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Sample records for electron transfer catalyst

  1. Au25 Clusters as Electron-Transfer Catalysts Induced the Intramolecular Cascade Reaction of 2-nitrobenzonitrile

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hanbao; Li, Peng; Wang, Shuxin; Fu, Fangyu; Xiang, Ji; Zhu, Manzhou; Li, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Design of atomically precise metal nanocluster catalysts is of great importance in understanding the essence of the catalytic reactions at the atomic level. Here, for the first time, Au25z nanoslusters were employed as electron transfer catalysts to induce an intramolecular cascade reaction at ambient conditions and gave rise to high conversion (87%) and selectivity (96%). Electron spin-resonance spectra indeed confirmed the consecutive electron transfer process and the formation of N radical. UV-vis absorption spectra also verified Au25z was intact after the catalytic circle. Our research may open up wide opportunities for extensive organic reactions catalyzed by Au25z. PMID:24225495

  2. Photoinduced electron transfer in a chromophore-catalyst assembly anchored to TiO2.

    PubMed

    Ashford, Dennis L; Song, Wenjing; Concepcion, Javier J; Glasson, Christopher R K; Brennaman, M Kyle; Norris, Michael R; Fang, Zhen; Templeton, Joseph L; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-11-21

    Photoinduced formation, separation, and buildup of multiple redox equivalents are an integral part of cycles for producing solar fuels in dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells (DSPECs). Excitation wavelength-dependent electron injection, intra-assembly electron transfer, and pH-dependent back electron transfer on TiO(2) were investigated for the molecular assembly [((PO(3)H(2)-CH(2))-bpy)(2)Ru(a)(bpy-NH-CO-trpy)Ru(b)(bpy)(OH(2))](4+) ([TiO(2)-Ru(a)(II)-Ru(b)(II)-OH(2)](4+); ((PO(3)H(2)-CH(2))(2)-bpy = ([2,2'-bipyridine]-4,4'-diylbis(methylene))diphosphonic acid); bpy-ph-NH-CO-trpy = 4-([2,2':6',2″-terpyridin]-4'-yl)-N-((4'-methyl-[2,2'-bipyridin]-4-yl)methyl) benzamide); bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine). This assembly combines a light-harvesting chromophore and a water oxidation catalyst linked by a synthetically flexible saturated bridge designed to enable long-lived charge-separated states. Following excitation of the chromophore, rapid electron injection into TiO(2) and intra-assembly electron transfer occur on the subnanosecond time scale followed by microsecond-millisecond back electron transfer from the semiconductor to the oxidized catalyst, [TiO(2)(e(-))-Ru(a)(II)-Ru(b)(III)-OH(2)](4+)→[TiO(2)-Ru(a)(II)-Ru(b)(II)-OH(2)](4+). PMID:23101955

  3. Incorporation of Water-Oxidation Catalysts into Photoinduced Electron Transfer Systems: Toward Solar Fuel Generation via Artificial Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagnini, Michael Thomas

    A key goal of artificial photosynthesis is to mimic the photochemistry of photosystem II and oxidize water using light energy, with the ultimate aim of using the liberated electrons for reductive, fuel-forming reactions. One of the more recent challenges in the field of solar fuels chemistry is the efficient activation of molecular water-oxidation catalysts with photoinduced electron transfer, an effort that would benefit from detailed knowledge of the energetics and kinetics of each electron transfer step in a light-driven catalytic cycle. The focus of this thesis is the synthesis and photophysical characterization of covalent assemblies comprising a redox-active organic chromophore and the iridium(III)-based water-oxidation catalyst Cp*Ir(ppy)Cl (ppy = 2-phenylpyridine), and the rates and pathways for photogeneration of higher-valence states of the catalyst are determined with femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy and other time-resolved spectroscopic techniques. In linking the photooxidant perylene-3,4:9,10-bis (dicarboximide) (PDI) to the Ir(III) catalyst, fast photoinduced electron transfer from the metal complex to PDI outcompetes heavy-atom quenching of the dye excited state, and the catalytic integrity of the complex is retained, as determined by electrocatalysis experiments. Long-lived higher-valence states of the catalyst are necessary for the accumulation of oxidizing equivalents for oxygen evolution, and the lifetime of photogenerated Ir(IV) has been extended by over two orders of magnitude by catalyst incorporation into a covalent electron acceptor--chromophore--catalyst triad, in which the dye is perylene-3,4-dicarboximide (PMI). Time resolved X-ray absorption studies of the triad confirm the photogeneration of an Ir(IV) metal center, a species that is too unstable to observe with chemical or electrochemical oxidation methods. This approach to preparing higher-valence states of water-oxidation catalysts has great promise for deducing catalytic mechanisms and probing highly-reactive intermediates, and it also establishes a basis in systems design for photodriving catalytic processes. Covalent dye-catalyst assemblies have been gaining recognition as a useful motif for incorporation into dye-sensitized photoanodes for photoelectrochemical water-splitting cells, and the PMI-Ir catalyst unit is well-poised, both in the energetics and kinetics of its electron transfer properties, to improve upon current solar-driven fuel-forming devices.

  4. Ultrafast photodriven intramolecular electron transfer from an iridium-based water-oxidation catalyst to perylene diimide derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Vagnini, Michael T.; Smeigh, Amanda L.; Blakemore, James D.; Eaton, Samuel W.; Schley, Nathan D.; D’Souza, Francis; Crabtree, Robert H.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Co, Dick T.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Photodriving the activity of water-oxidation catalysts is a critical step toward generating fuel from sunlight. The design of a system with optimal energetics and kinetics requires a mechanistic understanding of the single-electron transfer events in catalyst activation. To this end, we report here the synthesis and photophysical characterization of two covalently bound chromophore-catalyst electron transfer dyads, in which the dyes are derivatives of the strong photooxidant perylene-3,4:9,10-bis(dicarboximide) (PDI) and the molecular catalyst is the Cp∗Ir(ppy)Cl metal complex, where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine. Photoexcitation of the PDI in each dyad results in reduction of the chromophore to PDI•- in less than 10 ps, a process that outcompetes any generation of 3∗PDI by spin-orbit-induced intersystem crossing. Biexponential charge recombination largely to the PDI-Ir(III) ground state is suggestive of multiple populations of the PDI•--Ir(IV) ion-pair, whose relative abundance varies with solvent polarity. Electrochemical studies of the dyads show strong irreversible oxidation current similar to that seen for model catalysts, indicating that the catalytic integrity of the metal complex is maintained upon attachment to the high molecular weight photosensitizer. PMID:22586073

  5. Hydrogen Photogeneration Promoted by Efficient Electron Transfer from Iridium Sensitizers to Colloidal MoS2 Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yong-Jun; Yu, Zhen-Tao; Liu, Xiao-Jie; Cai, Jian-Guang; Guan, Zhong-Jie; Zou, Zhi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    We report the utilization of colloidal MoS2 nanoparticles (NPs) for multicomponent photocatalytic water reduction systems in cooperation with a series of cyclometalated Ir(III) sensitizers. The effects of the particle size and particle dispersion of MoS2 NPs catalyst, reaction solvent and the concentration of the components on hydrogen evolution efficiency were investigated. The MoS2 NPs exhibited higher catalytic performance than did other commonly used water reduction catalysts under identical experiment conditions. The introduction of the carboxylate anchoring groups in the iridium complexes allows the species to be favorably chem-adsorbed onto the MoS2 NPs surface to increase the electron transfer, resulting in enhancement of hydrogen evolution relative to the non-attached systems. The highest apparent quantum yield, which was as high as 12.4%, for hydrogen evolution, was obtained (λ = 400 nm). PMID:24509729

  6. Interference of H/sub 2/ with the electron transfer to colloidal Pt catalyst and consequences for photochemical water reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbesen, T.W.

    1984-08-30

    In an effort to obtain better understanding of the problems of generating H/sub 2/ in photochemical systems, the interaction between 1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium dichloride (MV/sup 2 +/), H/sub 2/ and colloidal Pt-poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) catalyst has been analyzed by both spectrophotometry and pulse radiolysis. The rate constant of the destructive hydrogenation of MV/sup +/. by reduced (Pt) was measured to be 10/sup 2/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. Cysteine will successfully block this reaction but it does not affect the rate of electron transfer between MV/sup +/. and (Pt). The rate electron transfer between MV/sup +/. and (Pt) was found to be a linear function of the Pt concentration at constant (PVA) (10/sup 8/ M/sup -1/s/sup -1/) and to be inversely dependent on (MV/sup 2 +/) and the partial H/sub 2/ pressure. The latter dependence was then included in a model for numerical analysis of H/sub 2/-generating photochemical systems. It was found that this model correlates well with reported experimental results: nonlinear rate of H/sub 2/ production, lower than expected quantum yields, yield dependence on acceptor and catalyst concentrations. 36 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  7. Photoinduced electron transfer pathways in hydrogen-evolving reduced graphene oxide-boosted hybrid nano-bio catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Dimitrijevic, Nada M; Chang, Angela Y; Schaller, Richard D; Liu, Yuzi; Rajh, Tijana; Rozhkova, Elena A

    2014-08-26

    Photocatalytic production of clean hydrogen fuels using water and sunlight has attracted remarkable attention due to the increasing global energy demand. Natural and synthetic dyes can be utilized to sensitize semiconductors for solar energy transformation using visible light. In this study, reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and a membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) were employed as building modules to harness visible light by a Pt/TiO2 nanocatalyst. Introduction of the rGO boosts the nano-bio catalyst performance that results in hydrogen production rates of approximately 11.24 mmol of H2 (μmol protein)(-1) h(-1). Photoelectrochemical measurements show a 9-fold increase in photocurrent density when TiO2 electrodes were modified with rGO and bR. Electron paramagnetic resonance and transient absorption spectroscopy demonstrate an interfacial charge transfer from the photoexcited rGO to the semiconductor under visible light. PMID:25050831

  8. A kinetic study of plutonium dioxide dissolution in hydrochloric acid using iron (II) as an electron transfer catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Fife, K.W.

    1996-09-01

    Effective dissolution of plutonium dioxide has traditionally been accomplished by contact with strong nitric acid containing a small amount of fluoride at temperatures of {approximately} 100 C. In spite of these aggressive conditions, PuO{sub 2} dissolution is sometimes incomplete requiring additional contact with the solvent. This work focused on an alternative to conventional dissolution in nitric acid where an electron transfer catalyst, Fe(II), was used in hydrochloric acid. Cyclic voltammetry was employed as an in-situ analytical technique for monitoring the dissolution reaction rate. The plutonium oxide selected for this study was decomposed plutonium oxalate with > 95% of the material having a particle diameter (< 70 {micro}m) as determined by a scanning laser microscopy technique. Attempts to dry sieve the oxide into narrow size fractions prior to dissolution in the HCl-Fe(II) solvent system failed, apparently due to significant interparticle attractive forces. Although sieve splits were obtained, subsequent scanning laser microscopy analysis of the sieve fractions indicated that particle segregation was not accomplished and the individual sieve fractions retained a particle size distribution very similar to the original powder assemblage. This phenomena was confirmed through subsequent dissolution experiments on the various screen fractions which illustrated no difference in kinetic behavior between the original oxide assemblage and the sieve fractions.

  9. The electron is a catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, Armido; Curran, Dennis P.

    2014-09-01

    The electron is an efficient catalyst for conducting various types of radical cascade reaction that proceed by way of radical and radical ion intermediates. But because electrons are omnipresent, catalysis by electrons often passes unnoticed. In this Review, a simple analogy between acid/base catalysis and redox catalysis is presented. Conceptually, the electron is a catalyst in much the same way that a proton is a catalyst. The 'electron is a catalyst' paradigm unifies mechanistically an assortment of synthetic transformations that otherwise have little or no apparent relationship. Diverse radical cascades, including unimolecular radical substitution reactions (SRN1-type chemistry), base-promoted homolytic aromatic substitutions (BHAS), radical Heck-type reactions, radical cross-dehydrogenative couplings (CDC), direct arene trifluoromethylations and radical alkoxycarbonylations, can all be viewed as electron-catalysed reactions.

  10. The Role of a Dipeptide Outer-Coordination Sphere on H2 -Production Catalysts: Influence on Catalytic Rates and Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Reback, Matthew L.; Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Ho, Ming-Hsun; Jain, Avijita; Squier, Thomas C.; Raugei, Simone; Roberts, John A.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-02-04

    The outer-coordination sphere of enzymes acts to fine-tune the active site reactivity and control catalytic rates, suggesting that incorporation of analogous structural elements into molecular catalysts may be necessary to achieve rates comparable to those observed in enzyme systems at low overpotentials. In this work, we evaluate the effect of an amino acid and dipeptide outer-coordination sphere on [Ni(PPh2NPh-R2)2]2+ hydrogen production catalysts. A series of 12 new complexes containing non-natural amino acids or dipeptides were prepared to test the effects of positioning, size, polarity and aromaticity on catalytic activity. The non-natural amino acid was either 3-(meta- or para-aminophenyl)propionic acid terminated as an acid, an ester or an amide. Dipeptides consisted of one of the non-natural amino acids coupled to one of four amino acid esters: alanine, serine, phenylalanine or tyrosine. All of the catalysts are active for hydrogen production, with rates averaging ~1000 s-1, 40% faster than the unmodified catalyst. Structure and polarity of the aliphatic or aromatic side chains of the C-terminal peptide do not strongly influence rates. However, the presence of an amide bond increases rates, suggesting a role for the amide in assisting catalysis. Overpotentials were lower with substituents at the N-phenyl meta position. This is consistent with slower electron transfer in the less compact, para-substituted complexes, as shown in digital simulations of catalyst cyclic voltammograms and computational modeling of the complexes. Combining the current results with insights from previous results, we propose a mechanism for the role of the amino acid and dipeptide based outer-coordination sphere in molecular hydrogen production catalysts.

  11. Photophysical studies of chromium sensitizers designed for excited state hole transfer to semiconductors and sequential hole/electron transfers from photoexcited cadmium sulfide nanorods to mononuclear ruthenium water-oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Huan-Wei

    This dissertation describes three research projects related to solar cells and solar water splitting with a goal of utilizing solar energy, a renewable energy source. The first project is focused on photophysical studies of four newly-synthesized Cr(III) tris-bipyridyl complexes featuring the 4-dmcbpy (dimethyl 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxylate) ligand. Static and time-resolved emission results suggest that the complexes store ˜1.7 eV of energy for multiple microseconds. Using cyclic voltammetry, it is found that the inclusion of 4-dmcbpy shifts the E1/2 of CrIII/II by +0.2 V from the homoleptic parent complexes without 4-dmcbpy. All four complexes have excited state potentials of CrIII*/II between +1.8 and +2.0 V vs. NHE, placing them among the most powerful photooxidants reported and making them candidates for hole-injection sensitizers. The second project continues with Cr(III) complexes, but using iminopyridine Schiff base ligands. Two complexes feature hexadentate ligands and the other two are their tris-bidentate analogues. One of each pair contains methyl ester groups for attachment to semiconductors. Cyclic voltammograms show that the hexadentate and tris-bidentate analogues have almost identical reduction potentials, but the addition of ester substituents shifts the reduction potentials by +0.2 V. The absorption spectra of the hexadentate complexes show improved absorption of visible light compared to the tris-bidentate analogues. For freshly prepared sample solutions in CH3CN, time-resolved emission and transient absorption measurements for the Cr(III) tris-bidentate ester complex show a doublet excited state with a 17-19 microsecond lifetime at room temperature, while no emission or transient absorption signals from the doublet states are observed for the hexadentate analogue under the same conditions. The dramatic difference is due to the presence of a nonligated bridgehead nitrogen atom. The third project features charge transfer interactions between a photoexcited cadmium sulfide nanorod and [Ru(diethyl 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxylate)(2,2':6',2"-terpyridine)Cl] +, a mononuclear water-oxidation catalyst. Upon photoexcitation, hole transfer from the cadmium sulfide nanorod oxidizes the catalyst (Ru 2+ → Ru3+) on a 100 ps to 1 ns timescale. This is followed by electron transfer (10-100 ns) from the nanorod to reduce the Ru3+ center. The relatively slow electron transfer dynamics may provide opportunities for the accumulation of multiple holes at the catalyst, which is required for water oxidation.

  12. Two-Electron Transfer Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiaxing; Balamurugan, D; Zhang, Peng; Skourtis, Spiros S; Beratan, David N

    2015-06-18

    The frontiers of electron-transfer chemistry demand that we develop theoretical frameworks to describe the delivery of multiple electrons, atoms, and ions in molecular systems. When electrons move over long distances through high barriers, where the probability for thermal population of oxidized or reduced bridge-localized states is very small, the electrons will tunnel from the donor (D) to acceptor (A), facilitated by bridge-mediated superexchange interactions. If the stable donor and acceptor redox states on D and A differ by two electrons, it is possible that the electrons will propagate coherently from D to A. While structure-function relations for single-electron superexchange in molecules are well established, strategies to manipulate the coherent flow of multiple electrons are largely unknown. In contrast to one-electron superexchange, two-electron superexchange involves both one- and two-electron virtual intermediate states, the number of virtual intermediates increases very rapidly with system size, and multiple classes of pathways interfere with one another. In the study described here, we developed simple superexchange models for two-electron transfer. We explored how the bridge structure and energetics influence multielectron superexchange, and we compared two-electron superexchange interactions to single-electron superexchange. Multielectron superexchange introduces interference between singly and doubly oxidized (or reduced) bridge virtual states, so that even simple linear donor-bridge-acceptor systems have pathway topologies that resemble those seen for one-electron superexchange through bridges with multiple parallel pathways. The simple model systems studied here exhibit a richness that is amenable to experimental exploration by manipulating the multiple pathways, pathway crosstalk, and changes in the number of donor and acceptor species. The features that emerge from these studies may assist in developing new strategies to deliver multiple electrons in condensed-phase redox systems, including multiple-electron redox species, multimetallic/multielectron redox catalysts, and multiexciton excited states. PMID:25583181

  13. Electron transfer in peptides.

    PubMed

    Shah, Afzal; Adhikari, Bimalendu; Martic, Sanela; Munir, Azeema; Shahzad, Suniya; Ahmad, Khurshid; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2015-02-21

    In this review, we discuss the factors that influence electron transfer in peptides. We summarize experimental results from solution and surface studies and highlight the ongoing debate on the mechanistic aspects of this fundamental reaction. Here, we provide a balanced approach that remains unbiased and does not favor one mechanistic view over another. Support for a putative hopping mechanism in which an electron transfers in a stepwise manner is contrasted with experimental results that support electron tunneling or even some form of ballistic transfer or a pathway transfer for an electron between donor and acceptor sites. In some cases, experimental evidence suggests that a change in the electron transfer mechanism occurs as a result of donor-acceptor separation. However, this common understanding of the switch between tunneling and hopping as a function of chain length is not sufficient for explaining electron transfer in peptides. Apart from chain length, several other factors such as the extent of the secondary structure, backbone conformation, dipole orientation, the presence of special amino acids, hydrogen bonding, and the dynamic properties of a peptide also influence the rate and mode of electron transfer in peptides. Electron transfer plays a key role in physical, chemical and biological systems, so its control is a fundamental task in bioelectrochemical systems, the design of peptide based sensors and molecular junctions. Therefore, this topic is at the heart of a number of biological and technological processes and thus remains of vital interest. PMID:25619931

  14. Rh2(II,III) Catalysts with Chelating Carboxylate and Carboxamidate Supports: Electronic Structure and Nitrene Transfer Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Varela-Álvarez, Adrián; Yang, Tzuhsiung; Jennings, Heather; Kornecki, Katherine P; Macmillan, Samantha N; Lancaster, Kyle M; Mack, James B C; Du Bois, J; Berry, John F; Musaev, Djamaladdin G

    2016-02-24

    Dirhodium-catalyzed C-H amination is hypothesized to proceed via Rh2-nitrene intermediates in either the Rh2(II,II) or Rh2(II,III) redox state. Herein, we report joint theoretical and experimental studies of the ground electronic state (GES), redox potentials, and C-H amination of [Rh2(II,III)(O2CCH3)4(L)n](+) (1_L) (L = none, Cl(-), and H2O), [Rh2(esp)2](+) (2), and Rh2(espn)2Cl (3) (esp = α,α,α',α'-tetramethyl-1,3-benzenedipropanoate and espn = α,α,α',α'-tetramethyl-1,3-benzenedipropanamidate). CASSCF calculations on 1_L yield a wave function with two closely weighted configurations, (δ*)(2)(π1*)(2)(π2*)(1) and (δ*)(2)(π1*)(1)(π2*)(2), consistent with reported EPR g values [ Chem. Phys. Lett. 1986 , 130 , 20 - 23 ]. In contrast, EPR spectra of 2 show g values consistent with the DFT-computed (π*)(4)(δ*)(1) GES. EPR spectra and Cl K-edge XAS for 3 are consistent with a (π*)(4)(δ*)(1) GES, as supported by DFT. Nitrene intermediates 2N_L and 3N_L are also examined by DFT (the nitrene is an NSO3R species). DFT calculations suggest a doublet GES for 2N_L and a quartet GES for 3N_L. CASSCF calculations describe the GES of 2N as Rh2(II,II) with a coordinated nitrene radical cation, (π*)(4)(δ*)(2)(πnitrene,1)(1)(πnitrene,2)(0). Conversely, the GES of 3N is Rh2(II,III) with a coordinated triplet nitrene, (π*)(4)(δ*)(1)(πnitrene,1)(1)(πnitrene,2)(1). Quartet transition states ((4)TSs) are found to react via a stepwise radical mechanism, whereas (2)TSs are found to react via a concerted mechanism that is lower in energy compared to (4)TSs for both 2N_L and 3N_L. The experimental (determined by intramolecular competition) and (2)TS-calculated kinetic isotopic effect (KIE) shows a KIE ∼ 3 for both 2N and 3N, which is consistent with a concerted mechanism. PMID:26820386

  15. Photo-induced electron transfer method

    DOEpatents

    Wohlgemuth, R.; Calvin, M.

    1984-01-24

    The efficiency of photo-induced electron transfer reactions is increased and the back transfer of electrons in such reactions is greatly reduced when a photo-sensitizer zinc porphyrin-surfactant and an electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant are admixed into phospholipid membranes. The phospholipids comprising said membranes are selected from phospholipids whose head portions are negatively charged. Said membranes are contacted with an aqueous medium in which an essentially neutral viologen electron acceptor is admixed. Catalysts capable of transferring electrons from reduced viologen electron acceptor to hydrogen to produce elemental hydrogen are also included in the aqueous medium. An oxidizable olefin is also admixed in the phospholipid for the purpose of combining with oxygen that coordinates with oxidized electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant.

  16. Photo-induced electron transfer method

    DOEpatents

    Wohlgemuth, Roland; Calvin, Melvin

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of photo-induced electron transfer reactions is increased and the back transfer of electrons in such reactions is greatly reduced when a photo-sensitizer zinc porphyrin-surfactant and an electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant are admixed into phospho-lipid membranes. The phospholipids comprising said membranes are selected from phospholipids whose head portions are negatively charged. Said membranes are contacted with an aqueous medium in which an essentially neutral viologen electron acceptor is admixed. Catalysts capable of transfering electrons from reduced viologen electron acceptor to hydrogen to produce elemental hydrogen are also included in the aqueous medium. An oxidizable olefin is also admixed in the phospholipid for the purpose of combining with oxygen that coordinates with oxidized electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant.

  17. Nonadiabatic anharmonic electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, P. P.

    2013-03-28

    The effect of an inner sphere, local mode vibration on an electron transfer is modeled using the nonadiabatic transition probability (rate) expression together with both the anharmonic Morse and the harmonic oscillator potential. For an anharmonic inner sphere mode, a variational analysis uses harmonic oscillator basis functions to overcome the difficulties evaluating Morse-model Franck-Condon overlap factors. Individual matrix elements are computed with the use of new, fast, robust, and flexible recurrence relations. The analysis therefore readily addresses changes in frequency and/or displacement of oscillator minimums in the different electron transfer states. Direct summation of the individual Boltzmann weighted Franck-Condon contributions avoids the limitations inherent in the use of the familiar high-temperature, Gaussian form of the rate constant. The effect of harmonic versus anharmonic inner sphere modes on the electron transfer is readily seen, especially in the exoergic, inverted region. The behavior of the transition probability can also be displayed as a surface for all temperatures and values of the driving force/exoergicity {Delta}=-{Delta}G. The temperature insensitivity of the transfer rate is clearly seen when the exoergicity equals the collective reorganization energy ({Delta}={Lambda}{sub s}) along a maximum ln (w) vs. {Delta} ridge of the surface. The surface also reveals additional regions for {Delta} where ln (w) appears to be insensitive to temperature, or effectively activationless, for some kinds of inner sphere contributions.

  18. Intramolecular electron transfer rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hupp, Joseph T.

    The initial goals of this project were: (1) to construct pulsed-accelerated-flow and pulsed-laser (transient absorbance) instruments for intramolecular electron-transfer rate measurements, (2) to design and synthesize appropriate molecules and perform such measurements, (3) to develop further an electrochemical method for gauging site-to-site electronic coupling, and (4) to apply time-dependent Raman scattering theory to the problem of inner-shell reorganization in charge-transfer reactions. Although all four goals were met, we also found it necessary to pursue studies in some unforeseen directions. For example, early on we discovered that medium effects (aggregation and ion pairing) could play a very large, and previously unrecognized, role in some optical intervalence reactions. Given the importance of the effects to the areas above, we chose to map them in a fairly complete fashion. Also, in anticipation of possible renewal we initiated studies in a new area: bimolecular photoredox kinetics in supercritical media. Finally, in a small project carried out largely by undergraduates we examined solvent tuning effects upon lifetimes of photo-excited ruthenium am(m)ine bipyridine complexes. The key new findings and other highlights of these studies are outlined.

  19. Easy To Synthesize, Robust Organo‐osmium Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Coverdale, James P. C.; Sanchez‐Cano, Carlos; Clarkson, Guy J.; Soni, Rina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) is an important process in organic synthesis for which the Noyori‐type RuII catalysts [(arene)Ru(Tsdiamine)] are now well established and widely used. We now demonstrate for the first time the catalytic activity of the osmium analogues. X‐ray crystal structures of the 16‐electron OsII catalysts are almost identical to those of RuII. Intriguingly the precursor complex was isolated as a dichlorido complex with a monodentate amine ligand. The OsII catalysts are readily synthesised (within 1 h) and exhibit excellent enantioselectivity in ATH reactions of ketones. PMID:25853228

  20. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-07-11

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid-base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron-proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ λ. Multiple-Site Electron-Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron-proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron-proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e-/2H+ MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving force for long-range proton transfer in Photosysem II and through other biological membranes. In EPT, simultaneous transfer of electrons and protons occurs on time scales short compared to the periods of coupled vibrations and solvent modes. A theory for EPT has been developed which rationalizes rate constants and activation barriers, includes temperature- and driving force (ΔG)-dependences implicitly, and explains kinetic isotope effects. The distance-dependence of EPT is dominated by the short-range nature of proton transfer, with electron transfer being far less demanding.Changes in external pH do not affect an EPT elementary step. Solvent molecules or buffer components can act as proton donor acceptors, but individual H2O molecules are neither good bases (pKa(H3O+) = -1.74) nor good acids (pKa(H2O) = 15.7). There are many examples of mechanisms in chemistry, in biology, on surfaces, and in the gas phase which utilize EPT. PCET and EPT play critical roles in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of Photosystem II and other biological reactions by decreasing driving force and avoiding high-energy intermediates.

  1. Charge Transfer Dynamics in Complexes of Light-Absorbing CdS Nanorods and Redox Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilker, Molly Bea

    The use of photoexcited electrons and holes in semiconductor nanocrystals as reduction and oxidation reagents is an intriguing way of harvesting photon energy to drive chemical reactions. This dissertation describes research efforts to understand the photoexcited charge transfer kinetics in complexes of colloidal CdS nanorods coupled with either a water oxidation or reduction catalyst. The first project focuses on the charge transfer interactions between photoexcited CdS nanorods and a mononuclear water oxidation catalyst derived from the [Ru(bpy)(tpy)Cl]+ parent structure. The second project details the electron transfer kinetics in complexes of CdS nanorods coupled with [FeFe]-hydrogenase, which catalyzes H+ reduction. These complexes photochemically produce H2 with quantum yields of up to 20%. Kinetics of electron transfer from CdS nanorods to hydrogenase play a critical role in the overall photochemical reactivity, as the quantum efficiency of electron transfer defines the upper limit on the quantum yield of H 2 generation. Insights from these time-resolved spectroscopic studies are used to discuss the intricate kinetic pathways involved in photochemical H2 generation and the mechanism for electron transfer from photoexcited nanorods to hydrogenase in photocatalytic complexes.

  2. Electron transfer in biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, H.B.

    1995-12-01

    Electron-transfer reactions are key stemps in photosynthesis, respiration, drug metabolism, and many other biochemical processes. These reactions commonly occur between protein-bound prosthetic groups that are separated by large molecular distances (often greater than 10 {Angstrom}). Although the electron donors and acceptors are expected to be weakly coupled, the reactions are remarkably fast and proceed with high specificity. Recent work on structurally engineered iron and cooper proteins has shown that the chemical bonds in the intervening medium potentially can control the rates of these electron-transfer reactions.

  3. Coherence in electron transfer pathways

    PubMed Central

    Skourtis, Spiros S.; Beratan, David N.; Waldeck, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Central to the view of electron-transfer reactions is the idea that nuclear motion generates a transition state geometry at which the electron/hole amplitude propagates coherently from the electron donor to the electron acceptor. In the weakly coupled or nonadiabatic regime, the electron amplitude tunnels through an electronic barrier between the donor and acceptor. The structure of the barrier is determined by the covalent and noncovalent interactions of the bridge. Because the tunneling barrier depends on the nuclear coordinates of the reactants (and on the surrounding medium), the tunneling barrier is highly anisotropic, and it is useful to identify particular routes, or pathways, along which the transmission amplitude propagates. Moreover, when more than one such pathway exists, and the paths give rise to comparable transmission amplitude magnitudes, one may expect to observe quantum interferences among pathways if the propagation remains coherent. Given that the effective tunneling barrier height and width are affected by the nuclear positions, the modulation of the nuclear coordinates will lead to a modulation of the tunneling barrier and hence of the electron flow. For long distance electron transfer in biological and biomimetic systems, nuclear fluctuations, arising from flexible protein moieties and mobile water bridges, can become quite significant. We discuss experimental and theoretical results that explore the quantum interferences among coupling pathways in electron-transfer kinetics; we emphasize recent data and theories associated with the signatures of chirality and inelastic processes, which are manifested in the tunneling pathway coherence (or absence of coherence). PMID:23833692

  4. Preparation and Characterization of Surface-Covered Nanometer-Sized Catalyst by Carboxylate Phase Transfer

    PubMed

    Hu; Dong; Chen; Peng

    1997-10-15

    Surface-covered nanometer-sized CuO/Al2O3, CuO-ZnO/Al2O3, and CuO/ZnO catalysts were prepared by phase transfer with carboxylate. The surface-covered structure was studied using XPS, XRD, TEM, and high-resolution electron microscope. The results indicated that amorphous CuO and ZnO were dispersed on the surface of nanometer-sized Al2O3 particles in catalysts CuO-ZnO/Al2O3 and CuO/Al2O3, respectively. The thickness of its surface layer is about several angstroms. No spinel structure was found in the catalyst. The particle size of the surface-covered CuO/Al2O3 catalyst was about 2-3 nm. Al2O3 in the catalyst was amorphous. Surface-covered material CuO in the catalyst with low CuO content was also armophous. A large amount of copper carboxylate resulted in crystalline CuO and Cu2O. The protective ability of carboxylate to sol particles differs from the metal element of carboxylate. Copyright 1997 Academic Press. Copyright 1997Academic Press PMID:9398414

  5. Interfacial electronic effects control the reaction selectivity of platinum catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangxu; Xu, Chaofa; Huang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Jinyu; Gu, Lin; Li, Gang; Tang, Zichao; Wu, Binghui; Yang, Huayan; Zhao, Zipeng; Zhou, Zhiyou; Fu, Gang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-05-01

    Tuning the electronic structure of heterogeneous metal catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to optimize their catalytic activities. By preparing ethylenediamine-coated ultrathin platinum nanowires as a model catalyst, here we demonstrate an interfacial electronic effect induced by simple organic modifications to control the selectivity of metal nanocatalysts during catalytic hydrogenation. This we apply to produce thermodynamically unfavourable but industrially important compounds, with ultrathin platinum nanowires exhibiting an unexpectedly high selectivity for the production of N-hydroxylanilines, through the partial hydrogenation of nitroaromatics. Mechanistic studies reveal that the electron donation from ethylenediamine makes the surface of platinum nanowires highly electron rich. During catalysis, such an interfacial electronic effect makes the catalytic surface favour the adsorption of electron-deficient reactants over electron-rich substrates (that is, N-hydroxylanilines), thus preventing full hydrogenation. More importantly, this interfacial electronic effect, achieved through simple organic modifications, may now be used for the optimization of commercial platinum catalysts.

  6. Interfacial electronic effects control the reaction selectivity of platinum catalysts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangxu; Xu, Chaofa; Huang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Jinyu; Gu, Lin; Li, Gang; Tang, Zichao; Wu, Binghui; Yang, Huayan; Zhao, Zipeng; Zhou, Zhiyou; Fu, Gang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-05-01

    Tuning the electronic structure of heterogeneous metal catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to optimize their catalytic activities. By preparing ethylenediamine-coated ultrathin platinum nanowires as a model catalyst, here we demonstrate an interfacial electronic effect induced by simple organic modifications to control the selectivity of metal nanocatalysts during catalytic hydrogenation. This we apply to produce thermodynamically unfavourable but industrially important compounds, with ultrathin platinum nanowires exhibiting an unexpectedly high selectivity for the production of N-hydroxylanilines, through the partial hydrogenation of nitroaromatics. Mechanistic studies reveal that the electron donation from ethylenediamine makes the surface of platinum nanowires highly electron rich. During catalysis, such an interfacial electronic effect makes the catalytic surface favour the adsorption of electron-deficient reactants over electron-rich substrates (that is, N-hydroxylanilines), thus preventing full hydrogenation. More importantly, this interfacial electronic effect, achieved through simple organic modifications, may now be used for the optimization of commercial platinum catalysts. PMID:26808458

  7. Polar solvation and electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-13

    The report is divided into the following sections: completion of previous studies on solvation dynamics, dipole lattice studies, inertial components of solvation response, simple models of solvation dynamics, rotational dynamics and dielectric friction, intramolecular electron transfer reactions, and intermolecular donor-acceptor complexes.

  8. Facile graphene transfer directly to target substrates with a reusable metal catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafra, D. L.; Ming, T.; Kong, J.

    2015-09-01

    High-throughput, roll-to-roll growth and transferring of high-quality, large-area chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene directly onto a target substrate with a reusable metal catalyst is an enabling technology for flexible optoelectronics. We explore the direct transfer via hot lamination of CVD graphene onto a flexible substrate, followed by electrochemical delamination (bubble transfer) of the graphene. The transfer method investigated here does not require any intermediate transfer layer and allows the copper to be reused, which will reduce the production cost and avoid the generation of chemical waste. Such integration is one necessary step forward toward the economical and industrial scale production of graphene. Our method bares promise in various applications. As an example, we fabricated flexible solution-gated graphene field-effect-transistors, which exhibited transconductance as high as 200 μS.High-throughput, roll-to-roll growth and transferring of high-quality, large-area chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene directly onto a target substrate with a reusable metal catalyst is an enabling technology for flexible optoelectronics. We explore the direct transfer via hot lamination of CVD graphene onto a flexible substrate, followed by electrochemical delamination (bubble transfer) of the graphene. The transfer method investigated here does not require any intermediate transfer layer and allows the copper to be reused, which will reduce the production cost and avoid the generation of chemical waste. Such integration is one necessary step forward toward the economical and industrial scale production of graphene. Our method bares promise in various applications. As an example, we fabricated flexible solution-gated graphene field-effect-transistors, which exhibited transconductance as high as 200 μS. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03892h

  9. Intramolecular electron transfer and solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, John D.; Su, Shyh-Gang

    1987-12-01

    The intramolecular charge transfer reaction and solvation dynamics of 4,4'-dimethylaminophenyl sulphone in alcohols are measured using picosecond time-resolved emission spectroscopy. The results are compared to theoretical models that treat the solvent as a dielectric continuum. In alcohol solvents, the value for τ-1L (τL =τDɛ∞/ɛs) using either n2 or ɛmw for ɛ∞ do not provide a good gauge for the intramolecular electron transfer rate. These results are discussed in terms of the importance of vibrational contributions to the reaction rates and the applicability of the parameter τL in gauging the solvent dynamics. In addition, the time-resolved emission data clearly show that the charge transfer state is formed out of equilibrium with the surrounding solvent structure. The measured time scales for the ensuing solvent relaxation are significantly longer than the hydrodynamic continuum model prediction of τL. The discrepancy between the observed rates and those predicted by models based on a dielectric continuum description of the solvent reveal the importance of the underlying molecular aspects of the role of the solvent in both intramolecular charge transfer and solvation.

  10. Experimental Approaches to Studying Biological Electron Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Robert A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Provides an overview on biological electron-transfer reactions, summarizing what is known about how distance, spatial organization, medium, and other factors affect electron transfer. Experimental approaches, including studies of bimolecular electron transfer reactions (electrostatic effects and precursor complexes), are considered. (JN)

  11. Sample preparation and electron microscopy of hydrocracking catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, S.; McComb, D. W.; Perkins, J. M.; Haswell, R.

    2008-08-01

    This work focuses on the preparation of zeolite and alumina hydrocracking catalysts for investigation by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). EELS can potentially give new insights into the location and structure of coke which can result in catalyst deactivation. Three sample preparation techniques have been used - microtoming, focussed ion beam milling (LIB) and conventional ion beam milling. Crushing and grinding the catalyst pellets has been discounted as a preparation technique as the spatial relationship between the coke and the catalyst is lost using this method. Microtomed sections show some mechanical damage while sections milled in a single beam LIB microscope show gallium decoration in pores and were too thick for EELS. Conventional ion beam milling has proved to be most successful as it results in extensive thin regions and maintains the spatial distribution of the zeolite and alumina phases.

  12. Molecular co-catalyst accelerating hole transfer for enhanced photocatalytic H2 evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Wentuan; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Lei; Jin, Tao; Zhang, Lidong; Zhang, Qun; Luo, Yi; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2015-10-01

    In artificial photocatalysis, sluggish kinetics of hole transfer and the resulting high-charge recombination rate have been the Achilles' heel of photocatalytic conversion efficiency. Here we demonstrate water-soluble molecules as co-catalysts to accelerate hole transfer for improved photocatalytic H2 evolution activity. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), by virtue of its reversible redox couple TFA./TFA-, serves as a homogeneous co-catalyst that not only maximizes the contact areas between co-catalysts and reactants but also greatly promotes hole transfer. Thus K4Nb6O17 nanosheet catalysts achieve drastically increased photocatalytic H2 production rate in the presence of TFA, up to 32 times with respect to the blank experiment. The molecular co-catalyst represents a new, simple and highly effective approach to suppress recombination of photogenerated charges, and has provided fertile new ground for creating high-efficiency photosynthesis systems, avoiding use of noble-metal co-catalysts.

  13. Molecular co-catalyst accelerating hole transfer for enhanced photocatalytic H2 evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Wentuan; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Lei; Jin, Tao; Zhang, Lidong; Zhang, Qun; Luo, Yi; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2015-01-01

    In artificial photocatalysis, sluggish kinetics of hole transfer and the resulting high-charge recombination rate have been the Achilles' heel of photocatalytic conversion efficiency. Here we demonstrate water-soluble molecules as co-catalysts to accelerate hole transfer for improved photocatalytic H2 evolution activity. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), by virtue of its reversible redox couple TFA·/TFA−, serves as a homogeneous co-catalyst that not only maximizes the contact areas between co-catalysts and reactants but also greatly promotes hole transfer. Thus K4Nb6O17 nanosheet catalysts achieve drastically increased photocatalytic H2 production rate in the presence of TFA, up to 32 times with respect to the blank experiment. The molecular co-catalyst represents a new, simple and highly effective approach to suppress recombination of photogenerated charges, and has provided fertile new ground for creating high-efficiency photosynthesis systems, avoiding use of noble-metal co-catalysts. PMID:26486863

  14. Polymerization catalysts containing electron-withdrawing amide ligands

    DOEpatents

    Watkin, John G.; Click, Damon R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention describes methods of making a series of amine-containing organic compounds which are used as ligands for group 3-10 and lanthanide metal compounds. The ligands have electron-withdrawing groups bonded to them. The metal compounds, when combined with a cocatalyst, are catalysts for the polymerization of olefins.

  15. Oligomer and mixed-metal compounds potential multielectron transfer catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rillema, D.P.

    1992-03-30

    Projects related to the design and characterization of multimetallic complexes has proceeded forward with a number of achievements. First, photoprocesses in hydrogel matrices lead to the conclusion that cationic metallochromophores could be ion exchanged into a hydrogel matrix ({kappa}-carageenan) and substantial photocurrents could be generated. Second, X-ray structures of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}, Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup 2+} and Ru(bpz){sub 3}{sup 2+}, where bpy is 2,2{prime}-bipyridine, bpm is 2,2{prime}-bipyrimidine and bpz is 2,2{prime}-bipyrizine, were obtained and revealed similar Ru-N bond distances in each complex even though their {sigma}-donor and {pi}-acceptor character differ markedly. The structure parameters are expected to provide theoreticians with the information needed to probe the electronic character of the molecular systems and provide us with direction in our synthetic strategies. Third, a copper(I) complex was synthesized with a dimeric-ethane-bridged, 1,10-phenanthroline ligand that resulted in isolation of a bimetallic species. The copper(I) complex did luminesce weakly, suggesting that the dimer possesses potential electron transfer capability. Fourth, the photophysical properties of (Re(CO){sub 4}(L-L)){sup +}, where L-L = heterocyclic diimine ligands, and Pt(bph)X{sub 2}, where bph = the dianion of biphenyl and X = CH{sub 3}CN, py or ethylendiamine, displayed luminescence at high energy and underwent excited-state electron transfer. Such high energy emitters provide high driving forces for undergoing excited-state electron transfer. Fifth, both energy and electron transfer were observed in mixed-metal complexes bridged by 1,2-bis(2,2{prime}-bipyridyl-4{prime}-yl) ethane.

  16. Negative Ion Resonances and the "Electronic Catalyst"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. E.

    1998-03-01

    The formation of a negative ion resonance state during electron-molecule scattering leads to huge enhancements in the cross-sections for non-thermal, mode-selective molecular excitation or dissociation [1]. Negative ion states may thus have a key role to play in molecular sensing and processing at surfaces. In the first part of this talk I will focus on the recent exploitation, in basic physics, of a classic example of resonance scattering - the case of physisorbed molecular oxygen. As examples, I will show (a) how the angular distributions in negative ion resonance scattering can be used to separate out and identify the orientational ordering in a 2D gas phase which co-exists with a 2D solid on the graphite surface [2], and (b) how surface electron attachment couples with resonant molecular optical excitation to produce a new mechanism for surface enhanced photochemistry, illustrated in the same system [3]. In the second part of the talk I will turn to the exploitation of negative ion resonances in applied physics. I will demonstrate that electrons emitted from a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) device can be used to mediate a simple chemical reaction, namely the decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons via dissociative electron attachment (DA) [4,5]. The peak in the kinetic energy of the emitted electrons shifts upwards with increasing device voltage, which should allow tunable selection of particular molecular electron attachment resonances. 1. R.E. Palmer and P.J. Rous, Rev. Mod. Phys. 64 383 (1992). 2. K.B.K. Tang, et. al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 277 321 (1997). 3. L. Siller, et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76 1960 (1996). 4. R.G. Sharpe, et. al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 234 354 (1995). 5. R.G. Sharpe and R.E. Palmer, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 29 1 (1996).

  17. Supramolecular electron transfer by anion binding.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Ohkubo, Kei; D'Souza, Francis; Sessler, Jonathan L

    2012-10-11

    Anion binding has emerged as an attractive strategy to construct supramolecular electron donor-acceptor complexes. In recent years, the level of sophistication in the design of these systems has advanced to the point where it is possible to create ensembles that mimic key aspects of the photoinduced electron-transfer events operative in the photosynthetic reaction centre. Although anion binding is a reversible process, kinetic studies on anion binding and dissociation processes, as well as photoinduced electron-transfer and back electron-transfer reactions in supramolecular electron donor-acceptor complexes formed by anion binding, have revealed that photoinduced electron transfer and back electron transfer occur at time scales much faster than those associated with anion binding and dissociation. This difference in rates ensures that the linkage between electron donor and acceptor moieties is maintained over the course of most forward and back electron-transfer processes. A particular example of this principle is illustrated by electron-transfer ensembles based on tetrathiafulvalene calix[4]pyrroles (TTF-C4Ps). In these ensembles, the TTF-C4Ps act as donors, transferring electrons to various electron acceptors after anion binding. Competition with non-redox active substrates is also observed. Anion binding to the pyrrole amine groups of an oxoporphyrinogen unit within various supramolecular complexes formed with fullerenes also results in acceleration of the photoinduced electron-transfer process but deceleration of the back electron transfer; again, this is ascribed to favourable structural and electronic changes. Anion binding also plays a role in stabilizing supramolecular complexes between sulphonated tetraphenylporphyrin anions ([MTPPS](4-): M = H(2) and Zn) and a lithium ion encapsulated C(60) (Li(+)@C(60)); the resulting ensemble produces long-lived charge-separated states upon photoexcitation of the porphyrins. PMID:22766725

  18. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) of Iron Fischer Tropsch Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Aming; Xu, Huifang; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2006-04-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy have been used to study iron catalysts for Fischer Tropsch synthesis. When silica-containing iron oxide precursors are activated in flowing CO, the iron phase segregates into iron carbide crystallites, leaving behind some unreduced iron oxide in an amorphous state coexisting with the silica binder. The iron carbide crystallites are found covered by characteristic amorphous carbonaceous surface layers. These amorphous species are difficult to analyze by traditional catalyst characterization techniques, which lack spatial resolution. Even a surface-sensitive technique such as XPS shows only broad carbon or iron peaks in these catalysts. As we show in this work, EELS allows us to distinguish three different carbonaceous species: reactive amorphous carbon, graphitic carbon, and carbidic carbon in the bulk of the iron carbide particles. The carbidic carbon K edge shows an intense “[pi]*” peak with an edge shift of about 1 eV to higher energy loss compared to that of the [pi]* of amorphous carbon film or graphitic carbon. EELS analysis of the oxygen K edge allows us to distinguish the amorphous unreduced iron phase from the silica binder, indicating these are two separate phases. These results shed light onto the complex phase transformations that accompany the activation of iron catalysts for Fischer Tropsch synthesis.

  19. Light-driven microbial dissimilatory electron transfer to hematite.

    PubMed

    Li, Dao-Bo; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Ling-Li; Li, Wen-Wei; Huang, Yu-Xi; Pei, Dan-Ni; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-11-14

    The ability of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms (DMRM) to conduct extracellular electron transfer with conductive cellular components grants them great potential for bioenergy and environmental applications. Crystalline Fe(III) oxide, a type of widespread electron acceptor for DMRM in nature, can be excited by light for photocatalysis and microbial culture-mediated photocurrent production. However, the feasibility of direct electron transfer from living cells to light-excited Fe(III) oxides has not been well documented and the cellular physiology in this process has not been clarified. To resolve these problems, an electrochemical system composed of Geobacter sulfurreducens and hematite (?-Fe2O3) was constructed, and direct electron transfer from G. sulfurreducens cells to the light-excited ?-Fe2O3 in the absence of soluble electron shuttles was observed. Further studies evidenced the efficient excitation of ?-Fe2O3 and the dependence of photocurrent production on the biocatalytic activity. Light-induced electron transfer on the cell-?-Fe2O3 interface correlated linearly with the rates of microbial respiration and substrate consumption. In addition, the G. sulfurreducens cells were found to survive on light-excited ?-Fe2O3. These results prove a direct mechanism behind the DMRM respiration driven by photo-induced charge separation in semiconductive acceptors and also imply new opportunities to design photo-bioelectronic devices with living cells as a catalyst. PMID:25238285

  20. Electron transfer mechanisms in surface dynamical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, M.; Shima, N.; Tsuneyuki, S.

    Some topics concerning on the dynamical electron transfer processes between adparticle and surface are discussed based on recent theoretical studies. They include the band effect on the electron transfer probability, the change from the diabatic to adiabatic behavior seen in the field induced desorption (FID), and the effect of the couplings with the medium degrees of freedom on the electron transfer process. It is elucidated how the competition of the energy parameters, i.e., the band width, the inverse of the scattering time and the interaction energy leads to different features of the electron transfer. Natural crossover of the FID behavior from the diabatic to the adiabatic limit is clarified by the generalized kinematic equation based on the quantum model of the electron transfer. Enhancement of the diabatic behavior by the coupling with the heat bath or sorrounding medium is concluded with the stochastic trajectory method and the time-developing operator method.

  1. Catalytic Olefin Hydroamidation Enabled by Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a ternary catalyst system for the intramolecular hydroamidation of unactivated olefins using simple N-aryl amide derivatives. Amide activation in these reactions occurs via concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mediated by an excited state iridium complex and weak phosphate base to furnish a reactive amidyl radical that readily adds to pendant alkenes. A series of H-atom, electron, and proton transfer events with a thiophenol cocatalyst furnish the product and regenerate the active forms of the photocatalyst and base. Mechanistic studies indicate that the amide substrate can be selectively homolyzed via PCET in the presence of the thiophenol, despite a large difference in bond dissociation free energies between these functional groups. PMID:26439818

  2. Exciton Relaxation and Electron Transfer Dynamics of Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cunming

    Quantum dots (QDs), also referred to as colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, exhibit unique electronic and optical properties arising from their three-dimensional confinement and strongly enhanced coulomb interactions. Developing a detailed understanding of the exciton relaxation dynamics within QDs is important not only for sake of exploring the fundamental physics of quantum confinement processes, but also for their applications. Ultrafast transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy, as a powerful tool to explore the relaxation dynamics of excitons, was employed to characterize the hot single/multiexciton relaxation dynamics at the first four exciton states of CdSe/CdZnS QDs. We observed for the first time that the hot hole can relax through two possible pathways: Intraband multiple phonon coupling and intrinsic defect trapping, with a lifetime of ˜7 ps. Additionally, an ultra-short component of ˜ 8 ps, directly associated with the Auger recombination of highly energetic exciton states, was discovered. After exploring the exciton relaxation inside QDs, ultrafast TA spectroscopy was further applied to study the electron transferring outside from QDs. By using a brand-new photocatalytic system consisting of CdSe QDs and Ni-dihydrolipoic acid (Ni-DHLA) catalyst, which has represented a robust photocatalysis of H2 from water, the photoinduced electron transfer (ET) dynamics between QD and the catalyst, one of most important steps during H2 generation, was studied. We found smaller bare CdSe QDs exhibit a better ET performance and CdS shelling on the bare QDs leads to worsen the ET. The calculations of effective mass approximation (EMA) and Marcus theory show the ET process is mainly dominated by driving force, electronic coupling strength and reorganization energy between QD and the catalyst.

  3. Electron transfer to continuum states

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, J.H. |

    1994-12-31

    Gene Rudd`s analysis of doubly differential cross sections for the ionization of He atoms by proton impact suggested that electrons were being carried along by the proton for a short period of time after being ejected from the target region. Normally, this would represent an electron capture event in which an excited state of atomic hydrogen is formed. Because the electron ends up ionized it was recognized that these states of the proton must be continuum states. This insight was confirmed by observations of the continuum electron capture (CEC) cusp when the electron velocity equals the proton velocity in the final state. The impact of this idea upon the theory of ionization at high energies is reviewed.

  4. Dynamics of electron transfer in amine photooxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, K.S.; Freilich, S.C.; Schaeffer, C.G.

    1980-08-13

    Studies were initiated utilizing picosecond (ps) absorption spectroscopy, to directly monitor the dynamics of electron transfer from 1,4-diazabicyclo(2.2.2)octane (Dabco) to the excited states of benzophenone and fluorenone. These two systems were chosen because of their contrasting photochemistry. The quantum yield for photoreduction of benzophenone in polar solvents is generally greater than 0.1, while that of fluorenone is zero. In polar solvents, the proposed mechanism dictates that an electron is transferred to the excited singlet state fluorenone, which then back-transfers the electron, regenerating ground-state fluorenone and amine. Photolysis of benzophenone in the presence of an amine transfers an electron to an excited triplet state, forming an ion pair that is stable relative to diffusional separation. The results of this study verify this proposal.

  5. Electron-probe microanalysis of alumina-supported platinum catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Lakis, R.E.; Vicenzi, E.P.; Allen, F.M.

    1996-12-31

    Many catalysts of commercial importance contain a number of active metals and promoters that are impregnated into porous ceramic support with well controlled concentration profiles relative to the other constituents. It would be of great practical importance to reliably measure the distribution of active materials in a quantitative manner. A previous investigation which focused upon porous alumina, identified a deficit of detected electrons which increased with increasing porosity, and was perhaps due to the roughness of the porous materials surface. This leads to unrealistically low composition totals when traditional correction procedures are employed. This study is a first step towards the collection of high statistical quality data on catalyst materials so that new matrix correction procedures may be developed for these systems. The alumina supported catalyst specimens were prepared by Engelhard Corporation using routine wet impregnation techniques, and were independently analyzed for platinum content. Fully dense {alpha}-alumina was used for the aluminum and oxygen standards, and high purity platinum was used for the platinum standard.

  6. Artificial photosynthesis: from nanosecond electron transfer to catalytic water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kärkäs, Markus D; Johnston, Eric V; Verho, Oscar; Akermark, Björn

    2014-01-21

    Human society faces a fundamental challenge as energy consumption is projected to increase due to population and economic growth as fossil fuel resources decrease. Therefore the transition to alternative and sustainable energy sources is of the utmost importance. The conversion of solar energy into chemical energy, by splitting H2O to generate molecular O2 and H2, could contribute to solving the global energy problem. Developing such a system will require the combination of several complicated processes, such as light-harvesting, charge separation, electron transfer, H2O oxidation, and reduction of the generated protons. The primary processes of charge separation and catalysis, which occur in the natural photosynthetic machinery, provide us with an excellent blueprint for the design of such systems. This Account describes our efforts to construct supramolecular assemblies capable of carrying out photoinduced electron transfer and to develop artificial water oxidation catalysts (WOCs). Early work in our group focused on linking a ruthenium chromophore to a manganese-based oxidation catalyst. When we incorporated a tyrosine unit into these supramolecular assemblies, we could observe fast intramolecular electron transfer from the manganese centers, via the tyrosine moiety, to the photooxidized ruthenium center, which clearly resembles the processes occurring in the natural system. Although we demonstrated multi-electron transfer in our artificial systems, the bottleneck proved to be the stability of the WOCs. Researchers have developed a number of WOCs, but the majority can only catalyze H2O oxidation in the presence of strong oxidants such as Ce(IV), which is difficult to generate photochemically. By contrast, illumination of ruthenium(II) photosensitizers in the presence of a sacrificial acceptor generates [Ru(bpy)3](3+)-type oxidants. Their oxidation potentials are significantly lower than that of Ce(IV), but our group recently showed that incorporating negatively charged groups into the ligand backbone could decrease the oxidation potential of the catalysts and, at the same time, decrease the potential for H2O oxidation. This permitted us to develop both ruthenium- and manganese-based WOCs that can operate under neutral conditions, driven by the mild oxidant [Ru(bpy)3](3+). Many hurdles to the development of viable systems for the production of solar fuels remain. However, the combination of important features from the natural photosynthetic machinery and novel artificial components adds insights into the complicated catalytic processes that are involved in splitting H2O. PMID:23957573

  7. Pulse radiolytic studies of electron transfer processes and applications to solar photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Neta, P.

    1992-01-17

    The studies use pulse radiolysis to provide absolute rate constants for reactions of many inorganic radicals and organic peroxyl radicals, key intermediates in many chemical processes, and to study electron transfer reactions of metalloporphyrins for solar energy conversion. Highlights of research during the past 3 years are: metalloporphyrins and colloidal catalysts, inorganic radicals, peroxyl radicals, and other topics.

  8. A systematic computational study of electronic effects on hydrogen sensitivity of olefin polymerization catalysts (abstract only)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coussens, Betty B.; Budzelaar, Peter H. M.; Friederichs, Nic

    2008-02-01

    One of the important product parameters of polyolefins is their molecular weight (distribution). A common way to control this parameter is to add molecular hydrogen during the polymerization, which then acts as a chain transfer agent. The factors governing the hydrogen sensitivity of olefin polymerization catalysts are poorly understood and have attracted little attention from computational chemists. To explore the electronic factors determining hydrogen sensitivity we performed density functional calculations on a wide range of simple model systems including some metallocenes and a few basic models of heterogeneous catalysts. As a quantitative measure for hydrogen sensitivity we used the ratio of (i) the rate constant for chain transfer to hydrogen to (ii) the rate constant for ethene insertion, kh/kp (see the scheme below), and as a measure of electrophilicity we used the energy of complexation to the probe molecule ammonia. \\[ \\mathsEPS+[c]{6785801.eps}{29.861pc} \\] For isolated species in the gas phase, complexation energies appear to dominate the chemistry. Ethene complexes more strongly than hydrogen and with increasing electrophilicity of the metal centre this difference grows; the hydrogen sensitivity decreases accordingly. Although many factors (like catalyst dormancy and deactivation issues) complicate the comparison with experiment, this result seems to agree both in broad terms with the experimental lower hydrogen sensitivity of heterogeneous catalysts, and more specifically with the increased hydrogen sensitivity of highly alkylated or fused metallocenes. The opposite conclusion reached by Blom (see Blom et al 2002 Macromol. Chem. Phys. 203 381-7) is due to the use of a very different measure of electrophilicity, rather than to different experimental data.

  9. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Holman; Ling Zang; Ruchuan Liu; David M. Adams

    2009-10-20

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  10. Electron transfer reactions within zeolites: Radical cation from benzonorbornadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Pitchumani, K.; Ramamurthy, V.; Corbin, D.R.

    1996-08-28

    Zeolites are being used as solid acid catalysts in a number of commercial processes. Occasionally zeolites are also reported to perform as electron transfer agents. Recently, we observed that radical cations of certain olefins and thiophene oligomers can be generated spontaneously within ZSM-5 zeolites. We noticed that these radical cations generated from diphenyl polyenes and thiophene oligomers were remarkably stable (at room temperature) within ZSM-5 and can be characterized spectroscopically at leisure. We have initiated a program on electron transfer processes within large pore zeolites. The basis of this approach is that once a cation radical is generated within a large pore zeolite, it will have sufficient room to undergo a molecular transformation. Our aim is to identify a condition under which electron transfer can be routinely and reliably carried out within large pore zeolites such as faujasites. To our great surprise, when benzonorbornadiene A and a number of olefins were included in divalent cation exchanged faujasites. they were transformed into products very quickly (<15 min). This observation allowed us to explore the use of zeolites as oxidants. Results of our studies on benzonorbornadiene are presented in this communication. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Electron transfer reactions in microporous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Mallouk, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    Basic thrust the research program involves use of microporous solids (zeolites, clays, layered and tunnel structure oxide semiconductors) as organizing media for artificial photosynthetic systems. Purpose of the microporous solid is twofold. First, it induces spatial organization of photoactive and electroactive components (sensitizers, semiconductor particles, electron relays, and catalysts) at the solid-solution interface, enhancing the quantum efficiency of charge separation and separating physically the ultimate electron donor and acceptor in the electron transport chain. Second, since the microcrystalline solid admits only molecules of a certain charge and size, it is possible to achieve permanent charge separation by sieving chemical photoproducts (e.g., H[sub 2] and I[sub 3][sup [minus

  12. Protein electron transfer: Dynamics and statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2013-07-01

    Electron transfer between redox proteins participating in energy chains of biology is required to proceed with high energetic efficiency, minimizing losses of redox energy to heat. Within the standard models of electron transfer, this requirement, combined with the need for unidirectional (preferably activationless) transitions, is translated into the need to minimize the reorganization energy of electron transfer. This design program is, however, unrealistic for proteins whose active sites are typically positioned close to the polar and flexible protein-water interface to allow inter-protein electron tunneling. The high flexibility of the interfacial region makes both the hydration water and the surface protein layer act as highly polar solvents. The reorganization energy, as measured by fluctuations, is not minimized, but rather maximized in this region. Natural systems in fact utilize the broad breadth of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations, but in the ways not anticipated by the standard models based on equilibrium thermodynamics. The combination of the broad spectrum of static fluctuations with their dispersive dynamics offers the mechanism of dynamical freezing (ergodicity breaking) of subsets of nuclear modes on the time of reaction/residence of the electron at a redox cofactor. The separation of time-scales of nuclear modes coupled to electron transfer allows dynamical freezing. In particular, the separation between the relaxation time of electro-elastic fluctuations of the interface and the time of conformational transitions of the protein caused by changing redox state results in dynamical freezing of the latter for sufficiently fast electron transfer. The observable consequence of this dynamical freezing is significantly different reorganization energies describing the curvature at the bottom of electron-transfer free energy surfaces (large) and the distance between their minima (Stokes shift, small). The ratio of the two reorganization energies establishes the parameter by which the energetic efficiency of protein electron transfer is increased relative to the standard expectations, thus minimizing losses of energy to heat. Energetically efficient electron transfer occurs in a chain of conformationally quenched cofactors and is characterized by flattened free energy surfaces, reminiscent of the flat and rugged landscape at the stability basin of a folded protein.

  13. Protein electron transfer: Dynamics and statistics.

    PubMed

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2013-07-14

    Electron transfer between redox proteins participating in energy chains of biology is required to proceed with high energetic efficiency, minimizing losses of redox energy to heat. Within the standard models of electron transfer, this requirement, combined with the need for unidirectional (preferably activationless) transitions, is translated into the need to minimize the reorganization energy of electron transfer. This design program is, however, unrealistic for proteins whose active sites are typically positioned close to the polar and flexible protein-water interface to allow inter-protein electron tunneling. The high flexibility of the interfacial region makes both the hydration water and the surface protein layer act as highly polar solvents. The reorganization energy, as measured by fluctuations, is not minimized, but rather maximized in this region. Natural systems in fact utilize the broad breadth of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations, but in the ways not anticipated by the standard models based on equilibrium thermodynamics. The combination of the broad spectrum of static fluctuations with their dispersive dynamics offers the mechanism of dynamical freezing (ergodicity breaking) of subsets of nuclear modes on the time of reaction/residence of the electron at a redox cofactor. The separation of time-scales of nuclear modes coupled to electron transfer allows dynamical freezing. In particular, the separation between the relaxation time of electro-elastic fluctuations of the interface and the time of conformational transitions of the protein caused by changing redox state results in dynamical freezing of the latter for sufficiently fast electron transfer. The observable consequence of this dynamical freezing is significantly different reorganization energies describing the curvature at the bottom of electron-transfer free energy surfaces (large) and the distance between their minima (Stokes shift, small). The ratio of the two reorganization energies establishes the parameter by which the energetic efficiency of protein electron transfer is increased relative to the standard expectations, thus minimizing losses of energy to heat. Energetically efficient electron transfer occurs in a chain of conformationally quenched cofactors and is characterized by flattened free energy surfaces, reminiscent of the flat and rugged landscape at the stability basin of a folded protein. PMID:23862967

  14. Potential technology transfers of research on low-temperature carbon monoxide-oxygen recombination catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poziomek, Edward J.

    1990-01-01

    Results from research on catalytic recombination of CO-O2 for stable closed-cycle operation of CO2 lasers hold much promise for a variety of technology transfer. Expansion of CO2 laser remote sensing applications toward chemical detection and pollution monitoring would certainly be expected. However, the catalysts themselves may be especially effective in low-temperature oxidation of a number of chemicals in addition to CO. It is therefore of interest to compare the CO-O2 catalysts with chemical systems designed for chemical sensing, air purification and process catalysis. Success in understanding the catalytic mechanisms of the recombination of CO-O2 could help to shed light on how catalyst systems operate. New directions in low-temperature oxidation catalysts, coatings for chemical sensors and sorbents for air purification could well emerge.

  15. Electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy studies of carbon fiber formation at Fe catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, V. D.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Batov, D. V.; Bangert, U.; Gutiérrez-Sosa, A.; Harvey, A. J.

    2002-02-01

    Nanofibers were produced by the chemical vapor deposition method in the presence of Fe-catalyst particles at temperatures of 700-850 K by disproportionation of CO. Electron diffraction and high resolution electron imaging as well as electron energy loss spectroscopy and x-ray analysis techniques were used to study the nanofiber formation in different places at the catalyst surface. The particles enclosed by the fibers were found to be Fe7C3 and Fe3C. Crystallographic relationships between deposit and particle were established. The structural properties of the deposit were found to be dependent on the position at the particle surface. Graphitic growth was favored at certain facets. At the particle tip graphene sheet formation competed with Fe2O3 oxide formation. We also report the occurrence of a low loss feature between 3 and 4 eV, concurrent with the dispersion of an interface plasmon at the graphite/Fe2O3 interface.

  16. Mechanism of cobalt self-exchange electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Ullman, Andrew M; Nocera, Daniel G

    2013-10-01

    A heptanuclear cobalt cluster was synthesized in two different oxidation states, Co(II)7 and a mixed valence Co(III)Co(II)6, as a soluble model of a cobalt-phosphate/borate (Co-OEC) water splitting catalyst. Crystallographic characterization indicates similar cluster cores, distinguished primarily at the central Co atom. An anion associates to the cluster cores via hydrogen bonding. Using an isotope exchange method, an anomalously slow self-exchange electron transfer rate constant (k(obs) = 1.53 × 10(-3) M(-1) s(-1) at 40 °C and 38 mM [OTf] in MeCN), as compared to that predicted from semiclassical Marcus theory, supports a charge transfer process that is accelerated by dissociation of the anion from the oxidized cluster. This mechanism sheds light on the inverse dependence of anions in the self-repair mechanism of Co-OECs. Moreover, because H2O cannot directly bridge cobalt centers, owing to the encapsulation of the central Co within the cluster core, the observed results address a long-standing controversy surrounding the Co(2+/3+) self-exchange electron transfer reaction of the hexaaqua complex. PMID:23987247

  17. Metal Bridging for Directing and Accelerating Electron Transfer as Exemplified by Harnessing the Reactivity of AIBN.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yinjun; Guo, Shengmei; Wu, Longmin; Xia, Chungu; Huang, Hanmin

    2015-05-11

    A new strategy for tuning the electron transfer between radicals and enolates has been developed. This method elicits the innate reactivity of AIBN with a copper catalyst and enables a cascade reaction with cinnamic acids. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies and control experiments indicate that the redox-active copper species not only activates the radical by coordination, but also serves as a bridge to bring the radical and nucleophile within close proximity to facilitate electron transfer. By exploiting possible combinations of redox-active metals and radical entities with suitable coordinating functional groups, this strategy should contribute to the development of a broad range of radical-based reactions. PMID:25809686

  18. BASE-CATALYZED DESTRUCTION OF PCBS-NEW DONORS, NEW TRANSFER AGENTS/CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of hydrogen transfer agents and catalysts to improve the base-catalyzed decomposition of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was investigated. The reaction proceeded only in the presence of base, but the rate of PCB disappearance increased with increasing amount of hydrogen ...

  19. Magnetically Recoverable Supported Ruthenium Catalyst for Hydrogenation of Alkynes and Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ruthenium (Ru) catalyst supported on magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and used for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The cata...

  20. Solvent gating of intramolecular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.M. ); Spears, K.G.; Gong, J.H.; Wach, M. )

    1994-02-03

    The rates for ionic photodissociation of malachite green leucocyanide to form cyanide ion and a malachite green carbonium ion were measured as a function of solvent and temperature. The observed rates in mixtures of polar and nonpolar solvents all had an activation energy of about 1 kcal/mol for a wide range of dielectric constants. This dissociative intramolecular electron transfer (DIET) is unusual because it is the first example where solvent configurational entropy changes are required to enable a large amplitude molecular distortion leading to a nonadiabatic electron transfer and ionic dissociation. This solvent gated intramolecular electron-transfer mechanism is supported by analysis of the preexponential and activation energy trends in dipolar aprotic solven mixtures and alcohol solvents. The large amplitude motion is not separately measurable due to the slow gating rates, but viscosity effects on both the preexponential and the activation energy are analyzed to demonstrate consistency with a barrierless diffusion model having a structural dependence on electron-transfer rate. The rate has an inverse dependence on viscosity raised to the 0.53 power. 36 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. 75 FR 33681 - Electronic Fund Transfers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... document in the Federal Register of June 4, 2010 (75 FR 31665). The document (FR Doc. 2010-13280) amended... number 2. In the final rule, FR Doc. 2010-13280, published on June 4, 2010 (75 FR 31665) make the... CFR Part 205 Electronic Fund Transfers June 4, 2010. AGENCY: Board of Governors of the Federal...

  2. Electron transfer kinetics in water-splitting dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swierk, John R.

    Water-splitting dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical (WS-DSPECs) cells utilize molecular sensitizers absorbed on mesoporous TiO2 electrodes to harvest visible light, inject photoexcited electrons into the conduction band of TiO2, and finally transfer holes across the TiO2 surface to water oxidation catalysts, which in turn oxidize water to give molecular oxygen and four protons. Within the TiO2 layer photoinjected electrons are transported to a transparent conductor back contact and from there to a dark cathode to reduce protons to molecular hydrogen. WS-DSPECs offer several advantages for alternative solar fuels systems: the use of low-cost materials, tunable molecular sensitizers, and relaxed catalytic turnover requirements to name a few. Despite these advantageous features, power conversion efficiencies in WS-DSPECs are generally low. Broadly, this thesis explores the fundamental electron transfer processes that control the efficiency of these cells. Chapter 1 presents a survey of the previous literature and individually considers each component of a WS-DSPEC (water oxidation catalyst, sensitizers, electrode materials, redox mediators, and overall system design). Chapter 2 presents a novel method of preparing a WS-DSPEC that utilizes crystalline IrO2 nanoparticles directly sintered to TiO2 as a water oxidation catalyst and describes a previously unknown electron-scavenging pathway by IrO2. Chapter 3 explores how electron trapping by and proton intercalation into TiO2 controls the photoelectrochemical performance of WS-DSPECs. Chapter 4 characterizes how electron recombination with the oxidized sensitizer and electron scavenging by the IrO 2 catalyst combine to limit the concentration of conduction band electrons and by extension photocurrent in WS-DSPECs. Chapter 5 demonstrates the use of the first totally organic sensitizers for light driven water-splitting and explores how the molecular and electronic structure of a sensitizer affects the electron transfer steps of injection, recombination, and hole transfer among others. Finally, in Chapter 6 a model system that describes electron transfer between an oxidized sensitizer and water oxidation catalyst is demonstrated and provides insight into sensitizer regeneration in WS-DSPECs. Together the results in these chapters present a detailed picture of how electron scavenging, recombination, and transport combine to generate photocurrent in a fully characterized WS-DSPEC and serve as starting point for the further development of WS-DSPECs.

  3. Liquid-Phase Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Furfural over Homogeneous Lewis Acid-Ru/C Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulou, Paraskevi; Martin, Nickolas; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2015-06-22

    The catalytic performance of homogeneous Lewis acid catalysts and their interaction with Ru/C catalyst are studied in the catalytic transfer hydrogenation of furfural by using 2-propanol as a solvent and hydrogen donor. We find that Lewis acid catalysts hydrogenate the furfural to furfuryl alcohol, which is then etherified with 2-propanol. The catalytic activity is correlated with an empirical scale of Lewis acid strength and exhibits a volcano behavior. Lanthanides are the most active, with DyCl3 giving complete furfural conversion and a 97 % yield of furfuryl alcohol at 180 °C after 3 h. The combination of Lewis acid and Ru/C catalysts results in synergy for the stronger Lewis acid catalysts, with a significant increase in the furfural conversion and methyl furan yield. Optimum results are obtained by using Ru/C combined with VCl3 , AlCl3 , SnCl4 , YbCl3 , and RuCl3 . Our results indicate that the combination of Lewis acid/metal catalysts is a general strategy for performing tandem reactions in the upgrade of furans. PMID:26013846

  4. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-12

    This research project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic many of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. Specifically, the molecules are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic multistep electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited singlet state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they model carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  5. Current Theoretical Challenges in Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Electron-Proton Nonadiabaticity, Proton Relays, and Ultrafast Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-05-25

    We found that proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an important role in a wide range of biological and chemical processes. The motions of the electrons, transferring protons, solute nuclei, and solvent nuclei occur on a wide range of time scales and are often strongly coupled. As a result, the theoretical description of these processes requires a combination of quantum and classical methods. This Perspective discusses three of the current theoretical challenges in the field of PCET. The first challenge is the calculation of electron–proton nonadiabatic effects, which are significant for these reactions because the hydrogen tunneling is often faster than the electronic transition. The second challenge is the modeling of electron transfer coupled to proton transport along hydrogen-bonded networks. Moreover, the third challenge is the simulation of the ultrafast dynamics of nonequilibrium photoinduced PCET reactions in solution. Insights provided by theoretical studies may assist in the design of more effective catalysts for energy conversion processes.

  6. Role of iron-based catalyst and hydrogen transfer in direct coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Xian Li; Shuxun Hu; Lijun Jin; Haoquan Hu

    2008-03-15

    The aim of this research is to understand the major function of iron-based catalysts on direct coal liquefaction (DCL). Pyrolysis and direct liquefaction of Shenhua bituminous coal were carried out to investigate the effect of three solvents (wash-oil from coal-tar, cycle-oil from coal liquefaction, and tetralin) in a N{sub 2} or a H{sub 2} atmosphere and with or without catalyst. The hydrogen content in the solvent and liquid product and the H{sub 2} consumption for every run were calculated to understand the hydrogen transfer approach in DCL. The results showed that the iron-based catalyst promotes the coal pyrolysis, and the dominating function of the catalyst in DCL is to promote the formation of activated hydrogen and to accelerate the secondary distribution of H in the reaction system including the gas, liquid, and solid phases. The major transfer approach of the activated hydrogen is from molecular hydrogen to solvent and then from solvent to coal, and the solvent takes on the role of a 'bridge' in the hydrogen transfer approach. 31 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of auto catalyst and cobalt germanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haiping

    The modern ceria-zirconia based catalysts are used in automobiles to reduce exhaust pollutants. Cobalt germanides have potential applications as electrical contacts in the future Ge-based semiconductor devices. In this thesis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to study the atomic scale interactions between metallic nanostructures and crystalline substrates in the two material systems mentioned above. The model catalyst samples consisted of precious metal nano-particles (Pd, Rh) supported on the surface of (Ce,Zr)O2 thin films. The response of the microstructure of the metal-oxide interface to the reduction and oxidation treatments was investigated by cross-sectional high resolution TEM. Atomic detail of the metal-oxide interface was obtained. It was found that Pd and Rh showed different sintering and interaction behaviors on the oxide surface. The preferred orientation of Pd particles in this study was Pd(111)//CZO(111). Partial encapsulation of Pd particles by reduced (Ce,Zr)O 2 surface was observed and possible mechanisms of the encapsulation were discussed. The characteristics of the metal-oxide interaction depend on the properties of the oxide, as well as their relative orientation. The results provide experimental evidence for understanding the thermodynamics of the equilibrium morphology of a solid particle supported on a solid surface that is not considered as inert. The reaction of Co with Ge to form epitaxial Co5Ge7 was studied by in situ ultra-high vacuum (UHV) TEM using two methods. One was reactive deposition of Co on Ge, in which the Ge substrate was maintained at 350°C during deposition. The other method was solid state reaction, in which the deposition of Co on Ge was carried out at room temperature followed by annealing to higher temperatures. During reactive deposition, the deposited Co reacted with Ge to form nanosized 3D Co 5Ge7 islands. During solid state reaction, a continuous epitaxial Co5Ge7 film on the (001) Ge substrate was formed at ˜300°C. With further annealing at a higher temperature, the continuous Co5Ge 7 layer broke into 3D islands in order to relieve the strain energy in the epitaxial Co5Ge7 layer. Electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction were used to identify the cobalt germanide phase and epitaxial orientation relationships with respect to the substrate.

  8. Biotechnological Aspects of Microbial Extracellular Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Souichiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a type of microbial respiration that enables electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials, including naturally-occurring metal compounds and artificial electrodes. Microorganisms harboring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, in addition to their contribution to global energy and material cycles. In this review, current knowledge on microbial EET and its application to diverse biotechnologies, including the bioremediation of toxic metals, recovery of useful metals, biocorrosion, and microbial electrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis), were introduced. Two potential biotechnologies based on microbial EET, namely the electrochemical control of microbial metabolism and electrochemical stimulation of microbial symbiotic reactions (electric syntrophy), were also discussed. PMID:26004795

  9. Biotechnological Aspects of Microbial Extracellular Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Kato, Souichiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a type of microbial respiration that enables electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials, including naturally-occurring metal compounds and artificial electrodes. Microorganisms harboring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, in addition to their contribution to global energy and material cycles. In this review, current knowledge on microbial EET and its application to diverse biotechnologies, including the bioremediation of toxic metals, recovery of useful metals, biocorrosion, and microbial electrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis), were introduced. Two potential biotechnologies based on microbial EET, namely the electrochemical control of microbial metabolism and electrochemical stimulation of microbial symbiotic reactions (electric syntrophy), were also discussed. PMID:26004795

  10. New coal-derived catalyst for transfer hydrocracking of vacuum residue

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Ikusei; Fujimoto, Kaoru

    1995-12-31

    Liquid phase hydrocracking of Arabian Heavy vacuum residue conducted in the presence of metal supported active carbon catalyst gave large amount of distillates (70%) with small hydrogen consumption. Especially the Yallourn coal derived active carbon catalyst showed high activity for the cracking of Arabian Heavy vacuum residue. The yield of asphaltene in the product oil was very low, whereas the coke yield was relatively high (about 4 wt%). In the metal-free active carbon system, the coke yield and the content of olefins, sulfur compounds, and asphaltene in the product oil were higher than those of the metal-supported active carbon system. These results suggest that asphaltene in feed oil was adsorbed on the metal supported active carbon catalyst and was decomposed or dehydrogenated on it to form coke and hydrogen atoms. The hydrogen atoms formed migrated on the carbon surface to reach the metal site and transferred to free radicals, olefins, or organo sulfur compounds.

  11. Modeling electron transfer in photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Makita, Hiroki; Hastings, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Nanosecond to millisecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopy has been used to study electron transfer processes in photosystem I particles from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 with eight different quinones incorporated into the A1 binding site, at both 298 and 77K. A detailed kinetic model was constructed and solved within the context of Marcus electron transfer theory, and it was found that all of the data could be well described only if the in situ midpoint potentials of the quinones fell in a tightly defined range. For photosystem I with phylloquinone incorporated into the A1 binding site all of the time-resolved optical data is best modeled when the in situ midpoint potential of phylloquinone on the A/B branch is -635/-690mV, respectively. With the midpoint potential of the FX iron sulfur cluster set at -680mV, this indicates that forward electron transfer from A1(-) to FX is slightly endergonic/exergonic on the A/B branch, respectively. Additionally, for forward electron transfer from A1(-) to FX, on both the A and B branches the reorganization energy is close to 0.7eV. Reorganization energies of 0.4 or 1.0eV are not possible. For the eight different quinones incorporated, the same kinetic model was used, allowing us to establish in situ redox potentials for all of the incorporated quinones on both branches. A linear correlation was found between the in situ and in vitro midpoint potentials of the quinones on both branches. PMID:26994812

  12. Mass transfer effects in solvent-free fat interesterification reactions: influences on catalyst design.

    PubMed

    Ison, A P; Macrae, A R; Smith, C G; Bosley, J

    1994-01-20

    The use of solvent-free systems in the oil and fats industry is commonplace. Initial studies on interesterification were carried out in solvent systems because the lipase was immobilized solely by adsorption onto particles of diatomaceous earth. In this study, the mass transfer characteristics associated with the continuous interesterification of olive oil in a solvent-free system have been examined, for lipase immobilized on the three ion-exchange materials: Duolite ES562, Duolite ES568, and Spheroil DEA. The process of immobilization is influenced by the internal structure of the material and this in turn influences the interesterification activity of the catalyst. Individually prepared catalysts for the three support materials have shown that external mass transfer limitations are unlikely even at low flowrates.In the case of Spherosil DEA, with a mean pore diameter of 1480 A, the wide pores would be expected to reduce internal mass transfer limitations; however, it is more likely that the reduction in activity with increased catalyst loading is due to the lipase molecules being immobilized in a tightly packed monolayer. In such a situation, some active sites of the lipase molecules would become inaccessible to substrate molecules leading to an observed reduction in activity. For Duolite ES568, the observed results are very similar to those seen for Spherosil DEA, however, the pore structure of this support material indicate that some internal mass transfer limitations may also be occurring. Yet the contribution of the individual effects cannot be determined. The results observed for the support Duolite ES562 are different than those observed for the other materials and reflect the heterogeneity of Duolite ES562. The large proportion of narrow pores in the support mean that, for the catalysts examined, immobilization is most likely to have occurred in the external pores of the particles, and as such no internal mass transfer limitation is observed.It is clear that for interesterification the material chosen for enzyme immobilization will have an important role in determining the catalyst efficiency. External mass transfer limitations are very minor and observed internal mass transfer limitations may be caused by both internal mass transfer and the manner in which the immobilization process occurs. PMID:18615605

  13. A La-doped Mg-Al mixed metal oxide supported copper catalyst with enhanced catalytic performance in transfer dehydrogenation of 1-decanol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Yajie; Liu, Qian; Yang, Lan; Fan, Guoli; Li, Feng

    2016-01-21

    In the present work, a La-doped Mg-Al mixed metal oxide supported copper catalyst (Cu/La-MgAlO) was synthesized through a layered double hydroxide precursor route. The materials were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, CO2-temperature programmed desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectra of CO2 absorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results revealed that the introduction of a trace amount of La could significantly improve the surface basicity of the Cu/La-MgAlO catalyst, especially strong Lewis basicity. Compared with the undoped supported Cu catalyst, Cu/La-MgAlO exhibited much higher activity and selectivity in the liquid-phase transfer dehydrogenation of 1-decanol with a 1-decanal yield up to 89%. The excellent catalytic efficiency was mainly ascribed to the surface cooperation between the Lewis basic sites and the adjacent Cu(0)/Cu(+) species. That is, basic sites, especially strong-strength basic sites, held the key to the abstraction of protons from the hydroxyl group in 1-decanol, while the adjacent Cu(0) and Cu(+) species were responsible for the hydrogen transfer and the adsorption of styrene in the transfer dehydrogenation and hydrogenation reactions, respectively. This study provides a new method for designing cost-effective supported copper-based catalysts highly efficient for the transfer dehydrogenation of primary aliphatic alcohols by modifying the surface basicity of metal oxide supports. PMID:26659760

  14. Facile graphene transfer directly to target substrates with a reusable metal catalyst.

    PubMed

    Mafra, D L; Ming, T; Kong, J

    2015-09-28

    High-throughput, roll-to-roll growth and transferring of high-quality, large-area chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene directly onto a target substrate with a reusable metal catalyst is an enabling technology for flexible optoelectronics. We explore the direct transfer via hot lamination of CVD graphene onto a flexible substrate, followed by electrochemical delamination (bubble transfer) of the graphene. The transfer method investigated here does not require any intermediate transfer layer and allows the copper to be reused, which will reduce the production cost and avoid the generation of chemical waste. Such integration is one necessary step forward toward the economical and industrial scale production of graphene. Our method bares promise in various applications. As an example, we fabricated flexible solution-gated graphene field-effect-transistors, which exhibited transconductance as high as 200 μS. PMID:26289387

  15. Electron Transfer and Reaction Mechanism of Laccases

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephen M.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2015-01-01

    Laccases are part of the family of multicopper oxidases (MCOs), which couple the oxidation of substrates to the four electron reduction of O2 to H2O. MCOs contain a minimum of four Cu's divided into Type 1 (T1), Type 2 (T2), and binuclear Type 3 (T3) Cu sites that are distinguished based on unique spectroscopic features. Substrate oxidation occurs near the T1, and electrons are transferred approximately 13 Å through the protein via the Cys-His pathway to the T2/T3 trinuclear copper cluster (TNC) where dioxygen reduction occurs. This review outlines the electron transfer (ET) process in laccases, and the mechanism of O2 reduction as elucidated through spectroscopic, kinetic, and computational data. Marcus theory is used to describe the relevant factors which impact ET rates including the driving force (ΔG°), reorganization energy (λ), and electronic coupling matrix element (HDA). Then the mechanism of O2 reaction is detailed with particular focus on the intermediates formed during the two 2e− reduction steps. The first 2e− step forms the peroxide intermediate (PI), followed by the second 2e− step to form the native intermediate (NI), which has been shown to be the catalytically relevant fully oxidized form of the enzyme. PMID:25572295

  16. Promoting Interspecies Electron Transfer with Biochar

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Liu, Fanghua; Fan, Wei; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were attached to the biochar, yet not in close contact, suggesting that electrons were likely conducted through the biochar, rather than biological electrical connections. The finding that biochar can stimulate DIET may be an important consideration when amending soils with biochar and can help explain why biochar may enhance methane production from organic wastes under anaerobic conditions. PMID:24846283

  17. Photon-to-electron quantum information transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, Hideo

    2011-05-01

    Spin is a fundamental property of electrons and plays an important role in information storage. For spin-based quantum information technology, preparation and read-out of the electron spin state must be spin coherent, but both the traditional preparation and read-out of the spin state are projective to up/down spin states, which do not have spin coherence. We have recently demonstrated that the polarization coherence of light can be coherently transferred to the spin coherence of electrons in a semiconductor. We have also developed a new scheme named tomographic Kerr rotation (TKR) by generalizing the traditional KR to directly readout the spin coherence of optically prepared electrons without the need for the spin dynamics, which allows the spin projection measurement in an arbitrary set of basis states. These demonstrations were performed using g-factor-controlled semiconductor quantum wells with precessing and nonprecessing electrons. The developed scheme offers a tool for performing basis-independent preparation and read-out of a spin quantum state in a solid. These results encourage us to make a quantum media converter between flying photon qubits and stationary electron spin qubits in semiconductors.

  18. Frontier orbital symmetry control of intermolecular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, B.

    1990-11-01

    Research continued on the study of intermolecular electron transfer. This report discusses the following topics: fluorescence quenching by electron transfer and the modification of quenching dynamics by solvent properties and net free energy change; transient absorption measurements following selective excitation of 1:1 EDA complex isomers; selective quenching of dual fluorescence from linked EDA systems; electron-transfer sensitized cycloreversion of rubrene endoperoxide; and vibronic modification of adiabatic requirements for intermolecular electron transfer. (CBS)

  19. Frontier orbital symmetry control of intermolecular electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, B.

    1990-11-01

    Research continued on the study of intermolecular electron transfer. The following topics are discussed: fluorescence quenching by electron transfer and the modification of quenching dynamics by solvent properties and net free energy change; transient absorption measurements following selective excitation of 1:1 EDA complex isomers; selective quenching of dual fluorescence from linked EDA systems; electron-transfer sensitized cycloreversion of rubrene endoperoxide; and vibronic modification of adiabatic requirements for intermolecular electron transfer.

  20. 14 CFR 1274.931 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.931 Electronic funds transfer payment methods. Electronic Funds Transfer Payment Methods July 2002 Payments under...

  1. 14 CFR 1260.69 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.69 Electronic funds transfer payment methods. Electronic Funds Transfer Payment Methods October 2000 (a) Payments under this grant will be made by...

  2. 31 CFR 208.3 - Payment by electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Payment by electronic funds transfer... DISBURSEMENTS § 208.3 Payment by electronic funds transfer. Subject to § 208.4, and notwithstanding any other... electronic funds transfer....

  3. 48 CFR 18.124 - Electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electronic funds transfer. 18.124 Section 18.124 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... Electronic funds transfer. Electronic funds transfer payments may be waived for acquisitions to...

  4. 14 CFR 1274.931 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.931 Electronic funds transfer payment methods. Electronic Funds Transfer Payment Methods July 2002 Payments under...

  5. 31 CFR 208.3 - Payment by electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Payment by electronic funds transfer... DISBURSEMENTS § 208.3 Payment by electronic funds transfer. Subject to § 208.4, and notwithstanding any other... electronic funds transfer....

  6. 48 CFR 18.123 - Electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic funds transfer. 18.123 Section 18.123 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... Electronic funds transfer. Electronic funds transfer payments may be waived for acquisitions to...

  7. 48 CFR 18.124 - Electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electronic funds transfer. 18.124 Section 18.124 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... Electronic funds transfer. Electronic funds transfer payments may be waived for acquisitions to...

  8. 14 CFR 1260.69 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.69 Electronic funds transfer payment methods. Electronic Funds Transfer Payment Methods October 2000 (a) Payments under this grant will be made by...

  9. 14 CFR 1260.69 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.69 Electronic funds transfer payment methods. Electronic Funds Transfer Payment Methods October 2000 (a) Payments under this grant will be made by...

  10. 14 CFR 1274.931 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.931 Electronic funds transfer payment methods. Electronic Funds Transfer Payment Methods July 2002 Payments under...

  11. 31 CFR 208.3 - Payment by electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Payment by electronic funds transfer... DISBURSEMENTS § 208.3 Payment by electronic funds transfer. Subject to § 208.4, and notwithstanding any other... electronic funds transfer....

  12. 48 CFR 18.124 - Electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electronic funds transfer. 18.124 Section 18.124 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... Electronic funds transfer. Electronic funds transfer payments may be waived for acquisitions to...

  13. 48 CFR 18.124 - Electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electronic funds transfer. 18.124 Section 18.124 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... Electronic funds transfer. Electronic funds transfer payments may be waived for acquisitions to...

  14. Photoinduced electron transfer reactions in zeolite cages

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.K.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes work in the two areas of zeolites and layered double hydroxides. Results of studies on structural aspects of Ru(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+]-zeolite Y are summarized. Photoinduced electron transfer between entrapped Ru(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+] and methylviologen (MV) in neighboring supercages was examined. Benzylviologen was also used. Since molecules larger than 13 [angstrom] cannot be accomodated in zeolite cages, the layered double metal hydroxides (LDH) LiAl[sub 2](OH)[sub 6][sup +]X[sup [minus

  15. Double electron transfer in H- + H+ collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruning, H.; Helm, H.; Briggs, J. S.

    2007-11-01

    Absolute cross sections for double electron transfer in H- + H+ collisions have been measured for center-of-mass energies from 0.5 keV to 12 keV. Clear oscillations in the cross section are observed which are in excellent agreement with earlier measurements at lower energies by Brouillard et al (1979) as well as Peart and Dolder (1979). After an oscillation maximum at 3 keV center-of-mass energy the cross section decreases for increasing energy with no indication of further oscillations.

  16. Nonlinear quantum effects on electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimori, A.

    1995-03-01

    An approximate expression is developed for a nonadiabatic electron transfer rate to estimate quantum effects of nuclear rearrangements. The time-dependent formula for Fermi's golden rule is expanded by Plank's constant to the second order, using the Wigner transformation. The method of h̵- expansion is applicable to systems with nonlinear potentials or many degrees of freedom. Using a continuum approximation, from the expansion, a rate expression is obtained, including sizes of reactants and a distance between reactants explicitly. The ratio of the obtained rate to the classical rate agrees well with a ratio by a quantum Monte Carlo simulation.

  17. Molecular Models for Conductance in Junctions and Electrochemical Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazinani, Shobeir Khezr Seddigh

    This thesis develops molecular models for electron transport in molecular junctions and intra-molecular electron transfer. The goal is to identify molecular descriptors that afford a substantial simplification of these electronic processes. First, the connection between static molecular polarizability and the molecular conductance is examined. A correlation emerges whereby the measured conductance of a tunneling junction decreases as a function of the calculated molecular polarizability for several systems, a result consistent with the idea of a molecule as a polarizable dielectric. A model based on a macroscopic extension of the Clausius-Mossotti equation to the molecular domain and Simmon's tunneling model is developed to explain this correlation. Despite the simplicity of the theory, it paves the way for further experimental, conceptual and theoretical developments in the use of molecular descriptors to describe both conductance and electron transfer. Second, the conductance of several biologically relevant, weakly bonded, hydrogen-bonded systems is systematically investigated. While there is no correlation between hydrogen bond strength and conductance, the results indicate a relation between the conductance and atomic polarizability of the hydrogen bond acceptor atom. The relevance of these results to electron transfer in biological systems is discussed. Hydrogen production and oxidation using catalysts inspired by hydrogenases provides a more sustainable alternative to the use of precious metals. To understand electrochemical and spectroscopic properties of a collection of Fe and Ni mimics of hydrogenases, high-level density functional theory calculations are described. The results, based on a detailed analysis of the energies, charges and molecular orbitals of these metal complexes, indicate the importance of geometric constraints imposed by the ligand on molecular properties such as acidity and electrocatalytic activity. Based on model calculations of several intermediates in the catalytic cycle of a model NiFe complex, a hypothetical reaction mechanism, which very well agrees with the observed experimental results, is proffered. Future work related to this thesis may involve the systematic analysis of chemical reactivity in constrained geometries, a subject of importance if the context of enzymatic activity. Another, more intriguing direction is related to the fundamental issue of reformulating Marcus theory in terms of the molecular dielectric response function.

  18. Heat and Mass Transfer in a Reforming Catalyst Bed: Quantitative Evaluation of the Controlling Factor by Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usami, Yutaka; Fukusako, Shoichiro; Yamada, Masahiko

    Heat and mass transfer characteristics in a reforming catalyst bed have been experimentally investigated. Experiments were carried out with a single bench-scaled reforming tube which was filled with reforming catalyst. The tube wall was uniformly heated, and mixtures of steam and methane or propane were reformed through the catalyst bed. Most part of the reaction was completed in the upper part of the test tube. The effects of space velocity, which is a ratio of volumetric flow rate of process gas to the catalyst volume, steam carbon molar ratio, wall temperature, bed temperature, and catalyst particle diameter on the transport phenomena with chemical reaction, were determined. A correlation to heat transfer coefficient was determined by Nu, Rep, Pr, dp/d, and Da. The prediction of the overall methane conversion rate was also presented.

  19. Electron Transfer and Localization in Endohederal Metallofullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shenyuan; Yoon, Mina; Hicke, Christian; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    Endohedral metallofullerenes constitute an appealing class of nanoscale building blocks for fabrication of a wide range of noval materials. One open question of fundamental importance is the precise nature of charge redistribution with the carbon cages (Cn) upon metal encapsulation. Using ab initio density functional theory, we systematically study the electronic structure of metallofullerenes, focusing on the spatial charge redistribution. For all large metallofullerenes (n >32), the valence electrons of the metal atoms are all transferred to the fullerene states. Surprisingly, the transferred charge is found to be highly localized inside the cage near the metal cations, rather than uniformly distributed on the surfaces of the carbon cage as traditionally belied. This counterintuitive charge localization picture is attributed to the strong metal-cage interactions within the systems. These findings may prove to be instrumental in the design of novel fullerene-based functional nanomaterials. 1Supported by the DMSE program and grant no. DE-FG02-05ER46209 of USDOE, grant no. DMR-0606485 of USNSF, and NSF of China.

  20. Electron Transfer Interactome of Cytochrome c

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Alexander N.; van Nuland, Nico A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Lying at the heart of many vital cellular processes such as photosynthesis and respiration, biological electron transfer (ET) is mediated by transient interactions among proteins that recognize multiple binding partners. Accurate description of the ET complexes – necessary for a comprehensive understanding of the cellular signaling and metabolism – is compounded by their short lifetimes and pronounced binding promiscuity. Here, we used a computational approach relying solely on the steric properties of the individual proteins to predict the ET properties of protein complexes constituting the functional interactome of the eukaryotic cytochrome c (Cc). Cc is a small, soluble, highly-conserved electron carrier protein that coordinates the electron flow among different redox partners. In eukaryotes, Cc is a key component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, where it shuttles electrons between its reductase and oxidase, and an essential electron donor or acceptor in a number of other redox systems. Starting from the structures of individual proteins, we performed extensive conformational sampling of the ET-competent binding geometries, which allowed mapping out functional epitopes in the Cc complexes, estimating the upper limit of the ET rate in a given system, assessing ET properties of different binding stoichiometries, and gauging the effect of domain mobility on the intermolecular ET. The resulting picture of the Cc interactome 1) reveals that most ET-competent binding geometries are located in electrostatically favorable regions, 2) indicates that the ET can take place from more than one protein-protein orientation, and 3) suggests that protein dynamics within redox complexes, and not the electron tunneling event itself, is the rate-limiting step in the intermolecular ET. Further, we show that the functional epitope size correlates with the extent of dynamics in the Cc complexes and thus can be used as a diagnostic tool for protein mobility. PMID:23236271

  1. Ultrafast Interfacial Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Petek, Hrvoje; Zhao, Jin

    2010-12-08

    Interfaces between metallic or semiconducting solids and protic solvent adsorbates or liquids represent one of the most important, and yet hardly explored material environments for proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes. PCET mediated dynamical phenomena driven by light, electron, and chemical potentials are central in energy transduction processes of vast economic and environmental importance including the photocatalytic splitting of H₂O, the photo and electrochemical reduction of CO₂, and the conversion of chemical to electrical energy in fuel cells. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the dynamical aspects of PCET at solid surfaces are particularly challenging because relatively localized charges within a solvent couple in the presence of strong interfacial potentials to delocalized states of electronic continua of semiconductor or metal electrodes. Moreover, the localized charges are never the bare protons and electrons that balance chemical equations, but rather are dressed particles with associated polarization clouds inhomogeneously distributed and comprised variously of free electrons, lattice ions, and solvent molecules. The polarization clouds screen the Coulomb potential on the medium specific time scales and impose energetic costs associated with transport through the inhomogeneous region of interfaces between the solid and molecular environments. We introduce some recent theoretical studies aimed at providing an atomistic description on metal-protic solvent interface and modeling of simple processes such as the discharge of H⁺ at a metal interface. Because of the paucity of experimental research and embryonic stage of theory, our goal is to present some key theoretical concepts and early experimental efforts based primarily on a surface science approach to ultrafast electron induced dynamics. In order to introduce some key features of interfacial PCET in the strong and intermediate coupling regimes, we discuss specific examples of photoinduced dissociation of alkanes on metals and photoinduced PCET dynamics of methanol covered TiO₂ surfaces.

  2. Reaction of electron-transfer flavoprotein with electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase

    SciTech Connect

    Beckmann, J.D.; Frerman, F.E.

    1985-07-16

    The oxidative half-reaction of electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF), electron transfer from ETF to electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO), is dependent on complementary surface charges on the two proteins. ETF is the positively charged member of the redox pair. The evidence is based on the pH and ionic strength dependencies of the comproportionation of oxidized ETF and ETF hydroquinone catalyzed by ETF-QO and on the effects of chemical modification of ETF on the comproportionation reaction. Acetylation of one and five epsilon-amino groups of lysyl residues results in 3- and 13-fold increases, respectively, in the K/sub m/ of ETF-QO for ETF but no change in V/sub max/. Amidination, which maintains positive charge at modified loci, has no effect on steady-state kinetic constants. These chemical modifications have no effect on the equilibrium constant for equilibration of ETF redox states. The K/sub m/ of ETF-QO for ETF is pH dependent above pH 8.5, suggesting titration of lysyl residues. The ionic strength dependence of TN/KmETF for the reaction follows the limiting Bronsted equation. The ETF-QO-catalyzed comproportionation reaction exhibits a primary deuterium isotope effect in D2O, perhaps indicating the participation of solvent water in the electron-transfer reaction.

  3. Quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process in Lorentzian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2014-08-15

    The quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process between a positive ion and a neutral atom collision is investigated in nonthermal generalized Lorentzian plasmas. The result shows that the nonthermal effect enhances the resonant electron transfer cross section in Lorentzian plasmas. It is found that the nonthermal effect on the classical resonant electron transfer cross section is more significant than that on the quantum tunneling resonant charge transfer cross section. It is shown that the nonthermal effect on the resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with an increase of the Debye length. In addition, the nonthermal effect on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with increasing collision energy. The variation of nonthermal and plasma shielding effects on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process is also discussed.

  4. GPU-accelerated computation of electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Höfinger, Siegfried; Acocella, Angela; Pop, Sergiu C; Narumi, Tetsu; Yasuoka, Kenji; Beu, Titus; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    Electron transfer is a fundamental process that can be studied with the help of computer simulation. The underlying quantum mechanical description renders the problem a computationally intensive application. In this study, we probe the graphics processing unit (GPU) for suitability to this type of problem. Time-critical components are identified via profiling of an existing implementation and several different variants are tested involving the GPU at increasing levels of abstraction. A publicly available library supporting basic linear algebra operations on the GPU turns out to accelerate the computation approximately 50-fold with minor dependence on actual problem size. The performance gain does not compromise numerical accuracy and is of significant value for practical purposes. PMID:22847673

  5. Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Peng; Li, Yuanzuo; Ma, Fengcai; Pullerits, Tõnu; Sun, Mengtao

    2016-04-01

    Electron transfer (ET) is the key process in light-driven charge separation reactions in organic solar cells. The current review summarizes the progress in theoretical modelling of ET in these materials. First we give an account of ET, with a description originating from Marcus theory. We systematically go through all the relevant parameters and show how they depend on different material properties, and discuss the consequences such dependencies have for the performance of the devices. Finally, we present a set of visualization methods which have proven to be very useful in analyzing the elementary processes in absorption and charge separation events. Such visualization tools help us to understand the properties of the photochemical and photobiological systems in solar cells. PMID:26853631

  6. Theory of plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luxia; May, Volkhard

    2015-04-01

    A particular attempt to improve the efficiency of a dye sensitized solar cell is it's decoration with metal nano-particles (MNP). The MNP-plasmon induced enhancement of the local field enlarges the photoexcitation of the dyes and a subsequent improvement of the charge separation efficiency may result. In a recent work (2014 J. Phys. Chem. C 118 2812) we presented a theory of plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer for perylene attached to a TiO2 surface and placed in the proximity of a spherical MNP. These earlier studies are generalized here to the coupling of to up to four MNPs and to the use of somewhat altered molecular parameters. If the MNPs are placed close to each other strong hybridization of plasmon excitations appears and a broad resonance to which molecular excitations are coupled is formed. To investigate this situation the whole charge injection dynamics is described in the framework of the density matrix theory. The approach accounts for optical excitation of the dye coupled to the MNPs and considers subsequent electron injection into the rutile TiO2-cluster. Using a tight-binding model for the TiO2-system with about 105 atoms the electron motion in the cluster is described. We again consider short optical excitation which causes an intermediate steady state with a time-independent overall probability to have the electron injected into the cluster. This probability is used to introduce an enhancement factor which rates the influence of the MNP. Values larger than 500 are obtained.

  7. Electron transfer reactions in microporous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallouk, T. E.

    1992-05-01

    We have studied electron transfer quenching of the excited state of Ru3(2+) in aqueous suspensions of zeolites Y, L, and mordenite. The internal pore network of the zeolite is ion-exchanged with methylviologen cations, which quench the excited state of the surface-bound sensitizer. A detailed study of the quenching and charge recombination kinetics, using time-resolved luminescence quenching and transient diffuse reflectance spectroscopies, shows two remarkable effects: first, the excited state quenching is entirely dynamic is large-pore zeolites (L and Y), even when they are prepared as apparently 'dry' powders (which still contain significant amounts of internally sited water). Second, a lower limit for the diffusion coefficient of the MV(2+) ion in these zeolites, determined by this technique, is 10(exp -7) sq cm sec, i.e., only about one order of magnitude slower than a typical ion in liquid water, and 2 to 3 orders of magnitude faster than charge transfer diffusion of cations in polyelectrolyte films or membranes such as Nafion. Surface sensitization of internally platinized layered oxide semiconductors such as K(4-x)H(x)Nb6O17 - nH2O(x approx. = 2.5) yields photocatalysts for the production of H2 and I3(-) in aqueous iodide solutions. Layered alkali niobates and titanates form a class of zeolitic wide-bandap semiconductors, and are the first examples of photocatalysts that evolve hydrogen from an electrochemically reversible (i.e., non-sacrificial) electron donor with visible light excitation.

  8. Solvent dynamics and electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasaiah, Jayendran C.; Zhu, Jianjun

    1994-02-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies of the influence of solvent dynamics on electron transfer (ET) reactions are discussed. It is seen that the survival probabilities of the reactants and products can be obtained as the solution to an integral equation using experimental or simulation data on the solvation dynamics. The theory developed for ET between thermally equilibrated reactants in solution, in which the ligand vibrations were treated classically, is extended to include quantum effects on the inner-shell ligand vibration and electron transfer from a nonequilibrium initial state prepared, for example, by laser excitation. This leads to a slight modification of the integral equation which is easily solved on a personal computer to provide results that can be directly compared with experiment. Analytic approximations to the solutions of the integral equation, ranging from a single exponential to multiexponential time dependence of the survival probabilities are discussed. The rate constant for the single exponential decay of the reactants interpolates between the thermal equilibrium rate constant kie (that is independent of solvent dynamics) and a diffusion controlled rate constant kid (determined by solvent dynamics) and also between the wide (A=0) and narrow (A=1) window limits dominated by inner-sphere ligand vibration and outer-sphere solvent reorganization respectively. The explicit dependence of the integral equation solutions on solvation dynamics S(t), the free energy of reaction ΔG0, the total reorganization energy λ and its partitioning between ligand vibration λq and solvent polarization fluctuations λ0, and the nature of the initial state should be useful in the analysis and design of ET experiments in different solvents.

  9. Electron transfer reactions in microporous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Mallouk, T.E.

    1992-05-01

    We have studied electron transfer quenching of the excited state of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} in aqueous suspensions of zeolites Y, L, and mordenite. The internal pore network of the zeolite is ion-exchanged with methylviologen cations, which quench the excited state of the surface-bound sensitizer. A detailed study of the quenching and charge recombination kinetics, using time-resolved luminescence quenching and transient diffuse reflectance spectroscopies, shows to remarkable effects: first, the excited state quenching is entirely dynamic is large-pore zeolites (L and Y), even when they are prepared as apparently dry'' powders (which still contain significant amounts of internally sited water). Second, a lower limit for the diffusion coefficient of the MV{sup 2+} ion in these zeolites, determined by this technique, is 10{sup {minus}7} cm{sup 2}sec, i.e., only about one order of magnitude slower than a typical ion in liquid water, and 2--3 orders of magnitude faster than charge transfer diffusion of cations in polyelectrolyte films or membranes such as Nafion. Surface sensitization of internally platinized layered oxide semiconductors such as K{sub 4-x}H{sub x}Nb{sub 6}O{sub 17}{center dot}nH{sub 2}O (x {approx} 2.5) yields photocatalysts for the production of H{sub 2} and I{sub 3{minus}} in aqueous iodide solutions. Layered alkali niobates and titanates form a class of zeolitic wide-bandap semiconductors, and are the first examples of photocatalysts that evolve hydrogen from an electrochemically reversible (i.e., non-sacrificial) electron donor with visible light excitation.

  10. Electron Transfer versus Proton Transfer in Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Reactions of Polyprotonated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardena, Harsha P.; He, Min; Chrisman, Paul A.; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Hogan, Jason M.; Hodges, Brittany D. M.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    The ion/ion reactions of several dozen reagent anions with triply protonated cations of the model peptide KGAILKGAILR have been examined to evaluate predictions of a LandauZener-based model for the likelihood for electron transfer. Evidence for electron transfer was provided by the appearance of fragment ions unique to electron transfer or electron capture dissociation. Proton transfer and electron transfer are competitive processes for any combination of anionic and cationic reactants. For reagent anions in reactions with protonated peptides, proton transfer is usually significantly more exothermic than electron transfer. If charge transfer occurs at relatively long distances, electron transfer should, therefore, be favored on kinetic grounds because the reactant and product channels cross at greater distances, provided conditions are favorable for electron transfer at the crossing point. The results are consistent with a model based on LandauZener theory that indicates both thermodynamic and geometric criteria apply for electron transfer involving polyatomic anions. Both the model and the data suggest that electron affinities associated with the anionic reagents greater than about 6070 kcal/mol minimize the likelihood that electron transfer will be observed. Provided the electron affinity is not too high, the FranckCondon factors associated with the anion and its corresponding neutral must not be too low. When one or the other of these criteria is not met, proton transfer tends to occur essentially exclusively. Experiments involving ion/ion attachment products also suggest that a significant barrier exists to the isomerization between chemical complexes that, if formed, lead to either proton transfer or electron transfer. PMID:16144411

  11. Constructing Regioregular Star Poly(3-hexylthiophene) via Externally Initiated Kumada Catalyst-Transfer Polycondensation

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Mingjian; Okamoto, Ken; Bronstein, Hugo A.; Luscombe, Christine K.

    2012-03-20

    A synthetic route was developed for the preparation of di- and trifunctional Ni complex-based initiators. Each initiator affords well-defined 2-arm (V-shaped) and 3-arm (Y-shaped) regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (rr-P3HT) with controlled molecular weight and narrow polydispersities by the externally initiated Kumada catalyst-transfer polycondensation. The core spacer length and end o-tolylhalide group of the functional initiators exhibited differences in reactivity and show that the biphenyl spacers are effective for the synthesis of V-shaped and Y-shaped rr-P3HTs.

  12. Vectorial electron transfer in spatially ordered arrays. Progress report, January 1991--January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    Objective was to find methods for rapid, controlled placement of light absorbers, relays, and multi-electron catalysts at defined sites with respect to a semiconductor or metal surface and thus to develop methods for preparing chemically modified photoactive surfaces as artificial photosynthetic units. Progress has been made in four areas: synthesis of new materials for directional electron transfer, preparation and characterization of anisotropic composites containing organic and inorganic components, elaboration of mechanisms of electrocatalysis, and development of new methods for surface modification of metals and semiconductors.

  13. Proton Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions at the Surface of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braten, Miles N.

    Nanostructured metal oxide materials are found in many products and processes in our society today, but they play a particularly important role in the conversion and storage of energy. The materials are used as catalysts and redox active supports in devices such as dye sensitized solar cells, solid oxide fuel cells, and flow batteries, where they transfer and store electrons and charge balancing cations. Oftentimes electron transfer is modulated by the cations and when the cation is a proton, these redox reactions are known as proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions. The work described in this dissertation focuses on understanding the PCET reactivity of nanocrystalline metal oxide materials. Chapter 1 introduces the concept of PCET and provides background information on the zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals (NCs) which the majority of the research is focused on. Chapter 2 examines the chemistry that occurs during the photoreduction of ZnO NCs. Chapter 3 describes experiments probing how ZnO NC capping ligand concentration and NC size modulate PCET reaction rates. Chapter 4 describes experiments that compare the PCET reactivity of ZnO NCs with different numbers of electrons and protons stored on them. Chapter 5 describes attempts to observe the electrochemical reduction of ZnO NCs attached to gold electrodes. Finally, Chapter 6 contains attempts to identify a nanostructured metal oxide alkane oxidation catalyst for use in fuel cell.

  14. Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Charge and Excitation Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Piotrowiak

    2004-09-28

    We report the and/or state of several subprojects of our DOE sponsored research on Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Electron and Excitation Transfer: (1) Construction of an ultrafast Ti:sapphire amplifier. (2) Mediation of electronic interactions in host-guest molecules. (3) Theoretical models of electrolytes in weakly polar media. (4) Symmetry effects in intramolecular excitation transfer.

  15. Oxygenation of methylarenes to benzaldehyde derivatives by a polyoxometalate mediated electron transfer-oxygen transfer reaction in aqueous sulfuric Acid.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Bidyut Bikash; Efremenko, Irena; Neumann, Ronny

    2015-05-13

    The synthesis of benzaldehyde derivatives by oxygenation of methylarenes is of significant conceptual and practical interest because these compounds are important chemical intermediates whose synthesis is still carried out by nonsustainable methods with very low atom economy and formation of copious amounts of waste. Now an oxygenation reaction with a 100% theoretical atom economy using a polyoxometalate oxygen donor has been found. The product yield is typically above 95% with no "overoxidation" to benzoic acids; H2 is released by electrolysis, enabling additional reaction cycles. An electrocatalytic cycle is also feasible. This reaction is possible through the use of an aqueous sulfuric acid solvent, in an aqueous biphasic reaction mode that also allows simple catalyst recycling and recovery. The solvent plays a key role in the reaction mechanism by protonating the polyoxometalate thereby enabling the activation of the methylarenes by an electron transfer process. After additional proton transfer and oxygen transfer steps, benzylic alcohols are formed that further react by an electron transfer-proton transfer sequence forming benzaldehyde derivatives. PMID:25901934

  16. Insights into proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms of electrocatalytic H2 oxidation and production

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, Samantha; Fernandez, Laura; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2012-09-25

    The design of molecular electrocatalysts for H2 oxidation and production is important for the development of alternative renewable energy sources that are abundant, inexpensive, and environmentally benign. Recently nickel-based molecular electrocatalysts with pendant amines that act as proton relays for the nickel center were shown to effectively catalyze H2 oxidation and production. We developed a quantum mechanical approach for studying proton-coupled electron transfer processes in these types of molecular electrocatalysts. This theoretical approach is applied to a nickel-based catalyst in which phosphorous atoms are directly bonded to the nickel center and nitrogen atoms of the ligand rings act as proton relays. The cataly c step of interest involves electron transfer between the nickel complex and the electrode as well as intramolecular proton transfer between the nickel and nitrogen atoms. This process can occur sequentially, with either the electron or proton transferring first, or concertedly, with the electron and proton transferring simultaneously without a stable intermediate. The heterogeneous rate constants are calculated as functions of overpotential for the concerted electron-proton transfer reaction and the two electron transfer reactions in the sequential mechanisms. Our calculations illustrate that the concerted electron-proton transfer standard rate constant will increase as the equilibrium distance between the nickel and nitrogen atoms decreases and as the nitrogen atoms become more mobile to facilitate the contraction of this distance. This approach assists in the identification of the favored mechanisms under various experimental conditions and provides insight into the qualitative impact of substituents on the nitrogen and phosphorous atoms. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under FWP 56073.

  17. Metal ion modulated electron transfer in photosynthetic proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Utschig, L. M.; Thurnauer, M. C.; Chemistry

    2004-07-01

    Photosynthetic purple bacterial reaction center (RC) proteins are ideal native systems for addressing basic questions regarding the nature of biological electron transfer because both the protein structure and the electron-transfer reactions are well-characterized. Metal ion binding to the RC can affect primary photochemistry and provides a probe for understanding the involvement of local protein environments in electron transfer. The RC has two distinct transition metal ion binding sites, the well-known non-heme Fe{sup 2+} site buried in the protein interior and a recently discovered Zn{sup 2+} site located on the surface of the protein. Fe{sup 2+} removal and Zn{sup 2+} binding systematically affect different electron-transfer steps in the RC. Factors involved in the metal ion alteration of RC electron transfer may provide a paradigm for other biological systems involved in electron transfer.

  18. A Systematic Investigation of Quaternary Ammonium Ions as Asymmetric Phase Transfer Catalysts. Synthesis of Catalyst Libraries and Evaluation of Catalyst Activity

    PubMed Central

    Denmark, Scott E.; Gould, Nathan D.; Wolf, Larry M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite over three decades of research into asymmetric phase transfer catalysis (APTC), a fundamental understanding of the factors that affect the rate and stereoselectivity of this important process are still obscure. This paper describes the initial stages of a long-term program aimed at elucidating the physical organic foundations of APTC employing a chemoinformatic analysis of the alkylation of a protected glycine imine with a libraries of enantiomerically enriched quaternary ammonium ions. The synthesis of the quaternary ammonium ions follows a diversity oriented approach wherein the tandem inter[4+2]/intra[3+2] cycloaddition of nitroalkenes serves as the key transformation. A two part synthetic strategy comprised of: (1) preparation of enantioenriched scaffolds and (2) development of parallel synthesis procedures is described. The strategy allows for the facile introduction of four variable groups in the vicinity of a stereogenic quaternary ammonium ion. The quaternary ammonium ions exhibited a wide range of activity and to a lesser degree enantioselectivity. Catalyst activity and selectivity are rationalized in a qualitative way based on the effective positive potential of the ammonium ion. PMID:21446721

  19. [Mechanistic examination of organometallic electron transfer reactions: Annual report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    Our mechanistic examination of electron transfer reactions between organometallic complexes has required data from our stopped-flow infrared spectrophotometer that was constructed in the first year. Our research on organometallic electron transfer reaction mechanisms was recognized by an invitation to the Symposium on Organometallic Reaction Mechanisms at the National ACS meeting in Miami. We have obtained a reasonable understanding of the electron transfer reactions between metal cations and anions and between metal carbonyl anions and metal carbonyl dimers. In addition we have begun to obtain data on the outer sphere electron transfer between metal carbonyl anions and coordination complexes and on reactions involving cluster anions.

  20. (Mechanistic examination of organometallic electron transfer reactions: Annual report, 1989)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Our mechanistic examination of electron transfer reactions between organometallic complexes has required data from our stopped-flow infrared spectrophotometer that was constructed in the first year. Our research on organometallic electron transfer reaction mechanisms was recognized by an invitation to the Symposium on Organometallic Reaction Mechanisms at the National ACS meeting in Miami. We have obtained a reasonable understanding of the electron transfer reactions between metal cations and anions and between metal carbonyl anions and metal carbonyl dimers. In addition we have begun to obtain data on the outer sphere electron transfer between metal carbonyl anions and coordination complexes and on reactions involving cluster anions.

  1. The contrasting catalytic efficiency and cancer cell antiproliferative activity of stereoselective organoruthenium transfer hydrogenation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Sanchez-Cano, Carlos; Soni, Rina; Romero-Canelon, Isolda; Hearn, Jessica M; Liu, Zhe; Wills, Martin; Sadler, Peter J

    2016-05-28

    The rapidly growing area of catalytic ruthenium chemistry has provided new complexes with potential as organometallic anticancer agents with novel mechanisms of action. Here we report the anticancer activity of four neutral organometallic Ru(II) arene N-tosyl-1,2-diphenylethane-1,2-diamine (TsDPEN) tethered transfer hydrogenation catalysts. The enantiomers (R,R)-[Ru(η(6)-C6H5(CH2)3-TsDPEN-N-Me)Cl] (8) and (S,S)-[Ru(η(6)-C6H5(CH2)3-TsDPEN-N-Me)Cl] (8a) exhibited higher potency than cisplatin against A2780 human ovarian cancer cells. When the N-methyl was replaced by N-H, i.e. to give (R,R)-[Ru(η(6)-Ph(CH2)3-TsDPEN-NH)Cl] (7) and (S,S)-[Ru(η(6)-Ph(CH2)3-TsDPEN-NH)Cl] (7a), respectively, anticancer activity decreased >5-fold. Their antiproliferative activity appears to be linked to their ability to accumulate in cells, and their mechanism of action might involve inhibition of tubulin polymerisation. This appears to be the first report of the potent anticancer activity of tethered Ru(II) arene complexes, and the structure-activity relationship suggests that the N-methyl substituents are important for potency. In the National Cancer Institute 60-cancer-cell-line screen, complexes 8 and 8a exhibited higher activity than cisplatin towards a broad range of cancer cell lines. Intriguingly, in contrast to their potent anticancer properties, complexes 8/8a are poor catalysts for asymmetric transfer hydrogenation, whereas complexes 7/7a are effective asymmetric hydrogenation catalysts. PMID:27109147

  2. Desulfurization of coal: enhanced selectivity using phase transfer catalysts. Quarterly report, March 1 - May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.R.; Hippo, E.J.

    1996-12-31

    Due to environmental problems related to the combustion of high sulfur Illinois coal, there continues to be interest in the development in viable pre-combustion desulfurization processes. Recent studies by the authors have obtained very good sulfur removals but the reagents that are used are too expensive. Use of cheaper reagents leads to a loss of desired coal properties. This study investigated the application phase transfer catalysts to the selective oxidation of sulfur in coal using air and oxygen as oxidants. The phase transfer catalyst is expected to function as a selectivity moderator by permitting the use of milder reaction conditions that otherwise necessary. This would enhance the sulfur selectivity and help retain the heating value of the coal. The use of certain coal combustion wastes for desulfurization, and the application of cerium (IV) catalyzed air oxidation for selective sulfur oxidation are also being studied. If successful, this project could lead to the rapid development of a commercially viable desulfurization process. This would significantly improve the marketability of Illinois coal.

  3. Charge remote fragmentation in electron capture and electron transfer dissociations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojuan; Lin, Cheng; Han, Liang; Costello, Catherine E.; OConnor, Peter B.

    2010-01-01

    Secondary fragmentations of three synthetic peptides (human ?A crystallin peptide 1-11, the deamidated form of human ?B2 crystallin peptide 4-14, and amyloid ? peptide 25-35) were studied in both electron capture dissociation (ECD) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) mode. In ECD, in addition to c and z ion formations, charge remote fragmentations (CRF) of z ions were abundant, resulting in internal fragment formation or partial/entire side chain losses from amino acids, sometimes several residues away from the backbone cleavage site, and to some extent multiple side chain losses. The internal fragments were observed in peptides with basic residues located in the middle of the sequences, which was different from most tryptic peptides with basic residues located at the C-terminus. These secondary cleavages were initiated by hydrogen abstraction at the ?-, ?-, or ?-position of the amino acid side chain. In comparison, ETD generates fewer CRF fragments than ECD. This secondary cleavage study will facilitate ECD/ETD spectra interpretation, and help de novo sequencing and database searching. PMID:20171118

  4. Mechanism of Intermolecular Electron Transfer in Bionanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruodis, A.; Galikova, N.; Šarka, K.; Saulė, R.; Batiuškaitė, D.; Saulis, G.

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. Most patients are inoperable and hepatoma cells are resistant to conventional chemotherapies. Thus, the development of novel therapies for HCC treatment is of paramount importance. Amongst different alimentary factors, vitamin C and vitamin K3 In the present work, it has been shown that the treatment of mouse hepatoma MH-22A cells by vitamin C and vitamin K3 at the ratio of 100:1 greatly enhanced their cytotoxicity. When cells were subjected to vitamin C at 200 μM or to vitamin K3 at 2 μM separately, their viability reduced by only about 10%. However, when vitamins C and K3 were combined at the same concentrations, they killed more than 90% of cells. To elucidate the mechanism of the synergistic cytotoxicity of the C&K3 mixture, theoretical quantum-chemical analysis of the dynamics of intermolecular electron transfer (IET) processes within the complexes containing C (five forms) and K3 (one form) has been carried out. Optimization of the ground state complex geometry has been provided by means of GAUSSIAN03 package. Simulation of the IET has been carried out using NUVOLA package, in the framework of molecular orbitals (MO). The rate of IET has been calculated using Fermi Golden rule. The results of simulations allow us to create the preliminary model of the reaction pathway.

  5. Activation entropy of electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milischuk, Anatoli A.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.; Newton, Marshall D.

    2006-05-01

    We report microscopic calculations of free energies and entropies for intramolecular electron transfer reactions. The calculation algorithm combines the atomistic geometry and charge distribution of a molecular solute obtained from quantum calculations with the microscopic polarization response of a polar solvent expressed in terms of its polarization structure factors. The procedure is tested on a donor-acceptor complex in which ruthenium donor and cobalt acceptor sites are linked by a four-proline polypeptide. The reorganization energies and reaction energy gaps are calculated as a function of temperature by using structure factors obtained from our analytical procedure and from computer simulations. Good agreement between two procedures and with direct computer simulations of the reorganization energy is achieved. The microscopic algorithm is compared to the dielectric continuum calculations. We found that the strong dependence of the reorganization energy on the solvent refractive index predicted by continuum models is not supported by the microscopic theory. Also, the reorganization and overall solvation entropies are substantially larger in the microscopic theory compared to continuum models.

  6. Electronic transfer of sensitive patient data.

    PubMed

    Detterbeck, A M W; Kaiser, J; Hirschfelder, U

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop decision-making aids and recommendations for dental practitioners regarding the utilization and sharing of sensitive digital patient data. In the current environment of growing digitization, healthcare professionals need detailed knowledge of secure data management to maximize confidentiality and minimize the risks involved in both archiving patient data and sharing it through electronic channels. Despite well-defined legal requirements, an all-inclusive technological solution does not currently exist. The need for a preliminary review and critical appraisal of common practices of data transfer prompted a search of the literature and the Web to identify viable methods of secure data exchange and to develop a flowchart. A strong focus was placed on the transmission of datasets both smaller than and larger than 10 MB, and on secure communication by smartphone. Although encryption of patient-related data should be routine, it is often difficult to implement. Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) and Secure/Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (S/MIME) are viable standards for secure e-mail encryption. Sharing of high-volume data should be accomplished with the help of file encryption. Careful handling of sensitive patient data is mandatory, and it is the end-user's responsibility to meet any requirements for encryption, preferably by using free, open-source (and hence transparent) software. PMID:25911828

  7. Current Theoretical Challenges in Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Electron-Proton Nonadiabaticity, Proton Relays, and Ultrafast Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-06-16

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an important role in a wide range of biological and chemical processes. The motions of the electrons, transferring protons, solute nuclei, and solvent nuclei occur on a wide range of timescales and are often strongly coupled. As a result, the theoretical description of these processes requires a combination of quantum and classical methods. This perspective discusses three of the current theoretical challenges in the field of PCET. The first challenge is the calculation of electron-proton nonadiabatic effects, which are significant for these reactions because the hydrogen tunneling is often faster than the electronic transition. The second challenge is the modeling of electron transfer coupled to proton transport along hydrogen-bonded networks. The third challenge is the simulation of the ultrafast dynamics of nonequilibrium photoinduced PCET reactions in solution. Insights provided by theoretical studies may assist in the design of more effective catalysts for energy conversion processes. The proton relay portion of this review is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  8. Current Theoretical Challenges in Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Electron Proton Nonadiabaticity, Proton Relays, and Ultrafast Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-06-16

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an important role in a wide range of biological and chemical processes. The motions of the electrons, transferring protons, solute nuclei, and solvent nuclei occur on a wide range of time scales and are often strongly coupled. As a result, the theoretical description of these processes requires a combination of quantum and classical methods. This Perspective discusses three of the current theoretical challenges in the field of PCET. The first challenge is the calculation of electron proton nonadiabatic effects, which are significant for these reactions because the hydrogen tunneling is often faster than the electronic transition. The second challenge is the modeling of electron transfer coupled to proton transport along hydrogen-bonded networks. The third challenge is the simulation of the ultrafast dynamics of nonequilibrium photoinduced PCET reactions in solution. Insights provided by theoretical studies may assist in the design of more effective catalysts for energy conversion processes. The proton relay portion of this review is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  9. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads

    SciTech Connect

    1993-03-01

    This project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic some of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. This research project is leading to a better understanding of the energy conserving steps of photosynthesis via the study of synthetic model systems which abstract features of the natural photosynthetic apparatus. The knowledge gained from these studies will aid in the design of artificial photosynthetic reaction centers which employ the basic chemistry and physics of photosynthesis to help meet mankind`s energy needs. The approach to artificial photosynthesis employed in this project is to use synthetic pigments, electron donors, and electron acceptors similar to those found in biological reaction centers, but to replace the protein component with covalent bonds. These chemical linkages determine the electronic coupling between the various moieties by controlling separation, relative orientation, and overlap of electronic orbitals. The model systems are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited single state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they mimic carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  10. A nonadiabatic theory for ultrafast catalytic electron transfer: a model for the photosynthetic reaction center.

    PubMed

    Aubry, Serge; Kopidakis, Georgios

    2005-12-01

    A non-adiabatic theory of Electron Transfer (ET), which improves the standard theory near the inversion point and becomes equivalent to it far from the inversion point, is presented. The complex amplitudes of the electronic wavefunctions at different sites are used as Kramers variables for describing the quantum tunneling of the electron in the deformable potential generated by its environment (nonadiabaticity) which is modeled as a harmonic classical thermal bath. After exact elimination of the bath, the effective electron dynamics is described by a discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation with norm preserving dissipative terms and a Langevin random force, with a frequency cut-off, due to the thermalized phonons.This theory reveals the existence of a specially interesting marginal case when the linear and nonlinear coefficients of a two electronic states system are appropriately tuned for forming a Coherent Electron-Phonon Oscillator (CEPO). An electron injected on one of the electronic states of a CEPO generates large amplitude charge oscillations (even at zero temperature) associated with coherent phonon oscillations and electronic level oscillations. This fluctuating electronic level may resonate with a third site which captures the electron so that Ultrafast Electron Transfer (UFET) becomes possible. Numerical results are shown where two weakly interacting sites, a donor and a catalyst, form a CEPO that triggers an UFET to an acceptor. Without a catalytic site, a very large energy barrier prevents any direct ET. This UFET is shown to have many qualitative features similar to those observed in the primary charge separation in photosynthetic reaction centers. We suggest that more generally, CEPO could be a paradigm for understanding many selective chemical reactions involving electron transfer in biosystems. PMID:23345905

  11. Probing active electron transfer branch in photosystem I reaction center.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savikhin, Sergei; Dashdorj, Naranbaatar; Xu, Wu; Martinsson, Peter; Chitnis, Parag

    2003-03-01

    Complimentary point mutations were introduced at the primary electron acceptor sites in A and B branches of the photosystem I (PS I) reaction center (RC) from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and their effect on the kinetics of the electron transfer process was studied by means of ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy. The results indicate that in these species the electron transfer occurs primarily along the A-branch. Previous optical experiments on PS I complexes from Chlorella sorokiniana demonstrated that both branches of RC are equally active. That suggests that the directionality of electron transfer in PS I is species dependent.

  12. Electron transfer reactions in microporous solids. Progress report, September 1990--January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mallouk, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    Basic thrust the research program involves use of microporous solids (zeolites, clays, layered and tunnel structure oxide semiconductors) as organizing media for artificial photosynthetic systems. Purpose of the microporous solid is twofold. First, it induces spatial organization of photoactive and electroactive components (sensitizers, semiconductor particles, electron relays, and catalysts) at the solid-solution interface, enhancing the quantum efficiency of charge separation and separating physically the ultimate electron donor and acceptor in the electron transport chain. Second, since the microcrystalline solid admits only molecules of a certain charge and size, it is possible to achieve permanent charge separation by sieving chemical photoproducts (e.g., H{sub 2} and I{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, or H{sub 2} and O{sub 2)} from each other. Spectroscopic and electrochemical methods are used to study the kinetics of electron transfer reactions in these hybrid molecular/solid state assemblies.

  13. The distance and temperature dependence of electron-transfer rates

    SciTech Connect

    Sutin, N.

    1987-01-01

    Electron transfer occurs over relatively long distances in a variety of systems. In interpreting the measured electron-transfer rates it is usually assumed that the rate constants depend exponentially on the distance separating the two redox sites and that this distance dependence arises from the decrease in the electronic coupling of the redox sites with increasing separation. Although the electronic coupling is an important factor determining the distance dependence of the rate, theoretical considerations suggest that the nuclear factors are also important. The various factors determining long-range electron-transfer rates are discussed and it is shown that very different distance dependences are predicted for reactions in the normal and inverted free-energy regions. The effect of the enthalpy change on the electron-transfer rate is also considered; three enthalpy regions are identified depending on the overall free energy and entropy changes for the reaction.

  14. Ring-opening metathesis polymerization of 18-e Cobalt(I)-containing norbornene and application as heterogeneous macromolecular catalyst in atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yi; Zhang, Jiuyang; Wilbon, Perry; Qiao, Yali; Tang, Chuanbing

    2014-11-01

    In the last decades, metallopolymers have received great attention due to their various applications in the fields of materials and chemistry. In this article, a neutral 18-electron exo-substituted η(4) -cyclopentadiene CpCo(I) unit-containing polymer is prepared in a controlled/"living" fashion by combining facile click chemistry and ring-opening meta-thesis polymerization (ROMP). This Co(I)-containing polymer is further used as a heterogeneous macromolecular catalyst for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of methyl methacrylate and styrene. PMID:25250694

  15. Harvesting singlet fission for solar energy conversion: one versus two-electron transfer electron transfer from the quantum superposition state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wai-Lun; Tritsch, John; Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2013-03-01

    Singlet fission (SF) is being explored to increase the efficiency of organic photovoltaics. A key question is how to effectively extract multiple electron-hole pairs from multiple excitons with the presence of other competing channels such as electron transfer from the singlet state. Recent experiments on the pentacene and tetracene show that a quantum superposition of the singlet (S1) and multiexciton (ME) state is formed during SF. However, little is known about the kinetics of electron transfer from this quantum superposition. Here, we apply time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to the tetracene/C60 interface to probe one and two electron transfer from S1 and ME states, respectively. Because of the relatively slow (7 ps) SF in tetracene, both one- and two-electron transfer are allowed. We show evidence for the formation of two distinct charge transfer states due to electron transfer from photo-excited tetracene to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and the LUMO+1 levels in C60. Kinetic analysis shows that 60% of the quantum superposition transfers one electron through the S1 state to C60 while 40% undergoes two-electron transfer through the ME state.

  16. Electron-transfer processes in dendrimers and their implication in biology, catalysis, sensing and nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astruc, Didier

    2012-04-01

    The extraordinary development of the design and synthesis of dendrimers has allowed scientists to locate redox sites at precise positions (core, focal points, branching points, termini, cavities) of these perfectly defined macromolecules, which have generation-controlled sizes and topologies matching those of biomolecules. Redox-dendrimer engineering has led to fine modelling studies of electron-transfer metalloproteins, in which the branches of the dendrimers hinder access to the active site in a manner reminiscent of that of the protein. It has also enabled the construction of remarkable catalysts, sensors and printboards, including by sophisticated design of the interface between redox dendrimers and solid-state devices -- for example by functionalizing electrodes and other surfaces. Electron-transfer processes between dendrimers and a variety of other molecules hold promising applications in diverse areas that range from bio-engineering to sensing, catalysis and energy materials.

  17. Integrating proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) and excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Kent, Caleb A.; Paul, Jared J.; Papanikolas, John M.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2010-11-01

    In many of the chemical steps in photosynthesis and artificial photosynthesis, proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays an essential role. An important issue is how excited state reactivity can be integrated with PCET to carry out solar fuel reactions such as water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen or water reduction of CO2 to methanol or hydrocarbons. The principles behind PCET and concerted electron–proton transfer (EPT) pathways are reasonably well understood. In Photosystem II antenna light absorption is followed by sensitization of chlorophyll P680 and electron transfer quenching to give P680+. The oxidized chlorophyll activates the oxygen evolving complex (OEC), a CaMn4 cluster, through an intervening tyrosine–histidine pair, YZ. EPT plays a major role in a series of four activation steps that ultimately result in loss of 4e-/4H+ from the OEC with oxygen evolution. The key elements in photosynthesis and artificial photosynthesis – light absorption, excited state energy and electron transfer, electron transfer activation of multiple-electron, multiple-proton catalysis – can also be assembled in dye sensitized photoelectrochemical synthesis cells (DS-PEC). In this approach, molecular or nanoscale assemblies are incorporated at separate electrodes for coupled, light driven oxidation and reduction. Separate excited state electron transfer followed by proton transfer can be combined in single semi-concerted steps (photo-EPT) by photolysis of organic charge transfer excited states with H-bonded bases or in metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited states in pre-associated assemblies with H-bonded electron transfer donors or acceptors. In these assemblies, photochemically induced electron and proton transfer occur in a single, semi-concerted event to give high-energy, redox active intermediates.

  18. Nickel phlorin intermediate formed by proton-coupled electron transfer in hydrogen evolution mechanism.

    PubMed

    Solis, Brian H; Maher, Andrew G; Dogutan, Dilek K; Nocera, Daniel G; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-01-19

    The development of more effective energy conversion processes is critical for global energy sustainability. The design of molecular electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction is an important component of these efforts. Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, in which electron transfer is coupled to proton transfer, play an important role in these processes and can be enhanced by incorporating proton relays into the molecular electrocatalysts. Herein nickel porphyrin electrocatalysts with and without an internal proton relay are investigated to elucidate the hydrogen evolution mechanisms and thereby enable the design of more effective catalysts. Density functional theory calculations indicate that electrochemical reduction leads to dearomatization of the porphyrin conjugated system, thereby favoring protonation at the meso carbon of the porphyrin ring to produce a phlorin intermediate. A key step in the proposed mechanisms is a thermodynamically favorable PCET reaction composed of intramolecular electron transfer from the nickel to the porphyrin and proton transfer from a carboxylic acid hanging group or an external acid to the meso carbon of the porphyrin. The C-H bond of the active phlorin acts similarly to the more traditional metal-hydride by reacting with acid to produce H2. Support for the theoretically predicted mechanism is provided by the agreement between simulated and experimental cyclic voltammograms in weak and strong acid and by the detection of a phlorin intermediate through spectroelectrochemical measurements. These results suggest that phlorin species have the potential to perform unique chemistry that could prove useful in designing more effective electrocatalysts. PMID:26655344

  19. Desulfurization of coal: Enhanced selectivity using phase transfer catalysts. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.R.; Hippo, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    Due to environmental problems related to the combustion of high sulfur Illinois coal, there continues to be interest in the development of viable pre-combustion desulfurization processes. Recent studies by the authors have obtained very good sulfur removals but the reagents that are used are too expensive. Use of cheaper reagents leads to a loss of desired coal properties. This study investigates the application of phase transfer catalysts to the selective oxidation of sulfur in coal using air and oxygen as oxidants. The phase transfer catalyst is expected to function as a selectivity moderator by permitting the use of milder reaction conditions than otherwise necessary. This would enhance the sulfur selectivity and help retain the heating value of the coal. The use of certain coal combustion wastes for desulfurization, and the application of cerium (IV) catalyzed air oxidations for selective sulfur oxidation are also being studied. If successful this project could lead to the rapid development of a commercially viable desulfurization process. This would significantly improve the marketability of Illinois coal. During this quarter aliquots of the IBC-101 coal have been ground to various particle sizes in an attempt to find the optimum physical pretreatment for mineral, especially pyrite, removal. Analysis of these various aliquots shows them to be representative of the original coal. In addition, preliminary desulfurization reactions using fly ash and scrubber sludges have been performed on an unoxidized IBC-101 sample. Results will be available next quarter. Also, SEM-EDAX analysis of the fly ash indicates that it contains oxides that have shown activity in base desulfurization reactions.

  20. K-shell Analysis Reveals Distinct Functional Parts in an Electron Transfer Network and Its Implications for Extracellular Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dewu; Li, Ling; Shu, Chuanjun; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) and hence has attracted considerable attention. The EET pathways mainly consist of c-type cytochromes, along with some other proteins involved in electron transfer processes. By whole genome study and protein interactions inquisition, we constructed a large-scale electron transfer network containing 2276 interactions among 454 electron transfer related proteins in S. oneidensis MR-1. Using the k-shell decomposition method, we identified and analyzed distinct parts of the electron transfer network. We found that there was a negative correlation between the ks (k-shell values) and the average DR_100 (disordered regions per 100 amino acids) in every shell, which suggested that disordered regions of proteins played an important role during the formation and extension of the electron transfer network. Furthermore, proteins in the top three shells of the network are mainly located in the cytoplasm and inner membrane; these proteins can be responsible for transfer of electrons into the quinone pool in a wide variety of environmental conditions. In most of the other shells, proteins are broadly located throughout the five cellular compartments (cytoplasm, inner membrane, periplasm, outer membrane, and extracellular), which ensures the important EET ability of S. oneidensis MR-1. Specifically, the fourth shell was responsible for EET and the c-type cytochromes in the remaining shells of the electron transfer network were involved in aiding EET. Taken together, these results show that there are distinct functional parts in the electron transfer network of S. oneidensis MR-1, and the EET processes could achieve high efficiency through cooperation through such an electron transfer network. PMID:27148219

  1. Photoinduced electron transfers with carbon dots

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Cao, Li; Lu, Fushen; Meziani, Mohammed J.; Li, Heting; Qi, Gang; Zhou, Bing; Harruff, Barbara A.; Kermarrec, Fabien; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2009-01-01

    The photoluminescence in carbon dots (surface-passivated small carbon nanoparticles) could be quenched efficiently by electron acceptor or donor molecules in solution, namely that photo-excited carbon dots are both excellent electron donors and excellent electron acceptors, thus offering new opportunities for their potential uses in light energy conversion and related applications. PMID:19557278

  2. A molecular shift register based on electron transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Josenelson; Beratan, David N.

    1988-01-01

    An electronic shift-register memory at the molecular level is described. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. This device integrates designed electronic molecules onto a very large scale integrated (silicon microelectronic) substrate, providing an example of a 'molecular electronic device' that could actually be made. The design requirements for such a device and possible synthetic strategies are discussed. Devices along these lines should have lower energy usage and enhanced storage density.

  3. Electron Transfer Rate Maxima at Large Donor-Acceptor Distances.

    PubMed

    Kuss-Petermann, Martin; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-02-01

    Because of their low mass, electrons can transfer rapidly over long (>15 Å) distances, but usually reaction rates decrease with increasing donor-acceptor distance. We report here on electron transfer rate maxima at donor-acceptor separations of 30.6 Å, observed for thermal electron transfer between an anthraquinone radical anion and a triarylamine radical cation in three homologous series of rigid-rod-like donor-photosensitizer-acceptor triads with p-xylene bridges. Our experimental observations can be explained by a weak distance dependence of electronic donor-acceptor coupling combined with a strong increase of the (outer-sphere) reorganization energy with increasing distance, as predicted by electron transfer theory more than 30 years ago. The observed effect has important consequences for light-to-chemical energy conversion. PMID:26800279

  4. Dissociative electron attachment and charge transfer in condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Andrew D.; Sanche, Lon

    2003-09-01

    Experiments using energy-selected beams of electrons incident from vacuum upon thin vapour deposited solids show that, as in the gas-phase, scattering cross sections at low energies are dominated by the formation of temporary negative ions (or resonances) and that molecular damage may be effected via dissociative electron attachment (DEA). Recent results also show that charge transfer between anionic states of target molecules and their environment is often crucial in determining cross sections for electron driven processes. Here, we review recent work from our laboratory, in which charge transfer is observed. For rare gas solids, electron exchange between the electron-exciton complex and either a metal substrate or co-adsorbed molecule enhances the desorption of metastable atoms and/or molecular dissociation. We discuss how transient electron capture by surface electron states of a substrate and subsequent electron transfer to a molecular adsorbate enhances the effective cross sections for DEA. We also consider the case of DEA to CF 2Cl 2 condensed on water and ammonia ices, where electron exchange between pre-solvated electron states of ice and transient molecular anions can also increase DEA cross sections. Electron transfer from molecular resonances into pre-solvated electron states of ice is also discussed.

  5. Nanostructural and Chemical Characterization of Supported Metal Oxide Catalysts by Aberration Corrected Analytical Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wu

    In this thesis, aberration corrected STEM imaging and chemical analysis techniques have been extensively applied in the structural and chemical characterization of supported tungsten oxide catalysts in an attempt to reveal the structure-activity relationships at play in these catalyst systems. The supported WO3/ZrO2 solid acid catalyst system is a major focal point of this thesis, and detailed aberration-corrected STEM-HAADF imaging studies were performed on a systematic set of catalysts showing different level of catalytic performance. The nature of the catalytically most active WOx species was identified by correlating structural information, obtained from STEM-HAADF and in-situ optical spectroscopy studies, with catalytic testing results. Specifically, ˜1nm distorted Zr-WOx mixed oxide clusters were identified to be the most active species for both the methanol dehydration and n-pentane isomerization reactions in the WO3/ZrO2 catalyst system. The use of amorphous zirconia as a precursor support material makes it much easier to extract and incorporate Zr cations into the surface WOx clusters during calcination. The calcination temperature was also identified to also play an important role in the formation of these most active Zr-WOx clusters. When the calcination temperature is comparable to or higher than the 896K Huttig temperature of ZrO2 (at which surface ZrO x species have sufficient mobility to agglomerate and sinter), the chance for successful surface WOx and ZrOx intermixing is significantly increased. Based on this perceived structure-activity relationship, several new catalyst synthesis strategies were developed in an attempt to optimize the catalytic performance of WOx-based catalysts. We have demonstrated in Chapter 3 that co-impregnation of WOx and ZrOx precursors onto an inactive model WO3/ZrO2 catalyst, followed by a calcination treatment above the 896K Huttig temperature of ZrO 2, promotes the surface diffusion of ZrO2 and intermixing of ZrOx with WOx. As a consequence, the catalytic activity of the co-impregnated material is dramatically increased by more than two orders of magnitude. We further showed in Chapter 5 that the Keggin structure based on phosphotungstic acid hydrate (i.e. an ˜ 1nm P-WOx mixed oxide cluster) can be successfully immobilized on an amorphous SiO2 support surface. Such catalyst design experiments further support our postulated structure-activity model, in which WO x clusters mixed with some low valence heteroatoms are the most active entities for the methanol dehydration and n-pentane isomerization reactions. Another major theme of this thesis is the analysis of model double-supported metal oxide catalysts, in which a high surface area oxide support material (amorphous SiO2) is modified by the presence of a second metal oxide surface species (TiO2 or ZrO2) added to control the distribution and activity of the active surface WOx component. These complex double-supported metal oxide catalysts represent a very significant challenge in terms of structural characterization. A new electron microscopy characterization strategy was developed for this purpose which combined aberration corrected STEM imaging with concurrent EELS and XEDS analysis. We demonstrated that the various components in a double-supported WO3/TiO 2/SiO2 catalyst system can be effectively visualized using complementary HAADF and STEM-BF imaging within an aberration corrected STEM. Furthermore, when combined with chemical analysis by STEM-EELS and XEDS within the same STEM instrument, it is possible to map out the relative spatial distribution of all the metal oxide components within the WO3/TiO2/SiO 2 catalyst. By comparing the structures of a systematic set of WO 3/TiO2/SiO2 samples displaying high, intermediate and low activity for the methanol dehydration reaction, we showed that the acidic catalytic activity seems to benefit from having (i) a more localized electron density on the TiOx support and (ii) a larger WOx domain that can better disperse the electron density. The results presented in this thesis clearly demonstrate the power of aberration corrected STEM imaging and chemical analysis techniques in the study of supported metal oxide catalysts. Many valuable insights into the structure-activity relationships existing in these supported WOx catalyst systems have been obtained as described above. In order to better understand the nature of these fascinating catalyst materials and further develop catalysts with even better catalytic performance, several suggestions for future work on these supported WOx catalysts are also discussed in the last chapter of this thesis. In particular, in-situ electron microscopy techniques that allow samples to be imaged in HAADF mode under reaction condition need to be further developed. Such an advance could potentially provide unprecedented insights into the structure-activity relationships that exist in these catalyst systems and open up new opportunities for structural and chemical characterization of catalyst materials under realistic working conditions.

  6. Electron acceptor dependence of electron shuttle secretion and extracellular electron transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Bing-Bing; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Dao-Bo; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an extensively studied dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a great potential for bioremediation and electricity generation. It secretes flavins as electron shuttles which play an important role in extracellular electron transfer. However, the influence of various environmental factors on the secretion of flavins is largely unknown. Here, the effects of electron acceptors, including fumarate, ferrihydrite, Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), nitrate and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), on the secretion of flavins were investigated. The level of riboflavin and riboflavin-5'-phosphate (FMN) secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 varied considerably with different electron acceptors. While nitrate and ferrihydrite suppressed the secretion of flavins in relative to fumarate, Fe(III)-NTA and TMAO promoted such a secretion and greatly enhanced ferrihydrite reduction and electricity generation. This work clearly demonstrates that electron acceptors could considerably affect the secretion of flavins and consequent microbial EET. Such impacts of electron acceptors in the environment deserve more attention. PMID:23558182

  7. REFLECTIONS ON THE TWO-STATE ELECTRON TRANSFER MODEL.

    SciTech Connect

    Brunschwig, B.S.

    2000-01-12

    There is general agreement that the two most important factors determining electron transfer rates in solution are the degree of electronic interaction between the donor and acceptor sites, and the changes in the nuclear configurations of the donor, acceptor, and surrounding medium that occur upon the gain or loss of an electron Ll-51. The electronic interaction of the sites will be very weak, and the electron transfer slow, when the sites are far apart or their interaction is symmetry or spin forbidden. Since electron motion is much faster than nuclear motion, energy conservation requires that, prior to the actual electron transfer, the nuclear configurations of the reactants and the surrounding medium adjust from their equilibrium values to a configuration (generally) intermediate between that of the reactants and products. In the case of electron transfer between , two metal complexes in a polar solvent, the nuclear configuration changes involve adjustments in the metal-ligand and intraligand bond lengths and angles, and changes in the orientations of the surrounding solvent molecules. In common with ordinary chemical reactions, an electron transfer reaction can then be described in terms of the motion of the system on an energy surface from the reactant equilibrium configuration (initial state) to the product equilibrium configuration (final state) via the activated complex (transition state) configuration.

  8. Electron transfer between multihaem cytochromes c₃ from Desulfovibrio africanus.

    PubMed

    Quintas, Pedro O; Oliveira, Márcia S; Catarino, Teresa; Turner, David L

    2013-04-01

    The tetrahaem type I cytochromes c3 from Desulfovibrionaceae shuttle electrons from a periplasmic hydrogenase to transmembrane electron transfer complexes. In D. africanus, it is believed that the electrons are received by another tetrahaem cytochrome c3, denoted type II, which is associated with the membrane complex. Thermodynamic measurements show that the type I cytochrome c3 has the potential to transfer two electrons at a time. This study uses two-dimensional NMR to investigate the exchange of electrons between type I and type II cytochromes c3 at equilibrium in intermediate stages of oxidation. The results indicate that the two proteins are physiological partners but that only single-electron transfers occur in solution. PMID:23385167

  9. Coordinated photoinduced electron and proton transfer in a molecular triad

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, S.C.; Macpherson, A.N.; Lin, S.; Liddell, P.A.; Seely, G.R.; Moore, A.L.; Moore, T.A.; Gust, D. )

    1995-02-08

    Excitation of carotenoid-porphyrin-quinone (C-P-Q) triads yields the porphyrin first excited singlet state, which decays by electron transfer to give a C-P[sup [center dot]+]-Q[sup [center dot]-] charge-separated state. Competing with rapid charge recombination is electron transfer from the carotenoid to produce a long-lived C[sup [center dot]+]-P-Q[sup [center dot]-] species. High quantum yields of the final state require tuning of electronic and thermodynamic factors to favor forward electron transfer over charge recombination. Triad 1 illustrates a new strategy for slowing charge recombination based on coupling photoinduced electron transfer to a change in proton chemical potential. The quantum yields and lifetimes of the final charge-separated states in the triads were assessed by monitoring the transient carotenoid radical cation absorptions. The results demonstrate that the yield of charge separation in multicomponent molecular photovoltaics can be increased by a coordinated electron and proton transfer process. It is also interesting that in 1 a substantial fraction of the intramolecular redox potential produced by photoinduced electron transfer is transformed into proton chemical potential. Elaboration of this concept could lead to photoinduced generation of proton motive force in a heterogeneous system. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  10. 76 FR 29901 - Electronic Fund Transfers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... Board anticipates that final rules on remittance transfers will be issued by the Bureau. \\26\\ 75 FR 57252 (Sept. 20, 2010). IV. Legal Authority Section 1073 of the Dodd-Frank Act creates a new Section 919... Act) was signed into law.\\1\\ Section 1073 of the Dodd-Frank Act adds a new Section 919 to the EFTA...

  11. Cd(ii)-MOF-IM: post-synthesis functionalization of a Cd(ii)-MOF as a triphase transfer catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Cheng; Ma, Jian-Ping; Liu, Qi-Kui; Hu, Yu-Hong; Dong, Yu-Bin

    2016-05-19

    A robust and porous Cd(ii)-MOF based on a bent imidazole-bridged ligand was synthesized and post-synthetically functionalized with linear alkyl chains to afford imidazolium salt (IM)-type triphase transfer catalysts for organic transformations. The imidazolium salt decorated Cd(ii)-MOF-IM exhibits typical solid phase transfer catalytic behavior for the azidation and thiolation of bromoalkane between aqueous/organic phases. Moreover, they can be easily recovered and reused under the PTC conditions. Cd(ii)-MOF-IM herein created a versatile family of solid phase transfer catalysts for promoting a broad scope of reactions carried out in a biphasic mixture of two immiscible solvents. PMID:27039710

  12. Diameter-dependent electronic transport properties of Au-catalyst/Ge-nanowire Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, S Thomas; Leonard, Francois; Swartzentruber, Brian S; Talin, A Alee

    2008-01-01

    We present electronic transport measurements in individual Au-catalyst/Ge-nanowire interfaces demonstrating the presence of a Schottky barrier. Surprisingly, the small-bias conductance density increases with decreasing diameter. Theoretical calculations suggest that this effect arises because electron-hole recombination in the depletion region is the dominant charge transport mechanism, with a diameter dependence of both the depletion width and the electron-hole recombination time. The recombination time is dominated by surface contributions and depends linearly on the nanowire diameter.

  13. Electronic excitation energy transfer between nucleobases of natural DNA.

    PubMed

    Vayá, Ignacio; Gustavsson, Thomas; Douki, Thierry; Berlin, Yuri; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2012-07-18

    Transfer of the electronic excitation energy in calf thymus DNA is studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence anisotropy, after an initial decay starting on the femtosecond time scale, dwindles down to ca. 0.1. The in-plane depolarized fluorescence decays are described by a stretched exponential law. Our observations are consistent with one-dimensional transfer mediated by charge-transfer excited states. PMID:22765050

  14. Removal of VOCs by hybrid electron beam reactor with catalyst bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinkyu; Han, Bumsoo; Kim, Yuri; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Park, Chong-Rae; Kim, Jong-Chul; Kim, Jo-Chun; Kim, Ki-Joon

    2004-09-01

    Electron beam decomposition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was studied in order to obtain information for developing effective treatment method of off-gases from industries. We have examined the combination of electron beam and catalyst honeycomb which is either 1% platinum based or ceramic honeycomb- based aluminum oxide, using a hybrid reactor in order to improve removal efficiency and CO 2 formation; and to suppress undesirable by-product formation e.g. O 3, aerosol, H xC y. , and tar. The experiments were conducted using a pilot-scale treatment system (maximum capacity; 1800 N m 3/h) that fitted the field size to scale up from the traditional laboratory scale system for VOC removal with electron beam irradiation. Toluene was selected as a typical VOC that was irradiated to investigate product formation, effect of ceramic and catalyst, and factors effecting overall efficiency of degradation. Styrene was selected as the most odorous compound among the VOCs of interest. It was found that VOCs could be destroyed more effectively using a hybrid system with catalyst bed than with electron beam irradiation only.

  15. Photoinduced electron transfer from DABCO to trans-nitrostilbenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görner, Helmut; Schulte-Frohlinde, Dietrich

    The anion radical of the trans isomers of 4-nitro-, 4,4'-dinitro-, and 4-nitro-4'-methoxystilbene was generated by triplet quenching with 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) in polar solvents at room temperature using laser flash photolysis. Electron transfer and trans → cis photoisomerization are competing processes. The radical ions decay by electron back-transfer yielding the initial ground states.

  16. A facile measurement of heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Paulo R; Benites, Tiago Azevedo; Góes, Márcio Sousa; Davis, Jason J

    2013-11-19

    This work introduces a simple, single-step, impedance-derived capacitance spectroscopic approach as a convenient and direct way of reporting the heterogeneous rate of electron-transfer between an electrode and solution-phase redox species. The proposed methodology requires no equivalent circuit analysis or data fitting and is equally applicable to the strong coupling (diffusion-mediated) or weak coupling electron-transfer regimes. PMID:24187916

  17. MANAGING ELECTRONIC DATA TRANSFER IN ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of computers and electronic information poses a complex problem for potential litigation in space law. The problem currently manifests itself in at least two ways. First, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) enforcement of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compen...

  18. Theoretical analysis of proton relays in electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Auer, Benjamin; Fernandez, Laura E; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-06-01

    The coupling of long-range electron transfer to proton transport over multiple sites plays a vital role in many biological and chemical processes. Recently the concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction in a molecule with a hydrogen-bond relay inserted between the proton donor and acceptor sites was studied electrochemically. The standard rate constants and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) were measured experimentally for this double proton transfer system and a related single proton transfer system. In the present paper, these systems are studied theoretically using vibronically nonadiabatic rate constant expressions for electrochemical PCET. Application of this approach to proton relays requires the calculation of multidimensional proton vibrational wave functions and the incorporation of multiple proton donor-acceptor motions. The decrease in proton donor-acceptor distances due to thermal fluctuations and the contributions from excited electron-proton vibronic states play important roles in these systems. The calculated KIEs and the ratio of the standard rate constants for the single and double proton transfer systems are in agreement with the experimental data. The calculations indicate that the standard PCET rate constant is lower for the double proton transfer system because of the smaller overlap integral between the ground state reduced and oxidized proton vibrational wave functions, resulting in greater contributions from excited electron-proton vibronic states with higher free energy barriers. The theory predicts that this rate constant may be increased by modifying the molecule in a manner that decreases the equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distances or alters the molecular thermal motions to facilitate the concurrent decrease of these distances. These insights may guide the design of more efficient catalysts for energy conversion devices. PMID:21524104

  19. Understanding catalyst behavior during in situ heating through simultaneous secondary and transmitted electron imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    By coupling techniques of simultaneous secondary (SE) and transmitted electron (TE) imaging at high resolution in a modern scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), with the ability to heat specimens using a highly stable MEMS-based heating platform, we obtained synergistic information to clarify the behavior of catalysts during in situ thermal treatments. Au/iron oxide catalyst 'leached' to remove surface Au was heated to temperatures as high as 700°C. The Fe2O3 support particle structure tended to reduce to Fe3O4 and formed surface terraces; the formation, coalescence, and mobility of 1- to 2-nm particles on the terraces were characterized in SE, STEM-ADF, and TEM-BF modes. If combined with simultaneous nanoprobe spectroscopy, this approach will open the door to a new way of studying the kinetics of nano-scaled phenomena. PMID:25419195

  20. Does electron-transfer theory explain large rate differences in singlet and triplet excited state electron-transfer reactions?

    SciTech Connect

    Zusman, L.D.; Kurnikov, I.V.; Beratan, D.N.

    1995-12-31

    Gray and coworkers have shown that intramolecular electron-transfer rates from singlet and triplet excited states in iridium(spacer)pyridinium complexes can be vastly different (>5 orders of magnitude). We have analyzed the possible sources of these differences, including effects that may arise from reorganization energies, free energies, and tunneling matrix elements. When distance dependent reorganization energies and energy dependent tunneling matrix elements are included, a systematic framework emerges to describe these electron-transfer reactions.

  1. Mathematics and electronics - the conceptual transfer problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waks, S.

    1988-07-01

    The article deals with the gap between the technological-school student's mastery of pure mathematical principles and his/her competence in their implementation in electronics and suggests a means for narrowing this, using a case study. A cooperative effort by mathematics and electronics teachers, involving coordination of content, teaching strategies and timing, was implemented on two groups (treatment and control). The treatment group achieved significantly higher average scores in tests in those questions where the mathematical reinforcement provided in the treatment process could be used - and this in spite of the group's weaker standing in the electronics course. Moreover, it was establised that treatment students adopted a more analytical approach in their solution strategies, while control students tended to rely more on recall and 'ready-made' formulae. The main conclusion of our case study is that mastery of mathematical theory and principles is a prerequisite to efficient tackling of technological problems, but is not always enough. Cooperation between the maths and electronics teachers contributes to improvement of the teaching-learning process in a technological discipline.

  2. Vectorial electron transfer in spatially ordered arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Progress has been made in four areas: the synthesis of new materials for directional electron; the preparation and characterization of anisotropic composites bearing organic and inorganic components; the elaboration of mechanisms of electrocatalysis; and the development of new methods for surface modification of metals and semiconductors.

  3. Theory of photoinduced heterogeneous electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, K.L.; Tachiya, Masanori

    2006-02-14

    We consider electron injection into the conduction band of a semiconductor, from an electronically excited state of a dye molecule, adsorbed on its surface. For arbitrary width of the conduction band, the survival probability of the excited state can be calculated using a Green's-function approach. We show that the existence of a split-off state can play an important role in the total injection probability. In the wide band limit, the survival probability decays exponentially, but for finite band widths it does not. We further investigate the effect of vibrations on the process. A Green's operator technique may be used to solve this too exactly. We show that the problem may be reduced to a non-Hermitian eigenvalue problem for the vibrational states alone. Exact results can be obtained for arbitrary bandwidth and for a few vibrational degrees of freedom. In the wide band limit, the dynamics is particularly simple and we find that (1) the survival probability of the excited state is unchanged by the inclusion of vibrational motion, but (2) each vibrational state now has a finite lifetime. Numerical results are presented for the effects of reorganization energy, energy of the injecting level, and the variation of the matrix element for the electron injection, on the survival probability of the electron in the excited state. As an illustration of the approach, we also present results of numerical calculation of the absorption spectrum of perylene adsorbed on TiO{sub 2} and compare it with experimental results.

  4. A simulation of an electrochemical adiabatic electron-transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Schmickler, W.

    2000-09-01

    Adiabatic electron exchange between an electroactive species and a metal electrode is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The system is assumed to be in contact with a thermal bath, which provides the activation energy required for an electron transfer. The method allows the explicit calculation of transmission factors.

  5. Frontier orbital symmetry control of intermolecular electron transfer. Final report, September 15, 1988--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, B.

    1997-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics: the recovery of intermolecular transfer parameters from fluorescence quenching in liquids; photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer in flexible donor/space/acceptor systems containing an extended unsaturated spacer; electron transfer sensitized reaction; the recovery of solute and fractal dimensions from electron transfer quenching data; and frontier orbital symmetry control of back electron transfer.

  6. Proton-coupled electron transfer in solution, proteins, and electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Soudackov, Alexander V.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in the theoretical treatment of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions are reviewed. These reactions play an important role in a wide range of biological processes, as well as in fuel cells, solar cells, chemical sensors, and electrochemical devices. A unified theoretical framework has been developed to describe both sequential and concerted PCET, as well as hydrogen atom transfer (HAT). A quantitative diagnostic has been proposed to differentiate between HAT and PCET in terms of the degree of electronic nonadiabaticity, where HAT corresponds to electronically adiabatic proton transfer and PCET corresponds to electronically nonadiabatic proton transfer. In both cases, the overall reaction is typically vibronically nonadiabatic. A series of rate constant expressions have been derived in various limits by describing the PCET reactions in terms of nonadiabatic transitions between electron-proton vibronic states. These expressions account for the solvent response to both electron and proton transfer and the effects of the proton donor-acceptor vibrational motion. The solvent and protein environment can be represented by a dielectric continuum or described with explicit molecular dynamics. These theoretical treatments have been applied to numerous PCET reactions in solution and proteins. Expressions for heterogeneous rate constants and current densities for electrochemical PCET have also been derived and applied to model systems. PMID:18842015

  7. Electron transfer pathways in photosystem I reaction centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashin, Nikolaj; Larsson, Sven

    2003-07-01

    Electron transfer following charge separation in the photosystem I (PSI) reaction center of Synechococcus elongatus is studied using theoretical methods. The difference in rate between two almost symmetrical A- and B-branches is caused by a difference in a single residue (Trp B673 versus Gly A693), close to the F X iron-sulfur cluster. Partly due to its polar environment, Trp B673 acts as an electron acceptor in its π-system. The rate increases on the B-side due to shortened distances for electron transfer.

  8. Tipping the Balance between Concerted versus Sequential Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Kretchmer, Joshua S; Miller, Thomas F

    2016-02-01

    We use quantized molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the competition between concerted and sequential proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reaction mechanisms in inorganic catalysts. By analyzing reactive nonadiabatic PCET trajectories and computing both concerted and sequential rate constants, we characterize various molecular features that govern inorganic PCET reactions, including the solvent polarity, ligand-mediated electron-proton interactions, and intrinsic proton-transfer (PT) energy barrier. Using atomistic simulations with over 1200 atoms, we find that the symmetric iron biimidazoline system is extremely biased toward the concerted mechanism because of the strong ligand-mediated electron-proton interaction and the short PT distance. However, by investigating system-bath models in which electron-proton interactions are shielded, which are representative of ruthenium terpyridylbenzoates and iron (tetraphenylporphyrin)benzoates, we predict that a crossover between the concerted and sequential PCET mechanisms may be possible either by increasing the polarity of the solvent or by increasing the intrinsic PT energy barrier. In addition, we predict the possibility of a crossover in the PCET mechanism by directly varying the strength of the ligand-mediated electron-proton interactions. The results presented here reveal new strategies for altering the competition between the competing PCET mechanisms and design principles for controlling PCET in catalytic systems. PMID:26440812

  9. Ultrafast spectroscopy of electron transfer dynamics in liquids; excitation transfer studies of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goun, Alexei A.

    The transfer of an electron from a donor to an acceptor is the fundamental step in a wide range of chemical and biological processes. As a result, electron-transfer reactions have been the focus of numerous theoretical and experimental efforts aimed at understanding the kinetics and mechanism of the transfer event. Liquid solvents are an important medium for electron-transfer processes. The influences of the distance dependence, diffusion, the radial distribution function, and the hydrodynamic effect have been incorporated into the theory of electron transfer in solution, as well as into the theory of electron transfer between donors and acceptors in the head group regions of micelles. The development of new laser system with a pulse duration of tens of femtoseconds, with tunable wavelength allowed us to study these processes on a considerably shorter time scale than previous studies. This allowed us to observe not only the diffusion controlled but also the kinetics of electron transfer for donor/acceptor pairs that are in close proximity. In one set of experiments we have studied the kinetics of electron transfer in electron accepting molecule (rhodamine 3B) dissolved in electron donating solvent (N,N-dimethylaniline). The data for the forward electron transfer and geminate recombination are approximated by the statistical theory of the electron transfer. Optical anisotropy observed in the experiment demonstrates the orientation dependence of the electron transfer rate. In further experiments we investigated the electron transfer in non-hydrogen bonding liquids of increasing viscosity. The effective value of the donor/acceptor electronic coupling was found to decrease with viscosity. Electron transfer experiments were also carried out on the surface of micelles. The systems studied are the hole donor octadecyl-rhodamine B (ODRB) and the hole acceptor N,N-dimethyl-aniline (DMA) in micelles made of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB). It was found that the effective coupling is reduced compared to donor/acceptor pairs dissolved in simple liquids. In the 2nd half of thesis we have addressed the question of the dynamics of phase transitions. We have demonstrated the ability to use the fluorescent excitation-transfer technique to study the demixing of liquids specifically, kinetics of demixing water and 2,6-dimethylpyridine. These two liquids possess a low critical temperature point, which allowed us to use a temperature jump from a laser pulse to initiate the process of phase separation. It was found that Coumarin480 laser dye and HPTS (8-Hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid) fluorescent dye have significantly different solubilities in the components of the mixture. These dyes undergo excitation transfer from Coumarin480 to HPTS in the uniform state, but not in the phase-separated state. A system with a temperature jump pump and an excitation transfer probe measured the time scale of the initial step of the phase separation.

  10. Alternative ground states enable pathway switching in biological electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Abriata, Luciano A.; Álvarez-Paggi, Damián; Ledesma, Gabriela N.; Blackburn, Ninian J.; Vila, Alejandro J.; Murgida, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    Electron transfer is the simplest chemical reaction and constitutes the basis of a large variety of biological processes, such as photosynthesis and cellular respiration. Nature has evolved specific proteins and cofactors for these functions. The mechanisms optimizing biological electron transfer have been matter of intense debate, such as the role of the protein milieu between donor and acceptor sites. Here we propose a mechanism regulating long-range electron transfer in proteins. Specifically, we report a spectroscopic, electrochemical, and theoretical study on WT and single-mutant CuA redox centers from Thermus thermophilus, which shows that thermal fluctuations may populate two alternative ground-state electronic wave functions optimized for electron entry and exit, respectively, through two different and nearly perpendicular pathways. These findings suggest a unique role for alternative or “invisible” electronic ground states in directional electron transfer. Moreover, it is shown that this energy gap and, therefore, the equilibrium between ground states can be fine-tuned by minor perturbations, suggesting alternative ways through which protein–protein interactions and membrane potential may optimize and regulate electron–proton energy transduction. PMID:23054836

  11. Vectorial electron transfer in spatially ordered arrays. Progress report, August 1994--January 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    With DOE support from August 1994 to August 1997, this project sought to identify methods for controlled placement of light absorbers, relays, and multielectron catalysts at defined sites from a fixed semiconductor or metal surface and, thus, to develop methods for preparing chemically modified photoactive surfaces as artificial photosynthetic units. These designed materials have been evaluated as efficient light collection devices and as substrates for defining the key features that govern the efficiency of long distance electron transfer and energy migration. The authors have synthesized several different families of integrated chemical systems as soluble arrays, as solid thin films, and as adsorbates on solid electrodes, seeking to establish how spatial definition deriving from covalent attachment to a helical polymer backbone, from self assembly of functionalized tethers on gold or metal oxide surfaces, and from rigid or layered block polymers can lead to controlled electron and energy transfer. The authors have also conducted physical characterization of semiconductor-containing composites active in controlled interfacial electron transfer, with charge transport in these materials having been evaluated by photophysical and electrochemical methods.

  12. Modelling extracellular limitations for mediated versus direct interspecies electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Storck, Tomas; Virdis, Bernardino; Batstone, Damien J

    2016-03-01

    Interspecies electron transfer (IET) is important for many anaerobic processes, but is critically dependent on mode of transfer. In particular, direct IET (DIET) has been recently proposed as a metabolically advantageous mode compared with mediated IET (MIET) via hydrogen or formate. We analyse relative feasibility of these IET modes by modelling external limitations using a reaction-diffusion-electrochemical approach in a three-dimensional domain. For otherwise identical conditions, external electron transfer rates per cell pair (cp) are considerably higher for formate-MIET (317 × 10(3) e(-) cp(-1) s(-1)) compared with DIET (44.9 × 10(3) e(-) cp(-1) s(-1)) or hydrogen-MIET (5.24 × 10(3) e(-) cp(-1) s(-1)). MIET is limited by the mediator concentration gradient at which reactions are still thermodynamically feasible, whereas DIET is limited through redox cofactor (for example, cytochromes) activation losses. Model outcomes are sensitive to key parameters for external electron transfer including cofactor electron transfer rate constant and redox cofactor area, concentration or count per cell, but formate-MIET is generally more favourable for reasonable parameter ranges. Extending the analysis to multiple cells shows that the size of the network does not strongly influence relative or absolute favourability of IET modes. Similar electron transfer rates for formate-MIET and DIET can be achieved in our case with a slight (0.7 kJ mol(-1)) thermodynamic advantage for DIET. This indicates that close to thermodynamic feasibility, external limitations can be compensated for by improved metabolic efficiency when using direct electron transfer. PMID:26545286

  13. An Auger electron spectroscopy study of the activation of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. II. Carbon monoxide activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G. ); Datye, A.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Activation procedures can have a dramatic effect on the activity of iron-based catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. CO conversion over a 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst (parts by weight) can vary by nearly a factor of 3, depending on activation treatment. In contrast, a 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst displays little dependence of F-T activity on activation treatment. An ultra-high vacuum surface analysis chamber coupled to an atmospheric reactor has been used to measure the surface composition of these catalysts following activation in carbon monoxide at 280[degrees]C, while transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and BET surface area measurements have been used to investigate catalyst morphology. CO activation of the 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst at 280[degrees]C results in partial reduction of iron to a mixture of Fe[sub x]O and Fe[sub 3]O[sub 4], and an overall surface composition very similar to that obtained following hydrogen activation at 220 or 280[degrees]C, consistent with the invariance of F-T activity with activation treatment for this catalyst. Activation of the 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst in CO at 280[degrees]C results in the formation of iron carbide particles, growth of graphitic carbon (C[sub g]) filaments, and formation of a thick, porous, C[sub g] layer covering the carbide particles. Differences in F-T activity between the hydrogen- and CO-activated 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst are discussed in terms of surface composition and catalyst morphology. The difference in sensitivity of the two catalysts to activation conditions is related to differences in the extent of reduction of the catalysts. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. An Auger electron spectroscopy study of the activation of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. I. Hydrogen activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G. )

    1993-03-01

    Activation procedures can have a dramatic effect on the activity of iron-based catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. CO conversion over a 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst (parts by weight) can vary by nearly a factor of 3, depending on activation. In contrast, a 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst displays only minor variations in activity with activation conditions. An ultra-high vacuum surface analysis chamber coupled to an atmospheric pressure reactor has been used to measure the surface compositions of these catalysts following various hydrogen activation procedures. Activation of the 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst in H[sub 2] results in rapid reduction of iron to the metallic state, and segregation of sulfur to the catalyst surface. The sulfur arises from bulk sulfate impurities present in the metal nitrates used to prepare the catalyst. Sulfur coverage increases with both activation time and temperature, due to an increase in the rate of sulfur diffusion with temperature. F-T activity of this catalyst varies inversely with sulfur coverage, consistent with the well-known poisoning effect of sulfur on F-T synthesis. For the 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst no significant variations in surface composition are observed as a function of hydrogen activation temperature, consistent with the absence of any variations in catalyst activity. Only partial reduction of iron to a mixture of Fe[sub x]O and Fe[sub 3]O[sub 4] is observed for this catalyst for all activation conditions investigated. Using electron beam effects to remove potassium and silica shows that one or both of these components inhibits reduction of iron to the metallic state in the 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst. 48 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. Exploring the interparticle electron transfer process in the photocatalytic oxidation of 4-chlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Ou, Hsin-Hung; Lo, Shang-Lien; Wu, Chung-Hsin

    2006-10-11

    This work aimed to investigate the interparticle electron transfer (IPET) process within the coupled-photocatalyst systems on the basis of the degradation of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP). TiO(2), ZnO and SnO(2) are used as the model photocatalysts owing to their increasing energy levels which correspond to the IPET concept. In the single-photocatalyst tests, ZnO tests are associated with the highest degradation rate constants (0.347+/-0.083 h(-1) at pH 7 and 0.453+/-0.011 h(-1) at pH 11) and a better DOC reduction than in other single catalyst tests under given conditions. ZnO/SnO(2) coupled tests have constants of 0.612+/-0.068 and 0.948+/-0.069 h(-1) at pH 7 and 11, respectively. Additionally, the 4-CP prefers the breakdown of chloride group in TiO(2) system while proceeding hydroxylation reaction in ZnO systems. Meanwhile, a phenomenonlogical model coupled with the IPET effect was developed to explore the separation of photo-electrons and photo-holes within catalysts. Based on the model parameters, the recombination rate of photo-electrons and photo-holes in TiO(2)/SnO(2) and ZnO/SnO(2) systems is 20-45% lower than that obtained by a respective single catalyst. Thus, coupled-photocatalyst tests, TiO(2)/SnO(2) and ZnO/SnO(2) efficiently suppress the recombination, particularly for ZnO/SnO(2) tests at pH 11. PMID:16707214

  16. Desulfurization of coal: Enhanced selectivity using phase transfer catalysts. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.R.; Hippo, E.J.

    1997-05-01

    Due to environmental problems related to the combustion of high sulfur Illinois coal, there continues to be interest in the development of viable pre-combustion desulfurization processes. Recent studies by the authors have obtained very good sulfur removals but the reagents that are used are too expensive. Use of cheaper reagents leads to a loss of desired coal properties. This study investigated the application of phase transfer catalysts to the selective oxidation of sulfur in coal using air and oxygen as oxidants. The phase transfer catalyst was expected to function as a selectivity moderator by permitting the use of milder reaction conditions than otherwise necessary. This would enhance the sulfur selectivity and help retain the heating value of the coal. The use of certain coal combustion wastes for desulfurization, and the application of cerium (IV) catalyzed air oxidations for selective sulfur oxidation were also studied. If successful this project would have lead to the rapid development of a commercially viable desulfurization process. This would have significantly improved the marketability of Illinois coal. However, the phase transfer catalysts, the cerium and the scrubber sledge did not catalize the sulfur removal significantly.

  17. Inelastic tunneling in long-distance biological electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Emile S.; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A.

    1997-09-01

    The effect of protein dynamics on the long-distance biological electron transfer reactions is discussed. Computer simulations reported recently by our group [Daizadeh, Medvedev, and Stuchebrukhov, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94, 3703 (1997)] have shown that in some cases a strong dynamic coupling of a tunneling electron to vibrational motions of the protein matrix can exist. This results in a modification of the conventional picture of electron transfer in proteins. The new element in the modified theory is that the tunneling electron is capable of emitting or absorbing vibrational energy (phonons) from the medium. As a result, some biological reactions may occur in an activationless fashion. In the present paper we study analytically the probabilities of such inelastic tunneling events and show how they affect the overall dependence of the reaction rate on the driving force, temperature, and the strength of electron-phonon coupling. Harmonic and anharmonic models are proposed for vibrational dynamics of the intervening medium.

  18. Photoinduced electron transfer processes in homogeneous and microheterogeneous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, D.G.

    1991-10-01

    The focus of the work described in this report is on single electron transfer reactions of excited states which culminate in the formation of stable or metastable even electron species. For the most part the studies have involved even electron organic substrates which are thus converted photochemically to odd electron species and then at some stage reconvert to even electron products. These reactions generally fall into two rather different categories. In one set of studies we have examined reactions in which the metastable reagents generated by single electron transfer quenching of an excited state undergo novel fragmentation reactions, chiefly involving C-C bond cleavage. These reactions often culminate in novel and potentially useful chemical reactions and frequently have the potential for leading to new chemical products otherwise unaffordable by conventional reaction paths. In a rather different investigation we have also studied reactions in which single electron transfer quenching of an excited state is followed by subsequent reactions which lead reversibly to metastable two electron products which, often stable in themselves, can nonetheless be reacted with each other or with other reagents to regenerate the starting materials with release of energy. 66 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Direct Interspecies Electron Transfer between Geobacter metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Liu, Fanghua; Markovaite, Beatrice; Chen, Shanshan; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is potentially an effective form of syntrophy in methanogenic communities, but little is known about the diversity of methanogens capable of DIET. The ability of Methanosarcina barkeri to participate in DIET was evaluated in coculture with Geobacter metallireducens. Cocultures formed aggregates that shared electrons via DIET during the stoichiometric conversion of ethanol to methane. Cocultures could not be initiated with a pilin-deficient G. metallireducens strain, suggesting that long-range electron transfer along pili was important for DIET. Amendments of granular activated carbon permitted the pilin-deficient G. metallireducens isolates to share electrons with M. barkeri, demonstrating that this conductive material could substitute for pili in promoting DIET. When M. barkeri was grown in coculture with the H2-producing Pelobacter carbinolicus, incapable of DIET, M. barkeri utilized H2 as an electron donor but metabolized little of the acetate that P. carbinolicus produced. This suggested that H2, but not electrons derived from DIET, inhibited acetate metabolism. P. carbinolicus-M. barkeri cocultures did not aggregate, demonstrating that, unlike DIET, close physical contact was not necessary for interspecies H2 transfer. M. barkeri is the second methanogen found to accept electrons via DIET and the first methanogen known to be capable of using either H2 or electrons derived from DIET for CO2 reduction. Furthermore, M. barkeri is genetically tractable, making it a model organism for elucidating mechanisms by which methanogens make biological electrical connections with other cells. PMID:24837373

  20. Recoverable organorhodium-functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane: a bifunctional heterogeneous catalyst for asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of aromatic ketones in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shuang; Jin, Ronghua; Zhang, Huaisheng; Yao, Hui; Zhuang, Jinglan; Liu, Guohua; Li, Hexing

    2012-06-25

    A bifuctional heterogeneous chiral rhodium catalyst exhibited excellent catalytic activity and enantioselectivity in asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of aromatic ketones and their analogues in aqueous medium, which could be recovered easily and used repetitively without affecting obviously its enantioselectivity. PMID:22590711

  1. Electron Transfer Between Colloidal ZnO Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hayoun, Rebecca; Whitaker, Kelly M.; Gamelin, Daniel R.; Mayer, James M.

    2011-03-30

    Colloidal ZnO nanocrystals capped with dodecylamine and dissolved in toluene can be charged photochemically to give stable solutions in which electrons are present in the conduction bands of the nanocrystals. These conduction-band electrons are readily monitored by EPR spectroscopy, with g* values that correlate with the nanocrystal sizes. Mixing a solution of charged small nanocrystals (e{sub CB}{sup -}:ZnO-S) with a solution of uncharged large nanocrystals (ZnO-L) caused changes in the EPR spectrum indicative of quantitative electron transfer from small to large nanocrystals. EPR spectra of the reverse reaction, e{sub CB}{sup -}:ZnO-L + ZnO-S, showed that electrons do not transfer from large to small nanocrystals. Stopped-flow kinetics studies monitoring the change in the UV bandedge absorption showed that reactions of 50 {micro}M nanocrystals were complete within the 5 ms mixing time of the instrument. Similar results were obtained for the reaction of charged nanocrystals with methyl viologen (MV{sup 2+}). These and related results indicate that the electron-transfer reactions of these colloidal nanocrystals are quantitative and very rapid, despite the presence of {approx}1.5 nm long dodecylamine capping ligands. These soluble ZnO nanocrystals are thus well-defined redox reagents suitable for studies of electron transfer involving semiconductor nanostructures.

  2. Nanoantioxidant-driven plasmon enhanced proton-coupled electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Blattmann, Christoph O.; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2015-12-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon-enhancement of PCET brings together the so far unrelated research domains of nanoplasmonics and electron/proton translocation with significant impact on applications based on interfacial electron/proton transfer.Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon-enhancement of PCET brings together the so far unrelated research domains of nanoplasmonics and electron/proton translocation with significant impact on applications based on interfacial electron/proton transfer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04942c

  3. Photochemical electron transfer in liquid/liquid solvent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Marecek, V.; De Armond, A.H.; De Armond, M.K. )

    1989-03-29

    A photoinduced charge transfer at the water/1,2-dichloroethane and water/benzonitrile interfaces was studied, using the photoredox couple ruthenium-trisbipyridine complex, Ru(byp){sub 3}{sup 2+}, dissolved in the organic phase and methyl viologen, MV{sup 2+}, in the aqueous phase. It was concluded that the photocurrent observed can be ascribed to an electron transfer between the excited ruthenium complex and methyl viologen.

  4. Photo-induced electron-transfer reactions in heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. M.

    1981-11-01

    The conversion of solar energy into chemical energy was pursued by two approaches. One is the photo-induced electron transfer reactions in heterogeneous media, and the other is the photo-decomposition of water with liquid-junction solar cells. Photo-induced electron-transfer reactions in heterogeneous media with colloidal silica or poly-acrylate were studied by flash photolysis. In an effort to illustrate that small band-gap semiconductors can be protected from photo-corrosion through surface modification, the surface of polycrystalline ZnO was chemically coated with zinc phthalocyanine and the electron-transfer process across the coated ZnO-electrolyte interface was studied by photo-electrochemical techniques.

  5. Steam reforming of n-hexane on pellet and monolithic catalyst beds. A comparative study on improvements due to heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Monolithic catalysts with higher available active surface areas and better thermal conductivity than conventional pellets beds, making possible the steam reforming of fuels heavier than naphtha, were examined. Performance comparisons were made between conventional pellet beds and honeycomb monolith catalysts using n-hexane as the fuel. Metal-supported monoliths were examined. These offer higher structural stability and higher thermal conductivity than ceramic supports. Data from two metal monoliths of different nickel catalyst loadings were compared to pellets under the same operating conditions. Improved heat transfer and better conversion efficiencies were obtained with the monolith having higher catalyst loading. Surface-gas interaction was observed throughout the length of the monoliths.

  6. Improving the efficiency of water splitting in dye-sensitized solar cells by using a biomimetic electron transfer mediator

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yixin; Swierk, John R.; Megiatto, Jackson D.; Sherman, Benjamin; Youngblood, W. Justin; Qin, Dongdong; Lentz, Deanna M.; Moore, Ana L.; Moore, Thomas A.; Gust, Devens; Mallouk, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Photoelectrochemical water splitting directly converts solar energy to chemical energy stored in hydrogen, a high energy density fuel. Although water splitting using semiconductor photoelectrodes has been studied for more than 40 years, it has only recently been demonstrated using dye-sensitized electrodes. The quantum yield for water splitting in these dye-based systems has, so far, been very low because the charge recombination reaction is faster than the catalytic four-electron oxidation of water to oxygen. We show here that the quantum yield is more than doubled by incorporating an electron transfer mediator that is mimetic of the tyrosine-histidine mediator in Photosystem II. The mediator molecule is covalently bound to the water oxidation catalyst, a colloidal iridium oxide particle, and is coadsorbed onto a porous titanium dioxide electrode with a Ruthenium polypyridyl sensitizer. As in the natural photosynthetic system, this molecule mediates electron transfer between a relatively slow metal oxide catalyst that oxidizes water on the millisecond timescale and a dye molecule that is oxidized in a fast light-induced electron transfer reaction. The presence of the mediator molecule in the system results in photoelectrochemical water splitting with an internal quantum efficiency of approximately 2.3% using blue light. PMID:22547794

  7. Electron transfer statistics and thermal fluctuations in molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Himangshu Prabal; Harbola, Upendra

    2015-02-28

    We derive analytical expressions for probability distribution function (PDF) for electron transport in a simple model of quantum junction in presence of thermal fluctuations. Our approach is based on the large deviation theory combined with the generating function method. For large number of electrons transferred, the PDF is found to decay exponentially in the tails with different rates due to applied bias. This asymmetry in the PDF is related to the fluctuation theorem. Statistics of fluctuations are analyzed in terms of the Fano factor. Thermal fluctuations play a quantitative role in determining the statistics of electron transfer; they tend to suppress the average current while enhancing the fluctuations in particle transfer. This gives rise to both bunching and antibunching phenomena as determined by the Fano factor. The thermal fluctuations and shot noise compete with each other and determine the net (effective) statistics of particle transfer. Exact analytical expression is obtained for delay time distribution. The optimal values of the delay time between successive electron transfers can be lowered below the corresponding shot noise values by tuning the thermal effects.

  8. Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry of Hemoglobin on Clinical Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho Graça, Didia; Lescuyer, Pierre; Clerici, Lorella; Tsybin, Yury O.; Hartmer, Ralf; Meyer, Markus; Samii, Kaveh; Hochstrasser, Denis F.; Scherl, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    A mass spectrometry-based assay combining the specificity of selected reaction monitoring and the protein ion activation capabilities of electron transfer dissociation was developed and employed for the rapid identification of hemoglobin variants from whole blood without previous proteolytic cleavage. The analysis was performed in a robust ion trap mass spectrometer operating at nominal mass accuracy and resolution. Subtle differences in globin sequences, resulting with mass shifts of about one Da, can be unambiguously identified. These results suggest that mass spectrometry analysis of entire proteins using electron transfer dissociation can be employed on clinical samples in a workflow compatible with diagnostic applications.

  9. Theory of the Control of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Andrew Musso

    This dissertation describes the theoretial exploration of electron transfer (ET) processes at the interface between bulk and molecular or nanoscale materials. Analysis of simple model Hamiltonians, those for the two- and three-level electronic systems as well as for a single electronic level coupled to a continuum, inform an understanding of electron transfer in nontrivial systems. A new treatment of the three-level system at an undergraduate level encapsulates the hopping and superexchange mechanisms of electron transfer. The elegance of the behavior of ET from a single-level/continuum system precedes a treatment of the reverse process---quasicontinuum-to-discrete level ET. This reverse process, relevant to ET from a bulk material to a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) offers a handle for the coherent control of ET at an interface: the shape of an electronic wavepacket within the quasicontinuum. An extension of the single-level-to-continuum ET process is the injection of an electron from a QD to a wide-bandgap semiconductor nanoparticle (NP). We construct a minimal model to explain trends in ET rates at the QD/NP interface as a function of QD size. Finally, we propose a scheme to gate ET through a molecular junction via the coherent control of the torsional mode(s) of a linking molecule within the junction.

  10. Effects of Protein Dynamics on Biological Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daizadeh, Iraj; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei

    1998-03-01

    We have recently developed techniques whereby the electronic coupling matrix element which is proportional to the electron tunneling probability can be calculated by semi-empirical means (Daizadeh, I., Gehlen, J. N., Stuchebrukhov, A. A. (1997) J. Chem. Phys.) 106, 5658. All of these methods that we have formulated as well as other researchers in the field depend on a static picture of the electronic coupling assuming conventional theory. Our current research casts some doubt as to the legitimacy of such approximations. In fact, we have found a new aspect in long distance electron transfer reactions in proteins which reveals that the quantum mechanical tunneling process occuring at the transition state for electron transfer involves in an intricate way a non-linear dynamics of the protein medium in which the tunneling occurs (Daizadeh, I., Medvedev, E. S., Stuchebrukhov, A. A. (1997) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA) 94, 3703. It is the couplings of electron and vibrational degrees of freedom (phonons) that seem to be of critical importance for the dynamics of electron transfer in proteins. We calculate auto-correlation functions whose Fourier harmonics may elucidate certain couplings between the traveling charge and certain normal modes in the protein.

  11. Energy and electron transfer processes in polymethine dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, Karl-Heinz; Gadonas, Roaldas

    1996-04-01

    Polymethine dyes and its derivatives are attractive for their interesting optical and photo-electric properties. They are used as very efficient spectral sensitizers and laser dyes. Due to the high rate constant of deactivation channels of such dyes the primary processes of bimolecular processes as energy or electron transfer proceed within not more than some picoseconds or even shorter. In the case of a polymethine which does not isomerize we were able to show by means of time-resolved absorption spectroscopy that the singlet state photoelectron transfer to methyl- and benzylviologen had an efficiency of 0.15 with rate constants of 6.7{center_dot}10{sup 9} and 4.6{center_dot}10{sup 9} l/mole{center_dot}s, respectively, yielding the polymethine dication radical. The photoreduction with tetraphenylborate and potassium rhodanide is also very efficient with an efficiency of about 0.10 with rate constants of 2.4{center_dot}10{sup 10} and 1.6{center_dot}10{sup 10} l/mole{center_dot}s, respectively, yielding the polymethine neutral radical. The spectral differences of the observed radical spectra are small. The investigation of the temperature dependence of the photo induced electron transfer of the investigated polymethine to methylviologen results in an activation energy {delta}G*=24 kJ/mole and a value of the frequency factor of A=4.7{center_dot}10{sup 14} l/mole{center_dot}s. Strong deviation from a linear Arrhenius plot was observed at low temperatures which can be explained by solvent-solute interaction decreasing the electron transfer rate constant at lower temperatures. The calculated electron transfer rate constants agree with the assumption of the investigated process as a diffusion-controlled one. Energy transfer occurs as a efficient competitive deactivation channel from photo excited polymethine dyes to other chromophore systems with a strong overlapping of the fluorescence and the absorption bands of the donor and the acceptor, respectively. We have investigated the time and spectral evolution of the energy transfer process from a polymethine dye to different energy acceptor dyes in solution. The general question within this respect was the involvement of an intermediate electron transfer as competitive process in the energy transfer process. Whereas the Foerster energy transfer radius calculated from the time-resolved data exceeds the value received from the overlap integral by 15%, indicating deviation from a normal Foerster decay type the semilogarithmic plot of the ground state recovery kinetics vs. square root of time results in an ideal straight line dependence. No intermediate spectra as well as intermediate time behaviour was found in these complexes.

  12. Photocatalytic Conversion of Nitrobenzene to Aniline through Sequential Proton-Coupled One-Electron Transfers from a Cadmium Sulfide Quantum Dot.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Stephen C; Homan, Stephanie Bettis; Weiss, Emily A

    2016-02-10

    This paper describes the use of cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs) as visible-light photocatalysts for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline through six sequential photoinduced, proton-coupled electron transfers. At pH 3.6-4.3, the internal quantum yield of photons-to-reducing electrons is 37.1% over 54 h of illumination, with no apparent decrease in catalyst activity. Monitoring of the QD exciton by transient absorption reveals that, for each step in the catalytic cycle, the sacrificial reductant, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, scavenges the excitonic hole in ∼5 ps to form QD(•-); electron transfer to nitrobenzene or the intermediates nitrosobenzene and phenylhydroxylamine then occurs on the nanosecond time scale. The rate constants for the single-electron transfer reactions are correlated with the driving forces for the corresponding proton-coupled electron transfers. This result suggests, but does not prove, that electron transfer, not proton transfer, is rate-limiting for these reactions. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the QD-molecule systems shows that the photoproduct aniline, left unprotonated, serves as a poison for the QD catalyst by adsorbing to its surface. Performing the reaction at an acidic pH not only encourages aniline to desorb but also increases the probability of protonated intermediates; the latter effect probably ensures that recruitment of protons is not rate-limiting. PMID:26784531

  13. Cycloreversion of β-lactams via photoinduced electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ruiz, Raúl; Sáez, Jose A; Jiménez, M Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A

    2014-11-14

    The radical anions of β-lactams, photogenerated in the presence of DABCO as an electron donor, undergo cycloreversion via N-C4 bond cleavage, back electron transfer and final C2-C3 bond cleavage, leading to olefins. The involved intermediates are 1,4-radical anions and 1,4-biradicals. The experimental observations are consistent with the results of DFT calculations. PMID:25223340

  14. Theory of ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer: Contributions of direct charge transfer excitations to the absorbance

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Luxia; Willig, Frank; May, Volkhard

    2007-04-07

    Absorption spectra related to heterogeneous electron transfer are analyzed with the focus on direct charge transfer transition from the surface attached molecule into the semiconductor band states. The computations are based on a model of reduced dimensionality with a single intramolecular vibrational coordinate but a complete account for the continuum of conduction band states. The applicability of this model to perylene on TiO{sub 2} has been demonstrated in a series of earlier papers. Here, based on a time-dependent formulation, the absorbance is calculated with the inclusion of charge transfer excitations. A broad parameter set inspired by the perylene TiO{sub 2} systems is considered. In particular, the description generalizes the Fano effect to heterogeneous electron transfer reactions. Preliminary simulations of measured spectra are presented for perylene-catechol attached to TiO{sub 2}.

  15. Magnetic resonance studies of photo-induced electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    van Willigen, H.

    1992-11-01

    Fourier Transform Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (FT EPR) is useful in study of photochemical reactions: a microwave pulse rotates the electron spin magnetization vector from z (magnetic field) into xy plane ([pi]/2 pulse); the time evolution of magnetization in xy plane, the free induction decay (FID), is sampled. Fourier transform of FID gives the frequency domain EPR spectrum of the free radicals, and the method is ideal for time-resolved studies of free radicals produced by pulsed-laser excitation. Investigations of electron transfer reactions focused on porphyrin (donor) - quinone (acceptor) systems. First, two hydrogen abstraction reactions were studied with FT EPR: photoreduction of acetone with 2-propanol, yielding the acetone ketyl radical, and the reaction of 2-propanol with t-butoxy radicals. Then, the FT EPR study of benzoquinone or duroquinone anion radicals generated by pulsed-laser induced electron transfer from zinc tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP) or tetrasulfonated Zn(TPP), was carried out in homogeneous solution, micellar solutions, and silica gel. Finally, FT EPR was used to study electron transfer quenching of triplet C[sub 60] by electron donors.

  16. Semisynthetic and Biomolecular Hydrogen Evolution Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kandemir, Banu; Chakraborty, Saikat; Guo, Yixing; Bren, Kara L

    2016-01-19

    There has been great interest in the development of stable, inexpensive, efficient catalysts capable of reducing aqueous protons to hydrogen (H2), an alternative to fossil fuels. While synthetic H2 evolution catalysts have been in development for decades, recently there has been great progress in engineering biomolecular catalysts and assemblies of synthetic catalysts and biomolecules. In this Forum Article, progress in engineering proteins to catalyze H2 evolution from water is discussed. The artificial enzymes described include assemblies of synthetic catalysts and photosynthetic proteins, proteins with cofactors replaced with synthetic catalysts, and derivatives of electron-transfer proteins. In addition, a new catalyst consisting of a thermophilic cobalt-substituted cytochrome c is reported. As an electrocatalyst, the cobalt cytochrome shows nearly quantitative Faradaic efficiency and excellent longevity with a turnover number of >270000. PMID:26671416

  17. Studying Fischer-Tropsch catalysts using transmission electron microscopy and model systems of nanoparticles on planar supports.

    SciTech Connect

    Thune, P. C.; Weststrate, C. J.; Moodley, P.; Saib, A. M.; van de Loosdrecht, J.; Miller, J. T.; Niemantsverdriet, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticle model systems on planar supports form a versatile platform for studying morphological and compositional changes of catalysts due to exposure to realistic reaction conditions. We review examples from our work on iron and cobalt catalysts, which can undergo significant rearrangement in the reactive environment of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The use of specially designed, silicon based supports with thin film SiO{sub 2} enables the application of transmission electron microscopy, which has furnished important insight into e.g. the mechanisms of catalyst regeneration.

  18. Nanostructural and Chemical Characterization of Complex Oxide Catalysts by Analytical Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Weihao

    Complex oxide catalysts are used as heterogeneous catalysts for producing various important organic chemicals. In this thesis, three types of complex oxide catalysts prepared using novel preparation methods have been studied. Each of them has been evaluated for its catalytic performance, namely (i) the selective oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride over vanadium phosphate (V-P-O) materials; (ii) the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of ethane to ethylene over niobium phosphate (Nb-P-O) materials, and (iii) the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde over iron molybdate (Fe-Mo-O) materials. Analytical electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and other related characterization techniques have been used to provide useful information regarding the morphology, crystallography and chemical composition of these complex oxide catalysts. The underlying aim of this work is to uncover meaningful synthesis-structure-performance relationships for these three complex catalyst systems. Firstly, a standard methodology for generating V-P-O materials, i.e. the VPD route, has been revisited and modified. A variety of alkanes have been added during the alcohol reduction step of VOPO4·2H2O (dihydrate), which were found to have a remarkable influence on the morphology and structure of the V-P-O materials produced. Either VOHPO4·0.5H2O (hemihydrate) or VO(H2PO4)2 material can be produced depending on the precise alcohol:alkane volume ratio used in the reaction. In addition, the specific order in which the alkane and alcohol are added to VOPO 4·2H2O during the VPD route has a dramatic effect on the morphology of the resultant precursor. Through detailed electron microscopy studies we have been able to unveil the epitaxial relationship between the dihyrate and hemihydrate crystalline phases as being [001]dihydrate // [001]hemihydrate and [100]dihydrate // [110]hemihydrate. A two-step mechanism by which the topotactic transformation from dihydrate to hemihydrate occurs has been proposed. Secondly, three different novel synthesis routes have been explored for producing V-P-O catalysts. The first route, involving the addition of various V-P-O 'seeds' during the VPD process, was found to have a profound effect on the morphology of the V-P-O precursor and on inducing certain unexpected phase transformations. Specifically, the V-P-O seed was found to induce the transformation of VO(H2PO4)2 to hemihydrate phase in a 3-octanol solution. The second route, namely the use of a di-block copolymer template in the VPO route, was found to generate a more crystalline hemihydrate precursor with a rhomboidal morphology, which could be activated in a much shorter time period as compared to conventional V-P-O precursors. The third route involved encapsulating the fragile V-P-O rosette-type catalysts within a mechanically protective SiO2 shell. When used in a circulating fluidized bed reactor, these core/shell V-P-O catalysts showed a promising initial catalytic performance, but suffered a severe degradation in performance after two years-on-line. We have been able to attribute this degradation to three contributing factors; namely (i) the generation of inactive V 5+ (e.g. beta-VOPO4) phases, (ii) densification of the SiO2 shell and (iii) loss of core V-P-O materials. In addition, through this latter study, the novel X-ray ultramicroscopy (XuM) technique has been shown to have great potential for the non-destructive study of micron-scale catalyst particles. Thirdly, three different niobium phosphate materials, namely the Nb 2P4O15, NbOPO4 and Nb1.91P 2.82O12 phases, have been synthesized. Each of them was evaluated for the ODH of ethane to ethylene and the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde, respectively. It was found that the Nb1.91P2.82O 12 phase is the most desirable structure for ethane ODH, whereas the NbOPO4 phase is more effective for methanol oxidation. The morphological and structural changes induced by both reactions on these Nb-P-O catalysts have been monitored, and correlated to the measured changes in their catalytic performance. Finally, a highly active Fe2(MoO4)3/MoO 3 catalyst for methanol oxidation has been prepared using a novel impregnation method. This catalyst consists of MoO3 nanorods on which epitaxial Fe2(MoO4)3 islands are supported. Based on our microstructural characterization studies, a mechanism has been proposed for the formation of this fascinating nanorod/island morphology which involves a thermally induced solid-state diffusive reaction accompanied by the Kirkendall effect. The excellent catalytic performance of this catalyst is thought to result from the synergistic behaviour between the active surface Fe2 (MoO4)3 islands and the underlying MoO3 reservoir.

  19. Nanoantioxidant-driven plasmon enhanced proton-coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Georgios A; Blattmann, Christoph O; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2016-01-14

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol(-1) and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon-enhancement of PCET brings together the so far unrelated research domains of nanoplasmonics and electron/proton translocation with significant impact on applications based on interfacial electron/proton transfer. PMID:26505730

  20. CORRELATING ELECTRONIC AND VIBRATIONAL MOTIONS IN CHARGE TRANSFER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Munira

    2014-06-27

    The goal of this research program was to measure coupled electronic and nuclear motions during photoinduced charge transfer processes in transition metal complexes by developing and using novel femtosecond spectroscopies. The scientific highlights and the resulting scientific publications from the DOE supported work are outlined in the technical report.

  1. 75 FR 75897 - Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... alternative payment methods. These final regulations conform to the decision by FMS to eliminate the system... regulations. These regulations implement the decision of FMS to eliminate the system that enables the... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1, 31, 40, and 301 RIN 1545-BJ13 Electronic Funds Transfer...

  2. 77 FR 40459 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E); Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ..., the Bureau published the Final Rule (77 FR 6194), which implements the Electronic Fund Transfer Act... changes made to Sec. 1005.3(a) in the interim final rule published on December 27, 2011 (76 FR 81020). The... on December 27, 2011 (76 FR 81020) for which the Bureau found good cause to conclude that...

  3. Tryptophan-to-heme electron transfer in ferrous myoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Monni, Roberto; Al Haddad, André; van Mourik, Frank; Auböck, Gerald; Chergui, Majed

    2015-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that in ferric myoglobins (Mb) the fluorescence quenching of the photoexcited tryptophan 14 (*Trp14) residue is in part due to an electron transfer to the heme porphyrin (porph), turning it to the ferrous state. However, the invariance of *Trp decay times in ferric and ferrous Mbs raises the question as to whether electron transfer may also be operative in the latter. Using UV pump/visible probe transient absorption, we show that this is indeed the case for deoxy-Mb. We observe that the reduction generates (with a yield of about 30%) a low-valence Fe–porphyrin π [FeII(porph●−)] -anion radical, which we observe for the first time to our knowledge under physiological conditions. We suggest that the pathway for the electron transfer proceeds via the leucine 69 (Leu69) and valine 68 (Val68) residues. The results on ferric Mbs and the present ones highlight the generality of Trp–porphyrin electron transfer in heme proteins. PMID:25902517

  4. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2015-12-01

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule's permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory.

  5. Electronic Data Transfer--A System That's Working in Connecticut.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    The Electronic Data Transfer (EDT) network for Connecticut local school districts encompasses nine major databases and provides dozens of online data reports to network users. At a low cost and high degree of success, EDT has improved the data collection and reconciliation process at the state and local levels and generated a capacity for…

  6. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2015-12-14

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule's permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory. PMID:26671385

  7. 31 CFR 208.3 - Payment by electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment by electronic funds transfer. 208.3 Section 208.3 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE MANAGEMENT OF FEDERAL...

  8. Direct simulation of proton-coupled electron transfer reaction dynamics and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretchmer, Joshua S.; Miller, Thomas F., III

    2014-03-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, in which both an electron and an associated proton undergo reactive transfer, play an important role in many chemical and biological systems. Due to the complexity of this class of reactions, a variety of different mechanisms fall under the umbrella of PCET. However, the physical driving forces that determine the preferred mechanism in a given system still remain poorly understood. Towards this end, we extend ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD), a path-integral quantum dynamics method, to enable the direct simulation and characterization of PCET reaction dynamics in both fully atomistic and system-bath models of organometallic catalysts. In addition to providing validation for the simulation method via extensive comparison with existing PCET rate theories, we analyze the RPMD trajectories to investigate the competition between the concerted and sequential reaction mechanisms for PCET, elucidating the large role of the solvent in controlling the preferred mechanism. We further employ RPMD to determine the kinetics and mechanistic features of concerted PCET reactions across different regimes of electronic and vibrational coupling, providing evidence for a new and distinct PCET reaction mechanism.

  9. A unified diabatic description for electron transfer reactions, isomerization reactions, proton transfer reactions, and aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-10-14

    While diabatic approaches are ubiquitous for the understanding of electron-transfer reactions and have been mooted as being of general relevance, alternate applications have not been able to unify the same wide range of observed spectroscopic and kinetic properties. The cause of this is identified as the fundamentally different orbital configurations involved: charge-transfer phenomena involve typically either 1 or 3 electrons in two orbitals whereas most reactions are typically closed shell. As a result, two vibrationally coupled electronic states depict charge-transfer scenarios whereas three coupled states arise for closed-shell reactions of non-degenerate molecules and seven states for the reactions implicated in the aromaticity of benzene. Previous diabatic treatments of closed-shell processes have considered only two arbitrarily chosen states as being critical, mapping these states to those for electron transfer. We show that such effective two-state diabatic models are feasible but involve renormalized electronic coupling and vibrational coupling parameters, with this renormalization being property dependent. With this caveat, diabatic models are shown to provide excellent descriptions of the spectroscopy and kinetics of the ammonia inversion reaction, proton transfer in N2H7(+), and aromaticity in benzene. This allows for the development of a single simple theory that can semi-quantitatively describe all of these chemical phenomena, as well as of course electron-transfer reactions. It forms a basis for understanding many technologically relevant aspects of chemical reactions, condensed-matter physics, chemical quantum entanglement, nanotechnology, and natural or artificial solar energy capture and conversion. PMID:26193994

  10. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Tianquan

    2014-04-22

    The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticle/liquid interface. This knowledge is essential to many semiconductor nanoparticle based devices, including photocatalytic waste degradation and dye sensitized solar cells.

  11. Protein dynamics modulated electron transfer kinetics in early stage photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Prasanta; Dua, Arti

    2013-01-01

    A recent experiment has probed the electron transfer kinetics in the early stage of photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides for the reaction center of wild type and different mutants [Science 316, 747 (2007)]. By monitoring the changes in the transient absorption of the donor-acceptor pair at 280 and 930 nm, both of which show non-exponential temporal decay, the experiment has provided a strong evidence that the initial electron transfer kinetics is modulated by the dynamics of protein backbone. In this work, we present a model where the electron transfer kinetics of the donor-acceptor pair is described along the reaction coordinate associated with the distance fluctuations in a protein backbone. The stochastic evolution of the reaction coordinate is described in terms of a non-Markovian generalized Langevin equation with a memory kernel and Gaussian colored noise, both of which are completely described in terms of the microscopics of the protein normal modes. This model provides excellent fits to the transient absorption signals at 280 and 930 nm associated with protein distance fluctuations and protein dynamics modulated electron transfer reaction, respectively. In contrast to previous models, the present work explains the microscopic origins of the non-exponential decay of the transient absorption curve at 280 nm in terms of multiple time scales of relaxation of the protein normal modes. Dynamic disorder in the reaction pathway due to protein conformational fluctuations which occur on time scales slower than or comparable to the electron transfer kinetics explains the microscopic origin of the non-exponential nature of the transient absorption decay at 930 nm. The theoretical estimates for the relative driving force for five different mutants are in close agreement with the experimental estimates obtained using electrochemical measurements.

  12. Protein dynamics modulated electron transfer kinetics in early stage photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Prasanta; Dua, Arti

    2013-01-28

    A recent experiment has probed the electron transfer kinetics in the early stage of photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides for the reaction center of wild type and different mutants [Science 316, 747 (2007)]. By monitoring the changes in the transient absorption of the donor-acceptor pair at 280 and 930 nm, both of which show non-exponential temporal decay, the experiment has provided a strong evidence that the initial electron transfer kinetics is modulated by the dynamics of protein backbone. In this work, we present a model where the electron transfer kinetics of the donor-acceptor pair is described along the reaction coordinate associated with the distance fluctuations in a protein backbone. The stochastic evolution of the reaction coordinate is described in terms of a non-Markovian generalized Langevin equation with a memory kernel and Gaussian colored noise, both of which are completely described in terms of the microscopics of the protein normal modes. This model provides excellent fits to the transient absorption signals at 280 and 930 nm associated with protein distance fluctuations and protein dynamics modulated electron transfer reaction, respectively. In contrast to previous models, the present work explains the microscopic origins of the non-exponential decay of the transient absorption curve at 280 nm in terms of multiple time scales of relaxation of the protein normal modes. Dynamic disorder in the reaction pathway due to protein conformational fluctuations which occur on time scales slower than or comparable to the electron transfer kinetics explains the microscopic origin of the non-exponential nature of the transient absorption decay at 930 nm. The theoretical estimates for the relative driving force for five different mutants are in close agreement with the experimental estimates obtained using electrochemical measurements. PMID:23387626

  13. Highly enantioselective epoxidation of 2-methylnaphthoquinone (vitamin K3) mediated by new cinchona alkaloid phase-transfer catalysts.

    PubMed

    Berkessel, Albrecht; Guixà, Maria; Schmidt, Friederike; Neudörfl, Jörg M; Lex, Johann

    2007-01-01

    In the area of catalytic asymmetric epoxidation, the highly enantioselective transformation of cyclic enones and quinones is an extremely challenging target. With the aim to develop new and highly effective phase-transfer catalysts for this purpose, we conducted a systematic structural variation of PTCs based on quinine and quinidine. In the total of 15 new quaternary ammonium PTCs, modifications included, for example, the exchange of the quinine methoxy group for a free hydroxyl or other alkoxy substituents, and the introduction of additional elements of chirality through alkylation of the alkaloid quinuclidine nitrogen atom by chiral electrophiles. For example, the well-established 9- anthracenylmethyl group was exchanged for a "chiral" anthracene in the form of 9-chloromethyl-[(1,8-S;4,5-R)-1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8-octahydro-1,4:5,8-dimethanoanthracene. The asymmetric epoxidation of vitamin K(3) was used as the test reaction for our novel PTCs. The readily available PTC 10 (derived from quinine in three convenient and high-yielding steps) proved to be the most enantioselective catalyst for this purpose known to date: At a catalyst loading of only 2.50 mol %, the quinone epoxide was obtained in 76 % yield and with 85 % ee (previously: < or =34 % ee), using commercial bleach (aqueous sodium hypochlorite) as the oxidant. To rationalize the sense of induction effected by our novel phase-transfer catalysts, a computational analysis of steric interactions in the intermediate chlorooxy enolate-PTC ion pair was conducted. Based on this analysis, the sense of induction for all 15 novel PTCs could be consistently explained. PMID:17348045

  14. Catalytic Alkene Carboaminations Enabled by Oxidative Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Gilbert J.; Knowles, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a dual catalyst system comprised of an iridium photocatalyst and weak phosphate base that is capable of both selectively homolyzing the N–H bonds of N-arylamides (bond dissociation free energies ~ 100 kcal/mol) via concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and mediating efficient carboamination reactions of the resulting amidyl radicals. This manner of PCET activation, which finds its basis in numerous biological redox processes, enables the formal homolysis of a stronger amide N–H bond in the presence of weaker allylic C–H bonds, a selectivity that is uncommon in conventional molecular H atom acceptors. Moreover, this transformation affords access to a broad range of structurally complex heterocycles from simple amide starting materials. The design, synthetic scope, and mechanistic evaluation of the PCET process are described. PMID:26166022

  15. 76 FR 35219 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Payment by Electronic Fund Transfer

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... Regulation; Information Collection; Payment by Electronic Fund Transfer AGENCY: Department of Defense (DOD... extension of a previously approved information collection requirement concerning payment by electronic fund... contract by electronic fund transfer (EFT). The information necessary to make the EFT transaction...

  16. The Role of Resonant Vibrations in Electronic Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Malý, Pavel; Somsen, Oscar J G; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Mančal, Tomáš; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear vibrations play a prominent role in the spectroscopy and dynamics of electronic systems. As recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest, this may be even more so when vibrational frequencies are resonant with transitions between the electronic states. Herein, a vibronic multilevel Redfield model is reported for excitonically coupled electronic two-level systems with a few explicitly included vibrational modes and interacting with a phonon bath. With numerical simulations the effects of the quantized vibrations on the dynamics of energy transfer and coherence in a model dimer are illustrated. The resonance between the vibrational frequency and energy gap between the sites leads to a large delocalization of vibronic states, which then results in faster energy transfer and longer-lived mixed coherences. PMID:26910485

  17. Transfer Printed Crystalline Nanomembrane for Versatile Electronic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung-Hun

    Flexible electronics have traditionally been addressed low-frequency applications, since the materials for the traditional flexible electronics, such as polymer and non-crystalline inorganic semiconductors, have poor electronic properties. Fast flexible electronics that operate at radio frequencies (RF), particularly at microwave frequencies, could lead to a number of novel RF applications where rigid chip-based solid-state electronics cannot easily fulfill. Single-crystal semiconductor nanomembranes (NM) that can be released from a number of wafer sources are mechanically very flexible yet exhibit outstanding electronic properties that are equivalent to their bulky counterparts. These thin flexible single-crystal materials can furthermore be placed, via transfer printing techniques, to nearly any substrate, including flexible polymers, thus creating the opportunity to realize RF flexible electronics. In this thesis, various RF transistors made of semiconductor NMs on plastic substrates will be discussed. In addition, as a photonic application, the demonstration of large-area Si NM surface normal ultra-compact photonic crystal reflectors fabricated using the laser interference lithography technique (LIL) will be discussed. Particularly, the mechanism of LIL and NM transfer without using an adhesive layer will be introduced and their optical performance will be addressed. Lastly, the realization of selective substitutional boron doping, using heavily doped Si NM as a doping source, will be discussed. A detailed mechanism using computational modeling and experimental analyses will be provided. The fabrication of high voltage diamond p-i diodes and their performance will be discussed.

  18. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads. Technical progress report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-12

    This research project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic many of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. Specifically, the molecules are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic multistep electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited singlet state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they model carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  19. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multi-chromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-14

    This research project involves the design, synthesis and study of the molecules which mimic many of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. Specifically, the molecules are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic multistep electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited singlet state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they model carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  20. Simulations of charge transfer in Electron Multiplying Charge Coupled Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, N.; Stefanov, K.; Hall, D.; Jordan, D.; Holland, A.

    2014-12-01

    Electron Multiplying Charge Coupled Devices (EMCCDs) are a variant of traditional CCD technology well suited to applications that demand high speed operation in low light conditions. On-chip signal amplification allows the sensor to effectively suppress the noise introduced by readout electronics, permitting sub-electron read noise at MHz pixel rates. The devices have been the subject of many detailed studies concerning their operation, however there has not been a study into the transfer and multiplication process within the EMCCD gain register. Such an investigation has the potential to explain certain observed performance characteristics, as well as inform further optimisations to their operation. In this study, the results from simulation of charge transfer within an EMCCD gain register element are discussed with a specific focus on the implications for serial charge transfer efficiency (CTE). The effects of operating voltage and readout speed are explored in context with typical operating conditions. It is shown that during transfer, a small portion of signal charge may become trapped at the semiconductor-insulator interface that could act to degrade the serial CTE in certain operating conditions.

  1. Understanding catalyst behavior during in situ heating through simultaneous secondary and transmitted electron imaging

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Howe, Jane Y.; Allard, Jr., Lawrence Frederick; Demers, Hendrix; Bigelow, Wilbur C.; Steven H. Overbury

    2014-11-14

    In situ heating study via a simultaneous secondary electron (SE) and transmitted electron (TE) microscopy is extremely insightful because information from the surface (SE) and bulk (TE) can be readily obtained. The leached Au/Fe2O3 catalyst has voids on the surface of Fe2O3. Upon heating to 500 °C, voids shrank and disappeared, while internal Au species diffused to the surface to form new nanoparticles. Heating in vacuum reduced Fe2O3 to Fe3O4. Heating at 700 °C caused coalescence and growth of Au particles and formation of faceted Fe3O4 surfaces. We achieved 1.1 nm resolution in SE imaging during in situ heating.

  2. Electron Transfer Mechanisms of DNA Repair by Photolyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Dongping

    2015-04-01

    Photolyase is a flavin photoenzyme that repairs two DNA base damage products induced by ultraviolet (UV) light: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts. With femtosecond spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis, investigators have recently made significant advances in our understanding of UV-damaged DNA repair, and the entire enzymatic dynamics can now be mapped out in real time. For dimer repair, six elementary steps have been characterized, including three electron transfer reactions and two bond-breaking processes, and their reaction times have been determined. A unique electron-tunneling pathway was identified, and the critical residues in modulating the repair function at the active site were determined. The dynamic synergy between the elementary reactions for maintaining high repair efficiency was elucidated, and the biological nature of the flavin active state was uncovered. For 6-4 photoproduct repair, a proton-coupled electron transfer repair mechanism has been revealed. The elucidation of electron transfer mechanisms and two repair photocycles is significant and provides a molecular basis for future practical applications, such as in rational drug design for curing skin cancer.

  3. Electron transfer mechanisms of DNA repair by photolyase.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Dongping

    2015-04-01

    Photolyase is a flavin photoenzyme that repairs two DNA base damage products induced by ultraviolet (UV) light: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts. With femtosecond spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis, investigators have recently made significant advances in our understanding of UV-damaged DNA repair, and the entire enzymatic dynamics can now be mapped out in real time. For dimer repair, six elementary steps have been characterized, including three electron transfer reactions and two bond-breaking processes, and their reaction times have been determined. A unique electron-tunneling pathway was identified, and the critical residues in modulating the repair function at the active site were determined. The dynamic synergy between the elementary reactions for maintaining high repair efficiency was elucidated, and the biological nature of the flavin active state was uncovered. For 6-4 photoproduct repair, a proton-coupled electron transfer repair mechanism has been revealed. The elucidation of electron transfer mechanisms and two repair photocycles is significant and provides a molecular basis for future practical applications, such as in rational drug design for curing skin cancer. PMID:25830375

  4. Vibrationally Assisted Electron Transfer Mechanism of Olfaction: Myth or Reality?

    PubMed Central

    Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Chang, Po-Yao; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Smell is a vital sense for animals. The mainstream explanation of smell is based on recognition of the odorant molecules through characteristics of their surface, e.g., shape, but certain experiments suggest that such recognition is complemented by recognition of vibrational modes. According to this suggestion an olfactory receptor is activated by electron transfer assisted through odorant vibrational excitation. The hundreds to thousands of different olfactory receptors in an animal recognize odorants over a discriminant landscape with surface properties and vibrational frequencies as the two major dimensions. In the present paper we introduce the vibrationally assisted mechanism of olfaction and demonstrate for several odorants that, indeed, a strong enhancement of an electron tunneling rate due to odorant vibrations can arise. We discuss in this regard the influence of odorant deuteration and explain, thereby, recent experiments performed on Drosophila melanogaster. Our demonstration is based on known physical properties of biological electron transfer and on ab initio calculations on odorants carried out for the purpose of the present study. We identify a range of physical characteristics which olfactory receptors and odorants must obey for the vibrationally assisted electron transfer mechanism to function. We argue that the stated characteristics are feasible for realistic olfactory receptors, noting, though, that the receptor structure presently is still unknown, but can be studied through homology modeling. PMID:22899100

  5. Alternating electron and proton transfer steps in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Klauss, André; Haumann, Michael; Dau, Holger

    2012-10-01

    Water oxidation by cyanobacteria, algae, and plants is pivotal in oxygenic photosynthesis, the process that powers life on Earth, and is the paradigm for engineering solar fuel-production systems. Each complete reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation requires the removal of four electrons and four protons from the catalytic site, a manganese-calcium complex and its protein environment in photosystem II. In time-resolved photothermal beam deflection experiments, we monitored apparent volume changes of the photosystem II protein associated with charge creation by light-induced electron transfer (contraction) and charge-compensating proton relocation (expansion). Two previously invisible proton removal steps were detected, thereby filling two gaps in the basic reaction-cycle model of photosynthetic water oxidation. In the S(2) → S(3) transition of the classical S-state cycle, an intermediate is formed by deprotonation clearly before electron transfer to the oxidant (Y Z OX). The rate-determining elementary step (τ, approximately 30 µs at 20 °C) in the long-distance proton relocation toward the protein-water interface is characterized by a high activation energy (E(a) = 0.46 ± 0.05 eV) and strong H/D kinetic isotope effect (approximately 6). The characteristics of a proton transfer step during the S(0) → S(1) transition are similar (τ, approximately 100 µs; E(a) = 0.34 ± 0.08 eV; kinetic isotope effect, approximately 3); however, the proton removal from the Mn complex proceeds after electron transfer to . By discovery of the transient formation of two further intermediate states in the reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation, a temporal sequence of strictly alternating removal of electrons and protons from the catalytic site is established. PMID:22988080

  6. Alternating electron and proton transfer steps in photosynthetic water oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Klauss, André; Haumann, Michael; Dau, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Water oxidation by cyanobacteria, algae, and plants is pivotal in oxygenic photosynthesis, the process that powers life on Earth, and is the paradigm for engineering solar fuel–production systems. Each complete reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation requires the removal of four electrons and four protons from the catalytic site, a manganese–calcium complex and its protein environment in photosystem II. In time-resolved photothermal beam deflection experiments, we monitored apparent volume changes of the photosystem II protein associated with charge creation by light-induced electron transfer (contraction) and charge-compensating proton relocation (expansion). Two previously invisible proton removal steps were detected, thereby filling two gaps in the basic reaction-cycle model of photosynthetic water oxidation. In the S2 → S3 transition of the classical S-state cycle, an intermediate is formed by deprotonation clearly before electron transfer to the oxidant (). The rate-determining elementary step (τ, approximately 30 µs at 20 °C) in the long-distance proton relocation toward the protein–water interface is characterized by a high activation energy (Ea = 0.46 ± 0.05 eV) and strong H/D kinetic isotope effect (approximately 6). The characteristics of a proton transfer step during the S0 → S1 transition are similar (τ, approximately 100 µs; Ea = 0.34 ± 0.08 eV; kinetic isotope effect, approximately 3); however, the proton removal from the Mn complex proceeds after electron transfer to . By discovery of the transient formation of two further intermediate states in the reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation, a temporal sequence of strictly alternating removal of electrons and protons from the catalytic site is established. PMID:22988080

  7. Electron transfer, decoherence, and protein dynamics: insights from atomistic simulations.

    PubMed

    Narth, Christophe; Gillet, Natacha; Cailliez, Fabien; Lévy, Bernard; de la Lande, Aurélien

    2015-04-21

    Electron transfer in biological systems drives the processes of life. From cellular respiration to photosynthesis and enzymatic catalysis, electron transfers (ET) are chemical processes on which essential biological functions rely. Over the last 40 years, scientists have sought understanding of how these essential processes function in biology. One important breakthrough was the discovery that Marcus theory (MT) of electron transfer is applicable to biological systems. Chemists have experimentally collected both the reorganization energies (λ) and the driving forces (ΔG°), two parameters of Marcus theory, for a large variety of ET processes in proteins. At the same time, theoretical chemists have developed computational approaches that rely on molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry calculations to access numerical estimates of λ and ΔG°. Yet another crucial piece in determining the rate of an electron transfer is the electronic coupling between the initial and final electronic wave functions. This is an important prefactor in the nonadiabatic rate expression, since it reflects the probability that an electron tunnels from the electron donor to the acceptor through the intervening medium. The fact that a protein matrix supports electron tunneling much more efficiently than vacuum is now well documented, both experimentally and theoretically. Meanwhile, many chemists have provided examples of the rich physical chemistry that can be induced by protein dynamics. This Account describes our studies of the dynamical effects on electron tunneling. We present our analysis of two examples of natural biological systems through MD simulations and tunneling pathway analyses. Through these examples, we show that protein dynamics sustain efficient tunneling. Second, we introduce two time scales: τcoh and τFC. The former characterizes how fast the electronic coupling varies with nuclear vibrations (which cause dephasing). The latter reflects the time taken by the system to leave the crossing region. In the framework of open quantum systems, τFC is a short time approximation of the characteristic decoherence time of the electronic subsystem in interaction with its nuclear environment. The comparison of the respective values of τcoh and τFC allows us to probe the occurrence of non-Condon effects. We use ab initio MD simulations to analyze how decoherence appears in several biological cofactors. We conclude that we cannot account for its order of magnitude by considering only the atoms or bonds directly concerned with the transfer. Decoherence results from contributions from all atoms of the system appearing with a time delay that increases with the distance from the primarily concerned atoms or bonds. The delay and magnitude of the contributions depend on the chemical nature of the system. Finally, we present recent developments based on constrained DFT for efficient and accurate evaluations of the electronic coupling in ab initio MD simulations. These are promising methods to study the subtle fluctuations of the electronic coupling and the mechanisms of electronic decoherence in biological systems. PMID:25730126

  8. Cu/MgAl(2)O(4) as bifunctional catalyst for aldol condensation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and selective transfer hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Pupovac, Kristina; Palkovits, Regina

    2013-11-01

    Copper supported on mesoporous magnesium aluminate has been prepared as noble-metal-free solid catalyst for aldol condensation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural with acetone, followed by hydrogenation of the aldol condensation products. The investigated mesoporous spinels possess high activity as solid-base catalysts. Magnesium aluminate exhibits superior activity compared to zinc and cobalt-based aluminates, reaching full conversion and up to 81 % yield of the 1:1 aldol product. The high activity can be correlated to a higher concentration of basic surface sites on magnesium aluminate. Applying continuous regeneration, the catalysts can be recycled without loss of activity. Focusing on the subsequent hydrogenation of aldol condensation products, Cu/MgAl2 O4 allows a selective hydrogenation and CO bond cleavage, delivering 3-hydroxybutyl-5-methylfuran as the main product with up to 84 % selectivity avoiding ring saturation. Analysis of the hydrogenation activity reveals that the reaction proceeds in the following order: CC>CO>CO cleavage>ring hydrogenation. Comparable activity and selectivity can be also achieved utilizing 2-propanol as solvent in the transfer hydrogenation, providing the possibility for partial recycling of acetone and optimization of the hydrogen management. PMID:24038987

  9. The rate of electrochemical electron-transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmickler, W.; Mohr, J.

    2002-08-01

    Electrochemical electron-transfer reactions form the basis of such important devices as fuel cells and sensors. Previous theories of these reactions were limited either to the case of weak electronic interaction between the electrode and the reactants, or to strong interactions. In this work the rate of electron exchange is calculated by a combination of quantum mechanics and computer simulations. This method is valid for all strengths of the electronic interaction, so that the dependence of the reaction rate on the interaction strength could be obtained. Our results encompass three different regimes; in the order of increasing interaction these are: (i) a linear region, in which first-order perturbation theory holds; (ii) a weakly adiabatic region, in which the rate is limited by solvent dynamics; (iii) a strongly adiabatic region, in which the interaction lowers the energy of activation.

  10. PS-BEMP as a basic catalyst for the phospha-Michael addition to electron-poor alkenes.

    PubMed

    Strappaveccia, Giacomo; Bianchi, Luca; Ziarelli, Simone; Santoro, Stefano; Lanari, Daniela; Pizzo, Ferdinando; Vaccaro, Luigi

    2016-04-14

    PS-BEMP was used as a heterogeneous catalyst for the phospha-Michael addition of phosphorus nucleophiles to a variety of electron-poor alkenes. The addition reactions were generally performed with equimolar amounts of reagents under solvent free conditions. The protocol proved to be very efficient for the addition to aromatic, non-aromatic and cyclic ketones, giving good yields (78-85%) in all cases. The protocol was also extended with good results to α,β-unsaturated esters and nitriles. This demonstrates that PS-BEMP is a good catalyst for the phospha-Michael addition to electron-poor alkenes. PMID:26974873

  11. Nile blue can photosensitize DNA damage through electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Ota, Kazuhiro; Hirayama, Junya; Oikawa, Shinji; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2014-04-21

    The mechanism of DNA damage photosensitized by Nile blue (NB) was studied using (32)P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments. NB bound to the DNA strand was possibly intercalated through an electrostatic interaction. Photoirradiated NB caused DNA cleavage at guanine residues when the DNA fragments were treated with piperidine. Consecutive guanines, the underlined G in 5'-GG and 5'-GGG, were selectively damaged through photoinduced electron transfer. The fluorescence lifetime of NB was decreased by guanine-containing DNA sequence, supporting this mechanism. Single guanines were also slightly damaged by photoexcited NB, and DNA photodamage by NB was slightly enhanced in D2O. These results suggest that the singlet oxygen mechanism also partly contributes to DNA photodamage by NB. DNA damage photosensitized by NB via electron transfer may be an important mechanism in medicinal applications of photosensitizers, such as photodynamic therapy in low oxygen. PMID:24576317

  12. Vibronic couplings and coherent electron transfer in bridged systems.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, Raffaele; Capobianco, Amedeo; Landi, Alessandro; Peluso, Andrea

    2015-12-14

    A computational strategy to analyze the dynamics of coherent electron transfer processes in bridged systems, involving three or more electronic states, is presented. The approach is based on partitioning of the Hilbert space of the time independent basis functions in subspaces of increasing dimensionality, which allows us to easily check the convergence of the time dependent wave function. Vibronic couplings are determined by Duschinsky's analysis of the equilibrium position displacements, carried out using the equilibrium geometries and normal modes of the redox partners obtained at the DFT computational level. PMID:26172426

  13. Insights into Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer from Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provorse, Makenzie R.

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is utilized throughout Nature to facilitate essential biological processes, such as photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and DNA replication and repair. The general approach to studying PCET processes is based on a two-dimensional More O'Ferrall-Jencks diagram in which electron transfer (ET) and proton transfer (PT) occur in a sequential or concerted fashion. Experimentally, it is difficult to discern the contributing factors of concerted PCET mechanisms. Several theoretical approaches have arisen to qualitatively and quantitatively investigate these reactions. Here, we present a multistate density functional theory (MSDFT) method to efficiently and accurately model PCET mechanisms. The MSDFT method is validated against experimental and computational data previously reported on an isoelectronic series of small molecule self-exchange hydrogen atom transfer reactions and a model complex specifically designed to study long-range ET through a hydrogen-bonded salt-bridge interface. Further application of this method to the hydrogen atom abstraction of ascorbate by a nitroxyl radical demonstrates the sensitivity of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties to solvent effects. In particular, the origin of the unusual kinetic isotope effect is investigated. Lastly, the MSDFT is employed in a combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach to explicitly model PCET in condensed phases.

  14. Intermittent Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Biju, Vasudevan P.; Micic, Miodrag; Hu, Dehong; Lu, H. Peter

    2004-08-04

    We report on single molecule studies of photosensitized interfacial electron transfer (ET) processes in Coumarin 343 (C343)-TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) and Cresyl Violet (CV+)-TiO2 NP systems, using time-correlated single photon counting coupled with scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence intensity trajectories of individual dye molecules adsorbed on a semiconductor NP surface showed fluorescence fluctuations and blinking, with time constrants distributed from sub-milliseconds to several seconds.

  15. Low activation barriers characterize intramolecular electron transfer in ascorbate oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1992-01-01

    Anaerobic reduction kinetics of the zucchini squash ascorbate oxidase (AO; L-ascorbate:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.10.3.3) by pulse radiolytically produced CO2- radical ions were investigated. Changes in the absorption bands of type 1 [Cu(II)] (610 nm) and type 3 [Cu(II)] (330 nm) were monitored over a range of reactant concentrations, pH, and temperature. The direct bimolecular reduction of type 1 [Cu(II)] [(1.2 +/- 0.2) x 10(9) M-1.s-1] was followed by its subsequent reoxidation in three distinct phases, all found to be unimolecular processes with the respective specific rates of 201 +/- 8, 20 +/- 4, and 2.3 +/- 0.2 s-1 at pH 5.5 and 298 K. While at this pH no direct bimolecular reduction was resolved in the 330-nm band, at pH 7.0 such a direct process was observed [(6.5 +/- 1.2) x 10(8) M-1.s-1]. In the same slower time domains where type 1 [Cu(I)] reoxidation was monitored, reduction of type 3 [Cu(II)] was observed, which was also concentration independent and with identical rate constants and amplitudes commensurate with those of type 1 [Cu(II)] reoxidation. These results show that after electron uptake by type 1 [Cu(II)], its reoxidation takes place by intramolecular electron transfer to type 3 [Cu(II)]. The observed specific rates are similar to values reported for the limiting-rate constants of AO reduction by excess substrate, suggesting that internal electron transfer is the rate-determining step of AO activity. The temperature dependence of the intramolecular electron transfer rate constants was measured from 275 to 308 K at pH 5.5 and, from the Eyring plots, low activation enthalpies were calculated--namely, 9.1 +/- 1.1 and 6.8 +/- 1.0 kJ.mol-1 for the fastest and slowest phases, respectively. The activation entropies observed for these respective phases were -170 +/- 9 and -215 +/- 16 J.K-1.mol-1. The exceptionally low enthalpy barriers imply the involvement of highly optimized electron transfer pathways for internal electron transfer. PMID:1518859

  16. Electron transfer processs with excited molecules at semiconductor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memming, R.

    In the first part of the paper, energy levels used in solid-state physics, in electrochemistry and in photochemistry are introduced and combined in a l- electron energy concept. This is also applied to excited molecules being adsorbed at semiconductor electrodes. On the basis of this concept, theoretical models concerning electron-transfer processes between molecules in their ground and excited state and semiconductor electrodes are then developed. In the last part of the paper, a number of typical results are presented and discussed. It is shown that the primary step is an electron-transfer reaction between an excited molecule and the semiconductor, whereas energy transfer plays only a minor role, which leads mostly to quenching. Most processes can be interpreted on the basis of the theoretical model mentioned above. Various phenomena, such as quantum yield, supersensitization, quenching, and influence of pH and doping of the semiconductor are discussed in detail. Finally, a brief outlook at the applications in solar-energy conversion systems is given.

  17. The electron transfer system of synthrophically grown desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Christopher; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin Koo; Ringbauer, Joseph; HE, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David

    2009-01-01

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic coupling between hydrogen producers and consumers is a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent on growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation were upregulated in D. vulgaris compared with their expression in sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn), and the well-characterized high-molecular-weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and upregulated genes. Additionally, a predicted operon containing genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited upregulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd, and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little effect on growth via sulfate respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that to understand microbial processes that sustain nutrient cycling, lifestyles not captured in pure culture must be considered.

  18. The Electron Transfer System of Syntrophically Grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    PBD; ENIGMA; GTL; VIMSS; Walker, Christopher B.; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin K.; Ringbauer Jr., Joseph A.; He, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D.; Arkin, Adam P.; Hazen, Terry C.; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David A.

    2009-06-22

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  19. The electron transfer system of syntrophically grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.B.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.K.; Ringbauer, Jr., J.A.; He, Q.; Zhou, J.; Voordouw, G.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Hazen, T.C.; Stolyar, S.; Stahl, D.A.

    2009-05-01

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  20. Nanoparticle facilitated extracellular electron transfer in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaocheng; Hu, Jinsong; Lieber, Alexander M; Jackan, Charles S; Biffinger, Justin C; Fitzgerald, Lisa A; Ringeisen, Bradley R; Lieber, Charles M

    2014-11-12

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been the focus of substantial research interest due to their potential for long-term, renewable electrical power generation via the metabolism of a broad spectrum of organic substrates, although the low power densities have limited their applications to date. Here, we demonstrate the potential to improve the power extraction by exploiting biogenic inorganic nanoparticles to facilitate extracellular electron transfer in MFCs. Simultaneous short-circuit current recording and optical imaging on a nanotechnology-enabled platform showed substantial current increase from Shewanella PV-4 after the formation of cell/iron sulfide nanoparticle aggregates. Detailed characterization of the structure and composition of the cell/nanoparticle interface revealed crystalline iron sulfide nanoparticles in intimate contact with and uniformly coating the cell membrane. In addition, studies designed to address the fundamental mechanisms of charge transport in this hybrid system showed that charge transport only occurred in the presence of live Shewanella, and moreover demonstrated that the enhanced current output can be attributed to improved electron transfer at cell/electrode interface and through the cellular-networks. Our approach of interconnecting and electrically contacting bacterial cells through biogenic nanoparticles represents a unique and promising direction in MFC research and has the potential to not only advance our fundamental knowledge about electron transfer processes in these biological systems but also overcome a key limitation in MFCs by constructing an electrically connected, three-dimensional cell network from the bottom-up. PMID:25310721

  1. Mitochondrial copper(I) transfer from Cox17 to Sco1 is coupled to electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Banci, Lucia; Bertini, Ivano; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone; Hadjiloi, Theodoros; Martinelli, Manuele; Palumaa, Peep

    2008-05-13

    The human protein Cox17 contains three pairs of cysteines. In the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS) it exists in a partially oxidized form with two S-S bonds and two reduced cysteines (HCox17(2S-S)). HCox17(2S-S) is involved in copper transfer to the human cochaperones Sco1 and Cox11, which are implicated in the assembly of cytochrome c oxidase. We show here that Cu(I)HCox17(2S-S), i.e., the copper-loaded form of the protein, can transfer simultaneously copper(I) and two electrons to the human cochaperone Sco1 (HSco1) in the oxidized state, i.e., with its metal-binding cysteines forming a disulfide bond. The result is Cu(I)HSco1 and the fully oxidized apoHCox17(3S-S), which can be then reduced by glutathione to apoHCox17(2S-S). The HSco1/HCox17(2S-S) redox reaction is thermodynamically driven by copper transfer. These reactions may occur in vivo because HSco1 can be found in the partially oxidized state within the IMS, consistent with the variable redox properties of the latter compartment. The electron transfer-coupled metallation of HSco1 can be a mechanism within the IMS for an efficient specific transfer of the metal to proteins, where metal-binding thiols are oxidized. The same reaction of copper-electron-coupled transfer does not occur with the human homolog of Sco1, HSco2, for kinetic reasons that may be ascribed to the lack of a specific metal-bridged protein-protein complex, which is instead observed in the Cu(I)HCox17(2S-S)/HSco1 interaction. PMID:18458339

  2. Application Scope and Limitations of TADDOL-Derived Chiral Ammonium Salt Phase-Transfer Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Gururaja, Guddeangadi N.; Herchl, Richard; Pichler, Antonia; Gratzer, Katharina; Waser, Mario

    2014-01-01

    We have recently introduced a new class of chiral ammonium salt catalysts derived from easily available TADDOLs. To get a full picture of the scope of application and limitations of our catalysts we tested them in a variety of different important transformations. We found that, although these compounds have recently shown their good potential in the asymmetric α-alkylation of glycine Schiff bases, they clearly failed when we attempted to control more reactive nucleophiles like β-keto esters. On the other hand, when using them to catalyse the addition of glycine Schiff bases to different Michael acceptors it was found necessary to carefully optimize the reaction conditions for every single substrate class, as seemingly small structural changes sometimes required the use of totally different reaction conditions. Under carefully optimized conditions enantiomeric ratios up to 91:9 could be achieved in the addition of glycine Schiff bases to acrylates, whereas acrylamides and methyl vinyl ketone gave slightly lower selectivities (up to e.r. 77:23 in these cases). Thus, together with additional studies towards the syntheses of these catalysts we have now a very detailed understanding about the scope and limitations of the synthesis sequence to access our PTCs and about the application scope of these catalysts in asymmetric transformations. PMID:23584056

  3. Advanced oxidation of aromatic VOCs using a pilot system with electron beam-catalyst coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Joon; Kim, Junghwan; Son, Youn-Suk; Chung, Sang-Gwi; Kim, Jo-Chun

    2012-05-01

    The decomposition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using a pilot system of electron beam (EB)-catalyst coupling was investigated. Two aromatic VOCs, toluene (1800 ppmC) and o-xylene (1500 ppmC), were irradiated with a dose range of 0-10 kGy at room temperature. The removal efficiencies for toluene and o-xylene were 92.4% and 94.5%, respectively, under a 10 kGy absorbed dose condition, which were higher than the results of 45.7% and 52.3% when EB-only was used, respectively. The CO2 selectivity approached 100% for both toluene and o-xylene using the EB-catalyst coupling system, while the concentrations of O3 formed were 0.02 ppm (toluene) and 0.003 ppm (o-xylene) at 10 kGy. The aerosol concentration was also measured as 43.2 μg/m3 (toluene) and 53.4 μg/m3 (o-xylene) at 10 kGy absorbed dose.

  4. Regulating proton-coupled electron transfer for efficient water splitting by manganese oxides at neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Inuzuka, Riko; Takashima, Toshihiro; Hayashi, Toru; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2014-06-01

    Manganese oxides have been extensively investigated as model systems for the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. However, most bioinspired catalysts are inefficient at neutral pH and functional similarity to the oxygen-evolving complex has been rarely achieved with manganese. Here we report the regulation of proton-coupled electron transfer involved in water oxidation by manganese oxides. Pyridine and its derivatives, which have pKa values intermediate to the water ligand bound to manganese(II) and manganese(III), are used as proton-coupled electron transfer induction reagents. The induction of concerted proton-coupled electron transfer is demonstrated by the detection of deuterium kinetic isotope effects and compliance of the reactions with the libido rule. Although proton-coupled electron transfer regulation is essential for the facial redox change of manganese in photosystem II, most manganese oxides impair these regulatory mechanisms. Thus, the present findings may provide a new design rationale for functional analogues of the oxygen-evolving complex for efficient water splitting at neutral pH.

  5. Regulating proton-coupled electron transfer for efficient water splitting by manganese oxides at neutral pH

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Inuzuka, Riko; Takashima, Toshihiro; Hayashi, Toru; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2014-01-01

    Manganese oxides have been extensively investigated as model systems for the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. However, most bioinspired catalysts are inefficient at neutral pH and functional similarity to the oxygen-evolving complex has been rarely achieved with manganese. Here we report the regulation of proton-coupled electron transfer involved in water oxidation by manganese oxides. Pyridine and its derivatives, which have pKa values intermediate to the water ligand bound to manganese(II) and manganese(III), are used as proton-coupled electron transfer induction reagents. The induction of concerted proton-coupled electron transfer is demonstrated by the detection of deuterium kinetic isotope effects and compliance of the reactions with the libido rule. Although proton-coupled electron transfer regulation is essential for the facial redox change of manganese in photosystem II, most manganese oxides impair these regulatory mechanisms. Thus, the present findings may provide a new design rationale for functional analogues of the oxygen-evolving complex for efficient water splitting at neutral pH. PMID:24977746

  6. Water-mediated electron transfer between protein redox centers.

    PubMed

    Migliore, Agostino; Corni, Stefano; Felice, Rosa Di; Molinari, Elisa

    2007-04-12

    Recent experimental and theoretical investigations show that water molecules between or near redox partners can significantly affect their electron-transfer (ET) properties. Here we study the effects of intervening water molecules on the electron self-exchange reaction of azurin (Az), by performing a conformational sampling on the water medium and by using a newly developed ab initio method to calculate transfer integrals between molecular redox sites. We show that the insertion of water molecules at the interface between the copper active sites of Az dimers slightly increases the overall ET rate, while some favorable water conformations can considerably enhance the ET kinetics. These features are traced back to the interplay of two competing factors: the electrostatic interaction between the water and protein subsystems (mainly opposing the ET process for the water arrangements drawn from MD simulations) and the effectiveness of water in mediating ET coupling pathways. Such an interplay provides a physical basis for the found absence of correlation between the electronic couplings derived through ab initio electronic structure calculations and the related quantities obtained through the Empirical Pathways (EP) method. In fact, the latter does not account for electrostatic effects on the transfer integrals. Thus, we conclude that the water-mediated electron tunneling is not controlled by the geometry of a single physical pathway. We discuss the results in terms of the interplay between different ET pathways controlled by the conformational changes of one of the water molecules via its electrostatic influence. Finally, we examine the dynamical effects of the interfacial water and check the validity of the Condon approximation. PMID:17388538

  7. Intercellular wiring enables electron transfer between methanotrophic archaea and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Gunter; Krukenberg, Viola; Riedel, Dietmar; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Boetius, Antje

    2015-10-22

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate controls the emission of the greenhouse gas methane from the ocean floor. In marine sediments, AOM is performed by dual-species consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) inhabiting the methane-sulfate transition zone. The biochemical pathways and biological adaptations enabling this globally relevant process are not fully understood. Here we study the syntrophic interaction in thermophilic AOM (TAOM) between ANME-1 archaea and their consortium partner SRB HotSeep-1 (ref. 6) at 60 °C to test the hypothesis of a direct interspecies exchange of electrons. The activity of TAOM consortia was compared to the first ANME-free culture of an AOM partner bacterium that grows using hydrogen as the sole electron donor. The thermophilic ANME-1 do not produce sufficient hydrogen to sustain the observed growth of the HotSeep-1 partner. Enhancing the growth of the HotSeep-1 partner by hydrogen addition represses methane oxidation and the metabolic activity of ANME-1. Further supporting the hypothesis of direct electron transfer between the partners, we observe that under TAOM conditions, both ANME and the HotSeep-1 bacteria overexpress genes for extracellular cytochrome production and form cell-to-cell connections that resemble the nanowire structures responsible for interspecies electron transfer between syntrophic consortia of Geobacter. HotSeep-1 highly expresses genes for pili production only during consortial growth using methane, and the nanowire-like structures are absent in HotSeep-1 cells isolated with hydrogen. These observations suggest that direct electron transfer is a principal mechanism in TAOM, which may also explain the enigmatic functioning and specificity of other methanotrophic ANME-SRB consortia. PMID:26490622

  8. Fabrication of a biofuel cell improved by the π-conjugated electron pathway effect induced from a new enzyme catalyst employing terephthalaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Yongjin; Hyun, Kyu Hwan; Kwon, Yongchai

    2015-12-01

    A model explaining the π-conjugated electron pathway effect induced by a novel cross-linker adopted enzyme catalyst is suggested and the performance and stability of an enzymatic biofuel cell (EBC) adopting the new catalyst are evaluated. For this purpose, new terephthalaldehyde (TPA) and conventional glutaraldehyde (GA) cross-linkers are adopted on a glucose oxidase (GOx), polyethyleneimine (PEI) and carbon nanotube (CNT)(GOx/PEI/CNT) structure. GOx/PEI/CNT cross-linked by TPA (TPA/[GOx/PEI/CNT]) results in a superior EBC performance and stability to other catalysts. It is attributed to the π bonds conjugated between the aldehyde of TPA and amine of the GOx/PEI molecules. By π conjugation, electrons bonded with carbon and nitrogen are delocalized, promoting the electron transfer and catalytic activity with an excellent EBC performance. The maximum power density (MPD) of an EBC adopting TPA/[GOx/PEI/CNT] (0.66 mW cm-2) is far better than that of the other EBCs (the MPD of EBC adopting GOx/PEI/CNT is 0.40 mW cm-2). Regarding stability, the covalent bonding formed between TPA and GOx/PEI plays a critical role in preventing the denaturation of GOx molecules, leading to an excellent stability. By repeated measurements of the catalytic activity, TPA/[GOx/PEI/CNT] maintains its activity to 92% of its initial value even after five weeks.A model explaining the π-conjugated electron pathway effect induced by a novel cross-linker adopted enzyme catalyst is suggested and the performance and stability of an enzymatic biofuel cell (EBC) adopting the new catalyst are evaluated. For this purpose, new terephthalaldehyde (TPA) and conventional glutaraldehyde (GA) cross-linkers are adopted on a glucose oxidase (GOx), polyethyleneimine (PEI) and carbon nanotube (CNT)(GOx/PEI/CNT) structure. GOx/PEI/CNT cross-linked by TPA (TPA/[GOx/PEI/CNT]) results in a superior EBC performance and stability to other catalysts. It is attributed to the π bonds conjugated between the aldehyde of TPA and amine of the GOx/PEI molecules. By π conjugation, electrons bonded with carbon and nitrogen are delocalized, promoting the electron transfer and catalytic activity with an excellent EBC performance. The maximum power density (MPD) of an EBC adopting TPA/[GOx/PEI/CNT] (0.66 mW cm-2) is far better than that of the other EBCs (the MPD of EBC adopting GOx/PEI/CNT is 0.40 mW cm-2). Regarding stability, the covalent bonding formed between TPA and GOx/PEI plays a critical role in preventing the denaturation of GOx molecules, leading to an excellent stability. By repeated measurements of the catalytic activity, TPA/[GOx/PEI/CNT] maintains its activity to 92% of its initial value even after five weeks. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06703k

  9. Electron Spectroscopy In Heavy-Ion Storage Rings: Resonant and Non-Resonant Electron Transfer Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, S.; Stoehlker, Th.; Trotsenko, S.; Kozhuharov, Ch.; Spillmann, U.; Bosch, F.; Liesen, D.; Winters, D.; Hillenbrand, P.-M.; Shabaev, V.; Tupitsyn, I.; Kozhedub, Y.; Rothard, H.; Reuschl, R.; Ullrich, J.; Moshammer, R.; Voitkiv, A.; Surzhykov, A.; Fischer, D.; Doerner, R.

    2011-06-01

    Whereas our understanding of total cross sections for ionization and capture processes in ion-atom collisions is widely viewed as having arrived at a state of adequate maturity, the same cannot be said at all about the dynamics of collisions, multi-electron processes or the electron continua (in target and projectile) which are at the origin of total cross sections. We depict how these processes can be studied favourably in storage ring environments. We present examples of resonant and non-resonant electron transfer processes, radiative and non-radiative. This is elucidated via the relation of the electron nucleus bremsstrahlung at the high energy tip of the bremsstrahlung spectrum to the radiative electron capture cusp (RECC) and a new approach to determining molecular orbital binding energies in superheavy quasi-molecules in resonant KK charge transfer.

  10. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Molecular Electrocatalysis: Theoretical Methods and Design Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Solis, Brian H.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-07-07

    Molecular electrocatalysts play an essential role in a wide range of energy conversion processes. The objective of electrocatalyst design is to maximize the turnover frequency and minimize the overpotential for the overall catalytic cycle. Typically the catalytic cycle is dominated by key proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes comprised of sequential or concerted electron transfer and proton transfer steps. A variety of theoretical methods have been developed to investigate the mechanisms, thermodynamics, and kinetics of PCET processes in electrocatalytic cycles. Electronic structure methods can be used to calculate the reduction potentials and pKa’s and to generate thermodynamic schemes, free energy reaction pathways, and Pourbaix diagrams, which indicate the most stable species at each pH and potential. These types of calculations have assisted in identifying the thermodynamically favorable mechanisms under specified experimental conditions, such as acid strength and overpotential. Such calculations have also revealed linear correlations among the thermodynamic properties, which can be used to predict the impact of modifying the ligand, substituents, or metal center. The role of non-innocent ligands, namely ligand protonation or reduction, has also been examined theoretically. In addition, the rate constants for electron and proton transfer reactions, as well as concerted PCET reactions, have been calculated to investigate the kinetics of molecular electrocatalysts. The concerted PCET mechanism is thought to lower the overpotential required for catalysis by avoiding high-energy intermediates. Rate constant calculations have revealed that the concerted mechanism involving intramolecular proton transfer will be favored by designing more flexible ligands that facilitate the proton donor-acceptor motion while also maintaining a sufficiently short equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distance. Overall, theoretical methods have assisted in the interpretation of experimental data and the design of more effective molecular electrocatalysts. The research on the Ni(P2N2)2 catalysts was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  11. Interfacial electron transfer into functionalized crystalline polyoxotitanate nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Snoeberger, Robert C; Young, Karin J; Tang, Jiji; Allen, Laura J; Crabtree, Robert H; Brudvig, Gary W; Coppens, Philip; Batista, Victor S; Benedict, Jason B

    2012-05-30

    Interfacial electron transfer (IET) between a chromophore and a semiconductor nanoparticle is one of the key processes in a dye-sensitized solar cell. Theoretical simulations of the electron transfer in polyoxotitanate nanoclusters Ti(17)O(24)(OPr(i))(20) (Ti(17)) functionalized with four p-nitrophenyl acetylacetone (NPA-H) adsorbates, of which the atomic structure has been fully established by X-ray diffraction measurements, are presented. Complementary experimental information showing IET has been obtained by EPR spectroscopy. Evolution of the time-dependent photoexcited electron during the initial 5 fs after instantaneous excitation to the NPA LUMO + 1 has been evaluated. Evidence for delocalization of the excitation over multiple chromophores after excitation to the NPA LUMO + 2 state on a 15 fs time scale is also obtained. While chromophores are generally considered electronically isolated with respect to neighboring sensitizers, our calculations show that this is not necessarily the case. The present work is the most comprehensive study to date of a sensitized semiconductor nanoparticle in which the structure of the surface and the mode of molecular adsorption are precisely defined. PMID:22548416

  12. Molecular mimicry of photosynthetic energy and electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gust, D.; Moore, T.A.; Moore, A.L. )

    1993-04-01

    Proper application of reaction design considerations can yield artificial photosynthetic devices which credibility mimic the three natural photochemical processes. One approach is to use pigments and electron donors and acceptors related to those found in natural photosynthesis (and thus presumably optimal for that system), but to replace the protein with covalent bonds as an organizing precept. Molecular pentads described herein exemplify the success of this approach. At the heart of these molecules, are two covalently linked synthetic porphyrin moieties (P-P). One of these models for chlorophyll is attached to a carotenoid polyene (C), whereas the other is linked to a rigid diquinone (Q-Q). As discussed later in this paper, excitation of such a pentad is followed by photoinitiated electron transfer steps which ultimately give a C[sup [center dot]+]-P-P-Q-Q[sup [center dot]-] charge-separated state. Depending upon the structure of the pentad and the conditions, these states are formed with quantum yields of up to 0.83, have lifetimes approaching 0.5 ms, and store about one-half of the energy of the exciting singlet state. Related photosynthesis mimics display singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to porphyrins and among porphyrin chromophores, and rapid quenching of porphyrin triplet states by attached carotenoids. How have the structures of these and other successful artificial reaction centers evolved, and what will be the next steps in their development The authors will address these questions from the point of view of photoinitiated electron transfer, and then singlet and triplet energy transfer will briefly be considered. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Quantum effects in adiabatic electrochemical electron-transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koper, M. T. M.; Mohr, J.-H.; Schmickler, W.

    1997-07-01

    The role of nuclear tunneling in adiabatic electrochemical electron-transfer reactions is studied by applying the WKB approximation and the Quantum Kramers Theory to the ground-state potential energy surface calculated from an extended Anderson-Newns Hamiltonian. Reorganization of both solvent and ligand modes is considered. In the limit of vanishing electronic coupling analytical formulas are obtained for the temperature dependence of the activation parameters, which are valid over a practically unlimited temperature range. In the limit of high temperature, they are shown to be identical to expression derived from the non-adiabatic Levich-Dogonadze theory. The effect of friction and non-vanishing electronic coupling are studied and both are found to suppress the relative contribution of the nuclear tunneling to the overall reaction rate.

  14. Single electron transfer mechanism of oxidative dechlorination of 4-chloroanisole on copper(II)-smectite

    SciTech Connect

    Govindaraj, N.; Mortland, M.M.; Boyd, S.A.

    1987-11-01

    4-Chloroanisole was found to react with Cu(II)-smectite forming a blue clay-organic complex. The presence of radical cation intermediates in the complex was confirmed by electron spin resonance and infrared spectroscopy. The radical cation intermediates were formed via an initial one electron oxidation of 4-chloroanisole by Cu(II)-smectite. Coupling of the radical cation of 4-chloroanisole (I) with a neutral 4-chloroanisole molecule gave a biphenyl radical cation (VI). Single electron transfer from the dimerized radical cation (VI) to Cu(II)-smectite resulted in the formation of a nonradical dication biphenyl intermediate (V). Reaction of the blue clay-organic complex with methanol resulted in the formation of the final dechlorinated dimeric product, viz., 4,4'-dimethoxybiphenyl. Chloride ion was recovered form the methanol extract. It is suggested that Cu(II)-smectite may be a useful catalyst in the oxidative polymerization and dechlorination of chlorinated aromatic toxicants. The products of these reactions should be significantly less toxic than the parent compounds. 15 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  15. DNA Damage Induced by Low-Energy Electrons: Electron Transfer and Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Yi; Wagner, J. Richard; Sanche, Leon

    2006-05-26

    Thin films of the short single strand of DNA, GCAT, in which guanine (G) or adenine (A) have been removed, were bombarded under vacuum by 4 to 15 eV electrons. The fragments corresponding to base release and strand breaks (SB) were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography and their yields compared with those obtained from unmodified GCAT. From such a comparison, it is shown that, using GCAT as a model system (1) most SB result from electron capture by DNA bases followed by electron transfer to the phosphate group and (2) the initial capture probability depends on the coherence of the electron wave within the tetramer.

  16. Decorating single layer graphene oxide with electron donor and acceptor molecules for the study of photoinduced electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Das, Sushanta K; Kc, Chandra B; Ohkubo, Kei; Yamada, Yusuke; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; D'Souza, Francis

    2013-03-11

    Graphene oxide decorated with an electron donor, zinc(II) phthalocyanine, and an electron acceptor, fullerene, has been synthesized, and photoinduced electron transfer leading to charge-separation is reported. PMID:23380812

  17. Interspecies Electron Transfer during Propionate and Butyrate Degradation in Mesophilic, Granular Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, J. E.; Ahring, B. K.

    1995-01-01

    Granules from a mesophilic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor were disintegrated, and bacteria utilizing only hydrogen or formate or both hydrogen and formate were added to investigate the role of interspecies electron transfer during degradation of propionate and butyrate. The data indicate that the major electron transfer occurred via interspecies hydrogen transfer, while interspecies formate transfer may not be essential for interspecies electron transfer in this system during degradation of propionate and butyrate. PMID:16535082

  18. Application of Electron-Transfer Theory to Several Systems of Biological Interest

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Marcus, R. A.; Sutin, N.

    1985-03-23

    Electron-transfer reaction rates are compared with theoretically calculated values for several reactions in the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. A second aspect of the theory, the cross-relation, is illustrated using protein-protein electron transfers.

  19. ELECTRON TRANSFER MECHANISM AT THE SOLID-LIQUID INTERFACE OF PHYLLOSILICATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interfacial electron transfer processes on clay minerals have significant impact in natural environments and geochemical systems. Nitrobenzene was used as molecular probes to study the electron transfer mechanism at the solid-water interfaces of Fe-containing phyllosicates. For...

  20. Variation of the resonant transfer rate when passing from nonadiabatic to adiabatic electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Gladkikh, V; Burshtein, A I; Rips, I

    2005-06-16

    Two competing theories are used for bridging the gap between the nonadiabatic and the deeply adiabatic electron transfer between symmetric parabolic wells. For the high friction limit, a simple analytic interpolation is proposed as a reasonable alternative to them, well-fitted to the results of numerical simulations. It provides a continuous description of the electron transfer rate in the whole range of variation of the nonadiabatic coupling between the diabatic states. For lower friction, the original theories are used for the same goal. With an increase in coupling, the cusped barrier transforms into the parabolic one. Correspondingly, the pre-exponent of the Arrhenius transfer rate first increases with coupling, then levels off approaching the "dynamic solvent effect" plateau but finally reduces reaching the limit of the adiabatic Kramers theory for the parabolic barrier. These changes proceeding with a reduction in the particle separation affect significantly the spatial dependence of the total transfer rate. When approaching the contact distance, the exact rate becomes smaller than in the theory of dynamical solvent effects and much smaller than predicted by perturbation theory (golden rule), conventionally used in photochemistry and electrochemistry. PMID:16833848

  1. Reduced density matrix hybrid approach: Application to electronic energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Berkelbach, Timothy C.; Reichman, David R.; Markland, Thomas E.

    2012-02-28

    Electronic energy transfer in the condensed phase, such as that occurring in photosynthetic complexes, frequently occurs in regimes where the energy scales of the system and environment are similar. This situation provides a challenge to theoretical investigation since most approaches are accurate only when a certain energetic parameter is small compared to others in the problem. Here we show that in these difficult regimes, the Ehrenfest approach provides a good starting point for a dynamical description of the energy transfer process due to its ability to accurately treat coupling to slow environmental modes. To further improve on the accuracy of the Ehrenfest approach, we use our reduced density matrix hybrid framework to treat the faster environmental modes quantum mechanically, at the level of a perturbative master equation. This combined approach is shown to provide an efficient and quantitative description of electronic energy transfer in a model dimer and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex and is used to investigate the effect of environmental preparation on the resulting dynamics.

  2. Application of ozone decomposition catalysts to electron-beam irradiated xylene/air mixtures for enhancing carbon dioxide production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakoda, Teruyuki; Matsumoto, Kanae; Shimada, Akihiko; Narita, Tadashi; Kojima, Takuji; Hirota, Koichi

    2008-05-01

    The electron beam (EB) oxidation of gaseous xylene in air, appearing as ventilation gases emitted from painting factories, was investigated under various experimental conditions. Thereby, the implementation of an ozone decomposition catalyst, MnO 2, into EB-induced oxidation of xylene/air mixtures strongly contributed in the achievement of a better purification degree.

  3. Improving electronic structure methods to predict nano-optoelectronics and nano-catalyst functions.

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Ida Marie B.; Marzari, Nicola; Shelnutt, John Allen; Kulik, Heather J.; Medforth, Craig John; Leung, Kevin

    2009-10-01

    This report focuses on quantum chemistry and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) calculations applied to elucidate the mechanism of the multi-step, 2-electron, electrochemical reduction of the green house gas molecule carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to carbon monoxide (CO) in aqueous media. When combined with H{sub 2} gas to form synthesis ('syn') gas, CO becomes a key precursor to methane, methanol, and other useful hydrocarbon products. To elucidate the mechanism of this reaction, we apply computational electrochemistry which is a fledgling, important area of basic science critical to energy storage. This report highlights several approaches, including the calculation of redox potentials, the explicit depiction of liquid water environments using AIMD, and free energy methods. While costly, these pioneering calculations reveal the key role of hydration- and protonation-stabilization of reaction intermediates, and may inform the design of CO{sub 2}-capture materials as well as its electrochemical reduction. In the course of this work, we have also dealt with the challenges of identifying and applying electronic structure methods which are sufficiently accurate to deal with transition metal ion complex-based catalyst. Such electronic structure methods are also pertinent to the accurate modeling of actinide materials and therefore to nuclear energy research. Our multi-pronged effort towards achieving this titular goal of the LDRD is discussed.

  4. Synthesis of imine and reduced imine compounds containing aromatic sulfonamide: use as catalyst for in situ generation of ruthenium catalysts in transfer hydrogenation of acetophenone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Serkan; Arslan, Fatma; Kayacı, Nilgün; Kalaycioglu, Nilgun Ozpozan

    2014-01-01

    Three imine and three reduced imine ligands containing aromatic sulfonamide (2-7) were isolated by a simple method and characterized by FT-IR, NMR, and elemental analysis. Meanwhile, the interaction of 2-7 ligands with [(p-cymene)RuCl2]2 was analyzed in situ by UV-vis spectrophotometer. The in situ generated catalytic system derived from N-(2-(benzylideneamino)phenyl)-2,4,6-trimethyl-benzenesulfonamides and N-(2-(benzylamino)phenyl)-2,4,6-trimethyl-benzenesulfonamides with [(p-cymene)RuCl2]2 was used as a catalyst in the transfer hydrogenation (TH) of p-substituted acetophenone derivatives. The catalytic systems displayed high activities, which increased in the order 7<4<5<6<1<2<3. The best activity for the TH of 4-chloroacetophenone was provided with the [(p-cymene)RuCl2]2/ligand (3) catalytic system (turnover frequency values: 720 h(-1) for 10 min on S/C: 500/1). PMID:24184620

  5. Electronic Energy transfer in light-harvesting antenna complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossein-Nejad, Hoda

    The studies presented in this thesis explore electronic energy transfer (EET) in light-harvesting antenna complexes and investigate the role of quantum coherence in EET. The dynamics of energy transfer are investigated in three distinct length scales and a different formulation of the exciton transport problem is applied at each scale. These scales include: the scale of a molecular dimer, the scale of a single protein and the scale of a molecular aggregate. The antenna protein phycoerythrin 545 (PE545) isolated from the photosynthetic cryptophyte algae Rhodomonas CS4 is specifically studied in two chapters of this thesis. It is found that formation of small aggregates delocalizes the excitation across chromophores of adjacent proteins, and that this delocalization has a dramatic effect in enhancing the rate of energy transfer between pigments. Furthermore, we investigate EET from a donor to an acceptor via an intermediate site and observe that interference of coherent pathways gives a finite correction to the transfer rate that is sensitively dependent on the nature of the vibrational interactions in the system. The statistical fluctuations of a system exhibiting EET are investigated in the final chapter. The techniques of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics are applied to investigate the steady-state of a typical system exhibiting EET that is perturbed out of equilibrium due to its interaction with a fluctuating bath.

  6. Understanding the Electronic Structure of 4d Metal Complexes: From Molecular Spinors to L-Edge Spectra of a di-Ru Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Alperovich, Igor; Smolentsev, Grigory; Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Jurss, Jonah W.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Soldatov, Alexander; Pushkar, Yulia

    2015-09-17

    L{sub 2,3}-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has demonstrated unique capabilities for the analysis of the electronic structure of di-Ru complexes such as the blue dimer cis,cis-[Ru{sub 2}{sup III}O(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(bpy){sub 4}]{sup 4+} water oxidation catalyst. Spectra of the blue dimer and the monomeric [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+} model complex show considerably different splitting of the Ru L{sub 2,3} absorption edge, which reflects changes in the relative energies of the Ru 4d orbitals caused by hybridization with a bridging ligand and spin-orbit coupling effects. To aid the interpretation of spectroscopic data, we developed a new approach, which computes L{sub 2,3}-edges XAS spectra as dipole transitions between molecular spinors of 4d transition metal complexes. This allows for careful inclusion of the spin-orbit coupling effects and the hybridization of the Ru 4d and ligand orbitals. The obtained theoretical Ru L{sub 2,3}-edge spectra are in close agreement with experiment. Critically, existing single-electron methods (FEFF, FDMNES) broadly used to simulate XAS could not reproduce the experimental Ru L-edge spectra for the [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+} model complex nor for the blue dimer, while charge transfer multiplet (CTM) calculations were not applicable due to the complexity and low symmetry of the blue dimer water oxidation catalyst. We demonstrated that L-edge spectroscopy is informative for analysis of bridging metal complexes. The developed computational approach enhances L-edge spectroscopy as a tool for analysis of the electronic structures of complexes, materials, catalysts, and reactive intermediates with 4d transition metals.

  7. Understanding the electronic structure of 4d metal complexes: from molecular spinors to L-edge spectra of a di-Ru catalyst.

    PubMed

    Alperovich, Igor; Smolentsev, Grigory; Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Jurss, Jonah W; Concepcion, Javier J; Meyer, Thomas J; Soldatov, Alexander; Pushkar, Yulia

    2011-10-01

    L(2,3)-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has demonstrated unique capabilities for the analysis of the electronic structure of di-Ru complexes such as the blue dimer cis,cis-[Ru(III)(2)O(H(2)O)(2)(bpy)(4)](4+) water oxidation catalyst. Spectra of the blue dimer and the monomeric [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) model complex show considerably different splitting of the Ru L(2,3) absorption edge, which reflects changes in the relative energies of the Ru 4d orbitals caused by hybridization with a bridging ligand and spin-orbit coupling effects. To aid the interpretation of spectroscopic data, we developed a new approach, which computes L(2,3)-edges XAS spectra as dipole transitions between molecular spinors of 4d transition metal complexes. This allows for careful inclusion of the spin-orbit coupling effects and the hybridization of the Ru 4d and ligand orbitals. The obtained theoretical Ru L(2,3)-edge spectra are in close agreement with experiment. Critically, existing single-electron methods (FEFF, FDMNES) broadly used to simulate XAS could not reproduce the experimental Ru L-edge spectra for the [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) model complex nor for the blue dimer, while charge transfer multiplet (CTM) calculations were not applicable due to the complexity and low symmetry of the blue dimer water oxidation catalyst. We demonstrated that L-edge spectroscopy is informative for analysis of bridging metal complexes. The developed computational approach enhances L-edge spectroscopy as a tool for analysis of the electronic structures of complexes, materials, catalysts, and reactive intermediates with 4d transition metals. PMID:21866913

  8. Hetero-cycloreversions mediated by photoinduced electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ruiz, Raúl; Jiménez, M Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A

    2014-04-15

    Discovered more than eight decades ago, the Diels-Alder (DA) cycloaddition (CA) remains one of the most versatile tools in synthetic organic chemistry. Hetero-DA processes are powerful methods for the synthesis of densely functionalized six-membered heterocycles, ubiquitous substructures found in natural products and bioactive compounds. These reactions frequently employ azadienes and oxadienes, but only a few groups have reported DA processes with thiadienes. The electron transfer (ET) version of the DA reaction, though less investigated, has emerged as a subject of increasing interest. In the last two decades, researchers have paid closer attention to radical ionic hetero-cycloreversions, mainly in connection with their possible involvement in the repair of pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photolesions in DNA by photolyases. In biological systems, these reactions likely occur through a reductive photosensitization mechanism. In addition, photooxidation can lead to cycloreversion (CR) reactions, and researchers can exploit this strategy for DNA repair therapies. In this Account, we discuss electron-transfer (ET) mediated hetero-CR reactions. We focus on the oxidative and reductive ET splitting of oxetanes, azetidines, and thietanes. Photoinduced electron transfer facilitates the splitting of a variety of four-membered heterocycles. In this context, researchers have commonly examined oxetanes, both experimentally and theoretically. Although a few studies have reported the cycloreversion of azetidines and thietanes carried out under electron transfer conditions, the number of examples remains limited. In general, the cleavage of the ionized four-membered rings appears to occur via a nonconcerted two-step mechanism. The trapping of the intermediate 1,4-radical ions and transient absorption spectroscopy data support this hypothesis, and it explains the observed loss of stereochemistry in the products. In the initial step, either C-C or C-X bond breaking may occur, and the preferred route depends on the substitution pattern of the ring, the type of heteroatom, and various experimental conditions. To better accommodate spin and charge, C-X cleavage happens more frequently, especially in the radical anionic version of the reaction. The addition or withdrawal of a single electron provides a new complementary synthetic strategy to activate hetero-cycloreversions. Despite its potential, this strategy remains largely unexplored. However, it offers a useful method to achieve C═X/olefin metathesis or, upon ring expansion, to construct six-membered heterocyclic rings. PMID:24702062

  9. Activation of molecular catalysts using semiconductor quantum dots

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Thomas J.; Sykora, Milan; Klimov, Victor I.

    2011-10-04

    Photocatalytic materials based on coupling of semiconductor nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQD) and molecular catalysts. These materials have capability to drive or catalyze non-spontaneous chemical reactions in the presence of visible radiation, ultraviolet radiation, or both. The NQD functions in these materials as a light absorber and charge generator. Following light absorption, the NQD activates a molecular catalyst adsorbed on the surface of the NQD via transfer of one or more charges (either electrons or electron-holes) from the NQD to the molecular catalyst. The activated molecular catalyst can then drive a chemical reaction. A photoelectrolytic device that includes such photocatalytic materials is also described.

  10. Microbial extracellular electron transfer and its relevance to iron corrosion.

    PubMed

    Kato, Souichiro

    2016-03-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a microbial metabolism that enables efficient electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials. Microorganisms harbouring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, including bioleaching and bioelectrochemical systems. On the other hand, recent research revealed that microbial EET potentially induces corrosion of iron structures. It has been well known that corrosion of iron occurring under anoxic conditions is mostly caused by microbial activities, which is termed as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Among diverse MIC mechanisms, microbial EET activity that enhances corrosion via direct uptake of electrons from metallic iron, specifically termed as electrical MIC (EMIC), has been regarded as one of the major causative factors. The EMIC-inducing microorganisms initially identified were certain sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea isolated from marine environments. Subsequently, abilities to induce EMIC were also demonstrated in diverse anaerobic microorganisms in freshwater environments and oil fields, including acetogenic bacteria and nitrate-reducing bacteria. Abilities of EET and EMIC are now regarded as microbial traits more widespread among diverse microbial clades than was thought previously. In this review, basic understandings of microbial EET and recent progresses in the EMIC research are introduced. PMID:26863985

  11. Modeling biofilms with dual extracellular electron transfer mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-11-28

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as their terminal electron acceptor for metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce components requisite for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates both diffusion- and conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found the literature. Our simulation results showed that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct measurements and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that cyclic and squarewave voltammetry are currently not good tools to determine the specific percentage of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms used by biofilms. The developed model will be a critical tool in designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms.

  12. Modeling biofilms with dual extracellular electron transfer mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Renslow, Ryan; Babauta, Jerome; Kuprat, Andrew; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as terminal electron acceptors for their metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce the requisite components for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates the diffusion- and the conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to S. oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found in the literature. Our simulation results show that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have a metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of G. sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct parameters and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that simulated cyclic and squarewave voltammetry based on our model are currently not capable of determining the specific percentages of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in a biofilm. The developed model will be a critical tool for designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms. PMID:24113651

  13. Single Electron Transfer Living Radical Polymerization via a New Initiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiongxiong; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Xu; Ai, Lingling; Cheng, Chuanjie

    2014-08-01

    Research and development of novel initiating system such as single electron transfer living radical polymerization (SET-LRP) is of high importance in polymer chemistry. A new SET-LRP initiator was synthesized and applied to prepare end-functionalized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in this study. α-Trichloromethyl benzyl alcohol was firstly synthesized, followed by preparation of PMMA under SET-LRP conditions. Conversion of MMA was 81.9%, and the molecular weight of PMMA was about 2.5 kDa at 60 °C for 1 h. Consistency of the number-average molecular weight of PMMA from NMR, GPC and theoretical calculation indicated that the polymerization featured controllable property. Broad molecular weight distribution (MWD) may be ascribed to branched polymers formed by initiation and chain transfer.

  14. Photoinduced electron transfer from dialkyl nitroxides to halogenated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Chateauneuf, J. ); Lusztyk, J.; Ingold, K.U. )

    1990-02-02

    Laser flash photolysis (LFP) at wavelengths within the charge-transfer absorption present in CCl{sub 4} solutions of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPO) yields the oxoammonium chloride of TEMPO, 1 ({lambda}{sub max} = 460 nm), and the trichloromethyl radical in an essentially instantaneous ({le}18 ps) process. The primary photochemical event is an electron transfer from TEMPO to CCl{sub 4}, and this is followed by immediate decomposition of the CCl{sub 4}{sup {sm bullet}{minus}} radical anion to Cl{sup {minus}} and Cl{sub 3}C{sup {sm bullet}}. An independent synthesis of 1 confirmed that the absorption attributed to this species has been correctly assigned. The formation of Cl{sub 3}C{sup {sm bullet}} was inferred by its trapping by molecular oxygen. LFP of TEMPO in other halogenated solvents and of other nitroxides in halogenated solvents has confirmed the generality of these photoreactions.

  15. Report on picosecond studies of electron transfer in photosynthetic models

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, T.L.; Bucks, R.R.; Boxer, S.G.; Fujita, I.

    1980-01-01

    Considerable spectroscopic work on reaction centers 8RC) from photosynthetic bacteria and on photosystem I (PSI) particles from green plants has established that the initial photochemical step in these systems is the subnanosecond tranfer of an electron resulting in the creation of an oxidized donor and a reduced acceptor. For both of these systems the electron donor is a dimer. The acceptor for bacterial RC's is bacteriopheophytin, a metal-free bacteriochlorophyll. The acceptor for PSI is thought to be chlorophyll/sub a/. Dimeric and trimeric model molecules containing PChl/sub a/ were studied. However, rather than relying on chemical equilibria to join the potential electron donors and acceptors, we covalently attached all of the subunits to form a single large molecule. The distance was altered between the donor and acceptor subunits by using both 10 atom and 5 atom chains. Also, the effects of altering the relative orientation of the donor and acceptor were probed by contrasting the kinetics observed with added pyridine too those observed with added alcohol. The addition of pyridine prevents the dimer and trimer models from aggregating. However, the addition of alcohol causes intramolecular bonding of the model's subunits though R-OH bridges. Because the dielectric constant (epsilon) of the solvent directly affects the kinetics of electron transfer reactions, several solvents were used: toluene, CH/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/, and CH/sub 3/CN. Also, since a goal of this type of research is to correlate electrochemical, spectroscopic and structural information to predict the likelihood of electron transfer reactions, we varied the redox span of the potential photoproducts.

  16. 12 CFR 205.14 - Electronic fund transfer service provider not holding consumer's account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic fund transfer service provider not holding consumer's account. 205.14 Section 205.14 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM ELECTRONIC FUND TRANSFERS (REGULATION E) § 205.14 Electronic fund transfer service provider not...

  17. 45 CFR 162.1601 - Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and... Services ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Health Care Electronic Funds Transfers (EFT) and Remittance Advice § 162.1601 Health care electronic funds transfers...

  18. 45 CFR 162.1601 - Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and... SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Health Care Electronic Funds Transfers (EFT) and Remittance Advice § 162.1601 Health care electronic funds transfers...

  19. 45 CFR 162.1601 - Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and... SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Health Care Electronic Funds Transfers (EFT) and Remittance Advice § 162.1601 Health care electronic funds transfers...

  20. Suppression of electron transfer to dioxygen by charge transfer and electron transfer complexes in the FAD-dependent reductase component of toluene dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzong-Yuan; Werther, Tobias; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Dobbek, Holger

    2012-11-01

    The three-component toluene dioxygenase system consists of an FAD-containing reductase, a Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin, and a Rieske-type dioxygenase. The task of the FAD-containing reductase is to shuttle electrons from NADH to the ferredoxin, a reaction the enzyme has to catalyze in the presence of dioxygen. We investigated the kinetics of the reductase in the reductive and oxidative half-reaction and detected a stable charge transfer complex between the reduced reductase and NAD(+) at the end of the reductive half-reaction, which is substantially less reactive toward dioxygen than the reduced reductase in the absence of NAD(+). A plausible reason for the low reactivity toward dioxygen is revealed by the crystal structure of the complex between NAD(+) and reduced reductase, which shows that the nicotinamide ring and the protein matrix shield the reactive C4a position of the isoalloxazine ring and force the tricycle into an atypical planar conformation, both factors disfavoring the reaction of the reduced flavin with dioxygen. A rapid electron transfer from the charge transfer complex to electron acceptors further reduces the risk of unwanted side reactions, and the crystal structure of a complex between the reductase and its cognate ferredoxin shows a short distance between the electron-donating and -accepting cofactors. Attraction between the two proteins is likely mediated by opposite charges at one large patch of the complex interface. The stability, specificity, and reactivity of the observed charge transfer and electron transfer complexes are thought to prevent the reaction of reductase(TOL) with dioxygen and thus present a solution toward conflicting requirements. PMID:22992736

  1. Suppression of Electron Transfer to Dioxygen by Charge Transfer and Electron Transfer Complexes in the FAD-dependent Reductase Component of Toluene Dioxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzong-Yuan; Werther, Tobias; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Dobbek, Holger

    2012-01-01

    The three-component toluene dioxygenase system consists of an FAD-containing reductase, a Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin, and a Rieske-type dioxygenase. The task of the FAD-containing reductase is to shuttle electrons from NADH to the ferredoxin, a reaction the enzyme has to catalyze in the presence of dioxygen. We investigated the kinetics of the reductase in the reductive and oxidative half-reaction and detected a stable charge transfer complex between the reduced reductase and NAD+ at the end of the reductive half-reaction, which is substantially less reactive toward dioxygen than the reduced reductase in the absence of NAD+. A plausible reason for the low reactivity toward dioxygen is revealed by the crystal structure of the complex between NAD+ and reduced reductase, which shows that the nicotinamide ring and the protein matrix shield the reactive C4a position of the isoalloxazine ring and force the tricycle into an atypical planar conformation, both factors disfavoring the reaction of the reduced flavin with dioxygen. A rapid electron transfer from the charge transfer complex to electron acceptors further reduces the risk of unwanted side reactions, and the crystal structure of a complex between the reductase and its cognate ferredoxin shows a short distance between the electron-donating and -accepting cofactors. Attraction between the two proteins is likely mediated by opposite charges at one large patch of the complex interface. The stability, specificity, and reactivity of the observed charge transfer and electron transfer complexes are thought to prevent the reaction of reductaseTOL with dioxygen and thus present a solution toward conflicting requirements. PMID:22992736

  2. Ultrafast Photoinduced Interfacial Proton Coupled Electron Transfer from CdSe Quantum Dots to 4,4'-Bipyridine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinquan; Wu, Kaifeng; Rudshteyn, Benjamin; Jia, Yanyan; Ding, Wendu; Xie, Zhao-Xiong; Batista, Victor S; Lian, Tianquan

    2016-01-27

    Pyridine and derivatives have been reported as efficient and selective catalysts for the electrochemical and photoelectrochemical reduction of CO2 to methanol. Although the catalytic mechanism remains a subject of considerable recent debate, most proposed models involve interfacial proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) to electrode-bound catalysts. We report a combined experimental and theoretical study of the photoreduction of 4,4'-bipyridium (bPYD) using CdSe quantum dots (QDs) as a model system for interfacial PCET. We observed ultrafast photoinduced PCET from CdSe QDs to form doubly protonated [bPYDH2](+•) radical cations at low pH (4-6). Through studies of the dependence of PCET rate on isotopic substitution, pH and bPYD concentration, the radical formation mechanism was identified to be a sequential interfacial electron and proton transfer (ET/PT) process with a rate-limiting pH independent electron transfer rate constant, kint, of 1.05 ± 0.13 × 10(10) s(-1) between a QD and an adsorbed singly protonated [bPYDH](+). Theoretical studies of the adsorption of [bPYDH](+) and methylviologen on QD surfaces revealed important effects of hydrogen bonding with the capping ligand (3-mercaptopropionic acid) on binding geometry and interfacial PCET. In the presence of sacrificial electron donors, this system was shown to be capable of generating [bPYDH2](+•) radical cations under continuous illumination at 405 nm with a steady-state photoreduction quantum yield of 1.1 ± 0.1% at pH 4. The mechanism of bPYD photoreduction reported in this work may provide useful insights into the catalytic roles of pyridine and pyridine derivatives in the electrochemical and photoelectrochemical reduction of CO2. PMID:26713752

  3. Copper-Catalyzed Aerobic Oxidations of Organic Molecules: Pathways for Two-Electron Oxidation with a Four-Electron Oxidant and a One-Electron Redox-Active Catalyst.

    PubMed

    McCann, Scott D; Stahl, Shannon S

    2015-06-16

    Selective oxidation reactions have extraordinary value in organic chemistry, ranging from the conversion of petrochemical feedstocks into industrial chemicals and polymer precursors to the introduction of heteroatom functional groups into pharmaceutical and agrochemical intermediates. Molecular oxygen (O2) would be the ideal oxidant for these transformations. Whereas many commodity-scale oxidations of simple hydrocarbon feedstocks employ O2 as an oxidant, methods for selective oxidation of more complex molecules bearing diverse functional groups are often incompatible with existing aerobic oxidation methods. The latter limitation provides the basis for our interest in the development of new catalytic transformations and the elucidation of mechanistic principles that underlie selective aerobic oxidation reactions. One challenge inherent in such methods is the incommensurate redox stoichiometry associated with the use of O2, a four-electron oxidant, in reactions that achieve two-electron oxidation of organic molecules. This issue is further complicated by the use of first-row transition-metal catalysts, which tend to undergo facile one-electron redox steps. In recent years, we have been investigating Cu-catalyzed aerobic oxidation reactions wherein the complexities just noted are clearly evident. This Account surveys our work in this area, which has emphasized three general classes of reactions: (1) single-electron-transfer reactions for oxidative functionalization of electron-rich substrates, such as arenes and heterocycles; (2) oxidative carbon-heteroatom bond-forming reactions, including C-H oxidations, that proceed via organocopper(III) intermediates; and (3) methods for aerobic oxidation of alcohols and amines that use Cu(II) in combination with an organic redox-active cocatalyst to dehydrogenate the carbon-heteroatom bond. These reaction classes demonstrate three different pathways to achieve two-electron oxidation of organic molecules via the cooperative involvement of two one-electron oxidants, either two Cu(II) species or Cu(II) and a nitroxyl cocatalyst. They show the ability of Cu to participate in traditional organometallic steps commonly associated with precious-metal catalysts, such as C-H activation and reductive elimination, but also demonstrate the accessibility of reaction steps not typically associated with precious-metal catalysts, such as single-electron transfer. Many of the Cu-catalyzed reactions offer advantages over analogous two-electron oxidation reactions mediated by palladium or other noble metals. For example, carbon-heteroatom oxidative coupling reactions in the first two reaction classes noted above are capable of using O2 as the terminal oxidant, while analogous reactions with Pd commonly require less desirable oxidants, such as hypervalent iodine or electrophilic halogen sources. In addition, the alcohol and amine oxidations in the third reaction class are significantly more efficient and show much broader scope and functional group tolerance than related Pd-catalyzed reactions. The mechanistic basis for these differences are described herein. PMID:26020118

  4. Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Sutin, N.; Creutz, C.

    1980-01-01

    Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed.

  5. Photoinduced electron transfer from phycoerythrin to colloidal metal semiconductor nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathiravan, A.; Chandramohan, M.; Renganathan, R.; Sekar, S.

    2009-04-01

    Phycoerythrin is a water soluble pigment which absorbs in the visible region at 563 nm. The interaction of phycoerythrin with colloidal metal semiconductors was studied by absorption, FT-IR and fluorescence spectroscopy. Phycoerythrin adsorbed strongly on the surface of TiO 2 nanoparticles, the apparent association constant for the association between colloidal metal-TiO 2 nanoparticles and phycoerythrin was determined from fluorescence quenching data. The free energy change (Δ Get) for electron transfer process has been calculated by applying Rehm-Weller equation.

  6. New Insights into Fundamental Electron Transfer from Single Nanoparticle Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuting; Lin, Chuhong; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Laborda, Eduardo; Shao, Lidong; Compton, Richard G

    2016-04-21

    The reductive redox behavior of oxygen in aqueous acid solution leading first to adsorbed superoxide species at single palladium coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (of length ca. 5 μm and width 130 nm) is reported. The small dimensions of the electroactive surface create conditions of high mass-transport permitting the resolution of electrode kinetic effects. In combination with new theoretical models, it is shown that the physical location of the formed product within the double layer of the electrode profoundly influences the observed electron transfer kinetics. This generically important result gives new physical insights into the modeling of the many electrochemical processes involving adsorbed intermediates. PMID:27063353

  7. How Much Is Transferred from Training to the Job? The 10% Delusion as a Catalyst for Thinking about Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, J. Kevin; Yelon, Stephen L.; Billington, Abigail Q.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the common belief that only a small amount of what is taught in a training program is actually transferred to the job. After providing evidence of the source of the generalization and the acceptance of the notion despite the lack of empirical, behavioral evidence, we take the opportunity to examine the likely reasons for that…

  8. How Much Is Transferred from Training to the Job? The 10% Delusion as a Catalyst for Thinking about Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, J. Kevin; Yelon, Stephen L.; Billington, Abigail Q.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the common belief that only a small amount of what is taught in a training program is actually transferred to the job. After providing evidence of the source of the generalization and the acceptance of the notion despite the lack of empirical, behavioral evidence, we take the opportunity to examine the likely reasons for that

  9. The electronic transfer of information and aerospace knowledge diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Bishop, Ann P.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Increasing reliance on and investment in information technology and electronic networking systems presupposes that computing and information technology will play a motor role in the diffusion of aerospace knowledge. Little is known, however, about actual information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The authors state that the potential contributions of information technology to increased productivity and competitiveness will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge regarding the information-seeking behavior of the members of the social system - those who are producing, transferring, and using scientific and technical information - is incorporated into a new technology policy framework. Research into the use of information technology and electronic networks by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists, collected as part of a research project designed to study aerospace knowledge diffusion, is presented in support of this assertion.

  10. Atomic level study of water-gas shift catalysts via transmission electron microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akatay, Mehmed Cem

    Water-gas shift (WGS), CO + H2O ⇆ CO2 + H2 (DeltaH° = -41 kJ mol -1), is an industrially important reaction for the production of high purity hydrogen. Commercial Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts are employed to accelerate this reaction, yet these catalysts suffer from certain drawbacks, including costly regeneration processes and sulfur poisoning. Extensive research is focused on developing new catalysts to replace the current technology. Supported noble metals stand out as promising candidates, yet comprise intricate nanostructures complicating the understanding of their working mechanism. In this study, the structure of the supported Pt catalysts is explored by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy. The effect of the supporting phase and the use of secondary metals on the reaction kinetics is investigated. Structural heterogeneities are quantified and correlated with the kinetic descriptors of the catalysts to develop a fundamental understanding of the catalytic mechanism. The effect of the reaction environment on catalyst structure is examined by in-situ techniques. This study benefitted greatly from the use of model catalysts that provide a convenient medium for the atomic level characterization of nanostructures. Based on these studies, Pt supported on iron oxide nano islands deposited on inert spherical alumina exhibited 48 times higher WGS turnover rate (normalized by the total Pt surface area) than Pt supported on bulk iron oxide. The rate of aqueous phase glycerol reforming reaction of Pt supported on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) is promoted by co-impregnating with cobalt. The synthesis resulted in a variety of nanostructures among which Pt-Co bimetallic nanoparticles are found to be responsible for the observed promotion. The unprecedented WGS rate of Pt supported on Mo2C is explored by forming Mo 2C patches on top of MWCNTs and the rate promotion is found to be caused by the Pt-Mo bimetallic entities.

  11. Catalytic conversion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Mechanistic investigations of hydrogen transfer from an iron-based catalyst to alkylarenes

    SciTech Connect

    Autrey, T.; Linehan, J.C.; Camaioni, D.M.; Powers, T.R.; McMillan, E.F.; Franz, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    Results of our model compound studies suggest that free radical hydrogen transfer pathways from the catalyst to the alkylarene are responsible for the scission of strong carbon-carbon bonds. There are two requisites for the observed selective bond scission. First is the stability of the ipso adduct precursor leading to displacement, the more stable the adduct the more probable bond scission. This explains why benzyl radical displacement > phenoxy radical displacement in benzyldiphenyl ether and explains why PhCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PhCH{sub 2} radical > naphthylmethyl radical from NMBB. Second, given equal ipso adduct precursor stabilities, e.g. methyldiphenylmethane, the stability of the departing radical determines the selectivity. this explains benzyl radical > methyl radical in the methylated diphenylmethanes and explains why {alpha}-hydroxyphenethyl radical > methyl radical in 1,2-ditolylethanol. We have assumed little physical interaction between the molecules and the catalytic surface and have been able to satisfactorily explain most of the observed selectivity. However, for NMBB we expect a higher selectivity for -A- bond scission relative to -B- bond scission, given the ca. 6 kcal/mol difference between the radical adduct formed by the hydrogen atom addition to 1-methylnaphthalene and p-xylene. It is possible that physical properties play a role in lowering the selectivity in -B- bond scission. Also, catalysts prepared by other methods may contain different activity sites and operate by different mechanisms.

  12. Biochemical Mechanisms Controlling Terminal Electron Transfer in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmus, R.; Liermann, L. J.; Brantley, S. L.; Tien, M.

    2009-04-01

    The ability of Geobacter sulfurreducens to use a variety of metals as terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) for cellular respiration makes it attractive for use in bioremediation and implies its importance to mineral cycling in the environment. This study is aimed at understanding the biochemical mechanisms that allow Geobacter sulfurreducens to use soluble and insoluble iron and manganese forms as TEAs for cellular respiration and is the first of its kind to address the kinetics of manganese use as a TEA by G. sulfurreducens. First, G. sulfurreducens was conditioned to grow on various soluble and insoluble iron and manganese forms. G. sulfurreducens demonstrated enhanced growth rates when cultured using soluble TEAs compared with insoluble TEAs. However, the lower growth rate on insoluble iron compared with soluble iron was observed concomitantly with a 1-2 log lower cell density in stationary phase in insoluble iron cultures and a lower growth yield per electron donor used in log growth phase. Furthermore, the growth yield per electron was similar with both soluble and insoluble iron. These results suggest that the net amount of energy available for biomass production achieved from reducing insoluble iron is lower than with soluble iron, which may be due to a different biochemical mechanism catalyzing the electron transfer to TEA dependent upon the solubility of the TEA. One scenario consistent with this notion is that protein(s) in the outer membrane of G. sulfurreducens that transfers electrons to insoluble TEAs does so in a manner that uncouples electron flow from the proton pump in the cellular membrane, similar to what we have observed with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Both the growth rate and growth yield of G. sulfurreducens on insoluble manganese were higher than on insoluble iron, indicating that there is a difference in the flow of electrons to the TEA in these two situations. While the different redox potentials of these elements may affect these values, it is also possible that differential protein expression occurs when G. sulfurreducens is grown with insoluble iron versus insoluble iron. These initial results indicate that G. sulfurreducens allocates energy to unique cellular functions depending on the type of TEA used, suggesting that novel mechanisms are used to enable use of various metal forms for respiration. Follow-up protein expression studies were then conducted and are now being used to begin to delineate what biochemical mechanisms and cellular pathways are involved in these processes.

  13. Coupling capillary zone electrophoresis with electron transfer dissociation and activated ion electron transfer dissociation for top-down proteomics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yimeng; Riley, Nicholas M; Sun, Liangliang; Hebert, Alexander S; Yan, Xiaojing; Westphall, Michael S; Rush, Matthew J P; Zhu, Guijie; Champion, Matthew M; Mba Medie, Felix; Champion, Patricia A DiGiuseppe; Coon, Joshua J; Dovichi, Norman J

    2015-01-01

    Top-down proteomics offers the potential for full protein characterization, but many challenges remain for this approach, including efficient protein separations and effective fragmentation of intact proteins. Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) has shown great potential for separation of intact proteins, especially for differentially modified proteoforms of the same gene product. To date, however, CZE has been used only with collision-based fragmentation methods. Here we report the first implementation of electron transfer dissociation (ETD) with online CZE separations for top-down proteomics, analyzing a mixture of four standard proteins and a complex protein mixture from the Mycobacterium marinum bacterial secretome. Using a multipurpose dissociation cell on an Orbitrap Elite system, we demonstrate that CZE is fully compatible with ETD as well as higher energy collisional dissociation (HCD), and that the two complementary fragmentation methods can be used in tandem on the electrophoretic time scale for improved protein characterization. Furthermore, we show that activated ion electron transfer dissociation (AI-ETD), a recently introduced method for enhanced ETD fragmentation, provides useful performance with CZE separations to greatly increase protein characterization. When combined with HCD, AI-ETD improved the protein sequence coverage by more than 200% for proteins from both standard and complex mixtures, highlighting the benefits electron-driven dissociation methods can add to CZE separations. PMID:25893372

  14. Controlled environment specimen transfer.

    PubMed

    Damsgaard, Christian D; Zandbergen, Henny; W Hansen, Thomas; Chorkendorff, Ib; B Wagner, Jakob

    2014-08-01

    Specimen transfer under controlled environment conditions, such as temperature, pressure, and gas composition, is necessary to conduct successive complementary in situ characterization of materials sensitive to ambient conditions. The in situ transfer concept is introduced by linking an environmental transmission electron microscope to an in situ X-ray diffractometer through a dedicated transmission electron microscope specimen transfer holder, capable of sealing the specimen in a gaseous environment at elevated temperatures. Two catalyst material systems have been investigated; Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst for methanol synthesis and a Co/Al2O3 catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Both systems are sensitive to ambient atmosphere as they will oxidize after relatively short air exposure. The Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst, was reduced in the in situ X-ray diffractometer set-up, and subsequently, successfully transferred in a reactive environment to the environmental transmission electron microscope where further analysis on the local scale were conducted. The Co/Al2O3 catalyst was reduced in the environmental microscope and successfully kept reduced outside the microscope in a reactive environment. The in situ transfer holder facilitates complimentary in situ experiments of the same specimen without changing the specimen state during transfer. PMID:24824787

  15. Effect of Aptamer Binding on the Electron-Transfer Properties of Redox Cofactors.

    PubMed

    Emahi, Ismaila; Gruenke, Paige R; Baum, Dana A

    2015-12-01

    In vitro selection or SELEX has allowed for the identification of functional nucleic acids (FNAs) that can potentially mimic and replace protein enzymes. These FNAs likely interact with cofactors, just like enzymes bind cofactors in their active sites. Investigating how FNA binding affects cofactor properties is important for understanding how an active site is formed and for developing useful enzyme mimics. Oxidoreductase enzymes contain cofactors in their active sites that allow the enzymes to do redox chemistry. In certain applications, these redox cofactors act as electron-transfer shuttles that transport electrons between the enzymes' active sites and electrode surfaces. Three redox cofactors commonly found in oxidoreductases are flavin adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), and pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ). We are interested in investigating how DNA aptamers that bind these cofactors influence the cofactors' redox abilities and if these aptamer-cofactor complexes could serve as redox catalysts. We employed cyclic voltammetry and amperometry to study the electrochemical properties of NAD(+) and PQQ when bound to DNA aptamers. Our results suggest that the aptamers provide a stable environment for the cofactor to participate in redox reactions, although enhanced redox activity was not observed. This work provides a foundation for the development of new FNAs capable of redox activity. PMID:26498628

  16. Evolution of Gold Structure During Thermal Treatment of Au/FeOx Catalysts Revealed by Aberration-Corrected Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Overbury, Steven {Steve} H; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Borisevich, Albina Y; Deng, Weiling; Si, Rui; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Prof. Maria

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution aberration-corrected electron microscopy was performed on a series of catalysts derived from a parent material, 2 at.% Au/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (WGC ref. no. 60C), prepared by co-precipitation and calcined in air at 400 C, and a catalyst prepared by leaching surface gold from the parent catalyst and exposed to various treatments, including use in the water-gas shift reaction at 250 C. Aberration-corrected JEOL 2200FS (JEOL USA, Peabody, MA) and Vacuum Generators HB-603U STEM instruments were used to image fresh, reduced, leached, used and re-oxidized catalyst samples. A new in situ heating technology (Protochips Inc., Raleigh, NC, USA), which permits full sub-Angstrom imaging resolution in the JEOL 2200FS was used to study the effects of temperature on the behavior of gold species. A remarkable stability of gold to redox treatments up to 400 C, with atomic gold decorating step surfaces of iron oxide was identified. On heating the samples in vacuum to 700 C, it was found that monodispersed gold began to sinter to form nanoparticles above 500 C. Gold species internal to the iron oxide support material was shown to diffuse to the surface at elevated temperature, coalescing into discrete nanocrystals. The results demonstrate the value of in situ heating for understanding morphological changes in the catalyst with elevated temperature treatments.

  17. Electron donor properties of Claus catalysts. I. Influence of NaOH on the catalytic activity of silica gel

    SciTech Connect

    Dudzik, Z.; George, Z.M.

    1980-05-01

    The influence of electron donor properties of catalysts on the Claus reaction was investigated by impregnating relatively inactive silica gel with NaOH and observing the formation of SO/sub 2//sup -/ anion radicals by ESR spectroscopy and determining the corresponding Claus catalytic activity by the initial rate of the Claus reaction. A good correlation between the electron donor properties and the Claus activity was observed for silica gel impregnated with varying amounts of NaOH. As the NaOH impregnation was increased, the ESR signal intensity of SO/sub 2//sup -/ and the rate of reaction went through a maximum. SO/sub 2//sup -/ which appears to be a reaction intermediate reacted rapidly with H/sub 2/S both in the static system and under Claus reaction conditions. The use of SO/sub 2/ as a test molecule for evaluating electron-donor properties of catalysts has been proposed. 8 figures.

  18. Electron emission and electron transfer processes in proton-naphthalene collisions at intermediate velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, P. M.; Rajput, J.; Safvan, C. P.; Vig, S.; Kadhane, U.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the fragmentation and ionization of naphthalene by protons at intermediate velocities (between 1.41 and 2.68 a.u.). Relative cross sections for electron capture (EC), electron emission (EE), and capture ionization are measured. The EC cross sections decrease rapidly over the energy range under consideration (50-150 keV) and are lower than EE cross sections. The EE cross sections, on the other hand, change very slowly in this energy range. The energetics of interactions is quantified by comparing the mass spectra with the photodissociation breakdown curves from literature. In the case of single capture, resonant electron transfer to n = 1 state in H+ is seen to dominate the interaction but is shown to be accompanied by a small amount of electronic energy loss. In the EE mode, two mechanisms are shown to be active in the collision process: large impact parameter plasmon excitation mode, and closer encounters with higher amounts of electronic energy loss.

  19. Vibrational dynamics in photoinduced electron transfer. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, K.G.

    1993-09-08

    Objective is to perform a new type of measurement for optically excited electron transfer processes that can provide unique experimental insight into the molecular mechanism of electron transfer. Measurements of optically excited electron transfer are done with picosecond infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy to monitor the vibrational motions of the molecules immediately after electron transfer. Theory and experiment suggest that molecular vibrations and distortions are important controlling elements for electron transfer, and direct information has yet to be obtained on these elements of electron transfer mechanisms. The second period of funding has been dedicated to finishing technique development and performing studies of electron transfer in ion pair systems to identify if vibrational dependent electron transfer rates are present in this system. We have succeeded in measuring, for the first time, electron transfer rates as a function of vibrational state in an ion pair complex in solution. In a different area of electron transfer research we have proposed a new mechanism of solvent gated electron transfer.

  20. Electronic Health Records and Adverse Drug Events after Patient Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Boockvar, Kenneth S.; Livote, Elayne E.; Goldstein, Nathan; Nebeker, Jonathan R.; Siu, Albert; Fried, Terri

    2009-01-01

    Background Our objective was to examine the frequencies of medication error and adverse drug events (ADEs) at the time of patient transfer in a system with an electronic health record (EHR) as compared to a system without an EHR. We hypothesized that the frequencies of these events would be lower in the EHR system because of better information exchange across sites of care. Methods 469 patients transferred between 7 nursing homes and 3 hospitals in New York and Connecticut between 1999-2005 were followed retrospectively. 2 groups of patients were compared: U.S. Veterans Affairs (VA) patients, with an EHR, and non-VA patients, without an EHR, on the following measures: 1) Medication prescribing discrepancies at nursing home/hospital transfer; 2) High-risk medication discrepancies; and 3) ADEs caused by medication discrepancies according to structured medical record review by pairs of physician and pharmacist raters. Results The overall incidence of ADE caused by medication discrepancies was 0.20 per hospitalization episode. After controlling for demographic and clinical covariates, there were no significant differences between VA and non-VA groups in medication discrepancies (mean difference 0.02; 95%CI −0.81 to 0.85), high-risk medication discrepancies (−0.18; 95%CI −0.22 to 0.58), or occurrence of an ADE caused by a medication discrepancy (odds ratio 0.96; 95%CI 0.18 to 5.01). Conclusions There was no difference, with and without an EHR, in the occurrence of medication discrepancies or ADEs caused by medication discrepancies at the time of transfer between sites of care. Reducing such problems may require specialized computer tools to facilitate medication review. PMID:20724395

  1. ATP-induced electron transfer by redox-selective partner recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Sandra E.; Goetzl, Sebastian; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Bommer, Martin; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Hildebrandt, Peter; Dobbek, Holger

    2014-08-01

    Thermodynamically unfavourable electron transfers are enabled by coupling to an energy-supplying reaction. How the energy is transduced from the exergonic to the endergonic process is largely unknown. Here we provide the structural basis for an energy transduction process in the reductive activation of B12-dependent methyltransferases. The transfer of one electron from an activating enzyme to the cobalamin cofactor is energetically uphill and relies on coupling to an ATPase reaction. Our results demonstrate that the key to coupling is, besides the oxidation state-dependent complex formation, the conformational gating of the electron transfer. Complex formation induces a substitution of the ligand at the electron-accepting Co ion. Addition of ATP initiates electron transfer by provoking conformational changes that destabilize the complex. We show how remodelling of the electron-accepting Co2+ promotes ATP-dependent electron transfer; an efficient strategy not seen in other electron-transferring ATPases.

  2. a Time-Resolved Spectroscopic Study of Photoinitiated Electron Transfer Reactions in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Christopher James

    Photoinitiated electron transfer reactions may be considered within the context of two categories: (1) direct electron transfer, as observed in charge transfer molecular complexes. The photoexcitation couples the ground and charge transfer potential surfaces and (2) indirect electron transfer, as observed in covalently bonded donor (D) and acceptor (A) moieties. The optical preparation of an eigenstate of the donor or acceptor is followed by the evolution of the system to the charge transfer state. This thesis presents a study of pico- and subpicosecond polarization and vibrational relaxations accompanying these two classes of condensed phase electron transfer reactions. The thesis presents optical ultrafast pump-probe measurements on the electron donor-acceptor complex tetracyanoethylene -hexamethylbenzene in polar and non-polar solvents. The experimental electron transfer rates are compared with nonadiabatic and adiabatic electron-transfer theories using a previously published analysis of all the vibrational modes active of the reaction. As the experimental electron transfer rates are competitive with and in same cases faster than the polarization relaxation time of the solvent, it is necessary to simulate the Smoluchowski diffusion of the reacting system over an equilibrating reaction coordinate. Regarding the coupling of the reactant and product electronic surfaces, it is shown that the nuclear kinetic operator can give rise to the coupling responsible for the electron transfer reaction. This non-Born-Oppenheimer matrix element is estimated using information obtained from the absorption and Raman spectra. Using this coupling, good agreement is found between the experimentally observed and theoretically predicted rates. This thesis also presents an optical time resolved spectroscopic study of the indirect electron transfer reaction in the model system magnesium triphenylporphyrinquinone in a range of solvent environments. These molecules have long served as model compounds for the ultrafast dynamics in photosynthetic complexes. In view of the recently observed coherent relaxation dynamics of Mg-tetraphenylporphyrin, these multicomponent electron transfer kinetic data are analyzed, focussing on the role of low frequency coherences in electron transfer processes.

  3. Charge transfer emission in coumarin 343 sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle: A direct measurement of back electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, H.N.

    1999-11-25

    Electron injection and back electron transfer dynamics in coumarin 343 (C-343) adsorbed on TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are studied by picosecond transient absorption and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The direct detection of electrons in the nanoparticles and the parent cation are monitored using picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, and the corresponding dynamics of the adsorbate are monitored by time-resolved absorption spectra of the cation radical of C-343 in the visible region. When the electron returns from the nanoparticles to the present cation, a low quantum yield red-shifted charge transfer emission is observed. Measuring the charge transfer emission lifetimes by a picosecond time-resolved fluorimeter, the author gets an exact rate of back electron transfer reaction from the nanoparticle to the parent cation.

  4. Fabrication and single-electron-transfer operation of a triple-dot single-electron transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Mingyu; Uchida, Takafumi; Tsurumaki-Fukuchi, Atsushi; Arita, Masashi; Fujiwara, Akira; Ono, Yukinori; Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Inokawa, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2015-12-01

    A triple-dot single-electron transistor was fabricated on silicon-on-insulator wafer using pattern-dependent oxidation. A specially designed one-dimensional silicon wire having small constrictions at both ends was converted to a triple-dot single-electron transistor by means of pattern-dependent oxidation. The fabrication of the center dot involved quantum size effects and stress-induced band gap reduction, whereas that of the two side dots involved thickness modulation because of the complex edge structure of two-dimensional silicon. Single-electron turnstile operation was confirmed at 8 K when a 100-mV, 1-MHz square wave was applied. Monte Carlo simulations indicated that such a device with inhomogeneous tunnel and gate capacitances can exhibit single-electron transfer.

  5. Layered Black Phosphorus: Strongly Anisotropic Magnetic, Electronic, and Electron-Transfer Properties.

    PubMed

    Sofer, Zdeněk; Sedmidubský, David; Huber, Štěpán; Luxa, Jan; Bouša, Daniel; Boothroyd, Chris; Pumera, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Layered elemental materials, such as black phosphorus, exhibit unique properties originating from their highly anisotropic layered structure. The results presented herein demonstrate an anomalous anisotropy for the electrical, magnetic, and electrochemical properties of black phosphorus. It is shown that heterogeneous electron transfer from black phosphorus to outer- and inner-sphere molecular probes is highly anisotropic. The electron-transfer rates differ at the basal and edge planes. These unusual properties were interpreted by means of calculations, manifesting the metallic character of the edge planes as compared to the semiconducting properties of the basal plane. This indicates that black phosphorus belongs to a group of materials known as topological insulators. Consequently, these effects render the magnetic properties highly anisotropic, as both diamagnetic and paramagnetic behavior can be observed depending on the orientation in the magnetic field. PMID:26822395

  6. Electronic shift register memory based on molecular electron-transfer reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Jose Nelson; Beratan, David N.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a shift register memory at the molecular level is described in detail. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules incorporated on a very large scale integrated (VLSI) substrate, and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. The design requirements for such a system are discussed, and several realistic strategies for synthesizing these systems are presented. The immediate advantage of such a hybrid molecular/VLSI device would arise from the possible information storage density. The prospect of considerable savings of energy per bit processed also exists. This molecular shift register memory element design solves the conceptual problems associated with integrating molecular size components with larger (micron) size features on a chip.

  7. Exogenous electron shuttle-mediated extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella putrefaciens 200: electrochemical parameters and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yundang; Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiaomin; Li, Fangbai

    2014-08-19

    Despite the importance of exogenous electron shuttles (ESs) in extracellular electron transfer (EET), a lack of understanding of the key properties of ESs is a concern given their different influences on EET processes. Here, the ES-mediated EET capacity of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 (SP200) was evaluated by examining the electricity generated in a microbial fuel cell. The results indicated that all the ESs substantially accelerated the current generation compared to only SP200. The current and polarization parameters were linearly correlated with both the standard redox potential (E(ES)(0)) and the electron accepting capacity (EAC) of the ESs. A thermodynamic analysis of the electron transfer from the electron donor to the electrode suggested that the EET from c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts) to ESs is a crucial step causing the differences in EET capacities among various ESs. Based on the derived equations, both E(ES)(0) and EAC can quantitatively determine potential losses (ΔE) that reflect the potential loss of the ES-mediated EET. In situ spectral kinetic analysis of ES reduction by c-Cyts in a living SP200 suspension was first investigated with the E(ES), E(c-Cyt), and ΔE values being calculated. This study can provide a comprehensive understanding of the role of ESs in EET. PMID:25058026

  8. Factors influencing redox potentials of electron transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Moore, G R; Pettigrew, G W; Rogers, N K

    1986-07-01

    The redox potentials of electron transfer proteins vary over a wide range, even when the type of redox center is the same. Rees [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA (1985) 82, 3082-3085] proposed that this variation of redox potential partly reflects the different net charges of the proteins, and he presented a linear correlation between these two properties for 36 proteins. A review of the factors that influence protein redox potentials makes it clear that this linear correlation is fortuitous. The key factors influencing redox potentials are the contributions to the Gibbs energy difference between the two redox states, resulting from bonding interactions at the redox center, electrostatic interactions between the redox-center charge and polar groups within the protein and solvent, and redox-state conformational changes. The relative importance of these terms is likely to vary from protein to protein. PMID:3460080

  9. Photoinduced charge accumulation by metal ion-coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Bonn, Annabell G; Wenger, Oliver S

    2015-10-01

    An oligotriarylamine (OTA) unit, a Ru(bpy)3(2+) photosensitizer moiety (Ru), and an anthraquinone (AQ) entity were combined to a molecular dyad (Ru-OTA) and a molecular triad (AQ-Ru-OTA). Pulsed laser excitation at 532 nm led to the formation of charge-separated states of the type Ru(-)-OTA(+) and AQ(-)-Ru-OTA(+) with lifetimes of ≤10 ns and 2.4 μs, respectively, in de-aerated CH3CN at 25 °C. Upon addition of Sc(OTf)3, very long-lived photoproducts were observed. Under steady-state irradiation conditions using a flux of (6.74 ± 0.21) × 10(15) photons per second at 450 nm, the formation of twofold oxidized oligotriarylamine (OTA(2+)) was detected in aerated CH3CN containing 0.02 M Sc(3+), as demonstrated unambiguously by comparison with UV-Vis absorption spectra obtained in the course of chemical oxidation with Cu(2+). Photodriven charge accumulation on the OTA unit of Ru-OTA and AQ-Ru-OTA is possible due to the lowering of the O2 reduction potential caused by the interaction of superoxide with the strong Lewis acid Sc(3+). The presence of the anthraquinone unit in AQ-Ru-OTA accelerates the rate-determining reaction step for charge accumulation by a factor of 10 compared to the Ru-OTA dyad. This is attributed to the formation of Sc(3+)-stabilized anthraquinone radical anion intermediates in the triad. Possible mechanistic pathways leading to charge accumulation are discussed. Photodriven charge accumulation is of key importance for solar fuels because their production will have to rely on multi-electron chemistry rather than single-electron reaction steps. Our study is the first to demonstrate that metal ion-coupled electron transfer (MCET) can be exploited to accumulate charges on a given molecular unit using visible light as an energy input. The approach of using a combination of intra- and intermolecular electron transfer reactions which are enabled by MCET is conceptually novel, and the fundamental insights gained from our study are relevant in the greater context of solar energy conversion. PMID:26312416

  10. A stochastic reorganizational bath model for electronic energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Takatoshi E-mail: aspuru@chemistry.harvard.edu; Huh, Joonsuk; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán E-mail: aspuru@chemistry.harvard.edu

    2014-06-28

    Environmentally induced fluctuations of the optical gap play a crucial role in electronic energy transfer dynamics. One of the simplest approaches to incorporate such fluctuations in energy transfer dynamics is the well known Haken-Strobl-Reineker (HSR) model, in which the energy-gap fluctuation is approximated as white noise. Recently, several groups have employed molecular dynamics simulations and excited-state calculations in conjunction to account for excitation energies’ thermal fluctuations. On the other hand, since the original work of HSR, many groups have employed stochastic models to simulate the same transfer dynamics. Here, we discuss a rigorous connection between the stochastic and the atomistic bath models. If the phonon bath is treated classically, time evolution of the exciton-phonon system can be described by Ehrenfest dynamics. To establish the relationship between the stochastic and atomistic bath models, we employ a projection operator technique to derive the generalized Langevin equations for the energy-gap fluctuations. The stochastic bath model can be obtained as an approximation of the atomistic Ehrenfest equations via the generalized Langevin approach. Based on this connection, we propose a novel scheme to take account of reorganization effects within the framework of stochastic models. The proposed scheme provides a better description of the population dynamics especially in the regime of strong exciton-phonon coupling. Finally, we discuss the effect of the bath reorganization in the absorption and fluorescence spectra of ideal J-aggregates in terms of the Stokes shifts. We find a simple expression that relates the reorganization contribution to the Stokes shifts – the reorganization shift – to the ideal or non-ideal exciton delocalization in a J-aggregate. The reorganization shift can be described by three parameters: the monomer reorganization energy, the relaxation time of the optical gap, and the exciton delocalization length. This simple relationship allows one to understand the physical origin of the Stokes shifts in molecular aggregates.

  11. A stochastic reorganizational bath model for electronic energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Huh, Joonsuk; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-06-28

    Environmentally induced fluctuations of the optical gap play a crucial role in electronic energy transfer dynamics. One of the simplest approaches to incorporate such fluctuations in energy transfer dynamics is the well known Haken-Strobl-Reineker (HSR) model, in which the energy-gap fluctuation is approximated as white noise. Recently, several groups have employed molecular dynamics simulations and excited-state calculations in conjunction to account for excitation energies' thermal fluctuations. On the other hand, since the original work of HSR, many groups have employed stochastic models to simulate the same transfer dynamics. Here, we discuss a rigorous connection between the stochastic and the atomistic bath models. If the phonon bath is treated classically, time evolution of the exciton-phonon system can be described by Ehrenfest dynamics. To establish the relationship between the stochastic and atomistic bath models, we employ a projection operator technique to derive the generalized Langevin equations for the energy-gap fluctuations. The stochastic bath model can be obtained as an approximation of the atomistic Ehrenfest equations via the generalized Langevin approach. Based on this connection, we propose a novel scheme to take account of reorganization effects within the framework of stochastic models. The proposed scheme provides a better description of the population dynamics especially in the regime of strong exciton-phonon coupling. Finally, we discuss the effect of the bath reorganization in the absorption and fluorescence spectra of ideal J-aggregates in terms of the Stokes shifts. We find a simple expression that relates the reorganization contribution to the Stokes shifts - the reorganization shift - to the ideal or non-ideal exciton delocalization in a J-aggregate. The reorganization shift can be described by three parameters: the monomer reorganization energy, the relaxation time of the optical gap, and the exciton delocalization length. This simple relationship allows one to understand the physical origin of the Stokes shifts in molecular aggregates. PMID:24985614

  12. A stochastic reorganizational bath model for electronic energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Huh, Joonsuk; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-06-01

    Environmentally induced fluctuations of the optical gap play a crucial role in electronic energy transfer dynamics. One of the simplest approaches to incorporate such fluctuations in energy transfer dynamics is the well known Haken-Strobl-Reineker (HSR) model, in which the energy-gap fluctuation is approximated as white noise. Recently, several groups have employed molecular dynamics simulations and excited-state calculations in conjunction to account for excitation energies' thermal fluctuations. On the other hand, since the original work of HSR, many groups have employed stochastic models to simulate the same transfer dynamics. Here, we discuss a rigorous connection between the stochastic and the atomistic bath models. If the phonon bath is treated classically, time evolution of the exciton-phonon system can be described by Ehrenfest dynamics. To establish the relationship between the stochastic and atomistic bath models, we employ a projection operator technique to derive the generalized Langevin equations for the energy-gap fluctuations. The stochastic bath model can be obtained as an approximation of the atomistic Ehrenfest equations via the generalized Langevin approach. Based on this connection, we propose a novel scheme to take account of reorganization effects within the framework of stochastic models. The proposed scheme provides a better description of the population dynamics especially in the regime of strong exciton-phonon coupling. Finally, we discuss the effect of the bath reorganization in the absorption and fluorescence spectra of ideal J-aggregates in terms of the Stokes shifts. We find a simple expression that relates the reorganization contribution to the Stokes shifts - the reorganization shift - to the ideal or non-ideal exciton delocalization in a J-aggregate. The reorganization shift can be described by three parameters: the monomer reorganization energy, the relaxation time of the optical gap, and the exciton delocalization length. This simple relationship allows one to understand the physical origin of the Stokes shifts in molecular aggregates.

  13. Solvent dynamical effects on bond-breaking electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianjun; Spirina, O. B.; Cukier, R. I.

    1994-06-01

    The effects of solvent and intramolecular dynamics on the rates of bond-breaking electron transfer (BBET) reactions is investigated. In the model we adopt, suggested by Saveant [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 109, 6788 (1987)], electron transfer and bond breaking are considered to occur as a concerted process. Thermal equilibrium rate constants kie [i=1(2) denoting the forward (reverse) reaction] are derived and exhibit a characteristic Marcus form, with the reorganization energy equal to the sum of contributions from the solvent, intramolecular vibrational and bond-breaking coordinates. The effect of dynamics on the BBET rate constants is studied by using diffusion-reaction equations. We assume that the intramolecular vibrational coordinate is in equilibrium and the solvent and the bond-breaking coordinates can be out of equilibrium. The survival probabilities are derived analytically with the use of a decoupling approximation. The single exponential decay of the survival probabilities leads to nonthermal-equilibrium rate constants ki that interpolate between the thermal equilibrium kie and diffusion controlled kid rate constants (where motion along the nonequilibrium coordinates control the rate) according to k-1i=k-1ie+k-1id. The diffusion controlled rate constants kid depend on the relaxation times along both the bond-breaking and solvent coordinates. For large activation energies, the fast relaxation will dominate the rate, while for small activation energies, the slow relaxation time will dominate the rate. We also discuss the case of the dynamics along the bond-breaking coordinate being characterized by an energy diffusion process. The rate constant is evaluated for high activation barrier reactions and still has the form given above, with a suitably redefined relaxation time for energy diffusion.

  14. Magnetic Silica-Supported Ruthenium Nanoparticles: An Efficient Catalyst for Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    One-pot synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles on magnetic silica is described which involve the in situ generation of magnetic silica (Fe3O4@ SiO2) and ruthenium nano particles immobilization; the hydration of nitriles and transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds occurs in hi...

  15. Visible-light-mediated utilization of α-aminoalkyl radicals: addition to electron-deficient alkenes using photoredox catalysts.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Kazunari; Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2012-02-22

    Synthetic use of α-aminoalkyl radicals formed by single electron oxidation of amines is quite limited. Here we demonstrate addition of α-aminoalkyl radicals to electron-deficient alkenes by visible-light-mediated electron transfer using transition metal polypyridyl complexes as photocatalysts, via a sequential redox pathway. PMID:22296639

  16. Electron transfer from flavin to iron in the Pseudomonas oleovorans rubredoxin reductase-rubredoxin electron transfer complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, H J; Basran, J; Scrutton, N S

    1998-11-01

    Rubredoxin reductase (RR) and rubredoxin form a soluble and physiological eT complex. The complex provides reducing equivalents for a membrane-bound omega-hydroxylase, required for the hydroxylation of alkanes and related compounds. The gene (alkT) encoding RR has been overexpressed and the enzyme purified in amounts suitable for studies of eT by stopped-flow spectroscopy. The eT reactions from NADH to the flavin of RR and from reduced RR to the 1Fe and 2Fe forms of rubredoxin have been characterized by transient kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. The reductive half-reaction proceeds in a one-step reaction involving oxidized enzyme and a two-electron-reduced enzyme-NAD+ charge-transfer complex. Flavin reduction is observed at 450 nm and charge-transfer formation at 750 nm; both steps are hyperbolically dependent on NADH concentration. The limiting flavin reduction rate (180 +/- 4 s-1) is comparable to the limiting rate for charge-transfer formation (189 +/- 7 s-1) and analysis at 450 and 750 nm yielded enzyme-NADH dissociation constants of 36 +/- 2 and 43 +/- 5 microM, respectively. Thermodynamic analysis of the reductive half-reaction yielded values for changes in entropy (DeltaS = -65.8 +/- 2.2 J mol-1 K-1), enthalpy (DeltaH = 37.8 +/- 0.6 kJ mol-1) and Gibbs free energy (DeltaG = 57.5 +/- 0.7 kJ mol-1 at 298 K) during hydride ion transfer to the flavin N5 atom. Spectral analysis of mixtures of 1Fe or 2Fe rubredoxin and RR suggest that conformational changes accompany eT complex assembly. Both the 1Fe (nonphysiological) and 2Fe (physiological) forms of rubredoxin were found to oxidize two electron-reduced rubredoxin reductase with approximately equal facility. Rates for the reduction of rubredoxin are hyperbolically dependent on rubredoxin concentration and the limiting rates are 72. 7 +/- 0.6 and 55.2 +/- 0.3 s-1 for the 1Fe and 2Fe forms, respectively. Analysis of the temperature dependence of eT to rubredoxin using eT theory revealed that the reaction is not adequately described as a nonadiabatic eT reaction (HAB > 80 cm-1). eT to both the 1Fe and 2Fe forms of rubredoxin is therefore gated by an adiabatic process that precedes the eT reaction from flavin to iron. Possible origins of this adiabatic event are discussed. PMID:9799514

  17. Redox induced electron transfer in doublet azo-anion diradical rhenium(II) complexes. Characterization of complete electron transfer series.

    PubMed

    Paul, Nandadulal; Samanta, Subhas; Goswami, Sreebrata

    2010-03-15

    Reactions of dirhenium decacarbonyl with the two azoaromatic ligands, L(a) = (2-phenylazo)pyridine and L(b) = (4-chloro-2-phenylazo)pyridine (general abbreviation of the ligands is L) afford paramagnetic rhenium(II) complexes, [Re(II)(L(*-))(2)(CO)(2)] (1) (S = 1/2 ground state) with two one-electron reduced azo-anion radical ligands in an octahedral geometrical arrangement. At room temperature (300 K) the complexes 1a-b, showed magnetic moments (mu(eff)) close to 1.94 mu(B), which is suggestive of the existence of strong antiferromagnetic interactions in the complexes. The results of magnetic measurements on one of the complexes, 1b, in the temperature range 2-300 K are reported. The above complexes showed two cathodic and two anodic responses in cyclic voltammetry where one-electron oxidation leads to an unusual redox event involving simultaneous reduction of the rhenium(II) and oxidation of the second ligand via intramolecular electron transfer. The oxidized complexes 1a(+) and 1b(+) are air stable and were isolated as crystalline solids as their tri-iodide (I(3)(-)) salts. The structures of the two representative complexes, 1b and [1b]I(3), as determined by X-ray crystallography, are compared. The anionic complexes, [1](-) and [1](2-) were characterized in solution by their spectral properties. PMID:20170136

  18. Transfer-free graphene synthesis on sapphire by catalyst metal agglomeration technique and demonstration of top-gate field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, Makoto Arima, Yukinori; Kubo, Toshiharu; Egawa, Takashi; Mizuno, Masaya; Soga, Tetsuo

    2015-08-17

    Transfer-free graphene synthesis was performed on sapphire substrates by using the catalyst metal agglomeration technique, and the graphene film quality was compared to that synthesized on sputtered SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates. Raman scattering measurements indicated that the graphene film on sapphire has better structural qualities than that on sputtered SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates. The cross-sectional transmission microscopic study also revealed that the film flatness was drastically improved by using sapphire substrates instead of sputtered SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates. These quality improvements seemed to be due the chemical and thermal stabilities of sapphire. Top-gate field-effect transistors were fabricated using the graphene films on sapphire, and it was confirmed that their drain current can be modulated with applied gate voltages. The maximum field-effect mobilities were estimated to be 720 cm{sup 2}/V s for electrons and 880 cm{sup 2}/V s for holes, respectively.

  19. Ions interacting with planar aromatic molecules: Modeling electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, B. O.; Alexander, J. D.; Chen, T.; Pettersson, A. T.; Gatchell, M.; Cederquist, H.; Zettergren, H.

    2013-02-07

    We present theoretical absolute charge exchange cross sections for multiply charged cations interacting with the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules pyrene C{sub 14}H{sub 10}, coronene C{sub 24}H{sub 12}, or circumcoronene C{sub 54}H{sub 18}. These planar, nearly circular, PAHs are modelled as conducting, infinitely thin, and perfectly circular discs, which are randomly oriented with respect to straight line ion trajectories. We present the analytical solution for the potential energy surface experienced by an electron in the field of such a charged disc and a point-charge at an arbitrary position. The location and height of the corresponding potential energy barrier from this simple model are in close agreement with those from much more computationally demanding Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations in a number of test cases. The model results compare favourably with available experimental data on single- and multiple electron transfer reactions and we demonstrate that it is important to include the orientation dependent polarizabilities of the molecules (model discs) in particular for the larger PAHs. PAH ionization energy sequences from DFT are tabulated and used as model inputs. Absolute cross sections for the ionization of PAH molecules, and PAH ionization energies such as the ones presented here may be useful when considering the roles of PAHs and their ions in, e.g., interstellar chemistry, stellar atmospheres, and in related photoabsorption and photoemission spectroscopies.

  20. Electronically conducting proton exchange polymers as catalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction, hydrogen oxidation, and methanol oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, M.C.; Qi, Z.; Pickup, P.G.

    1999-06-01

    A variety of supported catalysts were prepared by the chemical deposition of Pt and Pt-Ru particles on chemically prepared poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrene-4-sulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS) and PEDOT/polyvinylsulfate (PVS) composites. The polymer particles were designed to provide a porous, proton-conducting and electron-conducting catalyst support for use in fuel cells. These polymer-supported catalysts were characterized by electron microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and conductivity measurements. Their catalytic activities toward hydrogen and methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction were evaluated in proton exchange membrane fuel-cell-type gas diffusion electrodes. Activities for oxygen reduction comparable to that obtained with a commercial carbon-supported catalyst were observed, whereas those for hydrogen and methanol oxidation were significantly inferior, although still high for prototype catalysts.

  1. 12 CFR 205.14 - Electronic fund transfer service provider not holding consumer's account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Electronic fund transfer service provider not holding consumer's account. 205.14 Section 205.14 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM ELECTRONIC FUND TRANSFERS (REGULATION E) § 205.14 Electronic...

  2. "Sticky electrons" transport and interfacial transfer of electrons in the dye-sensitized solar cell.

    PubMed

    Peter, Laurence

    2009-11-17

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs, also known as Gratzel cells) mimic the photosynthetic process by using a sensitizer dye to harvest light energy to generate electrical power. Several functional features of these photochemical devices are unusual, and DSC research offers a rewarding arena in which to test new ideas, new materials, and new methodologies. Indeed, one of the most attractive chemical features of the DSC is that the basic concept can be used to construct a range of devices, replacing individual components with alternative materials. Despite two decades of increasing research activity, however, many aspects of the behavior of electrons in the DSC remain puzzling. In this Account, we highlight current understanding of the processes involved in the functioning of the DSC, with particular emphasis on what happens to the electrons in the mesoporous film following the injection step. The collection of photoinjected electrons appears to involve a random walk process in which electrons move through the network of interconnected titanium dioxide nanoparticles while undergoing frequent trapping and detrapping. During their passage to the cell contact, electrons may be lost by transfer to tri-iodide species in the redox electrolyte that permeates the mesoporous film. Competition between electron collection and back electron transfer determines the performance of a DSC: ideally, all injected electrons should be collected without loss. This Account then goes on to survey recent experimental and theoretical progress in the field, placing particular emphasis on issues that need to be resolved before we can gain a clear picture of how the DSC works. Several important questions about the behavior of "sticky" electrons, those that undergo multiple trapping and detrapping, in the DSC remain unanswered. The most fundamental of these concerns is the nature of the electron traps that appear to dominate the time-dependent photocurrent and photovoltage response of DSCs. The origin of the nonideality factor in the relationship between the intensity and the DSC photovoltage is also unclear, as is the discrepancy in electron diffusion length values determined by steady-state and non-steady-state methods. With these unanswered questions, DSC research is likely to remain an active and fruitful area for some years to come. PMID:19637905

  3. Membrane catalyst layer for fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1993-01-01

    A gas reaction fuel cell incorporates a thin catalyst layer between a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) membrane and a porous electrode backing. The catalyst layer is preferably less than about 10 .mu.m in thickness with a carbon supported platinum catalyst loading less than about 0.35 mgPt/cm.sup.2. The film is formed as an ink that is spread and cured on a film release blank. The cured film is then transferred to the SPE membrane and hot pressed into the surface to form a catalyst layer having a controlled thickness and catalyst distribution. Alternatively, the catalyst layer is formed by applying a Na.sup.+ form of a perfluorosulfonate ionomer directly to the membrane, drying the film at a high temperature, and then converting the film back to the protonated form of the ionomer. The layer has adequate gas permeability so that cell performance is not affected and has a density and particle distribution effective to optimize proton access to the catalyst and electronic continuity for electron flow from the half-cell reaction occurring at the catalyst.

  4. Identification of Catalysts and Materials for a High-Energy Density Biochemical Fuel Cell: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-345

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirardi, M.; Svedruzic, D.

    2013-07-01

    The proposed research attempted to identify novel biochemical catalysts, catalyst support materials, high-efficiency electron transfer agents between catalyst active sites and electrodes, and solid-phase electrolytes in order to maximize the current density of biochemical fuel cells that utilize various alcohols as substrates.

  5. Photoinduced electron transfer reaction in polymer-surfactant aggregates: Photoinduced electron transfer between N,N-dimethylaniline and 7-amino coumarin dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Anjan; Seth, Debabrata; Setua, Palash; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2008-05-28

    Photoinduced electron transfer between coumarin dyes and N,N-dimethylaniline has been investigated by using steady state and picosecond time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) micelles and PVP-polyvinyl pyrrolidone (SDS) polymer-surfactant aggregates. A slower rate of electron transfer is observed in PVP-SDS aggregates than in polymer-free SDS micelles. A Marcus type inversion is observed in the correlation of free energy change in comparison with the electron transfer rate. The careful investigation reveals that C-151 deviates from the normal Marcus inverted region compared to its analogs C-152 and C-481 due to slower rotational relaxation and smaller translational diffusion coefficient.

  6. Ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer reactions in supramolecular arrays: Studies of electronic coupling and solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Wiederrecht, G.P.; Svec, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    Research in our laboratory focuses on developing supramolecular arrays that produce long-lived charge separation by limiting the electronic coupling between the separated charges, and on the role of solvation in determining the rates and energetics of photoinitiated electron transfer reactions. Arrays have been developed that closely mimic the electronic coupling that was observed only for long-lived radical pairs produced in photosynthetic glassy solids. A series of 36 fixed-distance donor-acceptor molecules using porphyrin donors, triptycene spacers, and 9 different acceptors has been prepared; these are used to probe the dependence of photoinduced charge separation rates on free energy of reaction as a function of solvent both in liquid and solid solution. Data were obtained on rates of charge separation in dioxane, MTHF, butyronitrile, toluene, chlorobenzene, and benzonitrile.

  7. Ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer reactions in supramolecular arrays: Studies of electronic coupling and solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Wiederrecht, G.P.; Svec, W.A.

    1993-05-01

    Research in our laboratory focuses on developing supramolecular arrays that produce long-lived charge separation by limiting the electronic coupling between the separated charges, and on the role of solvation in determining the rates and energetics of photoinitiated electron transfer reactions. Arrays have been developed that closely mimic the electronic coupling that was observed only for long-lived radical pairs produced in photosynthetic glassy solids. A series of 36 fixed-distance donor-acceptor molecules using porphyrin donors, triptycene spacers, and 9 different acceptors has been prepared; these are used to probe the dependence of photoinduced charge separation rates on free energy of reaction as a function of solvent both in liquid and solid solution. Data were obtained on rates of charge separation in dioxane, MTHF, butyronitrile, toluene, chlorobenzene, and benzonitrile.

  8. Interfacial Electron Transfer and Transient Photoconductivity Studied with Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milot, Rebecca Lee

    Terahertz spectroscopy is distinguished from other far infrared and millimeter wave spectroscopies by its inherent phase sensitivity and sub-picosecond time resolution making it a versatile technique to study a wide range of physical phenomena. As THz spectroscopy is still a relatively new field, many aspects of THz generation mechanisms have not been fully examined. Using terahertz emission spectroscopy (TES), THz emission from ZnTe(110) was analyzed and found to be limited by two-photon absorption and free-carrier generation at high excitation fluences. Due to concerns about the continued use of fossil fuels, solar energy has been widely investigated as a promising source of renewable energy. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have been developed as a low-cost alternative to conventional photovoltaic solar cells. To solve the issues of the intermittency and inefficient transport associated with solar energy, researchers are attempting to adapt DSSCs for water oxidation and chemical fuel production. Both device designs incorporate sensitizer molecules covalently bound to metal oxide nanoparticles. The sensitizer, which is comprised of a chromophore and anchoring group, absorbs light and transfers an electron from its excited state to the conduction band of the metal oxide, producing an electric current. Using time-resolved THz spectroscopy (TRTS), an optical pump/THz probe technique, the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from sensitizers to metal oxides was evaluated as a function of the chromophore, its anchoring group, and the metal oxide identity. Experiments for studying fully functioning DSSCs and water oxidation devices are also described. Bio-inspired pentafluorophenyl porphyrin chromophores have been designed and synthesized for use in photoelectrochemical water oxidation cells. Influences on the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from the chromophores into TiO2 and SnO2 nanoparticles due to changes in both the central substituent to the porphyrin ring and degree of fluorination of ring substituents were analyzed. Due to the high reduction potentials of these sensitizers, injection into TiO2 was generally not observed. Injection timescales from the porphyrins into SnO2 depended strongly on the identity of the central substituent and were affected by competition with excited-state deactivation processes. The carboxylate anchoring group is commonly used to bind DSSC sensitizers to metal oxide surfaces but is typically not stable under the aqueous and oxidative conditions required for water oxidation. Electron injection efficiency and water stability of several alternative anchoring groups, including phosphonic acid, hydroxamic acid, acerylacetone, and boronic acid, were evaluated. While all of the anchoring groups exhibited water stability superior to carboxylate, the hydroxamate anchor had the best combination of ease of handling and electron injection efficiency. The effects on photoconductivity due to metal oxide morphology and the addition of dopants were also analyzed. Mixtures of anatase and rutile TiO 2 nanoparticles are known to exhibit cooperative effects which increase the efficiency of DSSCs and photocatalysis relative to the pure-phase materials. Through analysis of TRTS measurements, the mechanism of this synergistic effect was found to involve electron transfer from the lower-mobility, higher surface area rutile nanoparticles to anatase particles, resulting in a higher charge collection efficiency. In addition to morphology, doping has been investigated as a means of expanding the spectral range of visible absorption of photocatalysts. Doping ZnO nanowires with manganese(II) was found to significantly decrease the electron mobility, and doping with cobalt(II) increased the timescale for electron trapping. These differences can be understood by considering the changes to the band structure of ZnO effected by the dopants. Preliminary analyses of the solvent and electrolyte dependence on the electron injection rate and efficiency suggest that electron injection can be affected by several components of a DSSC or water oxidation cell in addition to the sensitizer and metal oxide. Performing TRTS studies on fully assembled devices will therefore be essential for determining the relationship between electron injection and device efficiency.

  9. Unusual non-bifunctional mechanism for Co-PNP complex catalyzed transfer hydrogenation governed by the electronic configuration of metal center.

    PubMed

    Hou, Cheng; Jiang, Jingxing; Li, Yinwu; Zhang, Zhihan; Zhao, Cunyuan; Ke, Zhuofeng

    2015-10-01

    The mimic of hydrogenases has unleashed a myriad of bifunctional catalysts, which are widely used in the catalytic hydrogenation of polar multiple bonds. With respect to ancillary ligands, the bifunctional mechanism is generally considered to proceed via the metal-ligand cooperation transition state. Inspired by the interesting study conducted by Hanson et al. (Chem Commun., 2013, 49, 10151), we present a computational study of a distinctive example, where a Co(II)-PNP catalyst with an ancillary ligand exhibits efficient transfer hydrogenation through a non-bifunctional mechanism. Both the bifunctional and non-bifunctional mechanisms are discussed. The calculated results, which are based on a full model of the catalyst, suggest that the inner-sphere non-bifunctional mechanism is more favorable (by ∼11 kcal mol(-1)) than the outer-sphere bifunctional mechanism, which is in agreement with the experimental observations. The origin of this mechanistic preference of the Co(II)-PNP catalyst can be attributed to its preference for the square planar geometry. A traditional bifunctional mechanism is less plausible for Co(II)-PNP due to the high distortion energy caused by the change in electronic configuration with the varied ligand field. Considering previous studies that focus on the development of ligands more often, this computational study indicates that the catalytic hydrogenation mechanism is controlled not only by the structure of the ligand but also by the electronic configuration of the metal center. PMID:26332273

  10. Tuning photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer by electron accepting and donating substituents in oxazolones.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Gülsiye; Karabıyık, Hasan; Aygün, Muhittin; Alp, Serap; Ozçelik, Serdar

    2013-07-01

    The solvatochromic and spectral properties of oxazolone derivatives in various solvents were reported. Fluorescence spectra clearly showed positive and negative solvatochromism depending on substituents. The solvatochromic plots and quantum chemical computations at DFT-B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) level were used to assess dipole moment changes between the ground and the first excited singlet-states. The electron accepting nitro substituent at the para-position increased the π-electron mobility, however, the 3,5-dinitro substituent decreased the π-electron mobility as a result of inverse accumulation of the electronic density as compared with that of its ground state. Experimental and computational studies proved that the photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer (PIET) is responsible for the observed solvatochromic effects. We demonstrate that PIET can be finely tailored by the position of the electron accepting and donating substituents in the phenyl ring of the oxazolone derivatives. We propose that the photoactive CPO derivatives are new molecular class of conjugated push-pull structures using azlactone moiety as the π-conjugated linker and may find applications in photovoltaic cells and light emitting diodes. PMID:23494168

  11. Reorganization energy of electron transfer processes in ionic fluids: A molecular Debye-Hueckel approach

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Tiejun; Song Xueyu

    2013-03-21

    The reorganization energy of electron transfer processes in ionic fluids is studied under the linear response approximation using a molecule Debye-Hueckel theory. Reorganization energies of some model reactants of electron transfer reactions in molten salts are obtained from molecular simulations and a molecule Debye-Hueckel approach. Good agreements between simulation results and the results from our theoretical calculations using the same model Hamiltonian are found. Applications of our theory to electron transfer reactions in room temperature ionic liquids further demonstrate that our theoretical approach presents a reliable and accurate methodology for the estimation of reorganization energies of electron transfer reactions in ionic fluids.

  12. Reorganization energy of electron transfer processes in ionic fluids: A molecular Debye-Hückel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Tiejun; Song, Xueyu

    2013-03-01

    The reorganization energy of electron transfer processes in ionic fluids is studied under the linear response approximation using a molecule Debye-Hückel theory. Reorganization energies of some model reactants of electron transfer reactions in molten salts are obtained from molecular simulations and a molecule Debye-Hückel approach. Good agreements between simulation results and the results from our theoretical calculations using the same model Hamiltonian are found. Applications of our theory to electron transfer reactions in room temperature ionic liquids further demonstrate that our theoretical approach presents a reliable and accurate methodology for the estimation of reorganization energies of electron transfer reactions in ionic fluids.

  13. Reorganization energy of electron transfer processes in ionic fluids: a molecular Debye-Hückel approach.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Tiejun; Song, Xueyu

    2013-03-21

    The reorganization energy of electron transfer processes in ionic fluids is studied under the linear response approximation using a molecule Debye-Hückel theory. Reorganization energies of some model reactants of electron transfer reactions in molten salts are obtained from molecular simulations and a molecule Debye-Hückel approach. Good agreements between simulation results and the results from our theoretical calculations using the same model Hamiltonian are found. Applications of our theory to electron transfer reactions in room temperature ionic liquids further demonstrate that our theoretical approach presents a reliable and accurate methodology for the estimation of reorganization energies of electron transfer reactions in ionic fluids. PMID:23534625

  14. Electron transfer dissociation of multiply protonated and fixed charge disulfide linked polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawardena, Harsha P.; Gorenstein, Lev; Erickson, David E.; Xia, Yu; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2007-09-01

    Multiply protonated disulfide linked peptides and fixed charged analogs have been subjected to electron transfer ion/ion reactions to examine the role of excess protons in inducing cleavage of the disulfide bond in electron transfer dissociation. Systems in which all of the excess charge was due to fixed charge sites (i.e., quaternary ammonium groups) showed somewhat more disulfide bond cleavage than the fully protonated species. This observation argues against a major role for a mechanism that requires hydrogen transfer to the disulfide bond as a prerequisite for its cleavage. Interestingly, species with mixed cation sites (one or more excess protons and one or more fixed charge side chains) showed lower propensities for disulfide bond cleavage than either the corresponding fully protonated or fully derivatized species. This observation is not likely to be accounted for by direct electron transfer to a Coulomb stabilized disulfide bond because the identities of the charge bearing sites are not expected to play a significant role in the degree of stabilization. The results appear to be best rationalized on the basis of the [`]through bond electron transfer' mechanism of Simons et al., in conjunction with rate limiting intramolecular electron transfer(s) between charge bearing sites. Intramolecular electron transfer between charge sites can play a role in mediating electron movement from the site of initial electron capture to the site from which an electron is transferred to the disulfide anti-bonding orbital.

  15. Cobalt(III) tetraaza-macrocyclic complexes as efficient catalyst for photoinduced hydrogen production in water: Theoretical investigation of the electronic structure of the reduced species and mechanistic insight.

    PubMed

    Gueret, Robin; Castillo, Carmen E; Rebarz, Mateusz; Thomas, Fabrice; Hargrove, Aaron-Albert; Pécaut, Jacques; Sliwa, Michel; Fortage, Jérôme; Collomb, Marie-Noëlle

    2015-11-01

    We recently reported a very efficient homogeneous system for visible-light driven hydrogen production in water based on the cobalt(III) tetraaza-macrocyclic complex [Co(CR)Cl2](+) (1) (CR=2,12-dimethyl-3,7,11,17-tetra-azabicyclo(11.3.1)-heptadeca-1(17),2,11,13,15-pentaene) as a noble metal-free catalyst, with [Ru(II)(bpy)3](2+) (Ru) as photosensitizer and ascorbate/ascorbic acid (HA(-)/H2A) as a sacrificial electron donor and buffer (PhysChemChemPhys 2013, 15, 17544). This catalyst presents the particularity to achieve very high turnover numbers (TONs) (up to 1000) at pH 4.0 at a relative high concentration (0.1mM) generating a large amount of hydrogen and having a long term stability. A similar activity was observed for the aquo derivative [Co(III)(CR)(H2O)2](3+) (2) due to substitution of chloro ligands by water molecule in water. In this work, the geometry and electronic structures of 2 and its analog [Zn(II)(CR)Cl](+) (3) derivative containing the redox innocent Zn(II) metal ion have been investigated by DFT calculations under various oxidation states. We also further studied the photocatalytic activity of this system and evaluated the influence of varying the relative concentration of the different components on the H2-evolving activity. Turnover numbers versus catalyst (TONCat) were found to be dependent on the catalyst concentration with the highest value of 1130 obtained at 0.05 mM. Interestingly, the analogous nickel derivative, [Ni(II)(CR)Cl2] (4), when tested under the same experimental conditions was found to be fully inactive for H2 production. Nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy measurements have revealed that the first electron-transfer steps of the photocatalytic H2-evolution mechanism with the Ru/cobalt tetraaza/HA(-)/H2A system involve a reductive quenching of the excited state of the photosensitizer by ascorbate (kq=2.5×10(7) M(-1) s(-1)) followed by an electron transfer from the reduced photosensitizer to the catalyst (ket=1.4×10(9) M(-1) s(-1)). The reduced catalyst can then enter into the cycle of hydrogen evolution. PMID:25997378

  16. Bulk-surface relationship of an electronic structure for high-throughput screening of metal oxide catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweun, Joshua Minwoo; Li, Chenzhe; Zheng, Yongping; Cho, Maenghyo; Kim, Yoon Young; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2016-05-01

    Designing metal-oxides consisting of earth-abundant elements has been a crucial issue to replace precious metal catalysts. To achieve efficient screening of metal-oxide catalysts via bulk descriptors rather than surface descriptors, we investigated the relationship between the electronic structure of bulk and that of the surface for lanthanum-based perovskite oxides, LaMO3 (M = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu). Through density functional theory calculations, we examined the d-band occupancy of the bulk and surface transition-metal atoms (nBulk and nSurf) and the adsorption energy of an oxygen atom (Eads) on (001), (110), and (111) surfaces. For the (001) surface, we observed strong correlation between the nBulk and nSurf with an R-squared value over 94%, and the result was interpreted in terms of ligand field splitting and antibonding/bonding level splitting. Moreover, the Eads on the surfaces was highly correlated with the nBulk with an R-squared value of more than 94%, and different surface relaxations could be explained by the bulk electronic structure (e.g., LaMnO3 vs. LaTiO3). These results suggest that a bulk-derived descriptor such as nBulk can be used to screen metal-oxide catalysts.

  17. Insights into Ru-based molecular water oxidation catalysts: electronic and noncovalent-interaction effects on their catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lele; Wang, Lei; Inge, A Ken; Fischer, Andreas; Zou, Xiaodong; Sun, Licheng

    2013-07-15

    A series of Ru-bda water oxidation catalysts [Ru(bda)L2] (H2bda = 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid; L = [HNEt3][3-SO3-pyridine], 1; 4-(EtOOC)-pyridine, 2; 4-bromopyridine, 3; pyridine, 4; 4-methoxypyridine, 5; 4-(Me2N)-pyridine, 6; 4-[Ph(CH2)3]-pyridine, 7) were synthesized with electron-donating/-withdrawing groups and hydrophilic/hydrophobic groups in the axial ligands. These complexes were characterized by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, high-resolution mass spectrometry, elemental analysis, and electrochemistry. In addition, complexes 1 and 6 were further identified by single crystal X-ray crystallography, revealing a highly distorted octahedral configuration of the Ru coordination sphere. All of these complexes are highly active toward Ce(IV)-driven (Ce(IV) = Ce(NH4)2(NO3)6) water oxidation with oxygen evolution rates up to 119 mols of O2 per mole of catalyst per second. Their structure-activity relationship was investigated. Electron-withdrawing and noncovalent interactions (attraction) exhibit positive effect on the catalytic activity of Ru-bda catalysts. PMID:23808491

  18. Nitrate storage behavior of Ba/MnOx-CeO2 catalyst and its activity for soot oxidation with heat transfer limitations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaodong; Liu, Shuang; Lin, Fan; Weng, Duan

    2010-09-15

    A BaMnCe ternary catalyst was prepared by impregnating barium acetate on MnO(x)-CeO(2) mixed oxides, with the monoxide supported catalysts and the solid solution support as references. The activities of the catalysts for soot oxidation were evaluated in the presence of NO under an energy transference controlled regime. BaMnCe presented the lowest maximal soot oxidation rate temperature at 393 degrees C among the catalysts investigated. Although BaMnCe experienced a loss in the specific surface area and low-temperature redox property due to blocking of the support pores by barium carbonate, its superior soot oxidation activity highlighted the importance of relatively stable bidentate/monodentate nitrates coordinated to Mn(x+) and Ce(x+) sites and more stable ionic barium nitrate. About half of the nitrates stored on this catalyst decomposed within the temperature interval of 350-450 degrees C, and the ignition temperature of soot decreased significantly with involvement of the nitrates or NO(2) released. PMID:20538410

  19. The electron transfer complex between nitrous oxide reductase and its electron donors.

    PubMed

    Dell'acqua, Simone; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G; Pauleta, Sofia R

    2011-12-01

    Identifying redox partners and the interaction surfaces is crucial for fully understanding electron flow in a respiratory chain. In this study, we focused on the interaction of nitrous oxide reductase (N(2)OR), which catalyzes the final step in bacterial denitrification, with its physiological electron donor, either a c-type cytochrome or a type 1 copper protein. The comparison between the interaction of N(2)OR from three different microorganisms, Pseudomonas nautica, Paracoccus denitrificans, and Achromobacter cycloclastes, with their physiological electron donors was performed through the analysis of the primary sequence alignment, electrostatic surface, and molecular docking simulations, using the bimolecular complex generation with global evaluation and ranking algorithm. The docking results were analyzed taking into account the experimental data, since the interaction is suggested to have either a hydrophobic nature, in the case of P. nautica N(2)OR, or an electrostatic nature, in the case of P. denitrificans N(2)OR and A. cycloclastes N(2)OR. A set of well-conserved residues on the N(2)OR surface were identified as being part of the electron transfer pathway from the redox partner to N(2)OR (Ala495, Asp519, Val524, His566 and Leu568 numbered according to the P. nautica N(2)OR sequence). Moreover, we built a model for Wolinella succinogenes N(2)OR, an enzyme that has an additional c-type-heme-containing domain. The structures of the N(2)OR domain and the c-type-heme-containing domain were modeled and the full-length structure was obtained by molecular docking simulation of these two domains. The orientation of the c-type-heme-containing domain relative to the N(2)OR domain is similar to that found in the other electron transfer complexes. PMID:21739254

  20. Pore structure modification of diatomite as sulfuric acid catalyst support by high energy electron beam irradiation and hydrothermal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chong; Zhang, Guilong; Wang, Min; Chen, Jianfeng; Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan

    2014-08-01

    High energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation and hydrothermal treatment (HT), were applied in order to remove the impurities and enlarge the pore size of diatomite, making diatomite more suitable to be a catalyst support. The results demonstrated that, through thermal, charge, impact and etching effects, HEEB irradiation could make the impurities in the pores of diatomite loose and remove some of them. Then HT could remove rest of them from the pores and contribute significantly to the modification of the pore size distribution of diatomite due to thermal expansion, water swelling and thermolysis effects. Moreover, the pore structure modification improved the properties (BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) specific surface area, bulk density and pore volume) of diatomite and the catalytic efficiency of the catalyst prepared from the treated diatomite.

  1. Dynamic structural evolution of supported palladium–ceria core–shell catalysts revealed by in situ electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyi; Chen, Chen; Cargnello, Matteo; Fornasiero, Paolo; Gorte, Raymond J.; Graham, George W.; Pan, Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    The exceptional activity for methane combustion of modular palladium–ceria core–shell subunits on silicon-functionalized alumina that was recently reported has created renewed interest in the potential of core–shell structures as catalysts. Here we report on our use of advanced ex situ and in situ electron microscopy with atomic resolution to show that the modular palladium–ceria core–shell subunits undergo structural evolution over a wide temperature range. In situ observations performed in an atmospheric gas cell within this temperature range provide real-time evidence that the palladium and ceria nanoparticle constituents of the palladium–ceria core–shell participate in a dynamical process that leads to the formation of an unanticipated structure comprised of an intimate mixture of palladium, cerium, silicon and oxygen, with very high dispersion. This finding may open new perspectives about the origin of the activity of this catalyst. PMID:26160065

  2. Dynamic structural evolution of supported palladium-ceria core-shell catalysts revealed by in situ electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuyi; Chen, Chen; Cargnello, Matteo; Fornasiero, Paolo; Gorte, Raymond J; Graham, George W; Pan, Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    The exceptional activity for methane combustion of modular palladium-ceria core-shell subunits on silicon-functionalized alumina that was recently reported has created renewed interest in the potential of core-shell structures as catalysts. Here we report on our use of advanced ex situ and in situ electron microscopy with atomic resolution to show that the modular palladium-ceria core-shell subunits undergo structural evolution over a wide temperature range. In situ observations performed in an atmospheric gas cell within this temperature range provide real-time evidence that the palladium and ceria nanoparticle constituents of the palladium-ceria core-shell participate in a dynamical process that leads to the formation of an unanticipated structure comprised of an intimate mixture of palladium, cerium, silicon and oxygen, with very high dispersion. This finding may open new perspectives about the origin of the activity of this catalyst. PMID:26160065

  3. Vibrational and Electronic Energy Transfer and Dissociation of Diatomic Molecules by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At high altitudes and velocities equal to or greater than the geosynchronous return velocity (10 kilometers per second), the shock layer of a hypersonic flight will be in thermochemical nonequilibrium and partially ionized. The amount of ionization is determined by the velocity. For a trans atmospheric flight of 10 kilometers per second and at an altitude of 80 kilometers, a maximum of 1% ionization is expected. At a velocity of 12 - 17 kilometer per second, such as a Mars return mission, up to 30% of the atoms and molecules in the flow field will be ionized. Under those circumstances, electrons play an important role in determining the internal states of atoms and molecules in the flow field and hence the amount of radiative heat load and the distance it takes for the flow field to re-establish equilibrium. Electron collisions provide an effective means of transferring energy even when the electron number density is as low as 1%. Because the mass of an electron is 12,760 times smaller than the reduced mass of N2, its average speed, and hence its average collision frequency, is more than 100 times larger. Even in the slightly ionized regime with only 1% electrons, the frequency of electron-molecule collisions is equal to or larger than that of molecule-molecule collisions, an important consideration in the low density part of the atmosphere. Three electron-molecule collision processes relevant to hypersonic flows will be considered: (1) vibrational excitation/de-excitation of a diatomic molecule by electron impact, (2) electronic excitation/de-excitation, and (3) dissociative recombination in electron-diatomic ion collisions. A review of available data, both theory and experiment, will be given. Particular attention will be paid to tailoring the molecular physics to the condition of hypersonic flows. For example, the high rotational temperatures in a hypersonic flow field means that most experimental data carried out under room temperatures are not applicable. Also, the average electron temperature is expected to be between 10,000 and 20,000 K. Thus only data for low energy electrons are relevant to the model.

  4. Sensitization of ultra-long-range excited-state electron transfer by energy transfer in a polymerized film

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Akitaka; Stewart, David J.; Fang, Zhen; Brennaman, M. Kyle; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Distance-dependent energy transfer occurs from the Metal-to-Ligand Charge Transfer (MLCT) excited state to an anthracene-acrylate derivative (Acr-An) incorporated into the polymer network of a semirigid poly(ethyleneglycol)dimethacrylate monolith. Following excitation, to Acr-An triplet energy transfer occurs followed by long-range, Acr-3An—Acr-An → Acr-An—Acr-3An, energy migration. With methyl viologen dication (MV2+) added as a trap, Acr-3An + MV2+ → Acr-An+ + MV+ electron transfer results in sensitized electron transfer quenching over a distance of approximately 90 Å. PMID:22949698

  5. Accumulative charge separation for solar fuels production: coupling light-induced single electron transfer to multielectron catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hammarström, Leif

    2015-03-17

    The conversion and storage of solar energy into a fuel holds promise to provide a significant part of the future renewable energy demand of our societies. Solar energy technologies today generate heat or electricity, while the large majority of our energy is used in the form of fuels. Direct conversion of solar energy to a fuel would satisfy our needs for storable energy on a large scale. Solar fuels can be generated by absorbing light and converting its energy to chemical energy by electron transfer leading to separation of electrons and holes. The electrons are used in the catalytic reduction of a cheap substrate with low energy content into a high-energy fuel. The holes are filled by oxidation of water, which is the only electron source available for large scale solar fuel production. Absorption of a single photon typically leads to separation of a single electron-hole pair. In contrast, fuel production and water oxidation are multielectron, multiproton reactions. Therefore, a system for direct solar fuel production must be able to accumulate the electrons and holes provided by the sequential absorption of several photons in order to complete the catalytic reactions. In this Account, the process is termed accumulative charge separation. This is considerably more complicated than charge separation on a single electron level and needs particular attention. Semiconductor materials and molecular dyes have for a long time been optimized for use in photovoltaic devices. Efforts are made to develop new systems for light harvesting and charge separation that are better optimized for solar fuel production than those used in the early devices presented so far. Significant progress has recently been made in the discovery and design of better homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts for solar fuels and water oxidation. While the heterogeneous ones perform better today, molecular catalysts based on transition metal complexes offer much greater tunability of electronic and structural properties, they are typically more amenable to mechanistic analysis, and they are small and therefore require less material. Therefore, they have arguably greater potential as future efficient catalysts but must be efficiently coupled to accumulative charge separation. This Account discusses accumulative charge separation with focus on molecular and molecule-semiconductor hybrid systems. The coupling between charge separation and catalysis involves many challenges that are often overlooked, and they are not always apparent when studying water oxidation and fuel formation as separate half-reactions with sacrificial agents. Transition metal catalysts, as well as other multielectron donors and acceptors, cycle through many different states that may quench the excited sensitizer by nonproductive pathways. Examples where this has been shown, often with ultrafast rates, are reviewed. Strategies to avoid these competing energy-loss reactions and still obtain efficient coupling of charge separation to catalysis are discussed. This includes recent examples of dye-sensitized semiconductor devices with molecular catalysts and dyes that realize complete water splitting, albeit with limited efficiency. PMID:25675365

  6. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  7. DETERMINATION OF HETEROGENEOUS ELECTRON TRANSFER RATE CONSTANTS AT MICROFABRICATED IRIDIUM ELECTRODES. (R825511C022)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been an increasing use of both solid metal and microfabricated iridium electrodes as substrates for various types of electroanalysis. However, investigations to determine heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants on iridium, especially at an electron beam evapor...

  8. A high-resolution electron microscopy investigation of TiO sub 2 (B)-supported vanadium oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wallenberg, L.R.; Sanati, M.; Andersson, A. )

    1990-11-01

    TiO{sub 2}(B) crystals were found to be isomorphic with those of its precursor, K{sub 2}TI{sub 4}O{sub 9}. The former crystals had a large number of facetted voids, 3-30 nm, formed as a result of the removal of potassium and water in preceding hydrolysis and calcination steps, respectively. TiO{sub 2}(B)-supported vanadium oxide catalysts with loadings in the range 0.25-10 theoretical layers were prepared by impregnation of the support with an oxalic acid solution of NH{sub 4}VO{sub 3} followed by calcination in air. HREM micrographs of catalysts with a low vanadium loading, recorded using a low electron-dose imaging technique, showed that the surfaces, in the initial stage, were without any anomalous surface structure. This observation may be due to a similar structure of the support and the deposited vanadia phase. At high vanadium loadings, both amorphous and crystalline particles were seen, in agreement with the features revealed by the use of IR spectroscopy. For catalysts with low vanadium loadings, the IR difference spectra showed the presence of tetrahedrally coordinated V{sup 4+} and V{sub 5+} species. In a fully converged electron beam, reduction of the support and the vanadia phases occurred, resulting in the formation of small crystallites. The catalysts were used for the oxidation of toluene to benzaldehyde. However, contrary to what has been observed for the ammoxidation producing benzonitrile, no enhanced catalytic properties, in comparison with those of crystalline V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, were obtained using TiO{sub 2}(B) as support.

  9. Statistical analysis of electron transfer dissociation pairwise fragmentation patterns.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenzhou; Song, Chi; Bailey, Derek J; Tseng, George C; Coon, Joshua J; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2011-12-15

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) is an alternative peptide dissociation method developed in recent years. Compared with the traditional collision induced dissociation (CID) b and y ion formation, ETD generates c and z ions and the backbone cleavage is believed to be less selective. We have reported previously the application of a statistical data mining strategy, K-means clustering, to discover fragmentation patterns for CID, and here we report application of this approach to ETD spectra. We use ETD data sets from digestions with three different proteases. Data analysis shows that selective cleavages do exist for ETD, with the fragmentation patterns affected by protease, charge states, and amino acid residue compositions. It is also noticed that the c(n-1) ion, corresponding to loss of the C-terminal amino acid residue, is statistically strong regardless of the residue at the C-terminus of the peptide, which suggests that the peptide gas phase conformation plays an important role in the dissociation pathways. These patterns provide a basis for mechanism elucidation, spectral prediction, and improvement of ETD peptide identification algorithms. PMID:22022956

  10. Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlynn, Shawn E.; Chadwick, Grayson L.; Kempes, Christopher P.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2015-10-01

    Multicellular assemblages of microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and the proximity afforded by aggregation is thought to permit intercellular metabolic coupling that can accommodate otherwise unfavourable reactions. Consortia of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria are a well-known environmental example of microbial co-aggregation; however, the coupling mechanisms between these paired organisms is not well understood, despite the attention given them because of the global significance of anaerobic methane oxidation. Here we examined the influence of interspecies spatial positioning as it relates to biosynthetic activity within structurally diverse uncultured methane-oxidizing consortia by measuring stable isotope incorporation for individual archaeal and bacterial cells to constrain their potential metabolic interactions. In contrast to conventional models of syntrophy based on the passage of molecular intermediates, cellular activities were found to be independent of both species intermixing and distance between syntrophic partners within consortia. A generalized model of electric conductivity between co-associated archaea and bacteria best fit the empirical data. Combined with the detection of large multi-haem cytochromes in the genomes of methanotrophic archaea and the demonstration of redox-dependent staining of the matrix between cells in consortia, these results provide evidence for syntrophic coupling through direct electron transfer.

  11. Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Shawn E; Chadwick, Grayson L; Kempes, Christopher P; Orphan, Victoria J

    2015-10-22

    Multicellular assemblages of microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and the proximity afforded by aggregation is thought to permit intercellular metabolic coupling that can accommodate otherwise unfavourable reactions. Consortia of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria are a well-known environmental example of microbial co-aggregation; however, the coupling mechanisms between these paired organisms is not well understood, despite the attention given them because of the global significance of anaerobic methane oxidation. Here we examined the influence of interspecies spatial positioning as it relates to biosynthetic activity within structurally diverse uncultured methane-oxidizing consortia by measuring stable isotope incorporation for individual archaeal and bacterial cells to constrain their potential metabolic interactions. In contrast to conventional models of syntrophy based on the passage of molecular intermediates, cellular activities were found to be independent of both species intermixing and distance between syntrophic partners within consortia. A generalized model of electric conductivity between co-associated archaea and bacteria best fit the empirical data. Combined with the detection of large multi-haem cytochromes in the genomes of methanotrophic archaea and the demonstration of redox-dependent staining of the matrix between cells in consortia, these results provide evidence for syntrophic coupling through direct electron transfer. PMID:26375009

  12. Electron transfer precedes ATP hydrolysis during nitrogenase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Duval, Simon; Danyal, Karamatullah; Shaw, Sudipta; Lytle, Anna K; Dean, Dennis R; Hoffman, Brian M; Antony, Edwin; Seefeldt, Lance C

    2013-10-01

    The biological reduction of N2 to NH3 catalyzed by Mo-dependent nitrogenase requires at least eight rounds of a complex cycle of events associated with ATP-driven electron transfer (ET) from the Fe protein to the catalytic MoFe protein, with each ET coupled to the hydrolysis of two ATP molecules. Although steps within this cycle have been studied for decades, the nature of the coupling between ATP hydrolysis and ET, in particular the order of ET and ATP hydrolysis, has been elusive. Here, we have measured first-order rate constants for each key step in the reaction sequence, including direct measurement of the ATP hydrolysis rate constant: kATP = 70 s(-1), 25 °C. Comparison of the rate constants establishes that the reaction sequence involves four sequential steps: (i) conformationally gated ET (kET = 140 s(-1), 25 °C), (ii) ATP hydrolysis (kATP = 70 s(-1), 25 °C), (iii) Phosphate release (kPi = 16 s(-1), 25 °C), and (iv) Fe protein dissociation from the MoFe protein (kdiss = 6 s(-1), 25 °C). These findings allow completion of the thermodynamic cycle undergone by the Fe protein, showing that the energy of ATP binding and protein-protein association drive ET, with subsequent ATP hydrolysis and Pi release causing dissociation of the complex between the Fe(ox)(ADP)2 protein and the reduced MoFe protein. PMID:24062462

  13. Revisiting direct electron transfer in nanostructured carbon laccase oxygen cathodes.

    PubMed

    Adam, Catherine; Scodeller, Pablo; Grattieri, Matteo; Villalba, Matías; Calvo, Ernesto J

    2016-06-01

    The biocatalytic electroreduction of oxygen has been studied on large surface area graphite and Vulcan® carbon electrodes with adsorbed Trametes trogii laccase. The electrokinetics of the O2 reduction reaction (ORR) was studied at different electrode potentials, O2 partial pressures and concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Even though the overpotential at 0.25mA·cm(-2) for the ORR at T1Cu of the adsorbed laccase on carbon is 0.8V lower than for Pt of similar geometric area, the rate of the reaction and thus the operative current density is limited by the enzyme reaction rate at the T2/T3 cluster site for the adsorbed enzyme. The transition potential for the rate determining step from the direct electron transfer (DET) to the enzyme reaction shifts to higher potentials at higher oxygen partial pressure. Hydrogen peroxide produced by the ORR on bare carbon support participates in an inhibition mechanism, with uncompetitive predominance at high H2O2 concentration, non-competitive contribution can be detected at low inhibitor concentration. PMID:26883057

  14. Synthesis, Characterization, Photophysics and Photochemistry of Pyrylogen Electron Transfer Sensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Clennan, Edward L.; Liao, Chen

    2014-01-01

    A series of new dicationic sensitizers that are hybrids of pyrylium salts and viologens has been synthesized. The electrochemical and photophysical properties of these "pyrylogen" sensitizers are reported in sufficient detail to allow rationale design of new photoinduced electron transfer reactions. The range of their reduction potentials (+0.37-+0.05V vs SCE) coupled with their range of singlet (48-63 kcal mol(-1)) and triplet (48-57kcalmol(-1)) energies demonstrate that they are potent oxidizing agents in both their singlet and triplet excited states, thermodynamically capable of oxidizing substrates with oxidation potentials as high as 3.1eV. The pyrylogens are synthesized in three steps from readily available starting materials in modest overall 11.4-22.3% yields. These sensitizers have the added advantages that: (1) their radical cations do not react on the CV timescale with oxygen bypassing the need to run reactions under nitrogen or argon and (2) have long wavelength absorptions between 413 and 523nm well out of the range where competitive absorbance by most substrates would cause a problem. These new sensitizers do react with water requiring special precautions to operate in a dry reaction environment.

  15. Electron-transfer studies of a peroxide dianion.

    PubMed

    Ullman, Andrew M; Sun, Xianru; Graham, Daniel J; Lopez, Nazario; Nava, Matthew; De Las Cuevas, Rebecca; Müller, Peter; Rybak-Akimova, Elena V; Cummins, Christopher C; Nocera, Daniel G

    2014-05-19

    A peroxide dianion (O2(2-)) can be isolated within the cavity of hexacarboxamide cryptand, [(O2)⊂mBDCA-5t-H6](2-), stabilized by hydrogen bonding but otherwise free of proton or metal-ion association. This feature has allowed the electron-transfer (ET) kinetics of isolated peroxide to be examined chemically and electrochemically. The ET of [(O2)⊂mBDCA-5t-H6](2-) with a series of seven quinones, with reduction potentials spanning 1 V, has been examined by stopped-flow spectroscopy. The kinetics of the homogeneous ET reaction has been correlated to heterogeneous ET kinetics as measured electrochemically to provide a unified description of ET between the Butler-Volmer and Marcus models. The chemical and electrochemical oxidation kinetics together indicate that the oxidative ET of O2(2-) occurs by an outer-sphere mechanism that exhibits significant nonadiabatic character, suggesting that the highest occupied molecular orbital of O2(2-) within the cryptand is sterically shielded from the oxidizing species. An understanding of the ET chemistry of a free peroxide dianion will be useful in studies of metal-air batteries and the use of [(O2)⊂mBDCA-5t-H6](2-) as a chemical reagent. PMID:24773522

  16. Effects of quantum coherence in metalloprotein electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorner, Ross; Goold, John; Heaney, Libby; Farrow, Tristan; Vedral, Vlatko

    2012-09-01

    Many intramolecular electron transfer (ET) reactions in biology are mediated by metal centers in proteins. This process is commonly described by a model of diffusive hopping according to the semiclassical theories of Marcus and Hopfield. However, recent studies have raised the possibility that nontrivial quantum mechanical effects play a functioning role in certain biomolecular processes. Here, we investigate the potential effects of quantum coherence in biological ET by extending the semiclassical model to allow for the possibility of quantum coherent phenomena using a quantum master equation based on the Holstein Hamiltonian. We test the model on the structurally defined chain of seven iron-sulfur clusters in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide plus hydrogen:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I), a crucial respiratory enzyme and one of the longest chains of metal centers in biology. Using experimental parameters where possible, we find that, in limited circumstances, a small quantum mechanical contribution can provide a marked increase in the ET rate above the semiclassical diffusive-hopping rate. Under typical biological conditions, our model reduces to well-known diffusive behavior.

  17. Modeling Charge Transfer in Fullerene Collisions via Real-Time Electron Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jakowski, Jacek; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2012-01-01

    An approach for performing real-time dynamics of electron transfer in a prototype redox reaction that occurs in reactive collisions between neutral and ionic fullerenes is discussed. The quantum dynamical simulations show that the electron transfer occurs within 60 fs directly preceding the collision of the fullerenes, followed by structural changes and relaxation of electron charge. The consequences of real-time electron dynamics are fully elucidated for the far from equilibrium processes of collisions between neutral and multiply charged fullerenes.

  18. Long-range electron transfer across Peptide bridges: the transition from electron superexchange to hopping.

    PubMed

    Malak, Rouba Abdel; Gao, Zhinong; Wishart, James F; Isied, Stephan S

    2004-11-01

    Long-range electron transfer rate constants for complexes of the type [(bpy)2RuIIL-Pron-apyRuIII)(NH3)5]5++ proline residues (n) varying from 0 to 9 were determined by complementary electron pulse radiolysis and flash photolysis techniques from the picosecond to the millisecond time scales. The activationless kmax values from both techniques coalesce into one data set. The distance dependence of the reactions is consistent with a smooth transition from a superexchange mechanism with attenuation constant beta = 1.4 A-1 to a hopping mechanism with attenuation constant beta = 0.17 A-1. The transition occurs between n = 3 and 4 prolines, and the virtual hopping rate constant at the shortest distance is about 1 x 106 times slower than that observed for the superexchange value. PMID:15506726

  19. Metalloporphyrins as energy transfer catalysts: Progress report, August 1, 1984-July 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Sprio, T.G.

    1987-01-01

    Porphyrin excited state dynamics have been explored initially using a simple stationary sample cw laser technique to pump a steady state; the ground state spectrum is obtained by spinning the sample, and the excited state spectrum is obtained by subtraction. In this way triplet state Resoannce Rama (RR) spectra were obtained for the tetraphenylporphine (TPP) complexes of magnesium, zinc, and palladium, and excited state deligation was studied for pyridine and piperidine complexes of nickel TPP. In connection with the latter study, the systematics of RR frequencies and core size were established for 4- and 6-coordinate nickel porphyrins, and a 5-coordinate high-spin complex was definitively characterized. In addition RR spectra were analyzed for ruthenium porphyrins, as background for future excited state studies, and backbonding charcteristics were established. Charge transfer excited states of a 4,4'-bipyridine complex of ruthenium(II) were studied via the power-dependent photoinduced RR spectra produced with a YAG laser. RR spectra of metallo-OEP (octaethylporphyrin) cation radicals have also been studied.

  20. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multi-chromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads. Technical progress report, 1987--1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-14

    This research project involves the design, synthesis and study of the molecules which mimic many of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. Specifically, the molecules are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic multistep electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited singlet state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they model carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  1. Photoinduced bimolecular electron transfer kinetics in small unilamellar vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Kumbhakar, Manoj; Nath, Sukhendu; Pal, Haridas

    2007-11-21

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET) from N,N-dimethylaniline to some coumarin derivatives has been studied in small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) of the phospholipid, DL-{alpha}-dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine, using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching, both below and above the phase transition temperature of the vesicles. The primary interest was to examine whether Marcus inversion [H. Sumi and R. A. Marcus, J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] could be observed for the present ET systems in these organized assemblies. The influence of the topology of SUVs on the photophysical properties of the reactants and consequently on their ET kinetics has also been investigated. Absorption and fluorescence spectral data of the coumarins in SUVs and the variation of their fluorescence decays with temperature indicate that the dyes are localized in the bilayer of the SUVs. Time-resolved area normalized emission spectra analysis, however, reveals that the dyes are distributed in two different microenvironments in the SUVs, which we attribute to the two leaflets of the bilayer, one toward bulk water and the other toward the inner water pool. The microenvironments in the two leaflets are, however, not indicated to be that significantly different. Time-resolved anisotropy decays were biexponential for all the dyes in SUVs, and this has been interpreted in terms of the compound motion model according to which the dye molecules can experience a fast wobbling-in-cone type of motion as well as a slow overall rotating motion of the cone containing the molecule. The expected bimolecular diffusion-controlled rates in SUVs, as estimated by comparing the microviscosities in SUVs (determined from rotational correlation times) and that in acetonitrile solution, are much slower than the observed fluorescence quenching rates, suggesting that reactant diffusion (translational) does not play any role in the quenching kinetics in the present systems. Accordingly, clear inversions are observed in the correlation of the fluorescence quenching rate constants k{sub q} with the free energy change, {delta}G{sup 0} of the reactions. However, the coumarin dyes, C152 and C481 (cf. Scheme 1), show unusually high k{sub q} values and high activation barriers, which is not expected from Marcus ET theory. This unusual behavior is explained on the basis of participation of the twisted intramolecular charge transfer states of these two dyes in the ET kinetics.

  2. Photoinduced electron transfer in fullerene triads bearing pyrene and fluorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandanayaka, Atula S. D.; Araki, Yasuyaki; Ito, Osamu; Deviprasad, Gollapalli R.; Smith, Phillip M.; Rogers, Lisa M.; Zandler, Melvin E.; D'Souza, Francis

    2006-06-01

    Photochemical properties of pyrene and fluorene appended fulleropyrrolidine triads (AH 1-C 60-AH 2; AH 1 = pyrene and fluorene; AH 2 = naphthalene and phenyl) are reported. Electrochemical studies using cyclic voltammetry technique and DFT calculations at B3LYP/3-21G( ∗) method revealed that the charge-separated states in pyrene and fluorene appended triads are pyrene-C60rad --AH2 and fluorene-C60rad --AH2, respectively; however, no such charge-separated states could be established for naphthalene and phenyl appended triads. As demonstrated from the time resolved fluorescence, upon excitation of AH moiety in nonpolar solvents, energy transfer predominantly occurred from the singlet excited fluorophore to the C 60 moiety, whereas in polar DMF charge-separation also contributed to the fluorescence quenching. Additionally, charge separation also occurred from the singlet excited C 60 to the pyrene or fluorene entities of the triads in DMF. The rates and quantum yields of charge separation obtained by time-resolved emission studies were around 10 9 s -1 and 0.9-0.6 for pyrene-C 60-AH 2 and fluorene-C 60-AH 2 triads. Nanosecond transient absorption spectral studies performed by using 355 nm laser light on the triads, exhibited transient bands corresponding to the C60rad - and pyrene rad + or fluorene rad + , thus establishing the occurrence of electron transfer in these triads in DMF. The rates of charge recombination obtained by monitoring the decay of the C60rad - were found to be around 10 6 s -1 in DMF which resulted in the lifetimes of the radical ion pairs up to 1000 ns indicating charge stabilization in pyrene-C 60-AH 2 and fluorene-C 60-AH 2 triads. The formations of long-lived charge-separated states, pyrene-C60rad --AH2 and fluorene-C60rad --AH2 in DMF, were rationalized by evaluating the Marcus parameters from the temperature dependence of the charge-recombination rate constants.

  3. Theoretical/Computational Probes of Homogeneous and Interfacial Electron Transfer: Electronic Structure and Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Marshall

    2008-03-01

    Theoretical and computational techniques are used to elucidate the physical and chemical factors that control the kinetics of homogeneous and interfacial electron-transfer (ET) reactions. These latter include systems for which standard rate constants (k^0(l)) have been measured electrochemically for ET between substrate Au electrodes and redox couples attached to the electrode surfaces by variable lengths (l) of oligomethylene (OM), oligophenylenevinylene (OPV) and oligophenyleneethynylene (OPE) bridges. These oligomers, spanning a range of ˜ 1-4 nm, are components of mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), coupled to the substrate via S atom linkers. The mechanistic analysis of the kinetic behavior, including polaron-based activation and electronic tunneling, is supported by calculations of electronic structure and molecular and medium energetics. Band structure calculations for neat phenylthiolate SAMs on Au and Cu susbstrates were used to probe the properties of the interface, including surface dipole layer and work function, the electronic nature of the `thiolate' linker atoms, and the competition between direct and substrate-mediated coupling.

  4. Principles of hot electron thermionic emission (real space transfer) in semicoductor heterolayers and device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Karl

    The principles of real space transfer and its phenomenological description in terms of the concepts of electron temperature and quasi Fermi levels are reviewed. It is shown that real space transfer is a mechanism to achieve ultrafast switching and storage of charge carriers. The real space transfer-glow cathod analogy, which demonstrates the existence of a new transistor principle, is discussed in detail.

  5. Photochemical reactions of electron-deficient olefins with N,N,N‧,N‧-tetramethylbenzidine via photoinduced electron-transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yang; Zhao, Junshu; Ji, Yuanyuan; Yan, Lei; Yu, Shuqin

    2006-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer reactions of several electron-deficient olefins with N, N, N', N'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in acetonitrile solution have been studied by using laser flash photolysis technique and steady-state fluorescence quenching method. Laser pulse excitation of TMB yields 3TMB* after rapid intersystem crossing from 1TMB*. The triplet which located at 480 nm is found to undergo fast quenching with the electron acceptors fumaronitrile (FN), dimethyl fumarate (DMF), diethyl fumarate (DEF), cinnamonitrile (CN), α-acetoxyacrylonitrile (AAN), crotononitrile (CrN) and 3-methoxyacrylonitrile (MAN). Substituents binding to olefin molecule own different electron-donating/withdrawing powers, which determine the electron-deficient property (π-cloud density) of olefin molecule as well as control the electron transfer rate constant directly. The detection of ion radical intermediates in the photolysis reactions confirms the proposed electron transfer mechanism, as expected from thermodynamics. The quenching rate constants of triplet TMB by these olefins have been determined at 510 nm to avoid the disturbance of formed TMB cation radical around 475 nm. All the kqT values approach or reach to the diffusion-controlled limit. In addition, fluorescence quenching rate constants kqS have been also obtained by calculating with Stern-Volmer equation. A correlation between experimental electron transfer rate constants and free energy changes has been explained by Marcus theory of adiabatic outer-sphere electron transfer. Disharmonic kq values for CN and CrN in endergonic region may be the disturbance of exciplexs formation.

  6. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Westereng, Bjørge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Jørgensen, Henning; Larsen Andersen, Mogens; Eijsink, Vincent G.H.; Felby, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic oxidation of cell wall polysaccharides by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) plays a pivotal role in the degradation of plant biomass. While experiments have shown that LPMOs are copper dependent enzymes requiring an electron donor, the mechanism and origin of the electron supply in biological systems are only partly understood. We show here that insoluble high molecular weight lignin functions as a reservoir of electrons facilitating LPMO activity. The electrons are donated to the enzyme by long-range electron transfer involving soluble low molecular weight lignins present in plant cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds new light on how oxidative enzymes present in plant degraders may act in concert. PMID:26686263

  7. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Westereng, Bjørge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Jørgensen, Henning; Larsen Andersen, Mogens; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Felby, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic oxidation of cell wall polysaccharides by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) plays a pivotal role in the degradation of plant biomass. While experiments have shown that LPMOs are copper dependent enzymes requiring an electron donor, the mechanism and origin of the electron supply in biological systems are only partly understood. We show here that insoluble high molecular weight lignin functions as a reservoir of electrons facilitating LPMO activity. The electrons are donated to the enzyme by long-range electron transfer involving soluble low molecular weight lignins present in plant cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds new light on how oxidative enzymes present in plant degraders may act in concert. PMID:26686263

  8. Distance dependence of electron transfer from liposome-embedded (alkanephosphocholine-porphinato) zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchida, E.; Kaneko, M.; Nishide, H.; Hoshino, M.

    1986-05-22

    (Alkanephosphocholine-porphinato)zinc forms a geometrically well-defined bilayer liposome with phospholipid. Electron transfer from the liposome-embedded (porphinato)zincs with different alkyl chain lengths to methylviologen present in the outer bulk solution is measured by laser flash photolysis: the intermolecular electron transfer was observed only when the porphyrin plane is located within 12 A from the surface.

  9. 41 CFR 102-118.70 - Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... payments via electronic funds transfer? 102-118.70 Section 102-118.70 Public Contracts and Property... Services § 102-118.70 Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer? Yes, under 31 U.S.C. 3332, et seq., your agency must make all payments for goods and services via EFT (this includes...

  10. 41 CFR 102-118.70 - Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... payments via electronic funds transfer? 102-118.70 Section 102-118.70 Public Contracts and Property... Services § 102-118.70 Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer? Yes, under 31 U.S.C. 3332, et seq., your agency must make all payments for goods and services via EFT (this includes...

  11. 41 CFR 102-118.70 - Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... payments via electronic funds transfer? 102-118.70 Section 102-118.70 Public Contracts and Property... Services § 102-118.70 Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer? Yes, under 31 U.S.C. 3332, et seq., your agency must make all payments for goods and services via EFT (this includes...

  12. 41 CFR 102-118.70 - Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... payments via electronic funds transfer? 102-118.70 Section 102-118.70 Public Contracts and Property... Services § 102-118.70 Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer? Yes, under 31 U.S.C. 3332, et seq., your agency must make all payments for goods and services via EFT (this includes...

  13. 41 CFR 102-118.70 - Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... payments via electronic funds transfer? 102-118.70 Section 102-118.70 Public Contracts and Property... Services § 102-118.70 Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer? Yes, under 31 U.S.C. 3332, et seq., your agency must make all payments for goods and services via EFT (this includes...

  14. 48 CFR 52.232-38 - Submission of Electronic Funds Transfer Information with Offer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.232-38 Submission of Electronic Funds Transfer Information with... information that is required to make payment by electronic funds transfer (EFT) under any contract that... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Submission of...

  15. Theory for electron-transfer reactions involving two Marcus surfaces with a different force constant

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jau

    1994-02-01

    Theory for electron-transfer reactions at high temperature involving two Marcus parabolic surfaces with a different force constant is presented. The dynamic solvent effects are also considered using the stochastic Liouville equation, assuming an overdamped Debye solvent. An analytical expression for the adiabatic/nonadiabatic electron-transfer rate constant is derived.

  16. Electron transfer catalysis with monolayer protected Au25 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonello, Sabrina; Hesari, Mahdi; Polo, Federico; Maran, Flavio

    2012-08-01

    Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and the Au25L18+/Au25L18 redox couples as redox mediators. Simulation of the CV curves led to determination of the ET rate constant (kET) values for concerted dissociative ET to the peroxides. The ET free energy ΔG° could be estimated for all donor-acceptor combinations, leading to observation of a nice activation-driving force (log kETvs. ΔG°) relationship. Comparison with the kET obtained using a ferrocene-type donor with a formal potential similar to that of Au25L18/Au25L18- showed that the presence of the capping monolayer affects the ET rate rather significantly, which is attributed to the intrinsic nonadiabaticity of peroxide acceptors.Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and the Au25L18+/Au25L18 redox couples as redox mediators. Simulation of the CV curves led to determination of the ET rate constant (kET) values for concerted dissociative ET to the peroxides. The ET free energy ΔG° could be estimated for all donor-acceptor combinations, leading to observation of a nice activation-driving force (log kETvs. ΔG°) relationship. Comparison with the kET obtained using a ferrocene-type donor with a formal potential similar to that of Au25L18/Au25L18- showed that the presence of the capping monolayer affects the ET rate rather significantly, which is attributed to the intrinsic nonadiabaticity of peroxide acceptors. This article was submitted as part of a Themed Issue on metallic clusters. Other papers on this topic can be found in issue 14 of vol. 4 (2012). This issue can be found from the Nanoscale homepage [http://www.rsc.org/nanoscale].

  17. Protein electron transfer: is biology (thermo)dynamic?

    PubMed

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2015-12-01

    Simple physical mechanisms are behind the flow of energy in all forms of life. Energy comes to living systems through electrons occupying high-energy states, either from food (respiratory chains) or from light (photosynthesis). This energy is transformed into the cross-membrane proton-motive force that eventually drives all biochemistry of the cell. Life's ability to transfer electrons over large distances with nearly zero loss of free energy is puzzling and has not been accomplished in synthetic systems. The focus of this review is on how this energetic efficiency is realized. General physical mechanisms and interactions that allow proteins to fold into compact water-soluble structures are also responsible for a rugged landscape of energy states and a broad distribution of relaxation times. Specific to a protein as a fluctuating thermal bath is the protein-water interface, which is heterogeneous both dynamically and structurally. The spectrum of interfacial fluctuations is a consequence of protein's elastic flexibility combined with a high density of surface charges polarizing water dipoles into surface nanodomains. Electrostatics is critical to the protein function and the relevant questions are: (i) What is the spectrum of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations? (ii) Does the interfacial biological water produce electrostatic signatures specific to proteins? (iii) How is protein-mediated chemistry affected by electrostatics? These questions connect the fluctuation spectrum to the dynamical control of chemical reactivity, i.e. the dependence of the activation free energy of the reaction on the dynamics of the bath. Ergodicity is often broken in protein-driven reactions and thermodynamic free energies become irrelevant. Continuous ergodicity breaking in a dense spectrum of relaxation times requires using dynamically restricted ensembles to calculate statistical averages. When applied to the calculation of the rates, this formalism leads to the nonergodic activated kinetics, which extends the transition-state theory to dynamically dispersive media. Releasing the grip of thermodynamics in kinetic calculations through nonergodicity provides the mechanism for an efficient optimization between reaction rates and the spectrum of relaxation times of the protein-water thermal bath. Bath dynamics, it appears, play as important role as the free energy in optimizing biology's performance. PMID:26558324

  18. Protein electron transfer: is biology (thermo)dynamic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2015-12-01

    Simple physical mechanisms are behind the flow of energy in all forms of life. Energy comes to living systems through electrons occupying high-energy states, either from food (respiratory chains) or from light (photosynthesis). This energy is transformed into the cross-membrane proton-motive force that eventually drives all biochemistry of the cell. Life’s ability to transfer electrons over large distances with nearly zero loss of free energy is puzzling and has not been accomplished in synthetic systems. The focus of this review is on how this energetic efficiency is realized. General physical mechanisms and interactions that allow proteins to fold into compact water-soluble structures are also responsible for a rugged landscape of energy states and a broad distribution of relaxation times. Specific to a protein as a fluctuating thermal bath is the protein-water interface, which is heterogeneous both dynamically and structurally. The spectrum of interfacial fluctuations is a consequence of protein’s elastic flexibility combined with a high density of surface charges polarizing water dipoles into surface nanodomains. Electrostatics is critical to the protein function and the relevant questions are: (i) What is the spectrum of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations? (ii) Does the interfacial biological water produce electrostatic signatures specific to proteins? (iii) How is protein-mediated chemistry affected by electrostatics? These questions connect the fluctuation spectrum to the dynamical control of chemical reactivity, i.e. the dependence of the activation free energy of the reaction on the dynamics of the bath. Ergodicity is often broken in protein-driven reactions and thermodynamic free energies become irrelevant. Continuous ergodicity breaking in a dense spectrum of relaxation times requires using dynamically restricted ensembles to calculate statistical averages. When applied to the calculation of the rates, this formalism leads to the nonergodic activated kinetics, which extends the transition-state theory to dynamically dispersive media. Releasing the grip of thermodynamics in kinetic calculations through nonergodicity provides the mechanism for an efficient optimization between reaction rates and the spectrum of relaxation times of the protein-water thermal bath. Bath dynamics, it appears, play as important role as the free energy in optimizing biology’s performance.

  19. Photoinduced Electron Transfer between Anionic Corrole and DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Li; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Yang; Huang, Jun-Teng; Zhu, He; Ying, Xiao; Ji, Liang-Nian; Liu, Hai-Yang

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between a water-soluble anionic Ga(III) corrole [Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2] and calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) has been investigated by using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. A significant broadening from 570 to 585 nm of positive absorption band of the blend of Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2 and ct-DNA (Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2-ctDNA) has been observed from 0.15 to 0.50 ps after photoexcitation of Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2 into the Soret band. The control experiment has been performed on the model DNA ([poly(dG-dC)]2) rich in guanine bases, which exhibits a similar spectral broadening, whereas it is absent for [poly(dA-dT)]2 without guanine bases. The molecular orbital calculation shows that HOMO of Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2 is lower than that of guanine bases. The results of the electrochemical experiment show the reversible electron transfer (ET) between Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2 and guanine bases of ct-DNA is thermodynamically favorable. The dynamical analysis of the transient absorption spectra reveals that an ultrafast forward ET from the guanine bases to Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2 occurs within the pulse duration (156 fs), leading to the formation of an intermediate state. The following back ET to the ground state of Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2 may be accomplished in 520 fs. PMID:26752116

  20. Demonstration of Lignin-to-Peroxidase Direct Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Pogni, Rebecca; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Santos, José Ignacio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is a high redox-potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest that is able to oxidize phenolic and non-phenolic aromatics, Mn2+, and different dyes. The ability of VP from Pleurotus eryngii to oxidize water-soluble lignins (softwood and hardwood lignosulfonates) is demonstrated here by a combination of directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic techniques, among others. In addition, direct electron transfer between the peroxidase and the lignin macromolecule was kinetically characterized using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. VP variants were used to show that this reaction strongly depends on the presence of a solvent-exposed tryptophan residue (Trp-164). Moreover, the tryptophanyl radical detected by EPR spectroscopy of H2O2-activated VP (being absent from the W164S variant) was identified as catalytically active because it was reduced during lignosulfonate oxidation, resulting in the appearance of a lignin radical. The decrease of lignin fluorescence (excitation at 355 nm/emission at 400 nm) during VP treatment under steady-state conditions was accompanied by a decrease of the lignin (aromatic nuclei and side chains) signals in one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra, confirming the ligninolytic capabilities of the enzyme. Simultaneously, size-exclusion chromatography showed an increase of the molecular mass of the modified residual lignin, especially for the (low molecular mass) hardwood lignosulfonate, revealing that the oxidation products tend to recondense during the VP treatment. Finally, mutagenesis of selected residues neighboring Trp-164 resulted in improved apparent second-order rate constants for lignosulfonate reactions, revealing that changes in its protein environment (modifying the net negative charge and/or substrate accessibility/binding) can modulate the reactivity of the catalytic tryptophan. PMID:26240145

  1. Nonspherical nanoparticles with controlled morphologies via seeded surface-initiated single electron transfer radical polymerization in soap-free emulsion.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jinfeng; Wang, Lixia; Zhu, Lei; Pan, Mingwang; Wang, Wenjie; Liu, Ying; Liu, Gang

    2015-04-14

    This work reports a facile novel approach to prepare asymmetric poly(vinylidene fluoride)/polystyrene (PVDF/PS) composite latex particles with controllable morphologies using one-step soap-free seeded emulsion polymerization, i.e., surface-initiated single electron transfer radical polymerization (SET-RP) of styrene (St) at the surface of PVDF seed particles. It was observed that the morphology was influenced mainly by the St/PVDF feed ratio, the polymerization temperature, and the length of the catalyst Cu(0) wire (Φ 1.00 mm). When the feed ratio was St/PVDF = 5.0 g/1.0 g, snowman-like Janus particles were exclusively obtained. Raspberry-like and popcorn-like composite particles were observed at a higher reaction temperature or a shorter length of the catalyst wire. The reaction kinetics plots demonstrated some unique features. The formation of nonspherical composite nanoparticles can be ascribed to the surface nucleation of PS bulges following the SET-RP. PMID:25797695

  2. Efficiencies of photoinduced electron-transfer reactions: Role of the Marcus inverted region in return electron transfer within geminate radical-ion pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, I.R.; Ege, D.; Moser, J.E.; Farid, S. )

    1990-05-23

    In photoinduced electron-transfer processes the primary step is conversion of the electronic energy of an excited state into chemical energy retained in the form of a redox (geminate radical-ion) pair (A + D {sup hv}{yields} A{sup {sm bullet}{minus}}/D{sup {sm bullet}+}). In polar solvents, separation of the geminate pair occurs with formation of free radical ions in solution. The quantum yields of product formation, from reactions of either the free ions, or of the geminate pair, are often low, however, due to the return electron transfer reaction (A{sup {sm bullet}{minus}}/D{sup {sm bullet}+} {yields} A + D), an energy-wasting step that competes with the useful reactions of the ion pair. The present study was undertaken to investigate the parameters controlling the rates of these return electron transfer reactions. Quantum yields of free radical ion formation were measured for ion pairs formed upon electron-transfer quenching of the first excited singlet states of cyanoanthracenes by simple aromatic hydrocarbon donors in aceonitrile at room temperature. The free-ion yields are determined by the competition between the rates of separation and return electron transfer.

  3. Kinetics of electron transfer between semiquinones and stable radicals. [Triphenytlverdazyl and nitroxyl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Tatikolov, A.S.; Khudyakov, I.V.; Kuz'min, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of semiquinone and stable nitroxyl radicals has been studied in modeling radiosensitization processes. Bimolecular radical reactions which proceed through one-electron transfer are of interest for the information which they furnish concerning radical reactions, in general, and charge-transfer processes, in particular. The present work used flash photolysis to study the kinetics of electron transfer between semiquinone (Q/sup -//sup ./, QH/sup ./), nitroxyl, and triphenylverdazyl radicals in aqueous and aqueous organic solution.

  4. Pulse radiolytic and electrochemical investigations of intramolecular electron transfer in carotenoporphyrins and carotenoporphyrin-quinone triads

    SciTech Connect

    Land, E.J.; Lexa, D.; Bensasson, R.V.; Gust, D.; Moore, T.A. Moore, A.L.; Liddell, P.A.; Nemeth, G.A.

    1987-08-27

    Thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of intramolecular electron-transfer reactions in carotenoporphyrin dyads and carotenoid-porphyrin-quinone triads have been studied by using pulse radiolysis and cyclic voltammetry. Rapid (<1 ..mu..s) electron transfer from carotenoid radical anions to attached porphyrins has been inferred. Carotenoid cations, on the other hand, do not readily accept electrons from attached porphyrins or pyropheophorbides. Electrochemical studies provide the thermodynamic basis for these observations and also allow estimation of the energetics of photoinitiated two-step electron transfer and two-step charge recombination in triad models for photosynthetic charge separation.

  5. Tools for resolving complexity in the electron transfer networks of multiheme cytochromes c.

    PubMed

    Firer-Sherwood, Mackenzie A; Bewley, Kathryn D; Mock, Jee-Young; Elliott, Sean J

    2011-04-01

    Examining electron transfer between two proteins with identical spectroscopic signatures is a challenging task. It is supposed that several multiheme cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis form a molecular "wire" through which electrons are transported across the cellular space and a direct study of this transient protein-protein interaction has not yet been reported. In this study, we present variations on catalytic protein film voltammetry and an anaerobic affinity chromatography assay to demonstrate unidirectional electron transfer between proposed protein pairs. Through use of these techniques, we are able to confirm the transient interactions between these cytochromes, supporting the model of electron transfer that is present in the literature. PMID:21327265

  6. An electron energy-loss study of picene and chrysene based charge transfer salts

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Eric; Mahns, Benjamin; Büchner, Bernd; Knupfer, Martin

    2015-05-14

    The electronic excitation spectra of charge transfer compounds built from the hydrocarbons picene and chrysene, and the strong electron acceptors F{sub 4}TCNQ (2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) and TCNQ (7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethan) have been investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The corresponding charge transfer compounds have been prepared by co-evaporation of the pristine constituents. We demonstrate that all investigated combinations support charge transfer, which results in new electronic excitation features at low energy. This might represent a way to synthesize low band gap organic semiconductors.

  7. SO2−· Electron Transfer Ion/Ion Reactions with Disulfide Linked Polypeptide Ions

    PubMed Central

    Chrisman, Paul A.; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Hogan, Jason M.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    Multiply-charged peptide cations comprised of two polypeptide chains (designated A and B) bound via a disulfide linkage have been reacted with SO2−· in an electrodynamic ion trap mass spectrometer. These reactions proceed through both proton transfer (without dissociation) and electron transfer (with and without dissociation). Electron transfer reactions are shown to give rise to cleavage along the peptide backbone, loss of neutral molecules, and cleavage of the cystine bond. Disulfide bond cleavage is the preferred dissociation channel and both Chain A (or B)—S· and Chain A (or B)—SH fragment ions are observed, similar to those observed with electron capture dissociation (ECD) of disulfide-bound peptides. Electron transfer without dissociation produces [M + 2H]+· ions, which appear to be less kinetically stable than the proton transfer [M + H]+ product. When subjected to collision-induced dissociation (CID), the [M + 2H]+· ions fragment to give products that were also observed as dissociation products during the electron transfer reaction. However, not all dissociation channels noted in the electron transfer reaction were observed in the CID of the [M + 2H]+· ions. The charge state of the peptide has a significant effect on both the extent of electron transfer dissociation observed and the variety of dissociation products, with higher charge states giving more of each. PMID:15914021

  8. Catalysts for electrochemical generation of oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagans, P.; Yeager, E.

    1978-01-01

    Single crystal surfaces of platinum and gold and transition metal oxides of the spinel type were studied to find more effective catalysts for the electrolytic evolution of oxygen and to understand the mechanism and kinetics for the electrocatalysis in relation to the surface electronic and lattice properties of the catalyst. The single crystal studies involve the use of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy as complementary tools to the electrochemical measurements. Modifications to the transfer system and to the thin-layer electrochemical cell used to facilitate the transfer between the ultrahigh vacuum environment of the electron surface physics equipment and the electrochemical environment with a minimal possibility of changes in the surface structure, are described. The electrosorption underpotential deposition of Pb onto the Au(111), (100) and (110) single crystal surfaces with the thin-layer cell-LEED-Auger system is discussed as well as the synthesis of spinels for oxygen evolution studies.

  9. Environmental TEM study of electron beam induced electro-chemistry of Pr????Ca????MnO? catalysts for oxygen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mildner, Stephanie; Beleggia, Marco; Mierwaldt, Daniel; Hansen, Thoma Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Yazdi, Sadegh; Kasama, Takeshi; Ciston, Jim; Zhu, Yimei; Jooss, Christian

    2015-03-12

    Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy (ETEM) studies offer great potential for gathering atomic scale information on the electronic state of electrodes in contact with reactants but also pose big challenges due to the impact of the high energy electron beam. In this article, we present an ETEM study of a Pr????Ca????MnO? (PCMO) thin film electro-catalyst for water splitting and oxygen evolution in contact with water vapor. We show by means of off-axis electron holography and electrostatic modeling that the electron beam gives rise to a positive electric sample potential due to secondary electron emission. The value of the electric potential depends on the primary electron flux, the sample -conductivity and grounding, and gas properties. We present evidence that two observed electro-chemical reactions are driven by a beam induced electrostatic potential of the order of a volt. The first reaction is an anodic electrochemical oxidation reaction of oxygen depleted amorphous PCMO which results in recrystallization of the perovskite structure. The second reaction is oxygen evolution which can be detected by the oxidation of a silane additive and formation of SiO2x at catalytically active surfaces. Recently published in-situ XANES observation of subsurface oxygen vacancy formation during oxygen evolution at a positive potential [] is confirmed in this work. The quantification of beam induced potentials is an important step for future controlled electro-chemical experiments in an ETEM.

  10. A Comparison of Electron-Transfer Dynamics inIonic Liquids and Neutral Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Wishart J. F.; Lee, H.Y.; Issa, J.B.; Isied, S.S.; Castner, Jr., E.W.; Pan, Y.; Hussey, C.L.; Lee, K.S.

    2012-03-01

    The effect of ionic liquids on photoinduced electron-transfer reactions in a donor-bridge-acceptor system is examined for two ionic liquid solvents, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and tributylmethylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide. The results are compared with those for the same system in methanol and acetonitrile solution. Electron-transfer rates were measured using time-resolved fluorescence quenching for the donor-bridge-acceptor system comprising a 1-N,1-N-dimethylbenzene-1,4-diamine donor, a proline bridge, and a coumarin 343 acceptor. The photoinduced electron-transfer processes are in the inverted regime (-{Delta}G > {lambda}) in all four solvents, with driving forces of -1.6 to -1.9 eV and estimated reorganization energies of about 1.0 eV. The observed electron-transfer kinetics have broadly distributed rates that are generally slower in the ionic liquids compared to the neutral solvents, which also have narrower rate distributions. To describe the broad distributions of electron-transfer kinetics, we use two different models: a distribution of exponential lifetimes and a discrete sum of exponential lifetimes. Analysis of the donor-acceptor electronic coupling shows that for ionic liquids this intramolecular electron-transfer reaction should be treated using a solvent-controlled electron-transfer model.

  11. Chemical electron-transfer reactions in electrospray mass spectrometry: Effective oxidation potentials of electron-transfer reagents in methylene chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, G.J.; Zhou, F. )

    1994-10-15

    Cyclic voltammetry (CV), UV/visible absorption spectroscopy, and electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) are used in conjunction to study the mono- and /or dications produced in solution from the reaction of three model compounds ([beta]-carotene, cobalt(II) octaethylporphyrin (Co[sup II]OEP), nickel(II) octaethylporphyrin (Ni[sup II]OEP), in three different solvent/electron-transfer reagent systems (methylene chloride/0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) (v/v), methylene chloride/0.1% TFA/2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) v/v/200 [mu]M), methylene chloride/0.1% TFA/0.1% antimony pentafluoride (SbF[sub 5]) (v/v/v)). The reactions were carried out on-line with ES-MS by means of flow injection. Correlation of the CV data for these analytes with the ionic species determined to be in the solution on the basis of UV/visible absorption spectra and/or on the basis of the ionic species observed in the gas phase by ES-MS, along with our previously published data on these solvent/reagent systems, allowed an effective oxidation potential range, E, to be assigned to these solvent/reagent systems: methylene chloride/0.1% TFA (v/v), 0.6V [le] E[sub TFA] < 0.7 V; methylene chloride/0.1% TFA/DDQ (v/v/200 [mu]M), 0.8 [le] E[sub TFA/DDQ] < 1.0 V; methylene chloride/0.1% TFA/0.1% SbF[sub 5] (v/v/v), 1.3 [le] E[sub TFA/SbF(5)] < 1.5. 40 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Excess-Electron Transfer in DNA by a Fluctuation-Assisted Hopping Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hsun; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of excess-electron transfer in DNA has attracted the attention of scientists from all kinds of research fields because of its importance in biological processes. To date, several studies on excess-electron transfer in consecutive adenine (A):thymine (T) sequences in donor-DNA-acceptor systems have been published. However, the reported excess-electron transfer rate constants for consecutive T's are in the range of 10(10)-10(11) s(-1) depending on the photosensitizing electron donor, which provides various driving forces for excess-electron injection into DNA. In this study, we employed a strongly electron-donating photosensitizer, a dimer of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (2E), and an electron acceptor, diphenylacetylene (DPA), to synthesize a series of modified DNA oligomers (2-Tn, n = 3-6) in order to investigate the excess-electron transfer dynamics in these donor-DNA-acceptor systems using femtosecond laser flash photolysis. The relation between the free energy change for charge injection and the excess-electron transfer rate among consecutive T's provided an intrinsic excess-electron hopping rate constant of (3.8 ± 1.5) × 10(10) s(-1) in the DNA, which is consistent with the fluctuation frequency of the DNA sugar backbone and bases (3.3 × 10(10) s(-1)). Thus, we discuss the effect of structural fluctuations on the excess-electron hopping in DNA. PMID:26741048

  13. Redox potential of the terminal quinone electron acceptor QB in photosystem II reveals the mechanism of electron transfer regulation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuki; Nagao, Ryo; Noguchi, Takumi

    2016-01-19

    Photosystem II (PSII) extracts electrons from water at a Mn4CaO5 cluster using light energy and then transfers them to two plastoquinones, the primary quinone electron acceptor QA and the secondary quinone electron acceptor QB. This forward electron transfer is an essential process in light energy conversion. Meanwhile, backward electron transfer is also significant in photoprotection of PSII proteins. Modulation of the redox potential (Em) gap of QA and QB mainly regulates the forward and backward electron transfers in PSII. However, the full scheme of electron transfer regulation remains unresolved due to the unknown Em value of QB. Here, for the first time (to our knowledge), the Em value of QB reduction was measured directly using spectroelectrochemistry in combination with light-induced Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy. The Em(QB (-)/QB) was determined to be approximately +90 mV and was virtually unaffected by depletion of the Mn4CaO5 cluster. This insensitivity of Em(QB (-)/QB), in combination with the known large upshift of Em(QA (-)/QA), explains the mechanism of PSII photoprotection with an impaired Mn4CaO5 cluster, in which a large decrease in the Em gap between QA and QB promotes rapid charge recombination via QA (-). PMID:26715751

  14. Photoinduced electron transfer in zinc naphthalocyanine-naphthalenediimide supramolecular dyads.

    PubMed

    El-Khouly, Mohamed E; Moiseev, Andrey G; van der Est, Art; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2012-04-10

    Photoinduced electron transfer was studied in self-assembled donor-acceptor dyads, formed by axial coordination of pyridine appended with naphthalenediimide (NDI) to zinc naphthalocyanine (ZnNc). The NDI-py:ZnNc (1) and NDI(CH(2))(2)-py:ZnNc (2) self-assembled dyads absorb light over a wide region of the UV/Vis/near infrared (NIR) spectrum. The formation constants of the dyads 1 and 2 in toluene were found to be 2.5×10(4) and 2.2×10(4) M(-1), respectively, from the steady-state absorption and emission measurements, suggesting moderately stable complex formation. Fluorescence quenching was observed upon the coordination of the pyridine-appended NDI to ZnNc in toluene. The energy-level diagram derived from electrochemical and optical data suggests that exergonic charge separation through the singlet state of ZnNc ((1)ZnNc*) provides the main quenching pathway. Clear evidence for charge separation from the singlet state of ZnNc to NDI was provided by femtosecond laser photolysis measurements of the characteristic absorption bands of the ZnNc radical cation in the NIR region at 960 nm and the NDI radical anion in the visible region. The rates of charge-separation of 1 and 2 were found to be 2.2×10(10) and 4.4×10(9) s(-1), respectively, indicating fast and efficient charge separation (CS). The rates of charge recombination (CR) and the lifetimes of the charge-separated states were found to be 8.50×10(8) s(-1) (1.2 ns) for 1 and 1.90×10(8) s(-1) (5.3 ns) for 2. These values indicate that the rates of the CS and CR processes decrease as the length of the spacer increases. Their absorption over a wide portion of the solar spectrum and the high ratio of the CS/CR rates suggests that the self-assembled NDI-py:ZnNc and NDI(CH(2))(2)-py:ZnNc dyads are useful as photosynthetic models. PMID:22290735

  15. Transferable pseudoclassical electrons for aufbau of atomic ions.

    PubMed

    Ekesan, Solen; Kale, Seyit; Herzfeld, Judith

    2014-06-01

    Generalizing the LEWIS reactive force field from electron pairs to single electrons, we present LEWIS• in which explicit valence electrons interact with each other and with nuclear cores via pairwise interactions. The valence electrons are independently mobile particles, following classical equations of motion according to potentials modified from Coulombic as required to capture quantum characteristics. As proof of principle, the aufbau of atomic ions is described for diverse main group elements from the first three rows of the periodic table, using a single potential for interactions between electrons of like spin and another for electrons of unlike spin. The electrons of each spin are found to distribute themselves in a fashion akin to the major lobes of the hybrid atomic orbitals, suggesting a pointillist description of the electron density. The broader validity of the LEWIS• force field is illustrated by predicting the vibrational frequencies of diatomic and triatomic hydrogen species. PMID:24752384

  16. Transferable Pseudo-Classical Electrons for Aufbau of Atomic Ions

    PubMed Central

    Ekesan, Solen; Kale, Seyit; Herzfeld, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Generalizing the LEWIS reactive force field from electron pairs to single electrons, we present LEWIS in which explicit valence electrons interact with each other and with nuclear cores via pairwise interactions. The valence electrons are independently mobile particles, following classical equations of motion according to potentials modified from Coulombic as required to capture quantum characteristics. As proof of principle, the aufbau of atomic ions is described for diverse main group elements from the first three rows of the periodic table, using a single potential for interactions between electrons of like spin and another for electrons of unlike spin. The electrons of each spin are found to distribute themselves in a fashion akin to the major lobes of the hybrid atomic orbitals, suggesting a pointillist description of the electron density. The broader validity of the LEWIS force field is illustrated by predicting the vibrational frequencies of diatomic and triatomic hydrogen species. PMID:24752384

  17. SO 2 adsorption and thermal stability and reducibility of sulfates formed on the magnesium-aluminate spinel sulfur-transfer catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin-an; Li, Cheng-lie

    2000-07-01

    Magnesium-aluminate spinel used as a sulfur-transfer catalyst in the fluid catalytic cracking units for SO x emission control was prepared by the precipitation method. The crystalline structure, textural property, and surface dehydroxylation of the sample were characterized by thermogravimetry-derivative thermogravimetry (TG-DTG), differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), liquid N 2 adsorption-desorption and infrared spectroscopy (IR) measurements. The behavior of SO 2 adsorption and oxidation on the surface of catalyst was evaluated with IR from 50°C to 600°C. Particularly, the thermal stability and H 2-reducibility of the formed sulfite or sulfate during SO 2 adsorption or oxidation were tested under various conditions. In the absence of oxygen in the feed mixture, weak physically adsorbed SO 2 species and surface sulfite were identified. In the case of SO 2 oxidative adsorption, both surface sulfate and bulk-like sulfate were formed. When the sulfated sample was reduced with hydrogen, the surface sulfite and sulfates were completely removed below 550°C in vacuum. The bulk-like sulfate, however, showed a high ability to resist H 2-reduction, which indicates that the reducibility of bulk-like sulfate formed on magnesium-aluminate spinel must be enhanced when it is used as a sulfur-transfer catalyst.

  18. Effect of 2-Propanol on the Transfer Hydrogenation of Aldehydes by Aqueous Sodium Formate using a Rhodium(I)-sulfonated Triphenylphosphine Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kathó, Ágnes; Szatmári, Imre; Papp, Gábor; Joó, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    In water/2-propanol mixtures [RhCl(mtppms)(3)] (mtppms = monosulfonated triphenylphosphine) was an efficient catalyst for the selective C=C reduction of trans-3-phenyl-2-propenal (trans-cinnamaldehyde) by hydrogen transfer from formate at temperatures as low as 30 °C. An outstandingly high catalyst turnover frequency of 1214 h(-1) was determined at 70 °C. A possible mechanism of the reaction is suggested on the basis of kinetic studies and (1)H- and (31)P-NMR spectroscopic identification of the major Rh(I) species in the reaction mixtures as cis-mer-[H(2)RhX(mtppms)(3)] (X = HCOO(-) or H(2)O). It was established that a large part but not all of the rate increase observed in water/2-propanol mixtures in comparison with systems with neat water as solvent was the consequence of complete dissolution of trans-cinnamaldehyde on the effect of the co-solvent. Nevertheless, the rate showed a significant further increase with increasing 2-propanol concentration even in homogeneous solution and this was ascribed to changes in the solvent structure. The high catalyst activity in this solvent mixture allowed the transfer hydrogenation of citral. Although good to excellent conversions were observed at 30-70 °C, a useful degree of selectivity in hydrogenation of C=C vs. C=O bonds could not be achieved. PMID:26507479

  19. Observation of orientation-dependent electron transfer in molecule–surface collisions

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Nils; Golibrzuch, Kai; Bartels, Christof; Chen, Li; Auerbach, Daniel J.; Wodtke, Alec M.; Schäfer, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Molecules typically must point in specific relative directions to participate efficiently in energy transfer and reactions. For example, Förster energy transfer favors specific relative directions of each molecule’s transition dipole [Förster T (1948) Ann Phys 2(1-2):55–75] and electron transfer between gas-phase molecules often depends on the relative orientation of orbitals [Brooks PR, et al. (2007) J Am Chem Soc 129(50):15572–15580]. Surface chemical reactions can be many orders of magnitude faster than their gas-phase analogs, a fact that underscores the importance of surfaces for catalysis. One reason surface reactions can be so fast is the labile change of oxidation state that commonly takes place upon adsorption, a process involving electron transfer between a solid metal and an approaching molecule. By transferring electrons to or from the adsorbate, the process of bond weakening and/or cleavage is initiated, chemically activating the reactant [Yoon B, et al. (2005) Science 307(5708):403–407]. Here, we show that the vibrational relaxation of NO—an example of electronically nonadiabatic energy transfer that is driven by an electron transfer event [Gadzuk JW (1983) J Chem Phys 79(12):6341–6348]—is dramatically enhanced when the molecule approaches an Au(111) surface with the N atom oriented toward the surface. This represents a rare opportunity to investigate the steric influences on an electron transfer reaction happening at a surface. PMID:24127598

  20. High throughput electron transfer from carbon dots to chloroplast: a rationale of enhanced photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sourov; Pradhan, Saheli; Mitra, Shouvik; Patra, Prasun; Bhattacharya, Ankita; Pramanik, Panchanan; Goswami, Arunava

    2014-03-01

    A biocompatible amine functionalized fluorescent carbon dots were developed and isolated for gram scale applications. Such carbogenic quantum dots can strongly conjugate over the surface of the chloroplast and due to that strong interaction the former can easily transfer electrons towards the latter by assistance of absorbed light or photons. An exceptionally high electron transfer from carbon dots to the chloroplast can directly effect the whole chain electron transfer pathway in a light reaction of photosynthesis, where electron carriers play an important role in modulating the system. As a result, carbon dots can promote photosynthesis by modulating the electron transfer process as they are capable of fastening the conversion of light energy to the electrical energy and finally to the chemical energy as assimilatory power (ATP and NADPH).A biocompatible amine functionalized fluorescent carbon dots were developed and isolated for gram scale applications. Such carbogenic quantum dots can strongly conjugate over the surface of the chloroplast and due to that strong interaction the former can easily transfer electrons towards the latter by assistance of absorbed light or photons. An exceptionally high electron transfer from carbon dots to the chloroplast can directly effect the whole chain electron transfer pathway in a light reaction of photosynthesis, where electron carriers play an important role in modulating the system. As a result, carbon dots can promote photosynthesis by modulating the electron transfer process as they are capable of fastening the conversion of light energy to the electrical energy and finally to the chemical energy as assimilatory power (ATP and NADPH). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06079a

  1. Sequential energy and electron transfer in a three-component system aligned on a clay nanosheet.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Takuya; Ramasamy, Elamparuthi; Ishida, Yohei; Shimada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Shinsuke; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan

    2016-02-10

    To achieve the goal of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer across three molecules, a phenomenon often utilized in artificial light harvesting systems, we have assembled a light absorber (that also serves as an energy donor), an energy acceptor (that also serves as an electron donor) and an electron acceptor on the surface of an anionic clay nanosheet. Since neutral organic molecules have no tendency to adsorb onto the anionic surface of clay, a positively charged water-soluble organic capsule was used to hold neutral light absorbers on the above surface. A three-component assembly was prepared by the co-adsorption of a cationic bipyridinium derivative, cationic zinc porphyrin and cationic octaamine encapsulated 2-acetylanthracene on an exfoliated anionic clay surface in water. Energy and electron transfer phenomena were monitored by steady state fluorescence and picosecond time resolved fluorescence decay. The excitation of 2-acetylanthracene in the three-component system resulted in energy transfer from 2-acetylanthracene to zinc porphyrin with 71% efficiency. Very little loss due to electron transfer from 2-acetylanthracene in the cavitand to the bipyridinium derivative was noticed. Energy transfer was followed by electron transfer from the zinc porphyrin to the cationic bipyridinium derivative with 81% efficiency. Analyses of fluorescence decay profiles confirmed the occurrence of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer. Merging the concepts of supramolecular chemistry and surface chemistry we realized sequential energy and electron transfer between three hydrophobic molecules in water. Exfoliated transparent saponite clay served as a matrix to align the three photoactive molecules at a close distance in aqueous solutions. PMID:26820105

  2. Intermolecular electron transfer from intramolecular excitation and coherent acoustic phonon generation in a hydrogen-bonded charge-transfer solid.

    PubMed

    Rury, Aaron S; Sorenson, Shayne; Dawlaty, Jahan M

    2016-03-14

    Organic materials that produce coherent lattice phonon excitations in response to external stimuli may provide next generation solutions in a wide range of applications. However, for these materials to lead to functional devices in technology, a full understanding of the possible driving forces of coherent lattice phonon generation must be attained. To facilitate the achievement of this goal, we have undertaken an optical spectroscopic study of an organic charge-transfer material formed from the ubiquitous reduction-oxidation pair hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone. Upon pumping this material, known as quinhydrone, on its intermolecular charge transfer resonance as well as an intramolecular resonance of p-benzoquinone, we find sub-cm(-1) oscillations whose dispersion with probe energy resembles that of a coherent acoustic phonon that we argue is coherently excited following changes in the electron density of quinhydrone. Using the dynamical information from these ultrafast pump-probe measurements, we find that the fastest process we can resolve does not change whether we pump quinhydrone at either energy. Electron-phonon coupling from both ultrafast coherent vibrational and steady-state resonance Raman spectroscopies allows us to determine that intramolecular electronic excitation of p-benzoquinone also drives the electron transfer process in quinhydrone. These results demonstrate the wide range of electronic excitations of the parent of molecules found in many functional organic materials that can drive coherent lattice phonon excitations useful for applications in electronics, photonics, and information technology. PMID:26979698

  3. Intermolecular electron transfer from intramolecular excitation and coherent acoustic phonon generation in a hydrogen-bonded charge-transfer solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rury, Aaron S.; Sorenson, Shayne; Dawlaty, Jahan M.

    2016-03-01

    Organic materials that produce coherent lattice phonon excitations in response to external stimuli may provide next generation solutions in a wide range of applications. However, for these materials to lead to functional devices in technology, a full understanding of the possible driving forces of coherent lattice phonon generation must be attained. To facilitate the achievement of this goal, we have undertaken an optical spectroscopic study of an organic charge-transfer material formed from the ubiquitous reduction-oxidation pair hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone. Upon pumping this material, known as quinhydrone, on its intermolecular charge transfer resonance as well as an intramolecular resonance of p-benzoquinone, we find sub-cm-1 oscillations whose dispersion with probe energy resembles that of a coherent acoustic phonon that we argue is coherently excited following changes in the electron density of quinhydrone. Using the dynamical information from these ultrafast pump-probe measurements, we find that the fastest process we can resolve does not change whether we pump quinhydrone at either energy. Electron-phonon coupling from both ultrafast coherent vibrational and steady-state resonance Raman spectroscopies allows us to determine that intramolecular electronic excitation of p-benzoquinone also drives the electron transfer process in quinhydrone. These results demonstrate the wide range of electronic excitations of the parent of molecules found in many functional organic materials that can drive coherent lattice phonon excitations useful for applications in electronics, photonics, and information technology.

  4. Simultaneous Detection of Electronic Structure Changes from Two Elements of a Bifunctional Catalyst Using Wavelength-Dispersive X-ray Emission Spectroscopy and in situ Electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Sheraz; Desmond Ng, Jia Wei; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Anzenberg, Eitan; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gorlin, Yelena; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; Zhang, Jin Z.; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Jaramillo, Thomas F.; Yano, Junko

    2015-01-01

    Multielectron catalytic reactions, such as water oxidation, nitrogen reduction, or hydrogen production in enzymes and inorganic catalysts often involve multimetallic clusters. In these systems, the reaction takes place between metals or metals and ligands to facilitate charge transfer, bond formation/breaking, substrate binding, and release of products. In this study, we present a method to detect X-ray emission signals from multiple elements simultaneously, which allows for the study of charge transfer and the sequential chemistry occurring between elements. Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) probes charge and spin states of metals as well as their ligand environment. A wavelength-dispersive spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry was used to disperse Kβ signals of multiple elements onto a position detector, enabling an XES spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode. This overcomes the scanning needs of the scanning spectrometers, providing data free from temporal and normalization errors and therefore ideal to follow sequential chemistry at multiple sites. We have applied this method to study MnOx-based bifunctional electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, we investigated the effects of adding a secondary element, Ni, to form MnNiOx and its impact on the chemical states and catalytic activity, by tracking the redox characteristics of each element upon sweeping the electrode potential. The detection scheme we describe here is general and can be applied to time-resolved studies of materials consisting of multiple elements, to follow the dynamics of catalytic and electron transfer reactions. PMID:25747045

  5. Performance of alumina-supported Pt catalysts in an electron-beam-sustained CO2 laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, D. L.; Jones, P. L.; Miyake, C. I.; Moody, S. E.

    1990-01-01

    The performance of an alumina-supported Pt catalyst system used to maintain the gas purity in an electron-beam-sustained (636) isotope CO2 laser amplifier has been tested. The system characteristics using the two-zone, parallel flow reactor were determined for both continuous- and end-of-day reactor operation using on-line mass spectrometric sampling. The laser amplifier was run with an energy loading of typically 110 J-l/atm and an electron-beam current of 4 mA/sq cm. With these conditions and a pulse repetition frequency of 10 Hz for up to 10,000 shots, increases on the order of 100 ppm O2 were observed with the purifier on and 150 ppm with it off. The 1/e time recovery time was found to be approximately 75 minutes.

  6. Understanding catalyst behavior during in situ heating through simultaneous secondary and transmitted electron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Jane Y.; Allard, Jr., Lawrence Frederick; Demers, Hendrix; Bigelow, Wilbur C.; Steven H. Overbury

    2014-11-14

    In situ heating study via a simultaneous secondary electron (SE) and transmitted electron (TE) microscopy is extremely insightful because information from the surface (SE) and bulk (TE) can be readily obtained. The leached Au/Fe2O3 catalyst has voids on the surface of Fe2O3. Upon heating to 500 °C, voids shrank and disappeared, while internal Au species diffused to the surface to form new nanoparticles. Heating in vacuum reduced Fe2O3 to Fe3O4. Heating at 700 °C caused coalescence and growth of Au particles and formation of faceted Fe3O4 surfaces. We achieved 1.1 nm resolution in SE imaging during in situ heating.

  7. Electronic coherence and the kinetics of energy transfer in light-harvesting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David; Miller, Thomas

    Recent 2D-spectroscopy experiments have observed transient electronic coherence in natural and artificial light harvesting systems, which raises questions about the role of electronic coherence in facilitating excitation energy transfer (EET) processes. In this talk, we introduce the recently developed partial linearized path-integral (PLPI) method, which can accurately simulate exciton transfer dynamics across multiple reaction regimes, as well as reliably describe the electronic coherence among excitonic states. Further, we develop a strategy that enables the analysis of the relative impact of static and dynamic electronic coherence. With PLPI simulations, we find that energy transfer dynamics are almost entirely dominated by static coherence effects; dynamic coherence is found to cause only minor effects. These conclusions are consistent with the historical view that emphasizes the importance of energy-level alignment for efficient incoherent energy transfer,while suggesting a less important role for more exotic electronic coherence effects that have been recently emphasized.

  8. High throughput electron transfer from carbon dots to chloroplast: a rationale of enhanced photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Sourov; Pradhan, Saheli; Mitra, Shouvik; Patra, Prasun; Bhattacharya, Ankita; Pramanik, Panchanan; Goswami, Arunava

    2014-04-01

    A biocompatible amine functionalized fluorescent carbon dots were developed and isolated for gram scale applications. Such carbogenic quantum dots can strongly conjugate over the surface of the chloroplast and due to that strong interaction the former can easily transfer electrons towards the latter by assistance of absorbed light or photons. An exceptionally high electron transfer from carbon dots to the chloroplast can directly effect the whole chain electron transfer pathway in a light reaction of photosynthesis, where electron carriers play an important role in modulating the system. As a result, carbon dots can promote photosynthesis by modulating the electron transfer process as they are capable of fastening the conversion of light energy to the electrical energy and finally to the chemical energy as assimilatory power (ATP and NADPH). PMID:24562190

  9. Diameter selective electron transfer from encapsulated ferrocenes to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizumi, Yoko; Suzuki, Hironori; Tange, Masayoshi; Okazaki, Toshiya

    2014-10-01

    The diameter selective photoluminescence quenching of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is observed upon ferrocene encapsulation, which can be attributed to electron transfer from the encapsulated ferrocenes to the SWCNTs. Interestingly, the dependence of the electron transfer process on the nanotube diameter is governed by the molecular orientation of the ferrocenes in the SWCNT rather than the reduction potentials of the SWCNT.The diameter selective photoluminescence quenching of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is observed upon ferrocene encapsulation, which can be attributed to electron transfer from the encapsulated ferrocenes to the SWCNTs. Interestingly, the dependence of the electron transfer process on the nanotube diameter is governed by the molecular orientation of the ferrocenes in the SWCNT rather than the reduction potentials of the SWCNT. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Calculated binding energies of FeCp2@SWCNTs and additional spectroscopic characterization are described in ESI. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04398g

  10. Solid-supported reagents composed of a copolymer possessing 2-O-sulfonyl mannosides and phase-transfer catalysts for the synthesis of 2-fluoroglucose.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Ryota; Sakai, Yuki; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    We described the synthesis of a solid-supported co-polymer possessing mannosides and phase-transfer catalysts and synthesis of 2-fluoroglucoside from it. We first prepared a soluble copolymer from two allene monomers possessing a precursor for the synthesis of 2-fluoroglycose and a crown ether. The copolymerization of the monomers via the ?-ally nickel-catalyst smoothly proceeded at room temperature to provide a desired copolymer without decomposition of the sulfonate esters. The copolymer exhibited high reactivity towards fluorination in comparison with a conventional precursor. We next synthesized the solid-supported copolymer by using the solid-supported initiator attached with TentaGel resins. TentaGel enabled polymerization under stirring with stirring bar without decomposition. The solid-supported copolymer exhibited comparable reactivity towards fluorination in comparison with the soluble copolymer. In addition, it can be easily separated from the reaction vessel by filtration. PMID:26525864

  11. 36 CFR 1235.48 - What documentation must agencies transfer with electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... NARA Form 14097, Technical Description for Transfer of Electronic Records, for magnetic tape media, and a completed NARA Form 14028, Information System Description Form, or their equivalents. Agencies must submit the required documentation, if electronic, in an electronic form that conforms to...

  12. 36 CFR 1235.48 - What documentation must agencies transfer with electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... NARA Form 14097, Technical Description for Transfer of Electronic Records, for magnetic tape media, and a completed NARA Form 14028, Information System Description Form, or their equivalents. Agencies must submit the required documentation, if electronic, in an electronic form that conforms to...

  13. 36 CFR 1235.48 - What documentation must agencies transfer with electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... NARA Form 14097, Technical Description for Transfer of Electronic Records, for magnetic tape media, and a completed NARA Form 14028, Information System Description Form, or their equivalents. Agencies must submit the required documentation, if electronic, in an electronic form that conforms to...

  14. The Potential Use of Electronic File Transfer in the National Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Roberta

    This paper reviews the incompatibilities among federal government electronic records and explores the potential use of electronic file transfer in the National Archives. It begins by explaining the procedures of the current Center for Electronic Records (NNX) for dealing with accessioning, preservation, and reference tapes. The advantages and…

  15. Influence of ionic strength on triplet-state natural organic matter loss by energy transfer and electron transfer pathways.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kimberly M; Pignatello, Joseph J; Mitch, William A

    2013-10-01

    Triplet state excited natural organic matter chromophores ((3)NOM*) are important reactive intermediates in indirect photochemical processes, yet the impact of salt concentrations relevant to estuarine and marine environments on (3)NOM* is poorly understood. The formation rates, pseudo-first-order loss rate constants, and steady-state concentration of (3)NOM* were monitored using the sorbate probe method in synthetic matrices with increasing ionic strength (IS) to seawater values using seawater halides or other salts. The steady-state concentration of (3)NOM* approximately doubled at seawater IS, regardless of the salt used, due to a decrease in the (3)NOM* decay rate constant. The electron transfer-mediated degradation of 2,4,6-trimethylphenol (TMP) by (3)NOM* was significantly slowed at higher IS. A model is proposed wherein high IS slows intra-organic matter electron transfer pathways, an important (3)NOM* loss pathway, leading to longer (3)NOM* lifetimes. Although IS did not appear to impact energy transfer pathways directly, the higher (3)NOM* steady-state concentrations promote energy transfer interactions. The observed decrease in decay rate constant, increase in steady-state concentration of (3)NOM* at high IS, and the inhibition of electron transfer pathways should be considered when determining the fate of organic pollutants in estuarine and marine environments. PMID:23952218

  16. Structural effects on photoinduced electron transfer in carotenoid-porphyrin-quinone triads

    SciTech Connect

    Kuciauskas, D.; Liddell, P.A.; Hung, S.C.; Lin, S.; Stone, S.; Seely, G.R.; Moore, A.L.; Moore, T.A.; Gust, D.

    1997-01-16

    meso-Polyarylporphyrins are often used as components of molecules that mimic photosynthetic reaction centers by carrying out photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. Studies of these systems have raised questions concerning the role of alkyl substituents at the `{beta}-pyrrolic` positions on the porphyrin periphery in limiting {pi}-{pi} overlap between the macrocycle and the aryl rings. The degree of overlap affects electronic coupling and, therefore, the rates of electron-transfer reactions. There is also evidence that when the linkages joining porphyrins to electron-acceptor or -donor moieties contain amide bonds, the sense of the amide linkage may strongly affect electron-transfer rate constants. In this study, three carotenoid-porphyrin-quinone molecular triads and various model compounds have been prepared, and electron-transfer has been studied using time-resolved emission and absorption techniques. The results show that steric hindrance due to methyl groups at the {beta}-pyrrolic positions reduces electron-transfer rate constants by a factor of approximately 1/5. In addition, amide-containing donor-acceptor linkages having the nitrogen atom attached to the porphyrin meso-aryl ring demonstrate electron-transfer rate constants approximately 30 times larger than those for similar linkages with the amide reversed, after correction for thermodynamic effects. 52 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Intermediates Produced in the Electron-Transfer Processes of Phenothiazine/Semiconductor Systems.

    PubMed

    Jian; Xiang; Sun; Sun; Chen; Zhou; Liu; Xu

    2000-09-01

    Phenothiazine radical cation PTH(+*) and phenothiazine dication PTH(2+) produced by photoinduced electron transfer in phenothiazine/semiconductor systems have been studied by using ESR, UV-visible absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. It is found that the PTH(+*) was generated by electron transfer from (1)PTH* and (3)PTH* to the conduction band of the semiconductors besides PTH(+*) resulted in the photoionization of PTH as well as PTH(2+) produced by electron transfer from PTH(+*) to the conduction band of the semiconductors successively. Very significant supplementary information provided by UV-visible absorption, ESR, and resonance Raman spectra of PTH(+*) and PTH(2+), which were obtained by oxidation of PTH with lead tetraacetate, not only confirmed the two-step mono-electron-transfer mechanism proposed for interpretation of electron-transfer processes in PTH/semiconductor systems but also demonstrated that the two successive electron-transfer steps were corresponding to the removal of a p-electron at the nitrogen atom and a p-electron at the sulfur atom in the PTH molecule, respectively. Consequently, the nonplanar configuration of the PTH molecule changed into a planar configuration of the PTH(2+). Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10942561

  18. Rates and Routes of Electron Transfer of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase in an Enzymatic Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Alexander; Stein, Matthias

    2015-10-29

    Hydrogenase enzymes are being used in enzymatic fuel cells immobilized on a graphite or carbon electrode surface, for example. The enzyme is used for the anodic oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2) to produce protons and electrons. The association and orientation of the enzyme at the anode electrode for a direct electron transfer is not completely resolved. The distal FeS-cluster in [NiFe]-hydrogenases contains a histidine residue which is known to play a critical role in the intermolecular electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode surface. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase graphite electrode association was investigated using Brownian Dynamics simulations. Residues that were shown to be in proximity to the electrode surface were identified (His184, Ser196, Glu461, Glu464), and electron transfer routes connecting the distal FeS-cluster with the surface residues were investigated. Several possible pathways for electron transfer between the distal FeS-cluster and the terminal amino acid residues were probed in terms of their rates of electron transfer using DFT methods. The reorganization energies λ of the distal iron-sulfur cluster and coronene as a molecular model for graphite were calculated. The reorganization energy of the distal (His)(Cys)3 cluster was found to be not very different from that of a standard cubane clusters with a (Cys)4 coordination. Electronic coupling matrix elements and rates of electron transfer for the different pathways were calculated according to the Marcus equation. The rates for glutamate-mediated electrode binding were found to be incompatible with experimental data. A direct electron transfer from the histidine ligand of the distal FeS-cluster to the electrode yielded rates of electron transfer in excellent agreement with experiment. A second pathway, however, from the distal FeS-cluster to the Ser196 residue was found to be equally efficient and feasible. PMID:26218232

  19. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, M. Z.

    1992-07-01

    Conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used to study the intermediates involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. These intermediates were excited state of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and species formed in reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern was the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes.

  20. Specific deuterium isotope effects on the rates of electron transfer within geminate radical-ion pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, I.R.; Farid, S.

    1988-11-09

    The results of the first systematic study of the effect of isotopic substitution on the rates of electron transfer for reactions in the inverted region are reported. Rates of return electron transfer within germinate radical ion pairs of 9,10-dicyanoanthracene (DCA) and 2,6,9,10-tetracyanoanthracene (TCA) radical ions and radical cations of perdeuteriated methyl-substituted benzene derivatives determined by a previously reported method are tabulated. The free energies of the electron-transfer reactions for both sets of ion pairs have been calculated, and in each case the reactions with deuterated cations was slower than with undeuterated radical cations. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1992-07-31

    Conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used to study the intermediates involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. These intermediates were excited state of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and species formed in reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern was the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes. (DLC)

  2. Photoinduced electron transfer in a supramolecular triad produced by porphyrin anion-induced electron transfer from tetrathiafulvalene calix[4]pyrrole to Li(+)@C60.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christina M; Ohkubo, Kei; Lammer, Aaron D; Kim, Dong Sub; Kawashima, Yuki; Sessler, Jonathan L; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-06-18

    Binding of a porphyrin carboxylate anion () to tetrathiafulvalene calix[4]pyrrole (TTF-C4P) results in electron transfer from TTF-C4P to Li(+)@C60 to produce the charge-separated state (1/TTF-C4P˙(+)/Li(+)@C60˙(-)) in benzonitrile. Upon photoexcitation of , photoinduced electron transfer from the triplet excited state of to TTF-C4P˙(+) occurs to produce the higher energy charge-separated state (˙(+)/TTF-C4P/Li(+)@C60˙(-)), which decays to the ground state with a lifetime of 4.8 μs. PMID:25990787

  3. Electron donor-acceptor quenching and photoinduced electron transfer for coumarin dyes. Technical report, 1 January-31 October 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G. II; Griffin, S.F.; Choi, C.; Bergmark, W.R.

    1983-10-31

    The fluorescence of 7-aminocoumarins is quenched by a variety of organic electron donors or acceptors in acetonitrile. In general, donors with half-wave oxidation potentials less positive than 1.0 V vs SCE and acceptors with reduction potentials less negative than -1.5 V vs SCE are candidates for diffusion limited quenching of coumarin singlet states. Profiles of quenching rates are consistent with calculated free energies for electron transfer between excited coumarins and donors or acceptors. In flash photolysis experiments electron transfer for several dyes and quenchers (e.g., methyl viologen) is demonstrated. Relatively low yields of net electron transfer are consistently obtained due to inefficient ionic photodissociation via singlet quenching or a low yield of more photoactive coumarin triplets. Electrochemical properties of the coumarins have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry with the indications of reversible oxidation and irreversible reduction as important processes.

  4. Measured multipole moments of continuum electron transfer angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Elston, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    The velocity space distribution of electrons emitted near the forward direction from collisions involving fast, highly stripped oxygen ions with gaseous and solid targets is presented and described in terms of multipole moments of the ejected charge distribution, which permits direct comparison with recent theory. The measurements are produced by employing position-sensitive electron detection to combine emission angle definition with conventional electrostatic spectrometry. Agreement obtained between theory and distributions observed for binary continuum electron loss processes coupled with a similar multipole content observed with solid targets suggests a model of convoy electron production dominated by electron loss from the projectile within the bulk of the target. Further, the connection between multipoles of the projectile electron emission distribution in single collisions and the state of excitation of that projectile excited states may provide the basis for a probe of the state of ions traversing bulk solid matter. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Near-IR excitation transfer and electron transfer in a BF2-chelated dipyrromethane-azadipyrromethane dyad and triad.

    PubMed

    El-Khouly, Mohamed E; Amin, Anu N; Zandler, Melvin E; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; D'Souza, Francis

    2012-04-23

    A molecular dyad and triad, comprised of a known photosensitizer, BF(2)-chelated dipyrromethane (BDP), covalently linked to its structural analog and near-IR emitting sensitizer, BF(2)-chelated tetraarylazadipyrromethane (ADP), have been newly synthesized and the photoinduced energy and electron transfer were examined by femtosecond and nanosecond laser flash photolysis. The structural integrity of the newly synthesized compounds has been established by spectroscopic, electrochemical, and computational methods. The DFT calculations revealed a molecular-clip-type structure for the triad, in which the BDP and ADP entities are separated by about 14 Å with a dihedral angle between the fluorophores of around 70°. Differential pulse voltammetry studies have revealed the redox states, allowing estimation of the energies of the charge-separated states. Such calculations revealed a charge separation from the singlet excited BDP ((1)BDP*) to ADP (BDP(.+)-ADP(.-)) to be energetically favorable in nonpolar toluene and in polar benzonitrile. In addition, the excitation transfer from the singlet BDP to ADP is also envisioned due to good spectral overlap of the BDP emission and ADP absorption spectra. Femtosecond laser flash photolysis studies provided concrete evidence for the occurrence of energy transfer from (1)BDP* to ADP (in benzonitrile and toluene) and electron transfer from BDP to (1)ADP* (in benzonitrile, but not in toluene). The kinetic study of energy transfer was measured by monitoring the rise of the ADP emission and revealed fast energy transfer (ca. 10(11) s(-1)) in these molecular systems. The kinetics of electron transfer via (1)ADP*, measured by monitoring the decay of the singlet ADP at λ=820 nm, revealed a relatively fast charge-separation process from BDP to (1)ADP*. These findings suggest the potential of the examined ADP-BDP molecules to be efficient photosynthetic antenna and reaction center models. PMID:22416038

  6. A Dinuclear Ruthenium-Based Water Oxidation Catalyst: Use of Non-Innocent Ligand Frameworks for Promoting Multi-Electron Reactions.

    PubMed

    Laine, Tanja M; Kärkäs, Markus D; Liao, Rong-Zhen; Siegbahn, Per E M; Åkermark, Björn

    2015-07-01

    Insight into how H2 O is oxidized to O2 is envisioned to facilitate the rational design of artificial water oxidation catalysts, which is a vital component in solar-to-fuel conversion schemes. Herein, we report on the mechanistic features associated with a dinuclear Ru-based water oxidation catalyst. The catalytic action of the designed Ru complex was studied by the combined use of high-resolution mass spectrometry, electrochemistry, and quantum chemical calculations. Based on the obtained results, it is suggested that the designed ligand scaffold in Ru complex 1 has a non-innocent behavior, in which metal-ligand cooperation is an important part during the four-electron oxidation of H2 O. This feature is vital for the observed catalytic efficiency and highlights that the preparation of catalysts housing non-innocent molecular frameworks could be a general strategy for accessing efficient catalysts for activation of H2 O. PMID:25925847

  7. A Dinuclear Ruthenium-Based Water Oxidation Catalyst: Use of Non-Innocent Ligand Frameworks for Promoting Multi-Electron Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Tanja M; Kärkäs, Markus D; Liao, Rong-Zhen; Siegbahn, Per E M; Åkermark, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Insight into how H2O is oxidized to O2 is envisioned to facilitate the rational design of artificial water oxidation catalysts, which is a vital component in solar-to-fuel conversion schemes. Herein, we report on the mechanistic features associated with a dinuclear Ru-based water oxidation catalyst. The catalytic action of the designed Ru complex was studied by the combined use of high-resolution mass spectrometry, electrochemistry, and quantum chemical calculations. Based on the obtained results, it is suggested that the designed ligand scaffold in Ru complex 1 has a non-innocent behavior, in which metal–ligand cooperation is an important part during the four-electron oxidation of H2O. This feature is vital for the observed catalytic efficiency and highlights that the preparation of catalysts housing non-innocent molecular frameworks could be a general strategy for accessing efficient catalysts for activation of H2O. PMID:25925847

  8. Efficient photoinduced orthogonal energy and electron transfer reactions via phospholipid membrane-bound donors and acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Clapp, P.J.; Armitage, B.; Roosa, P.; O'Brien, D.F. )

    1994-10-05

    A three component, liposome-bound photochemical molecular device (PMD) consisting of energy and electron transfer reactions is described. Bilayer membrane surface-associated dyes, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)-phenyl]-21H,2 3H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate salt and N,N[prime]-bis[(3-trimethylammonio)propyl]thiadicarbocya nine tribromide, are the energy donor and acceptor, respectively, in a blue light stimulated energy transfer reaction along the vesicle surface. The electronically excited cyanine is quenched by electron transfer from the phospholipid membrane bound triphenylbenzyl borate anion, which is located in the lipid bilayer interior. The PMD exhibits sequential reactions following electronic excitation with the novel feature that the steps proceed with orthogonal orientation: energy transfer occurs parallel to the membrane surface, and electron transfer occurs perpendicular to the surface. Photobleaching and fluorescence quenching experiments verify the transfer reactions, and Stern-Volmer analysis was used to estimate the reaction rate constants. At the highest concentrations examined of energy and electron acceptor ca. 60% of the photoexcited porphyrins were quenched by energy transfer to the cyanine. 56 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Proton-coupled electron transfer drives the proton pump of cytochrome c oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belevich, Ilya; Verkhovsky, Michael I.; Wikström, Mårten

    2006-04-01

    Electron transfer in cell respiration is coupled to proton translocation across mitochondrial and bacterial membranes, which is a primary event of biological energy transduction. The resulting electrochemical proton gradient is used to power energy-requiring reactions, such as ATP synthesis. Cytochrome c oxidase is a key component of the respiratory chain, which harnesses dioxygen as a sink for electrons and links O2 reduction to proton pumping. Electrons from cytochrome c are transferred sequentially to the O2 reduction site of cytochrome c oxidase via two other metal centres, CuA and haem a, and this is coupled to vectorial proton transfer across the membrane by a hitherto unknown mechanism. On the basis of the kinetics of proton uptake and release on the two aqueous sides of the membrane, it was recently suggested that proton pumping by cytochrome c oxidase is not mechanistically coupled to internal electron transfer. Here we have monitored translocation of electrical charge equivalents as well as electron transfer within cytochrome c oxidase in real time. The results show that electron transfer from haem a to the O2 reduction site initiates the proton pump mechanism by being kinetically linked to an internal vectorial proton transfer. This reaction drives the proton pump and occurs before relaxation steps in which protons are taken up from the aqueous space on one side of the membrane and released on the other.

  10. On the involvement of electron transfer reactions in the fluorescence decay kinetics heterogeneity of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ababou, Abdessamad; Bombarda, Elisa

    2001-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence study of single tryptophan-containing proteins, nuclease, ribonuclease T1, protein G, glucagon, and mastoparan, has been carried out. Three different methods were used for the analysis of fluorescence decays: the iterative reconvolution method, as reviewed and developed in our laboratory, the maximum entropy method, and the recent method that we called "energy transfer" method. All the proteins show heterogeneous fluorescence kinetics (multiexponential decay). The origin of this heterogeneity is interpreted in terms of current theories of electron transfer process, which treat the electron transfer process as a radiationless transition. The theoretical electron transfer rate was calculated assuming the peptide bond carbonyl as the acceptor site. The good agreement between experimental and theoretical electron-transfer rates leads us to suggest that the electron-transfer process is the principal quenching mechanism of Trp fluorescence in proteins, resulting in heterogeneous fluorescence kinetics. Furthermore, the origin of apparent homogeneous fluorescence kinetics (monoexponential decay) in some proteins also can be explained on the basis of electron-transfer mechanism. PMID:11567101

  11. Electron Transfer Processes to Continuum in Near-Relativistic Ion-Atom Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, S.; Stoehlker, Th.; Fritzsche, S.; Surzhykov, A.; Jakubassa-Amundsen, D.; Najjari, B.; Voitkiv, A.; Ullrich, J.; Moshammer, R.; Kozhuharov, C.; Gumberidze, A.; Spillmann, U.; Reuschl, R.; Hess, S.; Trotsenko, S.; Bosch, F.; Liesen, D.; Nofal, M.; Doerner, R.; Rothard, H.

    2009-03-10

    Theories for electron transfer to the continuum have encountered considerable difficulties to take into account the intrinsic many-electron processes in the capture channel. This may partially be attributed to large momentum transfers involved and thus collision systems are mostly not in the realm of first order perturbation theories. For this reason we have studied collision systems where simultaneously distinct competing electron transfer processes are found to be active, like radiative (RECC) and non-radiative electron capture to continuum (ECC) in the relativistic domain where one or two even active electrons are involved; here another, though distinct, transfer process, the projectile electron loss to continuum (ELC), permits additionally to study the dynamics of ionization very close to threshold. We have studied these electron transfer processes simultaneously in forward electron emission in two systems of different projectile Compton profile, U{sup 88+}+N{sub 2} and Sn{sup 47+}+N{sub 2} collisions using the forward electron spectrometer at the supersonic jet-target of the ESR storage ring. We report first results and compare with theory.

  12. Counting electrons on supported nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykhach, Yaroslava; Kozlov, Sergey M.; Skála, Tomáš; Tovt, Andrii; Stetsovych, Vitalii; Tsud, Nataliya; Dvořák, Filip; Johánek, Viktor; Neitzel, Armin; Mysliveček, Josef; Fabris, Stefano; Matolín, Vladimír; Neyman, Konstantin M.; Libuda, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Electronic interactions between metal nanoparticles and oxide supports control the functionality of nanomaterials, for example, the stability, the activity and the selectivity of catalysts. Such interactions involve electron transfer across the metal/support interface. In this work we quantify this charge transfer on a well-defined platinum/ceria catalyst at particle sizes relevant for heterogeneous catalysis. Combining synchrotron-radiation photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional calculations we show that the charge transfer per Pt atom is largest for Pt particles of around 50 atoms. Here, approximately one electron is transferred per ten Pt atoms from the nanoparticle to the support. For larger particles, the charge transfer reaches its intrinsic limit set by the support. For smaller particles, charge transfer is partially suppressed by nucleation at defects. These mechanistic and quantitative insights into charge transfer will help to make better use of particle size effects and electronic metal-support interactions in metal/oxide nanomaterials.

  13. Direct Delocalization for Calculating Electron Transfer in Fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Arntsen, Christopher D.; Reslan, Randa; Hernandez, Samuel; Gao, Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2013-08-05

    A method is introduced for simple calculation of charge transfer between very large solvated organic dimers (fullerenes here) from isolated dimer calculations. The individual monomers in noncentrosymmetric dimers experience different chemical environments, so that the dimers do not necessarily represent bulk-like molecules. Therefore, we apply a delocalizing bias directly to the Fock matrix of the dimer system, and verify that this is almost as accurate as self-consistent solvation. As large molecules like fullerenes have a plethora of excited states, the initially excited state orbitals are thermally populated, so that the rate is obtained as a thermal average over Marcus thermal transfers.

  14. Solvent dependence of intramolecular electron transfer in a helical oligoproline assembly.

    PubMed

    Striplin, Durwin R; Reece, Steven Y; McCafferty, Dewey G; Wall, Craig G; Friesen, Duane A; Erickson, Bruce W; Meyer, Thomas J

    2004-04-28

    The helical oligoproline assembly CH3-CO-Pro-Pro-Pro-Pra(Ptzpn)-Pro-Pro-Pra(RuIIb2m2+ -Pro-Pro-Pra(Anq)-Pro-Pro-Pro-NH2, having a spatially ordered array of functional sites protruding from the proline backbone, has been prepared. The 13-residue assembly formed a linear array containing a phenothiazine electron donor, a tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) chromophore, and an anthraquinone electron acceptor with the proline II secondary structure as shown by circular dichroism measurements. Following RuII --> b2m metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) excitation at 457 nm, electron-transfer quenching occurs, ultimately to give a redox-separated (RS) state containing a phenothiazine (PTZ) radical cation at the Pra(Ptzpn) site and an anthraquinone (ANQ) radical anion at the Pra(Anq) site. The redox-separated state was formed with 33-96% efficiency depending on the solvent, and the transient stored energy varied from -1.46 to -1.71 eV at 22 +/- 2 degrees C. The dominant quenching mechanism is PTZ reductive quenching of the initial RuIII(b2m*-) MLCT excited state which is followed by m*- --> ANQ electron transfer to give the RS state. Back electron transfer is highly exergonic and occurs in the inverted region. The rate constant for back electron transfer is solvent dependent and varies from 5.2 x 10(6) to 7.7 x 10(6) s-1 at 22 +/- 2 degrees C. It is concluded that back electron transfer occurs by direct ANQ*- --> PTZ*+ electron transfer. Based on independently evaluated kinetic parameters, the electron-transfer matrix element is HDA approximately 0.13 cm-1. PMID:15099113

  15. Frontier orbital symmetry control of intermolecular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, B.

    1991-09-01

    This report contains sections describing the selection of electron donor-acceptor systems, the synthesis and photophysical properties of linked electron-donor-acceptor systems, the estimation of photoinduced charge-separation rate constants from fluorescence quenching data, and radical ion-pair recombination by picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. 9 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  16. Pulse radiolytic studies of electron transfer processes and applications to solar photochemistry. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Neta, P.

    1995-02-01

    The pulse radiolysis technique is applied to the study of electron transfer processes in a variety of chemical systems. Reactive intermediates are produced in solution by electron pulse irradiation and the kinetics of their reactions are followed by time resolved absorption spectrophotometry. Complementary experiments are carried out with excimer laser flash photolysis. These studies are concerned with mechanisms, kinetics, and thermodynamics of reactions of organic and inorganic radicals and unstable oxidation states of metal ions. Reactions are studied in both aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. The studies focus on the unique ability of pulse radiolysis to provide absolute rate constants for reactions of many inorganic radicals and organic peroxyl radicals, species that are key intermediates in many chemical processes. A special concern of this work is the study of electron transfer reactions of metalloporphyrins, which permits evaluation of these molecules as intermediates in solar energy conversion. Metalloporphyrins react with free radicals via electron transfer, involving the ligand or the metal center, or via bonding to the metal, leading to a variety of chemical species whose behavior is also investigated. The highlights of the results during the past three years are summarized below under the following sections: (a) electron transfer reactions of peroxyl radicals, concentrating on the characterization of new peroxyl radicals derived from vinyl, phenyl, other aryl, and pyridyl; (b) solvent effects on electron transfer reactions of inorganic and organic peroxyl radicals, including reactions with porphyrins, and (c) electron transfer and alkylation reactions of metalloporphyrins and other complexes.

  17. The Mechanism and Properties of Electron Transfer in the Biological Organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng

    2013-08-01

    The mechanism and properties of electron transfer along protein molecules at finite temperature T ≠ 0 in the life systems are studied using nonlinear theory of bio-energy transport and Green function method, in which the electrons are transferred from donors to acceptors in virtue of the supersound soliton excited by the energy released in ATP hydrolysis. The electron transfer is, in essence, a process of oxidation-reduction reaction. In this study we first give the Hamiltonian and wavefunction of the system and find out the soliton solution of the dynamical equation in the protein molecules with finite temperature, and obtain the dynamical coefficient of the electron transfer. The results show that the speed of the electron transfer is related to the velocity of motion of the soliton, distribution of electrons in the donor and acceptor as well as the interaction strength among them. We finally concluded the changed rule of electric current, arising from the electron transfer, with increasing time. These results are useful in molecular and chemical biology.

  18. Localization of alkali metal ions in sodium-promoted palladium catalysts as studied by low energy ion scattering and transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liotta, L.F.; Deganello, G.; Delichere, P.

    1996-12-01

    Three series of palladium-based catalysts have been studied by Low Energy Ion Scattering (LEIS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The first series is comprised of Na-Pd/SiO{sub 2} catalysts, obtained by addition of palladium to a silica support and by further addition of sodium ions with a Na/Pd atomic ratio (R) equal to 0,6.4 and 25.6. The second series consists of palladium catalysts supported on natural pumice, in which, due to a different loading of supported palladium, R{prime}, the (Na+K)/Pd atomic ratio, is equal to 17.0 and 39.4. The third series is represented by two palladium-based catalysts supported on {open_quotes}model pumices,{close_quotes} synthetic silico-aluminates, obtained by sol-gel techniques, with a different amount of sodium, and R equal to 2.1 and 6.1 respectively. LEIS experiments and electron microscopy demonstrate a different location of alkali metal ions in the first two series: in the Na-Pd/SiO{sub 2} catalysts sodium is distributed in a way which is not uniform on the support and on the palladium metal, which is partly decorated with Na ions, whereas in the Pd/natural-pumice series the palladium surface is sodium-free. The results on the third series of catalysts, Pd/model pumice, are not definitive on the basis of the LEIS and TEM analyses, but by FTIR study of CO and CO{sub 2} adsorption, the decoration of palladium by sodium ions could be excluded. The results confirm the importance of the alkali metal ion location in alkali-promoted palladium catalysts and open new possibilities in the design of palladium-supported catalysts by a better control of promoter location. 18 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Bi-directional magnetic resonance based wireless power transfer for electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Durga P.; Nayak, Praveen P.; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan; Mishra, Debasish

    2015-09-01

    In order to power or charge electronic devices wirelessly, a bi-directional wireless power transfer method has been proposed and experimentally investigated. In the proposed design, two receiving coils are used on both sides of a transmitting coil along its central axis to receive the power wirelessly from the generated magnetic fields through strongly coupled magnetic resonance. It has been observed experimentally that the maximum power transfer occurs at the operating resonant frequency for optimum electric load connected across the receiving coils on both side. The optimum wireless power transfer efficiency is 88% for the bi-directional power transfer technique compared 84% in the one side receiver system. By adopting the developed bi-directional power transfer method, two electronic devices can be powered up or charged simultaneously instead of a single device through usual one side receiver system without affecting the optimum power transfer efficiency.

  20. Catalyst by Design

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; DeBusk, Melanie Moses

    2014-01-01

    The development of new catalytic materials is still dominated by trial and error methods. Although it has been successful, the empirical development of catalytic materials is time consuming and expensive with no guarantee of success. In our laboratories, we are developing a comprehensive catalysts by design that involves state-of-the-art first principle density functional theory calculations, experimental design of catalyst sites, and sub- ngstr m resolution imaging with an aberration-corrected electron microscope to characterize the microstructure. In this chapter, we focus on supported platinum cluster catalyst systems which are one of the most important industrial catalysts and attempt to demonstrate the feasibility of the catalyst by design concept.

  1. Transferred metal electrode films for large-area electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jin-Guo; Kam, Fong-Yu; Chua, Lay-Lay

    2014-11-10

    The evaporation of metal-film gate electrodes for top-gate organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) limits the minimum thickness of the polymer gate dielectric to typically more than 300 nm due to deep hot metal atom penetration and damage of the dielectric. We show here that the self-release layer transfer method recently developed for high-quality graphene transfer is also capable of giving high-quality metal thin-film transfers to produce high-performance capacitors and OFETs with superior dielectric breakdown strength even for ultrathin polymer dielectric films. Dielectric breakdown strengths up to 5–6 MV cm{sup −1} have been obtained for 50-nm thin films of polystyrene and a cyclic olefin copolymer TOPAS{sup ®} (Zeon). High-quality OFETs with sub-10 V operational voltages have been obtained this way using conventional polymer dielectrics and a high-mobility polymer semiconductor poly[2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophene-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-2,5-diyl]. The transferred metal films can make reliable contacts without damaging ultrathin polymer films, self-assembled monolayers and graphene, which is not otherwise possible from evaporated or sputtered metal films.

  2. 78 FR 30661 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... implement the remittance transfer provisions in section 1073 of the Dodd-Frank Act. See 76 FR 29902 (May 23... effective October 28, 2013. The effective date of the rules published February 7, 2012 (77 FR 6194), July 10, 2012 (77 FR 40459), and August 20, 2012 (77 FR 50244), which were delayed on January 29, 2013 (78...

  3. Rhodamine-6G can photosensitize folic acid decomposition through electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Ito, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    Rhodamine-6G photosensitized folic acid decomposition in aqueous solution, and its quantum yield in the presence of 10 ?M folic acid was 9.9 10-6. A possible mechanism of this photodecomposition is direct oxidation through an electron transfer from folic acid to rhodamine-6G. The fluorescence lifetime of rhodamine-6G was slightly decreased by folic acid, suggesting electron transfer in the excited singlet state of rhodamine-6G. The quenching rate coefficient estimated from the Stern-Volmer plot of the fluorescence quenching supported that this electron transfer proceeds as a diffusion-controlled reaction. The quantum yields of the electron transfer and the following reaction could be determined.

  4. 48 CFR 52.232-38 - Submission of Electronic Funds Transfer Information with Offer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... information that is required to make payment by electronic funds transfer (EFT) under any contract that results from this solicitation. This submission satisfies the requirement to provide EFT information...

  5. 77 FR 71035 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ... Fiscal Service Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) Market Research Study AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION: Notice and Request for comments. SUMMARY: The Financial Management Service, as part of its...

  6. Electrode assemblies composed of redox cascades from microbial respiratory electron transfer chains

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Andrew J.; Marritt, Sophie; Bradley, Justin; Shi, Liang; McMillan, Duncan G.; Jeuken, Lars J.; Richardson, David; Butt, Julea N.

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory and photosynthetic electron transfer chains are dependent on vectorial electron transfer through a series of redox proteins. Examples include electron transfer from NapC to NapAB nitrate reductase in Paracoccus denitrificans and from CymA to Fcc3 (flavocytochrome c3) fumarate reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In the present article, we demonstrate that graphite electrodes can serve as surfaces for the stepwise adsorption of NapC and NapAB, and the stepwise adsorption of CymA and Fcc3. Aspects of the catalytic properties of these assemblies are different from those of NapAB and Fcc3 adsorbed in isolation. We propose that this is due to the formation of NapC-NapAB and of CymA-Fcc3 complexes that are capable of supporting vectorial electron transfer.

  7. Design of a Molecular Memory Device: The Electron Transfer Shift Register Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, D.

    1993-01-01

    A molecular shift register memory at the molecular level is described. The memory elements consist of molecules can exit in either an oxidized or reduced state and the bits are shifted between the cells with photoinduced electron transfer reactions.

  8. Density Functional Reactivity Theory Characterizes Charge Separation Propensity in Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shubin; Ess, Daniel H.; Schauer, Cynthia

    2011-04-20

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions occur in many biological and artificial solar energy conversion processes. In these reactions the electron is often transferred to a site distant to the proton acceptor site. In this work, we employ the dual descriptor and the electrophilic Fukui function from density functional reactivity theory (DFRT) to characterize the propensity for an electron to be transferred to a site other than the proton acceptor site. The electrophilic regions of hydrogen bond or van der Waal reactant complexes were examined using these DFRT descriptors to determine the region of space to which the electron is most likely to be transferred. This analysis shows that in PCET reactions the electrophilic region of the reactant complex does not include the proton acceptor site.

  9. Facilitation of Electron Transfer in the Presence of Mitochondria-Targeting Molecule SS31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosach, Tetiana; Ebrahim, Mark; Ren, Yuhang; Darrah, Shaun; Szeto, Hazel

    2010-03-01

    Electron transfer (ET) processes in mitochondria are very important for the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the common source of the chemical energy. The inability to transfer electrons efficiently in mitochondrial ET chain plays a major role in age associated diseases, including diabetes and cancer. In this work, we used the time dependent absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy to study the electron transfer kinetics along the ET chain of mitochondria. Our spectroscopic results suggest that SS31, a small peptide molecule targeting to the mitochondrial inner membrane, can facilitate electron transfer and increase ATP production. We show that SS31 targets cytochrome c to both increase the availability of state and also potentially reduce the energy barrier required to reduce cytochrome c.

  10. Experimental insights on the electron transfer and energy transfer processes between Ce3+-Yb3+ and Ce3+-Tb3+ in borate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sontakke, Atul D.; Ueda, Jumpei; Katayama, Yumiko; Dorenbos, Pieter; Tanabe, Setsuhisa

    2015-03-01

    A facile method to describe the electron transfer and energy transfer processes among lanthanide ions is presented based on the temperature dependent donor luminescence decay kinetics. The electron transfer process in Ce3+-Yb3+ exhibits a steady rise with temperature, whereas the Ce3+-Tb3+ energy transfer remains nearly unaffected. This feature has been investigated using the rate equation modeling and a methodology for the quantitative estimation of interaction parameters is presented. Moreover, the overall consequences of electron transfer and energy transfer process on donor-acceptor luminescence behavior, quantum efficiency, and donor luminescence decay kinetics are discussed in borate glass host. The results in this study propose a straight forward approach to distinguish the electron transfer and energy transfer processes between lanthanide ions in dielectric hosts, which is highly advantageous in view of the recent developments on lanthanide doped materials for spectral conversion, persistent luminescence, and related applications.

  11. 48 CFR 52.232-35 - Designation of Office for Government Receipt of Electronic Funds Transfer Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Government Receipt of Electronic Funds Transfer Information. 52.232-35 Section 52.232-35 Federal Acquisition... Electronic Funds Transfer Information. As prescribed in 32.1110(c), insert the following clause: Designation of Office for Government Receipt of Electronic Funds Transfer Information (MAY 1999) (a) As...

  12. Modeling Charge Transfer in Fullerene Collisions via Real-Time Electron Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jakowski, Jacek; Irle, Stephan; Sumpter, Bobby G; Morokuma, Keiji

    2012-06-01

    An approach for performing real-time dynamics of electron transfer in a prototype redox reaction that occurs in reactive collisions between neutral and ionic fullerenes is discussed. The quantum dynamical simulations show that the electron transfer occurs within 60 fs directly preceding the collision of the fullerenes, followed by structural changes and relaxation of electron charge. The consequences of real-time electron dynamics are fully elucidated for the far from equilibrium processes of collisions between neutral and multiply charged fullerenes. PMID:26285634

  13. Time-bin state transfer to electron spin coherence in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kosaka, Hideo; Inagaki, Takahiro; Hitomi, Ryuta; Izawa, Fumishige; Mitsumori, Yasuyoshi; Edamatsu, Keiichi; Rikitake, Yoshiaki; Imamura, Hiroshi

    2014-12-04

    We demonstrate that a coherent superposition state of two temporally separated optical pulses, called a time-bin state, can be transferred to that of up/down electron spins in a semiconductor by synchronizing the time separation to the precession period of either electrons or holes. The time-bin transfer scheme does not require polarization mode degeneracy and can map the time-bin state to the electron spin state that is not accessible directly using only polarization. The scheme offers a new approach for quantum interfaces between photons and electron spins.

  14. Electron impact excitation of SO2 - Differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vuskovic, L.; Trajmar, S.

    1982-01-01

    Electron impact excitation of the electronic states of SO2 was investigated. Differential, integral, and inelastic momentum transfer cross sections were obtained by normalizing the relative measurements to the elastic cross sections. The cross sections are given for seven spectral ranges of the energy-loss spectra extending from the lowest electronic state to near the first ionization limit. Most of the regions represent the overlap of several electronic transitions. No measurements for these cross sections have been reported previously.

  15. Unraveling the charge transfer/electron transport in mesoporous semiconductive TiO2 films by voltabsorptometry.

    PubMed

    Renault, Christophe; Nicole, Lionel; Sanchez, Clément; Costentin, Cyrille; Balland, Véronique; Limoges, Benoît

    2015-04-28

    In this work, we demonstrate that chronoabsorptometry and more specifically cyclic voltabsorptometry are particularly well suited techniques for acquiring a comprehensive understanding of the dynamics of electron transfer/charge transport within a transparent mesoporous semiconductive metal oxide film loaded with a redox-active dye. This is illustrated with the quantitative analysis of the spectroelectrochemical responses of two distinct heme-based redox probes adsorbed in highly-ordered mesoporous TiO2 thin films (prepared from evaporation-induced self-assembly, EISA). On the basis of a finite linear diffusion-reaction model as well as the establishment of the analytical expressions governing the limiting cases, it was possible to quantitatively analyse, predict and interpret the unusual voltabsorptometric responses of the adsorbed redox species as a function of the potential applied to the semiconductive film (i.e., as a function of the transition from an insulating to a conductive state or vice versa). In particular, we were able to accurately determine the interfacial charge transfer rates between the adsorbed redox species and the porous semiconductor. Another important and unexpected finding, inferred from the voltabsorptograms, is an interfacial electron transfer process predominantly governed by the extended conduction band states of the EISA TiO2 film and not by the localized traps in the bandgap. This is a significant result that contrasts those previously observed for dye-sensitized solar cells formed of randomly sintered TiO2 nanoparticles, a behaviour that was ascribed to a particularly low density of localized surface states in EISA TiO2. The present methodology also provides a unique and straightforward access to an activation-driving force relationship according to the Marcus theory, thus opening new opportunities not only to investigate the driving-force effects on electron recombination dynamics in dye-sensitized solar cells but also to study the electron transfer/transport mechanisms in heterogeneous photoelectrocatalytic systems combining nanostructured semiconductor electrodes and heterogeneous redox-active catalysts. PMID:25804293

  16. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjulstok, Emil; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'Yov, Ilia A.

    2015-12-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe specifically the electron transfer reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome-a signaling photoreceptor protein that became attractive recently due to its possible function as a biological magnetoreceptor.

  17. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    PubMed Central

    Sjulstok, Emil; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov’yov, Ilia A.

    2015-01-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe specifically the electron transfer reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome–a signaling photoreceptor protein that became attractive recently due to its possible function as a biological magnetoreceptor. PMID:26689792

  18. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    PubMed

    Sjulstok, Emil; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2015-01-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe specifically the electron transfer reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome-a signaling photoreceptor protein that became attractive recently due to its possible function as a biological magnetoreceptor. PMID:26689792

  19. Exactly Solvable Quantum Model for Electrochemical Electron-Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Jörg-Heinrich; Schmickler, Wolfgang

    2000-01-01

    We consider electron exchange between a metal electrode and a solvated reactant coupled to a harmonic oscillator bath. In the wide-band approximation the time development of the occupation probability for the reactant orbital can be calculated explicitly. From the behavior at long times we derive an expression for the reaction rate that is valid for all strengths of the electronic interaction between the metal and the reactant. The rate constant is related to the scattering matrix for electron exchange between a metal substrate and a scanning tunneling microscope via an electroactive adsorbate.

  20. Bifunctional primary amine-thiourea-TfOH (BPAT·TfOH) as a chiral phase-transfer catalyst: the asymmetric synthesis of dihydropyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yangyun; Yu, Jipan; Miao, Zhiwei; Chen, Ruyu

    2011-04-21

    An enantioselective Biginelli reaction has been developed by using a bifunctional primary amine-thiourea-TfOH (BPAT·TfOH) as a chiral phase-transfer catalyst and t-BuNH(2)·TFA as an additive in saturated brine at room temperature. The corresponding dihydropyrimidines were obtained in moderate-to-good yields with up to 99% ee under mild conditions. A plausible transition state has been proposed to explain the origin of the activation and the asymmetric induction. PMID:21394354

  1. 36 CFR 1235.50 - What specifications and standards for transfer apply to electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What specifications and standards for transfer apply to electronic records? 1235.50 Section 1235.50 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT TRANSFER OF RECORDS TO THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF THE UNITED STATES...

  2. A new hybrid technique for the volatile organic compounds removal by combined use of electron beams, microwaves and catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ighigeanu, D.; Calinescu, I.; Martin, D.; Matei, C.

    2008-05-01

    A new hybrid technique for the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) removal, based on combined use of electron beam (EB) induced non-thermal plasma (NTP), microwave (MW) induced NTP and catalytic oxidation, named "EB + MW-plasma catalysis", is presented. The catalyst is introduced into the irradiation zone, i.e. into the MW reactor and EB reactor. Our work combined the features of three techniques used for VOCs removal, i.e. the very high efficiency of EB in converting VOCs to intermediate products (IP) by OH radical reactions, the ability of MW to produce NTP in electrodeless reaction vessels, and the important role of catalysts in the complete oxidation of the IP to CO2 and H2O. The EB + MW-catalysis improved both decomposition efficiency (Ed) and oxidation efficiency (Eo). Ed and Eo were, respectively, as follows for toluene: 59.5% and 82.2% for the MW-plasma catalysis, 77.2% and 87.1% for the EB-plasma catalysis and 92.8% and 90.5% for the EB + MW-plasma catalysis.

  3. A carotenoid-diporphyrin-quinone model for photosynthetic mutistep electron and energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gust, D.; Moore, T.A.; Moore, A.L.; Makings, L.R.; Seely, G.R.; Ma, Xiaochun; Trier, T.T.; Gao, F. )

    1988-10-26

    A four-component molecular device, which consists of two covalently linked porphyrins, one bearing a carotenoid polyene and the other a napthoquinone electron-acceptor, has been prepared to attempt to explain the electron-transfer strategy of photosynthesis. This tetrad was found to demonstrate singlet and triplet energy transfer behavior, which mimics photosynthetic antenna function by chlorophylls and carotenoids and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage. 27 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Synthesis and photoinduced electron transfer studies of a tri(phenothiazine)-subphthalocyanine-fullerene pentad.

    PubMed

    KC, Chandra B; Lim, Gary N; Zandler, Melvin E; D'Souza, Francis

    2013-09-01

    A novel donor-acceptor pentad featuring subphthalocyanine and fullerene as the primary electron donor and acceptor, and three phenothiazine entities as secondary hole transferring agents, have been newly synthesized and characterized as an photosynthetic reaction center model compound. Occurrences of ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer (PET) and slower charge recombination are witnessed in the pentad from the femtosecond and nanosecond transient absorption studies. PMID:23981125

  5. The electrochemical approach to concerted proton—electron transfers in the oxidation of phenols in water

    PubMed Central

    Costentin, Cyrille; Louault, Cyril; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    Establishing mechanisms and intrinsic reactivity in the oxidation of phenol with water as the proton acceptor is a fundamental task relevant to many reactions occurring in natural systems. Thanks to the easy measure of the reaction kinetics by the current and the setting of the driving force by the electrode potential, the electrochemical approach is particularly suited to this endeavor. Despite challenging difficulties related to self-inhibition blocking the electrode surface, experimental conditions were established that allowed a reliable analysis of the thermodynamics and mechanisms of the proton-coupled electron-transfer oxidation of phenol to be carried out by means of cyclic voltammetry. The thermodynamic characterization was conducted in buffer media whereas the mechanisms were revealed in unbuffered water. Unambiguous evidence of a concerted proton–electron transfer mechanism, with water as proton acceptor, was thus gathered by simulation of the experimental data with appropriately derived theoretical relationships, leading to the determination of a remarkably large intrinsic rate constant. The same strategy also allowed the quantitative analysis of the competition between the concerted proton–electron transfer pathway and an OH−-triggered stepwise pathway (proton transfer followed by electron transfer) at high pHs. Investigation of the passage between unbuffered and buffered media with the example of the PO4H2−/PO4H2− couple revealed the prevalence of a mechanism involving a proton transfer preceding an electron transfer over a PO4H2−-triggered concerted process. PMID:19822746

  6. Molecular Catalyst Immobilized Photocathodes for Water/Proton and Carbon Dioxide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Tian, Haining

    2015-11-01

    As one of the components in a tandem photoelectrochemical cell for solar-fuel production, the photocathode carries out the reduction reaction to convert solar light and the corresponding substrate (e.g., proton and CO2) into target fuels. Immobilizing molecular catalysts onto the photocathode is a promising strategy to enhance the interfacial electron/hole-transfer process and to improve the stability of the catalysts. Furthermore, the molecular catalysts are beneficial in improving the selectivity of the reduction reaction, particularly for CO2 reduction. On the photocathode, the binding mode of the catalysts and the arrangement between the photosensitizer and the catalyst also play crucial roles in the performance and stability of the final device. How to firmly and effectively immobilize the catalyst on the photoelectrode is now becoming a scientific question. Recent publications on molecular catalyst immobilized photocathodes are therefore surveyed. PMID:26437747

  7. Average electron tunneling route of the electron transfer in protein media.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Hirotaka; Kakitani, Toshiaki

    2008-08-14

    We present a new theoretical method to determine and visualize the average tunneling route of the electron transfer (ET) in protein media. In this, we properly took into account the fluctuation of the tunneling currents and the quantum-interference effect. The route was correlated with the electronic factor in the case of ET by the elastic tunneling mechanism. We expanded by the interatomic tunneling currents 's. Incorporating the quantum-interference effect into the mean-square interatomic tunneling currents, denoted as , we could express as a sum of variant Planck's over 2pi(2). Drawing the distribution of on the protein structure, we obtain the map which visually represents which parts of bonds and spaces most significantly contribute to . We applied this method to the ET from the bacteriopheophytin anion to the primary quinone in the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We obtained 's by a combined method of molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations. In calculating , we found that much destructive interference works among the interatomic tunneling currents even after taking the average. We drew the map by a pipe model where atoms a and b are connected by a pipe with width proportional to the magnitude of . We found that two groups of 's, which are mutually coupled with high correlation in each group, have broad pipes and form the average tunneling routes, called Trp route and Met route. Each of the two average tunneling routes is composed of a few major pathways in the Pathways model which are fused at considerable part to each other. We also analyzed the average tunneling route for the ET by the inelastic tunneling mechanism. PMID:18630851

  8. Determination of the electronics transfer function for current transient measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharf, Christian; Klanner, Robert

    2015-04-01

    We describe a straight-forward method for determining the transfer function of the readout of a sensor for the situation in which the current transient of the sensor can be precisely simulated. The method relies on the convolution theorem of Fourier transforms. The specific example is a planar silicon pad diode. The charge carriers in the sensor are produced by picosecond lasers with light of wavelengths of 675 and 1060 nm. The transfer function is determined from the 1060 nm data with the pad diode biased at 1000 V. It is shown that the simulated sensor response convoluted with this transfer function provides an excellent description of the measured transients for laser light of both wavelengths. The method has been applied successfully for the simulation of current transients of several different silicon pad diodes. It can also be applied for the analysis of transient-current measurements of radiation-damaged solid state sensors, as long as sensors properties, like high-frequency capacitance, are not too different.

  9. Transfer printing of thermoreversible ion gels for flexible electronics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun Hyung; Zhang, Sipei; Gu, Yuanyan; Lodge, Timothy P; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2013-10-01

    Thermally assisted transfer printing was employed to pattern thin films of high capacitance ion gels on polyimide, poly(ethylene terephthalate), and SiO2 substrates. The ion gels consisted of 20 wt % block copolymer poly(styrene-b-ethylene oxide-b-styrene and 80 wt % ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethyl sulfonyl)amide. Patterning resolution was on the order of 10 μm. Importantly, ion gels containing the block polymer with short PS end blocks (3.4 kg/mol) could be transfer-printed because of thermoreversible gelation that enabled intimate gel-substrate contact at 100 °C, while gels with long PS blocks (11 kg/mol) were not printable at the same temperature due to poor wetting contact between the gel and substrates. By using printed ion gels as high-capacitance gate insulators, electrolyte-gated thin-film transistors were fabricated that operated at low voltages (<1 V) with high on/off current ratios (∼10(5)). Statistical analysis of carrier mobility, turn-on voltage, and on/off ratio for an array of printed transistors demonstrated the excellent reproducibility of the printing technique. The results show that transfer printing is an attractive route to pattern high-capacitance ion gels for flexible thin-film devices. PMID:24028461

  10. Stille Catalyst-Transfer Polycondensation Using Pd-PEPPSI-IPr for High-Molecular-Weight Regioregular Poly(3-hexylthiophene).

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yunyan; Mohin, Jacob; Tsai, Chia-Hua; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Gil, Roberto R; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Noonan, Kevin J T

    2015-05-01

    A commercially available palladium N-heterocyclic carbene (Pd-NHC) precatalyst is used to initiate chain-growth polymerization of 2-bromo-3-hexyl-5-trimethylstannylthiophene. The molecular weight of the resultant poly(3-hexylthiophene) can be modulated (7 to 73 kDa, Đ = 1.14 to 1.53) by varying the catalyst concentration. Mass spectrometry data confirm control over the polymer end groups and (1)H NMR spectroscopy reveals that the palladium catalyst is capable of "ring-walking". A linear relationship between Mn and monomer conversion is observed. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray scattering verify the regioregular nature of the resultant polythiophene. PMID:25757046

  11. Rerouting electron transfer in molecular assemblies by redox-pair matching.

    PubMed

    Balgley, Renata; Shankar, Sreejith; Lahav, Michal; van der Boom, Milko E

    2015-10-12

    We demonstrate how the distance over which electron transfer occurs through organic materials can be controlled and extended. Coating of conductive surfaces with nanoscale layers of redox-active metal complexes allows the electrochemical addressing of distant layers that are otherwise electrochemically silent. Our materials can pass electrons selectively in directions that are determined by positioning of layers of metal complexes and the distances between them. These electron-transfer processes can be made dominantly uni- or bidirectional. The design involves 1) a set of isostructural metal complexes with different electron affinities, 2) a scalable metal-organic spacer, and 3) a versatile assembly approach that allows systematic variation of composition, structure, and electron-transfer properties. We control the electrochemical communication between interfaces by the deposition sequence and the spacer length, therefore we are able to program the bulk properties of the assemblies. PMID:26356009

  12. Beyond frontier molecular orbital theory: a systematic electron transfer model (ETM) for polar bimolecular organic reactions.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Katharine J; Johnson, Richard P

    2013-03-01

    Polar bimolecular reactions often begin as charge-transfer complexes and may proceed with a high degree of electron transfer character. Frontier molecular orbital (FMO) theory is predicated in part on this concept. We have developed an electron transfer model (ETM) in which we systematically transfer one electron between reactants and then use density functional methods to model the resultant radical or radical ion intermediates. Sites of higher reactivity are revealed by a composite spin density map (SDM) of odd electron character on the electron density surface, assuming that a new two-electron bond would occur preferentially at these sites. ETM correctly predicts regio- and stereoselectivity for a broad array of reactions, including Diels-Alder, dipolar and ketene cycloadditions, Birch reduction, many types of nucleophilic additions, and electrophilic addition to aromatic rings and polyenes. Conformational analysis of radical ions is often necessary to predict reaction stereochemistry. The electronic and geometric changes due to one-electron oxidation or reduction parallel the reaction coordinate for electrophilic or nucleophilic addition, respectively. The effect is more dramatic for one-electron reduction. PMID:23057698

  13. Measurement of the charge transfer efficiency of electrons clocked on superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Sabouret, G.; Lyon, S.A.

    2006-06-19

    Electrons floating on the surface of liquid helium are possible qubits for quantum information processing. Varying electric potentials do not modify spin states, which allows their transport on helium using a charge-coupled device (CCD)-like array of underlying gates. This scheme depends on an efficient intergate electron transfer and on the absence of electron traps. We will present a measurement of the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) of electrons clocked back and forth above a short CCD-like structure. The CTE obtained at low clocking frequencies is 0.999 with an electron density of about 4 electrons/{mu}m{sup 2}. We find no evidence for deep electron trapping.

  14. Extracellular electron transfer from cathode to microbes: application for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Choi, Okkyoung; Sang, Byoung-In

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer in microorganisms has been applied for bioelectrochemical synthesis utilizing microbes to catalyze anodic and/or cathodic biochemical reactions. Anodic reactions (electron transfer from microbe to anode) are used for current production and cathodic reactions (electron transfer from cathode to microbe) have recently been applied for current consumption for valuable biochemical production. The extensively studied exoelectrogenic bacteria Shewanella and Geobacter showed that both directions for electron transfer would be possible. It was proposed that gram-positive bacteria, in the absence of cytochrome C, would accept electrons using a cascade of membrane-bound complexes such as membrane-bound Fe-S proteins, oxidoreductase, and periplasmic enzymes. Modification of the cathode with the addition of positive charged species such as chitosan or with an increase of the interfacial area using a porous three-dimensional scaffold electrode led to increased current consumption. The extracellular electron transfer from the cathode to the microbe could catalyze various bioelectrochemical reductions. Electrofermentation used electrons from the cathode as reducing power to produce more reduced compounds such as alcohols than acids, shifting the metabolic pathway. Electrofuel could be generated through artificial photosynthesis using electrical energy instead of solar energy in the process of carbon fixation. PMID:26788124

  15. Identification of a new electron-transfer relaxation pathway in photoexcited pyrrole dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, Simon P.; Kirkby, Oliver M.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Worth, Graham A.; Fielding, Helen H.

    2016-04-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer is central to many biological processes and technological applications, such as the harvesting of solar energy and molecular electronics. The electron donor and acceptor units involved in electron transfer are often held in place by covalent bonds, π-π interactions or hydrogen bonds. Here, using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations, we reveal the existence of a new, low-energy, photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism in molecules held together by an NH⋯π bond. Specifically, we capture the electron-transfer process in a pyrrole dimer, from the excited π-system of the donor pyrrole to a Rydberg orbital localized on the N-atom of the acceptor pyrrole, mediated by an N-H stretch on the acceptor molecule. The resulting charge-transfer state is surprisingly long lived and leads to efficient electronic relaxation. We propose that this relaxation pathway plays an important role in biological and technological systems containing the pyrrole building block.

  16. Identification of a new electron-transfer relaxation pathway in photoexcited pyrrole dimers

    PubMed Central

    Neville, Simon P.; Kirkby, Oliver M.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Worth, Graham A.; Fielding, Helen H.

    2016-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer is central to many biological processes and technological applications, such as the harvesting of solar energy and molecular electronics. The electron donor and acceptor units involved in electron transfer are often held in place by covalent bonds, π–π interactions or hydrogen bonds. Here, using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations, we reveal the existence of a new, low-energy, photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism in molecules held together by an NH⋯π bond. Specifically, we capture the electron-transfer process in a pyrrole dimer, from the excited π-system of the donor pyrrole to a Rydberg orbital localized on the N-atom of the acceptor pyrrole, mediated by an N–H stretch on the acceptor molecule. The resulting charge-transfer state is surprisingly long lived and leads to efficient electronic relaxation. We propose that this relaxation pathway plays an important role in biological and technological systems containing the pyrrole building block. PMID:27098394

  17. Identification of a new electron-transfer relaxation pathway in photoexcited pyrrole dimers.

    PubMed

    Neville, Simon P; Kirkby, Oliver M; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Worth, Graham A; Fielding, Helen H

    2016-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer is central to many biological processes and technological applications, such as the harvesting of solar energy and molecular electronics. The electron donor and acceptor units involved in electron transfer are often held in place by covalent bonds, π-π interactions or hydrogen bonds. Here, using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations, we reveal the existence of a new, low-energy, photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism in molecules held together by an NH⋯π bond. Specifically, we capture the electron-transfer process in a pyrrole dimer, from the excited π-system of the donor pyrrole to a Rydberg orbital localized on the N-atom of the acceptor pyrrole, mediated by an N-H stretch on the acceptor molecule. The resulting charge-transfer state is surprisingly long lived and leads to efficient electronic relaxation. We propose that this relaxation pathway plays an important role in biological and technological systems containing the pyrrole building block. PMID:27098394

  18. A new semiclassical decoupling scheme for electronic transitions in molecular collisions - Application to vibrational-to-electronic energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.-W.; Lam, K. S.; Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1980-01-01

    A new semiclassical decoupling scheme (the trajectory-based decoupling scheme) is introduced in a computational study of vibrational-to-electronic energy transfer for a simple model system that simulates collinear atom-diatom collisions. The probability of energy transfer (P) is calculated quasiclassically using the new scheme as well as quantum mechanically as a function of the atomic electronic-energy separation (lambda), with overall good agreement between the two sets of results. Classical mechanics with the new decoupling scheme is found to be capable of predicting resonance behavior whereas an earlier decoupling scheme (the coordinate-based decoupling scheme) failed. Interference effects are not exhibited in P vs lambda results.

  19. (Formation of fuel via photochemical electron transfer). Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.

    1985-03-04

    Accomplishments for the past year are reported under the following three main headings, in addition to several other related studies: (1) heterocyclic sulfur compounds which display unusual properties as electron relays which may be important in chemical or fuel forming reactions; (2) cationic dyes which tend to aggregate in interesting ways when bound to polyanion in water; and (3) photochemistry of viologen or pyridinium ions which are complexed or ion-paired with electron donors. A publications update is appended with references cited in this report.

  20. Electron transfer between [4Fe-4S] clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2010-07-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters [4Fe-4S] are major components in biological electron transport (ET). Using the DFT/B3LYP method, we calculate electronic coupling for low- and high-potential ET between [4Fe-4S] clusters and explore its sensitivity to structural parameters of the system and external electric field. As an example, we consider a model of the bacterial respiratory complex I and estimate the role of neighboring amino acids in facilitating the ET process between the clusters. Our results suggest that the superexchange mechanism rather than hole hopping should be operative in ET between [4Fe-4S] redox centers.

  1. Concerted proton-electron transfer in the oxidation of hydrogen-bonded phenols.

    PubMed

    Rhile, Ian J; Markle, Todd F; Nagao, Hirotaka; DiPasquale, Antonio G; Lam, Oanh P; Lockwood, Mark A; Rotter, Katrina; Mayer, James M

    2006-05-10

    Three phenols with pendant, hydrogen-bonded bases (HOAr-B) have been oxidized in MeCN with various one-electron oxidants. The bases are a primary amine (-CPh(2)NH(2)), an imidazole, and a pyridine. The product of chemical and quasi-reversible electrochemical oxidations in each case is the phenoxyl radical in which the phenolic proton has transferred to the base, (*)OAr-BH(+), a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) process. The redox potentials for these oxidations are lower than for other phenols, predominately from the driving force for proton movement. One-electron oxidation of the phenols occurs by a concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) mechanism, based on thermochemical arguments, isotope effects, and DeltaDeltaG(++)/DeltaDeltaG degrees . The data rule out stepwise paths involving initial electron transfer to form the phenol radical cations [(*)(+)HOAr-B] or initial proton transfer to give the zwitterions [(-)OAr-BH(+)]. The rate constant for heterogeneous electron transfer from HOAr-NH(2) to a platinum electrode has been derived from electrochemical measurements. For oxidations of HOAr-NH(2), the dependence of the solution rate constants on driving force, on temperature, and on the nature of the oxidant, and the correspondence between the homogeneous and heterogeneous rate constants, are all consistent with the application of adiabatic Marcus theory. The CPET reorganization energies, lambda = 23-56 kcal mol(-)(1), are large in comparison with those for electron transfer reactions of aromatic compounds. The reactions are not highly non-adiabatic, based on minimum values of H(rp) derived from the temperature dependence of the rate constants. These are among the first detailed analyses of CPET reactions where the proton and electron move to different sites. PMID:16669677

  2. Characterizing the Behavior and Properties of an Excited Electronic State: Electron-Transfer Mediated Quenching of Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen, Lars; Zabala Ruiz, Arantza; Uttrup Pedersen, Steen; Ogilby, Peter R.

    2003-07-01

    We have designed a series of laboratory exercises to illustrate a range of key concepts traditionally encountered in a general course on physical chemistry. In these exercises, optical spectroscopic measurements, electrochemical measurements, kinetic measurements, and computer modeling are used to characterize the properties and behavior of an electronic excited state. Specifically, students are asked to use these tools to answer a question posed at the outset: "Upon interaction with a series of molecules, Q, are the fluorescent states of 9-cyano- and 9,10-dicyanoanthracene quenched via an electron transfer process?" In the laboratory, students experimentally quantify rate constants, kq (exp), for cyanoanthracene excited state removal by the molecules Q in a Stern Volmer study of fluorescence quenching. In other experiments, students collect information that allows them to independently calculate the rate constants, kq (calc), for these same molecules Q that would be expected if quenching proceeds via an electron transfer process. Upon comparison of these respective kq values in a Rehm Weller plot of both kq (exp) and kq (calc) against the Gibbs energy of electron transfer, the students ascertain that the quenching reaction studied indeed proceeds via electron transfer.

  3. Activation of Single-Component Nickel(II) Polyethylene Catalysts via Phase Transfer of Fluorous Phosphine Ligands.

    PubMed

    Xi, Zhenxing; Bazzi, Hassan S; Gladysz, John A

    2015-09-01

    The nickel salicylaldiminato phosphine complexes [1,2,3-C6H3(9-anthracenyl)O(CH═N(2,6-C6H3(iPr)2)]Ni(Me)[P(4-C6H4R)3] (4; R = a, (CH2)2Rf8; b, (CH2)3Rf8; c, H (Rf8 = (CF2)7CF3)) are prepared from the corresponding phosphines 3a-c and nickel NCMe adduct (46-68%). These are applied as catalysts for ethylene polymerization in toluene and fluorous/toluene liquid/liquid biphasic mixtures. Under the latter conditions, the fluorous phosphines 3a,b that must dissociate to generate the active catalyst migrate to the fluorous phase (partition coefficients 97.5:2.5 and 66.6:33.4 vs <0.5:>99.5 for 4a,b). Catalysts 4a,b show marked accelerations under biphasic conditions, but 4c (which has a lipophilic phosphine ligand) does not. Under all conditions, 4a,b are faster catalysts than the Ni(Ph)(PPh3) analogue, a previously reported benchmark. PMID:26300472

  4. Fabrication of nanowire electronics on nonconventional substrates by water-assisted transfer printing method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi Hwan; Kim, Dong Rip; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2011-08-10

    We report a simple, versatile, and wafer-scale water-assisted transfer printing method (WTP) that enables the transfer of nanowire devices onto diverse nonconventional substrates that were not easily accessible before, such as paper, plastics, tapes, glass, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), aluminum foil, and ultrathin polymer substrates. The WTP method relies on the phenomenon of water penetrating into the interface between Ni and SiO(2). The transfer yield is nearly 100%, and the transferred devices, including NW resistors, diodes, and field effect transistors, maintain their original geometries and electronic properties with high fidelity. PMID:21696196

  5. Fabrication of nanowire electronics on nonconventional substrates by water-assisted transfer printing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chi Hwan; Kim, Dong Rip; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2015-06-01

    We report a simple, versatile, and wafer-scale water-assisted transfer printing method (WTP) that enables the transfer of nanowire devices onto diverse nonconventional substrates that were not easily accessible before, such as paper, plastics, tapes, glass, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), aluminum foil, and ultrathin polymer substrates. The WTP method relies on the phenomenon of water penetrating into the interface between Ni and SiO2. The transfer yield is nearly 100%, and the transferred devices, including NW resistors, diodes, and field effect transistors, maintain their original geometries and electronic properties with high fidelity.

  6. Ultrasound assisted the preparation of 1-butoxy-4-nitrobenzene under a new multi-site phase-transfer catalyst--kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Harikumar, Kuppuswamy; Rajendran, Venugopal

    2014-01-01

    In the present research work deals with the preparation of 1-butoxy-4-nitrobenzene was successfully carried out by 4-nitrophenol with n-butyl bromide using aqueous potassium carbonate and catalyzed by a new multi-site phase-transfer catalyst (MPTC) viz., N(1),N(4)-diethyl-N(1),N(1),N(4),N(4)-tetraisopropylbutane-1,4-diammonium dibromide, under ultrasonic (40 kHz, 300 W) assisted organic solvent condition. The pseudo first-order kinetic equation was applied to describe the overall reaction. Under ultrasound irradiation (40 kHz, 300 W) in a batch reactor, it shows that the overall reaction greatly enhanced with ultrasound irradiation than without ultrasound. The present study provides a method to synthesize nitro aromatic ethers by ultrasound assisted liquid-liquid multi-site phase-transfer catalysis condition. PMID:23948491

  7. pH-Dependent Reduction Potentials and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanisms in Hydrogen-Producing Nickel Molecular Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, Samantha; Fernandez, Laura; Appel, Aaron M.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2013-04-01

    The nickel-based Ph Bz 2 2 P N electrocatalysts, which are comprised of a nickel atom and two 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-diphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane ligands, have been shown to effectively catalyze H2 production in acetonitrile. Recent electrochemical experiments revealed a linear dependence of the NiII/I reduction potential on pH, suggesting a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction. In the proposed mechanism, the catalytic cycle begins with a PCET process involving electrochemical electron transfer to the nickel center and intermolecular proton transfer from an acid to the pendant amine ligand. This paper presents quantum mechanical calculations of this PCET process to examine the thermodynamics of the sequential mechanisms, in which either the electron or the proton transfers first (ETPT and PTET, respectively), and the concerted mechanism (EPT). The favored mechanism depends on a balance among many factors, including the acid strength, association free energy for the acidcatalyst complex, PT free energy barrier, and ET reduction potential. The ET reduction potential is less negative after PT, favoring the PTET mechanism, and the association free energy is less positive after reduction, favoring the ETPT mechanism. The calculations, along with analysis of the experimental data, indicate that the sequential ETPT mechanism is favored for weak acids because of the substantial decrease in the association free energy after reduction. For strong acids, however, the PTET mechanism may be favored because the association free energy is somewhat smaller and PT is more thermodynamically favorable. The concerted mechanism could also occur, particularly for intermediate acid strengths. In the context of the entire catalytic cycle for H2 production, the initial PCET process involving intermolecular PT has a more negative reduction potential than the subsequent PCET process involving intramolecular PT. As a result, the second PCET should occur spontaneously, which is consistent with cyclic voltammogram experiments. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  8. Ultrafast Electron Transfer Kinetics of Graphene Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ran; Nioradze, Nikoloz; Santhosh, Padmanabhan; Li, Zhiting; Surwade, Sumedh P; Shenoy, Ganesh J; Parobek, David G; Kim, Min A; Liu, Haitao; Amemiya, Shigeru

    2015-12-01

    High electrochemical reactivity is required for various energy and sensing applications of graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Herein, we report that heterogeneous electron transfer can be remarkably fast at CVD-grown graphene electrodes that are fabricated without using the conventional poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) for graphene transfer from a growth substrate. We use nanogap voltammetry based on scanning electrochemical microscopy to obtain very high standard rate constants k(0) ≥25 cm s(-1) for ferrocenemethanol oxidation at polystyrene-supported graphene. The rate constants are at least 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than those at PMMA-transferred graphene, which demonstrates an anomalously weak dependence of electron-transfer rates on the potential. Slow kinetics at PMMA-transferred graphene is attributed to the presence of residual PMMA. This unprecedentedly high reactivity of PMMA-free CVD-grown graphene electrodes is fundamentally and practically important. PMID:26563580

  9. Photoinduced Electron and H-atom Transfer Reactions of Xanthone by Laser Flash Photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin-ting; Pan, Yang; Zhang, Li-min; Yu, Shu-qin

    2007-08-01

    The property of the lowest excited triplet states of xanthone in acetonitrile was investigated using time-resolved laser flash photolysis at 355 nm. The transient absorption spectra and the quenching rate constants (kq) of the excited xanthone with several amines were determined. Good correlation between lgkq and the driving force of the reactions suggests the electron transfer mechanism, except aniline and 3-nitroaniline (3-NO2-A) which showed energy transfer mechanism. With the appearance of ketyl radical, hydrogen atom transfer also happened between xanthone and dimethyl-p-toluidine, 3,5,N,N-tetramethylaniline, N,N-dimethylaniline, and triethylamine. Therefore, both electron transfer and H-atom transfer occured in these systems. Great discrepancies of kq values were discovered in H-atom abstraction reactions for alcohols and phenols, which can be explained by different abstraction mechanisms. The quenching rate constants between xanthone and alcohols correlate well with the ?-C-H bonding energy of alcohols.

  10. Electron-Proton Decoupling in Excited-State Hydrogen Atom Transfer in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Ohara, Ryuhei; Daigoku, Kota; Hashimoto, Kenro; Woodward, Jonathan R; Dedonder, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe; Fujii, Masaaki

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen-release by photoexcitation, excited-state-hydrogen-transfer (ESHT), is one of the important photochemical processes that occur in aromatic acids and is responsible for photoprotection of biomolecules. The mechanism is described by conversion of the initial state to a charge-separated state along the O(N)-H bond elongation, leading to dissociation. Thus ESHT is not a simple H-atom transfer in which a proton and a 1s electron move together. Here we show that the electron-transfer and the proton-motion are decoupled in gas-phase ESHT. We monitor electron and proton transfer independently by picosecond time-resolved near-infrared and infrared spectroscopy for isolated phenol-(ammonia)5 , a benchmark molecular cluster. Electron transfer from phenol to ammonia occurred in less than 3 picoseconds, while the overall H-atom transfer took 15 picoseconds. The observed electron-proton decoupling will allow for a deeper understanding and control of of photochemistry in biomolecules. PMID:26418630

  11. Vibrational coherence transfer in an electronically decoupled molecular dyad

    PubMed Central

    Schweighöfer, Felix; Dworak, Lars; Braun, Markus; Zastrow, Marc; Wahl, Jan; Burghardt, Irene; Rück-Braun, Karola; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2015-01-01

    The ring opening of a dithienylethene photoswitch incorporated in a bridged boron-dipyrromethene - dithienylethene molecular dyad was investigated with ultrafast spectroscopy. Coherent vibrations in the electronic ground state of the boron-dipyrromethene are triggered after selective photoexcitation of the closed dithienylethene indicating vibrational coupling although the two moieties are electronically isolated. A distribution of short-lived modes and a long-lived mode at 143 cm−1 are observed. Analysis of the theoretical frequency spectrum indicates two modes at 97 cm−1 and 147 cm−1 which strongly modulate the electronic transition energy. Both modes exhibit a characteristic displacement of the bridge suggesting that the mechanical momentum of the initial geometry change after photoexcitation of the dithienylethene is transduced to the boron-dipyrromethene. The relaxation to the dithienylethene electronic ground state is accompanied by significant heat dissipation into the surrounding medium. In the investigated dyad, the boron-dipyrromethene acts as probe for the ultrafast photophysical processes in the dithienylethene. PMID:25797419

  12. Nuclear interlevel transfer driven by collective outer shell electron oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, G.A.; Solem, J.G.; Biedenharn, L.C.

    1986-10-20

    The general problem of dynamic electron-nucleus coupling is discussed, and the possibility of using this mechanism to initiate gamma-ray lasing. Single-particle and collective mechanisms are considered. The problems associated with accurate calculation of these processes are discussed, and some numerical results are given. Work in process in described. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Cellular electron transfer and radical mechanisms for drug metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Biaglow, J.E.

    1981-05-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic reductions of various nitroaromatic compounds by mammalian cells result in the production of reactive intermediates. Drug reduction is dependent upon glucose, nonprotein thiols, endogenous enzyme levels, and drug electron affinity. Drugs with electron affinities approaching that of oxygen are reduced, in the presence of oxygen, beyond a one-electron radical anion. Nitroaromatic radical anion inactivation occurs by reaction with cellular ferricytochrome c, endogenous thiols, and with oxygen. In the latter case the reaction results in the production of peroxide. Drugs that are substrates for the enzyme glutathione-S-transferase remove endogeneous thiols and demonstrate peroxide production without prior thiol removal. Less electron affinic drugs such as misonidazole require thiol removal as well as the presence of cyanide or azide for maximal peroxide production. Under anaerobic conditions radical anion and nitroso intermediates are reactive with glutathione. Removal of endogenous thiols by hypoxic preincubation with misonidazole may be related to the enhanced radiation response and cytotoxicity of this drug. Reduction of nitro compounds in the presence of DNA and chemicals such as dithionite, zinc dust, or polarographic techniques causes binding to macromolecules and DNA breaks. Chemical-reduction of nitro compounds by ascorbate in the presence of cells enhances drug cytotoxic effects.

  14. Vibrational coherence transfer in an electronically decoupled molecular dyad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweighöfer, Felix; Dworak, Lars; Braun, Markus; Zastrow, Marc; Wahl, Jan; Burghardt, Irene; Rück-Braun, Karola; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2015-03-01

    The ring opening of a dithienylethene photoswitch incorporated in a bridged boron-dipyrromethene - dithienylethene molecular dyad was investigated with ultrafast spectroscopy. Coherent vibrations in the electronic ground state of the boron-dipyrromethene are triggered after selective photoexcitation of the closed dithienylethene indicating vibrational coupling although the two moieties are electronically isolated. A distribution of short-lived modes and a long-lived mode at 143 cm-1 are observed. Analysis of the theoretical frequency spectrum indicates two modes at 97 cm-1 and 147 cm-1 which strongly modulate the electronic transition energy. Both modes exhibit a characteristic displacement of the bridge suggesting that the mechanical momentum of the initial geometry change after photoexcitation of the dithienylethene is transduced to the boron-dipyrromethene. The relaxation to the dithienylethene electronic ground state is accompanied by significant heat dissipation into the surrounding medium. In the investigated dyad, the boron-dipyrromethene acts as probe for the ultrafast photophysical processes in the dithienylethene.

  15. Kinetics of electron transfer through the respiratory chain.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qusheng; Bethke, Craig M

    2002-01-01

    We show that the rate at which electrons pass through the respiratory chain in mitochondria and respiring prokaryotic cells is described by the product of three terms, one describing electron donation, one acceptance, and a third, the thermodynamic drive. We apply the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics in the context of the chemiosmotic model of proton translocation and energy conservation. This approach leads to a closed-form expression that predicts steady-state electron flux as a function of chemical conditions and the proton motive force across the mitochondrial inner membrane or prokaryotic cytoplasmic membrane. The rate expression, derived considering reverse and forward electron flow, is the first to account for both thermodynamic and kinetic controls on the respiration rate. The expression can be simplified under specific conditions to give rate laws of various forms familiar in cellular physiology and microbial ecology. The expression explains the nonlinear dependence of flux on electrical potential gradient, its hyperbolic dependence on substrate concentration, and the inhibiting effects of reaction products. It provides a theoretical basis for investigating life under unusual conditions, such as microbial respiration in alkaline waters. PMID:12324402

  16. Electron transfer of carbonylmetalate radical pairs: femtosecond visible spectroscopy of optically excited ion pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, X.; Spears, K.G.; Wiederrecht, G.P.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1997-02-01

    Charge transfer excitation at 640 nm of the cobaltocenium tetracarbonylcobaltate ion pair, [Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +}{vert_bar}Co(CO){sub 4}{sup -}], was monitored in 1,2- dichloroethane solution by femtosecond transient visible absorption spectroscopy. The absorption prepares a neutral radical pair that can undergo spontaneous back electron transfer, and which shows a double peaked spectrum with features at 760 and 815 nm at 3 ps delay time. Transient decay times of 5.8{+-}0.5 ps were measured by monitoring the decay of Co(CO){sub 4} at 757 nm and 780 nm, and these are assigned to the back electron transfer step. The ET kinetics are consistent with the previously reported rates of electron transfer that were measured for specific vibrational states by picosecond transient IR.

  17. Electron-transfer reactions at metal-solution interfaces: An introduction to some contemporary issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, M. J.

    1991-05-01

    Some pivotal aspects of the contemporary treatment of electrochemical kinetics for one electron redox couples are outlined, and some commonalities with homogeneous phase electron transfers are pointed out. Two illustrative examples of the interplay between theory and experiment are briefly discussed: specifically to the relation between the rates of electrochemical and homogeneous phase processes; and to the recognition and elucidation of dynamical solvent effects.

  18. Sulfated SnO2 modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes - A mixed proton-electron conducting support for Pt catalysts in direct ethanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinwei; Zhu, Hong; Guo, Zhijun; Wei, Yongsheng; Wang, Fanghui

    2011-03-01

    We report on the synthesis of sulfated SnO2 modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composites as new supports of Pt catalyst (Pt-S-SnO2/MWCNTs) with the aims to enhance electron and proton conductivity and also catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation. The Pt-S-SnO2/MWCNTs catalyst is synthesized by a combination of improved sol-gel and pulse-microwave assisted polyol methods. The surface presence, morphology and structure of the Pt-S-SnO2/MWCNTs catalyst are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The electrocatalytic properties of the Pt-S-SnO2/MWCNTs catalyst for ethanol oxidation reactions are investigated by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results show that Pt-S-SnO2/MWCNTs catalyst exhibits higher catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation than Pt supported on non-sulfated SnO2/MWCNTs composites.

  19. Proton-Transfer Polymerization by N-Heterocyclic Carbenes: Monomer and Catalyst Scopes and Mechanism for Converting Dimethacrylates into Unsaturated Polyesters.

    PubMed

    Hong, Miao; Tang, Xiaoyan; Falivene, Laura; Caporaso, Lucia; Cavallo, Luigi; Chen, Eugene Y-X

    2016-02-17

    This contribution presents a full account of experimental and theoretical/computational investigations into the N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-catalyzed proton-transfer polymerization (HTP) that converts common dimethacrylates (DMAs) containing no protic groups into unsaturated polyesters. This new HTP proceeds through the step-growth propagation cycles via enamine intermediates, consisting of the proposed conjugate addition-proton transfer-NHC release fundamental steps. This study examines the monomer and catalyst scopes as well as the fundamental steps involved in the overall HTP mechanism. DMAs having six different types of linkages connecting the two methacrylates have been polymerized into the corresponding unsaturated polyesters. The most intriguing unsaturated polyester of the series is that based on the biomass-derived furfuryl dimethacrylate, which showed a unique self-curing ability. Four MeO- and Cl-substituted TPT (1,3,4-triphenyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-1,2,4-triazol-5-ylidene) derivatives as methanol insertion products, (Rx)TPT(MeO/H) (R = MeO, Cl; x = 2, 3), and two free carbenes (catalysts), (OMe2)TPT and (OMe3)TPT, have been synthesized, while (OMe2)TPT(MeO/H) and (OMe2)TPT have also been structurally characterized. The structure/reactivity relationship study revealed that (OMe2)TPT, being both a strong nucleophile and a good leaving group, exhibits the highest HTP activity and also produced the polyester with the highest Mn, while the Cl-substituted TPT derivatives are least active and efficient. Computational studies have provided mechanistic insights into the tail-to-tail dimerization coupling step as a suitable model for the propagation cycle of the HTP. The extensive energy profile was mapped out, and the experimentally observed unicity of the TPT-based catalysts was satisfactorily explained with the thermodynamic formation of key spirocyclic species. PMID:26779897

  20. Gel protein capillary extraction apparatus. electronic protein transfer.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jonathan W; Gao, Jun; Lee, Cheng S

    2002-03-01

    A gel protein capillary extraction apparatus is developed and demonstrated for its rapid and effective transfer of SDS-protein complexes from polyacrylamide gel to a fused-silica capillary. The small dimensions of capillary columns permit the application of high voltages for achieving rapid and effective transfer of gel proteins. Furthermore, the fused-silica capillaries are internally coated with polyacrylamide for the elimination of electroosmotic pumping and protein adsorption onto the capillary wall. The extracted proteins are present in a highly concentrated solution plug as the result of field amplification and sample stacking during the extraction process. Three model proteins, including cytochrome c (14 kDa), ovalbumin (45 kDa), and beta-galactosidase (116 kDa), are visualized using coomassie blue staining and electrophoretically extracted from the gels with protein loading as low as 50 ng. The SDS-cytochrome c complexes extracted from a 50-ng protein loading are concentrated in a 30-nL solution plug inside the capillary with an estimated concentration of 0. 1 mg/mL or 10(-5) M. The capillary format allows the straightforward integration of a miniaturized trypsin-membrane reactor for on-line proteolytic digestion and ESI-MS analysis for protein/peptide identification. PMID:11924982