Science.gov

Sample records for electron transfer survivor

  1. Nonadiabatic anharmonic electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, P P

    2013-03-28

    The effect of an inner sphere, local mode vibration on an electron transfer is modeled using the nonadiabatic transition probability (rate) expression together with both the anharmonic Morse and the harmonic oscillator potential. For an anharmonic inner sphere mode, a variational analysis uses harmonic oscillator basis functions to overcome the difficulties evaluating Morse-model Franck-Condon overlap factors. Individual matrix elements are computed with the use of new, fast, robust, and flexible recurrence relations. The analysis therefore readily addresses changes in frequency and/or displacement of oscillator minimums in the different electron transfer states. Direct summation of the individual Boltzmann weighted Franck-Condon contributions avoids the limitations inherent in the use of the familiar high-temperature, gaussian form of the rate constant. The effect of harmonic versus anharmonic inner sphere modes on the electron transfer is readily seen, especially in the exoergic, inverted region. The behavior of the transition probability can also be displayed as a surface for all temperatures and values of the driving force/exoergicity Δ = -ΔG. The temperature insensitivity of the transfer rate is clearly seen when the exoergicity equals the collective reorganization energy (Δ = Λ(s)) along a maximum ln (w) vs. Δ ridge of the surface. The surface also reveals additional regions for Δ where ln (w) appears to be insensitive to temperature, or effectively activationless, for some kinds of inner sphere contributions. PMID:23556710

  2. Nonadiabatic anharmonic electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, P. P.

    2013-03-28

    The effect of an inner sphere, local mode vibration on an electron transfer is modeled using the nonadiabatic transition probability (rate) expression together with both the anharmonic Morse and the harmonic oscillator potential. For an anharmonic inner sphere mode, a variational analysis uses harmonic oscillator basis functions to overcome the difficulties evaluating Morse-model Franck-Condon overlap factors. Individual matrix elements are computed with the use of new, fast, robust, and flexible recurrence relations. The analysis therefore readily addresses changes in frequency and/or displacement of oscillator minimums in the different electron transfer states. Direct summation of the individual Boltzmann weighted Franck-Condon contributions avoids the limitations inherent in the use of the familiar high-temperature, Gaussian form of the rate constant. The effect of harmonic versus anharmonic inner sphere modes on the electron transfer is readily seen, especially in the exoergic, inverted region. The behavior of the transition probability can also be displayed as a surface for all temperatures and values of the driving force/exoergicity {Delta}=-{Delta}G. The temperature insensitivity of the transfer rate is clearly seen when the exoergicity equals the collective reorganization energy ({Delta}={Lambda}{sub s}) along a maximum ln (w) vs. {Delta} ridge of the surface. The surface also reveals additional regions for {Delta} where ln (w) appears to be insensitive to temperature, or effectively activationless, for some kinds of inner sphere contributions.

  3. Electron transfer in proteins.

    PubMed

    Gray, H B; Winkler, J R

    1996-01-01

    Electron-transfer (ET) reactions are key steps in a diverse array of biological transformations ranging from photosynthesis to aerobic respiration. A powerful theoretical formalism has been developed that describes ET rates in terms of two parameters: the nuclear reorganization energy (lambda) and the electronic-coupling strength (HAB). Studies of ET reactions in ruthenium-modified proteins have probed lambda and HAB in several metalloproteins (cytochrome c, myoglobin, azurin). This work has shown that protein reorganization energies are sensitive to the medium surrounding the redox sites and that an aqueous environment, in particular, leads to large reorganization energies. Analyses of electronic-coupling strengths suggest that the efficiency of long-range ET depends on the protein secondary structure: beta sheets appear to mediate coupling more efficiently than alpha-helical structures, and hydrogen bonds play a critical role in both. PMID:8811189

  4. Electronic Personal Health Records for Childhood Cancer Survivors: An Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Lisa K; Carvalho, Priscilla; Southward, Matthew; Schmidt, Mary Lou; Jabine, Leslie N; Stolley, Melinda R; Gerber, Ben S

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Childhood cancer survivors have complex healthcare needs that may be effectively communicated using electronic personal health records. This study explores the knowledge, interest, and attitudes of a sample of survivors and some of their caregivers towards electronic personal health records (ePHRs). Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in a pediatric hematology-oncology clinic and associated survivorship clinic with a convenience sample of caregivers of survivors who were <14 years old and survivors ≥14 years old along with their caregivers when present. A semi-structured interview was conducted with survivors and some caregivers to understand their knowledge, interest, and attitudes towards adoption of ePHRs. Results: Interviews were completed with 11 caregivers of young survivors, four survivors alone, and five survivor-caregiver dyads. Survivors ranged in age at diagnosis from 1 to 17 years old. Among the ethnically diverse sample, approximately half of the nine survivors and 25% of 16 caregivers reported having some knowledge of ePHRs. Eighty-nine percent (8/9) of the survivors and 81% (13/16) of the caregivers reported that they were somewhat or very comfortable using the internet. All nine survivors and 75% of caregivers were interested in the adoption of ePHRs. Data security and privacy were the primary concerns expressed. Conclusions: Interest in adoption of ePHRs to manage cancer survivorship-related health information was high. Most felt that the privacy and security concerns would not prevent adoption. Additional research is needed on larger and more representative samples of survivors to understand what types of support and education are needed to effectively implement ePHRs. PMID:25276495

  5. Electronic Personal Health Records for Childhood Cancer Survivors: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Priscilla; Southward, Matthew; Schmidt, Mary Lou; Jabine, Leslie N.; Stolley, Melinda R.; Gerber, Ben S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Childhood cancer survivors have complex healthcare needs that may be effectively communicated using electronic personal health records. This study explores the knowledge, interest, and attitudes of a sample of survivors and some of their caregivers towards electronic personal health records (ePHRs). Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in a pediatric hematology-oncology clinic and associated survivorship clinic with a convenience sample of caregivers of survivors who were <14 years old and survivors ≥14 years old along with their caregivers when present. A semi-structured interview was conducted with survivors and some caregivers to understand their knowledge, interest, and attitudes towards adoption of ePHRs. Results: Interviews were completed with 11 caregivers of young survivors, four survivors alone, and five survivor–caregiver dyads. Survivors ranged in age at diagnosis from 1 to 17 years old. Among the ethnically diverse sample, approximately half of the nine survivors and 25% of 16 caregivers reported having some knowledge of ePHRs. Eighty-nine percent (8/9) of the survivors and 81% (13/16) of the caregivers reported that they were somewhat or very comfortable using the internet. All nine survivors and 75% of caregivers were interested in the adoption of ePHRs. Data security and privacy were the primary concerns expressed. Conclusions: Interest in adoption of ePHRs to manage cancer survivorship-related health information was high. Most felt that the privacy and security concerns would not prevent adoption. Additional research is needed on larger and more representative samples of survivors to understand what types of support and education are needed to effectively implement ePHRs. PMID:25276495

  6. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-07-11

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid-base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron-proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ λ. Multiple-Site Electron-Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron-proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron-proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e-/2H+ MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving

  7. Electron transfer in biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, H.B.

    1995-12-01

    Electron-transfer reactions are key stemps in photosynthesis, respiration, drug metabolism, and many other biochemical processes. These reactions commonly occur between protein-bound prosthetic groups that are separated by large molecular distances (often greater than 10 {Angstrom}). Although the electron donors and acceptors are expected to be weakly coupled, the reactions are remarkably fast and proceed with high specificity. Recent work on structurally engineered iron and cooper proteins has shown that the chemical bonds in the intervening medium potentially can control the rates of these electron-transfer reactions.

  8. Coherence in electron transfer pathways.

    PubMed

    Skourtis, Spiros S; Beratan, David N; Waldeck, David H

    2011-01-01

    Central to the view of electron-transfer reactions is the idea that nuclear motion generates a transition state geometry at which the electron/hole amplitude propagates coherently from the electron donor to the electron acceptor. In the weakly coupled or nonadiabatic regime, the electron amplitude tunnels through an electronic barrier between the donor and acceptor. The structure of the barrier is determined by the covalent and noncovalent interactions of the bridge. Because the tunneling barrier depends on the nuclear coordinates of the reactants (and on the surrounding medium), the tunneling barrier is highly anisotropic, and it is useful to identify particular routes, or pathways, along which the transmission amplitude propagates. Moreover, when more than one such pathway exists, and the paths give rise to comparable transmission amplitude magnitudes, one may expect to observe quantum interferences among pathways if the propagation remains coherent. Given that the effective tunneling barrier height and width are affected by the nuclear positions, the modulation of the nuclear coordinates will lead to a modulation of the tunneling barrier and hence of the electron flow. For long distance electron transfer in biological and biomimetic systems, nuclear fluctuations, arising from flexible protein moieties and mobile water bridges, can become quite significant. We discuss experimental and theoretical results that explore the quantum interferences among coupling pathways in electron-transfer kinetics; we emphasize recent data and theories associated with the signatures of chirality and inelastic processes, which are manifested in the tunneling pathway coherence (or absence of coherence). PMID:23833692

  9. Electron shuttling in electron transfer dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Diane; Smuczynska, Sylwia; Simons, Jack

    2009-06-01

    Ab initio electronic structure calculations have been performed on two model systems containing a disulfide linkage and one or two positively charged sites, aimed at gaining further insight into how and where electrons attach to positively charged peptides under electron capture (ECD) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) mass spectroscopy conditions. Couplings among electronic states involving (i) an entrance-channel with the excess electron residing on a donor anion interacting with the positively charged peptide, (ii) a state in which the electron has been transferred to the SS [sigma]* orbital to cause bond cleavage, and (iii) a manifold of states in which the electron has been transferred to a ground- or excited-Rydberg orbital on a positive site. The results of this study suggest that specific excited Rydberg states play a key role in effecting electron shuttling to the SS [sigma]* orbital. The excited-Rydberg orbitals close in energy to the SS [sigma]* orbital and with sufficient radial extent to span the distance between the positive site and the SS [sigma]* orbital play the key role. Then, when the anion donor, excited-Rydberg, and SS [sigma]* orbitals achieve spatial proximity and similarity in energies, one can have what is termed here a shuttle of an electron from the donor to the SS [sigma]* orbital, which results in SS bond cleavage. For the singly and doubly charged systems studied here, it was the 3p and 3d Rydberg orbitals, respectively, that met these criteria of spatial and energetic proximity. For other peptides having different charge states, it will be other Rydberg orbitals that meet these criteria because the relative energies of the SS [sigma]* and Rydberg orbitals are governed by the (different) Coulomb stabilizations these orbitals experience. However, the evidence suggests that it is not very high-energy Rydberg states but states with 3 < n < 10 that are involved in the rate limiting steps in ECD, ETD, and ECID experiments.

  10. Two-Electron Transfer Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiaxing; Balamurugan, D; Zhang, Peng; Skourtis, Spiros S; Beratan, David N

    2015-06-18

    The frontiers of electron-transfer chemistry demand that we develop theoretical frameworks to describe the delivery of multiple electrons, atoms, and ions in molecular systems. When electrons move over long distances through high barriers, where the probability for thermal population of oxidized or reduced bridge-localized states is very small, the electrons will tunnel from the donor (D) to acceptor (A), facilitated by bridge-mediated superexchange interactions. If the stable donor and acceptor redox states on D and A differ by two electrons, it is possible that the electrons will propagate coherently from D to A. While structure-function relations for single-electron superexchange in molecules are well established, strategies to manipulate the coherent flow of multiple electrons are largely unknown. In contrast to one-electron superexchange, two-electron superexchange involves both one- and two-electron virtual intermediate states, the number of virtual intermediates increases very rapidly with system size, and multiple classes of pathways interfere with one another. In the study described here, we developed simple superexchange models for two-electron transfer. We explored how the bridge structure and energetics influence multielectron superexchange, and we compared two-electron superexchange interactions to single-electron superexchange. Multielectron superexchange introduces interference between singly and doubly oxidized (or reduced) bridge virtual states, so that even simple linear donor-bridge-acceptor systems have pathway topologies that resemble those seen for one-electron superexchange through bridges with multiple parallel pathways. The simple model systems studied here exhibit a richness that is amenable to experimental exploration by manipulating the multiple pathways, pathway crosstalk, and changes in the number of donor and acceptor species. The features that emerge from these studies may assist in developing new strategies to deliver multiple

  11. Polar solvation and electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-13

    The report is divided into the following sections: completion of previous studies on solvation dynamics, dipole lattice studies, inertial components of solvation response, simple models of solvation dynamics, rotational dynamics and dielectric friction, intramolecular electron transfer reactions, and intermolecular donor-acceptor complexes.

  12. The electronic couplings in electron transfer and excitation energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chao-Ping

    2009-04-21

    The transport of charge via electrons and the transport of excitation energy via excitons are two processes of fundamental importance in diverse areas of research. Characterization of electron transfer (ET) and excitation energy transfer (EET) rates are essential for a full understanding of, for instance, biological systems (such as respiration and photosynthesis) and opto-electronic devices (which interconvert electric and light energy). In this Account, we examine one of the parameters, the electronic coupling factor, for which reliable values are critical in determining transfer rates. Although ET and EET are different processes, many strategies for calculating the couplings share common themes. We emphasize the similarities in basic assumptions between the computational methods for the ET and EET couplings, examine the differences, and summarize the properties, advantages, and limits of the different computational methods. The electronic coupling factor is an off-diagonal Hamiltonian matrix element between the initial and final diabatic states in the transport processes. ET coupling is essentially the interaction of the two molecular orbitals (MOs) where the electron occupancy is changed. Singlet excitation energy transfer (SEET), however, contains a Frster dipole-dipole coupling as its most important constituent. Triplet excitation energy transfer (TEET) involves an exchange of two electrons of different spin and energy; thus, it is like an overlap interaction of two pairs of MOs. Strategies for calculating ET and EET couplings can be classified as (1) energy-gap-based approaches, (2) direct calculation of the off-diagonal matrix elements, or (3) use of an additional operator to describe the extent of charge or excitation localization and to calculate the coupling value. Some of the difficulties in calculating the couplings were recently resolved. Methods were developed to remove the nondynamical correlation problem from the highly precise coupled cluster

  13. Experimental Approaches to Studying Biological Electron Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Robert A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Provides an overview on biological electron-transfer reactions, summarizing what is known about how distance, spatial organization, medium, and other factors affect electron transfer. Experimental approaches, including studies of bimolecular electron transfer reactions (electrostatic effects and precursor complexes), are considered. (JN)

  14. Modular electron transfer circuits for synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Agapakis, Christina M

    2010-01-01

    Electron transfer is central to a wide range of essential metabolic pathways, from photosynthesis to fermentation. The evolutionary diversity and conservation of proteins that transfer electrons makes these pathways a valuable platform for engineered metabolic circuits in synthetic biology. Rational engineering of electron transfer pathways containing hydrogenases has the potential to lead to industrial scale production of hydrogen as an alternative source of clean fuel and experimental assays for understanding the complex interactions of multiple electron transfer proteins in vivo. We designed and implemented a synthetic hydrogen metabolism circuit in Escherichia coli that creates an electron transfer pathway both orthogonal to and integrated within existing metabolism. The design of such modular electron transfer circuits allows for facile characterization of in vivo system parameters with applications toward further engineering for alternative energy production. PMID:21468209

  15. Bridge mediated ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna, S.; Willig, F.; May, V.

    2002-01-01

    Bridge mediated photoinduced ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer (ET) from a molecularly anchored chromophore to a semiconductor surface is modelled theoretically. The continuum levels of the semiconductor substrate are taken into account in the numerical calculations via a polynomial expansion. Electron transfer for the direct injection case in the strong coupling limit is studied and compared with cases where intermediate bridging states are successively introduced to weaken the effective electronic coupling. The role of vibronic coherences in the strong electronic coupling limit as well as in off-resonant bridge mediated electron transfer is also discussed.

  16. Validation of self-reported post-treatment mammography surveillance among breast cancer survivors by electronic medical record extraction method

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Joanne M.; Shay, L. Aubree; Murphy, Caitlin C.; Hamann, Heidi A.; Bartholomew, L. Kay; Savas, Lara S.; Vernon, Sally W.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about validity of self-reported mammography surveillance among breast cancer survivors. Most studies have focused on accuracy among healthy, average-risk populations and none have assessed validity by electronic medical record (EMR) extraction method. To assess validity of survivor-reported mammography post-active treatment care, we surveyed all survivors diagnosed 2004–2009 in an academic hospital cancer registry (n = 1441). We used electronic query and manual review to extract EMR data. Concordance, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and report-to-records ratio were calculated by comparing survivors' self-reports to data from each extraction method. We also assessed average difference in months between mammography dates by source and correlates of concordance. Agreement between the two EMR extraction methods was high (concordance 0.90; kappa 0.70), with electronic query identifying more mammograms. Sensitivity was excellent (0.99) regardless of extraction method; concordance and positive predictive value were good; however, specificity was poor (manual review 0.20, electronic query 0.31). Report-to-records ratios were both over 1 suggesting over-reporting. We observed slight forward telescoping for survivors reporting mammograms 7–12 months prior to survey date. Higher educational attainment and less time since mammogram receipt were associated with greater concordance. Accuracy of survivors' self-reported mammograms was generally high with slight forward telescoping among those recalling their mammograms between 7 and 12 months prior to the survey date. Results are encouraging for clinicians and practitioners relying on survivor reports for surveillance care delivery and as a screening tool for inclusion in interventions promoting adherence to surveillance guidelines. PMID:25922083

  17. Photo-induced electron transfer method

    DOEpatents

    Wohlgemuth, Roland; Calvin, Melvin

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of photo-induced electron transfer reactions is increased and the back transfer of electrons in such reactions is greatly reduced when a photo-sensitizer zinc porphyrin-surfactant and an electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant are admixed into phospho-lipid membranes. The phospholipids comprising said membranes are selected from phospholipids whose head portions are negatively charged. Said membranes are contacted with an aqueous medium in which an essentially neutral viologen electron acceptor is admixed. Catalysts capable of transfering electrons from reduced viologen electron acceptor to hydrogen to produce elemental hydrogen are also included in the aqueous medium. An oxidizable olefin is also admixed in the phospholipid for the purpose of combining with oxygen that coordinates with oxidized electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant.

  18. Photo-induced electron transfer method

    DOEpatents

    Wohlgemuth, R.; Calvin, M.

    1984-01-24

    The efficiency of photo-induced electron transfer reactions is increased and the back transfer of electrons in such reactions is greatly reduced when a photo-sensitizer zinc porphyrin-surfactant and an electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant are admixed into phospholipid membranes. The phospholipids comprising said membranes are selected from phospholipids whose head portions are negatively charged. Said membranes are contacted with an aqueous medium in which an essentially neutral viologen electron acceptor is admixed. Catalysts capable of transferring electrons from reduced viologen electron acceptor to hydrogen to produce elemental hydrogen are also included in the aqueous medium. An oxidizable olefin is also admixed in the phospholipid for the purpose of combining with oxygen that coordinates with oxidized electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant.

  19. Photoinduced electron transfer in ordered polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G. II.

    1990-10-20

    Photochemical studies on organic polymers or biopolymers (particularly synthetic peptides) that have been modified by covalent attachment (or other means of binding) of organic chromophores and electron transfer agents are described. Specific projects involve are: peptide conjugates bearing electroactive residues such as tryptophan and specifically labeled at the N- or C-terminus of peptide chains; the electrostatic binding of organic dyes to poly-electrolytes (polyacrylates) for which the formation of dimeric aggregates of bound dye that display unusual photophysical and electron transfer properties is important; a study of the binding of dyes and electron transfer agents to the protein mimic,'' polyvinyl-2-pyrrolidinone (PVP), in hydrophobic domains that depend on specific H-bond interaction; and completion of an earlier study having to do with the triplet state properties of charge-transfer (CT) complexes of a high potential quinone and various electron donors (investigation of the properties of triplet (contact) radical-ion pairs). 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Dynamics of electron transfer in amine photooxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, K.S.; Freilich, S.C.; Schaeffer, C.G.

    1980-08-13

    Studies were initiated utilizing picosecond (ps) absorption spectroscopy, to directly monitor the dynamics of electron transfer from 1,4-diazabicyclo(2.2.2)octane (Dabco) to the excited states of benzophenone and fluorenone. These two systems were chosen because of their contrasting photochemistry. The quantum yield for photoreduction of benzophenone in polar solvents is generally greater than 0.1, while that of fluorenone is zero. In polar solvents, the proposed mechanism dictates that an electron is transferred to the excited singlet state fluorenone, which then back-transfers the electron, regenerating ground-state fluorenone and amine. Photolysis of benzophenone in the presence of an amine transfers an electron to an excited triplet state, forming an ion pair that is stable relative to diffusional separation. The results of this study verify this proposal.

  1. Vectorial electron transfer in spatially ordered arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Progress was made on synthesis of new materials for directional electron transfer (block copolymers and helical oligopeptides), preparation and characterization of anisotropic composites bearing organics and inorganics, electrocatalysis (redox-activated catalysts), and surface modifications of metals and semiconductors.

  2. Long-range electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.

    2005-01-01

    Recent investigations have shed much light on the nuclear and electronic factors that control the rates of long-range electron tunneling through molecules in aqueous and organic glasses as well as through bonds in donor–bridge–acceptor complexes. Couplings through covalent and hydrogen bonds are much stronger than those across van der Waals gaps, and these differences in coupling between bonded and nonbonded atoms account for the dependence of tunneling rates on the structure of the media between redox sites in Ru-modified proteins and protein–protein complexes. PMID:15738403

  3. Electron transfer across a thermal gradient.

    PubMed

    Craven, Galen T; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-08-23

    Charge transfer is a fundamental process that underlies a multitude of phenomena in chemistry and biology. Recent advances in observing and manipulating charge and heat transport at the nanoscale, and recently developed techniques for monitoring temperature at high temporal and spatial resolution, imply the need for considering electron transfer across thermal gradients. Here, a theory is developed for the rate of electron transfer and the associated heat transport between donor-acceptor pairs located at sites of different temperatures. To this end, through application of a generalized multidimensional transition state theory, the traditional Arrhenius picture of activation energy as a single point on a free energy surface is replaced with a bithermal property that is derived from statistical weighting over all configurations where the reactant and product states are equienergetic. The flow of energy associated with the electron transfer process is also examined, leading to relations between the rate of heat exchange among the donor and acceptor sites as functions of the temperature difference and the electronic driving bias. In particular, we find that an open electron transfer channel contributes to enhanced heat transport between sites even when they are in electronic equilibrium. The presented results provide a unified theory for charge transport and the associated heat conduction between sites at different temperatures. PMID:27450086

  4. Respiratory electron transfer pathways in plant mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Schertl, Peter; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    The respiratory electron transport chain (ETC) couples electron transfer from organic substrates onto molecular oxygen with proton translocation across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The resulting proton gradient is used by the ATP synthase complex for ATP formation. In plants, the ETC is especially intricate. Besides the “classical” oxidoreductase complexes (complex I–IV) and the mobile electron transporters cytochrome c and ubiquinone, it comprises numerous “alternative oxidoreductases.” Furthermore, several dehydrogenases localized in the mitochondrial matrix and the mitochondrial intermembrane space directly or indirectly provide electrons for the ETC. Entry of electrons into the system occurs via numerous pathways which are dynamically regulated in response to the metabolic state of a plant cell as well as environmental factors. This mini review aims to summarize recent findings on respiratory electron transfer pathways in plants and on the involved components and supramolecular assemblies. PMID:24808901

  5. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Holman; Ling Zang; Ruchuan Liu; David M. Adams

    2009-10-20

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  6. Protein electron transfer: Dynamics and statistics.

    PubMed

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2013-07-14

    Electron transfer between redox proteins participating in energy chains of biology is required to proceed with high energetic efficiency, minimizing losses of redox energy to heat. Within the standard models of electron transfer, this requirement, combined with the need for unidirectional (preferably activationless) transitions, is translated into the need to minimize the reorganization energy of electron transfer. This design program is, however, unrealistic for proteins whose active sites are typically positioned close to the polar and flexible protein-water interface to allow inter-protein electron tunneling. The high flexibility of the interfacial region makes both the hydration water and the surface protein layer act as highly polar solvents. The reorganization energy, as measured by fluctuations, is not minimized, but rather maximized in this region. Natural systems in fact utilize the broad breadth of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations, but in the ways not anticipated by the standard models based on equilibrium thermodynamics. The combination of the broad spectrum of static fluctuations with their dispersive dynamics offers the mechanism of dynamical freezing (ergodicity breaking) of subsets of nuclear modes on the time of reaction/residence of the electron at a redox cofactor. The separation of time-scales of nuclear modes coupled to electron transfer allows dynamical freezing. In particular, the separation between the relaxation time of electro-elastic fluctuations of the interface and the time of conformational transitions of the protein caused by changing redox state results in dynamical freezing of the latter for sufficiently fast electron transfer. The observable consequence of this dynamical freezing is significantly different reorganization energies describing the curvature at the bottom of electron-transfer free energy surfaces (large) and the distance between their minima (Stokes shift, small). The ratio of the two reorganization energies

  7. Photoinduced electron transfer in ordered polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G. II.

    1991-12-01

    Long range photoinduced electron transfer between electron donor and acceptor groups is of considerable current interest in terms of strategies for artificial photosynthesis and studies regarding the redox properties of proteins. As part of an extensive study of long range electron transfer involving biopolymers, we have carried out this year investigations of the assembly of electron transfer agents in a system of model short peptides. Also studied is a polyelectrolyte that can adopt a helical conformation when electrostatically complexed with organic dye counter-ions. The principal interest in these systems has to do with the well ordered secondary structures adopted by peptide polymers, and the capabilities for synthetic modification of peptide side chains and end groups with chromophores or electroactive substituents. The present report gives a brief account of the following elements of work related to photochemical electron transfer themes: (1) the synthesis and photochemical characterization of chromophore-bound peptides and amino acid model compounds based on the amino acids, tryptophan and the spacer residue, alanine (Ala); (2) the study of binding of the cationic organic dye to a peptide electrolyte, for which cooperative dye loading and helix formation is important; and (3) completion of the synthesis of a new series of acridinium chromophores that have rod-like'' arrangements of inked aryl rings for assembly of electron donor-acceptor systems that will exhibit especially long lived charge separation.

  8. Photoinduced electron transfer in a porphyrin dyad

    SciTech Connect

    Gust, D.; Moore, T.A.; Moore, A.L.; Leggett, L.; Lin, S.; DeGraziano, J.M.; Hermant, R.M.; Nicodem, D.; Craig, P.; Seely, G.R.; Nieman, R.A. )

    1993-07-29

    A prophyrin dyad designed to facilitate vectorial interporphyrin electron transfer has been synthesized and studied using steady-state and time-resolved absorption and emission spectroscopies. The dyad features a zinc tetraaylporphyrin bearing electron-donating substituents linked by an amide bond to a free base porphyrin carrying electron-withdrawing groups. Excitation of the zinc porphyrin moiety in dichloromethane solution is followed by singlet energy transfer to the free base and concurrent electron transfer to the same moiety to yield a charge-separated state. The free base first excited singlet state decays by accepting an electron from the zinc porphyrin to form the same charge-separated state. Similar results are observed in butyronitrile. Transient absorption studies in butyronitrile verify the formation of a short-lived (8 ps) charge-separated state from the porphyrin first excited singlet states. The results support the suggestion that fluorescence quenching in related porphyrin dyads and carotenoid--diporphyrin triads is due to photoinduced electron transfer, rather than some other decay process. 17 refs., 8 refs.

  9. Electron Transfer Dissociation of Oligonucleotide Cations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Suncerae I; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2009-06-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of multi-protonated 6 - 20-mer oligonucleotides and 12- and 14-mer duplexes is compared to collision activated dissociation (CAD). ETD causes efficient charge reduction of the multi-protonated oligonucleotides in addition to limited backbone cleavages to yield sequence ions of low abundance. Subsequent CAD of the charge-reduced oligonucleotides formed upon electron transfer, in a net process termed electron transfer collision activated dissociation (ETcaD), results in rich fragmentation in terms of w, a, z, and d products, with a marked decrease in the abundance of base loss ions and internal fragments. Complete sequencing was possible for nearly all oligonucleotides studied. ETcaD of an oligonucleotide duplex resulted in specific backbone cleavages, with conservation of weaker non-covalent bonds. PMID:20161288

  10. Unusual distance dependences of electron transfer rates.

    PubMed

    Kuss-Petermann, Martin; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-07-28

    Usually the rates for electron transfer (kET) decrease with increasing donor-acceptor distance, but Marcus theory predicts a regime in which kET is expected to increase when the transfer distance gets longer. Until recently, experimental evidence for such counter-intuitive behavior had been very limited, and consequently this effect is much less well-known than the Gaussian free energy dependence of electron transfer rates leading to the so-called inverted driving-force effect. This article presents the theoretical concepts that lead to the prediction of electron transfer rate maxima at large donor-acceptor distances, and it discusses conditions that are expected to favor experimental observations of such behavior. It continues with a consideration of specific recent examples in which electron transfer rates were observed to increase with increasing donor-acceptor distance, and it closes with a discussion of the importance of this effect in the context of light-to-chemical energy conversion. PMID:27353891

  11. Electron-transfer reactions in polymer matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannikov, Anatolii V.; Grishina, Antonina D.

    1989-12-01

    This paper discusses the dark reactions and photoreactions that occur with transfer of an electron from a donor to an acceptor in polymer matrices under electron tunnelling conditions and when forming change-transfer complexes. The main emphasis is on an analysis of the factors that determine the rate of electron transfer, which, in accordance with the advanced theory of electron transfer, are the magnitude of the exchange interaction, the free energy of the process, and the reorganisation energies of the medium and the reacting donor and acceptor molecules. The existing models for the movement of charge carriers between single-type transport sites are discussed. The limits of applicability of the different models have been determined. The reorganisation energy of a polymer matrix is shown to have a considerable effect on the rate of movement of charge carriers on introduced transport molecules. The effect of the dielectric properties and free volume of polymer matrices on the characteristics of electron phototransfer in donor-acceptor complexes is discussed. The bibliography includes 126 references.

  12. 75 FR 33681 - Electronic Fund Transfers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... document in the Federal Register of June 4, 2010 (75 FR 31665). The document (FR Doc. 2010-13280) amended... number 2. In the final rule, FR Doc. 2010-13280, published on June 4, 2010 (75 FR 31665) make the... CFR Part 205 Electronic Fund Transfers June 4, 2010. AGENCY: Board of Governors of the Federal...

  13. Solvent gating of intramolecular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.M. ); Spears, K.G.; Gong, J.H.; Wach, M. )

    1994-02-03

    The rates for ionic photodissociation of malachite green leucocyanide to form cyanide ion and a malachite green carbonium ion were measured as a function of solvent and temperature. The observed rates in mixtures of polar and nonpolar solvents all had an activation energy of about 1 kcal/mol for a wide range of dielectric constants. This dissociative intramolecular electron transfer (DIET) is unusual because it is the first example where solvent configurational entropy changes are required to enable a large amplitude molecular distortion leading to a nonadiabatic electron transfer and ionic dissociation. This solvent gated intramolecular electron-transfer mechanism is supported by analysis of the preexponential and activation energy trends in dipolar aprotic solven mixtures and alcohol solvents. The large amplitude motion is not separately measurable due to the slow gating rates, but viscosity effects on both the preexponential and the activation energy are analyzed to demonstrate consistency with a barrierless diffusion model having a structural dependence on electron-transfer rate. The rate has an inverse dependence on viscosity raised to the 0.53 power. 36 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Electron transfer kinetics in molecular photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimer, Todd Anthony

    1997-11-01

    Solar energy devices based on the sensitization of nanostructured titanium dioxide semiconductors have proven to be efficient converters of photons into electricity. However, many questions remain concerning the factors which govern conversion efficiency, stability, and photovoltage in these molecular level devices. The energetics and kinetics of electron transfer at the semiconductor/sensitizer interface play a critical role in solar cell photoelectrochemical properties. Through electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques the kinetics of the interfacial electron transfer processes have been measured. The kinetics are in general complex, and various models based on distributions of first order reaction rates or higher order reactions have been used to describe the experimental observations. The unique molecular nature of these devices allows the energy levels involved in electron transfer to be tuned through synthetic modification of the sensitizer. Systematic studies of chemically related sensitizers allow conclusions to be drawn about the factors which govern interfacial electron transfer processes and therefore determine the photoelectrochemical properties of the device. Hopefully, this thesis presents a foundation of knowledge which can successfully direct future development of sensitizers and semiconductors for efficient conversion of light to electricity.

  15. 75 FR 66644 - Electronic Fund Transfers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ...The Board is amending Regulation E, which implements the Electronic Fund Transfer Act, and the official staff commentary to the regulation, in order to implement legislation that modifies the effective date of certain disclosure requirements in the gift card provisions of the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act of...

  16. Electronic coherence in electronic energy transfer despite fast dephasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholes, Gregory

    2009-03-01

    F"orster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a common and fundamental photophysical process in life and materials sciences. FRET is an interchromophore relaxation process that transmits the electronic excitation from an initially excited donor to a ground state acceptor chromophore (light-absorbing moleule). FRET is used, for example, to harvest light in photosynthesis, measure distances in proteins, and it accelerates the photodegradation of polymers. In recent years attention has turned to the study of FRET in complex assemblies of molecules. While F"orster theory has enabled the efficiency of FRET to be predicted and analyzed in numerous and diverse areas of study, recent work has aimed to discover ways beyond the F"oster mechanism by which electronic energy can be transferred. The talk will compare and contrast theoretical and experimental studies of excitation relaxation in photosynthetic antenna systems with the conjugated polymer poly[2-methoxy,5-(2'-ethyl-hexoxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV). I will report new work where we have used a new anisotropy experiment to examine coherent energy transfer and a complementary technique using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy expose the role of coherence transfer in the fastest time dynamics. We find that coherent energy transfer occurs for many tens of femtoseconds, even at room temperature. That leads us to examine the nature and implications of the so-called intermediate coupling regime for EET.

  17. Electronic decoherence for electron transfer in blue copper proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, Daren M.; Cheng, Yuen-Kit; Rossky, Peter J.

    2001-09-01

    We present a molecular dynamics investigation of the electronic decoherence rate for electron transfer (ET) in a solvated protein molecule. We find that decoherence occurs on an ultrafast time scale of 2.4 fs, considerably faster than fluctuations in the electronic coupling. Both protein and solvent dynamics play important roles. Solvent alone would give rise to a decoherence time of 3.0 fs, as compared to 4.1 fs from the protein matrix alone. This implies that both solvation and protein dynamics can strongly affect both the rate and mechanism of ET.

  18. Electron transfer in silver telluride melt

    SciTech Connect

    Glazov, V.M.; Burkhanov, A.S.

    1987-06-01

    Electron transfer in silver telluride melt was studied experimentally at different temperatures. The method used to study electron transfer and thermodiffusion is based on Onsager's theory and consists of measuring the electrodiffusion potential which varies as a function of time in the system formed by the liquid semiconductor and the neutral metallic electrodes. The effective charges and the average coefficients of diffusion of silver ions were calculated and the ionic component of the total electrical conductivity of Ag/sub 2/Te melt was evaluated. It was observed that the indicated characteristics vary systematically in the series of silver chalcogenides with anionic substitution. The negative temperature coefficient of electrical conductivity in silver sulfide and silver selenide melts was explained.

  19. Reaction coordinates for electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rasaiah, Jayendran C.; Zhu Jianjun

    2008-12-07

    The polarization fluctuation and energy gap formulations of the reaction coordinate for outer sphere electron transfer are linearly related to the constant energy constraint Lagrangian multiplier m in Marcus' theory of electron transfer. The quadratic dependence of the free energies of the reactant and product intermediates on m and m+1, respectively, leads to similar dependence of the free energies on the reaction coordinates and to the same dependence of the activation energy on the reorganization energy and the standard reaction free energy. Within the approximations of a continuum model of the solvent and linear response of the longitudinal polarization to the electric field in Marcus' theory, both formulations of the reaction coordinate are expected to lead to the same results.

  20. Biotechnological Aspects of Microbial Extracellular Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Souichiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a type of microbial respiration that enables electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials, including naturally-occurring metal compounds and artificial electrodes. Microorganisms harboring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, in addition to their contribution to global energy and material cycles. In this review, current knowledge on microbial EET and its application to diverse biotechnologies, including the bioremediation of toxic metals, recovery of useful metals, biocorrosion, and microbial electrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis), were introduced. Two potential biotechnologies based on microbial EET, namely the electrochemical control of microbial metabolism and electrochemical stimulation of microbial symbiotic reactions (electric syntrophy), were also discussed. PMID:26004795

  1. Modeling electron transfer in photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Makita, Hiroki; Hastings, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Nanosecond to millisecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopy has been used to study electron transfer processes in photosystem I particles from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 with eight different quinones incorporated into the A1 binding site, at both 298 and 77K. A detailed kinetic model was constructed and solved within the context of Marcus electron transfer theory, and it was found that all of the data could be well described only if the in situ midpoint potentials of the quinones fell in a tightly defined range. For photosystem I with phylloquinone incorporated into the A1 binding site all of the time-resolved optical data is best modeled when the in situ midpoint potential of phylloquinone on the A/B branch is -635/-690 mV, respectively. With the midpoint potential of the F(X) iron sulfur cluster set at -680 mV, this indicates that forward electron transfer from A(1)(-) to F(X) is slightly endergonic/exergonic on the A/B branch, respectively. Additionally, for forward electron transfer from A(1)(-) to F(X), on both the A and B branches the reorganization energy is close to 0.7 eV. Reorganization energies of 0.4 or 1.0 eV are not possible. For the eight different quinones incorporated, the same kinetic model was used, allowing us to establish in situ redox potentials for all of the incorporated quinones on both branches. A linear correlation was found between the in situ and in vitro midpoint potentials of the quinones on both branches. PMID:26994812

  2. Kinetic ion thermometers for electron transfer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Robert; Tureček, František

    2015-02-19

    Peptide fragment ions of the z-type were used as kinetic ion thermometers to gauge the internal energy of peptide cation-radicals produced by electron transfer in the gas-phase. Electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-produced z2 ions containing the leucine residue, z2(Leu-Lys) and z2(Leu-Arg), were found to undergo spontaneous dissociation by loss of C3H7 that was monitored by time-resolved kinetic measurements on the time scale of the linear ion trap mass spectrometer. Kinetic modeling of the dissociations, including collisional cooling and product loss by neutralization, provided unimolecular rate constants for dissociation that were converted to the z ion internal energies using RRKM theory. The internal energy of z2(Leu-Lys) and z2(Leu-Arg) fragment ions was found to decrease with the increasing size of the precursor peptide ion, indicating vibrational energy partitioning between the ion and neutral fragments and ergodic behavior. The experimentally determined excitation in the peptide cation-radicals upon electron transfer (285-327 kJ mol(-1)) was found to be lower than that theoretically calculated from the reaction exothermicity. The reasons for this missing energy are discussed. PMID:25594857

  3. Electron transfer control in soluble methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weixue; Iacob, Roxana E; Luoh, Rebecca P; Engen, John R; Lippard, Stephen J

    2014-07-01

    The hydroxylation or epoxidation of hydrocarbons by bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases (BMMs) requires the interplay of three or four protein components. How component protein interactions control catalysis, however, is not well understood. In particular, the binding sites of the reductase components on the surface of their cognate hydroxylases and the role(s) that the regulatory proteins play during intermolecular electron transfer leading to the hydroxylase reduction have been enigmatic. Here we determine the reductase binding site on the hydroxylase of a BMM enzyme, soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). We present evidence that the ferredoxin domain of the reductase binds to the canyon region of the hydroxylase, previously determined to be the regulatory protein binding site as well. The latter thus inhibits reductase binding to the hydroxylase and, consequently, intermolecular electron transfer from the reductase to the hydroxylase diiron active site. The binding competition between the regulatory protein and the reductase may serve as a control mechanism for regulating electron transfer, and other BMM enzymes are likely to adopt the same mechanism. PMID:24937475

  4. Electron Transfer and Reaction Mechanism of Laccases

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephen M.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2015-01-01

    Laccases are part of the family of multicopper oxidases (MCOs), which couple the oxidation of substrates to the four electron reduction of O2 to H2O. MCOs contain a minimum of four Cu's divided into Type 1 (T1), Type 2 (T2), and binuclear Type 3 (T3) Cu sites that are distinguished based on unique spectroscopic features. Substrate oxidation occurs near the T1, and electrons are transferred approximately 13 Å through the protein via the Cys-His pathway to the T2/T3 trinuclear copper cluster (TNC) where dioxygen reduction occurs. This review outlines the electron transfer (ET) process in laccases, and the mechanism of O2 reduction as elucidated through spectroscopic, kinetic, and computational data. Marcus theory is used to describe the relevant factors which impact ET rates including the driving force (ΔG°), reorganization energy (λ), and electronic coupling matrix element (HDA). Then the mechanism of O2 reaction is detailed with particular focus on the intermediates formed during the two 2e− reduction steps. The first 2e− step forms the peroxide intermediate (PI), followed by the second 2e− step to form the native intermediate (NI), which has been shown to be the catalytically relevant fully oxidized form of the enzyme. PMID:25572295

  5. Promoting Interspecies Electron Transfer with Biochar

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Liu, Fanghua; Fan, Wei; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were attached to the biochar, yet not in close contact, suggesting that electrons were likely conducted through the biochar, rather than biological electrical connections. The finding that biochar can stimulate DIET may be an important consideration when amending soils with biochar and can help explain why biochar may enhance methane production from organic wastes under anaerobic conditions. PMID:24846283

  6. Photon-to-electron quantum information transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, Hideo

    2011-05-01

    Spin is a fundamental property of electrons and plays an important role in information storage. For spin-based quantum information technology, preparation and read-out of the electron spin state must be spin coherent, but both the traditional preparation and read-out of the spin state are projective to up/down spin states, which do not have spin coherence. We have recently demonstrated that the polarization coherence of light can be coherently transferred to the spin coherence of electrons in a semiconductor. We have also developed a new scheme named tomographic Kerr rotation (TKR) by generalizing the traditional KR to directly readout the spin coherence of optically prepared electrons without the need for the spin dynamics, which allows the spin projection measurement in an arbitrary set of basis states. These demonstrations were performed using g-factor-controlled semiconductor quantum wells with precessing and nonprecessing electrons. The developed scheme offers a tool for performing basis-independent preparation and read-out of a spin quantum state in a solid. These results encourage us to make a quantum media converter between flying photon qubits and stationary electron spin qubits in semiconductors.

  7. Frontier orbital symmetry control of intermolecular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, B.

    1990-11-01

    Research continued on the study of intermolecular electron transfer. This report discusses the following topics: fluorescence quenching by electron transfer and the modification of quenching dynamics by solvent properties and net free energy change; transient absorption measurements following selective excitation of 1:1 EDA complex isomers; selective quenching of dual fluorescence from linked EDA systems; electron-transfer sensitized cycloreversion of rubrene endoperoxide; and vibronic modification of adiabatic requirements for intermolecular electron transfer. (CBS)

  8. 48 CFR 18.124 - Electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electronic funds transfer. 18.124 Section 18.124 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... Electronic funds transfer. Electronic funds transfer payments may be waived for acquisitions to...

  9. 48 CFR 18.124 - Electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electronic funds transfer. 18.124 Section 18.124 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... Electronic funds transfer. Electronic funds transfer payments may be waived for acquisitions to...

  10. 31 CFR 208.3 - Payment by electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Payment by electronic funds transfer... DISBURSEMENTS § 208.3 Payment by electronic funds transfer. Subject to § 208.4, and notwithstanding any other... electronic funds transfer....

  11. 31 CFR 208.3 - Payment by electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Payment by electronic funds transfer... DISBURSEMENTS § 208.3 Payment by electronic funds transfer. Subject to § 208.4, and notwithstanding any other... electronic funds transfer....

  12. 48 CFR 18.124 - Electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electronic funds transfer. 18.124 Section 18.124 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... Electronic funds transfer. Electronic funds transfer payments may be waived for acquisitions to...

  13. 14 CFR 1260.69 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.69 Electronic funds transfer payment methods. Electronic Funds Transfer Payment Methods October 2000 (a) Payments under this grant will be made by...

  14. 48 CFR 18.124 - Electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electronic funds transfer. 18.124 Section 18.124 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... Electronic funds transfer. Electronic funds transfer payments may be waived for acquisitions to...

  15. 31 CFR 208.3 - Payment by electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Payment by electronic funds transfer... DISBURSEMENTS § 208.3 Payment by electronic funds transfer. Subject to § 208.4, and notwithstanding any other... electronic funds transfer....

  16. 14 CFR 1274.931 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.931 Electronic funds transfer payment methods. Electronic Funds Transfer Payment Methods July 2002 Payments under...

  17. 14 CFR 1260.69 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.69 Electronic funds transfer payment methods. Electronic Funds Transfer Payment Methods October 2000 (a) Payments under this grant will be made by...

  18. 14 CFR 1274.931 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.931 Electronic funds transfer payment methods. Electronic Funds Transfer Payment Methods July 2002 Payments under...

  19. Electronic energy transfer and electron transfer in flexible bichromophoric molecules studied in a supersonic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this dissertation is to use laser spectroscopy in supersonic jets to investigate the dynamics and mechanism of Electronic Energy Transfer (EET) and Photon-induced Electron Transfer (PET) in bichromophoric molecules with flexible bridges. Molecular geometry computations using molecular mechanism methods have been applied to the interpretations of experimental results. In the investigations of a series of molecules: (1- naphthalene) -(CH 2)n- (9-anthracene) (n = 1, 3 and 6), EET rate from the naphthalene moiety to the anthracene moiety has been found to be much faster than the naphthalene fluorescence lifetime. The importance of exchange mechanism has been demonstrated in the n = 3 and 6 molecules, which is explained by the formation of face-to-face inter- chromophore configurations. In the investigation of a methyldisilane-linked bichromophoric molecule containing anthracene and dimethyl-aniline, it has been found that this molecule can be directly excited to the Charge Transfer state without being excited to the Locally Excited state first. The unusually low-lying Charge Transfer state indicates a significant contribution to the electron transfer mechanism from the through Si-Si bond coupling. The silicon molecular wire is therefore shown to be a better electron conductor than the carbon molecular wire.

  20. Electron Transfer Interactome of Cytochrome c

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Alexander N.; van Nuland, Nico A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Lying at the heart of many vital cellular processes such as photosynthesis and respiration, biological electron transfer (ET) is mediated by transient interactions among proteins that recognize multiple binding partners. Accurate description of the ET complexes – necessary for a comprehensive understanding of the cellular signaling and metabolism – is compounded by their short lifetimes and pronounced binding promiscuity. Here, we used a computational approach relying solely on the steric properties of the individual proteins to predict the ET properties of protein complexes constituting the functional interactome of the eukaryotic cytochrome c (Cc). Cc is a small, soluble, highly-conserved electron carrier protein that coordinates the electron flow among different redox partners. In eukaryotes, Cc is a key component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, where it shuttles electrons between its reductase and oxidase, and an essential electron donor or acceptor in a number of other redox systems. Starting from the structures of individual proteins, we performed extensive conformational sampling of the ET-competent binding geometries, which allowed mapping out functional epitopes in the Cc complexes, estimating the upper limit of the ET rate in a given system, assessing ET properties of different binding stoichiometries, and gauging the effect of domain mobility on the intermolecular ET. The resulting picture of the Cc interactome 1) reveals that most ET-competent binding geometries are located in electrostatically favorable regions, 2) indicates that the ET can take place from more than one protein-protein orientation, and 3) suggests that protein dynamics within redox complexes, and not the electron tunneling event itself, is the rate-limiting step in the intermolecular ET. Further, we show that the functional epitope size correlates with the extent of dynamics in the Cc complexes and thus can be used as a diagnostic tool for protein mobility. PMID:23236271

  1. Quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process in Lorentzian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2014-08-15

    The quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process between a positive ion and a neutral atom collision is investigated in nonthermal generalized Lorentzian plasmas. The result shows that the nonthermal effect enhances the resonant electron transfer cross section in Lorentzian plasmas. It is found that the nonthermal effect on the classical resonant electron transfer cross section is more significant than that on the quantum tunneling resonant charge transfer cross section. It is shown that the nonthermal effect on the resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with an increase of the Debye length. In addition, the nonthermal effect on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with increasing collision energy. The variation of nonthermal and plasma shielding effects on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process is also discussed.

  2. GPU-accelerated computation of electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Höfinger, Siegfried; Acocella, Angela; Pop, Sergiu C; Narumi, Tetsu; Yasuoka, Kenji; Beu, Titus; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    Electron transfer is a fundamental process that can be studied with the help of computer simulation. The underlying quantum mechanical description renders the problem a computationally intensive application. In this study, we probe the graphics processing unit (GPU) for suitability to this type of problem. Time-critical components are identified via profiling of an existing implementation and several different variants are tested involving the GPU at increasing levels of abstraction. A publicly available library supporting basic linear algebra operations on the GPU turns out to accelerate the computation approximately 50-fold with minor dependence on actual problem size. The performance gain does not compromise numerical accuracy and is of significant value for practical purposes. PMID:22847673

  3. Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Peng; Li, Yuanzuo; Ma, Fengcai; Pullerits, Tõnu; Sun, Mengtao

    2016-04-01

    Electron transfer (ET) is the key process in light-driven charge separation reactions in organic solar cells. The current review summarizes the progress in theoretical modelling of ET in these materials. First we give an account of ET, with a description originating from Marcus theory. We systematically go through all the relevant parameters and show how they depend on different material properties, and discuss the consequences such dependencies have for the performance of the devices. Finally, we present a set of visualization methods which have proven to be very useful in analyzing the elementary processes in absorption and charge separation events. Such visualization tools help us to understand the properties of the photochemical and photobiological systems in solar cells. PMID:26853631

  4. Theory of plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luxia; May, Volkhard

    2015-04-01

    A particular attempt to improve the efficiency of a dye sensitized solar cell is it's decoration with metal nano-particles (MNP). The MNP-plasmon induced enhancement of the local field enlarges the photoexcitation of the dyes and a subsequent improvement of the charge separation efficiency may result. In a recent work (2014 J. Phys. Chem. C 118 2812) we presented a theory of plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer for perylene attached to a TiO2 surface and placed in the proximity of a spherical MNP. These earlier studies are generalized here to the coupling of to up to four MNPs and to the use of somewhat altered molecular parameters. If the MNPs are placed close to each other strong hybridization of plasmon excitations appears and a broad resonance to which molecular excitations are coupled is formed. To investigate this situation the whole charge injection dynamics is described in the framework of the density matrix theory. The approach accounts for optical excitation of the dye coupled to the MNPs and considers subsequent electron injection into the rutile TiO2-cluster. Using a tight-binding model for the TiO2-system with about 105 atoms the electron motion in the cluster is described. We again consider short optical excitation which causes an intermediate steady state with a time-independent overall probability to have the electron injected into the cluster. This probability is used to introduce an enhancement factor which rates the influence of the MNP. Values larger than 500 are obtained.

  5. Theory of plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luxia; May, Volkhard

    2015-04-10

    A particular attempt to improve the efficiency of a dye sensitized solar cell is it's decoration with metal nano-particles (MNP). The MNP-plasmon induced enhancement of the local field enlarges the photoexcitation of the dyes and a subsequent improvement of the charge separation efficiency may result. In a recent work (2014 J. Phys. Chem. C 118 2812) we presented a theory of plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer for perylene attached to a TiO2 surface and placed in the proximity of a spherical MNP. These earlier studies are generalized here to the coupling of to up to four MNPs and to the use of somewhat altered molecular parameters. If the MNPs are placed close to each other strong hybridization of plasmon excitations appears and a broad resonance to which molecular excitations are coupled is formed. To investigate this situation the whole charge injection dynamics is described in the framework of the density matrix theory. The approach accounts for optical excitation of the dye coupled to the MNPs and considers subsequent electron injection into the rutile TiO2-cluster. Using a tight-binding model for the TiO2-system with about 10(5) atoms the electron motion in the cluster is described. We again consider short optical excitation which causes an intermediate steady state with a time-independent overall probability to have the electron injected into the cluster. This probability is used to introduce an enhancement factor which rates the influence of the MNP. Values larger than 500 are obtained. PMID:25764984

  6. Electron transfer reactions in microporous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Mallouk, T.E.

    1992-05-01

    We have studied electron transfer quenching of the excited state of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} in aqueous suspensions of zeolites Y, L, and mordenite. The internal pore network of the zeolite is ion-exchanged with methylviologen cations, which quench the excited state of the surface-bound sensitizer. A detailed study of the quenching and charge recombination kinetics, using time-resolved luminescence quenching and transient diffuse reflectance spectroscopies, shows to remarkable effects: first, the excited state quenching is entirely dynamic is large-pore zeolites (L and Y), even when they are prepared as apparently dry'' powders (which still contain significant amounts of internally sited water). Second, a lower limit for the diffusion coefficient of the MV{sup 2+} ion in these zeolites, determined by this technique, is 10{sup {minus}7} cm{sup 2}sec, i.e., only about one order of magnitude slower than a typical ion in liquid water, and 2--3 orders of magnitude faster than charge transfer diffusion of cations in polyelectrolyte films or membranes such as Nafion. Surface sensitization of internally platinized layered oxide semiconductors such as K{sub 4-x}H{sub x}Nb{sub 6}O{sub 17}{center dot}nH{sub 2}O (x {approx} 2.5) yields photocatalysts for the production of H{sub 2} and I{sub 3{minus}} in aqueous iodide solutions. Layered alkali niobates and titanates form a class of zeolitic wide-bandap semiconductors, and are the first examples of photocatalysts that evolve hydrogen from an electrochemically reversible (i.e., non-sacrificial) electron donor with visible light excitation.

  7. Electron transfer reactions in microporous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallouk, T. E.

    1992-05-01

    We have studied electron transfer quenching of the excited state of Ru3(2+) in aqueous suspensions of zeolites Y, L, and mordenite. The internal pore network of the zeolite is ion-exchanged with methylviologen cations, which quench the excited state of the surface-bound sensitizer. A detailed study of the quenching and charge recombination kinetics, using time-resolved luminescence quenching and transient diffuse reflectance spectroscopies, shows two remarkable effects: first, the excited state quenching is entirely dynamic is large-pore zeolites (L and Y), even when they are prepared as apparently 'dry' powders (which still contain significant amounts of internally sited water). Second, a lower limit for the diffusion coefficient of the MV(2+) ion in these zeolites, determined by this technique, is 10(exp -7) sq cm sec, i.e., only about one order of magnitude slower than a typical ion in liquid water, and 2 to 3 orders of magnitude faster than charge transfer diffusion of cations in polyelectrolyte films or membranes such as Nafion. Surface sensitization of internally platinized layered oxide semiconductors such as K(4-x)H(x)Nb6O17 - nH2O(x approx. = 2.5) yields photocatalysts for the production of H2 and I3(-) in aqueous iodide solutions. Layered alkali niobates and titanates form a class of zeolitic wide-bandap semiconductors, and are the first examples of photocatalysts that evolve hydrogen from an electrochemically reversible (i.e., non-sacrificial) electron donor with visible light excitation.

  8. Visualization of electron transfer interactions of membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawato, Suguru

    1991-08-01

    To visualize electron transfer interactions of proteins in the cellular nieinbrane, we have developed a polarized laser flash-induced anisotropy decay imaging. The time-resolved anisotropy is particularly sensitive to protein-protein interactions. This technique has been successfully applied to examine formation and dissociation of electron transfer complex in adrenal cortex and liver. Electron transfer plays a significant role for steroid hormone synthesis from cholesterol in adrenalcortex and for drug metabolism in liver such as detoxification of chemical compounds. Several redox partners perticipate in dynamic electron transfer interactions. The terminal enzyme cytochrome P-450 receives electrons to activate molecular oxygen, resulting in hydroxylation of various substrates.

  9. Electron Transfer versus Proton Transfer in Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Reactions of Polyprotonated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardena, Harsha P.; He, Min; Chrisman, Paul A.; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Hogan, Jason M.; Hodges, Brittany D. M.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    The ion/ion reactions of several dozen reagent anions with triply protonated cations of the model peptide KGAILKGAILR have been examined to evaluate predictions of a Landau–Zener-based model for the likelihood for electron transfer. Evidence for electron transfer was provided by the appearance of fragment ions unique to electron transfer or electron capture dissociation. Proton transfer and electron transfer are competitive processes for any combination of anionic and cationic reactants. For reagent anions in reactions with protonated peptides, proton transfer is usually significantly more exothermic than electron transfer. If charge transfer occurs at relatively long distances, electron transfer should, therefore, be favored on kinetic grounds because the reactant and product channels cross at greater distances, provided conditions are favorable for electron transfer at the crossing point. The results are consistent with a model based on Landau–Zener theory that indicates both thermodynamic and geometric criteria apply for electron transfer involving polyatomic anions. Both the model and the data suggest that electron affinities associated with the anionic reagents greater than about 60–70 kcal/mol minimize the likelihood that electron transfer will be observed. Provided the electron affinity is not too high, the Franck–Condon factors associated with the anion and its corresponding neutral must not be too low. When one or the other of these criteria is not met, proton transfer tends to occur essentially exclusively. Experiments involving ion/ion attachment products also suggest that a significant barrier exists to the isomerization between chemical complexes that, if formed, lead to either proton transfer or electron transfer. PMID:16144411

  10. Analytical model for rates of electron attachment and intramolecular electron transfer in electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Simons, Jack

    2010-05-26

    A new physical model is put forth to allow the prediction of electron transfer rates and distances for (i) intramolecular transfer from an n > or = 3 Rydberg orbital on a positive site to a disulfide or amide bond site and (ii) intermolecular transfer from an anion donor to an n > or = 3 Rydberg orbital of a positively charged polypeptide. Although ab initio methods have proven capable of handling such electron transfer events when the Rydberg orbital has principal quantum number n = 3, they have proven to be incapable of handling Rydberg states having quantum number n > 3, so having a new tool capable of handling n > 3 Rydberg states is important. The model (i) focuses on each Rydberg orbital's large peak of high amplitude, (ii) approximates the electron density within this peak as constant within a radial shell characterized by a radius and thickness T both of which depend on the quantum number n, and (iii) assumes that strong coupling (either with an orbital of an anion donor or to a disulfide sigma* or a backbone amide pi* orbital) occurs when the valence orbital penetrates fully within the radial shell of the Rydberg orbital. These assumptions permit a derivation of the ratios of rates of electron transfer for n > 3 to those for n = 3. Combining these ratios with ab initio rates for n = 3 allows one to make rate predictions for inter- and intramolecular electron transfer involving Rydberg orbitals appropriate to the electron transfer dissociation process. One important prediction of this model is that the combination of large-penetration and Landau-Zener surface-crossing conditions places very severe limitations on which Rydberg levels can initially be populated in electron transfer dissociation. Another prediction is that a Rydberg orbital of a given principal quantum number n has a limited range of distances over which it can transfer an electron; sigma* or pi* orbitals either too far from or too close to a given Rydberg orbital cannot accept an electron

  11. Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Charge and Excitation Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Piotrowiak

    2004-09-28

    We report the and/or state of several subprojects of our DOE sponsored research on Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Electron and Excitation Transfer: (1) Construction of an ultrafast Ti:sapphire amplifier. (2) Mediation of electronic interactions in host-guest molecules. (3) Theoretical models of electrolytes in weakly polar media. (4) Symmetry effects in intramolecular excitation transfer.

  12. 48 CFR 18.123 - Electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic funds transfer. 18.123 Section 18.123 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES EMERGENCY ACQUISITIONS Available Acquisition Flexibilities 18.123 Electronic funds transfer. Electronic funds...

  13. (Mechanistic examination of organometallic electron transfer reactions: Annual report, 1989)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Our mechanistic examination of electron transfer reactions between organometallic complexes has required data from our stopped-flow infrared spectrophotometer that was constructed in the first year. Our research on organometallic electron transfer reaction mechanisms was recognized by an invitation to the Symposium on Organometallic Reaction Mechanisms at the National ACS meeting in Miami. We have obtained a reasonable understanding of the electron transfer reactions between metal cations and anions and between metal carbonyl anions and metal carbonyl dimers. In addition we have begun to obtain data on the outer sphere electron transfer between metal carbonyl anions and coordination complexes and on reactions involving cluster anions.

  14. [Mechanistic examination of organometallic electron transfer reactions: Annual report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    Our mechanistic examination of electron transfer reactions between organometallic complexes has required data from our stopped-flow infrared spectrophotometer that was constructed in the first year. Our research on organometallic electron transfer reaction mechanisms was recognized by an invitation to the Symposium on Organometallic Reaction Mechanisms at the National ACS meeting in Miami. We have obtained a reasonable understanding of the electron transfer reactions between metal cations and anions and between metal carbonyl anions and metal carbonyl dimers. In addition we have begun to obtain data on the outer sphere electron transfer between metal carbonyl anions and coordination complexes and on reactions involving cluster anions.

  15. Electronic transfer of sensitive patient data.

    PubMed

    Detterbeck, A M W; Kaiser, J; Hirschfelder, U

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop decision-making aids and recommendations for dental practitioners regarding the utilization and sharing of sensitive digital patient data. In the current environment of growing digitization, healthcare professionals need detailed knowledge of secure data management to maximize confidentiality and minimize the risks involved in both archiving patient data and sharing it through electronic channels. Despite well-defined legal requirements, an all-inclusive technological solution does not currently exist. The need for a preliminary review and critical appraisal of common practices of data transfer prompted a search of the literature and the Web to identify viable methods of secure data exchange and to develop a flowchart. A strong focus was placed on the transmission of datasets both smaller than and larger than 10 MB, and on secure communication by smartphone. Although encryption of patient-related data should be routine, it is often difficult to implement. Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) and Secure/Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (S/MIME) are viable standards for secure e-mail encryption. Sharing of high-volume data should be accomplished with the help of file encryption. Careful handling of sensitive patient data is mandatory, and it is the end-user's responsibility to meet any requirements for encryption, preferably by using free, open-source (and hence transparent) software. PMID:25911828

  16. Electronic overfill protection for crude oil transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kilgore, D.R.; Miles, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    There are many considerations involved in the transfer of crude oil, but the most catastrophic consequences may come as the result of a spill during loading or unloading. The safety and well-being of personnel in the vicinity is of the utmost concern. Should one be fortunate enough that an explosion or fire is not the results of a spill, the one must contend with the dilemma of containment. Preserving environmental integrity is a subject that is high on everyone`s list. The phrase ``reportable spill`` can send chills up and down anyone`s back. The repercussions continue: Ground water contamination; Soil remediation; Regulatory fines and penalties; Litigation. And this is all topped off by the ``black eye`` that the company receives with the perception of the public. For these reasons, and more, the carriers of crude oil are choosing self imposed compliances to reduce the frequency of spills. Electronic Overfill Protection has been modified to meet the specific needs and requirements of the crude oil industry. Here, the authors will examine how this type of system evolved, how it functions, and where it may lead.

  17. Activation entropy of electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milischuk, Anatoli A.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.; Newton, Marshall D.

    2006-05-01

    We report microscopic calculations of free energies and entropies for intramolecular electron transfer reactions. The calculation algorithm combines the atomistic geometry and charge distribution of a molecular solute obtained from quantum calculations with the microscopic polarization response of a polar solvent expressed in terms of its polarization structure factors. The procedure is tested on a donor-acceptor complex in which ruthenium donor and cobalt acceptor sites are linked by a four-proline polypeptide. The reorganization energies and reaction energy gaps are calculated as a function of temperature by using structure factors obtained from our analytical procedure and from computer simulations. Good agreement between two procedures and with direct computer simulations of the reorganization energy is achieved. The microscopic algorithm is compared to the dielectric continuum calculations. We found that the strong dependence of the reorganization energy on the solvent refractive index predicted by continuum models is not supported by the microscopic theory. Also, the reorganization and overall solvation entropies are substantially larger in the microscopic theory compared to continuum models.

  18. Mechanism of Intermolecular Electron Transfer in Bionanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruodis, A.; Galikova, N.; Šarka, K.; Saulė, R.; Batiuškaitė, D.; Saulis, G.

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. Most patients are inoperable and hepatoma cells are resistant to conventional chemotherapies. Thus, the development of novel therapies for HCC treatment is of paramount importance. Amongst different alimentary factors, vitamin C and vitamin K3 In the present work, it has been shown that the treatment of mouse hepatoma MH-22A cells by vitamin C and vitamin K3 at the ratio of 100:1 greatly enhanced their cytotoxicity. When cells were subjected to vitamin C at 200 μM or to vitamin K3 at 2 μM separately, their viability reduced by only about 10%. However, when vitamins C and K3 were combined at the same concentrations, they killed more than 90% of cells. To elucidate the mechanism of the synergistic cytotoxicity of the C&K3 mixture, theoretical quantum-chemical analysis of the dynamics of intermolecular electron transfer (IET) processes within the complexes containing C (five forms) and K3 (one form) has been carried out. Optimization of the ground state complex geometry has been provided by means of GAUSSIAN03 package. Simulation of the IET has been carried out using NUVOLA package, in the framework of molecular orbitals (MO). The rate of IET has been calculated using Fermi Golden rule. The results of simulations allow us to create the preliminary model of the reaction pathway.

  19. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads

    SciTech Connect

    1993-03-01

    This project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic some of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. This research project is leading to a better understanding of the energy conserving steps of photosynthesis via the study of synthetic model systems which abstract features of the natural photosynthetic apparatus. The knowledge gained from these studies will aid in the design of artificial photosynthetic reaction centers which employ the basic chemistry and physics of photosynthesis to help meet mankind`s energy needs. The approach to artificial photosynthesis employed in this project is to use synthetic pigments, electron donors, and electron acceptors similar to those found in biological reaction centers, but to replace the protein component with covalent bonds. These chemical linkages determine the electronic coupling between the various moieties by controlling separation, relative orientation, and overlap of electronic orbitals. The model systems are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited single state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they mimic carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  20. 75 FR 75897 - Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... published in the Federal Register (75 FR 51707) proposed amendments to the regulations (REG-153340-09) to... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1, 31, 40, and 301 RIN 1545-BJ13 Electronic Funds Transfer of... Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT). In response to the decision of the Financial Management Service...

  1. 76 FR 709 - Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-06

    ... Federal Register on Tuesday, December 7, 2010 (75 FR 75897) providing guidance relating to Federal tax deposits (FTDs) by Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT). The temporary and final regulations provide rules under... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 40 and 301 RIN 1545-BJ13 Electronic Funds Transfer of...

  2. 78 FR 66251 - Electronic Fund Transfers(Regulation E)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... PROTECTION 12 CFR Part 1005 RIN 3170-AA33 Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E) AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer... countries that qualify for an exception in subpart B of Regulation E, which implements the Electronic Fund....consumerfinance.gov/remittances-transfer-rule-amendment-to-regulation-e/ . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The...

  3. Single Molecule Electron Transfer Process of Ruthenium Complexes.

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Dehong; Lu, H PETER.

    2006-03-01

    Transition metal complexes such as ruthenium complexes, having metal-to-ligand charge transfer states, are extensively used in solar energy conversion and electron transfer in biological systems and at interfaces. The dynamics of metal-to-ligand charge transfer and subsequent intermolecular, intramolecular, and interfacial electron transfer processes can be highly complex and inhomogeneous, especially when molecules are involved in interactions and perturbations from heterogeneous local environments and gated by conformation fluctuations. We have employed the single-molecule spectroscopy, a powerful approach for inhomogeneous systems to study the electron transfer dynamics of ruthenium complexes. We have applied a range of statistical analysis methods to reveal nonclassical photon emission behavior of the single ruthenium complex, i.e., photon antibunching, and photophysical ground-state recovering dynamics on a microsecond time scale. The use of photon antibunching to measure phosphorescence lifetimes and single-molecule electron transfer dynamics at room temperature is demonstrated.

  4. Probing active electron transfer branch in photosystem I reaction center.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savikhin, Sergei; Dashdorj, Naranbaatar; Xu, Wu; Martinsson, Peter; Chitnis, Parag

    2003-03-01

    Complimentary point mutations were introduced at the primary electron acceptor sites in A and B branches of the photosystem I (PS I) reaction center (RC) from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and their effect on the kinetics of the electron transfer process was studied by means of ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy. The results indicate that in these species the electron transfer occurs primarily along the A-branch. Previous optical experiments on PS I complexes from Chlorella sorokiniana demonstrated that both branches of RC are equally active. That suggests that the directionality of electron transfer in PS I is species dependent.

  5. Harvesting singlet fission for solar energy conversion: one versus two-electron transfer electron transfer from the quantum superposition state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wai-Lun; Tritsch, John; Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2013-03-01

    Singlet fission (SF) is being explored to increase the efficiency of organic photovoltaics. A key question is how to effectively extract multiple electron-hole pairs from multiple excitons with the presence of other competing channels such as electron transfer from the singlet state. Recent experiments on the pentacene and tetracene show that a quantum superposition of the singlet (S1) and multiexciton (ME) state is formed during SF. However, little is known about the kinetics of electron transfer from this quantum superposition. Here, we apply time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to the tetracene/C60 interface to probe one and two electron transfer from S1 and ME states, respectively. Because of the relatively slow (7 ps) SF in tetracene, both one- and two-electron transfer are allowed. We show evidence for the formation of two distinct charge transfer states due to electron transfer from photo-excited tetracene to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and the LUMO+1 levels in C60. Kinetic analysis shows that 60% of the quantum superposition transfers one electron through the S1 state to C60 while 40% undergoes two-electron transfer through the ME state.

  6. Integrating proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) and excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Kent, Caleb A.; Paul, Jared J.; Papanikolas, John M.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2010-11-01

    In many of the chemical steps in photosynthesis and artificial photosynthesis, proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays an essential role. An important issue is how excited state reactivity can be integrated with PCET to carry out solar fuel reactions such as water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen or water reduction of CO2 to methanol or hydrocarbons. The principles behind PCET and concerted electron–proton transfer (EPT) pathways are reasonably well understood. In Photosystem II antenna light absorption is followed by sensitization of chlorophyll P680 and electron transfer quenching to give P680+. The oxidized chlorophyll activates the oxygen evolving complex (OEC), a CaMn4 cluster, through an intervening tyrosine–histidine pair, YZ. EPT plays a major role in a series of four activation steps that ultimately result in loss of 4e-/4H+ from the OEC with oxygen evolution. The key elements in photosynthesis and artificial photosynthesis – light absorption, excited state energy and electron transfer, electron transfer activation of multiple-electron, multiple-proton catalysis – can also be assembled in dye sensitized photoelectrochemical synthesis cells (DS-PEC). In this approach, molecular or nanoscale assemblies are incorporated at separate electrodes for coupled, light driven oxidation and reduction. Separate excited state electron transfer followed by proton transfer can be combined in single semi-concerted steps (photo-EPT) by photolysis of organic charge transfer excited states with H-bonded bases or in metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited states in pre-associated assemblies with H-bonded electron transfer donors or acceptors. In these assemblies, photochemically induced electron and proton transfer occur in a single, semi-concerted event to give high-energy, redox active intermediates.

  7. Electron Transfer Pathways in Cholesterol Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Porter, Todd D

    2015-10-01

    Cholesterol synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum requires electron input at multiple steps and utilizes both NADH and NADPH as the electron source. Four enzymes catalyzing five steps in the pathway require electron input: squalene monooxygenase, lanosterol demethylase, sterol 4α-methyl oxidase, and sterol C5-desaturase. The electron-donor proteins for these enzymes include cytochrome P450 reductase and the cytochrome b5 pathway. Here I review the evidence for electron donor protein requirements with these enzymes, the evidence for additional electron donor pathways, and the effect of deletion of these redox enzymes on cholesterol and lipid metabolism. PMID:26344922

  8. Near-infrared-induced electron transfer of an uranyl macrocyclic complex without energy transfer to dioxygen.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christina M; Ohkubo, Kei; Ho, I-Ting; Zhang, Zhan; Ishida, Masatoshi; Fang, Yuanyuan; Lynch, Vincent M; Kadish, Karl M; Sessler, Jonathan L; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-04-21

    Photoexcitation of dichloromethane solutions of an uranyl macrocyclic complex with cyclo[1]furan[1]pyridine[4]-pyrrole () at the near-infrared (NIR) band (1177 nm) in the presence of electron donors and acceptors resulted in NIR-induced electron transfer without producing singlet oxygen via energy transfer. PMID:25791126

  9. K-shell Analysis Reveals Distinct Functional Parts in an Electron Transfer Network and Its Implications for Extracellular Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dewu; Li, Ling; Shu, Chuanjun; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) and hence has attracted considerable attention. The EET pathways mainly consist of c-type cytochromes, along with some other proteins involved in electron transfer processes. By whole genome study and protein interactions inquisition, we constructed a large-scale electron transfer network containing 2276 interactions among 454 electron transfer related proteins in S. oneidensis MR-1. Using the k-shell decomposition method, we identified and analyzed distinct parts of the electron transfer network. We found that there was a negative correlation between the k s (k-shell values) and the average DR_100 (disordered regions per 100 amino acids) in every shell, which suggested that disordered regions of proteins played an important role during the formation and extension of the electron transfer network. Furthermore, proteins in the top three shells of the network are mainly located in the cytoplasm and inner membrane; these proteins can be responsible for transfer of electrons into the quinone pool in a wide variety of environmental conditions. In most of the other shells, proteins are broadly located throughout the five cellular compartments (cytoplasm, inner membrane, periplasm, outer membrane, and extracellular), which ensures the important EET ability of S. oneidensis MR-1. Specifically, the fourth shell was responsible for EET and the c-type cytochromes in the remaining shells of the electron transfer network were involved in aiding EET. Taken together, these results show that there are distinct functional parts in the electron transfer network of S. oneidensis MR-1, and the EET processes could achieve high efficiency through cooperation through such an electron transfer network. PMID:27148219

  10. K-shell Analysis Reveals Distinct Functional Parts in an Electron Transfer Network and Its Implications for Extracellular Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dewu; Li, Ling; Shu, Chuanjun; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) and hence has attracted considerable attention. The EET pathways mainly consist of c-type cytochromes, along with some other proteins involved in electron transfer processes. By whole genome study and protein interactions inquisition, we constructed a large-scale electron transfer network containing 2276 interactions among 454 electron transfer related proteins in S. oneidensis MR-1. Using the k-shell decomposition method, we identified and analyzed distinct parts of the electron transfer network. We found that there was a negative correlation between the ks (k-shell values) and the average DR_100 (disordered regions per 100 amino acids) in every shell, which suggested that disordered regions of proteins played an important role during the formation and extension of the electron transfer network. Furthermore, proteins in the top three shells of the network are mainly located in the cytoplasm and inner membrane; these proteins can be responsible for transfer of electrons into the quinone pool in a wide variety of environmental conditions. In most of the other shells, proteins are broadly located throughout the five cellular compartments (cytoplasm, inner membrane, periplasm, outer membrane, and extracellular), which ensures the important EET ability of S. oneidensis MR-1. Specifically, the fourth shell was responsible for EET and the c-type cytochromes in the remaining shells of the electron transfer network were involved in aiding EET. Taken together, these results show that there are distinct functional parts in the electron transfer network of S. oneidensis MR-1, and the EET processes could achieve high efficiency through cooperation through such an electron transfer network. PMID:27148219

  11. A molecular shift register based on electron transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Josenelson; Beratan, David N.

    1988-01-01

    An electronic shift-register memory at the molecular level is described. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. This device integrates designed electronic molecules onto a very large scale integrated (silicon microelectronic) substrate, providing an example of a 'molecular electronic device' that could actually be made. The design requirements for such a device and possible synthetic strategies are discussed. Devices along these lines should have lower energy usage and enhanced storage density.

  12. Final Report: Vibrational Dynamics in Photoinduced Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth G. Spears

    2006-04-19

    The objective of this grant was to understand how molecular vibrational states (geometry distortions) are involved in photoinduced electron transfer rates of molecules. This subject is an important component of understanding how molecular absorbers of light convert that energy into charge separation. This is important because the absorption usually excites molecular vibrations in a new electronic state prior to electron transfer to other molecules or semiconductor nanoparticles, as in some types of solar cells. The speeds of charge separation and charge recombination are key parameters that require experiments such as those in this work to test the rules governing electron transfer rates. Major progress was made on this goal. Some of the molecular structures selected for developing experimental data were bimolecular charge transfer complexes that contained metals of cobalt or vanadium. The experiments used the absorption of an ultrafast pulse of light to directly separate charges onto the two different molecular parts of the complex. The charge recombination then proceeds naturally, and one goal was to measure the speed of this recombination for different types of molecular vibrations. We used picosecond and femtosecond duration pulses with tunable colors at infrared wavelengths to directly observe vibrational states and their different rates of charge recombination (also called electron transfer). We discovered that different contact geometries in the complexes had very different electron transfer rates, and that one geometry had a significant dependence on the amount of vibration in the complex. This is the first and only measurement of such rates, and it allowed us to confirm our interpretation with a number of molecular models and test the sensitivity of electron transfer to vibrational states. This led us to develop a general theory, where we point out how molecular distortions can change the electron transfer rates to be much faster than prior theories

  13. Electron acceptor dependence of electron shuttle secretion and extracellular electron transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Bing-Bing; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Dao-Bo; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an extensively studied dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a great potential for bioremediation and electricity generation. It secretes flavins as electron shuttles which play an important role in extracellular electron transfer. However, the influence of various environmental factors on the secretion of flavins is largely unknown. Here, the effects of electron acceptors, including fumarate, ferrihydrite, Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), nitrate and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), on the secretion of flavins were investigated. The level of riboflavin and riboflavin-5'-phosphate (FMN) secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 varied considerably with different electron acceptors. While nitrate and ferrihydrite suppressed the secretion of flavins in relative to fumarate, Fe(III)-NTA and TMAO promoted such a secretion and greatly enhanced ferrihydrite reduction and electricity generation. This work clearly demonstrates that electron acceptors could considerably affect the secretion of flavins and consequent microbial EET. Such impacts of electron acceptors in the environment deserve more attention. PMID:23558182

  14. KOtBu: A Privileged Reagent for Electron Transfer Reactions?

    PubMed

    Barham, Joshua P; Coulthard, Graeme; Emery, Katie J; Doni, Eswararao; Cumine, Florimond; Nocera, Giuseppe; John, Matthew P; Berlouis, Leonard E A; McGuire, Thomas; Tuttle, Tell; Murphy, John A

    2016-06-15

    Many recent studies have used KOtBu in organic reactions that involve single electron transfer; in the literature, the electron transfer is proposed to occur either directly from the metal alkoxide or indirectly, following reaction of the alkoxide with a solvent or additive. These reaction classes include coupling reactions of halobenzenes and arenes, reductive cleavages of dithianes, and SRN1 reactions. Direct electron transfer would imply that alkali metal alkoxides are willing partners in these electron transfer reactions, but the literature reports provide little or no experimental evidence for this. This paper examines each of these classes of reaction in turn, and contests the roles proposed for KOtBu; instead, it provides new mechanistic information that in each case supports the in situ formation of organic electron donors. We go on to show that direct electron transfer from KOtBu can however occur in appropriate cases, where the electron acceptor has a reduction potential near the oxidation potential of KOtBu, and the example that we use is CBr4. In this case, computational results support electrochemical data in backing a direct electron transfer reaction. PMID:27183183

  15. REFLECTIONS ON THE TWO-STATE ELECTRON TRANSFER MODEL.

    SciTech Connect

    Brunschwig, B.S.

    2000-01-12

    There is general agreement that the two most important factors determining electron transfer rates in solution are the degree of electronic interaction between the donor and acceptor sites, and the changes in the nuclear configurations of the donor, acceptor, and surrounding medium that occur upon the gain or loss of an electron Ll-51. The electronic interaction of the sites will be very weak, and the electron transfer slow, when the sites are far apart or their interaction is symmetry or spin forbidden. Since electron motion is much faster than nuclear motion, energy conservation requires that, prior to the actual electron transfer, the nuclear configurations of the reactants and the surrounding medium adjust from their equilibrium values to a configuration (generally) intermediate between that of the reactants and products. In the case of electron transfer between , two metal complexes in a polar solvent, the nuclear configuration changes involve adjustments in the metal-ligand and intraligand bond lengths and angles, and changes in the orientations of the surrounding solvent molecules. In common with ordinary chemical reactions, an electron transfer reaction can then be described in terms of the motion of the system on an energy surface from the reactant equilibrium configuration (initial state) to the product equilibrium configuration (final state) via the activated complex (transition state) configuration.

  16. 76 FR 29901 - Electronic Fund Transfers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... Board anticipates that final rules on remittance transfers will be issued by the Bureau. \\26\\ 75 FR... be edited to remove any identifying or contact information. Public comments may also be viewed... a.m. and 5 p.m. on weekdays. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dana Miller, Mandie Aubrey or...

  17. Promoting Knowledge Transfer with Electronic Note Taking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katayama, Andrew D.; Shambaugh, R. Neal; Doctor, Tasneem

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the differences between (a) copying and pasting text versus typed note-taking methods of constructing study notes simultaneously with (b) vertically scaffolded versus horizontally scaffold notes on knowledge transfer. Forty-seven undergraduate educational psychology students participated. Materials included 2 electronic…

  18. Extracellular electron transfer mechanisms between microorganisms and minerals.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liang; Dong, Hailiang; Reguera, Gemma; Beyenal, Haluk; Lu, Anhuai; Liu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing; Fredrickson, James K

    2016-10-01

    Electrons can be transferred from microorganisms to multivalent metal ions that are associated with minerals and vice versa. As the microbial cell envelope is neither physically permeable to minerals nor electrically conductive, microorganisms have evolved strategies to exchange electrons with extracellular minerals. In this Review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that underlie the ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons, such as c-type cytochromes and microbial nanowires, with extracellular minerals and with microorganisms of the same or different species. Microorganisms that have extracellular electron transfer capability can be used for biotechnological applications, including bioremediation, biomining and the production of biofuels and nanomaterials. PMID:27573579

  19. Electronic excitation energy transfer between nucleobases of natural DNA.

    PubMed

    Vayá, Ignacio; Gustavsson, Thomas; Douki, Thierry; Berlin, Yuri; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2012-07-18

    Transfer of the electronic excitation energy in calf thymus DNA is studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence anisotropy, after an initial decay starting on the femtosecond time scale, dwindles down to ca. 0.1. The in-plane depolarized fluorescence decays are described by a stretched exponential law. Our observations are consistent with one-dimensional transfer mediated by charge-transfer excited states. PMID:22765050

  20. A facile measurement of heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Paulo R; Benites, Tiago Azevedo; Góes, Márcio Sousa; Davis, Jason J

    2013-11-19

    This work introduces a simple, single-step, impedance-derived capacitance spectroscopic approach as a convenient and direct way of reporting the heterogeneous rate of electron-transfer between an electrode and solution-phase redox species. The proposed methodology requires no equivalent circuit analysis or data fitting and is equally applicable to the strong coupling (diffusion-mediated) or weak coupling electron-transfer regimes. PMID:24187916

  1. Photoinduced electron transfer from DABCO to trans-nitrostilbenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görner, Helmut; Schulte-Frohlinde, Dietrich

    The anion radical of the trans isomers of 4-nitro-, 4,4'-dinitro-, and 4-nitro-4'-methoxystilbene was generated by triplet quenching with 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) in polar solvents at room temperature using laser flash photolysis. Electron transfer and trans → cis photoisomerization are competing processes. The radical ions decay by electron back-transfer yielding the initial ground states.

  2. MANAGING ELECTRONIC DATA TRANSFER IN ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of computers and electronic information poses a complex problem for potential litigation in space law. The problem currently manifests itself in at least two ways. First, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) enforcement of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compen...

  3. Improved heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics of fluorinated graphene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boopathi, Sidhureddy; Narayanan, Tharangattu N.; Senthil Kumar, Shanmugam

    2014-08-01

    Though graphitic carbons are commercially available for various electrochemical processes, their performance is limited in terms of various electrochemical activities. Recent experiments on layered carbon materials, such as graphene, demonstrated an augmented performance of these systems in all electrochemical activities due to their unique electronic properties, enhanced surface area, structure and chemical stabilities. Moreover, flexibility in controlling electronic, as well as electrochemical activities by heteroatom doping brings further leverage in their practical use. Here, we study the electron transfer kinetics of fluorinated graphene derivatives, known as fluorinated graphene oxide (FGO) and its reduced form, RFGO. Enhanced electron transfer kinetics (heterogeneous electron transfer (HET)) is observed from these fluorinated systems in comparison to their undoped systems such as graphene oxide (GO) and reduced GO. A detailed study has been conducted using standard redox probes and biomolecules revealing the enhanced electro-catalytic activities of FGO and RFGO, and electron transfer rates are simulated theoretically. This study reveals that fluorine not only induces defects in graphitic lattice leading to an enhanced HET process but also can modify the electronic structure of graphene surface.Though graphitic carbons are commercially available for various electrochemical processes, their performance is limited in terms of various electrochemical activities. Recent experiments on layered carbon materials, such as graphene, demonstrated an augmented performance of these systems in all electrochemical activities due to their unique electronic properties, enhanced surface area, structure and chemical stabilities. Moreover, flexibility in controlling electronic, as well as electrochemical activities by heteroatom doping brings further leverage in their practical use. Here, we study the electron transfer kinetics of fluorinated graphene derivatives, known as

  4. Nuclear interlevel transfer driven by electronic transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Solem, J.C.; Rinker, G.

    1985-01-01

    We show how a gamma-ray laser might be made by optically exciting a transfer of population from a long-lived isomer to an energetically adjacent short-lived state of the same nucleus. We compare the advantages of using transitions of high multipolarity versus transitions of low multi-polarity. Preliminary numerical investigations of the mechanism show it to be somewhat favorable. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions with Photometric Bases Reveal Free Energy Relationships for Proton Transfer.

    PubMed

    Eisenhart, Thomas T; Howland, William C; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2016-08-18

    The proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) oxidation of p-aminophenol in acetonitrile was initiated via stopped-flow rapid-mixing and spectroscopically monitored. For oxidation by ferrocenium in the presence of 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline proton acceptors, both the electron transfer and proton transfer components could be optically monitored in the visible region; the decay of the ferrocenium absorbance is readily monitored (λmax = 620 nm), and the absorbance of the 2,4-substituted 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives (λmax = 370-392 nm) red-shifts substantially (ca. 70 nm) upon protonation. Spectral analysis revealed the reaction proceeds via a stepwise electron transfer-proton transfer process, and modeling of the kinetics traces monitoring the ferrocenium and quinolinium signals provided rate constants for elementary proton and electron transfer steps. As the pKa values of the conjugate acids of the 2,4-R-7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives employed were readily tuned by varying the substituents at the 2- and 4-positions of the quinoline backbone, the driving force for proton transfer was systematically varied. Proton transfer rate constants (kPT,2 = (1.5-7.5) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), kPT,4 = (0.55-3.0) × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)) were found to correlate with the pKa of the conjugate acid of the proton acceptor, in agreement with anticipated free energy relationships for proton transfer processes in PCET reactions. PMID:27500804

  6. Electron transfer reactions in microporous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Mallouk, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    Basic thrust the research program involves use of microporous solids (zeolites, clays, layered and tunnel structure oxide semiconductors) as organizing media for artificial photosynthetic systems. Purpose of the microporous solid is twofold. First, it induces spatial organization of photoactive and electroactive components (sensitizers, semiconductor particles, electron relays, and catalysts) at the solid-solution interface, enhancing the quantum efficiency of charge separation and separating physically the ultimate electron donor and acceptor in the electron transport chain. Second, since the microcrystalline solid admits only molecules of a certain charge and size, it is possible to achieve permanent charge separation by sieving chemical photoproducts (e.g., H[sub 2] and I[sub 3][sup [minus

  7. Does electron-transfer theory explain large rate differences in singlet and triplet excited state electron-transfer reactions?

    SciTech Connect

    Zusman, L.D.; Kurnikov, I.V.; Beratan, D.N.

    1995-12-31

    Gray and coworkers have shown that intramolecular electron-transfer rates from singlet and triplet excited states in iridium(spacer)pyridinium complexes can be vastly different (>5 orders of magnitude). We have analyzed the possible sources of these differences, including effects that may arise from reorganization energies, free energies, and tunneling matrix elements. When distance dependent reorganization energies and energy dependent tunneling matrix elements are included, a systematic framework emerges to describe these electron-transfer reactions.

  8. Vectorial electron transfer in spatially ordered arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Progress has been made in four areas: the synthesis of new materials for directional electron; the preparation and characterization of anisotropic composites bearing organic and inorganic components; the elaboration of mechanisms of electrocatalysis; and the development of new methods for surface modification of metals and semiconductors.

  9. Frontier orbital symmetry control of intermolecular electron transfer. Final report, September 15, 1988--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, B.

    1997-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics: the recovery of intermolecular transfer parameters from fluorescence quenching in liquids; photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer in flexible donor/space/acceptor systems containing an extended unsaturated spacer; electron transfer sensitized reaction; the recovery of solute and fractal dimensions from electron transfer quenching data; and frontier orbital symmetry control of back electron transfer.

  10. Proton-coupled electron transfer in solution, proteins, and electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Soudackov, Alexander V

    2008-11-13

    Recent advances in the theoretical treatment of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions are reviewed. These reactions play an important role in a wide range of biological processes, as well as in fuel cells, solar cells, chemical sensors, and electrochemical devices. A unified theoretical framework has been developed to describe both sequential and concerted PCET, as well as hydrogen atom transfer (HAT). A quantitative diagnostic has been proposed to differentiate between HAT and PCET in terms of the degree of electronic nonadiabaticity, where HAT corresponds to electronically adiabatic proton transfer and PCET corresponds to electronically nonadiabatic proton transfer. In both cases, the overall reaction is typically vibronically nonadiabatic. A series of rate constant expressions have been derived in various limits by describing the PCET reactions in terms of nonadiabatic transitions between electron-proton vibronic states. These expressions account for the solvent response to both electron and proton transfer and the effects of the proton donor-acceptor vibrational motion. The solvent and protein environment can be represented by a dielectric continuum or described with explicit molecular dynamics. These theoretical treatments have been applied to numerous PCET reactions in solution and proteins. Expressions for heterogeneous rate constants and current densities for electrochemical PCET have also been derived and applied to model systems. PMID:18842015

  11. Electron transfer pathways in photosystem I reaction centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashin, Nikolaj; Larsson, Sven

    2003-07-01

    Electron transfer following charge separation in the photosystem I (PSI) reaction center of Synechococcus elongatus is studied using theoretical methods. The difference in rate between two almost symmetrical A- and B-branches is caused by a difference in a single residue (Trp B673 versus Gly A693), close to the F X iron-sulfur cluster. Partly due to its polar environment, Trp B673 acts as an electron acceptor in its π-system. The rate increases on the B-side due to shortened distances for electron transfer.

  12. A tetrastable naphthalenediimide: anion induced charge transfer, single and double electron transfer for combinational logic gates.

    PubMed

    Ajayakumar, M R; Hundal, Geeta; Mukhopadhyay, Pritam

    2013-09-11

    Herein we demonstrate the formation of the first tetrastable naphthalenediimide (NDI, 1a) molecule having multiple distinctly readable outputs. Differential response of 1a to fluoride anions induces intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), single/double electron transfer (SET/DET) leading to a set of combinational logic gates for the first time with a NDI moiety. PMID:23752683

  13. Lewis Acid Coupled Electron Transfer of Metal-Oxygen Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Ohkubo, Kei; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-12-01

    Redox-inactive metal ions and Brønsted acids that function as Lewis acids play pivotal roles in modulating the redox reactivity of metal-oxygen intermediates, such as metal-oxo and metal-peroxo complexes. The mechanisms of the oxidative CH bond cleavage of toluene derivatives, sulfoxidation of thioanisole derivatives, and epoxidation of styrene derivatives by mononuclear nonheme iron(IV)-oxo complexes in the presence of triflic acid (HOTf) and Sc(OTf)3 have been unified as rate-determining electron transfer coupled with binding of Lewis acids (HOTf and Sc(OTf)3 ) by iron(III)-oxo complexes. All logarithms of the observed second-order rate constants of Lewis acid-promoted oxidative CH bond cleavage, sulfoxidation, and epoxidation reactions of iron(IV)-oxo complexes exhibit remarkably unified correlations with the driving forces of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and metal ion-coupled electron transfer (MCET) in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer when the differences in the formation constants of precursor complexes were taken into account. The binding of HOTf and Sc(OTf)3 to the metal-oxo moiety has been confirmed for Mn(IV) -oxo complexes. The enhancement of the electron-transfer reactivity of metal-oxo complexes by binding of Lewis acids increases with increasing the Lewis acidity of redox-inactive metal ions. Metal ions can also bind to mononuclear nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complexes, resulting in acceleration of the electron-transfer reduction but deceleration of the electron-transfer oxidation. Such a control on the reactivity of metal-oxygen intermediates by binding of Lewis acids provides valuable insight into the role of Ca(2+) in the oxidation of water to dioxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II. PMID:26404482

  14. Ultrafast spectroscopy of electron transfer dynamics in liquids; excitation transfer studies of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goun, Alexei A.

    The transfer of an electron from a donor to an acceptor is the fundamental step in a wide range of chemical and biological processes. As a result, electron-transfer reactions have been the focus of numerous theoretical and experimental efforts aimed at understanding the kinetics and mechanism of the transfer event. Liquid solvents are an important medium for electron-transfer processes. The influences of the distance dependence, diffusion, the radial distribution function, and the hydrodynamic effect have been incorporated into the theory of electron transfer in solution, as well as into the theory of electron transfer between donors and acceptors in the head group regions of micelles. The development of new laser system with a pulse duration of tens of femtoseconds, with tunable wavelength allowed us to study these processes on a considerably shorter time scale than previous studies. This allowed us to observe not only the diffusion controlled but also the kinetics of electron transfer for donor/acceptor pairs that are in close proximity. In one set of experiments we have studied the kinetics of electron transfer in electron accepting molecule (rhodamine 3B) dissolved in electron donating solvent (N,N-dimethylaniline). The data for the forward electron transfer and geminate recombination are approximated by the statistical theory of the electron transfer. Optical anisotropy observed in the experiment demonstrates the orientation dependence of the electron transfer rate. In further experiments we investigated the electron transfer in non-hydrogen bonding liquids of increasing viscosity. The effective value of the donor/acceptor electronic coupling was found to decrease with viscosity. Electron transfer experiments were also carried out on the surface of micelles. The systems studied are the hole donor octadecyl-rhodamine B (ODRB) and the hole acceptor N,N-dimethyl-aniline (DMA) in micelles made of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and

  15. Electron spin resonance analysis of tooth enamel does not indicate exposures to large radiation doses in a large proportion of distally-exposed A-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Yuko; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Cullings, Harry M; Miyazawa, Chuzo; Nakamura, Nori

    2011-01-01

    The atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki led to two different types of radiation exposure; one was direct and brief and the other was indirect and persistent. The latter (so-called exposure to residual radiation) resulted from the presence of neutron activation products in the soil, or from fission products present in the fallout. Compared with the doses from direct exposures, estimations of individual doses from residual radiation have been much more complicated, and estimates vary widely among researchers. The present report bases its conclusions on radiation doses recorded in tooth enamel from survivors in Hiroshima. Those survivors were present at distances of about 3 km or greater from the hypocenter at the time of the explosion, and have DS02 estimated doses (direct exposure doses) of less than 5 mGy (and are regarded as control subjects). Individual doses were estimated by measuring CO(2)(-) radicals in tooth enamel with the electron spin resonance (ESR; or electron paramagnetic resonance, EPR) method. The results from 56 molars donated by 49 survivors provided estimated doses which vary from -200 mGy to 500 mGy, and the median dose was 17 mGy (25% and 75% quartiles are -54 mGy and 137 mGy, respectively) for the buccal parts and 13 mGy (25% and 75% quartiles: -49 mGy and 87 mGy, respectively) for the lingual parts of the molars. Three molars had ESR-estimated doses of 300 to 400 mGy for both the buccal and lingual parts, which indicates possible exposures to excess doses of penetrating radiation, although the origin of such radiation remains to be determined. The results did not support claims that a large fraction of distally-exposed survivors received large doses (e.g. 1 Gy) of external penetrating radiation resulting from residual radiation. PMID:21768749

  16. Electron transfer through rigid organic molecular wires enhanced by electronic and electron-vibration coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukegawa, Junpei; Schubert, Christina; Zhu, Xiaozhang; Tsuji, Hayato; Guldi, Dirk M.; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2014-10-01

    Electron transfer (ET) is a fundamental process in a wide range of biological systems, photovoltaics and molecular electronics. Therefore to understand the relationship between molecular structure and ET properties is of prime importance. For this purpose, photoinduced ET has been studied extensively using donor-bridge-acceptor molecules, in which π-conjugated molecular wires are employed as bridges. Here, we demonstrate that carbon-bridged oligo-p-phenylenevinylene (COPV), which is both rigid and flat, shows an 840-fold increase in the ET rate compared with the equivalent flexible molecular bridges. A 120-fold rate enhancement is explained in terms of enhanced electronic coupling between the electron donor and the electron acceptor because of effective conjugation through the COPVs. The remainder of the rate enhancement is explained by inelastic electron tunnelling through COPV caused by electron-vibration coupling, unprecedented for organic molecular wires in solution at room temperature. This type of nonlinear effect demonstrates the versatility and potential practical utility of COPVs in molecular device applications.

  17. Alternative ground states enable pathway switching in biological electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Abriata, Luciano A.; Álvarez-Paggi, Damián; Ledesma, Gabriela N.; Blackburn, Ninian J.; Vila, Alejandro J.; Murgida, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    Electron transfer is the simplest chemical reaction and constitutes the basis of a large variety of biological processes, such as photosynthesis and cellular respiration. Nature has evolved specific proteins and cofactors for these functions. The mechanisms optimizing biological electron transfer have been matter of intense debate, such as the role of the protein milieu between donor and acceptor sites. Here we propose a mechanism regulating long-range electron transfer in proteins. Specifically, we report a spectroscopic, electrochemical, and theoretical study on WT and single-mutant CuA redox centers from Thermus thermophilus, which shows that thermal fluctuations may populate two alternative ground-state electronic wave functions optimized for electron entry and exit, respectively, through two different and nearly perpendicular pathways. These findings suggest a unique role for alternative or “invisible” electronic ground states in directional electron transfer. Moreover, it is shown that this energy gap and, therefore, the equilibrium between ground states can be fine-tuned by minor perturbations, suggesting alternative ways through which protein–protein interactions and membrane potential may optimize and regulate electron–proton energy transduction. PMID:23054836

  18. Imaging population transfer in atoms with ultrafast electron pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Starace, Anthony F.

    2016-05-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy have made significant progress recently in investigating atomic-scale structural dynamics in gas-phase and condensed materials. With these advances, direct imaging of electronic motions in atoms and molecules by ultrafast electron diffraction is anticipated. We propose imaging a laser-driven coherent population transfer in lithium atoms by femtosecond ultrafast electron pulses. Valuable information and insight can be obtained from studying such a system in order to refine ultrafast electron techniques and to interpret experimental results. Adiabatic passage by level crossing is used to transfer the electron population from the 2 s to the 2 p state. Our simulations demonstrate the ability of ultrafast electron diffraction to image this population transfer, as the time-dependent diffraction images reflect the electronic motion in the scattering intensity and angular distribution. Furthermore, asymmetric diffraction patterns indicate that even the relative phases of the electronic wave function can be resolved, provided there is sufficient temporal resolution. This work has been supported in part by DOE Award No. DE-SC0012193 [H.-C.S.] and by NSF Grant No. PHYS-1505492 [A.F.S.].

  19. Collisional energy transfer and quenching of electronic excitation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, S. H.; Eyring, H.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this paper has been to explore in a preliminary way the nature and mechanism of collisional energy transfer and quenching of electronic excitation. For this purpose, the Born approximation has been used, and the triplet-triplet and singlet-singlet transfer, and the triplet-triplet and singlet-singlet quenching have been studied. It has been shown theoretically that (i) the singlet-singlet transfer constants (or cross sections) are always larger than the triplet-triplet transfer constants (or cross sections) for the same system of donor and acceptor; (ii) for the singlet-singlet transfer, the observed cross section varies linearly with respect to the spectral overlap between the donor emission and the acceptor absorption; (iii) the reason that the quenching constants (or cross sections) are always smaller than the energy transfer constants (or cross sections) is due to the fact that for the quenching the vibration of the acceptor hardly participates in accepting the electronic excitation and for the energy transfer only part of the excited electron energy of the donor is converted into the energy of nuclear motion; and (iv) the polar acceptor molecules are better quenchers than nonpolar acceptor molecules. PMID:16592281

  20. Plugging in or going wireless: strategies for interspecies electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena

    2014-01-01

    Interspecies exchange of electrons enables a diversity of microbial communities to gain energy from reactions that no one microbe can catalyze. The first recognized strategies for interspecies electron transfer were those that relied on chemical intermediates that are recycled through oxidized and reduced forms. Well-studied examples are interspecies H2 transfer and the cycling of sulfur intermediates in anaerobic photosynthetic communities. Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in which two species establish electrical contact is an alternative. Electrical contacts documented to date include electrically conductive pili, as well as conductive iron minerals and conductive carbon moieties such as activated carbon and biochar. Interspecies electron transfer is central to the functioning of methane-producing microbial communities. The importance of interspecies H2 transfer in many methanogenic communities is clear, but under some circumstances DIET predominates. It is expected that further mechanistic studies and broadening investigations to a wider range of environments will help elucidate the factors that favor specific forms of interspecies electron exchange under different environmental conditions. PMID:24904551

  1. Suicide Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, David H.

    1975-01-01

    Interviews with seven of ten known survivors of jumps from the Golden Gate and San Francisco-Oakland Bay bridges showed a unique association between the Golden Gate Bridge and suicide. The study went beyond exploring the nature of suicidal jumps and shed new light on the experience of nearly dying. All the survivors described this experience as tranquil and peaceful. None of them experienced life events or distant memories passing through their minds or before their eyes. However, all of them experienced transcendence and spiritual rebirth phenomena. Suggestions for preventing suicides from the Golden Gate Bridge are discussed, including the construction of a suicide barrier. PMID:1171558

  2. Optimization of Plasmon Decay Through Scattering and Hot Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeJarnette, Drew

    Light incident on metal nanoparticles induce localized surface oscillations of conductive electrons, called plasmons, which is a means to control and manipulate light. Excited plasmons decay as either thermal energy as absorbed phonons or electromagnetic energy as scattered photons. An additional decay pathway for plasmons can exist for gold nanoparticles situated on graphene. Excited plasmons can decay directly to the graphene as through hot electron transfer. This dissertation begins by computational analysis of plasmon resonance energy and bandwidth as a function of particle size, shape, and dielectric environment in addition to diffractive coupled in lattices creating a Fano resonance. With this knowledge, plasmon resonance was probed with incident electrons using electron energy loss spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope. Nanoparticles were fabricated using electron beam lithography on 50 nanometer thick silicon nitride with some particles fabricated with a graphene layer between the silicon nitride and metal structure. Plasmon resonance was compared between ellipses on and off graphene to characterize hot electron transfer as a means of plasmon decay. It was observed that the presence of graphene caused plasmon energy to decrease by as much as 9.8% and bandwidth to increase by 25%. Assuming the increased bandwidth was solely from electron transfer as an additional plasmon decay route, a 20% efficiency of plasmon decay to graphene was calculated for the particular ellipses analyzed.

  3. Photoinduced electron transfer processes in homogeneous and microheterogeneous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, D.G.

    1991-10-01

    The focus of the work described in this report is on single electron transfer reactions of excited states which culminate in the formation of stable or metastable even electron species. For the most part the studies have involved even electron organic substrates which are thus converted photochemically to odd electron species and then at some stage reconvert to even electron products. These reactions generally fall into two rather different categories. In one set of studies we have examined reactions in which the metastable reagents generated by single electron transfer quenching of an excited state undergo novel fragmentation reactions, chiefly involving C-C bond cleavage. These reactions often culminate in novel and potentially useful chemical reactions and frequently have the potential for leading to new chemical products otherwise unaffordable by conventional reaction paths. In a rather different investigation we have also studied reactions in which single electron transfer quenching of an excited state is followed by subsequent reactions which lead reversibly to metastable two electron products which, often stable in themselves, can nonetheless be reacted with each other or with other reagents to regenerate the starting materials with release of energy. 66 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Dynamics of photoinduced electron transfer from adsorbed molecules into solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, L.; Ernstorfer, R.; Willig, F.

    2007-08-01

    Ultrafast interfacial electron transfer from the donor orbital of organic chromophores into empty electronic acceptor states of a semiconductor and of a metal was investigated by two-photon photoemission spectroscopy (2PPE). Experimental tools and procedures have been developed for carrying out wet-chemistry preparation of the molecule/solid interface. The organic chromophore perylene was investigated with several different bridge/anchor groups on TiO2(110). One perylene compound was investigated for comparison on Ag(110). Angle and polarization dependent 2PPE measurements revealed the orientation of the perylene chromophore on the surface as controlled by the adsorption geometry of the respective anchor group on TiO2. UPS measurements gave the position of the HOMO level of the chromophore with respect to the Fermi level of the solid. The donor level of each molecule was found high enough to fulfill the “wide band limit” of heterogeneous electron transfer dynamics. Time constants for heterogeneous electron transfer were extracted from 2PPE transients. A difference by a factor of four was found, 13 fs against 47 fs, when a conjugated bond was exchanged for a saturated bond in the otherwise identical bridge group. The two different contributions to the 2PPE transients arising firstly from the excited state of the chromophore and secondly from the injected electrons were separated by measuring the latter contribution separately in the case of instantaneous interfacial electron transfer realized with catechol as adsorbate. The time scales measured for the electron transfer step and for the subsequent electron escape process from the surface into the bulk of TiO2 showed both good agreement with recent theoretical predictions of other groups for these systems.

  5. Nanoantioxidant-driven plasmon enhanced proton-coupled electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Blattmann, Christoph O.; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2015-12-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon-enhancement of PCET brings together the so far unrelated research domains of nanoplasmonics and electron/proton translocation with significant impact on applications based on interfacial electron/proton transfer.Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon

  6. Electron transfer dynamics: Zusman equation versus exact theory.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiang; Chen, Liping; Nan, Guangjun; Xu, Ruixue; Yan, YiJing

    2009-04-28

    The Zusman equation has been widely used to study the effect of solvent dynamics on electron transfer reactions. However, application of this equation is limited by the classical treatment of the nuclear degrees of freedom. In this paper, we revisit the Zusman equation in the framework of the exact hierarchical equations of motion formalism, and show that a high temperature approximation of the hierarchical theory is equivalent to the Zusman equation in describing electron transfer dynamics. Thus the exact hierarchical formalism naturally extends the Zusman equation to include quantum nuclear dynamics at low temperatures. This new finding has also inspired us to rescale the original hierarchical equations and incorporate a filtering algorithm to efficiently propagate the hierarchical equations. Numerical exact results are also presented for the electron transfer reaction dynamics and rate constant calculations. PMID:19405605

  7. Desert Survivors!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Jessica; Friedenstab, Steve

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a special third-grade classroom unit based on the reality show "Survivor." The goal of this engaging and interactive unit was to teach students about physical and behavioral adaptations that help animals survive in various desert biomes. The activity combines research, argument, and puppet play over one week of…

  8. Electron transfer statistics and thermal fluctuations in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Himangshu Prabal; Harbola, Upendra

    2015-02-01

    We derive analytical expressions for probability distribution function (PDF) for electron transport in a simple model of quantum junction in presence of thermal fluctuations. Our approach is based on the large deviation theory combined with the generating function method. For large number of electrons transferred, the PDF is found to decay exponentially in the tails with different rates due to applied bias. This asymmetry in the PDF is related to the fluctuation theorem. Statistics of fluctuations are analyzed in terms of the Fano factor. Thermal fluctuations play a quantitative role in determining the statistics of electron transfer; they tend to suppress the average current while enhancing the fluctuations in particle transfer. This gives rise to both bunching and antibunching phenomena as determined by the Fano factor. The thermal fluctuations and shot noise compete with each other and determine the net (effective) statistics of particle transfer. Exact analytical expression is obtained for delay time distribution. The optimal values of the delay time between successive electron transfers can be lowered below the corresponding shot noise values by tuning the thermal effects.

  9. Electron transfer statistics and thermal fluctuations in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Himangshu Prabal; Harbola, Upendra

    2015-02-28

    We derive analytical expressions for probability distribution function (PDF) for electron transport in a simple model of quantum junction in presence of thermal fluctuations. Our approach is based on the large deviation theory combined with the generating function method. For large number of electrons transferred, the PDF is found to decay exponentially in the tails with different rates due to applied bias. This asymmetry in the PDF is related to the fluctuation theorem. Statistics of fluctuations are analyzed in terms of the Fano factor. Thermal fluctuations play a quantitative role in determining the statistics of electron transfer; they tend to suppress the average current while enhancing the fluctuations in particle transfer. This gives rise to both bunching and antibunching phenomena as determined by the Fano factor. The thermal fluctuations and shot noise compete with each other and determine the net (effective) statistics of particle transfer. Exact analytical expression is obtained for delay time distribution. The optimal values of the delay time between successive electron transfers can be lowered below the corresponding shot noise values by tuning the thermal effects. PMID:25725711

  10. Electron transfer statistics and thermal fluctuations in molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Himangshu Prabal; Harbola, Upendra

    2015-02-28

    We derive analytical expressions for probability distribution function (PDF) for electron transport in a simple model of quantum junction in presence of thermal fluctuations. Our approach is based on the large deviation theory combined with the generating function method. For large number of electrons transferred, the PDF is found to decay exponentially in the tails with different rates due to applied bias. This asymmetry in the PDF is related to the fluctuation theorem. Statistics of fluctuations are analyzed in terms of the Fano factor. Thermal fluctuations play a quantitative role in determining the statistics of electron transfer; they tend to suppress the average current while enhancing the fluctuations in particle transfer. This gives rise to both bunching and antibunching phenomena as determined by the Fano factor. The thermal fluctuations and shot noise compete with each other and determine the net (effective) statistics of particle transfer. Exact analytical expression is obtained for delay time distribution. The optimal values of the delay time between successive electron transfers can be lowered below the corresponding shot noise values by tuning the thermal effects.

  11. Proton-coupled electron transfer with photoexcited metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Oliver S

    2013-07-16

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays a crucial role in many enzymatic reactions and is relevant for a variety of processes including water oxidation, nitrogen fixation, and carbon dioxide reduction. Much of the research on PCET has focused on transfers between molecules in their electronic ground states, but increasingly researchers are investigating PCET between photoexcited reactants. This Account describes recent studies of excited-state PCET with d(6) metal complexes emphasizing work performed in my laboratory. Upon photoexcitation, some complexes release an electron and a proton to benzoquinone reaction partners. Others act as combined electron-proton acceptors in the presence of phenols. As a result, we can investigate photoinduced PCET involving electron and proton transfer in a given direction, a process that resembles hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT). In other studies, the photoexcited metal complexes merely serve as electron donors or electron acceptors because the proton donating and accepting sites are located on other parts of the molecular PCET ensemble. We and others have used this multisite design to explore so-called bidirectional PCET which occurs in many enzymes. A central question in all of these studies is whether concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) can compete kinetically with sequential electron and proton transfer steps. Short laser pulses can trigger excited-state PCET, making it possible to investigate rapid reactions. Luminescence spectroscopy is a convenient tool for monitoring PCET, but unambiguous identification of reaction products can require a combination of luminescence spectroscopy and transient absorption spectroscopy. Nevertheless, in some cases, distinguishing between PCET photoproducts and reaction products formed by simple photoinduced electron transfer (ET) (reactions that don't include proton transfer) is tricky. Some of the studies presented here deal directly with this important problem. In one case study we

  12. Investigation of transferred-electron oscillations in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suntornwipat, N.; Majdi, S.; Gabrysch, M.; Isberg, J.

    2016-05-01

    The recent discovery of Negative Differential Mobility (NDM) in intrinsic single-crystalline diamond enables the development of devices for high frequency applications. The Transferred-Electron Oscillator (TEO) is one example of such devices that uses the benefit of NDM to generate continuous oscillations. This paper presents theoretical investigations of a diamond TEO in the temperature range of 110 to 140 K where NDM has been observed. Our simulations map out the parameter space in which transferred-electron oscillations are expected to occur for a specific device geometry. The results are promising and indicate that it is possible to fabricate diamond based TEO devices.

  13. Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry of Hemoglobin on Clinical Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho Graça, Didia; Lescuyer, Pierre; Clerici, Lorella; Tsybin, Yury O.; Hartmer, Ralf; Meyer, Markus; Samii, Kaveh; Hochstrasser, Denis F.; Scherl, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    A mass spectrometry-based assay combining the specificity of selected reaction monitoring and the protein ion activation capabilities of electron transfer dissociation was developed and employed for the rapid identification of hemoglobin variants from whole blood without previous proteolytic cleavage. The analysis was performed in a robust ion trap mass spectrometer operating at nominal mass accuracy and resolution. Subtle differences in globin sequences, resulting with mass shifts of about one Da, can be unambiguously identified. These results suggest that mass spectrometry analysis of entire proteins using electron transfer dissociation can be employed on clinical samples in a workflow compatible with diagnostic applications.

  14. Numerical simulation of transient moisture transfer into an electronic enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasirabadi, P. Shojaee; Jabbari, M.; Hattel, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Electronic systems are sometimes exposed to harsh environmental conditions of temperature and humidity. Moisture transfer into electronic enclosures and condensation can cause several problems such as corrosion and alteration in thermal stresses. It is therefore essential to study the local climate inside the enclosures to be able to protect the electronic systems. In this work, moisture transfer into a typical electronic enclosure is numerically studied using CFD. In order to reduce the CPU-time and make a way for subsequent factorial design analysis, a simplifying modification is applied in which the real 3D geometry is approximated by a 2D axial symmetry one. The results for 2D and 3D models were compared in order to calibrate the 2D representation. Furthermore, simulation results were compared with experimental data and good agreement was found.

  15. Electron-Wavepacket Reaction Dynamics in Proton Transfer of Formamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Kengo; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2009-10-01

    We apply the semiclassical Ehrenfest theory, which provides electron wavepacket dynamics coupled to nuclear motion, to a study of water-assisted proton relay in formamide compared with a forced proton transfer in gas phase, both of which are associated with the tautomerization. We start with the enol (imidic acid) form HO-CH═NH and track its proton transfer process to the keto (amide) form O═CH-NH2. Identifying the fact that this is indeed a "proton transfer process" rather than hydrogen-atom migration in terms of radical character on the proton, we show a collective quantum flux of electrons, which flows backward against the proton motion. This backward flux compensates the electrons tightly covering the proton, as represented in the Mulliken charge. The enol form formamide is one of the simplest species in the group O═CR1-NHR2, which is a unit of polypeptide. In the gas phase, the nitrogen atom may have a pyramidal structure as in the ammonium molecule; therefore, the C-N bond may allow low barrier rotation along it. This rotation is strongly prohibited by the formation of the double bond C═N induced by the proton transfer. Not only the dynamical process of proton transfer itself but also the electronic structures left behind are greatly affected by the presence of water molecule(s) and polar solvents. In discussing the relative stability of the formamide after the proton transfer, the following resonance structures are frequently mentioned, O--CH═N+H2 ↔ O═CH-NH2. Here we address the dynamical manifestation of the resonance structures in terms of our dynamical electron theory.

  16. Electron transfer at semiconducting metal dichalcogenide/liquid electrolyte interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.N.

    1992-01-01

    Charge transfer at semiconductor/electrolyte interfaces is the critical process in photoelectrochemical systems. Many aspects of the theory for these interfaces have yet to be experimentally verified. There are few reliable measurements of the fundamental electron transfer rate at nonilluminated semiconductors. This situation stems from experimental limitations imposed by most semiconductor electrode surfaces. Layered metal dichalcogenide semiconductors have excellent properties as semiconductor electrodes, but edge sites and crystal defects must be masked so only the defect-free basal plane of the two-dimensional material is exposed to solution. Conventional epoxy encapsulation of the crystal epoxy can introduce deleterious effects. A minielectrochemical cell was developed to perform experiments in a single drop of electrolyte held against the working electrode. The electrochemical behavior and operational considerations of the cell for aqueous and nonaqueous systems were investigated. Spatially-resolved electrochemistry was demonstrated for n-WSe[sub 2] and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. The minicell was used to investigate electron transfer at nonilluminated n-WSe[sub 2]/dimethylferrocene[sup +/0] interfaces. This semiconductor is resistant to corrosion and has stable interfacial energetics. Interfaces with excellent diode behavior could be obtained by probing different regions of the surface. Electron transfer at these high quality surfaces was studied over an extensive solution concentration range. The rate of electron transfer was independent of solution acceptor concentration from 5 [mu]M to 0.25 M. The electron transfer data can be explained by assuming a surface-state mediate mechanism. A second metal dichalcogenide, n-SnS[sub 2], was investigated to compare the behavior of this wide band gap material to the narrow band gap n-WSe[sub 2]. The n-SnS[sub 2] electrodes displayed undesirable electrochemical effects in several solvent systems.

  17. Cycloreversion of β-lactams via photoinduced electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ruiz, Raúl; Sáez, Jose A; Jiménez, M Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A

    2014-11-14

    The radical anions of β-lactams, photogenerated in the presence of DABCO as an electron donor, undergo cycloreversion via N-C4 bond cleavage, back electron transfer and final C2-C3 bond cleavage, leading to olefins. The involved intermediates are 1,4-radical anions and 1,4-biradicals. The experimental observations are consistent with the results of DFT calculations. PMID:25223340

  18. Fluctuations in Biological and Bioinspired Electron-Transfer Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Skourtis, Spiros S.; Waldeck, David H.; Beratan, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Central to theories of electron transfer (ET) is the idea that nuclear motion generates a transition state that enables electron flow to proceed, but nuclear motion also induces fluctuations in the donor-acceptor (DA) electronic coupling that is the rate-limiting parameter for nonadiabatic ET. The interplay between the DA energy gap and DA coupling fluctuations is particularly noteworthy in biological ET, where flexible protein and mobile water bridges take center stage. Here, we discuss the critical timescales at play for ET reactions in fluctuating media, highlighting issues of the Condon approximation, average medium versus fluctuation-controlled electron tunneling, gated and solvent relaxation controlled electron transfer, and the influence of inelastic tunneling on electronic coupling pathway interferences. Taken together, one may use this framework to establish principles to describe how macromolecular structure and structural fluctuations influence ET reactions. This framework deepens our understanding of ET chemistry in fluctuating media. Moreover, it provides a unifying perspective for biophysical charge-transfer processes and helps to frame new questions associated with energy harvesting and transduction in fluctuating media. PMID:20192814

  19. Theory of ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer: Contributions of direct charge transfer excitations to the absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luxia; Willig, Frank; May, Volkhard

    2007-04-01

    Absorption spectra related to heterogeneous electron transfer are analyzed with the focus on direct charge transfer transition from the surface attached molecule into the semiconductor band states. The computations are based on a model of reduced dimensionality with a single intramolecular vibrational coordinate but a complete account for the continuum of conduction band states. The applicability of this model to perylene on TiO2 has been demonstrated in a series of earlier papers. Here, based on a time-dependent formulation, the absorbance is calculated with the inclusion of charge transfer excitations. A broad parameter set inspired by the perylene TiO2 systems is considered. In particular, the description generalizes the Fano effect to heterogeneous electron transfer reactions. Preliminary simulations of measured spectra are presented for perylene-catechol attached to TiO2.

  20. Tryptophan-to-heme electron transfer in ferrous myoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Monni, Roberto; Al Haddad, André; van Mourik, Frank; Auböck, Gerald; Chergui, Majed

    2015-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that in ferric myoglobins (Mb) the fluorescence quenching of the photoexcited tryptophan 14 (*Trp14) residue is in part due to an electron transfer to the heme porphyrin (porph), turning it to the ferrous state. However, the invariance of *Trp decay times in ferric and ferrous Mbs raises the question as to whether electron transfer may also be operative in the latter. Using UV pump/visible probe transient absorption, we show that this is indeed the case for deoxy-Mb. We observe that the reduction generates (with a yield of about 30%) a low-valence Fe–porphyrin π [FeII(porph●−)] -anion radical, which we observe for the first time to our knowledge under physiological conditions. We suggest that the pathway for the electron transfer proceeds via the leucine 69 (Leu69) and valine 68 (Val68) residues. The results on ferric Mbs and the present ones highlight the generality of Trp–porphyrin electron transfer in heme proteins. PMID:25902517

  1. 77 FR 40459 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E); Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ..., the Bureau published the Final Rule (77 FR 6194), which implements the Electronic Fund Transfer Act... changes made to Sec. 1005.3(a) in the interim final rule published on December 27, 2011 (76 FR 81020). The... on December 27, 2011 (76 FR 81020) for which the Bureau found good cause to conclude that...

  2. 75 FR 52485 - Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... 23, 2010 (75 FR 51707), contain errors that may prove to be misleading and are in need of... notice of public hearing (REG-153340-09), which was the subject of FR Doc. 2010-20737, is corrected as... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1, 31, 40, and 301 RIN 1545-BJ13 Electronic Funds Transfer...

  3. 76 FR 708 - Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-06

    ... regulations (TD 9507) that were published in the Federal Register on Tuesday, December 7, 2010 (75 FR 75897... Accordingly, the final and temporary regulations (TD 9507), that are the subject of FR Doc. 2010-30526, are... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1, 31, 40, and 301 RIN 1545-BJ13 Electronic Funds Transfer...

  4. Ultrafast electron transfer via a bridge-extended donor orbital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernstorfer, R.; Gundlach, L.; Felber, S.; Storck, W.; Eichberger, R.; Zimmermann, C.; Willig, F.

    Electron transfer from the excited aromatic donor perylene to TiO2 occurred with 10 fs time constant via the conjugated -CH=CH- bridge unit compared to 57 fs in the presence of the saturated -CH2-CH2- bridge unit.

  5. HCFA proposal takes zip out of EFTs (electronic fund transfers).

    PubMed

    Gardner, E

    1991-09-01

    HCFA recently proposed reimbursing providers through electronic fund transfer, a low-cost, fast, efficient means of deposit and payment now commonplace throughout the country. EFTs promise hospitals benefits such as clerical savings through computerization, but regulations proposed by HCFA would inhibit the increased efficiency and cash flow such transactions also can offer. PMID:10112504

  6. Photoinduced electron transfer in binary blends of conjugated polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Jenekhe, A.A.; Paor, L.R. de; Chen, X.L.; Tarkka, R.M.

    1996-10-01

    The authors report observations concerning the intermolecular photoinduced electron transfer through blends of n-type/p-type {pi}-conjugated organic polymers. The results of transient absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence quenching analysis, and delocalized radical ion pair generation studies imply that these materials are supramolecular materials.

  7. 31 CFR 208.3 - Payment by electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment by electronic funds transfer. 208.3 Section 208.3 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE MANAGEMENT OF FEDERAL...

  8. 75 FR 51707 - Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...This document contains proposed regulations relating to Federal tax deposits (FTDs) by Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT). The proposed regulations affect all taxpayers that currently use FTD coupons. In response to the decision of the Financial Management Service to discontinue the system that processes FTD coupons, the proposed regulations provide rules under which depositors must use EFT for......

  9. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2015-12-01

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule's permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory.

  10. CORRELATING ELECTRONIC AND VIBRATIONAL MOTIONS IN CHARGE TRANSFER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Munira

    2014-06-27

    The goal of this research program was to measure coupled electronic and nuclear motions during photoinduced charge transfer processes in transition metal complexes by developing and using novel femtosecond spectroscopies. The scientific highlights and the resulting scientific publications from the DOE supported work are outlined in the technical report.

  11. 76 FR 81019 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... this rule. See 76 FR 43569 (July 21, 2011). \\4\\ Public Law 111-203, section 1002(14) (defining... response to a notice published at 76 FR 75825 (Dec. 5, 2011) concerning its efforts to identify priorities... that provide electronic fund transfer services jointly may contract among themselves to comply with...

  12. Nanoantioxidant-driven plasmon enhanced proton-coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Georgios A; Blattmann, Christoph O; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2016-01-14

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol(-1) and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon-enhancement of PCET brings together the so far unrelated research domains of nanoplasmonics and electron/proton translocation with significant impact on applications based on interfacial electron/proton transfer. PMID:26505730

  13. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2015-12-14

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule’s permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory.

  14. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Tianquan

    2014-04-22

    The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticle/liquid interface. This knowledge is essential to many semiconductor nanoparticle based devices, including photocatalytic waste degradation and dye sensitized solar cells.

  15. A unified diabatic description for electron transfer reactions, isomerization reactions, proton transfer reactions, and aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-10-14

    While diabatic approaches are ubiquitous for the understanding of electron-transfer reactions and have been mooted as being of general relevance, alternate applications have not been able to unify the same wide range of observed spectroscopic and kinetic properties. The cause of this is identified as the fundamentally different orbital configurations involved: charge-transfer phenomena involve typically either 1 or 3 electrons in two orbitals whereas most reactions are typically closed shell. As a result, two vibrationally coupled electronic states depict charge-transfer scenarios whereas three coupled states arise for closed-shell reactions of non-degenerate molecules and seven states for the reactions implicated in the aromaticity of benzene. Previous diabatic treatments of closed-shell processes have considered only two arbitrarily chosen states as being critical, mapping these states to those for electron transfer. We show that such effective two-state diabatic models are feasible but involve renormalized electronic coupling and vibrational coupling parameters, with this renormalization being property dependent. With this caveat, diabatic models are shown to provide excellent descriptions of the spectroscopy and kinetics of the ammonia inversion reaction, proton transfer in N2H7(+), and aromaticity in benzene. This allows for the development of a single simple theory that can semi-quantitatively describe all of these chemical phenomena, as well as of course electron-transfer reactions. It forms a basis for understanding many technologically relevant aspects of chemical reactions, condensed-matter physics, chemical quantum entanglement, nanotechnology, and natural or artificial solar energy capture and conversion. PMID:26193994

  16. Polarization transfer of bremsstrahlung arising from spin-polarized electrons.

    PubMed

    Märtin, R; Weber, G; Barday, R; Fritzsche, Y; Spillmann, U; Chen, W; DuBois, R D; Enders, J; Hegewald, M; Hess, S; Surzhykov, A; Thorn, D B; Trotsenko, S; Wagner, M; Winters, D F A; Yerokhin, V A; Stöhlker, Th

    2012-06-29

    We report on a study of the polarization transfer between transversely polarized incident electrons and the emitted x rays for electron-atom bremsstrahlung. By means of Compton polarimetry we performed for the first time an energy-differential measurement of the complete properties of bremsstrahlung emission related to linear polarization, i.e., the degree of linear polarization as well as the orientation of the polarization axis. For the high-energy end of the bremsstrahlung continuum the experimental results for both observables show a high sensitivity on the initial electron spin polarization and prove that the polarization orientation is virtually independent of the photon energy. PMID:23004992

  17. Protein dynamics modulated electron transfer kinetics in early stage photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Prasanta; Dua, Arti

    2013-01-01

    A recent experiment has probed the electron transfer kinetics in the early stage of photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides for the reaction center of wild type and different mutants [Science 316, 747 (2007)]. By monitoring the changes in the transient absorption of the donor-acceptor pair at 280 and 930 nm, both of which show non-exponential temporal decay, the experiment has provided a strong evidence that the initial electron transfer kinetics is modulated by the dynamics of protein backbone. In this work, we present a model where the electron transfer kinetics of the donor-acceptor pair is described along the reaction coordinate associated with the distance fluctuations in a protein backbone. The stochastic evolution of the reaction coordinate is described in terms of a non-Markovian generalized Langevin equation with a memory kernel and Gaussian colored noise, both of which are completely described in terms of the microscopics of the protein normal modes. This model provides excellent fits to the transient absorption signals at 280 and 930 nm associated with protein distance fluctuations and protein dynamics modulated electron transfer reaction, respectively. In contrast to previous models, the present work explains the microscopic origins of the non-exponential decay of the transient absorption curve at 280 nm in terms of multiple time scales of relaxation of the protein normal modes. Dynamic disorder in the reaction pathway due to protein conformational fluctuations which occur on time scales slower than or comparable to the electron transfer kinetics explains the microscopic origin of the non-exponential nature of the transient absorption decay at 930 nm. The theoretical estimates for the relative driving force for five different mutants are in close agreement with the experimental estimates obtained using electrochemical measurements.

  18. Protein dynamics modulated electron transfer kinetics in early stage photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Prasanta; Dua, Arti

    2013-01-28

    A recent experiment has probed the electron transfer kinetics in the early stage of photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides for the reaction center of wild type and different mutants [Science 316, 747 (2007)]. By monitoring the changes in the transient absorption of the donor-acceptor pair at 280 and 930 nm, both of which show non-exponential temporal decay, the experiment has provided a strong evidence that the initial electron transfer kinetics is modulated by the dynamics of protein backbone. In this work, we present a model where the electron transfer kinetics of the donor-acceptor pair is described along the reaction coordinate associated with the distance fluctuations in a protein backbone. The stochastic evolution of the reaction coordinate is described in terms of a non-Markovian generalized Langevin equation with a memory kernel and Gaussian colored noise, both of which are completely described in terms of the microscopics of the protein normal modes. This model provides excellent fits to the transient absorption signals at 280 and 930 nm associated with protein distance fluctuations and protein dynamics modulated electron transfer reaction, respectively. In contrast to previous models, the present work explains the microscopic origins of the non-exponential decay of the transient absorption curve at 280 nm in terms of multiple time scales of relaxation of the protein normal modes. Dynamic disorder in the reaction pathway due to protein conformational fluctuations which occur on time scales slower than or comparable to the electron transfer kinetics explains the microscopic origin of the non-exponential nature of the transient absorption decay at 930 nm. The theoretical estimates for the relative driving force for five different mutants are in close agreement with the experimental estimates obtained using electrochemical measurements. PMID:23387626

  19. 76 FR 35219 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Payment by Electronic Fund Transfer

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... contract by electronic fund transfer (EFT). The information necessary to make the EFT transaction is... Regulation; Information Collection; Payment by Electronic Fund Transfer AGENCY: Department of Defense (DOD... extension of a previously approved information collection requirement concerning payment by electronic...

  20. Transfer Printed Crystalline Nanomembrane for Versatile Electronic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung-Hun

    Flexible electronics have traditionally been addressed low-frequency applications, since the materials for the traditional flexible electronics, such as polymer and non-crystalline inorganic semiconductors, have poor electronic properties. Fast flexible electronics that operate at radio frequencies (RF), particularly at microwave frequencies, could lead to a number of novel RF applications where rigid chip-based solid-state electronics cannot easily fulfill. Single-crystal semiconductor nanomembranes (NM) that can be released from a number of wafer sources are mechanically very flexible yet exhibit outstanding electronic properties that are equivalent to their bulky counterparts. These thin flexible single-crystal materials can furthermore be placed, via transfer printing techniques, to nearly any substrate, including flexible polymers, thus creating the opportunity to realize RF flexible electronics. In this thesis, various RF transistors made of semiconductor NMs on plastic substrates will be discussed. In addition, as a photonic application, the demonstration of large-area Si NM surface normal ultra-compact photonic crystal reflectors fabricated using the laser interference lithography technique (LIL) will be discussed. Particularly, the mechanism of LIL and NM transfer without using an adhesive layer will be introduced and their optical performance will be addressed. Lastly, the realization of selective substitutional boron doping, using heavily doped Si NM as a doping source, will be discussed. A detailed mechanism using computational modeling and experimental analyses will be provided. The fabrication of high voltage diamond p-i diodes and their performance will be discussed.

  1. Syntrophic growth via quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jessica A.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which microbial species exchange electrons are of interest because interspecies electron transfer can expand the metabolic capabilities of microbial communities. Previous studies with the humic substance analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) suggested that quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer (QUIET) is feasible, but it was not determined if sufficient energy is available from QUIET to support the growth of both species. Furthermore, there have been no previous studies on the mechanisms for the oxidation of anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AHQDS). A co-culture of Geobacter metallireducens and G. sulfurreducens metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate much faster in the presence of AQDS, and there was an increase in cell protein. G. sulfurreducens was more abundant, consistent with G. sulfurreducens obtaining electrons from acetate that G. metallireducens produced from ethanol, as well as from AHQDS. Co-cultures initiated with a citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens that was unable to use acetate as an electron donor also metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate and cell growth, but acetate accumulated over time. G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens were equally abundant in these co-cultures reflecting the inability of the citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens to metabolize acetate. Evaluation of the mechanisms by which G. sulfurreducens accepts electrons from AHQDS demonstrated that a strain deficient in outer-surface c-type cytochromes that are required for AQDS reduction was as effective at QUIET as the wild-type strain. Deletion of additional genes previously implicated in extracellular electron transfer also had no impact on QUIET. These results demonstrate that QUIET can yield sufficient energy to support the growth of both syntrophic partners, but that the mechanisms by which electrons are derived from extracellular hydroquinones require further investigation. PMID

  2. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multi-chromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-14

    This research project involves the design, synthesis and study of the molecules which mimic many of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. Specifically, the molecules are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic multistep electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited singlet state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they model carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  3. Theoretical studies of electron transfer and optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesner, R. A.

    Progress was made in three areas. First, we have made major strides in developing our PSGVB electronic structure code including high level electron correlation methods needed to treat complex structures like semiconductor clusters. Secondly, we have developed a one-electron pseudopotential model for semiconductor clusters which reproduces the experimental bandgap as a function of cluster size without adjustable parameters. We are currently using the model to calculate absorption spectra as opposed to just the bandgap via a dispersed polaron formalism. Finally, we have developed two novel quantum dynamical methods, one involving surface hopping and the second utilizing Redfield theory. These methods will be applied to calculation of the relaxation of an excited electron in a semiconductor cluster and also to electron transfer through DNA.

  4. Asymmetric electron transfer in cyanobacterial Photosystem I: charge separation and secondary electron transfer dynamics of mutations near the primary electron acceptor A0.

    PubMed

    Dashdorj, Naranbaatar; Xu, Wu; Cohen, Rachel O; Golbeck, John H; Savikhin, Sergei

    2005-02-01

    Point mutations were introduced near the primary electron acceptor sites assigned to A0 in both the PsaA and PsaB branches of Photosystem I in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The residues Met688PsaA and Met668PsaB, which provide the axial ligands to the Mg2+ of the eC-A3 and eC-B3 chlorophylls, were changed to leucine and asparagine (chlorophyll notation follows Jordan et al., 2001). The removal of the ligand is expected to alter the midpoint potential of the A0/A0- redox pair and result in a change in the intrinsic charge separation rate and secondary electron transfer kinetics from A0- to A1. The dynamics of primary charge separation and secondary electron transfer were studied at 690 nm and 390 nm in these mutants by ultrafast optical pump-probe spectroscopy. The data reveal that mutations in the PsaB branch do not alter electron transfer dynamics, whereas mutations in the PsaA branch have a distinct effect on electron transfer, slowing down both the primary charge separation and the secondary electron transfer step (the latter by a factor of 3-10). These results suggest that electron transfer in cyanobacterial Photosystem I is asymmetric and occurs primarily along the PsaA branch of cofactors. PMID:15542554

  5. Rotational And Rovibrational Energy Transfer In Electron Collisions With Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuemmel, Helmar T.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Air flows around a hypervelocity reentry vehicle undergo dissociation, rovibrational excitation and ionization. More specifically the air, initially 80% N2 and 20% O2, in the shock layer consists of species such as N, O, N2, O2, NO, N+, O+, N+, O+, NO+ and 2 free electrons. It was pointed out in multi temperature models'' that the temperature of the rotational energy modes and the gas-kinetic translational temperature are quickly equilibrated by a few collisions and rise rapidly to high temperatures as 50000K before falling off to equilibrium value of 10000K. Contrary, the electronic and vibrational temperatures state energy distributions remain low (less than 15000K) because of the slow equilibration. Electron vibrational energy transfer is thought to play a crucial role in such a ionizing flow regime since chemical reaction rates and dissociation depend strongly on the vibrational temperatures. Modeling of these flowfields in principle require the rovibrational excitation and de-excitation cross section data for average electron energies from threshold up to several eV (leV=11605.4 K). In this lecture we focus on theoretical description of rotational effects i.e. energy transfer of electrons to molecules such that the molecular rotational (vojo goes to voj) or vibrational and rotational (v(sub 0)j(sub 0) goes to vj) states are changed. Excitation and de-excitation of electronic states was discussed in a previous talk at this conference.

  6. Hardwiring microbes via direct interspecies electron transfer: mechanisms and applications.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qiwen; Call, Douglas F

    2016-08-10

    Multicellular microbial communities are important catalysts in engineered systems designed to treat wastewater, remediate contaminated sediments, and produce energy from biomass. Understanding the interspecies interactions within them is therefore essential to design effective processes. The flow of electrons within these communities is especially important in the determination of reaction possibilities (thermodynamics) and rates (kinetics). Conventional models of electron transfer incorporate the diffusion of metabolites generated by one organism and consumed by a second, frequently referred to as mediated interspecies electron transfer (MIET). Evidence has emerged in the last decade that another method, called direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET), may occur between organisms or in conjunction with electrically conductive materials. Recent research has suggested that DIET can be stimulated in engineered systems to improve desired treatment goals and energy recovery in systems such as anaerobic digesters and microbial electrochemical technologies. In this review, we summarize the latest understanding of DIET mechanisms, the associated microorganisms, and the underlying thermodynamics. We also critically examine approaches to stimulate DIET in engineered systems and assess their effectiveness. We find that in most cases attempts to promote DIET in mixed culture systems do not yield the improvements expected based on defined culture studies. Uncertainties of other processes that may be co-occurring in real systems, such as contaminant sorption and biofilm promotion, need to be further investigated. We conclude by identifying areas of future research related to DIET and its application in biological treatment processes. PMID:27349520

  7. Electron Transfer Mechanisms of DNA Repair by Photolyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Dongping

    2015-04-01

    Photolyase is a flavin photoenzyme that repairs two DNA base damage products induced by ultraviolet (UV) light: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts. With femtosecond spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis, investigators have recently made significant advances in our understanding of UV-damaged DNA repair, and the entire enzymatic dynamics can now be mapped out in real time. For dimer repair, six elementary steps have been characterized, including three electron transfer reactions and two bond-breaking processes, and their reaction times have been determined. A unique electron-tunneling pathway was identified, and the critical residues in modulating the repair function at the active site were determined. The dynamic synergy between the elementary reactions for maintaining high repair efficiency was elucidated, and the biological nature of the flavin active state was uncovered. For 6-4 photoproduct repair, a proton-coupled electron transfer repair mechanism has been revealed. The elucidation of electron transfer mechanisms and two repair photocycles is significant and provides a molecular basis for future practical applications, such as in rational drug design for curing skin cancer.

  8. Vibrationally Assisted Electron Transfer Mechanism of Olfaction: Myth or Reality?

    PubMed Central

    Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Chang, Po-Yao; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Smell is a vital sense for animals. The mainstream explanation of smell is based on recognition of the odorant molecules through characteristics of their surface, e.g., shape, but certain experiments suggest that such recognition is complemented by recognition of vibrational modes. According to this suggestion an olfactory receptor is activated by electron transfer assisted through odorant vibrational excitation. The hundreds to thousands of different olfactory receptors in an animal recognize odorants over a discriminant landscape with surface properties and vibrational frequencies as the two major dimensions. In the present paper we introduce the vibrationally assisted mechanism of olfaction and demonstrate for several odorants that, indeed, a strong enhancement of an electron tunneling rate due to odorant vibrations can arise. We discuss in this regard the influence of odorant deuteration and explain, thereby, recent experiments performed on Drosophila melanogaster. Our demonstration is based on known physical properties of biological electron transfer and on ab initio calculations on odorants carried out for the purpose of the present study. We identify a range of physical characteristics which olfactory receptors and odorants must obey for the vibrationally assisted electron transfer mechanism to function. We argue that the stated characteristics are feasible for realistic olfactory receptors, noting, though, that the receptor structure presently is still unknown, but can be studied through homology modeling. PMID:22899100

  9. Electron transfer, decoherence, and protein dynamics: insights from atomistic simulations.

    PubMed

    Narth, Christophe; Gillet, Natacha; Cailliez, Fabien; Lévy, Bernard; de la Lande, Aurélien

    2015-04-21

    Electron transfer in biological systems drives the processes of life. From cellular respiration to photosynthesis and enzymatic catalysis, electron transfers (ET) are chemical processes on which essential biological functions rely. Over the last 40 years, scientists have sought understanding of how these essential processes function in biology. One important breakthrough was the discovery that Marcus theory (MT) of electron transfer is applicable to biological systems. Chemists have experimentally collected both the reorganization energies (λ) and the driving forces (ΔG°), two parameters of Marcus theory, for a large variety of ET processes in proteins. At the same time, theoretical chemists have developed computational approaches that rely on molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry calculations to access numerical estimates of λ and ΔG°. Yet another crucial piece in determining the rate of an electron transfer is the electronic coupling between the initial and final electronic wave functions. This is an important prefactor in the nonadiabatic rate expression, since it reflects the probability that an electron tunnels from the electron donor to the acceptor through the intervening medium. The fact that a protein matrix supports electron tunneling much more efficiently than vacuum is now well documented, both experimentally and theoretically. Meanwhile, many chemists have provided examples of the rich physical chemistry that can be induced by protein dynamics. This Account describes our studies of the dynamical effects on electron tunneling. We present our analysis of two examples of natural biological systems through MD simulations and tunneling pathway analyses. Through these examples, we show that protein dynamics sustain efficient tunneling. Second, we introduce two time scales: τcoh and τFC. The former characterizes how fast the electronic coupling varies with nuclear vibrations (which cause dephasing). The latter reflects the time taken by the system

  10. Neutral histidine and photoinduced electron transfer in DNA photolyases.

    PubMed

    Domratcheva, Tatiana

    2011-11-16

    The two major UV-induced DNA lesions, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and (6-4) pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoproducts, can be repaired by the light-activated enzymes CPD and (6-4) photolyases, respectively. It is a long-standing question how the two classes of photolyases with alike molecular structure are capable of reversing the two chemically different DNA photoproducts. In both photolyases the repair reaction is initiated by photoinduced electron transfer from the hydroquinone-anion part of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH(-)) cofactor to the photoproduct. Here, the state-of-the-art XMCQDPT2-CASSCF approach was employed to compute the excitation spectra of the respective active site models. It is found that protonation of His365 in the presence of the hydroquinone-anion electron donor causes spontaneous, as opposed to photoinduced, coupled proton and electron transfer to the (6-4) photoproduct. The resulting neutralized biradical, containing the neutral semiquinone and the N3'-protonated (6-4) photoproduct neutral radical, corresponds to the lowest energy electronic ground-state minimum. The high electron affinity of the N3'-protonated (6-4) photoproduct underlines this finding. Thus, it is anticipated that the (6-4) photoproduct repair is assisted by His365 in its neutral form, which is in contrast to the repair mechanisms proposed in the literature. The repair via hydroxyl group transfer assisted by neutral His365 is considered. The repair involves the 5'base radical anion of the (6-4) photoproduct which in terms of electronic structure is similar to the CPD radical anion. A unified model of the CPD and (6-4) photoproduct repair is proposed. PMID:21970417

  11. DNA Intercalated Psoralen Undergoes Efficient Photoinduced Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Fröbel, Sascha; Reiffers, Anna; Torres Ziegenbein, Christian; Gilch, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The interaction of psoralens with DNA has been used for therapeutic and research purposes for decades. Still the photoinduced behavior of psoralens in DNA has never been observed directly. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy is used here to gain direct insight into the photophysics of a DNA-intercalated psoralen (4'-aminomethyl-4,5',8-trimethyl-psoralen (AMT)). Intercalation reduces the excited singlet lifetime of AMT to 4 ps compared with 1400 ps for AMT in water. This singlet quenching prohibits the population of the triplet state that is accessed in free AMT. Instead, a DNA to AMT electron transfer takes place. The resulting radical pair decays primarily via charge recombination with a time constant of 30 ps. The efficient electron transfer observed here reveals a completely new aspect of the psoralen-DNA interaction. PMID:26262984

  12. Catalytic Olefin Hydroamidation Enabled by Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a ternary catalyst system for the intramolecular hydroamidation of unactivated olefins using simple N-aryl amide derivatives. Amide activation in these reactions occurs via concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mediated by an excited state iridium complex and weak phosphate base to furnish a reactive amidyl radical that readily adds to pendant alkenes. A series of H-atom, electron, and proton transfer events with a thiophenol cocatalyst furnish the product and regenerate the active forms of the photocatalyst and base. Mechanistic studies indicate that the amide substrate can be selectively homolyzed via PCET in the presence of the thiophenol, despite a large difference in bond dissociation free energies between these functional groups. PMID:26439818

  13. Solvent reorganizational red-edge effect in intramolecular electron transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Demchenko, A P; Sytnik, A I

    1991-01-01

    Polar solvents are characterized by statistical distributions of solute-solvent interaction energies that result in inhomogeneous broadening of the solute electronic spectra. This allows photoselection of the high interaction energy part of the distribution by excitation at the red (long-wavelength) edge of the absorption bands. We observe that intramolecular electron transfer in the bianthryl molecule from the locally excited (LE) to the charge-transfer (CT) state, which requires solvent relaxation and does not occur in vitrified polar solutions, is dramatically facilitated in low-temperature propylene glycol glass by the red-edge excitation. This allows one to obtain spectroscopically the pure CT form and observe its dependence upon the relaxational properties of the solvent. A qualitative potential model of this effect is presented. PMID:11607224

  14. Large scale oil lease automation and electronic custody transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C.R.; Elmer, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Typically, oil field production operations have only been automated at fields with long term production profiles and enhanced recovery. The automation generally consists of monitoring and control at the wellhead and centralized facilities. However, Union Pacific Resources Co. (UPRC) has successfully implemented a large scale automation program for rapid-decline primary recovery Austin Chalk wells where purchasers buy and transport oil from each individual wellsite. This project has resulted in two significant benefits. First, operators are using the system to re-engineer their work processes. Second, an inter-company team created a new electronic custody transfer method. This paper will describe: the progression of the company`s automation objectives in the area; the field operator`s interaction with the system, and the related benefits; the research and development of the new electronic custody transfer method.

  15. Insights into Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer from Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provorse, Makenzie R.

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is utilized throughout Nature to facilitate essential biological processes, such as photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and DNA replication and repair. The general approach to studying PCET processes is based on a two-dimensional More O'Ferrall-Jencks diagram in which electron transfer (ET) and proton transfer (PT) occur in a sequential or concerted fashion. Experimentally, it is difficult to discern the contributing factors of concerted PCET mechanisms. Several theoretical approaches have arisen to qualitatively and quantitatively investigate these reactions. Here, we present a multistate density functional theory (MSDFT) method to efficiently and accurately model PCET mechanisms. The MSDFT method is validated against experimental and computational data previously reported on an isoelectronic series of small molecule self-exchange hydrogen atom transfer reactions and a model complex specifically designed to study long-range ET through a hydrogen-bonded salt-bridge interface. Further application of this method to the hydrogen atom abstraction of ascorbate by a nitroxyl radical demonstrates the sensitivity of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties to solvent effects. In particular, the origin of the unusual kinetic isotope effect is investigated. Lastly, the MSDFT is employed in a combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach to explicitly model PCET in condensed phases.

  16. Intramolecular electronic energy transfer in bichromophoric molecular macrocyclic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speiser, Shammai

    1993-01-01

    The structures and spectral properties of several bichromophoric molecules, suitable for optical data processing, are presented. The bichromophoric molecules are composed of an aromatic ring connected by two methylene chains to an (alpha) -diketone moiety. Both the absorption and emission spectra of these compounds can be attributed to a superposition of the individual spectra of the separate chromophores. The critical transfer radia for electronic energy transfer from the aromatic (donor) chromophore to the (alpha) -diketone (acceptor) chromophore was calculated from the spectral overlap between the fluorescence spectrum of the aromatic ring with the absorption spectrum of the (alpha) -diketone chromophore. The results show that this series of molecules is well suited for a mechanistic study of short-range intramolecular electronic energy transfer (intra-EET). The temperature and the molecular structure dependence of the intra-EET efficiency in this series was measured and analyzed for both singlet-singlet and triplet-triplet routes. The results show that the transfer efficiency is strongly temperature and structure dependent, indicating that exchange interaction is responsible for intra-EET between close chromophores in a bichromophoric molecule. The relative contributions of interchromophoric distance and that of the relative orientation of the two chromophores to exchange interaction are discussed.

  17. Marcus wins nobel prize in chemistry for electron transfer theory

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the work of Rudolf Marcus of Caltech leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry [open quotes]for his contributions to the theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems.[close quotes] Applications of Marcus' theory include such diverse phenomena as photosynthesis, electrically conducting polymers, chemiluminescence, and corrosion. Historical aspects of his career are given. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  18. The electron transfer system of syntrophically grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.B.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.K.; Ringbauer, Jr., J.A.; He, Q.; Zhou, J.; Voordouw, G.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Hazen, T.C.; Stolyar, S.; Stahl, D.A.

    2009-05-01

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  19. The electron transfer system of synthrophically grown desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Christopher; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin Koo; Ringbauer, Joseph; HE, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David

    2009-01-01

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic coupling between hydrogen producers and consumers is a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent on growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation were upregulated in D. vulgaris compared with their expression in sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn), and the well-characterized high-molecular-weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and upregulated genes. Additionally, a predicted operon containing genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited upregulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd, and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little effect on growth via sulfate respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that to understand microbial processes that sustain nutrient cycling, lifestyles not captured in pure culture must be considered.

  20. Electron transfer reactions within zeolites: Radical cation from benzonorbornadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Pitchumani, K.; Ramamurthy, V.; Corbin, D.R.

    1996-08-28

    Zeolites are being used as solid acid catalysts in a number of commercial processes. Occasionally zeolites are also reported to perform as electron transfer agents. Recently, we observed that radical cations of certain olefins and thiophene oligomers can be generated spontaneously within ZSM-5 zeolites. We noticed that these radical cations generated from diphenyl polyenes and thiophene oligomers were remarkably stable (at room temperature) within ZSM-5 and can be characterized spectroscopically at leisure. We have initiated a program on electron transfer processes within large pore zeolites. The basis of this approach is that once a cation radical is generated within a large pore zeolite, it will have sufficient room to undergo a molecular transformation. Our aim is to identify a condition under which electron transfer can be routinely and reliably carried out within large pore zeolites such as faujasites. To our great surprise, when benzonorbornadiene A and a number of olefins were included in divalent cation exchanged faujasites. they were transformed into products very quickly (<15 min). This observation allowed us to explore the use of zeolites as oxidants. Results of our studies on benzonorbornadiene are presented in this communication. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  1. The Electron Transfer System of Syntrophically Grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    PBD; ENIGMA; GTL; VIMSS; Walker, Christopher B.; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin K.; Ringbauer Jr., Joseph A.; He, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D.; Arkin, Adam P.; Hazen, Terry C.; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David A.

    2009-06-22

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  2. Intercellular wiring enables electron transfer between methanotrophic archaea and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Gunter; Krukenberg, Viola; Riedel, Dietmar; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Boetius, Antje

    2015-10-22

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate controls the emission of the greenhouse gas methane from the ocean floor. In marine sediments, AOM is performed by dual-species consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) inhabiting the methane-sulfate transition zone. The biochemical pathways and biological adaptations enabling this globally relevant process are not fully understood. Here we study the syntrophic interaction in thermophilic AOM (TAOM) between ANME-1 archaea and their consortium partner SRB HotSeep-1 (ref. 6) at 60 °C to test the hypothesis of a direct interspecies exchange of electrons. The activity of TAOM consortia was compared to the first ANME-free culture of an AOM partner bacterium that grows using hydrogen as the sole electron donor. The thermophilic ANME-1 do not produce sufficient hydrogen to sustain the observed growth of the HotSeep-1 partner. Enhancing the growth of the HotSeep-1 partner by hydrogen addition represses methane oxidation and the metabolic activity of ANME-1. Further supporting the hypothesis of direct electron transfer between the partners, we observe that under TAOM conditions, both ANME and the HotSeep-1 bacteria overexpress genes for extracellular cytochrome production and form cell-to-cell connections that resemble the nanowire structures responsible for interspecies electron transfer between syntrophic consortia of Geobacter. HotSeep-1 highly expresses genes for pili production only during consortial growth using methane, and the nanowire-like structures are absent in HotSeep-1 cells isolated with hydrogen. These observations suggest that direct electron transfer is a principal mechanism in TAOM, which may also explain the enigmatic functioning and specificity of other methanotrophic ANME-SRB consortia. PMID:26490622

  3. Gaussian fluctuations and linear response in an electron transfer protein

    PubMed Central

    Simonson, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    In response to charge separation or transfer, polar liquids respond in a simple linear fashion. A similar linear response for proteins might be expected from the central limit theorem and is postulated in widely used theories of protein electrostatics, including the Marcus electron transfer theory and dielectric continuum theories. Although these theories are supported by a variety of experimental data, the exact validity of a linear protein dielectric response has been difficult to determine. Molecular dynamics simulations are presented that establish a linear dielectric response of both protein and surrounding solvent over the course of a biologically relevant electron transfer reaction: oxido-reduction of yeast cytochrome c in solution. Using an umbrella-sampling free energy approach with long simulations, an accurate treatment of long-range electrostatics and both classical and quantum models of the heme, good agreement is obtained with experiment for the redox potential relative to a heme–octapeptide complex. We obtain a reorganization free energy that is only half that for heme–octapeptide and is reproduced with a dielectric continuum model where the heme vicinity has a dielectric constant of only 1.1. This value implies that the contribution of protein reorganization to the electron transfer free energy barrier is reduced almost to the theoretical limit (a dielectric of one), and that the fluctuations of the electrostatic potential on the heme have a simple harmonic form, in accord with Marcus theory, even though the fluctuations of many individual protein groups (especially at the protein surface) are anharmonic. PMID:12011418

  4. Electron Transfer Reactions in Colloidal Quantum Dot-Ligand Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris-Cohen, Adam Joshua

    This thesis describes a quantitative analysis of the chemical composition of colloidal II-VI quantum dot (QD)-ligand complexes and transient absorption experiments analyzing the rates of electron transfer reactions in these complexes functionalized with redox active ligands. Chemical analysis reveals that phosphonate impurities in the surfactants used to synthesize CdSe QDs are the dominant ligands on the surface of the QDs, and these phosphonate impurities cause size-dependent Cd-enrichment of the QD surface. A study of the adsorption equilibrium of solution-phase CdS quantum dots and acid-derivatized viologen ligands (V2+) reveals that the structure of the surfaces of the QDs depends on the concentration of the QDs. A new model based on the Langmuir isotherm that treats both the number of adsorbed ligands per QD and the number of available binding sites per QD as binomially-distributed quantities is described. Transient absorption spectroscopy of solution-phase mixtures of colloidal CdS QDs and V2+ indicates electron transfer occurs from the conduction band of the QD to the LUMO of V2+. The rate constant for photoinduced electron transfer (PET) is independent of the number of methylene groups in the alkyl chain on the acid-derivatized viologen. The insensitivity of the electron transfer rate constant to the length of the functional groups on the viologen suggests a van der Waals (vdW) pathway for PET, where the electron bypasses the alkylcarboxylate and tunnels through the orbitals of the QD and of the bipyridinium core. The rate of PET from colloidal CdSe quantum dots (QDs) to oxo-centered triruthenium clusters (Ru 3O) depends on the structure of the chemical headgroup by which the Ru3O clusters adsorb to the QDs. Complexes comprising QDs and Ru 3O clusters adsorbed through a pyridine-4-carboxylic acid ligand have a PET rate constant of (4.9 ± 0.9)×109 s -1 whereas complexes comprising QDs and Ru3O clusters adsorbed through a 4-mercaptopyridine ligand have an

  5. Mechanisms for control of biological electron transfer reactions

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Heather R.; Dow, Brian A.; Davidson, Victor L.

    2014-01-01

    Electron transfer (ET) through and between proteins is a fundamental biological process. The rates and mechanisms of these ET reactions are controlled by the proteins in which the redox centers that donate and accept electrons reside. The protein influences the magnitudes of the ET parameters, the electronic coupling and reorganization energy that are associated with the ET reaction. The protein can regulate the rates of the ET reaction by requiring reaction steps to optimize the system for ET, leading to kinetic mechanisms of gated or coupled ET. Amino acid residues in the segment of the protein through which long range ET occurs can also modulate the ET rate by serving as staging points for hopping mechanisms of ET. Specific examples are presented to illustrate these mechanisms by which proteins control rates of ET reactions. PMID:25085775

  6. DNA Damage Induced by Low-Energy Electrons: Electron Transfer and Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Wagner, J. Richard; Sanche, Léon

    2006-05-01

    Thin films of the short single strand of DNA, GCAT, in which guanine (G) or adenine (A) have been removed, were bombarded under vacuum by 4 to 15 eV electrons. The fragments corresponding to base release and strand breaks (SB) were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography and their yields compared with those obtained from unmodified GCAT. From such a comparison, it is shown that, using GCAT as a model system, (1) most SB result from electron capture by DNA bases followed by electron transfer to the phosphate group and (2) the initial capture probability depends on the coherence of the electron wave within the tetramer.

  7. DNA Damage Induced by Low-Energy Electrons: Electron Transfer and Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Yi; Wagner, J. Richard; Sanche, Leon

    2006-05-26

    Thin films of the short single strand of DNA, GCAT, in which guanine (G) or adenine (A) have been removed, were bombarded under vacuum by 4 to 15 eV electrons. The fragments corresponding to base release and strand breaks (SB) were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography and their yields compared with those obtained from unmodified GCAT. From such a comparison, it is shown that, using GCAT as a model system (1) most SB result from electron capture by DNA bases followed by electron transfer to the phosphate group and (2) the initial capture probability depends on the coherence of the electron wave within the tetramer.

  8. Interchain electron-electron scattering in a one-dimensional charge-transfer conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Lyo, S.K.

    1982-02-15

    The contribution of donor-acceptor interchain electron-electron scattering to the dc resistivity is calculated for one-dimensional charge-transfer metallic conductors. The interchain electron-electron interaction is due to Coulombic or phonon-exchange interactions. The resistivity arises from U processes when the relative signs of the slopes of the donor and acceptor bands are the same and from N processes when they are opposite. The results predict an upper bound for the strength of interchain and possibly on-site Coulomb interactions. Application of the model to TTF-TCNQ (tetrathiafulvalenium tetracyanoquinodimethanide) is discussed.

  9. Evidence for the purely electronic character of primary electron transfer in purple bacteria Rh. Sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, I. O.; Poddubnyy, V. V.; Eremin, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    A quantum-chemical calculation of the excited electronic states of a Rh. Sphaeroides reaction centre was performed. We discovered a new excited electronic state which can participate in electron transfer (ET). The energy gradient calculations showed that photoexcitation activates only high-frequency vibrational modes. This contradicts the widely accepted picture of ET resulting from vibrational wave packet motion. An alternative model is suggested where ET has a purely dissipative character and occurs only due to pigment--protein interaction. With this model, we demonstrate that oscillations in the femtosecond spectra can be caused by the new electronic state and non-Markovian character of dissipative dynamics.

  10. Application of Electron-Transfer Theory to Several Systems of Biological Interest

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Marcus, R. A.; Sutin, N.

    1985-03-23

    Electron-transfer reaction rates are compared with theoretically calculated values for several reactions in the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. A second aspect of the theory, the cross-relation, is illustrated using protein-protein electron transfers.

  11. ELECTRON TRANSFER MECHANISM AT THE SOLID-LIQUID INTERFACE OF PHYLLOSILICATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interfacial electron transfer processes on clay minerals have significant impact in natural environments and geochemical systems. Nitrobenzene was used as molecular probes to study the electron transfer mechanism at the solid-water interfaces of Fe-containing phyllosicates. For...

  12. Concerted proton-electron transfers: electrochemical and related approaches.

    PubMed

    Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2010-07-20

    Proton-coupled electron transfers (PCETs) are omnipresent in natural and artificial chemical processes. Given the contemporary challenges associated with energy conversion, pollution abatement, and the development of high-performance sensors, a greater understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the practical efficiency of PCETs is a timely research topic. In contrast to hydrogen-atom transfers, proton and electron transfers involve different centers in PCET reactions. The reaction may go through an electron- or proton-transfer intermediate, giving rise to the electron-proton transfer (EPT) and the proton-electron transfer (PET) pathways. When the proton and electron transfers are concerted (the CPET pathway), the high-energy intermediates of the stepwise pathways are bypassed, although this thermodynamic benefit may have a kinetic cost. The primary task of kinetics-based mechanism analysis is therefore to distinguish the three pathways, quantifying the factors that govern the competition between them, which requires modeling of CPET reactivity. CPET models of varying sophistication have appeared, but the large number of parameters involved and the uncertainty of the quantum chemical calculations they may have to resort to make experimental confrontation and inspiration a necessary component of model testing and refinement. Electrochemical PCETs are worthy of particular attention, if only because most applications in which PCET mechanisms are operative involve collection or injection of electricity through electrodes. More fundamentally, changing the electrode potential is an easy and continuous means of varying the driving force of the reaction, whereas the current flowing through the electrode is a straightforward measure of its rate. Consequently, the current-potential response in nondestructive techniques (such as cyclic voltammetry) can be read as an activation-driving force relationship, provided the contribution of diffusion has been taken into account

  13. Electronic Energy transfer in light-harvesting antenna complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossein-Nejad, Hoda

    The studies presented in this thesis explore electronic energy transfer (EET) in light-harvesting antenna complexes and investigate the role of quantum coherence in EET. The dynamics of energy transfer are investigated in three distinct length scales and a different formulation of the exciton transport problem is applied at each scale. These scales include: the scale of a molecular dimer, the scale of a single protein and the scale of a molecular aggregate. The antenna protein phycoerythrin 545 (PE545) isolated from the photosynthetic cryptophyte algae Rhodomonas CS4 is specifically studied in two chapters of this thesis. It is found that formation of small aggregates delocalizes the excitation across chromophores of adjacent proteins, and that this delocalization has a dramatic effect in enhancing the rate of energy transfer between pigments. Furthermore, we investigate EET from a donor to an acceptor via an intermediate site and observe that interference of coherent pathways gives a finite correction to the transfer rate that is sensitively dependent on the nature of the vibrational interactions in the system. The statistical fluctuations of a system exhibiting EET are investigated in the final chapter. The techniques of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics are applied to investigate the steady-state of a typical system exhibiting EET that is perturbed out of equilibrium due to its interaction with a fluctuating bath.

  14. Angular momentum transfer and polarization degree of ions with one-valence electron by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Kenichi; Kai, Takeshi; Nakazaki, Shinobu; Igarashi, Akinori

    2009-04-01

    We carry out the R-matrix calculations for electron-impact excitations of ions with one valence electron. The integral cross sections and polarization degree are obtained for the excitation process from the ground state to the first 2P° state of Li2+, B2+ and Al2+ as functions of electron incident energy. The differential cross sections and angular momentum transfer are also shown at non-resonant low-energy points. As for the angular momentum transfer (L⊥) at small scattering angles, they are negative for B2+ and Al2+, while it is positive for Li2+. Thus L⊥ of doubly charged ions with one-valence electron is not simple.

  15. Modeling biofilms with dual extracellular electron transfer mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Renslow, Ryan; Babauta, Jerome; Kuprat, Andrew; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as terminal electron acceptors for their metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce the requisite components for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates the diffusion- and the conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to S. oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found in the literature. Our simulation results show that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have a metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of G. sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct parameters and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that simulated cyclic and squarewave voltammetry based on our model are currently not capable of determining the specific percentages of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in a biofilm. The developed model will be a critical tool for designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms. PMID:24113651

  16. Modeling biofilms with dual extracellular electron transfer mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Renslow, Ryan; Babauta, Jerome; Kuprat, Andrew; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-11-28

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as terminal electron acceptors for their metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce the requisite components for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates the diffusion- and the conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to S. oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found in the literature. Our simulation results show that (1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have a metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; (2) the thickness of G. sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; (3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and (4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct parameters and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that simulated cyclic and squarewave voltammetry based on our model are currently not capable of determining the specific percentages of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in a biofilm. The developed model will be a critical tool for designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms. PMID:24113651

  17. Modeling biofilms with dual extracellular electron transfer mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-11-28

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as their terminal electron acceptor for metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce components requisite for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates both diffusion- and conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found the literature. Our simulation results showed that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct measurements and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that cyclic and squarewave voltammetry are currently not good tools to determine the specific percentage of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms used by biofilms. The developed model will be a critical tool in designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms.

  18. Microbial extracellular electron transfer and its relevance to iron corrosion.

    PubMed

    Kato, Souichiro

    2016-03-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a microbial metabolism that enables efficient electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials. Microorganisms harbouring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, including bioleaching and bioelectrochemical systems. On the other hand, recent research revealed that microbial EET potentially induces corrosion of iron structures. It has been well known that corrosion of iron occurring under anoxic conditions is mostly caused by microbial activities, which is termed as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Among diverse MIC mechanisms, microbial EET activity that enhances corrosion via direct uptake of electrons from metallic iron, specifically termed as electrical MIC (EMIC), has been regarded as one of the major causative factors. The EMIC-inducing microorganisms initially identified were certain sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea isolated from marine environments. Subsequently, abilities to induce EMIC were also demonstrated in diverse anaerobic microorganisms in freshwater environments and oil fields, including acetogenic bacteria and nitrate-reducing bacteria. Abilities of EET and EMIC are now regarded as microbial traits more widespread among diverse microbial clades than was thought previously. In this review, basic understandings of microbial EET and recent progresses in the EMIC research are introduced. PMID:26863985

  19. Photoinduced electron transfer from dialkyl nitroxides to halogenated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Chateauneuf, J. ); Lusztyk, J.; Ingold, K.U. )

    1990-02-02

    Laser flash photolysis (LFP) at wavelengths within the charge-transfer absorption present in CCl{sub 4} solutions of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPO) yields the oxoammonium chloride of TEMPO, 1 ({lambda}{sub max} = 460 nm), and the trichloromethyl radical in an essentially instantaneous ({le}18 ps) process. The primary photochemical event is an electron transfer from TEMPO to CCl{sub 4}, and this is followed by immediate decomposition of the CCl{sub 4}{sup {sm bullet}{minus}} radical anion to Cl{sup {minus}} and Cl{sub 3}C{sup {sm bullet}}. An independent synthesis of 1 confirmed that the absorption attributed to this species has been correctly assigned. The formation of Cl{sub 3}C{sup {sm bullet}} was inferred by its trapping by molecular oxygen. LFP of TEMPO in other halogenated solvents and of other nitroxides in halogenated solvents has confirmed the generality of these photoreactions.

  20. Single Electron Transfer Living Radical Polymerization via a New Initiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiongxiong; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Xu; Ai, Lingling; Cheng, Chuanjie

    2014-08-01

    Research and development of novel initiating system such as single electron transfer living radical polymerization (SET-LRP) is of high importance in polymer chemistry. A new SET-LRP initiator was synthesized and applied to prepare end-functionalized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in this study. α-Trichloromethyl benzyl alcohol was firstly synthesized, followed by preparation of PMMA under SET-LRP conditions. Conversion of MMA was 81.9%, and the molecular weight of PMMA was about 2.5 kDa at 60 °C for 1 h. Consistency of the number-average molecular weight of PMMA from NMR, GPC and theoretical calculation indicated that the polymerization featured controllable property. Broad molecular weight distribution (MWD) may be ascribed to branched polymers formed by initiation and chain transfer.

  1. 12 CFR 205.15 - Electronic fund transfer of government benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Electronic fund transfer of government benefits. 205.15 Section 205.15 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM ELECTRONIC FUND TRANSFERS (REGULATION E) § 205.15 Electronic fund transfer of government benefits. (a) Government agency subject...

  2. 12 CFR 205.14 - Electronic fund transfer service provider not holding consumer's account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Electronic fund transfer service provider not holding consumer's account. 205.14 Section 205.14 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM ELECTRONIC FUND TRANSFERS (REGULATION E) § 205.14 Electronic fund transfer service provider not...

  3. Suppression of electron transfer to dioxygen by charge transfer and electron transfer complexes in the FAD-dependent reductase component of toluene dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzong-Yuan; Werther, Tobias; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Dobbek, Holger

    2012-11-01

    The three-component toluene dioxygenase system consists of an FAD-containing reductase, a Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin, and a Rieske-type dioxygenase. The task of the FAD-containing reductase is to shuttle electrons from NADH to the ferredoxin, a reaction the enzyme has to catalyze in the presence of dioxygen. We investigated the kinetics of the reductase in the reductive and oxidative half-reaction and detected a stable charge transfer complex between the reduced reductase and NAD(+) at the end of the reductive half-reaction, which is substantially less reactive toward dioxygen than the reduced reductase in the absence of NAD(+). A plausible reason for the low reactivity toward dioxygen is revealed by the crystal structure of the complex between NAD(+) and reduced reductase, which shows that the nicotinamide ring and the protein matrix shield the reactive C4a position of the isoalloxazine ring and force the tricycle into an atypical planar conformation, both factors disfavoring the reaction of the reduced flavin with dioxygen. A rapid electron transfer from the charge transfer complex to electron acceptors further reduces the risk of unwanted side reactions, and the crystal structure of a complex between the reductase and its cognate ferredoxin shows a short distance between the electron-donating and -accepting cofactors. Attraction between the two proteins is likely mediated by opposite charges at one large patch of the complex interface. The stability, specificity, and reactivity of the observed charge transfer and electron transfer complexes are thought to prevent the reaction of reductase(TOL) with dioxygen and thus present a solution toward conflicting requirements. PMID:22992736

  4. Photoinduced electron transfer from phycoerythrin to colloidal metal semiconductor nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathiravan, A.; Chandramohan, M.; Renganathan, R.; Sekar, S.

    2009-04-01

    Phycoerythrin is a water soluble pigment which absorbs in the visible region at 563 nm. The interaction of phycoerythrin with colloidal metal semiconductors was studied by absorption, FT-IR and fluorescence spectroscopy. Phycoerythrin adsorbed strongly on the surface of TiO 2 nanoparticles, the apparent association constant for the association between colloidal metal-TiO 2 nanoparticles and phycoerythrin was determined from fluorescence quenching data. The free energy change (Δ Get) for electron transfer process has been calculated by applying Rehm-Weller equation.

  5. Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Sutin, N.; Creutz, C.

    1980-01-01

    Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed.

  6. Photoinduced Electron Transfer Based Ion Sensing within an Optical Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Englich, Florian V.; Foo, Tze Cheung; Richardson, Andrew C.; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Sumby, Christopher J.; Monro, Tanya M.

    2011-01-01

    We combine suspended-core microstructured optical fibers with the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) effect to demonstrate a new type of fluorescent optical fiber-dip sensing platform for small volume ion detection. A sensor design based on a simple model PET-fluoroionophore system and small core microstructured optical fiber capable of detecting sodium ions is demonstrated. The performance of the dip sensor operating in a high sodium concentration regime (925 ppm Na+) and for lower sodium concentration environments (18.4 ppm Na+) is explored and future approaches to improving the sensor’s signal stability, sensitivity and selectivity are discussed. PMID:22163712

  7. Molecular structures of porphyrin-quinone models for electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Fajer, J.; Barkigia, K.M.; Melamed, D.; Sweet, R.M.; Kurreck, H.; Gersdorff, J. von; Plato, M.; Rohland, H.C.; Elger, G.; Moebius, K.

    1996-08-15

    Synthetic porphyrin-quinone complexes are commonly used to mimic electron transport in photosynthetic reaction centers and to probe the effects of energetics, distances, and relative orientations on rates of electron transfer between donor-acceptor couples. The structures of two such models have been determined by X-ray diffraction. The redox pairs consist of a zinc porphyrin covalently linked to benzoquinone in cis and trans configurations via a cyclohexanediyl bridge. The crystallographic studies were undertaken to provide a structural foundation for the extensive body of experimental and theoretical results that exists for these compounds in both the ground and photoinduced charge-separated states. The results validate conclusions reached from theoretical calculations, EPR and two-dimensional NMR results for these states. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. The electronic transfer of information and aerospace knowledge diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Bishop, Ann P.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Increasing reliance on and investment in information technology and electronic networking systems presupposes that computing and information technology will play a motor role in the diffusion of aerospace knowledge. Little is known, however, about actual information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The authors state that the potential contributions of information technology to increased productivity and competitiveness will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge regarding the information-seeking behavior of the members of the social system - those who are producing, transferring, and using scientific and technical information - is incorporated into a new technology policy framework. Research into the use of information technology and electronic networks by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists, collected as part of a research project designed to study aerospace knowledge diffusion, is presented in support of this assertion.

  9. Molecular Models for Conductance in Junctions and Electrochemical Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazinani, Shobeir Khezr Seddigh

    This thesis develops molecular models for electron transport in molecular junctions and intra-molecular electron transfer. The goal is to identify molecular descriptors that afford a substantial simplification of these electronic processes. First, the connection between static molecular polarizability and the molecular conductance is examined. A correlation emerges whereby the measured conductance of a tunneling junction decreases as a function of the calculated molecular polarizability for several systems, a result consistent with the idea of a molecule as a polarizable dielectric. A model based on a macroscopic extension of the Clausius-Mossotti equation to the molecular domain and Simmon's tunneling model is developed to explain this correlation. Despite the simplicity of the theory, it paves the way for further experimental, conceptual and theoretical developments in the use of molecular descriptors to describe both conductance and electron transfer. Second, the conductance of several biologically relevant, weakly bonded, hydrogen-bonded systems is systematically investigated. While there is no correlation between hydrogen bond strength and conductance, the results indicate a relation between the conductance and atomic polarizability of the hydrogen bond acceptor atom. The relevance of these results to electron transfer in biological systems is discussed. Hydrogen production and oxidation using catalysts inspired by hydrogenases provides a more sustainable alternative to the use of precious metals. To understand electrochemical and spectroscopic properties of a collection of Fe and Ni mimics of hydrogenases, high-level density functional theory calculations are described. The results, based on a detailed analysis of the energies, charges and molecular orbitals of these metal complexes, indicate the importance of geometric constraints imposed by the ligand on molecular properties such as acidity and electrocatalytic activity. Based on model calculations of

  10. Biochemical Mechanisms Controlling Terminal Electron Transfer in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmus, R.; Liermann, L. J.; Brantley, S. L.; Tien, M.

    2009-04-01

    The ability of Geobacter sulfurreducens to use a variety of metals as terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) for cellular respiration makes it attractive for use in bioremediation and implies its importance to mineral cycling in the environment. This study is aimed at understanding the biochemical mechanisms that allow Geobacter sulfurreducens to use soluble and insoluble iron and manganese forms as TEAs for cellular respiration and is the first of its kind to address the kinetics of manganese use as a TEA by G. sulfurreducens. First, G. sulfurreducens was conditioned to grow on various soluble and insoluble iron and manganese forms. G. sulfurreducens demonstrated enhanced growth rates when cultured using soluble TEAs compared with insoluble TEAs. However, the lower growth rate on insoluble iron compared with soluble iron was observed concomitantly with a 1-2 log lower cell density in stationary phase in insoluble iron cultures and a lower growth yield per electron donor used in log growth phase. Furthermore, the growth yield per electron was similar with both soluble and insoluble iron. These results suggest that the net amount of energy available for biomass production achieved from reducing insoluble iron is lower than with soluble iron, which may be due to a different biochemical mechanism catalyzing the electron transfer to TEA dependent upon the solubility of the TEA. One scenario consistent with this notion is that protein(s) in the outer membrane of G. sulfurreducens that transfers electrons to insoluble TEAs does so in a manner that uncouples electron flow from the proton pump in the cellular membrane, similar to what we have observed with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Both the growth rate and growth yield of G. sulfurreducens on insoluble manganese were higher than on insoluble iron, indicating that there is a difference in the flow of electrons to the TEA in these two situations. While the different redox potentials of these elements may affect these values

  11. Electrochemical Electron Transfer and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Effects of Double Layer and Ionic Environment on Solvent Reorganization Energies.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumya; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-06-14

    Electron transfer and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions at electrochemical interfaces play an essential role in a broad range of energy conversion processes. The reorganization energy, which is a measure of the free-energy change associated with solute and solvent rearrangements, is a key quantity for calculating rate constants for these reactions. We present a computational method for including the effects of the double layer and ionic environment of the diffuse layer in calculations of electrochemical solvent reorganization energies. This approach incorporates an accurate electronic charge distribution of the solute within a molecular-shaped cavity in conjunction with a dielectric continuum treatment of the solvent, ions, and electrode using the integral equations formalism polarizable continuum model. The molecule-solvent boundary is treated explicitly, but the effects of the electrode-double layer and double layer-diffuse layer boundaries, as well as the effects of the ionic strength of the solvent, are included through an external Green's function. The calculated total reorganization energies agree well with experimentally measured values for a series of electrochemical systems, and the effects of including both the double layer and ionic environment are found to be very small. This general approach was also extended to electrochemical PCET and produced total reorganization energies in close agreement with experimental values for two experimentally studied PCET systems. PMID:27111050

  12. Coupling capillary zone electrophoresis with electron transfer dissociation and activated ion electron transfer dissociation for top-down proteomics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yimeng; Riley, Nicholas M; Sun, Liangliang; Hebert, Alexander S; Yan, Xiaojing; Westphall, Michael S; Rush, Matthew J P; Zhu, Guijie; Champion, Matthew M; Mba Medie, Felix; Champion, Patricia A DiGiuseppe; Coon, Joshua J; Dovichi, Norman J

    2015-01-01

    Top-down proteomics offers the potential for full protein characterization, but many challenges remain for this approach, including efficient protein separations and effective fragmentation of intact proteins. Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) has shown great potential for separation of intact proteins, especially for differentially modified proteoforms of the same gene product. To date, however, CZE has been used only with collision-based fragmentation methods. Here we report the first implementation of electron transfer dissociation (ETD) with online CZE separations for top-down proteomics, analyzing a mixture of four standard proteins and a complex protein mixture from the Mycobacterium marinum bacterial secretome. Using a multipurpose dissociation cell on an Orbitrap Elite system, we demonstrate that CZE is fully compatible with ETD as well as higher energy collisional dissociation (HCD), and that the two complementary fragmentation methods can be used in tandem on the electrophoretic time scale for improved protein characterization. Furthermore, we show that activated ion electron transfer dissociation (AI-ETD), a recently introduced method for enhanced ETD fragmentation, provides useful performance with CZE separations to greatly increase protein characterization. When combined with HCD, AI-ETD improved the protein sequence coverage by more than 200% for proteins from both standard and complex mixtures, highlighting the benefits electron-driven dissociation methods can add to CZE separations. PMID:25893372

  13. Electronic energy transfer: Localized operator partitioning of electronic energy in composite quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Yaser; Brumer, Paul

    2012-11-01

    A Hamiltonian based approach using spatially localized projection operators is introduced to give precise meaning to the chemically intuitive idea of the electronic energy on a quantum subsystem. This definition facilitates the study of electronic energy transfer in arbitrarily coupled quantum systems. In particular, the decomposition scheme can be applied to molecular components that are strongly interacting (with significant orbital overlap) as well as to isolated fragments. The result defines a consistent electronic energy at all internuclear distances, including the case of separated fragments, and reduces to the well-known Förster and Dexter results in their respective limits. Numerical calculations of coherent energy and charge transfer dynamics in simple model systems are presented and the effect of collisionally induced decoherence is examined.

  14. The dynamical correlation in spacer-mediated electron transfer couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.-H.; Hsu, C.-P.

    2006-06-28

    The dynamical correlation effect in electron transfer (ET) coupling was studied in this work, for cases where electrons tunnel through a many-electron environment. The ET couplings for three different bridge-mediated model systems were calculated: (I) trans-alkyl chains [H{sub 2}C-(CH{sub 2}){sub n}-CH{sub 2}, n=2-10], (II) two isomers of trans-1,4-dimethylenecyclohexane, and (III) two ethylenes spaced by a saturated ethane molecule. The couplings were calculated as half energy gaps of the two lowest adiabatic states. The dynamical correlation was included with spin-flip (SF) and ionization potential or electron affinity coupled-cluster singles and doubles (SF-CCSD and IP/EA-CCSD) and a {delta}CCSD scheme. The direct coupling (DC) scheme is also used as a way to obtain a solution with nondynamical correlation, since DC uses approximated eigenstates that are symmetry-restoring linear combinations of two symmetry-broken unrestricted Hartree-Fock configurations. For all cases tested except for one, results from the DC scheme closely follow the CCSD data, indicating that the dual-configuration solutions can be a good approximation of wave functions with nondynamical correlation included, but there exist exceptions. Comparing the DC results with SF-CCSD and IP or EA-CCSD data, we concluded that the dynamical correlation effect is small for most of the cases we tested.

  15. MD studies of electron transfer at ambient and elevated pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, Alex; Spooner, Jacob; Weinberg, Noham

    2013-06-01

    The effect of pressure on the rate constants of outer-sphere electron transfer reactions has often been described using the Marcus-Hush theory. This theory agrees well with experiment when internal reorganization of the ionic system is negligible, however it does not offer a recipe for calculation of the effects that result from significant solute restructuring. We have recently developed a molecular dynamics technique that accurately describes structural dependence of molecular volumes in non-polar and weakly polar systems. We are now extending this approach to the case of highly polar ionic systems where both solvent and solute restructuring components are important. For this purpose we construct pressure-dependent two-dimensional surfaces for electron transfer reactions in coordinate system composed of interionic distance and Marcus-type solvent polarization coordinate, and use these surfaces to describe pressure effects on reaction kinetics. R.A. Marcus. J. Chem. Phys. 24, 966 (1956); 24, 979 (1956); 26, 867 (1957). Discuss. Faraday Soc. 29, 21 (1960). Faraday Discuss. Chem. Soc. 74, 7 (1982); N.S. Hush. Trans. Faraday Soc. 57, 557 (1961).

  16. Vibrational dynamics in photoinduced electron transfer. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, K.G.

    1993-09-08

    Objective is to perform a new type of measurement for optically excited electron transfer processes that can provide unique experimental insight into the molecular mechanism of electron transfer. Measurements of optically excited electron transfer are done with picosecond infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy to monitor the vibrational motions of the molecules immediately after electron transfer. Theory and experiment suggest that molecular vibrations and distortions are important controlling elements for electron transfer, and direct information has yet to be obtained on these elements of electron transfer mechanisms. The second period of funding has been dedicated to finishing technique development and performing studies of electron transfer in ion pair systems to identify if vibrational dependent electron transfer rates are present in this system. We have succeeded in measuring, for the first time, electron transfer rates as a function of vibrational state in an ion pair complex in solution. In a different area of electron transfer research we have proposed a new mechanism of solvent gated electron transfer.

  17. Mass transfer of electron acceptor aross the capillary fringe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Piepenbrink, M.; Grathwohl, P.

    2005-12-01

    Transverse dispersion has been identified as a potentially limiting parameter controlling the mixing of electron donors and electron acceptors for natural attenuation of plumes originating from continuously emitting sources, however determining reactive transverse dispersion coefficients is not a simple task. The objective of this work is to elaborate the mass transfer of electron acceptor across the capillary fringe. A two-dimensional numerical reactive transport model and a fully controlled tank experiment are set up to investigate the mass transfer across the capillary and reactive fringe, where the oxygen supply is the limiting factor. The tank (77.9 times 14 times 0.8 cm) is made from acrylic-glass and filled with glass beads (0.5-0.75mm). Sodium dithionite, an easily oxidizable compound, is used as a surrogate for contaminants and is continuously injected from the inlets of the tank and reaches a steady state flow. Air circulates on the top of the glass beads. The oxygen concentrations as well as the reactive products (sulfate) are measured at the outlets of the tank with an oxygen sensor and via IC. In addition to that, resazurine, a redox indicator, is added to visualize the redox zones. These two-dimensional experimental results show quantitatively and qualitatively how the oxygen concentrations decrease at the plume fringe. Two dimensional numerical simulations with Min3P predicted oxygen distributions are compared with the experimental results. Acknowledgements: This work was funded by Helmholtz Association and Helmholtz Research Center UFZ; Project: `Virtual Institute for isotope biogeochemistry-biologically mediated processes at geochemical gradients and interfaces in soil - aquifer systems', Contract VH-VI-155.

  18. Interfacial Electron Transfer and Transient Photoconductivity Studied with Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milot, Rebecca Lee

    Terahertz spectroscopy is distinguished from other far infrared and millimeter wave spectroscopies by its inherent phase sensitivity and sub-picosecond time resolution making it a versatile technique to study a wide range of physical phenomena. As THz spectroscopy is still a relatively new field, many aspects of THz generation mechanisms have not been fully examined. Using terahertz emission spectroscopy (TES), THz emission from ZnTe(110) was analyzed and found to be limited by two-photon absorption and free-carrier generation at high excitation fluences. Due to concerns about the continued use of fossil fuels, solar energy has been widely investigated as a promising source of renewable energy. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have been developed as a low-cost alternative to conventional photovoltaic solar cells. To solve the issues of the intermittency and inefficient transport associated with solar energy, researchers are attempting to adapt DSSCs for water oxidation and chemical fuel production. Both device designs incorporate sensitizer molecules covalently bound to metal oxide nanoparticles. The sensitizer, which is comprised of a chromophore and anchoring group, absorbs light and transfers an electron from its excited state to the conduction band of the metal oxide, producing an electric current. Using time-resolved THz spectroscopy (TRTS), an optical pump/THz probe technique, the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from sensitizers to metal oxides was evaluated as a function of the chromophore, its anchoring group, and the metal oxide identity. Experiments for studying fully functioning DSSCs and water oxidation devices are also described. Bio-inspired pentafluorophenyl porphyrin chromophores have been designed and synthesized for use in photoelectrochemical water oxidation cells. Influences on the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from the chromophores into TiO2 and SnO2 nanoparticles due to changes in both the central substituent to

  19. Topological analyses of time-dependent electronic structures: application to electron-transfers in methionine enkephalin.

    PubMed

    Pilmé, Julien; Luppi, Eleonora; Bergès, Jacqueline; Houée-Lévin, Chantal; de la Lande, Aurélien

    2014-08-01

    We have studied electron transfers (ET) between electron donors and acceptors, taking as illustrative example the case of ET in methionine enkephalin. Recent pulse and gamma radiolysis experiments suggested that an ultrafast ET takes place from the C-terminal tyrosine residue to the N-terminal, oxidized, methionine residue. According to standard theoretical frameworks like the Marcus theory, ET can be decomposed into two successive steps: i) the achievement through thermal fluctuations, of a set of nuclear coordinates associated with degeneracy of the two electronic states, ii) the electron tunneling from the donor molecular orbital to the acceptor molecular orbital. Here, we focus on the analysis of the time-dependent electronic dynamics during the tunneling event. This is done by extending the approaches based on the topological analyses of stationary electronic density and of the electron localization function (ELF) to the time-dependent domain. Furthermore, we analyzed isosurfaces of the divergence of the current density, showing the paths that are followed by the tunneling electron from the donor to the acceptor. We show how these functions can be calculated with constrained density functional theory. Beyond this work, the topological tools used here can open up new opportunities for the electronic description in the time-dependent domain. PMID:25060148

  20. Intramolecular Long-Distance Electron Transfer in Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Closs, Gerhard L.; Miller, John R.

    1988-04-01

    Intramolecular long-distance electron transfer (ET) has been actively studied in recent years in order to test existing theories in a quantitative way and to provide the necessary constants for predicting ET rates from simple structural parameters. Theoretical predictions of an ``inverted region,'' where increasing the driving force of the reaction will decrease its rate, have begun to be experimentally confirmed. A predicted nonlinear dependence of ET rates on the polarity of the solvent has also been confirmed. This work has implications for the design of efficient photochemical charge-separation devices. Other studies have been directed toward determining the distance dependence of ET reactions. Model studies on different series of compounds give similar distance dependences. When different stereochemical structures are compared, it becomes apparent that geometrical factors must be taken into account. Finally, the mechanism of coupling between donor and acceptor in weakly interacting systems has become of major importance. The theoretical and experimental evidence favors a model in which coupling is provided by the interaction with the orbitals of the intervening molecular fragments, although more experimental evidence is needed. Studies on intramolecular ET in organic model compounds have established that current theories give an adequate description of the process. The separation of electronic from nuclear coordinates is only a convenient approximation applied to many models, but in long-distance ET it works remarkably well. It is particularly gratifying to see Marcus' ideas finally confirmed after three decades of skepticism. By obtaining the numbers for quantitative correlations between rates and distances, these experiments have shown that saturated hydrocarbon fragments can ``conduct'' electrons over tens of angstroms. A dramatic demonstration of this fact has recently been obtained by tunneling electron microscopy on Langmuir-Blodgett films, showing in a

  1. ATP-induced electron transfer by redox-selective partner recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Sandra E.; Goetzl, Sebastian; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Bommer, Martin; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Hildebrandt, Peter; Dobbek, Holger

    2014-08-01

    Thermodynamically unfavourable electron transfers are enabled by coupling to an energy-supplying reaction. How the energy is transduced from the exergonic to the endergonic process is largely unknown. Here we provide the structural basis for an energy transduction process in the reductive activation of B12-dependent methyltransferases. The transfer of one electron from an activating enzyme to the cobalamin cofactor is energetically uphill and relies on coupling to an ATPase reaction. Our results demonstrate that the key to coupling is, besides the oxidation state-dependent complex formation, the conformational gating of the electron transfer. Complex formation induces a substitution of the ligand at the electron-accepting Co ion. Addition of ATP initiates electron transfer by provoking conformational changes that destabilize the complex. We show how remodelling of the electron-accepting Co2+ promotes ATP-dependent electron transfer; an efficient strategy not seen in other electron-transferring ATPases.

  2. Structural basis of interprotein electron transfer in bacterial sulfite oxidation

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Aaron P; Laming, Elise L; Casas Garcia, G Patricia; Kvansakul, Marc; Guss, J Mitchell; Trewhella, Jill; Calmes, Benoit; Bernhardt, Paul V; Kappler, Ulrike; Maher, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    Interprotein electron transfer underpins the essential processes of life and relies on the formation of specific, yet transient protein-protein interactions. In biological systems, the detoxification of sulfite is catalyzed by the sulfite-oxidizing enzymes (SOEs), which interact with an electron acceptor for catalytic turnover. Here, we report the structural and functional analyses of the SOE SorT from Sinorhizobium meliloti and its cognate electron acceptor SorU. Kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of the SorT/SorU interaction show the complex is dynamic in solution, and that the proteins interact with Kd = 13.5 ± 0.8 μM. The crystal structures of the oxidized SorT and SorU, both in isolation and in complex, reveal the interface to be remarkably electrostatic, with an unusually large number of direct hydrogen bonding interactions. The assembly of the complex is accompanied by an adjustment in the structure of SorU, and conformational sampling provides a mechanism for dissociation of the SorT/SorU assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09066.001 PMID:26687009

  3. Structural basis of interprotein electron transfer in bacterial sulfite oxidation.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Aaron P; Laming, Elise L; Casas Garcia, G Patricia; Kvansakul, Marc; Guss, J Mitchell; Trewhella, Jill; Calmes, Benoit; Bernhardt, Paul V; Hanson, Graeme R; Kappler, Ulrike; Maher, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    Interprotein electron transfer underpins the essential processes of life and relies on the formation of specific, yet transient protein-protein interactions. In biological systems, the detoxification of sulfite is catalyzed by the sulfite-oxidizing enzymes (SOEs), which interact with an electron acceptor for catalytic turnover. Here, we report the structural and functional analyses of the SOE SorT from Sinorhizobium meliloti and its cognate electron acceptor SorU. Kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of the SorT/SorU interaction show the complex is dynamic in solution, and that the proteins interact with Kd = 13.5 ± 0.8 μM. The crystal structures of the oxidized SorT and SorU, both in isolation and in complex, reveal the interface to be remarkably electrostatic, with an unusually large number of direct hydrogen bonding interactions. The assembly of the complex is accompanied by an adjustment in the structure of SorU, and conformational sampling provides a mechanism for dissociation of the SorT/SorU assembly. PMID:26687009

  4. Coherent Transfer of Electronic Wavepacket Motion Between Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tao; Richards, B. G.; Jones, R. R.

    2016-05-01

    We have shown that electron correlations, induced by controlled dipole-dipole (DD) interactions, can enable the coherent transfer of electronic wavepacket motion from atoms to their neighbors. In the experiment, a 5 ns tunable dye laser excites Rb atoms in a MOT to the 25s state in a weak static electric field for which the tunable 25s 33 s <--> 24p34p DD interaction is resonant. A picosecond THz pulse then further excites each Rydberg atom into a coherent superposition, of 25s and 24p states. The evolution of this mixed-parity wavepacket is characterized by time-dependent oscillations in the electric dipole moment, with a period of 2.9 ps. Approximately 5 ns after the wavepacket creation, a second 5 ns dye-laser promotes a second set of atoms from the 5p level into the 33s state. Because of the DD interaction, the second dye laser actually creates atom pairs whose electronic states are correlated via the resonant DD coupling. A 33 s + 34p wavepacket, oscillating with the same 2.9 ps period as the 25 s + 24p wavepacket, develops on the second set of atoms as a result of the correlation. A second, time-delayed ps THz pulse enables the detection of the coherent wavepacket motion on the two sets of atoms. This research has been supported by the NSF.

  5. Fabrication and single-electron-transfer operation of a triple-dot single-electron transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Mingyu Uchida, Takafumi; Tsurumaki-Fukuchi, Atsushi; Arita, Masashi; Takahashi, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Akira; Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Ono, Yukinori; Inokawa, Hiroshi

    2015-12-07

    A triple-dot single-electron transistor was fabricated on silicon-on-insulator wafer using pattern-dependent oxidation. A specially designed one-dimensional silicon wire having small constrictions at both ends was converted to a triple-dot single-electron transistor by means of pattern-dependent oxidation. The fabrication of the center dot involved quantum size effects and stress-induced band gap reduction, whereas that of the two side dots involved thickness modulation because of the complex edge structure of two-dimensional silicon. Single-electron turnstile operation was confirmed at 8 K when a 100-mV, 1-MHz square wave was applied. Monte Carlo simulations indicated that such a device with inhomogeneous tunnel and gate capacitances can exhibit single-electron transfer.

  6. Electronic shift register memory based on molecular electron-transfer reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Jose Nelson; Beratan, David N.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a shift register memory at the molecular level is described in detail. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules incorporated on a very large scale integrated (VLSI) substrate, and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. The design requirements for such a system are discussed, and several realistic strategies for synthesizing these systems are presented. The immediate advantage of such a hybrid molecular/VLSI device would arise from the possible information storage density. The prospect of considerable savings of energy per bit processed also exists. This molecular shift register memory element design solves the conceptual problems associated with integrating molecular size components with larger (micron) size features on a chip.

  7. Layered Black Phosphorus: Strongly Anisotropic Magnetic, Electronic, and Electron-Transfer Properties.

    PubMed

    Sofer, Zdeněk; Sedmidubský, David; Huber, Štěpán; Luxa, Jan; Bouša, Daniel; Boothroyd, Chris; Pumera, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Layered elemental materials, such as black phosphorus, exhibit unique properties originating from their highly anisotropic layered structure. The results presented herein demonstrate an anomalous anisotropy for the electrical, magnetic, and electrochemical properties of black phosphorus. It is shown that heterogeneous electron transfer from black phosphorus to outer- and inner-sphere molecular probes is highly anisotropic. The electron-transfer rates differ at the basal and edge planes. These unusual properties were interpreted by means of calculations, manifesting the metallic character of the edge planes as compared to the semiconducting properties of the basal plane. This indicates that black phosphorus belongs to a group of materials known as topological insulators. Consequently, these effects render the magnetic properties highly anisotropic, as both diamagnetic and paramagnetic behavior can be observed depending on the orientation in the magnetic field. PMID:26822395

  8. 27 CFR 27.48a - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... corporations, as defined in 26 U.S.C. 1563, and implementing regulations in 26 CFR 1.1563-1 through 1.1563-4.... (c) Electronic fund transfer or EFT means any transfer of funds, other than a transaction originated... electronic fund transfer. 27.48a Section 27.48a Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND...

  9. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa’s for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as insights into linear correlations and non-innocent ligands, are also described. In addition, computational methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoexcited PCET are discussed. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. PMID:26110700

  10. Electron transfer kinetics at polarized nanoscopic liquid/liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chenxin; Mirkin, Michael V

    2006-01-11

    Rapid kinetics of electron transfer (ET) reactions across the interface between water and 1,2-dichloroethane were measured by steady-state voltammetry at nanopipet electrodes (50- to 400-nm orifice radius). The origins of previously reported imperfect voltammetric responses of ET reactions at micropipets were investigated. Several new experimental systems were explored, and two of them yielded high-quality voltammograms suitable for kinetic experiments. The determined standard rate constants were compared to those measured previously at polarized and nonpolarized liquid/liquid interfaces. The effect of the interfacial dimensions on the magnitude of the apparent ET rate constant is discussed. A new approach to ET kinetic measurements based on the use of the scanning electrochemical microscope with a nanopipet tip and a metallic substrate has been developed and employed to check the validity of determined kinetic parameters. PMID:16390144

  11. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward.

    PubMed

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-07-22

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa's for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as insights into linear correlations and non-innocent ligands, are also described. In addition, computational methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoexcited PCET are discussed. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. PMID:26110700

  12. A stochastic reorganizational bath model for electronic energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Takatoshi E-mail: aspuru@chemistry.harvard.edu; Huh, Joonsuk; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán E-mail: aspuru@chemistry.harvard.edu

    2014-06-28

    Environmentally induced fluctuations of the optical gap play a crucial role in electronic energy transfer dynamics. One of the simplest approaches to incorporate such fluctuations in energy transfer dynamics is the well known Haken-Strobl-Reineker (HSR) model, in which the energy-gap fluctuation is approximated as white noise. Recently, several groups have employed molecular dynamics simulations and excited-state calculations in conjunction to account for excitation energies’ thermal fluctuations. On the other hand, since the original work of HSR, many groups have employed stochastic models to simulate the same transfer dynamics. Here, we discuss a rigorous connection between the stochastic and the atomistic bath models. If the phonon bath is treated classically, time evolution of the exciton-phonon system can be described by Ehrenfest dynamics. To establish the relationship between the stochastic and atomistic bath models, we employ a projection operator technique to derive the generalized Langevin equations for the energy-gap fluctuations. The stochastic bath model can be obtained as an approximation of the atomistic Ehrenfest equations via the generalized Langevin approach. Based on this connection, we propose a novel scheme to take account of reorganization effects within the framework of stochastic models. The proposed scheme provides a better description of the population dynamics especially in the regime of strong exciton-phonon coupling. Finally, we discuss the effect of the bath reorganization in the absorption and fluorescence spectra of ideal J-aggregates in terms of the Stokes shifts. We find a simple expression that relates the reorganization contribution to the Stokes shifts – the reorganization shift – to the ideal or non-ideal exciton delocalization in a J-aggregate. The reorganization shift can be described by three parameters: the monomer reorganization energy, the relaxation time of the optical gap, and the exciton delocalization length

  13. Quantum effects in ultrafast electron transfers within cryptochromes.

    PubMed

    Firmino, Thiago; Mangaud, Etienne; Cailliez, Fabien; Devolder, Adrien; Mendive-Tapia, David; Gatti, Fabien; Meier, Christoph; Desouter-Lecomte, Michèle; de la Lande, Aurélien

    2016-08-21

    Cryptochromes and photolyases are flavoproteins that may undergo ultrafast charge separation upon electronic excitation of their flavin cofactors. Charge separation involves chains of three or four tryptophan residues depending on the protein of interest. The molecular mechanisms of these processes are not completely clear. In the present work we investigate the relevance of quantum effects like the occurrence of nuclear tunneling and of coherences upon charge transfer in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochromes. The possible breakdown of the Condon approximation is also investigated. We have devised a simulation protocol based on the realization of molecular dynamics simulations on diabatic potential energy surfaces defined at the hybrid constrained density functional theory/molecular mechanics level. The outcomes of the simulations are analyzed through various dedicated kinetics schemes related to the Marcus theory that account for the aforementioned quantum effects. MD simulations also provide a basic material to define realistic model Hamiltonians for subsequent quantum dissipative dynamics. To carry out quantum simulations, we have implemented an algorithm based on the Hierarchical Equations of Motion. With this new tool in hand we have been able to model the electron transfer chain considering either two- or three-state models. Kinetic models and quantum simulations converge to the conclusion that quantum effects have a significant impact on the rate of charge separation. Nuclear tunneling involving atoms of the tryptophan redox cofactors as well as of the environment (protein atoms and water molecules) is significant. On the other hand non-Condon effects are negligible in most simulations. Taken together, the results of the present work provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling charge separation in this family of flavoproteins. PMID:27427185

  14. Structural studies of photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer in cyclopentadienylnickelnitrosyl

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.X.; Bowman, M.K.; Wang, Zhiyu; Norris, J.R. |; Montano, P.A. |

    1994-03-01

    A structural study based on EXAFS, FTIR, and optical absorption spectroscopies has been conducted on a photogenerated, metastable state of cyclopentadienylnickelnitrosyl (CpNiNO) produced by a reversible photochemical reaction. The photogenerated, metastable state with distinctively different EXAFS, IR, and optical absorption spectra from those of the ground state molecules was created by irradiating the sample with the 365 nm line of a mercury lamp at 20K . At the same temperature, the reverse reaction was induced by irradiation with the 313 nm line from the mercury lamp. Based on the analysis of the EXAFS data, the photogenerated, metastable state of CpNiNO has undergone considerable nuclear rearrangements compared to its ground state. The nuclear movement is characterized by a 0.12{angstrom} elongation of Ni-N bond and by a bending of Ni-N-O. A shift of the N-O stretching frequency from 1824 to 1387 cm{sup {minus}1} was observed in the photoinduced reaction with 365 nm light, implying that a NO{sup {minus}} like species results from intramolecular electron transfer from Ni to NO. The changes in the absorption spectra for the same reaction showed reduced absorption of the 385 nm band and a newly generated broad band near IR region. Temperature dependence of the Debye-Waller factor of CpNiNO was in good agreement with the diatomic harmonic oscillator for the Ni-N bond, but deviated for the Ni-O and the Ni-C bonds. Based on the structures obtained from EXAFS, ZINDO calculations for both the ground state and the photogenerated, metastable state of CpNiNO reproduced the general features of the observed absorption spectra and qualitatively explained the wavelength dependence of the reaction. The calculated partial charges on each atom in the ground state and the photogenerated, metastable state of CpNiNO are consistent with intramolecular electron transfer upon photoexcitation by 365 nm light.

  15. Electron transfer from flavin to iron in the Pseudomonas oleovorans rubredoxin reductase-rubredoxin electron transfer complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, H J; Basran, J; Scrutton, N S

    1998-11-01

    Rubredoxin reductase (RR) and rubredoxin form a soluble and physiological eT complex. The complex provides reducing equivalents for a membrane-bound omega-hydroxylase, required for the hydroxylation of alkanes and related compounds. The gene (alkT) encoding RR has been overexpressed and the enzyme purified in amounts suitable for studies of eT by stopped-flow spectroscopy. The eT reactions from NADH to the flavin of RR and from reduced RR to the 1Fe and 2Fe forms of rubredoxin have been characterized by transient kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. The reductive half-reaction proceeds in a one-step reaction involving oxidized enzyme and a two-electron-reduced enzyme-NAD+ charge-transfer complex. Flavin reduction is observed at 450 nm and charge-transfer formation at 750 nm; both steps are hyperbolically dependent on NADH concentration. The limiting flavin reduction rate (180 +/- 4 s-1) is comparable to the limiting rate for charge-transfer formation (189 +/- 7 s-1) and analysis at 450 and 750 nm yielded enzyme-NADH dissociation constants of 36 +/- 2 and 43 +/- 5 microM, respectively. Thermodynamic analysis of the reductive half-reaction yielded values for changes in entropy (DeltaS = -65.8 +/- 2.2 J mol-1 K-1), enthalpy (DeltaH = 37.8 +/- 0.6 kJ mol-1) and Gibbs free energy (DeltaG = 57.5 +/- 0.7 kJ mol-1 at 298 K) during hydride ion transfer to the flavin N5 atom. Spectral analysis of mixtures of 1Fe or 2Fe rubredoxin and RR suggest that conformational changes accompany eT complex assembly. Both the 1Fe (nonphysiological) and 2Fe (physiological) forms of rubredoxin were found to oxidize two electron-reduced rubredoxin reductase with approximately equal facility. Rates for the reduction of rubredoxin are hyperbolically dependent on rubredoxin concentration and the limiting rates are 72. 7 +/- 0.6 and 55.2 +/- 0.3 s-1 for the 1Fe and 2Fe forms, respectively. Analysis of the temperature dependence of eT to rubredoxin using eT theory revealed that the reaction is not

  16. Electron transfer in peptides: on the formation of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kracht, Sonja; Messerer, Matthias; Lang, Matthieu; Eckhardt, Sonja; Lauz, Miriam; Grobéty, Bernard; Fromm, Katharina M; Giese, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    Some microorganisms perform anaerobic mineral respiration by reducing metal ions to metal nanoparticles, using peptide aggregates as medium for electron transfer (ET). Such a reaction type is investigated here with model peptides and silver as the metal. Surprisingly, Ag(+) ions bound by peptides with histidine as the Ag(+)-binding amino acid and tyrosine as photoinducible electron donor cannot be reduced to Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) under ET conditions because the peptide prevents the aggregation of Ag atoms to form AgNPs. Only in the presence of chloride ions, which generate AgCl microcrystals in the peptide matrix, does the synthesis of AgNPs occur. The reaction starts with the formation of 100 nm Ag@AgCl/peptide nanocomposites which are cleaved into 15 nm AgNPs. This defined transformation from large nanoparticles into small ones is in contrast to the usually observed Ostwald ripening processes and can be followed in detail by studying time-resolved UV/Vis spectra which exhibit an isosbestic point. PMID:25663127

  17. 12 CFR 205.14 - Electronic fund transfer service provider not holding consumer's account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic fund transfer service provider not holding consumer's account. 205.14 Section 205.14 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM ELECTRONIC FUND TRANSFERS (REGULATION E) § 205.14 Electronic...

  18. 77 FR 71035 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ... Transfer (EFT) Market Research Study AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION... Financial Management Service solicits comments concerning the ``Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) Market Research Study.'' DATES: Written comments should be received on or before January 28, 2013....

  19. Study of Electron Transfer Processes between Simple Plasma Ions and Electron Attaching Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ted; Adams, Nigel; Babcock, Lucia

    1998-11-01

    CCl4 and SF6 are gases that rapidly attach electrons. They are used in etchant plasmas and in high power switches to prevent breakdown. This attachment results in a simple negative ion chemistry that can be well characterized. A concurrent series of reactions involving positive ions also occurs, with ionization eventually being removed by ion-ion mutual neutralization. However, unlike the negative ion chemistry, the positive ion chemistry is more complex and has not been well characterized. Common plasma ions are those of the rare and diatomic gases, along with impurity ions such as H_2O^+ and H_3O^+. Reactions of these ions with CCl4 and SF6 generally occur rapidly by dissociative electron transfer. Some exceptions have been observed when the reactant ion contains an H-atom(s), such as the production of HCl when H_3^+ reacts with CCl_4. Since these reactions involve a fixed amount of energy, they bear similarity to photoelectron and photoelectron-photoion coincidence studies of these electron attaching gases in which only Franck-Condon transitions can occur. Comparision of product ions observed and rate coefficients gives better insights into the mechanism of the electron transfer process. Support by NSF AST-9415485 is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer reactions in supramolecular arrays: Studies of electronic coupling and solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Wiederrecht, G.P.; Svec, W.A.

    1993-05-01

    Research in our laboratory focuses on developing supramolecular arrays that produce long-lived charge separation by limiting the electronic coupling between the separated charges, and on the role of solvation in determining the rates and energetics of photoinitiated electron transfer reactions. Arrays have been developed that closely mimic the electronic coupling that was observed only for long-lived radical pairs produced in photosynthetic glassy solids. A series of 36 fixed-distance donor-acceptor molecules using porphyrin donors, triptycene spacers, and 9 different acceptors has been prepared; these are used to probe the dependence of photoinduced charge separation rates on free energy of reaction as a function of solvent both in liquid and solid solution. Data were obtained on rates of charge separation in dioxane, MTHF, butyronitrile, toluene, chlorobenzene, and benzonitrile.

  1. Ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer reactions in supramolecular arrays: Studies of electronic coupling and solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Wiederrecht, G.P.; Svec, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    Research in our laboratory focuses on developing supramolecular arrays that produce long-lived charge separation by limiting the electronic coupling between the separated charges, and on the role of solvation in determining the rates and energetics of photoinitiated electron transfer reactions. Arrays have been developed that closely mimic the electronic coupling that was observed only for long-lived radical pairs produced in photosynthetic glassy solids. A series of 36 fixed-distance donor-acceptor molecules using porphyrin donors, triptycene spacers, and 9 different acceptors has been prepared; these are used to probe the dependence of photoinduced charge separation rates on free energy of reaction as a function of solvent both in liquid and solid solution. Data were obtained on rates of charge separation in dioxane, MTHF, butyronitrile, toluene, chlorobenzene, and benzonitrile.

  2. Photoinduced electron transfer reaction in polymer-surfactant aggregates: Photoinduced electron transfer between N,N-dimethylaniline and 7-amino coumarin dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Anjan; Seth, Debabrata; Setua, Palash; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2008-05-28

    Photoinduced electron transfer between coumarin dyes and N,N-dimethylaniline has been investigated by using steady state and picosecond time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) micelles and PVP-polyvinyl pyrrolidone (SDS) polymer-surfactant aggregates. A slower rate of electron transfer is observed in PVP-SDS aggregates than in polymer-free SDS micelles. A Marcus type inversion is observed in the correlation of free energy change in comparison with the electron transfer rate. The careful investigation reveals that C-151 deviates from the normal Marcus inverted region compared to its analogs C-152 and C-481 due to slower rotational relaxation and smaller translational diffusion coefficient.

  3. Surface Activation of Electrocatalysis at Oxide Electrodes. Concerted Electron-Proton Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Jurss, Jonah W.; Thorp, H. Holden; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2011-03-21

    Dramatic rate enhancements are observed for the oxidation of phenols, including tyrosine, at indium-tin oxide electrodes modified by the addition of the electron-transfer relays [MII(bpy)2(4,4'-(HO)2P(O)CH2)2bpy)]2+ (M = Ru, Os) with clear evidence for the importance of proton-coupled electron transfer and concerted electron-proton transfer.

  4. Reorganization energy of electron transfer processes in ionic fluids: A molecular Debye-Hueckel approach

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Tiejun; Song Xueyu

    2013-03-21

    The reorganization energy of electron transfer processes in ionic fluids is studied under the linear response approximation using a molecule Debye-Hueckel theory. Reorganization energies of some model reactants of electron transfer reactions in molten salts are obtained from molecular simulations and a molecule Debye-Hueckel approach. Good agreements between simulation results and the results from our theoretical calculations using the same model Hamiltonian are found. Applications of our theory to electron transfer reactions in room temperature ionic liquids further demonstrate that our theoretical approach presents a reliable and accurate methodology for the estimation of reorganization energies of electron transfer reactions in ionic fluids.

  5. Electron Transfer Reactivity of the Aqueous Iron(IV)-Oxo Complex. Outer-Sphere vs Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Bataineh, Hajem; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2016-07-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of organic and inorganic reductants by aqueous iron(IV) ions, Fe(IV)(H2O)5O(2+) (hereafter Fe(IV)aqO(2+)), are reported. The substrates examined include several water-soluble ferrocenes, hexachloroiridate(III), polypyridyl complexes M(NN)3(2+) (M = Os, Fe and Ru; NN = phenanthroline, bipyridine and derivatives), HABTS(-)/ABTS(2-), phenothiazines, Co(II)(dmgBF2)2, macrocyclic nickel(II) complexes, and aqueous cerium(III). Most of the reductants were oxidized cleanly to the corresponding one-electron oxidation products, with the exception of phenothiazines which produced the corresponding oxides in a single-step reaction, and polypyridyl complexes of Fe(II) and Ru(II) that generated ligand-modified products. Fe(IV)aqO(2+) oxidizes even Ce(III) (E(0) in 1 M HClO4 = 1.7 V) with a rate constant greater than 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). In 0.10 M aqueous HClO4 at 25 °C, the reactions of Os(phen)3(2+) (k = 2.5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)), IrCl6(3-) (1.6 × 10(6)), ABTS(2-) (4.7 × 10(7)), and Fe(cp)(C5H4CH2OH) (6.4 × 10(7)) appear to take place by outer sphere electron transfer (OSET). The rate constants for the oxidation of Os(phen)3(2+) and of ferrocenes remained unchanged in the acidity range 0.05 < [H(+)] < 0.10 M, ruling out prior protonation of Fe(IV)aqO(2+) and further supporting the OSET assignment. A fit to Marcus cross-relation yielded a composite parameter (log k22 + E(0)Fe/0.059) = 17.2 ± 0.8, where k22 and E(0)Fe are the self-exchange rate constant and reduction potential, respectively, for the Fe(IV)aqO(2+)/Fe(III)aqO(+) couple. Comparison with literature work suggests k22 < 10(-5) M(-1) s(-1) and thus E(0)(Fe(IV)aqO(2+)/Fe(III)aqO(+)) > 1.3 V. For proton-coupled electron transfer, the reduction potential is estimated at E(0) (Fe(IV)aqO(2+), H(+)/Fe(III)aqOH(2+)) ≥ 1.95 V. PMID:27320290

  6. When electron transfer meets electron transport in redox-active molecular nanojunctions.

    PubMed

    Janin, Marion; Ghilane, Jalal; Lacroix, Jean-Christophe

    2013-02-13

    A scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) was used to arrange two microelectrodes face-to-face separated by a micrometric gap. Polyaniline (PANI) was deposited electrochemically from the SECM tip side until it bridged the two electrodes. The junctions obtained were characterized by following the current through the PANI as a function of its electrochemical potential measured versus a reference electrode acting as a gate electrode in a solid-state transistor. PANI nanojunctions showed conductances below 100 nS in the oxidized state, indicating control of the charge transport within the whole micrometric gap by a limited number of PANI wires. The SECM configuration makes it possible to observe in the same experiment and in the same current range the electron-transfer and electron-transport processes. These two phenomena are distinguished here and characterized by following the variation of the current with the bias voltage and the scan rate. The electron-transfer current changes with the scan rate, while the charge-transport current varies with the bias voltage. Finally, despite the initially micrometric gap, a junction where the conductance is controlled by a single oligoaniline strand is achieved. PMID:23331168

  7. The electron transfer complex between nitrous oxide reductase and its electron donors.

    PubMed

    Dell'acqua, Simone; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G; Pauleta, Sofia R

    2011-12-01

    Identifying redox partners and the interaction surfaces is crucial for fully understanding electron flow in a respiratory chain. In this study, we focused on the interaction of nitrous oxide reductase (N(2)OR), which catalyzes the final step in bacterial denitrification, with its physiological electron donor, either a c-type cytochrome or a type 1 copper protein. The comparison between the interaction of N(2)OR from three different microorganisms, Pseudomonas nautica, Paracoccus denitrificans, and Achromobacter cycloclastes, with their physiological electron donors was performed through the analysis of the primary sequence alignment, electrostatic surface, and molecular docking simulations, using the bimolecular complex generation with global evaluation and ranking algorithm. The docking results were analyzed taking into account the experimental data, since the interaction is suggested to have either a hydrophobic nature, in the case of P. nautica N(2)OR, or an electrostatic nature, in the case of P. denitrificans N(2)OR and A. cycloclastes N(2)OR. A set of well-conserved residues on the N(2)OR surface were identified as being part of the electron transfer pathway from the redox partner to N(2)OR (Ala495, Asp519, Val524, His566 and Leu568 numbered according to the P. nautica N(2)OR sequence). Moreover, we built a model for Wolinella succinogenes N(2)OR, an enzyme that has an additional c-type-heme-containing domain. The structures of the N(2)OR domain and the c-type-heme-containing domain were modeled and the full-length structure was obtained by molecular docking simulation of these two domains. The orientation of the c-type-heme-containing domain relative to the N(2)OR domain is similar to that found in the other electron transfer complexes. PMID:21739254

  8. Vibrational and Electronic Energy Transfer and Dissociation of Diatomic Molecules by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At high altitudes and velocities equal to or greater than the geosynchronous return velocity (10 kilometers per second), the shock layer of a hypersonic flight will be in thermochemical nonequilibrium and partially ionized. The amount of ionization is determined by the velocity. For a trans atmospheric flight of 10 kilometers per second and at an altitude of 80 kilometers, a maximum of 1% ionization is expected. At a velocity of 12 - 17 kilometer per second, such as a Mars return mission, up to 30% of the atoms and molecules in the flow field will be ionized. Under those circumstances, electrons play an important role in determining the internal states of atoms and molecules in the flow field and hence the amount of radiative heat load and the distance it takes for the flow field to re-establish equilibrium. Electron collisions provide an effective means of transferring energy even when the electron number density is as low as 1%. Because the mass of an electron is 12,760 times smaller than the reduced mass of N2, its average speed, and hence its average collision frequency, is more than 100 times larger. Even in the slightly ionized regime with only 1% electrons, the frequency of electron-molecule collisions is equal to or larger than that of molecule-molecule collisions, an important consideration in the low density part of the atmosphere. Three electron-molecule collision processes relevant to hypersonic flows will be considered: (1) vibrational excitation/de-excitation of a diatomic molecule by electron impact, (2) electronic excitation/de-excitation, and (3) dissociative recombination in electron-diatomic ion collisions. A review of available data, both theory and experiment, will be given. Particular attention will be paid to tailoring the molecular physics to the condition of hypersonic flows. For example, the high rotational temperatures in a hypersonic flow field means that most experimental data carried out under room temperatures are not applicable. Also

  9. Probing concerted proton–electron transfer in phenol–imidazoles

    PubMed Central

    Markle, Todd F.; Rhile, Ian J.; DiPasquale, Antonio G.; Mayer, James M.

    2008-01-01

    A series of seven substituted 4,6-di-tert-butyl-2-(4,5-diarylimidazolyl)-phenols have been prepared and characterized, along with two related benzimidazole compounds. X-ray crystal structures of all of the compounds show that the phenol and imidazole rings are close to coplanar and are connected by an intramolecular ArOH⋯N hydrogen bond. One-electron oxidation of these compounds occurs with movement of the phenolic proton to the imidazole base by concerted proton–electron transfer (CPET) to yield fairly stable distonic radical cations. These phenol–base compounds are a valuable system in which to examine the key features of CPET. Kinetic measurements of bimolecular CPET oxidations, with Erxn between +0.04 and −0.33 V, give rate constants from (6.3 ± 0.6) × 102 to (3.0 ± 0.6) × 106 M−1 s−1. There is a good correlation of log(k) with ΔG°, with only one of the 15 rate constants falling more than a factor of 5.2 from the correlation line. Substituents on the imidazole affect the (O–H⋯N) hydrogen bond, as marked by variations in the 1H NMR and calculated vibrational spectra and geometries. Crystallographic dO⋯N values appear to be more strongly affected by crystal packing forces. However, there is almost no correlation of rate constants with any of these measured or computed parameters. Over this range of compounds from the same structural family, the dominant contributor to the differences in rate constant is the driving force ΔG°. PMID:18212121

  10. DETERMINATION OF HETEROGENEOUS ELECTRON TRANSFER RATE CONSTANTS AT MICROFABRICATED IRIDIUM ELECTRODES. (R825511C022)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been an increasing use of both solid metal and microfabricated iridium electrodes as substrates for various types of electroanalysis. However, investigations to determine heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants on iridium, especially at an electron beam evapor...

  11. Electron transfer-initiated Diels-Alder cycloadditions of 2'-hydroxychalcones.

    PubMed

    Cong, Huan; Ledbetter, Dustin; Rowe, Gerard T; Caradonna, John P; Porco, John A

    2008-07-23

    An efficient approach to cyclohexenyl chalcones employing highly electron rich 2'-hydroxychalcone dienophiles via electron transfer-initiated Diels-Alder cycloaddition is described. Using the methodology, the total synthesis of nicolaiodesin C has been accomplished. PMID:18576647

  12. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  13. Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Shawn E; Chadwick, Grayson L; Kempes, Christopher P; Orphan, Victoria J

    2015-10-22

    Multicellular assemblages of microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and the proximity afforded by aggregation is thought to permit intercellular metabolic coupling that can accommodate otherwise unfavourable reactions. Consortia of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria are a well-known environmental example of microbial co-aggregation; however, the coupling mechanisms between these paired organisms is not well understood, despite the attention given them because of the global significance of anaerobic methane oxidation. Here we examined the influence of interspecies spatial positioning as it relates to biosynthetic activity within structurally diverse uncultured methane-oxidizing consortia by measuring stable isotope incorporation for individual archaeal and bacterial cells to constrain their potential metabolic interactions. In contrast to conventional models of syntrophy based on the passage of molecular intermediates, cellular activities were found to be independent of both species intermixing and distance between syntrophic partners within consortia. A generalized model of electric conductivity between co-associated archaea and bacteria best fit the empirical data. Combined with the detection of large multi-haem cytochromes in the genomes of methanotrophic archaea and the demonstration of redox-dependent staining of the matrix between cells in consortia, these results provide evidence for syntrophic coupling through direct electron transfer. PMID:26375009

  14. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-06-25

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa’s for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoinduced processes, are also described. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. The work described herein was supported by National Science Foundation Grant CHE-13-61293 (theory development), National Institutes of Health Grant GM056207 (soybean lipoxygenase), Center for Chemical Innovation of the National Science Foundation Solar Fuels Grant CHE-1305124 (cobalt catalysts), Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (nickel catalysts), and Air Force Office of Scientific Research Award No. FA9550-14-1-0295 (photoinduced PCET).

  15. Revisiting direct electron transfer in nanostructured carbon laccase oxygen cathodes.

    PubMed

    Adam, Catherine; Scodeller, Pablo; Grattieri, Matteo; Villalba, Matías; Calvo, Ernesto J

    2016-06-01

    The biocatalytic electroreduction of oxygen has been studied on large surface area graphite and Vulcan® carbon electrodes with adsorbed Trametes trogii laccase. The electrokinetics of the O2 reduction reaction (ORR) was studied at different electrode potentials, O2 partial pressures and concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Even though the overpotential at 0.25 mA·cm(-2) for the ORR at T1Cu of the adsorbed laccase on carbon is 0.8 V lower than for Pt of similar geometric area, the rate of the reaction and thus the operative current density is limited by the enzyme reaction rate at the T2/T3 cluster site for the adsorbed enzyme. The transition potential for the rate determining step from the direct electron transfer (DET) to the enzyme reaction shifts to higher potentials at higher oxygen partial pressure. Hydrogen peroxide produced by the ORR on bare carbon support participates in an inhibition mechanism, with uncompetitive predominance at high H2O2 concentration, non-competitive contribution can be detected at low inhibitor concentration. PMID:26883057

  16. Effects of quantum coherence in metalloprotein electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorner, Ross; Goold, John; Heaney, Libby; Farrow, Tristan; Vedral, Vlatko

    2012-09-01

    Many intramolecular electron transfer (ET) reactions in biology are mediated by metal centers in proteins. This process is commonly described by a model of diffusive hopping according to the semiclassical theories of Marcus and Hopfield. However, recent studies have raised the possibility that nontrivial quantum mechanical effects play a functioning role in certain biomolecular processes. Here, we investigate the potential effects of quantum coherence in biological ET by extending the semiclassical model to allow for the possibility of quantum coherent phenomena using a quantum master equation based on the Holstein Hamiltonian. We test the model on the structurally defined chain of seven iron-sulfur clusters in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide plus hydrogen:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I), a crucial respiratory enzyme and one of the longest chains of metal centers in biology. Using experimental parameters where possible, we find that, in limited circumstances, a small quantum mechanical contribution can provide a marked increase in the ET rate above the semiclassical diffusive-hopping rate. Under typical biological conditions, our model reduces to well-known diffusive behavior.

  17. Synthesis, Characterization, Photophysics and Photochemistry of Pyrylogen Electron Transfer Sensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Clennan, Edward L.; Liao, Chen

    2014-01-01

    A series of new dicationic sensitizers that are hybrids of pyrylium salts and viologens has been synthesized. The electrochemical and photophysical properties of these "pyrylogen" sensitizers are reported in sufficient detail to allow rationale design of new photoinduced electron transfer reactions. The range of their reduction potentials (+0.37-+0.05V vs SCE) coupled with their range of singlet (48-63 kcal mol(-1)) and triplet (48-57kcalmol(-1)) energies demonstrate that they are potent oxidizing agents in both their singlet and triplet excited states, thermodynamically capable of oxidizing substrates with oxidation potentials as high as 3.1eV. The pyrylogens are synthesized in three steps from readily available starting materials in modest overall 11.4-22.3% yields. These sensitizers have the added advantages that: (1) their radical cations do not react on the CV timescale with oxygen bypassing the need to run reactions under nitrogen or argon and (2) have long wavelength absorptions between 413 and 523nm well out of the range where competitive absorbance by most substrates would cause a problem. These new sensitizers do react with water requiring special precautions to operate in a dry reaction environment.

  18. Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlynn, Shawn E.; Chadwick, Grayson L.; Kempes, Christopher P.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2015-10-01

    Multicellular assemblages of microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and the proximity afforded by aggregation is thought to permit intercellular metabolic coupling that can accommodate otherwise unfavourable reactions. Consortia of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria are a well-known environmental example of microbial co-aggregation; however, the coupling mechanisms between these paired organisms is not well understood, despite the attention given them because of the global significance of anaerobic methane oxidation. Here we examined the influence of interspecies spatial positioning as it relates to biosynthetic activity within structurally diverse uncultured methane-oxidizing consortia by measuring stable isotope incorporation for individual archaeal and bacterial cells to constrain their potential metabolic interactions. In contrast to conventional models of syntrophy based on the passage of molecular intermediates, cellular activities were found to be independent of both species intermixing and distance between syntrophic partners within consortia. A generalized model of electric conductivity between co-associated archaea and bacteria best fit the empirical data. Combined with the detection of large multi-haem cytochromes in the genomes of methanotrophic archaea and the demonstration of redox-dependent staining of the matrix between cells in consortia, these results provide evidence for syntrophic coupling through direct electron transfer.

  19. Electron transfer dissociation of dipositive uranyl and plutonyl coordination complexes.

    PubMed

    Rios, Daniel; Rutkowski, Philip X; Shuh, David K; Bray, Travis H; Gibson, John K; Van Stipdonk, Michael J

    2011-12-01

    Reported here is a comparison of electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) of solvent-coordinated dipositive uranyl and plutonyl ions generated by electrospray ionization. Fundamental differences between the ETD and CID processes are apparent, as are differences between the intrinsic chemistries of uranyl and plutonyl. Reduction of both charge and oxidation state, which is inherent in ETD activation of [An(VI) O(2) (CH(3) COCH(3) )(4) ](2+) , [An(VI) O(2) (CH(3) CN)(4) ](2) , [U(VI) O(2) (CH(3) COCH(3) )(5) ](2+) and [U(VI) O(2) (CH(3) CN)(5) ](2+) (An = U or Pu), is accompanied by ligand loss. Resulting low-coordinate uranyl(V) complexes add O(2) , whereas plutonyl(V) complexes do not. In contrast, CID of the same complexes generates predominantly doubly-charged products through loss of coordinating ligands. Singly-charged CID products of [U(VI) O(2) (CH(3) COCH(3) )(4,5) ](2+) , [U(VI) O(2) (CH(3) CN)(4,5) ](2+) and [Pu(VI) O(2) (CH(3) CN)(4) ](2+) retain the hexavalent metal oxidation state with the addition of hydroxide or acetone enolate anion ligands. However, CID of [Pu(VI) O(2) (CH(3) COCH(3) )(4) ](2+) generates monopositive plutonyl(V) complexes, reflecting relatively more facile reduction of Pu(VI) to Pu(V). PMID:22223415

  20. Electron transfer precedes ATP hydrolysis during nitrogenase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Duval, Simon; Danyal, Karamatullah; Shaw, Sudipta; Lytle, Anna K; Dean, Dennis R; Hoffman, Brian M; Antony, Edwin; Seefeldt, Lance C

    2013-10-01

    The biological reduction of N2 to NH3 catalyzed by Mo-dependent nitrogenase requires at least eight rounds of a complex cycle of events associated with ATP-driven electron transfer (ET) from the Fe protein to the catalytic MoFe protein, with each ET coupled to the hydrolysis of two ATP molecules. Although steps within this cycle have been studied for decades, the nature of the coupling between ATP hydrolysis and ET, in particular the order of ET and ATP hydrolysis, has been elusive. Here, we have measured first-order rate constants for each key step in the reaction sequence, including direct measurement of the ATP hydrolysis rate constant: kATP = 70 s(-1), 25 °C. Comparison of the rate constants establishes that the reaction sequence involves four sequential steps: (i) conformationally gated ET (kET = 140 s(-1), 25 °C), (ii) ATP hydrolysis (kATP = 70 s(-1), 25 °C), (iii) Phosphate release (kPi = 16 s(-1), 25 °C), and (iv) Fe protein dissociation from the MoFe protein (kdiss = 6 s(-1), 25 °C). These findings allow completion of the thermodynamic cycle undergone by the Fe protein, showing that the energy of ATP binding and protein-protein association drive ET, with subsequent ATP hydrolysis and Pi release causing dissociation of the complex between the Fe(ox)(ADP)2 protein and the reduced MoFe protein. PMID:24062462

  1. Synthetic Applications of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Emily C; Knowles, Robert R

    2016-08-16

    Redox events in which an electron and proton are exchanged in a concerted elementary step are commonly referred to as proton-coupled electron transfers (PCETs). PCETs are known to operate in numerous important biological redox processes, as well as recent inorganic technologies for small molecule activation. These studies suggest that PCET catalysis might also function as a general mode of substrate activation in organic synthesis. Over the past three years, our group has worked to advance this hypothesis and to demonstrate the synthetic utility of PCET through the development of novel catalytic radical chemistries. The central aim of these efforts has been to demonstrate the ability of PCET to homolytically activate a wide variety of common organic functional groups that are energetically inaccessible using known molecular H atom transfer catalysts. To do so, we made use of a simple formalism first introduced by Mayer and co-workers that allowed us to predict the thermodynamic capacity of any oxidant/base or reductant/acid pair to formally add or remove H· from a given substrate. With this insight, we were able to rationally select catalyst combinations thermodynamically competent to homolyze the extraordinarily strong E-H σ-bonds found in many common protic functional groups (BDFEs > 100 kcal/mol) or to form unusually weak bonds to hydrogen via the reductive action of common organic π-systems (BDFEs < 35 kcal/mol). These ideas were reduced to practice through the development of new catalyst systems for reductive PCET activations of ketones and oxidative PCET activation of amide N-H bonds to directly furnish reactive ketyl and amidyl radicals, respectively. In both systems, the reaction outcomes were found to be successfully predicted using the effective bond strength formalism, suggesting that these simple thermochemical considerations can provide useful and actionable insights into PCET reaction design. The ability of PCET catalysis to control

  2. Electronic resonance with anticorrelated pigment vibrations drives photosynthetic energy transfer outside the adiabatic framework

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vivek; Peters, William K.; Jonas, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The delocalized, anticorrelated component of pigment vibrations can drive nonadiabatic electronic energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting antennas. In femtosecond experiments, this energy transfer mechanism leads to excitation of delocalized, anticorrelated vibrational wavepackets on the ground electronic state that exhibit not only 2D spectroscopic signatures attributed to electronic coherence and oscillatory quantum energy transport but also a cross-peak asymmetry not previously explained by theory. A number of antennas have electronic energy gaps matching a pigment vibrational frequency with a small vibrational coordinate change on electronic excitation. Such photosynthetic energy transfer steps resemble molecular internal conversion through a nested intermolecular funnel. PMID:23267114

  3. Cooperative electrocatalytic alcohol oxidation with electron-proton-transfer mediators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalyan, Artavazd; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2016-07-01

    electron-proton-transfer mediators, such as TEMPO, may be used in combination with first-row transition metals, such as copper, to achieve efficient two-electron electrochemical processes, thereby introducing a new concept for the development of non-precious-metal electrocatalysts.

  4. Cooperative electrocatalytic alcohol oxidation with electron-proton-transfer mediators.

    PubMed

    Badalyan, Artavazd; Stahl, Shannon S

    2016-07-21

    electron-proton-transfer mediators, such as TEMPO, may be used in combination with first-row transition metals, such as copper, to achieve efficient two-electron electrochemical processes, thereby introducing a new concept for the development of non-precious-metal electrocatalysts. PMID:27350245

  5. The Psychospiritual Dynamics of Adult Survivors of Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemoncelli, John; Carey, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    Discusses challenges in treating adult survivors of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse, and how the relationship with God can either psychologically promote healing or maintain an abusive cycle. Argues that clinicians must understand the dynamic bonding process between abuser and survivor and how this relationship is typically transferred to…

  6. Microscale gradients and their role in electron-transfer mechanisms in biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Beyenal, Haluk; Babauta, Jerome T.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical and electrochemical gradients in biofilms play a critical role in electron-transfer processes between cells and a solid electron acceptor. Most of the time, electron-transfer processes have been investigated in the bulk phase, for a biofilm electrode or for an isolated component of a biofilm. Currently, the knowledge of chemical and electrochemical gradients in living biofilms respiring on a solid surface is limited. We believe the chemical and electrochemical gradients are critical for explaining electron-transfer mechanisms. The bulk conditions, an isolated part of a biofilm or a single cell cannot be used to explain electron-transfer mechanisms in biofilm systems. In addition, microscale gradients explain how the reactor configuration plays a critical role in electron-transfer processes. PMID:23176474

  7. Microscale gradients and their role in electron-transfer mechanisms in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Beyenal, Haluk; Babauta, Jerome T

    2012-12-01

    The chemical and electrochemical gradients in biofilms play a critical role in electron-transfer processes between cells and a solid electron acceptor. Most of the time, electron-transfer processes have been investigated in the bulk phase, for a biofilm electrode or for an isolated component of a biofilm. Currently, the knowledge of chemical and electrochemical gradients in living biofilms respiring on a solid surface is limited. We believe the chemical and electrochemical gradients are critical for explaining electron-transfer mechanisms. The bulk conditions, an isolated part of a biofilm or a single cell cannot be used to explain electron-transfer mechanisms in biofilm systems. In addition, microscale gradients explain how the reactor configuration plays a critical role in electron-transfer processes. PMID:23176474

  8. Long-range electron transfer across Peptide bridges: the transition from electron superexchange to hopping.

    PubMed

    Malak, Rouba Abdel; Gao, Zhinong; Wishart, James F; Isied, Stephan S

    2004-11-01

    Long-range electron transfer rate constants for complexes of the type [(bpy)2RuIIL-Pron-apyRuIII)(NH3)5]5++ proline residues (n) varying from 0 to 9 were determined by complementary electron pulse radiolysis and flash photolysis techniques from the picosecond to the millisecond time scales. The activationless kmax values from both techniques coalesce into one data set. The distance dependence of the reactions is consistent with a smooth transition from a superexchange mechanism with attenuation constant beta = 1.4 A-1 to a hopping mechanism with attenuation constant beta = 0.17 A-1. The transition occurs between n = 3 and 4 prolines, and the virtual hopping rate constant at the shortest distance is about 1 x 106 times slower than that observed for the superexchange value. PMID:15506726

  9. Electron-transfer acceleration investigated by time resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vlček, Antonín; Kvapilová, Hana; Towrie, Michael; Záliš, Stanislav

    2015-03-17

    Ultrafast electron transfer (ET) processes are important primary steps in natural and artificial photosynthesis, as well as in molecular electronic/photonic devices. In biological systems, ET often occurs surprisingly fast over long distances of several tens of angströms. Laser-pulse irradiation is conveniently used to generate strongly oxidizing (or reducing) excited states whose reactions are then studied by time-resolved spectroscopic techniques. While photoluminescence decay and UV-vis absorption supply precise kinetics data, time-resolved infrared absorption (TRIR) and Raman-based spectroscopies have the advantage of providing additional structural information and monitoring vibrational energy flows and dissipation, as well as medium relaxation, that accompany ultrafast ET. We will discuss three cases of photoinduced ET involving the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) moiety (N,N = polypyridine) that occur much faster than would be expected from ET theories. [Re(4-N-methylpyridinium-pyridine)(CO)3(N,N)](2+) represents a case of excited-state picosecond ET between two different ligands that remains ultrafast even in slow-relaxing solvents, beating the adiabatic limit. This is caused by vibrational/solvational excitation of the precursor state and participation of high-frequency quantum modes in barrier crossing. The case of Re-tryptophan assemblies demonstrates that excited-state Trp → *Re(II) ET is accelerated from nanoseconds to picoseconds when the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) chromophore is appended to a protein, close to a tryptophan residue. TRIR in combination with DFT calculations and structural studies reveals an interaction between the N,N ligand and the tryptophan indole. It results in partial electronic delocalization in the precursor excited state and likely contributes to the ultrafast ET rate. Long-lived vibrational/solvational excitation of the protein Re(I)(CO)3(N,N)···Trp moiety, documented by dynamic IR band shifts, could be another accelerating factor. The last

  10. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multi-chromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads. Technical progress report, 1987--1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-14

    This research project involves the design, synthesis and study of the molecules which mimic many of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. Specifically, the molecules are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic multistep electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited singlet state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they model carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  11. Heterogeneous electron transfer at nanoscopic electrodes: importance of electronic structures and electric double layers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengli; Liu, Yuwen; Chen, Junxiang

    2014-08-01

    Heterogeneous electron-transfer (ET) processes at solid electrodes play key roles in molecular electronics and electrochemical energy conversion and sensing. Electrode nanosization and/or nanostructurization are among the major current strategies for performance promotion in these fields. Besides, nano-sized/structured electrodes offer great opportunities to characterize electrochemical structures and processes with high spatial and temporal resolution. This review presents recent insights into the nanoscopic size and structure effects of electrodes and electrode materials on heterogeneous ET kinetics, by emphasizing the importance of the electric double-layer (EDL) at the electrode/electrolyte interface and the electronic structure of electrode materials. It is shown, by general conceptual analysis and recent example demonstrations of representative electrode systems including electrodes of nanometer sizes and gaps and of nanomaterials such as sp(2) hybridized nanocarbons and semiconductor quantum dots, how the heterogeneous ET kinetics, the electronic structures of electrodes, the EDL structures at the electrode/electrolyte interface and the nanoscopic electrode sizes and structures may be related. PMID:24871071

  12. Ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulation of electron transfer process: Fractional electron approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Hu, Hao; Hu, Xiangqian; Cohen, Aron J.; Yang, Weitao

    2008-03-01

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions are one of the most important processes in chemistry and biology. Because of the quantum nature of the processes and the complicated roles of the solvent, theoretical study of ET processes is challenging. To simulate ET processes at the electronic level, we have developed an efficient density functional theory (DFT) quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical (MM) approach that uses the fractional number of electrons as the order parameter to calculate the redox free energy of ET reactions in solution. We applied this method to study the ET reactions of the aqueous metal complexes Fe(H2O)62+/3+ and Ru(H2O)62+/3+. The calculated oxidation potentials, 5.82 eV for Fe(II/III) and 5.14 eV for Ru(II/III), agree well with the experimental data, 5.50 and 4.96 eV, for iron and ruthenium, respectively. Furthermore, we have constructed the diabatic free energy surfaces from histogram analysis based on the molecular dynamics trajectories. The resulting reorganization energy and the diabatic activation energy also show good agreement with experimental data. Our calculations show that using the fractional number of electrons (FNE) as the order parameter in the thermodynamic integration process leads to efficient sampling and validate the ab initio QM/MM approach in the calculation of redox free energies.

  13. Photoinduced electron transfer from semiconductor quantum dots to metal oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tvrdy, Kevin; Frantsuzov, Pavel A.; Kamat, Prashant V.

    2011-01-01

    Quantum dot-metal oxide junctions are an integral part of next-generation solar cells, light emitting diodes, and nanostructured electronic arrays. Here we present a comprehensive examination of electron transfer at these junctions, using a series of CdSe quantum dot donors (sizes 2.8, 3.3, 4.0, and 4.2 nm in diameter) and metal oxide nanoparticle acceptors (SnO2, TiO2, and ZnO). Apparent electron transfer rate constants showed strong dependence on change in system free energy, exhibiting a sharp rise at small driving forces followed by a modest rise further away from the characteristic reorganization energy. The observed trend mimics the predicted behavior of electron transfer from a single quantum state to a continuum of electron accepting states, such as those present in the conduction band of a metal oxide nanoparticle. In contrast with dye-sensitized metal oxide electron transfer studies, our systems did not exhibit unthermalized hot-electron injection due to relatively large ratios of electron cooling rate to electron transfer rate. To investigate the implications of these findings in photovoltaic cells, quantum dot-metal oxide working electrodes were constructed in an identical fashion to the films used for the electron transfer portion of the study. Interestingly, the films which exhibited the fastest electron transfer rates (SnO2) were not the same as those which showed the highest photocurrent (TiO2). These findings suggest that, in addition to electron transfer at the quantum dot-metal oxide interface, other electron transfer reactions play key roles in the determination of overall device efficiency. PMID:21149685

  14. Photochemical reactions of electron-deficient olefins with N,N,N‧,N‧-tetramethylbenzidine via photoinduced electron-transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yang; Zhao, Junshu; Ji, Yuanyuan; Yan, Lei; Yu, Shuqin

    2006-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer reactions of several electron-deficient olefins with N, N, N', N'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in acetonitrile solution have been studied by using laser flash photolysis technique and steady-state fluorescence quenching method. Laser pulse excitation of TMB yields 3TMB* after rapid intersystem crossing from 1TMB*. The triplet which located at 480 nm is found to undergo fast quenching with the electron acceptors fumaronitrile (FN), dimethyl fumarate (DMF), diethyl fumarate (DEF), cinnamonitrile (CN), α-acetoxyacrylonitrile (AAN), crotononitrile (CrN) and 3-methoxyacrylonitrile (MAN). Substituents binding to olefin molecule own different electron-donating/withdrawing powers, which determine the electron-deficient property (π-cloud density) of olefin molecule as well as control the electron transfer rate constant directly. The detection of ion radical intermediates in the photolysis reactions confirms the proposed electron transfer mechanism, as expected from thermodynamics. The quenching rate constants of triplet TMB by these olefins have been determined at 510 nm to avoid the disturbance of formed TMB cation radical around 475 nm. All the kqT values approach or reach to the diffusion-controlled limit. In addition, fluorescence quenching rate constants kqS have been also obtained by calculating with Stern-Volmer equation. A correlation between experimental electron transfer rate constants and free energy changes has been explained by Marcus theory of adiabatic outer-sphere electron transfer. Disharmonic kq values for CN and CrN in endergonic region may be the disturbance of exciplexs formation.

  15. 77 FR 10373 - Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program: Electronics Manufacturing: Revisions to Heat Transfer Fluid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ...The EPA is finalizing technical revisions to the electronics manufacturing source category of the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule related to fluorinated heat transfer fluids. More specifically, EPA is finalizing amendments to the definition of fluorinated heat transfer fluids and to the provisions to estimate and report emissions from fluorinated heat transfer fluids. This final rule is narrow......

  16. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Westereng, Bjørge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Jørgensen, Henning; Larsen Andersen, Mogens; Eijsink, Vincent G.H.; Felby, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic oxidation of cell wall polysaccharides by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) plays a pivotal role in the degradation of plant biomass. While experiments have shown that LPMOs are copper dependent enzymes requiring an electron donor, the mechanism and origin of the electron supply in biological systems are only partly understood. We show here that insoluble high molecular weight lignin functions as a reservoir of electrons facilitating LPMO activity. The electrons are donated to the enzyme by long-range electron transfer involving soluble low molecular weight lignins present in plant cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds new light on how oxidative enzymes present in plant degraders may act in concert. PMID:26686263

  17. Activated-ion electron transfer dissociation improves the ability of electron transfer dissociation to identify peptides in a complex mixture.

    PubMed

    Ledvina, Aaron R; Beauchene, Nicole A; McAlister, Graeme C; Syka, John E P; Schwartz, Jae C; Griep-Raming, Jens; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J

    2010-12-15

    Using a modified electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-enabled quadrupole linear ion trap (QLT) mass spectrometer, we demonstrate the utility of IR activation concomitant with ETD ion-ion reactions (activated-ion ETD, AI-ETD). Analyzing 12 strong cation exchanged (SCX) fractions of a LysC digest of human cell protein extract using ETD, collision-activated dissociation (CAD), and AI-ETD, we find that AI-ETD generates 13 405 peptide spectral matches (PSMs) at a 1% false-discovery rate (1% FDR), surpassing both ETD (7 968) and CAD (10 904). We also analyze 12 SCX fractions of a tryptic digest of human cell protein extract and find that ETD produces 6 234 PSMs, AI-ETD 9 130 PSMs, and CAD 15 209 PSMs. Compared to ETD with supplemental collisional activation (ETcaD), AI-ETD generates ∼80% more PSMs for the whole cell lysate digested with trypsin and ∼50% more PSMs for the whole cell lysate digested with LysC. PMID:21062032

  18. 75 FR 59172 - Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes; Hearing Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... Register on Thursday, August ] 26, 2010, (75 FR 52485) announced that a public hearing was scheduled for... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1, 31, 40, and 301 RIN 1545-BJ13 Electronic Funds Transfer of... on proposed regulation relating to Federal tax deposits (FTDs) by Electronic Funds Transfer...

  19. 49 CFR 225.37 - Magnetic media transfer and electronic submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Magnetic media transfer and electronic submission..., AND INVESTIGATIONS § 225.37 Magnetic media transfer and electronic submission. (a) A railroad has the option of submitting the following reports, updates, and amendments by way of magnetic media...

  20. Ultrafast Spectroscopic Signatures of Coherent Electron-Transfer Mechanisms in a Transition Metal Complex.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenkun; Giokas, Paul G; Cheshire, Thomas P; Williams, Olivia F; Dirkes, David J; You, Wei; Moran, Andrew M

    2016-07-28

    The prevalence of ultrafast electron-transfer processes in light-harvesting materials has motivated a deeper understanding of coherent reaction mechanisms. Kinetic models based on the traditional (equilibrium) form of Fermi's Golden Rule are commonly employed to understand photoinduced electron-transfer dynamics. These models fail in two ways when the electron-transfer process is fast compared to solvation dynamics and vibrational dephasing. First, electron-transfer dynamics may be accelerated if the photoexcited wavepacket traverses the point of degeneracy between donor and acceptor states in the solvent coordinate. Second, traditional kinetic models fail to describe electron-transfer transitions that yield products which undergo coherent nuclear motions. We address the second point in this work. Transient absorption spectroscopy and a numerical model are used to investigate coherent back-electron-transfer mechanisms in a transition metal complex composed of titanium and catechol, [Ti(cat)3](2-). The transient absorption experiments reveal coherent wavepacket motions initiated by the back-electron-transfer process. Model calculations suggest that the vibrationally coherent product states may originate in either vibrational populations or coherences of the reactant. That is, vibrational coherence may be produced even if the reactant does not undergo coherent nuclear motions. The analysis raises a question of broader significance: can a vibrational population-to-coherence transition (i.e., a nonsecular transition) accelerate electron-transfer reactions even when the rate is slower than vibrational dephasing? PMID:27362388

  1. 27 CFR 53.158 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... electronic fund transfer. 53.158 Section 53.158 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) FIREARMS MANUFACTURERS EXCISE TAXES... Taxes § 53.158 Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer. (a) In general. For return periods...

  2. 27 CFR 24.272 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... electronic fund transfer. 24.272 Section 24.272 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Removal, Return and Receipt of Wine Taxpaid Removals § 24.272 Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer. (a) General. (1) During a...

  3. Distance dependence of electron transfer from liposome-embedded (alkanephosphocholine-porphinato) zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchida, E.; Kaneko, M.; Nishide, H.; Hoshino, M.

    1986-05-22

    (Alkanephosphocholine-porphinato)zinc forms a geometrically well-defined bilayer liposome with phospholipid. Electron transfer from the liposome-embedded (porphinato)zincs with different alkyl chain lengths to methylviologen present in the outer bulk solution is measured by laser flash photolysis: the intermolecular electron transfer was observed only when the porphyrin plane is located within 12 A from the surface.

  4. Theory for electron-transfer reactions involving two Marcus surfaces with a different force constant

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jau

    1994-02-01

    Theory for electron-transfer reactions at high temperature involving two Marcus parabolic surfaces with a different force constant is presented. The dynamic solvent effects are also considered using the stochastic Liouville equation, assuming an overdamped Debye solvent. An analytical expression for the adiabatic/nonadiabatic electron-transfer rate constant is derived.

  5. Aminotroponiminates as tunable, redox-active ligands: reversible single electron transfer and reductive dimerisation.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, C; Krummenacher, I

    2016-08-21

    Aminotroponiminates (atis) are shown to be redox-active ligands. Under strongly reducing conditions, the result of electron transfer can be controlled by the choice of the metal bound to the ati ligand. Either reversible electron transfer or a reductively induced dimerisation is observed. The latter reaction is (regio- and diastereo-) selective and chemically reversible. PMID:27452905

  6. 49 CFR 225.37 - Optical media transfer and electronic submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Optical media transfer and electronic submission..., AND INVESTIGATIONS § 225.37 Optical media transfer and electronic submission. (a) A railroad has the option of submitting the following reports, updates, and amendments by way of optical media (CD-ROM),...

  7. 27 CFR 41.63 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... controlled group of corporations, as defined in 26 U.S.C. 1563, and implementing regulations in 26 CFR 1.1563... electronic fund transfer. 41.63 Section 41.63 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX... by electronic fund transfer. (a) Each importer who was liable, during a calendar year, for a...

  8. 41 CFR 102-118.70 - Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer? 102-118.70 Section 102-118.70 Public Contracts and Property... Services § 102-118.70 Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer? Yes, under 31...

  9. 48 CFR 52.232-33 - Payment by Electronic Funds Transfer-Central Contractor Registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.232-33 Payment by Electronic Funds Transfer—Central... Government under this contract shall be made by electronic funds transfer (EFT), except as provided in... Fedwire Transfer System. The rules governing Federal payments through the ACH are contained in 31 CFR...

  10. 77 FR 22066 - Proposed Collection of Information: “Notice of Reclamation Electronic Funds Transfer, Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... comments concerning forms FMS-I33, ``Notice of Reclamation. Electronic Funds Transfer, Federal Recurring Payment'' and FMS-135, ``Request for Debit. Electronic Funds Transfer, Federal Recurring Payments.'' DATES... Number: FMS 133, FMS 135. ] Abstract: Program agencies authorize Treasury to recover payments that...

  11. Electron-transfer photochromism to switch bulk second-order nonlinear optical properties with high contrast.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei-Xin; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Zhang, Ming-Jian; Lin, Chen-Sheng; Cai, Li-Zhen; Guo, Sheng-Ping; Guo, Guo-Cong

    2014-10-20

    The first bulk electron-transfer photochromic compound with intrinsic second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) photoswitching properties has been synthesized. This system employs an electron-transfer photoactive asymmetric viologen ligand coordinated to a zinc(II) center. PMID:25195919

  12. Protein electron transfer: is biology (thermo)dynamic?

    PubMed

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2015-12-01

    Simple physical mechanisms are behind the flow of energy in all forms of life. Energy comes to living systems through electrons occupying high-energy states, either from food (respiratory chains) or from light (photosynthesis). This energy is transformed into the cross-membrane proton-motive force that eventually drives all biochemistry of the cell. Life's ability to transfer electrons over large distances with nearly zero loss of free energy is puzzling and has not been accomplished in synthetic systems. The focus of this review is on how this energetic efficiency is realized. General physical mechanisms and interactions that allow proteins to fold into compact water-soluble structures are also responsible for a rugged landscape of energy states and a broad distribution of relaxation times. Specific to a protein as a fluctuating thermal bath is the protein-water interface, which is heterogeneous both dynamically and structurally. The spectrum of interfacial fluctuations is a consequence of protein's elastic flexibility combined with a high density of surface charges polarizing water dipoles into surface nanodomains. Electrostatics is critical to the protein function and the relevant questions are: (i) What is the spectrum of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations? (ii) Does the interfacial biological water produce electrostatic signatures specific to proteins? (iii) How is protein-mediated chemistry affected by electrostatics? These questions connect the fluctuation spectrum to the dynamical control of chemical reactivity, i.e. the dependence of the activation free energy of the reaction on the dynamics of the bath. Ergodicity is often broken in protein-driven reactions and thermodynamic free energies become irrelevant. Continuous ergodicity breaking in a dense spectrum of relaxation times requires using dynamically restricted ensembles to calculate statistical averages. When applied to the calculation of the rates, this formalism leads to the nonergodic activated

  13. Protein electron transfer: is biology (thermo)dynamic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2015-12-01

    Simple physical mechanisms are behind the flow of energy in all forms of life. Energy comes to living systems through electrons occupying high-energy states, either from food (respiratory chains) or from light (photosynthesis). This energy is transformed into the cross-membrane proton-motive force that eventually drives all biochemistry of the cell. Life’s ability to transfer electrons over large distances with nearly zero loss of free energy is puzzling and has not been accomplished in synthetic systems. The focus of this review is on how this energetic efficiency is realized. General physical mechanisms and interactions that allow proteins to fold into compact water-soluble structures are also responsible for a rugged landscape of energy states and a broad distribution of relaxation times. Specific to a protein as a fluctuating thermal bath is the protein-water interface, which is heterogeneous both dynamically and structurally. The spectrum of interfacial fluctuations is a consequence of protein’s elastic flexibility combined with a high density of surface charges polarizing water dipoles into surface nanodomains. Electrostatics is critical to the protein function and the relevant questions are: (i) What is the spectrum of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations? (ii) Does the interfacial biological water produce electrostatic signatures specific to proteins? (iii) How is protein-mediated chemistry affected by electrostatics? These questions connect the fluctuation spectrum to the dynamical control of chemical reactivity, i.e. the dependence of the activation free energy of the reaction on the dynamics of the bath. Ergodicity is often broken in protein-driven reactions and thermodynamic free energies become irrelevant. Continuous ergodicity breaking in a dense spectrum of relaxation times requires using dynamically restricted ensembles to calculate statistical averages. When applied to the calculation of the rates, this formalism leads to the nonergodic

  14. Demonstration of Lignin-to-Peroxidase Direct Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Pogni, Rebecca; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Santos, José Ignacio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is a high redox-potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest that is able to oxidize phenolic and non-phenolic aromatics, Mn2+, and different dyes. The ability of VP from Pleurotus eryngii to oxidize water-soluble lignins (softwood and hardwood lignosulfonates) is demonstrated here by a combination of directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic techniques, among others. In addition, direct electron transfer between the peroxidase and the lignin macromolecule was kinetically characterized using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. VP variants were used to show that this reaction strongly depends on the presence of a solvent-exposed tryptophan residue (Trp-164). Moreover, the tryptophanyl radical detected by EPR spectroscopy of H2O2-activated VP (being absent from the W164S variant) was identified as catalytically active because it was reduced during lignosulfonate oxidation, resulting in the appearance of a lignin radical. The decrease of lignin fluorescence (excitation at 355 nm/emission at 400 nm) during VP treatment under steady-state conditions was accompanied by a decrease of the lignin (aromatic nuclei and side chains) signals in one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra, confirming the ligninolytic capabilities of the enzyme. Simultaneously, size-exclusion chromatography showed an increase of the molecular mass of the modified residual lignin, especially for the (low molecular mass) hardwood lignosulfonate, revealing that the oxidation products tend to recondense during the VP treatment. Finally, mutagenesis of selected residues neighboring Trp-164 resulted in improved apparent second-order rate constants for lignosulfonate reactions, revealing that changes in its protein environment (modifying the net negative charge and/or substrate accessibility/binding) can modulate the reactivity of the catalytic tryptophan. PMID:26240145

  15. Photoinduced electron transfer in perylene-TiO2 nanoassemblies.

    PubMed

    Llansola-Portoles, Manuel J; Bergkamp, Jesse J; Tomlin, John; Moore, Thomas A; Kodis, Gerdenis; Moore, Ana L; Cosa, Gonzalo; Palacios, Rodrigo E

    2013-01-01

    The photosensitization effect of three perylene dye derivatives on titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) has been investigated. The dyes used, 1,7-dibromoperylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxy dianhydride (1), 1,7-dipyrrolidinylperylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxy dianhydride (2) and 1,7-bis(4-tert-butylphenyloxy)perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxy dianhydride (3) have in common bisanhydride groups that convert into TiO2 binding groups upon hydrolysis. The different substituents on the bay position of the dyes enable tuning of their redox properties to yield significantly different driving forces for photoinduced electron transfer (PeT). Recently developed TiO2 NPs having a small average size and a narrow distribution (4 ± 1 nm) are used in this work to prepare the dye-TiO2 systems under study. Whereas successful sensitization was obtained with 1 and 2 as evidenced by steady-state spectral shifts and transient absorption results, no evidence for the attachment of 3 to TiO2 was observed. The comparison of the rates of PeT (kPeT ) for 1- and 2-TiO2 systems studied in this work with those obtained for previously reported analogous systems, having TiO2 NPs covered by a surfactant layer (Hernandez et al. [2012] J. Phys. Chem. B., 117, 4568-4581), indicates that kPeT for the former systems is slower than that for the later. These results are interpreted in terms of the different energy values of the conduction band edge in each system. PMID:23742178

  16. Photoinduced Electron Transfer between Anionic Corrole and DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Li; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Yang; Huang, Jun-Teng; Zhu, He; Ying, Xiao; Ji, Liang-Nian; Liu, Hai-Yang

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between a water-soluble anionic Ga(III) corrole [Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2] and calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) has been investigated by using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. A significant broadening from 570 to 585 nm of positive absorption band of the blend of Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2 and ct-DNA (Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2-ctDNA) has been observed from 0.15 to 0.50 ps after photoexcitation of Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2 into the Soret band. The control experiment has been performed on the model DNA ([poly(dG-dC)]2) rich in guanine bases, which exhibits a similar spectral broadening, whereas it is absent for [poly(dA-dT)]2 without guanine bases. The molecular orbital calculation shows that HOMO of Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2 is lower than that of guanine bases. The results of the electrochemical experiment show the reversible electron transfer (ET) between Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2 and guanine bases of ct-DNA is thermodynamically favorable. The dynamical analysis of the transient absorption spectra reveals that an ultrafast forward ET from the guanine bases to Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2 occurs within the pulse duration (156 fs), leading to the formation of an intermediate state. The following back ET to the ground state of Ga(tpfc)(SO3Na)2 may be accomplished in 520 fs. PMID:26752116

  17. Efficiencies of photoinduced electron-transfer reactions: Role of the Marcus inverted region in return electron transfer within geminate radical-ion pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, I.R.; Ege, D.; Moser, J.E.; Farid, S. )

    1990-05-23

    In photoinduced electron-transfer processes the primary step is conversion of the electronic energy of an excited state into chemical energy retained in the form of a redox (geminate radical-ion) pair (A + D {sup hv}{yields} A{sup {sm bullet}{minus}}/D{sup {sm bullet}+}). In polar solvents, separation of the geminate pair occurs with formation of free radical ions in solution. The quantum yields of product formation, from reactions of either the free ions, or of the geminate pair, are often low, however, due to the return electron transfer reaction (A{sup {sm bullet}{minus}}/D{sup {sm bullet}+} {yields} A + D), an energy-wasting step that competes with the useful reactions of the ion pair. The present study was undertaken to investigate the parameters controlling the rates of these return electron transfer reactions. Quantum yields of free radical ion formation were measured for ion pairs formed upon electron-transfer quenching of the first excited singlet states of cyanoanthracenes by simple aromatic hydrocarbon donors in aceonitrile at room temperature. The free-ion yields are determined by the competition between the rates of separation and return electron transfer.

  18. Bridge-mediated hopping or superexchange electron-transfer processes in bis(triarylamine) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Christoph; Nöll, Gilbert; Schelter, Jürgen

    2002-09-01

    Hopping and superexchange are generally considered to be alternative electron-transfer mechanisms in molecular systems. In this work we used mixed-valence radical cations as model systems for the investigation of electron-transfer pathways. We show that substituents attached to a conjugated bridge connecting two triarylamine redox centres have a marked influence on the near-infrared absorption spectra of the corresponding cations. Spectral analysis, followed by evaluation of the electron-transfer parameters using the Generalized Mulliken-Hush theory and simulation of the potential energy surfaces, indicate that hopping and superexchange are not alternatives, but are both present in the radical cation with a dimethoxybenzene bridge. We found that the type of electron-transfer mechanism depends on the bridge-reorganization energy as well as on the bridge-state energy. Because superexchange and hopping follow different distance laws, our findings have implications for the design of new molecular and polymeric electron-transfer materials.

  19. Theory of ultrafast photoinduced heterogeneous electron transfer: Decay of vibrational coherence into a finite electronic-vibrational quasicontinuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna, S.; Willig, F.; May, V.

    2001-08-01

    Photo-induced electron transfer from a surface attached dye molecule to the band levels of a semiconductor is modeled via an electronic-vibronic quasicontinuum. The description enables one to obtain a fairly accurate expression for the decay of the excited molecular state, including initial vibronic coherences. The model accounts for (a) the effect of a finite band width, (b) variations in reorganization energy and electronic coupling, (c) various energetic positions for the injecting level, (d) different initial vibrational wave packets in the excited state, and (e) two vibrational modes participating in the electron transfer process. Most cases are studied numerically and can be reasonably well understood from the obtained decay expression.

  20. An electron energy-loss study of picene and chrysene based charge transfer salts

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Eric; Mahns, Benjamin; Büchner, Bernd; Knupfer, Martin

    2015-05-14

    The electronic excitation spectra of charge transfer compounds built from the hydrocarbons picene and chrysene, and the strong electron acceptors F{sub 4}TCNQ (2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) and TCNQ (7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethan) have been investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The corresponding charge transfer compounds have been prepared by co-evaporation of the pristine constituents. We demonstrate that all investigated combinations support charge transfer, which results in new electronic excitation features at low energy. This might represent a way to synthesize low band gap organic semiconductors.

  1. Probing the ultrafast electron transfer at the CuPc/Au(111) interface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wei; Wang Li; Qi Dongchen; Chen Shi; Gao Xingyu; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2006-05-01

    Core-hole clock spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure measurements have been used to investigate the ultrafast electron transfer dynamics at the Copper(II) phthalocyanine (CuPc)/Au(111) interface. It was found that the strong electronic coupling between the first layer of CuPc molecules and Au(111) substrate favors ultrafast electron transfer from the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the CuPc molecules to the conduction band of Au(111) in the time scale of {approx}6 fs. In contrast, the intermolecular electron transfer within multilayers of CuPc molecules via the weak van der Waals interaction was much slower.

  2. Enhanced electron transfer kinetics through hybrid graphene-carbon nanotube films

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Philémon A.; Raut, Akshay S.; Ubnoske, Stephen M.; Parker, Charles B.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first study of the electrochemical reactivity of a graphenated carbon nanotube (g-CNT) film. The electron transfer kinetics of the ferri-ferrocyanide couple were examined for a g-CNT film and compared to the kinetics to standard carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The g-CNT film exhibited much higher catalytic activity, with a heterogeneous electron-transfer rate constant, k0, approximately two orders of magnitude higher than for standard CNTs. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to correlate the higher electron transfer kinetics with the higher edge-density of the g-CNT film. PMID:25309121

  3. A Comparison of Electron-Transfer Dynamics inIonic Liquids and Neutral Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Wishart J. F.; Lee, H.Y.; Issa, J.B.; Isied, S.S.; Castner, Jr., E.W.; Pan, Y.; Hussey, C.L.; Lee, K.S.

    2012-03-01

    The effect of ionic liquids on photoinduced electron-transfer reactions in a donor-bridge-acceptor system is examined for two ionic liquid solvents, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and tributylmethylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide. The results are compared with those for the same system in methanol and acetonitrile solution. Electron-transfer rates were measured using time-resolved fluorescence quenching for the donor-bridge-acceptor system comprising a 1-N,1-N-dimethylbenzene-1,4-diamine donor, a proline bridge, and a coumarin 343 acceptor. The photoinduced electron-transfer processes are in the inverted regime (-{Delta}G > {lambda}) in all four solvents, with driving forces of -1.6 to -1.9 eV and estimated reorganization energies of about 1.0 eV. The observed electron-transfer kinetics have broadly distributed rates that are generally slower in the ionic liquids compared to the neutral solvents, which also have narrower rate distributions. To describe the broad distributions of electron-transfer kinetics, we use two different models: a distribution of exponential lifetimes and a discrete sum of exponential lifetimes. Analysis of the donor-acceptor electronic coupling shows that for ionic liquids this intramolecular electron-transfer reaction should be treated using a solvent-controlled electron-transfer model.

  4. Excess-Electron Transfer in DNA by a Fluctuation-Assisted Hopping Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hsun; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of excess-electron transfer in DNA has attracted the attention of scientists from all kinds of research fields because of its importance in biological processes. To date, several studies on excess-electron transfer in consecutive adenine (A):thymine (T) sequences in donor-DNA-acceptor systems have been published. However, the reported excess-electron transfer rate constants for consecutive T's are in the range of 10(10)-10(11) s(-1) depending on the photosensitizing electron donor, which provides various driving forces for excess-electron injection into DNA. In this study, we employed a strongly electron-donating photosensitizer, a dimer of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (2E), and an electron acceptor, diphenylacetylene (DPA), to synthesize a series of modified DNA oligomers (2-Tn, n = 3-6) in order to investigate the excess-electron transfer dynamics in these donor-DNA-acceptor systems using femtosecond laser flash photolysis. The relation between the free energy change for charge injection and the excess-electron transfer rate among consecutive T's provided an intrinsic excess-electron hopping rate constant of (3.8 ± 1.5) × 10(10) s(-1) in the DNA, which is consistent with the fluctuation frequency of the DNA sugar backbone and bases (3.3 × 10(10) s(-1)). Thus, we discuss the effect of structural fluctuations on the excess-electron hopping in DNA. PMID:26741048

  5. Redox potential of the terminal quinone electron acceptor QB in photosystem II reveals the mechanism of electron transfer regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yuki; Nagao, Ryo; Noguchi, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) extracts electrons from water at a Mn4CaO5 cluster using light energy and then transfers them to two plastoquinones, the primary quinone electron acceptor QA and the secondary quinone electron acceptor QB. This forward electron transfer is an essential process in light energy conversion. Meanwhile, backward electron transfer is also significant in photoprotection of PSII proteins. Modulation of the redox potential (Em) gap of QA and QB mainly regulates the forward and backward electron transfers in PSII. However, the full scheme of electron transfer regulation remains unresolved due to the unknown Em value of QB. Here, for the first time (to our knowledge), the Em value of QB reduction was measured directly using spectroelectrochemistry in combination with light-induced Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy. The Em(QB−/QB) was determined to be approximately +90 mV and was virtually unaffected by depletion of the Mn4CaO5 cluster. This insensitivity of Em(QB−/QB), in combination with the known large upshift of Em(QA−/QA), explains the mechanism of PSII photoprotection with an impaired Mn4CaO5 cluster, in which a large decrease in the Em gap between QA and QB promotes rapid charge recombination via QA−. PMID:26715751

  6. Transferable pseudoclassical electrons for aufbau of atomic ions.

    PubMed

    Ekesan, Solen; Kale, Seyit; Herzfeld, Judith

    2014-06-01

    Generalizing the LEWIS reactive force field from electron pairs to single electrons, we present LEWIS• in which explicit valence electrons interact with each other and with nuclear cores via pairwise interactions. The valence electrons are independently mobile particles, following classical equations of motion according to potentials modified from Coulombic as required to capture quantum characteristics. As proof of principle, the aufbau of atomic ions is described for diverse main group elements from the first three rows of the periodic table, using a single potential for interactions between electrons of like spin and another for electrons of unlike spin. The electrons of each spin are found to distribute themselves in a fashion akin to the major lobes of the hybrid atomic orbitals, suggesting a pointillist description of the electron density. The broader validity of the LEWIS• force field is illustrated by predicting the vibrational frequencies of diatomic and triatomic hydrogen species. PMID:24752384

  7. How fast is optically induced electron transfer in organic mixed valence systems?

    PubMed

    Lambert, C; Moos, M; Schmiedel, A; Holzapfel, M; Schäfer, J; Kess, M; Engel, V

    2016-07-28

    The rate of thermally induced electron transfer in organic mixed valence compounds has thoroughly been investigated by e.g. temperature dependent ESR spectroscopy. However, almost nothing is known about the dynamics of optically induced electron transfer processes in such systems. Therefore, we investigated these processes in mixed valence compounds based on triphenylamine redox centres bridged by conjugated spacers by NIR transient absorption spectroscopy with fs-time resolution. These experiments revealed an internal conversion (IC) process to be on the order of 50-200 fs which is equivalent to the back electron transfer after optical excitation into the intervalence charge transfer band. This IC is followed by ultrafast cooling to the ground state within 1 ps. Thus, in the systems investigated optically induced electron transfer is about 3-4 orders of magnitude faster than thermally induced ET. PMID:27376572

  8. Motherhood among Incest Survivors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Tamar

    1995-01-01

    Mothers (n=26) who were incest survivors were compared with 28 mothers with no such history for 7 areas of parenting skills: role-image, objectivity, expectations, rapport, communication, limit-setting, and role-support. Significant differences were found on all seven scales, characterized by a tendency for the incest survivors to be less skillful…

  9. Coherent transfer of light polarization to electron spins in a semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Hideo; Shigyou, Hideki; Mitsumori, Yasuyoshi; Rikitake, Yoshiaki; Imamura, Hiroshi; Kutsuwa, Takeshi; Arai, Koichiro; Edamatsu, Keiichi

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrate that the superposition of light polarization states is coherently transferred to electron spins in a semiconductor quantum well. By using time-resolved Kerr rotation, we observe the initial phase of Larmor precession of electron spins whose coherence is transferred from light. To break the electron-hole spin entanglement, we utilized the big discrepancy between the transverse g factors of electrons and light-holes. The result encourages us to make a quantum media converter between flying photon qubits and stationary electron-spin qubits in semiconductors. PMID:18352739

  10. Sequential energy and electron transfer in a three-component system aligned on a clay nanosheet.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Takuya; Ramasamy, Elamparuthi; Ishida, Yohei; Shimada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Shinsuke; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan

    2016-02-21

    To achieve the goal of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer across three molecules, a phenomenon often utilized in artificial light harvesting systems, we have assembled a light absorber (that also serves as an energy donor), an energy acceptor (that also serves as an electron donor) and an electron acceptor on the surface of an anionic clay nanosheet. Since neutral organic molecules have no tendency to adsorb onto the anionic surface of clay, a positively charged water-soluble organic capsule was used to hold neutral light absorbers on the above surface. A three-component assembly was prepared by the co-adsorption of a cationic bipyridinium derivative, cationic zinc porphyrin and cationic octaamine encapsulated 2-acetylanthracene on an exfoliated anionic clay surface in water. Energy and electron transfer phenomena were monitored by steady state fluorescence and picosecond time resolved fluorescence decay. The excitation of 2-acetylanthracene in the three-component system resulted in energy transfer from 2-acetylanthracene to zinc porphyrin with 71% efficiency. Very little loss due to electron transfer from 2-acetylanthracene in the cavitand to the bipyridinium derivative was noticed. Energy transfer was followed by electron transfer from the zinc porphyrin to the cationic bipyridinium derivative with 81% efficiency. Analyses of fluorescence decay profiles confirmed the occurrence of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer. Merging the concepts of supramolecular chemistry and surface chemistry we realized sequential energy and electron transfer between three hydrophobic molecules in water. Exfoliated transparent saponite clay served as a matrix to align the three photoactive molecules at a close distance in aqueous solutions. PMID:26820105

  11. The impact of an electronic health questionnaire on symptom management and behavior reporting for breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Bock, Meredith; Moore, Dan; Hwang, Jimmy; Shumay, Dianne; Lawson, Laurell; Hamolsky, Deborah; Esserman, Laura; Rugo, Hope; Chien, A Jo; Park, John; Munster, Pamela; Melisko, Michelle

    2012-08-01

    Breast cancer (BC) patients experience multiple symptoms as a result of diagnosis and treatment. While surveillance for detecting cancer recurrence is fundamental to follow-up care, managing symptoms, and promoting health behaviors are equally important. UCSF has implemented a secure online health questionnaire enabling BC patients to provide updates of their health history and symptoms. We randomly selected a sample of stage I-III BC patients (n = 106) who completed a questionnaire before a medical oncology visit between August 2010 and January 2011 and consented to have data used for research. We conducted a chart review calculating the number of symptoms reported in the questionnaire, the clinic note only, and both questionnaire and clinic note, excluding chronic symptoms addressed previously. Self-reported data on exercise and alcohol consumption was compared to documentation of these lifestyle factors in clinic notes. Patients reported significantly more symptoms using the online questionnaire (mean = 3.8, range 0-13) than were documented by the provider in clinic notes (mean = 1.8, range 0-7; p < 0.001 for the difference). A regression plot comparing the percentage of symptoms agreed upon by the patient and provider and the percentage of symptoms addressed yields a slope of 0.56 (95 % CI 0.41-0.71). The number of self-reported symptoms correlates with self-reported Karnofsky scale such that the number of symptoms reported by the patient increases linearly with this score until a threshold and it then plateaus (p < 0.001). Exercise behavior and alcohol consumption were reported in 100 % of the online questionnaires, but was documented in only 30/106 (28 %) and 75/106 (70 %) of charts reviewed. In 19/75 (25 %) charts with alcohol consumption documented, there was substantial discordance between patient and clinician reporting. Electronic data collection of BC patient-reported outcomes has a positive effect on symptom management and identification of

  12. Sequence-Dependent Photocurrent Generation through Long-Distance Excess-Electron Transfer in DNA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hsun; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2016-07-18

    Given its well-ordered continuous π stacking of nucleobases, DNA has been considered as a biomaterial for charge transfer in biosensors. For cathodic photocurrent generation resulting from hole transfer in DNA, sensitivity to DNA structure and base-pair stacking has been confirmed. However, such information has not been provided for anodic photocurrent generation resulting from excess-electron transfer in DNA. In the present study, we measured the anodic photocurrent of a DNA-modified Au electrode. Our results demonstrate long-distance excess-electron transfer in DNA, which is dominated by a hopping mechanism, and the photocurrent generation is sequence dependent. PMID:27243800

  13. Electronic coherence and the kinetics of energy transfer in light-harvesting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David; Miller, Thomas

    Recent 2D-spectroscopy experiments have observed transient electronic coherence in natural and artificial light harvesting systems, which raises questions about the role of electronic coherence in facilitating excitation energy transfer (EET) processes. In this talk, we introduce the recently developed partial linearized path-integral (PLPI) method, which can accurately simulate exciton transfer dynamics across multiple reaction regimes, as well as reliably describe the electronic coherence among excitonic states. Further, we develop a strategy that enables the analysis of the relative impact of static and dynamic electronic coherence. With PLPI simulations, we find that energy transfer dynamics are almost entirely dominated by static coherence effects; dynamic coherence is found to cause only minor effects. These conclusions are consistent with the historical view that emphasizes the importance of energy-level alignment for efficient incoherent energy transfer,while suggesting a less important role for more exotic electronic coherence effects that have been recently emphasized.

  14. Intermolecular electron transfer from intramolecular excitation and coherent acoustic phonon generation in a hydrogen-bonded charge-transfer solid.

    PubMed

    Rury, Aaron S; Sorenson, Shayne; Dawlaty, Jahan M

    2016-03-14

    Organic materials that produce coherent lattice phonon excitations in response to external stimuli may provide next generation solutions in a wide range of applications. However, for these materials to lead to functional devices in technology, a full understanding of the possible driving forces of coherent lattice phonon generation must be attained. To facilitate the achievement of this goal, we have undertaken an optical spectroscopic study of an organic charge-transfer material formed from the ubiquitous reduction-oxidation pair hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone. Upon pumping this material, known as quinhydrone, on its intermolecular charge transfer resonance as well as an intramolecular resonance of p-benzoquinone, we find sub-cm(-1) oscillations whose dispersion with probe energy resembles that of a coherent acoustic phonon that we argue is coherently excited following changes in the electron density of quinhydrone. Using the dynamical information from these ultrafast pump-probe measurements, we find that the fastest process we can resolve does not change whether we pump quinhydrone at either energy. Electron-phonon coupling from both ultrafast coherent vibrational and steady-state resonance Raman spectroscopies allows us to determine that intramolecular electronic excitation of p-benzoquinone also drives the electron transfer process in quinhydrone. These results demonstrate the wide range of electronic excitations of the parent of molecules found in many functional organic materials that can drive coherent lattice phonon excitations useful for applications in electronics, photonics, and information technology. PMID:26979698

  15. Intermolecular electron transfer from intramolecular excitation and coherent acoustic phonon generation in a hydrogen-bonded charge-transfer solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rury, Aaron S.; Sorenson, Shayne; Dawlaty, Jahan M.

    2016-03-01

    Organic materials that produce coherent lattice phonon excitations in response to external stimuli may provide next generation solutions in a wide range of applications. However, for these materials to lead to functional devices in technology, a full understanding of the possible driving forces of coherent lattice phonon generation must be attained. To facilitate the achievement of this goal, we have undertaken an optical spectroscopic study of an organic charge-transfer material formed from the ubiquitous reduction-oxidation pair hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone. Upon pumping this material, known as quinhydrone, on its intermolecular charge transfer resonance as well as an intramolecular resonance of p-benzoquinone, we find sub-cm-1 oscillations whose dispersion with probe energy resembles that of a coherent acoustic phonon that we argue is coherently excited following changes in the electron density of quinhydrone. Using the dynamical information from these ultrafast pump-probe measurements, we find that the fastest process we can resolve does not change whether we pump quinhydrone at either energy. Electron-phonon coupling from both ultrafast coherent vibrational and steady-state resonance Raman spectroscopies allows us to determine that intramolecular electronic excitation of p-benzoquinone also drives the electron transfer process in quinhydrone. These results demonstrate the wide range of electronic excitations of the parent of molecules found in many functional organic materials that can drive coherent lattice phonon excitations useful for applications in electronics, photonics, and information technology.

  16. Calculation of electron transfer in ruthenium-modified derivatives of cytochrome b562

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Prytkova, T. R.; Shunaev, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative theoretical studies of long-range electron transfer are still quite rare and require further development of computational methods for the analysis of such reactions. We considered the electron transfer reaction in rutenium-modified derivatives of cytochrome b562 with advanced modeling techniques. We conducted a series of ab initio calculations of the donor/acceptor interaction in protein fragments and compared the calculated electron velocity with available experimental data. Our approach takes into account the co-factor of the electronic structure and the impact of the solution on a donor-acceptor interaction. This allows us to predict the absolute values of the electron transfer rate unlike other computational methods which provide only qualitative results. Our estimates with good accuracy repeat the experimental values of electron transfer rate. It was found that the electron transfer in certain derivatives of cytochrome b562 is mainly caused by "shortcut" conformations in which the donor/acceptor interactions are mediated by the interaction of Ru-unbound ligands with groups of the protein surface. We argue that a quantitative theoretical analysis is essential for detailed understanding of electron transfer in proteins and mechanisms of biological redox reactions.

  17. Structural effects on photoinduced electron transfer in carotenoid-porphyrin-quinone triads

    SciTech Connect

    Kuciauskas, D.; Liddell, P.A.; Hung, S.C.; Lin, S.; Stone, S.; Seely, G.R.; Moore, A.L.; Moore, T.A.; Gust, D.

    1997-01-16

    meso-Polyarylporphyrins are often used as components of molecules that mimic photosynthetic reaction centers by carrying out photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. Studies of these systems have raised questions concerning the role of alkyl substituents at the `{beta}-pyrrolic` positions on the porphyrin periphery in limiting {pi}-{pi} overlap between the macrocycle and the aryl rings. The degree of overlap affects electronic coupling and, therefore, the rates of electron-transfer reactions. There is also evidence that when the linkages joining porphyrins to electron-acceptor or -donor moieties contain amide bonds, the sense of the amide linkage may strongly affect electron-transfer rate constants. In this study, three carotenoid-porphyrin-quinone molecular triads and various model compounds have been prepared, and electron-transfer has been studied using time-resolved emission and absorption techniques. The results show that steric hindrance due to methyl groups at the {beta}-pyrrolic positions reduces electron-transfer rate constants by a factor of approximately 1/5. In addition, amide-containing donor-acceptor linkages having the nitrogen atom attached to the porphyrin meso-aryl ring demonstrate electron-transfer rate constants approximately 30 times larger than those for similar linkages with the amide reversed, after correction for thermodynamic effects. 52 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Rates and Routes of Electron Transfer of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase in an Enzymatic Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Alexander; Stein, Matthias

    2015-10-29

    Hydrogenase enzymes are being used in enzymatic fuel cells immobilized on a graphite or carbon electrode surface, for example. The enzyme is used for the anodic oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2) to produce protons and electrons. The association and orientation of the enzyme at the anode electrode for a direct electron transfer is not completely resolved. The distal FeS-cluster in [NiFe]-hydrogenases contains a histidine residue which is known to play a critical role in the intermolecular electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode surface. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase graphite electrode association was investigated using Brownian Dynamics simulations. Residues that were shown to be in proximity to the electrode surface were identified (His184, Ser196, Glu461, Glu464), and electron transfer routes connecting the distal FeS-cluster with the surface residues were investigated. Several possible pathways for electron transfer between the distal FeS-cluster and the terminal amino acid residues were probed in terms of their rates of electron transfer using DFT methods. The reorganization energies λ of the distal iron-sulfur cluster and coronene as a molecular model for graphite were calculated. The reorganization energy of the distal (His)(Cys)3 cluster was found to be not very different from that of a standard cubane clusters with a (Cys)4 coordination. Electronic coupling matrix elements and rates of electron transfer for the different pathways were calculated according to the Marcus equation. The rates for glutamate-mediated electrode binding were found to be incompatible with experimental data. A direct electron transfer from the histidine ligand of the distal FeS-cluster to the electrode yielded rates of electron transfer in excellent agreement with experiment. A second pathway, however, from the distal FeS-cluster to the Ser196 residue was found to be equally efficient and feasible. PMID:26218232

  19. Coupled sensitizer-catalyst dyads: electron-transfer reactions in a perylene-polyoxometalate conjugate.

    PubMed

    Odobel, Fabrice; Séverac, Marjorie; Pellegrin, Yann; Blart, Errol; Fosse, Céline; Cannizzo, Caroline; Mayer, Cédric R; Elliott, Kristopher J; Harriman, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafast discharge of a single-electron capacitor: A variety of intramolecular electron-transfer reactions are apparent for polyoxometalates functionalized with covalently attached perylene monoimide chromophores, but these are restricted to single-electron events. (et=electron transfer, cr=charge recombination, csr=charge-shift reaction, PER=perylene, POM=polyoxometalate).A new strategy is introduced that permits covalent attachment of an organic chromophore to a polyoxometalate (POM) cluster. Two examples are reported that differ according to the nature of the anchoring group and the flexibility of the linker. Both POMs are functionalized with perylene monoimide units, which function as photon collectors and form a relatively long-lived charge-transfer state under illumination. They are reduced to a stable pi-radical anion by electrolysis or to a protonated dianion under photolysis in the presence of aqueous triethanolamine. The presence of the POM opens up an intramolecular electron-transfer route by which the charge-transfer state reduces the POM. The rate of this process depends on the molecular conformation and appears to involve through-space interactions. Prior reduction of the POM leads to efficient fluorescence quenching, again due to intramolecular electron transfer. In most cases, it is difficult to resolve the electron-transfer products because of relatively fast reverse charge shift that occurs within a closed conformer. Although the POM can store multiple electrons, it has not proved possible to use these systems as molecular-scale capacitors because of efficient electron transfer from the one-electron-reduced POM to the excited singlet state of the perylene monoimide. PMID:19197929

  20. Specific deuterium isotope effects on the rates of electron transfer within geminate radical-ion pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, I.R.; Farid, S.

    1988-11-09

    The results of the first systematic study of the effect of isotopic substitution on the rates of electron transfer for reactions in the inverted region are reported. Rates of return electron transfer within germinate radical ion pairs of 9,10-dicyanoanthracene (DCA) and 2,6,9,10-tetracyanoanthracene (TCA) radical ions and radical cations of perdeuteriated methyl-substituted benzene derivatives determined by a previously reported method are tabulated. The free energies of the electron-transfer reactions for both sets of ion pairs have been calculated, and in each case the reactions with deuterated cations was slower than with undeuterated radical cations. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1992-07-31

    Conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used to study the intermediates involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. These intermediates were excited state of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and species formed in reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern was the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes. (DLC)

  2. Efficient photoinduced orthogonal energy and electron transfer reactions via phospholipid membrane-bound donors and acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Clapp, P.J.; Armitage, B.; Roosa, P.; O'Brien, D.F. )

    1994-10-05

    A three component, liposome-bound photochemical molecular device (PMD) consisting of energy and electron transfer reactions is described. Bilayer membrane surface-associated dyes, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)-phenyl]-21H,2 3H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate salt and N,N[prime]-bis[(3-trimethylammonio)propyl]thiadicarbocya nine tribromide, are the energy donor and acceptor, respectively, in a blue light stimulated energy transfer reaction along the vesicle surface. The electronically excited cyanine is quenched by electron transfer from the phospholipid membrane bound triphenylbenzyl borate anion, which is located in the lipid bilayer interior. The PMD exhibits sequential reactions following electronic excitation with the novel feature that the steps proceed with orthogonal orientation: energy transfer occurs parallel to the membrane surface, and electron transfer occurs perpendicular to the surface. Photobleaching and fluorescence quenching experiments verify the transfer reactions, and Stern-Volmer analysis was used to estimate the reaction rate constants. At the highest concentrations examined of energy and electron acceptor ca. 60% of the photoexcited porphyrins were quenched by energy transfer to the cyanine. 56 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Role of coherence and delocalization in photo-induced electron transfer at organic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Abramavicius, V; Pranculis, V; Melianas, A; Inganäs, O; Gulbinas, V; Abramavicius, D

    2016-01-01

    Photo-induced charge transfer at molecular heterojunctions has gained particular interest due to the development of organic solar cells (OSC) based on blends of electron donating and accepting materials. While charge transfer between donor and acceptor molecules can be described by Marcus theory, additional carrier delocalization and coherent propagation might play the dominant role. Here, we describe ultrafast charge separation at the interface of a conjugated polymer and an aggregate of the fullerene derivative PCBM using the stochastic Schrödinger equation (SSE) and reveal the complex time evolution of electron transfer, mediated by electronic coherence and delocalization. By fitting the model to ultrafast charge separation experiments, we estimate the extent of electron delocalization and establish the transition from coherent electron propagation to incoherent hopping. Our results indicate that even a relatively weak coupling between PCBM molecules is sufficient to facilitate electron delocalization and efficient charge separation at organic interfaces. PMID:27605035

  4. Role of coherence and delocalization in photo-induced electron transfer at organic interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Abramavicius, V.; Pranculis, V.; Melianas, A.; Inganäs, O.; Gulbinas, V.; Abramavicius, D.

    2016-01-01

    Photo-induced charge transfer at molecular heterojunctions has gained particular interest due to the development of organic solar cells (OSC) based on blends of electron donating and accepting materials. While charge transfer between donor and acceptor molecules can be described by Marcus theory, additional carrier delocalization and coherent propagation might play the dominant role. Here, we describe ultrafast charge separation at the interface of a conjugated polymer and an aggregate of the fullerene derivative PCBM using the stochastic Schrödinger equation (SSE) and reveal the complex time evolution of electron transfer, mediated by electronic coherence and delocalization. By fitting the model to ultrafast charge separation experiments, we estimate the extent of electron delocalization and establish the transition from coherent electron propagation to incoherent hopping. Our results indicate that even a relatively weak coupling between PCBM molecules is sufficient to facilitate electron delocalization and efficient charge separation at organic interfaces. PMID:27605035

  5. Direct Delocalization for Calculating Electron Transfer in Fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Arntsen, Christopher D.; Reslan, Randa; Hernandez, Samuel; Gao, Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2013-08-05

    A method is introduced for simple calculation of charge transfer between very large solvated organic dimers (fullerenes here) from isolated dimer calculations. The individual monomers in noncentrosymmetric dimers experience different chemical environments, so that the dimers do not necessarily represent bulk-like molecules. Therefore, we apply a delocalizing bias directly to the Fock matrix of the dimer system, and verify that this is almost as accurate as self-consistent solvation. As large molecules like fullerenes have a plethora of excited states, the initially excited state orbitals are thermally populated, so that the rate is obtained as a thermal average over Marcus thermal transfers.

  6. Modification of classical Spitzer ion-electron energy transfer rate for large ratios of ion to electron temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rider, Todd H.; Catto, Peter J.

    1995-06-01

    Corrections to the classical Spitzer heat transfer rate between ions and electrons are calculated for the case when the ion temperature Ti is significantly higher than the electron temperature Te. It is found that slow electrons are partially depleted by their interactions with the ions, resulting in a decrease in the heat transfer in comparison with the Spitzer rate, which assumes perfectly Maxwellian electrons. The heat transfer steadily decreases from the classical value as Ti/Te increases; for Ti/Te values of several hundred, the heat transfer rate drops to around 60%-80% of the Spitzer result. A useful expression for the heat transfer correction factor in the case when all of the ion species are at the temperature Ti is found to be Pie/(Pie)Spitzer ≊[1+(me/mi)(Ti/Te)]3/2 exp{-[3.5∑i (Z2ini/ne)(me/mi) (Ti/Te)]2/3}. This expression is quite accurate for values of ∑i (Z2ini/ne)(mp/mi)(Ti/Te) less than about 50 (where mp is the proton mass), although it underestimates the heat transfer rate for larger values of Ti/Te, and one must resort to the more accurate but more complex analytical results derived in the paper. In the event that the ion distribution is non-Maxwellian, Ti in the correction factor should be replaced by 2/3, where is the mean ion energy.

  7. Frontier orbital symmetry control of intermolecular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, B.

    1991-09-01

    This report contains sections describing the selection of electron donor-acceptor systems, the synthesis and photophysical properties of linked electron-donor-acceptor systems, the estimation of photoinduced charge-separation rate constants from fluorescence quenching data, and radical ion-pair recombination by picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. 9 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  8. The Mechanism and Properties of Electron Transfer in the Biological Organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng

    2013-08-01

    The mechanism and properties of electron transfer along protein molecules at finite temperature T ≠ 0 in the life systems are studied using nonlinear theory of bio-energy transport and Green function method, in which the electrons are transferred from donors to acceptors in virtue of the supersound soliton excited by the energy released in ATP hydrolysis. The electron transfer is, in essence, a process of oxidation-reduction reaction. In this study we first give the Hamiltonian and wavefunction of the system and find out the soliton solution of the dynamical equation in the protein molecules with finite temperature, and obtain the dynamical coefficient of the electron transfer. The results show that the speed of the electron transfer is related to the velocity of motion of the soliton, distribution of electrons in the donor and acceptor as well as the interaction strength among them. We finally concluded the changed rule of electric current, arising from the electron transfer, with increasing time. These results are useful in molecular and chemical biology.

  9. Pulse radiolytic studies of electron transfer processes and applications to solar photochemistry. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Neta, P.

    1995-02-01

    The pulse radiolysis technique is applied to the study of electron transfer processes in a variety of chemical systems. Reactive intermediates are produced in solution by electron pulse irradiation and the kinetics of their reactions are followed by time resolved absorption spectrophotometry. Complementary experiments are carried out with excimer laser flash photolysis. These studies are concerned with mechanisms, kinetics, and thermodynamics of reactions of organic and inorganic radicals and unstable oxidation states of metal ions. Reactions are studied in both aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. The studies focus on the unique ability of pulse radiolysis to provide absolute rate constants for reactions of many inorganic radicals and organic peroxyl radicals, species that are key intermediates in many chemical processes. A special concern of this work is the study of electron transfer reactions of metalloporphyrins, which permits evaluation of these molecules as intermediates in solar energy conversion. Metalloporphyrins react with free radicals via electron transfer, involving the ligand or the metal center, or via bonding to the metal, leading to a variety of chemical species whose behavior is also investigated. The highlights of the results during the past three years are summarized below under the following sections: (a) electron transfer reactions of peroxyl radicals, concentrating on the characterization of new peroxyl radicals derived from vinyl, phenyl, other aryl, and pyridyl; (b) solvent effects on electron transfer reactions of inorganic and organic peroxyl radicals, including reactions with porphyrins, and (c) electron transfer and alkylation reactions of metalloporphyrins and other complexes.

  10. Bi-directional magnetic resonance based wireless power transfer for electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Durga P.; Nayak, Praveen P.; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan; Mishra, Debasish

    2015-09-01

    In order to power or charge electronic devices wirelessly, a bi-directional wireless power transfer method has been proposed and experimentally investigated. In the proposed design, two receiving coils are used on both sides of a transmitting coil along its central axis to receive the power wirelessly from the generated magnetic fields through strongly coupled magnetic resonance. It has been observed experimentally that the maximum power transfer occurs at the operating resonant frequency for optimum electric load connected across the receiving coils on both side. The optimum wireless power transfer efficiency is 88% for the bi-directional power transfer technique compared 84% in the one side receiver system. By adopting the developed bi-directional power transfer method, two electronic devices can be powered up or charged simultaneously instead of a single device through usual one side receiver system without affecting the optimum power transfer efficiency.

  11. Bi-directional magnetic resonance based wireless power transfer for electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Durga P.; Nayak, Praveen P.; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan; Mishra, Debasish

    2015-09-28

    In order to power or charge electronic devices wirelessly, a bi-directional wireless power transfer method has been proposed and experimentally investigated. In the proposed design, two receiving coils are used on both sides of a transmitting coil along its central axis to receive the power wirelessly from the generated magnetic fields through strongly coupled magnetic resonance. It has been observed experimentally that the maximum power transfer occurs at the operating resonant frequency for optimum electric load connected across the receiving coils on both side. The optimum wireless power transfer efficiency is 88% for the bi-directional power transfer technique compared 84% in the one side receiver system. By adopting the developed bi-directional power transfer method, two electronic devices can be powered up or charged simultaneously instead of a single device through usual one side receiver system without affecting the optimum power transfer efficiency.

  12. Transferred metal electrode films for large-area electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jin-Guo; Kam, Fong-Yu; Chua, Lay-Lay

    2014-11-10

    The evaporation of metal-film gate electrodes for top-gate organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) limits the minimum thickness of the polymer gate dielectric to typically more than 300 nm due to deep hot metal atom penetration and damage of the dielectric. We show here that the self-release layer transfer method recently developed for high-quality graphene transfer is also capable of giving high-quality metal thin-film transfers to produce high-performance capacitors and OFETs with superior dielectric breakdown strength even for ultrathin polymer dielectric films. Dielectric breakdown strengths up to 5–6 MV cm{sup −1} have been obtained for 50-nm thin films of polystyrene and a cyclic olefin copolymer TOPAS{sup ®} (Zeon). High-quality OFETs with sub-10 V operational voltages have been obtained this way using conventional polymer dielectrics and a high-mobility polymer semiconductor poly[2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophene-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-2,5-diyl]. The transferred metal films can make reliable contacts without damaging ultrathin polymer films, self-assembled monolayers and graphene, which is not otherwise possible from evaporated or sputtered metal films.

  13. 77 FR 6310 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... information on whether it should revise these threshold numbers in Regulation Z. See 76 FR 75825 (Dec. 5, 2011... would complete the rulemaking process. 76 FR 29902 (May 23, 2011). This proposal has two parts. First... disclosure and two receipts) for each transfer described above would create information overload...

  14. Pain in Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Glare, Paul A.; Davies, Pamela S.; Finlay, Esmé; Gulati, Amitabh; Lemanne, Dawn; Moryl, Natalie; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Paice, Judith A.; Stubblefield, Michael D.; Syrjala, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a common problem in cancer survivors, especially in the first few years after treatment. In the longer term, approximately 5% to 10% of survivors have chronic severe pain that interferes with functioning. The prevalence is much higher in certain subpopulations, such as breast cancer survivors. All cancer treatment modalities have the potential to cause pain. Currently, the approach to managing pain in cancer survivors is similar to that for chronic cancer-related pain, pharmacotherapy being the principal treatment modality. Although it may be appropriate to continue strong opioids in survivors with moderate to severe pain, most pain problems in cancer survivors will not require them. Moreover, because more than 40% of cancer survivors now live longer than 10 years, there is growing concern about the long-term adverse effects of opioids and the risks of misuse, abuse, and overdose in the nonpatient population. As with chronic nonmalignant pain, multimodal interventions that incorporate nonpharmacologic therapies should be part of the treatment strategy for pain in cancer survivors, prescribed with the aim of restoring functionality, not just providing comfort. For patients with complex pain issues, multidisciplinary programs should be used, if available. New or worsening pain in a cancer survivor must be evaluated to determine whether the cause is recurrent disease or a second malignancy. This article focuses on patients with a history of cancer who are beyond the acute diagnosis and treatment phase and on common treatment-related pain etiologies. The benefits and harms of the various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic options for pain management in this setting are reviewed. PMID:24799477

  15. Pain in cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Glare, Paul A; Davies, Pamela S; Finlay, Esmé; Gulati, Amitabh; Lemanne, Dawn; Moryl, Natalie; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Paice, Judith A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Syrjala, Karen L

    2014-06-01

    Pain is a common problem in cancer survivors, especially in the first few years after treatment. In the longer term, approximately 5% to 10% of survivors have chronic severe pain that interferes with functioning. The prevalence is much higher in certain subpopulations, such as breast cancer survivors. All cancer treatment modalities have the potential to cause pain. Currently, the approach to managing pain in cancer survivors is similar to that for chronic cancer-related pain, pharmacotherapy being the principal treatment modality. Although it may be appropriate to continue strong opioids in survivors with moderate to severe pain, most pain problems in cancer survivors will not require them. Moreover, because more than 40% of cancer survivors now live longer than 10 years, there is growing concern about the long-term adverse effects of opioids and the risks of misuse, abuse, and overdose in the nonpatient population. As with chronic nonmalignant pain, multimodal interventions that incorporate nonpharmacologic therapies should be part of the treatment strategy for pain in cancer survivors, prescribed with the aim of restoring functionality, not just providing comfort. For patients with complex pain issues, multidisciplinary programs should be used, if available. New or worsening pain in a cancer survivor must be evaluated to determine whether the cause is recurrent disease or a second malignancy. This article focuses on patients with a history of cancer who are beyond the acute diagnosis and treatment phase and on common treatment-related pain etiologies. The benefits and harms of the various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic options for pain management in this setting are reviewed. PMID:24799477

  16. Coexistence of Different Electron-Transfer Mechanisms in the DNA Repair Process by Photolyase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wook; Kodali, Goutham; Stanley, Robert J; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2016-08-01

    DNA photolyase has been the topic of extensive studies due to its important role of repairing photodamaged DNA, and its unique feature of using light as an energy source. A crucial step in the repair by DNA photolyase is the forward electron transfer from its cofactor (FADH(-) ) to the damaged DNA, and the detailed mechanism of this process has been controversial. In the present study, we examine the forward electron transfer in DNA photolyase by carrying out high-level ab initio calculations in combination with a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach, and by measuring fluorescence emission spectra at low temperature. On the basis of these computational and experimental results, we demonstrate that multiple decay pathways exist in DNA photolyase depending on the wavelength at excitation and the subsequent transition. This implies that the forward electron transfer in DNA photolyase occurs not only by superexchange mechanism but also by sequential electron transfer. PMID:27362906

  17. Extracellular electron transfer of a highly adhesive and metabolically versatile bacterium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Ishikawa, Masahito; Matsuda, Shoichi; Kimoto, Yuki; Hori, Katsutoshi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakanishi, Shuji

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial adhesion to a solid plays a predominant role in mediating the extracellular electron transfer for genus Acinetobactor, a metabolically versatile bacterium that can couple toluene degradation and electricity generation. PMID:23813865

  18. Electrode assemblies composed of redox cascades from microbial respiratory electron transfer chains

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Andrew J.; Marritt, Sophie; Bradley, Justin; Shi, Liang; McMillan, Duncan G.; Jeuken, Lars J.; Richardson, David; Butt, Julea N.

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory and photosynthetic electron transfer chains are dependent on vectorial electron transfer through a series of redox proteins. Examples include electron transfer from NapC to NapAB nitrate reductase in Paracoccus denitrificans and from CymA to Fcc3 (flavocytochrome c3) fumarate reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In the present article, we demonstrate that graphite electrodes can serve as surfaces for the stepwise adsorption of NapC and NapAB, and the stepwise adsorption of CymA and Fcc3. Aspects of the catalytic properties of these assemblies are different from those of NapAB and Fcc3 adsorbed in isolation. We propose that this is due to the formation of NapC-NapAB and of CymA-Fcc3 complexes that are capable of supporting vectorial electron transfer.

  19. Non-Markovian electron transfer reactions with frequency-dependent friction

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.

    1993-12-31

    A modified non-Markovian Zusman equation for electron transfer reactions with frequency-dependent friction is presented. The derivation is based on the spin-boson model with a two-level system coupled to a non-Debye polar solvent bath with frequency-dependent friction. The diffusion constant in the Smoluchowski diffusion operator of the ordinary Zusman equation should be replaced by a convolution of a retarded time-dependent diffusion constant. An analytical expression for the electron transfer rate constant was derived using the Green`s function method. In the adiabatic regime, electron transfer process is generally nonexponential. Because of the time-retardation, initial electron transfer reaction is influenced more by the higher frequency components in the solvent relaxation.

  20. 77 FR 34127 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Transfer Account...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... Fiscal Service Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Transfer Account (ETA) Financial Agency Agreement AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION: Notice and Request for comments. SUMMARY: The Financial Management Service, as part of...

  1. Design of a Molecular Memory Device: The Electron Transfer Shift Register Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, D.

    1993-01-01

    A molecular shift register memory at the molecular level is described. The memory elements consist of molecules can exit in either an oxidized or reduced state and the bits are shifted between the cells with photoinduced electron transfer reactions.

  2. Vectorial electron transfer in spatially ordered arrays. Progress report, January 1992--January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Progress was made on synthesis of new materials for directional electron transfer (block copolymers and helical oligopeptides), preparation and characterization of anisotropic composites bearing organics and inorganics, electrocatalysis (redox-activated catalysts), and surface modifications of metals and semiconductors.

  3. Facilitation of Electron Transfer in the Presence of Mitochondria-Targeting Molecule SS31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosach, Tetiana; Ebrahim, Mark; Ren, Yuhang; Darrah, Shaun; Szeto, Hazel

    2010-03-01

    Electron transfer (ET) processes in mitochondria are very important for the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the common source of the chemical energy. The inability to transfer electrons efficiently in mitochondrial ET chain plays a major role in age associated diseases, including diabetes and cancer. In this work, we used the time dependent absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy to study the electron transfer kinetics along the ET chain of mitochondria. Our spectroscopic results suggest that SS31, a small peptide molecule targeting to the mitochondrial inner membrane, can facilitate electron transfer and increase ATP production. We show that SS31 targets cytochrome c to both increase the availability of state and also potentially reduce the energy barrier required to reduce cytochrome c.

  4. Modeling Charge Transfer in Fullerene Collisions via Real-Time Electron Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jakowski, Jacek; Irle, Stephan; Sumpter, Bobby G; Morokuma, Keiji

    2012-06-01

    An approach for performing real-time dynamics of electron transfer in a prototype redox reaction that occurs in reactive collisions between neutral and ionic fullerenes is discussed. The quantum dynamical simulations show that the electron transfer occurs within 60 fs directly preceding the collision of the fullerenes, followed by structural changes and relaxation of electron charge. The consequences of real-time electron dynamics are fully elucidated for the far from equilibrium processes of collisions between neutral and multiply charged fullerenes. PMID:26285634

  5. Dynamics of ultrafast photoinduced heterogeneous electron transfer, implications for recent solar energy conversion scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, Lars; Burfeindt, Bernd; Mahrt, Jürgen; Willig, Frank

    2012-08-01

    The general case of a heterogeneous electron transfer reaction is realized by ultrafast electron transfer from a photo-excited molecule to a wide continuum of electronic acceptor states. Two different theoretical model calculations addressing the injection dynamics have recently been presented. The first scenario predicts a wide energy distribution for the injected electron via excitations of high-energy vibrational modes in the ionized molecule, whereas the second scenario ascribes the width to thermal fluctuations. We present experimental data at different temperatures and identify the valid injection scenario for perylene/TiO2 systems. The results are discussed in view of recent solar energy conversion scenarios.

  6. Rate of Interfacial Electron Transfer through the 1,2,3-Triazole Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Devaraj, Neal K.; Decreau, Richard A.; Ebina, Wataru; Collman, James P.; Chidsey, Christopher E. D.

    2012-01-01

    The rate of electron transfer is measured to two ferrocene and one iron tetraphenylporphyrin redox species coupled through terminal acetylenes to azide-terminated thiol monolayers by the Cu(I)-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (a Sharpless “click” reaction) to form the 1,2,3-triazole linkage. The high yield, chemoselectivity, convenience, and broad applicability of this triazole formation reaction make such a modular assembly strategy very attractive. Electron-transfer rate constants from greater than 60,000 to 1 s−1 are obtained by varying the length and conjugation of the electron-transfer bridge and by varying the surrounding diluent thiols in the monolayer. Triazole and the triazole carbonyl linkages provide similar electronic coupling for electron transfer as esters. The ability to vary the rate of electron transfer to many different redox species over many orders of magnitude by using modular coupling chemistry provides a convenient way to study and control the delivery of electrons to multielectron redox catalysts and similar interfacial systems that require controlled delivery of electrons. PMID:16898751

  7. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    PubMed Central

    Sjulstok, Emil; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov’yov, Ilia A.

    2015-01-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe specifically the electron transfer reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome–a signaling photoreceptor protein that became attractive recently due to its possible function as a biological magnetoreceptor. PMID:26689792

  8. Vibrationaly Driven Electron Transfer in CH3NO2-CdotCH3I Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knurr, Benjamin J.; Adams, Christopher L.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2011-06-01

    Excitation of vibrations in species with weakly bound electrons can lead to the loss of electrons by vibrational autodetachment (VAD). If the molecular host of a weakly bound electron is stabilized by solvation, VAD can become energetically disallowed. However, electron transfer can take the role of VAD if the solvent can accept an excess electron. The analog of such a process via electronic excitation is known as charge transfer to solvent and can be seen as distinct absorption bands in the UV spectra of bulk solutions and clusters. We investigate vibrationally driven charge transfer in CH3NO2-CdotCH3I clusters, initiated by excitation of CH stretching and HCH bending fundamental transitions in the cluster. In the initial configuration, the excess electron is localized on the nitro group of the CH3NO2 moiety. Upon excitation and subsequent vibrational relaxation, charge transfer to the CH3I molecule leads to dissociative attachment of the excess electron and formation of an I- fragment. No other fragments are observed, leading to the conclusion that the charge transfer reaction is the most favorable pathway. The reaction can be shut down by solvation of the cluster ion by two or more Ar atoms, in which case Ar evaporation becomes the only observed channel. Isotopic substitution using CD3I is used to identify the vibrational modes in the action spectra in concert with calculated infrared spectra of the complex.

  9. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjulstok, Emil; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'Yov, Ilia A.

    2015-12-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe specifically the electron transfer reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome-a signaling photoreceptor protein that became attractive recently due to its possible function as a biological magnetoreceptor.

  10. 36 CFR 1235.50 - What specifications and standards for transfer apply to electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What specifications and standards for transfer apply to electronic records? 1235.50 Section 1235.50 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT TRANSFER OF RECORDS TO THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF THE UNITED STATES...

  11. 27 CFR 19.524 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... controlled group of corporations, as defined in 26 U.S.C. 1563, and implementing regulations in 26 CFR 1.1563... electronic fund transfer. 19.524 Section 19.524 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Transfer...

  12. 27 CFR 41.63 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... controlled group of corporations, as defined in 26 U.S.C. 1563, and implementing regulations in 26 CFR 1.1563... commercial bank in making payment by electronic fund transfer (EFT) of such taxes during the succeeding... EFT means any transfer of funds, other than a transaction originated by check, draft, or similar...

  13. 36 CFR 1235.50 - What specifications and standards for transfer apply to electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What specifications and standards for transfer apply to electronic records? 1235.50 Section 1235.50 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT TRANSFER OF RECORDS TO THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF THE UNITED STATES...

  14. 36 CFR 1235.50 - What specifications and standards for transfer apply to electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and standards for transfer apply to electronic records? (a) General. (1) Agencies must transfer... “records” (within the context of the computer program, as opposed to a Federal record) or “tuples,” i.e... indicators for variable length records, or marks delimiting a data element, field, record, or file....

  15. Reaction dynamics and proton coupled electron transfer: studies of tyrosine-based charge transfer in natural and biomimetic systems.

    PubMed

    Barry, Bridgette A

    2015-01-01

    In bioenergetic reactions, electrons are transferred long distances via a hopping mechanism. In photosynthesis and DNA synthesis, the aromatic amino acid residue, tyrosine, functions as an intermediate that is transiently oxidized and reduced during long distance electron transfer. At physiological pH values, oxidation of tyrosine is associated with a deprotonation of the phenolic oxygen, giving rise to a proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction. Tyrosine-based PCET reactions are important in photosystem II, which carries out the light-induced oxidation of water, and in ribonucleotide reductase, which reduces ribonucleotides to form deoxynucleotides. Photosystem II contains two redox-active tyrosines, YD (Y160 in the D2 polypeptide) and YZ (Y161 in the D1 polypeptide). YD forms a light-induced stable radical, while YZ functions as an essential charge relay, oxidizing the catalytic Mn₄CaO₅ cluster on each of four photo-oxidation reactions. In Escherichia coli class 1a RNR, the β2 subunit contains the radical initiator, Y122O•, which is reversibly reduced and oxidized in long range electron transfer with the α2 subunit. In the isolated E. coli β2 subunit, Y122O• is a stable radical, but Y122O• is activated for rapid PCET in an α2β2 substrate/effector complex. Recent results concerning the structure and function of YD, YZ, and Y122 are reviewed here. Comparison is made to recent results derived from bioengineered proteins and biomimetic compounds, in which tyrosine-based charge transfer mechanisms have been investigated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. PMID:25260243

  16. Photoinduced Electron Transfer in DNA: Charge Shift Dynamics Between 8-Oxo-Guanine Anion and Adenine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyuan; Dood, Jordan; Beckstead, Ashley A; Li, Xi-Bo; Nguyen, Khiem V; Burrows, Cynthia J; Improta, Roberto; Kohler, Bern

    2015-06-18

    Femtosecond time-resolved IR spectroscopy is used to investigate the excited-state dynamics of a dinucleotide containing an 8-oxoguanine anion at the 5'-end and neutral adenine at the 3'-end. UV excitation of the dinucleotide transfers an electron from deprotonated 8-oxoguanine to its π-stacked neighbor adenine in less than 1 ps, generating a neutral 8-oxoguanine radical and an adenine radical anion. These species are identified by the excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated IR difference spectra. The quantum efficiency of this ultrafast charge shift reaction approaches unity. Back electron transfer from the adenine radical anion to the 8-oxguanine neutral radical occurs in 9 ps, or approximately 6 times faster than between the adenine radical anion and the 8-oxoguanine radical cation (Zhang, Y. et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2014, 111, 11612-11617). The large asymmetry in forward and back electron transfer rates is fully rationalized by semiclassical nonadiabatic electron transfer theory. Forward electron transfer is ultrafast because the driving force is nearly equal to the reorganization energy, which is estimated to lie between 1 and 2 eV. Back electron transfer is highly exergonic and takes place much more slowly in the Marcus inverted region. PMID:25660103

  17. Experimental and theoretical demonstrations for the mechanism behind enhanced microbial electron transfer by CNT network.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-Wei; Chen, Jie-Jie; Huang, Yu-Xi; Sun, Xue-Fei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Li, Dao-Bo; Xiong, Lu; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Feng; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) share the principle of the microbially catalyzed anodic substrate oxidation. Creating an electrode interface to promote extracellular electron transfer from microbes to electrode and understanding such mechanisms are crucial for engineering BESs. In this study, significantly promoted electron transfer and a 10-times increase in current generation in a BES were achieved by the utilization of carbon nanotube (CNT) network, compared with carbon paper. The mechanisms for the enhanced current generation with the CNT network were elucidated with both experimental approach and molecular dynamic simulations. The fabricated CNT network was found to be able to substantially enhance the interaction between the c-type cytochromes and solid electron acceptor, indicating that the direct electron transfer from outer-membrane decaheme c-type cytochromes to electrode might occur. The results obtained in this study will benefit for the optimized design of new materials to target the outer membrane proteins for enhanced electron exchanges. PMID:24429552

  18. Determination of the electronics transfer function for current transient measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharf, Christian; Klanner, Robert

    2015-04-01

    We describe a straight-forward method for determining the transfer function of the readout of a sensor for the situation in which the current transient of the sensor can be precisely simulated. The method relies on the convolution theorem of Fourier transforms. The specific example is a planar silicon pad diode. The charge carriers in the sensor are produced by picosecond lasers with light of wavelengths of 675 and 1060 nm. The transfer function is determined from the 1060 nm data with the pad diode biased at 1000 V. It is shown that the simulated sensor response convoluted with this transfer function provides an excellent description of the measured transients for laser light of both wavelengths. The method has been applied successfully for the simulation of current transients of several different silicon pad diodes. It can also be applied for the analysis of transient-current measurements of radiation-damaged solid state sensors, as long as sensors properties, like high-frequency capacitance, are not too different.

  19. Transfer printing of thermoreversible ion gels for flexible electronics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun Hyung; Zhang, Sipei; Gu, Yuanyan; Lodge, Timothy P; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2013-10-01

    Thermally assisted transfer printing was employed to pattern thin films of high capacitance ion gels on polyimide, poly(ethylene terephthalate), and SiO2 substrates. The ion gels consisted of 20 wt % block copolymer poly(styrene-b-ethylene oxide-b-styrene and 80 wt % ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethyl sulfonyl)amide. Patterning resolution was on the order of 10 μm. Importantly, ion gels containing the block polymer with short PS end blocks (3.4 kg/mol) could be transfer-printed because of thermoreversible gelation that enabled intimate gel-substrate contact at 100 °C, while gels with long PS blocks (11 kg/mol) were not printable at the same temperature due to poor wetting contact between the gel and substrates. By using printed ion gels as high-capacitance gate insulators, electrolyte-gated thin-film transistors were fabricated that operated at low voltages (<1 V) with high on/off current ratios (∼10(5)). Statistical analysis of carrier mobility, turn-on voltage, and on/off ratio for an array of printed transistors demonstrated the excellent reproducibility of the printing technique. The results show that transfer printing is an attractive route to pattern high-capacitance ion gels for flexible thin-film devices. PMID:24028461

  20. Electron Transfer Dissociation: Effects of Cation Charge State on Product Partitioning in Ion/Ion Electron Transfer to Multiply Protonated Polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of cation charge state on product partitioning in the gas-phase ion/ion electron transfer reactions of multiply protonated tryptic peptides, model peptides, and relatively large peptides with singly charged radical anions has been examined. In particular, partitioning into various competing channels, such as proton transfer (PT) versus electron transfer (ET), electron transfer with subsequent dissociation (ETD) versus electron transfer with no dissociation (ET,noD), and fragmentation of backbone bonds versus fragmentation of side chains, was measured quantitatively as a function of peptide charge state to allow insights to be drawn about the fundamental aspects of ion/ion reactions that lead to ETD. The ET channel increases relative to the PT channel, ETD increases relative to ET,noD, and fragmentation at backbone bonds increases relative to side-chain cleavages as cation charge state increases. The increase in ET versus PT with charge state is consistent with a Landau-Zener based curve-crossing model. An optimum charge state for ET is predicted by the model for the ground state-to-ground state reaction. However, when the population of excited product ion states is considered, it is possible that a decrease in ET efficiency as charge state increases will not be observed due to the possibility of the population of excited electronic states of the products. Several factors can contribute to the increase in ETD versus ET,noD and backbone cleavage versus side-chain losses. These factors include an increase in reaction exothermicity and charge state dependent differences in precursor and product ion structures, stabilities, and sites of protonation. PMID:23264749

  1. Electron Transfer Dissociation: Effects of Cation Charge State on Product Partitioning in Ion/Ion Electron Transfer to Multiply Protonated Polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; McLuckey, Scott A

    2012-12-15

    The effect of cation charge state on product partitioning in the gas-phase ion/ion electron transfer reactions of multiply protonated tryptic peptides, model peptides, and relatively large peptides with singly charged radical anions has been examined. In particular, partitioning into various competing channels, such as proton transfer (PT) versus electron transfer (ET), electron transfer with subsequent dissociation (ETD) versus electron transfer with no dissociation (ET,noD), and fragmentation of backbone bonds versus fragmentation of side chains, was measured quantitatively as a function of peptide charge state to allow insights to be drawn about the fundamental aspects of ion/ion reactions that lead to ETD. The ET channel increases relative to the PT channel, ETD increases relative to ET,noD, and fragmentation at backbone bonds increases relative to side-chain cleavages as cation charge state increases. The increase in ET versus PT with charge state is consistent with a Landau-Zener based curve-crossing model. An optimum charge state for ET is predicted by the model for the ground state-to-ground state reaction. However, when the population of excited product ion states is considered, it is possible that a decrease in ET efficiency as charge state increases will not be observed due to the possibility of the population of excited electronic states of the products. Several factors can contribute to the increase in ETD versus ET,noD and backbone cleavage versus side-chain losses. These factors include an increase in reaction exothermicity and charge state dependent differences in precursor and product ion structures, stabilities, and sites of protonation. PMID:23264749

  2. Measurement of the charge transfer efficiency of electrons clocked on superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Sabouret, G.; Lyon, S.A.

    2006-06-19

    Electrons floating on the surface of liquid helium are possible qubits for quantum information processing. Varying electric potentials do not modify spin states, which allows their transport on helium using a charge-coupled device (CCD)-like array of underlying gates. This scheme depends on an efficient intergate electron transfer and on the absence of electron traps. We will present a measurement of the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) of electrons clocked back and forth above a short CCD-like structure. The CTE obtained at low clocking frequencies is 0.999 with an electron density of about 4 electrons/{mu}m{sup 2}. We find no evidence for deep electron trapping.

  3. CLASSICAL MODEL FOR ELECTRONICALLY NON-ADIABATIC COLLISION PROCESSES: RESONANCE EFFECTS IN ELECTRONIC-VIBRATIONAL ENERGY TRANSFER

    SciTech Connect

    Orel, Ann E.; Miller, William H.

    1980-11-01

    A recently developed classical model for electronically nonadiabatic collision processes is applied to electronic-vibrational energy transfer in a collinear atom~diatom system, A + BC(v=1) + A*+ BC(v=0), which closely resembles Br-H{sub 2}. This classical model, which treats electronic as well as heavy particle (i.e., translation, rotation, and vibration) degrees of freedom by classical mechanics, is found to describe the resonance features in this process reasonably well. The usefulness of the approach is that it allows one to extend standard Monte Carlo classical trajectory methodology to include electronically non-adiabatic processes in a dynamically consistent way,

  4. Extracellular electron transfer from cathode to microbes: application for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Choi, Okkyoung; Sang, Byoung-In

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer in microorganisms has been applied for bioelectrochemical synthesis utilizing microbes to catalyze anodic and/or cathodic biochemical reactions. Anodic reactions (electron transfer from microbe to anode) are used for current production and cathodic reactions (electron transfer from cathode to microbe) have recently been applied for current consumption for valuable biochemical production. The extensively studied exoelectrogenic bacteria Shewanella and Geobacter showed that both directions for electron transfer would be possible. It was proposed that gram-positive bacteria, in the absence of cytochrome C, would accept electrons using a cascade of membrane-bound complexes such as membrane-bound Fe-S proteins, oxidoreductase, and periplasmic enzymes. Modification of the cathode with the addition of positive charged species such as chitosan or with an increase of the interfacial area using a porous three-dimensional scaffold electrode led to increased current consumption. The extracellular electron transfer from the cathode to the microbe could catalyze various bioelectrochemical reductions. Electrofermentation used electrons from the cathode as reducing power to produce more reduced compounds such as alcohols than acids, shifting the metabolic pathway. Electrofuel could be generated through artificial photosynthesis using electrical energy instead of solar energy in the process of carbon fixation. PMID:26788124

  5. Identification of a new electron-transfer relaxation pathway in photoexcited pyrrole dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, Simon P.; Kirkby, Oliver M.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Worth, Graham A.; Fielding, Helen H.

    2016-04-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer is central to many biological processes and technological applications, such as the harvesting of solar energy and molecular electronics. The electron donor and acceptor units involved in electron transfer are often held in place by covalent bonds, π-π interactions or hydrogen bonds. Here, using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations, we reveal the existence of a new, low-energy, photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism in molecules held together by an NH⋯π bond. Specifically, we capture the electron-transfer process in a pyrrole dimer, from the excited π-system of the donor pyrrole to a Rydberg orbital localized on the N-atom of the acceptor pyrrole, mediated by an N-H stretch on the acceptor molecule. The resulting charge-transfer state is surprisingly long lived and leads to efficient electronic relaxation. We propose that this relaxation pathway plays an important role in biological and technological systems containing the pyrrole building block.

  6. Identification of a new electron-transfer relaxation pathway in photoexcited pyrrole dimers.

    PubMed

    Neville, Simon P; Kirkby, Oliver M; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Worth, Graham A; Fielding, Helen H

    2016-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer is central to many biological processes and technological applications, such as the harvesting of solar energy and molecular electronics. The electron donor and acceptor units involved in electron transfer are often held in place by covalent bonds, π-π interactions or hydrogen bonds. Here, using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations, we reveal the existence of a new, low-energy, photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism in molecules held together by an NH⋯π bond. Specifically, we capture the electron-transfer process in a pyrrole dimer, from the excited π-system of the donor pyrrole to a Rydberg orbital localized on the N-atom of the acceptor pyrrole, mediated by an N-H stretch on the acceptor molecule. The resulting charge-transfer state is surprisingly long lived and leads to efficient electronic relaxation. We propose that this relaxation pathway plays an important role in biological and technological systems containing the pyrrole building block. PMID:27098394

  7. Monitoring the Coherent Vibrational Control of Electronic Excitation Transfer Using Ultrafast Pump-Probe Polarization Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, Jason; Cina, Jeffrey

    2010-03-01

    The interplay between nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom in molecular energy-transfer complexes is a subject of current interest. We have proposed a method to use coherent nuclear motion to control the transfer of electronic excitation energy between donor and acceptor moieties in electronically coupled dimers. The underlying electronic and nuclear motion at the level of quantum mechanical amplitudes can be observed using nonlinear wave-packet interferometry(nl-WPI), a form of fluorescence-detected multidimensional electronic spectroscopy. In our control scheme, coherent nuclear motion is induced in the acceptor chromophore prior to direct electronic excitation of the donor. This nuclear motion affects the instantaneous resonance conditions between donor and acceptor moieties and thus affects subsequent energy transfer dynamics. We have developed the framework to simulate four-pulse nl-WPI experiments, and the pump-probe limit thereof, on energy-transfer systems after interaction with a control pulse that induces nuclear motion. We present simulations in the pump-probe limit from model energy-transfer systems subjected to prior impulsive vibrational excitation, and show how pulse polarization can be used to infer electronic dynamics from isotropically oriented dimers.

  8. Identification of a new electron-transfer relaxation pathway in photoexcited pyrrole dimers

    PubMed Central

    Neville, Simon P.; Kirkby, Oliver M.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Worth, Graham A.; Fielding, Helen H.

    2016-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer is central to many biological processes and technological applications, such as the harvesting of solar energy and molecular electronics. The electron donor and acceptor units involved in electron transfer are often held in place by covalent bonds, π–π interactions or hydrogen bonds. Here, using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations, we reveal the existence of a new, low-energy, photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism in molecules held together by an NH⋯π bond. Specifically, we capture the electron-transfer process in a pyrrole dimer, from the excited π-system of the donor pyrrole to a Rydberg orbital localized on the N-atom of the acceptor pyrrole, mediated by an N–H stretch on the acceptor molecule. The resulting charge-transfer state is surprisingly long lived and leads to efficient electronic relaxation. We propose that this relaxation pathway plays an important role in biological and technological systems containing the pyrrole building block. PMID:27098394

  9. Insights into proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms of electrocatalytic H2 oxidation and production

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Samantha; Fernandez, Laura E.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The design of molecular electrocatalysts for H2 oxidation and production is important for the development of alternative renewable energy sources that are abundant, inexpensive, and environmentally benign. Recently, nickel-based molecular electrocatalysts with pendant amines that act as proton relays for the nickel center were shown to effectively catalyze H2 oxidation and production. We developed a quantum mechanical approach for studying proton-coupled electron transfer processes in these types of molecular electrocatalysts. This theoretical approach is applied to a nickel-based catalyst in which phosphorous atoms are directly bonded to the nickel center, and nitrogen atoms of the ligand rings act as proton relays. The catalytic step of interest involves electron transfer between the nickel complex and the electrode as well as intramolecular proton transfer between the nickel and nitrogen atoms. This process can occur sequentially, with either the electron or proton transferring first, or concertedly, with the electron and proton transferring simultaneously without a stable intermediate. The electrochemical rate constants are calculated as functions of overpotential for the concerted electron-proton transfer reaction and the two electron transfer reactions in the sequential mechanisms. Our calculations illustrate that the concerted electron-proton transfer standard rate constant will increase as the equilibrium distance between the nickel and nitrogen atoms decreases and as the pendant amines become more flexible to facilitate the contraction of this distance with a lower energy penalty. This approach identifies the favored mechanisms under various experimental conditions and provides insight into the impact of substituents on the nitrogen and phosphorous atoms. PMID:22529352

  10. Pain in cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Juan D; Farquhar-Smith, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Cancer and its treatment exert a heavy psychological and physical toll. Of the myriad symptoms which result, pain is common, encountered in between 30% and 60% of cancer survivors. Pain in cancer survivors is a major and growing problem, impeding the recovery and rehabilitation of patients who have beaten cancer and negatively impacting on cancer patients’ quality of life, work prospects and mental health. Persistent pain in cancer survivors remains challenging to treat successfully. Pain can arise both due to the underlying disease and the various treatments the patient has been subjected to. Chemotherapy causes painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), radiotherapy can produce late effect radiation toxicity and surgery may lead to the development of persistent post-surgical pain syndromes. This review explores a selection of the common causes of persistent pain in cancer survivors, detailing our current understanding of the pathophysiology and outlining both the clinical manifestations of individual pain states and the treatment options available. PMID:26516548

  11. A dynamic periplasmic electron transfer network enables respiratory flexibility beyond a thermodynamic regulatory regime

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Gunnar; Richter, Katrin; Doetsch, Andreas; Heide, Heinrich; Louro, Ricardo O; Gescher, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms show an astonishing versatility in energy metabolism. They can use a variety of different catabolic electron acceptors, but they use them according to a thermodynamic hierarchy, which is determined by the redox potential of the available electron acceptors. This hierarchy is reflected by a regulatory machinery that leads to the production of respiratory chains in dependence of the availability of the corresponding electron acceptors. In this study, we showed that the γ-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis produces several functional electron transfer chains simultaneously. Furthermore, these chains are interconnected, most likely with the aid of c-type cytochromes. The cytochrome pool of a single S. oneidensis cell consists of ca. 700 000 hemes, which are reduced in the absence on an electron acceptor, but can be reoxidized in the presence of a variety of electron acceptors, irrespective of prior growth conditions. The small tetraheme cytochrome (STC) and the soluble heme and flavin containing fumarate reductase FccA have overlapping activity and appear to be important for this electron transfer network. Double deletion mutants showed either delayed growth or no growth with ferric iron, nitrate, dimethyl sulfoxide or fumarate as electron acceptor. We propose that an electron transfer machinery that is produced irrespective of a thermodynamic hierarchy not only enables the organism to quickly release catabolic electrons to a variety of environmental electron acceptors, but also offers a fitness benefit in redox-stratified environments. PMID:25635641

  12. A dynamic periplasmic electron transfer network enables respiratory flexibility beyond a thermodynamic regulatory regime.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Gunnar; Richter, Katrin; Doetsch, Andreas; Heide, Heinrich; Louro, Ricardo O; Gescher, Johannes

    2015-08-01

    Microorganisms show an astonishing versatility in energy metabolism. They can use a variety of different catabolic electron acceptors, but they use them according to a thermodynamic hierarchy, which is determined by the redox potential of the available electron acceptors. This hierarchy is reflected by a regulatory machinery that leads to the production of respiratory chains in dependence of the availability of the corresponding electron acceptors. In this study, we showed that the γ-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis produces several functional electron transfer chains simultaneously. Furthermore, these chains are interconnected, most likely with the aid of c-type cytochromes. The cytochrome pool of a single S. oneidensis cell consists of ca. 700 000 hemes, which are reduced in the absence on an electron acceptor, but can be reoxidized in the presence of a variety of electron acceptors, irrespective of prior growth conditions. The small tetraheme cytochrome (STC) and the soluble heme and flavin containing fumarate reductase FccA have overlapping activity and appear to be important for this electron transfer network. Double deletion mutants showed either delayed growth or no growth with ferric iron, nitrate, dimethyl sulfoxide or fumarate as electron acceptor. We propose that an electron transfer machinery that is produced irrespective of a thermodynamic hierarchy not only enables the organism to quickly release catabolic electrons to a variety of environmental electron acceptors, but also offers a fitness benefit in redox-stratified environments. PMID:25635641

  13. A new semiclassical decoupling scheme for electronic transitions in molecular collisions - Application to vibrational-to-electronic energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.-W.; Lam, K. S.; Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1980-01-01

    A new semiclassical decoupling scheme (the trajectory-based decoupling scheme) is introduced in a computational study of vibrational-to-electronic energy transfer for a simple model system that simulates collinear atom-diatom collisions. The probability of energy transfer (P) is calculated quasiclassically using the new scheme as well as quantum mechanically as a function of the atomic electronic-energy separation (lambda), with overall good agreement between the two sets of results. Classical mechanics with the new decoupling scheme is found to be capable of predicting resonance behavior whereas an earlier decoupling scheme (the coordinate-based decoupling scheme) failed. Interference effects are not exhibited in P vs lambda results.

  14. Electron-impact ionization of helium with large energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, I.; Fursa, D. V.; Stelbovics, A. T.

    2006-09-15

    We consider the recently measured case of 730 eV electron-impact ionization of the ground state of helium with 205 and 500 eV coplanar outgoing electrons by Catoire et al. [J. Phys. B 39, 2827 (2006)]. These measurements, which are on a relative scale, show some unexpected structure and variation from the second-order distorted-wave Born approximation R-matrix and Brauner-Briggs-Klar theories. Using the convergent close-coupling method we provide an improved agreement with experiment, but some discrepancies still remain.

  15. Electron transfer between [4Fe-4S] clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2010-07-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters [4Fe-4S] are major components in biological electron transport (ET). Using the DFT/B3LYP method, we calculate electronic coupling for low- and high-potential ET between [4Fe-4S] clusters and explore its sensitivity to structural parameters of the system and external electric field. As an example, we consider a model of the bacterial respiratory complex I and estimate the role of neighboring amino acids in facilitating the ET process between the clusters. Our results suggest that the superexchange mechanism rather than hole hopping should be operative in ET between [4Fe-4S] redox centers.

  16. (Formation of fuel via photochemical electron transfer). Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.

    1985-03-04

    Accomplishments for the past year are reported under the following three main headings, in addition to several other related studies: (1) heterocyclic sulfur compounds which display unusual properties as electron relays which may be important in chemical or fuel forming reactions; (2) cationic dyes which tend to aggregate in interesting ways when bound to polyanion in water; and (3) photochemistry of viologen or pyridinium ions which are complexed or ion-paired with electron donors. A publications update is appended with references cited in this report.

  17. Concerted proton-electron transfer in the oxidation of hydrogen-bonded phenols.

    PubMed

    Rhile, Ian J; Markle, Todd F; Nagao, Hirotaka; DiPasquale, Antonio G; Lam, Oanh P; Lockwood, Mark A; Rotter, Katrina; Mayer, James M

    2006-05-10

    Three phenols with pendant, hydrogen-bonded bases (HOAr-B) have been oxidized in MeCN with various one-electron oxidants. The bases are a primary amine (-CPh(2)NH(2)), an imidazole, and a pyridine. The product of chemical and quasi-reversible electrochemical oxidations in each case is the phenoxyl radical in which the phenolic proton has transferred to the base, (*)OAr-BH(+), a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) process. The redox potentials for these oxidations are lower than for other phenols, predominately from the driving force for proton movement. One-electron oxidation of the phenols occurs by a concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) mechanism, based on thermochemical arguments, isotope effects, and DeltaDeltaG(++)/DeltaDeltaG degrees . The data rule out stepwise paths involving initial electron transfer to form the phenol radical cations [(*)(+)HOAr-B] or initial proton transfer to give the zwitterions [(-)OAr-BH(+)]. The rate constant for heterogeneous electron transfer from HOAr-NH(2) to a platinum electrode has been derived from electrochemical measurements. For oxidations of HOAr-NH(2), the dependence of the solution rate constants on driving force, on temperature, and on the nature of the oxidant, and the correspondence between the homogeneous and heterogeneous rate constants, are all consistent with the application of adiabatic Marcus theory. The CPET reorganization energies, lambda = 23-56 kcal mol(-)(1), are large in comparison with those for electron transfer reactions of aromatic compounds. The reactions are not highly non-adiabatic, based on minimum values of H(rp) derived from the temperature dependence of the rate constants. These are among the first detailed analyses of CPET reactions where the proton and electron move to different sites. PMID:16669677

  18. Fabrication of nanowire electronics on nonconventional substrates by water-assisted transfer printing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chi Hwan; Kim, Dong Rip; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2015-06-01

    We report a simple, versatile, and wafer-scale water-assisted transfer printing method (WTP) that enables the transfer of nanowire devices onto diverse nonconventional substrates that were not easily accessible before, such as paper, plastics, tapes, glass, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), aluminum foil, and ultrathin polymer substrates. The WTP method relies on the phenomenon of water penetrating into the interface between Ni and SiO2. The transfer yield is nearly 100%, and the transferred devices, including NW resistors, diodes, and field effect transistors, maintain their original geometries and electronic properties with high fidelity.

  19. Plasmon Enhancement of Electronic Energy Transfer Between Quantum Dots on the Surface of Nanoporous Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirova, N. S.; Myslitskaya, N. A.; Samusev, I. G.; Bryukhanov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    We use spectral kinetic methods to study electronic energy transfer processes between semiconductor quantum dots on the surface of wide-pore silica in the absence of and in the presence of silver nanoparticles, obtained by laser ablation methods. We have determined the efficiencies of dipole-dipole energy transfer between two-shell (CdSe/CdS/ZnS) and one-shell (CdSe/ZnS) quantum dots on the surface, the luminescence lifetimes and quantum yields, transfer distances and transfer rate constants. We have studied enhancement of photoprocesses in individual quantum dots and in a pair under the influence of resonant localized plasmons of ablative silver nanoparticles.

  20. Photoinduced Electron Transfer to Engineered Surface Traps in CdSe Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Califano, Marco; Zhu, Haiming; Yang, Ye; Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Song, Nianhui; Wang, Youwei; Zhang, Wenqing; Prezhdo, Oleg; Lian, Tianquan

    2014-03-01

    Quantum confined nanomaterials, such as semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs), have emerged in the past decade as a new class of materials for solar energy conversion. An appropriate model for describing photoinduced charge transfer in these systems is, however, still lacking. Recently we observed that the rate of photoinduced electron transfer from CdSe NCs to molecular acceptors increased with decreasing NC size (and increasing driving force) exhibiting a lack of Marcus inverted regime behaviour over an apparent driving force range of 0-1.3 V. Our atomistic semiempirical pseudopotential calculations show that an Auger assisted ET mechanism, in which the transfer of the electron is coupled to the excitation of the hole, can circumvent the unfavourable Frank-Condon overlap (that is a signature of inter- or intra- molecular electron transfer) in the Marcus inverted regime, reproducing our observed ET rates with remarkable accuracy. We conclude that electron transfer from quantum dots differs from electron transfer originating from both molecules and bulk semiconductors. It proceeds via a novel Auger-assisted pathway which we believe is available to most excitonic nanomaterials. This new finding will have a major impact on the design of next generation solar energy harvesting devices.

  1. Photoinduced Electron and H-atom Transfer Reactions of Xanthone by Laser Flash Photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin-ting; Pan, Yang; Zhang, Li-min; Yu, Shu-qin

    2007-08-01

    The property of the lowest excited triplet states of xanthone in acetonitrile was investigated using time-resolved laser flash photolysis at 355 nm. The transient absorption spectra and the quenching rate constants (kq) of the excited xanthone with several amines were determined. Good correlation between lgkq and the driving force of the reactions suggests the electron transfer mechanism, except aniline and 3-nitroaniline (3-NO2-A) which showed energy transfer mechanism. With the appearance of ketyl radical, hydrogen atom transfer also happened between xanthone and dimethyl-p-toluidine, 3,5,N,N-tetramethylaniline, N,N-dimethylaniline, and triethylamine. Therefore, both electron transfer and H-atom transfer occured in these systems. Great discrepancies of kq values were discovered in H-atom abstraction reactions for alcohols and phenols, which can be explained by different abstraction mechanisms. The quenching rate constants between xanthone and alcohols correlate well with the α-C-H bonding energy of alcohols.

  2. Kinetics of electron transfer through the respiratory chain.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qusheng; Bethke, Craig M

    2002-01-01

    We show that the rate at which electrons pass through the respiratory chain in mitochondria and respiring prokaryotic cells is described by the product of three terms, one describing electron donation, one acceptance, and a third, the thermodynamic drive. We apply the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics in the context of the chemiosmotic model of proton translocation and energy conservation. This approach leads to a closed-form expression that predicts steady-state electron flux as a function of chemical conditions and the proton motive force across the mitochondrial inner membrane or prokaryotic cytoplasmic membrane. The rate expression, derived considering reverse and forward electron flow, is the first to account for both thermodynamic and kinetic controls on the respiration rate. The expression can be simplified under specific conditions to give rate laws of various forms familiar in cellular physiology and microbial ecology. The expression explains the nonlinear dependence of flux on electrical potential gradient, its hyperbolic dependence on substrate concentration, and the inhibiting effects of reaction products. It provides a theoretical basis for investigating life under unusual conditions, such as microbial respiration in alkaline waters. PMID:12324402

  3. Kinetics of electron transfer through the respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qusheng; Bethke, Craig M

    2002-10-01

    We show that the rate at which electrons pass through the respiratory chain in mitochondria and respiring prokaryotic cells is described by the product of three terms, one describing electron donation, one acceptance, and a third, the thermodynamic drive. We apply the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics in the context of the chemiosmotic model of proton translocation and energy conservation. This approach leads to a closed-form expression that predicts steady-state electron flux as a function of chemical conditions and the proton motive force across the mitochondrial inner membrane or prokaryotic cytoplasmic membrane. The rate expression, derived considering reverse and forward electron flow, is the first to account for both thermodynamic and kinetic controls on the respiration rate. The expression can be simplified under specific conditions to give rate laws of various forms familiar in cellular physiology and microbial ecology. The expression explains the nonlinear dependence of flux on electrical potential gradient, its hyperbolic dependence on substrate concentration, and the inhibiting effects of reaction products. It provides a theoretical basis for investigating life under unusual conditions, such as microbial respiration in alkaline waters. PMID:12324402

  4. Nuclear interlevel transfer driven by collective outer shell electron oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, G.A.; Solem, J.G.; Biedenharn, L.C.

    1986-10-20

    The general problem of dynamic electron-nucleus coupling is discussed, and the possibility of using this mechanism to initiate gamma-ray lasing. Single-particle and collective mechanisms are considered. The problems associated with accurate calculation of these processes are discussed, and some numerical results are given. Work in process in described. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Vibrational coherence transfer in an electronically decoupled molecular dyad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweighöfer, Felix; Dworak, Lars; Braun, Markus; Zastrow, Marc; Wahl, Jan; Burghardt, Irene; Rück-Braun, Karola; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2015-03-01

    The ring opening of a dithienylethene photoswitch incorporated in a bridged boron-dipyrromethene - dithienylethene molecular dyad was investigated with ultrafast spectroscopy. Coherent vibrations in the electronic ground state of the boron-dipyrromethene are triggered after selective photoexcitation of the closed dithienylethene indicating vibrational coupling although the two moieties are electronically isolated. A distribution of short-lived modes and a long-lived mode at 143 cm-1 are observed. Analysis of the theoretical frequency spectrum indicates two modes at 97 cm-1 and 147 cm-1 which strongly modulate the electronic transition energy. Both modes exhibit a characteristic displacement of the bridge suggesting that the mechanical momentum of the initial geometry change after photoexcitation of the dithienylethene is transduced to the boron-dipyrromethene. The relaxation to the dithienylethene electronic ground state is accompanied by significant heat dissipation into the surrounding medium. In the investigated dyad, the boron-dipyrromethene acts as probe for the ultrafast photophysical processes in the dithienylethene.

  6. Vibrational coherence transfer in an electronically decoupled molecular dyad

    PubMed Central

    Schweighöfer, Felix; Dworak, Lars; Braun, Markus; Zastrow, Marc; Wahl, Jan; Burghardt, Irene; Rück-Braun, Karola; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2015-01-01

    The ring opening of a dithienylethene photoswitch incorporated in a bridged boron-dipyrromethene - dithienylethene molecular dyad was investigated with ultrafast spectroscopy. Coherent vibrations in the electronic ground state of the boron-dipyrromethene are triggered after selective photoexcitation of the closed dithienylethene indicating vibrational coupling although the two moieties are electronically isolated. A distribution of short-lived modes and a long-lived mode at 143 cm−1 are observed. Analysis of the theoretical frequency spectrum indicates two modes at 97 cm−1 and 147 cm−1 which strongly modulate the electronic transition energy. Both modes exhibit a characteristic displacement of the bridge suggesting that the mechanical momentum of the initial geometry change after photoexcitation of the dithienylethene is transduced to the boron-dipyrromethene. The relaxation to the dithienylethene electronic ground state is accompanied by significant heat dissipation into the surrounding medium. In the investigated dyad, the boron-dipyrromethene acts as probe for the ultrafast photophysical processes in the dithienylethene. PMID:25797419

  7. Vibrational coherence transfer in an electronically decoupled molecular dyad.

    PubMed

    Schweighöfer, Felix; Dworak, Lars; Braun, Markus; Zastrow, Marc; Wahl, Jan; Burghardt, Irene; Rück-Braun, Karola; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2015-01-01

    The ring opening of a dithienylethene photoswitch incorporated in a bridged boron-dipyrromethene - dithienylethene molecular dyad was investigated with ultrafast spectroscopy. Coherent vibrations in the electronic ground state of the boron-dipyrromethene are triggered after selective photoexcitation of the closed dithienylethene indicating vibrational coupling although the two moieties are electronically isolated. A distribution of short-lived modes and a long-lived mode at 143 cm(-1) are observed. Analysis of the theoretical frequency spectrum indicates two modes at 97 cm(-1) and 147 cm(-1) which strongly modulate the electronic transition energy. Both modes exhibit a characteristic displacement of the bridge suggesting that the mechanical momentum of the initial geometry change after photoexcitation of the dithienylethene is transduced to the boron-dipyrromethene. The relaxation to the dithienylethene electronic ground state is accompanied by significant heat dissipation into the surrounding medium. In the investigated dyad, the boron-dipyrromethene acts as probe for the ultrafast photophysical processes in the dithienylethene. PMID:25797419

  8. Electron transfer of carbonylmetalate radical pairs: femtosecond visible spectroscopy of optically excited ion pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, X.; Spears, K.G.; Wiederrecht, G.P.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1997-02-01

    Charge transfer excitation at 640 nm of the cobaltocenium tetracarbonylcobaltate ion pair, [Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +}{vert_bar}Co(CO){sub 4}{sup -}], was monitored in 1,2- dichloroethane solution by femtosecond transient visible absorption spectroscopy. The absorption prepares a neutral radical pair that can undergo spontaneous back electron transfer, and which shows a double peaked spectrum with features at 760 and 815 nm at 3 ps delay time. Transient decay times of 5.8{+-}0.5 ps were measured by monitoring the decay of Co(CO){sub 4} at 757 nm and 780 nm, and these are assigned to the back electron transfer step. The ET kinetics are consistent with the previously reported rates of electron transfer that were measured for specific vibrational states by picosecond transient IR.

  9. Photocurrents from photosystem II in a metal oxide hybrid system: Electron transfer pathways.

    PubMed

    Brinkert, Katharina; Le Formal, Florian; Li, Xiaoe; Durrant, James; Rutherford, A William; Fantuzzi, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the nature of the photocurrent generated by Photosystem II (PSII), the water oxidizing enzyme, isolated from Thermosynechococcus elongatus, when immobilized on nanostructured titanium dioxide on an indium tin oxide electrode (TiO2/ITO). We investigated the properties of the photocurrent from PSII when immobilized as a monolayer versus multilayers, in the presence and absence of an inhibitor that binds to the site of the exchangeable quinone (QB) and in the presence and absence of exogenous mobile electron carriers (mediators). The findings indicate that electron transfer occurs from the first quinone (QA) directly to the electrode surface but that the electron transfer through the nanostructured metal oxide is the rate-limiting step. Redox mediators enhance the photocurrent by taking electrons from the nanostructured semiconductor surface to the ITO electrode surface not from PSII. This is demonstrated by photocurrent enhancement using a mediator incapable of accepting electrons from PSII. This model for electron transfer also explains anomalies reported in the literature using similar and related systems. The slow rate of the electron transfer step in the TiO2 is due to the energy level of electron injection into the semiconducting material being below the conduction band. This limits the usefulness of the present hybrid electrode. Strategies to overcome this kinetic limitation are discussed. PMID:26946088

  10. 48 CFR 52.232-38 - Submission of Electronic Funds Transfer Information with Offer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... information that is required to make payment by electronic funds transfer (EFT) under any contract that... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Submission of Electronic... System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND...

  11. Explanation of Turbulent Suppression of Electron Heat Transfer in GOL-3 Facility at the Stage of Relativistic Electron Beam Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burdakov, A.V.; Kotelnikov, I.A.; Erofeev, V.I

    2005-01-15

    The effect of the electron heat transfer suppression during the stage of relativistic electron beam injection into a plasma was discovered experimentally more than a decade ago. It is now widely adopted that the suppression is a side sequel of Langmuir turbulence excited by the beam, however neither quantitative theory nor even rough estimates of the phenomena were available so far. We argue that the coefficient of turbulent thermal conductivity can be evaluated from a robust judgement based on the energy balance consideration.

  12. Electron transfer in the P450cam/PDX complex. The QM/MM e-pathway.

    PubMed

    Wallrapp, Frank; Masone, Diego; Guallar, Victor

    2008-12-18

    Electron transfer processes are simple but crucial reactions in biochemistry, being one of the main steps in almost all enzymatic cycles. Obtaining an atomic description of the transfer pathway is a difficult task, at both the experimental and theoretical levels. Here we combine protein-protein docking algorithms, protein structure prediction methodologies and mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics techniques to map the electron transfer pathway between cytochrome P450 camphor and its redox partner, putidaredoxin. Although the mechanism of interaction and electron transfer for this redox couple has been under investigation for over 30 years, the exact mechanism and electron transfer pathway has not been fully understood, yet. Our results report the first ab initio quantum chemistry description of the electron migration. The obtained electron transfer pathway indicates the key role of Arg112 of P450 and Asp38 of PDX and the existence of slightly different electron transfer pathways for different protein-protein complexes. PMID:18823106

  13. Electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer of an osmium aquo complex: theoretical analysis of asymmetric tafel plots and transfer coefficients.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, Michelle K; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2010-02-01

    Electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer of an osmium aquo complex attached to a self-assembled monolayer on a gold electrode is studied with a recently developed theoretical formulation. The calculated hydrogen/deuterium kinetic isotope effect for the standard rate constant, the cathodic transfer coefficient at zero overpotential, and the Tafel plot are in excellent agreement with experimental data. The input quantities to the heterogeneous rate constant expressions were calculated with density functional theory in conjunction with dielectric continuum models, and no parameters were fit to experimental data. The theoretical calculations indicate that the asymmetry of the Tafel plot and the deviation of the transfer coefficient at zero overpotential from the standard value of one-half arise from the change in the equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distance upon electron transfer. The direction of the asymmetry and deviation from one-half is determined by the sign of this distance change, and the magnitude of these effects is determined by the magnitude of this distance change, as well as the reorganization energy and the distance dependence of the overlap between the initial and final proton vibrational wave functions. This theory provides experimentally testable predictions for the impact of specific system properties on the qualitative behavior of the Tafel plots. PMID:20067257

  14. Kinetic pathway for interfacial electron transfer from a semiconductor to a molecule.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ke; Blair, Amber D; Piechota, Eric J; Schauer, Phil A; Sampaio, Renato N; Parlane, Fraser G L; Meyer, Gerald J; Berlinguette, Curtis P

    2016-09-01

    Molecular approaches to solar-energy conversion require a kinetic optimization of light-induced electron-transfer reactions. At molecular-semiconductor interfaces, this optimization has previously been accomplished through control of the distance between the semiconductor donor and the molecular acceptor and/or the free energy that accompanies electron transfer. Here we show that a kinetic pathway for electron transfer from a semiconductor to a molecular acceptor also exists and provides an alternative method for the control of interfacial kinetics. The pathway was identified by the rational design of molecules in which the distance and the driving force were held near parity and only the geometric torsion about a xylyl- or phenylthiophene bridge was varied. Electronic coupling through the phenyl bridge was a factor of ten greater than that through the xylyl bridge. Comparative studies revealed a significant bridge dependence for electron transfer that could not be rationalized by a change in distance or driving force. Instead, the data indicate an interfacial electron-transfer pathway that utilizes the aromatic bridge orbitals. PMID:27554412

  15. Electrostatic effects on electron-transfer kinetics in the cytochrome f-plastocyanin complex.

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, G M; Cramer, W A; Krishtalik, L I

    1997-01-01

    In a complex of two electron-transfer proteins, their redox potentials can be shifted due to changes in the dielectric surroundings and the electrostatic potentials at each center caused by the charged residues of the partner. These effects are dependent on the geometry of the complex. Three different docking configurations (DCs) for intracomplex electron transfer between cytochrome f and plastocyanin were studied, defined by 1) close contact of the positively charged region of cytochrome f and the negatively charged regions of plastocyanin (DC1) and by (2, 3) close contact of the surface regions adjacent to the Fe and Cu redox centers (DC2 and DC3). The equilibrium energetics for electron transfer in DC1-DC3 are the same within approximately +/-0.1 kT. The lower reorganization energy for DC2 results in a slightly lower activation energy for this complex compared with DC1 and DC3. The long heme-copper distance (approximately 24 A) in the DC1 complex drastically decreases electronic coupling and makes this complex much less favorable for electron transfer than DC2 or DC3. DC1-like complexes can only serve as docking intermediates in the pathway toward formation of an electron-transfer-competent complex. Elimination of the four positive charges arising from the lysine residues in the positive patch of cytochrome f, as accomplished by mutagenesis, exerts a negligible effect (approximately 3 mV) on the redox potential difference between cyt f and PC. PMID:9414237

  16. pH-dependent electron transfer reaction and direct bioelectrocatalysis of the quinohemoprotein pyranose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kouta; Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Ishida, Takuya; Yoshida, Makoto; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Nobuhumi

    2016-08-26

    A pyranose dehydrogenase from Coprinopsis cinerea (CcPDH) is an extracellular quinohemoeprotein, which consists a b-type cytochrome domain, a pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ) domain, and a family 1-type carbohydrate-binding module. The electron transfer reaction of CcPDH was studied using some electron acceptors and a carbon electrode at various pH levels. Phenazine methosulfate (PMS) reacted directly at the PQQ domain, whereas cytochrome c (cyt c) reacted via the cytochrome domain of intact CcPDH. Thus, electrons are transferred from reduced PQQ in the catalytic domain of CcPDH to heme b in the N-terminal cytochrome domain, which acts as a built-in mediator and transfers electron to a heterogenous electron transfer protein. The optimal pH values of the PMS reduction (pH 6.5) and the cyt c reduction (pH 8.5) differ. The catalytic currents for the oxidation of l-fucose were observed within a range of pH 4.5 to 11. Bioelectrocatalysis of CcPDH based on direct electron transfer demonstrated that the pH profile of the biocatalytic current was similar to the reduction activity of cyt c characters. PMID:27338639

  17. Recent advances in copper-catalyzed dehydrogenative functionalization via a single electron transfer (SET) process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun; Tang, Conghui; Jiao, Ning

    2012-05-01

    Copper salts have been developed as versatile catalysts for oxidative coupling reactions in organic synthesis. During these processes, Cu-catalysts are often proposed to serve as a one-electron oxidant to promote the single-electron transfer process. Recently, the transition-metal catalyzed direct dehydrogenative transformation has attracted considerable attention. This tutorial review summarizes the recent advances in the copper-catalyzed dehydrogenative functionalization via a single electron transfer (SET) process achieving C-C, C-N, C-O, C-halogen atoms, C-P, and N-N bond formation. PMID:22349590

  18. Enhanced Ionization of Embedded Clusters by Electron-Transfer-Mediated Decay in Helium Nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    LaForge, A C; Stumpf, V; Gokhberg, K; von Vangerow, J; Stienkemeier, F; Kryzhevoi, N V; O'Keeffe, P; Ciavardini, A; Krishnan, S R; Coreno, M; Prince, K C; Richter, R; Moshammer, R; Pfeifer, T; Cederbaum, L S; Mudrich, M

    2016-05-20

    We report the observation of electron-transfer-mediated decay (ETMD) involving magnesium (Mg) clusters embedded in helium (He) nanodroplets. ETMD is initiated by the ionization of He followed by removal of two electrons from the Mg clusters of which one is transferred to the He ion while the other electron is emitted into the continuum. The process is shown to be the dominant ionization mechanism for embedded clusters for photon energies above the ionization potential of He. For Mg clusters larger than five atoms we observe stable doubly ionized clusters. Thus, ETMD provides an efficient pathway to the formation of doubly ionized cold species in doped nanodroplets. PMID:27258866

  19. Riboflavin-shuttled extracellular electron transfer from Enterococcus faecalis to electrodes in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Enren; Cai, Yamin; Luo, Yue; Piao, Zhe

    2014-11-01

    Great attention has been focused on Gram-negative bacteria in the application of microbial fuel cells. In this study, the Gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecalis was employed in microbial fuel cells. Bacterial biofilms formed by E. faecalis ZER6 were investigated with respect to electricity production through the riboflavin-shuttled extracellular electron transfer. Trace riboflavin was shown to be essential for transferring electrons derived from the oxidation of glucose outside the peptidoglycan layer in the cell wall of E. faecalis biofilms formed on the surface of electrodes, in the absence of other potential electron mediators (e.g., yeast extract). PMID:25345758

  20. Au25 Clusters as Electron-Transfer Catalysts Induced the Intramolecular Cascade Reaction of 2-nitrobenzonitrile

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hanbao; Li, Peng; Wang, Shuxin; Fu, Fangyu; Xiang, Ji; Zhu, Manzhou; Li, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Design of atomically precise metal nanocluster catalysts is of great importance in understanding the essence of the catalytic reactions at the atomic level. Here, for the first time, Au25z nanoslusters were employed as electron transfer catalysts to induce an intramolecular cascade reaction at ambient conditions and gave rise to high conversion (87%) and selectivity (96%). Electron spin-resonance spectra indeed confirmed the consecutive electron transfer process and the formation of N radical. UV-vis absorption spectra also verified Au25z was intact after the catalytic circle. Our research may open up wide opportunities for extensive organic reactions catalyzed by Au25z. PMID:24225495

  1. Excitation of the ligand-to-metal charge transfer band induces electron tunnelling in azurin

    SciTech Connect

    Baldacchini, Chiara; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2014-03-03

    Optical excitation of azurin blue copper protein immobilized on indium-tin oxide, in resonance with its ligand-to-metal charge transfer absorption band, resulted in a light-induced current tunnelling within the protein milieu. The related electron transport rate is estimated to be about 10{sup 5} s{sup −1}. A model based on resonant tunnelling through an azurin excited molecular state is proposed. The capability of controlling electron transfer processes through light pulses opens interesting perspectives for implementation of azurin in bio-nano-opto-electronic devices.

  2. Enhanced Ionization of Embedded Clusters by Electron-Transfer-Mediated Decay in Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaForge, A. C.; Stumpf, V.; Gokhberg, K.; von Vangerow, J.; Stienkemeier, F.; Kryzhevoi, N. V.; O'Keeffe, P.; Ciavardini, A.; Krishnan, S. R.; Coreno, M.; Prince, K. C.; Richter, R.; Moshammer, R.; Pfeifer, T.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Mudrich, M.

    2016-05-01

    We report the observation of electron-transfer-mediated decay (ETMD) involving magnesium (Mg) clusters embedded in helium (He) nanodroplets. ETMD is initiated by the ionization of He followed by removal of two electrons from the Mg clusters of which one is transferred to the He ion while the other electron is emitted into the continuum. The process is shown to be the dominant ionization mechanism for embedded clusters for photon energies above the ionization potential of He. For Mg clusters larger than five atoms we observe stable doubly ionized clusters. Thus, ETMD provides an efficient pathway to the formation of doubly ionized cold species in doped nanodroplets.

  3. Ultrafast Electron Transfer Kinetics in the LM Dimer of Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chang; Carey, Anne-Marie; Gao, Bing-Rong; Wraight, Colin A; Woodbury, Neal W; Lin, Su

    2016-06-23

    It has become increasingly clear that dynamics plays a major role in the function of many protein systems. One system that has proven particularly facile for studying the effects of dynamics on protein-mediated chemistry is the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Previous experimental and computational analysis have suggested that the dynamics of the protein matrix surrounding the primary quinone acceptor, QA, may be particularly important in electron transfer involving this cofactor. One can substantially increase the flexibility of this region by removing one of the reaction center subunits, the H-subunit. Even with this large change in structure, photoinduced electron transfer to the quinone still takes place. To evaluate the effect of H-subunit removal on electron transfer to QA, we have compared the kinetics of electron transfer and associated spectral evolution for the LM dimer with that of the intact reaction center complex on picosecond to millisecond time scales. The transient absorption spectra associated with all measured electron transfer reactions are similar, with the exception of a broadening in the QX transition and a blue-shift in the QY transition bands of the special pair of bacteriochlorophylls (P) in the LM dimer. The kinetics of the electron transfer reactions not involving quinones are unaffected. There is, however, a 4-fold decrease in the electron transfer rate from the reduced bacteriopheophytin to QA in the LM dimer compared to the intact reaction center and a similar decrease in the recombination rate of the resulting charge-separated state (P(+)QA(-)). These results are consistent with the concept that the removal of the H-subunit results in increased flexibility in the region around the quinone and an associated shift in the reorganization energy associated with charge separation and recombination. PMID:27243380

  4. Tuning the reorganization energy of electron transfer in supramolecular ensembles - metalloporphyrin, oligophenylenevinylenes, and fullerene - and the impact on electron transfer kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stangel, Christina; Schubert, Christina; Kuhri, Susanne; Rotas, Georgios; Margraf, Johannes T.; Regulska, Elzbieta; Clark, Timothy; Torres, Tomás; Tagmatarchis, Nikos; Coutsolelos, Athanassios G.; Guldi, Dirk M.

    2015-01-01

    Oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) (oPPV) wires of various lengths featuring pyridyls at one terminal and C60 moieties at the other, have been used as molecular building blocks in combination with porphyrins to construct a novel class of electron donor-acceptor architectures. These architectures, which are based on non-covalent, directional interactions between the zinc centers of the porphyrins and the pyridyls, have been characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Complementary physico-chemical assays focused on the interactions between electron donors and acceptors in the ground and excited states. No appreciable electron interactions were noted in the ground state, which was being probed by electrochemistry, absorption spectroscopy, etc.; the electron acceptors are sufficiently decoupled from the electron donors. In the excited state, a different picture evolved. In particular, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption measurements revealed substantial electron donor-acceptor interactions. These led, upon photoexcitation of the porphyrins, to tunable intramolecular electron-transfer processes, that is, the oxidation of porphyrin and the reduction of C60. In this regard, the largest impact stems from a rather strong distance dependence of the total reorganization energy in stark contrast to the distance independence seen for covalently linked conjugates.Oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) (oPPV) wires of various lengths featuring pyridyls at one terminal and C60 moieties at the other, have been used as molecular building blocks in combination with porphyrins to construct a novel class of electron donor-acceptor architectures. These architectures, which are based on non-covalent, directional interactions between the zinc centers of the porphyrins and the pyridyls, have been characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Complementary physico-chemical assays focused on the interactions

  5. Rates of primary electron transfer reactions in the photosystem I reaction center reconstituted with different quinones as the secondary acceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kumazaki, Shigeichi; Kandori, Hideki; Yoshihara, Keitaro ); Iwaki, Masayo; Itoh, Shigeru ); Ikegamu, Isamu )

    1994-10-27

    Rates of sequential electron transfer reactions from the primary electron donor chlorophyll dimer (P700) to the electron acceptor chlorophyll a-686 (A[sub 0]) and to the secondary acceptor quinone (Q[sub [phi

  6. Challenges in reduction of dinitrogen by proton and electron transfer.

    PubMed

    van der Ham, Cornelis J M; Koper, Marc T M; Hetterscheid, Dennis G H

    2014-08-01

    Ammonia is an important nutrient for the growth of plants. In industry, ammonia is produced by the energy expensive Haber-Bosch process where dihydrogen and dinitrogen form ammonia at a very high pressure and temperature. In principle one could also reduce dinitrogen upon addition of protons and electrons similar to the mechanism of ammonia production by nitrogenases. Recently, major breakthroughs have taken place in our understanding of biological fixation of dinitrogen, of molecular model systems that can reduce dinitrogen, and in the electrochemical reduction of dinitrogen at heterogeneous surfaces. Yet for efficient reduction of dinitrogen with protons and electrons major hurdles still have to be overcome. In this tutorial review we give an overview of the different catalytic systems, highlight the recent breakthroughs, pinpoint common grounds and discuss the bottlenecks and challenges in catalytic reduction of dinitrogen. PMID:24802308

  7. Reaction electronic flux and its role in DNA intramolecular proton transfers.

    PubMed

    Durán, Rocío; Vöhringer-Martinez, Esteban; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Herrera, Bárbara

    2016-06-01

    Proton transfer reactions present a key step in many biological and chemical processes. Here, we focused on the electronic changes in the proton transfer reactions of the four DNA bases. In combination with the previous structural analysis the reaction electronic flux together with local descriptors as the Hirshfeld-I charges allow us to identify chemical events and rationalize the underlying reaction mechanism. Our results show that imine-enamine in adenine and citosyne, and keto-enol tautomerizations in thymine and guanine have different reaction mechanisms. The former involve net structural rearrangements driven by favoured electrostatic interactions between the proton and the acceptor atom whereas the keto-enol tautomerizations require electronic changes reflected in the reaction electronic flux and changes in the NBO bond orders which favour the proton transfer reaction. PMID:27256316

  8. Photo-induced electron transfer between a dendritic zinc(II) phthalocyanine and methyl viologen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhua; Chen, Jiangxu; Huang, Lishan; Xie, Shusen; Yang, Hongqin; Peng, Yiru

    2013-01-01

    The intermolecular electron transfer between the carboxylic dendritic zinc(II) phthalocyanines [G1-ZnPc( and G2-ZnPc(] and methyl viologen (MV) is studied by steady-state fluorescence and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopic method. The effect of dendron generation of this series of dendritic phthalocyanines on intermolecular electron transfer is investigated. The results show that the fluorescence emission of these dendritic phthalocyanines could be greatly quenched by MV upon excitation at 610 nm. The Stern-Volmer constant (KSV) of electron transfer is decreased with increasing dendron generations. Our study suggests that these dendritic phthalocyanines are an effective new electron donor and transmission complex and could be used as a potential artificial photosynthesis system.

  9. Direct electron transfer from electrode to electrochemically active bacteria in a bioelectrochemical dechlorination system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ding; Lei, Lecheng; Yang, Bin; Yu, Qingni; Li, Zhongjian

    2013-11-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) was dechlorinated by electrochemically active bacteria using an electrode as the direct electron donor. Dechlorination efficiency and coulombic efficiency (CE) were investigated. When hydrogen evolution reaction was eliminated by controlling the potential, both dechlorination efficiency and CE increase as the potential decreases, which implied the dechlorination was stimulated by electric current rather than hydrogen gas. Further investigation of the cyclic voltammetry characterization of the medium revealed nearly no redox mediator secreted by the bacteria. Moreover, the comparison of dechlorination experiments carried out with filtered and unfiltered medium provided convincible evidence that the dominating electron transfer mechanism for the dechlorination is direct electron transfer. Additionally, 454 pyrosequencing technique was employed to gain a comprehensive understanding of the biocathodic microbial community. The results showed Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were the three predominant groups. This paper demonstrated the direct electron transfer mechanism could be involved in PCP dechlorination with a biocathode. PMID:24035815

  10. Modulating the electronic structure of chromophores by chemical substituents for efficient energy transfer: application to fluorone.

    PubMed

    Sand, Andrew M; Liu, Claire; Valentine, Andrew J S; Mazziotti, David A

    2014-08-01

    Strong electron correlation within a quasi-spin model of chromophores was recently shown to enhance exciton energy transfer significantly. Here we investigate how the modulation of the electronic structure of the chromophores by chemical substitution can enhance energy-transfer efficiency. Unlike previous work that does not consider the direct effect of the electronic structure on exciton dynamics, we add chemical substituents to the fluorone dimer to study the effect of electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituents on exciton energy transfer. The exciton dynamics are studied from the solution of a quantum Liouville equation for an open system whose model Hamiltonian is derived from excited-state electronic structure calculations. Both van der Waals energies and coupling energies, arising from the Hellmann-Feynman force generated upon transferring the dimers from infinity to a finite separation, are built into the model Hamiltonian. Though these two effects are implicitly treated in dipole-based models, their explicit and separate treatment as discussed here is critical to forging the correct connection with the electronic structure calculations. We find that the addition of electron-donating substituents to the fluorone system results in an increase in exciton-transfer rates by factors ranging from 1.3-1.9. The computed oscillator strength is consistent with the recent experimental results on a larger heterodimer system containing fluorone. The oscillator strength increases with the addition of electron-donating substituents. Our results indicate that the study of chromophore networks via electronic structure will help in the future design of efficient synthetic light-harvesting systems. PMID:25062094

  11. The transfer between electron bulk kinetic energy and thermal energy in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Huang, Can; Wang, Shui

    2013-06-15

    By performing two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate the transfer between electron bulk kinetic and electron thermal energy in collisionless magnetic reconnection. In the vicinity of the X line, the electron bulk kinetic energy density is much larger than the electron thermal energy density. The evolution of the electron bulk kinetic energy is mainly determined by the work done by the electric field force and electron pressure gradient force. The work done by the electron gradient pressure force in the vicinity of the X line is changed to the electron enthalpy flux. In the magnetic island, the electron enthalpy flux is transferred to the electron thermal energy due to the compressibility of the plasma in the magnetic island. The compression of the plasma in the magnetic island is the consequence of the electromagnetic force acting on the plasma as the magnetic field lines release their tension after being reconnected. Therefore, we can observe that in the magnetic island the electron thermal energy density is much larger than the electron bulk kinetic energy density.

  12. Designed surface residue substitutions in [NiFe] hydrogenase that improve electron transfer characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yonemoto, Isaac T; Smith, Hamilton O; Weyman, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    Photobiological hydrogen production is an attractive, carbon-neutral means to convert solar energy to hydrogen. We build on previous research improving the Alteromonas macleodii "Deep Ecotype" [NiFe] hydrogenase, and report progress towards creating an artificial electron transfer pathway to supply the hydrogenase with electrons necessary for hydrogen production. Ferredoxin is the first soluble electron transfer mediator to receive high-energy electrons from photosystem I, and bears an electron with sufficient potential to efficiently reduce protons. Thus, we engineered a hydrogenase-ferredoxin fusion that also contained several other modifications. In addition to the C-terminal ferredoxin fusion, we truncated the C-terminus of the hydrogenase small subunit, identified as the available terminus closer to the electron transfer region. We also neutralized an anionic patch surrounding the interface Fe-S cluster to improve transfer kinetics with the negatively charged ferredoxin. Initial screening showed the enzyme tolerated both truncation and charge neutralization on the small subunit ferredoxin-binding face. While the enzyme activity was relatively unchanged using the substrate methyl viologen, we observed a marked improvement from both the ferredoxin fusion and surface modification using only dithionite as an electron donor. Combining ferredoxin fusion and surface charge modification showed progressively improved activity in an in vitro assay with purified enzyme. PMID:25603181

  13. Designed Surface Residue Substitutions in [NiFe] Hydrogenase that Improve Electron Transfer Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Yonemoto, Isaac T.; Smith, Hamilton O.; Weyman, Philip D.

    2015-01-01

    Photobiological hydrogen production is an attractive, carbon-neutral means to convert solar energy to hydrogen. We build on previous research improving the Alteromonas macleodii “Deep Ecotype” [NiFe] hydrogenase, and report progress towards creating an artificial electron transfer pathway to supply the hydrogenase with electrons necessary for hydrogen production. Ferredoxin is the first soluble electron transfer mediator to receive high-energy electrons from photosystem I, and bears an electron with sufficient potential to efficiently reduce protons. Thus, we engineered a hydrogenase-ferredoxin fusion that also contained several other modifications. In addition to the C-terminal ferredoxin fusion, we truncated the C-terminus of the hydrogenase small subunit, identified as the available terminus closer to the electron transfer region. We also neutralized an anionic patch surrounding the interface Fe-S cluster to improve transfer kinetics with the negatively charged ferredoxin. Initial screening showed the enzyme tolerated both truncation and charge neutralization on the small subunit ferredoxin-binding face. While the enzyme activity was relatively unchanged using the substrate methyl viologen, we observed a marked improvement from both the ferredoxin fusion and surface modification using only dithionite as an electron donor. Combining ferredoxin fusion and surface charge modification showed progressively improved activity in an in vitro assay with purified enzyme. PMID:25603181

  14. Manipulation of microbial extracellular electron transfer by changing molecular structure of phenazine-type redox mediators.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie-Jie; Chen, Wei; He, Hui; Li, Dao-Bo; Li, Wen-Wei; Xiong, Lu; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-01-15

    Phenazines, as a type of electron shuttle, are involved in various biological processes to facilitate microbial energy metabolism and electron transfer. They constitute a large group of nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds, which can be produced by a diverse range of bacteria or by artificial synthesis. They vary significantly in their properties, depending mainly on the nature and position of substitutent group. Thus, it is of great interest to find out the most favorable substituent type and molecular structure of phenazines for electron transfer routes. Here, the impacts of the substituent group on the reduction potentials of phenazine-type redox mediators in aqueous solution were investigated by quantum chemical calculations, and the calculation results were further validated with experimental data. The results show that the reaction free energy was substantially affected by the location of substituent groups on the phenazine molecule and the protonated water clusters. For the main proton addition process, the phenazines substituted with electron-donating groups and those with electron-withdrawing groups interacted with different protonated water clusters, attributed to the proximity effect of water molecules on proton transfer. Thus, high energy conversion efficiency could be achieved by controlling electron flow route with appropriate substituted phenazines to reduce the biological energy acquisition. This study provides useful information for designing efficient redox mediators to promote electron transfer between microbes and terminal acceptors, which are essential to bioenergy recovery from wastes and environmental bioremediation. PMID:23244024

  15. Fast spin information transfer between distant quantum dots using individual electrons.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, B; Hermelin, S; Takada, S; Yamamoto, M; Tarucha, S; Ludwig, A; Wieck, A D; Bäuerle, C; Meunier, T

    2016-08-01

    Transporting ensembles of electrons over long distances without losing their spin polarization is an important benchmark for spintronic devices. It usually requires injecting and probing spin-polarized electrons in conduction channels using ferromagnetic contacts or optical excitation. In parallel with this development, important efforts have been dedicated to achieving control of nanocircuits at the single-electron level. The detection and coherent manipulation of the spin of a single electron trapped in a quantum dot are now well established. Combined with the recently demonstrated control of the displacement of individual electrons between two distant quantum dots, these achievements allow the possibility of realizing spintronic protocols at the single-electron level. Here, we demonstrate that spin information carried by one or two electrons can be transferred between two quantum dots separated by a distance of 4 μm with a classical fidelity of 65%. We show that at present it is limited by spin flips occurring during the transfer procedure before and after electron displacement. Being able to encode and control information in the spin degree of freedom of a single electron while it is being transferred over distances of a few micrometres on nanosecond timescales will pave the way towards 'quantum spintronics' devices, which could be used to implement large-scale spin-based quantum information processing. PMID:27240417

  16. Fast spin information transfer between distant quantum dots using individual electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, B.; Hermelin, S.; Takada, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Tarucha, S.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.; Bäuerle, C.; Meunier, T.

    2016-08-01

    Transporting ensembles of electrons over long distances without losing their spin polarization is an important benchmark for spintronic devices. It usually requires injecting and probing spin-polarized electrons in conduction channels using ferromagnetic contacts or optical excitation. In parallel with this development, important efforts have been dedicated to achieving control of nanocircuits at the single-electron level. The detection and coherent manipulation of the spin of a single electron trapped in a quantum dot are now well established. Combined with the recently demonstrated control of the displacement of individual electrons between two distant quantum dots, these achievements allow the possibility of realizing spintronic protocols at the single-electron level. Here, we demonstrate that spin information carried by one or two electrons can be transferred between two quantum dots separated by a distance of 4 μm with a classical fidelity of 65%. We show that at present it is limited by spin flips occurring during the transfer procedure before and after electron displacement. Being able to encode and control information in the spin degree of freedom of a single electron while it is being transferred over distances of a few micrometres on nanosecond timescales will pave the way towards ‘quantum spintronics’ devices, which could be used to implement large-scale spin-based quantum information processing.

  17. Sequential Energy and Electron Transfer in Polynuclear Complex Sensitized TiO2 Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sandeep; Kar, Prasenjit; Banerjee, Tanmay; Das, Amitava; Ghosh, Hirendra N

    2012-06-01

    Polynuclear-polypyridyl complexes exhibit a directional energy-transfer property that can improve their photosensitization activity. In the present work, the energy-transfer process is explored in a trinuclear Ru2(∧)Os1 complex using transient absorption spectroscopy. This study reveals an efficient excitation energy transfer from the terminal (Ru(II) complex) to the core (Os(II) complex) region in the ultrafast time domain (400 fs-40 ps). The excitation energy funnel is useful in improving the functionalized core activity. This is evidenced in an interfacial electron-transfer study of Ru2(∧)Os1, Ru2(∧)Ru1, and Os1 complex sensitized TiO2 nanoparticle (TiO2 NP) systems. The intramolecular energy transfer causes sequential excitation of the core part of the Ru2(∧)Os1 complex, which leads to multiexponential electron injection into TiO2 NP. Besides this, the electronic coupling between the metal ion centers stabilizes the positive charge within the trinuclear complex, which results in a slow charge recombination reaction. This study shows that polynuclear complexes can be very useful for their panchromatic effects, unidirectional energy- and electron-transfer properties. PMID:26285635

  18. Simulations of fluorescence quenching using theoretical models of energy and electron transfer in random arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulu, Laurent G.; Kozak, John J.

    A master equation is solved numerically for investigating energy transfer and trapping in two-dimensional disordered systems of chlorophylls and quinones. Quenching of the excitation occurs both by electron transfer from a chlorophyll to a neighbouring quinone and by energy transfer to self-quenching traps consisting of statistical pairs of chlorophyll molecules closer than a critical distance. The quinone concentration dependence of the average lifetime of the calculated fluorescence decay is determined for different values of the Förster transfer radius 0 and A, the microscopic electron transfer rate at 'zero distance'. Quasi-Stern-Volmer behaviour is obtained. The half-quenching concentration and the quenching rate kQ depend strongly on A; they increase little with faster energy transfer because of competing self-quenching and slow electron transfer. Our results are compared to recent fluorescence quenching data that Chauvet and Patterson obtained from real-time measurements in monolayers of chlorophyll a and vitamin K1 diluted in dioleylphosphatidylcholine (DOL). Our convoluted decays fit the experimental data if A = 50-100 ns-1 and tMPH0193_images = 60-70 Å. Accordingly, kQ = 3-5 × 10-5 cm2/molecules·s. These values are in close agreement with those reported in the literature.

  19. Integrating Patient Reported Outcomes With Clinical Cancer Registry Data: A Feasibility Study of the Electronic Patient-Reported Outcomes From Cancer Survivors (ePOCS) System

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Helen; Thomas, James; Newsham, Alex; Downing, Amy; Morris, Eva; Brown, Julia; Velikova, Galina; Forman, David; Wright, Penny

    2013-01-01

    Background Routine measurement of Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs) linked with clinical data across the patient pathway is increasingly important for informing future care planning. The innovative electronic Patient-reported Outcomes from Cancer Survivors (ePOCS) system was developed to integrate PROs, collected online at specified post-diagnostic time-points, with clinical and treatment data in cancer registries. Objective This study tested the technical and clinical feasibility of ePOCS by running the system with a sample of potentially curable breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer patients in their first 15 months post diagnosis. Methods Patients completed questionnaires comprising multiple Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) via ePOCS within 6 months (T1), and at 9 (T2) and 15 (T3) months, post diagnosis. Feasibility outcomes included system informatics performance, patient recruitment, retention, representativeness and questionnaire completion (response rate), patient feedback, and administration burden involved in running the system. Results ePOCS ran efficiently with few technical problems. Patient participation was 55.21% (636/1152) overall, although varied by approach mode, and was considerably higher among patients approached face-to-face (61.4%, 490/798) than by telephone (48.8%, 21/43) or letter (41.0%, 125/305). Older and less affluent patients were less likely to join (both P<.001). Most non-consenters (71.1%, 234/329) cited information technology reasons (ie, difficulty using a computer). Questionnaires were fully or partially completed by 85.1% (541/636) of invited participants at T1 (80 questions total), 70.0% (442/631) at T2 (102-108 questions), and 66.3% (414/624) at T3 (148-154 questions), and fully completed at all three time-points by 57.6% (344/597) of participants. Reminders (mainly via email) effectively prompted responses. The PROs were successfully linked with cancer registry data for 100% of patients (N=636). Participant feedback

  20. Activators generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization of styrene in the presence of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Khezri, Khezrollah; Roghani-Mamaqani, Hossein

    2014-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Effect of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MCM-41) on the activator generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP) is investigated. Decrement of conversion and number average molecular weight and also increment of polydispersity index (PDI) values are three main results of addition of MCM-41 nanoparticles. Incorporation of MCM-41 nanoparticles in the polystyrene matrix can clearly increase thermal stability and decrease glass transition temperature of the nanocomposites. - Highlights: • Spherical morphology, hexagonal structure, and high surface area with regular pore diameters of the synthesized MCM-41 nanoparticles are examined. • AGET ATRP of styrene in the presence of MCM-41 nanoparticles is performed. • Effect of MCM-41 nanoparticles addition on the polymerization rate, conversion and molecular weights of the products are discussed. • Improvement in thermal stability of the nanocomposites and decreasing T{sub g} values was also observed by incorporation of MCM-41 nanoparticles. - Abstract: Activator generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization was employed to synthesize well-defined mesoporous silica nanoparticles/polystyrene composites. Inherent features of spherical mesoporous silica nanoparticles were evaluated by nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherm, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis techniques. Conversion and molecular weight evaluations were carried out using gas and size exclusion chromatography respectively. By the addition of only 3 wt% mesoporous silica nanoparticles, conversion decreases from 81 to 58%. Similarly, number average molecular weight decreases from 17,116 to 12,798 g mol{sup −1}. However, polydispersity index (PDI) values increases from 1.24 to 1.58. A peak around 4.1–4.2 ppm at proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy results clearly confirms the living nature of the polymerization. Thermogravimetric

  1. Contact and solvent-separated geminate radical ion pairs in electron-transfer photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, I.R.; Young, R.H.; Moody, R.E.; Farid, S. )

    1991-03-07

    The two primary intermediates that play a major role in determining the efficiencies of bimolecular photoinduced electron-transfer reactions are the contact (A{sup {sm bullet}{minus}}D{sup {sm bullet}+}) and the solvent-separated (A{sup {sm bullet}{minus}}(S)D{sup {sm bullet}+}) radical ion pairs, CRIP and SSRIP, respectively. These two species are distinguished by differences in electronic coupling, which is much smaller for the SSRIP compared to the CRIP, and solvation, which is much larger for the SSRIP compared to the CRIP. The present work addresses the quantitative aspects of these and other factors that influence the rates of energy-wasting return electron transfer within the ion-pair intermediates. The electron acceptor tetracyanoanthracene (TCA) forms ground-state charge-transfer complexes with alkyl-substituted benzene donors. By a change of the excitation wavelength and/or donor concentration, either the free TCA or the CT complex can be excited. Quenching of free {sup 1}TCA{sup *} by the alkylbenzene donors that have low oxidation potentials, such as pentamethylbenzene and hexamethylbenzene, in acetonitrile solution leads to the direct formation of geminate SSRIP. Excitation of the corresponding charge-transfer complexes leads to the formation of geminate CRIP. Rates of return electron transfer within the two types of ion pair are determined from quantum yields for formation of free radical ions pairs depend upon the reaction exothermicity in a manner consistent with the Marcus inverted region.

  2. Rates of intra- and intermolecular electron transfers in hydrogenase deduced from steady-state activity measurements.

    PubMed

    Dementin, Sébastien; Burlat, Bénédicte; Fourmond, Vincent; Leroux, Fanny; Liebgott, Pierre-Pol; Abou Hamdan, Abbas; Léger, Christophe; Rousset, Marc; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Bertrand, Patrick

    2011-07-01

    Electrons are transferred over long distances along chains of FeS clusters in hydrogenases, mitochondrial complexes, and many other respiratory enzymes. It is usually presumed that electron transfer is fast in these systems, despite the fact that there has been no direct measurement of rates of FeS-to-FeS electron transfer in any respiratory enzyme. In this context, we propose and apply to NiFe hydrogenase an original strategy that consists of quantitatively interpreting the variations of steady-state activity that result from changing the nature of the FeS clusters which connect the active site to the redox partner, and/or the nature of the redox partner. Rates of intra- and intermolecular electron transfer are deduced from such large data sets. The mutation-induced variations of electron transfer rates cannot be explained by changes in intercenter distances and reduction potentials. This establishes that FeS-to-FeS rate constants are extremely sensitive to the nature and coordination of the centers. PMID:21615141

  3. Electron transfer kinetics at a biotin/avidin patterned glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Nowall, W B; Dontha, N; Kuhr, W G

    1998-11-15

    Photolithographic techniques using a laser interference pattern were used to attach photobiotin to micron-sized stripes on the surface of a carbon electrode. Fluorophore-tagged avidin was attached to this spatially-patterned biotin with essentially no loss in spatial resolution. The kinetics of the glassy carbon surface were examined to see if electron transfer sites could indeed be segregated from the attachment sites of photobiotin-immobilized avidin. The ECL of luminol and SECM were used to verify the segregation between underivatized sites (which exhibit normal electron transfer kinetics) and extensively derivatized biotin/avidin surfaces (which presumably exhibit slow electron transfer kinetics). Both techniques were found to be capable of differentiating the protein-covered surface from bare carbon with sufficient resolution to tell whether a significant portion of the carbon surface is still active and available to detect the product of an enzyme generated analyte. These results indicate that extensive biotin/avidin derivatization of the surface does decrease the electron transfer rate of a carbon electrode, and that the photolithographic approach was able to modify specific sections of the electrode surface, while leaving other regions untouched and available for facile electron transfer. This leads to a more general protocol for the construction of enzyme-based biosensors which utilize diffusable mediators. PMID:9871979

  4. Domain motions and electron transfer dynamics in 2Fe-superoxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Horch, Marius; Utesch, Tillmann; Hildebrandt, Peter; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Zebger, Ingo

    2016-08-17

    Superoxide reductases are non-heme iron enzymes that represent valuable model systems for the reductive detoxification of reactive oxygen species. In the present study, we applied different theoretical methods to study the structural dynamics of a prototypical 2Fe-superoxide reductase and its influence on electron transfer towards the active site. Using normal mode and essential dynamics analyses, we could show that enzymes of this type are capable of well-defined, electrostatically triggered domain movements, which may allow conformational proofreading for cellular redox partners involved in intermolecular electron transfer. Moreover, these global modes of motion were found to enable access to molecular configurations with decreased tunnelling distances between the active site and the enzyme's second iron centre. Using all-atom classical molecular dynamics simulations and the tunnelling pathway model, however, we found that electron transfer between the two metal sites is not accelerated under these conditions. This unexpected finding suggests that the unperturbed enzymatic structure is optimized for intramolecular electron transfer, which provides an indirect indication of the biological relevance of such a mechanism. Consistently, efficient electron transfer was found to depend on a distinct route, which is accessible via the equilibrium geometry and characterized by a quasi conserved tyrosine that could enable multistep-tunnelling (hopping). Besides these explicit findings, the present study demonstrates the importance of considering both global and local protein dynamics, and a generalized approach for the functional analysis of these aspects is provided. PMID:27491757

  5. Control of the electronic ground state on an electron-transfer copper site by second-sphere perturbations.

    PubMed

    Morgada, Marcos N; Abriata, Luciano A; Zitare, Ulises; Alvarez-Paggi, Damian; Murgida, Daniel H; Vila, Alejandro J

    2014-06-10

    The Cu(A) center is a dinuclear copper site that serves as an optimized hub for long-range electron transfer in heme-copper terminal oxidases. Its electronic structure can be described in terms of a σ(u)* ground-state wavefunction with an alternative, less populated ground state of π(u) symmetry, which is thermally accessible. It is now shown that second-sphere mutations in the Cu(A) containing subunit of Thermus thermophilus ba3 oxidase perturb the electronic structure, which leads to a substantial increase in the population of the π(u) state, as shown by different spectroscopic methods. This perturbation does not affect the redox potential of the metal site, and despite an increase in the reorganization energy, it is not detrimental to the electron-transfer kinetics. The mutations were achieved by replacing the loops that are involved in protein-protein interactions with cytochrome c, suggesting that transient protein binding could also elicit ground-state switching in the oxidase, which enables alternative electron-transfer pathways. PMID:24777732

  6. Expanding the Diet for DIET: Electron Donors Supporting Direct Interspecies Electron Transfer (DIET) in Defined Co-Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Ying; Nevin, Kelly P.; Woodard, Trevor L.; Mu, Bo-Zhong; Lovley, Derek R.

    2016-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) has been recognized as an alternative to interspecies H2 transfer as a mechanism for syntrophic growth, but previous studies on DIET with defined co-cultures have only documented DIET with ethanol as the electron donor in the absence of conductive materials. Co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens metabolized propanol, butanol, propionate, and butyrate with the reduction of fumarate to succinate. G. metallireducens utilized each of these substrates whereas only electrons available from DIET supported G. sulfurreducens respiration. A co-culture of G. metallireducens and a strain of G. sulfurreducens that could not metabolize acetate oxidized acetate with fumarate as the electron acceptor, demonstrating that acetate can also be syntrophically metabolized via DIET. A co-culture of G. metallireducens and Methanosaeta harundinacea previously shown to syntrophically convert ethanol to methane via DIET metabolized propanol or butanol as the sole electron donor, but not propionate or butyrate. The stoichiometric accumulation of propionate or butyrate in the propanol- or butanol-fed cultures demonstrated that M. harundinaceae could conserve energy to support growth solely from electrons derived from DIET. Co-cultures of G. metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri could also incompletely metabolize propanol and butanol and did not metabolize propionate or butyrate as sole electron donors. These results expand the range of substrates that are known to be syntrophically metabolized through DIET, but suggest that claims of propionate and butyrate metabolism via DIET in mixed microbial communities warrant further validation. PMID:26973614

  7. Tuning the Electronic Coupling and Electron Transfer in Mo2 Donor-Acceptor Systems by Variation of the Bridge Conformation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mei Ting; Meng, Miao; Tan, Ying Ning; Cheng, Tao; Liu, Chun Y

    2016-02-24

    Assembling two quadruply bonded dimolybdenum units [Mo2 (DAniF)3 ](+) (DAniF=N,N'-di(p-anisyl)formamidinate) with 1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylate and its thiolated derivatives produced three complexes [{Mo2 (DAniF)3 }2 (μ-1,4-O2 CC10 H6 CO2 )], [{Mo2 (DAniF)3 }2 (μ-1,4-OSCC10 H6 COS)], and [{Mo2 (DAniF)3 }2 (μ-1,4-S2 CC10 H6 CS2 )]. In the X-ray structures, the naphthalene bridge deviates from the plane defined by the two Mo-Mo bond vectors with the torsion angle increasing as the chelating atoms of the bridging ligand vary from O to S. The mixed-valent species exhibit intervalence transition absorption bands with high energy and very low intensity. In comparison with the data for the phenylene analogues, the optically determined electronic coupling matrix elements (Hab =258-345 cm(-1) ) are lowered by a factor of two or more, and the electron-transfer rate constants (ket ≈10(11)  s(-1) ) are reduced by about one order of magnitude. These results show that, when the electron-transporting ability of the bridge and electron-donating (electron-accepting) ability of the donor (acceptor) are both variable, the former plays a dominant role in controlling the intramolecular electron transfer. DFT calculations revealed that increasing the torsion angle enlarges the HOMO-LUMO energy gap by elevating the (bridging) ligand-based LUMO energy. Therefore, our experimental results and theoretical analyses verify the superexchange mechanism for electronic coupling and electron transfer. PMID:26807909

  8. (Comparison of group transfer, inner shere and outer sphere electron transfer mechanisms for organometallic complexes)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Our studies of reactions of metal carbonyl cations and anions have shown that metal carbonyl cations can catalyze CO exchange reactions on metal carbonyl anions. This result provides further evidence for a mechanism involving attack of the metal carbonyl anion on a carbon of the metal carbonyl cation in CO{sup 2+} transfer reactions. Reaction of metal carbonyl anions with metal carbonyl halides is a common approach to formation of metal-metal bonds. We have begun to use kinetic data and product analysis to understand the formation of homobimetallic versus heterobimetallic products in such reactions. Initial data indicate a nucleophilic attack, possibly through a ring-slippage mechanism.

  9. [Comparison of group transfer, inner shere and outer sphere electron transfer mechanisms for organometallic complexes]. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Our studies of reactions of metal carbonyl cations and anions have shown that metal carbonyl cations can catalyze CO exchange reactions on metal carbonyl anions. This result provides further evidence for a mechanism involving attack of the metal carbonyl anion on a carbon of the metal carbonyl cation in CO{sup 2+} transfer reactions. Reaction of metal carbonyl anions with metal carbonyl halides is a common approach to formation of metal-metal bonds. We have begun to use kinetic data and product analysis to understand the formation of homobimetallic versus heterobimetallic products in such reactions. Initial data indicate a nucleophilic attack, possibly through a ring-slippage mechanism.

  10. Photoinduced 2-way electron transfer in composites of metal nanoclusters and semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Navendu; Paul, Sneha; Samanta, Anunay

    2016-07-01

    In order to explore the potential of nanocomposites comprising semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoclusters (NCs) in photovoltaic and catalytic applications, the interaction between CdTe QDs and gold NCs, Au10 and Au25, stabilized by histidine, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glutathione, is studied by an ultrafast transient absorption (TA) technique. Temporal and spectral studies of the transients reveal photoinduced 2-way electron transfer between the two constituents of the nanocomposites, where Au NCs, which generally act as electron donors when used as photosensitizers, perform the role of the efficient electron acceptor. Interestingly, it is found that the electron transfer dynamics in these composites is governed not by the distance of separation of the constituents but by the nature of the surface capping ligands. Despite a large separation between the QDs and NCs in a giant BSA-capped system, a higher electron transfer rate in this composite suggests that unlike other smaller capping agents, which act more like insulators, BSA allows much better electron conduction, as indicated previously.In order to explore the potential of nanocomposites comprising semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoclusters (NCs) in photovoltaic and catalytic applications, the interaction between CdTe QDs and gold NCs, Au10 and Au25, stabilized by histidine, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glutathione, is studied by an ultrafast transient absorption (TA) technique. Temporal and spectral studies of the transients reveal photoinduced 2-way electron transfer between the two constituents of the nanocomposites, where Au NCs, which generally act as electron donors when used as photosensitizers, perform the role of the efficient electron acceptor. Interestingly, it is found that the electron transfer dynamics in these composites is governed not by the distance of separation of the constituents but by the nature of the surface capping ligands. Despite a large separation

  11. Survivors of childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradwell, Moira

    2009-05-01

    Treatment of childhood cancer aims to cure with minimum risk to the patient's subsequent health. Monitoring the long-term effects of treatment on children and young adults is now an essential part of the continued care of survivors. Late effects include: impact on growth, development and intellectual function; organ system impairment; the development of second malignancies; and psychosocial problems. These can adversely affect long-term survival and the quality of life. In the UK, models of long-term follow up for survivors of childhood cancer vary from centre to centre but nurses have a significant role to play. Combining the nurse specialist role with that of the advanced practitioner ensures that the goals of improving the quality of nursing care to the survivors of childhood cancer are achieved and maximises the nursing contribution to their follow up. With the number of childhood cancer survivors increasing, providing holistic, health promotional care, tailored to the specific needs of survivors will be crucial for their future. PMID:19505060

  12. Effect of laser intensity on the determination of intermolecular electron transfer rate constants—Observation of Marcus inverted region in photoinduced back electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Yu-Xiang; Chan, Kwok-Chu; Tzeng, Biing-Chiau; Che, Chi-Ming

    1998-10-01

    The light intensity and concentration dependence of the photoproduct yield are investigated in a monophotonic process. The relationship of the photoproduct yield with the laser intensity and the complex concentration for a monophotonic process is derived under laser flash photolysis. The relationship is confirmed experimentally in a monophotonic process, i.e., triplet-triplet transition for a Cu(I) complex Cu6(DMNSN')6 (DMNSN'=4,6-dimethylpyrimidine-2-thiolate). At low light intensity, the relationship can be approximated by a linear inverse square root dependence on the light intensity. Based on this equation, a method is proposed to determine the intrinsic back electron transfer rate constant kETb in photoinduced intermolecular electron transfer reactions, precluding the effect from the diffusional encounter pairs. The Marcus "inverted region" is observed by using the method in photoinduced back electron transfer reactions of [Au2(dppm)2](ClO4)2 (dppm=bis(diphenylphosphino)methane) with a series of substituted pyridinium acceptors.

  13. Electron-transfer kinetics in cyanobacterial cells: methyl viologen is a poor inhibitor of linear electron flow.

    PubMed

    Sétif, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    The inhibitor methyl viologen (MV) has been widely used in photosynthesis to study oxidative stress. Its effects on electron transfer kinetics in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 cells were studied to characterize its electron-accepting properties. For the first hundreds of flashes following MV addition at submillimolar concentrations, the kinetics of NADPH formation were hardly modified (less than 15% decrease in signal amplitude) with a significant signal decrease only observed after more flashes or continuous illumination. The dependence of the P700 photooxidation kinetics on the MV concentration exhibited a saturation effect at 0.3 mM MV, a concentration which inhibits the recombination reactions in photosystem I. The kinetics of NADPH formation and decay under continuous light with MV at 0.3 mM showed that MV induces the oxidation of the NADP pool in darkness and that the yield of linear electron transfer decreased by only 50% after 1.5-2 photosystem-I turnovers. The unexpectedly poor efficiency of MV in inhibiting NADPH formation was corroborated by in vitro flash-induced absorption experiments with purified photosystem-I, ferredoxin and ferredoxin-NADP(+)-oxidoreductase. These experiments showed that the second-order rate constants of MV reduction are 20 to 40-fold smaller than the competing rate constants involved in reduction of ferredoxin and ferredoxin-NADP(+)-oxidoreductase. The present study shows that MV, which accepts electrons in vivo both at the level of photosystem-I and ferredoxin, can be used at submillimolar concentrations to inhibit recombination reactions in photosystem-I with only a moderate decrease in the efficiency of fast reactions involved in linear electron transfer and possibly cyclic electron transfer. PMID:25448535

  14. Electronic Energy Transfer on CaO Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2008-09-28

    We excite low-coordinated surface sites of nanostructured CaO samples using tunable UV laser pulses and observe hyperthermal O-atom emission indicative of an electronic excited-state desorption mechanism. The O-atom yield increases dramatically with photon energy, between 3.75 and 5.4 eV, below the bulk absorption threshold. The peak of the kinetic energy distribution does not increase with photon energy in the range 3.9 to 5.15 eV. These results are analyzed in the context of a laser desorption model developed previously for nanostructured MgO samples. The data are consistent with desorption induced by exciton localization at corner-hole trapped surface sites following either direct corner excitation or diffusion and localization of excitons from higher coordinated surface sites.

  15. Charge transfer and electronic doping in nitrogen-doped graphene

    PubMed Central

    Joucken, Frédéric; Tison, Yann; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Tejeda, Antonio; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Conrad, Edward; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Bellec, Amandine; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Ghijsen, Jacques; Sporken, Robert; Amara, Hakim; Ducastelle, François; Lagoute, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the modification of the graphene’s electronic structure upon doping is crucial for enlarging its potential applications. We present a study of nitrogen-doped graphene samples on SiC(000) combining angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The comparison between tunneling and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra reveals the spatial inhomogeneity of the Dirac energy shift and that a phonon correction has to be applied to the tunneling measurements. XPS data demonstrate the dependence of the N 1s binding energy of graphitic nitrogen on the nitrogen concentration. The measure of the Dirac energy for different nitrogen concentrations reveals that the ratio usually computed between the excess charge brought by the dopants and the dopants’ concentration depends on the latter. This is supported by a tight-binding model considering different values for the potentials on the nitrogen site and on its first neighbors. PMID:26411651

  16. Return electron transfer within geminate radical ion pairs. Observation of the marcus inverted region

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, I.R.; Ege, D.; Mattes, S.L.; Farid, S.

    1987-06-10

    In recent years the physical and chemical properties of photoinduced electron-transfer reactions have been extensively studied with particular emphasis on maximizing the efficiency of charge separation. However, energy-wasting return electron transfer, especially within the primary geminate radical ion pair for singlet-state reactions, often results in low quantum yields for free-ion formation. Detailed studies of the mechanisms and kinetics of product formation for several photosensitized electron-transfer reactions suggest that a relationship exists between the thermodynamics and the kinetics of the return electron transfer process. In this work the authors summarize the results of laser flash photolysis studies which were specifically designed to study this relationship. The results provide a clear example of the Marcus inverted region in these processes. Experiments were performed in degassed acetonitrile at room temperature using 9,10-dicyanoanthracene (DCA) and 2,6,9,10-tetracyanoanthracene (TCA) as the excited-state sensitizers and electron acceptors and naphthalene derivatives, diphenylacetylene, and biphenyl as the electron donors. Absolute quantum yields for formation of free radical ion (Theta/sub sep/) were determined by using conventional laser flash photolysis.

  17. Bidirectional microbial electron transfer: Switching an acetate oxidizing biofilm to nitrate reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Pous, Narcís; Carmona-Martínez, Alessandro A; Vilajeliu-Pons, Anna; Fiset, Erika; Bañeras, Lluis; Trably, Eric; Balaguer, M Dolors; Colprim, Jesús; Bernet, Nicolas; Puig, Sebastià

    2016-01-15

    Up to date a few electroactive bacteria embedded in biofilms are described to catalyze both anodic and cathodic reactions in bioelectrochemical systems (i.e. bidirectional electron transfer). How these bacteria transfer electrons to or from the electrode is still uncertain. In this study the extracellular electron transfer mechanism of bacteria within an electroactive biofilm was investigated by using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). First, a mature anodic electroactive biofilm was developed from an activated sludge sample (inoculum), acetate as electron donor and a poised electrode (+397mV vs. SHE). Later, this biofilm was "switched" to biocathodic conditions by feeding it with a medium containing nitrates and poising the electrode at -303mV vs. SHE. The electrochemical characterization indicated that both, acetate oxidation and nitrate reduction took place at a similar formal potential of -175±05 and -175±34mV vs. SHE, respectively. The biofilm was predominantly composed by Geobacter sp. at both experimental conditions. Taken together, the results indicated that both processes could be catalyzed by using the same electron conduit, and most likely by the same bacterial consortium. Hence, this study suggests that electroactive bacteria within biofilms could use the same electron transfer conduit for catalyzing anodic and cathodic reactions. PMID:26339932

  18. A redox beginning: Which came first phosphoryl, acyl, or electron transfer ?. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1994-01-01

    Thermodynamic and kinetic information available on the synthesis of prebiotic monomers and polymers will be examined in order to illuminate the prebiotic plausibility of polymer syntheses based on (a) phosphoryl transfer that yields phosphodiester polymers, (b) acyl transfer that gives polyamides, and (c) electron transfer that produces polydisulfide or poly(thio)ester polymers. New experimental results on the oxidative polymerization of 2,3-dimercaptopropanol by ferric ions on the surface of ferric hydroxide oxide will be discussed as a chemical model of polymerization by electron transfer. This redox polymerization that yields polymers with a polydisulfide backbone was found to give oligomers up to the 15-mer from 1 mM of 2,3-dimercaptopropanol after one day at 25 C. High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of the oligomers was carried out on an Alltech OH-100 column eluted with acetonitrile-water.

  19. Electron transfer beyond the static picture: A TDDFT/TD-ZINDO study of a pentacene dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Reslan, Randa; Lopata, Kenneth A.; Arntsen, Christopher D.; Govind, Niranjan; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2012-12-14

    We use time-dependent density functional theory and time-dependent ZINDO (a semi-empirical method) to study transfer of an extra electron between a pair of pentacene dimers. A measure of the electronic transfer integral is computed in a dynamic picture via the vertical excitation energy from a delocalized anionic ground state. With increasing dimer separation, this dynamical measurement of charge transfer is shown to be significantly larger than the commonly used static approximation (i.e., LUMO+1 - LUMO of the neutral dimer, or HOMO - LUMO of the charged dimer), up to an order of magnitude higher at 6 Å. These results offer a word of caution for calculations involving large separations, as in organic photovoltaics, where care must be taken when using a static picture to model charge transfer.

  20. Femtosecond laser field induced modifications of electron-transfer processes in Ne{sup +}-He collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhenzhong; Chen Deying; Fan Rongwei; Xia Yuanqin

    2012-01-02

    We demonstrate the presence of femtosecond laser induced charge transfer in Ne{sup +}-He collisions. Electron transfer in ion-atom collisions is considerably modified when the collision is embedded in a strong laser field with the laser intensity of {approx}10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The observed anisotropy of the He{sup +} angular distribution confirms the prediction of early work that the capture probability varies significantly with the laser polarization angle.

  1. Energy transfer enhancement by oxygen perturbation of spin-forbidden electronic transitions in aromatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monguzzi, A.; Tubino, R.; Salamone, M. M.; Meinardi, F.

    2010-09-01

    Triplet-triplet energy transfer in multicomponent organic systems is usually entirely ascribed to a Dexter-type mechanism involving only short-range donor/acceptor interactions. We demonstrate that the presence of molecular oxygen introduces a perturbation to the electronic structure of one of the involved moieties which can induce a large increase in the spin-forbidden transition oscillator strength so that the otherwise negligible Förster contribution dominates the overall energy transfer rate.

  2. Understanding the electron transfer process in ZnO-naphthol azobenzoic acid composites from photophysical characterisation.

    PubMed

    George, Leena; Kunhikannan, Athira K; Illathvalappil, Rajith; Ottoor, Divya; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Devi, R Nandini

    2016-08-10

    Semiconductor nanoparticles surface modified with organic molecules capable of visible light absorption and effectively transferring the electrons to the catalytic sites have the potential to be good photocatalysts. ZnO nanoparticles of size ∼3 nm are grafted with two azonaphthols, one conjugated and the other non-conjugated. The photophysical properties of modified ZnO indicate an effective electron transfer from the conjugated azonaphthol to ZnO but not in the case of the non-conjugated molecule. It is also observed from lifetime studies that the conjugated molecule stabilises the defect sites on ZnO nanoparticles. It is possible that excited electrons from the conjugated molecule are transferred to specific defect sites in ZnO. This apparently does not occur in the non-conjugated molecule, bringing to focus the importance of the photophysical characteristics of organic modifiers in designing visible light active photocatalysts. PMID:27443499

  3. Probe-based measurement of lateral single-electron transfer between individual molecules.

    PubMed

    Steurer, Wolfram; Fatayer, Shadi; Gross, Leo; Meyer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The field of molecular electronics aims at using single molecules as functional building blocks for electronics components, such as switches, rectifiers or transistors. A key challenge is to perform measurements with atomistic control over the alignment of the molecule and its contacting electrodes. Here we use atomic force microscopy to examine charge transfer between weakly coupled pentacene molecules on insulating films with single-electron sensitivity and control over the atomistic details. We show that, in addition to the imaging capability, the probe tip can be used to control the charge state of individual molecules and to detect charge transfers to/from the tip, as well as between individual molecules. Our approach represents a novel route for molecular charge transfer studies with a host of opportunities, especially in combination with single atom/molecule manipulation and nanopatterning techniques. PMID:26387533

  4. Probe-based measurement of lateral single-electron transfer between individual molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steurer, Wolfram; Fatayer, Shadi; Gross, Leo; Meyer, Gerhard

    2015-09-01

    The field of molecular electronics aims at using single molecules as functional building blocks for electronics components, such as switches, rectifiers or transistors. A key challenge is to perform measurements with atomistic control over the alignment of the molecule and its contacting electrodes. Here we use atomic force microscopy to examine charge transfer between weakly coupled pentacene molecules on insulating films with single-electron sensitivity and control over the atomistic details. We show that, in addition to the imaging capability, the probe tip can be used to control the charge state of individual molecules and to detect charge transfers to/from the tip, as well as between individual molecules. Our approach represents a novel route for molecular charge transfer studies with a host of opportunities, especially in combination with single atom/molecule manipulation and nanopatterning techniques.

  5. Anion Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Homogenous 2-Hydroxypyridine Dimer Electron Induced Proton Transfer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlk, Alexandra; Stokes, Sarah; Wang, Yi; Hicks, Zachary; Zhang, Xinxing; Blando, Nicolas; Frock, Andrew; Marquez, Sara; Bowen, Kit; Bowen Lab JHU Team

    Anion photoelectron spectroscopic (PES) and density functional theory (DFT) studies on the dimer anion of (2-hydroxypyridine)2-are reported. The experimentally measured vertical detachment energy (VDE) of 1.21eV compares well with the theoretically predicted values. The 2-hydroxypyridine anionic dimer system was investigated because of its resemblance to the nitrogenous heterocyclic pyrimidine nucleobases. Experimental and theoretical results show electron induced proton transfer (EIPT) in both the lactim and lactam homogeneous dimers. Upon electron attachment, the anion can serve as the intermediate between the two neutral dimers. A possible double proton transfer process can occur from the neutral (2-hydroxypyridine)2 to (2-pyridone)2 through the dimer anion. This potentially suggests an electron catalyzed double proton transfer mechanism of tautomerization. Research supported by the NSF Grant No. CHE-1360692.

  6. Directionality of electron transfer in cyanobacterial photosystem I at 298 and 77K.

    PubMed

    Makita, Hiroki; Hastings, Gary

    2015-06-01

    Electron transfer processes in cyanobacterial photosystem I particles from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 with a high potential naphthoquinone (2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone) incorporated into the A1 binding site have been studied at 298 and 77K using time-resolved visible and infrared difference spectroscopy. The high potential naphthoquinone inhibits electron transfer past A1, and biphasic P700(+)A1(-) radical pair recombination is observed. The two phases are assigned to P700(+)A1B(-) and P700(+)A1A(-) recombination. Analyses of the transient absorption changes indicate that the ratio of A- and B-branch electron transfer is 95:5 at 77 K and 77:23 at 298 K. PMID:25962848

  7. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1991-12-31

    During this period, conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used for the characterization of the intermediates that are involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. The intermediates of interest were the excited states of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and the species formed in the reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern has been the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes.

  8. Electron transfer in supercritical carbon dioxide: ultraexothermic charge recombination at the end of the "inverted region".

    PubMed

    Serpa, Carlos; Gomes, Paulo J S; Arnaut, Luis G; Formosinho, Sebastião J; Pina, João; de Melo, J Seixas

    2006-06-23

    Charge-recombination rates in contact radical-ion pairs, formed between aromatic hydrocarbons and nitriles in supercritical CO(2) and heptane, decrease with the exothermicity of the reactions until they reach -70 kcal mol(-1), but from there on an increase is observed. The first decrease in rate is typical of the "inverted region" of electron-transfer reactions. The change to an increase in the rate for ultra-exothermic electron transfer indicates a new free-energy relationship. We show that the resulting "double-inverted region" is not due to a change in mechanism. It is an intrinsic property of electron-transfer reactions, and it is due to the increase of the reorganisation energy with the reaction exothermicity. PMID:16548016

  9. Probe-based measurement of lateral single-electron transfer between individual molecules

    PubMed Central

    Steurer, Wolfram; Fatayer, Shadi; Gross, Leo; Meyer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The field of molecular electronics aims at using single molecules as functional building blocks for electronics components, such as switches, rectifiers or transistors. A key challenge is to perform measurements with atomistic control over the alignment of the molecule and its contacting electrodes. Here we use atomic force microscopy to examine charge transfer between weakly coupled pentacene molecules on insulating films with single-electron sensitivity and control over the atomistic details. We show that, in addition to the imaging capability, the probe tip can be used to control the charge state of individual molecules and to detect charge transfers to/from the tip, as well as between individual molecules. Our approach represents a novel route for molecular charge transfer studies with a host of opportunities, especially in combination with single atom/molecule manipulation and nanopatterning techniques. PMID:26387533

  10. Studies of Photosynthetic Energy and Charge Transfer by Two-dimensional Fourier transform electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, Jennifer

    2010-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform electronic spectroscopy has recently emerged as a powerful tool for the study of energy transfer in complex condensed-phase systems. Its experimental implementation is challenging but can be greatly simplified by implementing a pump-probe geometry, where the two phase-stable collinear pump pulses are created with an acousto-optic pulse-shaper. This approach also allows the use of a continuum probe pulse, expanding the available frequency range of the detection axis and allowing studies of energy transfer and electronic coupling over a broad range of frequencies. We discuss several benefits of 2D electronic spectroscopy and present 2D data on the D1-D2 reaction center complex of Photosystem II from spinach. We discuss the ability of 2D spectroscopy to distinguish between current models of energy and charge transfer in this system.

  11. A structural basis for electron transfer in bacterial photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J.R.; DiMagno, T.J.; Angerhofer, A.; Chang, C.H.; El-Kabbani, O.; Schiffer, M.

    1989-01-01

    Triplet data for the primary donor in single crystals of bacterial reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas viridis are interpreted in terms of the corresponding x-ray structures. The analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance data from single crystals (triplet zero field splitting and cation and triplet linewidth of the primary special pair donor of bacterial reaction centers) is extended to systems of a non-crystalline nature. A unified interpretation based on frontier molecular orbitals concludes that the special pair behaves like a supermolecule in all wild-type bacteria investigated here. However, in heterodimers of Rb. capsulatus (His/sup M200/ changed to Leu or Phe with the result that the M-half of the special pair is converted to bacteriopheophytin) the special pair possesses the EPR properties more appropriately described in terms of a monomer. In all cases the triplet state and cation EPR properties appear to be dominated by the highest occupied molecular orbitals. These conclusions derived from EPR experiments are supplemented by data from Stark spectroscopy of reaction centers from Rb. capsulatus. 41 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. Spin Chains and Electron Transfer at Stepped Silicon Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Aulbach, J; Erwin, S C; Claessen, R; Schäfer, J

    2016-04-13

    High-index surfaces of silicon with adsorbed gold can reconstruct to form highly ordered linear step arrays. These steps take the form of a narrow strip of graphitic silicon. In some cases--specifically, for Si(553)-Au and Si(557)-Au--a large fraction of the silicon atoms at the exposed edge of this strip are known to be spin-polarized and charge-ordered along the edge. The periodicity of this charge ordering is always commensurate with the structural periodicity along the step edge and hence leads to highly ordered arrays of local magnetic moments that can be regarded as "spin chains." Here, we demonstrate theoretically as well as experimentally that the closely related Si(775)-Au surface has--despite its very similar overall structure--zero spin polarization at its step edge. Using a combination of density-functional theory and scanning tunneling microscopy, we propose an electron-counting model that accounts for these differences. The model also predicts that unintentional defects and intentional dopants can create local spin moments at Si(hhk)-Au step edges. We analyze in detail one of these predictions and verify it experimentally. This finding opens the door to using techniques of surface chemistry and atom manipulation to create and control silicon spin chains. PMID:26974012

  13. Imaging charge and energy transfer in molecules using free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, Artem

    2014-05-01

    Charge and energy transfer reactions drive numerous important processes in physics, chemistry and biology, with applications ranging from X-ray astrophysics to artificial photosynthesis and molecular electronics. Experimentally, the central goal in studies of transfer phenomena is to trace the spatial localization of charge at a given time. Because of their element and site sensitivity, ultrafast X-rays provide a promising tool to address this goal. In this talk I will discuss several experiments where free-electron lasers were employed to study charge and energy transfer dynamics in fragmenting molecules. In a first example, we used intense, 70 femtosecond 1.5 keV pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to study distance dependence of electron transfer in laser-dissociated methyl iodide molecules. Inducing well-localized positive charge on the heavy iodine atom, we observe signature of electron transition from the separated methyl group up to the distances of 35 atomic units. In a complementary experiment, we studied charge exchange between two partners in a dissociating molecular iodine employing a pump-probe arrangement with two identical 90 eV pulses from the Free-Electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH). In both cases, the effective spatial range of the electron transfer can be reasonably described by a classical over-the-barrier model developed for ion-atom collisions. Finally, I will discuss a time-resolved measurement on non-local relaxation mechanism based on a long-range energy transfer, the so-called interatomic Coulombic decay. This work was supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Department of Energy and by the Kansas NSF ``First Award'' program.

  14. Photoinduced electron transfer in ordered polymers: Progress report, May 1, 1988--December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G. II

    1988-12-31

    Long-range photoinduced electron transfer between potential electron donors and acceptors is of considerable current interest in terms of strategies for artificial photosynthesis and studies regarding the redox properties of proteins. Electron transfer over organized arrays of significant dimension (e.g., 10 nm) may also be important for molecule-based bistable switches or rectifiers. As part of a program of study of long range electron transfer involving biopolymers, we report early investigations of the interaction of the xanthene dye, eosin (EY), with synthetic peptides constructed of the amino acid residues, lysine (Lys), tryptophan (Trp), and tyrosine (Tyr). The principal interest in these systems has to do with the well ordered secondary structures (e.g., ..cap alpha..-helices) adopted by peptide polymers and the capabilities for synthetic modification of peptide side chains and end groups with chromophores or electroactive substituents. Work which is completed or well underway includes synthesis of Trp homopolymer (20-25 Trp amino acid residues) with EY attached specifically at the N-terminus. Model compounds in which the xanthene dye is attached to one or two Trp residues have been prepared along with copolymers of Trp or Tyr and Lys with randomally labeled EY at Lys side chains. Photoinduced electron transfer between variously attached eosin pendants and co-bound Trp units has been studied using fluorescence quenching and laser flash photolysis methods. Also, as a model for events occurring for the synthetic peptides, electron transfer quenching of eosin singlet and triplet excited states by substituted phenols, representative of the pendant groups of Tyr residues has been investigated. The observation of ultra-long-lived contact radical ion pairs which result from the quenching an excited quinone molecule and the photolysis of quinone charge-transfer complexes constitute another theme of continuing research.

  15. DFT and time-resolved IR investigation of electron transfer between photogenerated 17- and 19-electron organometallic radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Cahoon, James B.; Kling, Matthias F.; Sawyer, Karma R.; Andersen, Lars K.; Harris, Charles B.

    2008-04-30

    The photochemical disproportionation mechanism of [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} in the presence of Lewis bases PR{sub 3} was investigated on the nano- and microsecond time-scales with Step-Scan FTIR time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. 532 nm laser excitation was used to homolytically cleave the W-W bond, forming the 17-electron radicals CpW(CO){sub 3} and initiating the reaction. With the Lewis base PPh{sub 3}, disproportionation to form the ionic products CpW(CO){sub 3}PPh{sub 3}{sup +} and CpW(CO){sub 3}{sup -} was directly monitored on the microsecond time-scale. Detailed examination of the kinetics and concentration dependence of this reaction indicates that disproportionation proceeds by electron transfer from the 19-electron species CpW(CO){sub 3}PPh{sub 3} to the 17-electron species CpW(CO){sub 3}. This result is contrary to the currently accepted disproportionation mechanism which predicts electron transfer from the 19-electron species to the dimer [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2}. With the Lewis base P(OMe){sub 3} on the other hand, ligand substitution to form the product [CpW(CO){sub 2}P(OMe){sub 3}]{sub 2} is the primary reaction on the microsecond time-scale. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations support the experimental results and suggest that the differences in the reactivity between P(OMe){sub 3} and PPh{sub 3} are due to steric effects. The results indicate that radical-to-radical electron transfer is a previously unknown but important process for the formation of ionic products with the organometallic dimer [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} and may also be applicable to the entire class of organometallic dimers containing a single metal-metal bond.

  16. Femtosecond Transfer Dynamics of Photogenerated Electrons at a Surface Resonance of Reconstructed InP(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töben, L.; Gundlach, L.; Ernstorfer, R.; Eichberger, R.; Hannappel, T.; Willig, F.; Zeiser, A.; Förstner, J.; Knorr, A.; Hahn, P. H.; Schmidt, W. G.

    2005-02-01

    Time-dependent two-photon photoemission spectra are used to resolve the femtosecond dynamics of hot electrons at the energetically lowest surface resonance of reconstructed InP(100). Two different cases are studied, where electrons either are lifted into the surface resonance via a direct optical transition or are captured from bulk states. These data are the first of this kind recorded with a time resolution below 70 fs. The microscopic analysis shows that electron-phonon scattering is a major mechanism for electron transfer between surface and bulk states.

  17. Ultrafast Electron Transfer Between Dye and Catalyst on a Mesoporous NiO Surface.

    PubMed

    Brown, Allison M; Antila, Liisa J; Mirmohades, Mohammad; Pullen, Sonja; Ott, Sascha; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-07-01

    The combination of molecular dyes and catalysts with semiconductors into dye-sensitized solar fuel devices (DSSFDs) requires control of efficient interfacial and surface charge transfer between the components. The present study reports on the light-induced electron transfer processes of p-type NiO films cosensitized with coumarin C343 and a bioinspired proton reduction catalyst, [FeFe](mcbdt)(CO)6 (mcbdt = 3-carboxybenzene-1,2-dithiolate). By transient optical spectroscopy we find that ultrafast interfacial electron transfer (τ ≈ 200 fs) from NiO to the excited C343 ("hole injection") is followed by rapid (t1/2 ≈ 10 ps) and efficient surface electron transfer from C343(-) to the coadsorbed [FeFe](mcbdt)(CO)6. The reduced catalyst has a clear spectroscopic signature that persists for several tens of microseconds, before charge recombination with NiO holes occurs. The demonstration of rapid surface electron transfer from dye to catalyst on NiO, and the relatively long lifetime of the resulting charge separated state, suggests the possibility to use these systems for photocathodes on DSSFDs. PMID:27314570

  18. Electronic and quantum dynamical insight into the ultrafast proton transfer of 1-hydroxy-2-acetonaphthone

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz-Sanchez, Juan Manuel; Gelabert, Ricard; Moreno, Miquel; Lluch, Jose M.

    2007-08-28

    The ultrafast proton-transfer dynamics of 1-hydroxy-2-acetonaphthone has been theoretically analyzed in the ground and first singlet excited electronic states by density functional theory calculations and quantum dynamics. The potential energies obtained in the ground electronic state reveal that the proton-transfer process does not lead to a stable keto tautomer unless the transfer of the hydrogen from the enol form is accompanied by an internal rotation of the newly formed O-H bond. Calculations in the first singlet excited electronic state point to a very low barrier for the formation of the keto tautomer. The analysis of the calculated frequencies of the two tautomers in the excited state unveils a coupling of the skeletal motions (low frequency modes) with the proton-transfer process, as it has been stated from time-resolved experiments. The electronic energies obtained by the time-dependent density functional theory formalism have been fitted to a monodimensional potential energy surface in order to perform an exact quantum dynamics study of the process. Our results show that the proton-transfer process is completed within 25.5 fs, in remarkable good agreement with experiments.

  19. Controllable Quantum State Transfer Between a Josephson Charge Qubit and an Electronic Spin Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Run-Ying; Wang, Hong-Ling; Feng, Zhi-Bo

    2016-01-01

    We propose a theoretical scheme to implement controllable quantum state transfer between a superconducting charge qubit and an electronic spin ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centers. By an electro-mechanical resonator acting as a quantum data bus, an effective interaction between the charge qubit and the spin ensemble can be achieved in the dispersive regime, by which state transfers are switchable due to the adjustable electrical coupling. With the accessible experimental parameters, we further numerically analyze the feasibility and robustness. The present scheme could provide a potential approach for transferring quantum states controllably with the hybrid system.

  20. The effects of fulvic acid on microbial denitrification: promotion of NADH generation, electron transfer, and consumption.

    PubMed

    Li, Mu; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Zheng, Xiong; Liu, Kun

    2016-06-01

    The heterotrophic denitrification requires the participation of electrons which are derived from direct electron donor (usually nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)), and the electrons are transferred via electron transport system in denitrifiers and then consumed by denitrifying enzymes. Despite the reported electron transfer ability of humic substances (HS), the influences of fulvic acid (FA), an ubiquitous major component of HS, on promoting NADH generation, electron transfer, and consumption in denitrification process have never been reported. The presence of FA, compared with the control, was found not only significantly improved the total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency (99.9 % versus 74.8 %) but remarkably reduced the nitrite accumulation (0.2 against 43.8 mg/L) and N2O emission (0.003 against 0.240 mg nitrogen/mg TN removed). The mechanisms study showed that FA increased the metabolism of carbon source via glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle pathways to produce more available NADH. FA also facilitated the electron transfer activities from NADH to denitrifying enzymes via complex I and complex III in electron transport system, which improved the reduction of nitrate and accelerated the transformations of nitrite and N2O, and lower nitrite and N2O accumulations were therefore observed. In addition, the consumption of electrons in denitrification was enhanced due to FA stimulating the synthesis and the catalytic activity of key denitrifying enzymes, especially nitrite reductase and N2O reductase. It will provide an important new insight into the potential effect of FA on microbial denitrification metabolism process and even nitrogen cycle in nature niches. PMID:26894403

  1. Promoted electron transfer of mitoxantrone binding with DNA by cytochrome c

    SciTech Connect

    Li Nan; Yang Xiurong . E-mail: xryang@ns.ciac.jl.cn

    2005-06-17

    A promoted electron transfer of an antitumor drug, mitoxantrone (MTX), intercalating into DNA duplex was successfully obtained upon addition of cytochromes c (cyt. c) in NaAc-HAc buffer solution (pH 4.5). The experimental results suggested that co-existence of MTX and cyt. c in the DNA helix is an important factor for accelerated electron transfer of MTX, where the promoter, cyt. c, operated smoothly through the DNA bridge. The UV/Vis spectroscopic experiments further confirmed the interaction process. Furthermore, a possible mechanism of such reaction was also discussed in this paper.

  2. Non-Markovian theory for the waiting time distributions of single electron transfers.

    PubMed

    Welack, Sven; Yan, YiJing

    2009-09-21

    We derive a non-Markovian theory for waiting time distributions of consecutive single electron transfer events. The presented microscopic Pauli rate equation formalism couples the open electrodes to the many-body system, allowing to take finite bias and temperature into consideration. Numerical results reveal transient oscillations of distinct system frequencies due to memory in the waiting time distributions. Memory effects can be approximated by an expansion in non-Markovian corrections. This method is employed to calculate memory landscapes displaying preservation of memory over multiple consecutive electron transfers. PMID:19778104

  3. Electron transfer in photosystem I containing native and modified quinone acceptors.

    PubMed

    Semenov, A Yu; Petrova, A A; Mamedov, M D; Nadtochenko, V A

    2015-06-01

    The pigment-protein complex of photosystem I (PS I) catalyzes light-driven oxidation of plastocyanin or cytochrome c6 and reduction of ferredoxin or flavodoxin in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of the processes of excitation energy transfer and formation of the primary and secondary ion-radical pairs within PS I. The electron transfer reaction involving quinone cofactor in the A1 site and its role in providing asymmetry of electron transport as well as interaction with oxygen and ascorbate in PS I are discussed. PMID:26531012

  4. Nonlinear response of metal nanoparticles: Double plasmon excitation and electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shiwu

    2015-06-21

    We investigate the dynamical response of a metal nanoparticle and the electron transfer to a molecule near its surface using time-dependent density functional theory. In addition to the linear response of the Mie resonance, double plasmon excitations and a low-frequency charge transfer band emerge and become prominent at high laser intensities. Both modes are nonlinear processes, which are derived from the re-excitation and decay of the primary plasmon mode, respectively. Our results shed light on the localised characters of the plasmon-molecule coupling and hot electron distributions. These findings have general implications to photoinduced phenomena in nanosystems. PMID:26093567

  5. Nonlinear response of metal nanoparticles: Double plasmon excitation and electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shiwu

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the dynamical response of a metal nanoparticle and the electron transfer to a molecule near its surface using time-dependent density functional theory. In addition to the linear response of the Mie resonance, double plasmon excitations and a low-frequency charge transfer band emerge and become prominent at high laser intensities. Both modes are nonlinear processes, which are derived from the re-excitation and decay of the primary plasmon mode, respectively. Our results shed light on the localised characters of the plasmon-molecule coupling and hot electron distributions. These findings have general implications to photoinduced phenomena in nanosystems.

  6. Nonlinear response of metal nanoparticles: Double plasmon excitation and electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Shiwu

    2015-06-21

    We investigate the dynamical response of a metal nanoparticle and the electron transfer to a molecule near its surface using time-dependent density functional theory. In addition to the linear response of the Mie resonance, double plasmon excitations and a low-frequency charge transfer band emerge and become prominent at high laser intensities. Both modes are nonlinear processes, which are derived from the re-excitation and decay of the primary plasmon mode, respectively. Our results shed light on the localised characters of the plasmon-molecule coupling and hot electron distributions. These findings have general implications to photoinduced phenomena in nanosystems.

  7. Photo-induced regeneration of hormones by electron transfer processes: Potential biological and medical consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getoff, Nikola; Hartmann, Johannes; Schittl, Heike; Gerschpacher, Marion; Quint, Ruth Maria

    2011-08-01

    Based on the previous results concerning electron transfer processes in biological substances, it was of interest to investigate if hormone transients resulting by e.g. electron emission can be regenerated. The presented results prove for the first time that the hormone transients originating by the electron emission process can be successfully regenerated by the transfer of electrons from a potent electron donor, such as vitamin C (VitC). Investigations were performed using progesterone (PRG), testosterone (TES) and estrone (E1) as representatives of hormones. By irradiation with monochromatic UV light (λ=254 nm) in a media of 40% water and 60% ethanol, the degradation as well as the regeneration of the hormones was studied with each hormone individually and in the mixture with VitC as a function of the absorbed UV dose, using HPLC. Calculated from the obtained initial yields, the determined regeneration of PRG amounted to 52.7%, for TES to 58.6% and for E1 to 90.9%. The consumption of VitC was determined in the same way. The reported results concerning the regeneration of hormones by the transfer of electrons from an electron donor offer a new, promising method for the therapy with hormones. As a consequence of the regeneration of hormones, a decreased formation of carcinogenic metabolites is expected.

  8. Electron transfer between the QmoABC membrane complex and adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Américo G; Santos, André A; Pereira, Inês A C

    2016-04-01

    The dissimilatory adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase (AprAB) is a key enzyme in the sulfate reduction pathway that catalyzes the reversible two electron reduction of adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) to sulfite and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). The physiological electron donor for AprAB is proposed to be the QmoABC membrane complex, coupling the quinone-pool to sulfate reduction. However, direct electron transfer between these two proteins has never been observed. In this work we demonstrate for the first time direct electron transfer between the Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 QmoABC complex and AprAB. Cyclic voltammetry conducted with the modified Qmo electrode and AprAB in the electrolyte solution presented the Qmo electrochemical signature with two additional well-defined one electron redox processes, attributed to the AprAB FAD redox behavior. Moreover, experiments performed under catalytic conditions using the QmoABC modified electrode, with AprAB and APS in solution, show a catalytic current peak develop in the cathodic wave, attributed to substrate reduction, and which is not observed in the absence of QmoABC. Substrate dependence conducted with different electrode preparations (with and without immobilized Qmo) demonstrated that the QmoABC complex is essential for efficient electron delivery to AprAB, in order to sustain catalysis. These results confirm the role of Qmo in electron transfer to AprAB. PMID:26768116

  9. Electron Transfer Mechanism in Gold Surface Modified with Self-Assembly Monolayers from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Filipe C. D. A.; Iost, Rodrigo M.; Crespilho, Frank N.; Caldas, Marília J.; Calzolari, Arrigo; Petrilli, Helena M.

    2013-03-01

    We report the investigation of electron tunneling mechanism of peptide ferrocenyl-glycylcystamine self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) onto Au (111) electrode surfaces. Recent experimental investigations showed that electron transfer in peptides can occur across long distances by separating the donor from the acceptor. This mechanism can be further fostered by the presence of electron donor terminations of Fc terminal units on SAMs but the charge transfer mechanism is still not clear. We study the interaction of the peptide ferrocenyl-glycylcystamine on the Au (111) from first principles calculations to evaluate the electron transfer mechanism. For this purpose, we used the Kohn Sham (KS) scheme for the Density Functional Theory (DFT) as implemented in the Quantum-ESPRESSO suit of codes, using Vandebilt ultrasoft pseudopotentials and GGA-PBE exchange correlation functional to evaluate the ground-state atomic and electronic structure of the system. The analysis of KS orbital at the Fermi Energy showed high electronic density localized in Fc molecules and the observation of a minor contribution from the solvent and counter ion. Based on the results, we infer evidences of electron tunneling mechanism from the molecule to the Au(111). We acknowledge FAPESP for grant support. Also, LCCA/USP, RICE and CENAPAD for computational resources.

  10. The single electron transfer chemistry of coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Flowers, R.A. II

    1994-12-31

    This research addressed electron donar properties and radical reactions in coal. Solid residues from pyridine Soxhlet extractions of Pocahontas No. 3, Upper Freeport, Pittsburgh No. 8, Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak coals were exposed to 4-vinylpyridine vapors and swelled. All of the 4-vinylpyridine could not be removed under vacuum at 100{degree}C. Diffuse reflectance FTIR revealed the presence of poly-(4-vinylpyridine) in the Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak coals. EPR spectra displayed the loss of inertinite radicals in Upper Freeport, Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak residues after exposure to 4-vinylpyridine. There was little change in the vitrinite radical density or environment. The molecule N,N{prime}-Diphenyl-p-phenylene diamine (DPPD) was exposed to the solid residues from pyridine Soxhlet extractions of the above coals. Diffuse reflectance FTIR failed to detect the imine product from radical reaction with DPPD. EPR spectra displayed the loss of inertinite radicals in Upper Freeport and Wyodak residues. 7,7,8,8-Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and Tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) were deposited into coals in pyridine. FTIR indicated complete conversion of TCNQ to a material with a singly occupied LUMO. In TCNE the LUMO is about 30% occupied. TCNQ and TCNE were deposited into the pyridine extracts and residues of Illinois No. 6 and Pittsburgh No. 8 coals. Only a small amount of the TCNQ and TCNE displayed nitrile shifts in the IR spectrum of a material with an occupied LUMO. It has been concluded that TCNQ must be part of the aromatic stacks in coal and the TCNQ LUMO is part of an extended band.

  11. Experimental studies of fundamental issues in electron transfer through nanometer scale devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Hiromichi

    Electron transfer reactions constitute many of the primary events in materials science, chemistry, physics, and biochemistry, e.g. the electron transport properties and photoexcited processes in solids and molecules, chemical reactions, corrosion, photosynthesis, respiration, and so forth. A self-assembled monolayer (SAM) film provides us with a unique environment not only to understand and manipulate the surface electronic properties of a solid, but also to control electron transfer processes at the interface. The first topic in this thesis describes the structure and electron tunneling characterization of alkanethiol SAMs on InP(100). Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the bonding of alkanethiols to n-InP surfaces and to measure the monolayer thickness. The results showed that the sulfur binds to In atoms on the surface, and provided film thicknesses of 6.4 A for C8H17SH, 11.1 A for C12H25SH, and 14.9 A for C16H 33SH, resulting in an average tilt angle of 55°. The analysis indicated that super-exchange coupling between the alkane chains plays an important role in defining electron tunneling barriers, especially for highly tilted chains. The second topic describes studies of cytochrome c bound to pure and mixed SAMs of o-terminated alkanethiol (terminated with pyridine, imidazole or nitrile groups) and alkanethiol on gold. Electrochemical methods are used to determine electron transfer rate constants of cytochrome c, and scanning tunneling microscopy to observe the cytochrome c on the SAM. Detailed analysis revealed direct association of the heme of cytochrome c with the terminal groups of the SAMs and a 'turning-over' of the electron transfer of cytochrome c from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regime. The third topic describes studies of oxidation and reduction of cytochrome c in solution through eleven different self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold electrodes by cyclic voltammetry. Electron transfer rate constants of

  12. Enantioselective N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Catalyzed β-Hydroxylation of Enals Using Nitroarenes: An Atom Transfer Reaction That Proceeds via Single Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A novel oxidative N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed reaction pathway has been discovered. Alkyl and aryl enals undergo β-hydroxylation via oxygen atom transfer from electron-deficient nitrobenzenes, followed by trapping of the resultant acyl azolium by the solvent. The proposed mechanism involves a single electron transfer event to initiate the reaction followed by radical recombination. This represents a profound mechanistic departure from the established two-electron disconnects in NHC catalysis. PMID:25302860

  13. Tuning of Hemes b Equilibrium Redox Potential Is Not Required for Cross-Membrane Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Pintscher, Sebastian; Kuleta, Patryk; Cieluch, Ewelina; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-03-25

    In biological energy conversion, cross-membrane electron transfer often involves an assembly of two hemesb The hemes display a large difference in redox midpoint potentials (ΔEm_b), which in several proteins is assumed to facilitate cross-membrane electron transfer and overcome a barrier of membrane potential. Here we challenge this assumption reporting on hemebligand mutants of cytochromebc1in which, for the first time in transmembrane cytochrome, one natural histidine has been replaced by lysine without loss of the native low spin type of heme iron. With these mutants we show that ΔEm_b can be markedly increased, and the redox potential of one of the hemes can stay above the level of quinone pool, or ΔEm_b can be markedly decreased to the point that two hemes are almost isopotential, yet the enzyme retains catalytically competent electron transfer between quinone binding sites and remains functionalin vivo This reveals that cytochromebc1can accommodate large changes in ΔEm_b without hampering catalysis, as long as these changes do not impose overly endergonic steps on downhill electron transfer from substrate to product. We propose that hemesbin this cytochrome and in other membranous cytochromesbact as electronic connectors for the catalytic sites with no fine tuning in ΔEm_b required for efficient cross-membrane electron transfer. We link this concept with a natural flexibility in occurrence of several thermodynamic configurations of the direction of electron flow and the direction of the gradient of potential in relation to the vector of the electric membrane potential. PMID:26858251

  14. Tuning of Hemes b Equilibrium Redox Potential Is Not Required for Cross-Membrane Electron Transfer*

    PubMed Central

    Pintscher, Sebastian; Kuleta, Patryk; Cieluch, Ewelina; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-01-01

    In biological energy conversion, cross-membrane electron transfer often involves an assembly of two hemes b. The hemes display a large difference in redox midpoint potentials (ΔEm_b), which in several proteins is assumed to facilitate cross-membrane electron transfer and overcome a barrier of membrane potential. Here we challenge this assumption reporting on heme b ligand mutants of cytochrome bc1 in which, for the first time in transmembrane cytochrome, one natural histidine has been replaced by lysine without loss of the native low spin type of heme iron. With these mutants we show that ΔEm_b can be markedly increased, and the redox potential of one of the hemes can stay above the level of quinone pool, or ΔEm_b can be markedly decreased to the point that two hemes are almost isopotential, yet the enzyme retains catalytically competent electron transfer between quinone binding sites and remains functional in vivo. This reveals that cytochrome bc1 can accommodate large changes in ΔEm_b without hampering catalysis, as long as these changes do not impose overly endergonic steps on downhill electron transfer from substrate to product. We propose that hemes b in this cytochrome and in other membranous cytochromes b act as electronic connectors for the catalytic sites with no fine tuning in ΔEm_b required for efficient cross-membrane electron transfer. We link this concept with a natural flexibility in occurrence of several thermodynamic configurations of the direction of electron flow and the direction of the gradient of potential in relation to the vector of the electric membrane potential. PMID:26858251

  15. Multiple sites of retardation of electron transfer in Photosystem II after hydrolysis of phosphatidylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Ha; Razeghifard, Reza; Anderson, Jan M; Chow, Wah Soon

    2007-01-01

    Phosphatidylglycerol (PG), containing the unique fatty acid Delta3, trans-16:1-hexadecenoic acid, is a minor but ubiquitous lipid component of thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts and cyanobacteria. We investigated its role in electron transfers and structural organization of Photosystem II (PSII) by treating Arabidopsis thaliana thylakoids with phospholipase A(2) to decrease the PG content. Phospholipase A(2) treatment of thylakoids (a) inhibited electron transfer from the primary quinone acceptor Q(A) to the secondary quinone acceptor Q(B), (b) retarded electron transfer from the manganese cluster to the redox-active tyrosine Z, (c) decreased the extent of flash-induced oxidation of tyrosine Z and dark-stable tyrosine D in parallel, and (d) inhibited PSII reaction centres such that electron flow to silicomolybdate in continuous light was inhibited. In addition, phospholipase A(2) treatment of thylakoids caused the partial dissociation of (a) PSII supercomplexes into PSII dimers that do not have the complete light-harvesting complex of PSII (LHCII); (b) PSII dimers into monomers; and (c) trimers of LHCII into monomers. Thus, removal of PG by phospholipase A(2) brings about profound structural changes in PSII, leading to inhibition/retardation of electron transfer on the donor side, in the reaction centre, and on the acceptor side. Our results broaden the simple view of the predominant effect being on the Q(B)-binding site. PMID:17235490

  16. Photocharging Artifacts in Measurements of Electron Transfer in Quantum-Dot-Sensitized Mesoporous Titania Films.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Nikolay S; McDaniel, Hunter; Fuke, Nobuhiro; Robel, Istvan; Klimov, Victor I

    2014-01-01

    Transient absorption and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of high-performance mesoporous TiO2 photoanodes sensitized with CuInSexS2-x quantum dots reveal the importance of hole scavenging in the characterization of photoinduced electron transfer. The apparent characteristic time of this process strongly depends on the local environment of the quantum dot/TiO2 junction due to accumulation of long-lived positive charges in the quantum dots. The presence of long-lived photoexcited holes introduces artifacts due to fast positive-trion Auger decay (60 ps time constant), which can dominate electron dynamics and thus mask true electron transfer. We show that the presence of a redox electrolyte is critical to the accurate characterization of charge transfer, since it enables fast extraction of holes and helps maintain charge neutrality of the quantum dots. Although electron transfer is observed to be relatively slow (19 ns time constant), a high electron extraction efficiency (>95%) can be achieved because in well-passivated CuInSexS2-x quantum dots neutral excitons have significantly longer lifetimes of hundreds of nanoseconds. PMID:26276189

  17. Role of electron transfer in Ce3+ sensitized Yb3+ luminescence in borate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sontakke, Atul D.; Ueda, Jumpei; Katayama, Yumiko; Zhuang, Yixi; Dorenbos, Pieter; Tanabe, Setsuhisa

    2015-01-01

    In a Ce3+-Yb3+ system, two mechanisms are proposed so far namely, the quantum cutting mechanism and the electron transfer mechanism explaining Yb3+ infrared luminescence under Ce3+ excitation. Among them, the quantum cutting mechanism, where one Ce3+ photon (ultraviolet/blue) gives rise to two Yb3+ photons (near infrared) is widely sought for because of its huge potential in enhancing the solar cell efficiency. In present study on Ce3+-Yb3+ codoped borate glasses, Ce3+ sensitized Yb3+ luminescence at ˜1 μm have been observed on Ce3+ 5d state excitation. However, the intensity of sensitized Yb3+ luminescence is found to be very weak compared to the strong quenching occurred in Ce3+ luminescence in Yb3+ codoped glasses. Moreover, the absolute luminescence quantum yield also showed a decreasing trend with Yb3+ codoping in the glasses. The overall behavior of the luminescence properties and the quantum yield is strongly contradicting with the quantum cutting phenomenon. The results are attributed to the energetically favorable electron transfer interactions followed by Ce3+-Yb3+ ⇌ Ce4+-Yb2+ inter-valence charge transfer and successfully explained using the absolute electron binding energies of dopant ions in the studied borate glass. Finally, an attempt has been presented to generalize the electron transfer mechanism among opposite oxidation/reduction property dopant ions using the vacuum referred electron binding energy (VRBE) scheme for lanthanide series.

  18. Ru(II)-diimine functionalized metalloproteins: From electron transfer studies to light-driven biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Lam, Quan; Kato, Mallory; Cheruzel, Lionel

    2016-05-01

    The unique photochemical properties of Ru(II)-diimine complexes have helped initiate a series of seminal electron transfer studies in metalloenzymes. It has thus been possible to experimentally determine rate constants for long-range electron transfers. These studies have laid the foundation for the investigation of reactive intermediates in heme proteins and for the design of light-activated biocatalysts. Various metalloenzymes such as hydrogenase, carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, nitrogenase, laccase and cytochrome P450 BM3 have been functionalized with Ru(II)-diimine complexes. Upon visible light-excitation, these photosensitized metalloproteins are capable of sustaining photocatalytic activity to reduce small molecules such as protons, acetylene, hydrogen cyanide and carbon monoxide or activate molecular dioxygen to produce hydroxylated products. The Ru(II)-diimine photosensitizers are hence able to deliver multiple electrons to metalloenzymes buried active sites, circumventing the need for the natural redox partners. In this review, we will highlight the key achievements of the light-driven biocatalysts, which stem from the extensive electron transfer investigations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26392147

  19. Inner reorganization limiting electron transfer controlled hydrogen bonding: intra- vs. intermolecular effects.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, Eduardo; Frontana, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    In this work, experimental evidence of the influence of the electron transfer kinetics during electron transfer controlled hydrogen bonding between anion radicals of metronidazole and ornidazole, derivatives of 5-nitro-imidazole, and 1,3-diethylurea as the hydrogen bond donor, is presented. Analysis of the variations of voltammetric EpIcvs. log KB[DH], where KB is the binding constant, allowed us to determine the values of the binding constant and also the electron transfer rate k, confirmed by experiments obtained at different scan rates. Electronic structure calculations at the BHandHLYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level for metronidazole, including the solvent effect by the Cramer/Truhlar model, suggested that the minimum energy conformer is stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. In this structure, the inner reorganization energy, λi,j, contributes significantly (0.5 eV) to the total reorganization energy of electron transfer, thus leading to a diminishment of the experimental k. PMID:24653999

  20. Unraveling the electron transfer processes of a nanowire protein from Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Alves, Mónica N; Fernandes, Ana P; Salgueiro, Carlos A; Paquete, Catarina M

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular electron transfer metabolism of Geobacter sulfurreducens is sustained by several multiheme c-type cytochromes. One of these is the dodecaheme cytochrome GSU1996 that belongs to a new sub-class of c-type cytochromes. GSU1996 is composed by four similar triheme domains (A–D). The C-terminal half of the molecule encompasses the domains C and D, which are connected by a small linker and the N-terminal half of the protein contains two domains (A and B) that form one structural unit. It was proposed that this protein works as an electrically conductive device in G. sulfurreducens, transferring electrons within the periplasm or to outer-membrane cytochromes. In this work, a novel strategy was applied to characterize in detail the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the hexaheme fragment CD of GSU1996. This characterization revealed the electron transfer process of GSU1996 for the first time, showing that a heme at the edge of the C-terminal of the protein is thermodynamic and kinetically competent to receive electrons from physiological redox partners. This information contributes towards understanding how this new sub-class of cytochromes functions as nanowires, and also increases the current knowledge of the extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in G. sulfurreducens. PMID:26435389

  1. A dynamical approach to non-adiabatic electron transfers at the bio-inorganic interface.

    PubMed

    Zanetti-Polzi, Laura; Corni, Stefano

    2016-04-21

    A methodology is proposed to investigate electron transfer reactions between redox-active biomolecular systems (e.g. a protein) and inorganic surfaces. The whole system is modelled at the atomistic level using classical molecular dynamics - making an extensive sampling of the system's configurations possible - and the energies associated with the redox-active complex reduction are calculated using a hybrid quantum/classical approach along the molecular dynamics trajectory. The non-adiabaticity is introduced a posteriori using a Monte Carlo approach based on the Landau-Zener theory extended to treat a metal surface. This approach thus allows us to investigate the role of the energy fluctuations, determined by the dynamical evolution of the system, as well as the role of non-adiabaticity in affecting the kinetic rate of the electron transfer reaction. Most notably, it allows us to investigate the two contributions separately, hence achieving a detailed picture of the mechanisms that determine the rate. The analysis of the system configurations also allows us to relate the estimated electronic coupling to the structural and dynamic properties of the system. As a test case, the methodology is here applied to study the electron transfer reaction between cytochrome c and a gold surface. The results obtained explain the different electron transfer rates experimentally measured for two different concentrations of proteins on the electrode surface. PMID:27031179

  2. Quantitative Probes of Electron-Phonon Coupling in an Organic Charge-Transfer Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rury, Aaron; Sorenson, Shayne; Driscoll, Eric; Dawlaty, Jahan

    While organic charge transfer (CT) materials may provide alternatives to inorganic materials in electronics and photonics applications, properties central to applications remain understudied in these organic materials. Specifically, electron-phonon coupling plays a pivotal role in electronic applications yet this coupling in CT materials remains difficult to directly characterize. To better understand the suitability of organic CT materials for electronic applications, we have devised an experimental technique that can directly assess electron-phonon coupling in a model organic CT material. Upon non-resonant interaction with an ultrafast laser pulse, we show that coherent excitation of Raman-active lattice vibrations of quinhydrone, a 1:1 co-crystal of the hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone, modulates the energies of electronic transitions probed by a white light pulse. Using a well-established theoretical framework of vibrational quantum beat spectra across the probe bandwidth, we quantitatively extract the parameters describing these electronic transitions to characterize electron-phonon coupling in this material. In conjunction with temperature-dependent resonance Raman measurements, we assess the hypothesis that several sharp transitions in the near-IR correspond to previously unknown excitonic states of this material. These results and their interpretation set the foundation for further elucidation of the one of the most important parameters in the application of organic charge-transfer materials to electronics and photonics.

  3. Projectile charge state effects on electron emission in transfer ionization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. T.; Zhu, X. L.; Feng, W. T.; Guo, D. L.; Gao, Y.; Qian, D. B.; Li, B.; Yan, S. C.; Xu, S.; Zhang, P.; Ma, X.

    2015-07-01

    Electron emissions in transfer ionization processes were studied for 75 keV u-1 He2+, and 80 keV u-1 Ne8+on He collisions, using the well-developed reaction microscope techniques. Momentum distributions in the scattering plane, doubly differential distributions as a function of longitudinal momentum and emission angles of the ejected electrons were obtained. An apparent enhancement of electrons distributed around the projectile in the scattering plane was found for the Ne8+ incident case. Furthermore, we report the ratio of doubly differential distributions at the emission angle of 0° between these two transfer ionization processes, in which an abrupt rise is found at and above the electron capture to the continuum peak. This rise qualitatively agrees with the prediction within the framework of Dettmann’s theory. We conclude that this kind of enhancement was caused by the charge state effect of the projectile.

  4. Inhibition of Plastocyanin to P700+ Electron Transfer in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by Hyperosmotic Stress1

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Jeffrey A.; Salbilla, Brian A.; Kanazawa, Atsuko; Kramer, David M.

    2001-01-01

    Oxygen electrode and fluorescence studies demonstrate that linear electron transport in the freshwater alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can be completely abolished by abrupt hyperosmotic shock. We show that the most likely primary site of inhibition of electron transfer by hyperosmotic shock is a blockage of electron transfer between plastocyanin (PC) or cytochrome c6 and P700. The effects on this reaction were reversible upon dilution of the osmolytes and the stability of plastocyanin or photosystem (PS) I was unaffected. Electron micrographs of osmotically shocked cells showed a significant decrease in the thylakoid lumen volume. Comparison of estimated lumenal width with the x-ray structures of plastocyanin and PS I suggest that lumenal space contracts during HOS so as to hinder the movement of docking to PS I of plastocyanin or cytochrome c6. PMID:11706196

  5. Concerted electron-proton transfer in the optical excitation of hydrogen-bonded dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Westlake, Brittany C.; Brennaman, Kyle M.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Paul, Jared J.; Bettis, Stephanie E.; Hampton, Shaun D.; Miller, Stephen A.; Lebedeva, Natalia V.; Forbes, Malcolm D. E.; Moran, Andrew M.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Papanikolas, John M.

    2011-05-24

    The simultaneous, concerted transfer of electrons and protons—electron-proton transfer (EPT)—is an important mechanism utilized in chemistry and biology to avoid high energy intermediates. There are many examples of thermally activated EPT in ground-state reactions and in excited states following photoexcitation and thermal relaxation. Here we report application of ultrafast excitation with absorption and Raman monitoring to detect a photochemically driven EPT process (photo-EPT). In this process, both electrons and protons are transferred during the absorption of a photon. Photo-EPT is induced by intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) excitation of hydrogen-bonded-base adducts with either a coumarin dye or 4-nitro-4'-biphenylphenol. Femtosecond transient absorption spectral measurements following ICT excitation reveal the appearance of two spectroscopically distinct states having different dynamical signatures. One of these states corresponds to a conventional ICT excited state in which the transferring H⁺ is initially associated with the proton donor. Proton transfer to the base (B) then occurs on the picosecond time scale. The other state is an ICT-EPT photoproduct. Upon excitation it forms initially in the nuclear configuration of the ground state by application of the Franck–Condon principle. However, due to the change in electronic configuration induced by the transition, excitation is accompanied by proton transfer with the protonated base formed with a highly elongated ⁺H–B bond. Coherent Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of a vibrational mode corresponding to the protonated base in the optically prepared state.

  6. Electron transfer kinetics in water-splitting dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swierk, John R.

    Water-splitting dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical (WS-DSPECs) cells utilize molecular sensitizers absorbed on mesoporous TiO2 electrodes to harvest visible light, inject photoexcited electrons into the conduction band of TiO2, and finally transfer holes across the TiO2 surface to water oxidation catalysts, which in turn oxidize water to give molecular oxygen and four protons. Within the TiO2 layer photoinjected electrons are transported to a transparent conductor back contact and from there to a dark cathode to reduce protons to molecular hydrogen. WS-DSPECs offer several advantages for alternative solar fuels systems: the use of low-cost materials, tunable molecular sensitizers, and relaxed catalytic turnover requirements to name a few. Despite these advantageous features, power conversion efficiencies in WS-DSPECs are generally low. Broadly, this thesis explores the fundamental electron transfer processes that control the efficiency of these cells. Chapter 1 presents a survey of the previous literature and individually considers each component of a WS-DSPEC (water oxidation catalyst, sensitizers, electrode materials, redox mediators, and overall system design). Chapter 2 presents a novel method of preparing a WS-DSPEC that utilizes crystalline IrO2 nanoparticles directly sintered to TiO2 as a water oxidation catalyst and describes a previously unknown electron-scavenging pathway by IrO2. Chapter 3 explores how electron trapping by and proton intercalation into TiO2 controls the photoelectrochemical performance of WS-DSPECs. Chapter 4 characterizes how electron recombination with the oxidized sensitizer and electron scavenging by the IrO 2 catalyst combine to limit the concentration of conduction band electrons and by extension photocurrent in WS-DSPECs. Chapter 5 demonstrates the use of the first totally organic sensitizers for light driven water-splitting and explores how the molecular and electronic structure of a sensitizer affects the electron transfer

  7. Ultrafast static and diffusion-controlled electron transfer at Ag29 nanocluster/molecular acceptor interfaces.

    PubMed

    Aly, Shawkat M; AbdulHalim, Lina G; Besong, Tabot M D; Soldan, Giada; Bakr, Osman M; Mohammed, Omar F

    2016-03-14

    Efficient absorption of visible light and a long-lived excited state lifetime of silver nanoclusters (Ag29 NCs) are integral properties for these new clusters to serve as light-harvesting materials. Upon optical excitation, electron injection at Ag29 NC/methyl viologen (MV(2+)) interfaces is very efficient and ultrafast. Interestingly, our femto- and nanosecond time-resolved results demonstrate clearly that both dynamic and static electron transfer mechanisms are involved in photoluminescence quenching of Ag29 NCs. PMID:26548942

  8. Electron transfer and capture dynamics in ZnSe quantum wells grown on GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Dongol, A.; Wagner, H. P.

    2013-12-04

    We investigate the transfer and capture dynamics of electrons in phase coherent photorefractive ZnSe quantum wells grown on GaAs using degenerate three-beam four-wave-mixing. The measurements reveal electron capture times by the quantum well in the order of several tens of picoseconds and a transit time of approximately 5 picoseconds from the GaAs substrate through the ZnMgSe barrier.

  9. The role of electronic structure calculation in mechanistic analysis of electron transfer reactions in the liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, M. D.

    1987-08-01

    Model calculations have been employed to elucidate the mechanism of electron transfer reactions in aqueous solution. The contribution of inner shell OH bonds to activation barriers has been estimated from calculation for metal ion hydrates. Calculated electron transfer matrix elements H sub if for redox processes of the type, ML sub 6 sup 2(+)+ ML sub 6 sup 3(+) in equilibrium ML sub 6 sup 3(+) + ML sub 6 sup 2(+), M = Fe, Co, or Ru, L = H2O or NH3, have been analyzed in terms of various orbital concepts. The matrix elements are based on ab initio wavefunctions for model supermolecule clusters of the type, (ML sub n ...L sub n M) sup 5(+), with n = 1 or 3. The analysis shows that the many-electron H sub if quantities can in fact be expressed to good approximation as effective 1-electron expressions of the type, H sub if proportional to lambda' sup 2 N sub c h sub L1Lr, where lambda' is the metal-ligand covalency parameter, h sub L1Lr is a local 1-electron matrix element for ligand orbitals in contact in the transition state, and N sub c is the number of such contacts. A least-squares fit of the data implies a value of approx. 5000/cm for h sub L1Lr, showing that significant coupling can occur in the absence of formal bonding between reactants.

  10. Electron-Transfer Pathways in the Heme and Quinone-Binding Domain of Complex II (Succinate Dehydrogenase)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Single electron transfers have been examined in complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) by the method of pulse radiolysis. Electrons are introduced into the enzyme initially at the [3Fe–4S] and ubiquinone sites followed by intramolecular equilibration with the b heme of the enzyme. To define thermodynamic and other controlling parameters for the pathways of electron transfer in complex II, site-directed variants were constructed and analyzed. Variants at SdhB-His207 and SdhB-Ile209 exhibit significantly perturbed electron transfer between the [3Fe–4S] cluster and ubiquinone. Analysis of the data using Marcus theory shows that the electronic coupling constants for wild-type and variant enzyme are all small, indicating that electron transfer occurs by diabatic tunneling. The presence of the ubiquinone is necessary for efficient electron transfer to the heme, which only slowly equilibrates with the [3Fe–4S] cluster in the absence of the quinone. PMID:24559074

  11. Photoinduced 2-way electron transfer in composites of metal nanoclusters and semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Navendu; Paul, Sneha; Samanta, Anunay

    2016-08-01

    In order to explore the potential of nanocomposites comprising semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoclusters (NCs) in photovoltaic and catalytic applications, the interaction between CdTe QDs and gold NCs, Au10 and Au25, stabilized by histidine, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glutathione, is studied by an ultrafast transient absorption (TA) technique. Temporal and spectral studies of the transients reveal photoinduced 2-way electron transfer between the two constituents of the nanocomposites, where Au NCs, which generally act as electron donors when used as photosensitizers, perform the role of the efficient electron acceptor. Interestingly, it is found that the electron transfer dynamics in these composites is governed not by the distance of separation of the constituents but by the nature of the surface capping ligands. Despite a large separation between the QDs and NCs in a giant BSA-capped system, a higher electron transfer rate in this composite suggests that unlike other smaller capping agents, which act more like insulators, BSA allows much better electron conduction, as indicated previously. PMID:27396603

  12. Constraint-Based Modeling of Carbon Fixation and the Energetics of Electron Transfer in Geobacter metallireducens

    PubMed Central

    Feist, Adam M.; Nagarajan, Harish; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Zhang, Tian; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.; Zengler, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III) was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate) by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species. PMID:24762737

  13. Density functional investigation of the electronic structure and charge transfer excited states of a multichromophoric antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R.; Baruah, Tunna

    2016-05-01

    We report an electronic structure study of a multichromophoric molecular complex containing two of each borondipyrromethane dye, Zn-tetraphenyl-porphyrin, bisphenyl anthracene and a fullerene. The snowflake shaped molecule behaves like an antenna capturing photon at different frequencies and transferring the photon energy to the porphyrin where electron transfer occurs from the porphyrin to the fullerene. The study is performed within density functional formalism using large polarized Guassian basis sets (12,478 basis functions in total). The energies of the HOMO and LUMO states in the complex, as adjudged by the ionization potential and the electron affinity values, show significant differences with respect to their values in participating subunits in isolation. These differences are also larger than the variations of the ionization potential and electron affinity values observed in non-bonded C60-ZnTPP complexes in co-facial arrangement or end-on orientations. An understanding of the origin of these differences is obtained by a systematic study of the effect of structural strain, the presence of ligands, the effect of orbital delocalization on the ionization energy and the electron affinity. Finally, a few lowest charge transfer energies involving electronic transitions from the porphyrin component to the fullerene subunit of the complex are predicted.

  14. Nickel phlorin intermediate formed by proton-coupled electron transfer in hydrogen evolution mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Brian H.; Maher, Andrew G.; Dogutan, Dilek K.; Nocera, Daniel G.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    The development of more effective energy conversion processes is critical for global energy sustainability. The design of molecular electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction is an important component of these efforts. Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, in which electron transfer is coupled to proton transfer, play an important role in these processes and can be enhanced by incorporating proton relays into the molecular electrocatalysts. Herein nickel porphyrin electrocatalysts with and without an internal proton relay are investigated to elucidate the hydrogen evolution mechanisms and thereby enable the design of more effective catalysts. Density functional theory calculations indicate that electrochemical reduction leads to dearomatization of the porphyrin conjugated system, thereby favoring protonation at the meso carbon of the porphyrin ring to produce a phlorin intermediate. A key step in the proposed mechanisms is a thermodynamically favorable PCET reaction composed of intramolecular electron transfer from the nickel to the porphyrin and proton transfer from a carboxylic acid hanging group or an external acid to the meso carbon of the porphyrin. The C–H bond of the active phlorin acts similarly to the more traditional metal-hydride by reacting with acid to produce H2. Support for the theoretically predicted mechanism is provided by the agreement between simulated and experimental cyclic voltammograms in weak and strong acid and by the detection of a phlorin intermediate through spectroelectrochemical measurements. These results suggest that phlorin species have the potential to perform unique chemistry that could prove useful in designing more effective electrocatalysts. PMID:26655344

  15. Children of Holocaust Survivors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Shirley Ann

    As a result of the Holocaust, many survivors developed long term psychosocial impairment known as the Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), which is characterized by depression, anxiety, hypocondriasis, inability to concentrate or to express anger, nightmares, insomnia, obsessive thoughts, guilt, mistrust, and alienation. The literature in this…

  16. The ‘porin–cytochrome’ model for microbe-to-mineral electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, David J.; Butt, Julea N.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Baiden, Nanakow; Gates, Andrew J.; Marritt, Sophie; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2012-05-30

    Many species of bacteria can couple anaerobic growth to the respiratory reduction of insoluble minerals containing Fe(III) or Mn(III/IV). It has been suggested that in Shewanella species electrons cross the outer membrane to extracellular substrates via 'porin-cytochrome' electron transport modules. The molecular structure of an outer-membrane extracellular-facing deca-haem terminus for such a module has recently been resolved. It is debated how, once outside the cells, electrons are transferred from outer-membrane cytochromes to insoluble electron sinks. This may occur directly or by assemblies of cytochromes, perhaps functioning as 'nanowires', or via electron shuttles. Here we review recent work in this field and explore whether it allows for unification of the electron transport mechanisms supporting extracellular mineral respiration in Shewanella that may extend into other genera of Gram-negative bacteria.

  17. Powering microbes with electricity: direct electron transfer from electrodes to microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, DR

    2010-09-16

    P>The discovery of electrotrophs, microorganisms that can directly accept electrons from electrodes for the reduction of terminal electron acceptors, has spurred the investigation of a wide range of potential applications. To date, only a handful of pure cultures have been shown to be capable of electrotrophy, but this process has also been inferred in many studies with undefined consortia. Potential electron acceptors include: carbon dioxide, nitrate, metals, chlorinated compounds, organic acids, protons and oxygen. Direct electron transfer from electrodes to cells has many advantages over indirect electrical stimulation of microbial metabolism via electron shuttles or hydrogen production. Supplying electrons with electrodes for the bioremediation of chlorinated compounds, nitrate or toxic metals may be preferable to adding organic electron donors or hydrogen to the subsurface or bioreactors. The most transformative application of electrotrophy may be microbial electrosynthesis in which carbon dioxide and water are converted to multi-carbon organic compounds that are released extracellularly. Coupling photovoltaic technology with microbial electrosynthesis represents a novel photosynthesis strategy that avoids many of the drawbacks of biomass-based strategies for the production of transportation fuels and other organic chemicals. The mechanisms for direct electron transfer from electrodes to microorganisms warrant further investigation in order to optimize envisioned applications.

  18. How Does Guanine-Cytosine Base Pair Affect Excess-Electron Transfer in DNA?

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hsun; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2015-06-25

    Charge transfer and proton transfer in DNA have attracted wide attention due to their relevance in biological processes and so on. Especially, excess-electron transfer (EET) in DNA has strong relation to DNA repair. However, our understanding on EET in DNA still remains limited. Herein, by using a strongly electron-donating photosensitizer, trimer of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (3E), and an electron acceptor, diphenylacetylene (DPA), two series of functionalized DNA oligomers were synthesized for investigation of EET dynamics in DNA. The transient absorption measurements during femtosecond laser flash photolysis showed that guanine:cytosine (G:C) base pair affects EET dynamics in DNA by two possible mechanisms: the excess-electron quenching by proton transfer with the complementary G after formation of C(•-) and the EET hindrance by inserting a G:C base pair as a potential barrier in consecutive thymines (T's). In the present paper, we provided useful information based on the direct kinetic measurements, which allowed us to discuss EET through oligonucleotides for the investigation of DNA damage/repair. PMID:26042867

  19. 78 FR 24386 - Electronic Fund Transfers; Determination of Effect on State Laws (Maine and Tennessee)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ... with the Bureau's rules on disclosure of records and information. See 12 CFR part 1070. \\6\\ 77 FR 50404... PROTECTION Electronic Fund Transfers; Determination of Effect on State Laws (Maine and Tennessee) AGENCY..., identified a different kind of conflict between Federal and State law. This commenter stated that...

  20. Intermolecular electron transfer rate in diffusion limited region: Picosecond fluorescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, B.; Periasamy, N.; Modi, S.; Dutt, G. Bhaskar; Doraiswamy, S.

    1992-12-01

    The temporal profiles of the quenched fluorescence decay of the free base meso-tetraphenyl porphyrin (H 2TPP) and its Zn derivative (ZnTPP) with quenchers such as quinones and m-dinitrobenzene have been analysed by methods developed for short time regimes which are known to be diffusion influenced [N. Periasamy et al., J. Chem. Phys.88, 1638 (1988); 89, 4799 (1988); Chem. Phys. Lett.160, 457 (1989); N. Periasamy, Biophys. J.. 54, 961 (1988); R. Das and N. Periasamy, Chem. Phys. 136, 361 (1989); G.C. Joshi et al., J. Phys. Chem.94, 2908 (1990)]. These quenchers are known to participate in an electron transfer reaction leading to a charge separation. The intrinsic rate constant ( ka) derived from the analysis is examined as a function of the change in free energy in the electron transfer reaction. Such a comparison indicates that ka can be related to the electron transfer rate, ket. The electron transfer rates measured in acetonitrile (solvent reorganization energy, λ s = 1.35) and toluene (λ s = 0.1) do not indicate the existence of an inverted region as predicted by Marcus. The trend agrees with the findings of Rehm and Weller [ Isr. J. Chem.8, 259 (1970)], except that the rate constants are at least one order of magnitude larger than the diffusion limited values.