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Sample records for electron temperature gradient

  1. Electron Temperature Gradient Mode Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Kim, J.-H.; Hoang, G. T.; Park, H.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B. P.

    2008-05-14

    Anomalous electron thermal losses plays a central role in the history of the controlled fusion program being the first and most persistent form of anomalous transport across all toroidal magnetic confinement devices. In the past decade the fusion program has made analysis and simulations of electron transport a high priority with the result of a clearer understanding of the phenomenon, yet still incomplete. Electron thermal transport driven by the electron temperature gradient is examined in detail from theory, simulation and power balance studies in tokamaks with strong auxiliary heating.

  2. Electron heat transport down steep temperature gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Matte, J.P.; Virmont, J.

    1982-12-27

    Electron heat transport is studied by numerically solving the Fokker-Planck equation, with a spherical harmonic representation of the distribution function. The first two terms (f/sub 0/, f/sub 1/) suffice, even in steep temperature gradients. Deviations from the Spitzer-Haerm law appear for lambda/L/sub T/ ((mean free path)/(temperature gradient length))> or approx. =0.01, as a result of non-Maxwellian f/sub 0/. For lambda/L/sub T/> or approx. =1, the heat flux is (1/3) of the free-streaming value. In intermediate cases, a harmonic law describes well the hottest part of the plasma.

  3. Analysis of the Critical Electron Temperature Gradient in Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Hu, B.; Zhu, P.; Hoang, G. T.; Bourdelle, C.; Ottaviani, M.; Garbet, X.; Giruzzi, G.

    2001-10-01

    The Tore Supra database of fast wave electron heating (FWEH) discharges is analyzed with respect to the role of the critical electron temperature gradient. The experimental evidence for the linear theory critical gradient is presented from both (i) power balance thermal flux versus the temperature gradient extrapolated to zero flux and (ii) the fluctuation spectra versus the gadient extrapolated to the vanishing point. Case studies with the LOCO and BALDUR transport codes are used to investigate the impact of the critical gradient in both cases close to the Ohmic discharge with 0.75 MW of rf power and strongly heated discharges with up to 7.4 MW of RF power. The interpretation of the critical gradient as a heat pinch term is also explored with thermodynamic theory and the space-time symmetries of the underlying dynamical equations. There is a relationship between the critical electron temperature gradient and the particle pinch. The evidence for the two candidates to explain the electron transport: trapped electron modes (TEM), characterized by wavenumbers much longer than the ion gyroradius, and the smaller-scale electron temperature gradient modes (ETG) with wavelengths comparable and smaller than the ion gyroradius is presented in detail.

  4. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Y; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann Jr, N C; Smith, D R

    2011-03-21

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k⊥ρs ≤10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  5. Density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a spherical tokamak.

    PubMed

    Ren, Y; Kaye, S M; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann, N C; Smith, D R; Yuh, H

    2011-04-22

    In this Letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k(⊥)ρ(s) ≲ 10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of 2 decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity. PMID:21599377

  6. Streamer-induced transport in electron temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Hauff, T.; Jenko, F.

    2009-10-15

    The question if and how streamers (i.e., radially elongated vortices) can lead to an enhancement of the electron heat transport in electron temperature gradient turbulence is addressed. To this aim, the electrons are treated as passive tracers, and their decorrelation mechanisms with respect to the advecting electrostatic potential are studied. A substantial transport enhancement is found in a wide region of parameter space.

  7. Characterizing Electron Temperature Gradient Turbulence Via Numerical Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nevins, W M; Candy, J; Cowley, S; Dannert, T; Dimits, A; Dorland, W; Estrada-Mila, C; Hammett, G W; Jenko, F; Pueschel, M J; Shumaker, D E

    2006-05-22

    Numerical simulations of electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence are presented which characterize the ETG fluctuation spectrum, establish limits to the validity of the adiabatic ion model often employed in studying ETG turbulence, and support the tentative conclusion that plasmaoperating regimes exist in which ETG turbulence produces sufficient electron heat transport to be experimentally relevant. We resolve prior controversies regarding simulation techniques and convergence by benchmarking simulations of ETG turbulence from four microturbulence codes, demonstrating agreement on the electron heat flux, correlation functions, fluctuation intensity, and rms flow shear at fixed simulation cross section and resolution in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. Excellent convergence of both continuum and particle-in-cell codes with time step and velocity-space resolution is demonstrated, while numerical issues relating to perpendicular (to the magnetic field) simulation dimensions and resolution are discussed. A parameter scan in the magnetic shear, s, demonstrates that the adiabatic ion model is valid at small values of s (s < 0.4 for the parameters used in this scan) but breaks down at higher magnetic shear. A proper treatment employing gyrokinetic ions reveals a steady increase in the electron heat transport with increasing magnetic shear, reaching electron heat transport rates consistent with analyses of experimental tokamak discharges.

  8. Electron temperature gradient driven instability in the tokamak boundary plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.Q.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Diamond, P.H.

    1992-12-15

    A general method is developed for calculating boundary plasma fluctuations across a magnetic separatrix in a tokamak with a divertor or a limiter. The slab model, which assumes a periodic plasma in the edge reaching the divertor or limiter plate in the scrape-off layer(SOL), should provide a good estimate, if the radial extent of the fluctuation quantities across the separatrix to the edge is small compared to that given by finite particle banana orbit. The Laplace transform is used for solving the initial value problem. The electron temperature gradient(ETG) driven instability is found to grow like t{sup {minus}1/2}e{sup {gamma}mt}.

  9. Non-linear saturation mechanism of electron temperature gradient modes

    SciTech Connect

    Tokluoglu, E. K.; Sokolov, V.; Sen, A. K.

    2012-10-15

    The electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode is a very plausible candidate to explain the large electron particle transport and thermal conduction. Production and identification of slab ETG modes and measurement electron transport have been already reported [X. Wei, V. Sokolov, and A. K. Sen, Phys. Plasmas 17, 042108 (2010); V. Sokolov and A. K. Sen, Phys. Rev. Lett. (2011)]. Now, we develop a theoretical model of non-linear saturation mechanism of ETG mode based on the three wave coupling of an unstable high frequency ETG mode with a damped ETG radial harmonic and a damped ion acoustic (IA) mode. Bicoherence analysis of Columbia linear machine (CLM) data show coupling between ETG modes ({approx}2.4 MHz) and a low frequency mode ({approx}50 kHz). The large damping drive of the ETG radial harmonic accompanied by the smaller but finite damping of the IA mode presents an energy sink for the unstable ETG mode, thus causing saturation. This model predicts a saturation level of {approx}10% and agrees with the observed levels of ETG modes in the CLM.

  10. Turbulent electron transport in edge pedestal by electron temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R.; Jhang, Hogun; Diamond, P. H.

    2013-11-15

    We present a model for turbulent electron thermal transport at the edge pedestal in high (H)-mode plasmas based on electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence. A quasi-linear analysis of electrostatic toroidal ETG modes shows that both turbulent electron thermal diffusivity and hyper-resistivity exhibits the Ohkawa scaling in which the radial correlation length of turbulence becomes the order of electron skin depth. Combination of the Ohkawa scales and the plasma current dependence results in a novel confinement scaling inside the pedestal region. It is also shown that ETG turbulence induces a thermoelectric pinch, which may accelerate the density pedestal formation.

  11. Electron temperature critical gradient and transport stiffness in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. P.; Petty, C. C.; White, A. E.; Holland, C.; Bravenec, R.; Austin, M. E.; Zeng, L.; Meneghini, O.

    2015-08-01

    In a continuing effort to validate turbulent transport models, the electron energy flux has been probed as a function of electron temperature gradient on the DIII-D tokamak. In the scan of gradient, a critical electron temperature gradient has been found in the electron heat fluxes and stiffness at various radii in L-mode plasmas. The TGLF reduced turbulent transport model (Staebler et al 2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 055909) and full gyrokinetic GYRO model (Candy and Waltz 2003 J. Comput. Phys. 186 545) recover the general trend of increasing electron energy flux with increasing electron temperature gradient scale length, but they do not predict the absolute level of transport at all radii and gradients. Comparing the experimental observations of incremental (heat pulse) diffusivity and stiffness to the models’ reveals that TGLF reproduces the trends in increasing diffusivity and stiffness with increasing electron temperature gradient scale length with a critical gradient behavior. The critical gradient of TGLF is found to have a dependence on q95, contrary to the independence of the experimental critical gradient from q95.

  12. Probing plasma turbulence by modulating the electron temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; Holland, C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Doyle, E. J.; Hillesheim, J.; Peebles, W. A.; Zeng, L.; White, A. E.; Austin, M. E.; Yan, Z.

    2010-05-15

    The local value of a/L{sub Te}, a turbulence drive term, was modulated with electron cyclotron heating in L-mode discharges on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] and the density and electron temperature fluctuations in low, intermediate, and high-k regimes were measured and compared with nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. The local drive term at rhoapprox0.6 was reduced by up to 50%, which produced comparable reductions in electron temperature fluctuations at low-k. At intermediate k, k{sub t}hetaapprox4 cm{sup -1} and k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}approx0.8, a very interesting and unexpected result was observed where density fluctuations increased by up to 10% when the local drive term was decreased by 50%. Initial comparisons of simulations from GYRO with the thermal diffusivity from power balance analysis and measured turbulence response are reported. Simulations for the case with the lowest drive term are challenging as they are near the marginal value of a/L{sub Te} for trapped electron mode activity.

  13. Regulation of electron temperature gradient turbulence by zonal flows driven by trapped electron modes

    SciTech Connect

    Asahi, Y. Tsutsui, H.; Tsuji-Iio, S.; Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.

    2014-05-15

    Turbulent transport caused by electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes was investigated by means of gyrokinetic simulations. It was found that the ETG turbulence can be regulated by meso-scale zonal flows driven by trapped electron modes (TEMs), which are excited with much smaller growth rates than those of ETG modes. The zonal flows of which radial wavelengths are in between the ion and the electron banana widths are not shielded by trapped ions nor electrons, and hence they are effectively driven by the TEMs. It was also shown that an E × B shearing rate of the TEM-driven zonal flows is larger than or comparable to the growth rates of long-wavelength ETG modes and TEMs, which make a main contribution to the turbulent transport before excitation of the zonal flows.

  14. Suppression of Electron Temperature Gradient Turbulence via Negative Magnetic Shear in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, H. Y.; Levinton, F. M.; Kaye, S. M.; Mazzucato, E.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Bell, R. E.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Peterson, J. L.; Smith, D. R.; Park, H. K.; Lee, W.

    2011-02-04

    Negative magnetic shear is found to suppress electron turbulence and improve electron thermal transport for plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Sufficiently negative magnetic shear results in a transition out of a stiff profile regime. Density fluctuation measurements from high-k microwave scattering are verified to be the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode by matching measured rest frequency and linear growth rate to gyrokinetic calculations. Fluctuation suppression under negligible ExB shear conditions confirm that negative magnetic shear alone is sufficient for ETG suppression. Measured electron temperature gradients can significantly exceed ETG critical gradients with ETG mode activity reduced to intermittent bursts, while electron thermal diffusivity improves to below 0.1 electron gyro-Bohms.

  15. Suppression of electron temperature gradient turbulence via negative magnetic shear in NSTX.

    PubMed

    Yuh, H Y; Kaye, S M; Levinton, F M; Mazzucato, E; Mikkelsen, D R; Smith, D R; Bell, R E; Hosea, J C; LeBlanc, B P; Peterson, J L; Park, H K; Lee, W

    2011-02-01

    Negative magnetic shear is found to suppress electron turbulence and improve electron thermal transport for plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Sufficiently negative magnetic shear results in a transition out of a stiff profile regime. Density fluctuation measurements from high-k microwave scattering are verified to be the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode by matching measured rest frequency and linear growth rate to gyrokinetic calculations. Fluctuation suppression under negligible E×B shear conditions confirm that negative magnetic shear alone is sufficient for ETG suppression. Measured electron temperature gradients can significantly exceed ETG critical gradients with ETG mode activity reduced to intermittent bursts, while electron thermal diffusivity improves to below 0.1 electron gyro-Bohms. PMID:21405404

  16. Verification of Gyrokinetic (delta)f Simulations of Electron Temperature Gradient Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Nevins, W M; Parker, S E; Chen, Y; Candy, J; Dimits, A; Dorland, W; Hammett, G W; Jenko, F

    2007-05-07

    The GEM gyrokinetic {delta}f simulation code [Chen, 2003] [Chen, 2007] is shown to reproduce electron temperature gradient turbulence at the benchmark operating point established in previous work [Nevins, 2006]. The electron thermal transport is within 10% of the expected value, while the turbulent fluctuation spectrum is shown to have the expected intensity and two-point correlation function.

  17. Experimental observation of electron-temperature-gradient turbulence in a laboratory plasma.

    PubMed

    Mattoo, S K; Singh, S K; Awasthi, L M; Singh, R; Kaw, P K

    2012-06-22

    We report the observation of electron-temperature-gradient (ETG) driven turbulence in the laboratory plasma of a large volume plasma device. The removal of unutilized primary ionizing and nonthermal electrons from uniform density plasma and the imposition and control of the gradient in the electron temperature (T[Symbol: see text] T(e)) are all achieved by placing a large (2 m diameter) magnetic electron energy filter in the middle of the device. In the dressed plasma, the observed ETG turbulence in the lower hybrid range of frequencies ν = (1-80 kHz) is characterized by a broadband with a power law. The mean wave number k perpendicular ρ(e) = (0.1-0.2) satisfies the condition k perpendicular ρ(e) ≤ 1, where ρ(e) is the electron Larmor radius. PMID:23004612

  18. Effects of magnetosonic perturbations on electron temperature gradient driven modes and the stability of skin depth sized electron ballooning modes

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, N.; Hirose, A.

    2007-11-15

    The effect of the magnetosonic perturbation {delta}B{sub parallel} on the growth of electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) modes and electron temperature gradient driven ballooning modes [Hirose, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 49, 145 (2007)] is investigated using local gyrokinetic analysis and numerical solution, with supporting simulations from the initial value code GS2 [Kotschenreuther, et al., Comp. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1996)]. The effect of {delta}B{sub parallel} on the ETG mode is found to depend on the competition between two physical processes related to magnetosonic compression. Local analysis of the ballooning mode appears to significantly overestimate growth rates of this instability. The electron temperature gradient driven ballooning mode has been observed in GS2 simulations. However, this work supports the conclusion that this instability will be subdominant to the ETG mode in normal tokamak regimes.

  19. Study of Turbulent Fluctuations Driven by the Electron Temperature Gradient in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.; Bell, R. E.; Ethier, S.; Hosea, J. C.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lee, W. W.; Ryan, P. M.; Smith, D. R.; Wang, W. X.; Wilson, J. R.

    2009-03-26

    Various theories and numerical simulations support the conjecture that the ubiquitous problem of anomalous electron transport in tokamaks may arise from a short-scale turbulence driven by the electron temperature gradient. To check whether this turbulence is present in plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), measurements of turbulent fluctuations were performed with coherent scattering of electromagnetic waves. Results from plasmas heated by high harmonic fast waves (HHFW) show the existence of density fluctuations in the range of wave numbers k⊥ρe=0.1-0.4, corresponding to a turbulence scale length of the order of the collisionless skin depth. Experimental observations and agreement with numerical results from the linear gyro-kinetic GS2 code indicate that the observed turbulence is driven by the electron temperature gradient. These turbulent fluctuations were not observed at the location of an internal transport barrier driven by a negative magnetic shear.

  20. Verification of gyrokinetic {delta}f simulations of electron temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Nevins, W. M.; Parker, S. E.; Chen, Y.; Candy, J.; Dimits, A.; Dorland, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Jenko, F.

    2007-08-15

    The GEM gyrokinetic {delta}f simulation code [Y. Chen and S. Parker, J. Comput. Phys. 189, 463 (2003); and ibid.220, 839 (2007)] is shown to reproduce electron temperature gradient turbulence at the benchmark operating point established in previous work [W. M. Nevins, J. Candy, S. Cowley, T. Dannert, A. Dimits, W. Dorland, C. Estrada-Mila, G. W. Hammett, F. Jenko, M. J. Pueschel, and D. E. Shumaker, Phys. Plasmas 13, 122306 (2006)]. The electron thermal transport is within 10% of the expected value, while the turbulent fluctuation spectrum is shown to have the expected intensity and two-point correlation function.

  1. Toroidal ion-temperature-gradient driven vortices in an inhomogeneous magnetoplasma with non-Maxwellian electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Arshad M.; Masood, W.; Iqbal, Javed; Batool, Nazia

    2015-09-01

    Nonlinear equations which govern the dynamics of low-frequency toroidal ion-temperature-gradient driven modes (i.e., ω ≪ ω c i , where ωci is the ion gyro-frequency) are derived in the presence of equilibrium density, temperature, and magnetic field gradients. In the nonlinear case, solutions in the form of dipolar vortices and vortex street are presented for a plasma comprising of Maxwellian ions and nonthermal electrons that are embedded in an external magnetic field. By using Braginskii's transport equations for the Maxwellian ions and Kappa distributed electrons, the coupled mode equations for the system under consideration are derived. The results have been applied in Tokamak plasmas, and it has been observed that the scale lengths over which the nonlinear vortex structures form get modified in the presence of Kappa distributed electrons. The present study is also applicable to tokamaks and stellarators where non-Maxwellian population has been observed in resonant frequency heating, electron cyclotron heating experiments, and in runaway electrons.

  2. Finite Larmor radius effects on the coupled trapped electron and ion temperature gradient modes

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, I.; Isliker, H.; Pavlenko, V. P.

    2007-09-15

    The properties of the coupled trapped electron and toroidal ion temperature gradient modes are investigated using the standard reactive fluid model and taking rigorously into account the effects attributed to the ion polarization drift and to the drifts associated with the lowest-order finite ion Larmor radius effects. In the flat density regime, where the coupling between the modes is relatively weak, the properties of the unstable modes are slightly modified through these effects. For the peak density regions, where the coupling of the modes is rather strong, these second-order drifts determine the spectra of the unstable modes near the marginal conditions.

  3. Wave-particle interaction and the nonlinear saturation of the electron temperature gradient mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadlamani, Srinath; Parker, Scott E.; Chen, Yang; Howard, James E.

    2004-11-01

    It has been proposed that the electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence is responsible for experimentally relevant electron thermal transport in tokamak plasmas. Significant transport levels are possible by the creation of radially elongated vortices or ``streamers" [1,2], which are sustained by the nonlinear saturation of the instability and are not susceptible to shear flow destruction, as is the case with the ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode. We present a dynamical system to explore the dependence of saturation level due to E × B and E_\\| motion, as well as the effect of radial elongation. With this model, we can predict the nonlinear saturation level of the ETG streamers. We compare our theoretical predictions with a 2D shear-less slab gyrokinetic electron code that includes the E_\\| nonlinearity. [1]F. Jenko, W. Dorland, M Kotschenreuther, and B.N. Rogers, Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000). [2]C. Holland, and P.H. Diamond, Phys. Plasmas 9, 3857 (2002). [3]W. M. Manheimer, Phys. Fluids 14, 579 (1971). [4]R. A. Smith, John A. Krommes, and W. W. Lee, Phys. Fluids 28, 1069 (1985).

  4. Linear and nonlinear dynamics of electron temperature gradient mode in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zakir, U.; Qamar, A.; Haque, Q.

    2013-05-15

    The effect of non-Maxwellian distributed ions on electron temperature gradient mode is investigated. The linear dispersion relation of η{sub e}−mode is obtained which shows that the behavior of this mode changes in the presence of superthermal ions. The growth rate of η{sub e}−mode driven linear instability is found and is observed to modify due to nonthermal ions. However, it is found that this leaves the electron energy transport coefficient unchanged. In the nonlinear regime, a dipolar vortex solution is derived which indicates that the dynamic behavior of the vortices changes with the inclusion of kappa distributed ions. The importance of present study with respect to space and laboratory plasmas is also pointed out.

  5. Temperature Gradient in Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    D. Staack; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2003-11-24

    Plasma potentials and electron temperatures were deduced from emissive and cold floating probe measurements in a 2 kW Hall thruster, operated in the discharge voltage range of 200-400 V. An almost linear dependence of the electron temperature on the plasma potential was observed in the acceleration region of the thruster both inside and outside the thruster. This result calls into question whether secondary electron emission from the ceramic channel walls plays a significant role in electron energy balance. The proportionality factor between the axial electron temperature gradient and the electric field is significantly smaller than might be expected by models employing Ohmic heating of electrons.

  6. Mode signature and stability for a Hamiltonian model of electron temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Tassi, E.; Morrison, P. J.

    2011-03-15

    Stability properties and mode signature for equilibria of a model of electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence are investigated by Hamiltonian techniques. After deriving new infinite families of Casimir invariants, associated with the noncanonical Poisson bracket of the model, a sufficient condition for stability is obtained by means of the Energy-Casimir method. Mode signature is then investigated for linear motions about homogeneous equilibria. Depending on the sign of the equilibrium 'translated' pressure gradient, stable equilibria can either be energy stable, i.e., possess definite linearized perturbation energy (Hamiltonian), or spectrally stable with the existence of negative energy modes. The ETG instability is then shown to arise through a Krein-type bifurcation, due to the merging of a positive and a negative energy mode, corresponding to two modified drift waves admitted by the system. The Hamiltonian of the linearized system is then explicitly transformed into normal form, which unambiguously defines mode signature. In particular, the fast mode turns out to always be a positive energy mode, whereas the energy of the slow mode can have either positive or negative sign. A reduced model with stable equilibria shear flow that possess a continuous spectrum is also analyzed and brought to normal form by a special integral transform. In this way it is seen how continuous spectra can have signature as well.

  7. Role of secondary long wavelength structures in the saturation of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jiquan; Kishimoto, Y.

    2008-11-15

    The dynamics of secondary long wavelength structures (LWSs) in electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence are investigated by performing gyrofluid simulations and modeling analyses in a slab geometry with an emphasis of the underlying nonlinear interaction processes. It is shown that the back-reaction of the secondary LWS on the ambient fluctuations essentially contributes to saturating ETG instability and limiting the electron transport. The LWS is nonlinearly generated mainly through the beating of the most unstable ETG modes, even a weak modulation instability. The back-reaction is identified as the enhanced stabilization of the ETG modes due to the streamer-type feature of the LWS, which dominantly produces a local poloidal mode coupling among unstable and highly damped spectral components to form a global mode, besides the suppression effect of the LWS due to the radial shearing decorrelation and/or the radial mode coupling. Finally, the correspondence between the LWS in the slab model and the quasimode observed in toroidal ETG simulation [Z. Lin et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056125 (2005)] and the importance of the nonlinear mode coupling in the multiscale turbulence interaction are discussed.

  8. Effects of parallel dynamics on vortex structures in electron temperature gradient driven turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, M.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.; Horton, W.

    2011-01-15

    Vortex structures and related heat transport properties in slab electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence are comprehensively investigated by means of nonlinear gyrokinetic Vlasov simulations, with the aim of elucidating the underlying physical mechanisms of the transition from turbulent to coherent states. Numerical results show three different types of vortex structures, i.e., coherent vortex streets accompanied with the transport reduction, turbulent vortices with steady transport, and a zonal-flow-dominated state, depending on the relative magnitude of the parallel compression to the diamagnetic drift. In particular, the formation of coherent vortex streets is correlated with the strong generation of zonal flows for the cases with weak parallel compression, even though the maximum growth rate of linear ETG modes is relatively large. The zonal flow generation in the ETG turbulence is investigated by the modulational instability analysis with a truncated fluid model, where the parallel dynamics such as acoustic modes for electrons is incorporated. The modulational instability for zonal flows is found to be stabilized by the effect of the finite parallel compression. The theoretical analysis qualitatively agrees with secondary growth of zonal flows found in the slab ETG turbulence simulations, where the transition of vortex structures is observed.

  9. Ion scale nonlinear interaction triggered by disparate scale electron temperature gradient mode

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Chanho; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Itoh, Kimitaka; Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2015-05-15

    We have observed that the disparate scale nonlinear interactions between the high-frequency (∼0.4 MHz) electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode and the ion-scale low-frequency fluctuations (∼kHz) were enhanced when the amplitude of the ETG mode exceeded a certain threshold. The dynamics of nonlinear coupling between the ETG mode and the drift wave (DW) mode has already been reported [C. Moon, T. Kaneko, and R. Hatakeyama, Phys. Rev. Lett. (2013)]. Here, we have newly observed that another low-frequency fluctuation with f ≃ 3.6 kHz, i.e., the flute mode, was enhanced, corresponding to the saturation of the DW mode growth. Specifically, the bicoherence between the flute mode and the DW mode reaches a significant level when the ∇T{sub e}/T{sub e} strength exceeded 0.54 cm{sup −1}. Thus, it is shown that the ETG mode energy was transferred to the DW mode, and then the energy was ultimately transferred to the flute mode, which was triggered by the disparate scale nonlinear interactions between the ETG and ion-scale low-frequency modes.

  10. Ion scale nonlinear interaction triggered by disparate scale electron temperature gradient mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Chanho; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Itoh, Kimitaka; Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2015-05-01

    We have observed that the disparate scale nonlinear interactions between the high-frequency (˜0.4 MHz) electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode and the ion-scale low-frequency fluctuations (˜kHz) were enhanced when the amplitude of the ETG mode exceeded a certain threshold. The dynamics of nonlinear coupling between the ETG mode and the drift wave (DW) mode has already been reported [C. Moon, T. Kaneko, and R. Hatakeyama, Phys. Rev. Lett. (2013)]. Here, we have newly observed that another low-frequency fluctuation with f ≃ 3.6 kHz, i.e., the flute mode, was enhanced, corresponding to the saturation of the DW mode growth. Specifically, the bicoherence between the flute mode and the DW mode reaches a significant level when the ∇Te/Te strength exceeded 0.54 cm-1. Thus, it is shown that the ETG mode energy was transferred to the DW mode, and then the energy was ultimately transferred to the flute mode, which was triggered by the disparate scale nonlinear interactions between the ETG and ion-scale low-frequency modes.

  11. The effects of nonthermal electron distributions on ion-temperature-gradient driven drift-wave instabilities in electron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Batool, Nazia; Masood, W.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2012-08-15

    The effects of nonthermal electron distributions on electrostatic ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven drift-wave instabilities in the presence of equilibrium density, temperature, and magnetic field gradients are investigated here. By using Braginskii's transport equations for ions and Cairns as well as Kappa distribution for electrons, the coupled mode equations are derived. The modified ITG driven modes are derived, and it is found both analytically as well as numerically that the nonthermal distribution of electrons significantly modify the real frequencies as well as the growth rate of the ITG driven drift wave instability. The growth rate of ion-temperature-gradient driven instability is found to be maximum for Cairns, intermediate for Kappa, and minimum for the Maxwellian distributed electron case. The results of present investigation might be helpful to understand several wave phenomena in space and laboratory plasmas in the presence of nonthermal electrons.

  12. Effect of entropy on anomalous transport in electron-temperature-gradient-modes

    SciTech Connect

    Yaqub Khan, M.; Iqbal, J.; Ul Haq, A.

    2014-05-15

    Due to the interconnection of entropy with temperature and density of plasma, it would be interesting to investigate plasma related phenomena with respect to entropy. By employing Braginskii transport equations, it is proved that entropy is proportional to a function of potential and distribution function of entropy is re-defined, ∇S–drift in obtained. New dispersion relation is derived; it is found that the anomalous transport depends on the gradient of the entropy.

  13. Stabilization of lower hybrid drift modes by finite parallel wavenumber and electron temperature gradients in field-reversed configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farengo, R.; Guzdar, P. N.; Lee, Y. C.

    1989-08-01

    The effect of finite parallel wavenumber and electron temperature gradients on the lower hybrid drift instability is studied in the parameter regime corresponding to the TRX-2 device [Fusion Technol. 9, 48 (1986)]. Perturbations in the electrostatic potential and all three components of the vector potential are considered and finite beta electron orbit modifications are included. The electron temperature gradient decreases the growth rate of the instability but, for kz=0, unstable modes exist for ηe(=T'en0/Ten0)>6. Since finite kz effects completely stabilize the mode at small values of kz/ky(≂5×10-3), magnetic shear could be responsible for stabilizing the lower hybrid drift instability in field-reversed configurations.

  14. Theory of coupled whistler-electron temperature gradient mode in high beta plasma: Application to linear plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.; Jha, R.; Mattoo, S. K.

    2011-10-15

    This paper presents a theory of coupled whistler (W) and electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode using two-fluid model in high beta plasma. Non-adiabatic ion response, parallel magnetic field perturbation ({delta}B{sub z}), perpendicular magnetic flutter ({delta}B{sub perpendicular}), and electron collisions are included in the treatment of theory. A linear dispersion relation for whistler-electron temperature gradient (W-ETG) mode is derived. The numerical results obtained from this relation are compared with the experimental results observed in large volume plasma device (LVPD) [Awasthi et al., Phys. Plasma 17, 42109 (2010)]. The theory predicts that the instability grows only where the temperature gradient is finite and the density gradient flat. For the parameters of the experiment, theoretically estimated frequency and wave number of W-ETG mode match with the values corresponding to the peak in the power spectrum observed in LVPD. By using simple mixing length argument, estimated level of fluctuations of W-ETG mode is in the range of fluctuation level observed in LVPD.

  15. Short-Scale Turbulent Fluctuations Driven by the Electron-Temperature Gradient in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.; Smith, D. R.; Bell, R. E.; Kaye, S.; Davis, W.; Hosea, J.; LeBlanc, B; Wilson, J. R.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Yuh, H.; Lee, W.; Park, H.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements with coherent scattering of electromagnetic waves in plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment indicate the existence of turbulent fluctuations in the range of wave numbers k?e 0:1 0:4, corresponding to a turbulence scale length nearly equal to the collisionless skin depth. Experimental observations and agreement with numerical results from a linear gyrokinetic stability code support the conjecture that the observed turbulence is driven by the electron-temperature gradient.

  16. Short-Scale Turbulent Fluctuations Driven by the Electron-Temperature Gradient in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.; Smith, D. R.; Bell, R. E.; Kaye, S. M.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Wilson, J. R.; Ryan, P. M.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Yuh, H.; Lee, W.; Park, H.

    2008-08-15

    Measurements with coherent scattering of electromagnetic waves in plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment indicate the existence of turbulent fluctuations in the range of wave numbers k{sub perpendicular}{rho}{sub e}=0.1-0.4, corresponding to a turbulence scale length nearly equal to the collisionless skin depth. Experimental observations and agreement with numerical results from a linear gyrokinetic stability code support the conjecture that the observed turbulence is driven by the electron-temperature gradient.

  17. Short-scale turbulent fluctuations driven by the electron-temperature gradient in the national spherical torus experiment.

    PubMed

    Mazzucato, E; Smith, D R; Bell, R E; Kaye, S M; Hosea, J C; LeBlanc, B P; Wilson, J R; Ryan, P M; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Yuh, H; Lee, W; Park, H

    2008-08-15

    Measurements with coherent scattering of electromagnetic waves in plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment indicate the existence of turbulent fluctuations in the range of wave numbers k perpendicular rho(e)=0.1-0.4, corresponding to a turbulence scale length nearly equal to the collisionless skin depth. Experimental observations and agreement with numerical results from a linear gyrokinetic stability code support the conjecture that the observed turbulence is driven by the electron-temperature gradient. PMID:18764544

  18. Electron temperature gradient mode instability and stationary vortices with elliptic and circular boundary conditions in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.; Zakir, U.; Qamar, A.

    2015-12-15

    Linear and nonlinear dynamics of electron temperature gradient mode along with parallel electron dynamics is investigated by considering hydrodynamic electrons and non-Maxwellian ions. It is noticed that the growth rate of η{sub e}-mode driven linear instability decreases by increasing the value of spectral index and increases by reducing the ion/electron temperature ratio along the magnetic field lines. The eigen mode dispersion relation is also found in the ballooning mode limit. Stationary solutions in the form of dipolar vortices are obtained for both circular and elliptic boundary conditions. It is shown that the dynamics of both circular and elliptic vortices changes with the inclusion of inhomogeneity and non-Maxwellian effects.

  19. Effects of impurity seeding and charge non-neutrality on electromagnetic electron temperature gradient modes in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Tangri, Varun; Singh, Raghvendra; Kaw, Predhiman

    2005-07-15

    A linear theory of toroidal electromagnetic electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode is reported. The effects such as Debye shielding, impurities, magnetic flutter perturbations {delta}B{sub perpendicular} and compressible parallel magnetic field perturbations {delta}B{sub parallel} are included in a fluid model. An eigenvalue equation is derived and solved analytically in local and semilocal limits. In the nonlocal limit, the eigenvalue equations are solved numerically. A comparison is also made of the linear thresholds obtained from this simple fluid model with previous gyrokinetic simulations. It is shown that the simple fluid theory results compare well with the thresholds obtained from gyrokinetic simulations.

  20. Probing temperature gradients within the GaN buffer layer of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with Raman thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, C. Pomeroy, J.; Kuball, M.

    2014-02-14

    We demonstrate the ability of confocal Raman thermography using a spatial filter and azimuthal polarization to probe vertical temperature gradients within the GaN buffer layer of operating AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors. Temperature gradients in the GaN layer are measured by using offset focal planes to minimize the contribution from different regions of the GaN buffer. The measured temperature gradient is in good agreement with a thermal simulation treating the GaN thermal conductivity as homogeneous throughout the layer and including a low thermal conductivity nucleation layer to model the heat flow between the buffer and substrate.

  1. Oxidation in a temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Russell, James H.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of a temperature gradient and heat flux on point defect diffusion in protective oxide scales were examined. Irreversible thermodynamics were used to expand Fick's first law of diffusion to include a heat flux term--a Soret effect. Oxidation kinetics were developed for the oxidation of cobalt and for nickel doped with chromium. Research in progress is described to verify the effects of a heat flux by oxidizing pure cobalt in a temperature gradient above 800 C, and comparing the kinetics to isothermal oxidation. The tests are being carried out in the new high temperature gaseous corrosion and corrosion/erosion facility at the Albany Research Center.

  2. Corrosion in a temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; White, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    High temperature corrosion limits the operation of equipment used in the Power Generation Industry. Some of the more destructive corrosive attack occurs on the surfaces of heat exchangers, boilers, and turbines where the alloys are subjected to large temperature gradients that cause a high heat flux through the accumulated ash, the corrosion product, and the alloy. Most current and past corrosion research has, however, been conducted under isothermal conditions. Research on the thermal-gradient-affected corrosion of various metals and alloys is currently being studied at the Albany Research Center’s SECERF (Severe Environment Corrosion and Erosion Research Facility) laboratory. The purpose of this research is to verify theoretical models of heat flux effects on corrosion and to quantify the differences between isothermal and thermal gradient corrosion effects. The effect of a temperature gradient and the resulting heat flux on corrosion of alloys with protective oxide scales is being examined by studying point defect diffusion and corrosion rates. Fick’s first law of diffusion was expanded, using irreversible thermodynamics, to include a heat flux term – a Soret effect. Oxide growth rates are being measured for the high temperature corrosion of cobalt at a metal surface temperature of 900ºC. Corrosion rates are also being determined for the high temperature corrosion of carbon steel boiler tubes in a simulated waste combustion environment consisting of O2, CO2, N2, and water vapor. Tests are being conducted both isothermally and in the presence of a temperature gradient to verify the effects of a heat flux and to compare to isothermal oxidation.

  3. Electron profile stiffness and critical gradient studies

    SciTech Connect

    DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; Burrell, K. H.; Smith, S. P.; White, A. E.; Doyle, E. J.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Zeng, L.; Holland, C.; McKee, G. R.

    2012-08-15

    Electron profile stiffness was studied in DIII-D L-mode discharges by systematically varying the heat flux in a narrow region with electron cyclotron heating and measuring the local change produced in {nabla}T{sub e}. Electron stiffness was found to slowly increase with toroidal rotation velocity. A critical inverse temperature gradient scale length 1/L{sub C} {approx} 3 m{sup -1} was identified at {rho}=0.6 and found to be independent of rotation. Both the heat pulse diffusivity and the power balance diffusivity, the latter determined by integrating the measured dependence of the heat pulse diffusivity on -{nabla}T{sub e}, were fit reasonably well by a model containing a critical inverse temperature gradient scale length and varying linearly with 1/L{sub T} above the threshold.

  4. Electron transfer across a thermal gradient.

    PubMed

    Craven, Galen T; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-08-23

    Charge transfer is a fundamental process that underlies a multitude of phenomena in chemistry and biology. Recent advances in observing and manipulating charge and heat transport at the nanoscale, and recently developed techniques for monitoring temperature at high temporal and spatial resolution, imply the need for considering electron transfer across thermal gradients. Here, a theory is developed for the rate of electron transfer and the associated heat transport between donor-acceptor pairs located at sites of different temperatures. To this end, through application of a generalized multidimensional transition state theory, the traditional Arrhenius picture of activation energy as a single point on a free energy surface is replaced with a bithermal property that is derived from statistical weighting over all configurations where the reactant and product states are equienergetic. The flow of energy associated with the electron transfer process is also examined, leading to relations between the rate of heat exchange among the donor and acceptor sites as functions of the temperature difference and the electronic driving bias. In particular, we find that an open electron transfer channel contributes to enhanced heat transport between sites even when they are in electronic equilibrium. The presented results provide a unified theory for charge transport and the associated heat conduction between sites at different temperatures. PMID:27450086

  5. Sound beam manipulation based on temperature gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Feng; Quan, Li; Liu, Xiaozhou Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    Previous research with temperature gradients has shown the feasibility of controlling airborne sound propagation. Here, we present a temperature gradients based airborne sound manipulation schemes: a cylindrical acoustic omnidirectional absorber (AOA). The proposed AOA has high absorption performance which can almost completely absorb the incident wave. Geometric acoustics is used to obtain the refractive index distributions with different radii, which is then utilized to deduce the desired temperature gradients. Since resonant units are not applied in the scheme, its working bandwidth is expected to be broadband. The scheme is temperature-tuned and easy to realize, which is of potential interest to fields such as noise control or acoustic cloaking.

  6. Sound beam manipulation based on temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Feng; Quan, Li; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-01

    Previous research with temperature gradients has shown the feasibility of controlling airborne sound propagation. Here, we present a temperature gradients based airborne sound manipulation schemes: a cylindrical acoustic omnidirectional absorber (AOA). The proposed AOA has high absorption performance which can almost completely absorb the incident wave. Geometric acoustics is used to obtain the refractive index distributions with different radii, which is then utilized to deduce the desired temperature gradients. Since resonant units are not applied in the scheme, its working bandwidth is expected to be broadband. The scheme is temperature-tuned and easy to realize, which is of potential interest to fields such as noise control or acoustic cloaking.

  7. HOT PRESSING WITH A TEMPERATURE GRADIENT

    DOEpatents

    Hausner, H.H.

    1958-05-20

    A method is described for producing powder metal compacts with a high length to width ratio, which are of substantially uniform density. The process consists in arranging a heating coil around the die and providing a temperature gradient along the length of the die with the highest temperature at the point of the compact farthest away from the ram or plunger.

  8. Control of vortex breakdown by temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, Miguel Angel; Shtern, Vladimir

    2003-11-01

    An axial gradient of temperature can either suppress or enhance vortex breakdown (VB). The underlying mechanism of such VB control is centrifugal or/and gravitational convection. An additional thermal-convection flow directed oppositely to the base flow suppresses VB while a co-flow enhances VB. Our numerical simulations of a compressible flow in a sealed cylinder induced by a rotating bottom disk clearly reveal these effects. We vary the temperature gradient (ɛ), Mach (Ma), Froude (Fr), and Reynolds (Re) numbers, and the aspect ratio (h). As ɛ increases (ɛ>0 corresponding to a temperature gradient parallel to the downward near-axis flow), the VB "bubble," which occurs at ɛ=0, diminishes and then totally disappears. The opposite temperature gradient (ɛ<0) enlarges the VB bubble and makes the flow unsteady. These effects of centrifugal convection become more prominent with increasing Ma and Re. Density variations induced by the temperature gradients are more important for VB control than those induced by the increase in Ma. A new efficient time-evolution code for axisymmetric flows of an ideal gas has facilitated these simulations.

  9. Program predicts reservoir temperature and geothermal gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Kutasov, I.M.

    1992-06-01

    This paper reports that a Fortran computer program has been developed to determine static formation temperatures (SFT) and geothermal gradient (GG). A minimum of input data (only two shut-in temperature logs) is required to obtain the values of SFT and GG. Modeling of primary oil production and designing enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects requires knowing the undisturbed (static) reservoir temperature. Furthermore, the bottom hole circulating temperature (BHCT) is an important factor affecting a cement's thickening time, rheological properties, compressive strength, development, and set time. To estimate the values of BHCT, the geothermal gradient should be determined with accuracy. Recently we obtained an approximate analytical solution which describes the shut-in temperature behavior.

  10. Temperature gradient formation while axial gas compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyko, V. I.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    A spinning gas in equilibrium has a rotation-dependent heat capacity. However, as equilibrium is approached, such as after sudden heating, significant variations in temperature appear. Surprisingly, when fast axial compression or instantaneous gas heating occurs, the temperature does not grow homogeneously in radial direction, but instead has a gradient towards to the maximum of potential energy of external or self potential. The gradient monotonically grows with compression rate and the amplitude of the potential. The gradient builds up due to change of equilibrium density distribution, yet, not due to acoustic waves created by the compression. This result was checked in numerical simulations for particles in an external constant gravitational potential and also for rotating gas in the cylinder with perfect slip boundary conditions on the walls. This work was supported by the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and by the NNSA SSAA Program through DOE Research Grant No. DE-FG52-08NA28553.

  11. Non-equilibrium spin polarization and spin-orbit torque induced by electric field and temperature gradient in a magnetized two-dimensional electron gas with Rashba spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrdal, Anna; Barnas, Jozef; Dugaev, Vitalii

    We have considered theoretically temperature dependence of non-equilibrium spin polarization of electrons that appears in a magnetized two-dimensional electron gas with Rashba spin-orbit interaction due to external electric field and/or temperature gradient. To do this we have employed the approach based on the Matsubara Green function formalism. We analyzed in detail variation of the induced spin polarization with position of the Fermi level, temperature, and Rashba coupling constant. Moreover, we analyzed the temperature dependence of the electrically and thermally induced spin polarization in the temperature regime, where the spin relaxation time can be assumed constant (independent of temperature). In contrast to the case of nonmagnetic Rashba gas, all three components of the induced spin polarization are now nonzero. The induced spin-polarization is exchange-coupled to the local equilibrium magnetization and therefore exerts a torque on the magnetization vector. We have considered in detail the temperature behavior of spin-orbit torque induced by electric field and by temperature gradient for specific relative orientation of the magnetization and electric field or temperature gradient, respectively.

  12. Eocene continental climates and latitudinal temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, David R.; Wing, Scott L.

    1995-11-01

    Global climate during the Mesozoic and early Cenozoic is thought to have been warmer than at present, but there is debate about winter temperatures. Paleontological data indicate mild temperatures even at high latitudes and in mid-latitude continental interiors, whereas computer simulations of continental paleoclimates produce winter temperatures closer to modern levels. Foliar physiognomy and floristic composition of 23 Eocene floras from the interior of North America and Australia indicate cold month means generally >2 °C, even where the mean annual temperature (MAT) was <15 °C. Reconstructed Eocene latitudinal gradients of MAT are curvilinear but are about 0.4 °C per 1° of latitude in continental interiors at mid-latitudes, much less than the 0.8 1.0 °C per 1° of latitude observed in eastern and central North America today, but similar to modern gradients in the Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes and on the west coast of North America. Latitudinal temperature gradients reconstructed here are broadly representative of Eocene climates, showing that the discrepancy between proxy data and simulations will not be resolved by regional adjustments to paleogeography or reinterpretation of individual fossil assemblages. Similar discrepancies between proxy data and general circulation model simulations for other time periods suggest that there is a basic flaw with the way climate models simulate heat transport to, or loss from, continental surfaces.

  13. Thermoelectrically cooled temperature-gradient apparatus for comparative cell and virus temperature studies.

    PubMed

    Clark, H F; Kaminski, F; Karzon, D T

    1970-05-01

    Establishment of a near-linear temperature gradient in an incubator has been accomplished by the application of heat to one terminus of a conducting body, normally a metal bar, and the removal of heat from the other terminus of the conducting body. Such incubators have been complex and unwieldy because of the need for mechanical refrigeration. We have described a simplified temperature gradient incubator which uses thermoelectric module cooling coupled with electric heating. Along the gradient, 20 stations in two parallel rows of 10, each accommodating a 30-ml plastic cell culture flask, were continually monitored by an electronic thermometer, and the temperatures were recorded. By manipulation of two simple potentiometer controls, any temperature gradient between 0 and 50 C could be obtained. Minor deviations which occurred between theoretically perfect and obtained temperature gradients were reproducible and readily measured. The gradient incubator was particularly applicable to (i) simultaneously studying a given biological activity over the entire temperature range supporting the growth of a given cell, virus, or microorganism, or (ii) precisely defining the upper or lower temperature limits of a biological system by 10-point determinations. Preliminary experiments have demonstrated the usefulness of the apparatus in characterizing the temperature limits for growth in vitro of cells of reptilian cell lines. The gradient incubator was also successfully utilized for the characterization of the effect of temperature on the efficiency of plating of amphibian viruses and possible temperature variants of those viruses. PMID:4987201

  14. Temperature Gradient Field Theory of Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S.; Ain, W. Q.; Azhari, A.; Prasada Rao, A. K.

    2016-02-01

    According to the proposed theory, ceramic particles present in molten metal, lose heat at a slower rate than the metallic liquid during cooling. Such condition results in the formation of a spherical thermal gradient field (TGF) around each particle. Hence, the interstitials (low temperature) of such TGFs are the regions to reach the nucleation temperature first, owing to low energy barrier than the liquid-particle interface (higher temperature). Analytics also indicate that the nucleation rate is higher at the TGF interstitials, than at the liquid-particle interface. Such TGF network results in simultaneous nucleation throughout the system, resulting in grain refinement.

  15. Stabilization of electron-scale turbulence by electron density gradient in national spherical torus experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz Ruiz, J.; White, A. E.; Ren, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E.; Lee, K. C.; Domier, C. W.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.

    2015-12-15

    Theory and experiments have shown that electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence on the electron gyro-scale, k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub e} ≲ 1, can be responsible for anomalous electron thermal transport in NSTX. Electron scale (high-k) turbulence is diagnosed in NSTX with a high-k microwave scattering system [D. R. Smith et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 123501 (2008)]. Here we report on stabilization effects of the electron density gradient on electron-scale density fluctuations in a set of neutral beam injection heated H-mode plasmas. We found that the absence of high-k density fluctuations from measurements is correlated with large equilibrium density gradient, which is shown to be consistent with linear stabilization of ETG modes due to the density gradient using the analytical ETG linear threshold in F. Jenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4096 (2001)] and linear gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995)]. We also found that the observed power of electron-scale turbulence (when it exists) is anti-correlated with the equilibrium density gradient, suggesting density gradient as a nonlinear stabilizing mechanism. Higher density gradients give rise to lower values of the plasma frame frequency, calculated based on the Doppler shift of the measured density fluctuations. Linear gyrokinetic simulations show that higher values of the electron density gradient reduce the value of the real frequency, in agreement with experimental observation. Nonlinear electron-scale gyrokinetic simulations show that high electron density gradient reduces electron heat flux and stiffness, and increases the ETG nonlinear threshold, consistent with experimental observations.

  16. Stabilization of electron-scale turbulence by electron density gradient in national spherical torus experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Ruiz, J.; Ren, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; White, A. E.; Kaye, S. M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E.; Lee, K. C.; Domier, C. W.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.

    2015-12-01

    Theory and experiments have shown that electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence on the electron gyro-scale, kρe ≲ 1, can be responsible for anomalous electron thermal transport in NSTX. Electron scale (high-k) turbulence is diagnosed in NSTX with a high-k microwave scattering system [D. R. Smith et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 123501 (2008)]. Here we report on stabilization effects of the electron density gradient on electron-scale density fluctuations in a set of neutral beam injection heated H-mode plasmas. We found that the absence of high-k density fluctuations from measurements is correlated with large equilibrium density gradient, which is shown to be consistent with linear stabilization of ETG modes due to the density gradient using the analytical ETG linear threshold in F. Jenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4096 (2001)] and linear gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995)]. We also found that the observed power of electron-scale turbulence (when it exists) is anti-correlated with the equilibrium density gradient, suggesting density gradient as a nonlinear stabilizing mechanism. Higher density gradients give rise to lower values of the plasma frame frequency, calculated based on the Doppler shift of the measured density fluctuations. Linear gyrokinetic simulations show that higher values of the electron density gradient reduce the value of the real frequency, in agreement with experimental observation. Nonlinear electron-scale gyrokinetic simulations show that high electron density gradient reduces electron heat flux and stiffness, and increases the ETG nonlinear threshold, consistent with experimental observations.

  17. Why molecules move along a temperature gradient

    PubMed Central

    Duhr, Stefan; Braun, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    Molecules drift along temperature gradients, an effect called thermophoresis, the Soret effect, or thermodiffusion. In liquids, its theoretical foundation is the subject of a long-standing debate. By using an all-optical microfluidic fluorescence method, we present experimental results for DNA and polystyrene beads over a large range of particle sizes, salt concentrations, and temperatures. The data support a unifying theory based on solvation entropy. Stated in simple terms, the Soret coefficient is given by the negative solvation entropy, divided by kT. The theory predicts the thermodiffusion of polystyrene beads and DNA without any free parameters. We assume a local thermodynamic equilibrium of the solvent molecules around the molecule. This assumption is fulfilled for moderate temperature gradients below a fluctuation criterion. For both DNA and polystyrene beads, thermophoretic motion changes sign at lower temperatures. This thermophilicity toward lower temperatures is attributed to an increasing positive entropy of hydration, whereas the generally dominating thermophobicity is explained by the negative entropy of ionic shielding. The understanding of thermodiffusion sets the stage for detailed probing of solvation properties of colloids and biomolecules. For example, we successfully determine the effective charge of DNA and beads over a size range that is not accessible with electrophoresis. PMID:17164337

  18. Spatial temperature gradients guide axonal outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Bryan; Vishwakarma, Vivek; Dhakal, Kamal; Bhattarai, Samik; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Jain, Ankur; Kim, Young-Tae; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2016-07-01

    Formation of neural networks during development and regeneration after injury depends on accuracy of axonal pathfinding, which is primarily believed to be influenced by chemical cues. Recently, there is growing evidence that physical cues can play crucial role in axonal guidance. However, detailed mechanism involved in such guidance cues is lacking. By using weakly-focused near-infrared continuous wave (CW) laser microbeam in the path of an advancing axon, we discovered that the beam acts as a repulsive guidance cue. Here, we report that this highly-effective at-a-distance guidance is the result of a temperature field produced by the near-infrared laser light absorption. Since light absorption by extracellular medium increases when the laser wavelength was red shifted, the threshold laser power for reliable guidance was significantly lower in the near-infrared as compared to the visible spectrum. The spatial temperature gradient caused by the near-infrared laser beam at-a-distance was found to activate temperature-sensitive membrane receptors, resulting in an influx of calcium. The repulsive guidance effect was significantly reduced when extracellular calcium was depleted or in the presence of TRPV1-antagonist. Further, direct heating using micro-heater confirmed that the axonal guidance is caused by shallow temperature-gradient, eliminating the role of any non-photothermal effects.

  19. Spatial temperature gradients guide axonal outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Black, Bryan; Vishwakarma, Vivek; Dhakal, Kamal; Bhattarai, Samik; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Jain, Ankur; Kim, Young-Tae; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2016-01-01

    Formation of neural networks during development and regeneration after injury depends on accuracy of axonal pathfinding, which is primarily believed to be influenced by chemical cues. Recently, there is growing evidence that physical cues can play crucial role in axonal guidance. However, detailed mechanism involved in such guidance cues is lacking. By using weakly-focused near-infrared continuous wave (CW) laser microbeam in the path of an advancing axon, we discovered that the beam acts as a repulsive guidance cue. Here, we report that this highly-effective at-a-distance guidance is the result of a temperature field produced by the near-infrared laser light absorption. Since light absorption by extracellular medium increases when the laser wavelength was red shifted, the threshold laser power for reliable guidance was significantly lower in the near-infrared as compared to the visible spectrum. The spatial temperature gradient caused by the near-infrared laser beam at-a-distance was found to activate temperature-sensitive membrane receptors, resulting in an influx of calcium. The repulsive guidance effect was significantly reduced when extracellular calcium was depleted or in the presence of TRPV1-antagonist. Further, direct heating using micro-heater confirmed that the axonal guidance is caused by shallow temperature-gradient, eliminating the role of any non-photothermal effects. PMID:27460512

  20. Spatial temperature gradients guide axonal outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Black, Bryan; Vishwakarma, Vivek; Dhakal, Kamal; Bhattarai, Samik; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Jain, Ankur; Kim, Young-tae; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2016-01-01

    Formation of neural networks during development and regeneration after injury depends on accuracy of axonal pathfinding, which is primarily believed to be influenced by chemical cues. Recently, there is growing evidence that physical cues can play crucial role in axonal guidance. However, detailed mechanism involved in such guidance cues is lacking. By using weakly-focused near-infrared continuous wave (CW) laser microbeam in the path of an advancing axon, we discovered that the beam acts as a repulsive guidance cue. Here, we report that this highly-effective at-a-distance guidance is the result of a temperature field produced by the near-infrared laser light absorption. Since light absorption by extracellular medium increases when the laser wavelength was red shifted, the threshold laser power for reliable guidance was significantly lower in the near-infrared as compared to the visible spectrum. The spatial temperature gradient caused by the near-infrared laser beam at-a-distance was found to activate temperature-sensitive membrane receptors, resulting in an influx of calcium. The repulsive guidance effect was significantly reduced when extracellular calcium was depleted or in the presence of TRPV1-antagonist. Further, direct heating using micro-heater confirmed that the axonal guidance is caused by shallow temperature-gradient, eliminating the role of any non-photothermal effects. PMID:27460512

  1. Ion temperature gradient mode driven solitons and shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakir, U.; Adnan, Muhammad; Haque, Q.; Qamar, Anisa; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2016-04-01

    Ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven solitons and shocks are studied in a plasma having gradients in the equilibrium number density and equilibrium ion temperature. In the linear regime, it is found that the ion temperature and the ratio of the gradient scale lengths, ηi=Ln/LT , affect both the real frequency and the growth rate of the ITG driven wave instability. In the nonlinear regime, for the first time we derive a Korteweg de Vries-type equation for the ITG mode, which admits solitary wave solution. It is found that the ITG mode supports only compressive solitons. Further, it is noticed that the soliton amplitude and width are sensitive to the parameter ηi=Ln/LT . Second, in the presence of dissipation in the system, we obtain a Burger type equation, which admits the shock wave solution. This work may be useful to understand the low frequency electrostatic modes in inhomogeneous electron-ion plasma having density and ion temperature gradients. For illustration, the model has been applied to tokamak plasma.

  2. Effect of Temperature Gradient on Thick Film Selective Emitter Emittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.; Clark, Eric B.; Chen, Zheng

    1997-01-01

    A temperature gradient across a thick (greater than or equal to .1 mm) film selective emitter will produce a significant reduction in the spectral emittance from the no temperature gradient case. Thick film selective emitters of rare earth doped host materials such as yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) are examples where temperature gradient effects are important. In this paper a model is developed for the spectral emittance assuming a linear temperature gradient across the film. Results of the model indicate that temperature gradients will result in reductions the order of 20% or more in the spectral emittance.

  3. 'Thermal forces': colloids in temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, Roberto

    2004-09-01

    In the presence of a thermal gradient, macromolecular solutes or dispersed particles drift to the cold or to the hot side: this effect is known as thermophoresis, and is the counterpart of particle suspensions of the Soret effect (or thermal diffusion) in simple fluid mixtures. Here I review recent experimental results on colloid thermophoresis and present new data suggesting a universal nature for the temperature dependence of thermophoresis in aqueous systems. There are strong analogies between thermophoresis in liquids and other thermally induced flow processes like gas thermal creep and membrane thermo-osmosis; starting from these, I present some guidelines for a general model of thermophoresis in disperse systems, accounting both for single-particle and collective effects.

  4. Observation of temperature-gradient-induced magnetization.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dazhi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Iguchi, R; Sato, K; Vehstedt, E K; Uchida, K; Bauer, G E W; Saitoh, E

    2016-01-01

    Applying magnetic fields has been the method of choice to magnetize non-magnetic materials, but they are difficult to focus. The magneto-electric effect and voltage-induced magnetization generate magnetization by applied electric fields, but only in special compounds or heterostructures. Here we demonstrate that a simple metal such as gold can be magnetized by a temperature gradient or magnetic resonance when in contact with a magnetic insulator by observing an anomalous Hall-like effect, which directly proves the breakdown of time-reversal symmetry. Such Hall measurements give experimental access to the spectral spin Hall conductance of the host metal, which is closely related to other spin caloritronics phenomena such as the spin Nernst effect and serves as a reference for theoretical calculation. PMID:27457185

  5. Observation of temperature-gradient-induced magnetization

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Dazhi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Iguchi, R.; Sato, K.; Vehstedt, E. K.; Uchida, K.; Bauer, G. E. W.; Saitoh, E.

    2016-01-01

    Applying magnetic fields has been the method of choice to magnetize non-magnetic materials, but they are difficult to focus. The magneto-electric effect and voltage-induced magnetization generate magnetization by applied electric fields, but only in special compounds or heterostructures. Here we demonstrate that a simple metal such as gold can be magnetized by a temperature gradient or magnetic resonance when in contact with a magnetic insulator by observing an anomalous Hall-like effect, which directly proves the breakdown of time-reversal symmetry. Such Hall measurements give experimental access to the spectral spin Hall conductance of the host metal, which is closely related to other spin caloritronics phenomena such as the spin Nernst effect and serves as a reference for theoretical calculation. PMID:27457185

  6. Finite sample effect in temperature gradient focusing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao; Shackman, Jonathan G; Ross, David

    2008-06-01

    Temperature gradient focusing (TGF) is a new and promising equilibrium gradient focusing method which can provide high concentration factors for improved detection limits in combination with high-resolution separation. In this technique, temperature-dependent buffer chemistry is employed to generate a gradient in the analyte electrophoretic velocity. By the application of a convective counter-flow, a zero-velocity point is created within a microchannel, at which location the ionic analytes accumulate or focus. In general, the analyte concentration is small when compared with buffer ion concentrations, such that the focusing mechanism works in the ideal, linearized regime. However, this presumption may at times be violated due to significant sample concentration growth or the use of a low-concentration buffer. Under these situations the sample concentration becomes non-negligible and can induce strong nonlinear interactions with buffer ions, which eventually lead to peak shifting and distortion, and the loss of detectability and resolution. In this work we combine theory, simulation, and experimental data to present a detailed study on nonlinear sample-buffer interactions in TGF. One of the key results is the derivation of a generalized Kohlrausch regulating function (KRF) that is valid for systems in which the electrophoretic mobilities are not constant but vary spatially. This generalized KRF greatly facilitates analysis, allowing reduction of the problem to a single equation describing sample concentration evolution, and is applicable to other problems with heterogeneous electrophoretic mobilities. Using this sample evolution equation we have derived an understanding of the nonlinear peak deformation phenomenon observed experimentally in TGF. We have used numerical simulations to validate our theory and to quantitatively predict TGF. Our simulation results demonstrate excellent agreement with experimental data, and also indicate that the proper inclusion of

  7. Temperature profiles in high gradient furnaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fripp, A. L.; Debnam, W. J.; Woodell, G. A.; Berry, R.; Crouch, R. K.; Sorokach, S. K.

    1989-01-01

    Accurate temperature measurement of the furnace environment is very important in both the science and technology of crystal growth as well as many other materials processing operations. A high degree of both accuracy and precision is acutely needed in the directional solidification of compound semiconductors in which the temperature profiles control the freezing isotherm which, in turn, affects the composition of the growth with a concomitant feedback perturbation on the temperature profile. Directional solidification requires a furnace configuration that will transport heat through the sample being grown. A common growth procedure is the Bridgman Stockbarger technique which basically consists of a hot zone and a cold zone separated by an insulator. In a normal growth procedure the material, contained in an ampoule, is melted in the hot zone and is then moved relative to the furnace toward the cold zone and solidification occurs in the insulated region. Since the primary path of heat between the hot and cold zones is through the sample, both axial and radial temperature gradients exist in the region of the growth interface. There is a need to know the temperature profile of the growth furnace with the crystal that is to be grown as the thermal load. However it is usually not feasible to insert thermocouples inside an ampoule and thermocouples attached to the outside wall of the ampoule have both a thermal and a mechanical contact problem as well as a view angle problem. The objective is to present a technique of calibrating a furnace with a thermal load that closely matches the sample to be grown and to describe procedures that circumvent both the thermal and mechanical contact problems.

  8. High temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1991-03-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have acknowledged a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high-temperature operation. Aeropropulsion applications for high-temperature electronic devices include engine ground test instrumentation such as multiplexers, analog-to-digital converters, and telemetry systems capable of withstanding hot section engine temperatures in excess of 600 C. Uncooled operation of control and condition monitoring systems in advanced supersonic aircraft would subject the electronics to temperatures in excess of 300 C. Similarly, engine-mounted integrated electronic sensors could reach temperatures which exceed 500 C. In addition to aeronautics, there are many other areas that could benefit from the existence of high-temperature electronic devices. Space applications include power electronic devices for space platforms and satellites. Since power electronics require radiators to shed waste heat, electronic devices that operate at higher temperatures would allow a reduction in radiator size. Terrestrial applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, high power electronics, and nuclear reactor instrumentation and control. To meet the needs of the applications mentioned previously, the high-temperature electronics (HTE) program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high-temperature semiconductor material. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, growth modeling, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices. Interest in SiC has grown dramatically in recent years due to solid advances in the technology. Much research remains to be performed, but SiC appears ready to emerge as a useful semiconductor material.

  9. Lower hybrid drift instability with temperature gradient in a perpendicular shock wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Y. M.; Wong, H. K.; Wu, C. S.

    1983-01-01

    Finite beta effects and an electron temperature gradient are included in the present study of the perpendicular bow shock geometry's lower hybrid instability, where the flute mode that is stable at the shock for constant electron temperature is destabilized in the case of a sufficiently great temperature gradient. Numerical solutions are given for cases in which the ion distribution is either drifting Maxwellian or consists of two Maxwellians, to represent the effect of reflected ions at the shock. A discussion is presented of the implications of results obtained for ion and electron heating and electron acceleration at the bow shock.

  10. 9519 biotite granodiorite reacted in a temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, R.W.; Bayhurst, G.K.

    1980-10-01

    A biotite granodiorite from the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal system was reacted in a controlled temperature gradient with initially distilled water for 60d. Polished rock prisms were located in the gradient at 72, 119, 161, 209, 270, and 310/sup 0/C. Scanning electron microscope and microprobe analyses show the appearance of secondary phases: Ca-montmorillonite at 72/sup 0/C and 119/sup 0/C; zeolite, either stilbite or heulandite, at 161/sup 0/C; and another zeolite, thomsonite, at higher temperatures. Solution analyses show a steady state equilibrium exists between solution and overgrowths after about 2 weeks of reaction. The chemographic relations for the system are explored in some detail indicating the divariant assemblages may be placed in a reasonable sequence in intensive variable space. These relations predict high and low temperature effects not directly observed experimentally as well as relevant univariant equilibria. Solution chemistry indicates the Na-Ca-K geothermometer more adequately predicts temperature in this system than does the silica geothermometer.

  11. Thermoacoustic mixture separation with an axial temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Drew W; Swift, Gregory A

    2008-01-01

    The theory of thermoacoustic mixture separation is extended to include the effect of a nonzero axial temperature gradient. The analysis yields a new term in the second-order mole flux that is proportional to the temperature gradient and to the square of the volumetric velocity and is independent of the phasing of the wave. Because of this new term, thermoacoustic separation stops at a critical temperature gradient and changes direction above that gradient. For a traveling wave, this gradient is somewhat higher than that predicted by a simple four-step model. An experiment tests the theory for temperature gradients from 0 to 416 K/m in 50-50 He-Ar mixtures.

  12. Electronic ceramics in high temperature environments

    SciTech Connect

    Searcy, A.W.; Meschi, D.J.

    1980-11-01

    Simple thermodynamic means are described for understanding and predicting the influence of temperature changes in various environments on electronic properties of ceramics. Thermal gradients, thermal cycling and vacuum annealing are discussed, as well as the variations of activities and solubilities with temperature.

  13. Temperature gradients drive mechanical energy gradients in the flight muscle of Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    George, N T; Sponberg, S; Daniel, T L

    2012-02-01

    A temperature gradient throughout the dominant flight muscle (dorsolongitudinal muscle, DLM(1)) of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta, together with temperature-dependent muscle contractile rates, demonstrates that significant spatial variation in power production is possible within a single muscle. Using in situ work-loop analyses under varying muscle temperatures and phases of activation, we show that regional differences in muscle temperature will induce a spatial gradient in the mechanical power output throughout the DLM(1). Indeed, we note that this power gradient spans from positive to negative values across the predicted temperature range. Warm ventral subunits produce positive power at their in vivo operating temperatures, and therefore act as motors. Concurrently, as muscle temperature decreases dorsally, the subunits produce approximately zero mechanical power output, acting as an elastic energy storage source, and negative power output, behaving as a damper. Adjusting the phase of activation further influences the temperature sensitivity of power output, significantly affecting the mechanical power output gradient that is expressed. Additionally, the separate subregions of the DLM(1) did not appear to employ significant physiological compensation for the temperature-induced differences in power output. Thus, although the components of a muscle are commonly thought to operate uniformly, a significant within-muscle temperature gradient has the potential to induce a mechanical power gradient, whereby subunits within a muscle operate with separate and distinct functional roles. PMID:22246256

  14. Effect of temperature gradient of EBI of image intensifier

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Q.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the authors give the experiments for the measurement of EBI of an image intensifier with the change of temperature gradient of it. At the same time, the authors give the curves of EBI versus the different temperature gradients. The paper shows the causes for EBI of an image intensifier with the change of temperature gradient. The paper concluded, from the calculations and experiments, that there is need for the waiting measurement time for us to minimize the measuremental difference of EBI caused by temperature gradient. It is also indicated that the paper provides some scientific basis for improving possibly detecting objective performance of low light level night vision system in field if they adopt the scheme for the effect of temperature gradient on EBI of an image intensifier.

  15. Directional Bleb Formation in Spherical Cells under Temperature Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Kotaro; Arai, Tomomi; Isaka, Akira; Sekiguchi, Taku; Itoh, Hideki; Seto, Yusuke; Miyazaki, Makito; Itabashi, Takeshi; Ohki, Takashi; Suzuki, Madoka; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2015-01-01

    Living cells sense absolute temperature and temporal changes in temperature using biological thermosensors such as ion channels. Here, we reveal, to our knowledge, a novel mechanism of sensing spatial temperature gradients within single cells. Spherical mitotic cells form directional membrane extensions (polar blebs) under sharp temperature gradients (≥∼0.065°C μm−1; 1.3°C temperature difference within a cell), which are created by local heating with a focused 1455-nm laser beam under an optical microscope. On the other hand, multiple nondirectional blebs are formed under gradual temperature gradients or uniform heating. During heating, the distribution of actomyosin complexes becomes inhomogeneous due to a break in the symmetry of its contractile force, highlighting the role of the actomyosin complex as a sensor of local temperature gradients. PMID:26200871

  16. Moving-Gradient Furnace With Constant-Temperature Cold Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J.; Shaubach, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    Outer heat pipe helps in controlling temperature of cold zone of furnace. Part of heat-pipe furnace that includes cold zone surrounded by another heat pipe equipped with heater at one end and water cooling coil at other end. Temperature of heat pipe maintained at desired constant value by controlling water cooling. Serves as constant-temperature heat source or heat sink, as needed, for gradient of temperature as gradient region moved along furnace. Proposed moving-gradient heat-pipe furnace used in terrestrial or spaceborne experiments on directional solidification in growth of crystals.

  17. Temperature gradients and clear-air turbulence probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, M. A.; Panofsky, H. A.; Peslen, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    In order to forecast clear-air turbulence (CAT) in jet aircraft flights, a study was conducted in which the data from a special-purpose instrument aboard a Boeing 747 jet airliner were compared with satellite-derived radiance gradients, conventional temperature gradients from analyzed maps, and temperature gradients obtained from a total air temperature sensor on the plane. The advantage of making use of satellite-derived data is that they are available worldwide without the need for radiosonde observations, which are scarce in many parts of the world. Major conclusions are that CAT probabilities are significantly higher over mountains than flat terrain, and that satellite radiance gradients appear to discriminate between CAT and no CAT better than conventional temperature gradients over flat lands, whereas the reverse is true over mountains, the differences between the two techniques being not large over mountains.

  18. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    To meet the needs of the aerospace propulsion and space power communities, the high temperature electronics program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. This program supports a major element of the Center's mission - to perform basic and developmental research aimed at improving aerospace propulsion systems. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices.

  19. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Seng, Gary T.

    1990-02-01

    To meet the needs of the aerospace propulsion and space power communities, the high temperature electronics program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. This program supports a major element of the Center's mission - to perform basic and developmental research aimed at improving aerospace propulsion systems. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices.

  20. The complex mixed Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin-full-wave approach and its application to the two dimensional mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z. X.

    2015-05-15

    The complex mixed Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB)-full-wave approach is applied to the 2D mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves in tokamak plasmas. The parallel mode structure is calculated with the full-wave approach, while the radial envelope is calculated with the complex WKB method. The tilting of the global mode structure along radius is demonstrated analytically. The effects of the phase and amplitude variation of the radial envelope on the parallel mode structure are included in terms of a complex radial wave vector in the parallel mode equation. It is shown that the radial equilibrium non-uniformity leads to the asymmetry of the parallel mode structure not only in configuration space but also in spectrum space. The mixed approach provides a practical way to analyze the asymmetric component of the global mode structure due to radial equilibrium non-uniformity.

  1. The complex mixed Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin-full-wave approach and its application to the two dimensional mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. X.

    2015-05-01

    The complex mixed Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB)-full-wave approach is applied to the 2D mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves in tokamak plasmas. The parallel mode structure is calculated with the full-wave approach, while the radial envelope is calculated with the complex WKB method. The tilting of the global mode structure along radius is demonstrated analytically. The effects of the phase and amplitude variation of the radial envelope on the parallel mode structure are included in terms of a complex radial wave vector in the parallel mode equation. It is shown that the radial equilibrium non-uniformity leads to the asymmetry of the parallel mode structure not only in configuration space but also in spectrum space. The mixed approach provides a practical way to analyze the asymmetric component of the global mode structure due to radial equilibrium non-uniformity.

  2. Control of vortex breakdown by axial gradient of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir

    2001-11-01

    It is shown that vortex breakdown (VB) can be suppressed or enhanced with help of temperature gradients. The underlying mechanism of such VB control is centrifugal convection. An axial gradient of temperature in a rotating fluid induces a counterflow that is parallel to the temperature gradient at periphery and anti-parallel near the axis (Shtern et.al. 2001, Phys. Fluids, 13, 2296). This centrifugal convection is utilized here to control VB in a compressible flow induced by a rotating lid in a sealed cylinder. To this end, we have developed an efficient 2D time-evolution code for compressible swirling flows. In our numerical studies, the temperature gradient, eps, and Mach number vary, while Reynolds number Re = 2450 and aspect ratio H/R = 2.5 are fixed. At eps= 0, there are two VB 'bubbles' which diminish and then totally disappear as increases eps, (eps > 0), which corresponds to the temperature gradient accelerating the near-axis flow. The opposite gradient of temperature (eps < 0) enhances VB: the bubble size increases and the flow becomes unsteady. These effects of temperature gradients are more prominent with increasing Mach number. The mechanism revealed can be applied to control VB in vortex burners and over delta wings of aircraft.

  3. Electronic Bloch oscillation in bilayer graphene gradient superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Hemeng; Li, Changan; Song, Yun; Ma, Tianxing; Wang, Li-Gang; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2014-08-18

    We investigate the electronic Bloch oscillation in bilayer graphene gradient superlattices using transfer matrix method. By introducing two kinds of gradient potentials of square barriers along electrons propagation direction, we find that Bloch oscillations up to terahertz can occur. Wannier-Stark ladders, as the counterpart of Bloch oscillation, are obtained as a series of equidistant transmission peaks, and the localization of the electronic wave function is also signature of Bloch oscillation. Furthermore, the period of Bloch oscillation decreases linearly with increasing gradient of barrier potentials.

  4. Galactic Temperature and Metallicity Gradients from Ultracompact H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afflerbach, A.; Churchwell, E.; Acord, J. M.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Depree, C. G.

    1996-10-01

    We report observations in the H42α, H66α, H76α, and H93α radio recombination lines (RRL) toward 28 ultracompact (UC) H II regions distributed in Galactocentric radius from 0 to 17 kpc. It was possible to fit the observed line intensities with a single set of electron density (ne) and temperature (Te)-values for 17 nebulae distributed in DG from 4 to 11 kpc using a non-LTE model analysis. A Galactocentric Te gradient was found of the form Te(K) = (5537±387) + (320±64)DG, where DG is the Galactocentric distance in kpc. On average, our sample is hotter than that found by Shaver et al. (1983) by approximately 1000 K. We attribute the higher average temperatures of the sources in our sample relative to those in the Shaver et al. sample to the higher density of our sample. As density increases from t0 cm-3 to 105 cm-3, metal coolants are quenched and Te increases. From the combination of photoionization-statistical equilibrium models at the densities of UC H II regions and the derived Te gradient, we find a Galactocentric oxygen abundance gradient d(O/H)/d(DG) =-0.047±0.009 dex kpc-1 under the assumption that the Te gradient is primarily determined by metal abundances. Within the uncertainties, the O/H gradient is the same as that found by Shaver et al. from optical observations. The observed line widths are correlated with density in the sense that the denser regions are more likely to have large turbulent motions and/or bulk motions such as outflows, rotation, shocks, etc. Helium RRLs were detected in a subset of six nebulae. The He+/H+ abundances are typically in the range 0.07-0.12 by number, consistent with the range found by other investigators from lower resolution observations. However, one source in our sample, G32.80A, has a ratio of 0.158±0.047, possibly indicating local enrichment of helium.

  5. Phase separation in thin films: Effect of temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Prabhat K.; Puri, Sanjay; Binder, Kurt

    2013-09-01

    We study the phase-separation kinetics of a binary (AB) mixture confined in a thin film of thickness D with a temperature gradient. Starting from a Kawasaki-exchange kinetic Ising model, we use a master-equation approach to systematically derive an extension of the Cahn-Hilliard model for this system. We study the effect of temperature gradients perpendicular to the film with “neutral” (no preference for either A or B) surfaces. We highlight the rich phenomenology and pattern dynamics which arises from the interplay of phase separation and the temperature gradient.

  6. Subsurface temperatures and geothermal gradients on the North Slope, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.; Bird, Kenneth J.; Magoon, Leslie B.

    1989-01-01

    Geothermal gradients as interpreted from a series of high-resolution stabilized well-bore-temperature surveys from 46 North Slope, Alaska, wells vary laterally and vertically throughout the near-surface sediment (0-2,000 m). The data from these surveys have been used in conjunction with depths of ice-bearing permafrost, as interpreted from 102 well logs, to project geothermal gradients within and below the ice-bearing permafrost sequence. The geothermal gradients calculated from the projected temperature profiles are similar to the geothermal gradients measured in the temperature surveys. Measured and projected geothermal gradients in the ice-bearing permafrost sequence range from 1.5??C/100m in the Prudhoe Bay area to 5.1??C/100m in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA).

  7. Relating Paleoclimate Data and Past Temperature Gradients: Some Suggestive Rules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, David

    1999-01-01

    Understanding tropical sensitivity is perhaps the major concern confronting researchers, for both past and future climate change issues. Tropical data has been beset by contradictions, and many techniques applicable to the extratropics are either unavailable or fraught with uncertainty when applied at low latitudes. Paleoclimate data, if interpreted within the context of the latitudinal temperature gradient data they imply, can be used to estimate what happened to tropical temperatures in the past, and provide a first guess for what might happen in the future. The approach is made possible by the modeling result that atmospheric dynamical changes, and the climate impacts they produce, respond primarily to temperature gradient changes. Here we review some "rules" obtained from GCM (General Circulation Model) experiments with different sea surface temperature gradients and different forcing, that can be used to relate paleoclimate reconstructions to the likely temperature gradient changes they suggest.

  8. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1987-11-01

    In recent years, there was a growing need for electronics capable of sustained high-temperature operation for aerospace propulsion system instrumentation, control and condition monitoring, and integrated sensors. The desired operating temperature in some applications exceeds 600 C, which is well beyond the capability of currently available semiconductor devices. Silicon carbide displays a number of properties which make it very attractive as a semiconductor material, one of which is the ability to retain its electronic integrity at temperatures well above 600 C. An IR-100 award was presented to NASA Lewis in 1983 for developing a chemical vapor deposition process to grow single crystals of this material on standard silicon wafers. Silicon carbide devices were demonstrated above 400 C, but much work remains in the areas of crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication before the full potential of silicon carbide can be realized. The presentation will conclude with current and future high-temperature electronics program plans. Although the development of silicon carbide falls into the category of high-risk research, the future looks promising, and the potential payoffs are tremendous.

  9. Temperature gradients in female reproductive tissues.

    PubMed

    Hunter, R H F

    2012-04-01

    Deep body temperature in mammals is generally but incorrectly regarded as uniform. Alterations of temperature in oviducts and preovulatory Graafian follicles may play a vital role in gamete maturation, fertilization and early embryonic development. At a molecular level, the conformation of regulatory proteins is susceptible to changes in temperature. Deviation from physiological temperature during IVF procedures could thereby exert a profound influence on patterns of gene expression as the embryonic genome unfolds during early cleavage stages and act to generate specific anomalies. Systematic studies are urgently required. The temperature of internal body organs in mammals such as rabbits and humans is widely regarded as uniform, but this is not correct. Temperatures in reproductive tissues such as ovaries and oviducts vary according to the stage of a menstrual or oestrous cycle. Such changes in temperature are thought to be critically involved in the maturation of eggs and spermatozoa and thus in events shortly before and after fertilization. Proteins in the cytoplasm and nuclei of eggs and very young embryos respond to small shifts in temperature by changing their three-dimensional shape. Conformational modifications in regulatory proteins in the nucleus would influence patterns of gene expression in developing embryos and may, when perturbed, alter the sexual phenotype of an individual. In the practical context of IVF, studies are needed of the influence of culturing gametes and embryos at different temperatures and ranges of temperature on the patterns of gene expression in preimplantation embryos. PMID:22369989

  10. High temperature electronics technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dening, J. C.; Hurtle, D. E.

    1984-03-01

    This report summarizes the barrier metallization developments accomplished in a program intended to develop 300 C electronic controls capability for potential on-engine aircraft engine application. In addition, this report documents preliminary life test results at 300 C and above and discusses improved design practices required for high temperature integrated injection logic semiconductors. Previous Phase 1 activities focused on determining the viability of operating silicon semiconductor devices over the -55 C to +300 C temperature range. This feasibility was substantiated but the need for additional design work and process development was indicated. Phase 2 emphasized the development of a high temperature metallization system as the primary development need for high temperature silicon semiconductor applications.

  11. Surface Tension Gradients Induced by Temperature: The Thermal Marangoni Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gugliotti, Marcos; Baptisto, Mauricio S.; Politi, Mario J.

    2004-01-01

    Surface tensions gradients were generated in a thin liquid film because of the local increase in temperature, for demonstration purposes. This is performed using a simple experiment and allows different alternatives for heat generation to be used.

  12. Vacuum membrane distillation by microchip with temperature gradient.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaopeng; Kato, Shinji; Anazawa, Takanori

    2010-04-01

    A multilayered microchip (25 x 95 mm) used for vacuum distillation is designed, fabricated and tested by rectification of a water-methanol mixture. The polymer chip employs a cooling channel to generate a temperature gradient along a distillation channel below, which is separated into a channel (72 microm deep) for liquid phase and a channel (72 microm deep) for vapor phase by an incorporated microporous poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) membrane. The temperature gradient is controlled by adjusting hotplate temperature and flow rate of cooling water to make the temperatures in the stripping section higher than the increasing boiling points of the water-enriched liquids and the temperatures in the rectifying section lower than the decreasing dew points of the methanol-enriched vapors. The effects of temperature gradient, feed composition, feed flow rate and membrane pore size on the micro distillation are also investigated. A theoretical plate number up to 1.8 is achieved at the optimum conditions. PMID:20300677

  13. The temperature gradient in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    The available compositional data on planets and satellites can be used to place stringent limits on the thermal environment in the solar nebula. The densities of the terrestrial planets, Ceres and Vesta, the Galilean satellites, and Titan; the atmospheric compositions of several of these bodies; and geochemical and geophysical data on the earth combine to define a strong dependence of formation temperature on heliocentric distance. It is impossible to reconcile the available compositional data with any model in which the formation temperatures of these bodies are determined by radiative equilibrium with the sun, regardless of the sun's luminosity. Rather, the data support Cameron's hypothesis of a dense, convective solar nebula, opaque to solar radiation, with an adiabatic temperature-pressure profile.

  14. Material Gradients in Stretchable Substrates toward Integrated Electronic Functionality.

    PubMed

    Naserifar, Naser; LeDuc, Philip R; Fedder, Gary K

    2016-05-01

    The approach toward a stretchable electronic substrate employs multiple soft polymer layers patterned around silicon chips, which act as surrogates for conventional electronics chips, to create a controllable stiffness gradient. Adding just one intermediate polymer layer results in a six-fold increase in the strain failure threshold enabling the substrate to be stretched to over twice its length before delamination occurs. PMID:26989814

  15. Convective flows in enclosures with vertical temperature or concentration gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L. W.; Chai, A. T.; Sun, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    The transport process in the fluid phase during the growth of a crystal has a profound influence on the structure and quality of the solid phase. In vertical growth techniques the fluid phase is often subjected to vertical temperature and concentration gradients. The main objective is to obtain more experimental data on convective flows in enclosures with vertical temperature or concentration gradients. Among actual crystal systems the parameters vary widely. The parametric ranges studied for mass transfer are mainly dictated by the electrochemical system employed to impose concentration gradients. Temperature or concentration difference are maintained between two horizontal end walls. The other walls are kept insulated. Experimental measurements and observations were made of the heat transfer or mass transfer, flow patterns, and the mean and fluctuating temperature distribution. The method used to visualize the flow pattern in the thermal cases is an electrochemical pH-indicator method. Laser shadowgraphs are employed to visualize flow patterns in the solutal cases.

  16. Broadband acoustic omnidirectional absorber based on temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Feng; Zhao, Ping; Quan, Li; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Xiufen

    2014-08-01

    Previous research into acoustic omnidirectional absorber (AOA) has shown the feasibility of forming acoustic black hole to guide the incident wave into the central absorptive cavity. However, major restrictions to practical applications exist due to complexity of designing metamaterials and unchangeable working states. Here, we propose two cylindrical, two-dimensional AOA schemes based on temperature gradients for airborne applications. One scheme with accurately designed temperature gradients has a better absorption performance which can almost completely absorb the incident wave, while the other one with a simplified configuration has low complexity which makes it much easier to realize. Geometric acoustics is used to obtain the refractive index distributions with different radii, which is then utilized to deduce the desired temperature gradients. Both schemes are temperature-tuned with broad working bandwidth.

  17. Gradient Limitations in Room Temperature and Superconducting Acceleration Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N. A.

    2009-01-22

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx}10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R and D program.

  18. Gradient limitations in room temperature and superconducting acceleration structures

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.A.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx} 10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R&D program.

  19. Liquid phase stability under an extreme temperature gradient.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhi; Sasikumar, Kiran; Keblinski, Pawel

    2013-11-27

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we subject bulk liquid to a very high-temperature gradient and observe a stable liquid phase with a local temperature well above the boiling point. Also, under this high-temperature gradient, the vapor phase exhibits condensation into a liquid at a temperature higher than the saturation temperature, indicating that the observed liquid stability is not caused by nucleation barrier kinetics. We show that, assuming local thermal equilibrium, the phase change can be understood from the thermodynamic analysis. The observed elevation of the boiling point is associated with the interplay between the "bulk" driving force for the phase change and surface tension of the liquid-vapor interface that suppresses the transformation. This phenomenon is analogous to that observed for liquids in confined geometries. In our study, however, a low-temperature liquid, rather than a solid, confines the high-temperature liquid. PMID:24329454

  20. Liquid Phase Stability Under an Extreme Temperature Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhi; Sasikumar, Kiran; Keblinski, Pawel

    2013-11-01

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we subject bulk liquid to a very high-temperature gradient and observe a stable liquid phase with a local temperature well above the boiling point. Also, under this high-temperature gradient, the vapor phase exhibits condensation into a liquid at a temperature higher than the saturation temperature, indicating that the observed liquid stability is not caused by nucleation barrier kinetics. We show that, assuming local thermal equilibrium, the phase change can be understood from the thermodynamic analysis. The observed elevation of the boiling point is associated with the interplay between the “bulk” driving force for the phase change and surface tension of the liquid-vapor interface that suppresses the transformation. This phenomenon is analogous to that observed for liquids in confined geometries. In our study, however, a low-temperature liquid, rather than a solid, confines the high-temperature liquid.

  1. An Expression for the Temperature Gradient in Chaotic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Hudson

    2008-12-22

    A coordinate system adapted to the invariant structures of chaotic magnetic fields is constructed. The coordinates are based on a set of ghost-surfaces, defined via an action-gradient flow between the minimax and minimizing periodic orbits. The construction of the chaotic coordinates allows an expression describing the temperature gradient across a chaotic magnetic field to be derived. The results are in close agreement with a numerical calculation.

  2. Multispecies Density and Temperature Gradient Dependence of Quasilinear Particle and Energy Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt; R.V. Budny; W.M. Tang

    2004-08-09

    The variations of the normalized quasilinear particle and energy fluxes with artificial changes in the density and temperature gradients, as well as the variations of the linear growth rates and real frequencies, for ion temperature gradient and trapped-electron modes, are calculated. The quasilinear fluxes are normalized to the total energy flux, summed over all species. Here, realistic cases for tokamaks and spherical torii are considered which have two impurity species. For situations where there are substantial changes in the normalized fluxes, the ''diffusive approximation,'' in which the normalized fluxes are taken to be linear in the gradients, is seen to be inaccurate. Even in the case of small artificial changes in density or temperature gradients, changes in the fluxes of different species (''off-diagonal'') generally are significant, or even dominant, compared to those for the same species (''diagonal'').

  3. Rock alteration in an experimentally imposed temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Rock alteration in a dynamic (circulating) hydrothermal system can be applied to any geologic system with mobile fluids. Some examples are geothermal energy extraction, ore mineral extraction, and radioactive waste isolation. While isothermal systems yield important results, polythermal (i.e., temperature gradient) systems more closely model reactions of fluid moving through a rock reservoir. The above examples will generally involve temperature gradients across the rock reservoir. A controlled temperature gradient circulation system was developed to help define these rock-fluid reactions. Six fine grained prisms are placed along the axis of a 113 cm pressure vessel. The prisms are at 72, 119, 161, 209, 270, and 310{degrees}C under flow conditions of 4 cc/min. at 1/3 kbar total pressure. In this experiment a granodiorite was reacted with initially distilled water.

  4. Temperature Trapping: Energy-Free Maintenance of Constant Temperatures as Ambient Temperature Gradients Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiangying; Li, Ying; Jiang, Chaoran; Huang, Jiping

    2016-07-01

    It is crucial to maintain constant temperatures in an energy-efficient way. Here we establish a temperature-trapping theory for asymmetric phase-transition materials with thermally responsive thermal conductivities. Then we theoretically introduce and experimentally demonstrate a concept of an energy-free thermostat within ambient temperature gradients. The thermostat is capable of self-maintaining a desired constant temperature without the need of consuming energy even though the environmental temperature gradient varies in a large range. As a model application of the concept, we design and show a different type of thermal cloak that has a constant temperature inside its central region in spite of the changing ambient temperature gradient, which is in sharp contrast to all the existing thermal cloaks. This work has relevance to energy-saving heat preservation, and it provides guidance both for manipulating heat flow without energy consumption and for designing new metamaterials with temperature-responsive or field-responsive parameters in many disciplines such as thermotics, optics, electromagnetics, acoustics, mechanics, electrics, and magnetism.

  5. Temperature Trapping: Energy-Free Maintenance of Constant Temperatures as Ambient Temperature Gradients Change.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiangying; Li, Ying; Jiang, Chaoran; Huang, Jiping

    2016-07-29

    It is crucial to maintain constant temperatures in an energy-efficient way. Here we establish a temperature-trapping theory for asymmetric phase-transition materials with thermally responsive thermal conductivities. Then we theoretically introduce and experimentally demonstrate a concept of an energy-free thermostat within ambient temperature gradients. The thermostat is capable of self-maintaining a desired constant temperature without the need of consuming energy even though the environmental temperature gradient varies in a large range. As a model application of the concept, we design and show a different type of thermal cloak that has a constant temperature inside its central region in spite of the changing ambient temperature gradient, which is in sharp contrast to all the existing thermal cloaks. This work has relevance to energy-saving heat preservation, and it provides guidance both for manipulating heat flow without energy consumption and for designing new metamaterials with temperature-responsive or field-responsive parameters in many disciplines such as thermotics, optics, electromagnetics, acoustics, mechanics, electrics, and magnetism. PMID:27517778

  6. Critically Balanced Ion Temperature Gradient Turbulence in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.

    2011-09-09

    Scaling laws for ion temperature gradient driven turbulence in magnetized toroidal plasmas are derived and compared with direct numerical simulations. Predicted dependences of turbulence fluctuation amplitudes, spatial scales, and resulting heat fluxes on temperature gradient and magnetic field line pitch are found to agree with numerical results in both the driving and inertial ranges. Evidence is provided to support the critical balance conjecture that parallel streaming and nonlinear perpendicular decorrelation times are comparable at all spatial scales, leading to a scaling relationship between parallel and perpendicular spatial scales. This indicates that even strongly magnetized plasma turbulence is intrinsically three dimensional.

  7. Oil displacement through a porous medium with a temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Cláudio L. N.; Andrade, José S., Jr.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2011-06-01

    We investigate the effect of a temperature gradient on oil recovery in a two-dimensional pore-network model. The oil viscosity depends on temperature as μo∝eB/T, where B is a physicochemical parameter, depending on the type of oil, and T is the temperature. A temperature gradient is applied across the medium in the flow direction. Initially, the porous medium is saturated with oil, and then another fluid is injected. We have considered two cases representing different injection strategies. In the first case, the invading fluid viscosity is constant (finite viscosity ratio), while in the second one, the invading fluid is inviscid (infinite viscosity ratio). Our results show that for the case of finite viscosity ratio, recovery increases with ΔT independent of strength or sign of the gradient. For an infinite viscosity ratio, a positive temperature gradient is necessary to enhance recovery. Moreover, we show that for ΔT>0, the percentage of oil recovery generally decreases (increases) with B for a finite (infinite) viscosity ratio. Finally, we also extend our results for infinite viscosity ratio to a three-dimensional porous media geometry.

  8. Global gyrokinetic ion temperature gradient turbulence simulations of ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villard, L.; Angelino, P.; Bottino, A.; Brunner, S.; Jolliet, S.; McMillan, B. F.; Tran, T. M.; Vernay, T.

    2013-07-01

    Global gyrokinetic simulations of ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence in an ideal MHD ITER equilibrium plasma are performed with the ORB5 code. The noise control and field-aligned Fourier filtering procedures implemented in ORB5 are essential in obtaining numerically healthy results with a reasonable amount of computational effort: typical simulations require 109 grid points, 109 particles and, despite a particle per cell ratio of unity, achieve a signal to noise ratio larger than 50. As compared with a circular concentric configuration with otherwise similar parameters (same ρ* = 1/720), the effective heat diffusivity is considerably reduced for the ITER MHD equilibrium. A self-organized radial structure appears, with long-lived zonal flows (ZF), modulating turbulence heat transport and resulting in a corrugated temperature gradient profile. The ratio of long-lived ZF to the fluctuating ZF is markedly higher for the ITER MHD equilibrium as compared with circular configurations, thereby producing a more effective ITG turbulence suppression, in spite of a higher linear growth rate. As a result, the nonlinear critical temperature gradient, R/LTcrit,NL, is about twice the linear critical temperature gradient, R/LTcrit,lin. Moreover, the heat transport stiffness above the nonlinear threshold is considerably reduced as compared with circular cases. Plasma elongation is probably one of the essential causes of this behaviour: indeed, undamped ZF residual levels and geodesic acoustic mode damping are both increasing with elongation. Other possible causes of the difference, such as magnetic shear profile effects, are also investigated.

  9. Uniform Spinning Sampling Gradient Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David H.; Ahmad, Rizwan; Liu, Yangping; Chen, Zhiyu; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To improve the quality and speed of electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) acquisition by combining a uniform sampling distribution with spinning gradient acquisition. Theory and Methods A uniform sampling distribution was derived for spinning gradient EPRI acquisition (Uniform Spinning Sampling, USS) and compared to the existing (Equilinear Spinning Sampling, ESS) acquisition strategy. Novel corrections were introduced to reduce artifacts in experimental data. Results Simulations demonstrated that USS puts an equal number of projections near each axis whereas ESS puts excessive projections at one axis, wasting acquisition time. Artifact corrections added to the magnetic gradient waveforms reduced noise and correlation between projections. USS images had higher SNR (85.9±0.8 vs. 56.2±0.8) and lower mean-squared error than ESS images. The quality of the USS images did not vary with the magnetic gradient orientation, in contrast to ESS images. The quality of rat heart images was improved using USS compared to that with ESS or traditional fast-scan acquisitions. Conclusion A novel EPRI acquisition which combines spinning gradient acquisition with a uniform sampling distribution was developed. This USS spinning gradient acquisition offers superior SNR and reduced artifacts compared to prior methods enabling potential improvements in speed and quality of EPR imaging in biological applications. PMID:23475830

  10. An Enhanced Nonlinear Critical Gradient for Electron Turbulent Transport due to Reversed Magnetic Shear

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J. L.; Hammet, G. W.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Yuh, H. Y.; Candy, J.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.

    2011-05-11

    The first nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs) in the National Spherical Torus Experiment show that reversed magnetic shear can suppress thermal transport by increasing the nonlinear critical gradient for electron-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence to three times its linear critical value. An interesting feature of this turbulence is non- linearly driven off-midplane radial streamers. This work reinforces the experimental observation that magnetic shear is likely an effective way of triggering and sustaining e-ITBs in magnetic fusion devices.

  11. Effects of Spatial Gradients on Electron Runaway Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacNeice, Peter; Ljepojevic, N. N.

    1996-01-01

    The runaway process is known to accelerate electrons in many laboratory plasmas and has been suggested as an acceleration mechanism in some astrophysical plasmas, including solar flares. Current calculations of the electron velocity distributions resulting from the runaway process are greatly restricted because they impose spatial homogeneity on the distribution. We have computed runaway distributions which include consistent development of spatial gradients in the energetic tail. Our solution for the electron velocity distribution is presented as a function of distance along a finite length acceleration region, and is compared with the equivalent distribution for the infinitely long homogenous system (i.e., no spatial gradients), as considered in the existing literature. All these results are for the weak field regime. We also discuss the severe restrictiveness of this weak field assumption.

  12. Liquid mixture convection during phase separation in a temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamorgese, A. G.; Mauri, R.

    2011-03-01

    We simulate the phase separation of a low-viscosity binary mixture, assuming that the fluid system is confined between two walls that are cooled down to different temperatures below the critical point of the mixture, corresponding to quenches within the unstable range of its phase diagram. Spinodal decomposition patterns for off-critical mixtures are studied numerically in two dimensions in the creeping flow limit and for a large Lewis number, together with their dependence on the fluidity coefficient. Our numerical results reproduce the large-scale unidirectional migration of phase-separating droplets that was observed experimentally by Califano et al. ["Large-scale, unidirectional convection during phase separation of a density-matched liquid mixture," Phys. Fluids 17, 094109 (2005)], who measured typical speeds that are quite larger than the Marangoni velocity. To understand this finding, we then studied the temperature-gradient-induced motion of an isolated droplet of the minority phase embedded in a continuous phase, showing that when the drop is near local equilibrium, its speed is of the same order as the Marangoni velocity, i.e., it is proportional to the unperturbed temperature gradient and the fluidity coefficient. However, far from local equilibrium, i.e., for very large unperturbed temperature gradients, the drop first accelerates to a speed that is larger than the Marangoni velocity, then, later, it decelerates, exhibiting an increase-decrease behavior, as described by Yin et al. ["Thermocapillary migration of nondeformable drops," Phys. Fluids 20, 082101 (2008)]. Such behavior is due to the large nonequilibrium, Korteweg-driven convection, which at first accelerates the droplets to relatively large velocities, and then tends to induce an approximately uniform inside temperature distribution so that the drop experiences an effective temperature gradient that is much smaller than the unperturbed one and, consequently, decelerates.

  13. The non-analogue nature of Pliocene temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Daniel J.

    2015-09-01

    The strong warming of the North Atlantic and high latitudes in the Pliocene (5.3-2.6 million years ago) continually fails to be simulated in climate model simulations. Being the last period of Earth history with higher global temperatures and carbon dioxide levels similar to today, it is an important target period for palaeoclimate models. One of the key features of the Pliocene climate is the reduced meridional gradients, particularly in the high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. Here we show that previously unconsidered palaeogeographic changes (river routing, ocean bathymetry and additional landmass in the modern Barents Sea), in the North Atlantic region can produce significant temperature responses at high latitudes. Along with orbital forcing, this can significantly decrease equator to pole temperature gradients in the Atlantic Ocean. These additional forcings show that the large Arctic warming and significantly reduced temperature gradients in the Pliocene are not analogous to future warming and that careful consideration of all the possible climatic forcings is required to accurately simulate Pliocene climate.

  14. The temperature gradient between 100 and 120 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, T. M.; Carignan, G. R.

    1975-01-01

    Oxygen density profiles inferred from Ogo 6 green nightglow emission vary too sharply between 100 and 120 km to be consistent with temperature gradients in standard model atmospheres, and the eddy diffusion coefficient K determined from these observations reaches its maximum below 115 km. For three atomic oxygen profiles obtained at geographic latitudes of -27.69, +48.89, and +59.10 the temperature profiles required to create a downward flux that varies with altitude as the integrated photolytic production rate above that altitude are calculated, assuming K to be invariant with altitude and latitude. The oxygen distribution can be reconciled with a constant eddy coefficient above 100 km if the temperature gradient reaches a value between 10 and 20 deg K/km for low values of the eddy coefficient (about 500,000 sq cm/sec) or between 30 and 50 deg K/km for a higher eddy coefficient (about 1.6 million sq cm/sec). The maximum gradient for the Jacchia (1971) model is about 10 deg K/km. These temperature profiles predict Ar/N ratios consistent with those measured by sounding rockets. The low K profiles are large enough to remove a large part of the solar energy deposited below 120 km by thermal conduction.

  15. What causes cooling water temperature gradients in forested stream reaches?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, G.; Malcolm, I. A.; Sadler, J. P.; Hannah, D. M.

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have suggested that shading by riparian vegetation may reduce maximum water temperature and provide refugia for temperature sensitive aquatic organisms. Longitudinal cooling gradients have been observed during the daytime for stream reaches shaded by coniferous trees downstream of clear cuts, or deciduous woodland downstream of open moorland. However, little is known about the energy exchange processes that drive such gradients, especially in semi-natural woodland contexts, and in the absence of potentially confounding cool groundwater inflows. To address this gap, this study quantified and modelled variability in stream temperature and heat fluxes along an upland reach of the Girnock Burn (a tributary of the Aberdeenshire Dee, Scotland) where riparian landuse transitions from open moorland to semi-natural forest. Observations were made along a 1050 m reach using a spatially-distributed network of ten water temperature micro-loggers, three automatic weather stations and >200 hemispherical photographs, which were used to estimate incoming solar radiation. These data parameterised a high-resolution energy flux model, incorporating flow-routing, which predicted spatio-temporal variability in stream temperature. Variability in stream temperature was controlled largely by energy fluxes at the water column-atmosphere interface. Predominantly net energy gains occurred along the reach during daylight hours, and heat exchange across the bed-water column interface accounted for <1% of the net energy budget. For periods when daytime net radiation gains were high (under clear skies), differences between water temperature observations decreased in the streamwise direction; a maximum difference of 2.5 °C was observed between the upstream reach boundary and 1050 m downstream. Furthermore, daily maximum water temperature at 1050 m downstream was ≤1°C cooler than at the upstream reach boundary and lagged the occurrence of daily maximum water temperature

  16. Decadal Changes in the World's Coastal Latitudinal Temperature Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Hannes; Doherty, Owen

    2013-01-01

    Most of the world's living marine resources inhabit coastal environments, where average thermal conditions change predictably with latitude. These coastal latitudinal temperature gradients (CLTG) coincide with important ecological clines,e.g., in marine species diversity or adaptive genetic variations, but how tightly thermal and ecological gradients are linked remains unclear. A first step is to consistently characterize the world's CLTGs. We extracted coastal cells from a global 1°×1° dataset of weekly sea surface temperatures (SST, 1982–2012) to quantify spatial and temporal variability of the world's 11 major CLTGs. Gradient strength, i.e., the slope of the linear mean-SST/latitude relationship, varied 3-fold between the steepest (North-American Atlantic and Asian Pacific gradients: −0.91°C and −0.68°C lat−1, respectively) and weakest CLTGs (African Indian Ocean and the South- and North-American Pacific gradients: −0.28, −0.29, −0.32°C lat−1, respectively). Analyzing CLTG strength by year revealed that seven gradients have weakened by 3–10% over the past three decades due to increased warming at high compared to low latitudes. Almost the entire South-American Pacific gradient (6–47°S), however, has considerably cooled over the study period (−0.3 to −1.7°C, 31 years), and the substantial weakening of the North-American Atlantic gradient (−10%) was due to warming at high latitudes (42–60°N, +0.8 to +1.6°C,31 years) and significant mid-latitude cooling (Florida to Cape Hatteras 26–35°N, −0.5 to −2.2°C, 31 years). Average SST trends rarely resulted from uniform shifts throughout the year; instead individual seasonal warming or cooling patterns elicited the observed changes in annual means. This is consistent with our finding of increased seasonality (i.e., summer-winter SST amplitude) in three quarters of all coastal cells (331 of 433). Our study highlights the regionally variable footprint of global climate change

  17. Upper bound for heat transport due to ion temperature gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.; Choi, K.

    1996-12-01

    Turbulent transport due to an ion temperature gradient is studied in the context of a fluid description in slab geometry. An upper bound on the heat transport is obtained through the use of a variational principle. The physical constraint of energy conservation that is included in the principle keeps the bound finite. Additional constraint is needed and employed for the magnetic shear effect to be accounted for. The bounding curve of the heat flux versus the ion temperature gradient, {eta}{sub {ital i}}, is presented along with the profiles of the fluctuations. The bound, after an extrapolation, is argued to be in the neighborhood of what numerical simulation predicts. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Electric field gradient and electronic properties of crown thioether compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Filipe Camargo Dalmatti Alves; Nascimento, Rafael Rodrigues Do; Gonçalves, Marcos Brown; Cottenier, Stefaan; Caldas, Marília Junqueira; Petrilli, Helena Maria

    2010-04-01

    We compare published TDPAC experiments on 111Cd in the crown thioether C6H12S3AgCl with ab-initio electronic structure calculations performed within the framework of the Density Functional Theory using the Projector Augmented Wave method. We conclude from this comparison that the Cd atom at the very moment of the TDPAC experiment is positively charged, and we point out to a methodological difference between reproducing experimental electric-field gradients in molecules versus solid metals.

  19. Ultrasonic flowmeters: temperature gradients and transducer geometry effects.

    PubMed

    Willatzen, M

    2003-03-01

    Ultrasonic flowmeter performance is addressed for the case of cylindrically shaped flowmeters employing two reciprocal ultrasonic transducers A and B so as to measure time-of-flight differences between signals transmitted from transducer A towards B followed by an equivalent signal transmitted from transducer B towards A. In the case where a liquid flows through the flowmeter's measuring section ("spoolpiece"), the arrival times of the two signals differ by an amount related to the flow passing between the two transducers. Firstly, a detailed study of flow measurement errors with mean flow in the laminar flow regime is carried out as a function of the mode index and the transducer diameter/cylinder diameter ratio in the case where no temperature gradients are present in the flowmeter sensor. It is shown that all modes except the fundamental mode overestimate the mean flow by a factor of 33.33% while excitation of the fundamental mode solely give error-free measurements. The immediate consequences are that the flowmeter error decreases as the transducer diameter/cylinder diameter ratio approaches 1 from 0 reflecting the fact that the excitation level of the fundamental mode increases from almost 0 to 1 as this ratio approaches 1 from 0. Secondly, the effect on flowmeter performance due to flow-induced temperature gradients is examined. It is shown that the presence of temperature gradients leads to flowmeter errors at the higher-flow values even in the case where the fundamental mode is the only mode excited. It is also deduced that flowmeter errors in general depend on the distance between transducers A and B whether temperature gradients exist or not. This conclusion is not reflected in the usual definition of flowmeter errors given by the so-called mode-dependent deviation of measurement introduced in earlier works. PMID:12565074

  20. Moving-Temperature-Gradient Heat-Pipe Furnace Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.; Gernert, Nelson J.

    1993-01-01

    In improved apparatus, ampoule of material directionally solidified mounted in central hole of annular heat pipe, at suitable axial position between heated and cooled ends. Heated end held in fixed position in single-element furnace; other end left in ambient air or else actively cooled. Gradient of temperature made to move along heat pipe by changing pressure of noncondensable gas. In comparison with prior crystal-growing apparatuses, this one simpler, smaller, and more efficient.

  1. Effect of wind and temperature gradients on received acoustic energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brienzo, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of refraction due to wind and temperature gradients on energy received from low flying aircraft is examined. A series of helicopter and jet flyby's were recorded with a microphone array on two separate days, each with distinctly different meteorological conditions. Energy in the 100 to 200 Hertz band is shown as a function of aircraft range from the array, and compared with the output of the Fast Field Program.

  2. Salinity gradient power: influences of temperature and nanopore size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Shiojenn; Li, Yu-Ming; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Hsu, Jyh-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Salinity gradient power is a promising, challenging, and readily available renewable energy. Among various methods for harvesting this clean energy, nanofluidic reverse electrodialysis (NRED) is of great potential. Since ionic transport depends highly on the temperature, so is the efficiency of the associated power generated. Here, we conduct a theoretical analysis on the influences of temperature and nanopore size on NRED, focusing on the temperature and nanopore size. The results gathered reveal that the maximum power increases with increasing temperature, but the conversion efficiency depends weakly on temperature. In general, the smaller the nanopore radius or the longer the nanopore, the better the ion selectivity. These results provide desirable and necessary information for improving the performance of NRED as well as designing relevant units in renewable energy plants.

  3. Salinity gradient power: influences of temperature and nanopore size.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Shiojenn; Li, Yu-Ming; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Hsu, Jyh-Ping

    2016-01-28

    Salinity gradient power is a promising, challenging, and readily available renewable energy. Among various methods for harvesting this clean energy, nanofluidic reverse electrodialysis (NRED) is of great potential. Since ionic transport depends highly on the temperature, so is the efficiency of the associated power generated. Here, we conduct a theoretical analysis on the influences of temperature and nanopore size on NRED, focusing on the temperature and nanopore size. The results gathered reveal that the maximum power increases with increasing temperature, but the conversion efficiency depends weakly on temperature. In general, the smaller the nanopore radius or the longer the nanopore, the better the ion selectivity. These results provide desirable and necessary information for improving the performance of NRED as well as designing relevant units in renewable energy plants. PMID:26752789

  4. Evidence for density-gradient-driven trapped-electron modes in improved confinement RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, James; Chapman, Brett; Sarff, John; Terry, Paul; Williams, Zach; Ding, Weixing; Brower, David; Parke, Eli

    2015-11-01

    Density fluctuations in the large-density-gradient region of improved-confinement MST RFP plasmas exhibit features characteristic of the trapped-electron-mode (TEM), strong evidence that drift wave turbulence emerges in RFP plasmas when magnetic transport is reduced. In standard RFP plasmas, core transport is governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from current-driven tearing modes. Using inductive control, these tearing modes are reduced, improving confinement. The improved confinement is associated with substantial increases in the density and temperature gradients, and we present evidence for the onset of drift wave instability. Density fluctuations are measured with a multi-chord, laser-based interferometer. These fluctuations have wavenumbers kϕ *ρs <0.14, frequencies characteristic of drift waves (>50 kHz), and are clearly distinct from residual global tearing modes. Their amplitudes increase with the local density gradient, and require a critical density gradient. Gyrokinetic analysis provides supporting evidence of microinstability in these plasmas, in which the density-gradient-driven TEM is most unstable. The experimental threshold gradient is close to the predicted critical gradient for linear stability. Work supported by DOE.

  5. Considerations of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, S.C.; Kulsrud, R.M. ); Sudan, R. )

    1991-10-01

    The ion-temperature-gradient-driven instability is considered in this paper. Physical pictures are presented to clarify the nature of the instability. The saturation of a single eddy is modeled by a simple nonlinear equation. It is shown that eddies that are elongated in the direction of the temperature gradient are the most unstable and have the highest saturation amplitudes. In a sheared magnetic field, such elongated eddies twist with the field lines. This structure is shown to be an alternative to the usual Fourier mode picture in which the mode is localized around the surface where {ital k}{sub {parallel}} =0. These elongated twisting eddies, which are an integral part of the ballooning mode'' structure, could survive in a torus. The elongated eddies are shown to be unstable to secondary instabilities that are driven by the large gradients in the long eddy. It is argued that the mixing length'' is affected by this nonlinear process, and is unlikely to be a linear eigenmode width.

  6. Electron Bernstein wave electron temperature profile diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    G. Taylor; P. Efthimion; B. Jones; T. Munsat; J. Spaleta; J. Hosea; R. Kaita; R. Majeski; J. Menard

    2000-07-20

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either overdense, operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g. where the plasma frequency is much greater than the electron cyclotron frequency, as in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition. Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves that can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers, as a result of their large perpendicular wavenumber. This paper reports on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B{sub o} {approximately} 2 kG, {approximately}10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} and T{sub e} {approx} to 10 -- 200 eV. Results are presented for electromagnetic measurements of EBW emission, mode-converted near the plasma edge. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multi-point Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be less than or equal to T{sub e} and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe and a 140 GHz interferometer were employed to measure changes in edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance, where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for overdense plasmas.

  7. Thomson scattering in dense plasmas with density and temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortmann, C.; Thiele, R.; Fäustlin, R. R.; Bornath, Th.; Holst, B.; Kraeft, W.-D.; Schwarz, V.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, Th.; Redmer, R.

    2009-09-01

    Collective X-ray Thomson scattering has become a versatile tool for the diagnostics of dense plasmas. Assuming homogeneous density and temperature throughout the target sample, these parameters can be determined directly from the plasmon dispersion and the ratio of plasmon amplitudes via detailed balance. In inhomogeneous media, the scattering signal is an average of the density and temperature dependent scattering cross-section weighted with the density and temperature profiles. We analyse Thomson scattering spectra in the XUV range from near solid density hydrogen targets generated by free electron laser radiation. The influence of plasma inhomogeneities on the scattering spectrum is investigated by comparing density and temperature averaged scattering signals to calculations assuming homogeneous targets. We find discrepancies larger than 10% between the mean electron density and the effective density as well as between the mean temperature and the effective temperature.

  8. Effects of predation risk across a latitudinal temperature gradient.

    PubMed

    Matassa, Catherine M; Trussell, Geoffrey C

    2015-03-01

    The nonconsumptive effects (NCEs) of predators on prey behavior and physiology can influence the structure and function of ecological communities. However, the strength of NCEs should depend on the physiological and environmental contexts in which prey must choose between food and safety. For ectotherms, temperature effects on metabolism and foraging rates may shape these choices, thereby altering NCE strength. We examined NCEs in a rocky intertidal food chain across a latitudinal sea surface temperature gradient within the Gulf of Maine. The NCEs of green crabs (Carcinus maenas) on the foraging, growth, and growth efficiency of prey snails (Nucella lapillus) were consistent across a broad (~8.5 °C) temperature range, even though snails that were transplanted south consumed twice as many mussels (Mytilus edulis) and grew twice as much as snails that were transplanted north. The positive effects of warmer temperatures in the south allowed snails under high risk to perform similarly to or better than snails under low risk at cooler temperatures. Our results suggest that for prey populations residing at temperatures below their thermal optimum, the positive effects of future warming may offset the negative effects of predation risk. Such effects may be favorable to prey populations facing increased predation rates due to warmer temperatures associated with climate change. Attention to the direct and indirect effects of temperature on species interactions should improve our ability to predict the effects of climate change on ecological communities. PMID:25433694

  9. Theory of the jitter radiation in a magnetized plasma accompanying a temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Makoto; Fujiki, Kazushiro

    2016-04-01

    The linear stability of a magnetized plasma accompanying a temperature gradient is reexamined by using plasma kinetic theory. We propose that the anisotropic velocity distribution function should be decomposed into two components. One is proportional to the temperature gradient parallel to the background magnetic field. The other is proportional to the temperature gradient perpendicular to the background magnetic field. Since the amplitude of the anisotropic velocity distribution function is proportional to the heat conductivity, and the heat conductivity perpendicular to the magnetic field is strongly reduced, the first component of the anisotropic velocity distribution function is predominant. The anisotropic velocity distribution function induced by the temperature gradient along the background magnetic field drives plasma kinetic instability and circular polarized magnetic plasma waves are excited. We show that the instability is almost identical to the Weibel instability in the weakly magnetized plasma. However, in the case of the instability caused by the temperature gradient, whether wave vectors of modes are parallel to or antiparallel to the background magnetic field, the growth rate of one mode is suppressed and the growth rate of the other mode is enhanced due to the background magnetic field. In the strongly magnetized plasma, one mode is stabilized and only one of the modes remains unstable. The formulae for the jitter radiation spectrum emitted by relativistic electrons when they travel through the magnetized plasma with the plasma waves driven by the instability are deduced at the first time. We show that the synchrotron emission and the jitter radiation are simultaneously emitted from the same relativistic electron. The jitter radiation is expected to be circularly polarized but with a very small polarization degree since almost the same amounts of left-handed and right-handed circular polarized magnetic waves are excited by the instability.

  10. Testing Method for Heat Resistance Under Temperature Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, K.; Kawasaki, A.; Itoh, Y.; Harada, Y.; Ono, F.

    2007-12-01

    “Testing Method for Heat Resistance under Temperature Gradient” is a Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) newly established by the Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry, after deliberations by the Japanese Industrial Standards Committee, in accordance with the Industrial Standardization Law. This standard specified the testing method for heat resistance under temperature gradient of materials and coated members of equipment exposed to high temperature, such as aircraft engines, gas turbines, and so on. This paper introduces the principle and overview of the established standard. In addition, taking the heat cycle test using the burner rig for instance, we specifically illustrate the acquirable data and their analysis in the standard. Monitoring of the effective thermal conductivity and acoustic emission particularly enables to the non-destructive evaluation of failure cycle.

  11. Ion temperature gradient turbulence in helical and axisymmetric RFP plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Predebon, I.; Xanthopoulos, P.

    2015-05-15

    Turbulence induced by the ion temperature gradient (ITG) is investigated in the helical and axisymmetric plasma states of a reversed field pinch device by means of gyrokinetic calculations. The two magnetic configurations are systematically compared, both linearly and nonlinearly, in order to evaluate the impact of the geometry on the instability and its ensuing transport, as well as on the production of zonal flows. Despite its enhanced confinement, the high-current helical state demonstrates a lower ITG stability threshold compared to the axisymmetric state, and ITG turbulence is expected to become an important contributor to the total heat transport.

  12. Acoustic disturbances in a gas with an axial temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lariononv, V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Linear analysis acoustic disturbances in one-dimensional gas flow with a longitudinal gradient of the sound speed provided. Known wave equation for the acoustic velocity is used. In the case of linear distribution of the sound speed in the hot part of the flow equation has an exact analytic solution. This allows to define the expression describing the propagation acoustic disturbances in a gas with varying mean temperature and density. The results can be used to calculate the resonance frequencies of the gas oscillations in the laboratory and industrial combustors.

  13. Ion temperature gradient turbulence in helical and axisymmetric RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predebon, I.; Xanthopoulos, P.

    2015-05-01

    Turbulence induced by the ion temperature gradient (ITG) is investigated in the helical and axisymmetric plasma states of a reversed field pinch device by means of gyrokinetic calculations. The two magnetic configurations are systematically compared, both linearly and nonlinearly, in order to evaluate the impact of the geometry on the instability and its ensuing transport, as well as on the production of zonal flows. Despite its enhanced confinement, the high-current helical state demonstrates a lower ITG stability threshold compared to the axisymmetric state, and ITG turbulence is expected to become an important contributor to the total heat transport.

  14. Cryogenic Temperature-Gradient Foam/Substrate Tensile Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailhe, Christophe

    2003-01-01

    The figure shows a fixture for measuring the tensile strength of the bond between an aluminum substrate and a thermally insulating polymeric foam. The specimen is meant to be representative of insulating foam on an aluminum tank that holds a cryogenic liquid. Prior to the development of this fixture, tensile tests of this type were performed on foam/substrate specimens immersed in cryogenic fluids. Because the specimens were cooled to cryogenic temperatures throughout their thicknesses, they tended to become brittle and to fracture at loads below true bond tensile strengths. The present fixture is equipped to provide a thermal gradient from cryogenic temperature at the foam/substrate interface to room temperature on the opposite foam surface. The fixture includes an upper aluminum block at room temperature and a lower aluminum block cooled to -423 F (approx. -253 C) by use of liquid helium. In preparation for a test, the metal outer surface (the lower surface) of a foam/substrate specimen is bonded to the lower block and the foam outer surface (the upper surface) of the specimen is bonded to the upper block. In comparison with the through-the-thickness cooling of immersion testing, the cryogenic-to-room-temperature thermal gradient that exists during testing on this fixture is a more realistic approximation of the operational thermal condition of sprayed insulating foam on a tank of cryogenic liquid. Hence, tensile tests performed on this fixture provide more accurate indications of operational bond tensile strengths. In addition, the introduction of the present fixture reduces the cost of testing by reducing the amount of cryogenic liquid consumed and the time needed to cool a specimen.

  15. Improved Temperature-Gradient Incubator and the Maximal Growth Temperature and Heat Resistance of Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, R. Paul; Heiniger, Patricia K.

    1965-01-01

    An improved all-metal temperature-gradient incubator produces its gradient by means of a bar permanently installed in a near-vertical position with its lower end in a cool constant-temperature water bath and with thermostatically controlled heaters near its top. Bolts hold the incubator in contact with the temperature-gradient bar, and polyurethane foam insulates the entire assemblage during use. Maximal growth temperatures of 34 representative strains of Salmonella were found to be between 43.2 and 46.2 C. In an agar medium with an initial level of 106 cells per milliliter, no strain survived 50 C for 48 hr. S. senftenberg 775W showed no greater heat resistance at or near 48 C than did other species or other S. senftenberg strains. However, it was considerably more resistant than other strains at 55 C. Images Fig. 2 PMID:14264850

  16. 43 CFR 3252.14 - How must I complete a temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How must I complete a temperature gradient... LEASING Conducting Exploration Operations § 3252.14 How must I complete a temperature gradient well? Complete temperature gradient wells to allow for proper abandonment, and to prevent interzonal migration...

  17. 43 CFR 3252.13 - How long may I collect information from my temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How long may I collect information from my temperature gradient well? 3252.13 Section 3252.13 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... temperature gradient well? You may collect information from your temperature gradient well for as long as...

  18. 43 CFR 3252.14 - How must I complete a temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How must I complete a temperature gradient... LEASING Conducting Exploration Operations § 3252.14 How must I complete a temperature gradient well? Complete temperature gradient wells to allow for proper abandonment, and to prevent interzonal migration...

  19. 43 CFR 3252.14 - How must I complete a temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How must I complete a temperature gradient... LEASING Conducting Exploration Operations § 3252.14 How must I complete a temperature gradient well? Complete temperature gradient wells to allow for proper abandonment, and to prevent interzonal migration...

  20. 43 CFR 3252.14 - How must I complete a temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How must I complete a temperature gradient... LEASING Conducting Exploration Operations § 3252.14 How must I complete a temperature gradient well? Complete temperature gradient wells to allow for proper abandonment, and to prevent interzonal migration...

  1. 43 CFR 3252.13 - How long may I collect information from my temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How long may I collect information from my temperature gradient well? 3252.13 Section 3252.13 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... temperature gradient well? You may collect information from your temperature gradient well for as long as...

  2. 43 CFR 3252.13 - How long may I collect information from my temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How long may I collect information from my temperature gradient well? 3252.13 Section 3252.13 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... temperature gradient well? You may collect information from your temperature gradient well for as long as...

  3. 43 CFR 3252.13 - How long may I collect information from my temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How long may I collect information from my temperature gradient well? 3252.13 Section 3252.13 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... temperature gradient well? You may collect information from your temperature gradient well for as long as...

  4. Intermittent bursts in ion-temperature-gradient turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, L.; Wang, Z. X.; Hu, Z. Q.; Li, J. Q.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Linear and nonlinear evolution of ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) modes is numerically investigated by using a Landau-fluid model in a sheared slab geometry. Dependence of the linear growth rates of ITG modes with different radial mode numbers on various equilibrium parameters is discussed in detail. It is found that the ITG mode with a higher radial mode number is the dominantly unstable one in a narrow current sheet system with a low magnetic shear. In nonlinear simulations with different magnetic shears, two types of nonlinear states, specifically, oscillatory relaxation to a steady state and an intermittent bursting state, are observed in the weak turbulence regime. Similar phenomena of both nonlinear states are also observed in the simulations with different temperature gradients. The basic physical processes of both nonlinear states are thoroughly analyzed by means of quasilinear simulations. It is found that the system relaxes to a steady state when the ITG mode is slightly unstable, whereas it enters an intermittent burst state when the ITG mode is more unstable. During each burst, the ITG mode with a higher radial mode number becomes the dominant one due to the energy cascade in kx space, which is induced by self-generated zonal flows.

  5. Scalings of energetic particle transport by ion temperature gradient microturbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Wenlu; Decyk, Viktor; Holod, Ihor; Xiao Yong; Lin Zhihong; Chen Liu

    2010-05-15

    Transport scaling of energetic particles by ion temperature gradient microturbulence in magnetized plasmas is studied in massively paralleled gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that the diffusivity decreases drastically at high particles energy (E) to plasma temperature (T) ratio because of the averaging effects of the large gyroradius and drift-orbit width, and the fast wave-particle decorrelation. At high energy, the diffusivity follows a (E/T){sup -1} scaling for purely passing particles, a (E/T){sup -2} scaling for deeply trapped particles and a (E/T){sup -1} scaling for particles with an isotropic velocity distribution since the diffusivity therein is contributed mostly by the passing particles.

  6. Acoustical power amplification and damping by temperature gradients.

    PubMed

    Biwa, Tetsushi; Komatsu, Ryo; Yazaki, Taichi

    2011-01-01

    Ceperley proposed a concept of a traveling wave heat engine ["A pistonless Stirling engine-The traveling wave heat engine," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 66, 1508-1513 (1979).] that provided a starting point of thermoacoustics today. This paper verifies experimentally his idea through observation of amplification and strong damping of a plane acoustic traveling wave as it passes through axial temperature gradients. The acoustic power gain is shown to obey a universal curve specified by a dimensionless parameter ωτα; ω is the angular frequency and τα is the relaxation time for the gas to thermally equilibrate with channel walls. As an application of his idea, a three-stage acoustic power amplifier is developed, which attains the gain up to 10 with a moderate temperature ratio of 2.3. PMID:21302995

  7. Demonstrating the Temperature Gradient Impact on Grain Growth in UO2 Using the Phase Field Method

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R Tonks; Yongfeng Zhang; Xianming Bai; Paul C Millett

    2014-01-01

    Grain boundaries (GBs) are driven to migrate up a temperature gradient. In this work, we use a phase field (PF) model to investigate the impact of temperature gradients on normal grain growth. GB motion in 2D UO2 polycrystals is predicted under increasing temperature gradients. We find that the temperature gradient does not significantly impact the average grain growth behavior, because the curvature driving force is dominant. However, it does cause significant local migration of the individual grains. In addition, the change in the GB mobility due to the temperature gradient results in larger grains in the hot portion of the polycrystal.

  8. An optimized resistor pattern for temperature gradient control in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selva, Bertrand; Marchalot, Julien; Jullien, Marie-Caroline

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility of generating high-temperature gradients with a linear temperature profile when heating is provided in situ. Thanks to improved optimization algorithms, the shape of resistors, which constitute the heating source, is optimized by applying the genetic algorithm NSGA-II (acronym for the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm) (Deb et al 2002 IEEE Trans. Evol. Comput. 6 2). Experimental validation of the linear temperature profile within the cavity is carried out using a thermally sensitive fluorophore, called Rhodamine B (Ross et al 2001 Anal. Chem. 73 4117-23, Erickson et al 2003 Lab Chip 3 141-9). The high level of agreement obtained between experimental and numerical results serves to validate the accuracy of this method for generating highly controlled temperature profiles. In the field of actuation, such a device is of potential interest since it allows for controlling bubbles or droplets moving by means of thermocapillary effects (Baroud et al 2007 Phys. Rev. E 75 046302). Digital microfluidics is a critical area in the field of microfluidics (Dreyfus et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 14) as well as in the so-called lab-on-a-chip technology. Through an example, the large application potential of such a technique is demonstrated, which entails handling a single bubble driven along a cavity using simple and tunable embedded resistors.

  9. Non-local gyrokinetic model of linear ion-temperature-gradient modes

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, S.; Anderson, J.

    2012-08-15

    The non-local properties of anomalous transport in fusion plasmas are still an elusive topic. In this work, a theory of non-local linear ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) drift modes while retaining non-adiabatic electrons and finite temperature gradients is presented, extending the previous work [S. Moradi et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 062106 (2011)]. A dispersion relation is derived to quantify the effects on the eigenvalues of the unstable ion temperature gradient modes and non-adiabatic electrons on the order of the fractional velocity operator in the Fokker-Planck equation. By solving this relation for a given eigenvalue, it is shown that as the linear eigenvalues of the modes increase, the order of the fractional velocity derivative deviates from two and the resulting equilibrium probability density distribution of the plasma, i.e., the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation, deviates from a Maxwellian and becomes Levy distributed. The relative effect of the real frequency of the ITG mode on the deviation of the plasma from Maxwellian is larger than from the growth rate. As was shown previously the resulting Levy distribution of the plasma may in turn significantly alter the transport as well.

  10. A sandwich-designed temperature-gradient incubator for studies of microbial temperature responses.

    PubMed

    Elsgaard, Lars; Jørgensen, Leif Wagner

    2002-03-01

    A temperature-gradient incubator (TGI) is described, which produces a thermal gradient over 34 aluminium modules (15x30x5 cm) intersected by 2-mm layers of partly insulating graphite foil (SigraFlex Universal). The new, sandwich-designed TGI has 30 rows of six replicate sample wells for incubation of 28-ml test tubes. An electric plate heats one end of the TGI, and the other end is cooled by thermoelectric Peltier elements in combination with a liquid cooling system. The TGI is equipped with 24 calibrated Pt-100 temperature sensors and insulated by polyurethane plates. A PC-operated SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) software (Genesis 4.20) is applied for temperature control using three advanced control loops. The precision of the TGI temperature measurements was better than +/-0.12 degrees C, and for a 0-40 degrees C gradient, the temperature at the six replicate sample wells varied less than +/-0.04 degrees C. Temperatures measured in incubated water samples closely matched the TGI temperatures, which showed a linear relationship to the sample row number. During operation for 8 days with a gradient of 0-40 degrees C, the temperature at the cold end was stable within +/-0.02 degrees C, while the temperatures at the middle and the warm end were stable within +/-0.08 degrees C (n=2370). Using the new TGI, it was shown that the fine-scale (1 degrees C) temperature dependence of S(o) oxidation rates in agricultural soil (0-29 degrees C) could be described by the Arrhenius relationship. The apparent activation energy (E(a)) for S(o) oxidation was 79 kJ mol(-1), which corresponded to a temperature coefficient (Q(10)) of 3.1. These data demonstrated that oxidation of S(o) in soil is strongly temperature-dependent. In conclusion, the new TGI allowed a detailed study of microbial temperature responses as it produced a precise, stable, and certifiable temperature gradient by the new and combined use of sandwich-design, thermoelectric cooling, and advanced

  11. Temperature Coefficient of Secondary Electron Emission: A Novel Thermal Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Md. Imran; Lubner, Sean Daniel; Ogletree, David Frank; Wong, Ed; Dames, Chris

    State of the art nanoscale temperature mapping techniques include Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) and optical thermoreflectance, though these have the challenges of requiring sample contact and being diffraction limited, respectively. Near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) can beat the diffraction limit but still cannot measure temperature at 10s of nanometer resolution. SEM is well known for topographic imaging but has not been previously used for thermal mapping. Past literature suggested that secondary electron yields might have a small temperature dependence due to electron-phonon scattering and/or temperature dependence of work function. We previously measured the temperature coefficient of secondary electron emission of several group IV and III-V semiconductors and found it to range from around 100 to 1000 ppm/K. Here, we utilize this to map a spatial temperature gradient in an SEM image. We implement a double-heater structure to produce a temperature gradient along the plane of a substrate. The primary electron beam is scanned across the sample's surface while the emitted (secondary plus backscattered) electron current and net absorbed sample currents are simultaneously recorded. The results demonstrate the ability to map a spatial temperature gradient.

  12. Effects of Temperature Gradients and Heat Fluxes on High-Temperature Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.

    2008-04-01

    The effects of a temperature gradient and heat flux on point defect diffusion in protective oxide scales were examined. Irreversible thermodynamics were used to expand Fick’s first law of diffusion to include a heat-flux term—a Soret effect. Oxidation kinetics were developed for the oxidation of cobalt and of nickel doped with chromium. Research is described to verify the effects of a heat flux by oxidizing pure cobalt in a temperature gradient at 900 °C, and comparing the kinetics to isothermal oxidation. No evidence of a heat flux effect was found.

  13. Fluid simulations of toroidal ion temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, I.; Isliker, H.; Pavlenko, V.P.; Hizanidis, K.; Vlahos, L.

    2006-02-15

    The evolution of the toroidal ion temperature gradient mode instability is numerically studied by using the equations based on the standard reactive fluid model. The long-term dynamics of the instability are investigated using random-phase, small-amplitude fluctuations for initial conditions. The main events during the evolution of the instability that lead to the formation of large-scale coherent structures are described and the role of the dominant nonlinearities is clarified. The polarization drift nonlinearity leads to the inverse energy cascade while the convective ion heat nonlinearity is responsible for the saturation of the instability. Finally, the sensitivity of the saturated state to the initial plasma conditions is examined.

  14. Coherent structures in ion temperature gradient turbulence-zonal flow

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rameswar; Singh, R.; Kaw, P.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; Diamond, P. H.

    2014-10-15

    Nonlinear stationary structure formation in the coupled ion temperature gradient (ITG)-zonal flow system is investigated. The ITG turbulence is described by a wave-kinetic equation for the action density of the ITG mode, and the longer scale zonal mode is described by a dynamic equation for the m = n = 0 component of the potential. Two populations of trapped and untrapped drift wave trajectories are shown to exist in a moving frame of reference. This novel effect leads to the formation of nonlinear stationary structures. It is shown that the ITG turbulence can self-consistently sustain coherent, radially propagating modulation envelope structures such as solitons, shocks, and nonlinear wave trains.

  15. Quasi-steady temperature gradient metamorphism in idealized, dry snow

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M. . Methods Development Group); Burns, P.J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Sommerfeld, R.A. )

    1994-03-01

    A three-dimensional model for heat and mass transport in microscale ice lattices of dry snow is formulated consistent with conservation laws and solid-vapor interface constraints. A finite element model that employs continuous mesh deformation is developed, and calculation of the effective diffusion rates in snow, metamorphosing under a temperature gradient, is performed. Results of the research provide basic insight into the movement of heat and water vapor in seasonal snowcovers. Agreement between the numerical results and measured data of effective thermal conductivity is excellent. The enhancement to the water vapor diffusion rate in snow is bracketed in the range of 1.05--2.0 times that of water vapor in dry air.

  16. Role of density gradient driven trapped electron mode turbulence in the H-mode inner core with electron heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, D. R.; Burrell, K. H.; Guttenfelder, W.; Rhodes, T. L.; Dimits, A. M.; Bravenec, R.; Grierson, B. A.; Holland, C.; Lohr, J.; Marinoni, A.; McKee, G. R.; Petty, C. C.; Rost, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Zemedkun, S.; Zeng, L.

    2016-05-01

    A series of DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] low torque quiescent H-mode experiments show that density gradient driven trapped electron mode (DGTEM) turbulence dominates the inner core of H-mode plasmas during strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH). Adding 3.4 MW ECH doubles Te/Ti from 0.5 to 1.0, which halves the linear DGTEM critical density gradient, locally reducing density peaking, while transport in all channels displays extreme stiffness in the density gradient. This suggests that fusion α-heating may degrade inner core confinement in H-mode plasmas with moderate density peaking and low collisionality, with equal electron and ion temperatures, key conditions expected in burning plasmas. Gyrokinetic simulations using GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] (and GENE [Jenko et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000)]) closely match not only particle, energy, and momentum fluxes but also density fluctuation spectra from Doppler backscattering (DBS), with and without ECH. Inner core DBS density fluctuations display discrete frequencies with adjacent toroidal mode numbers, which we identify as DGTEMs. GS2 [Dorland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5579 (2000)] predictions show the DGTEM can be suppressed, to avoid degradation with electron heating, by broadening the current density profile to attain q0>qmin>1 .

  17. Temperature effects on fish production across a natural thermal gradient.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, Eoin J; Ólafsson, Ólafur P; Demars, Benoît O L; Friberg, Nikolai; Guðbergsson, Guðni; Hannesdóttir, Elísabet R; Jackson, Michelle C; Johansson, Liselotte S; McLaughlin, Órla B; Ólafsson, Jón S; Woodward, Guy; Gíslason, Gísli M

    2016-09-01

    Global warming is widely predicted to reduce the biomass production of top predators, or even result in species loss. Several exceptions to this expectation have been identified, however, and it is vital that we understand the underlying mechanisms if we are to improve our ability to predict future trends. Here, we used a natural warming experiment in Iceland and quantitative theoretical predictions to investigate the success of brown trout as top predators across a stream temperature gradient (4-25 °C). Brown trout are at the northern limit of their geographic distribution in this system, with ambient stream temperatures below their optimum for maximal growth, and above it in the warmest streams. A five-month mark-recapture study revealed that population abundance, biomass, growth rate, and production of trout all increased with stream temperature. We identified two mechanisms that contributed to these responses: (1) trout became more selective in their diet as stream temperature increased, feeding higher in the food web and increasing in trophic position; and (2) trophic transfer through the food web was more efficient in the warmer streams. We found little evidence to support a third potential mechanism: that external subsidies would play a more important role in the diet of trout with increasing stream temperature. Resource availability was also amplified through the trophic levels with warming, as predicted by metabolic theory in nutrient-replete systems. These results highlight circumstances in which top predators can thrive in warmer environments and contribute to our knowledge of warming impacts on natural communities and ecosystem functioning. PMID:26936833

  18. Collisional model of quasilinear transport driven by toroidal electrostatic ion temperature gradient modes

    SciTech Connect

    Pusztai, I.; Fueloep, T.; Candy, J.; Hastie, R. J.

    2009-07-15

    The stability of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes and the quasilinear fluxes driven by them are analyzed in weakly collisional tokamak plasmas using a semianalytical model based on an approximate solution of the gyrokinetic equation, where collisions are modeled by a Lorentz operator. Although the frequencies and growth rates of ITG modes far from threshold are only very weakly sensitive to the collisionality, the a/L{sub Ti} threshold for stability is affected significantly by electron-ion collisions. The decrease in collisionality destabilizes the ITG mode driving an inward particle flux, which leads to the steepening of the density profile. Closed analytical expressions for the electron and ion density and temperature responses have been derived without expansion in the smallness of the magnetic drift frequencies. The results have been compared with gyrokinetic simulations with GYRO and illustrated by showing the scalings of the eigenvalues and quasilinear fluxes with collisionality, temperature scale length, and magnetic shear.

  19. Role of Density Gradient Driven Trapped Electron Modes in the H-Mode Inner Core with Electron Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, D.

    2015-11-01

    We present new experiments and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations showing that density gradient driven TEM (DGTEM) turbulence dominates the inner core of H-Mode plasmas during strong electron heating. Thus α-heating may degrade inner core confinement in H-Mode plasmas with moderate density peaking. These DIII-D low torque quiescent H-mode experiments were designed to study DGTEM turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations using GYRO (and GENE) closely match not only particle, energy, and momentum fluxes, but also density fluctuation spectra, with and without ECH. Adding 3.4 MW ECH doubles Te /Ti from 0.5 to 1.0, which halves the linear TEM critical density gradient, locally flattening the density profile. Density fluctuations from Doppler backscattering (DBS) intensify near ρ = 0.3 during ECH, displaying a band of coherent fluctuations with adjacent toroidal mode numbers. GYRO closely reproduces the DBS spectrum and its change in shape and intensity with ECH, identifying these as coherent TEMs. Prior to ECH, parallel flow shear lowers the effective nonlinear DGTEM critical density gradient 50%, but is negligible during ECH, when transport displays extreme stiffness in the density gradient. GS2 predictions show the DGTEM can be suppressed, to avoid degradation with electron heating, by broadening the current density profile to attain q0 >qmin > 1 . A related experiment in the same regime varied the electron temperature gradient in the outer half-radius (ρ ~ 0 . 65) using ECH, revealing spatially coherent 2D mode structures in the Te fluctuations measured by ECE imaging. Fourier analysis with modulated ECH finds a threshold in Te profile stiffness. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-08ER54966 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  20. Measurement of temperature and temperature gradient in millimeter samples by chlorine NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lužnik, Janko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2009-09-01

    A mini-thermometer based on the 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequency temperature dependence in the chlorates KClO3 and NaClO3 was built and successfully tested by measuring temperature and temperature gradient at 77 K and higher in about 100 mm3 active volume of a mini Joule-Thomson refrigerator. In the design of the tank-circuit coil, an array of small coils connected in series enabled us (a) to achieve a suitable ratio of inductance to capacity in the NQR spectrometer input tank circuit, (b) to use a single crystal of KClO3 or NaClO3 (of 1-2 mm3 size) in one coil as a mini-thermometer with a resolution of 0.03 K and (c) to construct a system for measuring temperature gradients when the spatial coordinates of each chlorate single crystal within an individual coil are known.

  1. Magnetic compressibility and ion-temperature-gradient-driven microinstabilities in magnetically confined plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zocco, A.; Helander, P.; Connor, J. W.

    2015-08-01

    The electromagnetic theory of the strongly driven ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) instability in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas is developed. Stabilizing and destabilizing effects are identified, and a critical βe (the ratio of the electron to magnetic pressure) for stabilization of the toroidal branch of the mode is calculated for magnetic equilibria independent of the coordinate along the magnetic field. Its scaling is βe  ∼  LTe/R, where LTe is the characteristic electron temperature gradient length, and R the major radius of the torus. We conjecture that a fast particle population can cause a similar stabilization due to its contribution to the equilibrium pressure gradient. For sheared equilibria, the boundary of marginal stability of the electromagnetic correction to the electrostatic mode is also given. For a general magnetic equilibrium, we find a critical length (for electromagnetic stabilization) of the extent of the unfavourable curvature along the magnetic field. This is a decreasing function of the local magnetic shear.

  2. Temperature Gradient Reconstructions from the Eastern Equatorial Pacific Cold Tongue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, H. L.; Ravelo, C.; Hovan, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) reconstructions from the Western and Eastern Equatorial Pacific (WEP and EEP) indicate the Equatorial Pacific was in a permanent El Niño-like state during the early Pliocene. Specifically, SST in the WEP was nearly the same as today, while SST in the EEP cold tongue region was 2-3 °C warmer than today. Climatic transitions recorded in the EEP are of particular interest due to the region’s sensitivity to changes in upwelling and thermocline depth, and due to its role in the global ocean heat balance. However, not much is known about the evolution of the EEP cold tongue. This study aims to reconstruct the east-west and north-south gradients within the EEP using new SST and sub-surface temperature records from ODP Sites 848, 849, and 853 and published paleoceanographic records from the EEP to examine the temporal and spatial evolution of the EEP cold tongue from the Pliocene to Recent. Mg/Ca analyses on Globigerinoides sacculifer and Globorotalia tumida and alkenone analyses have been made to reconstruct east-west and north-south SST and thermocline depth, respectively. Currently, G. tumida Mg/Ca records have been generated for Sites 848 (most southern) and 853 (most northern) and G. sacculifer Mg/Ca and alkenone records have been generated for Site 848. This study compares new data to published data to achieve exceptional spatial coverage of the EEP cold tongue. Comparison of SST data to reconstructions of thermocline temperatures, paleoproductivity, and wind field strength will provide insight into the underlying causes of changes in the intensity and spatial extent of the cold tongue. Understanding these causes will aid in explaining the transition from the permanent El Niño-like state to modern conditions as climate cooled through the Pliocene.

  3. The radial gradients and collisional properties of solar wind electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilvie, K. W.; Scudder, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The plasma instrument on Mariner 10 carried out measurements of electron density and temperature in the interplanetary medium between heliocentric distances of 0.85 and 0.45 AU. Due to the stable coronal configuration and low solar activity during the period of observation, the radial variations of these quantities could be obtained. The power-law exponent of the core temperature was measured to be -0.3 + or - 0.04, and the halo temperature was found to be almost independent of heliocentric distance. The exponent of the power law for the density variation was 2.5 + or - 0.2 and the extrapolated value at 1 AU was consistent with measured values during the same period. Calculations of the core electron self-collision time, and the core-halo equipartition time were made as a function of radial distance. These measurements indicate a macroscale picture of a Coulomb-collisional core and a collisionless isothermal halo. Extrapolating back to the sun, core and halo temperatures become equal at a radial distance of approx. 2-15 radii.

  4. Tightly linked zonal and meridional sea surface temperature gradients over the past five million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Alexey V.; Burls, Natalie J.; Lawrence, Kira T.; Peterson, Laura C.

    2015-12-01

    The climate of the tropics and surrounding regions is defined by pronounced zonal (east-west) and meridional (equator to mid-latitudes) gradients in sea surface temperature. These gradients control zonal and meridional atmospheric circulations, and thus the Earth’s climate. Global cooling over the past five million years, since the early Pliocene epoch, was accompanied by the gradual strengthening of these temperature gradients. Here we use records from the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, including a new alkenone palaeotemperature record from the South Pacific, to reconstruct changes in zonal and meridional sea surface temperature gradients since the Pliocene, and assess their connection using a comprehensive climate model. We find that the reconstructed zonal and meridional temperature gradients vary coherently over this time frame, showing a one-to-one relationship between their changes. In our model simulations, we systematically reduce the meridional sea surface temperature gradient by modifying the latitudinal distribution of cloud albedo or atmospheric CO2 concentration. The simulated zonal temperature gradient in the equatorial Pacific adjusts proportionally. These experiments and idealized modelling indicate that the meridional temperature gradient controls upper-ocean stratification in the tropics, which in turn controls the zonal gradient along the equator, as well as heat export from the tropical oceans. We conclude that this tight linkage between the two sea surface temperature gradients posits a fundamental constraint on both past and future climates.

  5. Porous cobalt spheres for high temperature gradient magnetically assisted fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.; Jovanovic, Goran N.; Wheeler, Richard R.; Sornchamni, Thana

    2003-02-20

    Porous metallic cobalt spheres have been prepared as high temperature capable media for employment in gradient magnetically assisted fluidization and filtration technologies. Cobalt impregnated alginate beads are first formed by extrusion of an aqueous suspension of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} into a Co(II) chloride solution. The organic polymer is thermally decomposed yielding cobalt oxide spheres, followed by reduction to the metallic state, and densification. Cobalt beads have been produced with porosities ranging between 10 and 50%, depending upon sintering conditions. The product media have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption porosimetry, and vibrating sample magnetometry.

  6. Porous cobalt spheres for high temperature gradient magnetically assisted fluidized beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.; Jovanovic, Goran N.; Wheeler, Richard R Jr; Sornchamni, Thana

    2003-01-01

    Porous metallic cobalt spheres have been prepared as high temperature capable media for employment in gradient magnetically assisted fluidization and filtration technologies. Cobalt impregnated alginate beads are first formed by extrusion of an aqueous suspension of Co3O4 into a Co(II) chloride solution. The organic polymer is thermally decomposed yielding cobalt oxide spheres, followed by reduction to the metallic state, and densification. Cobalt beads have been produced with porosities ranging between 10 and 50%, depending upon sintering conditions. The product media have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption porosimetry, and vibrating sample magnetometry. c2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Chaos in toroidal ion-temperature-gradient-driven modes in dust-contaminated magnetoplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamar, Anisa; Yaqub Khan, M.; Atta-Ullah-Shah; Mirza, Arshad M.; Ayub, M.

    2011-06-01

    A new set of nonlinear equations for toroidal ion-temperature-gradient-driven (ITGD) drift-dissipative waves is derived by using Braginskii's transport model of the ion dynamics and the Boltzmann distribution of electrons in the presence of negatively charged dust grains. The temporal behaviour of the nonlinear ITGD mode is found to be governed by three nonlinear equations for the amplitudes, which is a generalization of Lorenz- and Stenflo-type equations admitting chaotic trajectories. The linear stability analysis has been presented and stationary points for our generalized mode coupling equations are also derived.

  8. Ion temperature gradient driven transport in tokamaks with square shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, N.; Dorland, W.

    2010-06-15

    Advanced tokamak schemes which may offer significant improvement to plasma confinement on the usual large aspect ratio Dee-shaped flux surface configuration are of great interest to the fusion community. One possibility is to introduce square shaping to the flux surfaces. The gyrokinetic code GS2[Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1996)] is used to study linear stability and the resulting nonlinear thermal transport of the ion temperature gradient driven (ITG) mode in tokamak equilibria with square shaping. The maximum linear growth rate of ITG modes is increased by negative squareness (diamond shaping) and reduced by positive values (square shaping). The dependence of thermal transport produced by saturated ITG instabilities on squareness is not as clear. The overall trend follows that of the linear instability, heat and particle fluxes increase with negative squareness and decrease with positive squareness. This is contradictory to recent experimental results [Holcomb et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056116 (2009)] which show a reduction in transport with negative squareness. This may be reconciled as a reduction in transport (consistent with the experiment) is observed at small negative values of the squareness parameter.

  9. Tripolar vortex formation in dense quantum plasma with ion-temperature-gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Qamar, Anisa; Ata-ur-Rahman; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2012-05-15

    We have derived system of nonlinear equations governing the dynamics of low-frequency electrostatic toroidal ion-temperature-gradient mode for dense quantum magnetoplasma. For some specific profiles of the equilibrium density, temperature, and ion velocity gradients, the nonlinear equations admit a stationary solution in the form of a tripolar vortex. These results are relevant to understand nonlinear structure formation in dense quantum plasmas in the presence of equilibrium ion-temperature and density gradients.

  10. 43 CFR 3252.12 - How deep may I drill a temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How deep may I drill a temperature... RESOURCE LEASING Conducting Exploration Operations § 3252.12 How deep may I drill a temperature gradient well? (a) You may drill a temperature gradient well to any depth that we approve in your...

  11. 43 CFR 3252.12 - How deep may I drill a temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How deep may I drill a temperature... RESOURCE LEASING Conducting Exploration Operations § 3252.12 How deep may I drill a temperature gradient well? (a) You may drill a temperature gradient well to any depth that we approve in your...

  12. 43 CFR 3252.12 - How deep may I drill a temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How deep may I drill a temperature... RESOURCE LEASING Conducting Exploration Operations § 3252.12 How deep may I drill a temperature gradient well? (a) You may drill a temperature gradient well to any depth that we approve in your...

  13. 43 CFR 3252.12 - How deep may I drill a temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How deep may I drill a temperature... RESOURCE LEASING Conducting Exploration Operations § 3252.12 How deep may I drill a temperature gradient well? (a) You may drill a temperature gradient well to any depth that we approve in your...

  14. Heat transport in steep temperature gradients. I - Small flaring solar loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    Results on nonlocal heat transport which properly takes into account the presence of fast electrons with mean free paths much longer than the temperature scale height L are reviewed. In terms of the mean free path for the slow bulk electrons, lambda(s), the nonlocal effects are important whenever lambda(s)/L greater than 0.001, with the following consequences. The heat flux in the hot part of the gradient is reduced relative to the Spitzer-Haerm value q(SH) which does not take into account the heat carried away by the fast electrons. The heat flux in the cold part of the gradient is enhanced relative to the value q(SH) which does not take into account the heat deposited by the fast electrons. These quite general results, which should have several applications in astrophysics, are applied to the problem of thermal hard X-ray burst models. It is shown that heat is not bottled up as effectively as in some past models, and temperatures achieved for realistic energy input rates are consequently not as high. As a result such sources can be effective only in the soft part (10-30 keV) of the hard X-ray range for energy input rates up to 6,400 ergs/cu cm s. The analysis is based on a fluid model and does not consider the X-ray signature of fast electrons which escape to distances far beyond the conduction fronts formed. It is shown that such electrons could at most be effective in the soft part of the hard X-ray range.

  15. Body temperature and behavior of tree shrews and flying squirrels in a thermal gradient.

    PubMed

    Refinetti, R

    1998-02-15

    The daily rhythms of body temperature, temperature selection, and locomotor activity of tree shrews and flying squirrels were studied in a thermal gradient. In accordance with previous observations in other mammalian species, the rhythm of temperature selection was found to be 180 degrees out of phase with the body temperature rhythm in both species. Comparison of the amplitude of the body temperature rhythm in the presence and absence of the ambient temperature gradient indicated that behavioral temperature selection reduces the amplitude of the body temperature rhythm. This provides support for the hypothesis that the homeostatic control of body temperature opposes-rather than facilitates-the circadian oscillation in body temperature. PMID:9523893

  16. Ion-temperature-gradient sensitivity of the hydrodynamic instability caused by shear in the magnetic-field-aligned plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June; Koepke, M. E.

    2014-07-15

    The cross-magnetic-field (i.e., perpendicular) profile of ion temperature and the perpendicular profile of the magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) plasma flow are sometimes inhomogeneous for space and laboratory plasma. Instability caused either by a gradient in the ion-temperature profile or by shear in the parallel flow has been discussed extensively in the literature. In this paper, (1) hydrodynamic plasma stability is investigated, (2) real and imaginary frequency are quantified over a range of the shear parameter, the normalized wavenumber, and the ratio of density-gradient and ion-temperature-gradient scale lengths, and (3) the role of inverse Landau damping is illustrated for the case of combined ion-temperature gradient and parallel-flow shear. We find that increasing the ion-temperature gradient reduces the instability threshold for the hydrodynamic parallel-flow shear instability, also known as the parallel Kelvin-Helmholtz instability or the D'Angelo instability. We also find that a kinetic instability arises from the coupled, reinforcing action of both free-energy sources. For the case of comparable electron and ion temperature, we illustrate analytically the transition of the D'Angelo instability to the kinetic instability as (a) the shear parameter, (b) the normalized wavenumber, and (c) the ratio of density-gradient and ion-temperature-gradient scale lengths are varied and we attribute the changes in stability to changes in the amount of inverse ion Landau damping. We show that near a normalized wavenumber k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub i} of order unity (i) the real and imaginary values of frequency become comparable and (ii) the imaginary frequency, i.e., the growth rate, peaks.

  17. Temperature Gradients on the Cell Wall in the Critical Viscosity Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    Because of the diverging susceptibility delta rho/delta Tau near the liquid-vapor critical point, temperature gradients must be kept small to maintain adequate sample homogeneity. In our Science Requirements Document we paid particular attention to radial density gradients caused by equilibration of the xenon sample. Axial density gradients were addressed through the requirement that the cell's copper wall have a gradient less than 22 microK/m. This report re-examines the cell wall's temperature distribution in more detail by estimating all known significant contributions to temperature differences on the cell's wall.

  18. 43 CFR 3252.15 - When must I abandon a temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false When must I abandon a temperature gradient well? 3252.15 Section 3252.15 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued... LEASING Conducting Exploration Operations § 3252.15 When must I abandon a temperature gradient well?...

  19. 43 CFR 3252.16 - How must I abandon a temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How must I abandon a temperature gradient well? 3252.16 Section 3252.16 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued... LEASING Conducting Exploration Operations § 3252.16 How must I abandon a temperature gradient well?...

  20. 43 CFR 3252.15 - When must I abandon a temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false When must I abandon a temperature gradient well? 3252.15 Section 3252.15 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued... LEASING Conducting Exploration Operations § 3252.15 When must I abandon a temperature gradient well?...

  1. 43 CFR 3252.16 - How must I abandon a temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How must I abandon a temperature gradient well? 3252.16 Section 3252.16 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued... LEASING Conducting Exploration Operations § 3252.16 How must I abandon a temperature gradient well?...

  2. 43 CFR 3252.16 - How must I abandon a temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How must I abandon a temperature gradient well? 3252.16 Section 3252.16 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued... LEASING Conducting Exploration Operations § 3252.16 How must I abandon a temperature gradient well?...

  3. 43 CFR 3252.15 - When must I abandon a temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false When must I abandon a temperature gradient well? 3252.15 Section 3252.15 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued... LEASING Conducting Exploration Operations § 3252.15 When must I abandon a temperature gradient well?...

  4. 43 CFR 3252.15 - When must I abandon a temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false When must I abandon a temperature gradient well? 3252.15 Section 3252.15 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued... LEASING Conducting Exploration Operations § 3252.15 When must I abandon a temperature gradient well?...

  5. 43 CFR 3252.16 - How must I abandon a temperature gradient well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How must I abandon a temperature gradient well? 3252.16 Section 3252.16 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued... LEASING Conducting Exploration Operations § 3252.16 How must I abandon a temperature gradient well?...

  6. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  7. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Edward M.; Rosen, Mordecai D.

    1989-01-01

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  8. Determination of surface normal temperature gradients using thermographic phosphors and filtered Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brübach, J.; Zetterberg, J.; Omrane, A.; Li, Z. S.; Aldén, M.; Dreizler, A.

    2006-09-01

    Wall temperature as well as the temperature distribution within or close-by the boundary layer of an electrically heated axisymmetric jet impinging on a flat plate were monitored to deduce wall-normal temperature gradients. The radial surface temperature profile of the plate was determined by coating it with thermographic phosphors (TPs), materials whose phosphorescence decay time is dependent on their temperature. The TP was excited electronically by a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser (355 nm) and the temporal decay of the phosphorescence intensity was measured zero-dimensionally by a photomultiplier tube. In this case the 659-nm emission line of Mg3F2GeO4:Mn was monitored. The non-intrusive measurement of gas temperatures near the surface was performed two-dimensionally by filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS). A tunable frequency-tripled single-longitudinal-mode alexandrite laser beam at 254 nm was formed into a light sheet pointing parallel to the surface. The scattered light was imaged through a very narrow linewidth atomic mercury filter onto an intensified charged coupled device (ICCD). The elastic stray light from surfaces was strongly suppressed, whereas Doppler-broadened light was detected. Thermographic phosphors proved to be reliable for the measurement of surface temperatures. Dependent on the specific experimental conditions, problems appeared with signals interfering with the FRS radiation close-by the surface. Results and challenges of this approach are discussed.

  9. Study of near scrape-off layer (SOL) temperature and density gradient lengths with Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H. J.; Wolfrum, E.; Eich, T.; Kurzan, B.; Potzel, S.; Stroth, U.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-12-01

    Improvements to the Thomson scattering diagnostic have enabled the study of near scrape-off layer (SOL) decay lengths in the 2014 ASDEX Upgrade experimental campaign. A database of H-mode discharges has been studied using a two-line fit method for the core and log-linear fit for the near SOL region under both attached and detached divertor conditions. SOL electron temperature {{T}e} profiles have been found to have a radial exponential decay distribution which does not vary poloidally, consistent with the two-point model. In attached H-mode regimes, a log-linear regression shows that the SOL upstream dataset has the same main parametric dependencies as the scaling inferred from downstream Infrared camera measurements. A simple collisional relation from two-point model is found to best relate the upstream decay lengths and downstream divertor power widths. The SOL {{T}e} gradient length appears to be independent of {{T}e} pedestal parameters, but may correlate with the pedestal electron pressure parameters. Both the pedestal and SOL density and temperature scale lengths are linearly correlated with an almost constant gradient ratio, {ηe} . The smaller gradient ratio {ηe} and the fact that the Spitzer-Härm model is more valid, agrees with the studied plasma lying in the collisional regime. A transition to flat SOL ne profiles, previously reported for L-mode plasmas in many machines, has been observed in AUG detatched H-mode regimes. When the flattening of density profile happens in H-mode detached plasmas, the broadening of near SOL {{T}e} decay length {λ{{Te,u}}} also appears which may be good news for future machines.

  10. Microscale gradients and their role in electron-transfer mechanisms in biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Beyenal, Haluk; Babauta, Jerome T.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical and electrochemical gradients in biofilms play a critical role in electron-transfer processes between cells and a solid electron acceptor. Most of the time, electron-transfer processes have been investigated in the bulk phase, for a biofilm electrode or for an isolated component of a biofilm. Currently, the knowledge of chemical and electrochemical gradients in living biofilms respiring on a solid surface is limited. We believe the chemical and electrochemical gradients are critical for explaining electron-transfer mechanisms. The bulk conditions, an isolated part of a biofilm or a single cell cannot be used to explain electron-transfer mechanisms in biofilm systems. In addition, microscale gradients explain how the reactor configuration plays a critical role in electron-transfer processes. PMID:23176474

  11. Microscale gradients and their role in electron-transfer mechanisms in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Beyenal, Haluk; Babauta, Jerome T

    2012-12-01

    The chemical and electrochemical gradients in biofilms play a critical role in electron-transfer processes between cells and a solid electron acceptor. Most of the time, electron-transfer processes have been investigated in the bulk phase, for a biofilm electrode or for an isolated component of a biofilm. Currently, the knowledge of chemical and electrochemical gradients in living biofilms respiring on a solid surface is limited. We believe the chemical and electrochemical gradients are critical for explaining electron-transfer mechanisms. The bulk conditions, an isolated part of a biofilm or a single cell cannot be used to explain electron-transfer mechanisms in biofilm systems. In addition, microscale gradients explain how the reactor configuration plays a critical role in electron-transfer processes. PMID:23176474

  12. Acoustic response of a rectangular waveguide with a strong transverse temperature gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, William E.

    1989-01-01

    An acoustic wave equation was developed for a perfect gas with spatially-variable temperature. The strong-gradient wave equation was used to analyze the response of a rectangular wave guide containing a thermally-stratified gas. It was assumed that the temperature gradient is constant, representing one-dimensional heat transfer with a constant coefficient of conductivity. The analysis of the waveguide shows that the resonant frequencies of the waveguide are shifted away from the values that would be expected from the average temperature of the waveguide. For small gradients, the frequency shift is proportional to the square of the gradient. The factor of proportionality is a quadratic function of the natural frequency of the waveguide with uniform temperature. An experiment is designed to verify the essential features of the strong-gradient theory.

  13. Ion temperature gradient instability at sub-Larmor radius scales with non-zero ballooning angle

    SciTech Connect

    Migliano, P.; Hornsby, W. A.; Peeters, A. G.; Camenen, Y.; Casson, F. J.

    2013-02-15

    Linear gyro-kinetic stability calculations predict unstable toroidal ion temperature gradient modes (ITGs) with normalised poloidal wave vectors well above one (k{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub i}>1) for standard tokamak parameters with adiabatic electron response. These modes have a maximum amplitude at a poloidal angle {theta} that is shifted away from the low field side ({theta}{ne}0). The physical mechanism is clarified through the use of a fluid model. It is shown that the shift of the mode away from the low field side reduces the effective drift frequency which allows for the instability to develop. Numerical tests using the gyro-kinetic model confirm this physical mechanism. Furthermore, it is shown that modes localized away from the low field side can be important also for k{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub i}<1 close to the threshold of the ITG. In fact, modes with maximum amplitude at {theta}{ne}0 can exist for normalised temperature gradient lengths below the threshold of the ITG obtained for the case with the maximum at {theta}=0.

  14. Characterization of thermotropism in primary roots of maize: dependence on temperature and temperature gradient, and interaction with gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poff, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    Thermotropism in primary roots of Zea mays L. was studied with respect to gradient strength (degrees C cm-1), temperature of exposure within a gradient, pre-treatment temperature, and gravitropic stimulation. The magnitude of the response decreased with gradient strength. Maximum thermotropism was independent of gradient strength and pre-treatment temperature. The range of temperature for positive and negative thermotropism did not change with pre-treatment temperature. However, the exact range of temperatures for positive and negative thermotropism varied with gradient strengths. In general, temperatures of exposure lower than 25 degrees C resulted in positive tropic responses while temperatures of exposure of 39 degrees C or more resulted in negative tropic responses. Thermotropism was shown to modify and reverse the normal gravitropic curvature of a horizontal root when thermal gradients were applied opposite the 1 g vector. It is concluded that root thermotropism is a consequence of thermal sensing and that the curvature of the primary root results from the interaction of the thermal and gravitational sensing systems.

  15. Polymer crystallization in a temperature gradient field with controlled crystal growth rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, D.; Taskar, A. N.; Casale, O.

    1971-01-01

    A method is described for studying the influence of a temperature gradient on the crystallization of quiescent polymer melts. The apparatus used consists of two brass plates with embedded electrical resistance heaters and cooling coils. The crystallizations experiments were conducted by placing polymer specimens between the paltes, and manually adjusting heaters and cooling fluids for temperature control. Linear polyethylene, isotactic polyprophylene, and a high density polyethylene were used. It is concluded that the role of a temperature gradient in producing oriented crystallization is in producing conditions which lead the spherulitic growth pattern to proceed primarily in one direction. Steep gradients diminish the penetration of supercooling and favors oriented growth.

  16. Two-dimensional analysis of temperature-gradient actuation of cantilever beam resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahameed, Rashed; Elata, David

    2005-08-01

    This work considers microresonators that are driven by a temperature-gradient actuator. The driving forces in the temperature-gradient actuation scheme are internal mechanical moments induced by temperature gradients. In this work, a model for analyzing the dynamic thermomechanical response of temperature-gradient actuators is presented. In this model, the two-dimensional nature of the temperature field is fully considered. Several test structures were fabricated and their dynamic thermomechanical response was found to be in agreement with the model predictions. Some examples of parametric analysis are presented that show how the two-dimensional model can be used to optimize the system parameters under specific constraints of the operation conditions.

  17. Electron decoherence at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2001-03-01

    Electron decoherence is fundamental to condensed matter physics. Our understanding of metals and insulators in the Fermi-liquid framework relies entirely on a diverging decoherence rate 1/τ_φ at low temperatures, which is expected to vanish at T=0. However, recent experiments find that 1/τ_φ saturates at low temperatures [1-2]. We review these measurements on a variety of mesoscopic systems (in 0D, 1D, 2D and 3D) as well as the control experiments used to check for various artifacts [1-3]. We emphasize the connection between the temperature-independent decoherence rate and persistent current in normal metals [4]. We briefly discuss decoherence induced by dynamic defects or two-level systems [5,6], including its relevance--or lack thereof---to the experiments on metallic wires [2]. Saturation of decohrence rate is argued to be present in---and relevant to---the following phenomena: metal-insulator transition in 2D [7,8], superconductor-insulator transition in 2D [9], quantum-Hall-insulator transition [10], transport through superconductor/normal-metal hybrid junctions [11], normal-state resistivity of high Tc superconductors [12], persistent current in normal metals [4], and energy relaxation in normal metals [13]. [1] P. Mohanty, Physica B 280, 446 (2000). [2] P. Mohanty, E.M.Q. Jariwala, R. Webb, PRL 78, 3366 (1997); PRB 55, R13542 (1997). [3] P. Mohanty, R. Webb, PRL 84, 4481 (2000). [4] P. Mohanty, Ann. Phys. 8, 549 (1999). [5] P. Mohanty, M.L. Roukes (to be published). [6] K. Ahn, P. Mohanty, cond-mat/ 0011139. [7] S. Kravchenko et al. PRB 50, 8039 (1994). [8] G. Brunthaler, A. Prinz, G. Bauer, V. Pudalov, cond-mat/0007230. [9] A. Kapitulnik, N. Mason, S. Kivelson, S. Chakravarty, cond-mat/0008005. [10] D. Shahar, D. Tsui, M. Shayegan, J. Cunningham, E. Shimsoni, S. Sondhi, SSC. 102, 817 (1997). [11] A. Vaknin, A. Frydman, Z. Ovadyahu, PRB 61, 13037 (2000). [12] P. Fournier et al., PRB 62, R11993 (2000). [13] A. Gougam, F. Pierre, H. Pothier, D. Esteve, N

  18. Parallel implementation of electronic structure energy, gradient, and Hessian calculations.

    PubMed

    Lotrich, V; Flocke, N; Ponton, M; Yau, A D; Perera, A; Deumens, E; Bartlett, R J

    2008-05-21

    ACES III is a newly written program in which the computationally demanding components of the computational chemistry code ACES II [J. F. Stanton et al., Int. J. Quantum Chem. 526, 879 (1992); [ACES II program system, University of Florida, 1994] have been redesigned and implemented in parallel. The high-level algorithms include Hartree-Fock (HF) self-consistent field (SCF), second-order many-body perturbation theory [MBPT(2)] energy, gradient, and Hessian, and coupled cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] energy and gradient. For SCF, MBPT(2), and CCSD(T), both restricted HF and unrestricted HF reference wave functions are available. For MBPT(2) gradients and Hessians, a restricted open-shell HF reference is also supported. The methods are programed in a special language designed for the parallelization project. The language is called super instruction assembly language (SIAL). The design uses an extreme form of object-oriented programing. All compute intensive operations, such as tensor contractions and diagonalizations, all communication operations, and all input-output operations are handled by a parallel program written in C and FORTRAN 77. This parallel program, called the super instruction processor (SIP), interprets and executes the SIAL program. By separating the algorithmic complexity (in SIAL) from the complexities of execution on computer hardware (in SIP), a software system is created that allows for very effective optimization and tuning on different hardware architectures with quite manageable effort. PMID:18500853

  19. Parallel implementation of electronic structure energy, gradient, and Hessian calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotrich, V.; Flocke, N.; Ponton, M.; Yau, A. D.; Perera, A.; Deumens, E.; Bartlett, R. J.

    2008-05-01

    ACES III is a newly written program in which the computationally demanding components of the computational chemistry code ACES II [J. F. Stanton et al., Int. J. Quantum Chem. 526, 879 (1992); [ACES II program system, University of Florida, 1994] have been redesigned and implemented in parallel. The high-level algorithms include Hartree-Fock (HF) self-consistent field (SCF), second-order many-body perturbation theory [MBPT(2)] energy, gradient, and Hessian, and coupled cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] energy and gradient. For SCF, MBPT(2), and CCSD(T), both restricted HF and unrestricted HF reference wave functions are available. For MBPT(2) gradients and Hessians, a restricted open-shell HF reference is also supported. The methods are programed in a special language designed for the parallelization project. The language is called super instruction assembly language (SIAL). The design uses an extreme form of object-oriented programing. All compute intensive operations, such as tensor contractions and diagonalizations, all communication operations, and all input-output operations are handled by a parallel program written in C and FORTRAN 77. This parallel program, called the super instruction processor (SIP), interprets and executes the SIAL program. By separating the algorithmic complexity (in SIAL) from the complexities of execution on computer hardware (in SIP), a software system is created that allows for very effective optimization and tuning on different hardware architectures with quite manageable effort.

  20. Effect of RF Gradient upon the Performance of the Wisconsin SRF Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Bosch, Robert; Legg, Robert A.

    2013-12-01

    The performance of the Wisconsin 200-MHz SRF electron gun is simulated for several values of the RF gradient. Bunches with charge of 200 pC are modeled for the case where emittance compensation is completed during post-acceleration to 85 MeV in a TESLA module. We first perform simulations in which the initial bunch radius is optimal for the design gradient of 41 MV/m. We then optimize the radius as a function of RF gradient to improve the performance for low gradients.

  1. Metamorphism during temperature gradient with undersaturated advective airflow in a snow sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, Pirmin Philipp; Schneebeli, Martin; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2016-04-01

    Snow at or close to the surface commonly undergoes temperature gradient metamorphism under advective flow, which alters its microstructure and physical properties. Time-lapse X-ray microtomography is applied to investigate the structural dynamics of temperature gradient snow metamorphism exposed to an advective airflow in controlled laboratory conditions. Cold saturated air at the inlet was blown into the snow samples and warmed up while flowing across the sample with a temperature gradient of around 50 K m-1. Changes of the porous ice structure were observed at mid-height of the snow sample. Sublimation occurred due to the slight undersaturation of the incoming air into the warmer ice matrix. Diffusion of water vapor opposite to the direction of the temperature gradient counteracted the mass transport of advection. Therefore, the total net ice change was negligible leading to a constant porosity profile. However, the strong recrystallization of water molecules in snow may impact its isotopic or chemical content.

  2. Gradient temperature Raman spectroscopy identifies flexible sites in proline and alanine peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous thermo dynamic Raman spectroscopy (TDRS) applies the temperature gradients utilized in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to Raman spectroscopy, providing a straightforward technique to identify molecular rearrangements that occur just prior to phase transitions. Herein we apply TDRS...

  3. Using the column wall itself as resistive heater for fast temperature gradients in liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ruben; Pursch, Matthias; Desmet, Gert

    2015-11-13

    A new system is proposed for applying fast temperature gradients in liquid chromatography. It consists of a 0.7 mm × 150 mm fused-silica column coated with a 50 μm Nickel-layer, which is connecting with a power source and a temperature control system to perform fast and reproducible temperature gradients using the column wall itself as a resistive heater. Applying a current of 4A and passive cooling results in a maximal heating and cooling rate of, respectively, 71 and -21 °C/min. Multi-segment temperature gradients were superimposed on mobile phase gradients to enhance the selectivity for three sets of mixtures (pharmaceutical compounds, a highly complex mixture and an insecticide sample). This resulted in a higher peak count or better selectivities for the various mixtures. PMID:26476853

  4. Atmospheric study relating to pad lift-off and entry landing. [effects of midlatitude temperature gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    A relationship between the atmospheric general circulation and geophysical hydrodynamic experiments was sought by attempting to find a relationship between wave number and temperature gradient at mid-latitudes at 500 mb. To this end data were gathered from four winter seasons and analyzed. The statistical analysis failed to provide convincing support for the hypothesis of a direct relationship between wave number and temperature gradient, although an indication that the transient waves may be so related was noted.

  5. Effect of temperature gradient on the optical quality of mercurous chloride crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Davies, D. K.; Gottlieb, M.; Henningsen, T.; Mazelsky, R.

    1989-01-01

    Single crystals of mercurous chloride were grown at temperature gradients of 8, 11 and 17 K/cm by the physical vapor transport method. The optical quality of these crystals was evaluated by measuring bulk scattering and inhomogeneity of refractive index by birefringence interferometry. It was observed that a high temperature gradient at the solid-vapor interface induced thermal stresses and crystals showed higher scattering and irregular fringes.

  6. Director alignment relative to the temperature gradient in nematic liquid crystals studied by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Sarman, Sten; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2014-07-28

    The director alignment relative to the temperature gradient in nematic liquid crystal model systems consisting of soft oblate or prolate ellipsoids of revolution has been studied by molecular dynamics simulation. The temperature gradient is maintained by thermostating different parts of the system at different temperatures by using a Gaussian thermostat. It is found that the director of the prolate ellipsoids aligns perpendicularly to the temperature gradient whereas the director of the oblate ellipsoids aligns parallel to this gradient. When the director is oriented in between the parallel and perpendicular orientations a torque is exerted forcing the director to the parallel or perpendicular orientation. Because of symmetry restrictions there is no linear dependence of the torque being a pseudovector on the temperature gradient being a polar vector in an axially symmetric system such as a nematic liquid crystal. The lowest possible order of this dependence is quadratic. Thus the torque is very weak when the temperature gradient is small, which may explain why this orientation phenomenon is hard to observe experimentally. In both cases the director attains the orientation that minimises the irreversible entropy production. PMID:24919847

  7. Transport of Parallel Momentum by Toroidal Ion Temperature Gradient Instability near Marginality

    SciTech Connect

    E.S. Yoon and T.S. Hahm

    2009-10-20

    The turbulent angular momentum flux carried by ions resonant with toroidal ion temperature gradient(ITG) instability is calculated via quasilinear calculation using the phase-space conserving gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame. The results near ITG marginality indicate that the inward turbulent equipartition (TEP) momentum pinch [Hahm T.S. et al 2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 072302] remains as the most robust part of pinch. In addition, ion temperature gradient driven momentum flux is inward for typical parameters, while density gradient driven momentum flux is outward as in the previous kinetic result in slab geometry [Diamond P.H. et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 012303].

  8. Cooling vests with phase change material packs: the effects of temperature gradient, mass and covering area.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chuansi; Kuklane, Kalev; Holmer, Ingvar

    2010-05-01

    Phase change material (PCM) absorbs or releases latent heat when it changes phases, making thermal-regulated clothing possible. The objective of this study was to quantify the relationships between PCM cooling rate and temperature gradient, mass and covering area on a thermal manikin in a climatic chamber. Three melting temperatures (24, 28, 32 degrees C) of the PCMs, different mass, covering areas and two manikin temperatures (34 and 38 degrees C) were used. The results showed that the cooling rate of the PCM vests tested is positively correlated with the temperature gradient between the thermal manikin and the melting temperature of the PCMs. The required temperature gradient is suggested to be greater than 6 degrees C when PCM vests are used in hot climates. With the same temperature gradient, the cooling rate is mainly determined by the covering area. The duration of the cooling effect is dependent on PCM mass and the latent heat. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The study of factors affecting the cooling rate of personal cooling equipment incorporated with PCM helps to understand cooling mechanisms. The results suggest climatic conditions, the required temperature gradient, PCM mass and covering area should be taken into account when choosing personal PCM cooling equipment. PMID:20432090

  9. Comparison between kinetic-ballooning-mode-driven turbulence and ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Maeyama, S. Nakata, M.; Miyato, N.; Yagi, M.; Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Idomura, Y.

    2014-05-15

    Electromagnetic turbulence driven by kinetic ballooning modes (KBMs) in high-β plasma is investigated based on the local gyrokinetic model. Analysis of turbulent fluxes, norms, and phases of fluctuations shows that KBM turbulence gives narrower spectra and smaller phase factors than those in ion-temperature-gradient (ITG)-driven turbulence. This leads to the smaller transport fluxes in KBM turbulence than those in ITG turbulence even when they have similar linear growth rates. From the analysis of the entropy balance relation, it is found that the entropy transfer from ions to electrons through the field-particle interactions mainly drives electron perturbations, which creates radial twisted modes by rapid parallel motions of electrons in a sheared magnetic geometry. The nonlinear coupling between the dominant unstable mode and its twisted modes is important for the saturation of KBM turbulence, in contrast to the importance of zonal flow shearing in ITG turbulence. The coupling depends on the flux-tube domain with the one-poloidal-turn parallel length and on the torus periodicity constraint.

  10. Interaction between neoclassical effects and ion temperature gradient turbulence in gradient- and flux-driven gyrokinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberparleiter, M.; Jenko, F.; Told, D.; Doerk, H.; Görler, T.

    2016-04-01

    Neoclassical and turbulent transport in tokamaks has been studied extensively over the past decades, but their possible interaction remains largely an open question. The two are only truly independent if the length scales governing each of them are sufficiently separate, i.e., if the ratio ρ* between ion gyroradius and the pressure gradient scale length is small. This is not the case in particularly interesting regions such as transport barriers. Global simulations of a collisional ion-temperature-gradient-driven microturbulence performed with the nonlinear global gyrokinetic code Gene are presented. In particular, comparisons are made between systems with and without neoclassical effects. In fixed-gradient simulations, the modified radial electric field is shown to alter the zonal flow pattern such that a significant increase in turbulent transport is observed for ρ*≳1 /300 . Furthermore, the dependency of the flux on the collisionality changes. In simulations with fixed power input, we find that the presence of neoclassical effects decreases the frequency and amplitude of intermittent turbulent transport bursts (avalanches) and thus plays an important role for the self-organisation behaviour.

  11. Results of temperature gradient and heat flow in Santiam Pass Area, Oregon, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.L.; Gardner, M.C.; Koenig, J.B.

    1981-08-01

    The conclusions of this report are: (1) There is a weakly defined thermal anomaly within the area examined by temperature-gradient holes in the Santiam Pass area. This is a relict anomaly showing differences in permeability between the High Cascades and Western Cascades areas, more than a fundamental difference in shallow crustal temperatures. (2) The anomaly as defined by the 60 F isotherms at 400 feet follows a north-south trend immediately westward of the Cascade axis in the boundary region. It is clear that all holes spudded into High Cascades rocks result in isothermal and reversal gradients. Holes spudded in Western Cascades rocks result in positive gradients. (3) Cold groundwater flow influences and masks temperature gradients in the High Cascades to a depth of at least 700 feet, especially eastward from the major north-south trending faults. Pleistocene and Holocene rocks are very permeable aquifers. (4) Shallow gradient drilling in the lowlands westward of the faults provides more interpretable information than shallow drilling in the cold-water recharge zones. Topographic and climatological effects can be filtered out of the temperature gradient results. (5) The thermal anomaly seems to have 2 centers: one in the Belknap-Foley area, and one northward in the Sand Mountain area. The anomalies may or may not be connected along a north-south trend. (6) A geothermal effect is seen in holes downslope of the Western-High Cascade boundary. Mixing with cold waters is a powerful influence on temperature gradient data. (7) The temperature-gradient program has not yet examined and defined the geothermal resources potential of the area eastward of the Western Cascades-High Cascades boundary. Holes to 1500-2000 feet in depth are required to penetrate the high permeability-cold groundwater regime. (8) Drilling conditions are unfavorable. There are very few accessible level drill sites. Seasonal access problems and environmental restrictions together with frequent lost

  12. Electron temperature differences and double layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C.; Hershkowitz, N.; Lonngren, K. E.

    1983-01-01

    Electron temperature differences across plasma double layers are studied experimentally. It is shown that the temperature differences across a double layer can be varied and are not a result of thermalization of the bump-on-tail distribution. The implications of these results for electron thermal energy transport in laser-pellet and tandem-mirror experiments are also discussed.

  13. Flat meridional temperature gradient in the early Eocene in the subsurface rather than surface ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Sze Ling; Laepple, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The early Eocene (49-55 million years ago) is a time interval characterized by elevated surface temperatures and atmospheric CO2 (refs ,), and a flatter-than-present latitudinal surface temperature gradient. The multi-proxy-derived flat temperature gradient has been a challenge to reproduce in model simulations, especially the subtropical warmth at the high-latitude surface oceans, inferred from the archaeal lipid-based palaeothermometry, . Here we revisit the interpretation by analysing a global collection of multi-proxy temperature estimates from sediment cores spanning millennia to millions of years. Comparing the variability between proxy types, we demonstrate that the present interpretation overestimates the magnitude of past climate changes on all timescales. We attribute this to an inappropriate calibration, which reflects subsurface ocean but is calibrated to the sea surface, where the latitudinal temperature gradient is steeper. Recalibrating the proxy to the temperatures of subsurface ocean, where the signal is probably formed, yields colder -temperatures and latitudinal gradient consistent with standard climate model simulations of the Eocene climate, invalidating the apparent, extremely warm polar sea surface temperatures. We conclude that there is a need to reinterpret -inferred marine temperature records in the literature, especially for reconstructions of past warm climates that rely heavily on this proxy as reflecting subsurface ocean.

  14. Dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution measured by diffraction-limited nanothermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chengmingyue; Gan, Xiaosong; Li, Xiangping; Gu, Min

    2015-09-21

    We quantify the dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution using quantum-dot-based microscopic fluorescence nanothermometry. By incorporating CdSe quantum dots into the solution as a nanothermometer, precise temperature mapping with diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-degree temperature resolution is achieved. The acquired data on heat generation and dissipation show an excellent agreement with theoretical simulations. This work reveals an effective approach for noninvasive temperature regulation with localized nanoheaters in microfluidic environment.

  15. Dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution measured by diffraction-limited nanothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengmingyue; Gan, Xiaosong; Li, Xiangping; Gu, Min

    2015-09-01

    We quantify the dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution using quantum-dot-based microscopic fluorescence nanothermometry. By incorporating CdSe quantum dots into the solution as a nanothermometer, precise temperature mapping with diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-degree temperature resolution is achieved. The acquired data on heat generation and dissipation show an excellent agreement with theoretical simulations. This work reveals an effective approach for noninvasive temperature regulation with localized nanoheaters in microfluidic environment.

  16. Effect of re-heating on the hot electron temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrook, K.; Rosen, M.

    1980-06-17

    Resonant absorption is the direct conversion of the transverse laser light to longitudinal electron plasma waves (epw) at the critical density (10/sup 21/ (1.06 ..mu..m/lambda/sub 0/)/sup 2/ cm/sup -3/). The oscillating longitudinal electric field of the epw heats the electrons by accelerating them down the density gradient to a temperature of approximately 21T/sub e//sup 0/ /sup 25/ ((I(W/cm/sup 2/)/10/sup 16/)(lambda/sub 0//1.06 ..mu..m)/sup 2/)/sup 0/ /sup 4/. This section extends the previous work by studying the effects of magnetic fields and collisions (albedo) which return the heated electrons for further heating. A magnetic field increases their temperature and collisions do not.

  17. Origin of Temperature Gradient in Nonequilibrium Steady States in Weakly Coupled Quantum Spin Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Toyohiko; Sugita, Ayumu

    2016-07-01

    We study nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs) in quantum spin-1/2 chains in contact with two heat baths at different temperatures. We consider the weak-coupling limit both for spin-spin coupling in the system and for system-bath coupling. This setting allows us to treat NESSs with a nonzero temperature gradient analytically. We develop a perturbation theory for this weak-coupling situation and show a simple condition for the existence of nonzero temperature gradient. This condition is independent of the integrability of the system.

  18. Mirror symmetry breaking with limited enantioselective autocatalysis and temperature gradients: a stability survey.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Celia; Ribó, Josep M; Crusats, Joaquim; El-Hachemi, Zoubir; Moyano, Albert; Hochberg, David

    2013-02-01

    We analyze limited enantioselective (LES) autocatalysis in a temperature gradient and with internal flow/recycling of hot and cold material. Microreversibility forbids broken mirror symmetry for LES in the presence of a temperature gradient alone. This symmetry can be broken however when the auto-catalysis and limited enantioselective catalysis are each localized within the regions of low and high temperature, respectively. This scheme has been recently proposed as a plausible model for spontaneous emergence of chirality in abyssal hydrothermal vents. Regions in chemical parameter space are mapped out in which the racemic state is unstable and bifurcates to chiral solutions. PMID:23238372

  19. Multiple-Point Temperature Gradient Algorithm for Ring Laser Gyroscope Bias Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Geng; Zhang, Pengfei; Wei, Guo; Xie, Yuanping; Yu, Xudong; Long, Xingwu

    2015-01-01

    To further improve ring laser gyroscope (RLG) bias stability, a multiple-point temperature gradient algorithm is proposed for RLG bias compensation in this paper. Based on the multiple-point temperature measurement system, a complete thermo-image of the RLG block is developed. Combined with the multiple-point temperature gradients between different points of the RLG block, the particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to tune the support vector machine (SVM) parameters, and an optimized design for selecting the thermometer locations is also discussed. The experimental results validate the superiority of the introduced method and enhance the precision and generalizability in the RLG bias compensation model. PMID:26633401

  20. Multiple-Point Temperature Gradient Algorithm for Ring Laser Gyroscope Bias Compensation.

    PubMed

    Li, Geng; Zhang, Pengfei; Wei, Guo; Xie, Yuanping; Yu, Xudong; Long, Xingwu

    2015-01-01

    To further improve ring laser gyroscope (RLG) bias stability, a multiple-point temperature gradient algorithm is proposed for RLG bias compensation in this paper. Based on the multiple-point temperature measurement system, a complete thermo-image of the RLG block is developed. Combined with the multiple-point temperature gradients between different points of the RLG block, the particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to tune the support vector machine (SVM) parameters, and an optimized design for selecting the thermometer locations is also discussed. The experimental results validate the superiority of the introduced method and enhance the precision and generalizability in the RLG bias compensation model. PMID:26633401

  1. TEMPERATURE SELECTION BY HATCHLING AND YEARLING FLORIDA RED-BELLIED TURTLES (PSEUDEMYS NELSONI) IN THERMAL GRADIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We tested hatchling and yearling Florida red-bellied turtles (Pseudemys nelsoni) in laboratory thermal gradient chambers to determine if they would prefer particular temperatures. Most 1995 hatchlings selected the highest temperature zone of 27degrees C (Test 1) and 30 degrees ...

  2. A seismological determination of the temperature gradient in D″ beneath the western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ban-Yuan; Chen, Chin-Wu

    2005-05-01

    The temperature gradient of the thermal boundary layer in the D″ region is one of the basic properties of the mantle that remains difficult to evaluate. We characterize this quantity for a region in the western Pacific using gradient-sensitive seismological probes. First, both the amplitudes and travel times of the diffracted P and S phases (Pdiff, Sdiff) were analyzed to constrain the regional-scale vertical gradients of VP and VS. Acceptable models were grid-searched using synthetic waveforms for trial models that employ only one velocity gradient zone in D″. The VS models were searched over the parameter space of the thickness (H) and the gradient. Solutions show negative deviation from Preliminary Reference Earth Model and a trade-off between gradient and H from -0.00088 s-1, for190 km to -0.00049 s-1, for 240 km with a typical error of ±0.00015 s-1. Rather than pinning down the best solution, we consider two sets of solutions for VS with H = 190 and 240 km. For these two H values, the gradients of VP were determined solely by amplitude to be -0.00032 s-1 for 190 km and 0.00015 s-1 for 240 km, shrouded in relatively large errors of 0.0002-0.0003 s-1. We derive the temperature gradient from the resolved velocity gradients using the seismological-thermodynamic equation of Doornbos et al. (1986) and arrive at 9.0 ± 5.8 K/km and 5.7 ± 4.1 K/km over 190 and 240 km, respectively. The difference in gradient between these two models is statistically significant at the 99% confidence level, and the odds that the apparent steeper gradient is caused by squeezing energy of diffracted waves into a thinner zone can also be rejected with high confidence. The combination of the two models is thus consistent with a nonlinear temperature profile that steepens toward the core-mantle boundary. Both models detect the superadiabatic gradient of temperature in the lowermost mantle.

  3. Simultaneous measurement of core electron temperature and density fluctuations during electron cyclotron heating on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Staebler, G. M.; Burrell, K. H.; DeBoo, J. C.; Prater, R.

    2010-02-15

    New measurements show that long-wavelength (k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}<0.5) electron temperature fluctuations can play an important role in determining electron thermal transport in low-confinement mode (L-mode) tokamak plasmas. In neutral beam-heated L-mode tokamak plasmas, electron thermal transport and the amplitude of long-wavelength electron temperature fluctuations both increase in cases where local electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to modify the plasma profiles. In contrast, the amplitude of simultaneously measured long-wavelength density fluctuations does not significantly increase. Linear stability analysis indicates that the ratio of the trapped electron mode (TEM) to ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode growth rates increases in the cases with ECH. The increased importance of the TEM drive relative to the ITG mode drive in the cases with ECH may be associated with the increases in electron thermal transport and electron temperature fluctuations.

  4. Influence of the Latitudinal Temperature Gradient on Soil Dust Concentration and Deposition in Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegen, Ina; Rind, David

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the effects of changes in the latitudinal temperature gradient and the global mean temperature on dust concentration in the Northern Hemisphere, experiments with the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model (GISS GCM) are performed. The dust concentration over Greenland is calculated from sources in central and eastern Asia, which are integrated on-line in the model. The results show that an increase in the latitudinal temperature gradient increases both the Asian dust source strength and the concentration over Greenland. The source increase is the result of increased surface winds, and to a minor extent, the increase in Greenland dust is also associated with increased northward transport. Cooling the climate in addition to this increased gradient leads to a decrease in precipitation scavenging, which helps produce a further (slight) increase in Greenland dust in this experiment. Reducing the latitudinal gradient reduces the surface wind and hence the dust source, with a subsequent reduction in Greenland dust concentrations. Warming the climate in addition to this reduced gradient leads to a further reduction in Greenland dust due to enhanced precipitation scavenging. These results can be used to evaluate the relationship of Greenland ice core temperature changes to changes in the latitudinal and global temperatures.

  5. Influence of the Latitudinal Temperature Gradient on Soil Dust Concentration and Deposition in Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegen, Ina; Rind, David

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the effects of changes in the latitudinal temperature gradient and the global mean temperature on dust concentration in the Northern Hemisphere, experiments with the GISS GCM (Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model) are performed. The dust concentration over Greenland is calculated from sources in central and eastern Asia, which are integrated on-line in the model. The results show that an increase in the latitudinal temperature gradient increases both the Asian dust source strength and the concentration over Greenland. The source increase is the result of increased surface winds, and to a minor extent, the increase in Greenland dust is also associated with increased northward transport. Cooling the climate in addition to this increased gradient leads to a decrease in precipitation scavenging, which helps produce a further (slight) increase in Greenland dust in this experiment. Reducing the latitudinal gradient reduces the surface wind and hence the dust source, with a subsequent reduction in Greenland dust concentrations. Warming the climate in addition to this reduced gradient leads to a further reduction in Greenland dust due to enhanced precipitation scavenging. These results can be used to evaluate the relationship of Greenland ice core temperature changes to changes in the latitudinal and global temperatures.

  6. Migration of liquid phase from the primary/peritectic interface in a temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Peng; Li, XinZhong; Su, YanQing; Guo, JingJie

    2016-07-01

    The migration of the liquid droplets from the primary α/peritectic β interface at the peritectic temperature TP has been observed and analyzed in a Sn-Ni peritectic alloy. During the isothermal annealing stage of the interrupted directional solidification, a concentration gradient is established across the liquid droplets along the direction of the temperature gradient due to the temperature gradient zone melting. Simultaneous remelting/resolidification at the top/bottom of the liquid droplets by this concentration gradient have been confirmed to lead to migration of these droplets towards higher temperatures. The dependence of the migration distance of the liquid droplets on isothermal annealing time has been well predicted. Furthermore, since the lengths of the liquid droplet are not uniform along the direction of the temperature gradient, the remelting/resolidification rates which are dependent on the local morphology of liquid droplet are different at different local positions of the liquid droplets. It has been demonstrated that the morphology of the liquid droplet was also influenced by the morphologies of the liquid phase themselves. Therefore, the morphology of the liquid droplet itself changes from spherical to some kinds of irregular shapes during its migration.

  7. High temperature electronic gain device

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, J. Byron; Depp, Steven W.; Hamilton, Douglas J.; Kerwin, William J.

    1979-01-01

    An integrated thermionic device suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments. Cathode and control electrodes are deposited on a first substrate facing an anode on a second substrate. The substrates are sealed to a refractory wall and evacuated to form an integrated triode vacuum tube.

  8. Influence of temperature gradients on leaf water potential.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, H H; Prosser, R J

    1977-02-01

    Water potential was monitored at nine locations along single maize (Zea mays L.) leaf blades with aluminum block in situ thermocouple hygrometers. Water potential showed a continuous decrease toward the tip, with a 2- to 4-bar difference between leaf base and tip under both moist and dry soil conditions. The water potential difference between the soil and the leaf base was about 4 bars. Water potentials decreased during the day and during a drying cycle, and increased at night and after irrigation. Heating a band of a leaf to 40 C or cooling it to 7 C had no influence on the water potential of the affected portion when this was corrected for hygrometer output over standard calibrating solutions at the respective temperatures. Heating or cooling a portion of a leaf had neither short nor long term effects on water potential of more distal leaf portions continuously monitored by hygrometers in dew point readout. Water potential fluctuated with an amplitude of about 1.5 bars and an irregular period of 10 to 30 minutes. Measurements with silver foil in situ psychrometers gave similar results. PMID:16659828

  9. Influence of Temperature Gradients on Leaf Water Potential 1

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, Herman H.; Prosser, Rex J.

    1977-01-01

    Water potential was monitored at nine locations along single maize (Zea mays L.) leaf blades with aluminum block in situ thermocouple hygrometers. Water potential showed a continuous decrease toward the tip, with a 2- to 4-bar difference between leaf base and tip under both moist and dry soil conditions. The water potential difference between the soil and the leaf base was about 4 bars. Water potentials decreased during the day and during a drying cycle, and increased at night and after irrigation. Heating a band of a leaf to 40 C or cooling it to 7 C had no influence on the water potential of the affected portion when this was corrected for hygrometer output over standard calibrating solutions at the respective temperatures. Heating or cooling a portion of a leaf had neither short nor long term effects on water potential of more distal leaf portions continuously monitored by hygrometers in dew point readout. Water potential fluctuated with an amplitude of about 1.5 bars and an irregular period of 10 to 30 minutes. Measurements with silver foil in situ psychrometers gave similar results. PMID:16659828

  10. High temperature power electronics for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Baumann, Eric D.; Myers, Ira T.; Overton, Eric

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature electronics program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating materials research, development and testing of high temperature power components, and integration of the developed components and devices into a demonstrable 200 C power system, such as inverter. An overview of the program and a description of the in-house high temperature facilities along with experimental data obtained on high temperature materials are presented.

  11. Mechanisms Controlling Variability of the Interhemispheric Sea Surface Temperature Gradient in the Tropical Atlantic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Richard G.

    1996-09-01

    The seasonal evolution of sea surface temperature (SST) fields in the tropical Atlantic is explored for composites of extremely STRONG and WEAK northward SST gradients, because these are known to control the basinwide pressure gradient, latitude position of the intertopical convergence zone (ITCZ), and regional rainfall. Aimed at the origin and maintenance of anomalies in the interhemispheric SST gradient, and using surface and subsurface marine observations, differences in forcing of SST patterns from surface heat fluxes and entrainment are scaled by calendar-monthly mixed layer depth, and compared to the observed evolution of SST. For years with a STRONG as compared to WEAK gradient in boreal winter, a substantial portion of anomalous SST evolution from September to February can be attributed to departures in SST forcing by latent heat transfer: in the North Atlantic, strengthened northeast trades associated with a stronger North Atlantic high promote enhanced evaporative cooling, while weakened southeast trades reduce latent heat loss, intensifying seasonal warming. During March to August, Ekman upwelling in the north contributes less cooling to anomalously cold surface waters, while in the south autumn entrainment cools the upper layer more rapidly. The resulting decay of both cold anomalies in the north and warm anomalies in the south reduces the anomalously strong SST gradient. A pronounced decadal-scale trend toward a stronger northward SST gradient in January is reflected in an enhancement of Northeast Brazil rainfall, which is strongly correlated to the March-April interhemispheric SST gradient; both Pacific SST and the Atlantic SST gradient in January are associated with variability in the March-April gradient; however, SST in the Pacific and the SST gradient in the Atlantic are uncorrelated in January.

  12. Temperature gradient measurements by using thermoelectric effect in CNTs-silicone adhesive composite.

    PubMed

    Chani, Muhammad Tariq Saeed; Karimov, Kh S; Asiri, Abdullah M; Ahmed, Nisar; Bashir, Muhammad Mehran; Khan, Sher Bahadar; Rub, Malik Abdul; Azum, Naved

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the fabrication and investigation of thermoelectric cells based on composite of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and silicone adhesive. The composite contains CNT and silicon adhesive 1∶1 by weight. The current-voltage characteristics and dependences of voltage, current and Seebeck coefficient on the temperature gradient of cell were studied. It was observed that with increase in temperature gradient the open circuit voltage, short circuit current and the Seebeck coefficient of the cells increase. Approximately 7 times increase in temperature gradient increases the open circuit voltage and short circuit current up to 40 and 5 times, respectively. The simulation of experimental results is also carried out; the simulated results are well matched with experimental results. PMID:24748375

  13. Temperature Gradient Measurements by Using Thermoelectric Effect in CNTs-Silicone Adhesive Composite

    PubMed Central

    Chani, Muhammad Tariq Saeed; Karimov, Kh. S.; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Ahmed, Nisar; Bashir, Muhammad Mehran; Khan, Sher Bahadar; Rub, Malik Abdul; Azum, Naved

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the fabrication and investigation of thermoelectric cells based on composite of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and silicone adhesive. The composite contains CNT and silicon adhesive 1∶1 by weight. The current-voltage characteristics and dependences of voltage, current and Seebeck coefficient on the temperature gradient of cell were studied. It was observed that with increase in temperature gradient the open circuit voltage, short circuit current and the Seebeck coefficient of the cells increase. Approximately 7 times increase in temperature gradient increases the open circuit voltage and short circuit current up to 40 and 5 times, respectively. The simulation of experimental results is also carried out; the simulated results are well matched with experimental results. PMID:24748375

  14. Generalization of the thermoacoustic form functions for evaluating the transverse temperature gradient effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seghiri, A.; Kouidri, S.; Azzi, A.

    2016-06-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to study analytically the effect of transverse gradient of time averaged temperature on the oscillating flow between parallel plates that occurs in thermoacoustic device such as resonator, stack and heat exchanger. In fact, this transverse gradient of temperature is not taken into account in standard linear theory and can have considerable consequences on the thermoacoustic machines operating as the onset parameters. For this purpose, an asymptotic model generalizing the standard linear theory is proposed. This approach is done without making supplementary assumptions compared to the known model in literature. Consequently, generalized viscous and thermal form functions are deduced by analytical development. Hence, the results of the thermal non-uniformity according to transverse direction are analyzed using these form functions. Furthermore, the critical temperature gradient is calculated analytically for this case.

  15. Finite ballooning angle effects on ion temperature gradient driven mode in gyrokinetic flux tube simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rameswar; Brunner, S.; Ganesh, R.; Jenko, F.

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents effects of finite ballooning angles on linear ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven mode and associated heat and momentum flux in Gyrokinetic flux tube simulation GENE. It is found that zero ballooning angle is not always the one at which the linear growth rate is maximum. The ITG mode acquires a short wavelength (SW) branch (k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub i} > 1) when growth rates maximized over all ballooning angles are considered. However, the SW branch disappears on reducing temperature gradient showing characteristics of zero ballooning angle SWITG in case of extremely high temperature gradient. Associated heat flux is even with respect to ballooning angle and maximizes at nonzero ballooning angle while the parallel momentum flux is odd with respect to the ballooning angle.

  16. High-gradient acceleration of electrons in a plasma loaded wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Maroli, C.; Petrillo, V.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction of an electron beam with a transverse electromagnetic field and an electrostatic wave in a plasma loaded wiggler is described by means of system of self-consistent nonlinear equations. We demonstrate that the system is able to sustain resonantly high-amplitude electrostatic waves with phase velocity c, which gives rise to high gradient acceleration of the electron beam. Both gradient and saturation value of the average gamma factor of the beam increase considerably with increasing magnetic field of the wiggler and plasma density.

  17. High-gradient plasma-wakefield acceleration with two subpicosecond electron bunches.

    PubMed

    Kallos, Efthymios; Katsouleas, Tom; Kimura, Wayne D; Kusche, Karl; Muggli, Patric; Pavlishin, Igor; Pogorelsky, Igor; Stolyarov, Daniil; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2008-02-22

    A plasma-wakefield experiment is presented where two 60 MeV subpicosecond electron bunches are sent into a plasma produced by a capillary discharge. Both bunches are shorter than the plasma wavelength, and the phase of the second bunch relative to the plasma wave is adjusted by tuning the plasma density. It is shown that the second bunch experiences a 150 MeV/m loaded accelerating gradient in the wakefield driven by the first bunch. This is the first experiment to directly demonstrate high-gradient, controlled acceleration of a short-pulse trailing electron bunch in a high-density plasma. PMID:18352561

  18. Temperature and moisture distributions in a clay buffer material due to thermal gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.M.O.; Yong, R.N.; Kjartanson, B.

    1993-12-31

    Several series of one-dimensional tests were used to investigate the nature of transient heat and moisture movements in a clay buffer under different imposed temperature gradients. The measured temperature and moisture profiles were used to calculate the diffusion parameters governing heat and moisture movement in the buffer material. The diffusion parameters are shown to depend on the moisture content, temperature and moisture equilibrium time.

  19. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication of Titanium Alloy Gradient Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, Craig A.; Newman, John A.; Bird, Richard Keith; Shenoy, Ravi N.; Baughman, James M.; Gupta, Vipul K.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, the structural optimization of aerospace components has been done through geometric methods. A monolithic material is chosen based on the best compromise between the competing design limiting criteria. Then the structure is geometrically optimized to give the best overall performance using the single material chosen. Functionally graded materials offer the potential to further improve structural efficiency by allowing the material composition and/or microstructural features to spatially vary within a single structure. Thus, local properties could be tailored to the local design limiting criteria. Additive manufacturing techniques enable the fabrication of such graded materials and structures. This paper presents the results of a graded material study using two titanium alloys processed using electron beam freeform fabrication, an additive manufacturing process. The results show that the two alloys uniformly mix at various ratios and the resultant static tensile properties of the mixed alloys behave according to rule-of-mixtures. Additionally, the crack growth behavior across an abrupt change from one alloy to the other shows no discontinuity and the crack smoothly transitions from one crack growth regime into another.

  20. Glass-transition temperature gradient in nanocomposites: evidence from nuclear magnetic resonance and differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Papon, Aurélie; Montes, Hélène; Hanafi, Mohamed; Lequeux, François; Guy, Laurent; Saalwächter, Kay

    2012-02-10

    The slowing-down of the dynamics of a polymer chain near a surface has been observed for many years now. Here we show that the behavior of model nanocomposites can be quantitatively described with a gradient of glass-transition temperature. We describe with a single parameter-the range of this gradient-the temperature and solvent effect on the spin relaxation dynamics. Moreover, this parameter allows a quantitative description of the nanocomposite calorimetric response from the one of the bulk polymer. PMID:22401088

  1. Plasma size and power scaling of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Idomura, Yasuhiro; Nakata, Motoki

    2014-02-15

    The transport scaling with respect to plasma size and heating power is studied for ion temperature gradient driven turbulence using a fixed-flux full-f gyrokinetic Eulerian code. It is found that when heating power is scaled with plasma size, the ion heat diffusivity increases with plasma size in a local limit regime, where fixed-gradient δf simulations predict a gyro-Bohm scaling. In the local limit regime, the transport scaling is strongly affected by the stiffness of ion temperature profiles, which is related to the power degradation of confinement.

  2. Pore and grain boundary migration under a temperature gradient: a phase-field model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biner, S. B.

    2016-03-01

    The collective migration behavior of pores and grain boundaries under a temperature gradient is studied for simple single crystal, bi-crystal and polycrystal configurations with a phase-field model formulism. For simulation of the microstructure of solids, composed of pores and grain boundaries, the results indicate that not only the volume fraction of pores, but also its spatial partitioning between the grain boundary junctions and the grain boundary segments appears to be important. In addition to various physical properties, the evolution kinetics, under given temperature gradients, will be strongly influenced with the initial morphology of a poly-crystalline microstructure.

  3. Variable-temperature device for precision Casimir-force-gradient measurement.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Garza, R; Mohideen, U

    2013-02-01

    We present the design and use of an instrument that is based on a microcantilever to perform precision force gradient measurements. We demonstrate its performance through measurements of the Casimir pressure at various temperatures. The instrument can operate in high vacuum environments and temperatures between 5 K and 300 K. It uses an all-fiber optical interferometer to detect the resonant-frequency shift of a customized microcantilever due to the presence of a force gradient. To measure this shift we use both, a technique of frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy and the direct recording of the thermomechanical resonant frequency. PMID:23464254

  4. Pore and grain boundary migration under a temperature gradient: A phase-field model study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Biner, S. B.

    2016-03-16

    In this study, the collective migration behavior of pores and grain boundaries under a temperature gradient is studied for simple single crystal, bi-crystal and polycrystal configurations with a phase-field model formulism. For simulation of the microstructure of solids, composed of pores and grain boundaries, the results indicate that not only the volume fraction of pores, but also its spatial partitioning between the grain boundary junctions and the grain boundary segments appears to be important. In addition to various physical properties, the evolution kinetics, under given temperature gradients, will be strongly influenced with the initial morphology of a poly-crystalline microstructure.

  5. Gyrokinetic simulations of ion temperature gradient modes in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Predebon, I.; Guo, S. C.; Angioni, C.

    2010-01-15

    Linear gyrokinetic calculations are applied to the reversed field pinch configuration to investigate the occurrence of ion temperature gradient instabilities. The analysis shows this type of instability to be only marginally responsible for particle and energy transport. The required gradients could be reached only in correspondence to the temperature slopes arising at the boundary of the helical structure in the quasisingle helicity states. The dependence of the instability threshold on the relevant macroscopic quantities is considered. A discussion on the main differences in the driving mechanisms existing between the reversed field pinch and the tokamak configuration is addressed.

  6. Modeling Breakdown and Electron Orbits in High-Gradient Accelerating Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitzer, Seth A.; Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Stoltz, Peter H.; Norem, J.

    2010-11-01

    Next-generation rf accelerating cavities will employ very high-gradient electric fields, greater than 100 MV/m, as well as strong magnetic fields. However, breakdown of accelerating structures due to high field gradients is a major limitation on these accelerating cavities. One possible mechanism for breakdown initiation is the rapid buildup of electrons due to field emission coupled with secondary electron emission. Multipacting may enhance this effect. In order to understand the physical processes of breakdown initiation and the effectiveness of potential mitigation techniques, researchers in the Muon Accelerator Program are experimenting with a simplified cavity, referred to as the Box Cavity, in which they will measure breakdown under high-gradient rf with strong externally applied magnetic fields with different orientations. We present here simulation results for the box cavity including the effects of rf (805 MHz), magnetic fields, field-dependent emission, secondary electron emission, and space charge, using the 3-Dimensional plasma simulation code VORPAL. We measure the effect of different magnetic field strengths and orientations on electron orbits and buildup. We also simulate the effects of field emission in different parts of the box cavity, such as from corners of the box near the rf coupler, and measure the effects on electron buildup over many rf periods. These detailed and self-consistent models will aid experimentalists to understand breakdown onset in high-gradient metallic accelerating cavities.

  7. Comparison of Experimentally Measured Temperature Gradient and Finite-Element-Method Simulations for Two Continuously Cast Bloom Heating Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvíčala, M.; Frydrýšek, K.; Štamborská, M.

    2015-03-01

    This paper deals with the comparison of experimentally measured temperature gradients and finite-element-method (FEM) simulations of two heating strategies that were used for continuously cast bloom soaking. The temperature gradient between the bloom surface and center was measured by two thermocouples incorporated directly into the bloom. Scanning electron microscopy equipped by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, hot tensile tests, and interdendritic solidification software was used for modeling of steel thermophysical properties with respect to the alloying-elements macrosegregation. The model of the bloom was programmed in the Fortran language. The FEM software MARC/MENTAT 2012 was used for simulation of two heating strategies (plane strain formulation). The first heating model was fitted to the commonly used heating strategy when internal defects grew above the critical limit. The second heating model was a newly proposed strategy that consisted of slower heating up to 1073 K when the first warming-through period occurred. The FEM simulations included determinations of the temperature gradient, the equivalent of stress, the equivalent of elastic strain, the equivalent of plastic strain, and the equivalent of total strain. The simulation results were in good agreement with experimental observations. The new heating strategy based on the FEM simulations led to significantly lower occurrence of internal defects in hot-rolled billets that are used for cylinder production.

  8. Chirped-Pulse Inverse Free Electron Laser: A Tabletop, High-Gradient Vacuum Laser Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Troha, A L; Baldis, H A

    2001-03-05

    The inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) interaction is studied both theoretically and numerically in the case where the drive laser intensity approaches the relativistic regime, and the pulse duration is only a few optical cycles long. We show that by using an ultrashort, ultrahigh-intensity drive laser pulse, the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased considerably, thus yielding large energy gains. Using a chirped pulse and negative dispersion focusing optics allows one to take further advantage of the laser optical bandwidth and produce a chromatic line focus maximizing the gradient. The combination of these novel ideas results in a compact vacuum laser accelerator capable of accelerating picosecond electron bunches with a high gradient (GeV/m) and very low energy spread. A computer code which takes into account the three-dimensional nature of the interaction is currently in development and results are expected this Spring.

  9. Focusing of relativistic electrons in dense plasma using a resistivity-gradient-generated magnetic switchyard.

    PubMed

    Robinson, A P L; Key, M H; Tabak, M

    2012-03-23

    A method for producing a self-generated magnetic focussing structure for a beam of laser-generated relativistic electrons using a complex array of resistivity gradients is proposed and demonstrated using numerical simulations. The array of resistivity gradients is created by using a target consisting of alternating layers of different Z material. This new scheme is capable of effectively focussing the fast electrons even when the source is highly divergent. The application of this technique to cone-guided fast ignition inertial confinement fusion is considered, and it is shown that it may be possible to deposit over 25% of the fast electron energy into a hot spot even when the fast electron divergence angle is very large (e.g., 70° half-angle). PMID:22540591

  10. Deep Trek High Temperature Electronics Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Ohme

    2007-07-31

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative research agreement between Honeywell and U.S. Department of Energy to develop high-temperature electronics. Objects of this development included Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) wafer process development for high temperature, supporting design tools and libraries, and high temperature integrated circuit component development including FPGA, EEPROM, high-resolution A-to-D converter, and a precision amplifier.