mariana C; Archanjo, Braulio S; Vasconcelos, Thiago L; Ladeira, Luiz O; Neves, Bernardo R A

    2013-12-01

    Combined microscopy techniques are used to establish the usability of phosphonic acid layers as promoters of hydroxyapatite (HAp) growth. Using spread coating, octadecylphosphonic acid (OPA) self-assembled bilayers are delivered to the thin natural oxide layer of a titanium film surface with no prior treatment. These bilayers aggregate two major advantages of phosphonic moieties to titanium surfaces: nucleation of hydroxyapatite crystals from ionic solution and affinity for both titanium oxide surface and HAp crystals. The functionalized substrates and bare titanium (control) samples are immersed in an aqueous solution containing calcium and phosphorus ions. Over a 4-week immersion time, OPA-functionalized substrates present numerous large agglomerates of inorganic crystals, in contrast to control samples, with no significant amount of deposits. Initial sample characterization was performed with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Compositional and structural characterization of these agglomerates (using TEM, EDS, and electron diffraction), revealed that they are indeed HAp, the main component of the inorganic bone matrix. PMID:24123490

  17. Comparison of atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy analysis of oxide dispersion strengthened steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    London, A. J.; Lozano-Perez, S.; Santra, S.; Amirthapandian, S.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Sundar, C. S.; Grovenor, C. R. M.

    2014-06-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened steels owe part of their high temperature stability to the nano-scale oxides they contain. These yttrium-titanium oxides are notoriously difficult to characterise since they are embedded in a magnetic-ferritic matrix and often <10 nm across. This study uses correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography on the same material to explore the kind of information that can be gained on the character of the oxide particles. The influence of chromium in these alloys is of interest, therefore two model ODS steels Fe-(14Cr)-0.2Ti-0.3Y2O3 are compared. TEM is shown to accurately measure the size of the oxide particles and atom probe tomography is necessary to observe the smallest sub-1.5 nm particles. Larger Y2Ti2O7 and Y2TiO5 structured particles were identified by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, but the smallest oxides remain difficult to index. Chemical data from energy-filtered TEM agreed qualitatively with the atom probe findings. It was found that the majority of the oxide particles exhibit an unoxidised chromium shell which may be responsible for reducing the ultimate size of the oxide particles.

  18. The examination of calcium ion implanted alumina with energy filtered transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, E.M.; Hampikian, J.M.; Evans, N.D.

    1997-04-01

    Ion implantation can be used to alter in the optical response of insulators through the formation of embedded nano-sized particles. Single crystal alumina has been implanted at ambient temperature with 50 keV Ca{sup +} to a fluence of 5 {times} 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. Ion channeling, Knoop microhardness measurements, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicate that the alumina surface layer was amorphized by the implant. TEM also revealed nano-sized crystals {approx}7--8 nm in diameter. These nanocrystals are randomly oriented, and exhibit a face-centered cubic structure (FCC) with a lattice parameter of 0.409 nm {+-} 0.002 nm. The similarity between this crystallography and that of pure aluminum suggests that they are metallic aluminum nanocrystals with a slightly dilated lattice parameter, possibly due to the incorporation of a small amount of calcium. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) provides an avenue by which to confirm the metallic nature of the aluminum involved in the nanocrystals. EFTEM has confirmed that the aluminum present in the particles is metallic in nature, that the particles are oxygen deficient in comparison with the matrix material and that the particles are deficient in calcium, and therefore not likely to be calcia. The particles thus appear to be FCC Al (possibly alloyed with a few percent Ca) with a lattice parameter of 0.409nm. A similar result was obtained for yttrium ion implantation into alumina.

  19. The use of field emission scanning electron microscopy to assess recombinant adenovirus stability.

    PubMed

    Obenauer-Kutner, Linda J; Ihnat, Peter M; Yang, Tong-Yuan; Dovey-Hartman, Barbara J; Balu, Arthi; Cullen, Constance; Bordens, Ronald W; Grace, Michael J

    2002-09-20

    A field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) method was developed to assess the stability of a recombinant adenovirus (rAd). This method was designed to simultaneously sort, count, and size the total number of rAd viral species observed within an image field. To test the method, a preparation of p53 transgene-expressing recombinant adenovirus (rAd/p53) was incubated at 37 degrees C and the viral particles were evaluated by number, structure, and degree of aggregation as a function of time. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was also used to obtain ultrastructural detail. In addition, the infectious activity of the incubated rAd/p53 samples was determined using flow cytometry. FESEM image-analysis revealed that incubation at 37 degrees C resulted in a time-dependent decrease in the total number of detectable single rAd/p53 virus particles and an increase in apparent aggregates composed of more than three adenovirus particles. There was also an observed decrease in both the diameter and perimeter of the single rAd/p53 viral particles. TEM further revealed the accumulation of damaged single particles with time at 37 degrees C. The results of this study demonstrate that FESEM, coupled with sophisticated image analysis, may be an important tool in quantifying the distribution of aggregated species and assessing the overall stability of rAd samples. PMID:12396622

  20. Nano-fEM: Protein Localization Using Photo-activated Localization Microscopy and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shigeki; Richards, Jackson; Hollopeter, Gunther; Hobson, Robert J.; Davis, Wayne M.; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2012-01-01

    Mapping the distribution of proteins is essential for understanding the function of proteins in a cell. Fluorescence microscopy is extensively used for protein localization, but subcellular context is often absent in fluorescence images. Immuno-electron microscopy, on the other hand, can localize proteins, but the technique is limited by a lack of compatible antibodies, poor preservation of morphology and because most antigens are not exposed to the specimen surface. Correlative approaches can acquire the fluorescence image from a whole cell first, either from immuno-fluorescence or genetically tagged proteins. The sample is then fixed and embedded for electron microscopy, and the images are correlated 1-3. However, the low-resolution fluorescence image and the lack of fiducial markers preclude the precise localization of proteins. Alternatively, fluorescence imaging can be done after preserving the specimen in plastic. In this approach, the block is sectioned, and fluorescence images and electron micrographs of the same section are correlated 4-7. However, the diffraction limit of light in the correlated image obscures the locations of individual molecules, and the fluorescence often extends beyond the boundary of the cell. Nano-resolution fluorescence electron microscopy (nano-fEM) is designed to localize proteins at nano-scale by imaging the same sections using photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) and electron microscopy. PALM overcomes the diffraction limit by imaging individual fluorescent proteins and subsequently mapping the centroid of each fluorescent spot 8-10. We outline the nano-fEM technique in five steps. First, the sample is fixed and embedded using conditions that preserve the fluorescence of tagged proteins. Second, the resin blocks are sectioned into ultrathin segments (70-80 nm) that are mounted on a cover glass. Third, fluorescence is imaged in these sections using the Zeiss PALM microscope. Fourth, electron dense structures are imaged

  1. Simultaneous cathodoluminescence and electron microscopy cytometry of cellular vesicles labeled with fluorescent nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Sounderya; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Tizei, Luiz H. G.; Fang, Chia-Yi; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Le Cam, Eric; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Treussart, François; Kociak, Mathieu

    2016-06-01

    Light and Transmission Electron Microscopies (LM and TEM) hold potential in bioimaging owing to the advantages of fast imaging of multiple cells with LM and ultrastructure resolution offered by TEM. Integrated or correlated LM and TEM are the current approaches to combine the advantages of both techniques. Here we propose an alternative in which the electron beam of a scanning TEM (STEM) is used to excite concomitantly the luminescence of nanoparticle labels (a process known as cathodoluminescence, CL), and image the cell ultrastructure. This CL-STEM imaging allows obtaining luminescence spectra and imaging ultrastructure simultaneously. We present a proof of principle experiment, showing the potential of this technique in image cytometry of cell vesicular components. To label the vesicles we used fluorescent diamond nanocrystals (nanodiamonds, NDs) of size ~150 nm coated with different cationic polymers, known to trigger different internalization pathways. Each polymer was associated with a type of ND with a different emission spectrum. With CL-STEM, for each individual vesicle, we were able to measure (i) their size with nanometric resolution, (ii) their content in different ND labels, and realize intracellular component cytometry. In contrast to the recently reported organelle flow cytometry technique that requires cell sonication, CL-STEM-based image cytometry preserves the cell integrity and provides a much higher resolution in size. Although this novel approach is still limited by a low throughput, the automatization of data acquisition and image analysis, combined with improved intracellular targeting, should facilitate applications in cell biology at the subcellular level.Light and Transmission Electron Microscopies (LM and TEM) hold potential in bioimaging owing to the advantages of fast imaging of multiple cells with LM and ultrastructure resolution offered by TEM. Integrated or correlated LM and TEM are the current approaches to combine the advantages of

  2. Breaking resolution limits in ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Peter; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2006-01-01

    Ultrafast electron microscopy and diffraction are powerful techniques for the study of the time-resolved structures of molecules, materials, and biological systems. Central to these approaches is the use of ultrafast coherent electron packets. The electron pulses typically have an energy of 30 keV for diffraction and 100–200 keV for microscopy, corresponding to speeds of 33–70% of the speed of light. Although the spatial resolution can reach the atomic scale, the temporal resolution is limited by the pulse width and by the difference in group velocities of electrons and the light used to initiate the dynamical change. In this contribution, we introduce the concept of tilted optical pulses into diffraction and imaging techniques and demonstrate the methodology experimentally. These advances allow us to reach limits of time resolution down to regimes of a few femtoseconds and, possibly, attoseconds. With tilted pulses, every part of the sample is excited at precisely the same time as when the electrons arrive at the specimen. Here, this approach is demonstrated for the most unfavorable case of ultrafast crystallography. We also present a method for measuring the duration of electron packets by autocorrelating electron pulses in free space and without streaking, and we discuss the potential of tilting the electron pulses themselves for applications in domains involving nuclear and electron motions. PMID:17056711

  3. Quantifying Nanoscale Order in Amorphous Materials via Fluctuation Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogle, Stephanie Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) has been used to study the nanoscale order in various amorphous materials. The method is explicitly sensitive to 3- and 4-body atomic correlation functions in amorphous materials; this is sufficient to establish the existence of structural order on the nanoscale, even when the radial distribution function…

  4. The Electron Microscopy eXchange (EMX) initiative.

    PubMed

    Marabini, Roberto; Ludtke, Steven J; Murray, Stephen C; Chiu, Wah; de la Rosa-Trevín, Jose M; Patwardhan, Ardan; Heymann, J Bernard; Carazo, Jose M

    2016-05-01

    Three-dimensional electron microscopy (3DEM) of ice-embedded samples allows the structural analysis of large biological macromolecules close to their native state. Different techniques have been developed during the last forty years to process cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data. Not surprisingly, success in analysis and interpretation is highly correlated with the continuous development of image processing packages. The field has matured to the point where further progress in data and methods sharing depends on an agreement between the packages on how to describe common image processing tasks. Such standardization will facilitate the use of software as well as seamless collaboration, allowing the sharing of rich information between different platforms. Our aim here is to describe the Electron Microscopy eXchange (EMX) initiative, launched at the 2012 Instruct Image Processing Center Developer Workshop, with the intention of developing a first set of standard conventions for the interchange of information for single-particle analysis (EMX version 1.0). These conventions cover the specification of the metadata for micrograph and particle images, including contrast transfer function (CTF) parameters and particle orientations. EMX v1.0 has already been implemented in the Bsoft, EMAN, Xmipp and Scipion image processing packages. It has been and will be used in the CTF and EMDataBank Validation Challenges respectively. It is also being used in EMPIAR, the Electron Microscopy Pilot Image Archive, which stores raw image data related to the 3DEM reconstructions in EMDB. PMID:26873784

  5. 'GIARDIA MURIS': SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF IN VITRO EXCYSTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A recently developed in vitro excystation procedure results in almost total excystation of Giardia muris, an intestinal parasite of mice. The present experiment examines the G. muris cyst morphology by scanning electron microscopy and evaluates the efficacy of the excystation pro...

  6. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of corrosion degradation on tinplate substrates.

    PubMed

    Zumelzu, E; Cabezas, C; Vera, A

    2003-01-01

    The degradation of electrolytic tinplate used in food containers was analysed and evaluated, using scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical measurements of microcorrosion and ion dissolution by atomic absorption to prevent food contamination caused by metal traces and to increase the durability of such tinplates. PMID:12627896

  7. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Saibil, Helen R.; Grünewald, Kay; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a brief update on the use of cryo-electron microscopy for integrated structural biology, along with an overview of the plans for the UK national facility for electron microscopy being built at the Diamond synchrotron. Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback.

  8. Electron microscopy of Mycoplasma pneumoniae microcolonies grown on solid surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, C K; Pfister, R M; Somerson, N L

    1977-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae sprain CL-8 was studied by using various surfaces for adherence and growth. Cells grown on Epon 812, Formvar, carbon, and glass were of similar morphology. Thin Epon pieces were good material for culturing the organisms and examining thin-sectioned microcolonies by transmission electron microscopy. Images PMID:931378

  9. Improved handling of embedding plastics for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shannon, W A

    1982-08-01

    An improved, safer, rapid method for preparing embedding plastics for electron microscopy is described. The method consists of contained storage and dispensing of individual plastic components on an automatic tare balance. The proportions are based on weight measurements and may be calculated from volume or proportion recipes. The usual problems in and resulting from embedding plastic handling have been eliminated. PMID:6750130

  10. Detection of parvoviruses in wolf feces by electron microscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muneer, M.A.; Farah, I.O.; Pomeroy, K.A.; Goyal, S.M.; Mech, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    One hundred fifteen wolf (Canis lupus) feces were collected between 1980 and 1984 from northeastern Minnesota and were examined for canine parvovirus by negative contrast electron microscopy. Of these, seven (6%) samples revealed the presence of parvovirus. Some of these viruses were able to grow in cell cultures forming intranuclear inclusion bodies and giant cells.

  11. DICHOTOMOUS SAMPLERS MODIFIED FOR USE WITH ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large sulfate artifacts up to 2 um in diameter were observed by scanning electron microscopy for the fine particle fraction collected in dichotomous samplers. he artifacts were attributed to small liquid particles that piled up on the filter, coalesced, and later dried as larger ...

  12. Biological Applications and Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Brian G. Trewyn

    2006-05-01

    The research presented and discussed within involves the development of novel biological applications of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) and an investigation of mesoporous material by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Mesoporous silica nanoparticles organically functionalized shown to undergo endocytosis in cancer cells and drug release from the pores was controlled intracellularly and intercellularly. Transmission electron microscopy investigations demonstrated the variety of morphologies produced in this field of mesoporous silica nanomaterial synthesis. A series of room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) containing mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) materials with various particle morphologies, including spheres, ellipsoids, rods, and tubes, were synthesized. By changing the RTIL template, the pore morphology was tuned from the MCM-41 type of hexagonal mesopores to rotational moire type of helical channels, and to wormhole-like porous structures. These materials were used as controlled release delivery nanodevices to deliver antibacterial ionic liquids against Escherichia coli K12. The involvement of a specific organosiloxane function group, covalently attached to the exterior of fluorescein doped mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FITC-MSN), on the degree and kinetics of endocytosis in cancer and plant cells was investigated. The kinetics of endocystosis of TEG coated FITC-MSN is significantly quicker than FITC-MSN as determined by flow cytometry experiments. The fluorescence confocal microscopy investigation showed the endocytosis of TEG coated-FITC MSN triethylene glycol grafted fluorescein doped MSN (TEG coated-FITC MSN) into both KeLa cells and Tobacco root protoplasts. Once the synthesis of a controlled-release delivery system based on MCM-41-type mesoporous silica nanorods capped by disulfide bonds with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles was completed. The material was characterized by general methods and the dosage and kinetics of the

  13. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Bombyx Mori Silk Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y.; Martin, D. C.

    1997-03-01

    The microstructure of B. Mori silk fibers before and after degumming was examined by TEM, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), WAXS and low voltage SEM. SEM micrographs of the neat cocoon revealed a network of pairs of twisting filaments. After degumming, there were only individual filaments showing a surface texture consistent with an oriented fibrillar structure in the fiber interior. WAXS patterns confirmed the oriented beta-sheet crystal structure common to silkworm and spider silks. Low dose SAED results were fully consistent with the WAXS data, and revealed that the crystallographic texture did not vary significantly across the fiber diameter. TEM observations of microtomed fiber cross sections indicated a somewhat irregular shape, and also revealed a 0.5-2 micron sericin coating which was removed by the degumming process. TEM observations of the degummed silk fiber showed banded features with a characteristic spacing of nominally 600 nm along the fiber axis. These bands were oriented in a roughly parabolic or V-shape pointing along one axis within a given fiber. We hypothesize that this orientation is induced by the extrusion during the spinning process. Equatorial DF images revealed that axial and lateral sizes of the β-sheet crystallites in silk fibroin ranged from 20 to 170 nm and from 1 to 24 nm, respectively. Crazes developed in the degummed silk fiber parallel to the fiber direction. The formation of these crazes suggests that there are significant lateral interactions between fibrils in silk fibers.

  14. Tandem high-pressure freezing and quick freeze substitution of plant tissues for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bobik, Krzysztof; Dunlap, John R; Burch-Smith, Tessa M

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1940s transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been providing biologists with ultra-high resolution images of biological materials. Yet, because of laborious and time-consuming protocols that also demand experience in preparation of artifact-free samples, TEM is not considered a user-friendly technique. Traditional sample preparation for TEM used chemical fixatives to preserve cellular structures. High-pressure freezing is the cryofixation of biological samples under high pressures to produce very fast cooling rates, thereby restricting ice formation, which is detrimental to the integrity of cellular ultrastructure. High-pressure freezing and freeze substitution are currently the methods of choice for producing the highest quality morphology in resin sections for TEM. These methods minimize the artifacts normally associated with conventional processing for TEM of thin sections. After cryofixation the frozen water in the sample is replaced with liquid organic solvent at low temperatures, a process called freeze substitution. Freeze substitution is typically carried out over several days in dedicated, costly equipment. A recent innovation allows the process to be completed in three hours, instead of the usual two days. This is typically followed by several more days of sample preparation that includes infiltration and embedding in epoxy resins before sectioning. Here we present a protocol combining high-pressure freezing and quick freeze substitution that enables plant sample fixation to be accomplished within hours. The protocol can readily be adapted for working with other tissues or organisms. Plant tissues are of special concern because of the presence of aerated spaces and water-filled vacuoles that impede ice-free freezing of water. In addition, the process of chemical fixation is especially long in plants due to cell walls impeding the penetration of the chemicals to deep within the tissues. Plant tissues are therefore particularly challenging, but

  15. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Magnetite Plaquettes in Orgueil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Han, J.; Zolensky, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite sometimes takes the form of a plaquette - barrel-shaped stack of magnetite disks - in carbonaceous chondrites (CC) that show evidence of aqueous alteration. The asymmetric nature of the plaquettes caused Pizzarello and Groy to propose magnetite plaquettes as a naturally asymmetric mineral that can indroduce symmetry-breaking in organic molecules. Our previous synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (SXRCT) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of the magnetite plaquettes in fifteen CCs indicate that magnetite plaquettes are composed of nearly parallel discs, and the crystallographic orientations of the discs change around a rotational axis normal to the discs surfaces. In order to further investigate the nanostructures of magnetite plaquettes, we made two focused ion beam (FIB) sections of nine magnetite plaquettes from a thin section of CI Orgueil for transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. The X-ray spectrum imaging shows that the magnetite discs are purely iron oxide Fe3O4 (42.9 at% Fe and 57.1 at% O), which suggest that the plaquettes are of aqueous origin as it is difficult to form pure magnetite as a nebular condensate. The selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns acquired across the plaquettes show that the magnetite discs are single crystals. SEM and EBSD analyses suggest that the planar surfaces of the magnetite discs belong to the {100} planes of the cubic inverse spinel structure, which are supported by our TEM observations. Kerridge et al. suggested that the epitaxial relationship between magnetite plaquette and carbonate determines the magnetite face. However, according to our TEM observation, the association of magnetite with porous networks of phyllosilicate indicates that the epitaxial relationship with carbonate is not essential to the formation of magnetite plaquettes. It was difficult to determine the preferred rotational orientation of the plaquettes due to the symmetry of the cubic structure

  16. Nuclear uptake of ultrasmall gold-doxorubicin conjugates imaged by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Shastry, Sathvik; Bradforth, Stephen E.; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2014-11-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has been used to image free and encapsulated doxorubicin (Dox) uptake into cells, since interaction of Dox with DNA leads to a characteristic lifetime change. However, none of the reported Dox conjugates were able to enter cell nuclei. In this work, we use FLIM to show nuclear uptake of 2.7 nm mean diameter Au nanoparticles conjugated to Dox. The pattern of labelling differed substantially from what was seen with free Dox, with slower nuclear entry and stronger cytoplasmic labelling at all time points. As the cells died, the pattern of labelling changed further as intracellular structures disintegrated, consistent with association of Au-Dox to membranes. The patterns of Au distribution and intracellular structure changes were confirmed using electron microscopy, and indicate different mechanisms of cytotoxicity with stable Au-Dox conjugates compared to Dox alone. Such conjugates are promising tools for overcoming resistance in Dox-resistant cancers.Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has been used to image free and encapsulated doxorubicin (Dox) uptake into cells, since interaction of Dox with DNA leads to a characteristic lifetime change. However, none of the reported Dox conjugates were able to enter cell nuclei. In this work, we use FLIM to show nuclear uptake of 2.7 nm mean diameter Au nanoparticles conjugated to Dox. The pattern of labelling differed substantially from what was seen with free Dox, with slower nuclear entry and stronger cytoplasmic labelling at all time points. As the cells died, the pattern of labelling changed further as intracellular structures disintegrated, consistent with association of Au-Dox to membranes. The patterns of Au distribution and intracellular structure changes were confirmed using electron microscopy, and indicate different mechanisms of cytotoxicity with stable Au-Dox conjugates compared to Dox alone. Such conjugates are promising tools for overcoming resistance in

  17. Time Resolved Phase Transitions via Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B W; Armstrong, M R; Blobaum, K J; Browning, N D; Burnham, A K; Campbell, G H; Gee, R; Kim, J S; King, W E; Maiti, A; Piggott, W T; Torralva, B R

    2007-02-22

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) project is developing an in situ electron microscope with nanometer- and nanosecond-scale resolution for the study of rapid laser-driven processes in materials. We report on the results obtained in a year-long LDRD-supported effort to develop DTEM techniques and results for phase transitions in molecular crystals, reactive multilayer foils, and melting and resolidification of bismuth. We report the first in situ TEM observation of the HMX {beta}-{delta} phase transformation in sub-{micro}m crystals, computational results suggesting the importance of voids and free surfaces in the HMX transformation kinetics, and the first electron diffraction patterns of intermediate states in fast multilayer foil reactions. This project developed techniques which are applicable to many materials systems and will continue to be employed within the larger DTEM effort.

  18. Development of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray emission spectrometers for transmission electron microscopes--an introduction of valence electron spectroscopy for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Masami; Koike, Masato; Fukushima, Kurio; Kimura, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Two types of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray spectrometers, a high-dispersion type and a conventional one, for transmission electron microscopes were constructed. Those spectrometers were used to study the electronic states of valence electrons (bonding electrons). Both spectrometers extended the acceptable energy regions to higher than 2000 eV. The best energy resolution of 0.08 eV was obtained for an Al L-emission spectrum by using the high-dispersion type spectrometer. By using the spectrometer, C K-emission of carbon allotropes, Cu L-emission of Cu(1-x)Zn(x) alloys and Pt M-emission spectra were presented. The FWHM value of 12 eV was obtained for the Pt Malpha-emission peak. The performance of the conventional one was also presented for ZnS and a section specimen of a multilayer device. W-M and Si-K emissions were clearly resolved. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has an advantage for obtaining spectra from a single crystalline specimen with a defined crystal setting. As an example of anisotropic soft X-ray emission, C K-emission spectra of single crystalline graphite with different crystal settings were presented. From the spectra, density of states of pi- and sigma-bondings were separately derived. These results demonstrated a method to analyse the electronic states of valence electrons of materials in the nanometre scale based on TEM. PMID:20371492

  19. Detective quantum efficiency of electron area detectors in electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McMullan, G.; Chen, S.; Henderson, R.; Faruqi, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Recent progress in detector design has created the need for a careful side-by-side comparison of the modulation transfer function (MTF) and resolution-dependent detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of existing electron detectors with those of detectors based on new technology. We present MTF and DQE measurements for four types of detector: Kodak SO-163 film, TVIPS 224 charge coupled device (CCD) detector, the Medipix2 hybrid pixel detector, and an experimental direct electron monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) detector. Film and CCD performance was measured at 120 and 300 keV, while results are presented for the Medipix2 at 120 keV and for the MAPS detector at 300 keV. In the case of film, the effects of electron backscattering from both the holder and the plastic support have been investigated. We also show that part of the response of the emulsion in film comes from light generated in the plastic support. Computer simulations of film and the MAPS detector have been carried out and show good agreement with experiment. The agreement enables us to conclude that the DQE of a backthinned direct electron MAPS detector is likely to be equal to, or better than, that of film at 300 keV. PMID:19497671

  20. Crystallisation of Ge nanoclusters in SiO 2 caused by electron irradiation in TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenkov, M.; Matz, W.; Nepijko, S. A.; Lehmann, M.

    2001-07-01

    Ge nanoparticles fabricated by ion implantation technique in SiO 2 thin film crystallise after irradiation with a high-energy electron beam. The crystallisation process depends on the irradiation fluence and flux. Irradiation with a fluence above 6×10 3 C/ cm2 results in cluster growth and above 4×10 4 C/ cm2 in crystallisation. An irradiation with flux below 150 A/cm 2 leads to the crystallisation of Ge nanoparticles in the form of single crystals. For irradiation flux above this value the formation of twinned and multiply twinned particles (MTP) was observed.

  1. TEM Video Compressive Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Kovarik, Libor; Abellan, Patricia; Yuan, Xin; Carin, Lawrence; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-08-02

    One of the main limitations of imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution during in-situ TEM experiments is the frame rate of the camera being used to image the dynamic process. While the recent development of direct detectors has provided the hardware to achieve frame rates approaching 0.1ms, the cameras are expensive and must replace existing detectors. In this paper, we examine the use of coded aperture compressive sensing methods [1, 2, 3, 4] to increase the framerate of any camera with simple, low-cost hardware modifications. The coded aperture approach allows multiple sub-frames to be coded and integrated into a single camera frame during the acquisition process, and then extracted upon readout using statistical compressive sensing inversion. Our simulations show that it should be possible to increase the speed of any camera by at least an order of magnitude. Compressive Sensing (CS) combines sensing and compression in one operation, and thus provides an approach that could further improve the temporal resolution while correspondingly reducing the electron dose rate. Because the signal is measured in a compressive manner, fewer total measurements are required. When applied to TEM video capture, compressive imaging couled improve acquisition speed and reduce the electron dose rate. CS is a recent concept, and has come to the forefront due the seminal work of Candès [5]. Since the publication of Candès, there has been enormous growth in the application of CS and development of CS variants. For electron microscopy applications, the concept of CS has also been recently applied to electron tomography [6], and reduction of electron dose in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging [7]. To demonstrate the applicability of coded aperture CS video reconstruction for atomic level imaging, we simulate compressive sensing on observations of Pd nanoparticles and Ag nanoparticles during exposure to high temperatures and other environmental

  2. Challenges of microtome‐based serial block‐face scanning electron microscopy in neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    WANNER, A. A.; KIRSCHMANN, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Serial block‐face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM) is becoming increasingly popular for a wide range of applications in many disciplines from biology to material sciences. This review focuses on applications for circuit reconstruction in neuroscience, which is one of the major driving forces advancing SBEM. Neuronal circuit reconstruction poses exceptional challenges to volume EM in terms of resolution, field of view, acquisition time and sample preparation. Mapping the connections between neurons in the brain is crucial for understanding information flow and information processing in the brain. However, information on the connectivity between hundreds or even thousands of neurons densely packed in neuronal microcircuits is still largely missing. Volume EM techniques such as serial section TEM, automated tape‐collecting ultramicrotome, focused ion‐beam scanning electron microscopy and SBEM (microtome serial block‐face scanning electron microscopy) are the techniques that provide sufficient resolution to resolve ultrastructural details such as synapses and provides sufficient field of view for dense reconstruction of neuronal circuits. While volume EM techniques are advancing, they are generating large data sets on the terabyte scale that require new image processing workflows and analysis tools. In this review, we present the recent advances in SBEM for circuit reconstruction in neuroscience and an overview of existing image processing and analysis pipelines. PMID:25907464

  3. Generation and application of bessel beams in electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Harris, Jérémie; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Balboni, Roberto; Mafakheri, Erfan; Dennis, Mark R; Frabboni, Stefano; Boyd, Robert W; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2016-07-01

    We report a systematic treatment of the holographic generation of electron Bessel beams, with a view to applications in electron microscopy. We describe in detail the theory underlying hologram patterning, as well as the actual electron-optical configuration used experimentally. We show that by optimizing our nanofabrication recipe, electron Bessel beams can be generated with relative efficiencies reaching 37±3%. We also demonstrate by tuning various hologram parameters that electron Bessel beams can be produced with many visible rings, making them ideal for interferometric applications, or in more highly localized forms with fewer rings, more suitable for imaging. We describe the settings required to tune beam localization in this way, and explore beam and hologram configurations that allow the convergences and topological charges of electron Bessel beams to be controlled. We also characterize the phase structure of the Bessel beams generated with our technique, using a simulation procedure that accounts for imperfections in the hologram manufacturing process. PMID:27203186

  4. First use of a high-sensitivity active pixel sensor array as a detector for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuong, Nguyen-Huu; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; LeBlanc, Philippe; Duttweiler, Fred; Bouwer, James; Peltier, Steve; Ellisman, Mark; Denes, Peter; Bieser, Fred; Matis, Howard S.; Wieman, Howard; Kleinfelder, Stuart

    2004-06-01

    There is an urgent need to replace film and CCD cameras as recording instruments for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Film is too cumbersome to process and CCD cameras have low resolution, marginal to poor signal-to-noise ratio for single electron detection and high spatial distortion. To find a replacement device, we have tested a high sensitivity active pixel sensor (APS) array currently being developed for nuclear physics. The tests were done at 120 keV in a JEOL 1200 electron microscope. At this energy, each electron produced on average a signal-tonoise ratio about 20/1. The spatial resolution was also excellent with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) about 20 microns. Since it is very radiation tolerant and has almost no spatial distortion, the above tests showed that a high sensitivity CMOS APS array holds great promise as a direct detection device for electron microscopy.

  5. Biological applications and transmission electron microscopy investigation of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trewyn, Brian G.

    The research presented and discussed within involves the development of novel biological applications of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) and an investigation of mesoporous material by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A series of room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) containing mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) materials with various particle morphologies, including spheres, ellipsoids, rods, and tubes, were synthesized. By changing the RTIL template, the pore morphology was tuned from the MCM-41 type of hexagonal mesopores to rotational moire type of helical channels, and to wormhole-like porous structures. These materials were used as controlled release delivery nanodevices to deliver antibacterial ionic liquids against Escherichia coli K12. The involvement of a specific organosiloxane function group, covalently attached to the exterior of fluorescein doped mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FITC-MSN), on the degree and kinetics of endocytosis in cancer and plant cells was investigated. The kinetics of endocystosis of TEG coated FITC-MSN is significantly quicker than FITC-MSN as determined by flow cytometry experiments. The fluorescence confocal microscopy investigation showed the endocytosis of TEG coated-FITC MSN triethylene glycol grafted fluorescein doped MSN (TEG coated-FITC MSN) into both HeLa cells and Tobacco root protoplasts. Once the synthesis of a controlled-release delivery system based on MCM-41-type mesoporous silica nanorods capped by disulfide bonds with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles was completed. The material was characterized by general methods and the dosage and kinetics of the antioxidant dependent release was measured. Finally, the biological interaction of the material was determined along with TEM measurements. An electron microscopy investigation proved that the pore openings of the MSN were indeed blocked by the Fe 3O4 nanoparticles. The biological interaction investigation demonstrated Fe3O4-capped MSN

  6. Transmission electron microscopy of structural disorder in two-dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pinshane Yeh

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of two-dimensional materials (2D) offers an unprecedented opportunity to study disordered systems down to the single-atom level. The reduced dimensionality of these systems provides a two-fold opportunity: first, 2D materials serve as model systems for exploring direct correlations between the structure and properties of individual atomic features. Second, these studies enable the development of new 2D materials and devices with precisely tailored optical, electronic, and mechanical properties. The experiments presented in this thesis show the first atomic-resolution images of extended one- and two-dimensional disorder in 2D materials and the extraordinary range of consequences they have on the local materials properties. The thesis begins with studies that probe the structure and properties of the 1D defects that make up grain boundaries in atomically-thin layers of graphene and molybdenum disulfide. These experiments span length scales across five orders of magnitude to image every atom at the grain boundaries through atomic-resolution scanning TEM and rapidly map the location, orientation, and shape of several hundred grains with dark-field TEM. Correlating these images with local probes of electrical, mechanical, and optical properties reveals that grain boundaries have effects that range from the unmeasurable to the extreme. A second set of projects utilizes aberration-corrected electron microscopy of a newly discovered 2D polymorph of SiO2 to conduct some of the first atomic resolution studies of glass. Images of the atomic structure of 2D SiO2 strikingly resemble Zachariasen's foundational cartoon models of glasses and reveal distributions of medium-range ordering that will be critical for refining theoretical models for how and why glasses form. Additional experiments use the electron beam to excite and image atomic rearrangements in this 2D SiO2, producing dramatic videos that visualize the structural building blocks

  7. Ultrastructure of Plant Leaf Cuticles in relation to Sample Preparation as Observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Paula; Fernández, Victoria; García, María Luisa; Fernández, Agustín; Gil, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The leaf cuticular ultrastructure of some plant species has been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in only few studies. Attending to the different cuticle layers and inner structure, plant cuticles have been grouped into six general morphological types. With the aim of critically examining the effect of cuticle isolation and preparation for TEM analysis on cuticular ultrastructure, adaxial leaf cuticles of blue-gum eucalypt, grey poplar, and European pear were assessed, following a membrane science approach. The embedding and staining protocols affected the ultrastructure of the cuticles analysed. The solubility parameter, surface tension, and contact angles with water of pure Spurr's and LR-White resins were within a similar range. Differences were however estimated for resin : solvent mixtures, since Spurr's resin is combined with acetone and LR-White resin is mixed with ethanol. Given the composite hydrophilic and lipophilic nature of plant cuticles, the particular TEM tissue embedding and staining procedures employed may affect sample ultrastructure and the interpretation of the results in physicochemical and biological terms. It is concluded that tissue preparation procedures may be optimised to facilitate the observation of the micro- and nanostructure of cuticular layers and components with different degrees of polarity and hydrophobicity. PMID:24895682

  8. Kinetic Studies of Polyhydroxybutyrate Granule Formation in Wautersia eutropha H16 by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jiamin; Sinskey, Anthony J.; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2005-01-01

    Wautersia eutropha, formerly known as Ralstonia eutropha, a gram-negative bacterium, accumulates polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) as insoluble granules inside the cell when nutrients other than carbon are limited. In this paper, we report findings from kinetic studies of granule formation and degradation in W. eutropha H16 obtained using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In nitrogen-limited growth medium, the phenotype of the cells at the early stages of granule formation was revealed for the first time. At the center of the cells, dark-stained “mediation elements” with small granules attached were observed. These mediation elements are proposed to serve as nucleation sites for granule initiation. TEM images also revealed that when W. eutropha cells were introduced into nitrogen-limited medium from nutrient-rich medium, the cell size increased two- to threefold, and the cells underwent additional volume changes during growth. Unbiased stereology was used to analyze the two-dimensional TEM images, from which the average volume of a W. eutropha H16 cell and the total surface area of granules per cell in nutrient-rich and PHB production media were obtained. These parameters were essential in the calculation of the concentration of proteins involved in PHB formation and utilization and their changes with time. The extent of protein coverage of the granule surface area is presented in the accompanying paper (J. Tian, A. He, A. Lawrence, P. Liu, N. Watson, A. J. Sinskey, and J. Stubbe, J. Bacteriol. 187:3825-3832, 2005). PMID:15901706

  9. Ultrastructural examination of dentin using focused ion-beam cross-sectioning and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nalla, R K; Porter, A E; Daraio, C; Minor, A M; Radmilovic, V; Stach, E A; Tomsia, A P; Ritchie, R O

    2005-01-01

    Focused ion-beam (FIB) milling is a commonly used technique for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) sample preparation of inorganic materials. In this study, we seek to evaluate the FIB as a TEM preparation tool for human dentin. Two particular problems involving dentin, a structural analog of bone that makes up the bulk of the human tooth, are examined. Firstly, the process of aging is studied through an investigation of the mineralization in 'transparent' dentin, which is formed naturally due to the filling up of dentinal tubules with large mineral crystals. Next, the process of fracture is examined to evaluate incipient events that occur at the collagen fiber level. For both these cases, FIB-milling was able to generate high-quality specimens that could be used for subsequent TEM examination. The changes in the mineralization suggested a simple mechanism of mineral 'dissolution and reprecipitation', while examination of the collagen revealed incipient damage in the form of voids within the collagen fibers. These studies help shed light on the process of aging and fracture of mineralized tissues and are useful steps in developing a framework for understanding such processes. PMID:16182542

  10. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF Al-RICH SILICATE STARDUST FROM ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmer, Christian; Hoppe, Peter; Brenker, Frank E.

    2013-05-20

    We report on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations of two mineralogically unusual stardust silicates to constrain their circumstellar condensation conditions. Both grains were identified by high spatial resolution nano secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) in the Acfer 094 meteorite, one of the most pristine carbonaceous chondrites available for study. One grain is a highly crystalline, highly refractory (Fe content < 0.5 at%), structurally undisturbed orthopyroxene (MgSiO{sub 3}) with an unusually high Al content (1.8 {+-} 0.5 at%). This is the first TEM documentation of a single crystal pyroxene within the complete stardust silicate data set. We interpret the microstructure and chemistry of this grain as being a direct condensate from a gas of locally non-solar composition (i.e., with a higher-than-solar Al content and most likely also a lower-than-solar Mg/Si ratio) at (near)-equilibrium conditions. From the overabundance of crystalline olivine (six reported grains to date) compared to crystalline pyroxene (only documented as a single crystal in this work) we infer that formation of olivine over pyroxene is favored in circumstellar environments, in agreement with expectations from condensation theory and experiments. The second stardust silicate consists of an amorphous Ca-Si rich material which lacks any crystallinity based on TEM observations in which tiny (<20 nm) hibonite nanocrystallites are embedded. This complex assemblage therefore attests to the fast cooling and rapidly changing chemical environments under which dust grains in circumstellar shells form.

  11. Ballistic electron magnetic microscopy on epitaxial spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heindl, E.; Vancea, J.; Back, C. H.

    2007-02-01

    The tip of a scanning tunneling microscope has been used as an injector of hot electrons or hot holes into a spin valve epitaxially grown on n-GaAs67P33 . Spin-dependent transport of injected and hole excited electrons has been studied in an external magnetic field at room temperature. Significant variations in the collector current due to the spin-dependent inelastic decay of the hot charge carriers have been measured for parallel and antiparallel configurations of the magnetization of the individual layers. We found magnetocurrent effects on the order of 600% and relative large transmission values compared to other ballistic electron magnetic microscopy studies. In addition, we investigated the excitation of electron-hole pairs with its subsequent electron transport in the spin valve and found a magnetocurrent effect with positive sign.

  12. Multislice simulation of transmission electron microscopy imaging of helium bubbles in Fe.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bo; Edwards, Danny J; Kurtz, Richard J; Odette, G Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2012-01-01

    Formation of nanoscale helium (He) bubbles in reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels may lead to degradation of mechanical properties of materials. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has commonly been used to image the Fresnel contrast of He bubbles, using an underfocus of 0.5-1 µm. This paper presents our study of multislice simulation of the size correlation between imaged Fresnel rings and the actual He bubbles. It was found that for bubbles equal to or >3 nm in diameter, the imaged bubble size, represented by its inner diameter of the first dark Fresnel ring (D(in)) in underfocused imaging conditions, increases with increasing electron-beam incoherency, but decreases with increasing underfocus. The electron-beam accelerating voltage, bubble size, bubble position and TEM sample thickness were found to have no significant influence on the deviation of D(in) from the actual bubble size (D(0)). However, for bubbles equal to or <2 nm, D(in)/D(0) increases dramatically with increasing underfocus when it is above a threshold limit (e.g. Δf = -1 µm for a 2-nm bubble). The results of this study also suggested that He bubbles can be differentiated from argon (Ar) bubbles by contrast differences. PMID:23042825

  13. Multislice simulation of transmission electron microscopy imaging of helium bubbles in Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Bo; Edwards, Danny J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Odette, George R.; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2012-10-04

    Formation of nanoscale helium (He) bubbles in reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels may lead to degradation of mechanical properties of materials. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been commonly used to image the Fresnel contrast of He bubbles using a defocus of 0.5 µm ~ 1 µm. This paper presents our study of multislice simulation of the size correlation between imaged Fresnel rings and the actual He bubbles. It was found that for bubbles equal to or larger than 3 nm in diameter, the imaged bubble size, represented by its inner diameter of the first dark Fresnel ring (Din) in under-focused imaging conditions, increases with increasing electron-beam incoherency, but decreases with increasing defocus. The electron-beam accelerating voltage, bubble size, bubble position, and TEM sample thickness were found to have no significant influence on the deviation of Din from the actual bubble size (D0). For bubbles equal to or smaller than 2 nm, however, Din/Do increases dramatically with increasing defocus when it is above a threshold defocus. It was also suggested by this study that He bubbles can be differentiated from argon (Ar) bubbles by contrast differences.

  14. Microaspiration for high-pressure freezing: a new method for ultrastructural preservation of fragile and sparse tissues for TEM and electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Auer, Manfred; Triffo, W.J.; Palsdottir, H.; McDonald, K.L.; Inman, J.L.; Bissell, M.J.; Raphael, R.M.; Auer, M.; Lee, J.K.

    2008-02-13

    High-pressure freezing is the preferred method to prepare thick biological specimens for ultrastructural studies. However, the advantages obtained by this method often prove unattainable for samples that are difficult to handle during the freezing and substitution protocols. Delicate and sparse samples are difficult to manipulate and maintain intact throughout the sequence of freezing, infiltration, embedding, and final orientation for sectioning and subsequent TEM imaging. An established approach to surmount these difficulties is the use of cellulose microdialysis tubing to transport the sample. With an inner diameter of 200 micrometers, the tubing protects small and fragile samples within the thickness constraints of high-pressure freezing, and the tube ends can be sealed to avoid loss of sample. Importantly, the transparency of the tubing allows optical study of the specimen at different steps in the process. Here, we describe the use of a micromanipulator and microinjection apparatus to handle and position delicate specimens within the tubing. We report two biologically significant examples that benefit from this approach, 3D cultures of mammary epithelial cells and cochlear outer hair cells. We illustrate the potential for correlative light and electron microscopy as well as electron tomography.

  15. Immuno-electron microscopy of primary cell cultures from genetically modified animals in liquid by atmospheric scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Takaaki; Mori, Yosio; Hirano, Kazumi; Sugimoto, Shinya; Okuda, Ken-ichi; Matsumoto, Shunsuke; Namiki, Takeshi; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko; Kawata, Masaaki; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Sato, Mari; Suga, Mitsuo; Higashiyama, Kenichi; Sonomoto, Kenji; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu; Nishihara, Shoko; Sato, Chikara

    2014-04-01

    High-throughput immuno-electron microscopy is required to capture the protein-protein interactions realizing physiological functions. Atmospheric scanning electron microscopy (ASEM) allows in situ correlative light and electron microscopy of samples in liquid in an open atmospheric environment. Cells are cultured in a few milliliters of medium directly in the ASEM dish, which can be coated and transferred to an incubator as required. Here, cells were imaged by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM, sometimes with additional metal staining. Axonal partitioning of neurons was correlated with specific cytoskeletal structures, including microtubules, using primary-culture neurons from wild type Drosophila, and the involvement of ankyrin in the formation of the intra-axonal segmentation boundary was studied using neurons from an ankyrin-deficient mutant. Rubella virus replication producing anti-double-stranded RNA was captured at the host cell's plasma membrane. Fas receptosome formation was associated with clathrin internalization near the surface of primitive endoderm cells. Positively charged Nanogold clearly revealed the cell outlines of primitive endoderm cells, and the cell division of lactic acid bacteria. Based on these experiments, ASEM promises to allow the study of protein interactions in various complexes in a natural environment of aqueous liquid in the near future. PMID:24564988

  16. Synthesis and Cs-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Multimetallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Subarna; Bhattarai, Nabraj; Velázquez-Salazar, Jesus; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel; Subarna Khanal Team

    2014-03-01

    Multimetallic nanoparticles have been attracted greater attention both in materials science and nanotechnology due to its unique electronic, optical, biological, and catalytic properties lead by physiochemical interactions among different atoms and phases. The distinct features of multimetallic nanoparticles enhanced synergetic properties, large surface to volume ratio and quantum size effects ultimately lead to novel and wide range of possibilities for different applications than monometallic counterparts. For instance, PtPd, Pt/Cu, Au-Au3Cu, AgPd/Pt, AuCu/Pt and many other multimetallic nanoparticles have raised interest for their various applications in fuel cells, ethanol and methanol oxidation reactions, hydrogen storage, and so on. The nanostructures were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-corrected STEM), in combination with high angle annular dark field (HAADF), bright field (BF), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) detectors. These techniques allowed us to probe the structure at the atomic level of the nanoparticles revealing new structural information and elemental composition of the nanoparticles. The authors would like to acknowledge NSF grants DMR-1103730, ``Alloys at the Nanoscale: The Case of Nanoparticles Second Phase'' and NSF PREM Grant # DMR 0934218.

  17. Microfabricated high-bandpass foucault aperture for electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Glaeser, Robert; Cambie, Rossana; Jin, Jian

    2014-08-26

    A variant of the Foucault (knife-edge) aperture is disclosed that is designed to provide single-sideband (SSB) contrast at low spatial frequencies but retain conventional double-sideband (DSB) contrast at high spatial frequencies in transmission electron microscopy. The aperture includes a plate with an inner open area, a support extending from the plate at an edge of the open area, a half-circle feature mounted on the support and located at the center of the aperture open area. The radius of the half-circle portion of reciprocal space that is blocked by the aperture can be varied to suit the needs of electron microscopy investigation. The aperture is fabricated from conductive material which is preferably non-oxidizing, such as gold, for example.

  18. Scanning electron microscopy: preparation and imaging for SEM.

    PubMed

    Jones, Chris G

    2012-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been almost universally applied for the surface examination and characterization of both natural and man-made objects. Although an invasive technique, developments in electron microscopy over the years has given the microscopist a much clearer choice in how invasive the technique will be. With the advent of low vacuum SEM in the 1970s (The environmental cold stage, 1970) and environmental SEM in the late 1980s (J Microsc 160(pt. 1):9-19, 1989), it is now possible in some circumstances to examine samples without preparation. However, for the examination of biological tissue and cells it is still advisable to chemically fix, dehydrate, and coat samples for SEM imaging and analysis. This chapter aims to provide an overview of SEM as an imaging tool, and a general introduction to some of the methods applied for the preparation of samples. PMID:22907399

  19. Modern electron microscopy resolved in space, energy and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, F.

    2011-06-01

    Recent pioneering experiments combining ultrafast lasers with electron-based technology demonstrated the possibility to obtain real-time information about chemical bonds and their dynamics during reactions and phase transformation. These techniques have been successfully applied to several states of matter including gases, liquids, solids and biological samples showing a unique versatility thanks to the high sensitivity of electrons to tiny amounts of material and their low radiation damage. A very powerful tool, the time-resolved Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), is capable of delivering information on the structure of ordered and disordered matter through diffraction and imaging, with a spatial resolution down to the atomic limit (10-10 m); the same apparatus can distinguish dynamical phenomena happening on the time-scales between fs and ms, with a dynamic range of 12 orders of magnitude. At the same time, spectroscopic information can be obtained from the loss of kinetic energy of electrons interacting with specimens in the range of interband transitions and plasmons in solids, or charge transfers in molecules, all the way up to the atomic core levels with the same time-resolution. In this contribution, we focus on the recent advances in fs Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (FEELS), discussing the main results and their implications for future studies.

  20. Raman shifts and in situ TEM electrical degradation of electron-irradiated monolayer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkin, William M.; Balan, Adrian; Liang, Liangbo; Masih Das, Paul; Lamparski, Michael; Naylor, Carl; Rodriguez-Manzo, Julio A.; Johnson, Alan T.; Meunier, Vincent; Drndic, Marija

    We report how the presence of electron-beam-induced vacancies affects first-order Raman modes and correlate this effect with the evolution of in situ TEM two-terminal conductivity of monolayer MoS2 under electron irradiation. We observe a redshift in the E' Raman peak and a less pronounced blueshift in the A'1 peak with increasing electron dose. Using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, we show that irradiation causes partial removal of sulfur and correlate the dependence of the Raman peak shifts with S vacancy density (a few percent), which is confirmed by first-principles density functional theory calculations. Insitu device current measurements show exponential decrease in channel current upon irradiation. Our analysis demonstrates that the observed frequency shifts are intrinsic properties of the defective systems and that Raman spectroscopy can be used as a quantitative diagnostic tool to accurately characterize MoS2-based transport channels. This work was supported by the NIH Grant R21HG004767 and NIH Grant R21HG007856. Theoretical work at RPI was supported the NYSTAR program C080117 and the Office of Naval Research. C.H.N. and A.T.C.J. acknowledge support from UES/Air Force Research Lab.

  1. Practical aspects of monochromators developed for transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kimoto, Koji

    2014-01-01

    A few practical aspects of monochromators recently developed for transmission electron microscopy are briefly reviewed. The basic structures and properties of four monochromators, a single Wien filter monochromator, a double Wien filter monochromator, an omega-shaped electrostatic monochromator and an alpha-shaped magnetic monochromator, are outlined. The advantages and side effects of these monochromators in spectroscopy and imaging are pointed out. A few properties of the monochromators in imaging, such as spatial or angular chromaticity, are also discussed. PMID:25125333

  2. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  3. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  4. Preparation of gold nanocluster bioconjugates for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Heinecke, Christine L; Ackerson, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe types of gold nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates and their use in electron microscopy. Included are two detailed protocols for labeling an IgG antibody with gold monolayer protected clusters. The first approach is a direct bonding approach that utilizes the ligand place exchange reaction. The second approach describes NHS-EDC coupling of Au(144)(pMBA)(60) with IgG. Also included are various characterization techniques for determining labeling efficiency. PMID:23086882

  5. Vertically integrated optics for ballistic electron emission luminescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian; Yi, Wei; Russell, K. J.; Narayanamurti, V.; Hanson, M. P.; Gossard, A. C.

    2005-02-01

    We have integrated a photon detector directly into a ballistic electron emission luminescence (BEEL) heterostructure, just below a luminescent quantum well. Results from solid-state metal-base hot-electron transistors fabricated with this collector design indicate that more than 10% of the photons emitted by the quantum well excite photoelectrons in the detector region. The improved photonic coupling and effective collection angle in this scheme improves the BEEL signal by many orders of magnitude as compared to far-field detection with the most sensitive single-photon counters, enabling BEEL microscopy in systems with no optical components.

  6. Imaging Nanobubbles in Water with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Edward R.; Mecklenburg, Matthew; Singer, Scott B.; Aloni, Shaul; Regan, Brian Christopher

    2011-05-01

    We present a technique based on scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) that is capable of probing nanobubble dynamics with nanometer spatial resolution. A vacuum-tight vessel holds a sub-micrometer layer of water between two electron-transparent dielectric membranes. Electrical current pulses passing through a platinum wire on one of the membranes inject sufficient heat locally to initiate single bubble formation. In the absence of power input, all bubbles are observed to be unstable against collapse, but the STEM beam alone can cause a shrinking bubble to grow.

  7. Fixation methods for electron microscopy of human and other liver

    PubMed Central

    Wisse, Eddie; Braet, Filip; Duimel, Hans; Vreuls, Celien; Koek, Ger; Olde Damink, Steven WM; van den Broek, Maartje AJ; De Geest, Bart; Dejong, Cees HC; Tateno, Chise; Frederik, Peter

    2010-01-01

    For an electron microscopic study of the liver, expertise and complicated, time-consuming processing of hepatic tissues and cells is needed. The interpretation of electron microscopy (EM) images requires knowledge of the liver fine structure and experience with the numerous artifacts in fixation, embedding, sectioning, contrast staining and microscopic imaging. Hence, the aim of this paper is to present a detailed summary of different methods for the preparation of hepatic cells and tissue, for the purpose of preserving long-standing expertise and to encourage new investigators and clinicians to include EM studies of liver cells and tissue in their projects. PMID:20556830

  8. Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of InN Nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; Li, X.; Kryliouk, Olga; Park, H.J.; Mangum,J.; Anderson, T.

    2006-07-13

    InN nanorods were grown on a, c-, and r-plane of sapphire and also on Si (111) and GaN (0001) by non-catalytic, template-free hydride metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and studied by transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss (EELS) and photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature. These nanocrystals have different shapes and different faceting depending on the substrate used and their crystallographic orientation. EELS measurements have confirmed the high purity of these crystals. The observed PL peak was in the range of 0.9-0.95 eV. The strongest PL intensity was observed for the nanocrystals with the larger diameters.

  9. Experiments in electron microscopy: from metals to nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Nigel

    2015-04-01

    Electron microscopy has advanced remarkably as a tool for biological structure research since the development of methods to examine radiation-sensitive unstained specimens and the introduction of cryo-techniques. Structures of biological molecules at near-atomic resolution can now be obtained from images of single particles as well as crystalline arrays. It has also become possible to analyze structures of molecules in their functional context, i.e. in their natural membrane or cellular setting, and in an ionic environment like that in living tissue. Electron microscopy is thus opening ways to answer definitively questions about physiological mechanisms. Here I recall a number of experiments contributing to, and benefiting from the technical advances that have taken place. I begin—in the spirit of this crystallography series—with some biographical background, and then sketch the path to an analysis by time-resolved microscopy of the opening mechanism of an ion channel (nicotinic acetylcholine receptor). This analysis illustrates how electron imaging can be combined with freeze-trapping to illuminate a transient biological event: in our case, chemical-to-electrical transduction at the nerve-muscle synapse.

  10. Electron Microscopy: an Analytical Tool for Solid State Physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2013-03-01

    For too long the electron microscope has been considered as ``a big magnifying glass.'' Modern electron microscopy however has evolved into an analytical technique, able to provide quantitative data on structure, composition, chemical bonding and magnetic properties. Using lens corrected instruments it is now possible to determine atom shifts at interfaces with a precision of a few picometer; chemical diffusion at these interfaces can be imaged down to atomic scale. The chemical nature of the surface atoms can be visualized and even the bonding state of the elements (e.g. Mn2+ versus Mn3+) can be detected on an atomic scale. Electron microscopy is by principle a projection technique, but the final dream is to obtain atomic info of materials in three dimensions. We will show that this is no longer a dream, but that it is possible using advanced microscopy. We will show evidence of determining the valence change Ce4+ versus Ce3+ at the surface of a CeO2 nanocrystal; the atomic shifts at the interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 and the 3D relaxation of a Au nanocrystal.

  11. Reflection Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Surface Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    2005-08-01

    This book is a comprehensive review of the theories, techniques and applications of reflection electron microscopy (REM), reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). The book is divided into three parts: diffraction, imaging and spectroscopy. The text is written to combine basic techniques with special applications, theories with experiments, and the basic physics with materials science, so that a full picture of RHEED and REM emerges. An entirely self-contained study, the book contains much invaluable reference material, including FORTRAN source codes for calculating crystal structures data and electron energy-loss spectra in different scattering geometries. This and many other features makes the book an important and timely addition to the materials science literature for researchers and graduate students in physics and materials science.

  12. Reflection Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Surface Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    1996-05-01

    This book is a comprehensive review of the theories, techniques and applications of reflection electron microscopy (REM), reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). The book is divided into three parts: diffraction, imaging and spectroscopy. The text is written to combine basic techniques with special applications, theories with experiments, and the basic physics with materials science, so that a full picture of RHEED and REM emerges. An entirely self-contained study, the book contains much invaluable reference material, including FORTRAN source codes for calculating crystal structures data and electron energy-loss spectra in different scattering geometries. This and many other features makes the book an important and timely addition to the materials science literature for researchers and graduate students in physics and materials science.

  13. System and method for compressive scanning electron microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W

    2015-01-13

    A scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) system is disclosed. The system may make use of an electron beam scanning system configured to generate a plurality of electron beam scans over substantially an entire sample, with each scan varying in electron-illumination intensity over a course of the scan. A signal acquisition system may be used for obtaining at least one of an image, a diffraction pattern, or a spectrum from the scans, the image, diffraction pattern, or spectrum representing only information from at least one of a select subplurality or linear combination of all pixel locations comprising the image. A dataset may be produced from the information. A subsystem may be used for mathematically analyzing the dataset to predict actual information that would have been produced by each pixel location of the image.

  14. Characterization of an Irradiated RERTR-7 Fuel Plate Using Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    J. Gan; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; B. D. Miller; A. B. Robinson; P. Medvedev

    2010-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to characterize an irradiated fuel plate with Al-2Si matrix from the RERTR-7 experiment that was irradiated under moderate reactor conditions. The results of this work showed the presence of a bubble superlattice within the U-7Mo grains that accommodated fission gases (e.g., Xe). The presence of this structure helps the U-7Mo exhibit a stable swelling behaviour during irradiation. Furthermore, TEM analysis showed that the Si-rich interaction layers that develop around the fuel particles at the U-7Mo/matrix interface during fuel plate fabrication and irradiation become amorphous during irradiation, and in regions of the interaction layer that have relatively high Si concentrations the fission gas bubbles remain small and contained within the layer but in areas with lower Si concentrations the bubbles grow in size. An important question that remains to be answered about the irradiation behaviour of U-Mo dispersion fuels, is how do more aggressive irradiation conditions affect the behaviour of fission gases within the U-7Mo fuel particles and in the amorphous interaction layers on the microstructural scale that can be characterized using TEM? This paper discusses the results of TEM analysis that was performed on a sample taken from an irradiated RERTR-7 fuel plate with Al-2Si matrix. This plate was exposed to more aggressive irradiation conditions than was the sample taken from the RERTR-6 plate. The microstructural features present within the U-7Mo and the amorphous interaction layers will be discussed. The results of this analysis will be compared to what was observed in the earlier RERTR-6 fuel plate characterization.

  15. Electron microscopy study of antioxidant interaction with bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov, Oleg P.; Novikova, Olga V.; Konnov, Nikolai P.; Korsukov, Vladimir N.; Gunkin, Ivan F.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    2000-10-01

    To maintain native microorganisms genotype and phenotype features a lyophylization technique is widely used. However in this case cells are affected by influences of vacuum and low temperature that cause a part of the cells population to be destruction. Another factor reduced microorganisms vitality is formation of reactive oxygen forms that damage certain biological targets (such as DNA, membranes etc.) Recently to raise microorganism's resistance against adverse condition natural and synthetic antioxidants are used. Antioxidant- are antagonists of free radicals. Introduction of antioxidants in protective medium for lyophylization increase bacteria storage life about 2,0-4,8 fold in comparison with reference samples. In the article the main results of our investigation of antioxidants interaction with microorganism cells is described. As bacteria cells we use vaccine strain yersinia pestis EV, that were grown for 48 h at 28 degree(s)C on the Hottinger agar (pH 7,2). Antioxidants are inserted on the agar surface in specimen under test. To investigate a localization of antioxidants for electron microscopy investigation, thallium organic antioxidants were used. The thallium organic compounds have an antioxidant features if thallium is in low concentration (about 1(mu) g/ml). The localization of the thallium organic antioxidants on bacteria Y. pestis EV is visible in electron microscopy images, thallium being heavy metal with high electron density. The negatively stained bacteria and bacteria thin sections with thallium organic compounds were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy. The localization of the thallium organic compounds is clearly visible in electron micrographs as small dark spots with size about 10-80nm. Probably mechanisms of interaction of antioxidants with bacteria cells are discussed.

  16. A toolkit for the characterization of CCD cameras for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vulovic, M; Rieger, B; van Vliet, L J; Koster, A J; Ravelli, R B G

    2010-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD) are nowadays commonly utilized in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for applications in life sciences. Direct access to digitized images has revolutionized the use of electron microscopy, sparking developments such as automated collection of tomographic data, focal series, random conical tilt pairs and ultralarge single-particle data sets. Nevertheless, for ultrahigh-resolution work photographic plates are often still preferred. In the ideal case, the quality of the recorded image of a vitrified biological sample would solely be determined by the counting statistics of the limited electron dose the sample can withstand before beam-induced alterations dominate. Unfortunately, the image is degraded by the non-ideal point-spread function of the detector, as a result of a scintillator coupled by fibre optics to a CCD, and the addition of several inherent noise components. Different detector manufacturers provide different types of figures of merit when advertising the quality of their detector. It is hard for most laboratories to verify whether all of the anticipated specifications are met. In this report, a set of algorithms is presented to characterize on-axis slow-scan large-area CCD-based TEM detectors. These tools have been added to a publicly available image-processing toolbox for MATLAB. Three in-house CCD cameras were carefully characterized, yielding, among others, statistics for hot and bad pixels, the modulation transfer function, the conversion factor, the effective gain and the detective quantum efficiency. These statistics will aid data-collection strategy programs and provide prior information for quantitative imaging. The relative performance of the characterized detectors is discussed and a comparison is made with similar detectors that are used in the field of X-ray crystallography. PMID:20057054

  17. Morphological characterization via light and electron microscopy of Atlantic jackknife clam (Ensis directus) hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Preziosi, Brian M; Bowden, Timothy J

    2016-05-01

    The Atlantic jackknife clam, Ensis directus, is currently being researched as a potential species for aquaculture operations in Maine. The goal of this study was to describe the hemocytes of this species for the first time and provide a morphological classification scheme. We viewed hemocytes under light microscopy (using Hemacolor, neutral red, and Pappenheim's stains) as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The 2 main types of hemocytes found were granulocytes and hyalinocytes (agranular cells). The granulocytes were subdivided into large and small granulocytes while the hyalinocytes were subdivided into large and small hyalinocytes. The large hemocytes had both a larger diameter and smaller nucleus to cell diameter ratio than their smaller counterparts. A rare cell type, the vesicular cell, was also observed and it possessed many vesicles but few or no granules. Using TEM, granulocytes were found to contain both electron-lucent and electron-dense granules of various sizes. These numerous granules were the only structures that took up the neutral red stain. Hyalinocytes had few of these granules relative to granulocytes. Large hyalinocytes had both various organelles and large vesicles in their abundant cytoplasm while small hyalinocytes had little room for organelles in their scant cytoplasm. Total hemocyte counts averaged 1.96×10(6) cells mL(-1) while differential hemocyte counts averaged 11% for small hyalinocytes, 12% for large hyalinocytes, 59% for small granulocytes, and 18% for large granulocytes. The results of this study provide a starting point for future studies on E. directus immune function. PMID:27015289

  18. Investigation of Nematode Diversity using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fluorescent Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seacor, Taylor; Howell, Carina

    2013-03-01

    Nematode worms account for the vast majority of the animals in the biosphere. They are colossally important to global public health as parasites, and to agriculture both as pests and as beneficial inhabitants of healthy soil. Amphid neurons are the anterior chemosensory neurons in nematodes, mediating critical behaviors including chemotaxis and mating. We are examining the cellular morphology and external anatomy of amphid neurons, using fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively, of a wide range of soil nematodes isolated in the wild. We use both classical systematics (e.g. diagnostic keys) and molecular markers (e.g. ribosomal RNA) to classify these wild isolates. Our ultimate aim is to build a detailed anatomical database in order to dissect genetic pathways of neuronal development and function across phylogeny and ecology. Research supported by NSF grants 092304, 0806660, 1058829 and Lock Haven University FPDC grants

  19. A Simple Transmission Electron Microscopy Method for Fast Thickness Characterization of Suspended Graphene and Graphite Flakes.

    PubMed

    Rubino, Stefano; Akhtar, Sultan; Leifer, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We present a simple, fast method for thickness characterization of suspended graphene/graphite flakes that is based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We derive an analytical expression for the intensity of the transmitted electron beam I 0(t), as a function of the specimen thickness t (t<λ; where λ is the absorption constant for graphite). We show that in thin graphite crystals the transmitted intensity is a linear function of t. Furthermore, high-resolution (HR) TEM simulations are performed to obtain λ for a 001 zone axis orientation, in a two-beam case and in a low symmetry orientation. Subsequently, HR (used to determine t) and bright-field (to measure I 0(0) and I 0(t)) images were acquired to experimentally determine λ. The experimental value measured in low symmetry orientation matches the calculated value (i.e., λ=225±9 nm). The simulations also show that the linear approximation is valid up to a sample thickness of 3-4 nm regardless of the orientation and up to several ten nanometers for a low symmetry orientation. When compared with standard techniques for thickness determination of graphene/graphite, the method we propose has the advantage of being simple and fast, requiring only the acquisition of bright-field images. PMID:26915000

  20. Low-pass secondary electron detector for outlens scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Takashi; Iwai, Hideo

    2015-08-01

    A low-pass secondary electron detector has been invented for outlens scanning electron microscopy. This detector is composed of a bias grid above and an electron detector below the specimen. The upward low-energy electrons emitted from the specimen are reflected downward by the bias grid and reach the secondary electron detector. The high-energy electrons penetrate the grid and are not detected. This detector has an advantage of quantitative analysis because the secondary electron trajectories are easily traced with simple parabolic motion. The energy-filtered images of the GaN/Si sample are obtained using this detector.

  1. Determination of redox reaction rates and orders by in situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-11-19

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e⁻aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e⁻aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e⁻aq]. In addition, by comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e⁻aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  2. Determination of redox reaction rates and orders by in situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-11-19

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e⁻aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e⁻aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pdmore » deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e⁻aq]. In addition, by comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e⁻aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.« less

  3. 4D multiple-cathode ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, John Spencer; Liu, Haihua; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2014-01-01

    Four-dimensional multiple-cathode ultrafast electron microscopy is developed to enable the capture of multiple images at ultrashort time intervals for a single microscopic dynamic process. The dynamic process is initiated in the specimen by one femtosecond light pulse and probed by multiple packets of electrons generated by one UV laser pulse impinging on multiple, spatially distinct, cathode surfaces. Each packet is distinctly recorded, with timing and detector location controlled by the cathode configuration. In the first demonstration, two packets of electrons on each image frame (of the CCD) probe different times, separated by 19 picoseconds, in the evolution of the diffraction of a gold film following femtosecond heating. Future elaborations of this concept to extend its capabilities and expand the range of applications of 4D ultrafast electron microscopy are discussed. The proof-of-principle demonstration reported here provides a path toward the imaging of irreversible ultrafast phenomena of materials, and opens the door to studies involving the single-frame capture of ultrafast dynamics using single-pump/multiple-probe, embedded stroboscopic imaging. PMID:25006261

  4. 3D imaging of the early embryonic chicken heart with focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, Monique Y.; Gahan, Curran G.; López, Claudia S.; Thornburg, Kent L.; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Early embryonic heart development is a period of dynamic growth and remodeling, with rapid changes occurring at the tissue, cell, and subcellular levels. A detailed understanding of the events that establish the components of the heart wall has been hampered by a lack of methodologies for three dimensional (3D), high-resolution imaging. Focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) is a novel technology for imaging 3D tissue volumes at the subcellular level. FIB-SEM alternates between imaging the block face with a scanning electron beam and milling away thin sections of tissue with a focused ion beam, allowing for collection and analysis of 3D data. FIB-SEM was used to image the three layers of the day 4 chicken embryo heart: myocardium, cardiac jelly, and endocardium. Individual images obtained with FIB-SEM were comparable in quality and resolution to those obtained with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Up to 1100 serial images were obtained in 4 nm increments at 4.88 nm resolution, and image stacks were aligned to create volumes 800–1500 μm3 in size. Segmentation of organelles revealed their organization and distinct volume fractions between cardiac wall layers. We conclude that FIB-SEM is a powerful modality for 3D subcellular imaging of the embryonic heart wall. PMID:24742339

  5. Transient Thermometry and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Analysis of Filamentary Resistive Switches.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jonghan; Sharma, Abhishek A; Chen, Chao-Yang; Fantini, Andrea; Jurczak, Malgorzata; Herzing, Andrew A; Bain, James A; Picard, Yoosuf N; Skowronski, Marek

    2016-08-10

    We present data on the filament size and temperature distribution in Hf0.82Al0.18Ox-based Resistive Random Access Memory (RRAM) devices obtained by transient thermometry and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The thermometry shows that the temperature of the nonvolatile conducting filament can reach temperatures as high as 1600 K at the onset of RESET at voltage of 0.8 V and power of 40 μW. The size of the filament was estimated at about 1 nm in diameter. Hot filament increases the temperature of the surrounding high resistivity oxide, causing it to conduct and carry a significant fraction of the total current. The current spreading results in slowing down the filament temperature increase at higher power. The results of thermometry have been corroborated by HRTEM analysis of the as-fabricated and switched RRAM devices. The functional HfAlOx layer in as-fabricated devices is amorphous. In devices that were switched, we detected a small crystalline region of 10-15 nm in size. The crystallization temperature of the HfAlOx was determined to be 850 K in an independent annealing experiment. The size of the crystalline region agrees with thermal modeling based on the thermometry data. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coordinated with electron energy loss spectroscopy could not detect changes in the chemical makeup of the filament. PMID:27351065

  6. Microstructural Characterization of U-Nb-Zr, U-Mo-Nb, and U-Mo-Ti Alloys via Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    A. Ewh; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; Y. H. Sohn

    2010-06-01

    Ternary uranium molybdenum alloys are currently being investigated for use as dispersion and monolithic nuclear fuels in research reactors. In this study, two such ternary alloys, with compositions U-8Mo-3Nb and U-7Mo-3Ti in wt.%, were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging via scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to identify phase constituents. These alloys were homogenized at 950°C for 96 hours and were expected to be single-phase bcc-!-U. However, upon examination, it was determined that despite homogenization, each of the alloys contained a small volume fraction precipitate phase. Through SEM and XRD, it was confirmed that the matrix retained the bcc-!-U phase, but the precipitate phases could not be identified using these methods. TEM specimens were prepared using site-specific focused ion beam (FIB) in situ lift out (INLO) technique to include at least one precipitate from each alloy. By electron diffraction, the precipitate phases for the U- 8Mo-3Nb and U-7Mo-3Ti alloys were identified as bcc-(Mo,Nb) solid solution and bcc- (Mo,Ti) solid solution, respectively.

  7. Creating standards for absolute quantification of Coxiella burnetii in real-time PCR--a comparative study based on transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sting, Reinhard; Molz, Kerstin; Hoferer, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative standards are a prerequisite for quality control and quantification of pathogens. In this study the creation of quantitative standards for use in qPCR is described using the pathogen Coxiella burnetii. Quantification of Coxiella burnetii particles by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used as primary standard and compared with data obtained by light microscopy as well as genome equivalents (GE) and plasmid units (recombinant plasmid). Based on pathogen quantification using TEM and light microscopy, pathogen detection limits of 6 and 2 C. burnetii particles could be determined per com1 qPCR reaction, respectively. In comparison, the detection limits were 17 and 13 pathogen units using GE and plasmid units, respectively. The standard generated by TEM can be used as gold standard for universal application due to high accuracy, quantitative control of the producing process and supplying intact pathogen particles. PMID:25465354

  8. Design and Performance Characteristics of the ORNL AdvancedMicroscopy Laboratory and JEOL 2200FS-AC Aberration-CorrectedSTEM/TEM

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.; O'Keefe, Michael A.; Mishina, S.

    2005-02-15

    At ORNL, the new Advanced Microscopy Laboratory (AML) has recently been completed, with two aberration-corrected instruments installed, and two more planned in the near future to fill the 4-laboratory building. The installed JEOL 2200FS-AC has demonstrated aTEM information limit of 0.9A. This limit is expected given the measured instrument parameters (HT and OL power supply stabilities, beam energy spread, etc.), and illustrates that the environmental influences are not adversely affecting the instrument performance. In STEM high-angle annular dark-field (HA-ADF) mode, images of a thin Si crystal in<110>zone axis orientation, after primary aberrations in the illuminating beam were optimally corrected, showed a significant vibration effect. The microscope is fitted with three magnetically levitated turbo pumps (one on the column at about the specimen position,and two near floor level) that pump the Omega energy filter and detector chamber. These pumps run at 48,000 rpm, precisely equivalent to 800Hz. It was determined that the upper turbo pump was contributing essentially all of the 800Hz signal to the image, and in fact that the pump was defective. After replacing the pump with one significantly quieter than the original, the Si atomic column image and associated diffractogram(Fig. 4b) show a much-reduced effect of the 800Hz signal, but still some residual effect from the turbo pump. The upper pump will be removed from the main column to an adjacent frame on the floor, and will have a large-diameter, well-damped, pump line to the original connection to the column to effectively isolate the pump from the column. If the 800Hz signal results from mechanical vibrations, they will be damped, and if the signal results from acoustic coupling to the column, it can be damped by appropriate acoustic materials.

  9. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography.

    PubMed

    Jesse, S; Chi, M; Belianinov, A; Beekman, C; Kalinin, S V; Borisevich, A Y; Lupini, A R

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called "big-data" methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy. PMID:27211523

  10. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    PubMed Central

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy. PMID:27211523

  11. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  12. High-Pressure Freezing Electron Microscopy of Zebrafish Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Kanagaraj, Palsamy; Riedel, Dietmar; Dosch, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Oogenesis is an essential cellular and developmental process to prepare the oocyte for propagation of a species after fertilization. Oocytes of oviparous animals are enormous cells endowed with many, big cellular compartments, which are interconnected through active intracellular transport. The dynamic transport pathways and the big organelles of the oocyte provide the opportunity to study cellular trafficking with outstanding resolution. Hence, oocytes were classically used to investigate cellular compartments. Though many novel regulators of vesicle trafficking have been discovered in yeast, tissue culture cells and invertebrates, recent forward genetic screens in invertebrate and vertebrate oocytes isolated novel control proteins specific to multicellular organisms. Zebrafish is a widely used vertebrate model to study cellular and developmental processes in an entire animal. The transparency of zebrafish embryos allows following cellular events during early development with in vivo imaging. Unfortunately, the active endocytosis of the oocyte also represents a drawback for imaging. The massive amounts of yolk globules prevent the penetration of light-beams and currently make in vivo microscopy a challenge. As a consequence, electron microscopy (EM) still provides the highest resolution to analyze the ultra-structural details of compartments and organelles and the mechanisms controlling many cellular pathways of the oocyte. Among different fixation approaches for EM, High Pressure Freezing (HPF) in combination with freeze substitution significantly improves the samples preservation closest to their natural status. Here, we describe the HPF with freeze substitution embedding method for analyzing cellular processes in zebrafish oocytes using electron microscopy. PMID:27557580

  13. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-05-23

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. In this paper, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature andmore » does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. Finally, however, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.« less

  14. Electron Microscopy Study of Exotic Nanostructures of Cadmium Sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lifeng; Jiao, Jun

    2005-04-01

    In this article, two simple methods, evaporation-condensation and catalytic thermal evaporation, were used to investigate the synthesis of CdS nanostructures for nanoscale optoelectronic applications. To understand their growth mechanisms, various electron microscopy and microanalysis techniques were utilized in characterizing their morphologies, internal structures, growth directions and elemental compositions. The electron microscopy study reveals that when using the evaporation-condensation method, branched CdS nanorods and self-assembled arrays of CdS nanorods were synthesized at 800°C and 1000°C, respectively. Instead of morphological differences, both types of CdS nanorods grew along the [0001] direction. However, when using the catalytic thermal evaporation method (Au as the catalyst), patterned CdS nanowires and nanobelts were formed at the temperature region of 500 600°C and 600 750°C, respectively. Their growth direction was along the direction [1010] instead of [0001]. Based on the microscopy and microanalysis results, we propose some growth mechanisms in relation to the growth processes of those exotic CdS nanostructures.

  15. Minerals in coal: a transmission electron microscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, C.A.; Hsieh, K.C.

    1983-01-01

    Techniques of electron microscopy have been applied to identification of minerals in coal and coal conversion products. The principal problem is making satisfactory thin-samples. Ion-milling has been used, but grinding and microtoming also show promise. Principal attention has been given to characterization of sulfides and clays, but many other minerals have been identified. Application of the technique to identification of the minerals in oil shale has been demonstrated. The great value of this method is the extraordinary detail with which mineral inclusions can be characterized. General topography, crystal type (including space group of complex crystalline forms), planar spacing and chemical composition can be determined using the large array of techniques available - bright and dark field imaging, electron diffraction, including convergent beam electron diffraction, x-ray emission spectroscopy and energy loss spectroscopy. 63 refences, 10 figures.

  16. Time resolved electron microscopy for in situ experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Geoffrey H. McKeown, Joseph T.; Santala, Melissa K.

    2014-12-15

    Transmission electron microscopy has functioned for decades as a platform for in situ observation of materials and processes with high spatial resolution. Yet, the dynamics often remain elusive, as they unfold too fast to discern at these small spatial scales under traditional imaging conditions. Simply shortening the exposure time in hopes of capturing the action has limitations, as the number of electrons will eventually be reduced to the point where noise overtakes the signal in the image. Pulsed electron sources with high instantaneous current have successfully shortened exposure times (thus increasing the temporal resolution) by about six orders of magnitude over conventional sources while providing the necessary signal-to-noise ratio for dynamic imaging. We describe here the development of this new class of microscope and the principles of its operation, with examples of its application to problems in materials science.

  17. Effects of instrument imperfections on quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krause, Florian F; Schowalter, Marco; Grieb, Tim; Müller-Caspary, Knut; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Several instrumental imperfections of transmission electron microscopes are characterized and their effects on the results of quantitative scanning electron microscopy (STEM) are investigated and quantified using simulations. Methods to either avoid influences of these imperfections during acquisition or to include them in reference calculations are proposed. Particularly, distortions inflicted on the diffraction pattern by an image-aberration corrector can cause severe errors of more than 20% if not accounted for. A procedure for their measurement is proposed here. Furthermore, afterglow phenomena and nonlinear behavior of the detector itself can lead to incorrect normalization of measured intensities. Single electrons accidentally impinging on the detector are another source of error but can also be exploited for threshold-less calibration of STEM images to absolute dose, incident beam current determination and measurement of the detector sensitivity. PMID:26686661

  18. Opportunities for electron microscopy in space radiation biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lett, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    Densely ionizing, particulate radiations in outer space are likely to cause to mammalian tissues biological damage that is particularly amenable to examination by the techniques of electron microscopy. This situation arises primarily from the fact that once the density of ionization along the particle track exceeds a certain value, small discrete lesions involving many adjacent cells may be caused in organized tissues. Tissue damage produced by ionization densities below the critical value also afford opportunities for electron microscopic evaluation, as is shown by the damage produced in optic and proximate tissues of the New Zealand white rabbit in terrestrial experiments. Late radiation sequelae in nondividing, or terminally differentiating, tissues, and in stem cell populations, are of special importance in these regards. It is probable that evaluations of the hazards posed to astronauts by galactic particulate radiations during prolonged missions in outer space will not be complete without adequate electron microscopic evaluation of the damage those radiations cause to organized tissues.

  19. Lights Will Guide You : Sample Preparation and Applications for Integrated Laser and Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karreman, M. A.

    2013-03-01

    Correlative microscopy is the combined use of two different forms of microscopy in the study of a specimen, allowing for the exploitation of the advantages of both imaging tools. The integrated Laser and Electron Microscope (iLEM), developed at Utrecht University, combines a fluorescence microscope (FM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) in a single set-up. The region of interest in the specimen is labeled or tagged with a fluorescent probe and can easily be identified within a large field of view with the FM. Next, this same area is retraced in the TEM and can be studied at high resolution. The iLEM demands samples that can be imaged with both FM and TEM. Biological specimen, typically composed of light elements, generate low image contrast in the TEM. Therefore, these samples are often ‘contrasted’ with heavy metal stains. FM, on the other hand, images fluorescent samples. Sample preparation for correlative microscopy, and iLEM in particular, is complicated by the fact that the heavy metals stains employed for TEM quench the fluorescent signal of the probe that is imaged with FM. The first part of this thesis outlines preparation procedures for biological material yielding specimen that can be imaged with the iLEM. Here, approaches for the contrasting of thin sections of cells and tissue are introduced that do not affect the fluorescence signal of the probe that marks the region of interest. Furthermore, two novel procedures, VIS2FIXH and VIS2FIX­FS are described that allow for the chemical fixation of thin sections of cryo-immobilized material. These procedures greatly expedite the sample preparation process, and open up novel possibilities for the immuno-labeling of difficult antigens, eg. proteins and lipids that are challenging to preserve. The second part of this thesis describes applications of iLEM in research in the field of life and material science. The iLEM was employed in the study of UVC induced apoptosis (programmed cell death) of

  20. Integrating electron microscopy into nanoscience and materials engineering programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormia, Robert D.; Oye, Michael M.; Nguyen, Anh; Skiver, David; Shi, Meng; Torres, Yessica

    2014-10-01

    Preparing an effective workforce in high technology is the goal of both academic and industry training, and has been the engine that drives innovation and product development in the United States for over a century. During the last 50 years, technician training has comprised a combination of two-year academic programs, internships and apprentice training, and extensive On-the-Job Training (OJT). Recently, and especially in Silicon Valley, technicians have four-year college degrees, as well as relevant hands-on training. Characterization in general, and microscopy in particular, is an essential tool in process development, manufacturing and QA/QC, and failure analysis. Training for a broad range of skills and practice is challenging, especially for community colleges. Workforce studies (SRI/Boeing) suggest that even four year colleges often do not provide the relevant training and experience in laboratory skills, especially design of experiments and analysis of data. Companies in high-tech further report difficulty in finding skilled labor, especially with industry specific experience. Foothill College, in partnership with UCSC, SJSU, and NASA-Ames, has developed a microscopy training program embedded in a research laboratory, itself a partnership between university and government, providing hands-on experience in advanced instrumentation, experimental design and problem solving, with real-world context from small business innovators, in an environment called `the collaboratory'. The program builds on AFM-SEM training at Foothill, and provides affordable training in FE-SEM and TEM through a cost recovery model. In addition to instrument and engineering training, the collaboratory also supports academic and personal growth through a multiplayer social network of students, faculty, researchers, and innovators.

  1. Comprehensive size-determination of whole virus vaccine particles using gas-phase electrophoretic mobility macromolecular analyzer, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Havlik, Marlene; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Friedbacher, Gernot; Winkler, Wolfgang; Messner, Paul; Perez-Burgos, Laura; Tauer, Christa; Allmaier, Günter

    2015-09-01

    Biophysical properties including particle size distribution, integrity, and shape of whole virus vaccine particles at different stages in tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccines formulation were analyzed by a new set of methods. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) was used as a conservative sample preparation for vaccine particle fractionation and gas-phase electrophoretic mobility macromolecular analyzer (GEMMA) for analyzing electrophoretic mobility diameters of isolated TBE virions. The derived particle diameter was then correlated with molecular weight. The diameter of the TBE virions determined after SEC by GEMMA instrumentation was 46.8 ± 1.1 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were implemented for comparison purposes and to gain morphological information on the virion particle. Western blotting (Dot Blot) as an immunological method confirmed biological activity of the particles at various stages of the developed analytical strategy. AFM and TEM measurements revealed higher diameters with much higher SD for a limited number of virions, 60.4 ± 8.5 and 53.5 ± 5.3 nm, respectively. GEMMA instrumentation was also used for fractionation of virions with specifically selected diameters in the gas-phase, which were finally collected by means of an electrostatic sampler. At that point (i.e., after particle collection), AFM and TEM showed that the sampled virions were still intact, exhibiting a narrow size distribution (i.e., 59.8 ± 7.8 nm for AFM and 47.5 ± 5.2 nm for TEM images), and most importantly, dot blotting confirmed immunological activity of the collected samples. Furthermore dimers and virion artifacts were detected, too. PMID:26266988

  2. Comprehensive Size-Determination of Whole Virus Vaccine Particles Using Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Macromolecular Analyzer, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Havlik, Marlene; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Friedbacher, Gernot; Winkler, Wolfgang; Messner, Paul; Perez-Burgos, Laura; Tauer, Christa; Allmaier, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Biophysical properties including particle size distribution, integrity, and shape of whole virus vaccine particles at different stages in tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccines formulation were analyzed by a new set of methods. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) was used as a conservative sample preparation for vaccine particle fractionation and gas-phase electrophoretic mobility macromolecular analyzer (GEMMA) for analyzing electrophoretic mobility diameters of isolated TBE virions. The derived particle diameter was then correlated with molecular weight. The diameter of the TBE virions determined after SEC by GEMMA instrumentation was 46.8 ± 1.1 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were implemented for comparison purposes and to gain morphological information on the virion particle. Western blotting (Dot Blot) as an immunological method confirmed biological activity of the particles at various stages of the developed analytical strategy. AFM and TEM measurements revealed higher diameters with much higher SD for a limited number of virions, 60.4 ± 8.5 and 53.5 ± 5.3 nm, respectively. GEMMA instrumentation was also used for fractionation of virions with specifically selected diameters in the gas-phase, which were finally collected by means of an electrostatic sampler. At that point (i.e., after particle collection), AFM and TEM showed that the sampled virions were still intact, exhibiting a narrow size distribution (i.e., 59.8 ± 7.8 nm for AFM and 47.5 ± 5.2 nm for TEM images), and most importantly, dot blotting confirmed immunological activity of the collected samples. Furthermore dimers and virion artifacts were detected, too. PMID:26266988

  3. Scanning electron microscopy of Purkinje fibres of the pig heart.

    PubMed

    Bytzer, P

    1979-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of Purkinje fibres (P-fibres) from the septal walls and the septomarginal trabecula was performed on deparaffinized sections, the identification in SEM made possible by comparative light microscopy. The myofibrils in P-fibres from the septal walls were arranged in a cart-wheel fashion, whereas P-fibres from the septomarginal trabecula showed a nearly parallel alignment of the contractile material. Z-line ridges resembling the T-tubules of the myocardial fibres were observed in both kinds of P-fibres. The myofibrillar arrangements are discussed in relation to the expected mechanical stress put upon P-fibres in the 2 locations during systolic-diastolic activity. An adaptive function of the contractile material to the mechanical stress is suggested and the possible need of a T-tubular system is discussed. PMID:507370

  4. Ultrahigh Voltage Electron Microscopy Links Neuroanatomy and Neuroscience/Neuroendocrinology

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Hirotaka; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) analysis of anatomical ultrastructures is extremely important in most fields of biological research. Although it is very difficult to perform 3D image analysis on exact serial sets of ultrathin sections, 3D reconstruction from serial ultrathin sections can generally be used to obtain 3D information. However, this technique can only be applied to small areas of a specimen because of technical and physical difficulties. We used ultrahigh voltage electron microscopy (UHVEM) to overcome these difficulties and to study the chemical neuroanatomy of 3D ultrastructures. This methodology, which links UHVEM and light microscopy, is a useful and powerful tool for studying molecular and/or chemical neuroanatomy at the ultrastructural level. PMID:22567316

  5. TEM-nanoindentation studies of semiconducting structures.

    PubMed

    Le Bourhis, E; Patriarche, G

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of nanoindentation coupled with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigations of the plastic behaviour of semiconducting structures and its implication for device design. Instrumented nanoindentation has been developed to extract the mechanical behaviour of small volumes scaled to those encountered in semiconductor heterostructures. We illustrate that TEM is a powerful complementary tool for the study of local plasticity induced by nanoindentation. TEM-nanoindentation allows for detailed understanding of the plastic deformation in semiconducting structures and opens practical routes for improvement of devices. Performances of heterostructures are deteriously affected by dislocations that relax the lattice mismatched layers. Different ways to obtain compliant substructures are being developed in order to concentrate the plastic relaxation underneath the heterostructure. Such approaches allow for mechanical design of micro- and opto-electronic devices to be considered throughout the fabrication process. PMID:16901706

  6. Electron microscopy imaging of proteins on gallium phosphide semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjort, Martin; Bauer, Mikael; Gunnarsson, Stefan; Mårsell, Erik; Zakharov, Alexei A.; Karlsson, Gunnel; Sanfins, Elodie; Prinz, Christelle N.; Wallenberg, Reine; Cedervall, Tommy; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2016-02-01

    We have imaged GaP nanowires (NWs) incubated with human laminin, serum albumin (HSA), and blood plasma using both cryo-transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron based X-ray photoemission electron microscopy. This extensive imaging methodology simultaneously reveals structural, chemical and morphological details of individual nanowires and the adsorbed proteins. We found that the proteins bind to NWs, forming coronas with thicknesses close to the proteins' hydrodynamic diameters. We could directly image how laminin is extending from the NWs, maximizing the number of proteins bound to the NWs. NWs incubated with both laminin and HSA show protein coronas with a similar appearance to NWs incubated with laminin alone, indicating that the presence of HSA does not affect the laminin conformation on the NWs. In blood plasma, an intermediate sized corona around the NWs indicates a corona with a mixture of plasma proteins. The ability to directly visualize proteins on nanostructures in situ holds great promise for assessing the conformation and thickness of the protein corona, which is key to understanding and predicting the properties of engineered nanomaterials in a biological environment.We have imaged GaP nanowires (NWs) incubated with human laminin, serum albumin (HSA), and blood plasma using both cryo-transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron based X-ray photoemission electron microscopy. This extensive imaging methodology simultaneously reveals structural, chemical and morphological details of individual nanowires and the adsorbed proteins. We found that the proteins bind to NWs, forming coronas with thicknesses close to the proteins' hydrodynamic diameters. We could directly image how laminin is extending from the NWs, maximizing the number of proteins bound to the NWs. NWs incubated with both laminin and HSA show protein coronas with a similar appearance to NWs incubated with laminin alone, indicating that the presence of HSA does not affect the

  7. Dark-field transmission electron microscopy of cortical bone reveals details of extrafibrillar crystals.

    PubMed

    Schwarcz, Henry P; McNally, Elizabeth A; Botton, Gianluigi A

    2014-12-01

    In a previous study we showed that most of the mineral in bone is present in the form of "mineral structures", 5-6nm-thick, elongated plates which surround and are oriented parallel to collagen fibrils. Using dark-field transmission electron microscopy, we viewed mineral structures in ion-milled sections of cortical human bone cut parallel to the collagen fibrils. Within the mineral structures we observe single crystals of apatite averaging 5.8±2.7nm in width and 28±19nm in length, their long axes oriented parallel to the fibril axis. Some appear to be composite, co-aligned crystals as thin as 2nm. From their similarity to TEM images of crystals liberated from deproteinated bone we infer that we are viewing sections through platy crystals of apatite that are assembled together to form the mineral structures. PMID:25449316

  8. Avoiding drying-artifacts in transmission electron microscopy: Characterizing the size and colloidal state of nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Michen, Benjamin; Geers, Christoph; Vanhecke, Dimitri; Endes, Carola; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Balog, Sandor; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2015-01-01

    Standard transmission electron microscopy nanoparticle sample preparation generally requires the complete removal of the suspending liquid. Drying often introduces artifacts, which can obscure the state of the dispersion prior to drying and preclude automated image analysis typically used to obtain number-weighted particle size distribution. Here we present a straightforward protocol for prevention of the onset of drying artifacts, thereby allowing the preservation of in-situ colloidal features of nanoparticles during TEM sample preparation. This is achieved by adding a suitable macromolecular agent to the suspension. Both research- and economically-relevant particles with high polydispersity and/or shape anisotropy are easily characterized following our approach (http://bsa.bionanomaterials.ch), which allows for rapid and quantitative classification in terms of dimensionality and size: features that are major targets of European Union recommendations and legislation. PMID:25965905

  9. An in situ electron microscopy technique for the study of thermally activated reactions in multilayered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, M.A.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Weihs, T.P.

    1995-04-14

    A novel in situ transmission electron microscopy technique for the observation of reaction processes in multilayered materials is reported. The technique involves constant heating rate experiments of multilayered materials in image and diffraction modes. Because the fine scale microstructure of multilayered materials is typically a small fraction of the TEM specimen thickness, realistic comparison of the microstructural evolution with that of similarly processed thick foil samples is possible. Such experiments, when well designed, can provide rapid characterization of phase transformations and stability of nano-structured materials. The results of these experiments can be recorded in both video and micrograph format. The results and limitations of this technique will be shown for the Al/Zr and Al/Monel multilayered systems.

  10. A new method for preparing powders for transmission electron microscopy examination.

    PubMed

    Montone, A; Antisari, M Vittori

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we describe a novel method to prepare powder specimens for transmission electron microscopy examination. The powder samples are embedded in a metallic matrix by a route based on the plastic flow of a soft metal, using a small laboratory type hand driven hydraulic press. The resulting composites are processed with the conventional procedure based on grinding polishing and ion beam milling. The resulting TEM specimens have a self-supporting structure, good thermal and electrical conductivity while showing a well-polished surface resulting from the ion milling process. The method can be applied to a large variety of samples with sufficiently strong mechanical properties; a few examples are reported. The limits, mainly due to the mechanical toughness of the powder, are discussed. PMID:12801540

  11. Micropipes and voids at β¨SiC/Si(100) interfaces: an electron microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, R.; Gösele, U.; Niemann, E.; Wischmeyer, F.

    The microstructure of β-SiC/Si(100) interfaces generated by carbonization and subsequent growth in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Differently prepared cross section and planar specimens allowed a detailed characterization of interface defects. Besides pyramidal voids, which were frequently reported to appear at SiC/Si interfaces within the substrate, recently discovered micropipes are of special interest. Both kinds of defects form by outdiffusion of silicon during the carbonization process. In contrast to voids. which initially remain empty, micropipes develop by simultaneous ingrowth of SiC. The area densities of micropipes were found to be orders of magnitude higher than those of voids. Micropipe formation may be due to a high density of SiC nuclei preexisting on the substrate surfaces after pretreatments. The simultaneous development of voids and micropipes is discussed on the basis of results obtained from a short-time carbonization experiment.

  12. Identifying dislocations and stacking faults in GaN films by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, X. J.; Niu, M. T.; Zeng, X. H.; Huang, J.; Zhang, J. C.; Zhang, J. P.; Wang, J. F.; Xu, K.

    2016-08-01

    The application of annular bright field (ABF) and medium-angle annular dark field (MAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging to crystalline defect analysis has been extended to dislocations and stacking faults (SFs). Dislocations and SFs have been imaged under zone-axis and two-beam diffraction conditions. Comparing to conventional two-beam diffraction contrast images, the ABF and MAADF images of dislocations and SFs not only are complementary and symmetrical with their peaks at dislocation core and SFs plane, but also show similar extinction phenomenon. It is demonstrated that conventional TEM rules for diffraction contrast, i.e. g · b and g · R invisibility criteria remain applicable. The contrast mechanism and extinction of dislocation and SFs in ABF and MAADF STEM are illuminated by zero-order Laue zone Kikuchi diffraction.

  13. Installation of electric field electron beam blanker in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, Misa; Kimura, Yoshihide; Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Otsuka, Masayuki; Takai, Yoshizo

    2006-11-15

    We have newly installed an electric field electron beam blanker in a transmission electron microscopy, which chops an electron beam very quickly without the effect of hysteresis. The electric field, which is generated by the electron beam blanker, deflects the electron beam, and the electron beam is intercepted by an aperture. The response time of the beam blanker is 50 {mu}s. Therefore, a very short pulsed electron beam enables a charge-coupled device camera to directly expose an electron beam spot or diffraction pattern. Moreover, we measured the response of a deflector coil, which is usually used as an electron beam blanker, using our electron beam blanker. Our beam blanker will become a key component in a computer-assisted minimal dose system, which enables us to reduce the electron dose of the sample.

  14. High-resolution electron microscopy of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.E.; Kung, H.H.; Sickafus, K.E.; Gray, G.T. III; Field, R.D.; Smith, J.F.

    1997-11-01

    This final report chronicles a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Facility has doubled in size and tripled in quality since the beginning of the three-year period. The facility now includes a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a 100 kV field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM), a 300 kV field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscope (FE-HRTEM), and a 300 kV analytical transmission electron microscope. A new orientation imaging microscope is being installed. X-ray energy dispersive spectrometers for chemical analysis are available on all four microscopes; parallel electron energy loss spectrometers are operational on the FE-STEM and FE-HRTEM. These systems enable evaluation of local atomic bonding, as well as chemical composition in nanometer-scale regions. The FE-HRTEM has a point-to-point resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}, but the resolution can be pushed to its information limit of 1 {angstrom} by computer reconstruction of a focal series of images. HRTEM has been used to image the atomic structure of defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and interfaces in a variety of materials from superconductors and ferroelectrics to structural ceramics and intermetallics.

  15. Measuring electron-phonon coupling with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, Vidya

    Electron-boson interactions are ubiquitous in systems ranging from simple metals to novel materials such as graphene, high-temperature superconductors and topological insulators. Of particular interest is the coupling between electrons and phonons. In general, electron-phonon coupling gives rise to quasiparticles of decreased mobility and increased effective mass. Nearly all information about electron-phonon coupling is contained in the Eliashberg function (α2 F (ω k , E)) of the material. In this talk I discuss the various methods by which the effects of electron-phonon coupling can be measured by scanning tunneling microscopy. I will present STM data on a variety of systems ranging from metals to topological insulators and discuss the signatures of electron-phonon interactions in different types of STM data. In particular I discuss how high resolution measurements allow us to measure the dispersion and obtain the real part of the self-energy, which can in principle be inverted to obtain the Eliashberg function.

  16. Electron microscopy of primary cell cultures in solution and correlative optical microscopy using ASEM.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kinoshita, Takaaki; Uemura, Takeshi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Watanabe, Yohei; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Sato, Mari; Suga, Mitsuo; Maruyama, Yuusuke; Tsuji, Noriko M; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Nishihara, Shoko; Sato, Chikara

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy of cells in a natural environment of aqueous liquid facilitates high-throughput observation of protein complex formation. ASEM allows the inverted SEM to observe the wet sample from below, while an optical microscope observes it from above quasi-simultaneously. The disposable ASEM dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can be coated variously to realize the primary-culture of substrate-sensitive cells in a few milliliters of culture medium in a stable incubator environment. Neuron differentiation, neural networking, proplatelet-formation and phagocytosis were captured by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and imaged at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM with/without metal staining. Fas expression on the cell surface was visualized, correlated to the spatial distribution of F-actin. Axonal partitioning was studied using primary-culture neurons, and presynaptic induction by GluRδ2-N-terminus-linked fluorescent magnetic beads was correlated to the presynaptic-marker Bassoon. Further, megakaryocytes secreting proplatelets were captured, and P-selectins with adherence activity were localized to some of the granules present by immuno-ASEM. The phagocytosis of lactic acid bacteria by dendritic cells was also imaged. Based on these studies, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the study of various mesoscopic-scale dynamics in the near future. PMID:24216127

  17. Structural characterization of interfaces in epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions by transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Chang, L. Y.; Choi, S.-Y.; Kirkland, A. I.; Kohn, A.; Wang, S. G.; Petford-Long, A. K.; Ward, R. C. C.

    2010-07-01

    We present a detailed structural characterization of the interfaces in Fe/MgO/Fe layers grown by molecular-beam epitaxy using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning TEM, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. When fabricated into magnetic tunnel junctions, these epitaxial devices exhibit large tunnel magnetoresistance ratios (e.g., 318% at 10 K), though still considerably lower than the values predicted theoretically. The reason for this discrepancy is being debated and has been attributed to the structure of, and defects at the interface, namely, the relative position of the atoms, interface oxidation, strain, and structural asymmetry of the interfaces. In this structural study, we observed that Fe is bound to O at the interfaces. The interfaces are semicoherent and mostly sharp with a minor degree of oxidation. A comparison of the two interfaces shows that the top MgO/Fe interface is rougher.

  18. New developments in electron microscopy for serial image acquisition of neuronal profiles.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yoshiyuki

    2015-02-01

    Recent developments in electron microscopy largely automate the continuous acquisition of serial electron micrographs (EMGs), previously achieved by laborious manual serial ultrathin sectioning using an ultramicrotome and ultrastructural image capture process with transmission electron microscopy. The new systems cut thin sections and capture serial EMGs automatically, allowing for acquisition of large data sets in a reasonably short time. The new methods are focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy, ultramicrotome/serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, automated tape-collection ultramicrotome/scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope camera array. In this review, their positive and negative aspects are discussed. PMID:25564566

  19. Analysis of electron emission from GaAs(Cs,O) by low energy electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiuguang

    2015-10-01

    Low-energy electron microscopy was carried out to study the electron emission process from a GaAs photocathode with a negative electron affinity (NEA) surface. The relationship between emission current and electron affinity was investigated in detail to obtain information regarding the electron tunneling in the vacuum barrier and the electron distribution in the interior of GaAs, especially with respect to photoelectron capture in the band bending region. A comparison of the calculated quantized sub-band energies in the band bending region confirmed that the majority of photoelectrons fell within sub-bands, from where a large portion of the photoelectrons escape into the vacuum.

  20. Aberration-Coreected Electron Microscopy at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu,Y.; Wall, J.

    2008-04-01

    The last decade witnessed the rapid development and implementation of aberration correction in electron optics, realizing a more-than-70-year-old dream of aberration-free electron microscopy with a spatial resolution below one angstrom [1-9]. With sophisticated aberration correctors, modern electron microscopes now can reveal local structural information unavailable with neutrons and x-rays, such as the local arrangement of atoms, order/disorder, electronic inhomogeneity, bonding states, spin configuration, quantum confinement, and symmetry breaking [10-17]. Aberration correction through multipole-based correctors, as well as the associated improved stability in accelerating voltage, lens supplies, and goniometers in electron microscopes now enables medium-voltage (200-300kV) microscopes to achieve image resolution at or below 0.1nm. Aberration correction not only improves the instrument's spatial resolution but, equally importantly, allows larger objective lens pole-piece gaps to be employed thus realizing the potential of the instrument as a nanoscale property-measurement tool. That is, while retaining high spatial resolution, we can use various sample stages to observe the materials response under various temperature, electric- and magnetic- fields, and atmospheric environments. Such capabilities afford tremendous opportunities to tackle challenging science and technology issues in physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology. The research goal of the electron microscopy group at the Dept. of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science and the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, as well as the Institute for Advanced Electron Microscopy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is to elucidate the microscopic origin of the physical- and chemical-behavior of materials, and the role of individual, or groups of atoms, especially in their native functional environments. We plan to accomplish this by developing and implementing various quantitative electron

  1. Site-specific specimen preparation by focused ion beam milling for transmission electron microscopy of metal matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Philippe; Klotz, Ulrich E; Khalid, Fazal A; Beffort, Olivier

    2004-04-01

    This work describes the application and usefulness of the focused ion beam (FIB) technique for the preparation of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples from metal matrix composite materials. Results on an Aldiamond composite, manufactured by the squeeze casting infiltration process, were chosen for demonstration. It is almost impossible to prepare TEM specimens of this material by any other conventional method owing to the presence of highly inhomogeneous phases and reinforcement diamond particles. The present article gives a detailed account of the salient features of the FIB technique and its operation. One of the big advantages is the possibility to prepare site-specific TEM specimens with high spatial resolution. The artifacts occurring during the specimen preparation, for example, Ga-ion implantation, curtain effects, amorphous layers, bending of the lamella, or different milling behaviors of the materials have been discussed. Furthermore, TEM examination of the specimens prepared revealed an ultrafine amorphous layer of graphite formed at the interface between the Al and diamond particles that may affect the interfacial properties of the composite materials. This may not have been feasible without the successful application of the FIB technique for production of good quality site-specific TEM specimens. PMID:15306057

  2. The origins and evolution of freeze-etch electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Heuser, John E.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of the Balzers freeze-fracture machine by Moor in 1961 had a much greater impact on the advancement of electron microscopy than he could have imagined. Devised originally to circumvent the dangers of classical thin-section techniques, as well as to provide unique en face views of cell membranes, freeze-fracturing proved to be crucial for developing modern concepts of how biological membranes are organized and proved that membranes are bilayers of lipids within which proteins float and self-assemble. Later, when freeze-fracturing was combined with methods for freezing cells that avoided the fixation and cryoprotection steps that Moor still had to use to prepare the samples for his original invention, it became a means for capturing membrane dynamics on the millisecond time-scale, thus allowing a deeper understanding of the functions of biological membranes in living cells as well as their static ultrastructure. Finally, the realization that unfixed, non-cryoprotected samples could be deeply vacuum-etched or even freeze-dried after freeze-fracturing opened up a whole new way to image all the other molecular components of cells besides their membranes and also provided a powerful means to image the interactions of all the cytoplasmic components with the various membranes of the cell. The purpose of this review is to outline the history of these technical developments, to describe how they are being used in electron microscopy today and to suggest how they can be improved in order to further their utility for biological electron microscopy in the future. PMID:21844598

  3. Copper Decoration of Carbon Nanotubes and High Resolution Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probst, Camille

    A new process of decorating carbon nanotubes with copper was developed for the fabrication of nanocomposite aluminum-nanotubes. The process consists of three stages: oxidation, activation and electroless copper plating on the nanotubes. The oxidation step was required to create chemical function on the nanotubes, essential for the activation step. Then, catalytic nanoparticles of tin-palladium were deposited on the tubes. Finally, during the electroless copper plating, copper particles with a size between 20 and 60 nm were uniformly deposited on the nanotubes surface. The reproducibility of the process was shown by using another type of carbon nanotube. The fabrication of nanocomposites aluminum-nanotubes was tested by aluminum vacuum infiltration. Although the infiltration of carbon nanotubes did not produce the expected results, an interesting electron microscopy sample was discovered during the process development: the activated carbon nanotubes. Secondly, scanning transmitted electron microscopy (STEM) imaging in SEM was analysed. The images were obtained with a new detector on the field emission scanning electron microscope (Hitachi S-4700). Various parameters were analysed with the use of two different samples: the activated carbon nanotubes (previously obtained) and gold-palladium nanodeposits. Influences of working distance, accelerating voltage or sample used on the spatial resolution of images obtained with SMART (Scanning Microscope Assessment and Resolution Testing) were analysed. An optimum working distance for the best spatial resolution related to the sample analysed was found for the imaging in STEM mode. Finally, relation between probe size and spatial resolution of backscattered electrons (BSE) images was studied. An image synthesis method was developed to generate the BSE images from backscattered electrons coefficients obtained with CASINO software. Spatial resolution of images was determined using SMART. The analysis shown that using a probe

  4. Frontiers in Electron Microscopy: Probing the Nanoscale in Nanoseconds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Nigel

    2005-03-01

    Electron microscopy has traditionally been driven by the desire to investigate the result of a given materials process (e.g. nucleation and growth, fatigue etc) at the highest spatial resolution. However, this type of observation typically gives no indication as to how the material achieved its final state. With the nanotechnology revolution highlighting the novel properties that can be achieved by modifying the processing and ambient conditions a material is subjected to, the need to characterize the fundamentals behind the materials process itself has assumed critical importance. One of the developing methods to achieve this level of characterization is dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM). Using a laser pulse to stimulate the electron emission, pulse durations of nanoseconds and shorter can be achieved with sufficient signal to obtain images and diffraction patterns from materials excited by a laser in a pump-probe configuration (with the probe being the electron beam). A novel nanosecond electron microscope incorporating this principle has been used initially to observe the hexagonal close packed (HCP) to body centered cubic (BCC) martensitic phase transformation in titanium. The general class of martensitic phase transformations occur by a rapid shear of the crystal lattice. No long range diffusion is required during these transformations, thus they propagate through a crystal with a speed that can approach the speed of sound. The images and diffraction patterns obtained can be interpreted in terms of the unusual vibrational stabilization of the high temperature BCC phase of Ti. An interesting observation is that the speed of the transition seems to be dependent on the history of the sample and appears to be linked to the presence of oxygen impurities. This work was performed in collaboration with A. Ziegler, G. H. Campbell, H. Kleinschmidt, and O. Bostonjoglo and supported by LLNL LDRD project 04-ERD-071. This work performed under the auspices of

  5. Scanning Transmission X-Ray, Laser Scanning, and Transmission Electron Microscopy Mapping of the Exopolymeric Matrix of Microbial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J. R.; Swerhone, G. D. W.; Leppard, G. G.; Araki, T.; Zhang, X.; West, M. M.; Hitchcock, A. P.

    2003-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) were used to map the distribution of macromolecular subcomponents (e.g., polysaccharides, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids) of biofilm cells and matrix. The biofilms were developed from river water supplemented with methanol, and although they comprised a complex microbial community, the biofilms were dominated by heterotrophic bacteria. TEM provided the highest-resolution structural imaging, CLSM provided detailed compositional information when used in conjunction with molecular probes, and STXM provided compositional mapping of macromolecule distributions without the addition of probes. By examining exactly the same region of a sample with combinations of these techniques (STXM with CLSM and STXM with TEM), we demonstrate that this combination of multimicroscopy analysis can be used to create a detailed correlative map of biofilm structure and composition. We are using these correlative techniques to improve our understanding of the biochemical basis for biofilm organization and to assist studies intended to investigate and optimize biofilms for environmental remediation applications. PMID:12957944

  6. LLNL Workshop on TEM of Pu

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.E.

    1996-09-10

    On Sept. 10, 1996, LLNL hosted a workshop aimed at answering the question: Is it possible to carry out transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on plutonium metal in an electron microscope located outside the LLNL plutonium facility. The workshop focused on evaluation of a proposed plan for Pu microscopy both from a technical and environment, health, and safety point of view. After review and modification of the plan, workshop participants unanimously concluded that: (1) the technical plan is sound, (2) this technical plan, including a proposal for a new TEM, provides significant improvements and unique capabilities compared with the effort at LANL and is therefore complementary, (3) there is no significant environment, health, and safety obstacle to this plan.

  7. Electron Microscopy Studies of Solid Surfaces and Interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdardziska-Josifovska, Marija

    1991-02-01

    Electron microscopy techniques for study of surfaces and interfaces have been investigated and applied to (100) and (111) surfaces of MgO and to interfaces of Mo/Si multilayers and CoSi_2/Si epitaxial films. MgO surfaces subjected to different annealing and chemical treatments have been characterized by reflection electron microscopy imaging, reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), and reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). An oxygen rich (sqrt {3} times sqrt{3})R 30^circ reconstruction was found on the polar (111) surface upon annealing in oxygen at temperatures higher than 1500 ^circC. Transformation of the surface topography and segregation of calcium were observed on the cleaved (100) surface due to annealing. RHEED resonance conditions have been employed and studied with geometrical constructions, rocking curves and REELS. These conditions are associated with parabolas in the Kikuchi (K) patterns whose nature had been subject of much controversy. The parabolas have been explained as K lines of two-dimensional (2D) lattices in a general scheme which describes the K pattern geometry in terms of intersections of Brillouin zone boundaries with a sphere of reflections. Full treatment of the cases of 2D and 1D real lattices has revealed previously unknown boundaries in the form of parabolic surfaces (2D) and paraboloids of revolution (1D). These boundaries have been applied to lines which arise from electron channeling in 3D crystals and to RHEED parabolas from 2D surface reconstructions. Nanodiffraction, low angle dark-field imaging, electron holography, high spatial resolution EELS, and shadow imaging have been evaluated as means for measuring interface abruptness and change in mean-inner potential and compared to other microscopy techniques. Refraction effects at interfaces were observed as streaking of the nanodiffraction disks which was found to depend on the crystalline nature of the interface. For polycrystalline

  8. Cryogenic electron microscopy study of nanoemulsion formation from microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Seung; Morrison, Eric D; Frethem, Chris D; Zasadzinski, Joseph A; McCormick, Alon V

    2014-09-16

    We examine a process of preparing oil-in-water nanoemulsions by quenching (diluting and cooling) precursor microemulsions made with nonionic surfactants and a cosurfactant. The precursor microemulsion structure is varied by changing the concentration of the cosurfactant. Water-continuous microemulsions produce initial nanoemulsion structures that are small and simple, mostly unilamellar vesicles, but microemulsions that are not water-continuous produce initial nanoemulsion structures that are larger and multilamellar. Examination of these structures by cryo-electron microscopy supports the hypothesis that they are initially vesicular structures formed via lamellar intermediate structures, and that if the lamellar structures are too well ordered they fail to produce small simple structures. PMID:25141294

  9. Photoemission Electron Microscopy of a Plasmonic Silver Nanoparticle Trimer

    SciTech Connect

    Peppernick, Samuel J.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.; Wang, Jinyong; Wang, Yi-Chung; Wei, Wei

    2013-07-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to investigate the spatial distribution of photoelectrons emitted from core-shell silver (Ag) nanoparticles. We use two-photon photoemission microscopy (2P-PEEM) to spatially resolve electron emission from a trimeric core-shell aggregate of triangular symmetry. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations are performed to model the intensity distributions of the electromagnetic near-fields resulting from femtosecond (fs) laser excitation of localized surface plasmon oscillations in the triangular core-shell structure. We demonstrate that the predicted FDTD near-field intensity distribution reproduces the 2P-PEEM photoemission pattern.

  10. Photonic near-field imaging in multiphoton photoemission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, J. P. S.; Word, R. C.; Saliba, S. D.; Könenkamp, R.

    2013-05-01

    We report the observation of optical near fields in a photonic waveguide of conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) using multiphoton photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM). Nonlinear two-photon photoelectron emission is enhanced at field maxima created by interference between incident 410-nm and coherently excited guided photonic waves, providing strong phase contrast. Guided modes are observed under both transverse magnetic field (TM) and transverse electric field (TE) polarized illuminations and are consistent with classical electromagnetic theory. Implications on the role of multiphoton PEEM in optical near-field imaging are discussed.

  11. Analytical electron microscopy study of radioactive ceramic waste form

    SciTech Connect

    O'Holleran, T. P.; Sinkler, W.; Moschetti, T. L.; Johnson, S. G.; Goff, K. M.

    1999-11-11

    A ceramic waste form has been developed to immobilize the halide high-level waste stream from electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. Analytical electron microscopy studies, using both scanning and transmission instruments, have been performed to characterize the microstructure of this material. The microstructure consists primarily of sodalite granules (containing the bulk of the halides) bonded together with glass. The results of these studies are discussed in detail. Insight into the waste form fabrication process developed as a result of these studies is also discussed.

  12. Electron microscopy of a Gd-Ba-Cu-O superconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesh, R.; Thomas, G.; Meng, R. L.; Hor, P. H.; Chu, C. W.

    1989-01-01

    An electron microscopy study has been carried out to characterize the microstructure of a sintered Gd-Ba-Cu-O superconductor alloy. The GdBa2Cu3O(7-x) phase in the oxygen annealed sample is orthorhombic, while in the vacuum annealed sample it is tetragonal. It is shown that the details of the fine structure in the 001-line zone axis convergent beam patterns can be used to distinguish between the orthorhombic form and the tetragonal form. In addition to this matrix phase, an amorphous phase is frequently observed at the triple grain junctions. Gd-rich inclusions have been observed inside the matrix phase.

  13. Fiber analysis vignettes: Electron microscopy to the rescue!

    PubMed

    Roggli, Victor L

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in the exposure doses that contribute to the various asbestos-associated diseases. Epidemiological studies have shown important differences in the contributions of the various fiber types to asbestos-related diseases, with the amphiboles showing a greater degree of potency as compared to chrysotile. However, epidemiological studies have occasionally provided misleading results. Over the past several decades, there have been several examples where fiber analysis using electron microscopy produced unexpected results which were important to our understanding of disease-exposure relationships. It is the purpose of this article to summarize these fiber analysis vignettes. PMID:26934117

  14. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and compared to those of other techniques available.

  15. Direct single electron detection with a CMOS detector for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruqi, A. R.; Henderson, R.; Pryddetch, M.; Allport, P.; Evans, A.

    2005-07-01

    We report the results of an investigation into the use of a monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) for electron microscopy. MAPS, designed originally for astronomers at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratories, was installed in a 120 kV electron microscope (Philips CM12) at the MRC Laboratory in Cambridge for tests which included recording single electrons at 40 and 120 keV, and measuring signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), spatial resolution and radiation sensitivity. Our results show that, due to the excellent SNR and resolution, it is possible to register single electrons. The radiation damage to the detector is apparent with low doses and gets progressively greater so that its lifetime is limited to 600,000-900,000 electrons/pixel (very approximately 10-15 krad). Provided this detector can be radiation hardened to reduce its radiation sensitivity several hundred fold and increased in size, it will provide excellent performance for all types of electron microscopy.

  16. Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy Studies of Ferromagnet - Semiconductor Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, P. G.; Perrella, A. C.; Yurtsever, A.; Buhrman, R. A.

    2004-03-01

    Devices that employ spin as well as charge effects have been the subjects of extensive study recently. The magnetic tunneling transistor (1) is one important device that demonstrates an electrical means of injecting spin-polarized electrons into a semiconductor. A Schottky barrier lies at the heart of the device, and a high quality spatially homogenous and uniform barrier formed on GaAs is highly desirable. We have used ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) to study CoFe, Fe and permalloy deposited on a GaAs substrate to give nanometer resolved evaluation of hot electron transport through the films and across the Schottky barrier. All films give a homogenous, uniform barrier as compared with evaporated Au/GaAs and Ag/GaAs interfaces. We will report on BEEM measurements of the hot electron transfer ratio across the Schottky barrier for the different ferromagnetic materials, and on the energy and spin-dependent hot electron attenuation lengths of the CoFe, Fe, and permalloy films. (1) Sebastiaan van Dijken, Xin Jiang, Stuart S. P. Parkin, APL, 80, 3364.

  17. Transmission electron microscopy of carbon-coated and iron-doped titania nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjum, Dalaver H.; Memon, Nasir K.; Ismail, Mohamed; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Sharif, Usman; Chung, Suk Ho

    2016-09-01

    We present a study on the properties of iron (Fe)-doped and carbon (C)-coated titania (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) which has been compiled by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These TiO2 NPs were prepared by using the flame synthesis method. This method allows the simultaneous C coating and Fe doping of TiO2 NPs. XRD investigations revealed that the phase of the prepared NPs was anatase TiO2. Conventional TEM analysis showed that the average size of the TiO2 NPs was about 65 nm and that the NPs were uniformly coated with the element C. Furthermore, from the x-ray energy dispersive spectrometry analysis, it was found that about 8 at.% Fe was present in the synthesized samples. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) revealed the graphitized carbon structure of the layer surrounding the prepared TiO2 NPs. HRTEM analysis further revealed that the NPs possessed the crystalline structure of anatase titania. Energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) analysis showed the C coating and Fe doping of the NPs. The ratio of L3 and L2 peaks for the Ti-L23 and Fe-L23 edges present in the core loss electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) revealed a +4 oxidation state for the Ti and a +3 oxidation state for the Fe. These EELS results were further confirmed with XPS analysis. The electronic properties of the samples were investigated by applying Kramers–Kronig analysis to the low-loss EELS spectra acquired from the prepared NPs. The presented results showed that the band gap energy of the TiO2 NPs decreased from an original value of 3.2 eV to about 2.2 eV, which is quite close to the ideal band gap energy of 1.65 eV for photocatalysis semiconductors. The observed decrease in band gap energy of the TiO2 NPs was attributed to the presence of Fe atoms at the lattice sites of the anatase TiO2 lattice. In short, C-coated and Fe-doped TiO2 NPs were synthesized with a rather cost-effective and comparatively easily scalable method. The

  18. Transmission electron microscopy of carbon-coated and iron-doped titania nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Dalaver H; Memon, Nasir K; Ismail, Mohamed; Hedhili, Mohamed N; Sharif, Usman; Chung, Suk Ho

    2016-09-01

    We present a study on the properties of iron (Fe)-doped and carbon (C)-coated titania (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) which has been compiled by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These TiO2 NPs were prepared by using the flame synthesis method. This method allows the simultaneous C coating and Fe doping of TiO2 NPs. XRD investigations revealed that the phase of the prepared NPs was anatase TiO2. Conventional TEM analysis showed that the average size of the TiO2 NPs was about 65 nm and that the NPs were uniformly coated with the element C. Furthermore, from the x-ray energy dispersive spectrometry analysis, it was found that about 8 at.% Fe was present in the synthesized samples. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) revealed the graphitized carbon structure of the layer surrounding the prepared TiO2 NPs. HRTEM analysis further revealed that the NPs possessed the crystalline structure of anatase titania. Energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) analysis showed the C coating and Fe doping of the NPs. The ratio of L3 and L2 peaks for the Ti-L23 and Fe-L23 edges present in the core loss electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) revealed a +4 oxidation state for the Ti and a +3 oxidation state for the Fe. These EELS results were further confirmed with XPS analysis. The electronic properties of the samples were investigated by applying Kramers-Kronig analysis to the low-loss EELS spectra acquired from the prepared NPs. The presented results showed that the band gap energy of the TiO2 NPs decreased from an original value of 3.2 eV to about 2.2 eV, which is quite close to the ideal band gap energy of 1.65 eV for photocatalysis semiconductors. The observed decrease in band gap energy of the TiO2 NPs was attributed to the presence of Fe atoms at the lattice sites of the anatase TiO2 lattice. In short, C-coated and Fe-doped TiO2 NPs were synthesized with a rather cost-effective and comparatively easily scalable method. The

  19. Correlative video-light-electron microscopy of mobile organelles.

    PubMed

    Beznoussenko, Galina V; Mironov, Alexander A

    2015-01-01

    Correlative microscopy is a method when for the analysis of the very same cell or tissue area, several different methods of light microscopy (LM) and then electron microscopy (EM) are used consecutively. The combination of LM and EM allows researchers to study phenomena at a global scale and then to look for unique or rare events for their subsequent EM examination. Unfortunately, the observation of living cells under EM is still impossible. LM provides the possibility to examine quickly many live cells, whereas EM provides the high level of resolution. On the other side, the final goal of any morphological analysis of a biological sample, whether it is an organism, organ, tissue, cell, organelle, or molecule, is to get an averaged three-dimensional model of the structure examined and to determine the chemical composition of it. This chapter describes the methodology of imaging with the help of CVLEM. The guidelines presented herein enable researchers to analyze structure of organelles and to obtain the three-dimensional model of the structure examined, and in particular rare events captured by low-resolution imaging of a population or transient events captured by live imaging can now also be studied at high resolution by EM. PMID:25702127

  20. Transmission electron microscopy of deformed Ti-6Al-4 V micro-cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Rengen; Gong, Jicheng; Wilkinson, Angus J.; Jones, Ian P.

    2012-09-01

    Single α-β colony micro-cantilevers were machined from a polycrystalline commercial Ti-6Al-4 V sample using a focussed ion beam. Each cantilever contained several alpha lamellae separated by thin fillets of beta. A nanoindenter was used to perform micro-bending tests. The a3 prismatic slip system was selectively activated in the cantilevers by controlling the crystal orientation along the micro-cantilever. Specimens for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were prepared using a dual-beam focussed ion beam from a series of micro-cantilevers deformed to various extents. Bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy (BF-STEM) was used to investigate the processes of slip nucleation, propagation and transmission through the α/β interface. The cantilevers had an equilateral triangular cross-section with the bar at the top and the apex at the bottom. The compressive stresses developed near the apex were thus twice the tensile stresses near the top. Dislocations initiate first from the bottom and then from the top and move toward the neutral line. Even in the sample with a small deflection, i.e. 0.5 µm, dislocations were observed at the bottom of the cantilever, but dislocations were not observed at the top until the deflection reached 3 µm. Pile-ups pushed the dislocations past the neutral line when the micro-cantilevers were deflected to more than 4 µm.

  1. Electron microscopy structure study of laser-clad TiC-Ni particle-reinforced coating

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, J.H.; Li, X.; Lei, T.C.

    2000-04-01

    The microstructure of a laser-clad TiC-Ni particle-reinforced coating on 1045 steel was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and ion microprobe mass spectroscopy (IMMS). The microstructural constituents of the clad layers (CLs) were analyzed to be TiC particles, {gamma}-Ni primary dendrites, and interdendritic eutectics of {gamma}{sub E}-Ni plus M{sub 23}(CB){sub 6} and M{sub 6}(CB) carboborides. Three growth mechanisms of the original TiC particles were found: (1) stepped lateral growth at the edges, (2) radiated and cylindrically coupled growth at the edges, and (3) bridging growth of the clustered particles. Ordered and modulated structures were found in the original TiC particles. In addition to the original TiC particles, fine TiC particles precipitated from the liquid phase and {gamma}-Ni solid solution during laser cladding. The microstructures of the bonding zones (BZs) were intimately associated with laser processing parameters. The BZs of the clad coatings can be categorized into three types according to the combination of the CL with heat-affected zone (HAZ): (1) straight interface combination, (2) zigzag connection, and (3) combination by partial melting of prior austenitic grain boundaries of the substrate. The microstructural evolution of the CLs was discussed. The formation and phase transformation models of the BZs were proposed.

  2. Characterization of microstructural morphology of austempered ductile iron by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Guo, X L; Su, H Q; Wu, B Y; Liu, Z G

    1998-02-15

    Mechanical properties of austempered ductile iron (ADI) are mainly controlled by its unique microstructure. The objectives of this paper are to characterize the microstructural morphology and the phase distribution of ADI using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and to determine the mechanism of strengthening and toughening of ADI. The experimental results show that, in the microstructure of ADI composing of upper bainite, retained austenite, graphitic nodule, and a small amount of martensite, the upper bainite is composed of sub-units of ferrite in the shape of "wheat ears" on which the "wheat grains" grow at an angle of about 60 degrees to the long axis of the "wheat ears." The retained austenite is connected with each other in the shape of a continuous net. The wheat-ear like bainite with a homogeneous distribution in the continuous austenite net plays an important role to the strengthening and toughening of ADI. The metastable austenite appears in the shape of a large plate in which the martensite is preferentially formed. The appearance of martensite can be suppressed at the time when retained austenite remains stable, which is of benefit to the continuity and homogeneity of austenite net. PMID:9523764

  3. An analytical electron microscopy study of paraequilibrium cementite precipitation in ultra-high-strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, G.; Olson, G. B.; Campbell, C. E.

    1999-03-01

    To support quantitative design of ultra-high-strength (UHS) secondary-hardening steels, the precipitation of cementite prior to the precipitation of the M2C phase is investigated using a model alloy. The microstructure of cementite is investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Consistent with earlier studies on tempering of Fe-C martensite, lattice imaging of cementite suggests microsyntactic intergrowth of M5C2 (Hägg carbide). The concentration of substitutional alloying elements in cementite are quantified by high-resolution analytical electron microscopy (AEM) using extraction replica specimens. Quantification of the substitutional elements in cementite confirms its paraequilibrium (PE) state with ferrite at the very early stage of tempering. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of the thermodynamic driving force for nucleation of the primary-strengthening, coherent M2C carbide phase. The ferrite-cementite PE condition reduces the carbon concentration in the ferrite matrix with a significant reduction of M2C driving force. The kinetics of dissolution of PE cementite and its transition to other intermediate states will also influence the kinetics of secondary hardening behavior in UHS steels.

  4. Scanning electron microscopy of terminal airways of guinea pigs chronically inhaling diesel exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Kucukcelebi, A.; Mohamed, F.; Barnhart, M.I.

    1983-01-01

    The structural physiology of airways from 80 guinea pigs was examined for changes induced by diesel exhaust (DE) exposure. Acute, subacute and chronic studies contrasted inhalation effects of 250, 750, 1500 and 6000 micrograms DE/m3 with ''clean air'' breathing of age-matched controls. Nonciliated epithelial (Clara) cells, epithelial type 2 cells and alveolar macrophages were increased in a DE dose dependent fashion. Also, eosinophils, were recruited. Epithelial type 1 cells of the distal airways internalized DEP. The relative dustiness (particulate density) of airways was assessed from coded specimens. Some 86% of DE exposed animals were correctly identified. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) resolved surface located DE particulates (DEP). Single particles, loose clusters, low density agglomerates occurred. While SEM visual clues are insufficient for absolute identification of DE particles, there was supporting evidence from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and from SEM studies comparing vascular with intratracheally fixed specimens. Presumptive DEP were notable on bifurcation bridges in respiratory bronchioles and alveolar ducts while alveolar outpockets had heavy dust burdens. Clumps of macrophages in such alveoli almost occluded the airspace. We conclude that normal guinea pigs appear to adapt to a chronic DE stress environment. But, the ultrastructural basis (cellular protrusions, DEP agglomerates and secretional debris) exists in peripheral airways for airflow instability and increased airflow resistance.

  5. Sample heating system for spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kohashi, Teruo; Motai, Kumi

    2013-08-01

    A sample-heating system for spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM) has been developed and used for microscopic magnetization analysis at temperatures up to 500°C. In this system, a compact ceramic heater and a preheating operation keep the ultra-high vacuum conditions while the sample is heated during spin SEM measurement. Moreover, the secondary-electron collector, which is arranged close to the sample, was modified so that it is not damaged at high temperatures. The system was used to heat a Co(1000) single-crystal sample from room temperature up to 500°C, and the magnetic-domain structures were observed. Changes of the domain structures were observed around 220 and 400°C, and these changes are considered to be due to phase transitions of this sample. PMID:23349241

  6. Cryo electron microscopy to determine the structure of macromolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Carroni, Marta; Saibil, Helen R

    2016-02-15

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a structural molecular and cellular biology technique that has experienced major advances in recent years. Technological developments in image recording as well as in processing software make it possible to obtain three-dimensional reconstructions of macromolecular assemblies at near-atomic resolution that were formerly obtained only by X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy. In parallel, cryo-electron tomography has also benefitted from these technological advances, so that visualization of irregular complexes, organelles or whole cells with their molecular machines in situ has reached subnanometre resolution. Cryo-EM can therefore address a broad range of biological questions. The aim of this review is to provide a brief overview of the principles and current state of the cryo-EM field. PMID:26638773

  7. Combined Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Tilt- and Focal Series

    SciTech Connect

    Dahmen, Tim; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre G; Lupini, Andrew R; Kubel, Christian; Slusallek, Phillip; De Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a combined tilt- and focal series is proposed as a new recording scheme for high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Three-dimensional (3D) data were acquired by mechanically tilting the specimen, and recording a through-focal series at each tilt direction. The sample was a whole-mount macrophage cell with embedded gold nanoparticles. The tilt focal algebraic reconstruction technique (TF-ART) is introduced as a new algorithm to reconstruct tomograms from such combined tilt- and focal series. The feasibility of TF-ART was demonstrated by 3D reconstruction of the experimental 3D data. The results were compared with a conventional STEM tilt series of a similar sample. The combined tilt- and focal series led to smaller missing wedge artifacts, and a higher axial resolution than obtained for the STEM tilt series, thus improving on one of the main issues of tilt series-based electron tomography.

  8. Accessing intermediate ferroelectric switching regimes with time-resolved transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Christopher R.; Jablonski, Michael L.; Damodaran, Anoop R.; Jambunathan, Karthik; Martin, Lane W.; Taheri, Mitra L.

    2012-09-01

    BiFeO3 (BFO) is one of the most widely studied magneto-electric multiferroics. The magneto-electric coupling in BiFeO3, which allows for the control of the ferroelectric and magnetic domain structures via applied electric fields, can be used to incorporate BiFeO3 into novel spintronics devices and sensors. Before BiFeO3 can be integrated into such devices, however, a better understanding of the dynamics of ferroelectric switching, particularly in the vicinity of extended defects, is needed. We use in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate the response of ferroelectric domains within BiFeO3 thin films to applied electric fields at high temporal and spatial resolution. This technique is well suited to imaging the observed intermediate ferroelectric switching regimes, which occur on a time- and length-scale that are too fine to study via conventional scanning-probe techniques. Additionally, the spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopy allows for the direct study of the dynamics of domain nucleation and propagation in the presence of structural defects. In this article, we show how this high resolution technique captures transient ferroelectric structures forming during biasing, and how defects can both pin domains and act as a nucleation source. The observation of continuing domain coalescence over a range of times qualitatively agrees with the nucleation-limited-switching model proposed by Tagantsev et al. We demonstrate that our in situ transmission electron microscopy technique is well-suited to studying the dynamics of ferroelectric domains in BiFeO3 and other ferroelectric materials. These biasing experiments provide a real-time view of the complex dynamics of domain switching and complement scanning-probe techniques.

  9. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Saibil, Helen R.; Grünewald, Kay; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback. PMID:25615867

  10. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  11. Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Chris; Burnley, Tom; Patwardhan, Ardan; Scheres, Sjors; Topf, Maya; Roseman, Alan; Winn, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) is a new initiative for the structural biology community, following the success of CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography. Progress in supporting the users and developers of cryoEM software is reported. The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) has recently been established. The aims of the project are threefold: to build a coherent cryoEM community which will provide support for individual scientists and will act as a focal point for liaising with other communities, to support practising scientists in their use of cryoEM software and finally to support software developers in producing and disseminating robust and user-friendly programs. The project is closely modelled on CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography, and areas of common interest such as model fitting, underlying software libraries and tools for building program packages are being exploited. Nevertheless, cryoEM includes a number of techniques covering a large range of resolutions and a distinct project is required. In this article, progress so far is reported and future plans are discussed.

  12. Ultrastructure of the Odontocete organ of Corti: scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Morell, Maria; Lenoir, Marc; Shadwick, Robert E; Jauniaux, Thierry; Dabin, Willy; Begeman, Lineke; Ferreira, Marisa; Maestre, Iranzu; Degollada, Eduard; Hernandez-Milian, Gema; Cazevieille, Chantal; Fortuño, José-Manuel; Vogl, Wayne; Puel, Jean-Luc; André, Michel

    2015-02-15

    The morphological study of the Odontocete organ of Corti, together with possible alterations associated with damage from sound exposure, represents a key conservation approach to assess the effects of acoustic pollution on marine ecosystems. By collaborating with stranding networks from several European countries, 150 ears from 13 species of Odontocetes were collected and analyzed by scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. Based on our analyses, we first describe and compare Odontocete cochlear structures and then propose a diagnostic method to identify inner ear alterations in stranded individuals. The two species analyzed by TEM (Phocoena phocoena and Stenella coeruleoalba) showed morphological characteristics in the lower basal turn of high-frequency hearing species. Among other striking features, outer hair cell bodies were extremely small and were strongly attached to Deiters cells. Such morphological characteristics, shared with horseshoe bats, suggest that there has been convergent evolution of sound reception mechanisms among echolocating species. Despite possible autolytic artifacts due to technical and experimental constraints, the SEM analysis allowed us to detect the presence of scarring processes resulting from the disappearance of outer hair cells from the epithelium. In addition, in contrast to the rapid decomposition process of the sensory epithelium after death (especially of the inner hair cells), the tectorial membrane appeared to be more resistant to postmortem autolysis effects. Analysis of the stereocilia imprint pattern at the undersurface of the tectorial membrane may provide a way to detect possible ultrastructural alterations of the hair cell stereocilia by mirroring them on the tectorial membrane. PMID:25269663

  13. Transmission electron microscopy study of the oxidation of TiN layers during sputtering process

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chun; Kryder, Mark H.

    2008-03-15

    Epitaxial SrRuO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} (001) thin films with a TiN template layer have been deposited on Si(001) single crystal substrates by rf sputtering. The epitaxial orientation relationship was determined to be cube on cube with respect to Si and the crystal quality of the SrRuO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} film is preserved even when the TiN template layer was oxidized into anatase phase of TiO{sub 2} during the sputtering process of SrRuO{sub 3}. The effect of oxygen plasma on the oxidation and delamination of the TiN layer has been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The stress in the thin film of SrRuO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}/TiN structure was determined from the buckle shape in both plan view and cross-sectional TEM images. The critical stress and the compressive stress were estimated to be 2 and 4 GPa.

  14. Local sample thickness determination via scanning transmission electron microscopy defocus series.

    PubMed

    Beyer, A; Straubinger, R; Belz, J; Volz, K

    2016-05-01

    The usable aperture sizes in (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) have significantly increased in the past decade due to the introduction of aberration correction. In parallel with the consequent increase of convergence angle the depth of focus has decreased severely and optical sectioning in the STEM became feasible. Here we apply STEM defocus series to derive the local sample thickness of a TEM sample. To this end experimental as well as simulated defocus series of thin Si foils were acquired. The systematic blurring of high resolution high angle annular dark field images is quantified by evaluating the standard deviation of the image intensity for each image of a defocus series. The derived dependencies exhibit a pronounced maximum at the optimum defocus and drop to a background value for higher or lower values. The full width half maximum (FWHM) of the curve is equal to the sample thickness above a minimum thickness given by the size of the used aperture and the chromatic aberration of the microscope. The thicknesses obtained from experimental defocus series applying the proposed method are in good agreement with the values derived from other established methods. The key advantages of this method compared to others are its high spatial resolution and that it does not involve any time consuming simulations. PMID:26224521

  15. Effects of Methylmercury on Harbour Seal Peripheral Blood Leucocytes In Vitro Studied by Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Aurélie; De Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire; Schnitzler, Joseph; Siebert, Ursula; Das, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is highly immunotoxic and can alter the health status of the harbour seal, Phoca vitulina, from the North Sea. To investigate the mechanism of MeHg-induced toxicity in harbour seal lymphocytes, Concanavalin A (ConA)-stimulated peripheral blood leucocytes were exposed in vitro to sublethal concentrations of MeHgCl (0.2, 1, and 2 µM) for 72 h and then analysed for their viability and ultrastructure. After 72 h of incubation, cells were counted with a propidium iodide staining technique, a metabolic MTS assay was performed, and cells exposed to 1 µM of MeHgCl were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Alive cell numbers decreased with increased MeHgCl concentrations. In presence of ConA and 1 µM of MeHgCl, TEM images revealed a higher frequency of apoptotic cells. Exposed cells displayed condensation of the chromatin at the nuclear membrane and mitochondrial damages. The results suggest that in vitro MeHgCl-induced apoptosis in harbour seal lymphocytes through a mitochondrial pathway. PMID:26264045

  16. Analysis of high quality monatomic chromium films used in biological high resolution scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Apkarian, R P

    1994-01-01

    During the recent employment of field emission (FE) in-lens scanning electron microscopes (SEMs), refractory metal deposition technology has co-evolved to provide enhanced contrast of 1-10 nm hydrocarbon based biological structures imaged at high magnifications (> 200,000 times). Pioneer development employing the Penning sputter system in a high vacuum chamber proved that imaging of chromium (Cr) coated biological specimens contained enriched secondary electron (SE)-(I) contrasts. Single nanometer size fibrillar and particulate ectodomains within the context of complex biological membranes were accurately imaged without significant enlargement using the high resolution SE-I mode (HRSEM). This paper reports the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) testing of ultrathin (0.5-2.0 nm) Cr films deposited by planar magnetron sputter coating (PMSC). Essential parameters necessary to reproduce quality sputtered films of refractory metals used in HRSEM studies were described for the vacuum system and target operation conditions (current, voltage, and target distance). HRSEM imaging of biological specimens is presented to assess contrast attained from ultrathin fine grain Cr films deposited by PMSC. High magnification images were recorded to illustrate high quality contrasts attainable by HRSEM at low (1-5 kV) and high (10-30 kV) voltages. Dispersed molecules on formvar coated grids were sputter coated with a 1 nm thick Cr film before employing scanning transmission (STEM)/SEM modes of the FESEM to establish non-decorative image accuracy in the transmitted electron mode. PMID:7701300

  17. Perspective: 4D ultrafast electron microscopy--Evolutions and revolutions.

    PubMed

    Shorokhov, Dmitry; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2016-02-28

    In this Perspective, the evolutionary and revolutionary developments of ultrafast electron imaging are overviewed with focus on the "single-electron concept" for probing methodology. From the first electron microscope of Knoll and Ruska [Z. Phys. 78, 318 (1932)], constructed in the 1930s, to aberration-corrected instruments and on, to four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM), the developments over eight decades have transformed humans' scope of visualization. The changes in the length and time scales involved are unimaginable, beginning with the micrometer and second domains, and now reaching the space and time dimensions of atoms in matter. With these advances, it has become possible to follow the elementary structural dynamics as it unfolds in real time and to provide the means for visualizing materials behavior and biological functions. The aim is to understand emergent phenomena in complex systems, and 4D UEM is now central for the visualization of elementary processes involved, as illustrated here with examples from past achievements and future outlook. PMID:26931672

  18. Back-etch method for plan view transmission electron microscopy sample preparation of optically opaque films.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bo; Coffey, Kevin R

    2008-04-01

    Back-etch methods have been widely used to prepare plan view transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples of thin films on membranes by removal of the Si substrate below the membrane by backside etching. The conventional means to determine when to stop the etch process is to observe the color of the light transmitted through the sample, which is sensitive to the remaining Si thickness. However, most metallic films thicker than 75 nm are opaque, and there is no detectable color change prior to film perforation. In this paper, a back-etch method based on the observation of an abrupt change of optical reflection contrast is introduced as a means to determine the etch endpoint to prepare TEM samples for these films. As the acid etchant removes the Si substrate material a rough interface is generated. This interface becomes a relatively smooth and featureless region when the etchant reaches the membrane (film/SiO2). This featureless region is caused by the mirror reflection of the film plane (film/SiO2 interface) through the optically transparent SiO2 layer. The lower etch rate of SiO2 (compared with Si) gives the operator enough time to stop the etching without perforating the film. A clear view of the morphology and control of Si roughness during etching are critical to this method, which are discussed in detail. The procedures of mounting wax removal and sample rinsing are also described in detail, as during these steps damage to the membrane may easily occur without appropriate consideration. As examples, the preparation of 100-nm-thick Fe-based amorphous alloy thin film and 160-nm-thick Cu-thin film samples for TEM imaging is described. PMID:18227137

  19. Core size determination and structural characterization of intravenous iron complexes by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong; Petrochenko, Peter; Chen, Lynn; Wong, Sook Yee; Absar, Mohammad; Choi, Stephanie; Zheng, Jiwen

    2016-05-30

    Understanding physicochemical properties of intravenous (IV) iron drug products is essential to ensure the manufacturing process is consistent and streamlined. The history of physicochemical characterization of IV iron complex formulations stretches over several decades, with disparities in iron core size and particle morphology as the major source of debate. One of the main reasons for this controversy is room temperature sample preparation artifacts, which affect accurate determination of size, shape and agglomeration/aggregation of nanoscale iron particles. The present study is first to report the ultra-fine iron core structures of four IV iron complex formulations, sodium ferric gluconate, iron sucrose, low molecular weight iron dextran and ferumoxytol, using a cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) preservation technique, as opposed to the conventional room temperature (RT-TEM) technique. Our results show that room temperature preparation causes nanoparticle aggregation and deformation, while cryo-TEM preserves IV iron colloidal suspension in their native frozen-hydrated and undiluted state. In contrast to the current consensus in literature, all four IV iron colloids exhibit a similar morphology of their iron oxide cores with a spherical shape, narrow size distribution and an average size of 2nm. Moreover, out of the four tested formulations, ferumoxytol exhibits a cluster-like community of several iron carbohydrate particles which likely accounts for its large hydrodynamic size of 25nm, measured with dynamic light scattering. Our findings outline a suitable method for identifying colloidal nanoparticle core size in the native state, which is increasingly important for manufacturing and design control of complex drug formulations, such as IV iron drug products. PMID:27001529

  20. Transmission electron microscopy of the amorphization of copper indium diselenide by in situ ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hinks, J. A.; Edmondson, P. D.

    2012-03-01

    Copper indium diselenide (CIS), along with its derivatives Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2}, is a prime candidate for use in the absorber layers of photovoltaic devices. Due to its ability to resist radiation damage, it is particularly well suited for use in extraterrestrial and other irradiating environments. However, the nature of its radiation hardness is not well understood. In this study, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with in situ ion irradiation was used to monitor the dynamic microstructural effects of radiation damage on CIS. Samples were bombarded with 400 keV xenon ions to create large numbers of atomic displacements within the thickness of the TEM samples and thus explore the conditions under which, if any, CIS could be amorphized. By observing the impact of heavily damaging radiation in situ--rather than merely the end-state possible in ex situ experiments--at the magnifications allowed by TEM, it was possible to gain an understanding of the atomistic processes at work and the underlying mechanism that give rise to the radiation hardness of CIS. At 200 K and below, it was found that copper-poor samples could be amorphized and copper-rich samples could not. This difference in behavior is linked to the crystallographic phases that are present at different compositions. Amorphization was found to progress via a combination of one- and two-hit processes. The radiation hardness of CIS is discussed in terms of crystallographic structures/defects and the consequences these have for the ability of the material to recover from the effects of displacing radiation.

  1. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy study on microstructure of gallbladder mucosa in pig.

    PubMed

    Prozorowska, Ewelina; Jackowiak, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    The present light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies on porcine gallbladder mucosa provide a description of the microstructures of great functional importance such as mucosal folds, the epithelium, glands, and lymphatic nodules. The results showed the regional structural differences of the porcine gallbladder wall. Depending on the part of the gallbladder, three types of mucosal structures were described: simple and branched folds and mucosal crypts. An important structural feature found in the mucosa is connected with the structural variety of type of mucosal folds, which change from simple located in the neck, to most composed, i.e., branched or joined, in the polygonal crypts toward the fundus of the gallbladder. The morphometric analysis showed statistically significantly differences in the form and size of the folds and between the fundus, body, and neck of the gallbladder. Differences in the size of mucosal epithelium are discussed in terms of processes of synthesis and secretion of glycoproteins. Regional, species-specific differences in morphology of mucosal subepithelial glands, i.e., their secretory units and openings, and intensity of mucus secretion were described. Our results on the pig gallbladder show adaptation and/or specialization in particular areas of the mucosa for (1) secretion of mucus in the neck or body of gallbladder and (2) for cyclic volume changes, especially in the fundus of gallbladder. The description of the microstructures of mucosa in the porcine gallbladder could be useful as reference data for numerous experiments on the bile tract in the pig. PMID:25604381

  2. Engineering and Characterization of Collagen Networks Using Wet Atomic Force Microscopy and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, Jenna; Coffey, Tonya; Conrad, Brad; Burris, Jennifer; Hester, Brooke

    2014-03-01

    Collagen is an abundant protein and its monomers covalently crosslink to form fibrils which form fibers which contribute to forming macrostructures like tendon or bone. While the contribution is well understood at the macroscopic level, it is not well known at the fibril level. We wish to study the mechanical properties of collagen for networks of collagen fibers that vary in size and density. We present here a method to synthesize collagen networks from monomers and that allows us to vary the density of the networks. By using biotynilated collagen and a surface that is functionalized with avidin, we generate two-dimensional collagen networks across the surface of a silicon wafer. During network synthesis, the incubation time is varied from 30 minutes to 3 hours or temperature is varied from 25°C to 45°C. The two-dimensional collagen network created in the process is characterized using environmental atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The network density is measured by the number of strands in one frame using SPIP software. We expect that at body temperature (37°C) and with longer incubation times, the network density should increase.

  3. Indium hydroxide to oxide decomposition observed in one nanocrystal during in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Miehe, Gerhard; Lauterbach, Stefan; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Gurlo, Aleksander

    2013-02-15

    The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) is used to study, in situ, spatially resolved decomposition in individual nanocrystals of metal hydroxides and oxyhydroxides. This case study reports on the decomposition of indium hydroxide (c-In(OH){sub 3}) to bixbyite-type indium oxide (c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The electron beam is focused onto a single cube-shaped In(OH){sub 3} crystal of {l_brace}100{r_brace} morphology with ca. 35 nm edge length and a sequence of HR-TEM images was recorded during electron beam irradiation. The frame-by-frame analysis of video sequences allows for the in situ, time-resolved observation of the shape and orientation of the transformed crystals, which in turn enables the evaluation of the kinetics of c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystallization. Supplementary material (video of the transformation) related to this article can be found online at (10.1016/j.jssc.2012.09.022). After irradiation the shape of the parent cube-shaped crystal is preserved, however, its linear dimension (edge) is reduced by the factor 1.20. The corresponding spotted selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern representing zone [001] of c-In(OH){sub 3} is transformed to a diffuse strongly textured ring-like pattern of c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} that indicates the transformed cube is no longer a single crystal but is disintegrated into individual c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} domains with the size of about 5-10 nm. The induction time of approximately 15 s is estimated from the time-resolved Fourier transforms. The volume fraction of the transformed phase (c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3}), calculated from the shrinkage of the parent c-In(OH){sub 3} crystal in the recorded HR-TEM images, is used as a measure of the kinetics of c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystallization within the framework of Avrami-Erofeev formalism. The Avrami exponent of {approx}3 is characteristic for a reaction mechanism with fast nucleation at the beginning of the reaction and subsequent three-dimensional growth of

  4. A New Geometric Method Based on Two-Dimensional Transmission Electron Microscopy for Analysis of Interior versus Exterior Pd Loading on Hollow Carbon Nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Shuai, Danmeng; Wang, Chong M.; Genc, Arda; Werth, Charles J.

    2011-04-18

    Hallow carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are being explored as catalyst supports because of their unique properties; catalytic activities with both interior and exterior metal loadings are being evaluated. Electron tomography (3D transmission electron microscopy, 3D TEM) has been used to estimate internal versus external loading of metal nanoclusters. However, this method is time consuming and requires a specialized TEM. We prepared three hollow CNF supported Pd samples with various Pd localizations, and developed a geometric analysis method based on 2D TEM images to estimate Pd internal versus external loading percentages. Results show the similar localization for the same sample in terms of the number, surface area, and mass of Pd nanoclusters but distinct values for different samples. To test our method, we compare results for one segment of a CNF using both 3D scanning transmission electron microscopy (3D TEM) and our new 2D geometic analysis method. Agreement is within 15.1%. Our results also agree with 3D TEM results from the literature for similarly prepared Pd on CNFs (within 5.6%). Our geometric analysis method is proposed as a more straightforward and fast way to evaluate metal nanocluster localizations on tubular supports.

  5. Cryo-electron microscopy of extracellular vesicles in fresh plasma

    PubMed Central

    Yuana, Yuana; Koning, Roman I.; Kuil, Maxim E.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Koster, Abraham J.; Bertina, Rogier M; Osanto, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Extracellular vesicles (EV) are phospholipid bilayer-enclosed vesicles recognized as new mediators in intercellular communication and potential biomarkers of disease. They are found in many body fluids and mainly studied in fractions isolated from blood plasma in view of their potential in medicine. Due to the limitations of available analytical methods, morphological information on EV in fresh plasma is still rather limited. Objectives To image EV and determine the morphology, structure and size distribution in fresh plasma by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Methods Fresh citrate- and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-anticoagulated plasma or EV isolated from these plasmas were rapidly cryo-immobilized by vitrification and visualized by cryo-EM. Results EV isolated from fresh plasma were highly heterogeneous in morphology and size and mostly contain a discernible lipid bilayer (lipid vesicles). In fresh plasma there were 2 types of particles with a median diameter of 30 nm (25–260 nm). The majority of these particles are electron dense particles which most likely represent lipoproteins. The minority are lipid vesicles, either electron dense or electron lucent, which most likely represent EV. Lipid vesicles were occasionally observed in close proximity of platelets in citrate and EDTA-anticoagulated platelet-rich plasma. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) was employed to determine the 3D structure of platelet secretory granules. Conclusions Cryo-EM is a powerful technique that enables the characterization of EV in fresh plasma revealing structural details and considerable morphological heterogeneity. Only a small proportion of the submicron structures in fresh plasma are lipid vesicles representing EV. PMID:24455109

  6. Three-Dimensional Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Biological Specimens

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Niels; Sougrat, Rachid; Northan, Brian M.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2–3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset. PMID:20082729

  7. Utility of transmission electron microscopy in small round cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Rae; Ha, Seung Yeon; Cho, Hyun Yee

    2015-03-01

    Small round cell tumors (SRCTs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms composed of small, primitive, and undifferentiated cells sharing similar histology under light microscopy. SRCTs include Ewing sarcoma/peripheral neuroectodermal tumor family tumors, neuroblastoma, desmoplastic SRCT, rhabdomyosarcoma, poorly differentiated round cell synovial sarcoma, mesenchymal chondrosarcoma, small cell osteosarcoma, small cell malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and small cell schwannoma. Non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma, myeloid sarcoma, malignant melanoma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumor may also present as SRCT. The current shift towards immunohistochemistry and cytogenetic molecular techniques for SRCT may be inappropriate because of antigenic overlapping or inconclusive molecular results due to the lack of differentiation of primitive cells and unavailable genetic service or limited moleculocytogenetic experience. Although usage has declined, electron microscopy (EM) remains very useful and shows salient features for the diagnosis of SRCTs. Although EM is not always required, it provides reliability and validity in the diagnosis of SRCT. Here, the ultrastructural characteristics of SRCTs are reviewed and we suggest that EM would be utilized as one of the reliable modalities for the diagnosis of undifferentiated and poorly differentiated SRCTs. PMID:25812730

  8. Utility of Transmission Electron Microscopy in Small Round Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Rae; Ha, Seung Yeon; Cho, Hyun Yee

    2015-01-01

    Small round cell tumors (SRCTs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms composed of small, primitive, and undifferentiated cells sharing similar histology under light microscopy. SRCTs include Ewing sarcoma/peripheral neuroectodermal tumor family tumors, neuroblastoma, desmoplastic SRCT, rhabdomyosarcoma, poorly differentiated round cell synovial sarcoma, mesenchymal chondrosarcoma, small cell osteosarcoma, small cell malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and small cell schwannoma. Non-Hodgkin’s malignant lymphoma, myeloid sarcoma, malignant melanoma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumor may also present as SRCT. The current shift towards immunohistochemistry and cytogenetic molecular techniques for SRCT may be inappropriate because of antigenic overlapping or inconclusive molecular results due to the lack of differentiation of primitive cells and unavailable genetic service or limited moleculocytogenetic experience. Although usage has declined, electron microscopy (EM) remains very useful and shows salient features for the diagnosis of SRCTs. Although EM is not always required, it provides reliability and validity in the diagnosis of SRCT. Here, the ultrastructural characteristics of SRCTs are reviewed and we suggest that EM would be utilized as one of the reliable modalities for the diagnosis of undifferentiated and poorly differentiated SRCTs. PMID:25812730

  9. Procoagulant platelet balloons: evidence from cryopreparation and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hess, M W; Siljander, P

    2001-05-01

    Visualisation of the procoagulant transformation of human platelets has recently become possible through use of an in vitro approach combined with fluorescence and phase contrast microscopy. Here, we extended these studies to the ultrastructural level by employing both rapid freezing/freeze-substitution and conventional ambient-temperature chemical fixation for transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Procoagulant transformation was only inducible by adhering platelets to collagen fibrils or to the collagen-related peptide and exposing them to physiological extracellular Ca2+ levels. Under these conditions prominent, 2- to 4-micron-wide balloon-like structures were regularly observed, regardless of the specimen fixation protocol. In strong contrast to normal platelets in their vicinity, the balloons' subcellular architecture proved remarkably poor: dilute cytoplasm, no cytoskeleton, only a few, randomly distributed organelles and/or their remnants. Cryofixed balloons displayed intact and smooth surfaces whereas conventional specimen processing caused plasma membrane perforations and shrinkage of the balloons. Our results clearly show that neither the balloons themselves, nor their simple ultrastructure reflect fixation artefacts caused by inadequate membrane stabilisation. The balloons are interpreted as to be transformed and/or fragmented procoagulant platelets. Thus, the generation of balloons represents a genuine, final stage of platelet ontogenesis, presumably occurring alternatively to aggregate formation. PMID:11449892

  10. An electron microscopy study of wear in polysilicon microelectromechanical systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Enachescu, M.; Stach, Eric A.; Alsem, Daan Hein; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2005-02-01

    Wear is a critical factor in determining the durability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). While the reliability of polysilicon MEMS has received extensive attention, the mechanisms responsible for this failure mode at the microscale have yet to be conclusively determined. We have used on-chip polycrystalline silicon side-wall friction MEMS specimens to study active mechanisms during sliding wear in ambient air. Worn parts were examined by analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy, while local temperature changes were monitored using advanced infrared microscopy. Observations show that small amorphous debris particles ({approx}50-100 nm) are removed by fracture through the silicon grains ({approx}500 nm) and are oxidized during this process. Agglomeration of such debris particles into larger clusters also occurs. Some of these debris particles/clusters create plowing tracks on the beam surface. A nano-crystalline surface layer ({approx}20-200 nm), with higher oxygen content, forms during wear at and below regions of the worn surface; its formation is likely aided by high local stresses. No evidence of dislocation plasticity or of extreme local temperature increases was found, ruling out the possibility of high temperature-assisted wear mechanisms.

  11. Advanced analytical electron microscopy for alkali-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Danna; Ma, Cheng; Meng, Ying Shirley; More, Karren; Chi, Miaofang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are a leading candidate for electric vehicle and smart grid applications. However, further optimizations of the energy/power density, coulombic efficiency and cycle life are still needed, and this requires a thorough understanding of the dynamic evolution of each component and their synergistic behaviors during battery operation. With the capability of resolving the structure and chemistry at an atomic resolution, advanced analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) is an ideal technique for this task. The present review paper focuses on recent contributions of this important technique to the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical processes of battery materials. A detailed review of both static (ex situ) and real-time (in situ) studies will be given, and issues that still need to be addressed will be discussed.

  12. Temperature Calibration for In Situ Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Winterstein, JP; Lin, PA; Sharma, R

    2016-01-01

    In situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) experiments require specimen heating holders to study material behavior in gaseous environments at elevated temperatures. In order to extract meaningful kinetic parameters, such as activation energies, it is essential to have a direct and accurate measurement of local sample temperature. This is particularly important if the sample temperature might fluctuate, for example when room temperature gases are introduced to the sample area. Using selected-area diffraction (SAD) in an ETEM, the lattice parameter of Ag nanoparticles was measured as a function of the temperature and pressure of hydrogen gas to provide a calibration of the local sample temperature. SAD permits measurement of temperature to an accuracy of ± 30 °C using Ag lattice expansion. Gas introduction can cause sample cooling of several hundred degrees celsius for gas pressures achievable in the ETEM. PMID:26441334

  13. Electron microscopy of gallium nitride growth on polycrystalline diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, R. F.; Cherns, D.; Kuball, M.; Jiang, Q.; Allsopp, D.

    2015-11-01

    Transmission and scanning electron microscopy were used to examine the growth of gallium nitride (GaN) on polycrystalline diamond substrates grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy with a low-temperature aluminium nitride (AlN) nucleation layer. Growth on unmasked substrates was in the (0001) orientation with threading dislocation densities ≈7 × 109 cm-2. An epitaxial layer overgrowth technique was used to reduce the dislocation densities further, by depositing silicon nitride stripes on the surface and etching the unmasked regions down to the diamond substrate. A re-growth was then performed on the exposed side walls of the original GaN growth, reducing the threading dislocation density in the overgrown regions by two orders of magnitude. The resulting microstructures and the mechanisms of dislocation reduction are discussed.

  14. Near field and exit wave computations for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Howie, A

    2013-11-01

    The partial wave phase shift formalism of atomic scattering is applied to compute exit wave functions for isolated Au and Si atoms under both plane wave and focused probe illumination. Connections between the far field and near field (exit) waves are clarified. This approach treats the Coulomb singularity properly though at 100 keV large numbers of phase shifts are required. In principle any form of incident wave can be handled so it may provide a means for testing traditional scattering theories used in electron microscopy. By applying the analysis to an atom embedded in a constant potential rather than free space, exit spheres of radius half the interatomic spacing can be used. PMID:23726769

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of a liver cavernous hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Itoshima, T; Ito, T; Ukida, M; Ogawa, H; Kitadai, M; Hattori, S; Mizutani, S; Nagashima, H

    1983-02-01

    A 39-year-old female with a large cavernous hemangioma of the liver was successfully treated by ligation of the left hepatic artery. A wedge biopsy specimen of the hemangioma was obtained after the ligation and was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The hemangioma was demarcated from the surrounding normal liver parenchyma and had a labyrinth of caves 50-150 microns in diameter. The caves were separated by fibrous septa 20-40 microns in width. Endothelial cells of the caves were spindle-shaped and arranged in parallel. The surface property of the caves resembled that of the hepatic artery and differed from that of the portal vein or hepatic vein. These findings support that the cavernous hemangioma of the liver was supplied by the hepatic artery. The labyrinthine structure of the cavernous hemangioma may explain the long standing contrast enhancement of the hemangioma after hepatic arteriography. PMID:6832546

  16. A Primer to Single-Particle Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yifan; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Penczek, Pawel A.; Walz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) of single-particle specimens is used to determine the structure of proteins and macromolecular complexes without the need for crystals. Recent advances in detector technology and software algorithms now allow images of unprecedented quality to be recorded and structures to be determined at near-atomic resolution. However, compared with X-ray crystallography, cryo-EM is a young technique with distinct challenges. This primer explains the different steps and considerations involved in structure determination by single-particle cryo-EM to provide an overview for scientists wishing to understand more about this technique and the interpretation of data obtained with it, as well as a starting guide for new practitioners. PMID:25910204

  17. High-resolution electron microscopy and its applications.

    PubMed

    Li, F H

    1987-12-01

    A review of research on high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) carried out at the Institute of Physics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is presented. Apart from the direct observation of crystal and quasicrystal defects for some alloys, oxides, minerals, etc., and the structure determination for some minute crystals, an approximate image-contrast theory named pseudo-weak-phase object approximation (PWPOA), which shows the image contrast change with crystal thickness, is described. Within the framework of PWPOA, the image contrast of lithium ions in the crystal of R-Li2Ti3O7 has been observed. The usefulness of diffraction analysis techniques such as the direct method and Patterson method in HREM is discussed. Image deconvolution and resolution enhancement for weak-phase objects by use of the direct method are illustrated. In addition, preliminary results of image restoration for thick crystals are given. PMID:3505590

  18. Electron Microscopy Analysis of the Nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Hernández, Roberto; López-Villaseñor, Imelda; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Segura-Valdez, María De L.; Jiménez-García, Luis F.

    2005-08-01

    The nucleolus is the main site for synthesis and processing of ribosomal RNA in eukaryotes. In mammals, plants, and yeast the nucleolus has been extensively characterized by electron microscopy, but in the majority of the unicellular eukaryotes no such studies have been performed. Here we used ultrastructural cytochemical and immunocytochemical techniques as well as three-dimensional reconstruction to analyze the nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi, which is an early divergent eukaryote of medical importance. In T. cruzi epimastigotes the nucleolus is a spherical intranuclear ribonucleoprotein organelle localized in a relatively central position within the nucleus. Dense fibrillar and granular components but not fibrillar centers were observed. In addition, nuclear bodies resembling Cajal bodies were observed associated to the nucleolus in the surrounding nucleoplasm. Our results provide additional morphological data to better understand the synthesis and processing of the ribosomal RNA in kinetoplastids.

  19. Waveguide characterization with multi-photon photoemission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, J. P. S.; Word, Robert C.; Saliba, Sebastian; Koenenkamp, Rolf

    2012-10-01

    Multi-photon photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) images surface interactions of visible light with matter, showing electromagnetic (EM) waves that propagate at or near the surface. Images are interferometric, showing where incident and surface waves are in-phase (bright) and out-of-phase (dark), with strong contrast between regions of high and low rates of photoelectron emission. Interferogram analysis can determine the amplitude, wavelength, phase evolution, and propagation decay length of the surface waves. Most multi-photon PEEM studies focus on surface plasmon polaritons. We show that this technique can also be applied to conducting thin-film waveguides, measuring the properties of confined EM waves in a two-mode slab waveguide made of indium tin oxide on glass, which are consistent with waveguide theory. This research was funded by the US Department of Energy Basic Science Office under contract DE-FG02-10ER46406.

  20. Watershed Merge Tree Classification for Electron Microscopy Image Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, TIng; Jurrus, Elizabeth R.; Seyedhosseini, Mojtaba; Ellisman, Mark; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2012-11-11

    Automated segmentation of electron microscopy (EM) images is a challenging problem. In this paper, we present a novel method that utilizes a hierarchical structure and boundary classification for 2D neuron segmentation. With a membrane detection probability map, a watershed merge tree is built for the representation of hierarchical region merging from the watershed algorithm. A boundary classifier is learned with non-local image features to predict each potential merge in the tree, upon which merge decisions are made with consistency constraints in the sense of optimization to acquire the final segmentation. Independent of classifiers and decision strategies, our approach proposes a general framework for efficient hierarchical segmentation with statistical learning. We demonstrate that our method leads to a substantial improvement in segmentation accuracy.

  1. High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy of Cells Using Dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhang, Wei; Soffe, Rebecca; Nahavandi, Sofia; Shukla, Ravi; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2014-01-01

    Ultrastructural analysis of cells can reveal valuable information about their morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been widely used to provide high-resolution images from the surface of biological samples. However, samples need to be dehydrated and coated with conductive materials for SEM imaging. Besides, immobilizing non-adherent cells during processing and analysis is challenging and requires complex fixation protocols. In this work, we developed a novel dielectrophoresis based microfluidic platform for interfacing non-adherent cells with high-resolution SEM at low vacuum mode. The system enables rapid immobilization and dehydration of samples without deposition of chemical residues over the cell surface. Moreover, it enables the on-chip chemical stimulation and fixation of immobilized cells with minimum dislodgement. These advantages were demonstrated for comparing the morphological changes of non-budding and budding yeast cells following Lyticase treatment. PMID:25089528

  2. Advanced analytical electron microscopy for alkali-ion batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qian, Danna; Ma, Cheng; Meng, Ying Shirley; More, Karren; Chi, Miaofang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are a leading candidate for electric vehicle and smart grid applications. However, further optimizations of the energy/power density, coulombic efficiency and cycle life are still needed, and this requires a thorough understanding of the dynamic evolution of each component and their synergistic behaviors during battery operation. With the capability of resolving the structure and chemistry at an atomic resolution, advanced analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) is an ideal technique for this task. The present review paper focuses on recent contributions of this important technique to the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical processes of battery materials. A detailed reviewmore » of both static (ex situ) and real-time (in situ) studies will be given, and issues that still need to be addressed will be discussed.« less

  3. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and comparedmore » to those of other techniques available.« less

  4. Total coliphages removal by activated sludge process and their morphological diversity by transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jebri, Sihem; Hmaied, Fatma; Yahya, Mariem; Ben Ammar, Aouatef; Hamdi, Moktar

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to isolate phages in treated sewage collected from wastewater treatment plant, and explore their morphological diversity by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fates of total bacteriophages and their reduction by biological treatment were also assayed. Phages were isolated using the plaque assay then negatively stained and observed by electron microscope. Electron micrographs showed different types of phages with different shapes and sizes. The majority of viruses found in treated sewage ranged from 30 to 100 nm in capsid diameter. Many of them were tailed, belonging to Siphoviridae, Myoviridae and Podoviridae families. Non-tailed phage particles were also found at a low rate, presumably belonging to Leviviridae or Microviridae families. This study shows the diversity and the abundance of bacteriophages in wastewater after biological treatment. Their persistence in wastewater reused in agriculture should raise concerns about their potential role in controlling bacterial populations in the environment. They should be also included in water treatment quality controlling guidelines as fecal and viral indicators. PMID:27438235

  5. Atomic-Scale Imaging and Spectroscopy for In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jungjohann, K. L.; Evans, James E.; Aguiar, Jeff; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-06-04

    Observation of growth, synthesis, dynamics and electrochemical reactions in the liquid state is an important yet largely unstudied aspect of nanotechnology. The only techniques that can potentially provide the insights necessary to advance our understanding of these mechanisms is simultaneous atomic-scale imaging and quantitative chemical analysis (through spectroscopy) under environmental conditions in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). In this study we describe the experimental and technical conditions necessary to obtain electron energy loss (EEL) spectra from a nanoparticle in colloidal suspension using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with the environmental liquid stage. At a fluid path length below 400 nm, atomic resolution images can be obtained and simultaneous compositional analysis can be achieved. We show that EEL spectroscopy can be used to quantify the total fluid path length around the nanoparticle, and demonstrate characteristic core-loss signals from the suspended nanoparticles can be resolved and analyzed to provide information on the local interfacial chemistry with the surrounding environment. The combined approach using aberration corrected STEM and EEL spectra with the in situ fluid stage demonstrates a plenary platform for detailed investigations of solution based catalysis and biological research.

  6. Energy-Filtering Transmission Electron Microscopy on the Nanometer Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Grogger, Werner; Varela del Arco, Maria; Ristau, Roger; Schaffer, Bernhard; Hofer, Ferdinand; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2004-01-01

    Energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), developed about ten years ago, is now a routine analysis tool in the characterization of materials. Based on the physical principles of electron energy-loss spectrometry (EELS), but with the addition of in-column or post-column energy-filters, it forms images of microstructures using a narrow energy band of inelastically scattered electrons. Post-column energy-filters, developed commercially by Gatan (Gatan Imaging Filter, GIF) in the early 1990s, could be attached to nearly any TEM. Almost at the same time, the introduction of the EM-912 microscope with an integrated {Omega}-filter by Zeiss, made it possible to use in-column filters as well. These two developments made EFTEM possible on an almost routine basis. The operation of these filters is rather straightforward and it is now possible to acquire element specific images within a few minutes. However, the optimal setup for data acquisition, the judicious choice of experimental parameters to solve specific materials science problems and the interpretation of the results can be rather difficult. For best results, a fundamental knowledge of the underlying physics of EELS and a systematic development of the technical details is necessary. In this work, we discuss the current status of EFTEM in terms of spatial resolution and illustrate it with a few technologically relevant applications at the nanometer length scale.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy of Strongylus spp. in zebra.

    PubMed

    Els, H J; Malan, F S; Scialdo-Krecek, R C

    1983-12-01

    The external ultrastructure of the anterior and posterior extremities of the nematodes, Strongylus asini , Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus equinus and Strongylus edentatus, was studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fresh specimens of S. asini were collected from the caecum, ventral colon and vena portae of Equus burchelli and Equus zebra hartmannae ; S. vulgaris from the caecum, colon and arteria ileocolica of E. burchelli ; S. equinus from the ventral colon of E. z. hartmannae and S. edentatus from the caecum and ventral colon of both zebras , during surveys of parasites in zebras in the Etosha Game Reserve, South West Africa/Namibia, and the Kruger National Park, Republic of South Africa. The worms were cleaned, fixed and mounted by standard methods and photographed in a JEOL JSM - 35C scanning electron microscope (SEM) operating at 12kV . The SEM showed the following differences: the tips of the external leaf-crowns varied and were fine and delicate in S. asini , coarse and broad in S. vulgaris and, in S. equinus and S. edentatus, closely adherent, separating into single elements for half their length. The excretory pores showed only slight variation, and the morphology of the copulatory bursae did not differ from those seen with light microscopy. The genital cones differed markedly: S. asini had a ventral triangular projection and laterally 2 finger-like projections: in S. vulgaris there were numerous bosses on the lateral and ventral aspects of the cone; in S. equinus 2 finger-like processes projected laterocaudally ; and in S. edentatus 2 pairs of papilla-like processes projected laterally on the ventral aspects, and a pair of rounded projections and a pair of hair-like structures adorned the dorsal aspects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6676687

  8. An integrated micro- and macroarchitectural analysis of the Drosophila brain by computer-assisted serial section electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Albert; Saalfeld, Stephan; Preibisch, Stephan; Schmid, Benjamin; Cheng, Anchi; Pulokas, Jim; Tomancak, Pavel; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of microcircuitry (the connectivity at the level of individual neuronal processes and synapses), which is indispensable for our understanding of brain function, is based on serial transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or one of its modern variants. Due to technical limitations, most previous studies that used serial TEM recorded relatively small stacks of individual neurons. As a result, our knowledge of microcircuitry in any nervous system is very limited. We applied the software package TrakEM2 to reconstruct neuronal microcircuitry from TEM sections of a small brain, the early larval brain of Drosophila melanogaster. TrakEM2 enables us to embed the analysis of the TEM image volumes at the microcircuit level into a light microscopically derived neuro-anatomical framework, by registering confocal stacks containing sparsely labeled neural structures with the TEM image volume. We imaged two sets of serial TEM sections of the Drosophila first instar larval brain neuropile and one ventral nerve cord segment, and here report our first results pertaining to Drosophila brain microcircuitry. Terminal neurites fall into a small number of generic classes termed globular, varicose, axiform, and dendritiform. Globular and varicose neurites have large diameter segments that carry almost exclusively presynaptic sites. Dendritiform neurites are thin, highly branched processes that are almost exclusively postsynaptic. Due to the high branching density of dendritiform fibers and the fact that synapses are polyadic, neurites are highly interconnected even within small neuropile volumes. We describe the network motifs most frequently encountered in the Drosophila neuropile. Our study introduces an approach towards a comprehensive anatomical reconstruction of neuronal microcircuitry and delivers microcircuitry comparisons between vertebrate and insect neuropile. PMID:20957184

  9. An Integrated Micro- and Macroarchitectural Analysis of the Drosophila Brain by Computer-Assisted Serial Section Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Albert; Saalfeld, Stephan; Preibisch, Stephan; Schmid, Benjamin; Cheng, Anchi; Pulokas, Jim; Tomancak, Pavel; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of microcircuitry (the connectivity at the level of individual neuronal processes and synapses), which is indispensable for our understanding of brain function, is based on serial transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or one of its modern variants. Due to technical limitations, most previous studies that used serial TEM recorded relatively small stacks of individual neurons. As a result, our knowledge of microcircuitry in any nervous system is very limited. We applied the software package TrakEM2 to reconstruct neuronal microcircuitry from TEM sections of a small brain, the early larval brain of Drosophila melanogaster. TrakEM2 enables us to embed the analysis of the TEM image volumes at the microcircuit level into a light microscopically derived neuro-anatomical framework, by registering confocal stacks containing sparsely labeled neural structures with the TEM image volume. We imaged two sets of serial TEM sections of the Drosophila first instar larval brain neuropile and one ventral nerve cord segment, and here report our first results pertaining to Drosophila brain microcircuitry. Terminal neurites fall into a small number of generic classes termed globular, varicose, axiform, and dendritiform. Globular and varicose neurites have large diameter segments that carry almost exclusively presynaptic sites. Dendritiform neurites are thin, highly branched processes that are almost exclusively postsynaptic. Due to the high branching density of dendritiform fibers and the fact that synapses are polyadic, neurites are highly interconnected even within small neuropile volumes. We describe the network motifs most frequently encountered in the Drosophila neuropile. Our study introduces an approach towards a comprehensive anatomical reconstruction of neuronal microcircuitry and delivers microcircuitry comparisons between vertebrate and insect neuropile. PMID:20957184

  10. Correlative transmission electron microscopy and electrical properties study of switchable phase-change random access memory line cells

    SciTech Connect

    Oosthoek, J. L. M.; Kooi, B. J.; Voogt, F. C.; Attenborough, K.; Verheijen, M. A.; Hurkx, G. A. M.; Gravesteijn, D. J.

    2015-02-14

    Phase-change memory line cells, where the active material has a thickness of 15 nm, were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation such that they still could be switched and characterized electrically after the preparation. The result of these observations in comparison with detailed electrical characterization showed (i) normal behavior for relatively long amorphous marks, resulting in a hyperbolic dependence between SET resistance and SET current, indicating a switching mechanism based on initially long and thin nanoscale crystalline filaments which thicken gradually, and (ii) anomalous behavior, which holds for relatively short amorphous marks, where initially directly a massive crystalline filament is formed that consumes most of the width of the amorphous mark only leaving minor residual amorphous regions at its edges. The present results demonstrate that even in (purposely) thick TEM samples, the TEM sample preparation hampers the probability to observe normal behavior and it can be debated whether it is possible to produce electrically switchable TEM specimen in which the memory cells behave the same as in their original bulk embedded state.

  11. Immuno EM-OM correlative microscopy in solution by atmospheric scanning electron microscopy (ASEM).

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yuusuke; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Sato, Chikara

    2012-11-01

    In the atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM), an inverted SEM observes the wet sample from beneath an open dish while an optical microscope (OM) observes it from above. The disposable dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can hold a few milliliters of culture medium, and allows various types of cells to be cultured in a stable environment. The use of this system for in situ correlative OM/SEM immuno-microscopy is explored, the efficiency of the required dual-tagged labeling assessed and the imaging capabilities of the ASEM documented. We have visualized the cytoskeletons formed by actin and tubulin, the chaperone PDI that catalyses native disulfide bond formation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the calcium sensor STIM1 that is integrated in ER membranes, using established cell lines. In particular, a dynamic string-like gathering of STIM1 was observed on the ER in Jurkat T cells in response to Ca(2+) store depletion. We have also visualized filamentous actin (F-actin) and tubulin in the growth cones of primary-culture neurons as well as in synapses. Further, radially running actin fibers were shown to partly colocalize with concentric bands of the Ca(2+) signaling component Homer1c in the lamellipodia of neuron primary culture growth cones. After synapse formation, neurite configurations were drastically rearranged; a button structure with a fine F-actin frame faces a spine with a different F-actin framework. Based on this work, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the dynamics of various protein complexes to be investigated in the near future. PMID:22959994

  12. Imaging heterostructured quantum dots in cultured cells with epifluorescence and transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Erin M.; Trujillo Provencio, Casilda; Steinbrueck, Andrea; Rastogi, Pawan; Dennis, Allison; Hollingsworth, Jennifer; Serrano, Elba

    2011-03-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are semiconductor nanocrystals with extensive imaging and diagnostic capabilities, including the potential for single molecule tracking. Commercially available QDs offer distinct advantages over organic fluorophores, such as increased photostability and tunable emission spectra, but their cadmium selenide (CdSe) core raises toxicity concerns. For this reason, replacements for CdSe-based QDs have been sought that can offer equivalent optical properties. The spectral range, brightness and stability of InP QDs may comprise such a solution. To this end, LANL/CINT personnel fabricated moderately thick-shell novel InP QDs that retain brightness and emission over time in an aqueous environment. We are interested in evaluating how the composition and surface properties of these novel QDs affect their entry and sequestration within the cell. Here we use epifluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to evaluate the structural properties of cultured Xenopus kidney cells (A6; ATCC) that were exposed either to commercially available CdSe QDs (Qtracker® 565, Invitrogen) or to heterostructured InP QDs (LANL). Epifluorescence imaging permitted assessment of the general morphology of cells labeled with fluorescent molecular probes (Alexa Fluor® ® phalloidin; Hoechst 33342), and the prevalence of QD association with cells. In contrast, TEM offered unique advantages for viewing electron dense QDs at higher resolution with regard to subcellular sequestration and compartmentalization. Preliminary results show that in the absence of targeting moieties, InP QDs (200 nM) can passively enter cells and sequester nonspecifically in cytosolic regions whereas commercially available targeted QDs principally associate with membranous structures within the cell. Supported by: NIH 5R01GM084702.

  13. Directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography of grain boundary oxidation in a Ni-Al binary alloy exposed to high-temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-06-14

    Intergranular oxidation of a Ni-4Al alloy exposed to hydrogenated, high-temperature water was characterized using directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. These combined analyses revealed that discrete, well-separated oxides (NiAl2O4) precipitated along grain boundaries in the metal. Aluminum was depleted from the grain boundary between oxides and also from one side of the boundary as a result of grain boundary migration. The discrete oxide morphology, disconnected from the continuous surface oxidation, suggests intergranular solid-state internal oxidation of Al. Keywords: oxidation; grain boundaries; nickel alloys; atom probe tomography; transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  14. In vitro photosensitization II. An electron microscopy study of cellular destruction with mono-L-aspartyl chlorin e6 and photofrin II.

    PubMed

    Roberts, W G; Liaw, L H; Berns, M W

    1989-01-01

    Primary sites of subcellular destruction with photofrin II (PfII) and mono-L-aspartyl chlorin e6 (MACE) were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Potorous tridactylus (PTK2) cells were grown in Rose chambers and incubated for 24 hr with a sensitizer concentration sufficient to provide 100% mortality. Cells were irradiated with laser light and fixed and processed for electron microscopy at various times post-irradiation. The results indicate that PfII initially destroys mitochondria, whereas MACE destroys lysosomes. Both conclusions are consistent with fluorescence subcellular localization studies. PMID:2523992

  15. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) of nanophase ferric oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Iron oxide minerals are the prime candidates for Fe(III) signatures in remotely sensed Martian surface spectra. Magnetic, Mossbauer, and reflectance spectroscopy have been carried out in the laboratory in order to understand the mineralogical nature of Martian analog ferric oxide minerals of submicron or nanometer size range. Out of the iron oxide minerals studied, nanometer sized ferric oxides are promising candidates for possible Martian spectral analogs. 'Nanophase ferric oxide (np-Ox)' is a generic term for ferric oxide/oxihydroxide particles having nanoscale (less than 10 nm) particle dimensions. Ferrihydrite, superparamagnetic particles of hematite, maghemite and goethite, and nanometer sized particles of inherently paramagnetic lepidocrocite are all examples of nanophase ferric oxides. np-Ox particles in general do not give X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns with well defined peaks and would often be classified as X-ray amorphous. Therefore, different np-Oxs preparations should be characterized using a more sensitive technique e.g., high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The purpose of this study is to report the particle size, morphology and crystalline order, of five np-Ox samples by HRTEM imaging and electron diffraction (ED).

  16. The characterization of nanoparticles using analytical electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Whitney B.

    2011-06-01

    Nanoparticles are often overlooked during routine trace evidence analyses because of their small size and the degree of difficulty needed to efficiently characterize them. However, analytical electron microscopy (AEM) enables the characterization and/or identification of nanoparticles because of its high magnification capability, the ability to gather elemental data and also the ability to determine the internal structure of a single nanoparticles(1). There is a wide variety of natural and manufactured nanoparticles that are prominent within the environment and their presence becomes very valuable in the absence of larger particles. The combustion of materials produces by-products such as nano-sized carbon soot, fumes, fly ash and gun-shot residue (GSR). Using AEM, nano-sized carbon soot, fumes, fly ash and GSR can not only be distinguished from other nanoparticles within the environment but can also be distinguished from each other because of differences in morphology, elemental composition, and internal structure. The elemental information gathered from combustion by-products during AEM analysis can also give an indication of the original source material. Other nanoparticles such as paint pigments and fillers can also be characterized by AEM using morphology, electron diffraction and elemental composition.

  17. Analytical electron microscopy in mineralogy; exsolved phases in pyroxenes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nord, G.L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy has been successfully used to characterize the structure and composition of lamellar exsolution products in pyroxenes. At operating voltages of 100 and 200 keV, microanalytical techniques of x-ray energy analysis, convergent-beam electron diffraction, and lattice imaging have been used to chemically and structurally characterize exsolution lamellae only a few unit cells wide. Quantitative X-ray energy analysis using ratios of peak intensities has been adopted for the U.S. Geological Survey AEM in order to study the compositions of exsolved phases and changes in compositional profiles as a function of time and temperature. The quantitative analysis procedure involves 1) removal of instrument-induced background, 2) reduction of contamination, and 3) measurement of correction factors obtained from a wide range of standard compositions. The peak-ratio technique requires that the specimen thickness at the point of analysis be thin enough to make absorption corrections unnecessary (i.e., to satisfy the "thin-foil criteria"). In pyroxenes, the calculated "maximum thicknesses" range from 130 to 1400 nm for the ratios Mg/Si, Fe/Si, and Ca/Si; these "maximum thicknesses" have been contoured in pyroxene composition space as a guide during analysis. Analytical spatial resolutions of 50-100 nm have been achieved in AEM at 200 keV from the composition-profile studies, and analytical reproducibility in AEM from homogeneous pyroxene standards is ?? 1.5 mol% endmember. ?? 1982.

  18. Morphological classification of bioaerosols from composting using scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tamer Vestlund, A.; Al-Ashaab, R.; Tyrrel, S.F.; Longhurst, P.J.; Pollard, S.J.T.; Drew, G.H.

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Bioaerosols were captured using the filter method. • Bioaerosols were analysed using scanning electron microscope. • Bioaerosols were classified on the basis of morphology. • Single small cells were found more frequently than aggregates and larger cells. • Smaller cells may disperse further than heavier aggregate structures. - Abstract: This research classifies the physical morphology (form and structure) of bioaerosols emitted from open windrow composting. Aggregation state, shape and size of the particles captured are reported alongside the implications for bioaerosol dispersal after release. Bioaerosol sampling took place at a composting facility using personal air filter samplers. Samples were analysed using scanning electron microscopy. Particles were released mainly as small (<1 μm) single, spherical cells, followed by larger (>1 μm) single cells, with aggregates occurring in smaller proportions. Most aggregates consisted of clusters of 2–3 particles as opposed to chains, and were <10 μm in size. No cells were attached to soil debris or wood particles. These small single cells or small aggregates are more likely to disperse further downwind from source, and cell viability may be reduced due to increased exposure to environmental factors.

  19. Seeing Inside Materials by Aberration-Corrected Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    The recent successful correction of lens aberrations in the electron microscope has improved resolution by more than a factor of two in just a few years, bringing many benefits for the study of materials. These benefits extend significantly beyond enhanced resolution alone. Aberration correction gives higher resolution by allowing the objective lens to have a wider aperture, which also results in a reduced depth of field. This effect can be used to only focus specific sections inside materials for the first time. In this contribution we describe recent results exploiting this capability. Additionally, we show how combining the microscopy data with first-principles theory gives new insights into materials properties. We cover two applications, both involving heavy atoms in a lighter host. The first shows how single Hf atoms can be mapped in three dimensions inside the 1 nm-wide SiO2 region of a high dielectric constant device structure, and how a link to macroscopic device properties results through theoretical calculations. The second example is from the field of nanoscience, where individual Au atoms are imaged inside Si nanowires grown by a vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. The majority of Au atoms are probably injected by the highly energetic electron beam. However, their observed sites and atomic configurations represent at least meta-stable configurations and match well to results from density functional calculations.

  20. Aberration Corrected Photoemission Electron Microscopy with Photonics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Joseph P. S.

    Photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) uses photoelectrons excited from material surfaces by incident photons to probe the interaction of light with surfaces with nanometer-scale resolution. The point resolution of PEEM images is strongly limited by spherical and chromatic aberration. Image aberrations primarily originate from the acceleration of photoelectrons and imaging with the objective lens and vary strongly in magnitude with specimen emission characteristics. Spherical and chromatic aberration can be corrected with an electrostatic mirror, and here I develop a triode mirror with hyperbolic geometry that has two adjacent, field-adjustable regions. I present analytic and numerical models of the mirror and show that the optical properties agree to within a few percent. When this mirror is coupled with an electron lens, it can provide a large dynamic range of correction and the coefficients of spherical and chromatic aberration can be varied independently. I report on efforts to realize a triode mirror corrector, including design, characterization, and alignment in our microscope at Portland State University (PSU). PEEM may be used to investigate optically active nanostructures, and we show that photoelectron emission yields can be identified with diffraction, surface plasmons, and dielectric waveguiding. Furthermore, we find that photoelectron micrographs of nanostructured metal and dielectric structures correlate with electromagnetic field calculations. We conclude that photoemission is highly spatially sensitive to the electromagnetic field intensity, allowing the direct visualization of the interaction of light with material surfaces at nanometer scales and over a wide range of incident light frequencies.

  1. Quantitative Energy-filtering Transmission Electron Microscopy in Materials Science.

    PubMed

    Grogger; Hofer; Warbichler; Kothleitner

    2000-03-01

    Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) can be used to acquire elemental distribution images at high lateral resolution within short acquisition times. In this article, we present an overview of typical problems from materials science which can be preferentially solved by means of EFTEM. In the first example, we show how secondary phases in a steel specimen can be easily detected by recording jump ratio images of the matrix element under rocking beam illumination. Secondly, we describe how elemental maps can be converted into concentration maps. A Ba-Nd-titanate ceramics serves as a typical materials science example exhibiting three different compounds with varying composition. In order to reduce diffraction and/or thickness variation effects which may be a problem for quantification of crystalline specimens, we calculated atomic ratio maps by dividing two elemental maps and subsequent normalizing by the partial ionization cross-sections (or k-factors). Additionally, the atomic ratio maps are correlated using the scatter diagram technique thus leading to quantitative chemical phase maps. Finally, we show how the near-edge structures (electron energy-loss near edge fine structures, or ELNES) can be used for mapping chemical bonding states thus differentiating between various modifications of an element. In order to distinguish between diamond and non-diamond carbon in diamond coated materials, we have investigated a diamond layer on a substrate with the help of ELNES mapping utilizing the pi*-peak of the C-K ionization edge. PMID:10742404

  2. Characterization of Exhaust Emission Particulate Matter by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Blom, Douglas A.

    2000-08-20

    Health effects of PM are of intense interest TEM characterization well suited to provide information on individual particles--morphology--Elemental composition--Crystal structure Comparisons between spark ignition PM and diesel PM

  3. Two-dimensional dopant analysis in silicon using chemical etching and transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Suneeta Shamanna

    The purpose of this research has been to develop a methodologoy to map two-dimensional dopant distributions in silicon and investigate the factors that influence the interpretation of the results. The analysis exploits the image contrast obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using cross-section specimens which have undergone selective chemical etching. The appearance of iso-thickness contours in a selectively etched TEM sample must represent iso-concentration contours when imaged under constant diffraction conditions. The application of this technique is two-fold: (1) to establish a physical metrology of semiconductor devices for the purpose of research and development efforts that impact on future nodes outlined in the semiconductor roadmap and (2) to provide physical data for validation of simulation tools in technology computer aided design (TCAD). The research involves an investigation into the selective removal of doped regions for both test and device structures, followed by an analysis to obtain two-dimensional (2-D) dopant profiles. The critical issues which arise in the development of a methodology to profile dopant distributions and which are addressed in this investigation are, wedge technique versus conventional dimple and ion-mill procedures for thin-film preparation, thin-film versus bulk chemical etching, data acquisition using TEM and choice of diffraction conditions, sensitivity in terms of the etch detection limit, resolution influenced by the effective extinction length of the operating reflection, digital image processing to extract profiles from thickness contours, calibration of the 2-D profiles using a one-dimensional (1-D) calibrator and role of structure/dopant interactions such as stress, interfaces and point defects in test structures and real device structures containing additional processing sequences. Selective chemical etching in combination with TEM has the sensitivity, resolution and reproducibility required to be used

  4. Using advanced electron microscopy for the characterization of catalytic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrz, William D.

    Catalysis will continue to be vitally important to the advancement and sustainability of industrialized societies. Unfortunately, the petroleum-based resources that currently fuel the energy and consumer product needs of an advancing society are becoming increasingly difficult and expensive to extract as supplies diminish and the quality of sources degrade. Therefore, the development of sustainable energy sources and the improvement of the carbon efficiency of existing chemical processes are critical. Further challenges require that these initiatives are accomplished in an environmentally friendly fashion since the effects of carbon-based emissions are proving to be a serious threat to global climate stability. In this dissertation, materials being developed for sustainable energy and process improvement initiatives are studied. Our approach is to use materials characterization, namely advanced electron microscopy, to analyze the targeted systems at the nano- or Angstrom-scale with the goal of developing useful relationships between structure, composition, crystalline order, morphology, and catalytic performance. One area of interest is the complex Mo-V-M-O (M=Te, Sb, Ta, Nb) oxide system currently being developed for the selective oxidation/ammoxidation of propane to acrylic acid or acrylonitrile, respectively. Currently, the production of acrylic acid and acrylonitrile rely on propylene-based processes, yet significant cost savings could be realized if the olefin-based feeds could be replaced by paraffin-based ones. The major challenge preventing this feedstock replacement is the development of a suitable paraffin-activating catalyst. Currently, the best candidate is the Mo-V-Nb-Te-O complex oxide catalyst that is composed of two majority phases that are commonly referred to as M1 and M2. However, there is a limited understanding of the roles of each component with respect to how they contribute to catalyst stability and the reaction mechanism. Aberration

  5. Multiplexed TEM Specimen Preparation and Analysis of Plasmonic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Sėan K; Speir, Jeffrey A; Razinkov, Ivan; Cheng, Anchi; Crum, John; Jain, Tilak; Duggan, Erika; Liu, Er; Nolan, John P; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S

    2015-08-01

    We describe a system for rapidly screening hundreds of nanoparticle samples using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The system uses a liquid handling robot to place up to 96 individual samples onto a single standard TEM grid at separate locations. The grid is then transferred into the TEM and automated software is used to acquire multiscale images of each sample. The images are then analyzed to extract metrics on the size, shape, and morphology of the nanoparticles. The system has been used to characterize plasmonically active nanomaterials. PMID:26223550

  6. Multiplexed TEM Specimen Preparation and Analysis of Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Anchi; Crum, John; Jain, Tilak; Duggan, Erika; Liu, Er; Nolan, John P.; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a system for rapidly screening hundreds of nanoparticle samples using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The system uses a liquid handling robot to place up to 96 individual samples onto a single standard TEM grid at separate locations. The grid is then transferred into the TEM and automated software is used to acquire multi-scale images of each sample. The images are then analyzed to extract metrics on the size, shape, and morphology of the nanoparticles. The system has been used to characterize plasmonically-active nanomaterials. PMID:26223550

  7. Molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy: intermolecular electron tunneling for single-molecule recognition and electronics.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Molecular tips offer many advantages: first is their ability to perform chemically selective imaging because of chemical interactions between the sample and the molecular tip, thus improving a major drawback of conventional STM. Rational design of the molecular tip allows sophisticated chemical recognition; e.g., chiral recognition and selective visualization of atomic defects in carbon nanotubes. Another advantage is that they provide a unique method to quantify electron transfer between single molecules. Understanding such electron transfer is mandatory for the realization of molecular electronics. PMID:24420248

  8. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EPMA) of pink teeth

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, N.; Watanabe, G.; Harada, A.; Suzuki, T.

    1988-11-01

    Samples of postmortem pink teeth were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Fracture surfaces of the dentin in pink teeth were noticeably rough and revealed many more smaller dentinal tubules than those of the control white teeth. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis showed that the pink teeth contained iron which seemed to be derived from blood hemoglobin. The present study confirms that under the same circumstance red coloration of teeth may occur more easily in the teeth in which the dentin is less compact and contains more dentinal tubules.

  9. Isolated dystrophin molecules as seen by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pons, F; Augier, N; Heilig, R; Léger, J; Mornet, D; Léger, J J

    1990-10-01

    Dystrophin, the protein product of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus [Hoffman, E. P., Brown, R. H., Jr., & Kunkel, L. M. (1987) Cell 51, 919-928], is expressed in striated and smooth muscles as well as in non-muscle tissues. Examination of its primary structure has revealed that the molecule is composed of four domains, three of which share many features with the membrane cytoskeletal proteins spectrin and actinin. Dystrophin has thus been predicted to adopt a rod shape [Koenig, M., Monaco, A. P. & Kunkel, L. M. (1988) Cell 53, 219-228]. In the present study, we describe its isolation from the chicken gizzard smooth muscle and present electron microscopic images of the molecule. Polyclonal antibodies were first prepared from a dystrophin fragment derived from the chicken skeletal muscle gene (residues 1173-1728). A dystrophin-enriched membrane preparation from chicken gizzard muscle was then purified by passing it through an affinity chromatography column made with the anti-dystrophin antibodies. Electron microscopy of isolated and rotatory-shadowed dystrophin molecules revealed that the lengths measured for the dystrophin monomers (175 +/- 15 nm) are compatible with a structural arrangement of the repeat sequence segments in triple-barrel alpha-helices connected by short-turn regions, as was earlier postulated for the repeat domains of spectrin and actinin. Electron microscopic images indicate that in addition the dystrophin molecules could present the same capacity of self-association in oligomeric structures as these cytoskeletal proteins and may thus be a part of a complex molecular meshwork essential to muscle cell function. PMID:2236001

  10. Probing Individual Ice Nucleation Events with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; China, Swarup; Knopf, Daniel; Gilles, Mary; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is one of the processes of critical relevance to a range of topics in the fundamental and the applied science and technologies. Heterogeneous ice nucleation initiated by particles proceeds where microscopic properties of particle surfaces essentially control nucleation mechanisms. Ice nucleation in the atmosphere on particles governs the formation of ice and mixed phase clouds, which in turn influence the Earth's radiative budget and climate. Heterogeneous ice nucleation is still insufficiently understood and poses significant challenges in predictive understanding of climate change. We present a novel microscopy platform allowing observation of individual ice nucleation events at temperature range of 193-273 K and relative humidity relevant for ice formation in the atmospheric clouds. The approach utilizes a home built novel ice nucleation cell interfaced with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (IN-ESEM system). The IN-ESEM system is applied for direct observation of individual ice formation events, determining ice nucleation mechanisms, freezing temperatures, and relative humidity onsets. Reported microanalysis of the ice nucleating particles (INP) include elemental composition detected by the energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (EDX), and advanced speciation of the organic content in particles using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The performance of the IN-ESEM system is validated through a set of experiments with kaolinite particles with known ice nucleation propensity. We demonstrate an application of the IN-ESEM system to identify and characterize individual INP within a complex mixture of ambient particles.

  11. Vesicular lipidic systems, liposomes, PLO, and liposomes-PLO: characterization by electronic transmission microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, M Adolfina; Clares, Beatriz; Morales, M Encarnacion; Gallardo, Visitacion

    2008-12-01

    Situations exist in which rapid administration of treatment, as well as maintenance of efficient concentrations for the longest possible time, turns out to be essential. In view of the previous treatment, the elaboration of liposomes, PLO (pluronic lecithin organogel), and the mixture of both is described, as well as their characterizations by electronic transmission microscopy, with the aim of finding out precisely the type of structure for both controlled release systems, its composition, size, homogeneity, and integrity. The period of study has been 90 days. Multilaminar and unilaminar vesicles smaller than 1 microm in diameter were seen in the liposomes, PLO, and liposomes-PLO formulations on transmission electron microscopic (TEM) observation. The technique of characterization reveals the progressive aggregation of the liposomas along the period of study. However, all the vesicles of PLO maintain a defined structure and only a light aggregation 60 days after the elaboration. Changes of morphology and aggregation of liposomas decreased after the incorporation of cholesterol (CH) to the liposomal matrix. The best results were obtained with the formulas liposomes-PLO, which maintain their individuality and integrity during the whole period of study. The combined formulation of liposomas and PLO showed an increase of stability of both lipid systems. PMID:18853327

  12. Study on the Electrochemical Reaction Mechanism of ZnFe2O4 by In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qingmei; Wang, Shixin; Yao, Libing; Li, Haojie; Du, Gaohui; Ye, Huiqun; Fang, Yunzhang

    2016-06-01

    A family of mixed transition–metal oxides (MTMOs) has great potential for applications as anodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). However, the reaction mechanism of MTMOs anodes during lithiation/delithiation is remain unclear. Here, the lithiation/delithiation processes of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles are observed dynamically using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results suggest that during the first lithiation process the ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles undergo a conversion process and generate a composite structure of 1–3 nm Fe and Zn nanograins within Li2O matrix. During the delithiation process, volume contraction and the conversion of Zn and Fe take place with the disappearance of Li2O, followed by the complete conversion to Fe2O3 and ZnO not the original phase ZnFe2O4. The following cycles are dominated by the full reversible phase conversion between Zn, Fe and ZnO, Fe2O3. The Fe valence evolution during cycles evidenced by electron energy–loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques also exhibit the reversible conversion between Fe and Fe2O3 after the first lithiation, agreeing well with the in situ TEM results. Such in situ TEM observations provide valuable phenomenological insights into electrochemical reaction of MTMOs, which may help to optimize the composition of anode materials for further improved electrochemical performance.

  13. Study on the Electrochemical Reaction Mechanism of ZnFe2O4 by In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Su, Qingmei; Wang, Shixin; Yao, Libing; Li, Haojie; Du, Gaohui; Ye, Huiqun; Fang, Yunzhang

    2016-01-01

    A family of mixed transition-metal oxides (MTMOs) has great potential for applications as anodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). However, the reaction mechanism of MTMOs anodes during lithiation/delithiation is remain unclear. Here, the lithiation/delithiation processes of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles are observed dynamically using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results suggest that during the first lithiation process the ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles undergo a conversion process and generate a composite structure of 1-3 nm Fe and Zn nanograins within Li2O matrix. During the delithiation process, volume contraction and the conversion of Zn and Fe take place with the disappearance of Li2O, followed by the complete conversion to Fe2O3 and ZnO not the original phase ZnFe2O4. The following cycles are dominated by the full reversible phase conversion between Zn, Fe and ZnO, Fe2O3. The Fe valence evolution during cycles evidenced by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques also exhibit the reversible conversion between Fe and Fe2O3 after the first lithiation, agreeing well with the in situ TEM results. Such in situ TEM observations provide valuable phenomenological insights into electrochemical reaction of MTMOs, which may help to optimize the composition of anode materials for further improved electrochemical performance. PMID:27306189

  14. Protein-nanoparticle interaction in bioconjugated silver nanoparticles: A transmission electron microscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reymond-Laruinaz, Sébastien; Saviot, Lucien; Potin, Valérie; Marco de Lucas, María del Carmen

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of interaction between proteins and noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) is crucial to extend the use of NPs in biological applications and nanomedicine. We report the synthesis of Ag-NPs:protein bioconjugates synthesized in total absence of citrates or other stabilizing agents in order to study the NP-protein interaction. Four common proteins (lysozyme, bovine serum albumin, cytochrome-C and hemoglobin) were used in this work. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) were mainly used to study these bioconjugated NPs. TEM images showed Ag NPs with sizes in the 5-40 nm range. The presence of a protein layer surrounding the Ag NPs was also observed by TEM. Moreover, the composition at different points of single bioconjugated NPs was probed by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The thickness of the protein layer varies in the 3-15 nm range and the Ag NPs are a few nanometers away. This allowed to obtain an enhancement of the Raman signal of the proteins in the analysis of water suspensions of bioconjugates. SERS results showed a broadening of the Raman bands of the proteins which we attribute to the contribution of different configurations of the proteins adsorbed on the Ag NPs surface. Moreover, the assignment of an intense and sharp peak in the low-frequency range to Ag-N vibrations points to the chemisorption of the proteins on the Ag-NPs surface.

  15. Study on the Electrochemical Reaction Mechanism of ZnFe2O4 by In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qingmei; Wang, Shixin; Yao, Libing; Li, Haojie; Du, Gaohui; Ye, Huiqun; Fang, Yunzhang

    2016-01-01

    A family of mixed transition–metal oxides (MTMOs) has great potential for applications as anodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). However, the reaction mechanism of MTMOs anodes during lithiation/delithiation is remain unclear. Here, the lithiation/delithiation processes of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles are observed dynamically using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results suggest that during the first lithiation process the ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles undergo a conversion process and generate a composite structure of 1–3 nm Fe and Zn nanograins within Li2O matrix. During the delithiation process, volume contraction and the conversion of Zn and Fe take place with the disappearance of Li2O, followed by the complete conversion to Fe2O3 and ZnO not the original phase ZnFe2O4. The following cycles are dominated by the full reversible phase conversion between Zn, Fe and ZnO, Fe2O3. The Fe valence evolution during cycles evidenced by electron energy–loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques also exhibit the reversible conversion between Fe and Fe2O3 after the first lithiation, agreeing well with the in situ TEM results. Such in situ TEM observations provide valuable phenomenological insights into electrochemical reaction of MTMOs, which may help to optimize the composition of anode materials for further improved electrochemical performance. PMID:27306189

  16. Probing the Degradation Mechanisms in Electrolyte Solutions for Li-ion Batteries by In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Mehdi, Beata L.; Parent, Lucas R.; Gu, Meng; Park, Chiwoo; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Yaohui; Arslan, Ilke; Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Chong M.; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-02-21

    One of the goals in the development of new battery technologies is to find new electrolytes with increased electrochemical stability. In-situ (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) using an electrochemical fluid cell provides the ability to rapidly and directly characterize electrode/electrolyte interfacial reactions under battery relevant electrochemical conditions. Furthermore, as the electron beam itself causes a localized electrochemical reaction when it interacts with the electrolyte, the breakdown products that occur during the first stages of battery operation can potentially be simulated and characterized using a straightforward in-situ liquid stage (without electrochemical biasing capabilities). In this paper, we have studied the breakdown of a range of inorganic/salt complexes that are used in state-of-the-art Li-ion battery systems. The results of the in-situ (S)TEM experiments matches with previous stability tests performed during battery operation and the breakdown products and mechanisms are also consistent with known mechanisms. This analysis indicates that in-situ liquid stage (S)TEM observations can be used to directly test new electrolyte designs and provide structural insights into the origin of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation mechanism.

  17. Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies on Titanium-doped Sodium Aluminum Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culnane, Lance F.

    Hydrogen fuel cells play an important role in today's diverse and blossoming alternative energy industry. One of the greatest technological barriers for vehicular applications is the storage of hydrogen (which is required to power hydrogen fuel cells). Storing hydrogen as a gas is not volume efficient, and storing it as a liquid is not cost effective, therefore solid-state storage of hydrogen, such as in metal hydrides offers the most potential for success since many metal hydrides have attractive qualities for hydrogen storage such as: high volumetric capacity, cost efficiency, weight efficiency, low refueling times, and most importantly, high safety. Unfortunately, a compound has not been discovered which contains all of the attractive hydrogen storage qualities for vehicular applications. Sodium aluminum hydride (NaAlH 4) is one of the few compounds which is close to meeting requirements for car manufacturers, and has perhaps been researched the most extensively out of all metal hydrides in the last 15 years. This arises from the remarkable discovery by Bogdanovic who found that doping NaAlH4 with Ti dopants enabled the reversible dehydrogenation and hydrogenation of NaAlH 4 at mild conditions. Various evidence and theories have been proposed to suggest explanations for the enhanced kinetic effect that Ti-doping and ball-milling provide. However, the research community has not reached a consensus as to the exact role of Ti-dopants. If the role of titanium in the NaAlH4 dehydrogenation/hydrogenation mechanism could be understood, then more attractive metal hydrides could be designed. To this end, we conducted Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) studies to explain the role of the Ti dopants. The first known thorough particle size analysis of the NaAlH4 system was conducted, as well as TEM-EELS (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy), TEM-EDS (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy), and in-situ imaging studies. Preparation methods were found to be important for the

  18. Hot Electron Transport Properties of Thin Copper Films Using Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garramone, J. J.; Abel, J. R.; Sitnitsky, I. L.; Zhao, L.; Appelbaum, I.; Labella, V. P.

    2009-03-01

    Copper is widely used material for electrical interconnects within integrated circuits and recently as a base layer for hot electron spin injection and readout into silicon. Integral to both their applications is the knowledge of the electron scattering length. To the best of our knowledge, little work exists that directly measures the scattering length of electrons in copper. In this study we used ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) to measure the hot electron attenuation length of copper thin films deposited on Si(001). BEEM is a three terminal scanning tunneling microcopy (STM) based technique that can measure transport and Schottky heights of metal/semiconductor systems. We find a Schottky height of 0.67 eV and an attenuation length approaching 40 nm just above the Schottky height at 77 K. We also measure a decrease in the attenuation length with increasing tip bias to determine the relative roles of inelastic and elastic scattering.

  19. Scanning transmission electron microscopy strain measurement from millisecond frames of a direct electron charge coupled device

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Knut; Rosenauer, Andreas; Ryll, Henning; Ordavo, Ivan; Ihle, Sebastian; Soltau, Heike; Strueder, Lothar; Volz, Kerstin; Zweck, Josef

    2012-11-19

    A high-speed direct electron detection system is introduced to the field of transmission electron microscopy and applied to strain measurements in semiconductor nanostructures. In particular, a focused electron probe with a diameter of 0.5 nm was scanned over a fourfold quantum layer stack with alternating compressive and tensile strain and diffracted discs have been recorded on a scintillator-free direct electron detector with a frame time of 1 ms. We show that the applied algorithms can accurately detect Bragg beam positions despite a significant point spread each 300 kV electron causes during detection on the scintillator-free camera. For millisecond exposures, we find that strain can be measured with a precision of 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, enabling, e.g., strain mapping in a 100 Multiplication-Sign 100 nm{sup 2} region with 0.5 nm resolution in 40 s.

  20. Imaging doped silicon test structures using low energy electron microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakakura, Craig Yoshimi; Anderson, Meredith Lynn; Kellogg, Gary Lee

    2010-01-01

    This document is the final SAND Report for the LDRD Project 105877 - 'Novel Diagnostic for Advanced Measurements of Semiconductor Devices Exposed to Adverse Environments' - funded through the Nanoscience to Microsystems investment area. Along with the continuous decrease in the feature size of semiconductor device structures comes a growing need for inspection tools with high spatial resolution and high sample throughput. Ideally, such tools should be able to characterize both the surface morphology and local conductivity associated with the structures. The imaging capabilities and wide availability of scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) make them an obvious choice for imaging device structures. Dopant contrast from pn junctions using secondary electrons in the SEM was first reported in 1967 and more recently starting in the mid-1990s. However, the serial acquisition process associated with scanning techniques places limits on the sample throughput. Significantly improved throughput is possible with the use of a parallel imaging scheme such as that found in photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). The application of PEEM and LEEM to device structures relies on contrast mechanisms that distinguish differences in dopant type and concentration. Interestingly, one of the first applications of PEEM was a study of the doping of semiconductors, which showed that the PEEM contrast was very sensitive to the doping level and that dopant concentrations as low as 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} could be detected. More recent PEEM investigations of Schottky contacts were reported in the late 1990s by Giesen et al., followed by a series of papers in the early 2000s addressing doping contrast in PEEM by Ballarotto and co-workers and Frank and co-workers. In contrast to PEEM, comparatively little has been done to identify contrast mechanisms and assess the capabilities of LEEM for imaging semiconductor device strictures. The one exception is the

  1. Capturing enveloped viruses on affinity grids for downstream cryo-electron microscopy applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electron microscopy cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography are essential techniques used for characterizing basic virus morphology and determining the three-dimensional structure of viruses. Enveloped viruses, which contain an outer lipoprotein coat, constitute the largest group of pa...

  2. Study of titanate nanotubes by X-ray and electron diffraction and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brunatova, Tereza; Popelkova, Daniela; Wan, Wei; Oleynikov, Peter; Danis, Stanislav; Zou, Xiaodong; Kuzel, Radomir

    2014-01-15

    The structure of titanate nanotubes (Ti-NTs) was studied by a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), electron diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Ti-NTs are prepared by hydrothermal treatment of TiO{sub 2} powder. The structure is identified by powder X-ray diffraction as the one based on the structure of H{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}·H{sub 2}O phase. The same structure is obtained by projected potential from HRTEM through-focus image series. The structure is verified by simulated PXRD pattern with the aid of the Debye formula. The validity of the model is tested by computing Fourier transformation of a single nanotube which is proportional to measured electron diffraction intensities. A good agreement of this calculation with measured precession electron diffraction data is achieved. - Highlights: • Titanate nanotubes were prepared by hydrothermal method. • X-ray powder diffraction indicated their structure based on that of H{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}·H{sub 2}O. • Structural model was created with the aid of high-resolution electron microscopy. • The model was verified with electron diffraction data. • X-ray powder diffraction pattern was calculated with the aid of the Debye formula.

  3. Combination of transmission electron and atomic force microscopy techniques to determine volume equivalent diameter of submicrometer particles.

    PubMed

    Tumolva, Laarnie; Park, Ji-Yeon; Park, Kihong

    2012-04-01

    Morphological properties of atmospheric particles are directly related to their residence time and transport behaviors, and their deposition patterns in human respiratory systems. The projected properties of particles measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were combined with the particle height measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine volume equivalent diameter of submicrometer particles. For nonvolatile (refractory) laboratory-generated spherical polystyrene latex and cubic NaCl particles, the measured volume equivalent diameters agreed well with the true values (within 4%). However, for nonrefractory (NH(4))(2)SO(4) particles, the measured volume equivalent diameter was much smaller than the true value due to evaporation of volatile species at low vacuum pressure and high electron-beam intensity conditions in TEM, and deformation of particles in AFM. We observed that the volume equivalent diameter of 100 nm mobility-classified atmospheric particles was 35 ± 5 nm, suggesting that these particles contain nonrefractory species, whereas that of 20 nm mobility-classified atmospheric particles was found to be 19 ± 6 nm, suggesting that these particles were refractory and spherical. PMID:21919129

  4. In-vivo Candida biofilms in scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Paulitsch, Astrid Helga; Willinger, Birgit; Zsalatz, Benedikt; Stabentheiner, Edith; Marth, Egon; Buzina, Walter

    2009-11-01

    Candida biofilms on indwelling devices are an increasing problem in patients treated at intensive care units. The goal of this study was to examine the occurrence and frequency of these biofilms. A total of 172 catheters were collected from 105 male and 67 female patients (the age range of both patient groups was from 3 weeks to 98 years old). The catheters were incubated on blood agar plates and the resulting yeast colonies were subsequently identified. Furthermore, pieces of catheters were fixed, dried and sputter coated with gold for investigation with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Yeasts were recovered from significantly more catheters obtained from men than from women (chi(2): n = 67; P < 0.01). In SEM, 56.4% catheters turned out to be positive for biofilm formation. Again catheters from male patients were statistically significant (chi(2): n = 40; P < 0.01) more often positive than those from women. Candida albicans (71.1%) was the most common species isolated from the catheters, followed by C. glabrata (10.3%), C. parapsilosis (8.2%) and C. tropicalis (5.2%). Based on the results of this investigation, the epidemiology of Candida biofilms on indwelling devices seems to be a promising target for future investigations. PMID:19888801

  5. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunov, O.; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Jäger, A.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.; Dejneka, A.

    2015-02-01

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin-stained rat skin sections from plasma-treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  6. Microstructural evaluation of ? bilayer film by transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuan; Liu, Wei; Wang, Ruilan; Xuan, Yi; Li, Lin; Li, Hongchen; Xi, Xiao Xing

    1998-07-01

    The microstructure of 0022-3727/31/14/005/img11Cu0022-3727/31/14/005/img12 bilayer film grown on 0022-3727/31/14/005/img13 substrate was studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM). The results showed that the 0022-3727/31/14/005/img14 film is epitaxially grown on the 0022-3727/31/14/005/img13 substrate with c axis orientation. Planar defects, grain boundaries, moiré patterns, a axis oriented 0022-3727/31/14/005/img14 and impurity particulates are found in the 0022-3727/31/14/005/img14 film. The 0022-3727/31/14/005/img18 film was grown on the 0022-3727/31/14/005/img14 film with a columnar structure. However, some region of the 0022-3727/31/14/005/img18 film is single crystalline, but with strain bands. The development of strain bands in the 0022-3727/31/14/005/img18 film could be a result of lattice mismatch between 0022-3727/31/14/005/img14 and 0022-3727/31/14/005/img18 films and the surface roughness of the 0022-3727/31/14/005/img14 film. In consequence, the dielectric properties of the strained STO film are greatly decreased compared to the bulk single crystalline STO.

  7. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lunov, O. Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.

    2015-02-02

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  8. Analytical electron microscopy of biogenic and inorganic carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.

    1989-01-01

    In the terrestrial sedimentary environment, the mineralogically predominant carbonates are calcite-type minerals (rhombohedral carbonates) and aragonite-type minerals (orthorhombic carbonates). Most common minerals precipitating either inorganically or biogenically are high magnesium calcite and aragonite. High magnesium calcite (with magnesium carbonate substituting for more than 7 mole percent of the calcium carbonate) is stable only at temperatures greater than 700 C or thereabouts, and aragonite is stable only at pressures exceeding several kilobars of confining pressure. Therefore, these carbonates are expected to undergo chemical stabilization in the diagenetic environment to ultimately form stable calcite and dolomite. Because of the strong organic control of carbonate deposition in organisms during biomineralization, the microchemistry and microstructure of invertebrate skeletal material is much different than that present in inorganic carbonate cements. The style of preservation of microstructural features in skeletal material is therefore often quite distinctive when compared to that of inorganic carbonate even though wholesale recrystallization of the sediment has taken place. Microstructural and microchemical comparisons are made between high magnesium calcite echinoderm skeletal material and modern inorganic high magnesium calcite inorganic cements, using analytical electron microscopy and related techniques. Similar comparisons are made between analogous materials which have undergone stabilization in the diagenetic environment. Similar analysis schemes may prove useful in distinguishing between biogenic and inorganic carbonates in returned Martian carbonate samples.

  9. High-performance probes for light and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Sarada; Williams, Megan E.; Bloss, Erik B.; Stasevich, Timothy J.; Speer, Colenso M.; Nern, Aljoscha; Pfeiffer, Barret D.; Hooks, Bryan M.; Li, Wei-Ping; English, Brian P.; Tian, Teresa; Henry, Gilbert L.; Macklin, John J.; Patel, Ronak; Gerfen, Charles R.; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Wang, Yalin; Rubin, Gerald M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe an engineered family of highly antigenic molecules based on GFP-like fluorescent proteins. These molecules contain numerous copies of peptide epitopes and simultaneously bind IgG antibodies at each location. These “spaghetti monster” fluorescent proteins (smFPs) distribute well in neurons, notably into small dendrites, spines and axons. smFP immunolabeling localizes weakly expressed proteins not well resolved with traditional epitope tags. By varying epitope and scaffold, we generated a diverse family of mutually orthogonal antigens. In cultured neurons and mouse and fly brains, smFP probes allow robust, orthogonal multi-color visualization of proteins, cell populations and neuropil. smFP variants complement existing tracers, greatly increase the number of simultaneous imaging channels, and perform well in advanced preparations such as array tomography, super-resolution fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy. In living cells, the probes improve single-molecule image tracking and increase yield for RNA-Seq. These probes facilitate new experiments in connectomics, transcriptomics and protein localization. PMID:25915120

  10. Glycine receptor mechanism elucidated by electron cryo-microscopy.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Lü, Wei; Wu, Shenping; Cheng, Yifan; Gouaux, Eric

    2015-10-01

    The strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR) mediates inhibitory synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and brainstem and is linked to neurological disorders, including autism and hyperekplexia. Understanding of molecular mechanisms and pharmacology of glycine receptors has been hindered by a lack of high-resolution structures. Here we report electron cryo-microscopy structures of the zebrafish α1 GlyR with strychnine, glycine, or glycine and ivermectin (glycine/ivermectin). Strychnine arrests the receptor in an antagonist-bound closed ion channel state, glycine stabilizes the receptor in an agonist-bound open channel state, and the glycine/ivermectin complex adopts a potentially desensitized or partially open state. Relative to the glycine-bound state, strychnine expands the agonist-binding pocket via outward movement of the C loop, promotes rearrangement of the extracellular and transmembrane domain 'wrist' interface, and leads to rotation of the transmembrane domain towards the pore axis, occluding the ion conduction pathway. These structures illuminate the GlyR mechanism and define a rubric to interpret structures of Cys-loop receptors. PMID:26344198

  11. Analysis of virus textures in transmission electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Loris; Paci, Michelangelo; Caetano Dos Santos, Florentino Luciano; Brahnam, Sheryl; Hyttinen, Jari

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose an ensemble of texture descriptors for analyzing virus textures in transmission electron microscopy images. Specifically, we present several novel multi-quinary (MQ) codings of local binary pattern (LBP) variants: the MQ version of the dense LBP, the MQ version of the rotation invariant co-occurrence among adjacent LBPs, and the MQ version of the LBP histogram Fourier. To reduce computation time as well as to improve performance, a feature selection approach is utilized to select the thresholds used in the MQ approaches. In addition, we propose new variants of descriptors where two histograms, instead of the standard one histogram, are produced for each descriptor. The two histograms (one for edge pixels and the other for non-edge pixels) are calculated for training two different SVMs, whose results are then combined by sum rule. We show that a bag of features approach works well with this problem. Our experiments, using a publicly available dataset of 1500 images with 15 classes and same protocol as in previous works, demonstrate the superiority of our new proposed ensemble of texture descriptors. The MATLAB code of our approach is available at https://www.dei.unipd.it/node/2357. PMID:25488214

  12. Life Cycle of Neurospora crassa Viewed by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Seale, Thomas

    1973-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the major stages of the life cycle of two wild-type strains of Neurospora crassa Shear and Dodge (St. Lawrence 3.1a and 74A): mycelia, protoperithecium formation, perithecia, ascospores, ascospore germination and outgrowth, macro and microconidia, and germination and outgrowth of macroconidia. Structures seen at the limit of resolution of bright-field and phase-contrast microscopes, e.g., the ribbed surface of ascospores, are well resolved. New details of conidial development and surface structure are revealed. There appears to be only one distinguishable morphological difference between the two strains. The pattern of germination and outgrowth which seems relatively constant for strain 74A or strain 3.1a, appears to be different for each. Conidia from strain 3.1a almost always germinate from a site between interconidial attachment points; whereas the germ tubes of strain 74A usually emerge from or very near the interconidial attachment site. These germination patterns usually do not segregate 2:2 in asci dissected in order. This observation suggests that conidial germination pattern is not under the control of a single gene. Images PMID:4266170

  13. Glycine receptor mechanism illuminated by electron cryo-microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Lü, Wei; Wu, Shenping; Cheng, Yifan; Gouaux, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Summary The strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR) mediates inhibitory synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and brainstem and is linked to neurological disorders including autism and hyperekplexia. Understanding of molecular mechanisms and pharmacology of GlyRs has been hindered by a dearth of high-resolution structures. Here we report electron cryo-microscopy structures of the α1 GlyR with strychnine, glycine, or glycine/ivermectin. Strychnine arrests the receptor in an antagonist-bound, closed ion channel state, glycine stabilizes the receptor in an agonist-bound open channel state, and the glycine/ivermectin complex adopts a potentially desensitized or partially open state. Relative to the glycine-bound state, strychnine expands the agonist-binding pocket via outward movement of the C loop, promotes rearrangement of the extracellular and transmembrane domain ‘wrist’ interface, and leads to rotation of the transmembrane domain toward the pore axis, occluding the ion conduction pathway. These structures illuminate GlyR mechanism and define a rubric to interpret structures of Cys-loop receptors. PMID:26344198

  14. Electron microscopy of iron chalcogenide FeTe(Se) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchichko, I. O.; Presnyakov, M. Yu.; Stepantsov, E. A.; Kazakov, S. M.; Antipov, E. V.; Makarova, I. P.; Vasil'ev, A. L.

    2015-05-01

    The structure of Fe1 + δTe1 - x Se x films ( x = 0; 0.05) grown on single-crystal MgO and LaAlO3 substrates has been investigated by transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The study of Fe1.11Te/MgO structures has revealed two crystallographic orientation relationships between the film and substrate. It is shown that the lattice mismatch between the film and substrate is compensated for by the formation of misfit dislocations. The Burgers vector projection is determined. The stresses in the film can partially be compensated for due to the formation of an intermediate disordered layer. It is shown that a FeTe0.5Se0.5 film grown on a LaAlO3 substrate is single-crystal and that the FeTe0.5Se0.5/LaAlO3 interface in a selected region is coherent. The orientation relationships between the film and substrate are also determined for this case.

  15. Electron microscopy of iron chalcogenide FeTe(Se) films

    SciTech Connect

    Shchichko, I. O.; Presnyakov, M. Yu.; Stepantsov, E. A.; Kazakov, S. M.; Antipov, E. V.; Makarova, I. P.; Vasil’ev, A. L.

    2015-05-15

    The structure of Fe{sub 1+δ}Te{sub 1−x}Se{sub x} films (x = 0; 0.05) grown on single-crystal MgO and LaAlO{sub 3} substrates has been investigated by transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The study of Fe{sub 1.11}Te/MgO structures has revealed two crystallographic orientation relationships between the film and substrate. It is shown that the lattice mismatch between the film and substrate is compensated for by the formation of misfit dislocations. The Burgers vector projection is determined. The stresses in the film can partially be compensated for due to the formation of an intermediate disordered layer. It is shown that a FeTe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 0.5} film grown on a LaAlO{sub 3} substrate is single-crystal and that the FeTe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 0.5}/LaAlO{sub 3} interface in a selected region is coherent. The orientation relationships between the film and substrate are also determined for this case.

  16. Surface treatment of feldspathic porcelain: scanning electron microscopy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Valian, Azam

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Topographic analysis of treated ceramics provides qualitative information regarding the surface texture affecting the micromechanical retention and locking of resin-ceramics. This study aims to compare the surface microstructure following different surface treatments of feldspathic porcelain. MATERIALS AND METHODS This in-vitro study was conducted on 72 porcelain discs randomly divided into 12 groups (n=6). In 9 groups, feldspathic surfaces were subjected to sandblasting at 2, 3 or 4 bar pressure for 5, 10 or 15 seconds with 50 µm alumina particles at a 5 mm distance. In group 10, 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HF) gel was applied for 120 seconds. In group 11, specimens were sandblasted at 3 bar pressure for 10 seconds and then conditioned with HF. In group 12, specimens were first treated with HF and then sandblasted at 3 bar pressure for 10 seconds. All specimens were then evaluated under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at different magnifications. RESULTS SEM images of HF treated specimens revealed deep porosities of variable sizes; whereas, the sandblasted surfaces were more homogenous and had sharper peaks. Increasing the pressure and duration of sandblasting increased the surface roughness. SEM images of the two combined techniques showed that in group 11 (sandblasted first), HF caused deeper porosities; whereas in group 12 (treated with HF first) sandblasting caused irregularities with less homogeneity. CONCLUSION All surface treatments increased the surface area and caused porous surfaces. In groups subjected to HF, the porosities were deeper than those in sandblasted only groups. PMID:25352961

  17. Scanning electron microscopy of lung following alpha irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.L.; Lauhala, K.E.; McDonald, K.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Pulmonary aggregation of inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} particles leads to a cellular evolution of focal inflammation, fibrosis, epithelial dysplasia and lung tumor formation. Female Wistar rats were exposed to an aerosol of high-fired {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} (initial lung burden, 3.9 kBq) and the lungs examined at intervals from 1 day to 700 days after exposure by light and scanning electron microscopy and autoradiography. Peribronchiolar Pu particle aggregation increased with time, resulting in well-defined focal inflammatory lesions after 120 days and fibrotic lesions after 180 days. A generalized hypertrophy and hyperplasia of nonciliated bronchiolar cells was seen at 15 days and type II cell hyperplasia by 30 days after exposure. Focal dysplastic changes in type II alveolar epithelium and terminal nonciliated bronchiolar epithelium preceded carcinoma formation. Alveolar bronchiolarization was first noted at 120 days, squamous metaplasia at 210 days, squamous carcinoma at 270 days and adenocarcinoma at 600 days after exposure.

  18. Histological preparation of developing vestibular otoconia for scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The unique nature of vestibular otoconia as calcium carbonate biominerals makes them particularly susceptible to chemical deformation during histological processing. We fixed and stored otoconia from all three otolith endorgans of embryonic, hatchling and adult Japanese quail in glutaraldehyde containing either phosphate or non-phosphate buffers for varying lengths of time and processed them for scanning electron microscopy. Otoconia from all age groups and otolith endorgans processed in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) showed abnormal surface morphology when compared to acetone fixed controls. Otoconia processed in 0.1 M sodium cacodylate or HEPES buffered artificial endolymph (pH 7.4) showed normal morphology that was similar to controls. The degree of otoconial deformation was directly related to the time exposed to phosphate buffer. Short duration exposure produced particulate deformations while longer exposures resulted in fused otoconia that formed solid sheets. Otoconial surface deformation and fusing was independent of the glutaraldehyde component of the histological processing. These findings should help vestibular researchers to develop appropriate histological processing protocols in future studies of otoconia.

  19. Applications of Direct Detection Device in Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Liang; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Li, Shengdong; Leblanc, Philippe; Duttweiler, Fred; Bouwer, James C.; Peltier, Steven T.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Xuong, Nguyen-Huu

    2008-01-01

    A prototype Direct Detection Device (DDD) camera system has shown great promise in improving both the spatial resolution and the signal to noise ratio for electron microscopy at 120–400 keV beam energies (Xuong, et al., 2007. Methods in Cell Biology, 79, 721–739). Without the need for a resolution-limiting scintillation screen as in the charge coupled device (CCD), the DDD camera can outperform CCD based systems in terms of spatial resolution, due to its small pixel size (5 μm). In this paper, the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the DDD prototype is measured and compared with the specifications of commercial scientific CCD camera systems. Combining the fast speed of the DDD with image mosaic techniques, fast wide-area imaging is now possible. In this paper, the first large area mosaic image and the first tomography dataset from the DDD camera are presented, along with an image processing algorithm to correct the specimen drift utilizing the fast readout of the DDD system. PMID:18054249

  20. High-performance probes for light and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Sarada; Williams, Megan E; Bloss, Erik B; Stasevich, Timothy J; Speer, Colenso M; Nern, Aljoscha; Pfeiffer, Barret D; Hooks, Bryan M; Li, Wei-Ping; English, Brian P; Tian, Teresa; Henry, Gilbert L; Macklin, John J; Patel, Ronak; Gerfen, Charles R; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Wang, Yalin; Rubin, Gerald M; Looger, Loren L

    2015-06-01

    We describe an engineered family of highly antigenic molecules based on GFP-like fluorescent proteins. These molecules contain numerous copies of peptide epitopes and simultaneously bind IgG antibodies at each location. These 'spaghetti monster' fluorescent proteins (smFPs) distributed well in neurons, notably into small dendrites, spines and axons. smFP immunolabeling localized weakly expressed proteins not well resolved with traditional epitope tags. By varying epitope and scaffold, we generated a diverse family of mutually orthogonal antigens. In cultured neurons and mouse and fly brains, smFP probes allowed robust, orthogonal multicolor visualization of proteins, cell populations and neuropil. smFP variants complement existing tracers and greatly increase the number of simultaneous imaging channels, and they performed well in advanced preparations such as array tomography, super-resolution fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy. In living cells, the probes improved single-molecule image tracking and increased yield for RNA-seq. These probes facilitate new experiments in connectomics, transcriptomics and protein localization. PMID:25915120