Science.gov

Sample records for electron source combined

  1. A combination thermal dissociation/electron impact ionization source for RIB generation

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.; Cui, B.; Welton, R.F.

    1996-12-31

    The flourishing interest in radioactive ion beams (RIBs) with intensities adequate for astrophysics and nuclear physics research place a premium on targets that will swiftly release trace amounts of short lived radio-nuclei in the presence of bulk quantities of target material and ion sources that have the capability of efficiently ionizing the release products. Because of the low probability of simultaneously dissociating and efficiently ionizing the individual atomic constituents of molecules containing the element of interest with conventional, hot-cathode, electron-impact ion sources, the species of interest is often distributed in several mass channels in the form of molecular sideband beams and, consequently, the intensity is diluted. The authors have conceived an ion source that combines the excellent molecular dissociation properties of a thermal dissociator and the high efficiency characteristics of an electron impact ionization source to address these problems. If the concept proves to be a viable option, the source will be used as a complement to the electron beam plasma ion sources already in use at the HRIBF. The design features and principles of operation of the source are described in this article.

  2. Field emission electron source

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter; Cohen, Marvin Lou

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  3. Field emission electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Zettl, A.K.; Cohen, M.L.

    2000-05-02

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm{sup 2} at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  4. Radially uniform electron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomas, D.; Bame, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    A thermionic electron source capable of producing uniform count rates in a number of channel electron multipliers simultaneously was required for conditioning multipliers for an extended space mission. It was found that a straight tungsten filament in the center of a cylindrically symmetric geometry surrounded by an array of multipliers emits a radially asymmetric distribution of electrons that changes with time. A source was developed which successfully produces a time-independent radially uniform distribution of electrons by moving the filament out of the direct line of sight and replacing it with a centrally located electron 'cloud.'

  5. High brightness electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1995-07-01

    High energy physics accelerators and free electron lasers put increased demands on the electron beam sources. This paper describes the present research on attaining intense bright electron beams using photoinjectors. Recent results from the experimental programs will be given. The performance advantages and difficulties presently faced by researchers will be discussed, and the following topics will be covered. Progress has been made in photocathode materials, both in lifetime and quantum efficiency. Cesium telluride has demonstrated significantly longer lifetimes than cesium antimonide at 10{sup {minus}8} torr. However, the laser system is more difficult because cesium telluride requires quadrupled YLF instead of the doubled YLF required for cesium antimonide. The difficulty in using photoinjectors is primarily the drive laser, in particular the amplitude stability. Finally, emittance measurements of photoinjector systems can be complicated by the non-thermal nature of the electron beam. An example of the difficulty in measuring beam emittance is given.

  6. Carbon nanotube electron sources for electron microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    De Jonge, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Electron sources were made from individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes with closed caps and thoroughly cleaned surfaces. Nanotubes from both chemical vapor deposition growth and arc discharge growth were investigated. These emitters provide a highly stable emission current up to a threshold current of a few microamperes. At too large currents several processes take place such as splitting, breaking and cap closing. The emission process is field emission for a workfunction of 5 eV. The electron optical per-formance is highly beneficial for their use as high-brightness point sources in electron microscopes and advantageous with respect to state-of-the-art electron sources. The life-time is at least two years. We have tested the source successfully in a scanning electron microscope.

  7. An instrument combining an electrospray ionization source and a velocity-map imaging spectrometer for studying delayed electron emission of polyanions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concina, Bruno; Papalazarou, Evangelos; Barbaire, Marc; Clavier, Christian; Maurelli, Jacques; Lépine, Franck; Bordas, Christian

    2016-03-01

    An instrument combining an electrospray ionization source and a velocity-map imaging (VMI) spectrometer has been developed in order to study the delayed electron emission of molecular anions and especially of polyanions. It operates at a high repetition rate (kHz) in order to increase the acquisition speed. The VMI spectrometer has been upgraded for nanosecond time resolution by gating the voltages applied on the position-sensitive detector. Kinetic energy release distribution of thermionic emission (without any contribution from direct detachment) can be recorded for well-defined delays after the nanosecond laser excitation. The capability of the instrument is demonstrated by recording photodetachment spectra of the benchmark C60- anion and C842- dianion.

  8. Flow injection of liquid samples to a mass spectrometer with ionization under vacuum conditions: a combined ion source for single-photon and electron impact ionization.

    PubMed

    Schepler, Claudia; Sklorz, Martin; Passig, Johannes; Famiglini, Giorgio; Cappiello, Achille; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-09-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and atmospheric pressure photo-ionization (APPI) are the most important techniques for the ionization of liquid samples. However, working under atmospheric pressure conditions, all these techniques involve some chemical rather than purely physical processes, and therefore, side reactions often yield to matrix-dependent ionization efficiencies. Here, a system is presented that combines both soft single-photon ionization (SPI) and hard 70 eV electron impact ionization (EI) of dissolved compounds under vacuum conditions. A quadrupole mass spectrometer was modified to enable direct EI, a technique developed by Cappiello et al. to obtain library-searchable EI mass spectra as well as soft SPI mass spectra of sample solutions. An electron beam-pumped rare gas excimer lamp working at 126 nm was used as well as a focusable vacuum UV light source for single-photon ionization. Both techniques, EI and SPI, were applied successfully for flow injection experiments providing library-matchable EI fragment mass spectra and soft SPI mass spectra, showing dominant signals for the molecular ion. Four model compounds were analyzed: hexadecane, propofol, chlorpropham, and eugenol, with detection limits in the picomolar range. This novel combination of EI and SPI promises great analytical benefits, thanks to the possibility of combining database alignment for EI data and molecular mass information provided by SPI. Possible applications for the presented ionization technology system are a matrix-effect-free detection and a rapid screening of different complex mixtures without time-consuming sample preparation or separation techniques (e.g., for analysis of reaction solutions in combinatorial chemistry) or a switchable hard (EI) and soft (SPI) MS method as detection step for liquid chromatography. PMID:23812882

  9. The SLAC polarized electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, H.; Alley, R.; Frisch, J.

    1995-06-01

    The SLAC polarized electron source employs a photocathode DC high voltage gun with a loadlock and a YAG pumped Ti:sapphire laser system for colliding beam experiments or a flash lamp pumped Ti:sapphire laser for fixed target experiments. It uses a thin, strained GaAs(100) photocathode, and is capable of producing a pulsed beam with a polarization of {ge}80% and a peak current exceeding 10 A. Its operating efficiency has reached 99%. The physics and technology of producing high polarization electron beams from a GaAs photocathode will be reviewed. The prospects of realizing a polarized electron source for future linear colliders will also be discussed.

  10. Development of a pump-probe facility combining a far-infrared source with laser-like characteristics and a VUV free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faatz, B.; Fateev, A. A.; Feldhaus, J.; Krzywinski, J.; Pflueger, J.; Rossbach, J.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2001-12-01

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY is a facility producing sub-picosecond electron pulses for the generation of VUV or soft X-ray radiation in a free electron laser (FEL). The same electron pulses would also allow the direct production of high-power coherent radiation by passing the electron beam through an undulator. Intense, coherent far-infrared (FIR) undulator radiation can be produced from electron bunches at wavelengths longer than or equal to the bunch length. The source described in this paper provides, in the wavelength range 50- 300 μm, a train of about 1- 10 ps long radiation pulses, with about 1 mJ of optical energy per pulse radiated into the central cone. The average output power can exceed 50 W. In this conceptual design, we intend to use a conventional electromagnetic undulator with a 60 cm period length and a maximum field of 1.5 T. The FIR source will use the spent electron beam coming from the VUV FEL which allows one to significantly extend the scientific potential of the TTF without interfering with the main option of the TTF FEL operation. The pulses of the coherent FIR radiation are naturally synchronized with the VUV pulses from the main TTF FEL, enabling pump-probe techniques using either the FEL pulse as a pump or the FIR pulse as a probe, or vice versa.

  11. High Intensity Polarized Electron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelker, M.; Adderley, P.; Brittian, J.; Clark, J.; Grames, J.; Hansknecht, J.; McCarter, J.; Stutzman, M. L.; Suleiman, R.; Surles-Law, K.

    2008-02-01

    During the 1990s, at numerous facilities world wide, extensive R&D devoted to constructing reliable GaAs photoguns helped ensure successful accelerator-based nuclear and high-energy physics programs using spin polarized electron beams. Today, polarized electron source technology is considered mature, with most GaAs photoguns meeting accelerator and experiment beam specifications in a relatively trouble-free manner. Proposals for new collider facilities however, require electron beams with parameters beyond today's state-of-the-art and serve to renew interest in conducting polarized electron source R&D. And at CEBAF/Jefferson Lab, there is an immediate pressing need to prepare for new experiments that require considerably more beam current than before. One experiment in particular—Q-weak, a parity violation experiment that will look for physics beyond the Standard Model—requires 180 uA average current at polarization >80% for a duration of one year, with run-averaged helicity correlated current asymmetry less than 0.1 ppm. Neighboring halls will continue taking beam during Q-weak, pushing the total average beam current from the gun beyond 300 uA. This workshop contribution describes R&D at Jefferson Lab, dedicated toward extending the operating current of polarized electron sources to meet the requirements of high current experiments at CEBAF and to better appreciate the technological challenges of new accelerators, particularly high average current machines like eRHIC that require at least 25 mA at high polarization.

  12. ECR ion source with electron gun

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Z.Q.; Lyneis, C.M.

    1993-10-26

    An Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source having an electron gun for introducing electrons into the plasma chamber of the ion source is described. The ion source has a injection enclosure and a plasma chamber tank. The plasma chamber is defined by a plurality of longitudinal magnets. The electron gun injects electrons axially into the plasma chamber such that ionization within the plasma chamber occurs in the presence of the additional electrons produced by the electron gun. The electron gun has a cathode for emitting electrons therefrom which is heated by current supplied from an AC power supply while bias potential is provided by a bias power supply. A concentric inner conductor and outer conductor carry heating current to a carbon chuck and carbon pusher which hold the cathode in place and also heat the cathode. In the Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, the electron gun replaces the conventional first stage used in prior electron cyclotron resonance ion generators. 5 figures.

  13. SHIELDING ANALYSIS FOR PORTABLE GAUGING COMBINATION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    J. TOMPKINS; L. LEONARD; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    Radioisotopic decay has been used as a source of photons and neutrons for industrial gauging operations since the late 1950s. Early portable moisture/density gauging equipment used Americium (Am)-241/Beryllium (Be)/Cesium (Cs)-137 combination sources to supply the required nuclear energy for gauging. Combination sources typically contained 0.040 Ci of Am-241 and 0.010 Ci of CS-137 in the same source capsule. Most of these sources were manufactured approximately 30 years ago. Collection, transportation, and storage of these sources once removed from their original device represent a shielding problem with distinct gamma and neutron components. The Off-Site Source Recovery (OSR) Project is planning to use a multi-function drum (MFD) for the collection, shipping, and storage of AmBe sources, as well as the eventual waste package for disposal. The MFD is an approved TRU waste container design for DOE TRU waste known as the 12 inch Pipe Component Overpack. As the name indicates, this drum is based on a 12 inch ID stainless steel weldment approximately 25 inch in internal length. The existing drum design allows for addition of shielding within the pipe component up to the 110 kg maximum pay load weight. The 12 inch pipe component is packaged inside a 55-gallon drum, with the balance of the interior space filled with fiberboard dunnage. This packaging geometry is similar to the design of a DOT 6M, Type B shipping container.

  14. Combination free electron and gaseous laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Rockwood, Stephen D.; Stein, William E.

    1980-01-01

    A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

  15. Combination free-electron and gaseous laser

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, C.A.; Rockwood, S.D.; Stein, W.E.

    1981-06-08

    A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages is described. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

  16. Secondary electron ion source neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, John P.; McCollister, Daryl R.

    1998-01-01

    A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof

  17. Secondary electron ion source neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, J.P.; McCollister, D.R.

    1998-04-28

    A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter is disclosed. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof. 4 figs.

  18. An ultracold low emittance electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, G.; Harvey, M.; Murray, A. J.; Bellan, L.; Bertsche, W.; Appleby, R. B.; Mete, O.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2014-06-01

    Ultracold atom-based electron sources have recently been proposed as an alternative to the conventional photo-injectors or thermionic electron guns widely used in modern particle accelerators. The advantages of ultracold atom-based electron sources lie in the fact that the electrons extracted from the plasma (created from near threshold photo-ionization of ultracold atoms) have a very low temperature, i.e. down to tens of Kelvin. Extraction of these electrons has the potential for producing very low emittance electron bunches. These features are crucial for the next generation of particle accelerators, including free electron lasers, plasma-based accelerators and future linear colliders. The source also has many potential direct applications, including ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and electron microscopy, due to its intrinsically high coherence. In this paper, the basic mechanism of ultracold electron beam production is discussed and our new research facility for an ultracold, low emittance electron source is introduced. This source is based on a novel alternating current Magneto-Optical Trap (the AC-MOT). Detailed simulations for a proposed extraction system have shown that for a 1 pC bunch charge, a beam emittance of 0.35 mm mrad is obtainable, with a bunch length of 3 mm and energy spread 1%.

  19. ECR ion source with electron gun

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Zu Q.; Lyneis, Claude M.

    1993-01-01

    An Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (10) having an electron gun (52) for introducing electrons into the plasma chamber (18) of the ion source (10). The ion source (10) has a injection enclosure (12) and a plasma chamber tank (14). The plasma chamber (18) is defined by a plurality of longitudinal magnets (16). The electron gun (52) injects electrons axially into the plasma chamber (18) such that ionization within the plasma chamber (18) occurs in the presence of the additional electrons produced by the electron gun (52). The electron gun (52) has a cathode (116) for emitting electrons therefrom which is heated by current supplied from an AC power supply (96) while bias potential is provided by a bias power supply (118). A concentric inner conductor (60) and Outer conductor (62) carry heating current to a carbon chuck (104) and carbon pusher (114) Which hold the cathode (116) in place and also heat the cathode (16). In the Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (10), the electron gun (52) replaces the conventional first stage used in prior art electron cyclotron resonance ion generators.

  20. Cold electron sources using laser-cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulloch, Andrew J.; Sparkes, Ben M.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2016-08-01

    Since the first observation of electron diffraction in 1927, electrons have been used to probe the structure of matter. High-brightness sources of thermal electrons have recently emerged that are capable of simultaneously providing high spatial resolving power along with ultrafast temporal resolution, however they are yet to demonstrate the holy grail of single-shot diffraction of non-crystalline objects. The development of the cold atom electron source, based around the ionisation of laser cooled atoms, has the potential to contribute to this goal. Electron generation from laser cooled atoms is in its infancy, but in just ten years has moved from a proposal to a source capable of performing single-shot diffraction imaging of crystalline structures. The high brightness, high transverse coherence length, and small energy spread of cold electron sources are also potentially advantageous for applications ranging from seeding of x-ray free-electron lasers and synchrotrons to coherent diffractive imaging and microscopy. In this review we discuss the context which motivates the development of these sources, the operating principles of the source, and recent experimental results. The achievements demonstrated thus far combined with theoretical proposals to alleviate current bottlenecks in development promise a bright future for these sources.

  1. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  2. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-06-09

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  3. Improved operation of the nonambipolar electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmier, Ben; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2008-09-01

    Significant improvements have been made to the nonambipolar electron source (NES), a radio frequency (rf) plasma-based electron source that does not rely on electron emission at a cathode surface [B. Longmier, S. Baalrud, and N. Hershkowitz, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 113504 (2006)]. A prototype NES has produced 30 A of continuous electron current, using 2 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) Xe, 1300 W rf power at 13.56 MHz, yielding a 180 times gas utilization factor. A helicon mode transition has also been identified during NES operation with an argon propellant, using 15 SCCM Ar, 1000 W rf, and 100 G magnetic field. This NES technology has the ability to replace hollow cathode electron sources and to enable high power electric propulsion missions, eliminating one of the lifetime restrictions that many ion thrusters have previously been faced with.

  4. Versatile spin-polarized electron source

    DOEpatents

    Jozwiak, Chris; Park, Cheol -Hwan; Gotlieb, Kenneth; Louie, Steven G.; Hussain, Zahid; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2015-09-22

    One or more embodiments relate generally to the field of photoelectron spin and, more specifically, to a method and system for creating a controllable spin-polarized electron source. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for creating a controllable spin-polarized electron source comprising the following steps: providing one or more materials, the one or more materials having at least one surface and a material layer adjacent to said surface, wherein said surface comprises highly spin-polarized surface electrons, wherein the direction and spin of the surface electrons are locked together; providing at least one incident light capable of stimulating photoemission of said surface electrons; wherein the photon polarization of said incident light is tunable; and inducing photoemission of the surface electron states.

  5. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Reinard; Kester, Oliver

    2010-02-15

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not ''sorcery'' but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future.

  6. ILC Polarized Electron Source Design and R&D Program

    SciTech Connect

    Brachmann, A.; Sheppard, J.; Zhou, F.; Poelker, M.; /SLAC

    2012-04-06

    The R and D program for the ILC electron focuses on three areas. These are the source drive laser system, the electron gun and photo cathodes necessary to produce a highly polarized electron beam. Currently, the laser system and photo cathode development take place at SLAC's 'ILC Injector Test facility', which is an integrated lab (laser and gun) that allows the production of the electron beam and is equipped with a set of diagnostics, necessary to characterize the source performance. Development of the ILC electron gun takes place at Jefferson Lab, where advanced concepts and technologies for HV DC electron guns for polarized beams are being developed. The goal is to combine both efforts at one facility to demonstrate an electron beam with ILC specifications, which are electron beam charge and polarization as well as the cathode's lifetime. The source parameters are summarized in Table 1. The current schematic design of the ILC central complex is depicted in Figure 1. The electron and positron sources are located and laid out approximately symmetric on either side of the damping rings.

  7. Electron Storage Ring Development for ICS Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Loewen, Roderick

    2015-09-30

    There is an increasing world-wide interest in compact light sources based on Inverse Compton Scattering. Development of these types of light sources includes leveraging the investment in accelerator technology first developed at DOE National Laboratories. Although these types of light sources cannot replace the larger user-supported synchrotron facilities, they offer attractive alternatives for many x-ray science applications. Fundamental research at the SLAC National Laboratory in the 1990’s led to the idea of using laser-electron storage rings as a mechanism to generate x-rays with many properties of the larger synchrotron light facilities. This research led to a commercial spin-off of this technology. The SBIR project goal is to understand and improve the performance of the electron storage ring system of the commercially available Compact Light Source. The knowledge gained from studying a low-energy electron storage ring may also benefit other Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) source development. Better electron storage ring performance is one of the key technologies necessary to extend the utility and breadth of applications of the CLS or related ICS sources. This grant includes a subcontract with SLAC for technical personnel and resources for modeling, feedback development, and related accelerator physics studies.

  8. Electron beam ion sources and traps (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Reinard

    2000-02-01

    The electron beam method of stepwise ionization to highest charge states has found applications in electron beam ion sources (EBISs) for accelerators and atomic physics collision experiments as well as in electron beam ion traps (EBITs) for x-ray and mass spectroscopy. A dense and almost monoenergetic electron beam provides a unique tool for ionization, because radiative recombination by slow electrons is negligible and charge exchange is almost avoided in ultrahigh vacua. These are essential differences to electron cyclotron resonance ion sources with inevitable low energy electrons and comparatively high gas pressure. The distinction between EBIS and EBIT as genuine devices has become meaningless, because EBISs may work as traps and almost all EBITs are feeding beamlines for external experiments. More interesting is to note the diversification of these devices, which demonstrates that a matured technology is finding dedicated answers for different applications. At present we may distinguish six major lines of development and application: high current EBISs for upcoming hadron colliders, super EBITs in the energy range above 300 keV for quantum electrondynamics tests, inexpensive and small EBISTs for atomic physics studies, a highly efficient EBIS with oscillating electrons, MEDEBIS for tumor therapy with C6+, and charge breeding in facilities for exotic radioactive beams.

  9. The SLAC polarized electron source laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, J.

    1995-10-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) has operated a polarized photocathode electron source and titanium sapphire laser for high energy physics collisions for over 6,500 hours of nearly continuous operation. The laser system for the source has demonstrated > 98.5% total uptime for the duration of the experiment. The laser system uses a pair of titanium sapphire oscillators pumped by frequency doubled YAG lasers to produce 2ns, 250 {micro}J pulses at wavelengths from 740nm to 870nm.

  10. Positron source position sensing detector and electronics

    DOEpatents

    Burnham, Charles A.; Bradshaw, Jr., John F.; Kaufman, David E.; Chesler, David A.; Brownell, Gordon L.

    1985-01-01

    A positron source, position sensing device, particularly with medical applications, in which positron induced gamma radiation is detected using a ring of stacked, individual scintillation crystals, a plurality of photodetectors, separated from the scintillation crystals by a light guide, and high resolution position interpolation electronics. Preferably the scintillation crystals are several times more numerous than the photodetectors with each crystal being responsible for a single scintillation event from a received gamma ray. The light guide will disperse the light emitted from gamma ray absorption over several photodetectors. Processing electronics for the output of the photodetectors resolves the location of the scintillation event to a fraction of the dimension of each photodetector. Because each positron absorption results in two 180.degree. oppositely traveling gamma rays, the detection of scintillation in pairs permits location of the positron source in a manner useful for diagnostic purposes. The processing electronics simultaneously responds to the outputs of the photodetectors to locate the scintillations to the source crystal. While it is preferable that the scintillation crystal include a plurality of stacked crystal elements, the resolving power of the processing electronics is also applicable to continuous crystal scintillators.

  11. Update on the Electron Source Model

    SciTech Connect

    Cowee, Misa; Winske, Dan

    2012-07-17

    We summarize work done in FY12 on the Los Alamos Electron Source Model (ESM), which predicts the distribution of beta-decay electrons after a high altitude nuclear explosion (HANE) as a function of L, energy, and pitch angle. In the last year we have compared model results with data taken after the Russian 2 HANE test of 1962 and presented results at the HEART conference. We discuss our future plans to continue comparison with HANE data and to develop the code to allow a more complex set of initial conditions.

  12. Combining sources in stable isotope mixing models: alternative methods.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Donald L; Newsome, Seth D; Gregg, Jillian W

    2005-08-01

    Stable isotope mixing models are often used to quantify source contributions to a mixture. Examples include pollution source identification; trophic web studies; analysis of water sources for soils, plants; or water bodies, and many others. A common problem is having too many sources to allow a unique solution. We discuss two alternative procedures for addressing this problem. One option is a priori to combine sources with similar signatures so the number of sources is small enough to provide a unique solution. Aggregation should be considered only when isotopic signatures of clustered sources are not significantly different, and sources are related so the combined source group has some functional significance. For example, in a food web analysis, lumping several species within a trophic guild allows more interpretable results than lumping disparate food sources, even if they have similar isotopic signatures. One result of combining mixing model sources is increased uncertainty of the combined end-member isotopic signatures and consequently the source contribution estimates; this effect can be quantified using the IsoError model (http://www.epa.gov/wed/pages/models/isotopes/isoerror1_04.htm). As an alternative to lumping sources before a mixing analysis, the IsoSource mixing model (http://www.epa.gov/wed/pages/models/isosource/isosource.htm) can be used to find all feasible solutions of source contributions consistent with isotopic mass balance. While ranges of feasible contributions for each individual source can often be quite broad, contributions from functionally related groups of sources can be summed a posteriori, producing a range of solutions for the aggregate source that may be considerably narrower. A paleo-human dietary analysis example illustrates this method, which involves a terrestrial meat food source, a combination of three terrestrial plant foods, and a combination of three marine foods. In this case, a posteriori aggregation of sources allowed

  13. MULTIPLE ELECTRON BEAM ION PUMP AND SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, R.E.

    1962-02-27

    A vacuum pump is designed which operates by ionizing incoming air and by withdrawing the ions from the system by means of electrical fields. The apparatus comprises a cylindrical housing communicable with the vessel to be evacuated and having a thin wall section in one end. Suitable coils provide a longitudinal magnetic field within the cylinder. A broad cathode and an anode structure is provided to establish a plurality of adjacent electron beams which are parallel to the cylinder axis. Electron reflector means are provided so that each of the beams constitutes a PIG or reflex discharge. Such structure provides a large region in which incoming gas molecules may be ionized by electron bombardment. A charged electrode assembly accelerates the ions through the thin window, thereby removing the gas from the system. The invention may also be utilized as a highly efficient ion source. (AEC)

  14. Combined ultraviolet studies of astronomical sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.; Giampapa, M. S.; Huchra, J. P.; Noyes, R. W.; Hartmann, L. W.; Raymond, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Ultraviolet studies of astronomical sources are discussed. Some studies utilized IVE data. Non-radiative shock at the edge of the Cygnses Loop, stellar flares, local interestellar medium, hot galaxies, stellar mass ejection, contact binaries, double quasars, and stellar chromosphere and coronae are discussed.

  15. Fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Lyneis, Claude M; Leitner, D; Todd, D S; Sabbi, G; Prestemon, S; Caspi, S; Ferracin, P

    2008-02-01

    The concepts and technical challenges related to developing a fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source with a rf frequency greater than 40 GHz and magnetic confinement fields greater than twice B(ECR) will be explored in this article. Based on the semiempirical frequency scaling of ECR plasma density with the square of operating frequency, there should be significant gains in performance over current third generation ECR ion sources, which operate at rf frequencies between 20 and 30 GHz. While the third generation ECR ion sources use NbTi superconducting solenoid and sextupole coils, the new sources will need to use different superconducting materials, such as Nb(3)Sn, to reach the required magnetic confinement, which scales linearly with rf frequency. Additional technical challenges include increased bremsstrahlung production, which may increase faster than the plasma density, bremsstrahlung heating of the cold mass, and the availability of high power continuous wave microwave sources at these frequencies. With each generation of ECR ion sources, there are new challenges to be mastered, but the potential for higher performance and reduced cost of the associated accelerator continues to make this a promising avenue for development. PMID:18315111

  16. Biprism electron interferometry with a single atom tip source.

    PubMed

    Schütz, G; Rembold, A; Pooch, A; Meier, S; Schneeweiss, P; Rauschenbeutel, A; Günther, A; Chang, W T; Hwang, I S; Stibor, A

    2014-06-01

    Experiments with electron or ion matter waves require a coherent, monochromatic and long-term stable source with high brightness. These requirements are best fulfilled by single atom tip (SAT) field emitters. The performance of an iridium covered W(111) SAT is demonstrated and analyzed for electrons in a biprism interferometer. Furthermore we characterize the emission of the SAT in a separate field electron and field ion microscope and compare it with other emitter types. A new method is presented to fabricate the electrostatic charged biprism wire that separates and combines the matter wave. In contrast to other biprism interferometers the source and the biprism size are well defined within a few nanometers. The setup has direct applications in ion interferometry and Aharonov-Bohm physics. PMID:24704604

  17. Combined ultraviolet studies of astronomical source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupress, A. K.; Baliunas, S. L.; Blair, W. P.; Hartmann, L. W.; Huchra, J. P.; Raymond, J. C.; Smith, G. H.; Soderblom, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    As part of its Ultraviolet Studies of Astronomical Sources the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for the period 1 Feb. 1985 to 31 July 1985 observed the following: the Cygnus Loop; oxygen-rich supernova remnants in 1E0102-72; the Large Magellanic Cloud supernova remnants; P Cygni profiles in dwarf novae; soft X-ray photoionization of interstellar gas; spectral variations in AM Her stars; the mass of Feige 24; atmospheric inhomogeneities in Lambda Andromedae and FF Aquarii; photometric and spectroscopic observation of Capella; Alpha Orionis; metal deficient giant stars; M 67 giants; high-velocity winds from giant stars; accretion disk parameters in cataclysmic variables; chromospheric emission of late-type dwarfs in visual binaries; chromospheres and transient regions of stars in the Ursa Major group; and low-metallicity blue galaxies.

  18. SLC polarized beam source electron optics design

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.; Lavine, T.L.; Early, R.A.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Miller, R.H.; Schultz, D.C.; Spencer, C.M.; Yeremian, A.D.

    1991-05-01

    This paper describes the design of the beam-line from the polarized electron gun to the linac injector in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The polarized electron source is a GaAs photocathode, requiring 10{sup {minus}11}-Torr-range pressure for adequate quantum efficiency and longevity. The photocathode is illuminated by 3-nsec-long laser pulses. The quality of the optics for the 160-kV beam is crucial since electron-stimulated gas desorption from beam loss in excess of 0.1% of the 20-nC pulses may poison the photocathode. Our design for the transport line consists of a differential pumping region isolated by a pair of valves. Focusing is provided by a pair of Helmholtz coils and by several iron-encased solenoidal lenses. Our optics design is based on beam transport simulations using 2{1/2}-D particle-in-cell codes to model the gun and to solve the fully-relativistic time-dependent equations of motion in three dimensions for electrons in the presence of azimuthally symmetric electromagnetic fields. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  20. Infrared light sources with semimetal electron injection

    DOEpatents

    Kurtz, Steven R.; Biefeld, Robert M.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    1999-01-01

    An infrared light source is disclosed that comprises a layered semiconductor active region having a semimetal region and at least one quantum-well layer. The semimetal region, formed at an interface between a GaAsSb or GalnSb layer and an InAsSb layer, provides electrons and holes to the quantum-well layer to generate infrared light at a predetermined wavelength in the range of 2-6 .mu.m. Embodiments of the invention can be formed as electrically-activated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, and as optically-pumped lasers. Since the active region is unipolar, multiple active regions can be stacked to form a broadband or multiple-wavelength infrared light source.

  1. Infrared light sources with semimetal electron injection

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.R.; Biefeld, R.M.; Allerman, A.A.

    1999-11-30

    An infrared light source is disclosed that comprises a layered semiconductor active region having a semimetal region and at least one quantum-well layer. The semimetal region, formed at an interface between a GaAsSb or GaInSb layer and an InAsSb layer, provides electrons and holes to the quantum-well layer to generate infrared light at a predetermined wavelength in the range of 2--6 {mu}m. Embodiments of the invention can be formed as electrically-activated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, and as optically-pumped lasers. Since the active region is unipolar, multiple active regions can be stacked to form a broadband or multiple-wavelength infrared light source.

  2. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  3. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-12-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  4. Quantum description and properties of electrons emitted from pulsed nanotip electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lougovski, Pavel; Batelaan, Herman

    2011-08-15

    We present a quantum calculation of the electron degeneracy for electron sources. We explore quantum interference of electrons in the temporal and spatial domain and demonstrate how it can be utilized to characterize a pulsed electron source. We estimate effects of Coulomb repulsion on two-electron interference and show that currently available pulsed nanotip electron sources operate in the regime where the quantum nature of electrons can be made dominant.

  5. Liquid metal ion source assembly for external ion injection into an electron string ion source (ESIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, M. J.; Bark, R. A.; Thomae, R.; Donets, E. E.; Donets, E. D.; Boytsov, A.; Ponkin, D.; Ramsdorf, A.

    2016-02-01

    An assembly for a commercial Ga+ liquid metal ion source in combination with an ion transportation and focusing system, a pulse high-voltage quadrupole deflector, and a beam diagnostics system has been constructed in the framework of the iThemba LABS (Cape Town, South Africa)—JINR (Dubna, Russia) collaboration. First, results on Ga+ ion beam commissioning will be presented. Outlook of further experiments for measurements of charge breeding efficiency in the electron string ion source with the use of external injection of Ga+ and Au+ ion beams will be reported as well.

  6. Ion optics of RHIC electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Okamura, M.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Tan, Y.; Kuznetsov, G.

    2012-02-15

    RHIC electron beam ion source has been commissioned to operate as a versatile ion source on RHIC injection facility supplying ion species from He to Au for Booster. Except for light gaseous elements RHIC EBIS employs ion injection from several external primary ion sources. With electrostatic optics fast switching from one ion species to another can be done on a pulse to pulse mode. The design of an ion optical structure and the results of simulations for different ion species are presented. In the choice of optical elements special attention was paid to spherical aberrations for high-current space charge dominated ion beams. The combination of a gridded lens and a magnet lens in LEBT provides flexibility of optical control for a wide range of ion species to satisfy acceptance parameters of RFQ. The results of ion transmission measurements are presented.

  7. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM CURRENT MONITOR ELECTRONICS.

    SciTech Connect

    KESSELMAN,M.; DAWSON,W.C.

    2002-05-06

    This paper will discuss the present electronics design for the beam current monitor system to be used throughout the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The beam is composed of a micro-pulse structure due to the 402.5MHz RF, and is chopped into mini-pulses of 645ns duration with a 300ns gap, providing a macro-pulse of 1060 mini-pulses repeating at a 60Hz rate. Ring beam current will vary from about 15ma peak during studies, to about 50Amps peak (design to 100 amps). A digital approach to droop compensation has been implemented and initial test results presented.

  8. Efficiency of combined cyclotron--[hacek C]erenkov interaction between electrons and electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Nusinovich, G.S.; Vlasov, A.N. )

    1993-02-01

    A theory is presented describing the electron cyclotron interaction at frequencies near cutoff, followed by a [hacek C]erenkov interaction region. In such a case, the cyclotron interaction withdraws only the orbital component of electron momentum, while in the [hacek C]erenkov interaction the electrons lose their axial momentum. It is shown that the addition of the [hacek C]erenkov interaction significantly enhances the total electronic efficiency. Since both kinds of operation are relatively insensitive to electron velocity spread, the efficiency of the combined interaction is also rather tolerant to velocity spread. Thus, rather efficient sources of electromagnetic radiation based on poor quality electron beams may be developed.

  9. Interferometer combines laser light source and digital counting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Measurement of small linear displacements in digital readouts with extreme accuracy and sensitivity is achieved by an interferometer. The instrument combines a digital electro-optical fringe-counting system and a laser light source.

  10. An open-source laser electronics suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisenti, Neal C.; Reschovsky, Benjamin J.; Barker, Daniel S.; Restelli, Alessandro; Campbell, Gretchen K.

    2016-05-01

    We present an integrated set of open-source electronics for controlling external-cavity diode lasers and other instruments in the laboratory. The complete package includes a low-noise circuit for driving high-voltage piezoelectric actuators, an ultra-stable current controller based on the design of, and a high-performance, multi-channel temperature controller capable of driving thermo-electric coolers or resistive heaters. Each circuit (with the exception of the temperature controller) is designed to fit in a Eurocard rack equipped with a low-noise linear power supply capable of driving up to 5 A at +/- 15 V. A custom backplane allows signals to be shared between modules, and a digital communication bus makes the entire rack addressable by external control software over TCP/IP. The modular architecture makes it easy for additional circuits to be designed and integrated with existing electronics, providing a low-cost, customizable alternative to commercial systems without sacrificing performance.

  11. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle Brozas, F.; Crego, A.; Roso, L.; Peralta Conde, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose, we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However, electrons are stopped in the first layers, allowing a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  12. A new concept Tandem thermal dissociator/electron impact ion source for RIB generation

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.; Williams, C.

    1995-12-31

    An innovative thermal dissociation/electron impact ionization positive ion source is presently under design at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for potential use for generating RIBs at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF). Because of the low probability of simultaneously dissociating and efficiently ionizing the individual atomic constituents with conventional, hot-cathode, electron-impact ion sources, the ion beams extracted from these sources often appear as a mixture of several molecular sideband beams. In this way, the intensity of the species of interest is diluted. We have conceived an Ion source that combines the excellent molecular dissociation properties of a thermal dissociator and the high efficiency characteristics of an electron impact ionization source. If the concept proves to be a viable option, the source will be used as a complement to the electron beam plasma ion sources already in use at the HRIBF. The design features and principles of operation of the source are described in this article.

  13. Evaluation of high-energy brachytherapy source electronic disequilibrium and dose from emitted electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, Facundo; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Melhus, Christopher S.; Rivard, Mark J.

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: The region of electronic disequilibrium near photon-emitting brachytherapy sources of high-energy radionuclides ({sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, and {sup 169}Yb) and contributions to total dose from emitted electrons were studied using the GEANT4 and PENELOPE Monte Carlo codes. Methods: Hypothetical sources with active and capsule materials mimicking those of actual sources but with spherical shape were examined. Dose contributions due to source photons, x rays, and bremsstrahlung; source {beta}{sup -}, Auger electrons, and internal conversion electrons; and water collisional kerma were scored. To determine if conclusions obtained for electronic equilibrium conditions and electron dose contribution to total dose for the representative spherical sources could be applied to actual sources, the {sup 192}Ir mHDR-v2 source model (Nucletron B.V., Veenendaal, The Netherlands) was simulated for comparison to spherical source results and to published data. Results: Electronic equilibrium within 1% is reached for {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, and {sup 169}Yb at distances greater than 7, 3.5, 2, and 1 mm from the source center, respectively, in agreement with other published studies. At 1 mm from the source center, the electron contributions to total dose are 1.9% and 9.4% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, respectively. Electron emissions become important (i.e., >0.5%) within 3.3 mm of {sup 60}Co and 1.7 mm of {sup 192}Ir sources, yet are negligible over all distances for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 169}Yb. Electronic equilibrium conditions along the transversal source axis for the mHDR-v2 source are comparable to those of the spherical sources while electron dose to total dose contribution are quite different. Conclusions: Electronic equilibrium conditions obtained for spherical sources could be generalized to actual sources while electron contribution to total dose depends strongly on source dimensions, material composition, and electron spectra.

  14. Mid-IR laser source using hollow waveguide beam combining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, Ian F.; Thorne, Daniel H.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jenkins, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    Hollow waveguide technology is a route to efficient beam combining of multiple laser sources in a compact footprint. It is a technology appropriate for combining free-space or fibre-coupled beams generated by semiconductor, fibre or solidstate laser sources. This paper will present results of a breadboard mid-IR system comprising four laser sources combined using a hollow waveguide optical circuit. In this approach the individual dichroic beam combiner components are held in precision alignment slots in the hollow waveguide circuit and the different input wavelengths are guided between the components to a common output port. The hollow waveguide circuit is formed in the surface of a Macor (machinable glass-ceramic) substrate using precision CNC machining techniques. The hollow waveguides have fundamentally different propagation characteristics to solid core waveguides leading to transmission characteristics close to those of the atmosphere while still providing useful light guidance properties. The transmission efficiency and power handling of the hollow waveguide circuit can be designed to be very high across a broad waveband range. Three of the sources are quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), a semiconductor laser technology providing direct generation of midwave IR output. The combined beams provide 4.2 W of near diffraction-limited output co-boresighted to better than 20 µrad. High coupling efficiency into the waveguides is demonstrated, with negligible waveguide transmission losses. The overall transmission of the hollow waveguide beam combining optical circuit, weighted by the laser power at each wavelength, is 93%. This loss is dominated by the performance of the dichroic optics used to combine the beams.

  15. Diffraction imaging with electrons from an ultracold plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, S. D.; Sheludko, D. V.; McCulloch, A. J.; Junker, M.; Bell, S. C.; Quiney, H. M.; Scholten, R. E.

    2010-03-01

    The molecular structure of biological molecules such as bacteriorhodopsin can be determined by electron diffraction, but general application has been limited by the brightness of conventional electron sources. Brightness is proportional to current and inversely proportional to electron temperature. A high brightness electron source from cold atom clouds presents a promising alternative to traditional high temperature (104 K) sources. Cold atoms in a MOT can be photoionized just above threshold, releasing electron bunches with temperatures as low as 10 K. Although the number of electrons that can be extracted from a MOT is relatively small, the reduced temperature may enable brightness competitive with conventional alternatives. We have simulated electron diffraction from electron microscopy grids and 2D arrays of simple molecules, exploring the energy, coherence and brightness requirements for practical diffraction imaging.

  16. Inner Magnetospheric Superthermal Electron Transport: Photoelectron and Plasma Sheet Electron Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Liemohn, M. W.; Kozyra, J. U.; Moore, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    Two time-dependent kinetic models of superthermal electron transport are combined to conduct global calculations of the nonthermal electron distribution function throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is shown that the energy range of validity for this combined model extends down to the superthermal-thermal intersection at a few eV, allowing for the calculation of the entire distribution function and thus an accurate heating rate to the thermal plasma. Because of the linearity of the formulas, the source terms are separated to calculate the distributions from the various populations, namely photoelectrons (PEs) and plasma sheet electrons (PSEs). These distributions are discussed in detail, examining the processes responsible for their formation in the various regions of the inner magnetosphere. It is shown that convection, corotation, and Coulomb collisions are the dominant processes in the formation of the PE distribution function, and that PSEs are dominated by the interplay between the drift terms. Of note is that the PEs propagate around the nightside in a narrow channel at the edge of the plasmasphere as Coulomb collisions reduce the fluxes inside of this and convection compresses the flux tubes inward. These distributions are then recombined to show the development of the total superthermal electron distribution function in the inner magnetosphere and their influence on the thermal plasma. PEs usually dominate the dayside heating, with integral energy fluxes to the ionosphere reaching 10(exp 10) eV/sq cm/s in the plasmasphere, while heating from the PSEs typically does not exceed 10(exp 8)eV/sq cm/s. On the nightside, the inner plasmasphere is usually unheated by superthermal electrons. A feature of these combined spectra is that the distribution often has upward slopes with energy, particularly at the crossover from PE to PSE dominance, indicating that instabilities are possible.

  17. Inner Magnetospheric Superthermal Electron Transport: Photoelectron and Plasma Sheet Electron Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Liemohn, M. W.; Kozyra, J. U.; Moore, T. E.

    1998-01-01

    Two time-dependent kinetic models of superthermal electron transport are combined to conduct global calculations of the nonthermal electron distribution function throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is shown that the energy range of validity for this combined model extends down to the superthermal-thermal intersection at a few eV, allowing for the calculation of the en- tire distribution function and thus an accurate heating rate to the thermal plasma. Because of the linearity of the formulas, the source terms are separated to calculate the distributions from the various populations, namely photoelectrons (PEs) and plasma sheet electrons (PSEs). These distributions are discussed in detail, examining the processes responsible for their formation in the various regions of the inner magnetosphere. It is shown that convection, corotation, and Coulomb collisions are the dominant processes in the formation of the PE distribution function and that PSEs are dominated by the interplay between the drift terms. Of note is that the PEs propagate around the nightside in a narrow channel at the edge of the plasmasphere as Coulomb collisions reduce the fluxes inside of this and convection compresses the flux tubes inward. These distributions are then recombined to show the development of the total superthermal electron distribution function in the inner magnetosphere and their influence on the thermal plasma. PEs usually dominate the dayside heating, with integral energy fluxes to the ionosphere reaching 10(exp 10) eV/sq cm/s in the plasmasphere, while heating from the PSEs typically does not exceed 10(exp 8) eV/sq cm/s. On the nightside, the inner plasmasphere is usually unheated by superthermal electrons. A feature of these combined spectra is that the distribution often has upward slopes with energy, particularly at the crossover from PE to PSE dominance, indicating that instabilities are possible.

  18. Electron cyclotron resonance microwave ion sources for thin film processing

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    Plasmas created by microwave absorption at the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) are increasingly used for a variety of plasma processes, including both etching and deposition. ECR sources efficiently couple energy to electrons and use magnetic confinement to maximize the probability of an electron creating an ion or free radical in pressure regimes where the mean free path for ionization is comparable to the ECR source dimensions. The general operating principles of ECR sources are discussed with special emphasis on their use for thin film etching. Data on source performance during Cl base etching of Si using an ECR system are presented. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  19. An Update on Electronic Information Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Katherine

    1987-01-01

    This review of new developments and products in online services discusses trends in travel related services; full text databases; statistical source databases; an emphasis on regional and international business news; and user friendly systems. (Author/CLB)

  20. Method of electroplating a conversion electron emitting source on implant

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Gonzales, Gilbert R.; Adzic, Radoslav; Meinken, George E.

    2012-02-14

    Methods for preparing an implant coated with a conversion electron emitting source (CEES) are disclosed. The typical method includes cleaning the surface of the implant; placing the implant in an activating solution comprising hydrochloric acid to activate the surface; reducing the surface by H.sub.2 evolution in H.sub.2SO.sub.4 solution; and placing the implant in an electroplating solution that includes ions of the CEES, HCl, H.sub.2SO.sub.4, and resorcinol, gelatin, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, before tin plating, a seed layer is formed on the surface. The electroplated CEES coating can be further protected and stabilized by annealing in a heated oven, by passivation, or by being covered with a protective film. The invention also relates to a holding device for holding an implant, wherein the device selectively prevents electrodeposition on the portions of the implant contacting the device.

  1. Modulated Source Interferometry with Combined Amplitude and Frequency Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An improved interferometer is produced by modifying a conventional interferometer to include amplitude and/or frequency modulation of a coherent light source at radio or higher frequencies. The phase of the modulation signal can be detected in an interfering beam from an interferometer and can be used to determine the actual optical phase of the beam. As such, this improvement can be adapted to virtually any two-beam interferometer, including: Michelson, Mach-Zehnder, and Sagnac interferometers. The use of an amplitude modulated coherent tight source results in an interferometer that combines the wide range advantages of coherent interferometry with the precise distance measurement advantages of white light interferometry.

  2. On combined source solutions for bodies with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. R.

    1985-04-01

    Studies conducted by Rogers (1984, 1983) regarding impedance boundary condition (IBC) integral equations have been mainly concerned with the spurious interior resonance problem associated with electromagnetic solutions exterior to a closed surface. Specifically, exterior radiation and scattering solutions of the IBC electric and magnetic field integral equations (EFIE and MFI) have nonunique solutions at the interior resonant frequencies of a perfectly conducting cavity having the same shape as the impedance target. In the present investigation, examples are presented of numerical solutions to the IBC combined source integral equation for scattering from impedance spheres. The presented results demonstrate that the IBC combined source integral equation (CSIE) is effective in eliminating the spurious solutions which occur in the electric and magnetic field integral equations.

  3. Combined Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Tilt- and Focal Series

    SciTech Connect

    Dahmen, Tim; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre G; Lupini, Andrew R; Kubel, Christian; Slusallek, Phillip; De Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a combined tilt- and focal series is proposed as a new recording scheme for high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Three-dimensional (3D) data were acquired by mechanically tilting the specimen, and recording a through-focal series at each tilt direction. The sample was a whole-mount macrophage cell with embedded gold nanoparticles. The tilt focal algebraic reconstruction technique (TF-ART) is introduced as a new algorithm to reconstruct tomograms from such combined tilt- and focal series. The feasibility of TF-ART was demonstrated by 3D reconstruction of the experimental 3D data. The results were compared with a conventional STEM tilt series of a similar sample. The combined tilt- and focal series led to smaller missing wedge artifacts, and a higher axial resolution than obtained for the STEM tilt series, thus improving on one of the main issues of tilt series-based electron tomography.

  4. Lighting system combining daylight concentrators and an artificial source

    DOEpatents

    Bornstein, Jonathan G.; Friedman, Peter S.

    1985-01-01

    A combined lighting system for a building interior includes a stack of luminescent solar concentrators (LSC), an optical conduit made of preferably optical fibers for transmitting daylight from the LSC stack, a collimating lens set at an angle, a fixture for receiving the daylight at one end and for distributing the daylight as illumination inside the building, an artificial light source at the other end of the fixture for directing artifical light into the fixture for distribution as illumination inside the building, an automatic dimmer/brightener for the artificial light source, and a daylight sensor positioned near to the LSC stack for controlling the automatic dimmer/brightener in response to the daylight sensed. The system also has a reflector positioned behind the artificial light source and a fan for exhausting heated air out of the fixture during summer and for forcing heated air into the fixture for passage into the building interior during winter.

  5. Electron temperature and concentration in a thermal atomic oxygen source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedrow, Patrick Dennis

    1990-01-01

    A thermal atomic oxygen source for materials screening was built for NASA by Boeing Aerospace. The objective here was to use a microwave interferometer and Langmuir probe to characterize the electron concentration in this thermal atomic oxygen source. Typical operating conditions in the thermal atomic oxygen source were found to produce electron concentrations that were well below the detection threshold of the interferometer (10(exp 8) cm (sup -3)). The researchers calibrated (with the interferometer) the Langmuir probe at an artificially high plasma density and then used the circular and the square Langmuir probes to measure the low electron concentrations that exist during materials exposure tests. Electron concentration was measured as a function of power and position. The electrons were lost to the walls through ambipolar diffusion, and their concentration was accurately described by an equation. The electron concentration was proportional to power squared and decayed exponentially with distance.

  6. Electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.; Stirling, W.L.

    1979-10-25

    An electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources is provided. The system, employing crossed electric and magnetic fields, separates the electrons from the ions as they are extracted from the ion source plasma generator and before the ions are accelerated to their full energy. With the electric and magnetic fields oriented 90/sup 0/ to each other, the electrons remain at approximately the electrical potential at which they were generated. The electromagnetic forces cause the ions to be accelerated to the full accelerating supply voltage energy while being deflected through an angle of less than 90/sup 0/. The electrons precess out of the accelerating field region into an electron recovery region where they are collected at a small fraction of the full accelerating supply energy. It is possible, by this method, to collect > 90% of the electrons extracted along with the negative ions from a negative ion source beam at < 4% of full energy.

  7. Self-Consistent Electromagnetic Modeling of Electron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Mark

    2006-11-27

    The modeling of high-brightness electron sources, such as photoinjectors, requires a self-consistent technique for including the electromagnetics of tight electron bunches, as well as, the appropriate conductor boundary conditions of the source. A novel and effective technique for incorporating both of these effects utilizes time-dependent Green's functions. The advantages of this method are that Green's functions are generated by Delta function sources (making them ideal for tight bunch modeling) while simultaneously satisfying the conductor boundary condition. We demonstrate how these methods are used in a newly developed code called IRPSS (Indiana Rf Photocathode Source Simulator), and show initial simulations using IRPSS.

  8. Optically-pumped spin-exchange polarized electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirbhai, Munir Hussein

    Polarized electron beams are an indispensable probe of spin-dependent phenomena in fields of atomic and molecular physics, magnetism and biophysics. While their uses have become widespread, the standard source based on negative electron affinity gallium arsenide (GaAs) remains technically complicated. This has hindered progress on many experiments involving spin-polarized electrons, especially those using target gas loads, which tend to adversely affect the performance of GaAs sources. A robust system based on an alternative way to make polarized electron beams has been devised in this study, which builds on previous work done in our lab. It involves spin-exchange collisions between free, unpolarized electrons and oriented rubidium atoms in the presence of a quenching gas. This system has less stringent vacuum requirements than those of GaAs sources, and is capable of operating in background pressures of ~1mTorr. Beams with ~24% polarization and 4μA of current have been recorded, which is comparable to the performance obtained with the earlier version built in our lab. The present system is however not as unstable as in the previous work, and has the potential to be developed into a "turn-key" source of polarized electron beams. It has also allowed us to undertake a study to find factors which affect the beam polarization in this scheme of producing polarized electrons. Such knowledge will help us to design better optically-pumped spin-exchange polarized electron sources.

  9. Optimum target source term estimation for high energy electron accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, M. K.; Sahu, T. K.; Nair, Haridas G.; Nandedkar, R. V.; Bandyopadhyay, Tapas; Tripathi, R. M.; Hannurkar, P. R.

    2016-05-01

    Optimum target for bremsstrahlung emission is defined as the thickness of the target material, which produces maximum bremsstrahlung yield, on interaction of electron with the target. The bremsstrahlung dose rate per unit electron beam power at a distance of 1 m from the target material gives the optimum target source term. In the present work, simulations were performed for three different electron energies, 450, 1000 and 2500 MeV using EGSnrc Monte-Carlo code to determine the optimum thickness. An empirical relation for optimum target as a function of electron energy and atomic number of the target materials is found out from results. Using the simulated optimum target thickness, experiments are conducted to determine the optimum target source term. For the experimental determination, two available electron energies, 450 MeV and 550 MeV from booster synchrotron of Indus facility is used. The optimum target source term for these two energies are also simulated. The experimental and simulated source term are found to be in very good agreement within ±3%. Based on the agreement of the simulated source term with the experimental source term at 450 MeV and 550 MeV, the same simulation methodology is used to simulate optimum target source term up to 2500 MeV. The paper describes the simulations and experiments carried out on optimum target bremsstrahlung source term and the results obtained.

  10. ELECTRON INJECTORS FOR NEXT GENERATION X-RAY SOURCES.

    SciTech Connect

    BLUEM,H.; BEN-ZVI,I.; SRINIVASAN-RAO,T.; ET AL.

    2004-08-02

    Next generation x-ray sources require very high-brightness electron beams that are typically at or beyond the present state-of-the-art, and thus place stringent and demanding requirements upon the electron injector parameters. No one electron source concept is suitable for all the diverse applications envisaged, which have operating characteristics ranging from high-average-current, quasi-CW, to high-peak-current, single-pulse electron beams. Advanced Energy Systems, in collaboration with various partners, is developing several electron injector concepts for these x-ray source applications. The performance and design characteristics of five specific RF injectors, spanning ''L'' to ''X''-band, normal-conducting to superconducting, and low repetition rate to CW, which are presently in various stages of design, construction or testing, is described. We also discuss the status and schedule of each with respect to testing.

  11. Investigation of noise sources in SQUID electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Clem, T.R.; Goldstein, M.J.; Purpura, J.W.; Allen, L.H.; Claassen, J.H.; Gubser, D.U.; Wolf, S.A.

    1989-03-01

    The performance of SQUID-based electronics outside a laboratory-controlled environment may be degraded from that found in laboratory operation. Investigations on superconducting tubes, wires, and sheets have been conducted to identify contributions to such noise. Results have been obtained for bulk and thin film samples utilizing both the conventional low temperature materials, as well as the new high temperature oxide materials. Experiments have been conducted to quantify flux redistribution and flux motion in superconducting samples subjected to temperature changes, temperature gradients, and magnetic field gradients. These investigations have been conducted at magnetic fields typical of many SQUID applications, with field intensities much smaller than the critical values H/sub cl/. Penetration depth effects, flux pinning effects, and flux motion effects have been observed. The various types of experiments conducted along with specific results are described.

  12. Electron accelerator-driven photoneutron source for clinical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, Gregory Edward

    There are several potential uses for a high-flux thermal neutron source in both industrial and clinical applications. The viable commercial implementation of these applications requires a low cost, high-flux thermal neutron generator suitable for installation in industrial and clinical environments. This dissertation describes the MCNP modeling results of a high-flux thermal neutron source driven with an electron accelerator. An electron linac, fitted with a standard x-ray converter, can produce high neutron yields in materials with low photonuclear threshold energies, such as D and 9Be. Calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo for N-Particle (MCNP) transport code. Modeling results indicate that a 10 MeV, 10 kW electron linac can produce on the order of 1012 n/s in a heavy water photoneutron target. A 40 cm radius, 60 cm long cylindrical heavy water photoneutron target has a photoneutron production rate equal to 5.7 x 1012 n/s. The thermal neutron flux in an unreflected, 40 cm radius, 60 cm long heavy water target is calculated to be 9.81 x 109 n/cm 2/s. The sensitivity of these answers to heavy water purity was investigated, specifically, the dilution of heavy water with light water. It was shown that the peak thermal neutron flux in an unreflected target was not adversely effected by dilution up to a light water weight fraction of 25%. The final design consists of a 40 cm radius, 60 cm long cylindrical photonuclear target reflected on all sides with 20 cm of polyethylene. The polyethylene reflector increases the maximum thermal neutron flux by 66%, to 1.40 x 1010 n/cm2/s using a 10 MeV, 1 mA (10 kW) electron linac. At this flux level the device is capable of producing 831 muCi/mg of 165Dy from natural dysprosium. The device is capable of producing 160 muCi/mg of 198Au at this flux. The neutron shielding required for the device consists of 5 cm of 5% borated polyethylene (BPE) on the front of the device, 4.25 cm of BPE on the side, and 8.5 cm of BPE on

  13. Simultaneous source-mask optimization: a numerical combining method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mülders, Thomas; Domnenko, Vitaliy; Küchler, Bernd; Klimpel, Thomas; Stock, Hans-Jürgen; Poonawala, Amyn A.; Taravade, Kunal N.; Stanton, William A.

    2010-09-01

    A new method for simultaneous Source-Mask Optimization (SMO) is presented. In order to produce optimum imaging fidelity with respect to exposure lattitude, depth of focus (DoF) and mask error enhancement factor (MEEF) the presented method aims to leverage both, the available degrees of freedom of a pixelated source and those available for the mask layout. The approach described in this paper is designed as to work with dissected mask polygons. The dissection of the mask patterns is to be performed in advance (before SMO) with the Synopsys Proteus OPC engine, providing the available degrees of freedom for mask pattern optimization. This is similar to mask optimization done for optical proximity correction (OPC). Additionally, however, the illumination source will be simultaneously optimized. The SMO approach borrows many of the performance enhancement methods of OPC software for mask correction, but is especially designed as to simultaneously optimize a pixelated source shape as nowadays available in production environments. Designed as a numerical optimization approach the method is able to assess in acceptable times several hundreds of thousands source-mask combinations for small, critical layout snippets. This allows a global optimization scheme to be applied to the SMO problem which is expected to better explore the optimization space and thus to yield an improved solution quality compared to local optimizations methods. The method is applied to an example system for investigating the impact of source constraints on the SMO results. Also, it is investigated how well possibly conflicting goals of low MEEF and large DoF can be balanced.

  14. Combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method.

    PubMed

    Koutsouris, Georgios I; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Jacobsen, Finn

    2013-06-01

    A combined model for room acoustic predictions is developed, aiming to treat both diffuse and specular reflections in a unified way. Two established methods are incorporated: acoustical radiosity, accounting for the diffuse part, and the image source method, accounting for the specular part. The model is based on conservation of acoustical energy. Losses are taken into account by the energy absorption coefficient, and the diffuse reflections are controlled via the scattering coefficient, which defines the portion of energy that has been diffusely reflected. The way the model is formulated allows for a dynamic control of the image source production, so that no fixed maximum reflection order is required. The model is optimized for energy impulse response predictions in arbitrary polyhedral rooms. The predictions are validated by comparison with published measured data for a real music studio hall. The proposed model turns out to be promising for acoustic predictions providing a high level of detail and accuracy. PMID:23742350

  15. Gyrotron and its Electron Beam Source: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Udaybir; Kumar, Nitin; Sinha, AK

    2012-10-01

    Microwave occupies a glorious position in the electromagnetic spectrum and in that there are a number of devices in this frequency regime which are capable of high power operations. Among them, gyrotron has proven to be an efficient source for radio frequency (RF) generation at high power level and up to very high frequency. The gyrotron consists of several components like electron beam source, interaction structure, quasi-optical launcher, collector, RF window, magnet system, etc. All the components have their distinct role in the function of the device. Among them, electron beam source also called magnetron injection gun (MIG) is the generator of electron beam and it is very essential that MIG should produce and provide electron beam suitable for the beam-wave interaction at the interaction structure for the effective power growth. The paper presents the introduction of a microwave tube, gyrotron and its components alongwith review of the previous work, the background and the applications. The functions of various components of a gyrotron are discussed with particular highlighting on the electron beam emission from the electron beam source and the beam-wave interaction for power growth in the device. A review on different types of gyrotron electron beam sources is also presented.

  16. A combined geochemical and hydrological approach for understanding macronutrient sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapworth, Dan J.; Gooddy, Daren C.; Kent, Flo; Heaton, Tim H. E.; Cole, Steven J.; Allen, Debbie

    2013-09-01

    This study employed complementary geochemical techniques and distributed hydrological modelling to investigate multiple sources of catchment macronutrients and characterise their changes in contrasting storm and baseflow conditions. This approach was demonstrated for the Beult catchment in the county of Kent (England), a designated Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) indentified as failing to meet water quality standards for key nutrients under the Water Framework Directive. Significant changes in nutrient stoichiometry and bioavailability are observed for surface waters under contrasting flow regimes. Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentrations are approximately twice as high during baseflow compared to high flow, while the inverse is true for particulate, colloidal and dissolved hydrolysable phosphorus, dissolved organic carbon and nitrate. Nitrogen (N):phosphorus (P) ratios are lower during baseflow for most surface waters impacted by diffuse sources of pollution. Fluorescence indices of dissolved organic matter (DOM) show that waste water inputs may be locally important sources of more complex low molecular weight DOM, particularly during baseflow. Nitrate N and O isotope signatures, combined with other dissolved chemical tracers, confirm the dominance of wastewater N inputs at sites downsteam of sewerage treatment works during baseflow, with a shift towards the soil N pool in surface waters across the catchment during high flow. Distributed hydrological modelling using the Grid-to-Grid model reveal areas with the greatest runoff also export higher N and P concentrations, and hence deliver a greater flux of macronutrients, while forested areas with low nutrient concentrations reduce runoff and nutrient fluxes. During periods of high runoff, nested sampling indicates that nutrient fluxes scale with catchment area. This combined approach enables a more thorough assessment of the macronutrient sources and dynamics, better informing management options

  17. The source of multi spectral energy of solar energetic electron

    SciTech Connect

    Herdiwijaya, Dhani

    2015-04-16

    We study the solar energetic electron distribution obtained from ACE and GOES satellites which have different altitudes and electron spectral energy during the year 1997 to 2011. The electron spectral energies were 0.038–0.315 MeV from EPAM instrument onboard ACE satellite and >2 MeV from GOES satellite. We found that the low electron energy has no correlation with high energy. In spite of we have corrected to the altitude differences. It implied that they originated from time dependent events with different sources and physical processes at the solar atmosphere. The sources of multi spectral energetic electron were related to flare and CME phenomena. However, we also found that high energetic electron comes from coronal hole.

  18. Electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.; Stirling, William L.

    1982-01-01

    An electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources is provided. The system, employs crossed electric and magnetic fields to separate the electrons from ions as they are extracted from a negative ion source plasma generator and before the ions are accelerated to their full kinetic energy. With the electric and magnetic fields oriented 90.degree. to each other, the electrons are separated from the plasma and remain at approximately the electrical potential of the generator in which they were generated. The electrons migrate from the ion beam path in a precessing motion out of the ion accelerating field region into an electron recovery region provided by a specially designed electron collector electrode. The electron collector electrode is uniformly spaced from a surface of the ion generator which is transverse to the direction of migration of the electrons and the two surfaces are contoured in a matching relationship which departs from a planar configuration to provide an electric field component in the recovery region which is parallel to the magnetic field thereby forcing the electrons to be directed into and collected by the electron collector electrode. The collector electrode is maintained at a potential slightly positive with respect to the ion generator so that the electrons are collected at a small fraction of the full accelerating supply voltage energy.

  19. Interplanetary electrons - What is the strength of the Jupiter source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillius, W.; Ip, W.-H.; Knickerbocker, P.

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of conservative assumptions, a phenomenological approach is used to address the source strength of Jupiter for interplanetary electrons. It is estimated that Jupiter emits approximately 10 to the 24th - 10 to the 26th electrons per sec with energies in excess of 6 MeV, which sources may be compared with the population of approximately 3 x 10 to the 28th electrons of the same energy in the Jovian outer magnetosphere. It is concluded that Jupiter accelerates particles at a rate exceeding that of ordinary trapped particle dynamic processes.

  20. Multifunctional bulk plasma source based on discharge with electron injection

    SciTech Connect

    Klimov, A. S.; Medovnik, A. V.; Tyunkov, A. V.; Savkin, K. P.; Shandrikov, M. V.; Vizir, A. V.

    2013-01-15

    A bulk plasma source, based on a high-current dc glow discharge with electron injection, is described. Electron injection and some special design features of the plasma arc emitter provide a plasma source with very long periods between maintenance down-times and a long overall lifetime. The source uses a sectioned sputter-electrode array with six individual sputter targets, each of which can be independently biased. This discharge assembly configuration provides multifunctional operation, including plasma generation from different gases (argon, nitrogen, oxygen, acetylene) and deposition of composite metal nitride and oxide coatings.

  1. The Polarized Electron Source for the International Collider (ILC) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachmann, A.; Clendenin, J. E.; Garwin, E. L.; Ioakeimidi, K.; Kirby, R. E.; Maruyama, T.; Prescott, C. Y.; Sheppard, J.; Turner, J.; Zhou, F.

    2007-06-01

    The ILC project will be the next large high energy physics tool that will use polarized electrons (and positrons). For this machine spin physics will play an important role. The polarized electron source design is based on electron injectors built for the Stanford Linear Collider (polarized) and Tesla Test Facility (un-polarized). The ILC polarized electron source will provide a 5GeV spin polarized electron beam for injection into the ILC damping ring. Although most ILC machine parameters have been achieved by the SLC or TTF source, features of both must be integrated into one design. The bunch train structure presents unique challenges to the source laser drive system. A suitable laser system has not yet been demonstrated and is part of the ongoing R&D program for ILC at SLAC. Furthermore, ILC injector R&D incorporates photocathode development, increasing available polarization, and improving operational properties in gun vacuum systems. Another important area of research and development is advancing the design of DC and RF electron gun technology for polarized sources. This presentation presents the current status of the design and outlines aspects of the relevant R&D program carried out within the ILC community.

  2. A Carbon Nanotube Electron Source Based Ionization Vacuum Gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Changkun Dong; Ganapati Myneni

    2003-10-01

    The results of fabrication and performance of an ionization vacuum gauge using a carbon nanotube (CNT) electron source are presented. The electron source was constructed with multi-wall nanotubes (MWNT), which were grown using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The electron emission of the source was stable in vacuum pressure up to 10-7 Torr, which is better than the metal field emitters. The measurement linearity of the gauge was better than {+-}10% from 10-6 to 10-10 Torr. The gauge sensitivity of 4 Torr-1 was achieved under 50 {micro}A electron emission in nitrogen. The gauge is expected to find applications in vacuum measurements from 10-7 Torr to below 10-11 Torr.

  3. Miniature, low-power X-ray tube using a microchannel electron generator electron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Wm. Timothy (Inventor); Kelliher, Warren C. (Inventor); Hershyn, William (Inventor); DeLong, David P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention provide a novel, low-power X-ray tube and X-ray generating system. Embodiments of the invention use a multichannel electron generator as the electron source, thereby increasing reliability and decreasing power consumption of the X-ray tube. Unlike tubes using a conventional filament that must be heated by a current power source, embodiments of the invention require only a voltage power source, use very little current, and have no cooling requirements. The microchannel electron generator comprises one or more microchannel plates (MCPs), Each MCP comprises a honeycomb assembly of a plurality of annular components, which may be stacked to increase electron intensity. The multichannel electron generator used enables directional control of electron flow. In addition, the multichannel electron generator used is more robust than conventional filaments, making the resulting X-ray tube very shock and vibration resistant.

  4. Combining Open-Source Packages for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Albrecht; Grieger, Björn; Völk, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The science planning of the ESA Rosetta mission has presented challenges which were addressed with combining various open-source software packages, such as the SPICE toolkit, the Python language and the Web graphics library three.js. The challenge was to compute certain parameters from a pool of trajectories and (possible) attitudes to describe the behaviour of the spacecraft. To be able to do this declaratively and efficiently, a C library was implemented that allows to interface the SPICE toolkit for geometrical computations from the Python language and process as much data as possible during one subroutine call. To minimise the lines of code one has to write special care was taken to ensure that the bindings were idiomatic and thus integrate well into the Python language and ecosystem. When done well, this very much simplifies the structure of the code and facilitates the testing for correctness by automatic test suites and visual inspections. For rapid visualisation and confirmation of correctness of results, the geometries were visualised with the three.js library, a popular Javascript library for displaying three-dimensional graphics in a Web browser. Programmatically, this was achieved by generating data files from SPICE sources that were included into templated HTML and displayed by a browser, thus made easily accessible to interested parties at large. As feedback came and new ideas were to be explored, the authors benefited greatly from the design of the Python-to-SPICE library which allowed the expression of algorithms to be concise and easier to communicate. In summary, by combining several well-established open-source tools, we were able to put together a flexible computation and visualisation environment that helped communicate and build confidence in planning ideas.

  5. ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources for cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.M.

    1986-10-01

    In the last decade ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources have evolved from a single large, power consuming, complex prototype into a variety of compact, simple, reliable, efficient, high performance sources of high charge state ions for accelerators and atomic physics. The coupling of ECR sources to cyclotrons has resulted in significant performance gains in energy, intensity, reliability, and variety of ion species. Seven ECR sources are in regular operation with cyclotrons and numerous other projects are under development or in the planning stag. At least four laboratories have ECR sources dedicated for atomic physics research and other atomic physics programs share ECR sources with cyclotrons. An ECR source is now installed on the injector for the CERN SPS synchrotron to accelerate O/sup 8 +/ to relativistic energies. A project is underway at Argonne to couple an ECR source to a superconducting heavy-ion linac. Although tremendous progress has been made, the field of ECR sources is still a relatively young technology and there is still the potential for further advances both in source development and understanding of the plasma physics. The development of ECR sources is reviewed. The important physics mechanisms which come into play in the operation of ECR Sources are discussed, along with various models for charge state distributions (CSD). The design and performance of several ECR sources are compared. The 88-Inch Cyclotron and the LBL ECR is used as an example of cyclotron+ECR operation. The future of ECR sources is considered.

  6. A Low Power Photoemission Source for Electrons on Liquid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, S.; Sabouret, G.; Lyon, S. A.

    2010-11-01

    Electrons on the surface of liquid helium are a widely studied system that may also provide a promising method to implement a quantum computer. One experimental challenge in these studies is to generate electrons on the helium surface in a reliable manner without heating the cryo-system. An electron source relying on photoemission from a zinc film has been previously described using a high power continuous light source that heated the low temperature system. This work has been reproduced more compactly by using a low power pulsed lamp that avoids any heating. About 5×103 electrons are collected on 1 cm2 of helium surface for every pulse of light. A time-resolved experiment suggests that electrons are either emitted over or tunnel through the 1 eV barrier formed by the thin superfluid helium film on the zinc surface. No evidence of trapping or bubble formation is seen.

  7. An angular-selective electron source for the KATRIN experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, M.; Bokeloh, K.; Hein, H.; Bauer, S.; Baumeister, H.; Bonn, J.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Ostrick, B.; Rosendahl, S.; Streubel, S.; Valerius, K.; Zbořil, M.; Weinheimer, C.

    2014-11-01

    The KATRIN experiment is going to search for the average mass of the electron antineutrino with a sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c2. It uses a retardation spectrometer of MAC-E filter type to accurately measure the shape of the electron spectrum at the endpoint of tritium beta decay. In order to achieve the planned sensitivity the transmission properties of the spectrometer have to be understood with high precision for all initial conditions. For this purpose an electron source has been developed that emits single electrons at adjustable total energy and adjustable emission angle. The emission is pointlike and can be moved across the full flux tube that is imaged onto the detector. Here, we demonstrate that this novel type of electron source can be used to investigate the transmission properties of a MAC-E filter in detail.

  8. Magnetic insulation of secondary electrons in plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Wood, B.P.; Faehl, R.J.; Fleischmann, H.H.

    1993-09-01

    The uncontrolled loss of accelerated secondary electrons in plasma source ion implantation (PSII) can significantly reduce system efficiency and poses a potential x-ray hazard. This loss might be reduced by a magnetic field applied near the workpiece. The concept of magnetically-insulated PSII is proposed, in which secondary electrons are trapped to form a virtual cathode layer near the workpiece surface where the local electric field is essentially eliminated. Subsequent electrons that are emitted can then be reabsorbed by the workpiece. Estimates of anomalous electron transport from microinstabilities are made. Insight into the process is gained with multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  9. Hybrid photoneutron source optimization for electron accelerator-based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, F.; Shahriari, M.

    2010-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is being studied as a possible radiotherapic treatment for some cancer types. Neutron energy for penetrating into tissue should be in the epithermal range. Different methods are used for neutron production. Electron accelerators are an alternative way for producing neutrons in electron-photon-neutron processes. Optimization of electron/photon and photoneutron targets calculations with respect to electron energy, dimension (radius and thickness) and neutron yield were done by MCNPX Monte Carlo code. According to the results, a hybrid photoneutron source including BeD 2 and Tungsten has been introduced.

  10. Glow discharge electron impact ionization source for miniature mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Song, Qingyu; Noll, Robert J; Duncan, Jason; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2007-05-01

    A glow discharge electron impact ionization (GDEI) source was developed for operation using air as the support gas. An alternative to the use of thermoemission from a resistively heated filament electron source for miniature mass spectrometers, the GDEI source is shown to have advantages of long lifetime under high-pressure operation and low power consumption. The GDEI source was characterized using our laboratory's handheld mass spectrometer, the Mini 10. The effects of the discharge voltage and pressure were investigated. Design considerations are illustrated with calculations. Performance is demonstrated in a set of experimental tests. The results show that the low power requirements, mechanical ruggedness, and quality of the data produced using the small glow discharge ion source make it well-suited for use with a portable handheld mass spectrometer. PMID:17441220

  11. Development of a novel electron source for active space experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everding, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in light emitting diode (LED) technology have facilitated a potential remedy to the problems plaguing filament based electron sources. Using spaceworthy LEDs, the photoelectron cathode and its progenitor the ultraviolet cathode (UVC) take advantage of the photoelectric effect to produce electrons for space based experiments. To produce these devices, two species of LED, each producing either ultraviolet or visible radiation, were collected and tested to determine potential photocurrent output. Additionally, materials with requisite photoemission characteristics were collected and tested in vacuum with the LEDs to assess their usefulness as photoelectron sources. Furthermore, circuitry and computer software was compiled, tested, and refined to control the experimental and custodial duties of the UVC and photoelectron cathode while deployed as an electron source in space.

  12. The Ultimate Electron Sources Using Millimeter Long Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perea, N.; Rebollo, B.; Briones, J. A.; Morelos, A.; Hernandez, D.; Munoz, E.; Lopez-Urias, F.; Botello, A. R.; Charlier, J. C.; Meunier, V.; Hirata, G. A.; Maruyama, B.; Terrones, M.; Terrones, H.

    2012-02-01

    We are reporting the fabrication of a very efficient electron source using long and crystalline carbon nanotubes. These devices start to emit electrons at fields as low as 0.10 V/μm and reach threshold emission at 0.164 V/μm. In addition, these electron sources are very stable for long operation periods up to 200 hrs and can achieve peak current density of 2 Acm-2 at only 0.28 V/μm. To demonstrate intense electron beam generation, these devices were used to produce white light by cathodoluminescence. Finally, to rational the measured properties in open carbon nanotubes of different lengths we used density functional theory. The modeling establishes a clear correlation between length and field enhancement factor.

  13. Electron energy distribution function by using probe method in electron cyclotron resonance multicharged ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kumakura, Sho Kurisu, Yosuke; Kimura, Daiju; Yano, Keisuke; Imai, Youta; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    We are constructing a tandem type electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (ECRIS). High-energy electrons in ECRIS plasma affect electron energy distribution and generate multicharged ion. In this study, we measure electron energy distribution function (EEDF) of low energy region (≦100 eV) in ECRIS plasma at extremely low pressures (10{sup −3}–10{sup −5} Pa) by using cylindrical Langmuir probe. From the result, it is found that the EEDF correlates with the electron density and the temperature from the conventional probe analysis. In addition, we confirm that the tail of EEDF spreads to high energy region as the pressure rises and that there are electrons with high energy in ECR multicharged ion source plasma. The effective temperature estimated from the experimentally obtained EEDF is larger than the electron temperature obtained from the conventional method.

  14. Electron Beam Collimation for the Next Generation Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Steier, C.; Emma, P.; Nishimura, H.; Papadopoulos, C.; Sannibale, F.

    2013-05-20

    The Next Generation Light Source will deliver high (MHz) repetition rate electron beams to an array of free electron lasers. Because of the significant average current in such a facility, effective beam collimation is extremely important to minimize radiation damage to undulators, prevent quenches of superconducting cavities, limit dose rates outside of the accelerator tunnel and prevent equipment damage. This paper describes the early conceptual design of a collimation system, as well as initial results of simulations to test its effectiveness.

  15. Combining bayesian source imaging with equivalent dipole approach to solve the intracranial EEG source localization problem.

    PubMed

    Le Cam, Steven; Caune, Vairis; Ranta, Radu; Korats, Gundars; Louis-Dorr, Valerie

    2015-08-01

    The brain source localization problem has been extensively studied in the past years, yielding a large panel of methodologies, each bringing their own strengths and weaknesses. Combining several of these approaches might help in enhancing their respective performance. Our study is carried out in the particular context of intracranial recordings, with the objective to explain the measurements based on a reduced number of dipolar activities. We take benefit of the sparse nature of the Bayesian approaches to separate the noise from the source space, and to distinguish between several source contributions on the electrodes. This first step provides accurate estimates of the dipole projections, which can be used as an entry to an equivalent current dipole fitting procedure. We demonstrate on simulations that the localization results are significantly enhanced by this post-processing step when up to five dipoles are activated simultaneously. PMID:26736344

  16. Fifth-Generation Free-Electron Laser Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, Claudio

    2011-03-02

    During the past few years, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) have demonstrated the outstanding capability of free-electron lasers (FELs) as sources of coherent radiation in the soft and hard x-ray region. The high intensity, tens of GW, short pulses (few to less than 100 femtoseconds, and the unique transverse coherence properties are opening a new window to study the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. The LCLS, FLASH, and the other FELs now under construction are only the beginning of the development of these light sources. The next generations will reach new levels of performance: terawatt, atto-second, ultra-small line-width, high repetition rate, full longitudinal and transverse coherence. These future developments and the R&D needed to successfully build and operate the next generation of FEL light sources will be discussed.

  17. Trap-control system for polarized-electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Agranovich, V.L.; Beloglazov, V.I.; Efimov, V.P.; Kuz'menko, V.S.

    1985-11-01

    An electronic logic system for controlling accumulation and holding of electrons with energies less than 10 eV for polarization is described. A source of polarized electrons based on spin exchange with atoms of polarized hydrogen has been created for physics research on the linear accelerator of the Kharkov Applied Physics Institute. It was necessary to create functional supply and control circuits that feed to the trap electrodes pulsed voltages of given amplitude, polarity and duration. A diagram of the trap-control system is shown.

  18. Improved electron ionization ion source for the detection of supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirav, Aviv; Fialkov, Alexander; Gordin, Alexander

    2002-08-01

    An improved electron ionization (EI) ion source is described, based on the modification of a Brink-type EI ion source through the addition of a second cage with a fine mesh outside the ion chamber. The added outer cage shields the inner ion cage (ionization zone) against the penetration of the filament and electron repeller potentials, and thus results in the provision of ions with narrower ion energy distribution, hence improved ion-beam quality. The closer to zero electrical field inside the ion cage enables improved filtration (rejection) of ions that are produced from vacuum background compounds, based on difference in ion energies of beam and background species. The improved background ion filtration and ion-beam quality resulted in 2.6 times higher mass spectrometric ion signal, combined with 6.4 times better signal to noise ratio, in comparison with the same ion source having a single cage. The dual cage ion source further provides a smaller or no reduction of the electron emission current upon lowering the electron energy for achieving softer EI and/or electron attachment ionization. It also improves the long-term mass spectral and signal reproducibility and enables fast, automated change of the electron energy. Consequently, the dual cage EI ion source is especially effective for use with gas chromatography mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beams (SMB), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry with SMB, ion guns with SMB, and any other experimental systems with SMB or nonthermal molecular beams.

  19. Electron-beam multicharge ion source IMI-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul'manov, V. G.; Dement'ev, E. N.; Miginskaya, E. G.; Mironenko, L. A.; Pirogov, O. V.; Tomilov, V. P.; Tsukanov, V. M.

    2000-08-01

    The main parameters of the electron beam multicharge ion source IMI-2 are given. Experimental results are also given. The IMI-2 electron-beam system (EBS) includes a short-focus electron gyn with a spherical cathode of diameter 16 mm and curvature radius of 9.5 mm. The perveance of the gun is 1,6 (mu) A/V3/2. The electron beam current can reach 2.5 A. An electrostatic and magnetic beam compression of ~103 allows one to obtain a density of the electron beam of not less than ~103 A/cm2 on a 30 cm length. A specific method of dosed injection of the atoms of solid-state elements to an ion trap by means of local pulse deflection of the electron beam was used in the facility 1. The electron-beam ion source (EBIS) IMI-2, Fig. 1, has a vertical design with an electron gun in the top section. The electron gun is mounted in a vacuum chamber of diameter 160 mm and length 500 mm. The vacuum chamber having a drift structure is inside the classical water-cooled solenoid with a completely closed magnetic circuit. An electron collector, an ion line, and a magnetic analyzer are located in the lower section of the facility. Like IMI-1 7-9, IMI-2 2-6 was also designed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics for production of multicharge beams of gaseous and solid elements. In the EBS parameters, IMI-2 is intermediate between first-generation EBIS and those that can be used at acceleration complexes developed at the present time.

  20. Potential applications of an electron cyclotron resonance multicusp plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Haselton, H.H.; Roberto, J.B.; Stirling, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasmatron has been developed by feeding a multicusp bucket arc chamber with a compact ECR plasma source. This novel source produced large (about 25-cm-diam), uniform (to within {plus minus}10%), dense (>10{sup 11}-cm{sup -3}) plasmas of argon, helium, hydrogen, and oxygen. It has been operated to produce an oxygen plasma for etching 12.7-cm (5-in.) positive photoresist-coated silicon wafers with uniformity within {plus minus}8%. Results and potential applications of this new ECR plasma source for plasma processing of thin films are discussed. 21 refs., 10 figs.

  1. local alternative sources for cogeneration combined heat and power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agll, Abdulhakim Amer

    Global demand for energy continues to grow while countries around the globe race to reduce their reliance on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions by implementing policy measures and advancing technology. Sustainability has become an important issue in transportation and infrastructure development projects. While several agencies are trying to incorporate a range of sustainability measures in their goals and missions, only a few planning agencies have been able to implement these policies and they are far from perfect. The low rate of success in implementing sustainable policies is primarily due to incomplete understanding of the system and the interaction between various elements of the system. The conventional planning efforts focuses mainly on performance measures pertaining to the system and its impact on the environment but seldom on the social and economic impacts. The objective of this study is to use clean and alternative energy can be produced from many sources, and even use existing materials for energy generation. One such pathway is using wastewater, animal and organic waste, or landfills to create biogas for energy production. There are three tasks for this study. In topic one evaluated the energy saving that produced from combined hydrogen, heat, and power and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions by using local sustainable energy at the Missouri S&T campus to reduce energy consumption and fossil fuel usage. Second topic aimed to estimate energy recovery and power generation from alternative energy source by using Rankin steam cycle from municipal solid waste at Benghazi-Libya. And the last task is in progress. The results for topics one and two have been presented.

  2. Electron source of triode type with radial converging electron flow for irradiation of cylindrical targets

    SciTech Connect

    Engelko, V. I.; Kuznetsov, V. S.; Mueller, Georg

    2009-01-15

    Design of an electron source of triode type is described, which produces a radial converging electron beam employed for modification of the outer surface of fuel element claddings. Experimental investigations of the source showed that beam current magnitude, efficiency of beam focusing to the target, stability of source operation, and beam pulse duration become worse when the target diameter drops below certain values. A method for the calculation of the source operation was developed. Calculations showed that the reason of worse source operation is the initial angular spread of electrons when the target diameter is small. Because of the angular spread a part of electrons passes by the target and oscillates between the target and cathode. The space charge of the oscillating electrons lowers the emission current magnitude and leads to the formation of a virtual cathode in the grid-target gap despite the fact that the emission beam current is less than the limiting one. Formation of a virtual cathode is a reason for the unstable source operation and restriction of the beam pulse duration. Recommendations for the improvement of the source design are suggested.

  3. Integrating Print and Electronic Resources: Joyner Library's "Pirate Source"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nall, Clark; Lewis, Janice Steed

    2005-01-01

    Valuable information in print is often neglected because of the rapid proliferation of electronic resources and the bias of many library users against print sources. At Joyner Library, it was decided to construct an interactive subject guide database that included resources in all formats to offer users a convenient starting point for research and…

  4. Radiation sources and diagnostics with ultrashort electron bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Catravas, P.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2001-11-02

    The basic principles and design of radiation sources (transition radiation, Cerenkov radiation, radiation from periodic structures, etc.) and radiation-based diagnostics will be discussed, with emphasis on radiation from ultra-short electron bunches. Ultra-short electron bunches have the potential to produce high peak flux radiation sources that cover wavelength regimes where sources are currently not widely available (coherent THz/IR) as well as ultrashort X-ray pulses (3-100 fs). While radiation from the electron bunch contains the full signature of the electron beam and/or medium it has travelled through, the deconvolution of a single property of interest can be difficult due to a large number of contributing properties. The experimental implementation of novel solutions to this problem will be described for beams from 30 MeV to 30 GeV, including fluctuational interferometry, source imaging, phase matched cone angles and laser-based techniques, which utilize optical transition radiation, wiggler and Cerenkov radiation, and Thomson scattering. These novel diagnostic methods have the potential to resolve fs bunch durations, slice emittance on fs scales, etc. The advantages and novel features of these techniques will be discussed.

  5. Application of compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Iwata, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Hojo, S.; Kubo, T.; Kato, Y.; Biri, S.; Fekete, E.; Yoshida, Y.; Drentje, A. G.

    2008-02-15

    The compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source with a permanent magnet configuration (Kei2 source) has been developed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences for a new carbon therapy facility. The Kei2 source was designed for production of C{sup 4+} ions; its performance such as beam intensity and stability has already reached the medical requirements. Therefore, the prototype development of the source for medical use is essentially finished. Recently, we have started a few studies on other applications of the source. One is the production of fullerenes in the ECR plasma and modified fullerenes with various atoms for new materials. A second application is the production of multiply charged ions (not only carbon) for ion implantation. In this paper, some basic experiments for these applications are reported.

  6. A reflex electron beam discharge as a plasma source for electron beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, C.S.; Rocca, J.J.; Szapiro, B. )

    1988-10-01

    A reflex electron beam glow discharge has been used as a plasma source for the generation of broad-area electron beams. An electron current of 120 A (12 A/cm/sup 2/) was extracted from the plasma in 10 ..mu..s pulses and accelerated to energies greater than 1 keV in the gap between two grids. The scaling of the scheme for the generation of multikiloamp high-energy beams is discussed.

  7. Upgrade of the inverted source of polarized electrons at ELSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiliger, D.; Hillert, W.; Neff, B.

    2011-05-01

    Since 2000 an inverted source of polarized electrons at the electron stretcher accelerator ELSA routinely provides a pulsed beam with a polarization degree of about 80%. One micro-second long pulses with 100 nC charge are produced by irradiating a strained-layer superlattice photocathode with laser light from a flashlamp-pumped Ti:Sa laser. A rectangular pulse shape is achieved by operating the source in space charge limitation. The proposed hadron physics program requires an intensity upgrade to 200 mA which can be achieved by enlarging the emission area or by improving the quantum efficiency (QE). The resulting changes of the beam parameters (like emittance and space charge) and of the optics of the transfer line were investigated in numerical simulations. In order to enhance the source performance a new load lock system with crystal storage and atomic hydrogen cleaning will be installed in the near future.

  8. Cosmic ray electrons and positrons from discrete stochastic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mertsch, P.

    2011-02-01

    The distances that galactic cosmic ray electrons and positrons can travel are severely limited by energy losses to at most a few kiloparsec, thereby rendering the local spectrum very sensitive to the exact distribution of sources in our galactic neighbourhood. However, due to our ignorance of the exact source distribution, we can only predict the spectrum stochastically. We argue that even in the case of a large number of sources the central limit theorem is not applicable, but that the standard deviation for the flux from a random source is divergent due to a long power law tail of the probability density. Instead, we compute the expectation value and characterise the scatter around it by quantiles of the probability density using a generalised central limit theorem in a fully analytical way. The uncertainty band is asymmetric about the expectation value and can become quite large for TeV energies. In particular, the predicted local spectrum is marginally consistent with the measurements by Fermi-LAT and HESS even without imposing spectral breaks or cut-offs at source. We conclude that this uncertainty has to be properly accounted for when predicting electron fluxes above a few hundred GeV from astrophysical sources.

  9. Nanogap structures: combining enhanced Raman spectroscopy and electronic transport.

    PubMed

    Natelson, Douglas; Li, Yajing; Herzog, Joseph B

    2013-04-21

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is an experimental tool for accessing vibrational and chemical information, down to the single molecule level. SERS typically relies on plasmon excitations in metal nanostructures to concentrate the incident radiation and to provide an enhanced photon density of states to couple emitted radiation to the far field. Many common SERS platforms involve metal nanoparticles to generate the required electromagnetic enhancements. Here we concentrate on an alternative approach, in which the relevant plasmon excitations are supported at a truly nanoscale gap between extended electrodes, rather than discrete subwavelength nanoparticles. The ability to fabricate precise gaps on demand, and in some cases to tune the gap size in situ, combined with the additional capability of simultaneous electronic transport measurements of the nanogap, provides access to information not previously available in standard SERS. We summarize the rich plasmonic physics at work in these extended systems and highlight the recent state of the art including tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and the application of mechanical break junctions and electromigrated junctions. We describe in detail how we have performed in situ gap-enhanced Raman measurements of molecular-scale junctions while simultaneously subjecting these structures to electronic transport. These extended electrode structures allow us to study the pumping of vibrational modes by the flow of tunneling electrons, as well as the shifting of vibrational energies due to the applied bias. These experiments extend SERS into a tool for examining fundamental processes of dissipation, and provide insight into the mechanisms behind SERS spectral diffusion. We conclude with a brief discussion of future directions. PMID:23385304

  10. Simulation of Coulomb interaction effects in electron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouse, John; Zhu, Xieqing; Liu, Haoning; Munro, Eric

    2011-07-01

    Over many years, we have developed electron source simulation software that has been used widely in the electron optics community to aid the development of rotationally symmetric electron and ion guns. The simulation includes the modelling of cathode emission and the effects of volumetric space charge. In the present paper we describe the existing software and explain how we have extended this software to include the effects of discrete Coulomb interactions between the electrons as they travel from the cathode surface to the exit of the gun. In the paper, we will describe the numerical models we have employed, the techniques we have used to maximize the speed of the Coulomb force computation and present several illustrative examples of cases analyzed using the new software, including thermal field emitters, LaB 6 guns and flat dispenser-type cathodes.

  11. Separation of beam and electrons in the spallation neutron source H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Whealton, J.H.; Raridon, R.J.; Leung, K.N.

    1997-12-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) requires an ion source producing an H{sup {minus}} beam with a peak current of 35mA at a 6.2 percent duty factor. For the design of this ion source, extracted electrons must be transported and dumped without adversely affecting the H{sup {minus}} beam optics. Two issues are considered: (1) electron containment transport and controlled removal; and (2) first-order H{sup {minus}} beam steering. For electron containment, various magnetic, geometric and electrode biasing configurations are analyzed. A kinetic description for the negative ions and electrons is employed with self-consistent fields obtained from a steady-state solution to Poisson`s equation. Guiding center electron trajectories are used when the gyroradius is sufficiently small. The magnetic fields used to control the transport of the electrons and the asymmetric sheath produced by the gyrating electrons steer the ion beam. Scenarios for correcting this steering by split acceleration and focusing electrodes will be considered in some detail.

  12. Exotic X-ray Sources from Intermediate Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chouffani, K.; Wells, D.; Harmon, F.; Jones, J.L.; Lancaster, G.

    2003-08-26

    High intensity x-ray beams are used in a wide variety of applications in solid-state physics, medicine, biology and material sciences. Synchrotron radiation (SR) is currently the primary, high-quality x-ray source that satisfies both brilliance and tunability. The high cost, large size and low x-ray energies of SR facilities, however, are serious limitations. Alternatively, 'novel' x-ray sources are now possible due to new small linear accelerator (LINAC) technology, such as improved beam emittance, low background, sub-Picosecond beam pulses, high beam stability and higher repetition rate. These sources all stem from processes that produce Radiation from relativistic Electron beams in (crystalline) Periodic Structures (REPS), or the periodic 'structure' of laser light. REPS x-ray sources are serious candidates for bright, compact, portable, monochromatic, and tunable x-ray sources with varying degrees of polarization and coherence. Despite the discovery and early research into these sources over the past 25 years, these sources are still in their infancy. Experimental and theoretical research are still urgently needed to answer fundamental questions about the practical and ultimate limits of their brightness, mono-chromaticity etc. We present experimental results and theoretical comparisons for three exotic REPS sources. These are Laser-Compton Scattering (LCS), Channeling Radiation (CR) and Parametric X-Radiation (PXR)

  13. Program to research laser-driven thermionic electron sources for free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-01-01

    This is the Final Report on the research and development of high brightness pulse laser driven thermionic electron sources. Enhanced coupling of electron beam energies to radiative fields in accelerator-driven free-electron lasers requires injector cathodes of higher brightness than is possible with conventional dispenser cathodes or plasma-forming field emitters. Cesiated refractory surfaces and dispenser cathodes which are pulse laser heated may offer such an increase in brightness, by the emission of monoenergetic beams of electrons at high current densities. The studies were designed to investigate the emission characteristics of both of these types of thermionic cathodes.

  14. EMITTING ELECTRONS AND SOURCE ACTIVITY IN MARKARIAN 501

    SciTech Connect

    Mankuzhiyil, Nijil; Ansoldi, Stefano; Persic, Massimo; Rivers, Elizabeth; Rothschild, Richard; Tavecchio, Fabrizio

    2012-07-10

    We study the variation of the broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) of the BL Lac object Mrk 501 as a function of source activity, from quiescent to flaring. Through {chi}{sup 2}-minimization we model eight simultaneous SED data sets with a one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, and examine how model parameters vary with source activity. The emerging variability pattern of Mrk 501 is complex, with the Compton component arising from {gamma}-e scatterings that sometimes are (mostly) Thomson and sometimes (mostly) extreme Klein-Nishina. This can be seen from the variation of the Compton to synchrotron peak distance according to source state. The underlying electron spectra are faint/soft in quiescent states and bright/hard in flaring states. A comparison with Mrk 421 suggests that the typical values of the SSC parameters are different in the two sources: however, in both jets the energy density is particle-dominated in all states.

  15. COMBINING SOURCES IN STABLE ISOTOPE MIXING MODELS: ALTERNATIVE METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotope mixing models are often used to quantify source contributions to a mixture. Examples include pollution source identification; trophic web studies; analysis of water sources for soils, plants, or water bodies; and many others. A common problem is having too many s...

  16. The Brookhaven National Laboratory electron beam ion source for RHICa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, J. G.; Barton, D.; Beebe, E.; Bellavia, S.; Gould, O.; Kponou, A.; Lambiase, R.; Lockey, R.; McNerney, A.; Mapes, M.; Marneris, Y.; Okamura, M.; Phillips, D.; Pikin, A. I.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Snydstrup, L.; Theisen, C.; Wilinski, M.

    2010-02-01

    As part of a new heavy ion preinjector that will supply beams for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory, construction of a new electron beam ion source (EBIS) is now being completed. This source, based on the successful prototype Brookhaven National Laboratory Test EBIS, is designed to produce milliampere level currents of all ion species, with q/m=(1/6)-(1/2). Among the major components of this source are a 5 T, 2-m-long, 204 mm diameter warm bore superconducting solenoid, an electron gun designed to operate at a nominal current of 10 A, and an electron collector designed to dissipate ˜300 kW of peak power. Careful attention has been paid to the design of the vacuum system, since a pressure of 10-10 Torr is required in the trap region. The source includes several differential pumping stages, the trap can be baked to 400 C, and there are non-evaporable getter strips in the trap region. Power supplies include a 15 A, 15 kV electron collector power supply, and fast switchable power supplies for most of the 16 electrodes used for varying the trap potential distribution for ion injection, confinement, and extraction. The EBIS source and all EBIS power supplies sit on an isolated platform, which is pulsed up to a maximum of 100 kV during ion extraction. The EBIS is now fully assembled, and operation will be beginning following final vacuum and power supply tests. Details of the EBIS components are presented.

  17. Electron acceleration in a post-flare decimetric continuum source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, P.; White, S. M.; Karlický, M.; Sych, R.; Sawant, H. S.; Ananthakrishnan, S.

    2007-06-01

    Aims:To calculate the power budget for electron acceleration and the efficiency of the plasma emission mechanism in a post-flare decimetric continuum source. Methods: We have imaged a high brightness temperature (˜ 109 K) post-flare source at 1060 MHz with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). We use information from these images and the dynamic spectrum from the Hiraiso spectrograph together with the theoretical method described in Subramanian & Becker (2006, Sol. Phys., 237, 185) to calculate the power input to the electron acceleration process. The method assumes that the electrons are accelerated via a second-order Fermi acceleration mechanism. Results: We find that the power input to the nonthermal electrons is in the range 3× 1025-1026 erg/s. The efficiency of the overall plasma emission process starting from electron acceleration and culminating in the observed emission could range from 2.87× 10-9 to 2.38 × 10-8.

  18. A high-performance electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi,J.; Beebe, E.; Bellavia, S.; Gould, O.; Kponou, A.; Lambiase, R.; Lockey, R.; McCafferty, D.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A. I.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Syndstrup, L.

    2009-06-08

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory, a high current Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) has been developed as part of a new preinjector that is under construction to replace the Tandem Van de Graaffs as the heavy ion preinjector for the RHIC and NASA experimental programs. This preinjector will produce milliampere-level currents of essentially any ion species, with q/A {ge} 1/6, in short pulses, for injection into the Booster synchrotron. In order to produce the required intensities, this EBIS uses a 10A electron gun, and an electron collector designed to handle 300 kW of pulsed electron beam power. The EBIS trap region is 1.5 m long, inside a 5T, 2m long, 8-inch bore superconducting solenoid. The source is designed to switch ion species on a pulse-to-pulse basis, at a 5 Hz repetition rate. Singly-charged ions of the appropriate species, produced external to the EBIS, are injected into the trap and confined until the desired charge state is reached via stepwise ionization by the electron beam. Ions are then extracted and matched into an RFQ, followed by a short IH Linac, for acceleration to 2 MeV/A, prior to injection into the Booster synchrotron. An overview of the preinjector is presented, along with experimental results from the prototype EBIS, where all essential requirements have already been demonstrated. Design features and status of construction of the final high intensity EBIS is also be presented.

  19. Laser-Electron-Gamma-Source. Progress report, July 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Fineman, B.; Giordano, G.; Kistner, OC.; Matone, G.; Sandorfi, A.M.; Schaerf, C.; Thorn, C.E.; Ziegler, W.

    1986-07-01

    When completed, the Laser Electron Gamma Source (LEGS) is expected to provide intense beams of monochromatic and polarized (circular or linear) gamma rays with energies up to 500 MeV. The gamma-ray beams will be produced by Compton backscattering uv laser light from the electrons circulating in a storage ring. Progress with installation of the facility is described, particularly the Ar-ion laser and tagging spectrometer. Tests of the tagging spectrometer coponents is reported, and a second laser is described for higher energy operation. Estimates are given of expected beam parameters. Experimental equipment for the planned research projects to be carried out at the LEGS facility is discussed. (LEW)

  20. Developing electron beam bunching technology for improving light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Chan, K.C.D.; Feldman, D.W.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project was to develop a new electron bunch compression technology, experimentally demonstrate subpicosecond compression of bunches with charges on the order of 1 nC, and to theoretically investigate fundamental limitations to electron bunch compression. All of these goals were achieved, and in addition, the compression system built for this project was used to generate 22 nm light in a plasma-radiator light source.

  1. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    SciTech Connect

    White, Thomas A. Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco; Holton, James M.; Kirian, Richard A.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2013-07-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam.

  2. RF Heating in Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, D.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.

    2011-12-01

    ECRIS—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources are able to feed accelerators with intense currents of highly charged ions. In ECRIS a high density—high temperature plasma is generated by means of the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating inside a B-min, MHD stable trap. The state of the art about the principal heating mechanisms will be given. The paper will specially discuss the most critical and still open issues concerning the influence of the magnetic field and of the RF frequency on the plasma heating, as well as the impact of possible non-linear pumping wave—to—plasma interactions. The contribution of INFN-LNS will be specifically underlined. A short review on the future perspectives for the design of new generation ion sources will be given in conclusion.

  3. Design of an electron gun for terahertz radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ji; Pei, Yuan-Ji; Hu, Tong-Ning; Chen, Qu-Shan; Feng, Guang-Yao; Shang, Lei; Li, Cheng-Long

    2014-04-01

    An EC-ITC (External-Cathode Independently Tunable Cells) RF gun was employed with the aim of obtaining short-pulse bunches with high peak current for a terahertz radiation source. A gridded DC gun plays a key role as the external injecting electron source of the ITC RF gun, the performance of which determines the beam quality in the injector and transport line. In order to make the beam well compressed in the ITC RF gun, the energy of the electrons acquired from the gridded DC gun should be 15 keV at most. A proper structure of the gridded gun with double-anode is shown to overcome the strong space- charge force on the cathode, which is able to generate 6 μs beam with 4.5 A current successfully.

  4. Oscillating plasma bubbles. III. Internal electron sources and sinks

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2012-08-15

    An internal electron source has been used to neutralize ions injected from an ambient plasma into a spherical grid. The resultant plasma is termed a plasma 'bubble.' When the electron supply from the filament is reduced, the sheath inside the bubble becomes unstable. The plasma potential of the bubble oscillates near but below the ion plasma frequency. Different modes of oscillations have been observed as well as a subharmonic and multiple harmonics. The frequency increases with ion density and decreases with electron density. The peak amplitude occurs for an optimum current and the instability is quenched at large electron densities. The frequency also increases if Langmuir probes inside the bubble draw electrons. Allowing electrons from the ambient plasma to enter, the bubble changes the frequency dependence on grid voltage. It is concluded that the net space charge density in the sheath determines the oscillation frequency. It is suggested that the sheath instability is caused by ion inertia in an oscillating sheath electric field which is created by ion bunching.

  5. Electron-beam-assisted dry etching for GaAs using electron cyclotron resonance plasma electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Heiji; Matsui, Shinji

    1992-12-01

    Electron-beam (EB)-assisted dry etching of GaAs using Ar electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma as an electron shower source is developed to achieve a low energy and high current density electron beam (EB). The rate of EB-assisted dry etching is more than ten times larger than for Cl2 gas etching.It is confirmed, through photoluminescence measurement, that this etching method causes less damage than ion beam techniques and is very effective for damaged layer removal. Using this technique, a 0.4 μm linewidth low-damage fine structure of GaAs was fabricated.

  6. Electron-cloud mitigation in the spallation neutron source ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brodowski, J.; Cameron, P.; Davino, D.; Fedotov, A.; He, P.; Hseuh, H.; Lee, Y.Y.; Meng, W.; Raparia, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, S.Y.; Danilov, V.; Henderson, S.; Furman, M.; Pivi, M.; Macek, R.

    2003-05-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring is designed to accumulate, via H- injection, protons of 2 MW beam power at 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz [1]. At such beam intensity, electron cloud is expected to be one of the intensity-limiting mechanisms that complicate ring operations. This paper summarizes mitigation strategy adopted in the design, both in suppressing electron-cloud formation and in enhancing Landau damping, including tapered magnetic field and monitoring system for the collection of stripped electrons at injection, TiN coated beam chamber for suppression of the secondary yield, clearing electrodes dedicated for the injection region and parasitic on BPMs around the ring, solenoid windings in the collimation region, and planning of vacuum systems for beam scrubbing upon operation.

  7. Electron Cloud Mitigation in the Spallation Neutron Source Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brodowski, J.; Cameron, P.; Davino, Daniele; Fedotov, A.; He, P.; Hseuh, H.; Lee, Y.Y.; Ludewig, H.; Meng, W.; Raparia, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, S.Y.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Macek, R.J.; Furman, Miguel A.; Aleksandrov, A.; Cousineau, S.; Danilov, V.; Henderson, S.; /Brookhaven /CERN /LANL, Ctr. for Nonlinear Studies /LBL, Berkeley /Oak Ridge /SLAC

    2008-03-17

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring is designed to accumulate, via H{sup -} injection, protons of 2 MW beam power at 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz [1]. At such beam intensity, electron-cloud is expected to be one of the intensity-limiting mechanisms that complicate ring operations. This paper summarizes mitigation strategy adopted in the design, both in suppressing electron-cloud formation and in enhancing Landau damping, including tapered magnetic field and monitoring system for the collection of stripped electrons at injection, TiN coated beam chamber for suppression of the secondary yield, clearing electrodes dedicated for the injection region and parasitic on BPMs around the ring, solenoid windings in the collimation region, and planning of vacuum systems for beam scrubbing upon operation.

  8. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Yamamoto, T; Sekine, M; Okamura, M

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline. PMID:22380298

  9. Low coherence interferometry modelling using combined broadband Gaussian light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansz, Paul; Wild, Graham; Richardson, Steven; Hinckley, Steven

    2012-02-01

    Using a Low Coherence Interferometry (LCI) model, a comparison of broadband single-Gaussian and multi-Gaussian light sources has been undertaken. For single-Gaussian sources, the axial resolution improved with source bandwidth, confirming the coherence length relation that resolution for single Gaussian sources improves with increasing spectral bandwidth. However, narrow bandwidth light sources resulted in interferograms with overlapping strata peaks and the loss of individual strata information. For multiple-Gaussian sources with the same bandwidth, spectral side lobes increased, reducing A-scan reliability to show accurate layer information without eliminating the side lobes. The simulations show the conditions needed for resolution of strata information for broadband light sources using both single and multiple Gaussian models. The potential to use the model to study LCI and OCT light sources, optical delays and sample structures can better characterise these LCI and OCT elements. Forecasting misinformation in the interferogram, may allow preliminary corrections. With improvements to the LCI-OCT model, more applications are envisaged.

  10. Open source electronic health records and chronic disease management

    PubMed Central

    Goldwater, Jason C; Kwon, Nancy J; Nathanson, Ashley; Muckle, Alison E; Brown, Alexa; Cornejo, Kerri

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study and report on the use of open source electronic health records (EHR) to assist with chronic care management within safety net medical settings, such as community health centers (CHC). Methods and Materials The study was conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago from April to September 2010. The NORC team undertook a comprehensive environmental scan, including a literature review, a dozen key informant interviews using a semistructured protocol, and a series of site visits to CHC that currently use an open source EHR. Results Two of the sites chosen by NORC were actively using an open source EHR to assist in the redesign of their care delivery system to support more effective chronic disease management. This included incorporating the chronic care model into an CHC and using the EHR to help facilitate its elements, such as care teams for patients, in addition to maintaining health records on indigent populations, such as tuberculosis status on homeless patients. Discussion The ability to modify the open-source EHR to adapt to the CHC environment and leverage the ecosystem of providers and users to assist in this process provided significant advantages in chronic care management. Improvements in diabetes management, controlled hypertension and increases in tuberculosis vaccinations were assisted through the use of these open source systems. Conclusions The flexibility and adaptability of open source EHR demonstrated its utility and viability in the provision of necessary and needed chronic disease care among populations served by CHC. PMID:23813566

  11. Energy enhancement and spectrum narrowing in terahertz electron sources due to negative mass instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, Yu.; Bratman, V. L.; Savilov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    Simulations of coherent spontaneous undulator radiation in a waveguide demonstrate that the use of negative mass instability (NMI) for retaining longitudinal sizes of dense electron bunches, which are formed in laser-driven photoinjectors, allows one to increase power capabilities of a terahertz radiation source by many times. The NMI is realized in an undulator with combined helical and over-resonance uniform longitudinal magnetic fields due to nonisochronous longitudinal oscillations of electrons, whose frequencies increase/decrease with increasing/decreasing particle energy. In such conditions, an effective longitudinal size of the bunches can be preserved at long distance even at an extremely high electron density. Correspondingly, an energy extraction efficiency of more than 20% is revealed at a narrow frequency radiation spectrum, suggesting realization of a compact and powerful THz source.

  12. ELECTRON ENERGY PARTITION IN THE ABOVE-THE-LOOPTOP SOLAR HARD X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Mitsuo; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh S.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal

    2015-02-01

    Solar flares produce non-thermal electrons with energies up to tens of MeVs. To understand the origin of energetic electrons, coronal hard X-ray (HXR) sources, in particular above-the-looptop sources, have been studied extensively. However, it still remains unclear how energies are partitioned between thermal and non-thermal electrons within the above-the-looptop source. Here we show that the kappa distribution, when compared to conventional spectral models, can better characterize the above-the-looptop HXRs (≳15 keV) observed in four different cases. The widely used conventional model (i.e., the combined thermal plus power-law distribution) can also fit the data, but it returns unreasonable parameter values due to a non-physical sharp lower-energy cutoff E{sub c}. In two cases, extreme-ultraviolet data were available from SDO/AIA and the kappa distribution was still consistent with the analysis of differential emission measure. Based on the kappa distribution model, we found that the 2012 July 19 flare showed the largest non-thermal fraction of electron energies about 50%, suggesting equipartition of energies. Considering the results of particle-in-cell simulations, as well as density estimates of the four cases studied, we propose a scenario in which electron acceleration is achieved primarily by collisionless magnetic reconnection, but the electron energy partition in the above-the-looptop source depends on the source density. In low-density above-the-looptop regions (few times 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}), the enhanced non-thermal tail can remain and a prominent HXR source is created, whereas in higher-densities (>10{sup 10} cm{sup –3}), the non-thermal tail is suppressed or thermalized by Coulomb collisions.

  13. An Efficient Microwave Power Source: Free-electron Laser Afterburner

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Sessler, Andrew M.

    1993-03-04

    A kind of microwave power source, called a free-electron laser afterburner (FEL afterburner) which consists of a free-electron laser buncher and a slow-wave output structure sharing a magnetic wiggler field with the buncher, is proposed. The buncher and the slow-wave structure can operate in either a travelling-wave state or a standing-wave state. In the buncher, the wiggler field together with the radiation field makes an electron beam bunched, and in the slow-wave structure the wiggler field keeps the beam bunched while the bunched beam interacts strongly with the slow-wave structure and so produces rf power. The bunching process comes from the free-electron laser mechanism and the generating process of rf power is in a slow-wave structure. A three-dimensional, time-dependent code is used to simulate a particular standing-wave FEL afterburner and it is shown that rf power of up to 1.57 GW can be obtained, at 17.12 GHz, from a l-kA, 5-MeV electron beam.

  14. On the application of quantum transport theory to electron sources.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kevin L

    2003-01-01

    Electron sources (e.g., field emitter arrays, wide band-gap (WBG) semiconductor materials and coatings, carbon nanotubes, etc.) seek to exploit ballistic transport within the vacuum after emission from microfabricated structures. Regardless of kind, all sources strive to minimize the barrier to electron emission by engineering material properties (work function/electron affinity) or physical geometry (field enhancement) of the cathode. The unique capabilities of cold cathodes, such as instant ON/OFF performance, high brightness, high current density, large transconductance to capacitance ratio, cold emission, small size and/or low voltage operation characteristics, commend their use in several advanced devices when physical size, weight, power consumption, beam current, and pulse repletion frequency are important, e.g., RF power amplifier such as traveling wave tubes (TWTs) for radar and communications, electrodynamic tethers for satellite deboost/reboost, and electric propulsion systems such as Hall thrusters for small satellites. The theoretical program described herein is directed towards models to evaluate emission current from electron sources (in particular, emission from WBG and Spindt-type field emitter) in order to assess their utility, capabilities and performance characteristics. Modeling efforts particularly include: band bending, non-linear and resonant (Poole-Frenkel) potentials, the extension of one-dimensional theory to multi-dimensional structures, and emission site statistics due to variations in geometry and the presence of adsorbates. Two particular methodologies, namely, the modified Airy approach and metal-semiconductor statistical hyperbolic/ellipsoidal model, are described in detail in their present stage of development. PMID:12535543

  15. Reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene DNAPL source zones: source zone architecture versus electron donor availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, M.; Kokkinaki, A.; Sleep, B.

    2014-12-01

    The persistence of dense-non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface has led practitioners and regulatory agencies to turn towards low-maintenance, low-cost remediation methods. Biological degradation has been suggested as a possible solution, based on the well-proven ability of certain microbial species to break down dissolved chlorinated ethenes under favorable conditions. However, the biodegradation of pure phase chlorinated ethenes is subject to additional constraints: the continuous release of electron acceptor at a rate governed by mass transfer kinetics, and the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of DNAPL source zones which leads to spatially and temporally variable availability of the reactants for reductive dechlorination. In this work, we investigate the relationship between various DNAPL source zone characteristics and reaction kinetics using COMPSIM, a multiphase groundwater model that considers non-equilibrium mass transfer and Monod-type kinetics for reductive dechlorination. Numerical simulations are performed for simple, homogeneous trichloroethene DNAPL source zones to demonstrate the effect of single source zone characteristics, as well as for larger, more realistic heterogeneous source zones. It is shown that source zone size, and mass transfer kinetics may have a decisive effect on the predicted bio-enhancement. Finally, we evaluate the performance of DNAPL bioremediation for realistic, thermodynamically constrained, concentrations of electron donor. Our results indicate that the latter may be the most important limitation for the success of DNAPL bioremediation, leading to reduced bio-enhancement and, in many cases, comparable performance with water flooding.

  16. Electron Solvation in Liquid Ammonia: Lithium, Sodium, Magnesium, and Calcium as Electron Sources.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2016-03-10

    A free electron in solution, known as a solvated electron, is the smallest possible anion. Alkali and alkaline earth atoms serve as electron donors in solvents that mediate outer-sphere electron transfer. We report herein ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of lithium, sodium, magnesium, and calcium in liquid ammonia at 250 K. By analyzing the electronic properties and the ionic and solvation structures and dynamics, we systematically characterize these metals as electron donors and ammonia molecules as electron acceptors. We show that the solvated metal strongly modifies the properties of its solvation shells and that the observed effect is metal-specific. Specifically, the radius and charge exhibit major impacts. The single solvated electron present in the alkali metal systems is distributed more uniformly among the solvent molecules of each metal's two solvation shells. In contrast, alkaline earth metals favor a less uniform distribution of the electron density. Alkali and alkaline earth atoms are coordinated by four and six NH3 molecules, respectively. The smaller atoms, Li and Mg, are stronger electron donors than Na and Ca. This result is surprising, as smaller atoms in a column of the periodic table have higher ionization potentials. However, it can be explained by stronger electron donor-acceptor interactions between the smaller atoms and the solvent molecules. The structure of the first solvation shell is sharpest for Mg, which has a large charge and a small radius. Solvation is weakest for Na, which has a small charge and a large radius. Weak solvation leads to rapid dynamics, as reflected in the diffusion coefficients of NH3 molecules of the first two solvation shells and the Na atom. The properties of the solvated electrons established in the present study are important for radiation chemistry, synthetic chemistry, condensed-matter charge transfer, and energy sources. PMID:26886153

  17. Multi-port power electronic interface for renewable energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei

    Energy intensive products and services are penetrating people's daily life as well as different sectors of industry during recent decades. Further effort to improve efficiency, reduce green house gas and hazardous particle emission lead to the emergence of the "more electric" concept in several industries including transportation. This trend, however, burdens the aging power system and existing local power networks. To offer a remedy to the problem and a smooth transition to a more reliable, more diverse, and more efficient power grid of the future, the concept of Multi-port Power Electronic Interface (MPEI) for localized power processing is introduced in this dissertation, which interfaces and manages various sources, loads and storages. Different means of integrating multiple sources and storages into the existing power system are studied and evaluated; the six phase-leg structure is chosen to interface five sources/loads: fuel cell, wind turbine, solar cell, battery and utility grid. Partitioning of source-interface and load-interface on a system level as well as analysis and modeling on small signal level are performed. A novel control structure for source-interface is proposed in the design, which forms Controlled Quasi Current Source (CQCS) during the load sharing operation and offers several salient advantages: • Inherent average current-mode control. • Easy share of steady state current/power. • Share of load dynamics for better source protection. Local control loops for various input ports are designed based on linearized system model; controller performance is tuned to accommodate the characteristics of different sources. To maintain a sustainable operation, different modes of operation are defined for MPEI; detailed state-transition with associated events are also defined in each operation mode. Prototype of MPEI is built and control system is implemented digitally in a digital signal processor; steady state and transient performance of MPEI is

  18. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Boytsov, A Yu; Donets, D E; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Katagiri, K; Noda, K; Ponkin, D O; Ramzdorf, A Yu; Salnikov, V V; Shutov, V B

    2015-08-01

    The type of the Electron String Ion Sources (ESIS) is considered to be the appropriate one to produce pulsed C(4+) and C(6+) ion beams for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact, the new test ESIS Krion-6T already now provides more than 10(10) C(4+) ions per pulse and about 5 × 10(9) C(6+) ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable to apply at synchrotrons. It has also been found that Krion-6T can provide more than 10(11) C(6+) ions per second at the 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. ESIS can be also a suitable type of ion source to produce the (11)C radioactive ion beams. A specialized cryogenic cell was experimentally tested at the Krion-2M ESIS for pulse injection of gaseous species into the electron string. It has been shown in experiments with stable methane that the total conversion efficiency of methane molecules to C(4+) ions reached 5%÷10%. For cancer therapy with simultaneous irradiation and precise dose control (positron emission tomography) by means of (11)C, transporting to the tumor with the primary accelerated (11)C(4+) beam, this efficiency is preliminarily considered to be large enough to produce the (11)C(4+) beam from radioactive methane and to inject this beam into synchrotrons. PMID:26329182

  19. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boytsov, A. Yu.; Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Katagiri, K.; Noda, K.; Ponkin, D. O.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.; Salnikov, V. V.; Shutov, V. B.

    2015-08-01

    The type of the Electron String Ion Sources (ESIS) is considered to be the appropriate one to produce pulsed C4+ and C6+ ion beams for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact, the new test ESIS Krion-6T already now provides more than 1010 C4+ ions per pulse and about 5 × 109 C6+ ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable to apply at synchrotrons. It has also been found that Krion-6T can provide more than 1011 C6+ ions per second at the 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. ESIS can be also a suitable type of ion source to produce the 11C radioactive ion beams. A specialized cryogenic cell was experimentally tested at the Krion-2M ESIS for pulse injection of gaseous species into the electron string. It has been shown in experiments with stable methane that the total conversion efficiency of methane molecules to C4+ ions reached 5%÷10%. For cancer therapy with simultaneous irradiation and precise dose control (positron emission tomography) by means of 11C, transporting to the tumor with the primary accelerated 11C4+ beam, this efficiency is preliminarily considered to be large enough to produce the 11C4+ beam from radioactive methane and to inject this beam into synchrotrons.

  20. The polarized electron source of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.; Alley, R.; Clendenin, J.; Frisch, J.; Mulhollan, G.; Saez, P.; Tang, H.; Witte, K.

    1994-08-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator has been running with polarized electrons both in the collider (SLC) mode and in the fixed target mode. The accelerators polarized electron source is based on a thin, strained GaAs photocathode, which is held at a negative high voltage and illuminated by a Titanium Sapphire laser. The reliability of the source was better than 95% during the eight-month-long 1993 SLC run. A beam polarization of 63% was measured by the SLD experiment at the SLC interaction point in the 1993 data run. The fixed-target experiment E143 measured a beam polarization of 85% in its 1993--94 run. These polarization measurements, made at high energy, are in good agreement with measurements made at low energy on a calibrated Mott polarimeter. The higher beam polarization in the fixed target experiment is due to a thinner, more highly strained GaAs photocathode than had been used earlier, and to the experiment`s low beam current requirements. The SLC is now running with the high polarization photocathode. Details of the source, and experience with the high polarization strained GaAs photocathodes on the accelerator in the current SLC run, will be presented.

  1. A new beam source for free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.C.; Wang, Z.J.; Zhu, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    A high power, high current density and high voltage electron beam was generated with the pseudospark discharge (PS), this is a new beam source for free electron lasers. The design and construction of the pseudospark discharge was described, the device has low cost and is easy to fabricate. The experiments are presented, the configuration parameters of the modified pulse line accelerator (PLA) are as follows. The PS hollow cavity has a 3 cm diameter and 4.1 cm long. The discharge chamber consists of planar cathode with hollow cavity, sets of intermediate electrodes and insulators with a common channel, and a planar anode. The electrodes are made of brass and the insulators are made of Plexiglas. The diameter of the channel is 3.2 mm. The anode-cathode gap distance is varied in 10-100 mm. The electron beams have voltage of 200 KeV, current of 2 KA and beam diameter of 1mm. The beam penetrated a 0.3 mm hole on a copper foil of 0.05 mm thick at the distance of 5 cm from the anode and penetrated a 0.6 mm hole on an acid-sensitive film at the distance of 15 cm. A compact free electron laser with a table size is discussed.

  2. Note: Simulation and test of a strip source electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Munawar; Islam, G. U.; Misbah, I.; Iqbal, O.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-06-15

    We present simulation and test of an indirectly heated strip source electron beam gun assembly using Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) electron beam trajectory program. The beam is now sharply focused with 3.04 mm diameter in the post anode region at 15.9 mm. The measured emission current and emission density were 1.12 A and 1.15 A/cm{sup 2}, respectively, that corresponds to power density of 11.5 kW/cm{sup 2}, at 10 kV acceleration potential. The simulated results were compared with then and now experiments and found in agreement. The gun is without any biasing, electrostatic and magnetic fields; hence simple and inexpensive. Moreover, it is now more powerful and is useful for accelerators technology due to high emission and low emittance parameters.

  3. Glow plasma trigger for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Vodopianov, A. V.; Golubev, S. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Savkin, K. P.; Yushkov, G. Yu.

    2010-02-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs) are particularly useful for nuclear, atomic, and high energy physics, as unique high current generators of multicharged ion beams. Plasmas of gas discharges in an open magnetic trap heated by pulsed (100 {mu}s and longer) high power (100 kW and higher) high-frequency (greater than 37.5 GHz) microwaves of gyrotrons is promising in the field of research in the development of electron cyclotron resonance sources for high charge state ion beams. Reaching high ion charge states requires a decrease in gas pressure in the magnetic trap, but this method leads to increases in time, in which the microwave discharge develops. The gas breakdown and microwave discharge duration becomes greater than or equal to the microwave pulse duration when the pressure is decreased. This makes reaching the critical plasma density initiate an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge during pulse of microwave gyrotron radiation with gas pressure lower than a certain threshold. In order to reduce losses of microwave power, it is necessary to shorten the time of development of the ECR discharge. For fast triggering of ECR discharge under low pressure in an ECRIS, we initially propose to fill the magnetic trap with the plasmas of auxiliary pulsed discharges in crossed ExB fields. The glow plasma trigger of ECR based on a Penning or magnetron discharge has made it possible not only to fill the trap with plasma with density of 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}, required for a rapid increase in plasma density and finally for ECR discharge ignition, but also to initially heat the plasma electrons to T{sub e}{approx_equal}20 eV.

  4. Glow plasma trigger for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Vodopianov, A V; Golubev, S V; Izotov, I V; Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Savkin, K P; Yushkov, G Yu

    2010-02-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs) are particularly useful for nuclear, atomic, and high energy physics, as unique high current generators of multicharged ion beams. Plasmas of gas discharges in an open magnetic trap heated by pulsed (100 micros and longer) high power (100 kW and higher) high-frequency (greater than 37.5 GHz) microwaves of gyrotrons is promising in the field of research in the development of electron cyclotron resonance sources for high charge state ion beams. Reaching high ion charge states requires a decrease in gas pressure in the magnetic trap, but this method leads to increases in time, in which the microwave discharge develops. The gas breakdown and microwave discharge duration becomes greater than or equal to the microwave pulse duration when the pressure is decreased. This makes reaching the critical plasma density initiate an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge during pulse of microwave gyrotron radiation with gas pressure lower than a certain threshold. In order to reduce losses of microwave power, it is necessary to shorten the time of development of the ECR discharge. For fast triggering of ECR discharge under low pressure in an ECRIS, we initially propose to fill the magnetic trap with the plasmas of auxiliary pulsed discharges in crossed ExB fields. The glow plasma trigger of ECR based on a Penning or magnetron discharge has made it possible not only to fill the trap with plasma with density of 10(12) cm(-3), required for a rapid increase in plasma density and finally for ECR discharge ignition, but also to initially heat the plasma electrons to T(e) approximately = 20 eV. PMID:20192326

  5. THE ENVIRONMENT AND DISTRIBUTION OF EMITTING ELECTRONS AS A FUNCTION OF SOURCE ACTIVITY IN MARKARIAN 421

    SciTech Connect

    Mankuzhiyil, Nijil; Ansoldi, Stefano; Tavecchio, Fabrizio

    2011-05-20

    For the high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object Mrk 421, we study the variation of the spectral energy distribution (SED) as a function of source activity, from quiescent to active. We use a fully automatized {chi}{sup 2}-minimization procedure, instead of the 'eyeball' procedure more commonly used in the literature, to model nine SED data sets with a one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model and examine how the model parameters vary with source activity. The latter issue can finally be addressed now, because simultaneous broadband SEDs (spanning from optical to very high energy photon) have finally become available. Our results suggest that in Mrk 421 the magnetic field (B) decreases with source activity, whereas the electron spectrum's break energy ({gamma}{sub br}) and the Doppler factor ({delta}) increase-the other SSC parameters turn out to be uncorrelated with source activity. In the SSC framework, these results are interpreted in a picture where the synchrotron power and peak frequency remain constant with varying source activity, through a combination of decreasing magnetic field and increasing number density of {gamma} {<=} {gamma}{sub br} electrons: since this leads to an increased electron-photon scattering efficiency, the resulting Compton power increases, and so does the total (= synchrotron plus Compton) emission.

  6. An Unusual Source of Multiple ESD Events in Electronic Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. C.

    2015-10-01

    Small wall mounted power supplies that plug directly into AC power mains and furnish power, usually low voltage DC, to equipment over a low voltage cable are ubiquitous in the electronic field. It is shown that these low voltage supplies can be the source of multiple ESD events that are fed to the connected system on the low voltage cable when an ESD event is applied to the system or directly to the power supplies. The multiple ESD events produce nasty current waveforms Examples of these waveforms and the measurement method are given. The results have been duplicated in three laboratories, results are presented from two of the three.

  7. Theoretical investigation of a tunable free-electron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Shenggang; Hu Min; Zhang Yaxin; Liu Weihao; Zhang Ping; Zhou Jun

    2011-06-15

    The concept and experimental results of a light source given in a recent paper by Adamo et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 113901 (2009)] are very interesting and attractive. Our paper presents detailed theoretical investigations on such a light source, and our results confirm that the mechanism of the light radiation experimentally detected in the published paper is a special kind of diffraction radiation in a waveguide with nanoscale periodic structure excited by an electron beam. The numerical calculations based on our theory and digital simulations agree well with the experimental results. This mechanism of diffraction radiation is of significance in physics and optics, and may bring good opportunities for the generation of electromagnetic waves from terahertz to light frequency regimes.

  8. Pulsed magnetic field-electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation

    SciTech Connect

    Muehle, C.; Ratzinger, U.; Joest, G.; Leible, K.; Schennach, S.; Wolf, B.H.

    1996-03-01

    The pulsed magnetic field (PuMa)-electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source uses a pulsed coil to improve the peak current by opening the magnetic bottle along the beam axis. After demonstration of the principle of the pulsed magnetic extraction, the ion source was tested with different gases. We received promising results from helium to krypton. The influence of the current in the pulsed coil on the analyzed ion current was measured. With increased current levels within the pulsed coil not only the pulse height of the PuMa pulse, but the pulse length can also be controlled. By using the pulsed coil the maximum of the charge state distribution can be shifted to higher charge states. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Eyesafe coherent detection wind lidar based on a beam-combined pulsed laser source.

    PubMed

    Lombard, L; Valla, M; Planchat, C; Goular, D; Augère, B; Bourdon, P; Canat, G

    2015-03-15

    We report on a coherent wind lidar built with two coherently-beam-combined fiber amplifiers. The lidar performances of the combined-amplifier and the single-amplifier are compared using two criterions: carrier-to-noise ratio and wind speed noise floor. In both cases, lidar performances are not degraded with a combined source and are close to the theoretical optimum. Combined sources are well suited to improve coherent wind lidar accuracy, range, and integration time. PMID:25768174

  10. Fabrication of nano ion-electron sources and nano-probes by local electron bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezeq, Moh'd.; Ali, Ahmed; Barada, Hassan

    2015-04-01

    A new method for fabricating nano ion-electron sources and nano probes with an apex in the range of 1 nm is introduced. The method is based on bombarding a regular tip apex with electrons extracted and accelerated from a nearby source by the electric field. This can be achieved by placing a metal ring around a precursor metal tip at a level below the tip apex in a field ion microscope (FIM). The metal ring is then heated, by a grounded DC power source, to a temperature below the thermionic emission value. The electric field between the tip and the hot ring is high enough to cause electrons to be extracted from the metal ring, i.e. Schottky field emission, and then accelerated to the shank with energy sufficient to dislodge atoms from the shank. An atomic scale apex with a single atom end can be obtained by monitoring the evolution of the tip apex due to the movement of mobile atoms while adjusting the tip electric field and the temperature of the metal ring. As this method depends only on the electron bombardment mechanism, this makes it a clean process that can be applied to any metal or heavily doped semiconductor materials appropriate for generating a high electric field for FIM applications.

  11. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, Alexander Alessi, James G. Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-09

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  12. Mapping electron sources and sinks in a marine biogeobattery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Revil, André; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2014-08-01

    Filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family form a biogeobattery in marine sediments by mediating an electric coupling between sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers and oxygen reduction at the sediment surface. The electric fields generated in such biogeobatteries were determined with microelectrodes and correlated well with geochemical indicators of microbial electrogenic activity in the top 2 cm of the sediment. The electric fields collapsed within less than a minute when oxygen was removed and reestablished when oxygen was reintroduced, demonstrating a direct coupling between aerobic microbial activity and presence of electric fields. Modeling of the electric potential distribution was used to quantify and localize electron sources and sinks. Most anodic oxidation was confined to the lower part of the anoxic zone with nondetectable free sulfide, suggesting that iron sulfide was the main sulfide source and had already been depleted in the upper part of the anoxic zone. The flow of electrons from anoxic sediment layers fuelled up to 80% of the aerobic activity of the sediment. Responses of the electric field to the presence and absence of nitrate, nitrite, or nitrous oxide in the overlying water readily demonstrated potentials for cathodic reduction of nitrite or nitric oxide and possibly nitrate but not nitrous oxide.

  13. A mulitple cathode gun design for the eRHIC polarized electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, X.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.; Pikin, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Rao, T.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Wang, E.; Wu, Q.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-28

    The future electron-ion collider eRHIC requires a high average current ({approx}50 mA), short bunch ({approx}3 mm), low emittance ({approx}20 {micro}m) polarized electron source. The maximum average current of a polarized electron source so far is more than 1 mA, but much less than 50 mA, from a GaAs:Cs cathode. One possible approach to overcome the average current limit and to achieve the required 50 mA beam for eRHIC, is to combine beamlets from multiple cathodes to one beam. In this paper, we present the feasibility studies of this technique. The future eRHIC project, next upgrade of RHIC, will be the first electron-heavy ion collider in the world. It requires polarized electron source with a high average current ({approx}50 mA), short bunch ({approx}3 mm), emittance of about 20 {micro}m and energy spread of {approx}1% at 10 MeV. The state-of-art polarized electron cathode can generate average current of about more than 1 mA, but much less than 50 mA. The current is limited by the low quantum efficiency, space charge and ultra-high vacuum requirement of the polarized cathode. A possible approach to achieve the 50 mA beam is to employ multiple cathodes, such as 20 cathodes, and funnel the multiple bunched beams from cathodes to the same axis. Fig.1 illustrates schematically the concept of combining the multiple beams. We name it as 'Gatling gun' because it bears functional similarity to a Gatling gun. Laser beams strike the cathodes sequentially with revolution frequency of 700 kHz. Each beam bunch is focused by a solenoid and is bent toward the combiner. The combiner with rotating bending field bends all bunches arriving the combiner with a rotational pattern to the same axis. The energy of each bunch is modified by a bunching cavity (112MHz) and a 3rd harmonic cavity (336MHz). The bunch length is compressed ballistically in the drift space and is frozen after energy has been boosted to 10 MeV by the Booster linac. Each beam bunch contains 3.5 nC charge. The

  14. Combining harmonic generation and laser chirping to achieve high spectral density in Compton sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzić, Balša; Reeves, Cody; Krafft, Geoffrey A.

    2016-04-01

    Recently various laser-chirping schemes have been investigated with the goal of reducing or eliminating ponderomotive line broadening in Compton or Thomson scattering occurring at high laser intensities. As a next level of detail in the spectrum calculations, we have calculated the line smoothing and broadening expected due to incident beam energy spread within a one-dimensional plane wave model for the incident laser pulse, both for compensated (chirped) and unchirped cases. The scattered compensated distributions are treatable analytically within three models for the envelope of the incident laser pulses: Gaussian, Lorentzian, or hyperbolic secant. We use the new results to demonstrate that the laser chirping in Compton sources at high laser intensities: (i) enables the use of higher order harmonics, thereby reducing the required electron beam energies; and (ii) increases the photon yield in a small frequency band beyond that possible with the fundamental without chirping. This combination of chirping and higher harmonics can lead to substantial savings in the design, construction and operational costs of the new Compton sources. This is of particular importance to the widely popular laser-plasma accelerator based Compton sources, as the improvement in their beam quality enters the regime where chirping is most effective.

  15. Brightness limitations in multi-kiloampere electron beam sources

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.A.; Boyd, J.K.; Paul, A.C.; Prono, D.S.

    1984-08-24

    Heuristic relationships such as the Lawson-Penner criterion, used to scale Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifier gain and efficiency over orders of magnitude in beam current and brightness, have no fundamental basis. The brightness of a given source is set by practical design choices such as peak voltage, cathode type, gun electrode geometry, and focusing field topology. The design of low emittance, high current electron guns has received considerable attention at Livermore over the past few years. The measured brightnesses of the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) and Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) guns are less than predicted with the EBQ gun design code; this discrepancy is due to plasma effects from the present cold, plasma cathode in the code. The EBQ code is well suited to exploring the current limits of gridless relativistic Pierce columns with moderate current density (<50 A/cm/sup 2/) at the cathode. As EBQ uses a steady-state calculation it is not amenable for study of transient phenomena at the beam head. For this purpose, a Darwin approximation code, DPC, has been written. The main component in our experimental cathode development effort is a readily modified electron gun that will allow us to test many candidate cathode materials, types and electrode geometries at field stresses up to 1 MV/cm. 6 references, 6 figures.

  16. A sub-nanosecond rise time intense electron beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Chandra, R.; Mitra, S.; Beg, M. D.; Sharma, D. K.; Sharma, A.; Mittal, K. C.

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a 75 kV, 55 A, 2 nanosecond duration, <= 850 ps rise time, single shot, intense ( >= 100 A/cm2) electron beam source and also the measurement technique adopted in sub-nanosecond regime. A 200 kV (nanosecond pulse) coaxial pulse forming line (PFL) based pulser is designed to drive a cold cathode explosive emission electron gun. The electron gun diode consists with a planer graphite cathode, which has the emission area of 8 mm diameter and a SS 304L anode mesh. Vacuum is achieved of the order of 3.5e-5 mbar by using a diffusion pump, backed by rotary pump. At the diagnostic side for diode voltage measurement a fast response copper sulphate aqueous solution resistive voltage divider is designed and implemented. For the beam current diagnostic a graphite Faraday cup is designed with taking care of response time in GHz (1.0-3.0 GHz) regime. The circuit diagram, voltage and current waveforms and the experimental setup is presented.

  17. Positron Production Using a Laser-Wakefield Electron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, G. Jackson; Albert, Felicie; Chen, Hui; Park, Jaebum; Pollock, Bradley

    2014-10-01

    Positron generation using wakefield-accelerated electrons driven into a second mm-scale target was investigated using the Callisto Laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This technique is in contrast to previous experiments that use direct laser-target interactions to create positron-electron pairs, and has the potential to make laser-produced positron sources widely available to smaller scale laboratories. Monte Carlo simulations show a near-collimated (<10 mrad) wakefield electron beam produces a positron beam with a significantly larger divergence angle (>100 mrad) due to multiple small angle coulomb scattering, resulting in an emitted pair density of 1013 particles/cm3. At the Callisto Laser, we did not observe a signal consistent with positrons using two different charged particle spectrometers. This could be due to a high noise environment and a large detection threshold. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the LLNL LDRD program under tracking code 13-LW-076 and 12-ERD-062.

  18. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Boytsov, A. Yu.; Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Ponkin, D. O.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.; Salnikov, V. V.; Shutov, V. B.; Katagiri, K.; Noda, K.

    2015-08-15

    The type of the Electron String Ion Sources (ESIS) is considered to be the appropriate one to produce pulsed C{sup 4+} and C{sup 6+} ion beams for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact, the new test ESIS Krion-6T already now provides more than 10{sup 10} C{sup 4+} ions per pulse and about 5 × 10{sup 9} C{sup 6+} ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable to apply at synchrotrons. It has also been found that Krion-6T can provide more than 10{sup 11} C{sup 6+} ions per second at the 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. ESIS can be also a suitable type of ion source to produce the {sup 11}C radioactive ion beams. A specialized cryogenic cell was experimentally tested at the Krion-2M ESIS for pulse injection of gaseous species into the electron string. It has been shown in experiments with stable methane that the total conversion efficiency of methane molecules to C{sup 4+} ions reached 5%÷10%. For cancer therapy with simultaneous irradiation and precise dose control (positron emission tomography) by means of {sup 11}C, transporting to the tumor with the primary accelerated {sup 11}C{sup 4+} beam, this efficiency is preliminarily considered to be large enough to produce the {sup 11}C{sup 4+} beam from radioactive methane and to inject this beam into synchrotrons.

  19. The status of the Electron Beam Ion Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, M.P.

    1990-12-31

    More than twenty years after its invention, 13 examples of the Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) are in operation worldwide. The substantial progress in operation and insight, achieved over the last few years, made the EBISes become reliable tools for the production of beams of very highly charged, low-energy ions. For example, 8 EBISes produce bare argon on a standard basis. The successful production of hydrogen-like xenon presents the ions with the highest ionization energy, whereas the production of Th80+ presents the highest achieved charge state. Several synchrotrons are fed by EBIS injectors, taking advantage of the EBIS batch mode production, which yields the highest charge states. A few EBISes are used for ion source development. However, most of the EBISes` efforts are directed to research the physics of highly charged ions. Some of those are used to study the electron--ion interaction inside the source. But normally, most EBISes deliver the ions for external experiments, which so far concentrate on the recombination of the highly charged ions with atoms, molecules and surfaces. The ions are typically produced at a potential of 1 to a few kilovolts per charge; but in most cases, the EBIS is mounted on a high voltage platform or is followed by an RFQ, and therefore can generate ion energies from a few hundred volts up to a few hundred kilovolts per charge. The delivered beams have a low emittance and a low energy spread, which is an advantage for high-resolution experiments. This paper presents briefly all operational EBISes, their capabilities, their achievements, and their contribution to physics research. 5 figs., 1 tab., 59 refs.

  20. The status of the Electron Beam Ion Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    More than twenty years after its invention, 13 examples of the Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) are in operation worldwide. The substantial progress in operation and insight, achieved over the last few years, made the EBISes become reliable tools for the production of beams of very highly charged, low-energy ions. For example, 8 EBISes produce bare argon on a standard basis. The successful production of hydrogen-like xenon presents the ions with the highest ionization energy, whereas the production of Th80+ presents the highest achieved charge state. Several synchrotrons are fed by EBIS injectors, taking advantage of the EBIS batch mode production, which yields the highest charge states. A few EBISes are used for ion source development. However, most of the EBISes' efforts are directed to research the physics of highly charged ions. Some of those are used to study the electron--ion interaction inside the source. But normally, most EBISes deliver the ions for external experiments, which so far concentrate on the recombination of the highly charged ions with atoms, molecules and surfaces. The ions are typically produced at a potential of 1 to a few kilovolts per charge; but in most cases, the EBIS is mounted on a high voltage platform or is followed by an RFQ, and therefore can generate ion energies from a few hundred volts up to a few hundred kilovolts per charge. The delivered beams have a low emittance and a low energy spread, which is an advantage for high-resolution experiments. This paper presents briefly all operational EBISes, their capabilities, their achievements, and their contribution to physics research. 5 figs., 1 tab., 59 refs.

  1. Auroral electron beams - Electric currents and energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, R. L.

    1981-09-01

    The energy sources, electric equipotentials and electric currents associated with auroral electron acceleration observed during rocket flight 18:152 are discussed. Steep flow gradients at the interface between the convection boundary layer and the plasma sheet are considered as the probable source of energy for dayside and dawn and dusk auroras, while it is suggested that the cross tail potential drop may provide an energy source for some midnight auroras. Birkeland currents that flow along distorted field lines are shown possibly to be important in the mechanism that produces U-shaped equipotentials in the ionosphere, as well as unexpected jumps in ionospheric or magnetotail currents and unusual electric fields and plasma drift in the magnetotail. The production of equipotential structures under oppositely directed higher-altitude electric fields is discussed, and it is pointed out that cold ionospheric plasma can enter the structure in a cusp-shaped region where fields are weak. The rocket data reveals that the sudden change in conductivity at the edge of the bright arc and the constancy of the electric field produce sudden changes in the Hall and Pedersen currents. It is concluded that current continuity is satisfied primarily by east-west changes in the electric field or conductivity.

  2. Parametric Modeling of Electron Beam Loss in Synchrotron Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; Schweiger, C.; Hartman, E.; Corbett, J.; Lee, M.; Lui, P.; Paterson, E.; /SLAC

    2007-11-28

    Synchrotron light is used for a wide variety of scientific disciplines ranging from physical chemistry to molecular biology and industrial applications. As the electron beam circulates, random single-particle collisional processes lead to decay of the beam current in time. We report a simulation study in which a combined neural network (NN) and first-principles (FP) model is used to capture the decay in beam current due to Touschek, Bremsstrahlung, and Coulomb effects. The FP block in the combined model is a parametric description of the beam current decay where model parameters vary as a function of beam operating conditions (e.g. vertical scraper position, RF voltage, number of the bunches, and total beam current). The NN block provides the parameters of the FP model and is trained (through constrained nonlinear optimization) to capture the variation in model parameters as operating condition of the beam changes. Simulation results will be presented to demonstrate that the proposed combined framework accurately models beam decay as well as variation to model parameters without direct access to parameter values in the model.

  3. The super-ACO free electron laser source in the UV and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Ninno, G.; Nutarelli, D.; Garzella, D.; Nahon, L.; Hirsch, M.; Renault, E.; Couprie, M. E.

    2001-06-01

    Free electron lasers (FELs) are new sources of tuneable coherent radiation, based on the interaction of a relativistic electron beam with a permanent magnetic field. The Super-ACO FEL operates in the UV (down to 300 nm) at 800 MeV, the nominal energy of the electron beam, with a high repetition rate (8 MHz) . It presents a high average extracted power (up to 300 mW), short pulses (15-50 ps FWHM) and small bandwidth (3×10 -2 nm) . Taking advantage of these characteristics, we demonstrated for the first time the possibility of using a storage ring FEL as a coherent source of radiation for scientific applications. In particular, the tuneable Super-ACO FEL source, combined with synchrotron radiation covering the X-ray to infra-red range, is a unique tool for the time-dependent studies of excited states. Such analysis benefits from the natural synchronisation of both sources at a high repetition rate, their mutual tunability, high intensity and coherence. Several experimental set-ups are now under operation.

  4. The cardiac implantable electronic device power source: evolution and revolution.

    PubMed

    Mond, Harry G; Freitag, Gary

    2014-12-01

    Although the first power source for an implantable pacemaker was a rechargeable nickel-cadmium battery, it was rapidly replaced by an unreliable short-life zinc-mercury cell. This sustained the small pacemaker industry until the early 1970s, when the lithium-iodine cell became the dominant power source for low voltage, microampere current, single- and dual-chamber pacemakers. By the early 2000s, a number of significant advances were occurring with pacemaker technology which necessitated that the power source should now provide milliampere current for data logging, telemetric communication, and programming, as well as powering more complicated pacing devices such as biventricular pacemakers, treatment or prevention of atrial tachyarrhythmias, and the integration of innovative physiologic sensors. Because the current delivery of the lithium-iodine battery was inadequate for these functions, other lithium anode chemistries that can provide medium power were introduced. These include lithium-carbon monofluoride, lithium-manganese dioxide, and lithium-silver vanadium oxide/carbon mono-fluoride hybrids. In the early 1980s, the first implantable defibrillators for high voltage therapy used a lithium-vanadium pentoxide battery. With the introduction of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator, the reliable lithium-silver vanadium oxide became the power source. More recently, because of the demands of biventricular pacing, data logging, and telemetry, lithium-manganese dioxide and the hybrid lithium-silver vanadium oxide/carbon mono-fluoride laminate have also been used. Today all cardiac implantable electronic devices are powered by lithium anode batteries. PMID:25387600

  5. Optimal electron and combined electron and photon therapy in the phase space of complication-free cure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åsell, Mats; Hyödynmaa, Simo; Söderström, Svante; Brahme, Anders

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of using intensity-modulated high-energy electrons beams alone or in combination with photon beams to treat tumours located at depths from 5 cm to 25 cm has been investigated. A radiobiologically based optimization algorithm using the probability of complication-free tumour control has been used to calculate the optimal dose distributions. Two different target volumes have been used; one advanced cervical cancer with locally involved lymph nodes and one astrocytoma in the upper brain hemisphere. Treatments with only electron beams and also combinations between electron and photon beams have been investigated. The dependence of the expected treatment outcome on the beam energy and directions was investigated, and to some extent on the number of beam portals. It is shown that the beam direction intervals resulting in a high expected treatment outcome increase with increasing electron energy and also with some electron-photon combinations. For an eccentrically placed, not too deeply situated tumour surrounded by sensitive normal tissue it is shown that the expected treatment outcome can be improved by using electron beams in combination with photon beams compared with using two photon beams, and using two electron beams results in almost as high an expected treatment outcome. The possibility of improving the dose conformity from electron beams by adding photon fields parallel or orthogonal to the electron beams is demonstrated.

  6. Optimized combinations of abatement strategies for urban mobile sources.

    PubMed

    Yu, T Y; Lin, Y C; Chang, L F

    2000-08-01

    The maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) scale was chosen as a practical index for quantifying ozone-forming impacts. The integer linear and nonlinear programming techniques were employed as the optimization method to maximize MIR and volatile organic compound (VOC) reductions, and minimize ozone's marginal cost with varied control costs. Mobile vehicles were divided into nine categories according to the demands of decision makers and the distinctive features of local circumstance in metro-Taipei. The emission factor (EF) and vehicle kilometers traveled (VKT) of each kind of vehicle were estimated by MOBILE5B model via native parameters and questionnaires. Compressed natural gas (CNG) and inspection and maintenance (I/M) were the alternative control programs for buses and touring buses; liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), I/M, methanol, electrical vehicle (EV) were for taxis and low duty gasoline vehicles. EV, methanol, and I/M were the possible control methods for two-stroke and four-stroke engine motorcycles; I/M programs for low-duty diesel trucks, heavy-duty diesel trucks, and low-duty gasoline trucks. The results include the emission ratios of specific vehicle to all vehicles, the best combination of abated measures based on different objectives, and the marginal cost for ozone and VOC with varied control costs. PMID:11057602

  7. Open source cardiology electronic health record development for DIGICARDIAC implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugarte, Nelson; Medina, Rubén.; Huiracocha, Lourdes; Rojas, Rubén.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the development of a Cardiology Electronic Health Record (CEHR) system. Software consists of a structured algorithm designed under Health Level-7 (HL7) international standards. Novelty of the system is the integration of high resolution ECG (HRECG) signal acquisition and processing tools, patient information management tools and telecardiology tools. Acquisition tools are for management and control of the DIGICARDIAC electrocardiograph functions. Processing tools allow management of HRECG signal analysis searching for indicative patterns of cardiovascular pathologies. Telecardiology tools incorporation allows system communication with other health care centers decreasing access time to the patient information. CEHR system was completely developed using open source software. Preliminary results of process validation showed the system efficiency.

  8. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources.

    PubMed

    White, Thomas A; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco; Holton, James M; Kirian, Richard A; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Chapman, Henry N

    2013-07-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the `serial crystallography' methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam. PMID:23793149

  9. Manipulating the electron distribution through a combination of electron injection and MacKenzie’s Maxwell Demon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2015-06-01

    Experiments on electron heating are performed in a biased hot filament-produced argon plasma. Electrons are confined by multi-dipole magnetic fields on the radial wall of the cylindrical chamber but not the planar end walls. Electron heating is provided by a combination of cold electron injection (Hershowitz N and Leung K N 1975 Appl. Phys. Lett. 26 607) and a MacKenzie Maxwell Demon (Mackenzie K R et al 1971 Appl. Phys. Lett. 18 529). This approach allows the manipulation of the electrons by introducing a depleted tail into the electron energy distribution function or by removing a depleted tail. It is found that the injected electrons mimic and thermalize with the electron species with the closest average energy or temperature. The effect of the injected electrons is optimal when they mimic the secondary electrons emitted from the wall instead of the degraded primary electrons. Both approaches combine to achieve increases in electron temperature Te from 0.67 to 2.8 eV, which was not significantly higher than using each approach alone.

  10. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; ET AL.

    2005-02-28

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linac. The highly successful development of an EBIS at BNL now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based pre-injectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  11. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochems, P.; Kirk, A. T.; Bunert, E.; Runge, M.; Goncalves, P.; Zimmermann, S.

    2015-06-01

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter.

  12. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control.

    PubMed

    Cochems, P; Kirk, A T; Bunert, E; Runge, M; Goncalves, P; Zimmermann, S

    2015-06-01

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter. PMID:26133868

  13. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control

    SciTech Connect

    Cochems, P.; Kirk, A. T.; Bunert, E.; Runge, M.; Goncalves, P.; Zimmermann, S.

    2015-06-15

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter.

  14. Gas breakdown in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalyga, V. A.; Zorin, V. G.; Izotov, I. V.; Sidorov, A. V.; Lamy, T.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.

    2006-03-01

    The realization of the beta-beam project (http://beta-beam.web.cern.ch/beta-beam/) assumes the formation of a pulsed ion beam of helium and neon radioactive isotopes. A pulsed electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source of multicharged ions has been proposed to produce such a beam [P. Sortais et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 1610 (2004)]. The rising of plasma density up to a stationary level must be fast enough to actualize this approach. This condition is mandatory to avoid particle losses in the transmission line. In the presented work, the rising time of the plasma density in an ECR ion source from a background level up to 98% of a stationary level is calculated. A zero-dimensional model of plasma formation in a mirror trap [V. Semenov et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 635 (2002)] is used, able to make calculation for a wide range of microwave frequencies. Plasma confinement regime can either be classic (Pastoukhov [Rev. Plasma Phys. 13, 203 (1987)]) or gas dynamic, depending on the plasma parameters. The calculations are in good agreement with the experimental results obtained at the SMIS'37 setup. Numerical calculations also show that particle losses can be significantly reduced by pumping effect; thanks to microwave frequency increase above 40GHz.

  15. Estimation of the electron density and radiative energy losses in a calcium plasma source based on an electron cyclotron resonance discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Potanin, E. P. Ustinov, A. L.

    2013-06-15

    The parameters of a calcium plasma source based on an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge were calculated. The analysis was performed as applied to an ion cyclotron resonance system designed for separation of calcium isotopes. The plasma electrons in the source were heated by gyrotron microwave radiation in the zone of the inhomogeneous magnetic field. It was assumed that, in such a combined trap, the energy of the extraordinary microwave propagating from the high-field side was initially transferred to a small group of resonance electrons. As a result, two electron components with different transverse temperatures-the hot resonance component and the cold nonresonance component-were created in the plasma. The longitudinal temperatures of both components were assumed to be equal. The entire discharge space was divided into a narrow ECR zone, where resonance electrons acquired transverse energy, and the region of the discharge itself, where the gas was ionized. The transverse energy of resonance electrons was calculated by solving the equations for electron motion in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. Using the law of energy conservation and the balance condition for the number of hot electrons entering the discharge zone and cooled due to ionization and elastic collisions, the density of hot electrons was estimated and the dependence of the longitudinal temperature T{sub e Parallel-To} of the main (cold) electron component on the energy fraction {beta} lost for radiation was obtained.

  16. Advanced Strained-Superlattice Photocathodes for Polarized Electron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Aaron Moy

    2005-01-31

    Polarized electrons have been essential for high-energy parity-violating experiments and measurements of the nucleon spin structure. The availability of a polarized electron beam was crucial to the success of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) in achieving a precise measurement of the electroweak mixing angle, and polarized electron beams will be required for all future linear colliders. Polarized electrons are readily produced by GaAs photocathode sources. When a circularly polarized laser beam tuned to the bandgap minimum is directed to the negative-electron-affinity (NEA) surface of a GaAs crystal, longitudinally polarized electrons are emitted into vacuum. The electron polarization is easily reversed by reversing the laser polarization. The important properties of these photocathodes for accelerator applications are: degree of polarization of the extracted beam; ability to extract sufficient charge to meet accelerator pulse-structure requirements; efficiency and stability of operation; and absence of any asymmetries in the beam properties (charge, position, energy, etc.) upon polarization reversal. The performance of GaAs photocathodes has improved significantly since they were first introduced in 1978 [1]. The theoretical maximum polarization of 50% for natural GaAs was first exceeded in 1991 using the lattice mismatch of a thin InGaAs layer epitaxially grown over a GaAs substrate to generate a strain in the former that broke the natural degeneracy between the heavy- and light-hole valence bands [2]. Polarizations as high as 78% were produced for the SLC from photocathodes based on a thin GaAs epilayer grown on GaAsP [3,4]. After 10 years of experience with many cathode samples at several laboratories [5], the maximum polarization using the GaAs/GaAsP single strained-layer cathode remained limited to 80%, while the quantum efficiency (QE) for a 100-nm epilayer is only 0.3% or less. Two factors were known to limit the polarization of these cathodes: (1) the

  17. Possibilities of utilizing alternative energy sources for combined heat supply systems in the Baltic

    SciTech Connect

    Shipkovs, P.; Grislis, V.; Zebergs, V. )

    1991-01-01

    The problem of alternative energy sources is an issue of major importance for the Baltic republics because of the limited supply of conventional energy resources. One of the ways to solve this problem could be the introduction of combined heat supply systems (CHSS). The combined heat supply systems are such systems where various energy sources in different regimes are made use of to ensure the optimum temperature on residential and industrial premises. The influence of climatic conditions on the selection of heat supply systems has been studied at large. In the present paper the use of alternative energy sources (AES) in combined heat supply systems (CHSS) is described.

  18. Cosmic-ray source of runaway electrons in thundercloud electric field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M.

    2008-12-01

    To increase an accuracy of numerical simulations of the high-altitude and high-energy electric phenomena in thunderstorm atmosphere basing on the electric breakdown combining the cosmic-ray effects and relativistic runaway electron (RE) avalanches it is necessary to have accurate source of seed REs produced by cosmic rays. We calculated the source using the Monte-Carlo technique. Actually a number of secondary electrons was calculated with energies above the runaway threshold depending on the field overvoltage relative to the minimum of the drag force affecting electrons. The cosmic radiation propagation through the atmosphere was simulated based on simplified model of the nuclear cascade: a cosmic proton was assumed to completely lose its energy in the first interaction with air nuclei, producing 15 pions with equal energies. The flux of primary radiation was divided into 20 angular groups containing equal number of particles. In view of the lack of the experimental data on the RE source it is impossible to directly estimate the accuracy of the obtained source. Therefore the model reliability was verified by comparing results of secondary radiation calculations with known experimental altitude variations in the secondary cosmic rays and their spectra. The source was calculated as the specific generation rate of the secondary electrons by cosmic radiation dependent on electric field overvoltage and the altitude above the Earth's surface. It is recommended as a source of relativistic runaway electron avalanches in numerical simulations of electric discharges in atmosphere controlled by REs in thunderstorm fields and their emissions: optical, gamma and neutrons. The source already was used to simulate the high-altitude discharge and its emissions. In particular, the calculated gamma-ray pulses (photon numbers and spectra, pulse duration) agree with detected terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs). Conclusions of the published analyses (Cummer and Lyons, 2005; Cummer et

  19. Prospects for advanced electron cyclotron resonance and electron beam ion source charge breeding methods for EURISOL

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, P.; Jardin, P.; Maunoury, L.; Traykov, E.; Varenne, F.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Ban, G.; Celona, L.; Lunney, D.; Choinski, J.; Gmaj, P.; Jakubowski, A.; Steckiewicz, O.; Kalvas, T.; and others

    2012-02-15

    As the most ambitious concept of isotope separation on line (ISOL) facility, EURISOL aims at producing unprecedented intensities of post-accelerated radioactive isotopes. Charge breeding, which transforms the charge state of radioactive beams from 1+ to an n+ charge state prior to post-acceleration, is a key technology which has to overcome the following challenges: high charge states for high energies, efficiency, rapidity and purity. On the roadmap to EURISOL, a dedicated R and D is being undertaken to push forward the frontiers of the present state-of-the-art techniques which use either electron cyclotron resonance or electron beam ion sources. We describe here the guidelines of this R and D.

  20. Charge breeding results and future prospects with electron cyclotron resonance ion source and electron beam ion source (invited).

    PubMed

    Vondrasek, R; Levand, A; Pardo, R; Savard, G; Scott, R

    2012-02-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility will provide low-energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams for the nuclear physics program. A 70 mCi (252)Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The final CARIBU configuration will utilize a 1 Ci (252)Cf source to produce radioactive beams with intensities up to 10(6) ions∕s for use in the ATLAS facility. The ECR charge breeder has been tested with stable beam injection and has achieved charge breeding efficiencies of 3.6% for (23)Na(8+), 15.6% for (84)Kr(17+), and 13.7% for (85)Rb(19+) with typical breeding times of 10 ms∕charge state. For the first radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for (143)Cs(27+) and 14.7% for (143)Ba(27+). The project has been commissioned with a radioactive beam of (143)Ba(27+) accelerated to 6.1 MeV∕u. In order to take advantage of its lower residual contamination, an EBIS charge breeder will replace the ECR charge breeder in the next two years. The advantages and disadvantages of the two techniques are compared taking into account the requirements of the next generation radioactive beam facilities. PMID:22380254

  1. Charge breeding results and future prospects with electron cyclotron resonance ion source and electron beam ion source (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Levand, A.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2012-02-15

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility will provide low-energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams for the nuclear physics program. A 70 mCi {sup 252}Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The final CARIBU configuration will utilize a 1 Ci {sup 252}Cf source to produce radioactive beams with intensities up to 10{sup 6} ions/s for use in the ATLAS facility. The ECR charge breeder has been tested with stable beam injection and has achieved charge breeding efficiencies of 3.6% for {sup 23}Na{sup 8+}, 15.6% for {sup 84}Kr{sup 17+}, and 13.7% for {sup 85}Rb{sup 19+} with typical breeding times of 10 ms/charge state. For the first radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for {sup 143}Cs{sup 27+} and 14.7% for {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+}. The project has been commissioned with a radioactive beam of {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+} accelerated to 6.1 MeV/u. In order to take advantage of its lower residual contamination, an EBIS charge breeder will replace the ECR charge breeder in the next two years. The advantages and disadvantages of the two techniques are compared taking into account the requirements of the next generation radioactive beam facilities.

  2. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

    2005-09-01

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The proposed pre-injector system would also provide for a major enhancement in capability for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), which utilizes heavy-ion beams from the RHIC complex. EBIS would allow for the acceleration of all important ion species for the NASA radiobiology program, such as, helium, argon, and neon which are unavailable with the present Tandem injector. In addition, the new system would allow for very rapid switching of ion species for

  3. Power combination of a self-coherent high power microwave source

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Xiaolu Zhang, Xiaoping; Li, Yangmei; Dang, Fangchao; Zhang, Jun

    2015-09-15

    In our previous work, generating two phase-locked high power microwaves (HPMs) in a single self-coherent HPM device has been demonstrated. In this paper, after optimizing the structure of the previous self-coherent source, we design a power combiner with a folded phase-adjustment waveguide to realize power combination between its two sub-sources. Further particle-in-cell simulation of the combined source shows that when the diode voltage is 687 kV and the axial magnetic field is 0.8 T, a combined output microwave with 3.59 GW and 9.72 GHz is generated. The impedance of the combined device is 36 Ω and the total power conversion efficiency is 28%.

  4. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Ching-Hung.

    1992-01-01

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  5. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Ching-Hung

    1992-12-31

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  6. Note: Thermal analysis of the long line source electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M.; Wasy, A.; Lodhi, M. A. K.

    2013-05-01

    We performed thermal analysis for our previously reported [M. Iqbal, K. Masood, M. Rafiq, M. A. Chaudhry, and F. Aleem, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74, 4616 (2003), 10.1063/1.1614852], long linear filament electron gun assembly using ANSYS software. The source was set under a thermal load of 3000 °C, to evaluate temperature distribution, thermal strain, and heat flux at various components of the gun. We calculated the maximum heat flux (9.0 W/mm2) that produced a thermal strain of 0.05 at the focusing electrodes. However, the minimum value of the heat flux (0.3 W/mm2) was at the anode electrodes which correspond to a negligible thermal strain. The gun was validated experimentally showing a uniform cross section of the beam at the molybdenum work plate comparable to the size of the filament. Our experimental and theoretical results are in agreement. The gun had been in continuous operation for several hours at high temperatures without any thermal run-out.

  7. Laser Electron Gamma Source: Biennial progress report, June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Sandorfi, A.M.

    1996-09-01

    The LEGS facility provides intense, polarized, monochromatic {gamma}-ray beams by Compton backscattering laser light from relativistic electrons circulating in the X-Ray storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven national Laboratory. Since 1990, experiments have concentrated on single polarization observables (polarized beams on unpolarized targets) in nuclear reactions involving the {Delta} resonance. Highlights of the last two years are given. An updated status of LEGS, and recent publications, is available on the WWW via http://WWW.LEGS.BNL.GOV/{approximately}LEGS/. In 1997 a new phase of operations will begin, focusing on double-polarization measurements with circularly polarized photon beams and longitudinally polarized nucleon targets. This work requires the development of (i) a new frozen-spin hydrogen-deuteride target that provides high polarizations for both nuclear species, and (ii) a new large acceptance detector array for measuring total reaction cross sections in both neutral and charged-particle channels. Progress on these instrumentation developments is an ongoing effort of the LEGS Spin Collaboration (LSC) and is discussed in the last section of this report.

  8. Biofuel cell as a power source for electronic contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Falk, Magnus; Andoralov, Viktor; Blum, Zoltan; Sotres, Javier; Suyatin, Dmitry B; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas; Arnebrant, Thomas; Shleev, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    Here we present unequivocal experimental proof that microscale cofactor- and membrane-less, direct electron transfer based enzymatic fuel cells do produce significant amounts of electrical energy in human lachrymal liquid (tears). 100 μm diameter gold wires, covered with 17 nm gold nanoparticles, were used to fashion three-dimensional nanostructured microelectrodes, which were biomodified with Corynascus thermophilus cellobiose dehydrogenase and Myrothecium verrucaria bilirubin oxidase as anodic and cathodic bioelements, respectively. The following characteristics of miniature glucose/oxygen biodevices operating in human tears were registered: 0.57 V open-circuit voltage, about 1 μW cm(-2) maximum power density at a cell voltage of 0.5 V, and more than 20 h operational half-life. Theoretical calculations regarding the maximum recoverable electrical energy can be extracted from the biofuel and the biooxidant, glucose and molecular oxygen, each readily available in human lachrymal liquid, fully support our belief that biofuel cells can be used as electrical power sources for so called smart contact lenses. PMID:22621980

  9. Electron-capture Supernovae as Sources of 60Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanajo, Shinya; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Müller, Bernhard

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the nucleosynthesis of the radionuclide 60Fe in electron-capture supernovae (ECSNe). The nucleosynthetic results are based on a self-consistent, two-dimensional simulation of an ECSN as well as models in which the densities are systematically increased by some factors (low-entropy models). 60Fe is found to be appreciably made in neutron-rich ejecta during the nuclear quasi-equilibrium phase with greater amounts being produced in the lower-entropy models. Our results, combining them with the yields of core-collapse supernovae in the literature, suggest that ECSNe account for at least 4%-30% of live 60Fe in the Milky Way. ECSNe co-produce neutron-rich isotopes, 48Ca, 50Ti, 54Cr, some light trans-iron elements, and possibly weak r-process elements including some radionuclides such as 93Zr, 99Tc, and 107Pd, whose association with 60Fe might have been imprinted in primitive meteorites or in the deep ocean crust on the Earth.

  10. ELECTRON-CAPTURE SUPERNOVAE AS SOURCES OF {sup 60}Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Wanajo, Shinya; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Mueller, Bernhard

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the nucleosynthesis of the radionuclide {sup 60}Fe in electron-capture supernovae (ECSNe). The nucleosynthetic results are based on a self-consistent, two-dimensional simulation of an ECSN as well as models in which the densities are systematically increased by some factors (low-entropy models). {sup 60}Fe is found to be appreciably made in neutron-rich ejecta during the nuclear quasi-equilibrium phase with greater amounts being produced in the lower-entropy models. Our results, combining them with the yields of core-collapse supernovae in the literature, suggest that ECSNe account for at least 4%-30% of live {sup 60}Fe in the Milky Way. ECSNe co-produce neutron-rich isotopes, {sup 48}Ca, {sup 50}Ti, {sup 54}Cr, some light trans-iron elements, and possibly weak r-process elements including some radionuclides such as {sup 93}Zr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 107}Pd, whose association with {sup 60}Fe might have been imprinted in primitive meteorites or in the deep ocean crust on the Earth.

  11. The combination of different carbon sources enhances bacterial growth efficiency in aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Fonte, Ellen S; Amado, André M; Meirelles-Pereira, Frederico; Esteves, Francisco A; Rosado, Alexandre S; Farjalla, Vinicius F

    2013-11-01

    The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool is composed of several organic carbon compounds from different carbon sources. Each of these sources may support different bacterial growth rates, but few studies have specifically analyzed the effects of the combination of different carbon sources on bacterial metabolism. In this study, we evaluated the response of several metabolic parameters, including bacterial biomass production (BP), bacterial respiration (BR), bacterial growth efficiency (BGE), and bacterial community structure, on the presence of three DOC sources alone and in combination. We hypothesized that the mixture of different DOC sources would increase the efficiency of carbon use by bacteria (BGE). We established a full-factorial substitutive design (seven treatments) in which the effects of the number and identity of DOC sources on bacterial metabolism were evaluated. We calculated the expected metabolic rates of the combined DOC treatments based on the single-DOC treatments and observed a positive interaction on BP, a negative interaction on BR, and, consequently, a positive interaction on BGE for the combinations. The bacterial community composition appeared to have a minor impact on differences in bacterial metabolism among the treatments. Our data indicate that mixtures of DOC sources result in a more efficient biological use of carbon. This study provides strong evidence that the mixture of different DOC sources is a key factor affecting the role of bacteria in the carbon flux of aquatic ecosystems. PMID:23963223

  12. Contamination by sputtering in mirror field electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbatkin, S.M.; Berry, L.A. )

    1992-09-01

    Langmuir probe measurements, visual observation, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry have been used to investigate source chamber sputtering for electron cyclotron resonance plasma systems operated with Ar, N{sub 2}, and Cl{sub 2}. Potentials in the source {gt}20 eV combined with high plasma densities ({approx gt}10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}) led to source chamber sputtering and coating of the microwave entrance window. The microwave entrance window coating caused significant absorption of incident microwave power and decreased source efficiency by as much as 50% within 5 min. Operation of the source with an anodized aluminum liner was effective in reducing microwave entrance window coating but resulted in some heavy metal contamination due to sputtering of impurities in the liner itself. Also, checks with secondary ion mass spectrometry indicated some Al contamination from sputtering of the anodized aluminum liner material. Finally, a technique for {ital in} {ital situ} cleaning of the microwave entrance window was developed and is described in detail.

  13. SYSTEMATIC SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY FOR EVALUATING COMBINED BIOLOGICAL/GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A semi-quantitative scanning electron microscope (SEK) analytical technique has been developed to examine granular activated carbon (GAC) utilized as media for biomass attachment in liquid waste treatment (combined processes). he procedure allows for the objective monitoring, com...

  14. Self-consistent multidimensional electron kinetic model for inductively coupled plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Fa Foster

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) sources have received increasing interest in microelectronics fabrication and lighting industry. In 2-D configuration space (r, z) and 2-D velocity domain (νθ,νz), a self- consistent electron kinetic analytic model is developed for various ICP sources. The electromagnetic (EM) model is established based on modal analysis, while the kinetic analysis gives the perturbed Maxwellian distribution of electrons by solving Boltzmann-Vlasov equation. The self- consistent algorithm combines the EM model and the kinetic analysis by updating their results consistently until the solution converges. The closed-form solutions in the analytical model provide rigorous and fast computing for the EM fields and the electron kinetic behavior. The kinetic analysis shows that the RF energy in an ICP source is extracted by a collisionless dissipation mechanism, if the electron thermovelocity is close to the RF phase velocities. A criterion for collisionless damping is thus given based on the analytic solutions. To achieve uniformly distributed plasma for plasma processing, we propose a novel discharge structure with both planar and vertical coil excitations. The theoretical results demonstrate improved uniformity for the excited azimuthal E-field in the chamber. Non-monotonic spatial decay in electric field and space current distributions was recently observed in weakly- collisional plasmas. The anomalous skin effect is found to be responsible for this phenomenon. The proposed model successfully models the non-monotonic spatial decay effect and achieves good agreements with the measurements for different applied RF powers. The proposed analytical model is compared with other theoretical models and different experimental measurements. The developed model is also applied to two kinds of ICP discharges used for electrodeless light sources. One structure uses a vertical internal coil antenna to excite plasmas and another has a metal shield to prevent the

  15. Field match verification during combination proton, photon, and electron therapy for oligometastatic inflammatory breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Amos, Richard A.; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2012-01-01

    Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) has been shown in randomized trials to improve overall survival for patients with locally advanced breast cancer. The standard PMRT clinical target volume (CTV) encompasses the chest wall and undissected regional lymphatics. Conformal isodose distributions covering the standard CTV with acceptable dose limits to normal tissue can typically be achieved with a combination of photon and electron fields. Field borders are marked on the patient's skin using a light field projection of each beam and are subsequently used to verify daily field matching clinically. Initial imaging of a patient with oligometastatic inflammatory breast cancer demonstrated direct extension of disease from the involved internal mammary lymph node chain into the anterior mediastinum as the only site of metastatic disease. The patient achieved a pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and underwent mastectomy. The initial sites of gross disease, including the anterior mediastinal node was included in the CTV for PMRT, and treatment planning demonstrated a clear advantage to the inclusion of proton fields in this case. The absence of a light source on the proton delivery system that accurately projects proton field edges onto the patient's skin posed a significant challenge for daily verification of proton-to-photon and -electron field matching. Proton field-specific radiographic imaging devices were designed and used such that proton field edges could be delineated on the patient's skin and used for daily matching with photon and electron fields. Manufacture of the imaging devices was quick and inexpensive. Weekly verification of proton field alignment with the proton field delineation on the skin demonstrated agreement within 3-mm tolerance. The patient remains with no evidence of disease 18 months after completing radiation. Other patients with similar indications may benefit from multimodality radiation therapy.

  16. Structural examination of lithium niobate ferroelectric crystals by combining scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremova, P. V.; Ped'ko, B. B.; Kuznecova, Yu. V.

    2016-02-01

    The structure of lithium niobate single crystals is studied by a complex technique that combines scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. By implementing the piezoresponse force method on an atomic force microscope, the domain structure of lithium niobate crystals, which was not revealed without electron beam irradiation, is visualized

  17. Novel freestanding nanotube devices for combining TEM and electron diffraction with Raman and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Jannik C.; Obergfell, Dirk; Roth, Siegmar; Paillet, Matthieu; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Neumann, Anita; Duesberg, Georg

    2005-09-27

    A versatile procedure for combining high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction with Raman spectroscopy and transport measurements on the very same nanotube is presented. For this we prepare free-standing structures on the corner of a substrate by electron beam lithography and an etching process. Further, this procedure makes possible a TEM quality control of nanotubes grown directly on the substrate.

  18. RF-driven ion source with a back-streaming electron dump

    DOEpatents

    Kwan, Joe; Ji, Qing

    2014-05-20

    A novel ion source is described having an improved lifetime. The ion source, in one embodiment, is a proton source, including an external RF antenna mounted to an RF window. To prevent backstreaming electrons formed in the beam column from striking the RF window, a back streaming electron dump is provided, which in one embodiment is formed of a cylindrical tube, open at one end to the ion source chamber and capped at its other end by a metal plug. The plug, maintained at the same electrical potential as the source, captures these backstreaming electrons, and thus prevents localized heating of the window, which due to said heating, might otherwise cause window damage.

  19. Electronic neutron sources for compensated porosity well logging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allan Xi; Antolak, Arlyn J; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2012-02-01

    The viability of replacing Americium–Beryllium (Am–Be) radiological neutron sources in compensated porosity nuclear well logging tools with D–T or D–D accelerator-driven neutron sources is explored. The analysis consisted of developing a model for a typical well-logging borehole configuration and computing the helium-3 detector response to varying formation porosities using three different neutron sources (Am–Be, D–D, and D–T). The results indicate that, when normalized to the same source intensity, the use of a D–D neutron source has greater sensitivity for measuring the formation porosity than either an Am–Be or D–T source. The results of the study provide operational requirements that enable compensated porosity well logging with a compact, low power D–D neutron generator, which the current state-of-the-art indicates is technically achievable.

  20. Electronic neutron sources for compensated porosity well logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K.-N.

    2012-08-01

    The viability of replacing Americium-Beryllium (Am-Be) radiological neutron sources in compensated porosity nuclear well logging tools with D-T or D-D accelerator-driven neutron sources is explored. The analysis consisted of developing a model for a typical well-logging borehole configuration and computing the helium-3 detector response to varying formation porosities using three different neutron sources (Am-Be, D-D, and D-T). The results indicate that, when normalized to the same source intensity, the use of a D-D neutron source has greater sensitivity for measuring the formation porosity than either an Am-Be or D-T source. The results of the study provide operational requirements that enable compensated porosity well logging with a compact, low power D-D neutron generator, which the current state-of-the-art indicates is technically achievable.

  1. Liquid metal alloy ion source based metal ion injection into a room-temperature electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, A.; Ritter, E.; Zschornack, G.; Ullmann, F.; Pilz, W.; Bischoff, L.

    2012-02-15

    We have carried out a series of measurements demonstrating the feasibility of using the Dresden electron beam ion source (EBIS)-A, a table-top sized, permanent magnet technology based electron beam ion source, as a charge breeder. Low charged gold ions from an AuGe liquid metal alloy ion source were injected into the EBIS and re-extracted as highly charged ions, thereby producing charge states as high as Au{sup 60+}. The setup, the charge breeding technique, breeding efficiencies as well as acceptance and emittance studies are presented.

  2. Extraction of a steady state electron beam from HCD (hollow cathode discharge) plasmas for EBIS (electron beam ion source) applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.; Kovarik, V.; Prelec, K.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments to extract high brightness electron beams from hollow cathode discharge plasmas are now in progress. A unique feature of these plasmas, which in principle can facilitate the extraction of large current low emittance electron beams, is the existence of a relatively high energy electron population with a very narrow energy spread. This electron population was identified in a self-extraction experiment, which yielded a 35 eV, 600 mA electron beam with parallel energy spread of less than 0.5 eV. Preliminary, crude application of 2.5 kV extraction voltage yielded a steady state electron beam current of 1.2 A. The end result of this endeavor would be an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) with an electron beam current of 6 A. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  3. First spin-resolved electron distributions in crystals from combined polarized neutron and X-ray diffraction experiments

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Maxime; Gillon, Béatrice; Claiser, Nicolas; Gillet, Jean-Michel; Lecomte, Claude; Souhassou, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1980s it has been possible to probe crystallized matter, thanks to X-ray or neutron scattering techniques, to obtain an accurate charge density or spin distribution at the atomic scale. Despite the description of the same physical quantity (electron density) and tremendous development of sources, detectors, data treatment software etc., these different techniques evolved separately with one model per experiment. However, a breakthrough was recently made by the development of a common model in order to combine information coming from all these different experiments. Here we report the first experimental determination of spin-resolved electron density obtained by a combined treatment of X-ray, neutron and polarized neutron diffraction data. These experimental spin up and spin down densities compare very well with density functional theory (DFT) calculations and also confirm a theoretical prediction made in 1985 which claims that majority spin electrons should have a more contracted distribution around the nucleus than minority spin electrons. Topological analysis of the resulting experimental spin-resolved electron density is also briefly discussed. PMID:25075338

  4. Plasma diagnosis as a tool for the determination of the parameters of electron beam evaporation and sources of ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Jaya; Dileep Kumar, V.; Yadav, S. P.; Barnwal, Tripti A.; Dikshit, Biswaranjan

    2016-07-01

    The atomic vapor generated by electron beam heating is partially ionized due to atom–atom collisions (Saha ionization) and electron impact ionization, which depend upon the source temperature and area of evaporation as compared to the area of electron beam bombardment on the target. When electron beam evaporation is carried out by inserting the target inside an insulating liner to reduce conductive heat loss, it is expected that the area of evaporation becomes significantly more than the area of electron beam bombardment on the target, resulting in reduced electron impact ionization. To assess this effect and to quantify the parameters of evaporation, such as temperature and area of evaporation, we have carried out experiments using zirconium, tin and aluminum as a target. By measuring the ion content using a Langmuir probe, in addition to measuring the atomic vapor flux at a specific height, and by combining the experimental data with theoretical expressions, we have established a method for simultaneously inferring the source temperature, evaporation area and ion fraction. This assumes significance because the temperature cannot be reliably measured by an optical pyrometer due to the wavelength dependent source emissivity and reflectivity of thin film mirrors. In addition, it also cannot be inferred from only the atomic flux data at a certain height as the area of evaporation is unknown (it can be much more than the area of electron bombardment, especially when the target is placed in a liner). Finally, the reason for the lower observed electron temperatures of the plasma for all the three cases is found to be the energy loss due to electron impact excitation of the atomic vapor during its expansion from the source.

  5. Development of AN Undulator Radiation Source for the Cornell Electron Storage Ring.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Eric B.

    An undulator was installed in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) as an intense source of hard x-rays. The undulator produces a vertical magnetic field whose strength varies sinusoidally with a 3.3 cm period along the 2 m length of the device. When the 5.437 GeV electron beam in CESR passes through the field of the undulator, the electrons produce a radiation spectrum dominated by sharp peaks consisting of a fundamental with a 2.7 A wavelength, and its harmonics. Within the peaks, undulators are capable of producing 10^4 times as much radiation as conventional synchrotron sources. To produce undulator radiation, the greatest angle between the trajectory of an electron and the central axis of the undulator must be less than the opening angle of the radiation. A special low emittance lattice was designed for CESR to satisfy this condition. The characteristics of low emittance lattice designs are discussed and the performance of an undulator with an electron beam of non -zero emittance is analyzed. The undulator consists of vanadium permendur poles excited by neodymium iron boron permanent magnets. The peak field on-axis is 0.53 T although a lower field was used in practice. The design of the magnet is discussed. Under low emittance conditions in CESR, as much as 35 mA of electrons were stored in a single bunch and a total of 115 mA were stored in six bunches. The horizontal emittance was 65 nm-rad and the vertical emittance was 1 nm-rad. The magnetic field of the undulator had no significant effect on the behavior of the beam. Undulator spectra were obtained with distinct peaks up to the seventh harmonic. The form of spectra for the flux through a pinhole agrees with theory but the amplitude of the harmonics is as much as four times smaller. The discrepancy may come from a combination of the finite size of the pinhole, electron beam motion, and magnetic field errors in the undulator. Other x-ray measurements are also presented.

  6. 77 FR 69632 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Electronic Source Data in Clinical Investigations; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Electronic Source Data in Clinical Investigations.'' This document revises and updates the draft guidance entitled ``Electronic Source Documentation in Clinical Investigations.'' This revised draft document provides guidance to sponsors, contract research organizations (CROs), data......

  7. X-ray spectra from the Cornell Electron-Beam Ion Source (CEBIS I)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Kostroun, V.O.; Ghanbari, E.; Janson, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation emitted from the Cornell electron beam ion source (CEBIS I) has been surveyed with a Si(Li) x-ray detector. These spectra can be used to estimate backgrounds from electron bremsstrahlung and to evaluate the feasibility of atomic physics experiments using the CEBIS I source in this configuration. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  8. Broad-tunable terahertz source with over-mode waveguide driven by train of electron bunches.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihao; Lu, Yalin; He, Zhigang; Li, Weiwei; Wang, Lin; Jia, Qika

    2016-02-22

    A broad-tunable free electron terahertz radiation source is proposed. In this source, a train of electron bunches with tunable bunching frequency is produced by a photocathode based DC-gun under excitation of a train of tunable laser pulses. These electron bunches are then applied to excite an over-mode waveguide, in which diverse guided modes are coupled into radiation with frequency determined by the bunching frequency. By this means, the tunable radiation with frequency extending from 0.1 THz to 1.2 THz can be obtained from one single structure model. In addition, compared with other sources, the proposed source is compact and easily achievable. PMID:26907061

  9. 2D-Combined ICP/CCP numerical modeling for RF plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Masaru; Ikeda, Kei; Ochi, Syuta

    2015-09-01

    A numerical investigation of sputtering distribution on antenna cover in Radio Frequency (13.56 MHz) plasma(RF plasma) source by energetic ions bombardment has been performed including influences of static electric field from voltage of antenna and of inductive electric field from current of antenna. In order to validate the developed technique, the static electron heating distribution and the inductive electron heating distribution in simulation are compared. The comparison shows the static electric field is shielded in the sheath of the high electron density (1017m-3) plasma and the plasma is sustained by inductive electric field from current of antenna. The deep sheath potential in simulation is generated over the region of large vulnerable in experiment. The numerical simulation technique with calculating static electric field and inductive electric field is important for development of the RF plasma source with large current and long life time.

  10. Factors Influencing the Electron Yield of Needle-Ring Pulsed Corona Discharge Electron Source for Negative Ion Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Li, Shengli; Li, Mingshu

    2013-12-01

    A simple negative ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) is designed and used to investigate the factors that influence the number and efficiency of electrons generated by the needle-ring pulsed corona discharge electron source. Simulation with Ansoft Maxwell 12 is carried out to analyze the electric field distribution within the IMS, and to offer the basis and foundation for analyzing the measurement results. The measurement results of the quantities of electrons show that when the drift electric field strength and the ring inner diameter rise, both the number of effective electrons and the effective electron rate are increased. When the discharge voltage becomes stronger, the number of effective electrons goes up while the effective electron rate goes down. In light of the simulation results, mechanisms underlying the effects of drift electric field strength, ring inner diameter, and discharge voltage on the effective electron number and effective electron rate are discussed. These will make great sense for designing negative ion mode IMS using the needle-ring pulsed corona discharge as the electron source.

  11. Electron beam treatment of non-conducting materials by a fore-pump-pressure plasma-cathode electron beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdovitsin, V. A.; Klimov, A. S.; Medovnik, A. V.; Oks, E. M.

    2010-10-01

    In the irradiation of an insulated target by an electron beam produced by a plasma-cathode electron beam source operating in the fore-vacuum pressure range (5-15 Pa), the target potential is much lower than the electron beam energy, offering the possibility of direct electron treatment of insulating materials. It is found that in the electron beam irradiation of a non-conducting target in a moderately high pressure range, the electron charge on the target surface is neutralized mainly by ions from a volume discharge established between the negatively charged target surface and the grounded walls of the vacuum chamber. This allows the possibility of direct electron beam treatment (heating, melting, welding) of ceramics and other non-conducting and semiconductor materials.

  12. Time evolution of bremsstrahlung and ion production of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, Ollie; Ropponen, Tommi; Jones, Peter; Peura, Pauli

    2008-01-01

    Bremsstrahlung radiation measurement is one of the most commonly used plasma diagnostics methods. Most of the bremsstrahlung measurements with electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources have been performed in continuous operation mode yielding information only on the steady state bremsstrahlung emission. This article describes the results of bremsstrahlung and ion current measurement with the JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS operated in pulsed mode. The experiments reveal information about the bremsstrahlung radiation in plasma conditions before reaching the equilibrium. The time scale of bremsstrahlung production is compared to ion production time scale for different charge states. The bremsstrahlung data is presented with 2 millisecond time intervals as a function of neutral gas pressure and microwave power. Data from hundreds of microwave pulses is combined in order to have a sufficient amount of events at each time step. The relevant plasma physics phenomena during both, the leading and the trailing edge of the RF pulse, are discussed.

  13. FIRST EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM DEGAS, THE QUANTUM LIMITED BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotorev, Max S.; Commins, Eugene D.; Oneill, James; Sannibale, Fernando; Tremsin, Anton; Wan, Weishi

    2008-06-23

    The construction of DEGAS (DEGenerate Advanced Source), a proof of principle for a quantum limited brightness electron source, has been completed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The commissioning and the characterization of this source, designed to generate coherent single electron 'bunches' with brightness approaching the quantum limit at a repetition rate of few MHz, has been started. In this paper the first experimental results are described.

  14. Electron density spatial profiles of the DCP source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zander, Andrew T.; Miller, Myron H.

    Electron densities are measured in the high current, analytical and intervening zones of a DCP whose operating parameters are systematically varied. Detailed Ne distribution profiles are obtained for various sleeve flow, nebulizer flow, arc current and matrix concentration regimes. Flowing argon is found to establish a thermal pinch in the high current zone and to steepen gradients in plasmas employed for spectrochemical analysis. The distinctive electron density distributions in the DCP are more sensitive to modulation of gas flow variables than to changes in arc current. Magnetic pressure has no discernible role in pinch formation. Electron densities in spectroscopic regions are minimally affected by easily ionized or other matrix constituents at usual analytical concentrations.

  15. ROLE OF DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTERS IN HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON SOURCES.

    SciTech Connect

    RAO, T.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-09-20

    In this paper we explore the possibility of using diamond secondary emitter in a high average current electron injector to amplify the current from the photocathode and to isolate the cathode and the injector from each other to increase the life time of the cathode and preserve the performance of the injector. Secondary electron yield of 225 and current density of 0.8 a/cm{sup 2} have been measured in the transmission mode from type 2 a natural diamond. Although the diamond will be heated during normal operation in the injector, calculations indicate that by cryogenically cooling the diamond, the temperature gradient along the diamond can be maintained within the acceptable range. The electron energy and temporal distributions are expected to be narrow from this device resulting in high brightness beams. Plans are underway to measure the SEY in emission mode, fabricate photocathode-diamond capsule and test diamond and capsule in superconducting RF injector.

  16. Evaluation of the Combined AERCOARE/AERMOD Modeling Approach for Offshore Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    ENVIRON conducted an evaluation of the combined AERCOARE/AERMOD (AERCOARE-MOD) modeling approach for offshore sources using tracer data from four field studies. AERCOARE processes overwater meteorological data for use by the AERMOD air quality dispersion model (EPA, 2004a). AERC...

  17. A setup for resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering on liquids at free electron laser light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Schreck, Simon; Foehlisch, Alexander; Eckert, Sebastian; Beye, Martin; Suljoti, Edlira; Weniger, Christian; Wernet, Philippe; Kalus, Christian; Nordlund, Dennis; Zhang, Wenkai; Hartsock, Robert W.; Gaffney, Kelly J.; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J.; Kennedy, Brian; and others

    2012-12-15

    We present a flexible and compact experimental setup that combines an in vacuum liquid jet with an x-ray emission spectrometer to enable static and femtosecond time-resolved resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements from liquids at free electron laser (FEL) light sources. We demonstrate the feasibility of this type of experiments with the measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source FEL facility. At the FEL we observed changes in the RIXS spectra at high peak fluences which currently sets a limit to maximum attainable count rate at FELs. The setup presented here opens up new possibilities to study the structure and dynamics in liquids.

  18. The Importance of Electron Source Population to the Remarkable Enhancement of Radiation belt Electrons during the October 2012 Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Reeves, G. D.; Chen, Y.; Henderson, M. G.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2013-12-01

    During the October 8-9 2012 storm, the MeV electron fluxes in the heart of the outer radiation belt are first wiped out then exhibit a three-orders-of-magnitude increase on the timescale of hours, as observed by the MagEIS and REPT instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes. There is strong observational evidence that the remarkable enhancement is due to local acceleration by chorus waves, as shown in the recent Science paper by Reeves et al.1. However, the importance of the dynamic electron source population transported in from the plasma sheet, to the observed remarkable enhancement, has not been studied. We illustrate the importance of the source population with our simulation of the event using the DREAM 3D diffusion model. Three new modifications have been implemented in the model: 1) incorporating a realistic and time-dependent low-energy boundary condition at 100 keV obtained from the MagEIS data; 2) utilizing event-specific chorus wave distributions derived from the low-energy electron precipitation observed by POES and validated against the in situ wave data from EMFISIS; 3) using an ';open' boundary condition at L*=11 and implementing electron lifetimes on the order of the drift period outside the solar-wind driven last closed drift shell. The model quantitatively reproduces the MeV electron dynamics during this event, including the fast dropout at the start of Oct. 8th, low electron flux during the first Dst dip, and the remarkable enhancement peaked at L*=4.2 during the second Dst dip. By comparing the model results with realistic source population against those with constant low-energy boundary (see figure), we find that the realistic electron source population is critical to reproduce the observed fast and significant increase of MeV electrons. 1Reeves, G. D., et al. (2013), Electron Acceleration in the Heart of the Van Allen Radiation Belts, Science, DOI:10.1126/science.1237743. Comparison between data and model results during the October 2012 storm for

  19. Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources

    DOEpatents

    Neil, G.R.

    1996-07-30

    A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  20. Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George R.

    1996-01-01

    A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  1. LINEAR ELECTROSTATIC INSTABILITY OF THE ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Litwin, C.; Vella, M.C.; Sessler, A.

    1981-12-01

    Linear plasma fluid theory is used to study the stability of a cold electron beam in Brillouin equilibrium which passes through a stationary cold ion background, with particular interest in stability for parameters relevant to EBIS devices. Dispersion is studied both analytically and numerically. For {ell}=0, the usual infinite medium two stream instability condition is shown to correspond to a requirement that beam perveance exceed a minimum value, P>33 {micro}pervs; hence, this mode is stable for EBIS (P {approx} l{micro}perv). The Brillouin equilibrium rotation is shown to cause an electron-ion rotating stream instability, which is convectively unstable. The {ell}=1 mode is also found to be unstable. Higher modes numbers, {ell}>1, are unstable, but have reduced growth. Instability is only weakly affected by finite beam radius and boundary conditions.

  2. High Brightness and high polarization electron source using transmission photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Naoto; Jin Xiuguang; Ujihara, Toru; Takeda, Yoshikazu; Mano, Atsushi; Nakagawa, Yasuhide; Nakanishi, Tsutomu; Okumi, Shoji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Konomi, Taro; Ohshima, Takashi; Saka, Takashi; Kato, Toshihiro; Horinaka, Hiromichi; Yasue, Tsuneo; Koshikawa, Takanori

    2009-08-04

    A transmission photocathode was fabricated based on GaAs-GaAsP strained superlattice layers on a GaP substrate and a 20 kV-gun was built to generate the polarized electron beams with the diameter of a few micro-meter. As the results, the reduced brightness of 1.3x10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}/sr and the polarization of 90% were achieved.

  3. Positron generation using laser-wakefield electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G. J. Park, J.; Pollock, B. B.; Albert, F.; Chen, Hui

    2015-09-15

    Positron generation, using wakefield-accelerated electrons driven into a converter target, was investigated experimentally and through Monte Carlo simulations. Using experimentally measured initial electron distributions from a 60 fs laser system, modeling shows that a collimated wakefield electron beam of moderate energy (50–200 MeV) produces a large number of positrons (∼10{sup 7}), which are emitted from the rear of a mm-scale, high-Z target with divergence angles between 50 and 150 mrad. The large perpendicular momentum of the positrons was found to be dominated by contributions from multiple small angle Coulomb scattering. Positrons were not observed above background noise for a range of targets where simulations indicate a 5–30× increase in the beam charge was necessary to exceed threshold detection. These results provide new understanding to the fundamental limitations of creating narrow-divergence, high-density positron beams from laser-wakefield platforms for use in future laboratory pair plasma experiments.

  4. Standard source for certification of optical-electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fastova, Natalia I.; Maraev, Anton A.; Ishanin, Gennady G.

    2016-04-01

    To reduce the error at the certification of optoelectronic devices, sources and detectors of the standard sources and its diaphragm must be thermally stabilized in order to create a uniform background. We developed an uncooled model blackbody TCID-100 with working temperature up to 100°C with a thermally stabilized transmitter and the diaphragm set. The developed model is a cylinder made of red copper with a conical cavity. Cone length was chosen empirically to provide uniform heating over the entire length of the blackbody cavity. With the developed model, we conducted cavity temperature measurement transmitter, which enabled to evaluate the advantages and drawbacks of the blackbody design. In this article we examined models of blackbodies, the most popular types of cavities and the calculation of the thermal emissivity for them. We have designed blackbody and measured the cavity temperature change over the time.

  5. Combined two-photon microscopy and optical coherence tomography using individually optimized sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Bosu; Lee, Byunghak; Jang, Min Seong; Nam, Hyoseok; Kim, Hae Koo; Yoon, Sang June; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Sang-Joon; Yang, Bo-Gie; Jang, Myoung Ho; Kim, Ki Hean

    2011-03-01

    Two-photon microscopy (TPM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are 3D tissue imaging techniques based on different contrast mechanisms. We developed a combined system of TPM and OCT to provide information of both imaging modalities for in-vivo tissue study. TPM and OCT were implemented by using separate light sources, a Ti-Sapphire laser and a wavelength-swept source centered at 1300 nm respectively, and scanners. Light from the two sources was combined for the simultaneous imaging of tissue samples. TPM provided molecular, cellular information of tissues in the region of a few hundred microns on one side at a sub-cellular resolution, and ran at approximately 40 frames per second. OCT provided structural information in the tissue region larger than TPM images at a sub-tenth micron resolution by using 0.1 numerical aperture. OCT had the field of view of 800 um × 800 um based on a 20x objective, the sensitivity of 97dB, and the imaging speed of 0.8 volumes per second. This combined system was tested with simple microsphere specimens, and then was applied to image the explanted intestine of a mouse model and the plant leaves. Morphology and micro-structures of the intestine villi and immune cells within the villi were shown in the intestine image, and chloroplasts and various microstructures of the maize leaves were visualized in 3D by the combined system.

  6. Perceptual assessment of quality of urban soundscapes with combined noise sources and water sounds.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Yong; Lee, Pyoung Jik; You, Jin; Kang, Jian

    2010-03-01

    In this study, urban soundscapes containing combined noise sources were evaluated through field surveys and laboratory experiments. The effect of water sounds on masking urban noises was then examined in order to enhance the soundscape perception. Field surveys in 16 urban spaces were conducted through soundwalking to evaluate the annoyance of combined noise sources. Synthesis curves were derived for the relationships between noise levels and the percentage of highly annoyed (%HA) and the percentage of annoyed (%A) for the combined noise sources. Qualitative analysis was also made using semantic scales for evaluating the quality of the soundscape, and it was shown that the perception of acoustic comfort and loudness was strongly related to the annoyance. A laboratory auditory experiment was then conducted in order to quantify the total annoyance caused by road traffic noise and four types of construction noise. It was shown that the annoyance ratings were related to the types of construction noise in combination with road traffic noise and the level of the road traffic noise. Finally, water sounds were determined to be the best sounds to use for enhancing the urban soundscape. The level of the water sounds should be similar to or not less than 3 dB below the level of the urban noises. PMID:20329835

  7. Electron density measurement of cesium seeded negative ion source by surface wave probe

    SciTech Connect

    Kisaki, M.; Tsumori, K.; Nakano, H.; Ikeda, K.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Shibuya, M.; Sato, M.; Sekiguchi, H.; Komada, S.; Kondo, T.; Hayashi, H.; Asano, E.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.

    2012-02-15

    Electron density measurements of a large-scaled negative ion source were carried out with a surface wave probe. By comparison of the electron densities determined with the surface wave probe and a Langmuir probe, it was confirmed that the surface wave probe is highly available for diagnostic of the electron density in H{sup -} ion sources. In addition, it was found that the ratio of the electron density to the H{sup -} ion density dramatically decreases with increase of a bias voltage and the H{sup -} ions become dominant negative particles at the bias voltage of more than 6 V.

  8. A tetrastable naphthalenediimide: anion induced charge transfer, single and double electron transfer for combinational logic gates.

    PubMed

    Ajayakumar, M R; Hundal, Geeta; Mukhopadhyay, Pritam

    2013-09-11

    Herein we demonstrate the formation of the first tetrastable naphthalenediimide (NDI, 1a) molecule having multiple distinctly readable outputs. Differential response of 1a to fluoride anions induces intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), single/double electron transfer (SET/DET) leading to a set of combinational logic gates for the first time with a NDI moiety. PMID:23752683

  9. Ionization source utilizing a jet disturber in combination with an ion funnel and method of operation

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Kim, Taeman; Tang, Keqi; Udseth, Harold R.

    2003-06-24

    A jet disturber used in combination with an ion funnel to focus ions and other charged particles generated at or near atmospheric pressure into a relatively low pressure region, which allows increased conductance of the ions and other charged particles. The jet disturber is positioned within an ion funnel and may be interfaced with a multi-capillary inlet juxtaposed between an ion source and the interior of an instrument maintained at near atmospheric pressure. The invention finds particular advantages when deployed to improve the ion transmission between an electrospray ionization source and the first vacuum stage of a mass spectrometer.

  10. A digital combining-weight estimation algorithm for broadband sources with the array feed compensation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.; Rodemich, E. R.

    1994-01-01

    An algorithm for estimating the optimum combining weights for the Ka-band (33.7-GHz) array feed compensation system was developed and analyzed. The input signal is assumed to be broadband radiation of thermal origin, generated by a distant radio source. Currently, seven video converters operating in conjunction with the real-time correlator are used to obtain these weight estimates. The algorithm described here requires only simple operations that can be implemented on a PC-based combining system, greatly reducing the amount of hardware. Therefore, system reliability and portability will be improved.

  11. New tandem type ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance for universal source of synthesized ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Yano, Keisuke; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Nishiokada, Takuya; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    A new tandem type source has been constructed on the basis of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for producing synthesized ion beams. We investigate feasibility and hope to realize the device which has wide range operation window in a single device to produce many kinds of ion beams based on ECR ion source (ECRIS). It is considered that ECR plasmas are necessary to be available to individual operations with different plasma parameters. Both of analysis of ion beams and investigation of plasma parameters are conducted on produced plasmas. We describe construction of the new tandem type ion source based on ECRIS with wide operation window for aiming at producing synthesized ion beams as this new source can be a universal source.

  12. Electron-helium and electron-neon scattering cross sections at low electron energies using a photoelectron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Vijay; Subramanian, K. P.; Krishnakumar, E.

    1987-01-01

    Absolute electron-helium and electron-neon scattering cross sections have been measured at low electron energies using the powerful technique of photoelectron spectroscopy. The measurements have been carried out at 17 electron energies varying from 0.7 to 10 eV with an accuracy of + or - 2.7 percent. The results obtained in the present work have been compared with other recent measurement and calculations.

  13. Chemical ionization mass spectrometry using carbon nanotube field emission electron sources.

    PubMed

    Radauscher, Erich J; Keil, Adam D; Wells, Mitch; Amsden, Jason J; Piascik, Jeffrey R; Parker, Charles B; Stoner, Brian R; Glass, Jeffrey T

    2015-11-01

    A novel chemical ionization (CI) source has been developed based on a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission electron source. The CNT-based electron source was evaluated and compared with a standard filament thermionic electron source in a commercial explosives trace detection desktop mass spectrometer. This work demonstrates the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. Both positive and negative modes were investigated. Spectra were collected for a standard mass spectrometer calibration compound, perfluorotributylamine (PFTBA), as well as trace explosives including trinitrotoluene (TNT), Research Department explosive (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). The electrical characteristics, lifetime at operating pressure, and power requirements of the CNT-based electron source are reported. The CNT field emission electron sources demonstrated an average lifetime of 320 h when operated in constant emission mode under elevated CI pressures. The ability of the CNT field emission source to cycle on and off can provide enhanced lifetime and reduced power consumption without sacrificing performance and detection capabilities. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26133527

  14. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Electron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radauscher, Erich J.; Keil, Adam D.; Wells, Mitch; Amsden, Jason J.; Piascik, Jeffrey R.; Parker, Charles B.; Stoner, Brian R.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2015-11-01

    A novel chemical ionization (CI) source has been developed based on a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission electron source. The CNT-based electron source was evaluated and compared with a standard filament thermionic electron source in a commercial explosives trace detection desktop mass spectrometer. This work demonstrates the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. Both positive and negative modes were investigated. Spectra were collected for a standard mass spectrometer calibration compound, perfluorotributylamine (PFTBA), as well as trace explosives including trinitrotoluene (TNT), Research Department explosive (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). The electrical characteristics, lifetime at operating pressure, and power requirements of the CNT-based electron source are reported. The CNT field emission electron sources demonstrated an average lifetime of 320 h when operated in constant emission mode under elevated CI pressures. The ability of the CNT field emission source to cycle on and off can provide enhanced lifetime and reduced power consumption without sacrificing performance and detection capabilities.

  15. Distribution of terminal electron-accepting processes in an aquifer having multiple contaminant sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.; Bruce, B.W.

    1997-01-01

    Concentrations of electron acceptors, electron donors, and H2 in groundwater were measured to determine the distribution of terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs) in an alluvial aquifer having multiple contaminant sources. Upgradient contaminant sources included two separate hydrocarbon point sources, one of which contained the fuel oxygenate methyl tertbutyl ether (MTBE). Infiltrating river water was a source of dissolved NO31 SO4 and organic carbon (DOC) to the downgradient part of the aquifer. Groundwater downgradient from the MTBE source had larger concentrations of electron acceptors (dissolved O2 and SO4) and smaller concentrations of TEAP end products (dissolved inorganic C, Fe2+ and CH4) than groundwater downgradient from the other hydrocarbon source, suggesting that MTBE was not as suitable for supporting TEAPs as the other hydrocarbons. Measurements of dissolved H2 indicated that SO4 reduction predominated in the aquifer during a period of high water levels in the aquifer and river. The predominant TEAP shifted to Fe3+ reduction in upgradient areas after water levels receded but remained SO4 reducing downgradient near the river. This distribution of TEAPs is the opposite of what is commonly observed in aquifers having a single contaminant point source and probably reflects the input of Dec and SO4 to the aquifer from the river. Results of this study indicate that the distribution of TEAPs in aquifers having multiple contaminant sources depends on the composition and location of the contaminants and on the availability of electron acceptors.

  16. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C. A.; Perry, A.; Pikin, A. I.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Vondrasek, R. C.; Zinkann, G. P.

    2015-08-28

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstratemore » stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this study, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz.« less

  17. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N. Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C. A.; Perry, A.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Vondrasek, R. C.; Zinkann, G. P.; Pikin, A. I.

    2015-08-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstrate stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this paper, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz.

  18. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Ostroumov, P N; Barcikowski, A; Dickerson, C A; Perry, A; Pikin, A I; Sharamentov, S I; Vondrasek, R C; Zinkann, G P

    2015-08-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstrate stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this paper, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz. PMID:26329185

  19. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C. A.; Perry, A.; Pikin, A. I.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Vondrasek, R. C.; Zinkann, G. P.

    2015-08-28

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstrate stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this study, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz.

  20. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C. A.; Perry, A.; Pikin, A. I.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Vondrasek, R. C.; Zinkann, G. P.

    2015-08-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstrate stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this paper, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz.

  1. Revisiting the Fully Automated Double-ring Infiltrometer using Open-source Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, J.; Werkema, D., Jr.; Lane, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    The double-ring infiltrometer (DRI) is commonly used for measuring soil hydraulic conductivity. However, constant-head DRI tests typically involve the use of Mariotte tubes, which can be problematic to set-up, and time-consuming to maintain and monitor during infiltration tests. Maheshwari (1996, Australian Journal of Soil Research, v. 34, p. 709-714) developed a method for eliminating Mariotte tubes for constant-head tests using a computer-controlled combination of water-level indicators and solenoids to maintain a near-constant head in the DRI. A pressure transducer mounted on a depth-to-volume calibrated tank measures the water delivery rates during the test and data are saved on a hard drive or floppy disk. Here we use an inexpensive combination of pressure transducers, microcontroller, and open-source electronics that eliminate the need for Mariotte tubes. The system automates DRI water delivery and data recording for both constant- and falling-head infiltration tests. The user has the option of choosing water supplied to the DRI through a pressurized water system, pump, or gravity fed. An LCD screen enables user interface and observation of data for quality analysis in the field. The digital data are stored on a micro-SD card in standard column format for future retrieval and easy importing into conventional processing and plotting software. We show the results of infiltrometer tests using the automated system and a conventional Mariotte tube system conducted over test beds of uniform soils.

  2. Silver as an electron source for photodissociation of hydronium

    SciTech Connect

    Papas, B. N.; Whitten, J. L.

    2011-11-28

    The photochemistry of a solvated hydronium ion near a silver surface is investigated using ab initio self-consistent field and configuration interaction theory. Photoinduced electron attachment can occur at energies in the range of 1.1-1.2 eV depending upon the initial orientation of the hydronium relative to the silver surface. Rearrangement of solvating waters considerably reduces transition state barriers to dissociation on the excited-state potential energy surface, such that fast dissociation of the neutralized hydronium would occur with no barrier. Both the H and H{sub 2} product channels are exothermic pathways on the excited state surface and in several instances exothermic compared to the energy of the initial structure.

  3. The Orbiting Standards Platform. [combined satellite signal source and field strength meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, H. T.; Estin, A. J.; Morgan, W. L.; Woodruff, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Orbiting Standards Platform (OSP) is a combination satellite signal source and field strength meter which will make possible highly accurate, truly far-field measurements of large aperture antenna gain, pattern, sidelobes, and polarization as well as system G/T and EIRP. These measurements may be used to initially characterize earth station equipment and for the subsequent monitoring of its performance. This paper describes a technical-feasibility study of the OSP.

  4. Brightness measurement of an electron impact gas ion source for proton beam writing applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, N; Xu, X; Pang, R; Raman, P Santhana; Khursheed, A; van Kan, J A

    2016-02-01

    We are developing a high brightness nano-aperture electron impact gas ion source, which can create ion beams from a miniature ionization chamber with relatively small virtual source sizes, typically around 100 nm. A prototype source of this kind was designed and successively micro-fabricated using integrated circuit technology. Experiments to measure source brightness were performed inside a field emission scanning electron microscope. The total output current was measured to be between 200 and 300 pA. The highest estimated reduced brightness was found to be comparable to the injecting focused electron beam reduced brightness. This translates into an ion reduced brightness that is significantly better than that of conventional radio frequency ion sources, currently used in single-ended MeV accelerators. PMID:26931964

  5. Brightness measurement of an electron impact gas ion source for proton beam writing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N.; Xu, X.; Pang, R.; Santhana Raman, P.; Khursheed, A.; van Kan, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    We are developing a high brightness nano-aperture electron impact gas ion source, which can create ion beams from a miniature ionization chamber with relatively small virtual source sizes, typically around 100 nm. A prototype source of this kind was designed and successively micro-fabricated using integrated circuit technology. Experiments to measure source brightness were performed inside a field emission scanning electron microscope. The total output current was measured to be between 200 and 300 pA. The highest estimated reduced brightness was found to be comparable to the injecting focused electron beam reduced brightness. This translates into an ion reduced brightness that is significantly better than that of conventional radio frequency ion sources, currently used in single-ended MeV accelerators.

  6. Grating monochromator for electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation.

    PubMed

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shouichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kubono, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Kase, Masayuki; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Shimoura, Susumu

    2013-07-01

    Recently, we started to observe optical line spectra from an ECR plasma using a grating monochromator with a photomultiplier. The light intensity of line spectrum from the ECR plasma had a strong correlation with ion beam intensity measured by a magnetic mass analyzer. This correlation is a significant information for beam tuning because it allows the extraction of the desired ion species from the ECR plasma. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process, but this research gives new insights into its simplification. In this paper, the grating monochromator method for beam tuning of a Hyper-ECR ion source as an injector for RIKEN azimuthal varying field (AVF) cyclotron is described. PMID:23902055

  7. Electronic Ghost Images Around Soft ROSAT Point Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesser, A.; Nousek, J.

    1992-12-01

    The PSPC can not always properly position X-ray events with very low energy. This results in apparent `ghost images', as named in MPE calibration reports. We study this effect using the bright, ultra-soft X-ray source H1504+65 and find that as many as 1/2 of the total events in the lowest two channels are displaced into 8 satellite ghost images. We display the appearance of the images, supply quantitative estimates of the effect, and suggest the kind of scientific inquiries likely to be adversely affected. This research was performed as part of the Penn State Site of the National Science Foundation's Research Experiences for Undergraduates.

  8. Physics of Intense Electron Current Sources for Helicity Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinson, E. T.; Barr, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.; Perry, J. M.; Redd, A. J.; Winz, G. R.

    2014-10-01

    DC helicity injection (HI) for non-solenoidal ST startup requires sources of current at the tokamak edge. Since the rate of HI scales with injection voltage, understanding of the physics setting injector impedance is necessary for a predictive model of the HI rate and subsequent growth of Ip. In Pegasus, arc plasma sources are used for current injection. They operate immersed in tokamak edge plasma, and are biased at ~1-2 kV with respect to the vessel to draw current densities J ~ 1 kA/cm2 from an arc plasma cathode. Prior to tokamak formation, impedance data manifests two regimes, one at low current (< 1 kA) with I ~V 3 / 2 , and a higher current mode where I ~V 1 / 2 holds. The impedance in the I ~V 3 / 2 regime is consistent with an electrostatic double layer. Current in the I ~V 1 / 2 regime is linear in arc gas fueling rate, suggesting a space-charge limit set by nedge. In the presence of tokamak plasmas, voltage oscillations of the order 100s of volts are measured during MHD relaxation activity. These fluctuations occur at the characteristic frequencies of the n = 1 and n = 0 MHD activity observed on magnetic probes, and are suggestive of dynamic activity found in LHI simulations in NIMROD. Advanced injector design techniques have allowed higher voltage operation. These include staged shielding to prevent external arcing, and shaped cathodes, which minimize the onset and material damage due to cathode spot formation. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  9. Antitumor action of non thermal plasma sources, DBD and Plasma Gun, alone or in combined protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Eric; Brullé, Laura; Vandamme, Marc; Riès, Delphine; Le Pape, Alain; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel

    2012-10-01

    The presentation deals with the assessment on two non thermal plasma sources developed and optimized for oncology applications. The first plasma source is a floating-electrode dielectric barrier discharge powered at a few hundreds of Hz which deliver air-plasma directly on the surface of cell culture medium in dishes or on the skin or organs of mice bearing cancer tumors. The second plasma source, so called Plasma Gun, is a plasma jet source triggered in noble gas, transferred in high aspect ratio and flexible capillaries, on targeting cells or tumors after plasma transfer in air through the ``plasma plume'' generated at the capillary outlet. In vitro evidence for massive cancer cell destruction and in vivo tumor activity and growth rate reductions have been measured with both plasma sources. DNA damages, cell cycle arrests and apoptosis induction were also demonstrated following the application of any of the two plasma source both in vitro and in vivo. The comparison of plasma treatment with state of the art chemotherapeutic alternatives has been performed and last but not least the benefit of combined protocols involving plasma and chemotherapeutic treatments has been evidenced for mice bearing orthotopic pancreas cancer and is under evaluation for the colon tumors.

  10. Electron cloud development in the Proton Storage Ring and in theSpallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Furman, M.A.

    2002-10-08

    We have applied our simulation code "POSINST" to evaluatethe contribution to the growth rate of the electron-cloud instability inproton storage rings. Recent simulation results for the main features ofthe electron cloud in the storage ring of the Spallation Neutron Source(SNS) at Oak Ridge, and updated results for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR)at Los Alamos are presented in this paper. A key ingredient in our modelis a detailed description of the secondary emitted-electron energyspectrum. A refined model for the secondary emission process includingthe so-called true secondary, rediffused and backscattered electrons hasrecently been included in the electron-cloud code.