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Sample records for electronic engineering applications

  1. Engineered phages for electronics.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yue

    2016-11-15

    Phages are traditionally widely studied in biology and chemistry. In recent years, engineered phages have attracted significant attentions for functionalization or construction of electronic devices, due to their specific binding, catalytic, nucleating or electronic properties. To apply the engineered phages in electronics, these are a number of interesting questions: how to engineer phages for electronics? How are the engineered phages characterized? How to assemble materials with engineered phages? How are the engineered phages micro or nanopatterned? What are the strategies to construct electronics devices with engineered phages? This review will highlight the early attempts to address these questions and explore the fundamental and practical aspects of engineered phages in electronics, including the approaches for selection or expression of specific peptides on phage coat proteins, characterization of engineered phages in electronics, assembly of electronic materials, patterning of engineered phages, and construction of electronic devices. It provides the methodologies and opens up ex-cit-ing op-por-tu-ni-ties for the development of a variety of new electronic materials and devices based on engineered phages for future applications. PMID:27322923

  2. Novel engineered compound semiconductor heterostructures for advanced electronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillman, Gregory E.; Holonyak, Nick, Jr.; Coleman, James J.

    1992-06-01

    To provide the technology base that will enable SDIO capitalization on the performance advantages offered through novel engineered multiple-lavered compound semiconductor structures, this project has focussed on three specific areas: (1) carbon doping of AlGaAs/GaAs and InP/InGaAs materials for reliable high frequency heterojunction bipolar transistors; (2) impurity induced layer disordering and the environmental degradation of AlxGal-xAs-GaAs quantum-well heterostructures and the native oxide stabilization of AlxGal-xAs-GaAs quantum well heterostructure lasers; and (3) non-planar and strained-layer quantum well heterostructure lasers and laser arrays. The accomplishments in this three year research are reported in fifty-six publications and the abstracts included in this report.

  3. Electronics Engineering Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Univ., Atlanta. Dept. of Vocational and Career Development.

    This guide offers information and procedures necessary to train electronics engineering technicians. Discussed first are the rationale and objectives of the curriculum. The occupational field of electronics engineering technology is described. Next, a curriculum model is set forth that contains information on the standard electronics engineering…

  4. An Analog Computer for Electronic Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, A. L.; Iu, H. H. C.; Lu, D. D. C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a compact analog computer and proposes its use in electronic engineering teaching laboratories to develop student understanding of applications in analog electronics, electronic components, engineering mathematics, control engineering, safe laboratory and workshop practices, circuit construction, testing, and maintenance. The…

  5. Electronic engine controls

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, S.

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports that pioneered in the mid-80s to manage and optimize engine performance under continually changing conditions, electronic controls have made a significant impact on truck maintenance. But they also served another important purpose: they curbed emissions enough to meet EPA's new heavy-truck standards set in 1985 (see sidebar). In that same year, Detroit Diesel introduced its Detroit Diesel Electronic Controls (DDEC) system, and a trend was born. Suddenly horsepower rating, torque curve, and maximum engine and road speed could be governed by electronics. Engine-mounted sensors could provide drivers with precise information about fluid and pressure levels, inside and outside temperatures, and a host of other information. The advent of electronic engine controls signaled the dawn of a revolution in trucking. For company owners who wanted greater control of their operations, electronics were wonderful news. But new controls meant new engine designs and radical changes in engine maintenance and repair. So for many members of the waste-hauling industry, electronics were far from wonderful. It's not that haulers didn't want cleaner air or trucks that were increasingly fuel efficient. It's more that they winced at the thought of retraining their mechanics - already hard to find and retain - to work on a new breed of engine. Then there were other considerations. drivers, for example, might not cotton to the fancy electronic dashboard displays. They might also rebel at having their maximum road speed present at a rate they couldn't change. Then there was the cost factor: Electronics and other provisions used to meet Clean Air Act reductions of oxides of nitrogen between 1991, 94 and 98 model years could add as much as $10,000 to $15,000 to the cost of each truck.

  6. Stirling engine application study

    SciTech Connect

    Teagan, W.P.; Cunningham, D.R.

    1983-03-01

    The potential for Stirling engine applications in the 0.5 to 5000 hp output range is assessed. The following are included: a market survey of potential engine applications, classification of applications, conventional engine markets and performance characteristics, status of Sterling engine systems, selection of application classes for Stirling engines, and the possible effects of technology, economic conditions, and regulatory changes. (MHR)

  7. Special electronic distance meter calibration for precise engineering surveying industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Jaroslav; Štroner, Martin; Urban, Rudolf

    2015-05-01

    All surveying instruments and their measurements suffer from some errors. To refine the measurement results, it is necessary to use procedures restricting influence of the instrument errors on the measured values or to implement numerical corrections. In precise engineering surveying industrial applications the accuracy of the distances usually realized on relatively short distance is a key parameter limiting the resulting accuracy of the determined values (coordinates, etc.). To determine the size of systematic and random errors of the measured distances were made test with the idea of the suppression of the random error by the averaging of the repeating measurement, and reducing systematic errors influence of by identifying their absolute size on the absolute baseline realized in geodetic laboratory at the Faculty of Civil Engineering CTU in Prague. The 16 concrete pillars with forced centerings were set up and the absolute distances between the points were determined with a standard deviation of 0.02 millimetre using a Leica Absolute Tracker AT401. For any distance measured by the calibrated instruments (up to the length of the testing baseline, i.e. 38.6 m) can now be determined the size of error correction of the distance meter in two ways: Firstly by the interpolation on the raw data, or secondly using correction function derived by previous FFT transformation usage. The quality of this calibration and correction procedure was tested on three instruments (Trimble S6 HP, Topcon GPT-7501, Trimble M3) experimentally using Leica Absolute Tracker AT401. By the correction procedure was the standard deviation of the measured distances reduced significantly to less than 0.6 mm. In case of Topcon GPT-7501 is the nominal standard deviation 2 mm, achieved (without corrections) 2.8 mm and after corrections 0.55 mm; in case of Trimble M3 is nominal standard deviation 3 mm, achieved (without corrections) 1.1 mm and after corrections 0.58 mm; and finally in case of Trimble

  8. Nano-scale engineering using lead chalcogenide nanocrystals for opto-electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fan

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) or nanocrystals of inorganic semiconductors exhibit exceptional optoelectronic properties such as tunable band-gap, high absorption cross-section and narrow emission spectra. This thesis discusses the characterizations and physical properties of lead-chalcogenide nanocrystals, their assembly into more complex nanostructures and applications in solar cells and near-infrared light-emitting devices. In the first part of this work, we demonstrate that the band edge emission of PbS quantum dots can be tuned from the visible to the mid-infrared region through size control, while the self-attachment of PbS nanocrystals can lead to the formation of 1-D nanowires, 2-D quantum dot monolayers and 3-D quantum dot solids. In particular, the assembly of closely-packed quantum dot solids has attracted enormous attention. A series of distinctive optoelectronic properties has been observed, such as superb multiple exciton generation efficiencies, efficient hot-electron transfer and cold-exciton recycling. Since the surfactant determines the quantum dot surface passivation and inter dot electronic coupling, we examine the influence of different cross-linking surfactants on the optoelectronic properties of the quantum dot solids. Then, we discuss the ability to tune the quantum dot band-gap combined with the controllable assembly of lead-chalcogenide quantum dots, which opens new possibilities to engineer the properties of quantum dot solids. The PbS and PbSe quantum dot cascade structures and PbS/PbSe quantum dot heterojunctions are assembled using the layer-by-layer deposition method. We show that exciton funnelling and trap state-bound exciton recycling in the quantum dot cascade structure dramatically enhances the quantum dots photoluminescence. Moreover, we show that both type-I and type-II PbS/PbSe quantum dot heterojunctions can be assembled by carefully choosing the quantum dot sizes. In type-I heterojunctions, the excited electron-hole pairs tend

  9. Space Electronic Test Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Rodney D.

    2004-01-01

    The Space Power and Propulsion Test Engineering Branch at NASA Glenn Research center has the important duty of controlling electronic test engineering services. These services include test planning and early assessment of Space projects, management and/or technical support required to safely and effectively prepare the article and facility for testing, operation of test facilities, and validation/delivery of data to customer. The Space Electronic Test Engineering Branch is assigned electronic test engineering responsibility for the GRC Space Simulation, Microgravity, Cryogenic, and Combustion Test Facilities. While working with the Space Power and Propulsion Test Engineering Branch I am working on several different assignments. My primary assignment deals with an electrical hardware unit known as Sunny Boy. Sunny Boy is a DC load Bank that is designed for solar arrays in which it is used to convert DC power form the solar arrays into AC power at 60 hertz to pump back into the electricity grid. However, there are some researchers who decided that they would like to use the Sunny Boy unit in a space simulation as a DC load bank for a space shuttle or even the International Space Station hardware. In order to do so I must create a communication link between a computer and the Sunny Boy unit so that I can preset a few of the limits (such power, set & constant voltage levels) that Sunny Boy will need to operate using the applied DC load. Apart from this assignment I am also working on a hi-tech circuit that I need to have built at a researcher s request. This is a high voltage analog to digital circuit that will be used to record data from space ion propulsion rocket booster tests. The problem that makes building this circuit so difficult is that it contains high voltage we must find a way to lower the voltage signal before the data is transferred into the computer to be read. The solution to this problem was to transport the signal using infrared light which will lower

  10. Stretchable metal oxide thin film transistors on engineered substrate for electronic skin applications.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Alessia; Lacour, Stphanie P

    2015-08-01

    Electronic skins aim at providing distributed sensing and computation in a large-area and elastic membrane. Control and addressing of high-density soft sensors will be achieved when thin film transistor matrices are also integrated in the soft carrier substrate. Here, we report on the design, manufacturing and characterization of metal oxide thin film transistors on these stretchable substrates. The TFTs are integrated onto an engineered silicone substrate with embedded strain relief to protect the devices from catastrophic cracking. The TFT stack is composed of an amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O active layer, a hybrid AlxOy/Parylene dielectric film, gold electrodes and interconnects. All layers are prepared and patterned with planar, low temperature and dry processing. We demonstrate the interconnected IGZO TFTs sustain applied tensile strain up to 20% without electrical degradation and mechanical fracture. Active devices are critical for distributed sensing. The compatibility of IGZO TFTs with soft and biocompatible substrates is an encouraging step towards wearable electronic skins. PMID:26738152

  11. Engineering highly organized and aligned single walled carbon nanotube networks for electronic device applications: Interconnects, chemical sensor, and optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Lae

    For 20 years, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been studied actively due to their unique one-dimensional nanostructure and superior electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. For these reasons, they offer the potential to serve as building blocks for future electronic devices such as field effect transistors (FETs), electromechanical devices, and various sensors. In order to realize these applications, it is crucial to develop a simple, scalable, and reliable nanomanufacturing process that controllably places aligned SWNTs in desired locations, orientations, and dimensions. Also electronic properties (semiconducting/metallic) of SWNTs and their organized networks must be controlled for the desired performance of devices and systems. These fundamental challenges are significantly limiting the use of SWNTs for future electronic device applications. Here, we demonstrate a strategy to fabricate highly controlled micro/nanoscale SWNT network structures and present the related assembly mechanism to engineer the SWNT network topology and its electrical transport properties. A method designed to evaluate the electrical reliability of such nano- and microscale SWNT networks is also presented. Moreover, we develop and investigate a robust SWNT based multifunctional selective chemical sensor and a range of multifunctional optoelectronic switches, photo-transistors, optoelectronic logic gates and complex optoelectronic digital circuits.

  12. Stirling engine application study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teagan, W. P.; Cunningham, D.

    1983-01-01

    A range of potential applications for Stirling engines in the power range from 0.5 to 5000 hp is surveyed. Over one hundred such engine applications are grouped into a small number of classes (10), with the application in each class having a high degree of commonality in technical performance and cost requirements. A review of conventional engines (usually spark ignition or Diesel) was then undertaken to determine the degree to which commercial engine practice now serves the needs of the application classes and to detemine the nature of the competition faced by a new engine system. In each application class the Stirling engine was compared to the conventional engines, assuming that objectives of ongoing Stirling engine development programs are met. This ranking process indicated that Stirling engines showed potential for use in all application classes except very light duty applications (lawn mowers, etc.). However, this potential is contingent on demonstrating much greater operating life and reliability than has been demonstrated to date by developmental Stirling engine systems. This implies that future program initiatives in developing Stirling engine systems should give more emphasis to life and reliability issues than has been the case in ongoing programs.

  13. Molecular Engineering of Functional Materials for Energy and Opto-Electronic Applications.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Domanski, Konrad; Konrad, Domanski; Aghazada, Sadig; Rakstys, Kasparas; Paek, Sanghyun; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2015-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the dedicated research directions of the Group for Molecular Engineering of Functional Materials (GMF). This includes molecular engineering aspects of sensitizers constructed from ruthenium complexes, organic molecules, porphyrins and phthalocyanines. Manipulation of organometal trihalide perovskites, and charge transporting materials for high performance perovskite solar cells and photo-detectors are also described. Controlling phosphorescence color, and quantum yields in iridium complexes by tailoring ligands for organic light emitting diodes are demonstrated. Efficient reduction of CO(2) to CO using molecular catalyst on a protected Cu(2)O photocathode, and cost-effective water-splitting cell using a high efficiency perovskite solar cell are presented. PMID:26507343

  14. Low temperature thermal engineering of nanoparticle ink for flexible electronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Seung Hwan

    2016-07-01

    Flexible electronics are getting a lot of attention for future electronics due to their flexibility and light weight. Flexible electronics are usually fabricated on heat sensitive flexible substrates such as plastic, fabric or even paper. Therefore, the successful fabrication of flexible electronics needs a novel low temperature process development for metal circuit patterning on flexible substrates because the traditional photolithography process usually uses multiple stages of very high temperature steps for metal deposition and patterning and corrosive chemicals. In this paper, the recent novel development based on nanoparticle ink for effective deposition and patterning of high resolution metal patterns on heat sensitive, low cost and light weight plastic substrates at low temperature and in ambient pressure without using any expensive, toxic and time consuming lithographic processes will be reviewed. Nanoparticles exhibit many remarkable characteristics that are significantly different from the bulk counter parts. Nanoparticles shows size dependent melting temperature drop due to the thermodynamics size effect. These novel thermal characteristics of nanoparticles are very important for flexible electronics fabrication process development.

  15. Numerical simulation of optical and electronic properties for multilayer organic light-emitting diodes and its application in engineering education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shu-Hsuan; Chang, Yung-Cheng; Yang, Cheng-Hong; Chen, Jun-Rong; Kuo, Yen-Kuang

    2006-02-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been extensively developed in the past few years. The OLED displays have advantages over other displays, such as CRT, LCD, and PDP in thickness, weight, brightness, response time, viewing angle, contrast, driving power, flexibility, and capability of self-emission. In this work, the optical and electronic properties of multilayer OLED devices are numerically studied with an APSYS (Advanced Physical Model of Semiconductor Devices) simulation program. Specifically, the emission and absorption spectra of the Alq 3, DCM, PBD, and SA light-emitting layers, and energy band diagrams, electron-hole recombination rates, and current-voltage characteristics of the simulated OLED devices, typically with a multilayer structure of metal/Alq 3/EML/TPD/ITO constructed by Lim et al., are investigated and compared to the experimental results. The physical models utilized in this work are similar to those presented by Ruhstaller et al. and Hoffmann et al. The simulated results indicate that the emission spectra of the Alq 3, DCM, PBD, and SA light-emitting layers obtained in this study are in good agreement with those obtained experimentally by Zugang et al. Optimization of the optical and electronic performance of the multilayer OLED devices are attempted. In order to further promote the research results, the whole numerical simulation process for optimizing the design of OLED devices has been applied to a project-based course of OLED device design to enhance the students' skills in photonics device design at the Graduate Institute of Photonics of National Changhua University of Education in Taiwan. In the meantime, the effectiveness of the course has been proved by various assessments. The application of the results is a useful point of reference for the research on photonics device design and engineering education. Therefore, it proffers a synthetic effect between innovation and practical application.

  16. Combustion synthesis and engineering of nanoparticles for electronic, structural and superconductor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stangle, G.C.; Amarakoon, V.R.W.; Schulze, W.A.

    1993-05-28

    Fully dense, nanocrystalline ceramic articles were prepared by the new nanofabrication process. The process consists of two steps: synthesis of ceramic nanoparticles and fabrication of dense, nanocrystalline ceramic parts. The synthesis step produced 10-nanometer-diameter crystallites, and is capable of being scaled up to kilogram/hour production rates. The fabrication step produced dense parts at significantly reduced sintering temperatures and times -- representing a factor of 10--100 reduction in process energy requirements. The process was demonstrated by producing ultrafine-grained yttria-stabilized ZrO[sub 2], an important material with a variety of energy-related applications (solid electrolytes, oxygen sensors, electrode materials, thermal barrier coatings, etc.). Results from this period clearly illustrate the capabilities of this energy-efficient and directly commercializable process for producing dense, nanocrystalline, multicomponent oxide ceramics.

  17. Digital electronic engine control history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, T. W.

    1984-01-01

    Full authority digital electronic engine controls (DEECs) were studied, developed, and ground tested because of projected benefits in operability, improved performance, reduced maintenance, improved reliability, and lower life cycle costs. The issues of operability and improved performance, however, are assessed in a flight test program. The DEEC on a F100 engine in an F-15 aircraft was demonstrated and evaluated. The events leading to the flight test program are chronicled and important management and technical results are identified.

  18. Engineering high charge transfer n-doping of graphene electrodes and its application to organic electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Simon; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Kidambi, Piran R.; Alexander-Webber, Jack A.; Weijtens, Christ; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Aria, Adrianus I.; Qasim, Malik M.; Wilkinson, Timothy D.; Robertson, John; Hofmann, Stephan; Meyer, Jens

    2015-07-01

    Using thermally evaporated cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) in an organic matrix, we present a novel strategy for efficient n-doping of monolayer graphene and a ~90% reduction in its sheet resistance to ~250 Ohm sq-1. Photoemission spectroscopy confirms the presence of a large interface dipole of ~0.9 eV between graphene and the Cs2CO3/organic matrix. This leads to a strong charge transfer based doping of graphene with a Fermi level shift of ~1.0 eV. Using this approach we demonstrate efficient, standard industrial manufacturing process compatible graphene-based inverted organic light emitting diodes on glass and flexible substrates with efficiencies comparable to those of state-of-the-art ITO based devices.Using thermally evaporated cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) in an organic matrix, we present a novel strategy for efficient n-doping of monolayer graphene and a ~90% reduction in its sheet resistance to ~250 Ohm sq-1. Photoemission spectroscopy confirms the presence of a large interface dipole of ~0.9 eV between graphene and the Cs2CO3/organic matrix. This leads to a strong charge transfer based doping of graphene with a Fermi level shift of ~1.0 eV. Using this approach we demonstrate efficient, standard industrial manufacturing process compatible graphene-based inverted organic light emitting diodes on glass and flexible substrates with efficiencies comparable to those of state-of-the-art ITO based devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03246f

  19. Engineering Lessons Learned and Systems Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Garcia, Danny; Vaughan, William W.

    2005-01-01

    Systems Engineering is fundamental to good engineering, which in turn depends on the integration and application of engineering lessons learned. Thus, good Systems Engineering also depends on systems engineering lessons learned from within the aerospace industry being documented and applied. About ten percent of the engineering lessons learned documented in the NASA Lessons Learned Information System are directly related to Systems Engineering. A key issue associated with lessons learned datasets is the communication and incorporation of this information into engineering processes. As part of the NASA Technical Standards Program activities, engineering lessons learned datasets have been identified from a number of sources. These are being searched and screened for those having a relation to Technical Standards. This paper will address some of these Systems Engineering Lessons Learned and how they are being related to Technical Standards within the NASA Technical Standards Program, including linking to the Agency's Interactive Engineering Discipline Training Courses and the life cycle for a flight vehicle development program.

  20. Engineering electrochemical capacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John R.

    2016-09-01

    Electrochemical capacitor (EC) applications have broadened tremendously since EC energy storage devices were introduced in 1978. Then typical applications operated below 10 V at power levels below 1 W. Today many EC applications operate at voltages approaching 1000 V at power levels above 100 kW. This paper briefly reviews EC energy storage technology, shows representative applications using EC storage, and describes engineering approaches to design EC storage systems. Comparisons are made among storage systems designed to meet the same application power requirement but using different commercial electrochemical capacitor products.

  1. Biomedical applications engineering tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laenger, C. J., Sr.

    1976-01-01

    The engineering tasks performed in response to needs articulated by clinicians are described. Initial contacts were made with these clinician-technology requestors by the Southwest Research Institute NASA Biomedical Applications Team. The basic purpose of the program was to effectively transfer aerospace technology into functional hardware to solve real biomedical problems.

  2. Engineering Lessons Learned and Systems Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Garcia, Danny; Vaughan, William W.

    2005-01-01

    Systems Engineering is fundamental to good engineering, which in turn depends on the integration and application of engineering lessons learned and technical standards. Thus, good Systems Engineering also depends on systems engineering lessons learned from within the aerospace industry being documented and applied. About ten percent of the engineering lessons learned documented in the NASA Lessons Learned Information System are directly related to Systems Engineering. A key issue associated with lessons learned datasets is the communication and incorporation of this information into engineering processes. Systems Engineering has been defined (EINIS-632) as "an interdisciplinary approach encompassing the entire technical effort to evolve and verify an integrated and life-cycle balanced set of system people, product, and process solutions that satisfy customer needs". Designing reliable space-based systems has always been a goal for NASA, and many painful lessons have been learned along the way. One of the continuing functions of a system engineer is to compile development and operations "lessons learned" documents and ensure their integration into future systems development activities. They can produce insights and information for risk identification identification and characterization. on a new project. Lessons learned files from previous projects are especially valuable in risk

  3. Combustion synthesis and engineering nanoparticles for electronic, structural and superconductor applications. Final report, May 31, 1992--May 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Stangle, G.C.; Schulze, W.A.; Amarakoon, V.R.W.

    1996-05-30

    Dense, nanocrystalline ceramic articles of doped ZrO{sub 2} (for use in solid electrolytes, oxygen sensors, electrode materials, thermal barrier coatings, etc.), BaTiO{sub 3} (for capacitor applications), and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (a high-temperature superconductor with uses, e.g., in magnetic flux trapping and high-speed capacitor applications) were prepared by the new nanofabrication process that has been developed in this research program. The process consists of two steps: synthesis of ceramic nanoparticles, and fabrication of dense ceramic articles that possess nanocrystalline features. The synthesis step is capable of producing 10-nanometer-diameter crystallites of doped ZrO{sub 2}, and of being scaled up to kilogram/hour production rates. The fabrication step produced dense, ultrafine-grained articles at significantly reduced sintering temperatures and times--representing a factor of 10-100 reduction in process energy requirements. The process has thus been shown to be technically feasible, while a preliminary engineering cost analysis of a pilot plant-scale version of the process indicates that it is both a cost- and an energy-efficient method of producing nanoparticles and nanocrystalline ceramics from those nanoparticles. One U.S. patent for this process has been allowed, and an additional five (continuation-in-part) applications have been filed. Technology transfer efforts have begun, through ongoing discussions with representatives from three manufacturing concerns.

  4. The use of holographic interferometry and electron speckle pattern interferometry for diffusion measurement in biochemical and pharmaceutical engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, Anders; Marucci, Mariagrazia

    2008-12-01

    In this review holographic interferometry and electron speckle pattern interferometry are discussed as efficient techniques for diffusion measurements in biochemical and pharmaceutical applications. Transport phenomena can be studied, quantitatively and qualitatively, in gels, liquids and membranes. Detailed information on these phenomena is required to design effective chromatography bioseparation processes using gel beads or ultrafiltration membranes, and in the design of controlled-release pharmaceuticals using membrane-coated pellets or tablets. The influence of gel concentration, ion strength in the liquid and the size of diffusing protein molecules can easily be studied with good accuracy. When studying membranes, the resistance can be quantified, and it is also possible to discriminate between permeable and semi-permeable membranes. In this review the influence of temperature, natural convection and light deflection on the accuracy of the diffusion measurements is also discussed.

  5. Coordination of engineering applications: Project summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cassidy, P.J.

    1996-08-31

    The purpose of this project was to focus on and coordinate several active engineering applications projects to optimize their integration. The end result of the project was to develop and demonstrate the capability of electronically receiving a part from the originating design agency, performing computer-aided engineering analyses, developing process plans, adding electronic input from numerous onsite systems, and producing an online operation sheet (manual) for viewing on a shop floor workstation. A successful demonstration of these applications was performed in December 1988.

  6. A Honeycomb-Structured Ti-6Al-4V Oil-Gas Separation Rotor Additively Manufactured by Selective Electron Beam Melting for Aero-engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H. P.; Wang, Q. B.; Yang, G. Y.; Gu, J.; Liu, N.; Jia, L.; Qian, M.

    2016-03-01

    Oil -gas separation is a key process in an aero-engine lubrication system. This study reports an innovative development in oil -gas separation. A honeycomb-structured rotor with hexagonal cone-shaped pore channels has been designed, additively manufactured from Ti-6Al-4V using selective electron beam melting (SEBM) and assessed for oil -gas separation for aero-engine application. The Ti-6Al-4V honeycomb structure showed a high compressive strength of 110 MPa compared to less than 20 MPa for metal foam structures. The oil -gas separation efficiency of the honeycomb-structured separation rotor achieved 99.8% at the rotation speed of 6000 rpm with much lower ventilation resistance (17.3 kPa) than that of the separator rotor constructed using a Ni-Cr alloy foam structure (23.5 kPa). The honeycomb-structured Ti-6Al-4V separator rotor produced by SEBM provides a promising solution to more efficient oil -gas separation in the aero-engine lubrication system.

  7. Vortex Characterization for Engineering Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jankun-Kelly, M; Thompson, D S; Jiang, M; Shannahan, B; Machiraju, R

    2008-01-30

    Realistic engineering simulation data often have features that are not optimally resolved due to practical limitations on mesh resolution. To be useful to application engineers, vortex characterization techniques must be sufficiently robust to handle realistic data with complex vortex topologies. In this paper, we present enhancements to the vortex topology identification component of an existing vortex characterization algorithm. The modified techniques are demonstrated by application to three realistic data sets that illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of our approach.

  8. Ceramic applications in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, H. E.; Heitman, P. W.; Lindgren, L. C.; Thrasher, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    The application of ceramic components to demonstrate improved cycle efficiency by raising the operating temperature of the existing Allison IGI 404 vehicular gas turbine engine is discussed. This effort was called the Ceramic Applications in Turbine Engines (CATE) program and has successfully demonstrated ceramic components. Among these components are two design configurations featuring stationary and rotating caramic components in the IGT 404 engine. A complete discussion of all phases of the program, design, materials development, fabrication of ceramic components, and testing-including rig, engine, and vehicle demonstation test are presented. During the CATE program, a ceramic technology base was established that is now being applied to automotive and other gas turbine engine programs. This technology base is outlined and also provides a description of the CATE program accomplishments.

  9. Electronic engine 'mockup' shortens design time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, J. C.; Jatzek, H. A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    CAD systems approaches being used by one engine manufacturing company to display the engine and all accessories are described. The electronic mock-ups of engines under development permits examining the entire engine and its support equipment without resorting to a manufactured model. The Geomod program module allows definitions of sections of tubing in appropriate places and subsequent generations of a solid model, or cabling sections in a wire frame representation. Interferences are automatically identified, even when the system is accessed by several designers simultaneously. Storage of the data provides for representational printouts and plots for subcontractors.

  10. Interfacial engineering of nanoparticle systems: Assesment of electron transfer in inter and intrananoparticle photosystems as well as sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phebus, Bruce Drury

    Electron transfer within nanochemical systems plays a key role in their uses. This body of work looks to better understand the conditions required for electron transport within these nanochemical systems and under what circumstances does it play a role in their use. Assessing electron transfer from aqueous graphene nanoparticles to aqueous ions through observation by quenching photoluminescence pointed to interesting requirements for transfer. Sensitivity was observed down to 1.6x10 -6 M for the most strongly quenching ions. More interesting though was a marked dependence on chemical hardness of the ions, with specific chemical hardness required to quench each graphene quantum dot species. Graphene quantum dots sourced from carbon fiber were observed to quench best with ions near that of 8.50 eV chemical hardness, like that of nickelous ions. Nitrogen doped graphene quantum dots were observed to quench best with ions near 7.70 eV in chemical hardness, like that of mercuric ions. The shift to a lower hardness is also noted in a shift toward lower excitation energy of the nanoparticles. For some ions concentration dependence was observed, with ions increasing PL emission initially then subsequently acting as quenchers. This behavior points to multiple quenching sites on the nanoparticles with different complexation values, some leading to stabilization of the PL emission when complexed. EDTA, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, was used as a complexing agent to assess possible recovery of emissions. EDTA was observed to complex ions and recovers some PL emission from some ions, with recovery dependent not only on quenching efficiency of the ion but the complexation constant. The most intriguing behavior was observed for aluminum ions which were observed to further quench with additions of EDTA after a critical point emission started to recover. We ascribe this behavior to multiple complexation sites on the nanoparticles with varied concentration and distinct roles in

  11. ELECTRICAL TECHNIQUES FOR ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bisdorf, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    Surface electrical geophysical methods have been used in such engineering applications as locating and delineating shallow gravel deposits, depth to bedrock, faults, clay zones, and other geological phenomena. Other engineering applications include determining water quality, tracing ground water contaminant plumes and locating dam seepages. Various methods and electrode arrays are employed to solve particular geological problems. The sensitivity of a particular method or electrode array depends upon the physics on which the method is based, the array geometry, the electrical contrast between the target and host materials, and the depth to the target. Each of the available electrical methods has its own particular advantages and applications which the paper discusses.

  12. Interfacial engineering of nanoparticle systems: Assesment of electron transfer in inter and intrananoparticle photosystems as well as sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phebus, Bruce Drury

    Electron transfer within nanochemical systems plays a key role in their uses. This body of work looks to better understand the conditions required for electron transport within these nanochemical systems and under what circumstances does it play a role in their use. Assessing electron transfer from aqueous graphene nanoparticles to aqueous ions through observation by quenching photoluminescence pointed to interesting requirements for transfer. Sensitivity was observed down to 1.6x10 -6 M for the most strongly quenching ions. More interesting though was a marked dependence on chemical hardness of the ions, with specific chemical hardness required to quench each graphene quantum dot species. Graphene quantum dots sourced from carbon fiber were observed to quench best with ions near that of 8.50 eV chemical hardness, like that of nickelous ions. Nitrogen doped graphene quantum dots were observed to quench best with ions near 7.70 eV in chemical hardness, like that of mercuric ions. The shift to a lower hardness is also noted in a shift toward lower excitation energy of the nanoparticles. For some ions concentration dependence was observed, with ions increasing PL emission initially then subsequently acting as quenchers. This behavior points to multiple quenching sites on the nanoparticles with different complexation values, some leading to stabilization of the PL emission when complexed. EDTA, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, was used as a complexing agent to assess possible recovery of emissions. EDTA was observed to complex ions and recovers some PL emission from some ions, with recovery dependent not only on quenching efficiency of the ion but the complexation constant. The most intriguing behavior was observed for aluminum ions which were observed to further quench with additions of EDTA after a critical point emission started to recover. We ascribe this behavior to multiple complexation sites on the nanoparticles with varied concentration and distinct roles in

  13. Electronics Engineering Research. Final report, FY 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Weissenberger, S.

    1980-01-01

    Accomplishments in Electronics Engineering Research (EER) during FY79 spanned a broad range of technologies, from high-speed microelectronics to digital image enhancement; from underground probing with electromagnetic waves to detecting neutrons with a small solid-state device; and from computer systems to aid engineers, to software tools to aid programmers. This report describes the overall EER program and its objectives, summarizes progress made in FY79, and outlines plans for FY80.

  14. Programmed electronic advance for engines

    SciTech Connect

    Dogadko, P.

    1987-03-03

    An ignition advance control is described for an internal combustion engine including a crankshaft, a throttle control, and at least one cylinder, the ignition advance control comprising a spark ignition circuit associated with the cylinder and including trigger means operative to cause an ignition spark, means for generating a control pulse associated with the cylinder, latch means for enabling the trigger means in response to generation of the control pulse, means for generating a constant plurality of sequentially occurring electrical reference pulses during each revolution of the crankshaft, means for counting the reference pulses developed during each revolution of the crankshaft, means for firing the enabled trigger means in response to the counting means counting a predetermined number of the reference pulses to cause the ignition spark at a predetermined ignition point in each revolution of the crankshaft, means for sensing the position of the throttle control, and means responsive to the throttle sensing means for varying the predetermined number of reference pulses solely in accordance with the position of the throttle control to vary the predetermined ignition point as appropriate for the position of the throttle control.

  15. Cognitive engineering in aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, David D.

    1993-01-01

    The progress that was made with respect to the objectives and goals of the research that is being carried out in the Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory (CSEL) under a Cooperative Agreement with NASA Ames Research Center is described. The major objective of this project is to expand the research base in Cognitive Engineering to be able to support the development and human-centered design of automated systems for aerospace applications. This research project is in support of the Aviation Safety/Automation Research plan and related NASA research goals in space applications.

  16. Polymers for engineering applications

    SciTech Connect

    Seymour, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the world of engineering plastics. It discusses the polymers, their properties strengths and limitations. There are 11 chapters, organized so that each chapter builds on the knowledge of the previous material. Coverage includes important polymer concepts, such as molecular structure, bonding, morphology and molecular weight, and polymer properties, such as thermal expansion, thermal transition, electrical properties and viscoelasticity. Details are provided on methods of processing fabrication and on specific families of polymers. The general-purpose polymers are discussed, such as natural and synthetic rubbers, rayon, acrylic and alkyd coatings, polyethylene, polystyrene and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). There's information on high-performance polymers - fibers, elastomers, and coatings. A thorough explanation of the characteristics and qualities of nylons, polyesters, polyimides, neoprene, silicones, polyurethanes and other polymers is given in the same section. Functional polymers with special properties, such as photoconductivity, electric conductivity, piezoelectricity, light sensitivity, and ion exchange; and polymers that are superior to general-purpose plastics, such as ABS, filled polypropylene, and glass-reinforced plastics, are also covered.

  17. Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Area report FY'84

    SciTech Connect

    Minichino, C.; Phelps, P.L.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the work of the Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Areas for FY'84: diagnostics and microelectronic engineering; signal and control engineering; microwave and pulsed power engineering; computer-aided engineering; engineering modeling and simulation; and systems engineering. For each Thrust Area, an overview and a description of the goals and achievements of each project is provided.

  18. Electronics Engineering Department EE technical review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    This is a technical review of work done by the Electronics Engineering Department of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Titles of papers included in this review are as follows: Motion-Control System for the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine; A New Rotating Turbine Camera Controller that Extends Capability and Improves Reliability; The Ring Seating System and The LGF Data Acquisition System.

  19. New Project System for Undergraduate Electronic Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Dirk M.; Chiu, Shen Y.

    2005-01-01

    A new approach to projects for undergraduate electronic engineering in an Australian university has been applied successfully for over 10 years. This approach has a number of projects running over three year period. Feedback from past graduates and their managers has confirmed that these projects train the students well, giving them the ability…

  20. Electronic materials testing in commercial aircraft engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Dieter

    A device for the electronic testing of materials used in commercial aircraft engines is described. The instrument can be used for ferromagnetic, ferrimagnetic, and nonferromagnetic metallic materials, and it functions either optically or acoustically. The design of the device is described and technical data are given. The device operates under the principle of controlled self-inductivity. Its mode of operation is described.

  1. Engineered Proteins: Redox Properties and Their Applications

    PubMed Central

    Prabhulkar, Shradha; Tian, Hui; Wang, Xiaotang; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Oxidoreductases and metalloproteins, representing more than one third of all known proteins, serve as significant catalysts for numerous biological processes that involve electron transfers such as photosynthesis, respiration, metabolism, and molecular signaling. The functional properties of the oxidoreductases/metalloproteins are determined by the nature of their redox centers. Protein engineering is a powerful approach that is used to incorporate biological and abiological redox cofactors as well as novel enzymes and redox proteins with predictable structures and desirable functions for important biological and chemical applications. The methods of protein engineering, mainly rational design, directed evolution, protein surface modifications, and domain shuffling, have allowed the creation and study of a number of redox proteins. This review presents a selection of engineered redox proteins achieved through these methods, resulting in a manipulation in redox potentials, an increase in electron-transfer efficiency, and an expansion of native proteins by de novo design. Such engineered/modified redox proteins with desired properties have led to a broad spectrum of practical applications, ranging from biosensors, biofuel cells, to pharmaceuticals and hybrid catalysis. Glucose biosensors are one of the most successful products in enzyme electrochemistry, with reconstituted glucose oxidase achieving effective electrical communication with the sensor electrode; direct electron-transfer-type biofuel cells are developed to avoid thermodynamic loss and mediator leakage; and fusion proteins of P450s and redox partners make the biocatalytic generation of drug metabolites possible. In summary, this review includes the properties and applications of the engineered redox proteins as well as their significance and great potential in the exploration of bioelectrochemical sensing devices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1796–1822. PMID:22435347

  2. Harsh environments electronics : downhole applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, Paul Thomas

    2011-03-01

    The development and operational sustainment of renewable (geothermal) and non-renewable (fossil fuel) energy resources will be accompanied by increasingly higher costs factors: exploration and site preparation, operational maintenance and repair. Increased government oversight in the wake of the Gulf oil spill will only add to the cost burden. It is important to understand that downhole conditions are not just about elevated temperatures. It is often construed that military electronics are exposed to the upper limit in terms of extreme service environments. Probably the harshest of all service conditions for electronics and electrical equipment are those in oil, gas, and geothermal wells. From the technology perspective, advanced materials, sensors, and microelectronics devices are benefificial to the exploration and sustainment of energy resources, especially in terms of lower costs. Besides the need for the science that creates these breakthroughs - there is also a need for sustained engineering development and testing. Downhole oil, gas, and geothermal well applications can have a wide range of environments and reliability requirements: Temperature, Pressure, Vibration, Corrosion, and Service duration. All too frequently, these conditions are not well-defifined because the application is labeled as 'high temperature'. This ambiguity is problematic when the investigation turns to new approaches for electronic packaging solutions. The objective is to develop harsh environment, electronic packaging that meets customer requirements of cost, performance, and reliability. There are a number of challenges: (1) Materials sets - solder alloys, substrate materials; (2) Manufacturing process - low to middle volumes, low defect counts, new equipment technologies; and (3) Reliability testing - requirements documents, test methods and modeling, relevant standards documents. The cost to develop and sustain renewable and non-renewable energy resources will continue to escalate

  3. Industrial and Systems Engineering Applications in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivers, Charles H.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the many applications of Industrial and Systems Engineering used for safe NASA missions is shown. The topics include: 1) NASA Information; 2) Industrial Engineering; 3) Systems Engineering; and 4) Major NASA Programs.

  4. Engineering applications of virtual reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James R.; Grimes, Robert V.; Plant, Tony A.

    1996-04-01

    This paper addresses some of the practical applications, advantages and difficulties associated with the engineering applications of virtual reality. The paper tracks actual investigative work in progress on this subject at the BNR research lab in RTP, NC. This work attempts to demonstrate the actual value added to the engineering process by using existing 3D CAD data for interactive information navigation and evaluation of design concepts and products. Specifically, the work includes translation of Parametric Technology's Pro/ENGINEER models into a virtual world to evaluate potential attributes such as multiple concept exploration and product installation assessment. Other work discussed in this paper includes extensive evaluation of two new tools, VRML and SGI's/Template Graphics' WebSpace for navigation through Pro/ENGINEER models with links to supporting technical documentation and data. The benefits of using these tolls for 3D interactive navigation and exploration throughout three key phases of the physical design process is discussed in depth. The three phases are Design Concept Development, Product Design Evaluation and Product Design Networking. The predicted values added include reduced time to `concept ready', reduced prototype iterations, increased `design readiness' and shorter manufacturing introduction cycles.

  5. Diesel Engine Light Truck Application

    SciTech Connect

    2007-12-31

    The Diesel Engine Light Truck Application (DELTA) program consists of two major contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). The first one under DE-FC05-97-OR22606, starting from 1997, was completed in 2001, and consequently, a final report was submitted to DOE in 2003. The second part of the contract was under DE-FC05-02OR22909, covering the program progress from 2002 to 2007. This report is the final report of the second part of the program under contract DE-FC05-02OR22909. During the course of this contract, the program work scope and objectives were significantly changed. From 2002 to 2004, the DELTA program continued working on light-duty engine development with the 4.0L V6 DELTA engine, following the accomplishments made from the first part of the program under DE-FC05-97-OR22606. The program work scope in 2005-2007 was changed to the Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) soot layer characterization and substrate material assessment. This final report will cover two major technical tasks. (1) Continuation of the DELTA engine development to demonstrate production-viable diesel engine technologies and to demonstrate emissions compliance with significant fuel economy advantages, covering progress made from 2002 to 2004. (2) DPF soot layer characterization and substrate material assessment from 2005-2007.

  6. Electronic governor for an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Nanjyo, H.; Suzuki, H.

    1987-11-24

    An electronic governor for an internal combustion engine provided with a fuel injection pump for supplying fuel to the engine and having a control rack for adjusting fuel injection amount is described comprising, means providing a designated speed signal Vno indicative of the desired rotational speed No of the internal combustion engine, a speed detector detecting the rotational speed N of the internal combustion engine and producing the speed detection signal Vn indicative of the rotational speed N, a rack position detector detecting the position of the rack and producing a rack position detection signal VL indicative of the position of the rack, a speed deviation operation circuit responsive to the speed detection signal Vn for producing a constant speed control signal Vnd for effecting control to maintain the deviation of the actual rotational speed N from the designated rotational speed No within a permissible range, a rack position deviation operation circuit for producing a maximum rack position control signal VLd for effecting control to maintain the deviation of the rack position, a control mode selector and means responsive to the output of the control mode selector for controlling the rack to cause the deviation of the actual rotational speed N from the designated rotational speed No or the rack position from the maximum rack position to be within a certain range.

  7. Bending fatigue of electron-beam-welded foils. Application to a hydrodynamic air bearing in the Chrysler/DOE upgraded automotive gas tubine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltsman, J. F.; Halford, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    A hydrodynamic air bearing with a compliment surface is used in the gas generator of an upgraded automotive gas turbine engine. In the prototype design, the compliant surface is a thin foil spot welded at one end to the bearing cartridge. During operation, the foil failed along the line of spot welds which acted as a series of stress concentrators. Because of its higher degree of geometric uniformity, electron beam welding of the foil was selected as an alternative to spot welding. Room temperature bending fatigue tests were conducted to determine the fatigue resistance of the electron beam welded foils. Equations were determined relating cycles to crack initiation and cycles to failure to nominal total strain range. A scaling procedure is presented for estimating the reduction in cyclic life when the foil is at its normal operating temperature of 260 C (500 F).

  8. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  9. Organic electronic devices via interface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qianfei

    This dissertation focuses on interface engineering and its influence on organic electronic devices. A comprehensive review of interface studies in organic electronic devices is presented in Chapter 1. By interface engineering at the cathode contact, an ultra-high efficiency green polymer light emitting diode is demonstrated in Chapter 2. The interface modification turns out to be solution processable by using calcium acetylacetonate, donated by Ca(acac)2. The device structure is Induim Tin Oxide (ITO)/3,4-polyethylenedioxythiophene-polystyrene-sulfonate (PEDOT)/Green polyfluorene/Ca(acac) 2/Al. Based on this structure, we obtained device efficiencies as high as 28 cd/A at 2650 cd/m2, which is about a 3 times improvement over previous devices. The mechanism of this nano-layer has been studied by I-L-V measurements, photovoltaic measurements, XPS/UPS studies, impedance measurements as well as transient EL studies. The interfacial layer plays a crucial role for the efficiency improvement. It is believed to work as a hole blocking layer as well as an electron injection layer. Meanwhile, a systematic study on ITO electrodes is also carried out in Chapter 4. By engineering the interface at ITO electrode, the device lifetime has been improved. In Chapter 5, very bright white emission PLEDs are fabricated based on blue polyfluorene (PF) doped with 1 wt% 6, 8, 15, 17-tetraphyenyl-1.18, 4.5, 9.10, 13.14-tetrabenzoheptacene (TBH). The maximum luminance exceeds 20,000 cd/m2. The maximum luminance efficiency is 3.55 cd/A at 4228 cd/m2 while the maximum power efficiency is 1.6 lm/W at 310 cd/m2. The white color is achieved by an incomplete energy transfer from blue PF to TBH. The devices show super stable CIE coordinates as a function of current density. The interface engineering is also applied to memory devices. In Chapter 6, a novel nonvolatile memory device is fabricated by inserting a buffer layer at the anode contact. Devices with the structure of Cu

  10. Low secondary electron yield engineered surface for electron cloud mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Valizadeh, Reza; Malyshev, Oleg B. Wang, Sihui; Zolotovskaya, Svetlana A.; Allan Gillespie, W.; Abdolvand, Amin

    2014-12-08

    Secondary electron yield (SEY or δ) limits the performance of a number of devices. Particularly, in high-energy charged particle accelerators, the beam-induced electron multipacting is one of the main sources of electron cloud (e-cloud) build up on the beam path; in radio frequency wave guides, the electron multipacting limits their lifetime and causes power loss; and in detectors, the secondary electrons define the signal background and reduce the sensitivity. The best solution would be a material with a low SEY coating and for many applications δ < 1 would be sufficient. We report on an alternative surface preparation to the ones that are currently advocated. Three commonly used materials in accelerator vacuum chambers (stainless steel, copper, and aluminium) were laser processed to create a highly regular surface topography. It is shown that this treatment reduces the SEY of the copper, aluminium, and stainless steel from δ{sub max} of 1.90, 2.55, and 2.25 to 1.12, 1.45, and 1.12, respectively. The δ{sub max} further reduced to 0.76–0.78 for all three treated metals after bombardment with 500 eV electrons to a dose between 3.5 × 10{sup −3} and 2.0 × 10{sup −2} C·mm{sup −2}.

  11. Nastran's Application in Agricultural Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanwicklen, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Finite element analysis has been recognized as a valuable solution method by agricultural engineers. NASTRAN has been obtained by the Agricultural Engineering Department at the University of Georgia. The NASTRAN Thermal Analyzer has been used in the teaching program for an undergraduate course in heat transfer and will be used for a new graduate course in finite element analysis. The NASTRAN Thermal Analyzer has also been applied to several research problems in the Agricultural Engineering Department.

  12. (abstract) Electronic Packaging for Microspacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasler, David

    1993-01-01

    The intent of this presentation is to give a brief look into the future of electronic packaging for microspacecraft applications. Advancements in electronic packaging technology areas have developed to the point where a system engineer's visions, concepts, and requirements for a microspacecraft can now be a reality. These new developments are ideal candidates for microspacecraft applications. These technologies are capable of bringing about major changes in how we design future spacecraft while taking advantage of the benefits due to size, weight, power, performance, reliability , and cost. This presentation will also cover some advantages and limitations of surface mount technology (SMT), multichip modules (MCM), and wafer scale integration (WSI), and what is needed to implement these technologies into microspacecraft.

  13. Biocatalysts: application and engineering for industrial purposes.

    PubMed

    Jemli, Sonia; Ayadi-Zouari, Dorra; Hlima, Hajer Ben; Bejar, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are widely applied in various industrial applications and processes, including the food and beverage, animal feed, textile, detergent and medical industries. Enzymes screened from natural origins are often engineered before entering the market place because their native forms do not meet the requirements for industrial application. Protein engineering is concerned with the design and construction of novel enzymes with tailored functional properties, including stability, catalytic activity, reaction product inhibition and substrate specificity. Two broad approaches have been used for enzyme engineering, namely, rational design and directed evolution. The powerful and revolutionary techniques so far developed for protein engineering provide excellent opportunities for the design of industrial enzymes with specific properties and production of high-value products at lower production costs. The present review seeks to highlight the major fields of enzyme application and to provide an updated overview on previous protein engineering studies wherein natural enzymes were modified to meet the operational conditions required for industrial application. PMID:25373789

  14. Soil variability in engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessia, Giovanna

    2014-05-01

    Natural geomaterials, as soils and rocks, show spatial variability and heterogeneity of physical and mechanical properties. They can be measured by in field and laboratory testing. The heterogeneity concerns different values of litho-technical parameters pertaining similar lithological units placed close to each other. On the contrary, the variability is inherent to the formation and evolution processes experienced by each geological units (homogeneous geomaterials on average) and captured as a spatial structure of fluctuation of physical property values about their mean trend, e.g. the unit weight, the hydraulic permeability, the friction angle, the cohesion, among others. The preceding spatial variations shall be managed by engineering models to accomplish reliable designing of structures and infrastructures. Materon (1962) introduced the Geostatistics as the most comprehensive tool to manage spatial correlation of parameter measures used in a wide range of earth science applications. In the field of the engineering geology, Vanmarcke (1977) developed the first pioneering attempts to describe and manage the inherent variability in geomaterials although Terzaghi (1943) already highlighted that spatial fluctuations of physical and mechanical parameters used in geotechnical designing cannot be neglected. A few years later, Mandelbrot (1983) and Turcotte (1986) interpreted the internal arrangement of geomaterial according to Fractal Theory. In the same years, Vanmarcke (1983) proposed the Random Field Theory providing mathematical tools to deal with inherent variability of each geological units or stratigraphic succession that can be resembled as one material. In this approach, measurement fluctuations of physical parameters are interpreted through the spatial variability structure consisting in the correlation function and the scale of fluctuation. Fenton and Griffiths (1992) combined random field simulation with the finite element method to produce the Random

  15. Application of laser anemometry in turbine engine research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    The application of laser anemometry to the study of flow fields in turbine engine components is reviewed. Included are discussions of optical configurations, seeding requirements, electronic signal processing, and data processing. Some typical results are presented along with a discussion of ongoing work.

  16. Application of laser anemometry in turbine engine research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The application of laser anemometry to the study of flow fields in turbine engine components is reviewed. Included are discussions of optical configurations, seeding requirements, electronic signal processing, and data processing. Some typical results are presented along with a discussion of ongoing work.

  17. Imaging Strategies for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seung Yun; Ricles, Laura M.; Suggs, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering has evolved with multifaceted research being conducted using advanced technologies, and it is progressing toward clinical applications. As tissue engineering technology significantly advances, it proceeds toward increasing sophistication, including nanoscale strategies for material construction and synergetic methods for combining with cells, growth factors, or other macromolecules. Therefore, to assess advanced tissue-engineered constructs, tissue engineers need versatile imaging methods capable of monitoring not only morphological but also functional and molecular information. However, there is no single imaging modality that is suitable for all tissue-engineered constructs. Each imaging method has its own range of applications and provides information based on the specific properties of the imaging technique. Therefore, according to the requirements of the tissue engineering studies, the most appropriate tool should be selected among a variety of imaging modalities. The goal of this review article is to describe available biomedical imaging methods to assess tissue engineering applications and to provide tissue engineers with criteria and insights for determining the best imaging strategies. Commonly used biomedical imaging modalities, including X-ray and computed tomography, positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, optical imaging, and emerging techniques and multimodal imaging, will be discussed, focusing on the latest trends of their applications in recent tissue engineering studies. PMID:25012069

  18. Ceramic applications in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, J. A.; Janovicz, M. A.; Thrasher, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    Development testing activities on the 1900 F-configuration ceramic parts were completed, 2070 F-configuration ceramic component rig and engine testing was initiated, and the conceptual design for the 2265 F-configuration engine was identified. Fabrication of the 2070 F-configuration ceramic parts continued, along with burner rig development testing of the 2070 F-configuration metal combustor in preparation for 1132 C (2070 F) qualification test conditions. Shakedown testing of the hot engine simulator (HES) rig was also completed in preparation for testing of a spin rig-qualified ceramic-bladed rotor assembly at 1132 C (2070 F) test conditions. Concurrently, ceramics from new sources and alternate materials continued to be evaluated, and fabrication of 2070 F-configuration ceramic component from these new sources continued. Cold spin testing of the critical 2070 F-configuration blade continued in the spin test rig to qualify a set of ceramic blades at 117% engine speed for the gasifier turbine rotor. Rig testing of the ceramic-bladed gasifier turbine rotor assembly at 108% engine speed was also performed, which resulted in the failure of one blade. The new three-piece hot seal with the nickel oxide/calcium fluoride wearface composition was qualified in the regenerator rig and introduced to engine operation wiwth marginal success.

  19. Radio-Frequency Electronics, Circuits and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Jon B.

    This accessible and comprehensive book provides an introduction to the basic concepts and key circuits of radio frequency systems, covering fundamental principles which apply to all radio devices, from wireless data transceivers on semiconductor chips to high-power broadcast transmitters. Topics covered include filters, amplifiers, oscillators, modulators, low-noise amplifiers, phase-locked loops, and transformers. Applications of radio frequency systems are described in such areas as communications, radio and television broadcasting, radar, and radio astronomy. The book contains many exercises, and assumes only a knowledge of elementary electronics and circuit analysis. It will be an ideal textbook for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in electrical engineering, as well as an invaluable reference for researchers and professional engineers in this area, or for those moving into the field of wireless communications.

  20. Solid fuel applications to transportation engines

    SciTech Connect

    Rentz, Richard L.; Renner, Roy A.

    1980-06-01

    The utilization of solid fuels as alternatives to liquid fuels for future transportation engines is reviewed. Alternative liquid fuels will not be addressed nor will petroleum/solid fuel blends except for the case of diesel engines. With respect to diesel engines, coal/oil mixtures will be addressed because of the high interest in this specific application as a result of the large number of diesel engines currently in transportation use. Final assessments refer to solid fuels only for diesel engines. The technical assessments of solid fuels utilization for transportation engines is summarized: solid fuel combustion in transportation engines is in a non-developed state; highway transportation is not amenable to solid fuels utilization due to severe environmental, packaging, control, and disposal problems; diesel and open-cycle gas turbines do not appear worthy of further development, although coal/oil mixtures for slow speed diesels may offer some promise as a transition technology; closed-cycle gas turbines show some promise for solid fuels utilization for limited applications as does the Stirling engine for use of cleaner solid fuels; Rankine cycle engines show good potential for limited applications, such as for locomotives and ships; and any development program will require large resources and sophisticated equipment in order to advance the state-of-the-art.

  1. Mathematics and Engineering Applications, Some Selected Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    This document, a report of a seminar arranged by the Royal Belgian Society of Engineers and Industrialists, contains 35 papers illustrating the application of modern mathematics in engineering. There are eleven sections: Statistics, Operational Research, Boolean Algebra, Numerical Analysis, Eigenvalues, variations, Integral Equations and…

  2. Applications of Computer Graphics in Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Various applications of interactive computer graphics to the following areas of science and engineering were described: design and analysis of structures, configuration geometry, animation, flutter analysis, design and manufacturing, aircraft design and integration, wind tunnel data analysis, architecture and construction, flight simulation, hydrodynamics, curve and surface fitting, gas turbine engine design, analysis, and manufacturing, packaging of printed circuit boards, spacecraft design.

  3. IC Engine Applications of Carbon-Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. Burton; Rivers, H. Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Many of the properties of carbon-carbon make it an ideal material for reciprocating materials of intermittent combustion (IC) engines. Recent diesel engine tests, shown herein, indicate that the thermal and mechanical properties of carbon-carbon are adequate for piston applications, However, reducing the manufacturing costs and providing long term oxidation protection are still issues that need to be addressed.

  4. 3-dimensional bioprinting for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bon Kang; Choi, Dong Jin; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Min Sup; Kang, Chang Mo; Kim, Chun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The 3-dimensional (3D) printing technologies, referred to as additive manufacturing (AM) or rapid prototyping (RP), have acquired reputation over the past few years for art, architectural modeling, lightweight machines, and tissue engineering applications. Among these applications, tissue engineering field using 3D printing has attracted the attention from many researchers. 3D bioprinting has an advantage in the manufacture of a scaffold for tissue engineering applications, because of rapid-fabrication, high-precision, and customized-production, etc. In this review, we will introduce the principles and the current state of the 3D bioprinting methods. Focusing on some of studies that are being current application for biomedical and tissue engineering fields using printed 3D scaffolds. PMID:27114828

  5. Electron tubes for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellert, Bernd

    1994-05-01

    This report reviews research and development efforts within the last years for vacuum electron tubes, in particular power grid tubes for industrial applications. Physical and chemical effects are discussed that determine the performance of todays devices. Due to the progress made in the fundamental understanding of materials and newly developed processes the reliability and reproducibility of power grid tubes could be improved considerably. Modern computer controlled manufacturing methods ensure a high reproducibility of production and continuous quality certification according to ISO 9001 guarantees future high quality standards. Some typical applications of these tubes are given as an example.

  6. REVIEW ARTICLE: Magnetostrictive delay lines: engineering theory and sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristoforou, E.

    2003-02-01

    A review of the engineering theory and the sensing element applications of the magnetostrictive delay line (MDL) technique is presented. The state of the art of magnetic materials and effects used in sensor design is overviewed and the operation of MDLs and their basic engineering properties are discussed. The resulting position, stress and field sensors based on this technique as well as their most significant applications are demonstrated. Finally, the industrialization process and the integration of the sensors with electronic circuitry as well as their evaluation with respect to the state of the art are discussed.

  7. Engineering proteins for environmental applications.

    PubMed

    Janssen, D B; Schanstra, J P

    1994-06-01

    Recently, significant new insight has been obtained into the structure and catalytic mechanism of enzymes that convert environmental pollutants. Recent advances in protein engineering make it possible to use this information for improving the catalytic performance of such enzymes to achieve increased stability and expanded substrate range. PMID:7765007

  8. F-15 digital electronic engine control system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, L. P.

    1984-01-01

    A digital electronic engine control (DEEC) was developed for use on the F100-PW-100 turbofan engine. This control system has full authority control, capable of moving all the controlled variables over their full ranges. The digital computational electronics and fault detection and accomodation logic maintains safe engine operation. A hydromechanical backup control (BUC) is an integral part of the fuel metering unit and provides gas generator control at a reduced performance level in the event of an electronics failure. The DEEC's features, hardware, and major logic diagrams are described.

  9. Photonics applications and web engineering: WILGA Winter 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2015-09-01

    XXXVth periodic Symposium WILGA (winter edition) on Design, Construction and Application of Advanced Electronic and Photonic Systems was held at the end of January 2015. It is an established, periodic meeting of young researchers, M.Sc. and Ph.D. students and their supervisors. The meeting is organized by the PERG/ELHEP Laboratories of Institute of Electronic Systems - WUT since two decades. Sessions of the 2015 January meeting were: development of the architecture of digital electronics, embedded systems, design of system functionality, analog electronics and photonics, hardware - software integration, complex system reliability and dependability working in harsh environments, applications of electronic and photonic systems in space and satellite engineering and large research experiments. Summer edition of WILGA Symposium is organized on 25-31 May 2015 [wilga.ise.pw.edu.pl].

  10. Electronic Structure Engineering of Cu2O Film/ZnO Nanorods Array All-Oxide p-n Heterostructure for Enhanced Photoelectrochemical Property and Self-powered Biosensing Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhuo; Yan, Xiaoqin; Wang, Yunfei; Bai, Zhiming; Liu, Yichong; Zhang, Zheng; Lin, Pei; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yuan, Haoge; Zhang, Xueji; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We have engineered the electronic structure at the interface between Cu2O and ZnO nanorods (NRs) array, through adjusting the carrier concentration of Cu2O. The electrodeposition of Cu2O at pH 11 acquired the highest carrier concentration, resulting in the largest interfacial electric field between Cu2O and ZnO, which finally led to the highest separation efficiency of photogenerated charge carriers. The optimized Cu2O/ZnO NRs array p-n heterostructures exhibited enhanced PEC performance, such as elevated photocurrent and photoconversion efficiency, as well as excellent sensing performance for the sensitive detection of glutathione (GSH) in PBS buffer even at applied bias of 0 V which made the device self-powered. Besides, the favorable selectivity, high reproducibility and extremely wide detection range, make such heterostructure a promising candidate for PEC biosensing applications, probably for the extended field of PEC water splitting or other solar photovoltaic beacons.

  11. Photonics applications and web engineering: WILGA Summer 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2015-09-01

    Wilga Summer 2015 Symposium on Photonics Applications and Web Engineering was held on 23-31 May. The Symposium gathered over 350 participants, mainly young researchers active in optics, optoelectronics, photonics, electronics technologies and applications. There were presented around 300 presentations in a few main topical tracks including: bio-photonics, optical sensory networks, photonics-electronics-mechatronics co-design and integration, large functional system design and maintenance, Internet of Thins, and other. The paper is an introduction the 2015 WILGA Summer Symposium Proceedings, and digests some of the Symposium chosen key presentations.

  12. Application of Multimedia in Engineering Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohne, Gunter; Henkel, Veit

    2004-01-01

    Multimedia applications can provide enormous enrichment to the methodology of teaching, learning and learning by doing. When developing applications for the teaching of engineering design using these means of communication it is important to consider the special features of this field. This contribution gives a report on the experience gained by…

  13. Principles and applications of quantum control engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gough, John E.

    2012-01-01

    This is a brief survey of quantum feedback control and specifically follows on from the two-day conference Principles and applications of quantum control engineering, which took place in the Kavli Royal Society International Centre at Chicheley Hall, on 12–13 December 2011. This was the eighth in a series of principles and applications of control to quantum systems workshops. PMID:23091206

  14. Electronic Band Engineering of Epitaxial Graphene by Atomic Intercalation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasekera, Thushari; Sandin, Andreas; Xu, Shu; Wheeler, Virginia; Gaskill, D. K.; Rowe, J. E.; Kim, K. W.; Dougherty, Daniel B.; Buongiorno Nardelli, M.

    2012-02-01

    Using calculations from first principles, we have investigated possible ways of engineering the electronic band structure of epitaxial graphene on SiC. In particular, intercalation of different atomic species, such as Hydrogen, Fluorine, Sodium, Germanium, Carbon and Silicon is shown to modify and tune the interface electronic properties and band alignments. Our results suggest that intercalation in graphene is quite different from that in graphite, and could provide a fundamentally new way to achieve electronic control in graphene electronics.

  15. 23. CURRENT VELOCITYDIRECTION INDICATOR DEVELOPED BY WES ELECTRONICS ENGINEER LEILAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CURRENT VELOCITY-DIRECTION INDICATOR DEVELOPED BY WES ELECTRONICS ENGINEER LEILAND M. DUKE. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  16. Compound cycle engine for helicopter application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castor, Jere G.

    1986-01-01

    The Compound Cycle Engine (CCE) is a highly turbocharged, power compounded, ultra-high power density, light-weight diesel engine. The turbomachinery is similar to a moderate pressure ratio, free power turbine engine and the diesel core is high speed and a low compression ratio. This engine is considered a potential candidate for future military light helicopter applications. This executive summary presents cycle thermodynamic (SFC) and engine weight analyses performed to establish general engine operating parameters and configuration. An extensive performance and weight analysis based on a typical two hour helicopter (+30 minute reserve) mission determined final conceptual engine design. With this mission, CCE performance was compared to that of a T-800 class gas turbine engine. The CCE had a 31% lower-fuel consumption and resulted in a 16% reduction in engine plus fuel and fuel tank weight. Design SFC of the CCE is 0.33 lb-HP-HR and installed wet weight is 0.43 lbs/HP. The major technology development areas required for the CCE are identified and briefly discussed.

  17. Compound cycle engine for helicopter application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castor, Jere; Martin, John; Bradley, Curtiss

    1987-01-01

    The compound cycle engine (CCE) is a highly turbocharged, power-compounded, ultra-high-power-density, lightweight diesel engine. The turbomachinery is similar to a moderate-pressure-ratio, free-power-turbine gas turbine engine and the diesel core is high speed and a low compression ratio. This engine is considered a potential candidate for future military helicopter applications. Cycle thermodynamic specific fuel consumption (SFC) and engine weight analyses performed to establish general engine operating parameters and configurations are presented. An extensive performance and weight analysis based on a typical 2-hour helicopter (+30 minute reserve) mission determined final conceptual engine design. With this mission, CCE performance was compared to that of a contemporary gas turbine engine. The CCE had a 31 percent lower-fuel consumption and resulted in a 16 percent reduction in engine plus fuel and fuel tank weight. Design SFC of the CCE is 0.33 lb/hp-hr and installed wet weight is 0.43 lb/hp. The major technology development areas required for the CCE are identified and briefly discussed.

  18. Engineering tradeoffs in miniaturization of electronics for very large detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.S.

    1987-10-01

    The trend toward Application-Specific Integrated Circuits and similar systems-on-a-chip-technologies is fueling a new wave of innovation in detector electronics, just in time to address some of the problems being introduced by detectors which will approach a million channels of electronics. The cost-effectiveness of these technologies can be easily demonstrated, and the trend of the past twenty years of achieving more powerful electronics at a lower per-channel cost should receive a major impetus. The investment required in the new technologies will reshape the work force of most laboratories, by providing more and better tools, and by requiring training or retraining of significant numbers of personnel. The need for new instrumentation standards will arise at new levels in the detectors of the future. The laboratories must also invest heavily in integrating various computer aided engineering and computer aided design tools into a smoothly functioning system. They must also establish a new and different kind of working relationship with vendors and suppliers of both basic devices as well as standard packaged products. This paper discusses three concepts.

  19. Composite material application for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heubner, S. W.

    1982-01-01

    With increasing emphasis on improving engine thrust-to-weight ratios to provide improved payload capabilities, weight reductions achievable by the use of composites have become attractive. Of primary significance is the weight reduction offered by composites, although high temperature properties and cost reduction were also considered. The potential for application of composites to components of Earth-to-orbit hydrocarbon engines and orbit-to-orbit LOX/H2 engines was assessed. The components most likely to benefit from the application of composites were identified, as were the critical technology areas where developed would be required. Recommendations were made and a program outlined for the design, fabrication, and demonstration of specific engine components.

  20. Surface engineering of aluminum alloys for automotive engine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, S.; Dahotre, Narendra B.; Dahotre, Narendra B.

    2004-01-01

    The modification and refinement of surface and subsurface microstructure in Al-Si-based cast alloys via laser-induced rapid solidification can create a natural topography suitable for engine applications. The differential wear of the soft aluminum phase, hard silicon, and CuAl in the cell, along with the divorced eutectic nanostructure in the intercellular region, is expected to produce and replenish microfluidic channels and pits for efficient oil retention, spreading, and lubrication.

  1. Application Program Interface for Engineering and Scientific Applications

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-10-18

    An Application Program Interface (API) for engineering and scientific applications. This system allows application developers to write to a single uniform interface, obtaining access to all solvers in the Trilinos framwork. This includes linear solvers, eigensolvers, non-linear solvers, and time-dependent solvers.

  2. Composite Material Application to Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judd, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The substitution of reinforced plastic composite (RPC) materials for metal was studied. The major objectives were to: (1) determine the extent to which composite materials can be beneficially used in liquid rocket engines; (2) identify additional technology requirements; and (3) determine those areas which have the greatest potential for return. Weight savings, fabrication costs, performance, life, and maintainability factors were considered. Two baseline designs, representative of Earth to orbit and orbit to orbit engine systems, were selected. Weight savings are found to be possible for selected components with the substitution of materials for metal. Various technology needs are identified before RPC material can be used in rocket engine applications.

  3. Diffraction techniques in engineering applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kozarczek, K.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Watkins, T.R.; Wang, X.L.; Spooner, S.

    1995-12-31

    Diffraction techniques applied to crystalline materials provide quantitative information about the crystallographic structure and mechanical condition of the material. Those two characteristics influence the chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of a Component. A concerted application of x-ray and neutron diffraction allows one to comprehensively study the bulk and subsurface variations of such material characteristics as crystallographic texture, residual stress, and cold work. The Residual Stress User Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory offers academic and industrial researchers both neutron and x-ray diffraction capabilities. Recent examples of the application of work related to thin film, metal, ceramic and composite material technologies are presented.

  4. Electronic applications of flexible graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiangcheng; Chugh, Randy; Biller, Brian C.; Hoi, Yie Meng; Chung, D. D. L.

    2002-05-01

    Flexible graphite is effective for electronic applications, specifically electromagnetic interference (EMI) gasketing, resistive heating, thermoelectric-energy generation, and heat dissipation. It is comparable to or better than conductive-filled silicone materials for EMI gasketing. The shielding effectiveness reaches 125 dB. Flexible graphite as a heating element provides temperatures up to 980°C, response half-time down to 4 sec, and heat output at 60 sec up to 5600 J. The through-thickness, absolute thermoelectric power of flexible graphite is -2.6 µV/°C. Flexible graphite is effective as a thermal-interface material if the thickness is low (0.13 mm), the density is low (1.1 g/cm3), and the contact pressure is high (11.1 MPa). These applications make use of the flexibility and compliance of flexible graphite, in addition to its electronic and thermal behavior. Compliance is particularly important for the use of flexible graphite as interface materials, whether the interface is electrom agnetic, thermoelectric, or thermal.

  5. 76 FR 72087 - Special Conditions: Diamond Aircraft Industries, Model DA-40NG; Electronic Engine Control (EEC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    .... A47CE to include the new model DA- 40NG with the Austro Engine GmbH model E4 Aircraft Diesel Engine (ADE...-tail airplane with the Austro Engine GmbH model E4 diesel engine and an increased maximum takeoff gross... Engine GmbH model E4 aircraft diesel engine. 1. Electronic Engine Control a. For electronic...

  6. Optimization strategies for complex engineering applications

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, M.S.

    1998-02-01

    LDRD research activities have focused on increasing the robustness and efficiency of optimization studies for computationally complex engineering problems. Engineering applications can be characterized by extreme computational expense, lack of gradient information, discrete parameters, non-converging simulations, and nonsmooth, multimodal, and discontinuous response variations. Guided by these challenges, the LDRD research activities have developed application-specific techniques, fundamental optimization algorithms, multilevel hybrid and sequential approximate optimization strategies, parallel processing approaches, and automatic differentiation and adjoint augmentation methods. This report surveys these activities and summarizes the key findings and recommendations.

  7. Data base systems in electronic design engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D.

    1980-01-01

    The concepts of an integrated design data base system (DBMS) as it might apply to an electronic design company are discussed. Data elements of documentation, project specifications, project tracking, firmware, software, electronic and mechanical design can be integrated and managed through a single DBMS. Combining the attributes of a DBMS data handler with specialized systems and functional data can provide users with maximum flexibility, reduced redundancy, and increased overall systems performance. Although some system overhead is lost due to redundancy in transitory data, it is believed the combination of the two data types is advisable rather than trying to do all data handling through a single DBMS.

  8. Engineering Stem Cells for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Yin, Perry T; Han, Edward; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by a number of useful properties, including their ability to migrate, differentiate, and secrete a variety of therapeutic molecules such as immunomodulatory factors. As such, numerous pre-clinical and clinical studies have utilized stem cell-based therapies and demonstrated their tremendous potential for the treatment of various human diseases and disorders. Recently, efforts have focused on engineering stem cells in order to further enhance their innate abilities as well as to confer them with new functionalities, which can then be used in various biomedical applications. These engineered stem cells can take on a number of forms. For instance, engineered stem cells encompass the genetic modification of stem cells as well as the use of stem cells for gene delivery, nanoparticle loading and delivery, and even small molecule drug delivery. The present Review gives an in-depth account of the current status of engineered stem cells, including potential cell sources, the most common methods used to engineer stem cells, and the utilization of engineered stem cells in various biomedical applications, with a particular focus on tissue regeneration, the treatment of immunodeficiency diseases, and cancer. PMID:25772134

  9. Engineered carbon foam for temperature control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almajali, Mohammad Rajab

    pressure within the foam matrix were investigated. These factors lowered the heat transfer rate considerably and the melting area was reduced by more than 23%. Two samples, coated and uncoated carbon foam, were infiltrated with PCM and subjected to a uniform heat load test in a vacuum. The coated foam showed excellent performance compared to the uncoated foam. (iii) Finally, the new engineered carbon foam was used as a heat sink and heat exchanger in a thermoelectric cooler for a cooling vest application. Using carbon foam as the core material for this application, the effective transfer of heat was significantly increased while reducing the size and weight of the heat exchanger.

  10. Thermal barrier coatings application in diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbanks, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    Commercial use of thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines began in the mid 70's by Dr. Ingard Kvernes at the Central Institute for Industrial Research in Oslo, Norway. Dr. Kvernes attributed attack on diesel engine valves and piston crowns encountered in marine diesel engines in Norwegian ships as hot-corrosion attributed to a reduced quality of residual fuel. His solution was to coat these components to reduce metal temperature below the threshold of aggressive hot-corrosion and also provide protection. Roy Kamo introduced thermal barrier coatings in his 'Adiabatic Diesel Engine' in the late 70's. Kamo's concept was to eliminate the engine block water cooling system and reduce heat losses. Roy reported significant performance improvements in his thermally insulated engine at the SAE Congress in 1982. Kamo's work stimulates major programs with insulated engines, particularly in Europe. Most of the major diesel engine manufacturers conducted some level of test with insulated combustion chamber components. They initially ran into increased fuel consumption. The German engine consortium had Prof. Woschni of the Technical Institute in Munich. Woschni conducted testing with pistons with air gaps to provide the insulation effects. Woschni indicated the hot walls of the insulated engine created a major increase in heat transfer he refers to as 'convection vive.' Woschni's work was a major factor in the abrupt curtailment of insulated diesel engine work in continental Europe. Ricardo in the UK suggested that combustion should be reoptimized for the hot-wall effects of the insulated combustion chamber and showed under a narrow range of conditions fuel economy could be improved. The Department of Energy has supported thermal barrier coating development for diesel engine applications. In the Clean Diesel - 50 Percent Efficient (CD-50) engine for the year 2000, thermal barrier coatings will be used on piston crowns and possibly other components. The primary purpose of the

  11. Interface engineering for high performance graphene electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Dae Yool; Yang, Sang Yoon; Park, Hamin; Shin, Woo Cheol; Oh, Joong Gun; Cho, Byung Jin; Choi, Sung-Yool

    2015-06-01

    A decade after the discovery of graphene flakes, exfoliated from graphite, we have now secured large scale and high quality graphene film growth technology via a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. With the establishment of mass production of graphene using CVD, practical applications of graphene to electronic devices have gained an enormous amount of attention. However, several issues arise from the interfaces of graphene systems, such as damage/unintentional doping of graphene by the transfer process, the substrate effects on graphene, and poor dielectric formation on graphene due to its inert features, which result in degradation of both electrical performance and reliability in actual devices. The present paper provides a comprehensive review of the recent approaches to resolve these issues by interface engineering of graphene for high performance electronic devices. We deal with each interface that is encountered during the fabrication steps of graphene devices, from the graphene/metal growth substrate to graphene/high-k dielectrics, including the intermediate graphene/target substrate.

  12. Citation Analysis: A Case Study of Korean Scientists and Engineers in Electrical and Electronics Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieh, Hae-young

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated the citation patterns of publications by scientists and engineers in electrical and electronics engineering in Korea. Citation behavior of personnel in government, universities, and industry is compared; and citation patterns from articles in Korean and non-Korean publications are contrasted. (Contains 27…

  13. Engineering applications of heuristic multilevel optimization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.

    1989-01-01

    Some engineering applications of heuristic multilevel optimization methods are presented and the discussion focuses on the dependency matrix that indicates the relationship between problem functions and variables. Coordination of the subproblem optimizations is shown to be typically achieved through the use of exact or approximate sensitivity analysis. Areas for further development are identified.

  14. Engineering applications of heuristic multilevel optimization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.

    1988-01-01

    Some engineering applications of heuristic multilevel optimization methods are presented and the discussion focuses on the dependency matrix that indicates the relationship between problem functions and variables. Coordination of the subproblem optimizations is shown to be typically achieved through the use of exact or approximate sensitivity analysis. Areas for further development are identified.

  15. Tailored Carbon Nanotubes for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Veetil, Jithesh V.; Ye, Kaiming

    2008-01-01

    A decade of aggressive researches on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has paved way for extending these unique nanomaterials into a wide range of applications. In the relatively new arena of nanobiotechnology, a vast majority of applications are based on CNTs, ranging from miniaturized biosensors to organ regeneration. Nevertheless, the complexity of biological systems poses a significant challenge in developing CNT-based tissue engineering applications. This review focuses on the recent developments of CNT-based tissue engineering, where the interaction between living cells/tissues and the nanotubes have been transformed into a variety of novel techniques. This integration has already resulted in a revaluation of tissue engineering and organ regeneration techniques. Some of the new treatments that were not possible previously become reachable now. Because of the advent of surface chemistry, the CNT’s biocompatibility has been significantly improved, making it possible to serve as tissue scaffolding materials to enhance the organ regeneration. The superior mechanic strength and chemical inert also makes it ideal for blood compatible applications, especially for cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. The applications of CNTs in these cardiovascular surgeries led to a remarkable improvement in mechanical strength of implanted catheters and reduced thrombogenecity after surgery. Moreover, the functionalized CNTs have been extensively explored for in vivo targeted drug or gene delivery, which could potentially improve the efficiency of many cancer treatments. However, just like other nanomaterials, the cytotoxicity of CNTs has not been well established. Hence, more extensive cytotoxic studies are warranted while converting the hydrophobic CNTs into biocompatible nanomaterials. PMID:19496152

  16. Thermal barrier coatings application in diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbanks, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    Commercial use of thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines began in the mid 70's by Dr,. Ingard Kvernes at the Central Institute for Industrial Research in Oslo, Norway. Dr. Kvernes attributed attack on diesel engine valves and piston crowns encountered in marine diesel engines in Norwegian ships as hot-corrosion attributed to a reduced quality of residual fuel. His solution was to coat these components to reduce metal temperature below the threshold of aggressive hot-corrosion and also to provide protection. The Department of Energy has supported thermal barrier coating development for diesel engine applications. In the Clean Diesel - 50 Percent Efficient (CD-50) engine for the year 2000, thermal barrier coatings will be used on piston crowns and possibly other components. The primary purpose of the thermal barrier coatings will be to reduce thermal fatigue as the engine peak cylinder pressure will nearly be doubled. As the coatings result in higher available energy in the exhaust gas, efficiency gains are achieved through use of this energy by turbochargers, turbocompounding or thermoelectric generators.

  17. Space shuttle main engine computed tomography applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sporny, Richard F.

    1990-01-01

    For the past two years the potential applications of computed tomography to the fabrication and overhaul of the Space Shuttle Main Engine were evaluated. Application tests were performed at various government and manufacturer facilities with equipment produced by four different manufacturers. The hardware scanned varied in size and complexity from a small temperature sensor and turbine blades to an assembled heat exchanger and main injector oxidizer inlet manifold. The evaluation of capabilities included the ability to identify and locate internal flaws, measure the depth of surface cracks, measure wall thickness, compare manifold design contours to actual part contours, perform automatic dimensional inspections, generate 3D computer models of actual parts, and image the relationship of the details in a complex assembly. The capabilities evaluated, with the exception of measuring the depth of surface flaws, demonstrated the existing and potential ability to perform many beneficial Space Shuttle Main Engine applications.

  18. Applications of translation monitoring using electronic tacheometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obidowski, Ray M.; Teskey, William F.

    1994-03-01

    Monitoring the translations of points on structures and machinery is an important procedure in industrial engineering. Two low-cost translation monitoring systems using electronic tachometers have been developed and tested at the University of Calgary. The systems use both network and nonnetwork (direct) methods to measure relative point translations with submillimeter accuracy. The systems are simple and efficient, requiring only one observer using normal surveying instruments. Two case studies undertaken by the authors are described, demonstrating applications of the new monitoring systems. The first study is the measurement of thermal growth of a rotating gas turbine/compressor system during startup. The thermal movements were measured and found to be consistent with their expected behavior to a precision of 0.2 mm. The second study is the measurement of point displacements on a concrete structure and test frame during a load test at the University's Civil Engineering Structures Lab. The translations measured agree with the theoretical values from a finite element analysis.

  19. Combustion synthesis and engineering of nanoparticles for electronic, structural and superconductor applications. Annual progress report, December 1, 1992--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Stangle, G.C.; Amarakoon, V.R.W.; Schulze, W.A.

    1993-05-28

    Fully dense, nanocrystalline ceramic articles were prepared by the new nanofabrication process. The process consists of two steps: synthesis of ceramic nanoparticles and fabrication of dense, nanocrystalline ceramic parts. The synthesis step produced 10-nanometer-diameter crystallites, and is capable of being scaled up to kilogram/hour production rates. The fabrication step produced dense parts at significantly reduced sintering temperatures and times -- representing a factor of 10--100 reduction in process energy requirements. The process was demonstrated by producing ultrafine-grained yttria-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, an important material with a variety of energy-related applications (solid electrolytes, oxygen sensors, electrode materials, thermal barrier coatings, etc.). Results from this period clearly illustrate the capabilities of this energy-efficient and directly commercializable process for producing dense, nanocrystalline, multicomponent oxide ceramics.

  20. Combustion synthesis and engineering of nanoparticles for electronic, structural and superconductor applications. Annual progress report, December 1, 1992--August 19, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Stangle, G.C.; Amarakoon, V.R.W.; Schulze, W.A.

    1993-08-19

    Fully dense, nanocrystalline ceramic articles were prepared by a new nanofabrication process. The process consists of two steps: synthesis of ceramic nanoparticles and fabrication of dense, nanocrystalline ceramic parts. The synthesis step produced 10-nanometer-diameter crystallites, and is capable of being scaled up to kilogram/hour production rates. The fabrication step produced dense parts at significantly reduced sintering temperatures and times--representing a factor of 10--100 reduction in process energy requirements. Process was demonstrated by producing ultrafine-grained yttria-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, an important material with a variety of energy-related applications (e.g., solid electrolytes, oxygen sensors, electrode materials, thermal barrier coatings, etc.). Results from this period illustrate capabilities of this energy-efficient and directly commercializable process for producing dense, nanocrystalline, multicomponent oxide ceramics.

  1. Analog and Digital Electronics. A Study Guide of the Science and Engineering Technician Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, Vince; Greer, Marlin

    This study guide is part of an interdisciplinary curriculum entitled the Science and Engineering Technician (SET) Curriculum devised to provide basic information to train technicians in the use of electronic instruments and their application. The program of study integrates elements from the disciplines of chemistry, physics, mathematics,…

  2. Electronic Components, Transducers, and Basic Circuits. A Study Guide of the Science and Engineering Technician Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowery, Donald R.

    This study guide is part of a program of studies entitled the Science and Engineering Technician (SET) Curriculum developed for the purpose of training technicians in the use of electronic instruments and their applications. The program integrates elements from the disciplines of chemistry, physics, mathematics, mechanical technology, and…

  3. CFD applications in chemical propulsion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    The present research is aimed at developing analytical procedures for predicting the performance and stability characteristics of chemical propulsion engines. Specific emphasis is being placed on understanding the physical and chemical processes in the small engines that are used for applications such as spacecraft attitude control and drag make-up. The small thrust sizes of these engines lead to low nozzle Reynolds numbers with thick boundary layers which may even meet at the nozzle centerline. For this reason, the classical high Reynolds number procedures that are commonly used in the industry are inaccurate and of questionable utility for design. A complete analysis capability for the combined viscous and inviscid regions as well as for the subsonic, transonic, and supersonic portions of the flowfield is necessary to estimate performance levels and to enable tradeoff studies during design procedures.

  4. Tissue engineering applications of therapeutic cloning.

    PubMed

    Atala, Anthony; Koh, Chester J

    2004-01-01

    Few treatment options are available for patients suffering from diseased and injured organs because of a severe shortage of donor organs available for transplantation. Therapeutic cloning, where the nucleus from a donor cell is transferred into an enucleated oocyte in order to extract pluripotent embryonic stem cells, offers a potentially limitless source of cells for replacement therapy. Scientists in the field of tissue engineering apply the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and engineering to construct biological substitutes that will restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. The present chapter reviews recent advances that have occurred in therapeutic cloning and tissue engineering and describes applications of these new technologies that may offer novel therapies for patients with end-stage organ failure. PMID:15255761

  5. Electronic Structure Engineering of Cu2O Film/ZnO Nanorods Array All-Oxide p-n Heterostructure for Enhanced Photoelectrochemical Property and Self-powered Biosensing Application

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Zhuo; Yan, Xiaoqin; Wang, Yunfei; Bai, Zhiming; Liu, Yichong; Zhang, Zheng; Lin, Pei; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yuan, Haoge; Zhang, Xueji; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We have engineered the electronic structure at the interface between Cu2O and ZnO nanorods (NRs) array, through adjusting the carrier concentration of Cu2O. The electrodeposition of Cu2O at pH 11 acquired the highest carrier concentration, resulting in the largest interfacial electric field between Cu2O and ZnO, which finally led to the highest separation efficiency of photogenerated charge carriers. The optimized Cu2O/ZnO NRs array p-n heterostructures exhibited enhanced PEC performance, such as elevated photocurrent and photoconversion efficiency, as well as excellent sensing performance for the sensitive detection of glutathione (GSH) in PBS buffer even at applied bias of 0 V which made the device self-powered. Besides, the favorable selectivity, high reproducibility and extremely wide detection range, make such heterostructure a promising candidate for PEC biosensing applications, probably for the extended field of PEC water splitting or other solar photovoltaic beacons. PMID:25600940

  6. Electronic structure engineering of Cu2O film/ZnO nanorods array all-oxide p-n heterostructure for enhanced photoelectrochemical property and self-powered biosensing application.

    PubMed

    Kang, Zhuo; Yan, Xiaoqin; Wang, Yunfei; Bai, Zhiming; Liu, Yichong; Zhang, Zheng; Lin, Pei; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yuan, Haoge; Zhang, Xueji; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We have engineered the electronic structure at the interface between Cu2O and ZnO nanorods (NRs) array, through adjusting the carrier concentration of Cu2O. The electrodeposition of Cu2O at pH 11 acquired the highest carrier concentration, resulting in the largest interfacial electric field between Cu2O and ZnO, which finally led to the highest separation efficiency of photogenerated charge carriers. The optimized Cu2O/ZnO NRs array p-n heterostructures exhibited enhanced PEC performance, such as elevated photocurrent and photoconversion efficiency, as well as excellent sensing performance for the sensitive detection of glutathione (GSH) in PBS buffer even at applied bias of 0 V which made the device self-powered. Besides, the favorable selectivity, high reproducibility and extremely wide detection range, make such heterostructure a promising candidate for PEC biosensing applications, probably for the extended field of PEC water splitting or other solar photovoltaic beacons. PMID:25600940

  7. 40 CFR 94.221 - Application of good engineering judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Application of good engineering... § 94.221 Application of good engineering judgment. (a) The manufacturer shall exercise good engineering... the Administrator) a written description of the engineering judgment in question. (c)...

  8. 40 CFR 94.221 - Application of good engineering judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Application of good engineering... § 94.221 Application of good engineering judgment. (a) The manufacturer shall exercise good engineering... the Administrator) a written description of the engineering judgment in question. (c)...

  9. 40 CFR 94.221 - Application of good engineering judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Application of good engineering... § 94.221 Application of good engineering judgment. (a) The manufacturer shall exercise good engineering... the Administrator) a written description of the engineering judgment in question. (c)...

  10. 40 CFR 94.221 - Application of good engineering judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Application of good engineering... § 94.221 Application of good engineering judgment. (a) The manufacturer shall exercise good engineering... the Administrator) a written description of the engineering judgment in question. (c)...

  11. 40 CFR 94.221 - Application of good engineering judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Application of good engineering... § 94.221 Application of good engineering judgment. (a) The manufacturer shall exercise good engineering... the Administrator) a written description of the engineering judgment in question. (c)...

  12. Genetic engineering strategies for environmental applications.

    PubMed

    de Lorenzo, V

    1992-06-01

    Environmental applications of genetically engineered microorganisms are currently hampered not only by legal regulations restricting their release, but also by the frequent dearth of adequate genetic tools for their construction in the laboratory. Recent approaches to strain development include the use of non-antibiotic markers as selection determinants, the use of transposon-vectors for the permanent acquisition of recombinant genes, and the utilization of expression devices based on promoters from promiscuous plasmids and biodegradative pathway genes. PMID:1369388

  13. Palm Power Free-Piston Stirling Engine Control Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiter, Douglas E.; Holliday, Ezekiel

    2007-01-01

    A prototype 35We, JP-8 fueled, soldier-wearable power system for the DARPA Palm Power program has been developed and tested by Sunpower. A hermetically-sealed 42We Sunpower Free-Piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) with integral linear alternator is the prime mover for this system. To maximize system efficiency over a broad range of output power, a non-dissipative, highly efficient electronic control system which modulates engine output power by varying piston stroke and converts the AC output voltage of the FPSE into 28Vdc for the Palm Power end user, has been designed and demonstrated as an integral component of the Palm Power system. This paper reviews the current status and progress made in developing the control electronics for the Palm Power system, in addition to describing the operation and demonstrated performance of the engine controller in the context of the current JP-8 fueled Palm Power system.

  14. Engineering noble metal nanomaterials for environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingguo; Zhao, Tingting; Chen, Tiankai; Liu, Yanbiao; Ong, Choon Nam; Xie, Jianping

    2015-04-01

    Besides being valuable assets in our daily lives, noble metals (namely, gold, silver, and platinum) also feature many intriguing physical and chemical properties when their sizes are reduced to the nano- or even subnano-scale; such assets may significantly increase the values of the noble metals as functional materials for tackling important societal issues related to human health and the environment. Among which, designing/engineering of noble metal nanomaterials (NMNs) to address challenging issues in the environment has attracted recent interest in the community. In general, the use of NMNs for environmental applications is highly dependent on the physical and chemical properties of NMNs. Such properties can be readily controlled by tailoring the attributes of NMNs, including their size, shape, composition, and surface. In this feature article, we discuss recent progress in the rational design and engineering of NMNs with particular focus on their applications in the field of environmental sensing and catalysis. The development of functional NMNs for environmental applications is highly interdisciplinary, which requires concerted efforts from the communities of materials science, chemistry, engineering, and environmental science.

  15. Engineering noble metal nanomaterials for environmental applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingguo; Zhao, Tingting; Chen, Tiankai; Liu, Yanbiao; Ong, Choon Nam; Xie, Jianping

    2015-05-01

    Besides being valuable assets in our daily lives, noble metals (namely, gold, silver, and platinum) also feature many intriguing physical and chemical properties when their sizes are reduced to the nano- or even subnano-scale; such assets may significantly increase the values of the noble metals as functional materials for tackling important societal issues related to human health and the environment. Among which, designing/engineering of noble metal nanomaterials (NMNs) to address challenging issues in the environment has attracted recent interest in the community. In general, the use of NMNs for environmental applications is highly dependent on the physical and chemical properties of NMNs. Such properties can be readily controlled by tailoring the attributes of NMNs, including their size, shape, composition, and surface. In this feature article, we discuss recent progress in the rational design and engineering of NMNs with particular focus on their applications in the field of environmental sensing and catalysis. The development of functional NMNs for environmental applications is highly interdisciplinary, which requires concerted efforts from the communities of materials science, chemistry, engineering, and environmental science. PMID:25866322

  16. Experimental realization of a Szilard engine with a single electron

    PubMed Central

    Koski, Jonne V.; Maisi, Ville F.; Pekola, Jukka P.; Averin, Dmitri V.

    2014-01-01

    The most succinct manifestation of the second law of thermodynamics is the limitation imposed by the Landauer principle on the amount of heat a Maxwell demon (MD) can convert into free energy per single bit of information obtained in a measurement. We propose and realize an electronic MD based on a single-electron box operated as a Szilard engine, where kBT ln 2 of heat is extracted from the reservoir at temperature T per one bit of created information. The information is encoded in the position of an extra electron in the box. PMID:25201966

  17. Experimental realization of a Szilard engine with a single electron.

    PubMed

    Koski, Jonne V; Maisi, Ville F; Pekola, Jukka P; Averin, Dmitri V

    2014-09-23

    The most succinct manifestation of the second law of thermodynamics is the limitation imposed by the Landauer principle on the amount of heat a Maxwell demon (MD) can convert into free energy per single bit of information obtained in a measurement. We propose and realize an electronic MD based on a single-electron box operated as a Szilard engine, where kBT ln 2 of heat is extracted from the reservoir at temperature T per one bit of created information. The information is encoded in the position of an extra electron in the box. PMID:25201966

  18. Combinatorial approaches for inverse metabolic engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Skretas, Georgios; Kolisis, Fragiskos N.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional metabolic engineering analyzes biosynthetic and physiological pathways, identifies bottlenecks, and makes targeted genetic modifications with the ultimate goal of increasing the production of high-value products in living cells. Such efforts have led to the development of a variety of organisms with industrially relevant properties. However, there are a number of cellular phenotypes important for research and the industry for which the rational selection of cellular targets for modification is not easy or possible. In these cases, strain engineering can be alternatively carried out using “inverse metabolic engineering”, an approach that first generates genetic diversity by subjecting a population of cells to a particular mutagenic process, and then utilizes genetic screens or selections to identify the clones exhibiting the desired phenotype. Given the availability of an appropriate screen for a particular property, the success of inverse metabolic engineering efforts usually depends on the level and quality of genetic diversity which can be generated. Here, we review classic and recently developed combinatorial approaches for creating such genetic diversity and discuss the use of these methodologies in inverse metabolic engineering applications. PMID:24688681

  19. Application of physics engines in virtual worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Mark; Taylor, Tim

    2002-03-01

    Dynamic virtual worlds potentially can provide a much richer and more enjoyable experience than static ones. To realize such worlds, three approaches are commonly used. The first of these, and still widely applied, involves importing traditional animations from a modeling system such as 3D Studio Max. This approach is therefore limited to predefined animation scripts or combinations/blends thereof. The second approach involves the integration of some specific-purpose simulation code, such as car dynamics, and is thus generally limited to one (class of) application(s). The third approach involves the use of general-purpose physics engines, which promise to enable a range of compelling dynamic virtual worlds and to considerably speed up development. By far the largest market today for real-time simulation is computer games, revenues exceeding those of the movie industry. Traditionally, the simulation is produced by game developers in-house for specific titles. However, off-the-shelf middleware physics engines are now available for use in games and related domains. In this paper, we report on our experiences of using middleware physics engines to create a virtual world as an interactive experience, and an advanced scenario where artificial life techniques generate controllers for physically modeled characters.

  20. Human progenitor cells for bone engineering applications.

    PubMed

    de Peppo, G M; Thomsen, P; Karlsson, C; Strehl, R; Lindahl, A; Hyllner, J

    2013-06-01

    In this report, the authors review the human skeleton and the increasing burden of bone deficiencies, the limitations encountered with the current treatments and the opportunities provided by the emerging field of cell-based bone engineering. Special emphasis is placed on different sources of human progenitor cells, as well as their pros and cons in relation to their utilization for the large-scale construction of functional bone-engineered substitutes for clinical applications. It is concluded that, human pluripotent stem cells represent a valuable source for the derivation of progenitor cells, which combine the advantages of both embryonic and adult stem cells, and indeed display high potential for the construction of functional substitutes for bone replacement therapies. PMID:23642054

  1. Fundamentals handbook of electrical and computer engineering. Volume 1 Circuits fields and electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S. S. L.

    State of the art technology in circuits, fields, and electronics is discussed. The principles and applications of these technologies to industry, digital processing, microwave semiconductors, and computer-aided design are explained. Important concepts and methodologies in mathematics and physics are reviewed, and basic engineering sciences and associated design methods are dealt with, including: circuit theory and the design of magnetic circuits and active filter synthesis; digital signal processing, including FIR and IIR digital filter design; transmission lines, electromagnetic wave propagation and surface acoustic wave devices. Also considered are: electronics technologies, including power electronics, microwave semiconductors, GaAs devices, and magnetic bubble memories; digital circuits and logic design.

  2. Applications of fiber optic sensors in advanced engine controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitka, Edward F., II

    1989-06-01

    Measured parameters, operating ranges, accuracy requirements, environmental constraints, and speed of response of fiber optic sensors are identified for three categories of engines. The three engine categories are: (1) current turbojet, turbofan, and turboprop engines; (2) next generation and turbofan engines to be built in the 1990s; and (3) advanced supersonic/hypersonic engines represented by ramjet, scramjet, and air-turbo-ramjet concepts. The key development and test efforts in engine control applications of fiber optic sensors are discussed.

  3. The Applications Of Fibre Optics In Gas Turbine Engine Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davinson, Ian

    1984-08-01

    Instrumentation in Gas Turbines must operate in extremely harsh environments. Electro-optical methods are being increasingly used to measure such variables as displacement, temperature and gas flow and fibre optics are often required to enable sensitive electronic components to be placed remote from the hostile region. This paper reviews applications of fibre optics in Rolls-Royce up to the present. In addition the case for using fibre optic sensors for the measurement of other parameters in future will be presented, along with a discussion of the prospects for fibre optic data transmission on the next generation of digitally controlled engines.

  4. Real cases study through computer applications for futures Agricultural Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moratiel, R.; Durán, J. M.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2010-05-01

    One of the huge concerns on the higher engineer education is the lag of real cases study that the future professionals need in the work and corporation market. This concern was reflected in Bologna higher education system including recommendations in this respect. The knowhow as why this or other methodology is one of the keys to resolve this problem. In the last courses given in Department of Crop Production, at the Agronomy Engineer School of Madrid (Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Agrónomos, UPM) we have developed more than one hundred applications in Microsoft Excel®. Our aim was to show different real scenarios which the future Agronomic Engineers can be found in their professional life and with items related to crop production field. In order to achieve our target, each application in Excel presents a file text in which is explained the theoretical concepts and the objectives, as well as some resources used from Excel syntax. In this way, the student can understand and use of such application, even they can modify and customize it for a real case presented in their context and/or master project. This electronic monograph gives an answer to the need to manage data in several real scenarios showed in lectures, calculus resolution, information analysis and manage worksheets in a professional and student level.

  5. Transferable and flexible thin film devices for engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutyala, Madhu Santosh K.; Zhou, Jingzhou; Li, Xiaochun

    2014-05-01

    Thin film devices can be of significance for manufacturing, energy conversion systems, solid state electronics, wireless applications, etc. However, these thin film sensors/devices are normally fabricated on rigid silicon substrates, thus neither flexible nor transferrable for engineering applications. This paper reports an innovative approach to transfer polyimide (PI) embedded thin film devices, which were fabricated on glass, to thin metal foils. Thin film thermocouples (TFTCs) were fabricated on a thin PI film, which was spin coated and cured on a glass substrate. Another layer of PI film was then spin coated again on TFTC/PI and cured to obtain the embedded TFTCs. Assisted by oxygen plasma surface coarsening of the PI film on the glass substrate, the PI embedded TFTC was successfully transferred from the glass substrate to a flexible copper foil. To demonstrate the functionality of the flexible embedded thin film sensors, they were transferred to the sonotrode tip of an ultrasonic metal welding machine for in situ process monitoring. The dynamic temperatures near the sonotrode tip were effectively measured under various ultrasonic vibration amplitudes. This technique of transferring polymer embedded electronic devices onto metal foils yield great potentials for numerous engineering applications.

  6. Ceramic applications in the advanced Stirling automotive engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomazic, W. A.; Cairelli, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    The ideal cycle, its application to a practical machine, and the specific advantages of high efficiency, low emissions, multi-fuel capability, and low noise of the stirling engine are discussed. Certain portions of the Stirling engine must operate continuously at high temperature. Ceramics offer the potential of cost reduction and efficiency improvement for advanced engine applications. Potential applications for ceramics in Stirling engines, and some of the special problems pertinent to using ceramics in the Stirling engine are described. The research and technology program in ceramics which is planned to support the development of advanced Stirling engines is outlined.

  7. Tissue engineering skeletal muscle for orthopaedic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payumo, Francis C.; Kim, Hyun D.; Sherling, Michael A.; Smith, Lee P.; Powell, Courtney; Wang, Xiao; Keeping, Hugh S.; Valentini, Robert F.; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    With current technology, tissue-engineered skeletal muscle analogues (bioartificial muscles) generate too little active force to be clinically useful in orthopaedic applications. They have been engineered genetically with numerous transgenes (growth hormone, insulinlike growth factor-1, erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor), and have been shown to deliver these therapeutic proteins either locally or systemically for months in vivo. Bone morphogenetic proteins belonging to the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily are osteoinductive molecules that drive the differentiation pathway of mesenchymal cells toward the chondroblastic or osteoblastic lineage, and stimulate bone formation in vivo. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells endogenously expressing bone morphogenetic proteins might serve as a vehicle for systemic bone morphogenetic protein delivery in vivo, proliferating skeletal myoblasts (C2C12) were transduced with a replication defective retrovirus containing the gene for recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6 (C2BMP-6). The C2BMP-6 cells constitutively expressed recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6 and synthesized bioactive recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6, based on increased alkaline phosphatase activity in coincubated mesenchymal cells. C2BMP-6 cells did not secrete soluble, bioactive recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6, but retained the bioactivity in the cell layer. Therefore, genetically-engineered skeletal muscle cells might serve as a platform for long-term delivery of osteoinductive bone morphogenetic proteins locally.

  8. Application of polarization OCT in tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Ahearne, Mark; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Hu, Bin; Hampson, Karen; El Haj, Alicia J.

    2008-02-01

    For tissue engineering of load-bearing tissues, such as bone, tendon, cartilage, and cornea, it is critical to generate a highly organized extracellular matrix. The major component of the matrix in these tissues is collagen, which usually forms a highly hierarchical structure with increasing scale from fibril to fiber bundles. These bundles are ordered into a 3D network to withstand forces such as tensile, compressive or shear. To induce the formation of organized matrix and create a mimic body environment for tissue engineering, in particular, tendon tissue engineering, we have fabricated scaffolds with features to support the formation of uniaxially orientated collagen bundles. In addition, mechanical stimuli were applied to stimulate tissue formation and matrix organization. In parallel, we seek a nondestructive tool to monitor the changes within the constructs in response to these external stimulations. Polarizationsensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) is a non-destructive technique that provides functional imaging, and possesses the ability to assess in depth the organization of tissue. In this way, an engineered tissue construct can be monitored on-line, and correlated with the application of different stimuli by PSOCT. We have constructed a PSOCT using a superluminescent diode (FWHM 52nm) in this study and produced two types of tendon constructs. The matrix structural evolution under different mechanical stimulation has been evaluated by the PSOCT. The results in this study demonstrate that PSOCT was a powerful tool enabling us to monitor non-destructively and real time the progressive changes in matrix organization and assess the impact of various stimuli on tissue orientation and growth.

  9. Applications in Energy, Optics and Electronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Robert; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the applications of thin films in energy, optics and electronics. The use of thin-film technologies for heat mirrors, anti-reflection coatings, interference filters, solar cells, and metal contacts is included. (HM)

  10. Opto-Electronic Oscillator and its Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1996-01-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental results of a new class of microwave oscillators called opto-electronic oscillators (OEO). We discuss techniques of achieving high stability single mode operation and demonstrate the applications of OEO in photonic communication systems.

  11. Ion engine auxiliary propulsion applications and integration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zafran, S. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    The benefits derived from application of the 8-cm mercury electron bombardment ion thruster were assessed. Two specific spacecraft missions were studied. A thruster was tested to provide additional needed information on its efflux characteristics and interactive effects. A Users Manual was then prepared describing how to integrate the thruster for auxiliary propulsion on geosynchronous satellites. By incorporating ion engines on an advanced communications mission, the weight available for added payload increases by about 82 kg (181 lb) for a 100 kg (2200 lb) satellite which otherwise uses electrothermal hydrazine. Ion engines can be integrated into a high performance propulsion module that is compatible with the multimission modular spacecraft and can be used for both geosynchronous and low earth orbit applications. The low disturbance torques introduced by the ion engines permit accurate spacecraft pointing with the payload in operation during thrusting periods. The feasibility of using the thruster's neutralizer assembly for neutralization of differentially charged spacecraft surfaces at geosynchronous altitude was demonstrated during the testing program.

  12. Multifunctional, flexible electronic systems based on engineered nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Hyunhyub; Kapadia, Rehan; Takei, Kuniharu; Takahashi, Toshitake; Zhang, Xiaobo; Javey, Ali

    2012-08-01

    The development of flexible electronic systems has been extensively researched in recent years, with the goal of expanding the potential scope and market of modern electronic devices in the areas of computation, communications, displays, sensing and energy. Uniquely, the use of soft polymeric substrates enables the incorporation of advanced features beyond mechanical bendability and stretchability. In this paper, we describe several functionalities which can be achieved using engineered nanostructured materials. In particular, reversible binding, self-cleaning, antireflective and shape-reconfigurable properties are introduced for the realization of multifunctional, flexible electronic devices. Examples of flexible systems capable of spatial mapping and/or responding to external stimuli are also presented as a new class of user-interactive devices.

  13. 76 FR 55293 - Special Conditions: Diamond Aircraft Industries, Model DA-40NG; Electronic Engine Control (EEC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... cantilever low wing, T-tail airplane with the Austro Engine GmbH model E4 diesel engine and an increased..., Model DA-40NG; Electronic Engine Control (EEC) System AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... design feature(s) associated with an electronic engine control (EEC), also known as a Full...

  14. Electron accelerators: History, applications, and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, M. N.; Silva, T. F.

    2014-02-01

    This paper will present an outlook on sources of radiation, focusing on electron accelerators. We will review advances that were important for the development of particle accelerators, concentrating on those that led to modern electron accelerators. Electron accelerators are multipurpose machines that deliver beams with energies spanning five orders of magnitude, and are used in applications that range from fundamental studies of particle interactions to cross-linking polymer chains in industrial plants. Each accelerator type presents specific characteristics that make it more suitable for certain applications. Our work will focus on radiation sources for medical applications, dominated by electron linacs (linear accelerators), and those used for research, field where electron rings dominate. We will outline the main technological advances that occurred in the past decades, which made possible the construction of machines fit for clinical environments. Their compactness, efficiency and reliability have been key to their acceptance in clinical applications. This outline will include advances that allowed for the construction of brighter synchrotron light sources, where the relevant beam characteristics are good optical quality and high beam current. The development of insertion devices will also be discussed, as well the development of Free Electron Lasers (FEL). We conclude the review with an outline of the new developments of electron accelerators and the expectations for Energy Recovery Linacs.

  15. Optical engine initiation: multiple compartment applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Jeffrey H.

    2009-05-01

    Modern day propulsion systems are used in aerospace applications for different purposes. The aerospace industry typically requires propulsion systems to operate in a rocket mode in order to drive large boost vehicles. The defense industry generally requires propulsion systems to operate in an air-breathing mode in order to drive missiles. A mixed system could use an air-breathing first stage and a rocket-mode upper stage for space access. Thus, propulsion systems can be used for high mass payloads and where the payload is dominated by the fuel/oxidizer mass being used by the propulsion system. The pulse detonation wave engine (PDWE) uses an alternative type of detonation cycle to achieve the same propulsion results. The primary component of the PDWE is the combustion chamber (or detonation tube). The PDWE represents an attractive propulsion source since its engine cycle is thermodynamically closest to that of a constant volume reaction. This characteristic leads to the inference that a maximum of the potential energy of the PDWE is put into thrust and not into flow work. Consequently, the volume must be increased. The technical community has increasingly adopted the alternative choice of increasing total volume by designing the engine to include a set of banks of smaller combustion chambers. This technique increases the complexity of the ignition subsystem because the inter-chamber timing must be considered. Current approaches to igniting the PDWE have involved separate shock or blast wave initiators and chemical additives designed to enhance detonatibility. An optical ignition subsystem generates a series of optical pulses, where the optical pulses ignite the fuel/oxidizer mixture such that the chambers detonate in a desired order. The detonation system also has an optical transport subsystem for transporting the optical pulses from the optical ignition subsystem to the chambers. The use of optical ignition and transport provides a non-toxic, small, lightweight

  16. Evaluation of heat engine for hybrid vehicle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, H. W.

    1984-01-01

    The status of ongoing heat-engine developments, including spark-ignition, compression-ignition, internal-combustion, and external-combustion engines is presented. The potential of engine concepts under consideration for hybrid vehicle use is evaluated, using self-imposed criteria for selection. The deficiencies of the engines currently being evaluated in hybrid vehicles are discussed. Focus is on recent research with two-stroke, rotary, and free-piston engines. It is concluded that these engine concepts have the most promising potential for future application in hybrid vehicles. Recommendations are made for analysis and experimentation to evaluate stop-start and transient emission behavior of recommended engine concepts.

  17. Surface Engineering of Graphene-Based Nanomaterials for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Graphene-based nanomaterials have attracted tremendous interest over the past decade due to their unique electronic, optical, mechanical, and chemical properties. However, the biomedical applications of these intriguing nanomaterials are still limited due to their suboptimal solubility/biocompatibility, potential toxicity, and difficulties in achieving active tumor targeting, just to name a few. In this Topical Review, we will discuss in detail the important role of surface engineering (i.e., bioconjugation) in improving the in vitro/in vivo stability and enriching the functionality of graphene-based nanomaterials, which can enable single/multimodality imaging (e.g., optical imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and therapy (e.g., photothermal therapy, photodynamic therapy, and drug/gene delivery) of cancer. Current challenges and future research directions are also discussed and we believe that graphene-based nanomaterials are attractive nanoplatforms for a broad array of future biomedical applications. PMID:25117569

  18. Active IR-applications in civil engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggenhauser, H.

    2002-06-01

    Applications of IR-thermography in civil engineering are not limited to the identification of heat losses in building envelopes. As it is well known from other areas of non-destructive testing, active IR-thermographic methods such as cooling down or lock-in thermography improves the results in many investigations. In civil engineering these techniques have not been used widely. Mostly thermography is used in a quasi-static manner. The interpretation of moisture measurements with thermography on surfaces can be very difficult due to several overlapping effects: emissivity changes due to composition, heat transfer through wet sections of the specimen, cooling through air flow or reflected spurious radiation sources. These effects can be reduced by selectively measuring the reflection in two wavelength windows, one on an absorption band of water and another in a reference band and then combining the results in a moisture index image. Cooling down thermography can be used to identify subsurface structural deficiencies. For building materials like concrete these measurements are performed on a much longer time scale than in flash lamp experiments. A quantitative analysis of the full cooling down process over several minutes can reliably identify defects at different depths. Experiments at BAM have shown, that active thermography is capabale of identifying structural deficiencies or moist areas in building materials much more reliable than quasi-static thermography.

  19. Neural network application to comprehensive engine diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marko, Kenneth A.

    1994-01-01

    We have previously reported on the use of neural networks for detection and identification of faults in complex microprocessor controlled powertrain systems. The data analyzed in those studies consisted of the full spectrum of signals passing between the engine and the real-time microprocessor controller. The specific task of the classification system was to classify system operation as nominal or abnormal and to identify the fault present. The primary concern in earlier work was the identification of faults, in sensors or actuators in the powertrain system as it was exercised over its full operating range. The use of data from a variety of sources, each contributing some potentially useful information to the classification task, is commonly referred to as sensor fusion and typifies the type of problems successfully addressed using neural networks. In this work we explore the application of neural networks to a different diagnostic problem, the diagnosis of faults in newly manufactured engines and the utility of neural networks for process control.

  20. Engineering application based on fuzzy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pislaru, Marius; Avasilcai, Silvia; Trandabat, Alexandru

    2011-12-01

    The article focus on an application of chemical engineering. A fuzzy modeling methodology designed to determinate two relevant characteristics of a chemical compound (ferrocenylsiloxane polyamide) for self-assembling - surface tension and maximum UV absorbance measured as temperature and concentration functions. One of the most important parts of a fuzzy rule-based inference system for the polyamide solution characteristics determinations is that it allows to interpret the knowledge contained in the model and also to improve it with a-priori knowledge. The results obtained through proposed method are highly accurate and its can be optimized by utilizing the available information during the modeling process. The results showed that it is feasible in theory and reliable on calculation applying Mamdani fuzzy inference system to the estimation of optical and surface properties of a polyamide solution.

  1. Engineering application based on fuzzy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pislaru, Marius; Avasilcai, Silvia; Trandabat, Alexandru

    2012-01-01

    The article focus on an application of chemical engineering. A fuzzy modeling methodology designed to determinate two relevant characteristics of a chemical compound (ferrocenylsiloxane polyamide) for self-assembling - surface tension and maximum UV absorbance measured as temperature and concentration functions. One of the most important parts of a fuzzy rule-based inference system for the polyamide solution characteristics determinations is that it allows to interpret the knowledge contained in the model and also to improve it with a-priori knowledge. The results obtained through proposed method are highly accurate and its can be optimized by utilizing the available information during the modeling process. The results showed that it is feasible in theory and reliable on calculation applying Mamdani fuzzy inference system to the estimation of optical and surface properties of a polyamide solution.

  2. Hardwiring microbes via direct interspecies electron transfer: mechanisms and applications.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qiwen; Call, Douglas F

    2016-08-10

    Multicellular microbial communities are important catalysts in engineered systems designed to treat wastewater, remediate contaminated sediments, and produce energy from biomass. Understanding the interspecies interactions within them is therefore essential to design effective processes. The flow of electrons within these communities is especially important in the determination of reaction possibilities (thermodynamics) and rates (kinetics). Conventional models of electron transfer incorporate the diffusion of metabolites generated by one organism and consumed by a second, frequently referred to as mediated interspecies electron transfer (MIET). Evidence has emerged in the last decade that another method, called direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET), may occur between organisms or in conjunction with electrically conductive materials. Recent research has suggested that DIET can be stimulated in engineered systems to improve desired treatment goals and energy recovery in systems such as anaerobic digesters and microbial electrochemical technologies. In this review, we summarize the latest understanding of DIET mechanisms, the associated microorganisms, and the underlying thermodynamics. We also critically examine approaches to stimulate DIET in engineered systems and assess their effectiveness. We find that in most cases attempts to promote DIET in mixed culture systems do not yield the improvements expected based on defined culture studies. Uncertainties of other processes that may be co-occurring in real systems, such as contaminant sorption and biofilm promotion, need to be further investigated. We conclude by identifying areas of future research related to DIET and its application in biological treatment processes. PMID:27349520

  3. Speed Control of General Purpose Engine with Electronic Governor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawut, Umerujan; Tohti, Gheyret; Takigawa, Buso; Tsuji, Teruo

    This paper presents a general purpose engine speed control system with an electronic governor in order to improve the current system with a mechanical governor which shows unstable characteristics by change of mecanical friction or A/F ratio (Air/Fuel ratio). For the control system above, there are problems that the feedback signal is only a crank angle because of cost and the controlled object is a general purpose engine which is strongly nonlinear. In order to overcome these problems, the system model is shown for the dynamic estimation of the amount of air flow and the robust controller is designed. That is, the proposed system includes the robust sliding-mode controller by the feedback signal of only a crank angle where Genetic Algorithm is applied for the controller design. The simulation and the experiments by MATLAB/Simulink are performed to show the effectiveness of our proposal.

  4. Materials for Stretchable Electronics - Electronic Eyeballs, Brain Monitors and Other Applications

    ScienceCinema

    Rogers, John A. [University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign, Illinois, United States

    2010-01-08

    Electronic circuits that involve transistors and related components on thin plastic sheets or rubber slabs offer mechanical properties (e.g. bendability, stretchability) and other features (e.g. lightweight, rugged construction) which cannot be easily achieved with technologies that use rigid, fragile semiconductor wafer or glass substrates.  Device examples include personal or structural health monitors and electronic eye imagers, in which the electronics must conform to complex curvilinear shapes or flex/stretch during use.  Our recent work accomplishes these technology outcomes by use of single crystal inorganic nanomaterials in ?wavy? buckled configurations on elastomeric supports.  This talk will describe key fundamental materials and mechanics aspects of these approaches, as well as engineering features of their use in individual transistors, photodiodes and integrated circuits.  Cardiac and brain monitoring devices provide examples of application in biomedicine; hemispherical electronic eye cameras illustrate new capacities for bio-inspired device design.

  5. Engineering β-sheet peptide assemblies for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiqiang; Cai, Zheng; Chen, Qiling; Liu, Menghua; Ye, Ling; Ren, Jiaoyan; Liao, Wenzhen; Liu, Shuwen

    2016-02-23

    Hydrogels have been widely studied in various biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering, cell culture, immunotherapy and vaccines, and drug delivery. Peptide-based nanofibers represent a promising new strategy for current drug delivery approaches and cell carriers for tissue engineering. This review focuses on the recent advances in the use of self-assembling engineered β-sheet peptide assemblies for biomedical applications. The applications of peptide nanofibers in biomedical fields, such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, immunotherapy, and vaccines, are highlighted. The current challenges and future perspectives for self-assembling peptide nanofibers in biomedical applications are discussed. PMID:26700207

  6. JPRS report: Science and technology. USSR: Electronics and electrical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-02-01

    This is a compilation of translated articles from Russian publications. The articles are presented under several general classifications. They are as follow: Broadcasting, Consumer Electronics; Antennas, Propagation; Circuits, Systems; Transportation; Industrial Electronics, Control Instrumentation; and Power Engineering. A representative title from each category is as follows: Computer aided physical modeling and design of VLSI matrix circuit topology; Experimental results of studies of artificial ionospheric turbulence; Algorithm for estimating spatial distribution of velocities in radar watch systems; Principles of constructing comprehensive system for computer aided design of railroad automation and remote control; Automated setting algorithm for the Remmikont R-130 microprocessor controller; and Giant magnetostriction: new possibilities for building electric high torque precision motors and drives.

  7. Electronic and photonic power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Walko, R.J.; Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.; Reed, S.T.; Renschler, C.L. ); Shepodd, T.J. ); Ellefson, R.E.; Gill, J.T. ); Leonard, L.E. )

    1990-01-01

    Efficient conversion of radioactive decay to electrical power has been the goal of a number of past research efforts. One of these was the Elgin-Kidde nuclear battery. In this concept promethium-147 was used as a beta source which was then mixed with a phosphor to produce a radioluminescent (RL) source of light. The light source was coupled to silicon photovoltaic converters to create electricity. This photoelectric approach is being revisited using tritium based solid state compounds and advanced gas concepts to produce RL light sources being disclosed at this conference. Efficient conversion of the RL light energy to electrical energy imposes certain requirements on the semiconductor converter. These requirements will be discussed. Projections of power source electrical and physical characteristics will be presented based on reasonable design parameter assumptions. The words Power Supply'' usually evoke a vision of a rotating machine or chemical battery. However, today's technology is making increasing use of photonics, where information and even power can be moved through optical fibers. Brighter volumetric RL light sources open a whole new range of photonics-based applications, while solid state tritiated compounds provide the foundation for improved mechanical adaptability and safety. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. 2D electronic materials for army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Terrance; Perconti, Philip

    2015-05-01

    The record electronic properties achieved in monolayer graphene and related 2D materials such as molybdenum disulfide and hexagonal boron nitride show promise for revolutionary high-speed and low-power electronic devices. Heterogeneous 2D-stacked materials may create enabling technology for future communication and computation applications to meet soldier requirements. For instance, transparent, flexible and even wearable systems may become feasible. With soldier and squad level electronic power demands increasing, the Army is committed to developing and harnessing graphene-like 2D materials for compact low size-weight-and-power-cost (SWAP-C) systems. This paper will review developments in 2D electronic materials at the Army Research Laboratory over the last five years and discuss directions for future army applications.

  9. The Application of Tissue Engineering Procedures to Repair the Larynx

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringel, Robert L.; Kahane, Joel C.; Hillsamer, Peter J.; Lee, Annie S.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2006-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering/regenerative medicine combines the quantitative principles of engineering with the principles of the life sciences toward the goal of reconstituting structurally and functionally normal tissues and organs. There has been relatively little application of tissue engineering efforts toward the organs of speech, voice,…

  10. Applications of Electron Linear Induction Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westenskow*, Glen; Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    Linear Induction Accelerators (LIAs) can readily produce intense electron beams. For example, the ATA accelerator produced a 500 GW beam and the LIU-30 a 4 TW beam (see Chap. 2). Since the induction accelerator concept was proposed in the late 1950s [1, 2], there have been many proposed schemes to convert the beam power to other forms. Categories of applications that have been demonstrated for electron LIAs include:

  11. CMC Technology Advancements for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    CMC research at NASA Glenn is focused on aircraft propulsion applications. The objective is to enable reduced engine emissions and fuel consumption for more environmentally friendly aircraft. Engine system studies show that incorporation of ceramic composites into turbine engines will enable significant reductions in emissions and fuel burn due to increased engine efficiency resulting from reduced cooling requirements for hot section components. This presentation will describe recent progress and challenges in developing fiber and matrix constituents for 2700 F CMC turbine applications. In addition, ongoing research in the development of durable environmental barrier coatings, ceramic joining integration technologies and life prediction methods for CMC engine components will be reviewed.

  12. Advanced materials for aircraft engine applications.

    PubMed

    Backman, D G; Williams, J C

    1992-02-28

    A review of advances for aircraft engine structural materials and processes is presented. Improved materials, such as superalloys, and the processes for making turbine disks and blades have had a major impact on the capability of modern gas turbine engines. New structural materials, notably composites and intermetallic materials, are emerging that will eventually further enhance engine performance, reduce engine weight, and thereby enable new aircraft systems. In the future, successful aerospace manufacturers will combine product design and materials excellence with improved manufacturing methods to increase production efficiency, enhance product quality, and decrease the engine development cycle time. PMID:17817782

  13. Electron Beam Scanning in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongen, Yves; Herer, Arnold

    1996-05-01

    Scanned electron beams are used within many industries for applications such as sterilization of medical disposables, crosslinking of wire and cables insulating jackets, polymerization and degradation of resins and biomaterials, modification of semiconductors, coloration of gemstones and glasses, removal of oxides from coal plant flue gasses, and the curing of advanced composites and other molded forms. X-rays generated from scanned electron beams make yet other applications, such as food irradiation, viable. Typical accelerators for these applications range in beam energy from 0.5MeV to 10 MeV, with beam powers between 5 to 500kW and scanning widths between 20 and 300 cm. Since precise control of dose delivery is required in many of these applications, the integration of beam characteristics, product conveyance, and beam scanning mechanisms must be well understood and optimized. Fundamental issues and some case examples are presented.

  14. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Janet; Hull, David; Gorican, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) are of significant interest to the scientific and technical communities for many of the same reasons that carbon nanotubes (CNT) have attracted wide attention. Both materials have potentially unique and important properties for structural and electronic applications. However of even more consequence than their similarities may be the complementary differences between carbon and boron nitride nanotubes While BNNT possess a very high modulus similar to CNT, they also possess superior chemical and thermal stability. Additionally, BNNT have more uniform electronic properties, with a uniform band gap of 5.5 eV while CNT vary from semi-conductive to highly conductive behavior. Boron nitride nanotubes have been synthesized both in the literature and at NASA Glenn Research Center, by a variety of methods such as chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge and reactive milling. Consistent large scale production of a reliable product has proven difficult. Progress in the reproducible synthesis of 1-2 gram sized batches of boron nitride nanotubes will be discussed as well as potential uses for this unique material.

  15. 2003 SNL ASCI applications software quality engineering assessment report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Ellis, Molly A.; Williamson, Charles Michael; Bonano, Lora A.

    2004-02-01

    This document describes the 2003 SNL ASCI Software Quality Engineering (SQE) assessment of twenty ASCI application code teams and the results of that assessment. The purpose of this assessment was to determine code team compliance with the Sandia National Laboratories ASCI Applications Software Quality Engineering Practices, Version 2.0 as part of an overall program assessment.

  16. Plug engine systems for future launch vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immich, H.; Koelle, D. E.; Parsley, R. C.

    1992-08-01

    Several feasible design options are presented for plug engine systems designed for future launch vehicle applications, including a plug nozzle engine with an annular combustion chamber, a segmented modular design, and an integration of a number of conventional engines around a common plug. The advantages and disadvantages of these options are discussed for a range of potential applications, which include single-stage-to-orbit vehicles and upper stage vehicles such as the second stage of the Saenger HTOL launch vehicle concept.

  17. Dynamic systems-engineering process - The application of concurrent engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiskerchen, Michael J.; Pittman, R. Bruce

    1989-01-01

    A system engineering methodology is described which enables users, particulary NASA and DOD, to accommodate changing needs; incorporate emerging technologies; identify, quantify, and manage system risks; manage evolving functional requirements; track the changing environment; and reduce system life-cycle costs. The approach is a concurrent, dynamic one which starts by constructing a performance model defining the required system functions and the interrelationships. A detailed probabilistic risk assessment of the system elements and their interrelationships is performed, and quantitative analysis of the reliability and maintainability of an engineering system allows its different technical and process failure modes to be identified and their probabilities to be computed. Decision makers can choose technical solutions that maximize an objective function and minimize the probability of failure under resource constraints.

  18. Efficient quantum optical state engineering and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCusker, Kevin T.

    Over a century after the modern prediction of the existence of individual particles of light by Albert Einstein, a reliable source of this simple quantum state of one photon does not exist. While common light sources such as a light bulb, LED, or laser can produce a pulse of light with an average of one photon, there is (currently) no way of knowing the number of photons in that pulse without first absorbing (and thereby destroying) them. Spontaneous parametric down-conversion, a process in which one high-energy photon splits into two lower-energy photons, allows us to prepare a single-photon state by detecting one of the photons, which then heralds the existence of its twin. This process has been the workhorse of quantum optics, allowing demonstrations of a myriad of quantum processes and protocols, such as entanglement, cryptography, superdense coding, teleportation, and simple quantum computing demonstrations. All of these processes would benefit from better engineering of the underlying down-conversion process, but despite significant effort (both theoretical and experimental), optimization of this process is ongoing. The focus of this work is to optimize certain aspects of a down-conversion source, and then use this tool in novel experiments not otherwise feasible. Specifically, the goal is to optimize the heralding efficiency of the down-conversion photons, i.e., the probability that if one photon is detected, the other photon is also detected. This source is then applied to two experiments (a single-photon source, and a quantum cryptography implementation), and the detailed theory of an additional application (a source of Fock states and path-entangled states, called N00N states) is discussed, along with some other possible applications.

  19. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  20. The special applications of Tevatron electron lens

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaolong Zhang et al.

    2003-08-11

    Besides the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) runs as a R and D project for Tevatron Beam-Beam Compensation, it is used daily as a Beam Abort Gap Cleaner for collider operations. It can also be served as beam exciter for beam dynamics measurements and slow proton or antiproton bunch remover. This report describes all these applications and observations.

  1. Engineering and Applications of fungal laccases for organic synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kunamneni, Adinarayana; Camarero, Susana; García-Burgos, Carlos; Plou, Francisco J; Ballesteros, Antonio; Alcalde, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    Laccases are multi-copper containing oxidases (EC 1.10.3.2), widely distributed in fungi, higher plants and bacteria. Laccase catalyses the oxidation of phenols, polyphenols and anilines by one-electron abstraction, with the concomitant reduction of oxygen to water in a four-electron transfer process. In the presence of small redox mediators, laccase offers a broader repertory of oxidations including non-phenolic substrates. Hence, fungal laccases are considered as ideal green catalysts of great biotechnological impact due to their few requirements (they only require air, and they produce water as the only by-product) and their broad substrate specificity, including direct bioelectrocatalysis. Thus, laccases and/or laccase-mediator systems find potential applications in bioremediation, paper pulp bleaching, finishing of textiles, bio-fuel cells and more. Significantly, laccases can be used in organic synthesis, as they can perform exquisite transformations ranging from the oxidation of functional groups to the heteromolecular coupling for production of new antibiotics derivatives, or the catalysis of key steps in the synthesis of complex natural products. In this review, the application of fungal laccases and their engineering by rational design and directed evolution for organic synthesis purposes are discussed. PMID:19019256

  2. Metal Vapour Lasers: Physics, Engineering and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Christopher E.

    1999-03-01

    Metal Vapour Lasers Christopher E. Little University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland Since the first successful demonstration of a metal vapour laser (MVL) in 1962, this class of laser has become widely used in a broad range of fields including precision materials processing, isotope separation and medicine. The MVLs that are used today have a range of impressive characteristics that are not readily available using other technologies. In particular, the combination of high average output powers, pulse recurrence frequencies and beam quality available from green/yellow Cu vapour lasers (CVLs) and Cu bromide lasers, coupled with the high-quality, multiwatt ultraviolet (265-289 nm) radiation that can be produced using simple nonlinear optical techniques, means that Cu lasers will continue to be important for many years. Metal Vapour Lasers covers all the most commercially important and scientifically interesting pulsed and continuous wave (CW) gas-discharge MVLs, and includes device histories, operating characteristics, engineering, kinetics, commercial exploitation and applications. Short descriptions of gas discharges and excitation techniques make this volume self-consistent. A comprehensive bibliography is also provided. The greater part of this book is devoted to CVLs and their variants, including new sealed-off, high-power 'kinetically enhanced' CVLs and Cu bromide lasers. However, many other self-terminating MVLs are also discussed, including the red AuVL, green/infrared MnVL and infrared BaVL. Pulsed, high-gain, high average power lasers in the UV/violet (373.7, 430.5 nm) spectral regions are represented by Sr¯+ and Ca¯+ discharge-afterglow recombination lasers. The most commercially successful of the MVLs - the CW, UV/blue cataphoretic He-Cd¯+ ion laser - is described. Hollow cathode lasers are represented in two guises: 'white light' (blue/green/red) He-Cd¯+ ion lasers and UV/infrared Ne/He-Cu¯+ ion lasers. This unique volume is an

  3. [Application of atomic absorption spectrometry in the engine knock detection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Dan

    2013-02-01

    Because existing human experience diagnosis method and apparatus for auxiliary diagnosis method are difficult to diagnose quickly engine knock. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to detect the automobile engine knock in in innovative way. After having determined Fe, Al, Cu, Cr and Pb content in the 35 groups of Audi A6 engine oil whose travel course is 2 000 -70 000 kilometers and whose sampling interval is 2 000 kilometers by atomic absorption spectrometry, the database of primary metal content in the same automobile engine at different mileage was established. The research shows that the main metal content fluctuates within a certain range. In practical engineering applications, after the determination of engine oil main metal content and comparison with its database value, it can not only help to diagnose the type and location of engine knock without the disintegration and reduce vehicle maintenance costs and improve the accuracy of engine knock fault diagnosis. PMID:23697150

  4. Application of Statistics in Engineering Technology Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhan, Wei; Fink, Rainer; Fang, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Statistics is a critical tool for robustness analysis, measurement system error analysis, test data analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and many other fields in the engineering world. Traditionally, however, statistics is not extensively used in undergraduate engineering technology (ET) programs, resulting in a major disconnect from industry…

  5. Evaluation of potential military applications of stirling engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelrich, Ivan C.; Riddell, Frederick R.

    1988-07-01

    This paper reports on the potential military applications of the Stirling engine. In the applications considered here, the major advantages cited for the Stirling engine are multifuel capability, efficiency, and low noise levels. These potential advantages are small compared to current diesels. Diesels are already able to burn broadcut fuels, have high efficiency, and can be adequately muffled. Their major disadvantages are size, weight, and cost. These disadvantages are only severe in vehicular and mobile power applications where the competition is open-cycle internal combustion engines (diesel, spark-ignition, or turbine). In underwater and space power applications where closed-cycle engines are a necessity, the use of Stirling engines shows more promise.

  6. Study of small turbofan engines applicable to single-engine light airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    The design, efficiency and cost factors are investigated for application of turbofan propulsion engines to single engine, general aviation light airplanes. A companion study of a hypothetical engine family of a thrust range suitable to such aircraft and having a high degree of commonality of design features and parts is presented. Future turbofan powered light airplanes can have a lower fuel consumption, lower weight, reduced airframe maintenance requirements and improved engine overhaul periods as compared to current piston engined powered airplanes. Achievement of compliance with noise and chemical emission regulations is expected without impairing performance, operating cost or safety.

  7. Electronic Noses for Environmental Monitoring Applications

    PubMed Central

    Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena; Rosso, Renato Del

    2014-01-01

    Electronic nose applications in environmental monitoring are nowadays of great interest, because of the instruments' proven capability of recognizing and discriminating between a variety of different gases and odors using just a small number of sensors. Such applications in the environmental field include analysis of parameters relating to environmental quality, process control, and verification of efficiency of odor control systems. This article reviews the findings of recent scientific studies in this field, with particular focus on the abovementioned applications. In general, these studies prove that electronic noses are mostly suitable for the different applications reported, especially if the instruments are specifically developed and fine-tuned. As a general rule, literature studies also discuss the critical aspects connected with the different possible uses, as well as research regarding the development of effective solutions. However, currently the main limit to the diffusion of electronic noses as environmental monitoring tools is their complexity and the lack of specific regulation for their standardization, as their use entails a large number of degrees of freedom, regarding for instance the training and the data processing procedures. PMID:25347583

  8. Electronic noses for environmental monitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena; Del Rosso, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Electronic nose applications in environmental monitoring are nowadays of great interest, because of the instruments' proven capability of recognizing and discriminating between a variety of different gases and odors using just a small number of sensors. Such applications in the environmental field include analysis of parameters relating to environmental quality, process control, and verification of efficiency of odor control systems. This article reviews the findings of recent scientific studies in this field, with particular focus on the abovementioned applications. In general, these studies prove that electronic noses are mostly suitable for the different applications reported, especially if the instruments are specifically developed and fine-tuned. As a general rule, literature studies also discuss the critical aspects connected with the different possible uses, as well as research regarding the development of effective solutions. However, currently the main limit to the diffusion of electronic noses as environmental monitoring tools is their complexity and the lack of specific regulation for their standardization, as their use entails a large number of degrees of freedom, regarding for instance the training and the data processing procedures. PMID:25347583

  9. The application of manufacturing systems engineering for aero engine gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pewsey, Stephen M. S.

    1991-10-01

    The adoption of manufacturing systems engineering principles in order to improve cost effectiveness of manufacturing operations is considered. The introduction of cells where families of parts are made from raw material to finished product using a team approach has been initiated. The benefits to date are significant in terms of lead time reductions, inventory, and nonconformance savings as well as improvements in work force motivation and morale. The overall corporate manufacturing strategy of gears is explained. Some of the problems encountered with the transfer of gear production from one site to another with minimum disruption are described. Some of the radical changes being made in the manufacture of gears in line with the strategy of making Rolls-Royce a total quality organization are also described.

  10. Algebraic and Trigonometric Equations With Applications. A Study Guide of the Science and Engineering Technician Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Roger H.

    This study guide is part of an interdisciplinary curriculum entitled the Science and Engineering Technician (SET) Curriculum designed with the objective of training technicians in the use of electronic instruments and their applications. The curriculum integrates elements from the disciplines of chemistry, physics, mathematics, mechanical…

  11. Electronic structure engineering of various structural phases of phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sumandeep; Kumar, Ashok; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K

    2016-07-21

    We report the tailoring of the electronic structures of various structural phases of phosphorene (α-P, β-P, γ-P and δ-P) based homo- and hetero-bilayers through in-plane mechanical strains, vertical pressure and transverse electric field by employing density functional theory. In-plane biaxial strains have considerably modified the electronic bandgap of both homo- and hetero-bilayers while vertical pressure induces metallization in the considered structures. The γ-P homo-bilayer structure showed the highest ultimate tensile strength (UTS ∼ 6.21 GPa) upon in-plane stretching. Upon application of a transverse electric field, the variation in the bandgap of hetero-bilayers was found to be strongly dependent on the polarity of the applied field which is attributed to the counterbalance between the external electric field and the internal field induced by different structural phases and heterogeneity in the arrangements of atoms of each surface of the hetero-bilayer system. Our results demonstrate that the electronic structures of the considered hetero- and homo-bilayers of phosphorene could be modified by biaxial strain, pressure and electric field to achieve the desired properties for future nano-electronic devices. PMID:27334095

  12. 21 CFR 1311.120 - Electronic prescription application requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electronic prescription application requirements... REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRONIC ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS Electronic Prescriptions § 1311.120 Electronic prescription application requirements. (a) A practitioner may only use an electronic prescription...

  13. 21 CFR 1311.120 - Electronic prescription application requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic prescription application requirements... REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRONIC ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS (Eff. 6-1-10) Electronic Prescriptions § 1311.120 Electronic prescription application requirements. (a) A practitioner may only use an electronic...

  14. 21 CFR 1311.120 - Electronic prescription application requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electronic prescription application requirements... REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRONIC ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS Electronic Prescriptions § 1311.120 Electronic prescription application requirements. (a) A practitioner may only use an electronic prescription...

  15. Reliability of ceramics for heat engine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages associated with the use of monolithic ceramics in heat engines are discussed. The principle gaps in the state of understanding of ceramic material, failure origins, nondestructive tests as well as life prediction are included.

  16. Electron backscatter diffraction: applications for nuclear materials.

    PubMed

    Medevielle; Hugon; Dugne

    1999-09-01

    The diffraction of electrons was first observed in 1928 by Kikuchi. The phenomenon results in the formation of characteristic diagrams of the crystalline lattice and the orientation of the phase. Backscattered electrons are diffracted by the different crystallographic planes (hkl) according to the Bragg angle thetab. These describe, by symmetry, two cones of axes normal to the diffracting plane. Information is collected on a phosphor screen, leading to the acquisition of a diffraction pattern called a Kikuchi diagram. Several improvements now give a wide range of applications such as phase identification (carbides or complex compounds in a (U,Zr,O) structure), analysis of materials interfaces (ZrO2/UO2), as well as solidification studies and local texture determination (molybdenum sheets). In these applications, EBSD, as a type of quantitative metallography, is a powerful tool. PMID:10460689

  17. Synaptic electronics: materials, devices and applications.

    PubMed

    Kuzum, Duygu; Yu, Shimeng; Wong, H-S Philip

    2013-09-27

    In this paper, the recent progress of synaptic electronics is reviewed. The basics of biological synaptic plasticity and learning are described. The material properties and electrical switching characteristics of a variety of synaptic devices are discussed, with a focus on the use of synaptic devices for neuromorphic or brain-inspired computing. Performance metrics desirable for large-scale implementations of synaptic devices are illustrated. A review of recent work on targeted computing applications with synaptic devices is presented. PMID:23999572

  18. Stirling engine alternatives for the terrestrial solar application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, J.

    1985-01-01

    The first phase of the present study of Stirling engine alternatives for solar thermal-electric generation has been completed. Development risk levels are considered to be high for all engines evaluated. Free-piston type and Ringbom-type Stirling engine-alternators are not yet developed for the 25 to 50-kW electrical power range, although smaller machines have demonstrated the inherent robustness of the machines. Kinematic-type Stirling engines are presently achieving a 3500 hr lifetime or longer on critical components, and lifetime must still be further extended for the solar application. Operational and technical characteristics of all types of Stirling engines have been reviewed with engine developers. Technical work of merit in progress in each engine development organization should be recognized and supported in an appropriate manner.

  19. Engineering biofunctional magnetic nanoparticles for biotechnological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moros, Maria; Pelaz, Beatriz; López-Larrubia, Pilar; García-Martin, Maria L.; Grazú, Valeria; de La Fuente, Jesus M.

    2010-09-01

    surrounding water protons due to nanoparticle aggregation demonstrates the bioactivity of these nanoparticles functionalized with carbohydrates. To finish with, nanoparticle toxicity is evaluated by means of MTT assay. The obtained results clearly indicate that these nanoparticles are excellent candidates for their further application in nanomedicine or nanobiotechnology. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Chemical, physical and magnetic characterization; R2 maps; stability of NPs at different conditions; size of glucose NPs in the presence of Concanavalin A; MTT assays of the samples are shown in figures S1-S10. Table S1 represents the hydrodynamic size of PMAO NPs after being washed with different solvents. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00104j

  20. High Temperature Wireless Communication And Electronics For Harsh Environment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Beheim, G. M.; Ponchak, G. E.; Chen, L.-Y

    2007-01-01

    In order for future aerospace propulsion systems to meet the increasing requirements for decreased maintenance, improved capability, and increased safety, the inclusion of intelligence into the propulsion system design and operation becomes necessary. These propulsion systems will have to incorporate technology that will monitor propulsion component conditions, analyze the incoming data, and modify operating parameters to optimize propulsion system operations. This implies the development of sensors, actuators, and electronics, with associated packaging, that will be able to operate under the harsh environments present in an engine. However, given the harsh environments inherent in propulsion systems, the development of engine-compatible electronics and sensors is not straightforward. The ability of a sensor system to operate in a given environment often depends as much on the technologies supporting the sensor element as the element itself. If the supporting technology cannot handle the application, then no matter how good the sensor is itself, the sensor system will fail. An example is high temperature environments where supporting technologies are often not capable of operation in engine conditions. Further, for every sensor going into an engine environment, i.e., for every new piece of hardware that improves the in-situ intelligence of the components, communication wires almost always must follow. The communication wires may be within or between parts, or from the engine to the controller. As more hardware is added, more wires, weight, complexity, and potential for unreliability is also introduced. Thus, wireless communication combined with in-situ processing of data would significantly improve the ability to include sensors into high temperature systems and thus lead toward more intelligent engine systems. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is presently leading the development of electronics, communication systems, and sensors capable of prolonged stable

  1. 77 FR 30523 - Albany Engineering Corporation; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Albany Engineering Corporation; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2012, Albany Engineering Corporation filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section...) or 16,000 MWh (Scenario 2). Applicant Contact: Wendy Jo Carey, Albany Engineering Corporation,...

  2. 40 CFR 1042.840 - Application requirements for remanufactured engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... additional information to evaluate your application. (a) Describe the engine family's specifications and... special fuels or additives. (h) Identify the engine family's useful life. (i) Include the maintenance and... Air Act. (r) Include the information required by other subparts of this part. (s) Include...

  3. The beginnings. [Of Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicles Application

    SciTech Connect

    Bohl, R.J.; Kirk, W.L.; Holman, R.R.; Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA )

    1989-06-01

    The development of the nuclear rocket engine called NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) is described. The choice of fuel element, required rocket parameters, NERVA project objectives, division of responsibilities among different organizations, and NERVA design configuration are reviewed. Progress that has been made in the development of NERVA is addressed.

  4. Flight testing the Digital Electronic Engine Control (DEEC) A unique management experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, T. W.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Kock, B. M.

    1983-01-01

    The concept for the DEEC had its origin in the early 1970s. At that time it was recognized that the F100 engine performance, operability, reliability, and cost could be substantially improved by replacing the original mechanical/supervisory electronic control system with a full-authority digital control system. By 1978, the engine manufacturer had designed and initiated the procurement of flight-qualified control system hardware. As a precursor to an integrated controls program, a flight evaluation of the DEEC system on the F-15 aircraft was proposed. Questions regarding the management of the DEEC flight evaluation program are discussed along with the program elements, the technical results of the F-15 evaluation, and the impact of the flight evaluation on after-burning turbofan controls technology and its use in and application to military aircraft. The lessons learned through the conduct of the program are discussed.

  5. Systematic Applications of Metabolomics in Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Dromms, Robert A.; Styczynski, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    The goals of metabolic engineering are well-served by the biological information provided by metabolomics: information on how the cell is currently using its biochemical resources is perhaps one of the best ways to inform strategies to engineer a cell to produce a target compound. Using the analysis of extracellular or intracellular levels of the target compound (or a few closely related molecules) to drive metabolic engineering is quite common. However, there is surprisingly little systematic use of metabolomics datasets, which simultaneously measure hundreds of metabolites rather than just a few, for that same purpose. Here, we review the most common systematic approaches to integrating metabolite data with metabolic engineering, with emphasis on existing efforts to use whole-metabolome datasets. We then review some of the most common approaches for computational modeling of cell-wide metabolism, including constraint-based models, and discuss current computational approaches that explicitly use metabolomics data. We conclude with discussion of the broader potential of computational approaches that systematically use metabolomics data to drive metabolic engineering. PMID:24957776

  6. Design of applicative 100 W Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kagawa, Noboru; Hirata, Koichi; Takeuchi, Makoto

    1995-12-31

    A small 100 W displacer type Stirling engine is being developed under a project of a JSME committee, RC127. The project consists of sixteen Japanese academic researchers of universities and governmental laboratories and eleven enterprise members related to the Stirling field. The engine has very unique features. Its expansion cylinder is heated by combustion gas or solar energy directly, and a simple cooling system rejects heat from the working fluid. A regenerator is built in the displacer piston with heating and cooling tubes in which the working fluid flows from/to outer tubes. The outer tubes for heating were located at the top of the expansion cylinder and the tubes for cooling are in the middle of the cylinder. The target performance is a 100 W output with 20% thermal efficiency at the operating conditions of 923 K expansion space temperature, 343 K compression space temperature, and 1,000 rpm. The 100 W displacer engine was designed based on a design manual established by a related JSME committee, RC110. It contains several guides to design for cycle, heat exchanger system, and mechanism of most Stirling cycle machines. The engine was designed by using the fundamental method, the second and third-order analyses accomplished with the newly arranged knowledge about each component. This paper presents the engine specifications and the theoretical analysis results. The design method is also introduced briefly.

  7. Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science during the period April 1, 1983 through September 30, 1983 is summarized.

  8. Electronic Health Record Application Support Service Enablers.

    PubMed

    Neofytou, M S; Neokleous, K; Aristodemou, A; Constantinou, I; Antoniou, Z; Schiza, E C; Pattichis, C S; Schizas, C N

    2015-08-01

    There is a huge need for open source software solutions in the healthcare domain, given the flexibility, interoperability and resource savings characteristics they offer. In this context, this paper presents the development of three open source libraries - Specific Enablers (SEs) for eHealth applications that were developed under the European project titled "Future Internet Social and Technological Alignment Research" (FI-STAR) funded under the "Future Internet Public Private Partnership" (FI-PPP) program. The three SEs developed under the Electronic Health Record Application Support Service Enablers (EHR-EN) correspond to: a) an Electronic Health Record enabler (EHR SE), b) a patient summary enabler based on the EU project "European patient Summary Open Source services" (epSOS SE) supporting patient mobility and the offering of interoperable services, and c) a Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS) enabler (PACS SE) based on the dcm4che open source system for the support of medical imaging functionality. The EHR SE follows the HL7 Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) V2.0 and supports the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) profiles (recently awarded in Connectathon 2015). These three FI-STAR platform enablers are designed to facilitate the deployment of innovative applications and value added services in the health care sector. They can be downloaded from the FI-STAR cataloque website. Work in progress focuses in the validation and evaluation scenarios for the proving and demonstration of the usability, applicability and adaptability of the proposed enablers. PMID:26736531

  9. Electronic structure theory: Applications and geometrical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coh, Sinisa

    This thesis contains several applications of the first-principles electronic-structure theory with special emphasis in parts of the thesis on the geometrical aspects of the theory. We start by reviewing the basics of the first-principles electronic-structure methods which are then used throughout the thesis. The first application of these methods is on the analysis of the stability and lattice dynamics of alpha- and beta-cristobalite phases of SiO2. We also map the complete low-energy landscape connecting these two structures and give implications on the phase transition in this compound. Next we study a family of Pbnm perovskites that are promising candidates for silicon-compatible high-K dielectrics. We calculate their structure and dielectric response, and compare with experimental results where available. The third application of these methods is to the large isosymmetric reorientation of oxygen octahedra rotation axes in epitaxially strained perovskites. We explain the origin of the peculiar energy landscape topology as a function of epitaxial strain. In the part of the thesis devoted to the geometrical aspects of electronic structure theory, we begin by extending the concept of electronic polarization to a Chern insulators. These insulators are characterized by a non-zero off-diagonal sigma_xy conductivity tensor component, quantized in units of e 2/h. Finally we discuss another geometrical quantity, the Chern-Simons orbital magnetoelectric coupling. We present a first-principles based calculation of this quantity in several compounds, and motivated by recent developments in the theory of topological insulators, we speculate about the existence of "large-theta materials," in which this kind of coupling could be unusually large.

  10. Vacuum plasma spray applications on liquid fuel rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckechnie, T. N.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Bryant, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process (VPS) has been developed by NASA and Rocketdyne for a variety of applications on liquid fuel rocket engines, including the Space Shuttle Main Engine. These applications encompass thermal barrier coatings which are thermal shock resistant for turbopump blades and nozzles; bond coatings for cryogenic titanium components; wear resistant coatings and materials; high conductivity copper, NaRloy-Z, combustion chamber liners, and structural nickel base material, Inconel 718, for nozzle and combustion chamber support jackets.

  11. Vacuum plasma spray applications on liquid fuel rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKechnie, T. N.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Bryant, M. A.

    1992-07-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process (VPS) has been developed by NASA and Rocketdyne for a variety of applications on liquid fuel rocket engines, including the Space Shuttle Main Engine. These applications encompass thermal barrier coatings which are thermal shock resistant for turbopump blades and nozzles; bond coatings for cryogenic titanium components; wear resistant coatings and materials; high conductivity copper, NaRloy-Z, combustion chamber liners, and structural nickel base material, Inconel 718, for nozzle and combustion chamber support jackets.

  12. Key applications of plant metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Lau, Warren; Fischbach, Michael A; Osbourn, Anne; Sattely, Elizabeth S

    2014-06-01

    Great strides have been made in plant metabolic engineering over the last two decades, with notable success stories including Golden rice. Here, we discuss the field's progress in addressing four long-standing challenges: creating plants that satisfy their own nitrogen requirement, so reducing or eliminating the need for nitrogen fertilizer; enhancing the nutrient content of crop plants; engineering biofuel feed stocks that harbor easy-to-access fermentable saccharides by incorporating self-destructing lignin; and increasing photosynthetic efficiency. We also look to the future at emerging areas of research in this field. PMID:24915445

  13. Key Applications of Plant Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Warren; Fischbach, Michael A.; Osbourn, Anne; Sattely, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Great strides have been made in plant metabolic engineering over the last two decades, with notable success stories including Golden rice. Here, we discuss the field's progress in addressing four long-standing challenges: creating plants that satisfy their own nitrogen requirement, so reducing or eliminating the need for nitrogen fertilizer; enhancing the nutrient content of crop plants; engineering biofuel feed stocks that harbor easy-to-access fermentable saccharides by incorporating self-destructing lignin; and increasing photosynthetic efficiency. We also look to the future at emerging areas of research in this field. PMID:24915445

  14. Stirling engine applications study. Final report Jan-Dec 82

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.L.; Eckard, S.E.; McCarthy, R.; Spera, R.; Antoniak, Z.

    1983-08-01

    A comprehensive survey of the potential applications for gas-fired, stationary Stirling engines was conducted. Engine characteristics were determined from a literature search and personal contacts. Such attributes as multi-fuel capability, low emissions (noise and chemical pollutants), and good part load efficiency were verified. Its thermal efficiency (demonstrated and potential) was found to be approximately equal to the diesel engine. Its potential cost is estimated to exceed that of a diesel engine and long life, reliability, and low maintenance attributes have not yet been established.

  15. Current and future engine applications of Gr/PI composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Schmid, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    The application of organic matrix composites to gas turbine engine components has been the subject of numerous government and company funded programs since the 1960's. The possibility of significant weight reductions, performance improvements and lower component costs have made the organic matrix composites extremely attractive to aircraft engine designers. Very little of this potential was incorporated into production engines over the years even though a significant number of components were designed, fabricated and tested. Some of the reasons behind the slow rate of incorporation include the following: (1) criticality; (2) engine operating temperature; (3) small component size; (4) small production volume; (5) high production cost; and (6) interfacing with metal parts.

  16. Laser processing of ormosils for tissue engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, A.; Zamfirescu, M.; Radu, C.; Dinescu, M.; Buruiana, E. C.; Buruiana, T.; Sima, L. E.; Petrescu, S. M.

    2011-09-01

    Hybrid methacrylates based on silane derivates (ormosils) have been considered for applications in electronics, microtechnology, corrosion resistant coatings, dentistry, and biomedical implants. The presence of both inorganic chains, responsible for chemical and thermal stability, hardness, and transparency, and organic groups, which bring new advantages such as the possibility of functionalization and easy, low temperature processing, can result in the appearance of unique properties. 2D structures of hybrid polymers were produced by Two Photon Polymerization (2PP). A Ti: Sapphire laser having 200 fs pulse duration and 2 kHz repetition rate, working at a wavelength of 775 nm, was used for the 2PP experiments. The biocompatibility of the obtained structures (scaffolds) was tested in different cell cultures, which is a first step toward exploring their potential for applications in tissue engineering. Cells morphology, adhesion, and alignment were studied on polymeric structures with different shapes, obtained in various experimental conditions. Their interaction with normal human epidermal melanocytes (NHEM) and dysplastic oral keratinocytes (DOK) was investigated, with the aim of obtaining an epidermal graft.

  17. Ceramic applications in turbine engines. [for automotive application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, J. A.; Helms, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    In the past the potential of vehicular gas engines could not be realized because component materials served to limit the turbine operating temperature, thereby restricting fuel economy and initial cost. It was, therefore, not possible for the vehicular gas turbine to compete with more conventional engines. The emergence of low-cost, high-temperature ceramic components has the potential to reverse this situation. For example, the Allison GT404 engine, operating with ceramic components at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2350 F to 2500 F, has the potential of a fuel economy which is better than that of current Diesel engines. The Allison AGT100 engine operating with ceramic components offers the possibility of a 30% improvement in fuel economy over 1985 spark ignition engines. The materials considered for an employment in the ceramic components include silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum silicate, and lithium aluminum silicate.

  18. The Expanding World of Tissue Engineering: The Building Blocks and New Applications of Tissue Engineered Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Zorlutuna, Pinar; Vrana, Nihal Engin; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering has been growing in the recent years as more products have made it to the market and as new uses for the engineered tissues have emerged, motivating many researchers to engage in this multidisciplinary field of research. Engineered tissues are now not only considered as end products for regenerative medicine, but also have emerged as enabling technologies for other fields of research ranging from drug discovery to biorobotics. This widespread use necessitates a variety of methodologies for production of tissue engineered constructs. In this review, these methods together with their non-clinical applications will be described. First, we will focus on novel materials used in tissue engineering scaffolds; such as recombinant proteins and synthetic, self assembling polypeptides. The recent advances in the modular tissue engineering area will be discussed. Then scaffold-free production methods, based on either cell sheets or cell aggregates will be described. Cell sources used in tissue engineering and new methods that provide improved control over cell behavior such as pathway engineering and biomimetic microenvironments for directing cell differentiation will be discussed. Finally, we will summarize the emerging uses of engineered constructs such as model tissues for drug discovery, cancer research and biorobotics applications. PMID:23268388

  19. Applications of yeast surface display for protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Cherf, Gerald M.; Cochran, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    The method of displaying recombinant proteins on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae via genetic fusion to an abundant cell wall protein, a technology known as yeast surface display, or simply, yeast display, has become a valuable protein engineering tool for a broad spectrum of biotechnology and biomedical applications. This review focuses on the use of yeast display for engineering protein affinity, stability, and enzymatic activity. Strategies and examples for each protein engineering goal are discussed. Additional applications of yeast display are also briefly presented, including protein epitope mapping, identification of protein-protein interactions, and uses of displayed proteins in industry and medicine. PMID:26060074

  20. Development and application of high-temperature sensors and electronics for propulsion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Wrbanek, John D.; Okojie, Robert S.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Chen, Liangyu; Xu, Jennifer; Beheim, Glenn M.

    2006-05-01

    High temperature sensors and electronics are necessary for a number of aerospace propulsion applications. The Sensors and Electronics Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center (NASA GRC) has been involved in the design, fabrication, and application of a range of sensors and electronics that have use in high temperature, harsh environment propulsion environments. The emphasis is on developing advanced capabilities for measurement and control of aeropropulsion systems as well as monitoring the safety of those systems using Micro/Nano technologies. Specific areas of work include SiC based electronic devices and sensors; thin film thermocouples, strain gauges, and heat flux gauges; chemical sensors; as well as integrated and multifunctional sensor systems. Each sensor type has its own technical challenges related to integration and reliability in a given application. These activities have a common goal of improving the awareness of the state of the propulsion system and moving towards the realization of intelligent engines. This paper will give an overview of the broad range of sensor-related development activities on-going in the NASA GRC Sensors and Electronics Branch as well as their current and potential use in propulsion systems.

  1. Digital Electronic Engine Control (DEEC) Flight Evaluation in an F-15 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Flight evaluation in an F-15 aircraft by digital electronic engine control (DEEC) was investigated. Topics discussed include: system description, F100 engine tests, effects of inlet distortion on static pressure probe, flight tests, digital electronic engine control fault detection and accommodation flight evaluation, flight evaluation of a hydromechanical backup control, augmentor transient capability of an F100 engine, investigation of nozzle instability, real time in flight thrust calculation, and control technology for future aircraft propulsion systems. It is shown that the DEEC system is a powerful and flexible controller for the F100 engine.

  2. Identifying and Engineering the Electronic Properties of the Resistive Switching Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Zhang, Z.; Shi, L. P.

    2016-02-01

    The resistive switching interface is promising for building random access memory devices with electroforming-free characteristics, rectification functionality and highly reproducible resistive switching performance. The electronic structures of the resistive switching interface are important not only from a fundamental point of view, but also from the fascinating perspective of interface engineering for high performance devices. However, the electronic properties of typical resistive switching interfacial structures at an atomic level are less well understood, compared to those of bulky resistive switching structures. In this work, we study the electronic structures of two typical resistive switching interfacial structures, TiO2/Ti4O7 and Ta2O5/TaO2, using the screened exchange (sX-LDA) functional. We uncover that the system Fermi energies of both interfaces are just above the conduction band edge of the corresponding stoichiometric oxides. According to the defect charge transition levels, the oxygen vacancy is stabilized at the -2 charged state in Ta2O5 and TiO2 where the switching takes place. However, it is desirable for the +2 charged oxygen vacancy to be stabilized to achieve controlled resistive switching under the electrical field. We propose to introduce interfacial dopants to shift the system Fermi energies downward so that the +2 charged oxygen vacancy can be stable. Several dipole models are presented to account for the ability of the Fermi level to shift due to the interfacial dopants. These methods are readily applicable to interface engineering for high performance devices.

  3. Electronic Components for use in Extreme Temperature Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Electrical power management and control systems designed for use in planetary exploration missions and deep space probes require electronics that are capable of efficient and reliable operation under extreme temperature conditions. Space-based infra-red satellites, all-electric ships, jet engines, electromagnetic launchers, magnetic levitation transport systems, and power facilities are also typical examples where the electronics are expected to be exposed to harsh temperatures and to operate under severe thermal swings. Most commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) devices are not designed to function under such extreme conditions and, therefore, new parts must be developed or the conventional devices need to be modified. For example, spacecraft operating in the cold environment of deep space carry a large number of radioisotope heating units in order to maintain the surrounding temperature of the on-board electronics at approximately 20 C. At the other end, built-in radiators and coolers render the operation of electronics possible under hot conditions. These thermal measures lead to design complexity, affect development costs, and increase size and weight. Electronics capable of operation at extreme temperatures, thus, will not only tolerate the hostile operational environment, but also make the overall system efficient, more reliable, and less expensive. The Extreme Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on research and development of electronics suitable for applications in the aerospace environment and deep space exploration missions. Research is being conducted on devices, including COTS parts, for potential use under extreme temperatures. These components include semiconductor switching devices, passive devices, DC/DC converters, operational amplifiers, and oscillators. An overview of the program will be presented along with some experimental findings.

  4. 21 CFR 1311.120 - Electronic prescription application requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electronic prescription application requirements. 1311.120 Section 1311.120 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRONIC ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS Electronic Prescriptions § 1311.120 Electronic prescription application requirements. (a)...

  5. Applicability of Topaz Composites to Electron Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomfim, K. S.; Souza, D. N.

    2010-11-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetric topaz properties have been investigated and the results have shown that this mineral presents characteristics of a good dosimeter mainly in doses evaluation in radiotherapy with photons beams in radiotherapy. Typical applications of thermoluminescent dosimeters in radiotherapy are: in vivo dosimetry on patients (either as a routine quality assurance procedure or for dose monitoring in special cases); verification of treatment techniques; dosimetry audits; and comparisons among hospitals. The mean aim of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of topaz-Teflon pellets as thermoluminescent dosimeters in high-energy electron beams used to radiotherapy. Topaz-Teflon pellets were used as TLD.

  6. Application of word processing to engineering documentation

    SciTech Connect

    McGirr, C.J.

    1980-08-25

    Word processing has increased the production rate of engineering documents at the General Electric Neutron Devices Department. Time reductions are 10 percent for original typing, 35 percent for document revisions, and 90 percent for repetitive typing. Total man-hours saved annually are 1155. The system consists of two work stations, a master central processing unit, and a daisy printer. These are ties into a large-scale computer. 4 figures.

  7. Uprated OMS engine status and future applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, W. C.; Brasher, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    The baseline Orbital Maneuvering Engine (OME) of the Space Shuttle has the potential for significant performance uprating, leading to increased Shuttle performance capability. The approach to uprating that is being pursued at the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center is the use of a gas generator-driven turbopump to increase OME operating pressure. A higher pressure engine can have a greater nozzle expansion ratio in the same envelope and at the same thrust level, giving increased engine Isp. The results of trade studies and analyses that have led to the preferred uprated OME configuration are described. The significant accomplishments of a pre-development component demonstration program are also presented, including descriptions of test hardware and discussion of test results. It is shown that testing to date confirms the capability of the preferred uprated OME configuration to meet or exceed performance and life requirements. Potential future activities leading up to a full-scale development program are described, and the capability for the uprated OME to be used in future storable propellant upper stages is discussed.

  8. ESPACE - a geodetic Master's program for the education of Satellite Application Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedman, K.; Kirschner, S.; Seitz, F.

    2012-04-01

    In the last decades there has been a rapid development of new geodetic and other Earth observation satellites. Applications of these satellites such as car navigation systems, weather predictions, and, digital maps (such as Google Earth or Google Maps) play a more and more important role in our daily life. For geosciences, satellite applications such as remote sensing and precise positioning/navigation have turned out to be extremely useful and are meanwhile indispensable. Today, researchers within geodesy, climatology, oceanography, meteorology as well as within Earth system science are all dependent on up-to-date satellite data. Design, development and handling of these missions require experts with knowledge not only in space engineering, but also in the specific applications. That gives rise to a new kind of engineers - satellite application engineers. The study program for these engineers combines parts of different classical disciplines such as geodesy, aerospace engineering or electronic engineering. The satellite application engineering program Earth Oriented Space Science and Technology (ESPACE) was founded in 2005 at the Technische Universität München, mainly from institutions involved in geodesy and aerospace engineering. It is an international, interdisciplinary Master's program, and is open to students with a BSc in both Science (e.g. Geodesy, Mathematics, Informatics, Geophysics) and Engineering (e.g. Aerospace, Electronical and Mechanical Engineering). The program is completely conducted in English. ESPACE benefits from and utilizes its location in Munich with its unique concentration of expertise related to space science and technology. Teaching staff from 3 universities (Technische Universität München, Ludwig-Maximilian University, University of the Federal Armed Forces), research institutions (such as the German Aerospace Center, DLR and the German Geodetic Research Institute, DGFI) and space industry (such as EADS or Kayser-Threde) are

  9. NASA Applications and Lessons Learned in Reliability Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safie, Fayssal M.; Fuller, Raymond P.

    2011-01-01

    Since the Shuttle Challenger accident in 1986, communities across NASA have been developing and extensively using quantitative reliability and risk assessment methods in their decision making process. This paper discusses several reliability engineering applications that NASA has used over the year to support the design, development, and operation of critical space flight hardware. Specifically, the paper discusses several reliability engineering applications used by NASA in areas such as risk management, inspection policies, components upgrades, reliability growth, integrated failure analysis, and physics based probabilistic engineering analysis. In each of these areas, the paper provides a brief discussion of a case study to demonstrate the value added and the criticality of reliability engineering in supporting NASA project and program decisions to fly safely. Examples of these case studies discussed are reliability based life limit extension of Shuttle Space Main Engine (SSME) hardware, Reliability based inspection policies for Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) turbine disc, probabilistic structural engineering analysis for reliability prediction of the SSME alternate turbo-pump development, impact of ET foam reliability on the Space Shuttle System risk, and reliability based Space Shuttle upgrade for safety. Special attention is given in this paper to the physics based probabilistic engineering analysis applications and their critical role in evaluating the reliability of NASA development hardware including their potential use in a research and technology development environment.

  10. Connecting NASA science and engineering with earth science applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Research Council (NRC) recently highlighted the dual role of NASA to support both science and applications in planning Earth observations. This Editorial reports the efforts of the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission to integrate applications with science and engineering i...

  11. Engineering artificial machines from designable DNA materials for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hao; Huang, Guoyou; Han, Yulong; Zhang, Xiaohui; Li, Yuhui; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng; Wang, Lin

    2015-06-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) emerges as building bricks for the fabrication of nanostructure with complete artificial architecture and geometry. The amazing ability of DNA in building two- and three-dimensional structures raises the possibility of developing smart nanomachines with versatile controllability for various applications. Here, we overviewed the recent progresses in engineering DNA machines for specific bioengineering and biomedical applications. PMID:25547514

  12. Rocket engine heat transfer and material technology for commercial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiltabiddle, J.; Campbell, J.

    1974-01-01

    Liquid fueled rocket engine combustion, heat transfer, and material technology have been utilized in the design and development of compact combustion and heat exchange equipment intended for application in the commercial field. An initial application of the concepts to the design of a compact steam generator to be utilized by electrical utilities for the production of peaking power is described.

  13. Engineering Artificial Machines from Designable DNA Materials for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guoyou; Han, Yulong; Zhang, Xiaohui; Li, Yuhui; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) emerges as building bricks for the fabrication of nanostructure with complete artificial architecture and geometry. The amazing ability of DNA in building two- and three-dimensional structures raises the possibility of developing smart nanomachines with versatile controllability for various applications. Here, we overviewed the recent progresses in engineering DNA machines for specific bioengineering and biomedical applications. PMID:25547514

  14. Flight testing the digital electronic engine control in the F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, L. P.

    1984-01-01

    The digital electronic engine control (DEEC) is a full-authority digital engine control developed for the F100-PW-100 turbofan engine which was flight tested on an F-15 aircraft. The DEEC hardware and software throughout the F-15 flight envelope was evaluated. Real-time data reduction and data display systems were implemented. New test techniques and stronger coordination between the propulsion test engineer and pilot were developed which produced efficient use of test time, reduced pilot work load, and greatly improved quality data. The engine pressure ratio (EPR) control mode is demonstrated. It is found that the nonaugmented throttle transients and engine performance are satisfactory.

  15. Electronic cigarettes: incorporating human factors engineering into risk assessments

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ling; Rudy, Susan F; Cheng, James M; Durmowicz, Elizabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Objective A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the impact of human factors (HF) on the risks associated with electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and to identify research gaps. HF is the evaluation of human interactions with products and includes the analysis of user, environment and product complexity. Consideration of HF may mitigate known and potential hazards from the use and misuse of a consumer product, including e-cigarettes. Methods Five databases were searched through January 2014 and publications relevant to HF were incorporated. Voluntary adverse event (AE) reports submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the package labelling of 12 e-cigarette products were analysed. Results No studies specifically addressing the impact of HF on e-cigarette use risks were identified. Most e-cigarette users are smokers, but data on the user population are inconsistent. No articles focused specifically on e-cigarette use environments, storage conditions, product operational requirements, product complexities, user errors or misuse. Twelve published studies analysed e-cigarette labelling and concluded that labelling was inadequate or misleading. FDA labelling analysis revealed similar concerns described in the literature. AE reports related to design concerns are increasing and fatalities related to accidental exposure and misuse have occurred; however, no publications evaluating the relationship between AEs and HF were identified. Conclusions The HF impacting e-cigarette use and related hazards are inadequately characterised. Thorough analyses of user–product–environment interfaces, product complexities and AEs associated with typical and atypical use are needed to better incorporate HF engineering principles to inform and potentially reduce or mitigate the emerging hazards associated with e-cigarette products. PMID:24732164

  16. 78 FR 56692 - Albany Engineering Corporation; Notice of Successive Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Albany Engineering Corporation; Notice of Successive Preliminary Permit... August 20, 2013, Albany Engineering Corporation (Albany Engineering) filed an application for a..., Albany Engineering Corporation, 5 Washington Square, Albany, NY 12205; phone: (518) 456-7712....

  17. Electrospinning polyaniline-contained gelatin nanofibers for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengyan; Guo, Yi; Wei, Yen; MacDiarmid, Alan G; Lelkes, Peter I

    2006-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANi), a conductive polymer, was blended with a natural protein, gelatin, and co-electrospun into nanofibers to investigate the potential application of such a blend as conductive scaffold for tissue engineering purposes. Electrospun PANi-contained gelatin fibers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrical conductivity measurement, mechanical tensile testing, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). SEM analysis of the blend fibers containing less than 3% PANi in total weight, revealed uniform fibers with no evidence for phase segregation, as also confirmed by DSC. Our data indicate that with increasing the amount of PANi (from 0 to approximately 5%w/w), the average fiber size was reduced from 803+/-121 nm to 61+/-13 nm (p<0.01) and the tensile modulus increased from 499+/-207 MPa to 1384+/-105 MPa (p<0.05). The results of the DSC study further strengthen our notion that the doping of gelatin with a few % PANi leads to an alteration of the physicochemical properties of gelatin. To test the usefulness of PANi-gelatin blends as a fibrous matrix for supporting cell growth, H9c2 rat cardiac myoblast cells were cultured on fiber-coated glass cover slips. Cell cultures were evaluated in terms of cell proliferation and morphology. Our results indicate that all PANi-gelatin blend fibers supported H9c2 cell attachment and proliferation to a similar degree as the control tissue culture-treated plastic (TCP) and smooth glass substrates. Depending on the concentrations of PANi, the cells initially displayed different morphologies on the fibrous substrates, but after 1 week all cultures reached confluence of similar densities and morphology. Taken together these results suggest that PANi-gelatin blend nanofibers might provide a novel conductive material well suited as biocompatible scaffolds for tissue engineering. PMID:16352335

  18. Applications of laser printing for organic electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaporte, Ph.; Ainsebaa, A.; Alloncle, A.-P.; Benetti, M.; Boutopoulos, C.; Cannata, D.; Di Pietrantonio, F.; Dinca, V.; Dinescu, M.; Dutroncy, J.; Eason, R.; Feinaugle, M.; Fernández-Pradas, J.-M.; Grisel, A.; Kaur, K.; Lehmann, U.; Lippert, T.; Loussert, C.; Makrygianni, M.; Manfredonia, I.; Mattle, T.; Morenza, J.-L.; Nagel, M.; Nüesch, F.; Palla-Papavlu, A.; Rapp, L.; Rizvi, N.; Rodio, G.; Sanaur, S.; Serra, P.; Shaw-Stewart, J.; Sones, C. L.; Verona, E.; Zergioti, I.

    2013-03-01

    The development of organic electronic requires a non contact digital printing process. The European funded e-LIFT project investigated the possibility of using the Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique to address this field of applications. This process has been optimized for the deposition of functional organic and inorganic materials in liquid and solid phase, and a set of polymer dynamic release layer (DRL) has been developed to allow a safe transfer of a large range of thin films. Then, some specific applications related to the development of heterogeneous integration in organic electronics have been addressed. We demonstrated the ability of LIFT process to print thin film of organic semiconductor and to realize Organic Thin Film Transistors (OTFT) with mobilities as high as 4 10-2 cm2.V-1.s-1 and Ion/Ioff ratio of 2.8 105. Polymer Light Emitting Diodes (PLED) have been laser printed by transferring in a single step process a stack of thin films, leading to the fabrication of red, blue green PLEDs with luminance ranging from 145 cd.m-2 to 540 cd.m-2. Then, chemical sensors and biosensors have been fabricated by printing polymers and proteins on Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices. The ability of LIFT to transfer several sensing elements on a same device with high resolution allows improving the selectivity of these sensors and biosensors. Gas sensors based on the deposition of semiconducting oxide (SnO2) and biosensors for the detection of herbicides relying on the printing of proteins have also been realized and their performances overcome those of commercial devices. At last, we successfully laser-printed thermoelectric materials and realized microgenerators for energy harvesting applications.

  19. Highly integrated digital electronic control: Digital flight control, aircraft model identification, and adaptive engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Landy, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    The highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) program at NASA Ames Research Center, Dryden Flight Research Facility is a multiphase flight research program to quantify the benefits of promising integrated control systems. McDonnell Aircraft Company is the prime contractor, with United Technologies Pratt and Whitney Aircraft, and Lear Siegler Incorporated as major subcontractors. The NASA F-15A testbed aircraft was modified by the HIDEC program by installing a digital electronic flight control system (DEFCS) and replacing the standard F100 (Arab 3) engines with F100 engine model derivative (EMD) engines equipped with digital electronic engine controls (DEEC), and integrating the DEEC's and DEFCS. The modified aircraft provides the capability for testing many integrated control modes involving the flight controls, engine controls, and inlet controls. This paper focuses on the first two phases of the HIDEC program, which are the digital flight control system/aircraft model identification (DEFCS/AMI) phase and the adaptive engine control system (ADECS) phase.

  20. Plug engine systems for future launch vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immich, H.; Parsley, R. C.

    1993-06-01

    Based on improved viability resulting from modern analysis techniques, plug nozzle rocket engines are once again being investigated with respect to advanced launch vehicle concepts. The advantage of these engines is the external expansion, which self-adapts to external pressure variation, as well as the short compact design for high expansion ratios. This paper describes feasible design options ranging from a plug nozzle engine with an annular combustion chamber to a segmented modular design, to the integration of a number of conventional engines around a common plug. The advantages and disadvantages of these options are discussed for a range of potential applications including single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicles, as well as upper stage vehicles such as the second stage of the SAeNGER HTOL launch vehicle concept. Also included is a discussion of how maturing computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling techniques could significantly reduce installed performance uncertainties, reducing plug engine development risk.

  1. Piezoelectric polymers as biomaterials for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Clarisse; Sencadas, Vítor; Correia, Daniela M; Lanceros-Méndez, Senentxu

    2015-12-01

    Tissue engineering often rely on scaffolds for supporting cell differentiation and growth. Novel paradigms for tissue engineering include the need of active or smart scaffolds in order to properly regenerate specific tissues. In particular, as electrical and electromechanical clues are among the most relevant ones in determining tissue functionality in tissues such as muscle and bone, among others, electroactive materials and, in particular, piezoelectric ones, show strong potential for novel tissue engineering strategies, in particular taking also into account the existence of these phenomena within some specific tissues, indicating their requirement also during tissue regeneration. This referee reports on piezoelectric materials used for tissue engineering applications. The most used materials for tissue engineering strategies are reported together with the main achievements, challenges and future needs for research and actual therapies. This review provides thus a compilation of the most relevant results and strategies and a start point for novel research pathways in the most relevant and challenging open questions. PMID:26355812

  2. Fabrication of polylactide nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mkhabela, Vuyiswa J.; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2015-05-22

    Highly porous three-dimensional polylactide (PLA) scaffolds were obtained from PLA incorporated with different amounts of chitosan-modified montmorillonite (CS-MMT), through solvent casting and particulate leaching method. The processed scaffolds were tested in vitro for their possible application in bone tissue engineering. Scaffolds were characterized by Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB SEM), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR), and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) to study their structure and intermolecular interactions. Bioresorbability tests in simulated body fluid (pH 7.4) were conducted to assess the response of the scaffolds in a simulated physiological condition. The FIB SEM images of the scaffolds showed a porous architecture with gradual change in morphology with increasing CS-MMT concentration. FTIR analysis revealed the presence of both PLA and CS-MMT particles on the surface of the scaffolds. XRD showed that the crystalline unit cell type was the same for all the scaffolds, and crystallinity decreased with an increase in CS-MMT concentration. The scaffolds were found to be bioresorbable, with rapid bioresorbability on the scaffolds with a high CS-MMT concentration.

  3. Fabrication of polylactide nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhabela, Vuyiswa J.; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2015-05-01

    Highly porous three-dimensional polylactide (PLA) scaffolds were obtained from PLA incorporated with different amounts of chitosan-modified montmorillonite (CS-MMT), through solvent casting and particulate leaching method. The processed scaffolds were tested in vitro for their possible application in bone tissue engineering. Scaffolds were characterized by Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB SEM), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR), and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) to study their structure and intermolecular interactions. Bioresorbability tests in simulated body fluid (pH 7.4) were conducted to assess the response of the scaffolds in a simulated physiological condition. The FIB SEM images of the scaffolds showed a porous architecture with gradual change in morphology with increasing CS-MMT concentration. FTIR analysis revealed the presence of both PLA and CS-MMT particles on the surface of the scaffolds. XRD showed that the crystalline unit cell type was the same for all the scaffolds, and crystallinity decreased with an increase in CS-MMT concentration. The scaffolds were found to be bioresorbable, with rapid bioresorbability on the scaffolds with a high CS-MMT concentration.

  4. Biophysics applications of free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Robert H.

    1993-07-01

    There has been a significant financial effort poured into the technology of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) over the last 15 years or so. Much of that money was spent in the hopes that the FEL would be a key element in the Strategic Defense Initiative, but a small fraction of money was allocated for the Medical FEL program. The Medical FELs program was aimed at exploring how the unique capabilities of the FEL could be utilized in medical applications. Part of the Medical FEl effort has been in clinical applications, but some of the effort has also been put into exploring applications of the FEL for fundamental biological physics. It is the purpose of this brief text to outline some of the fundamental biophysics I have done, and some plans we have for the future. Since the FEL is (still) considered to be an avant garde device, the reader should not be surprised to find that much of the work proposed here is also rather radical and avant garde.

  5. Electron holography—basics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichte, Hannes; Lehmann, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Despite the huge progress achieved recently by means of the corrector for aberrations, allowing now a true atomic resolution of 0.1 nm, hence making it an unrivalled tool for nanoscience, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) suffers from a severe drawback: in a conventional electron micrograph only a poor phase contrast can be achieved, i.e. phase structures are virtually invisible. Therefore, conventional TEM is nearly blind for electric and magnetic fields, which are pure phase objects. Since such fields provoked by the atomic structure, e.g. of semiconductors and ferroelectrics, largely determine the solid state properties, hence the importance for high technology applications, substantial object information is missing. Electron holography in TEM offers the solution: by superposition with a coherent reference wave, a hologram is recorded, from which the image wave can be completely reconstructed by amplitude and phase. Now the object is displayed quantitatively in two separate images: one representing the amplitude, the other the phase. From the phase image, electric and magnetic fields can be determined quantitatively in the range from micrometre down to atomic dimensions by all wave optical methods that one can think of, both in real space and in Fourier space. Electron holography is pure wave optics. Therefore, we discuss the basics of coherence and interference, the implementation into a TEM, the path of rays for recording holograms as well as the limits in lateral and signal resolution. We outline the methods of reconstructing the wave by numerical image processing and procedures for extracting the object properties of interest. Furthermore, we present a broad spectrum of applications both at mesoscopic and atomic dimensions. This paper gives an overview of the state of the art pointing at the needs for further development. It is also meant as encouragement for those who refrain from holography, thinking that it can only be performed by specialists in

  6. Applicability of advanced automotive heat engines to solar thermal power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beremand, D. G.; Evans, D. G.; Alger, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The requirements of a solar thermal power system are reviewed and compared with the predicted characteristics of automobile engines under development. A good match is found in terms of power level and efficiency when the automobile engines, designed for maximum powers of 65-100 kW (87 to 133 hp) are operated to the nominal 20-40 kW electric output requirement of the solar thermal application. At these reduced power levels it appears that the automotive gas turbine and Stirling engines have the potential to deliver the 40+ percent efficiency goal of the solar thermal program.

  7. Solar sailing: mission applications and engineering challenges.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Colin R

    2003-12-15

    Solar sailing is emerging as a promising form of advanced spacecraft propulsion, which can enable exciting new space-science mission concepts. By exploiting the momentum transported by solar photons, solar sails can perform high-energy orbit-transfer manoeuvres without the need for reaction mass. Missions such as planetary-sample return, multiple small-body rendezvous and fast missions to the outer Solar System can therefore be enabled with the use of only a modest launch vehicle. In addition, new families of highly non-Keplerian orbits have been identified that are unique to solar sails, and can enable new ways of performing space-science missions. While the opportunities presented by solar sailing are appealing, engineering challenges are still to be solved before the technology finally comes to fruition. PMID:14667309

  8. Supercritical fluid mixing in Diesel Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Luis; Ma, Peter; Kurman, Matthew; Tess, Michael; Ihme, Matthias; Kweon, Chol-Bum

    2014-11-01

    A numerical framework for simulating supercritical fluids mixing with large density ratios is presented in the context of diesel sprays. Accurate modeling of real fluid effects on the fuel air mixture formation process is critical in characterizing engine combustion. Recent work (Dahms, 2013) has suggested that liquid fuel enters the chamber in a transcritical state and rapidly evolves to supercritical regime where the interface transitions from a distinct liquid/gas interface into a continuous turbulent mixing layer. In this work, the Peng Robinson EoS is invoked as the real fluid model due to an acceptable compromise between accuracy and computational tractability. Measurements at supercritical conditions are reported from the Constant Pressure Flow (CPF) chamber facility at the Army Research Laboratory. Mie and Schlieren optical spray diagnostics are utilized to provide time resolved liquid and vapor penetration length measurement. The quantitative comparison presented is discussed. Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU).

  9. Software engineering with application-specific languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, David J.; Barker, Linda; Mitchell, Deborah; Pollack, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    Application-Specific Languages (ASL's) are small, special-purpose languages that are targeted to solve a specific class of problems. Using ASL's on software development projects can provide considerable cost savings, reduce risk, and enhance quality and reliability. ASL's provide a platform for reuse within a project or across many projects and enable less-experienced programmers to tap into the expertise of application-area experts. ASL's have been used on several software development projects for the Space Shuttle Program. On these projects, the use of ASL's resulted in considerable cost savings over conventional development techniques. Two of these projects are described.

  10. Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Lean Natural Gas Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, II, James E; Storey, John Morse; Theiss, Timothy J; Ponnusamy, Senthil; Ferguson, Harley Douglas; Williams, Aaron M; Tassitano, James B

    2007-09-01

    Distributed energy is an approach for meeting energy needs that has several advantages. Distributed energy improves energy security during natural disasters or terrorist actions, improves transmission grid reliability by reducing grid load, and enhances power quality through voltage support and reactive power. In addition, distributed energy can be efficient since transmission losses are minimized. One prime mover for distributed energy is the natural gas reciprocating engine generator set. Natural gas reciprocating engines are flexible and scalable solutions for many distributed energy needs. The engines can be run continuously or occasionally as peak demand requires, and their operation and maintenance is straightforward. Furthermore, system efficiencies can be maximized when natural gas reciprocating engines are combined with thermal energy recovery for cooling, heating, and power applications. Expansion of natural gas reciprocating engines for distributed energy is dependent on several factors, but two prominent factors are efficiency and emissions. Efficiencies must be high enough to enable low operating costs, and emissions must be low enough to permit significant operation hours, especially in non-attainment areas where emissions are stringently regulated. To address these issues the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission launched research and development programs called Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) and Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (ARICE), respectively. Fuel efficiency and low emissions are two primary goals of these programs. The work presented here was funded by the ARES program and, thus, addresses the ARES 2010 goals of 50% thermal efficiency (fuel efficiency) and <0.1 g/bhp-hr emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). A summary of the goals for the ARES program is given in Table 1-1. ARICE 2007 goals are 45% thermal efficiency and <0.015 g/bhp-hr NOx. Several approaches for improving the

  11. Software environment for implementing engineering applications on MIMD computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, L. A.; Valimohamed, K. A.; Schiff, S.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the concept for a software environment for developing engineering application systems for multiprocessor hardware (MIMD) is presented. The philosophy employed is to solve the largest problems possible in a reasonable amount of time, rather than solve existing problems faster. In the proposed environment most of the problems concerning parallel computation and handling of large distributed data spaces are hidden from the application program developer, thereby facilitating the development of large-scale software applications. Applications developed under the environment can be executed on a variety of MIMD hardware; it protects the application software from the effects of a rapidly changing MIMD hardware technology.

  12. Miniature sensor suitable for electronic nose applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A.; Gehl, Anthony C.; Allman, Steve L.; Johansson, Alicia; Boisen, Anja

    2007-05-01

    A major research effort has been devoted over the years for the development of chemical sensors for the detection of chemical and explosive vapors. However, the deployment of such chemical sensors will require the use of multiple sensors (probably tens of sensors) in a sensor package to achieve selective detection. In order to keep the overall detector unit small, miniature sensors with sufficient sensitivity of detection will be needed. We report sensitive detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a stimulant for the nerve agents, using a miniature sensor unit based on piezoresistive microcantilevers. The sensor can detect parts-per-trillion concentrations of DMMP within 10s exposure times. The small size of the sensor makes it ideally suited for electronic nose applications.

  13. Power electronic applications for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickrell, Roy L.; Lazbin, Igor

    1990-01-01

    NASA plans to orbit a permanently manned space station in the late 1990s, which requires development and assembly of a photovoltaic (PV) power source system to supply up to 75 kW of electrical power average during the orbital period. The electrical power requirements are to be met by a combination of PV source, storage, and control elements for the sun and eclipse periods. The authors discuss the application of power electronics and controls to manage the generation, storage, and distribution of power to meet the station loads, as well as the computer models used for analysis and simulation of the PV power system. The requirements for power source integrated controls to adjust storage charge power during the insolation period current limiting, breaker interrupt current values, and the electrical fault protection approach are defined. Based on these requirements, operating concepts have been defined which then become drivers for specific system and element design.

  14. Photopatternable silicone compositions for electronic packaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkness, Brian R.; Gardner, Geoff B.; Alger, James S.; Cummings, Michelle R.; Princing, Jennifer; Lee, Yeong; Meynen, Herman; Gonzales, Mario; Vandevelde, Bart; Vanden Bulcke, Mathieu; Winters, Christophe; Beyne, Eric

    2004-05-01

    A growing need for low stress high temperature thick film materials has prompted the development of new spin-coatable photopatternable silicones (Dow Corning WL-5000 series) to assist manufactures in building the next generation of electronic devices. These new negative-tone materials can be easily coated onto electronic substrates and patterned using standard i-line and broadband lithographic processes. Films ranging from 6 to 50 μm have been demonstrated with patterned features resolved to an aspect ratio of less than 1.3. The etched regions provide a sloped sidewall and curved surfaces to facilitate metallization processes. The films are cured at low temperatures (150 to 250°C) to provide low modulus values in the range of 150 to 500 MPa, are inherently hydrophobic, and are based on cure chemistry that is acid free and delivers thermally stable cross-links. As a result, the films show very little shrinkage during thermal cure (~2%), do not require extended high temperature processing, and provide a very low residual stress (<8 MPa). They also show excellent thermal stability and mechanical integrity when exposed to high temperatures. A simple wet process has been developed to facilitate film rework and allow for sacrificial layer applications.

  15. [The biologic functional surfaces and their applications in tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Yao, Fanglian; Chen, Man; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Haiyue; An, Xiaoyan; Yao, Kangde

    2007-10-01

    The construction of biologic functional surfaces of materials, from the visual angle of material science, is aimed to make the biomaterials adapted by tissues, and to endow them with dynamic conformity; moreover, from the view-point of clinical applications, it is the functional surface to join the environmental tissues with the implanted material, playing the role of artificial extracellular matrix (ECM). The architecture of biologic functional surface is very important in tissue engineering science. Here the primary concepts of biological surface science and the construction and application of biofunctional surfaces in tissue engineering are reviewed. PMID:18027721

  16. High-Performance electronics at ultra-low power consumption for space applications: From superconductor to nanoscale semiconductor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Robert V.; Simmons, Jerry; Kupferman, Stuart; McWhorter, Paul; Dunlap, David; Kovanis, V.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed review of Sandia's work in ultralow power dissipation electronics for space flight applications, including superconductive electronics, new advances in quantum well structures, and ultra-high purity 3-5 materials, and recent advances in micro-electro-optical-mechanical systems (MEMS) is presented. The superconductive electronics and micromechanical devices are well suited for application in micro-robotics, micro-rocket engines, and advanced sensors.

  17. Electronic nose for space program applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Rebecca C.; Buttner, William J.; Linnell, Bruce R.; Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2003-01-01

    The ability to monitor air contaminants in the shuttle and the International Space Station is important to ensure the health and safety of astronauts, and equipment integrity. Three specific space applications have been identified that would benefit from a chemical monitor: (a) organic contaminants in space cabin air; (b) hypergolic propellant contaminants in the shuttle airlock; (c) pre-combustion signature vapors from electrical fires. NASA at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is assessing several commercial and developing electronic noses (E-noses) for these applications. A short series of tests identified those E-noses that exhibited sufficient sensitivity to the vapors of interest. Only two E-noses exhibited sufficient sensitivity for hypergolic fuels at the required levels, while several commercial E-noses showed sufficient sensitivity of common organic vapors. These E-noses were subjected to further tests to assess their ability to identify vapors. Development and testing of E-nose models using vendor supplied software packages correctly identified vapors with an accuracy of 70-90%. In-house software improvements increased the identification rates between 90 and 100%. Further software enhancements are under development. Details on the experimental setup, test protocols, and results on E-nose performance are presented in this paper along with special emphasis on specific software enhancements. c2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Electronic nose for space program applications.

    PubMed

    Young, Rebecca C; Buttner, William J; Linnell, Bruce R; Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2003-08-01

    The ability to monitor air contaminants in the shuttle and the International Space Station is important to ensure the health and safety of astronauts, and equipment integrity. Three specific space applications have been identified that would benefit from a chemical monitor: (a) organic contaminants in space cabin air; (b) hypergolic propellant contaminants in the shuttle airlock; (c) pre-combustion signature vapors from electrical fires. NASA at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is assessing several commercial and developing electronic noses (E-noses) for these applications. A short series of tests identified those E-noses that exhibited sufficient sensitivity to the vapors of interest. Only two E-noses exhibited sufficient sensitivity for hypergolic fuels at the required levels, while several commercial E-noses showed sufficient sensitivity of common organic vapors. These E-noses were subjected to further tests to assess their ability to identify vapors. Development and testing of E-nose models using vendor supplied software packages correctly identified vapors with an accuracy of 70-90%. In-house software improvements increased the identification rates between 90 and 100%. Further software enhancements are under development. Details on the experimental setup, test protocols, and results on E-nose performance are presented in this paper along with special emphasis on specific software enhancements. PMID:14584511

  19. Electronic Out-fall Inspection Application - 12007

    SciTech Connect

    Weymouth, A Kent III; Pham, Minh; Messick, Chuck

    2012-07-01

    In early 2009 an exciting opportunity was presented to the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) team at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS maintenance group was directed to maintain all Out-falls on Site, increasing their workload from 75 to 183 out-falls with no additional resources. The existing out-fall inspection system consisted of inspections performed manually and documented via paper trail. The inspections were closed out upon completion of activities and placed in file cabinets with no central location for tracking/trending maintenance activities. A platform for meeting new improvements required for documentation by the Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) out-fall permits was needed to replace this current system that had been in place since the 1980's. This was accomplished by building a geographically aware electronic application that improved reliability of site out-fall maintenance and ensured consistent standards were maintained for environmental excellence and worker efficiency. Inspections are now performed via tablet and uploaded to a central point. Work orders are completed and closed either in the field using tablets (mobile application) or in their offices (via web portal) using PCs. And finally completed work orders are now stored in a central database allowing trending of maintenance activities. (authors)

  20. Computational Model Tracking Primary Electrons, Secondary Electrons, and Ions in the Discharge Chamber of an Ion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Menart, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Computational modeling of the plasma located in the discharge chamber of an ion engine is an important activity so that the development and design of the next generation of ion engines may be enhanced. In this work a computational tool called XOOPIC is used to model the primary electrons, secondary electrons, and ions inside the discharge chamber. The details of this computational tool are discussed in this paper. Preliminary results from XOOPIC are presented. The results presented include particle number density distributions for the primary electrons, the secondary electrons, and the ions. In addition the total number of a particular particle in the discharge chamber as a function of time, electric potential maps and magnetic field maps are presented. A primary electron number density plot from PRIMA is given in this paper so that the results of XOOPIC can be compared to it. PRIMA is a computer code that the present investigators have used in much of their previous work that provides results that compare well to experimental results. PRIMA only models the primary electrons in the discharge chamber. Modeling ions and secondary electrons, as well as the primary electrons, will greatly increase our ability to predict different characteristics of the plasma discharge used in an ion engine.

  1. 46 CFR 113.35-15 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application...) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-15 Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application. If a mechanical engine order...

  2. 46 CFR 113.35-15 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application...) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-15 Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application. If a mechanical engine order...

  3. 46 CFR 113.35-15 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application...) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-15 Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application. If a mechanical engine order...

  4. 46 CFR 113.35-15 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application...) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-15 Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application. If a mechanical engine order...

  5. 46 CFR 113.35-15 - Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application...) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 113.35-15 Mechanical engine order telegraph systems; application. If a mechanical engine order...

  6. Flight evaluation of modifications to a digital electronic engine control system in an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Myers, L. P.; Zeller, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    The third phase of a flight evaluation of a digital electronic engine control system in an F-15 has recently been completed. It was found that digital electronic engine control software logic changes and augmentor hardware improvements resulted in significant improvements in engine operation. For intermediate to maximum power throttle transients, an increase in altitude capability of up to 8000 ft was found, and for idle to maximum transients, an increase of up to 4000 ft was found. A nozzle instability noted in earlier flight testing was investigated on a test engine at NASA Lewis Research Center, a digital electronic engine control software logic change was developed and evaluated, and no instability occurred in the Phase 3 flight evaluation. The backup control airstart modification was evaluated, and gave an improvement of airstart capability by reducing the minimum airspeed for successful airstarts by 50 to 75 knots.

  7. Vortex visualization for practical engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Jankun-Kelly, Monika; Jiang, Ming; Thompson, David; Machiraju, Raghu

    2006-01-01

    In order to understand complex vortical flows in large data sets, we must be able to detect and visualize vortices in an automated fashion. In this paper, we present a feature-based vortex detection and visualization technique that is appropriate for large computational fluid dynamics data sets computed on unstructured meshes. In particular, we focus on the application of this technique to visualization of the flow over a serrated wing and the flow field around a spinning missile with dithering canards. We have developed a core line extraction technique based on the observation that vortex cores coincide with local extrema in certain scalar fields. We also have developed a novel technique to handle complex vortex topology that is based on k-means clustering. These techniques facilitate visualization of vortices in simulation data that may not be optimally resolved or sampled. Results are included that highlight the strengths and weaknesses of our approach. We conclude by describing how our approach can be improved to enhance robustness and expand its range of applicability. PMID:17080822

  8. LCCP Desktop Application v1.0 Engineering Reference

    SciTech Connect

    Beshr, Mohamed; Aute, Vikrant

    2014-04-01

    This Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP) Desktop Application Engineering Reference is divided into three parts. The first part of the guide, consisting of the LCCP objective, literature review, and mathematical background, is presented in Sections 2-4. The second part of the guide (given in Sections 5-10) provides a description of the input data required by the LCCP desktop application, including each of the input pages (Application Information, Load Information, and Simulation Information) and details for interfacing the LCCP Desktop Application with the VapCyc and EnergyPlus simulation programs. The third part of the guide (given in Section 11) describes the various interfaces of the LCCP code.

  9. Application of the cell sheet technique in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, GUANGNAN; QI, YIYING; NIU, LIE; DI, TUOYU; ZHONG, JINWEI; FANG, TINGTING; YAN, WEIQI

    2015-01-01

    The development and application of the tissue engineering technique has shown a significant potential in regenerative medicine. However, the limitations of conventional tissue engineering methods (cell suspensions, scaffolds and/or growth factors) restrict its application in certain fields. The novel cell sheet technique can overcome such disadvantages. Cultured cells can be harvested as intact sheets without the use of proteolytic enzymes, such as trypsin or dispase, which can result in cell damage and loss of differentiated phenotypes. The cell sheet is a complete layer, which contains extracellular matrix, ion channel, growth factor receptors, nexin and other important cell surface proteins. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have the potential for multiple differentiation, are promising candidate seed cells for tissue engineering. The MSC sheet technique may have potential in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering in general. Additionally, induced pluripotent stem cell and embryonic stem cell-derived cell sheets have been proposed for tissue regeneration. Currently, the application of cell sheet for tissue reconstruction includes: Direct recipient sites implantation, superposition of cell sheets to construct three-dimensional structure for implantation, or cell sheet combined with scaffolds. The present review discusses the progress in cell sheet techniques, particularly stem cell sheet techniques, in tissue engineering. PMID:26623011

  10. Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings for Advanced Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (T/EBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engine systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures and reduce cooling requirements, thus help achieve engine low emission and high efficiency goals. Advanced T/EBCs are being developed for the low emission SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor applications by extending the CMC liner and vane temperature capability to 1650 C (3000 F) in oxidizing and water vapor containing combustion environments. Low conductivity thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are also being developed for metallic turbine airfoil and combustor applications, providing the component temperature capability up to 1650 C (3000 F). In this paper, ceramic coating development considerations and requirements for both the ceramic and metallic components will be described for engine high temperature and high-heat-flux applications. The underlying coating failure mechanisms and life prediction approaches will be discussed based on the simulated engine tests and fracture mechanics modeling results.

  11. Application of glyph-based techniques for multivariate engineering visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazar, Vladimir; Marunic, Gordana; Percic, Marko; Butkovic, Zlatko

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a review of glyph-based techniques for engineering visualization as well as practical application for the multivariate visualization process. Two glyph techniques, Chernoff faces and star glyphs, uncommonly used in engineering practice, are described, applied to the selected data set, run through the chosen optimization methods and user evaluated. As an example of how these techniques function, a set of data for the optimization of a heat exchanger with a microchannel coil is adopted for visualization. The results acquired by the chosen visualization techniques are related to the results of optimization carried out by the response surface method and compared with the results of user evaluation. Based on the data set from engineering research and practice, the advantages and disadvantages of these techniques for engineering visualization are identified and discussed.

  12. Evaluation of undeveloped rocket engine cycle applications to advanced transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Undeveloped pump-fed, liquid propellant rocket engine cycles were assessed and evaluated for application to Next Manned Transportation System (NMTS) vehicles, which would include the evolving Space Transportation System (STS Evolution), the Personnel Launch System (PLS), and the Advanced Manned Launch System (AMLS). Undeveloped engine cycles selected for further analysis had potential for increased reliability, more maintainability, reduced cost, and improved (or possibly level) performance when compared to the existing SSME and proposed STME engines. The split expander (SX) cycle, the full flow staged combustion (FFSC) cycle, and a hybrid version of the FFSC, which has a LOX expander drive for the LOX pump, were selected for definition and analysis. Technology requirements and issues were identified and analyses of vehicle systems weight deltas using the SX and FFSC cycles in AMLS vehicles were performed. A strawman schedule and cost estimate for FFSC subsystem technology developments and integrated engine system demonstration was also provided.

  13. Using hybrid expert system approaches for engineering applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. H.; Boarnet, M. G.; Culbert, C. J.; Savely, R. T.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, the use of hybrid expert system shells and hybrid (i.e., algorithmic and heuristic) approaches for solving engineering problems is reported. Aspects of various engineering problem domains are reviewed for a number of examples with specific applications made to recently developed prototype expert systems. Based on this prototyping experience, critical evaluations of and comparisons between commercially available tools, and some research tools, in the United States and Australia, and their underlying problem-solving paradigms are made. Characteristics of the implementation tool and the engineering domain are compared and practical software engineering issues are discussed with respect to hybrid tools and approaches. Finally, guidelines are offered with the hope that expert system development will be less time consuming, more effective, and more cost-effective than it has been in the past.

  14. Shape Engineered Nanoparticle Fabrication for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrullah, Azeem

    Semiconductor fabrication research has developed technologies that allow for the deposition and patterning of thin films, and can be applied to many different industries, including the field of medicine. One such application is the fabrication of nanoparticles. There is a wide variety of nanoparticle-based medical diagnostics and therapies, including drug delivery and cancer imaging. Most of the nanoparticles being studied are chemically synthesized and spherical in shape, and studies have shown that other shapes can be more useful in certain applications, especially those that involve in vivo analysis and treatment. Fabrication of particles using a tool set developed from the semiconductor industry can allow for a detailed study of size and shape dependence on nanoparticle uptake in the bloodstream. Particle fabrication is achieved using thin film deposition, ion beam proximity lithography, wet etching, and lift-off, all similar to techniques commonly found in the semiconductor industry. The particles are formed using patterns developed with proximity lithography, and this represents the largest effort in this work. An ion beam, generated by a saddle-field ion source, is used to irradiate a polymeric resist with a thin membrane stencil mask placed in close proximity to the resist coated substrate in order to define the pattern. A saddle-field ion source was constructed and characterized for proximity lithography, with a beam diameter of 4.8 mm for a +/-5% tolerance in current density, a source size range of 0.3--0.9 mm, an average brightness value of 15 nAcm2˙sr , and average exposure times of ≈30 s. Stencil masks were fabricated from silicon nitride membranes in order to generate the pattern for the nanoparticles, and the particles were fabricated using a bi-layer resist and a sacrificial copper layer for release into solution.

  15. Electronic Information and Applications in Musicology and Music Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duggan, Mary Kay

    1992-01-01

    Describes electronic publishing and information resources in the field of music. Topics addressed include bibliographic citations of books, journal articles, scores, and sound recordings; bibliographic utilities; computer network resources; electronic music applications; tutorial and laboratory projects; interactive multimedia publications; and…

  16. Biomaterial based cardiac tissue engineering and its applications

    PubMed Central

    Huyer, Locke Davenport; Montgomery, Miles; Zhao, Yimu; Xiao, Yun; Conant, Genevieve; Korolj, Anastasia; Radisic, Milica

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, necessitating the development of effective treatment strategies. A myocardial infarction involves the blockage of a coronary artery leading to depletion of nutrient and oxygen supply to cardiomyocytes and massive cell death in a region of the myocardium. Cardiac tissue engineering is the growth of functional cardiac tissue in vitro on biomaterial scaffolds for regenerative medicine application. This strategy relies on the optimization of the complex relationship between cell networks and biomaterial properties. In this review, we discuss important biomaterial properties for cardiac tissue engineering applications, such as elasticity, degradation, and induced host response, and their relationship to engineered cardiac cell environments. With these properties in mind, we also emphasize in vitro use of cardiac tissues for high-throughput drug screening and disease modelling. PMID:25989939

  17. Biomaterial based cardiac tissue engineering and its applications.

    PubMed

    Huyer, Locke Davenport; Montgomery, Miles; Zhao, Yimu; Xiao, Yun; Conant, Genevieve; Korolj, Anastasia; Radisic, Milica

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, necessitating the development of effective treatment strategies. A myocardial infarction involves the blockage of a coronary artery leading to depletion of nutrient and oxygen supply to cardiomyocytes and massive cell death in a region of the myocardium. Cardiac tissue engineering is the growth of functional cardiac tissue in vitro on biomaterial scaffolds for regenerative medicine application. This strategy relies on the optimization of the complex relationship between cell networks and biomaterial properties. In this review, we discuss important biomaterial properties for cardiac tissue engineering applications, such as elasticity, degradation, and induced host response, and their relationship to engineered cardiac cell environments. With these properties in mind, we also emphasize in vitro use of cardiac tissues for high-throughput drug screening and disease modelling. PMID:25989939

  18. System Engineering of Photonic Systems for Space Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Pryor, Jonathan E.

    2014-01-01

    The application of photonics in space systems requires tight integration with the spacecraft systems to ensure accurate operation. This requires some detailed and specific system engineering to properly incorporate the photonics into the spacecraft architecture and to guide the spacecraft architecture in supporting the photonics devices. Recent research in product focused, elegant system engineering has led to a system approach which provides a robust approach to this integration. Focusing on the mission application and the integration of the spacecraft system physics incorporation of the photonics can be efficiently and effectively accomplished. This requires a clear understanding of the driving physics properties of the photonics device to ensure proper integration with no unintended consequences. The driving physics considerations in terms of optical performance will be identified for their use in system integration. Keywords: System Engineering, Optical Transfer Function, Optical Physics, Photonics, Image Jitter, Launch Vehicle, System Integration, Organizational Interaction

  19. Engineered nonviral nanocarriers for intracellular gene delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Ojea-Jiménez, Isaac; Tort, Olivia; Lorenzo, Julia; Puntes, Victor F

    2012-10-01

    The efficient delivery of nucleic acids into mammalian cells is a central aspect of cell biology and of medical applications, including cancer therapy and tissue engineering. Non-viral chemical methods have been received with great interest for transfecting cells. However, further development of nanocarriers that are biocompatible, efficient and suitable for clinical applications is still required. In this paper, the different material platforms for gene delivery are comparatively addressed, and the mechanisms of interaction with biological systems are discussed carefully. PMID:22972254

  20. Development of single crystal alloys for specific engine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, D. A.; Arthey, R. P.

    1986-02-01

    A comprehensive family of alloys which meets the requirements of particular engine applications was developed. Alloy SRR is a high strength alloy to replace DS MM002 in applications where increased creep, tensile, and fatigue strength are required; RR2000 is designed for blades requiring low density or high impact resistance; RR2060 was developed as a nozzle guide vane alloy, with exceptional resistance to environmental attack and thermal fatigue.

  1. Coaxial electrospun fibers: applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Huang, Jiangnan; Yu, Guoqiang; Cardenas, Romel; Wei, Suying; Wujcik, Evan K; Guo, Zhanhu

    2016-09-01

    Coelectrospinning and emulsion electrospinning are two main methods for preparing core-sheath electrospun nanofibers in a cost-effective and efficient manner. Here, physical phenomena and the effects of solution and processing parameters on the coaxial fibers are introduced. Coaxial fibers with specific drugs encapsulated in the core can exhibit a sustained and controlled release. Their exhibited high surface area and three-dimensional nanofibrous network allows the electrospun fibers to resemble native extracellular matrices. These features of the nanofibers show that they have great potential in drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Proteins, growth factors, antibiotics, and many other agents have been successfully encapsulated into coaxial fibers for drug delivery. A main advantage of the core-sheath design is that after the process of electrospinning and release, these drugs remain bioactive due to the protection of the sheath. Applications of coaxial fibers as scaffolds for tissue engineering include bone, cartilage, cardiac tissue, skin, blood vessels and nervous tissue, among others. A synopsis of novel coaxial electrospun fibers, discussing their applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering, is covered pertaining to proteins, growth factors, antibiotics, and other drugs and applications in the fields of bone, cartilage, cardiac, skin, blood vessel, and nervous tissue engineering, respectively. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:654-677. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1391 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26848106

  2. Guidance Document for PMF Applications with the Multilinear Engine

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document serves as a guide for users of the Multilinear Engine version 2 (ME-2) for source apportionment applications utilizing positive matrix factorization (PMF). It aims to educate experienced source apportionment analysts on available ME rotational tools and provides gui...

  3. Application of Plagiarism Screening Software in the Chemical Engineering Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Matthew E.; Bullard, Lisa G.

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism is an area of increasing concern for written ChE assignments, such as laboratory and design reports, due to ease of access to text and other materials via the internet. This study examines the application of plagiarism screening software to four courses in a university chemical engineering curriculum. The effectiveness of plagiarism…

  4. Economics of electron beam and electrical discharge processing for post-combustion NO(x) control in internal combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penetrante, B. M.

    1993-08-01

    The physics and chemistry of non-thermal plasma processing for post-combustion NO(x) control in internal combustion engines are discussed. A comparison of electron beam and electrical discharge processing is made regarding their power consumption, radical production, NO(x) removal mechanisms, and by-product formation. Pollution control applications present a good opportunity for transferring pulsed power techniques to the commercial sector. However, unless advances are made to drastically reduce the price and power consumption of electron beam sources and pulsed power systems, these plasma techniques will not become commercially competitive with conventional thermal or surface-catalytic methods.

  5. Engineered inorganic nanoparticles for drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Ojea-Jiménez, Isaac; Comenge, Joan; García-Fernández, Lorena; Megson, Zoë A; Casals, Eudald; Puntes, Victor F

    2013-06-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) currently have immense potential as drug delivery vectors due to their unique physicochemical properties such as high surface area per unit volume, their optical and magnetic uniqueness and the ability to be functionalized with a large number of ligands to enhance their affinity towards target molecules. These features, together with the therapeutic activity of some drugs, render the combination of these two entities (NP-drug) as an attractive alternative in the area of drug delivery. One of the major advantages of these conjugates is the possibility to have a local delivery of the drug, thus reducing systemic side effects and enabling a higher efficiency of the therapeutic molecule. This review highlights the direct implications of nanoscale particles in the development of drug delivery systems. In more detail, it is also remarked the extensive use of inorganic NPs for targeted cancer therapies. As the range of nanoparticles and their applications continues to increase, human safety concerns are gaining importance, which makes it necessary to better understand the potential toxicity hazards of these materials. PMID:23116108

  6. Engineering antibodies for clinical applications in cancer.

    PubMed

    Chester, Kerry; Pedley, Barbara; Tolner, Berend; Violet, John; Mayer, Astrid; Sharma, Surinder; Boxer, Geoff; Green, Alan; Nagl, Sylvia; Begent, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The 'magic bullet' concept predicted over a century ago that antibodies would be used to target cancer therapy. Since then initial problems that were related to specificity, purity and immungenicity of antibody-based reagents have slowly been overcome due to developments in technology and increased knowledge. As a result, antibodies are in use for many clinical applications and now comprise the second largest category of medicines in clinical development after vaccines. For antibody-based cancer therapeutics the last 20 years have met with an explosion of knowledge about the biology of the disease and potential targets as well as new technology which allows cloning and manipulation of multifunctional antibody-based molecules. However, the focus still remains on developing therapeutics that will have potential for treating cancer in people and this is efficiently assessed in mechanistic clinical trials that feed back to the laboratory for further development. This review illustrates the mechanistic approach to making new molecules for antibody imaging and therapy of cancer. It is illustrated by examples of radioimmunotherapy and antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy developed by the authors. PMID:15192316

  7. Sandia technology: Engineering and science applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maydew, M. C.; Parrot, H.; Dale, B. C.; Floyd, H. L.; Leonard, J. A.; Parrot, L.

    1990-12-01

    This report discusses: protecting environment, safety, and health; Sandia's quality initiative; Sandia vigorously pursues technology transfer; scientific and technical education support programs; nuclear weapons development; recognizing battlefield targets with trained artificial neural networks; battlefield robotics: warfare at a distance; a spinning shell sizes up the enemy; thwarting would-be nuclear terrorists; unattended video surveillance system for nuclear facilities; making the skies safer for travelers; onboard instrumentation system to evaluate performance of stockpile bombs; keeping track with lasers; extended-life lithium batteries; a remote digital video link acquires images securely; guiding high-performance missiles with laser gyroscopes; nonvolatile memory chips for space applications; initiating weapon explosives with lasers; next-generation optoelectronics and microelectronics technology developments; chemometrics: new methods for improving chemical analysis; research team focuses ion beam to record-breaking intensities; standardizing the volt to quantum accuracy; new techniques improve robotic software development productivity; a practical laser plasma source for generating soft x-rays; exploring metal grain boundaries; massively parallel computing; modeling the amount of desiccant needed for moisture control; attacking pollution with sunshine; designing fuel-conversion catalysts with computers; extending a nuclear power plant's useful life; plasma-facing components for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor.

  8. Metabolic engineering and applications of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.F.; Gerngross, U.T.; Peoples, O.P.

    1995-11-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) have been recognized for many years as naturally occurring biodegradable plastics. The PHA plastics range from those that resemble polypropylene to other that are more elastomeric. A fundamental understanding of the genetic and biochemical pathways involved in PHA synthesis has now made it possible to produce PHAs commercially at an attractive cost and scale, using Metabolix`s transgenic technology. This technology, which was pioneered at The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, allows PHAs to be produced in the short-term by highly efficient fermentation systems, and ultimately, in plant crops. Production of PHAs in plant crops offers the promise of costs competitive with petroleum derived polymers. Millions of acres of transgenic plant crops could provide millions of tonnes of PHAs, increasing the use of renewable resources, and decreasing the U.S. reliance on imported oil. Furthermore, through the production of new PHA products, this technology provides new outlets to expand the U.S. industrial agricultural base. An overview of the scientific and industrial importance of PHAs, including the molecular genetics, biosynthesis, applications, and markets for these materials will be presented.

  9. Electrostatic Chemical Strain: An Approach to Electronic Structure Engineering in Layered Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondinelli, James

    2015-03-01

    Traditional approaches to create and control functional electronic materials have focused on new phases in previously unknown bulk minerals. More recently, interlayer physics has spawned interest in known materials in unexplored atomic scale geometries, especially in complex transition metal oxides (TMO), where heterostructures and superlattices with abrupt interfaces can be created on demand. The interfaces between TMO overs a handle to direct the electrostatic field exerted on the transition metal centers via the coordinating oxygen ligands, which alter the M cation's d-orbital occupancies and spin state, thereby imparting desirable electronic functionality. In this talk, I describe an atomistic engineering approach that makes use of long-range electrostatic interactions between atomic metal-monoxide planes (AO and A'O) in naturally occurring superlattices, e.g., Ruddlesden-Popper (RP), phases, to tune interlayer atomic structure, orbital degeneracies, and magnetic properties. Using first-principles electronic structure calculations, I show how this electrostatic chemical strain (ECS) effect can be used to tune both crystal field energies and the frontier orbital structure in correlated (La, A)NiO4 RP phases at fixed stoichiometry. I describe how to enhance the Ni eg orbital polarization, resulting in NiO6 units that exhibit a single d (x2 -y2) band at the Fermi level--electronic features similar to the layered superconducting cuprates. This approach is generic in construction, making it applicable to any layered topology supporting heterovalent cation substitutions. I conclude by showing it is a realistic strategy to tailor the electronic properties of known materials, and discover yet-to-be realized novel functional oxides without resorting to complex assembly of multi-component heterostructures. Funding for this work is provided by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Grant No. N66001-12-4224 and performed in collaboration with P

  10. Electrospun Fibers for Energy, Electronic, & Environmental Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, Nicholas M.

    applications, fibers consisting of the commonly used organic photovoltaic electron donor/acceptor pair P3HT:PCBM were made by coaxial electrospinning. The inclusion of P3HT:PCBM fibers into an active layer of a organic photovoltaic device led to a ˜ 50% increase in power conversion efficiency over a thin film device of identical chemical composition and thickness. The inclusion of biological photosynthetic moieties into electrically relevant conjugated polymers was also explored for electrical applications. Polymeric fibers consisting largely of PEDOT:PSS were doped with thylakoid vesicles from spinach, and were found to act as photo-detectors. Native PEDOT:PSS does not exhibit such properties. For environmental applications, photocatalytic degradation membranes were also created by electrospinning cellulosic fibers which could be used as platforms to efficiently bind the photocatalyst TiO2. Employing different fiber-titania binding strategies, titania nanoparticles of various sizes and band gap configurations were successfully incorporated into mats of non-woven cellulosic nanofibers. These mats were found to successfully degrade dyes and relevant fresh water toxins such as microcystin-LR.

  11. Adiabatic diesel engine component development: Reference engine for on-highway applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakim, Nabil S.

    1986-01-01

    The main objectives were to select an advanced low heat rejection diesel reference engine (ADRE) and to carry out systems analysis and design. The ADRE concept selection consisted of: (1) rated point performance optimization; (2) study of various exhaust energy recovery scenarios; (3) components, systems and engine configuration studies; and (4) life cycle cost estimates of the ADRE economic worth. The resulting ADRE design proposed a reciprocator with many advanced features for the 1995 technology demonstration time frame. These included ceramic air gap insulated hot section structural components, high temperature tribology treatments, nonmechanical (camless) valve actuation systems, and elimination of the cylinder head gasket. ADRE system analysis and design resulted in more definition of the engine systems. These systems include: (1) electro-hydraulic valve actuation, (2) electronic common rail injection system; (3) engine electronic control; (4) power transfer for accessory drives and exhaust energy recovery systems; and (5) truck installation. Tribology and performance assessments were also carried out. Finite element and probability of survival analyses were undertaken for the ceramic low heat rejection component.

  12. Flight evaluation of a digital electronic engine control system in an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, L. P.; Mackall, K. G.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Walter, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    Benefits provided by a full-authority digital engine control are related to improvements in engine efficiency, performance, and operations. An additional benefit is the capability of detecting and accommodating failures in real time and providing engine-health diagnostics. The digital electronic engine control (DEEC), is a full-authority digital engine control developed for the F100-PW-100 turbofan engine. The DEEC has been flight tested on an F-15 aircraft. The flight tests had the objective to evaluate the DEEC hardware and software over the F-15 flight envelope. A description is presented of the results of the flight tests, which consisted of nonaugmented and augmented throttle transients, airstarts, and backup control operations. The aircraft, engine, DEEC system, and data acquisition and reduction system are discussed.

  13. Foil Bearing Starting Considerations and Requirements for Rotorcraft Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin C.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Foil gas bearings under development for rotorcraft-sized, hot core engine applications have been susceptible to damage from the slow acceleration and rates typically encountered during the pre-ignition stage in conventional engines. Recent laboratory failures have been assumed to be directly linked to operating foil bearings below their lift-off speed while following conventional startup procedures for the engines. In each instance, the continuous sliding contact between the foils and shaft was believed to thermally overload the bearing and cause the engines to fail. These failures highlight the need to characterize required acceleration rates and minimum operating speeds for these applications. In this report, startup experiments were conducted with a large, rotorcraft engine sized foil bearing under moderate load and acceleration rates to identify the proper start procedures needed to avoid bearing failure. The results showed that a bearing under a 39.4 kPa static load can withstand a modest acceleration rate of 500 rpm/s and excessive loitering below the bearing lift-off speed provided an adequate solid lubricant is present.

  14. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis.

  15. Cryogenic readout electronics for astronomical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierickx, B.; Vermeiren, J.; Cos, S.; Faymonville, R.; Lemke, D.

    1992-12-01

    The development of the cold readout electronics for the ISOPHOT focal plane experiment on the ISO (Infrared Space Observatory) is reported. For this low background application, custom designed highly sensitive integrating charge amplifiers are used for the readout of the extrinsic IR detectors. The use of CMOS circuits allows the multiplexing and readout of a large number of detectors at the detector temperature, with a very low power dissipation. The CMOS readout amplifier/multiplexer for deep cryogenic operation is discussed. The device is able to interface directly with extrinsic photoconductive detectors cooled down to the 1.8 to 10K range. In order to observe faint objects under low light level conditions the integration capacitor is 80 fF, featuring a saturation at 1 million charge carriers for an output voltage swing of 2 V and a noise level of 0.5 mV root mean square in nondestructive readout mode. With this circuit coupled to detectors with a responsivity of around 5 to 10 A/W, it is possible to reach noise equivalent power values of 10 to the minus 17th power W/square root of Hz. The multiplexer can be operated with only 10 wires for the supplies, and the clocking of the circuits.

  16. Recent Advances in Application of Biosensors in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Arghya; Lee, Yong-kyu; Jaffa, Ayad A.

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors research is a fast growing field in which tens of thousands of papers have been published over the years, and the industry is now worth billions of dollars. The biosensor products have found their applications in numerous industries including food and beverages, agricultural, environmental, medical diagnostics, and pharmaceutical industries and many more. Even though numerous biosensors have been developed for detection of proteins, peptides, enzymes, and numerous other biomolecules for diverse applications, their applications in tissue engineering have remained limited. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in application of novel biosensors in cell culture and tissue engineering, for example, real-time detection of small molecules such as glucose, lactose, and H2O2 as well as serum proteins of large molecular size, such as albumin and alpha-fetoprotein, and inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-g and TNF-α. In this review, we provide an overview of the recent advancements in biosensors for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25165697

  17. Recent advances in application of biosensors in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Anwarul; Nurunnabi, Md; Morshed, Mahboob; Paul, Arghya; Polini, Alessandro; Kuila, Tapas; Al Hariri, Moustafa; Lee, Yong-kyu; Jaffa, Ayad A

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors research is a fast growing field in which tens of thousands of papers have been published over the years, and the industry is now worth billions of dollars. The biosensor products have found their applications in numerous industries including food and beverages, agricultural, environmental, medical diagnostics, and pharmaceutical industries and many more. Even though numerous biosensors have been developed for detection of proteins, peptides, enzymes, and numerous other biomolecules for diverse applications, their applications in tissue engineering have remained limited. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in application of novel biosensors in cell culture and tissue engineering, for example, real-time detection of small molecules such as glucose, lactose, and H2O2 as well as serum proteins of large molecular size, such as albumin and alpha-fetoprotein, and inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-g and TNF-α. In this review, we provide an overview of the recent advancements in biosensors for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25165697

  18. Hera: Engineering Web Applications Using Semantic Web-based Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Sluijs, Kees; Houben, Geert-Jan; Leonardi, Erwin; Hidders, Jan

    In this chapter, we consider the contribution of models and model-driven approaches based on Semantic Web for the development of Web applications. The model-driven web engineering approach, that separates concerns on different abstraction level in the application design process, allows for more robust and structural design of web applications. This is illustrated by the use of Hera, an approach from the class of Web engineering methods that relies on models expressed using RDF(S) and an RDF(S) query language. It illustrates how models and in particular models that fit with the ideas and concepts from the Semantic Web allow to approach the design and engineering of modern, open and heterogeneous Web based systems. In the presented approach, adaptation and personalization are a main aspect and it is illustrated how they are expressed using semantic data models and languages. Also specific features of Hera are discussed, like interoperability between applications in user modeling, aspect orientation in Web design and graphical tool support for Web application design.

  19. Using MS visual basic to write engineering applications

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, D.E.; Anders, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    Microsoft Visual Basic for Windows (VB) allows Engineers to develop engineering applications that run in the Windows environment. VB provides the engineer a programming tool to write simple programs quickly that meet their needs. It is relatively easy to learn and use. Development of a Windows-like user interface is easy to do and there is a growing base of users and add-in applications. The technological advances that have allowed engineering workstations to convert from a mainframe environment to a stand alone PC connected to a network have also provided new programming tools. Modern programming languages allow the programmer to quickly design screen panels and easily reuse code. This paper discusses the features available in VB and provides several program examples. Example programs written using VB include gas and oil fluid correlations, interpolation software, gas well bottom hole pressure from surface conditions, volumetric reserve calculations, simple log anlaysis, water pattern analysis and bottom hole pressure analysis. These applications were developed with Visual Basic version 3.0 Professional.

  20. Quantum searching application in search based software engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Song, FangMin; Li, Xiangdong

    2013-05-01

    The Search Based Software Engineering (SBSE) is widely used in software engineering for identifying optimal solutions. However, there is no polynomial-time complexity solution used in the traditional algorithms for SBSE, and that causes the cost very high. In this paper, we analyze and compare several quantum search algorithms that could be applied for SBSE: quantum adiabatic evolution searching algorithm, fixed-point quantum search (FPQS), quantum walks, and a rapid modified Grover quantum searching method. The Grover's algorithm is thought as the best choice for a large-scaled unstructured data searching and theoretically it can be applicable to any search-space structure and any type of searching problems.

  1. Using Revised DACUM and Survey To Determine Electronic Engineering Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Liang-Te

    A study was conducted to determine a relevant curriculum for the electronic engineering technology programs of junior colleges in Taiwan that would meet workplace demand. Using a revised DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) technique, a duty-task profile of electronic technicians, which contained 12 duties and 73 tasks, was first constructed. Based on…

  2. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Postsecondary Electricity/Electronics/Related Engineering Programs. Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the following eight programs in the electricity/electronics/related engineering technology cluster: automated manufacturing technology; communications electronics repair technology; computer servicing technology;…

  3. Advanced photonic, electronic, and web engineering systems: WILGA Symposium, January 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    The cycle of WILGA Symposia [wilga.ise.pw.edu.pl] on Photonics and Web Engineering, Advanced Electronic Systems, under the auspices of SPIE, IEEE, KEiT PAN and WEiTI PW was initiated in 1998 by a Research Team PERG/ELHEP ISE PW. The WILGA conferences take place two times a year and the participants are young scientists from this country and abroad. This paper debates chosen topical tracks and some papers presented during the 31 WILGA Multi-Conference, which took place on 8-10 February 2013 at the Faculty of WEiTI PW. The January conference was attended by around 100 persons. Here we discuss closer the subjects of biomedical photonics, electronics and informatics, as well as chosen aspects of applications of advanced photonic, electronic circuits and systems. The 32 nd WILGA Symposium took place on 27 May - 02 June 2013 in WUT WILGA resort near Warsaw. These two editions of WILGA Conferences - January and May have generated more than 250 articles, from which around 100 were chosen by the Symposium and Conference Committees to be published in this volume of Proc.SPIE. WILGA Symposium papers are traditionally submitted via the WILGA web page [wilga.ise.pw.edu.pl] to the SPIE Proceedings publishing system [spie.org]. Email for the correspondence is: photonics@ise.pw.edu.pl. All Wilga papers are published in journals Elektronika, IJET-PAN and in Proc.SPIE. Topical tracks of the symposium usually embrace, among others, new technologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonics-electronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET and pi-of-the sky experiments development. The symposium In its two editions a year is a summary of the development of numerable Ph.D. theses carried out in this country and this geographical region in the area of advanced electronic and photonic systems. It is also

  4. Direct electron transfer type disposable sensor strip for glucose sensing employing an engineered FAD glucose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yuki; Ferri, Stefano; Huynh, Mai Linh; Shimizu, Hitomi; Yamaoka, Hideaki; Sode, Koji

    2013-02-01

    The FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (FADGDH) from Burkholderia cepacia has several attractive features for glucose sensing. However, expanding the application of this enzyme requires improvement of its substrate specificity, especially decreasing its high activity toward maltose. A three-dimensional structural model of the FADGDH catalytic subunit was generated by homology modeling. By comparing the predicted active site with that of glucose oxidase, the two amino acid residues serine 326 and serine 365 were targeted for site-directed mutagenesis. The single mutations that produced the highest glucose specificity were combined, leading to the creation of the S326Q/S365Y double mutant, which was virtually nonreactive to maltose while retaining high glucose dehydrogenase activity. The engineered FADGDH was used to develop a direct electron transfer-type, disposable glucose sensor strip by immobilizing the enzyme complex onto a carbon screen-printed electrode. While the electrode employing wild-type FADGDH provided dangerously flawed results in the presence of maltose, the sensor employing our engineered FADGDH showed a clear glucose concentration-dependent response that was not affected by the presence of maltose. PMID:23273282

  5. Mechanical override for electronic fuel control on a piston engine

    SciTech Connect

    Jedrziewski, S.T.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes an apparatus for controlling the throttle of a fuel burning engine from either a shaft powered by automatic fuel control equipment or by the translational motion of a manually positioned throttle lever. The apparatus is attached to the engine via a throttle shaft extending outwardly from the wall of the engine fuel-air metering system, the apparatus comprising: an outer housing shell having a generally cylindrical interior and a lever arm rigidly attached to and extending radially away from the periphery thereof, the lever end furthest from the periphery of the outer housing shell being pivotally connected to the manual throttle lever; an output spool mounted for rotation within one end of the outer housing shell, the output spool having an axial boring at its outermost end sized to receive and be secured to the throttle shaft. The inward facing end of the output spool is coaxially formed into a cup shaped annulus; and an input spool having a generally cylindrical shape, the input spool mounted for rotation within the second end of the outer housing shell, the innermost end of the input spool being sized to fit within the cup shaped annulus on the inward facing end of the output spool. The input spool has an axial boring at its outermost end sized to receive and be secured to a shaft powered by the automatic fuel control equipment.

  6. Strain Engineering of the Electronic Properties in -doped Oxide Superlattices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    You, Jeong Ho; Lee, Jun Hee; Okamoto, Satoshi; Cooper, Valentino R; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-01-01

    Strain effects on the electronic properties of (LaTiO3)1/(SrTiO3)N superlattices were investigated using density functional theory. Under biaxial in-plane strain within the range of 5% // 5%, the dxy orbital electrons are highly localized at the interfaces whereas the dyz and dxz orbital electrons are more distributed in the SrTiO3 (STO) spacer layers. For STO thickness N 3 unit cells (u.c.), the dxy orbital electrons form two-dimensional (2D) electron gases (2DEGs). The quantized energy levels of the 2DEG are insensitive to the STO spacer thickness, but are strongly dependent on the applied biaxial in-plane strain. As the in-plane strain changes frommore » compressive to tensile, the quantized energy levels of the dxy orbitals decrease thereby creating more states with 2D character. In contrast to the dxy orbital, the dyz and dxz orbitals always have three-dimensional (3D) transport characteristics and their energy levels increase as the strain changes from compressive to tensile. Since the charge densities in the dxy orbital and the dyz and dxz orbitals respond to biaxial in-plane strain in an opposite way, the transport dimensionality of the majority carriers can be controlled between 2D and 3D by applying biaxial in-plane strain.« less

  7. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carlstrom, Charles, M., Jr.

    2009-07-07

    demonstrated robust operation when tested at various orientations, temperatures, and humidity levels. Durability testing has progressed significantly over the course of the program. MEA, engine, and system level steady state testing has demonstrated degradation rates acceptable for initial product introduction. Test duration of over 5000 hrs has been achieved at both the MEA and breadboard system level. P3 level prototype life testing on engines (stacks with reactant conditioning) showed degradation rates comparable to carefully constructed lab fixtures. This was a major improvement over the P2 and P1 engine designs, which exhibited substantial reductions in life and performance between the lab cell and the actual engine. Over the course of the work on the P3 technology set, a platform approach was taken to the system design. By working in this direction, a number of product iterations with substantial market potential were identified. Although the main effort has been the development of a prototype charger for consumer electronic devices, multiple other product concepts were developed during the program showing the wide variety of potential applications.

  8. Metabolic engineering of Yarrowia lipolytica for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quinn; Jackson, Ethel N

    2015-12-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica is a safe and robust yeast that has a history of industrial applications. Its physiological, metabolic and genomic characteristics have made it a superior host for metabolic engineering. The results of optimizing internal pathways and introducing new pathways have demonstrated that Y. lipolytica can be a platform cell factory for cost-effective production of chemicals and fuels derived from fatty acids, lipids and acetyl-CoA. Two products have been commercialized from metabolically engineered Y. lipolytica strains producing high amounts of omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid, and more products are on the way to be produced at industrial scale. Here we review recent progress in metabolic engineering of Y. lipolytica for production of biodiesel fuel, functional fatty acids and carotenoids. PMID:26319895

  9. [Plastid genome engineering: novel optimization strategies and applications].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fei; Lu, Shizhan; Gao, Liang; Zhang, Juanjuan; Lin, Yongjun

    2015-08-01

    The plastid genome engineering system allows site-specific modifications via two homologous recombination events. It is much safer, more precise and efficient compared with the nuclear transformation system. This technology can be applied to the basic research to expand plastid genome function analysis, and it also provides an excellent platform for not only high-level production of recombinant proteins but also plant breeding. In this review, we summarize the state of the art and progresses in this field. We focus on novel breeding strategies in transformation system improvement and new tools to enhance plastid transgene expression levels. In addition, we highlight selected applications in resistance engineering and quality improvement via metabolic engineering. We believe that by overcoming current technological limitations in the plastid transformation system can another green revolution for crop breeding beckon. PMID:26266781

  10. Solar-Powered Electric Propulsion Systems: Engineering and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, J. W.; Kerrisk, D. J.

    1966-01-01

    Lightweight, multikilowatt solar power arrays in conjunction with electric propulsion offer potential improvements to space exploration, extending the usefulness of existing launch vehicles to higher-energy missions. Characteristics of solar-powered electric propulsion missions are outlined, and preliminary performance estimates are shown. Spacecraft system engineering is discussed with respect to parametric trade-offs in power and propulsion system design. Relationships between mission performance and propulsion system performance are illustrated. The present state of the art of electric propulsion systems is reviewed and related to the mission requirements identified earlier. The propulsion system design and test requirements for a mission spacecraft are identified and discussed. Although only ion engine systems are currently available, certain plasma propulsion systems offer some advantages in over-all system design. These are identified, and goals are set for plasma-thrustor systems to make them competitive with ion-engine systems for mission applications.

  11. Genetic engineering of the chloroplast: novel tools and new applications.

    PubMed

    Bock, Ralph

    2014-04-01

    The plastid genome represents an attractive target of genetic engineering in crop plants. Plastid transgenes often give high expression levels, can be stacked in operons and are largely excluded from pollen transmission. Recent research has greatly expanded our toolbox for plastid genome engineering and many new proof-of-principle applications have highlighted the enormous potential of the transplastomic technology in both crop improvement and the development of plants as bioreactors for the sustainable and cost-effective production of biopharmaceuticals, enzymes and raw materials for the chemical industry. This review describes recent technological advances with plastid transformation in seed plants. It focuses on novel tools for plastid genome engineering and transgene expression and summarizes progress with harnessing the potential of plastid transformation in biotechnology. PMID:24679252

  12. Flat-panel electronic displays: a triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering.

    PubMed

    Hilsum, Cyril

    2010-03-13

    This paper describes the history and science behind the development of modern flat-panel displays, and assesses future trends. Electronic displays are an important feature of modern life. For many years the cathode ray tube, an engineering marvel, was universal, but its shape was cumbersome and its operating voltage too high. The need for a flat-panel display, working at a low voltage, became imperative, and much research has been applied to this need. Any versatile flat-panel display will exploit an electro-optical effect, a transparent conductor and an addressing system to deliver data locally. The first need is to convert an electrical signal into a visible change. Two methods are available, the first giving emission of light, the second modulating ambient illumination. The most useful light-emitting media are semiconductors, historically exploiting III-V or II-VI compounds, but more recently organic or polymer semiconductors. Another possible effect uses gas plasma discharges. The modulating, or subtractive, effects that have been studied include liquid crystals, electrophoresis, electrowetting and electrochromism. A transparent conductor makes it possible to apply a voltage to an extended area while observing the results. The design is a compromise, since the free electrons that carry current also absorb light. The first materials used were metals, but some semiconductors, when heavily doped, give a better balance, with high transmission for a low resistance. Delivering data unambiguously to a million or so picture elements across the display area is no easy task. The preferred solution is an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor deposited at each cross-point in an X-Y matrix. Success in these endeavours has led to many applications for flat-panel displays, including television, flexible displays, electronic paper, electronic books and advertising signs. PMID:20123746

  13. Flat-panel electronic displays: a triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hilsum, Cyril

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the history and science behind the development of modern flat-panel displays, and assesses future trends. Electronic displays are an important feature of modern life. For many years the cathode ray tube, an engineering marvel, was universal, but its shape was cumbersome and its operating voltage too high. The need for a flat-panel display, working at a low voltage, became imperative, and much research has been applied to this need. Any versatile flat-panel display will exploit an electro-optical effect, a transparent conductor and an addressing system to deliver data locally. The first need is to convert an electrical signal into a visible change. Two methods are available, the first giving emission of light, the second modulating ambient illumination. The most useful light-emitting media are semiconductors, historically exploiting III–V or II–VI compounds, but more recently organic or polymer semiconductors. Another possible effect uses gas plasma discharges. The modulating, or subtractive, effects that have been studied include liquid crystals, electrophoresis, electrowetting and electrochromism. A transparent conductor makes it possible to apply a voltage to an extended area while observing the results. The design is a compromise, since the free electrons that carry current also absorb light. The first materials used were metals, but some semiconductors, when heavily doped, give a better balance, with high transmission for a low resistance. Delivering data unambiguously to a million or so picture elements across the display area is no easy task. The preferred solution is an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor deposited at each cross-point in an X–Y matrix. Success in these endeavours has led to many applications for flat-panel displays, including television, flexible displays, electronic paper, electronic books and advertising signs. PMID:20123746

  14. Enhancing gold recovery from electronic waste via lixiviant metabolic engineering in Chromobacterium violaceum

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Song Buck; Natarajan, Gayathri; Rahim, Muhammad Nadjad bin Abdul; Tan, Hwee Tong; Chung, Maxey Ching Ming; Ting, Yen Peng; Yew, Wen Shan

    2013-01-01

    Conventional leaching (extraction) methods for gold recovery from electronic waste involve the use of strong acids and pose considerable threat to the environment. The alternative use of bioleaching microbes for gold recovery is non-pollutive and relies on the secretion of a lixiviant or (bio)chemical such as cyanide for extraction of gold from electronic waste. However, widespread industrial use of bioleaching microbes has been constrained by the limited cyanogenic capabilities of lixiviant-producing microorganisms such as Chromobacterium violaceum. Here we show the construction of a metabolically-engineered strain of Chromobacterium violaceum that produces more (70%) cyanide lixiviant and recovers more than twice as much gold from electronic waste compared to wild-type bacteria. Comparative proteome analyses suggested the possibility of further enhancement in cyanogenesis through subsequent metabolic engineering. Our results demonstrated the utility of lixiviant metabolic engineering in the construction of enhanced bioleaching microbes for the bioleaching of precious metals from electronic waste. PMID:23868689

  15. 21 CFR 1311.120 - Electronic prescription application requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... electronically archive the digitally signed record. If the practitioner signs the prescription with his own... archive a copy of the digitally signed record, but need not apply the application's digital signature to... application must protect the stored audit records from unauthorized deletion. The electronic...

  16. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications: Joint Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothgeb, Matt; Kessel, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The overall objective of the Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications project is to evaluate and test pretreatments not containing hexavalent chrome in avionics and electronics housing applications. This objective will be accomplished by testing strong performing coating systems from prior NASA and DoD testing or new coating systems as determined by the stakeholders.

  17. Test and evaluation of the HIDEC engine uptrim algorithm. [Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R. J.; Myers, L. P.

    1986-01-01

    The highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) program will demonstrate and evaluate the improvements in performance and mission effectiveness that result from integrated engine-airframe control systems. Performance improvements will result from an adaptive engine stall margin mode, a highly integrated mode that uses the airplane flight conditions and the resulting inlet distortion to continuously compute engine stall margin. When there is excessive stall margin, the engine is uptrimmed for more thrust by increasing engine pressure ratio (EPR). The EPR uptrim logic has been evaluated and implemente into computer simulations. Thrust improvements over 10 percent are predicted for subsonic flight conditions. The EPR uptrim was successfully demonstrated during engine ground tests. Test results verify model predictions at the conditions tested.

  18. Protein–Hydrogel Interactions in Tissue Engineering: Mechanisms and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zustiak, Silviya P.; Wei, Yunqian

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the sophistication of the cellular microenvironment and the dynamics of tissue remodeling during development, disease, and regeneration have increased our appreciation of the current challenges facing tissue engineering. As this appreciation advances, we are better equipped to approach problems in the biology and therapeutics of even more complex fields, such as stem cells and cancer. To aid in these studies, as well as the established areas of tissue engineering, including cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and neural applications, biomaterials scientists have developed an extensive array of materials with specifically designed chemical, mechanical, and biological properties. Herein, we highlight an important topic within this area of biomaterials research, protein–hydrogel interactions. Due to inherent advantages of hydrated scaffolds for soft tissue engineering as well as specialized bioactivity of proteins and peptides, this field is well-posed to tackle major needs within emerging areas of tissue engineering. We provide an overview of the major modes of interactions between hydrogels and proteins (e.g., weak forces, covalent binding, affinity binding), examples of applications within growth factor delivery and three-dimensional scaffolds, and finally future directions within the area of hydrogel–protein interactions that will advance our ability to control the cell–biomaterial interface. PMID:23150926

  19. GLobal Integrated Design Environment (GLIDE): A Concurrent Engineering Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Melissa L.; Kunkel, Matthew R.; Smith, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The GLobal Integrated Design Environment (GLIDE) is a client-server software application purpose-built to mitigate issues associated with real time data sharing in concurrent engineering environments and to facilitate discipline-to-discipline interaction between multiple engineers and researchers. GLIDE is implemented in multiple programming languages utilizing standardized web protocols to enable secure parameter data sharing between engineers and researchers across the Internet in closed and/or widely distributed working environments. A well defined, HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP) based Application Programming Interface (API) to the GLIDE client/server environment enables users to interact with GLIDE, and each other, within common and familiar tools. One such common tool, Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation), paired with its add-in API for GLIDE, is discussed in this paper. The top-level examples given demonstrate how this interface improves the efficiency of the design process of a concurrent engineering study while reducing potential errors associated with manually sharing information between study participants.

  20. Recent insights on applications of pullulan in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Kaur, Navpreet; Rana, Vikas; Kennedy, John F

    2016-11-20

    Tissue engineering is a recently emerging line of act which assists the regeneration of damaged tissues, unable to self-repair themselves and in turn, enhances the natural healing potential of patients. The repair of injured tissue can be induced with the help of some artificially created polymer scaffolds for successful tissue regeneration. The pullulan composite scaffolds can be used to enhance the proliferation and differentiation of cells for tissue regeneration. The unique pattern of pullulan with α-(1→4) and α-(1→6) linkages along with the presence of nine hydroxyl groups on its surface, endows the polymer with distinctive physical features required for tissue engineering. Pullulan can be used for vascular engineering, bone repair and skin tissue engineering. Pullulan composite scaffolds can also be used for treatment of injured femoral condyle bone, skull bone and full thickness skin wound of murine models, transversal mandibular and tibial osteotomy in goat, etc. This review article highlights the latest developments on applications of pullulan and its derivatives in tissue engineering. PMID:27561517

  1. Precision engineering for optical applications: knowledge transfer into UK industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansom, Christopher; Shore, Paul

    2009-06-01

    A means of facilitating the transfer of precision engineering knowledge and skills from academic institutions and their research partners into UK optics and optical engineering companies is described. The process involves the creation of an Integrated Knowledge Centre (IKC), a partnership led by Cranfield University with the support of the University of Cambridge, University College London, and the OpTIC technium. This paper describes the development of the three main vehicles for knowledge transfer. These are a Masters level postgraduate degree course (the Cranfield University led MSc in "Ultra Precision Technologies"), a portfolio of industrial short courses which are designed to address key skills shortages in the fields of precision engineering for optical applications, and an e-learning package in precision engineering. The main issues encountered during the development of the knowledge transfer teaching and learning packages are discussed, and the outcomes from the first year of knowledge transfer activities are described. In overall summary, the results demonstrate how the Integrated Knowledge Centre in Ultra Precision and Structured Surfaces' approach to knowledge transfer has been effective in addressing the engineering skills gap in precision optics based industries.

  2. Turbulent heat transfer prediction method for application to scramjet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinckney, S. Z.

    1974-01-01

    An integral method for predicting boundary layer development in turbulent flow regions on two-dimensional or axisymmetric bodies was developed. The method has the capability of approximating nonequilibrium velocity profiles as well as the local surface friction in the presence of a pressure gradient. An approach was developed for the problem of predicting the heat transfer in a turbulent boundary layer in the presence of a high pressure gradient. The solution was derived with particular emphasis on its applicability to supersonic combustion; thus, the effects of real gas flows were included. The resulting integrodifferential boundary layer method permits the estimation of cooling reguirements for scramjet engines. Theoretical heat transfer results are compared with experimental combustor and noncombustor heat transfer data. The heat transfer method was used in the development of engine design concepts which will produce an engine with reduced cooling requirements. The Langley scramjet engine module was designed by utilizing these design concepts and this engine design is discussed along with its corresponding cooling requirements. The heat transfer method was also used to develop a combustor cooling correlation for a combustor whose local properties are computed one dimensionally by assuming a linear area variation and a given heat release schedule.

  3. The development and application of engineered proteins for bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.

    1995-09-26

    Clean up of the toxic legacy of the Cold War is projected to be the most expensive domestic project the nation has yet undertaken. Remediation of the Department of Energy and Department of Defense toxic waste sites alone are projected to cost {approximately}$1 trillion over a 20-30 year period. New, cost effective technologies are needed to attack this enormous problem. Los Alamos has put together a cross-divisional team of scientist to develop science based bioremediation technology to work toward this goal. In the team we have expertise in: (1) molecular, ecosystem and transport modeling; (2) genetic and protein engineering; (3) microbiology and microbial ecology; (4) structural biology; and (5) bioinorganic chemistry. This document summarizes talks at a workshop of different aspects of bioremediation technology including the following: Introducing novel function into a Heme enzyme: engineering by excavation; cytochrome P-450: ideal systems for bioremediation?; selection and development of bacterial strains for in situ remediation of cholorinated solvents; genetic analysis and preparation of toluene ortho-monooxygenase for field application in remediation of trichloroethylene; microbial ecology and diversity important to bioremediation; engineering haloalkane dehalogenase for bioremediation; enzymes for oxidative biodegradation; indigenous bacteria as hosts for engineered proteins; performance of indigenous bacterial, hosting engineered proteins in microbial communities.

  4. Study of small turbofan engines applicable to general-aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, G. L.; Burnett, G. A.; Alsworth, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    The applicability of small turbofan engines to general aviation aircraft is discussed. The engine and engine/airplane performance, weight, size, and cost interrelationships are examined. The effects of specific engine noise constraints are evaluated. The factors inhibiting the use of turbofan engines in general aviation aircraft are identified.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories ASCI Applications Software Quality Engineering Practices

    SciTech Connect

    ZEPPER, JOHN D.; ARAGON, KATHRYN MARY; ELLIS, MOLLY A.; BYLE, KATHLEEN A.; EATON, DONNA SUE

    2002-01-01

    This document provides a guide to the deployment of the software verification activities, software engineering practices, and project management principles that guide the development of Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) applications software at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia). The goal of this document is to identify practices and activities that will foster the development of reliable and trusted products produced by the ASCI Applications program. Document contents include an explanation of the structure and purpose of the ASCI Quality Management Council, an overview of the software development lifecycle, an outline of the practices and activities that should be followed, and an assessment tool. These sections map practices and activities at Sandia to the ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines, a Department of Energy document.

  6. Some design considerations for ceramic components in heat engine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1986-01-01

    The design methodology for brittle material structures which is being developed and used at the Lewis Research Center for sizing ceramic components in heat engine applications is reviewed. Theoretical aspects of designing with structural ceramics are discussed, and a general purpose reliability program for predicting fast fracture response due to volume distributed flaws is described. Statistical treatment of brittle behavior, based on the Weibull model, is reviewed and its advantages, as well as drawbacks, are listed. A mechanistic statistical fracture theory, proposed by Batdorf to overcome the Weibull model limitations and based on Griffith fracture mechanics, is summarized. Failure probability predictions are made for rotating annular Si3N4 disks using various fracture models, and the results are compared to actual failure data. The application of these design methods to Government funded ceramics engine demonstration programs is surveyed. The uncertainty in observed component performance emphasizes the need for proof testing and improved nondestructive evaluation to guarantee adequate structural integrity.

  7. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine: concepts for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Atala, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    Patients suffering from diseased and injured organs may be treated with transplanted organs. However, there is a severe shortage of donor organs that is worsening yearly given the aging population. Scientists in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering apply the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and bioengineering to construct biological substitutes that will restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. Therapeutic cloning, where the nucleus from a donor cell is transferred into an enucleated oocyte in order to extract pluripotent embryonic stem cells, offers a potentially limitless source of cells for tissue engineering applications. The stem cell field is also advancing rapidly, opening new options for therapy. This paper reviews recent advances that have occurred in regenerative medicine and describes applications of these new technologies that may offer novel therapies for patients with end-stage organ failure. PMID:15256042

  8. Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures are investigated. Constructions of special elements which containing traction-free circular boundaries are investigated. New versions of mixed variational principle and version of hybrid stress elements are formulated. A method is established for suppression of kinematic deformation modes. semiLoof plate and shell elements are constructed by assumed stress hybrid method. An elastic-plastic analysis is conducted by viscoplasticity theory using the mechanical subelement model.

  9. Laser Ignition Technology for Bi-Propellant Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Matt; Bossard, John; Early, Jim; Trinh, Huu; Dennis, Jay; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of laser ignition technology for bipropellant rocket engines applications. The objectives of this project include: (1) the selection test chambers and flows; (2) definition of the laser ignition setup; (3) pulse format optimization; (4) fiber optic coupled laser ignition system analysis; and (5) chamber integration issues definition. The testing concludes that rocket combustion chamber laser ignition is imminent. Support technologies (multiplexing, window durability/cleaning, and fiber optic durability) are feasible.

  10. Sterilization techniques for biodegradable scaffolds in tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zheng; Ronholm, Jennifer; Tian, Yiping; Sethi, Benu; Cao, Xudong

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable scaffolds have been extensively studied due to their wide applications in biomaterials and tissue engineering. However, infections associated with in vivo use of these scaffolds by different microbiological contaminants remain to be a significant challenge. This review focuses on different sterilization techniques including heat, chemical, irradiation, and other novel sterilization techniques for various biodegradable scaffolds. Comparisons of these techniques, including their sterilization mechanisms, post-sterilization effects, and sterilization efficiencies, are discussed. PMID:27247758

  11. Engineering flat electronic bands in quasiperiodic and fractal loop geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Atanu; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2015-11-01

    Exact construction of one electron eigenstates with flat, non-dispersive bands, and localized over clusters of various sizes is reported for a class of quasi-one-dimensional looped networks. Quasiperiodic Fibonacci and Berker fractal geometries are embedded in the arms of the loop threaded by a uniform magnetic flux. We work out an analytical scheme to unravel the localized single particle states pinned at various atomic sites or over clusters of them. The magnetic field is varied to control, in a subtle way, the extent of localization and the location of the flat band states in energy space. In addition to this we show that an appropriate tuning of the field can lead to a re-entrant behavior of the effective mass of the electron in a band, with a periodic flip in its sign.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories ASCI Applications Software Quality Engineering Practices

    SciTech Connect

    ZEPPER, JOHN D.; ARAGON, KATHRYN MARY; ELLIS, MOLLY A.; BYLE, KATHLEEN A.; EATON, DONNA SUE

    2003-04-01

    This document provides a guide to the deployment of the software verification activities, software engineering practices, and project management principles that guide the development of Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) applications software at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia). The goal of this document is to identify practices and activities that will foster the development of reliable and trusted products produced by the ASCI Applications program. Document contents include an explanation of the structure and purpose of the ASCI Quality Management Council, an overview of the software development lifecycle, an outline of the practices and activities that should be followed, and an assessment tool.

  13. Engineered nanomaterials for biophotonics applications: improving sensing, imaging, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    West, Jennifer L; Halas, Naomi J

    2003-01-01

    Advances in chemistry and physics are providing an expanding array of nanostructured materials with unique and powerful optical properties. These nanomaterials provide a new set of tools that are available to biomedical engineers, biologists, and medical scientists who seek new tools as biosensors and probes of biological fluids, cells, and tissue chemistry and function. Nanomaterials are also being used to develop optically controlled devices for applications such as modulated drug delivery as well as optical therapeutics. This review discusses applications that have been successfully demonstrated using nanomaterials including semiconductor nanocrystals, gold nanoparticles, gold nanoshells, and silver plasmon resonant particles. PMID:14527314

  14. Applications of neural networks in chemical engineering: Hybrid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrada, J.J.; Osborne-Lee, I.W. ); Grizzaffi, P.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Expert systems are known to be useful in capturing expertise and applying knowledge to chemical engineering problems such as diagnosis, process control, process simulation, and process advisory. However, expert system applications are traditionally limited to knowledge domains that are heuristic and involve only simple mathematics. Neural networks, on the other hand, represent an emerging technology capable of rapid recognition of patterned behavior without regard to mathematical complexity. Although useful in problem identification, neural networks are not very efficient in providing in-depth solutions and typically do not promote full understanding of the problem or the reasoning behind its solutions. Hence, applications of neural networks have certain limitations. This paper explores the potential for expanding the scope of chemical engineering areas where neural networks might be utilized by incorporating expert systems and neural networks into the same application, a process called hybridization. In addition, hybrid applications are compared with those using more traditional approaches, the results of the different applications are analyzed, and the feasibility of converting the preliminary prototypes described herein into useful final products is evaluated. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Technology Prospecting on Enzymes: Application, Marketing and Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuang; Yang, Xiaofeng; Yang, Shuai; Zhu, Muzi; Wang, Xiaoning

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes are protein molecules functioning as specialized catalysts for chemical reactions. They have contributed greatly to the traditional and modern chemical industry by improving existing processes. In this article, we first give a survey of representative industrial applications of enzymes, focusing on the technical applications, feed industry, food processing and cosmetic products. The recent important developments and applications of enzymes in industry are reviewed. Then large efforts are dedicated to the worldwide enzyme market from the demand and production perspectives. Special attention is laid on the Chinese enzyme market. Although enzyme applications are being developed in full swing, breakthroughs are needed to overcome their weaknesses in maintaining activities during the catalytic processes. Strategies of metagomic analysis, cell surface display technology and cell-free system might give valuable solutions in novel enzyme exploiting and enzyme engineering. PMID:24688658

  16. Engineering applications of a dynamical state feedback chaotification method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Savaş; Güzeliş, Cüneyt

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents two engineering applications of a chaotification method which can be applied to any inputstate linearizable (nonlinear) system including linear controllable ones as special cases. In the used chaotification method, a reference chaotic and linear system can be combined into a special form by a dynamical state feedback increasing the order of the open loop system to have the same chaotic dynamics with the reference chaotic system. Promising dc motor applications of the method are implemented by the proposed dynamical state feedback which is based on matching the closed loop dynamics to the well known Chua and also Lorenz chaotic systems. The first application, which is the chaotified dc motor used for mixing a corn syrup added acid-base mixture, is implemented via a personal computer and a microcontroller based circuit. As a second application, a chaotified dc motor with a taco-generator used in the feedback is realized by using fully analog circuit elements.

  17. Integrating electron microscopy into nanoscience and materials engineering programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormia, Robert D.; Oye, Michael M.; Nguyen, Anh; Skiver, David; Shi, Meng; Torres, Yessica

    2014-10-01

    Preparing an effective workforce in high technology is the goal of both academic and industry training, and has been the engine that drives innovation and product development in the United States for over a century. During the last 50 years, technician training has comprised a combination of two-year academic programs, internships and apprentice training, and extensive On-the-Job Training (OJT). Recently, and especially in Silicon Valley, technicians have four-year college degrees, as well as relevant hands-on training. Characterization in general, and microscopy in particular, is an essential tool in process development, manufacturing and QA/QC, and failure analysis. Training for a broad range of skills and practice is challenging, especially for community colleges. Workforce studies (SRI/Boeing) suggest that even four year colleges often do not provide the relevant training and experience in laboratory skills, especially design of experiments and analysis of data. Companies in high-tech further report difficulty in finding skilled labor, especially with industry specific experience. Foothill College, in partnership with UCSC, SJSU, and NASA-Ames, has developed a microscopy training program embedded in a research laboratory, itself a partnership between university and government, providing hands-on experience in advanced instrumentation, experimental design and problem solving, with real-world context from small business innovators, in an environment called `the collaboratory'. The program builds on AFM-SEM training at Foothill, and provides affordable training in FE-SEM and TEM through a cost recovery model. In addition to instrument and engineering training, the collaboratory also supports academic and personal growth through a multiplayer social network of students, faculty, researchers, and innovators.

  18. Space applications of superconductivity - Digital electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting electronics offers a variety of remarkable properties including high speed and low dissipation. The paper discusses fundamental considerations which appear to suggest that superconducting (cryogenic) technology will offer significant advantages for future digital devices. It shows how the active element in superconducting electronics, the Josephson junction, works and discusses the technology for fabricating the devices. The characteristics of published circuits are briefly reviewed, and the capabilities of future superconducting computers and instruments are projected.

  19. On the electron-positron cascade in AGN central engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Alex; Keenan, Brett; Medvedev, Mikhail

    2016-03-01

    Processes around spinning supermassive black holes (BH) in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are believed to determine how relativistic jets are launched and how the BH energy is extracted. The key ``ingredient'' is the origin of plasma in BH magnetospheres. In order to explore the process of the electron-positron plasma production, we developed a numerical code which models a one-dimensional (along a magnetic field line) dynamics of the cascade. Our simulations show that plasma production is controlled by the spectrum of the ambient photon field, the B-field strength, the BH spin and mass. Implications of our results to the Galactic Center and AGNs are discussed.

  20. 46 CFR 13.501 - Original application for tankerman-engineer endorsement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Original application for tankerman-engineer endorsement... AND SEAMEN CERTIFICATION OF TANKERMEN Requirements for Tankerman-Engineer Endorsement § 13.501 Original application for tankerman-engineer endorsement. Each applicant for a...

  1. Engineered hybrid cardiac patches with multifunctional electronics for online monitoring and regulation of tissue function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiner, Ron; Engel, Leeya; Fleischer, Sharon; Malki, Maayan; Gal, Idan; Shapira, Assaf; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Dvir, Tal

    2016-06-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering approaches to treat myocardial infarction, cardiac cells are seeded within three-dimensional porous scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. However, current cardiac patches do not allow for online monitoring and reporting of engineered-tissue performance, and do not interfere to deliver signals for patch activation or to enable its integration with the host. Here, we report an engineered cardiac patch that integrates cardiac cells with flexible, freestanding electronics and a 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The patch exhibited robust electronic properties, enabling the recording of cellular electrical activities and the on-demand provision of electrical stimulation for synchronizing cell contraction. We also show that electroactive polymers containing biological factors can be deposited on designated electrodes to release drugs in the patch microenvironment on demand. We expect that the integration of complex electronics within cardiac patches will eventually provide therapeutic control and regulation of cardiac function.

  2. Engineering Design and Fabrication of an Ampere-Class Superconducting Photocathode Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi,I.

    2008-11-17

    Over the past three years, Advanced Energy Systems and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have been collaborating on the design of an Ampere- class superconducting photocathode electron gun. BNL performed the physics design of the overall system and RF cavity under prior programs. Advanced Energy Systems (AES) is currently responsible for the engineering design and fabrication of the electron gun under contract to BNL. We will report on the engineering design and fabrication status of the superconducting photocathode electron gun. The overall configuration of the cryomodule will be reviewed. The layout of the hermitic string, space frame, shielding package, and cold mass will be discussed. The engineering design of the gun cavity and removable cathode will be presented in detail and areas of technical risk will be highlighted. Finally, the fabrication sequence and fabrication status of the gun cavity will be discussed.

  3. Tailoring the Electronic and Catalytic Properties of Au25 Nanoclusters via Ligand Engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Gao; Abroshan, Hadi; Liu, Chong; Zhuo, Shuo; Li, Zhimin; Xie, Yan; Kim, Hyung J; Rosi, Nathaniel L; Jin, Rongchao

    2016-08-23

    To explore the electronic and catalytic properties of nanoclusters, here we report an aromatic-thiolate-protected gold nanocluster, [Au25(SNap)18](-) [TOA](+), where SNap = 1-naphthalenethiolate and TOA = tetraoctylammonium. It exhibits distinct differences in electronic and catalytic properties in comparison with the previously reported [Au25(SCH2CH2Ph)18](-), albeit their skeletons (i.e., Au25S18 framework) are similar. A red shift by ∼10 nm in the HOMO-LUMO electronic absorption peak wavelength is observed for the aromatic-thiolate-protected nanocluster, which is attributed to its dilated Au13 kernel. The unsupported [Au25(SNap)18](-) nanoclusters show high thermal and antioxidation stabilities (e.g., at 80 °C in the present of O2, excess H2O2, or TBHP) due to the effects of aromatic ligands on stabilization of the nanocluster's frontier orbitals (HOMO and LUMO). Furthermore, the catalytic activity of the supported Au25(SR)18/CeO2 (R = Nap, Ph, CH2CH2Ph, and n-C6H13) is examined in the Ullmann heterocoupling reaction between 4-methyl-iodobenzene and 4-nitro-iodobenzene. Results show that the activity and selectivity of the catalysts are largely influenced by the chemical nature of the protecting thiolate ligands. This study highlights that the aromatic ligands not only lead to a higher conversion in catalytic reaction but also markedly increase the yield of the heterocoupling product (4-methyl-4'-nitro-1,1'-biphenyl). Through a combined approach of experiment and theory, this study sheds light on the structure-activity relationships of the Au25 nanoclusters and also offers guidelines for tailoring nanocluster properties by ligand engineering for specific applications. PMID:27442235

  4. Strain engineering of electronic properties of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniadaki, Aristea E.; Kopidakis, Georgios; Remediakis, Ioannis N.

    2016-02-01

    We present Density Functional Theory (DFT) results for the electronic and dielectric properties of single-layer (2D) semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides MX2 (M=Mo, W; X=S, Se, Te) under isotropic, uniaxial (along the zigzag and armchair directions), and shear strain. Electronic band gaps decrease while dielectric constants increase for heavier chalcogens X. The direct gaps of equilibrium structures often become indirect under certain types of strain, depending on the material. The effects of strain and of broken symmetry on the band structure are discussed. Gaps reach maximum values at small compressive strains or in equilibrium, and decrease with larger strains. In-plane dielectric constants generally increase with strain, reaching a minimum value at small compressive strains. The out-of-plane constants exhibit a similar behavior under shear strain but under isotropic and uniaxial strain they increase with compression and decrease with tension, thus exhibiting a monotonic behavior. These DFT results are theoretically explained using only structural parameters and equilibrium dielectric constants. Our findings are consistent with available experimental data.

  5. DELTA-DIESEL ENGINE LIGHT TRUCK APPLICATION Contract DE-FC05-97OR22606 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hakim, Nabil Balnaves, Mike

    2003-05-27

    DELTA Diesel Engine Light Truck Application End of Contract Report DE-FC05-97-OR22606 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report is the final technical report of the Diesel Engine Light Truck Application (DELTA) program under contract DE-FC05-97-OR22606. During the course of this contract, Detroit Diesel Corporation analyzed, designed, tooled, developed and applied the ''Proof of Concept'' (Generation 0) 4.0L V-6 DELTA engine and designed the successor ''Production Technology Demonstration'' (Generation 1) 4.0L V-6 DELTA engine. The objectives of DELTA Program contract DE-FC05-97-OR22606 were to: Demonstrate production-viable diesel engine technologies, specifically intended for the North American LDT and SUV markets; Demonstrate emissions compliance with significant fuel economy advantages. With a clean sheet design, DDC produced the DELTA engine concept promising the following attributes: 30-50% improved fuel economy; Low cost; Good durability and reliability; Acceptable noise, vibration and harshness (NVH); State-of-the-art features; Even firing, 4 valves per cylinder; High pressure common rail fuel system; Electronically controlled; Turbocharged, intercooled, cooled EGR; Extremely low emissions via CLEAN Combustion{copyright} technology. To demonstrate the engine technology in the SUV market, DDC repowered a 1999 Dodge Durango with the DELTA Generation 0 engine. Fuel economy improvements were approximately 50% better than the gasoline engine replaced in the vehicle.

  6. Applications of Domain Engineering in Ferroelectrics for Photonic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrymgeour, D. A.

    The advent of the laser in the early 1960's brought a surge of interest in techniques to modify, deflect, and change the frequency of laser light. These functions are extensively used today in such technological applications as displays, telecommunications, analog to digital conversion, printing, and data storage devices. Of the many competing technologies, optical devices fabricated in ferroelectric materials like lithium niobate and lithium tantalate offer a versatile solid-state platform to do all of these functions integrated seamlessly in the same device. By patterning these crystals into periodic gratings, the wavelength of light can be converted to different wavelengths through nonlinear optical effects to create new laser sources not readily available. If the domains are patterned into the shape of lenses or prisms, light passing through the crystal can be focused and deflected through the electro-optic effect. By precisely creating the domain structures in ferroelectric crystals, these functions and others can be combined in a single device offering large design flexibility, compactness, and utility.

  7. Applications of active adaptive noise control to jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoureshi, Rahmat; Brackney, Larry

    1993-01-01

    During phase 2 research on the application of active noise control to jet engines, the development of multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) active adaptive noise control algorithms and acoustic/controls models for turbofan engines were considered. Specific goals for this research phase included: (1) implementation of a MIMO adaptive minimum variance active noise controller; and (2) turbofan engine model development. A minimum variance control law for adaptive active noise control has been developed, simulated, and implemented for single-input/single-output (SISO) systems. Since acoustic systems tend to be distributed, multiple sensors, and actuators are more appropriate. As such, the SISO minimum variance controller was extended to the MIMO case. Simulation and experimental results are presented. A state-space model of a simplified gas turbine engine is developed using the bond graph technique. The model retains important system behavior, yet is of low enough order to be useful for controller design. Expansion of the model to include multiple stages and spools is also discussed.

  8. Enhanced Identification of Eligibility for Depression Research Using an Electronic Medical Record Search Engine

    PubMed Central

    Seyfried, Lisa; Hanauer, David; Nease, Donald; Albeiruti, Rashad; Kavanagh, Janet; Kales, Helen C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Electronic medical records (EMR) have become part of daily practice for many physicians. Attempts have been made to apply electronic search engine technology to speed EMR review. This was a prospective, observational study to compare the speed and accuracy of electronic search engine vs. manual review of the EMR. Methods Three raters reviewed 49 cases in the EMR to screen for eligibility in a depression study using the electronic search engine (EMERSE). One week later raters received a scrambled set of the same patients including 9 distractor cases, and used manual EMR review to determine eligibility. For both methods, accuracy was assessed for the original 49 cases by comparison with a gold standard rater. Results Use of EMERSE resulted in considerable time savings; chart reviews using EMERSE were significantly faster than traditional manual review (p=0.03). The percent agreement of raters with the gold standard (e.g. concurrent validity) using either EMERSE or manual review was not significantly different. Conclusions Using a search engine optimized for finding clinical information in the free-text sections of the EMR can provide significant time savings while preserving reliability. The major power of this search engine is not from a more advanced and sophisticated search algorithm, but rather from a user interface designed explicitly to help users search the entire medical record in a way that protects health information. PMID:19560962

  9. Nanostructured materials for applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering*

    PubMed Central

    GOLDBERG, MICHAEL; LANGER, ROBERT; JIA, XINQIAO

    2010-01-01

    point of view, both the drug-delivery vehicles and tissue-engineering scaffolds need to be biocompatible and biodegradable. The biological functions of encapsulated drugs and cells can be dramatically enhanced by designing biomaterials with controlled organizations at the nanometer scale. This review summarizes the most recent development in utilizing nanostructured materials for applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering. PMID:17471764

  10. Pericytes: Properties, Functions and Applications in Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Gökçinar-Yagci, Beyza; Uçkan-Çetinkaya, Duygu; Çelebi-Saltik, Betül

    2015-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are one of the most studied adult stem cells and in recent years. They have become attractive agents/cell source for cellular therapy and regenerative medicine applications. During investigations about their origin, researchers hypothesized that perivascular regions are the common anatomical regions where MSCs come from and perivascular cells like pericytes (PCs) (Rouget cells, mural cells) are in vivo counterparts of MSCs. Beside capillaries and microvessels as their most common locations, PCs are also found in large vessels (arteries and veins). They can be isolated from several tissues and organs particularly from retina and brain. There are different approaches about their isolation, characterization and culture but there has been no common protocol yet because of the lack of defined PC-specific marker. They make special contact with endothelial cells in the basement membrane and have very important functions in several tissues and organs. They participate in vascular development, stabilization, maturation, and remodeling, blood pressure control, endothelial cell proliferation and differentiation, contractility of vascular smooth muscle cells, wound healing, vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, long-term maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells in bone marrow niche. Their multipotential differentiation capacity and participation in many events in the body make PCs preferred cells in tissue engineering applications including 3D blood-brain barrier models, skeletal muscle constructs, bone tissue engineering and tissue-engineered vascular grafts. PMID:25865146

  11. Nanoscale Engineering of Closely-Spaced Electronic Spins in Diamond.

    PubMed

    Scarabelli, Diego; Trusheim, Matt; Gaathon, Ophir; Englund, Dirk; Wind, Shalom J

    2016-08-10

    Numerous theoretical protocols have been developed for quantum information processing with dipole-coupled solid-state spins. Nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have many of the desired properties, but a central challenge has been the positioning of NV centers at the nanometer scale that would allow for efficient and consistent dipolar couplings. Here we demonstrate a method for chip-scale fabrication of arrays of single NV centers with record spatial localization of about 10 nm in all three dimensions and controllable inter-NV spacing as small as 40 nm, which approaches the length scale of strong dipolar coupling. Our approach uses masked implantation of nitrogen through nanoapertures in a thin gold film, patterned via electron-beam lithography and dry etching. We verified the position and spin properties of the resulting NVs through wide-field super-resolution optically detected magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27428077

  12. Diamond-based heat spreaders for power electronic packaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemet, Thomas

    As any semiconductor-based devices, power electronic packages are driven by the constant increase of operating speed (higher frequency), integration level (higher power), and decrease in feature size (higher packing density). Although research and innovation efforts have kept these trends continuous for now more than fifty years, the electronic packaging technology is currently facing a challenge that must be addressed in order to move toward any further improvements in terms of performances or miniaturization: thermal management. Thermal issues in high-power packages strongly affect their reliability and lifetime and have now become one of the major limiting factors of power modules development. Thus, there is a strong need for materials that can sustain higher heat flux levels while safely integrating into the electronic package architecture. In such context, diamond is an attractive candidate because of its outstanding thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, and high electrical resistivity. Its low heat capacity relative to metals such as aluminum or copper makes it however preferable for heat spreading applications (as a heat-spreader) rather than for dissipating the heat flux itself (as a heat sink). In this study, a dual diamond-based heat-spreading solution is proposed. Polycrystalline diamond films were grown through laser-assisted combustion synthesis on electronic substrates (in the U.S) while, in parallel, diamond-reinforced copper-matrix composite films were fabricated through tape casting and hot pressing (in France). These two types of diamond-based heat-spreading films were characterized and their microstructure and chemical composition were related to their thermal performances. Particular emphasize was put on the influence of interfaces on the thermal properties of the materials, either inside a single material (grain boundaries) or between dissimilar materials (film/substrate interface, matrix/reinforcement interface). Finally, the packaging

  13. Wireless powered electronic sensors for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Heer, R; Wissenwasser, J; Milnera, M; Farmer, L; Hopfner, C; Vellekoop, M

    2010-01-01

    Radio frequency identification technology is used to power a novel platform of sensor devices. The employed energy harvesting system of the individual sensors enables a blanking of the radio frequency field for a defined period, while supplying the sensor electronics with a highly stable voltage. This guarantees interference free operation of the electronic circuitry during measurements. The implementation of this principle is demonstrated for a sensor system which is based on insets for state-of-the-art micro-titer-plates. Each inset is carrying electronic circuitry and an interdigitated electrode system which is acting as sensor for recording alterations of the cell metabolism. The presented sensor devices work without batteries and are designed for impedance measurements on microbiological cell cultures under physiological relevant conditions. PMID:21095667

  14. Composite engines for application to a single-stage-to-orbit vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendot, J. G.; Brown, P. N.; Piercy, T. G.

    1975-01-01

    Seven composite engines were designed for application to a reusable single-stage-to-orbit vehicle. The engine designs were variations of the supercharged ejector ramjet engine. The resulting performance, weight, and drawings of each engine form a data base for establishing a potential of this class of composite engine to various missions, including the single-stage-to-orbit application. The impact of advanced technology in the design of the critical fan turbine was established.

  15. Application of the Black-Scholes equation in pharmaceutical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuita, Esteban

    2016-05-01

    The Black-Scholes equation is applied in pharmaceutical engineering. The Black-Scholes equation is a classic equation in computational finance. In this work certain case of a modified Black-Scholes equation is analytically solved in the context of a problem of absorption of a drug by a tissue. The analytical solution is obtained using computer algebra specifically Maple. The solution is written as one series of associated Laguerre polynomials. In the procedure the Kummer M functions are used. The analytical solution is numerically tested and using experimental data is possible to estimate the pharmacological parameters of the tissue. We claim that our analytical solution will have important applications in pharmaceutical engineering.

  16. An engineered plant peroxisome and its application in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Kessel-Vigelius, Sarah K; Wiese, Jan; Schroers, Martin G; Wrobel, Thomas J; Hahn, Florian; Linka, Nicole

    2013-09-01

    Plant metabolic engineering is a promising tool for biotechnological applications. Major goals include enhancing plant fitness for an increased product yield and improving or introducing novel pathways to synthesize industrially relevant products. Plant peroxisomes are favorable targets for metabolic engineering, because they are involved in diverse functions, including primary and secondary metabolism, development, abiotic stress response, and pathogen defense. This review discusses targets for manipulating endogenous peroxisomal pathways, such as fatty acid β-oxidation, or introducing novel pathways, such as the synthesis of biodegradable polymers. Furthermore, strategies to bypass peroxisomal pathways for improved energy efficiency and detoxification of environmental pollutants are discussed. In sum, we highlight the biotechnological potential of plant peroxisomes and indicate future perspectives to exploit peroxisomes as biofactories. PMID:23849130

  17. Joining and Integration of Silicon Carbide for Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Coddington, Bryan; Asthana, Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    The critical need for ceramic joining and integration technologies is becoming better appreciated as the maturity level increases for turbine engine components fabricated from ceramic and ceramic matrix composite materials. Ceramic components offer higher operating temperatures and reduced cooling requirements. This translates into higher efficiencies and lower emissions. For fabricating complex shapes, diffusion bonding of silicon carbide (SiC) to SiC is being developed. For the integration of ceramic parts to the surrounding metallic engine system, brazing of SiC to metals is being developed. Overcoming the chemical, thermal, and mechanical incompatibilities between dissimilar materials is very challenging. This presentation will discuss the types of ceramic components being developed by researchers and industry and the benefits of using ceramic components. Also, the development of strong, crack-free, stable bonds will be discussed. The challenges and progress in developing joining and integration approaches for a specific application, i.e. a SiC injector, will be presented.

  18. Mobile Timekeeping Application Built on Reverse-Engineered JPL Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witoff, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Every year, non-exempt employees cumulatively waste over one man-year tracking their time and using the timekeeping Web page to save those times. This app eliminates this waste. The innovation is a native iPhone app. Libraries were built around a reverse- engineered JPL API. It represents a punch-in/punch-out paradigm for timekeeping. It is accessible natively via iPhones, and features ease of access. Any non-exempt employee can natively punch in and out, as well as save and view their JPL timecard. This app is built on custom libraries created by reverse-engineering the standard timekeeping application. Communication is through custom libraries that re-route traffic through BrowserRAS (remote access service). This has value at any center where employees track their time.

  19. Lead-free bearing alloys for engine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratke, Lorenz; Ågren, John; Ludwig, Andreas; Tonn, Babette; Gránásy, László; Mathiesen, Ragnvald; Arnberg, Lars; Anger, Gerd; Reifenhäuser, Bernd; Lauer, Michael; Garen, Rune; Gust, Edgar

    2005-10-01

    Recent developments to reduce the fuel consumption, emission and air pollution, size and weight of engines for automotive, truck, ship propulsion and electrical power generation lead to temperature and load conditions within the engines that cannot be borne by conventional bearings. Presently, only costly multilayer bearings with electroplated or sputtered surface coatings can cope with the load/speed combinations required. Ecological considerations in recent years led to a ban by the European Commission on the use of lead in cars a problem for the standard bronze-lead bearing material. This MAP project is therefore developing an aluminium-based lead-free bearing material with sufficient hardness, wear and friction properties and good corrosion resistance. Only alloys made of components immiscible in the molten state can meet the demanding requirements. Space experimentation plays a crucial role in optimising the cast microstructure for such applications.

  20. Theory and application of experimental model analysis in earthquake engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncarz, P. D.

    The feasibility and limitations of small-scale model studies in earthquake engineering research and practice is considered with emphasis on dynamic modeling theory, a study of the mechanical properties of model materials, the development of suitable model construction techniques and an evaluation of the accuracy of prototype response prediction through model case studies on components and simple steel and reinforced concrete structures. It is demonstrated that model analysis can be used in many cases to obtain quantitative information on the seismic behavior of complex structures which cannot be analyzed confidently by conventional techniques. Methodologies for model testing and response evaluation are developed in the project and applications of model analysis in seismic response studies on various types of civil engineering structures (buildings, bridges, dams, etc.) are evaluated.

  1. Cell Encapsulation in Biodegradable Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nicodemus, Garret D.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Encapsulating cells in biodegradable hydrogels offers numerous attractive features for tissue engineering, including ease of handling, a highly hydrated tissue-like environment for cell and tissue growth, and the ability to form in vivo. Many properties important to the design of a hydrogel scaffold, such as swelling, mechanical properties, degradation, and diffusion, are closely linked to the crosslinked structure of the hydrogel, which is controlled through a variety of different processing conditions. Degradation may be tuned by incorporating hydrolytically or enzymatically labile segments into the hydrogel or by using natural biopolymers that are susceptible to enzymatic degradation. Because cells are present during the gelation process, the number of suitable chemistries and formulations are limited. In this review, we describe important considerations for designing biodegradable hydrogels for cell encapsulation and highlight recent advances in material design and their applications in tissue engineering. PMID:18498217

  2. Engineering flowfield method with angle-of-attack applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoby, E. V.; Simmonds, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    An approximate inviscid flowfield method has been extended to include heat-transfer predictions using a technique to account for variable-entropy edge conditions. The engineering code computes the flowfield over hyperboloids, ellipsoids, paraboloids, and sphere cones at 0 deg angle of attack (AOA). For angle-of-attack applications, an approximation to sphere-cone streamline-spreading effects on the heat transfer along the windward and leeward rays and an empirical circumferential heating technique have been incorporated also in the method. The present engineering calculations yield good comparisons with existing pressure and heating data over sphere cones even at high incidence values with the restriction that the sonic-line location remain on the spherical cap.

  3. Autonomic Computing Paradigm For Large Scale Scientific And Engineering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, S.; Yang, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Large-scale distributed scientific applications are highly adaptive and heterogeneous in terms of their computational requirements. The computational complexity associated with each computational region or domain varies continuously and dramatically both in space and time throughout the whole life cycle of the application execution. Furthermore, the underlying distributed computing environment is similarly complex and dynamic in the availabilities and capacities of the computing resources. These challenges combined together make the current paradigms, which are based on passive components and static compositions, ineffectual. Autonomic Computing paradigm is an approach that efficiently addresses the complexity and dynamism of large scale scientific and engineering applications and realizes the self-management of these applications. In this presentation, we present an Autonomic Runtime Manager (ARM) that supports the development of autonomic applications. The ARM includes two modules: online monitoring and analysis module and autonomic planning and scheduling module. The ARM behaves as a closed-loop control system that dynamically controls and manages the execution of the applications at runtime. It regularly senses the state changes of both the applications and the underlying computing resources. It then uses these runtime information and prior knowledge about the application behavior and its physics to identify the appropriate solution methods as well as the required computing and storage resources. Consequently this approach enables us to develop autonomic applications, which are capable of self-management and self-optimization. We have developed and implemented the autonomic computing paradigms for several large scale applications such as wild fire simulations, simulations of flow through variably saturated geologic formations, and life sciences. The distributed wildfire simulation models the wildfire spread behavior by considering such factors as fuel

  4. Future Applications of Electronic Technology to Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Arthur J.; And Others

    Developments in electronic technology that have improved and linked together telecommunication and computers are discussed, as well as their use in instruction, implications of this use, and associated issues. The first section briefly describes the following developments: microcomputers and microprocessors, bubble memory, lasers, holography,…

  5. High temperature electronics applications in space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurgens, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    The extension of the range of operating temperatures of electronic components and systems for planetary exploration is examined. In particular, missions which utilize balloon-borne instruments to study the Venusian and Jovian atmospheres are discussed. Semiconductor development and devices including power sources, ultrastable oscillators, transmitters, antennas, electromechanical devices, and deployment systems are addressed.

  6. Sensor fusion with application to electronic warfare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanzalari, Robert M.; Van Alstine, Edward

    1999-03-01

    The Night Vision and Electronics Sensors Directorate, Survivability/Camouflage, Concealment and Deception Division mission is to provide affordable aircraft and ground electronic sensor/systems and signature management technologies which enhance survivability and lethality of US and International Forces. Since 1992, efforts have been undertaken in the area of Situational Awareness and Dominant Battlespace Knowledge. These include the Radar Deception and Jamming Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD), Survivability and Targeting System Integration, Integrated Situation Awareness and Targeting ATD, Combat Identification, Ground Vehicle Situational Awareness, and Combined Electronic Intelligence Target Correlation. This paper will address the Situational Awareness process as it relates to the integration of Electronic Warfare (EW) with targeting and intelligence and information warfare systems. Discussion will be presented on the Sensor Fusion, Situation Assessment and Response Management Strategies. Sensor Fusion includes the association, correlation, and combination of data and information from single and multiple sources to achieve refined position and identity estimates, and complete and timely assessments of situations and threats as well as their significance. Situation Assessment includes the process of interpreting and expressing the environmnet based on situation abstract products and information from technical and doctrinal data bases. Finally, Response Management provides the centralized, adaptable control of all renewable and expendable countermeasure assets resulting in optimization of the response to the threat environment.

  7. Defect engineering of the electronic transport through cuprous oxide interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadlallah, Mohamed M.; Eckern, Ulrich; Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2016-06-01

    The electronic transport through Au–(Cu2O)n–Au junctions is investigated using first-principles calculations and the nonequilibrium Green’s function method. The effect of varying the thickness (i.e., n) is studied as well as that of point defects and anion substitution. For all Cu2O thicknesses the conductance is more enhanced by bulk-like (in contrast to near-interface) defects, with the exception of O vacancies and Cl substitutional defects. A similar transmission behavior results from Cu deficiency and N substitution, as well as from Cl substitution and N interstitials for thick Cu2O junctions. In agreement with recent experimental observations, it is found that N and Cl doping enhances the conductance. A Frenkel defect, i.e., a superposition of an O interstitial and O substitutional defect, leads to a remarkably high conductance. From the analysis of the defect formation energies, Cu vacancies are found to be particularly stable, in agreement with earlier experimental and theoretical work.

  8. Defect engineering of the electronic transport through cuprous oxide interlayers

    PubMed Central

    Fadlallah, Mohamed M.; Eckern, Ulrich; Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The electronic transport through Au–(Cu2O)n–Au junctions is investigated using first-principles calculations and the nonequilibrium Green’s function method. The effect of varying the thickness (i.e., n) is studied as well as that of point defects and anion substitution. For all Cu2O thicknesses the conductance is more enhanced by bulk-like (in contrast to near-interface) defects, with the exception of O vacancies and Cl substitutional defects. A similar transmission behavior results from Cu deficiency and N substitution, as well as from Cl substitution and N interstitials for thick Cu2O junctions. In agreement with recent experimental observations, it is found that N and Cl doping enhances the conductance. A Frenkel defect, i.e., a superposition of an O interstitial and O substitutional defect, leads to a remarkably high conductance. From the analysis of the defect formation energies, Cu vacancies are found to be particularly stable, in agreement with earlier experimental and theoretical work. PMID:27256905

  9. Defect engineering of the electronic transport through cuprous oxide interlayers.

    PubMed

    Fadlallah, Mohamed M; Eckern, Ulrich; Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The electronic transport through Au-(Cu2O)n-Au junctions is investigated using first-principles calculations and the nonequilibrium Green's function method. The effect of varying the thickness (i.e., n) is studied as well as that of point defects and anion substitution. For all Cu2O thicknesses the conductance is more enhanced by bulk-like (in contrast to near-interface) defects, with the exception of O vacancies and Cl substitutional defects. A similar transmission behavior results from Cu deficiency and N substitution, as well as from Cl substitution and N interstitials for thick Cu2O junctions. In agreement with recent experimental observations, it is found that N and Cl doping enhances the conductance. A Frenkel defect, i.e., a superposition of an O interstitial and O substitutional defect, leads to a remarkably high conductance. From the analysis of the defect formation energies, Cu vacancies are found to be particularly stable, in agreement with earlier experimental and theoretical work. PMID:27256905

  10. Enabling Science and Engineering Applications on the Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, Ed

    2004-08-25

    The Grid has the potential to fundamentally change the way science and engineering are done. Aggregate power of computing resources connected by networks - of the Grid - exceeds that of any single supercomputer by many orders of magnitude. At the same time, our ability to carry out computations of the scale and level of detail required, for example, to study the Universe, or simulate a rocket engine, are severely constrained by available computing power. Hence, such applications should be one of the main driving forces behind the development of Grid computing. I will discuss some large scale applications, including simulations of colliding black holes, and show how they are driving the development of Grid computing technology. Applications are already being developed that are not only aware of their needs, but also of the resources available to them on the Grid. They will be able to adapt themselves automatically to respond to their changing needs, to spawn off tasks on other resources, and to adapt to the changing characteristics of the Grid including machine and network loads and availability. I will discuss a number of innovative scenarios for computing on the Grid enabled by such technologies, and demonstrate how close these are to being a reality.

  11. Generation and application of bessel beams in electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Harris, Jérémie; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Balboni, Roberto; Mafakheri, Erfan; Dennis, Mark R; Frabboni, Stefano; Boyd, Robert W; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2016-07-01

    We report a systematic treatment of the holographic generation of electron Bessel beams, with a view to applications in electron microscopy. We describe in detail the theory underlying hologram patterning, as well as the actual electron-optical configuration used experimentally. We show that by optimizing our nanofabrication recipe, electron Bessel beams can be generated with relative efficiencies reaching 37±3%. We also demonstrate by tuning various hologram parameters that electron Bessel beams can be produced with many visible rings, making them ideal for interferometric applications, or in more highly localized forms with fewer rings, more suitable for imaging. We describe the settings required to tune beam localization in this way, and explore beam and hologram configurations that allow the convergences and topological charges of electron Bessel beams to be controlled. We also characterize the phase structure of the Bessel beams generated with our technique, using a simulation procedure that accounts for imperfections in the hologram manufacturing process. PMID:27203186

  12. Chitosan for gene delivery and orthopedic tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Rosanne; O'Brien, Fergal J; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy involves the introduction of foreign genetic material into cells in order exert a therapeutic effect. The application of gene therapy to the field of orthopaedic tissue engineering is extremely promising as the controlled release of therapeutic proteins such as bone morphogenetic proteins have been shown to stimulate bone repair. However, there are a number of drawbacks associated with viral and synthetic non-viral gene delivery approaches. One natural polymer which has generated interest as a gene delivery vector is chitosan. Chitosan is biodegradable, biocompatible and non-toxic. Much of the appeal of chitosan is due to the presence of primary amine groups in its repeating units which become protonated in acidic conditions. This property makes it a promising candidate for non-viral gene delivery. Chitosan-based vectors have been shown to transfect a number of cell types including human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and human cervical cancer cells (HeLa). Aside from its use in gene delivery, chitosan possesses a range of properties that show promise in tissue engineering applications; it is biodegradable, biocompatible, has anti-bacterial activity, and, its cationic nature allows for electrostatic interaction with glycosaminoglycans and other proteoglycans. It can be used to make nano- and microparticles, sponges, gels, membranes and porous scaffolds. Chitosan has also been shown to enhance mineral deposition during osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in vitro. The purpose of this review is to critically discuss the use of chitosan as a gene delivery vector with emphasis on its application in orthopedic tissue engineering. PMID:23676471

  13. Electronics for Deep Space Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, R. L.; Hammond, A.; Dickman, J. E.; Gerber, S. S.; Elbuluk, M. E.; Overton, E.

    2002-01-01

    Deep space probes and planetary exploration missions require electrical power management and control systems that are capable of efficient and reliable operation in very cold temperature environments. Typically, in deep space probes, heating elements are used to keep the spacecraft electronics near room temperature. The utilization of power electronics designed for and operated at low temperature will contribute to increasing efficiency and improving reliability of space power systems. At NASA Glenn Research Center, commercial-off-the-shelf devices as well as developed components are being investigated for potential use at low temperatures. These devices include semiconductor switching devices, magnetics, and capacitors. Integrated circuits such as digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters, DC/DC converters, operational amplifiers, and oscillators are also being evaluated. In this paper, results will be presented for selected analog-to-digital converters, oscillators, DC/DC converters, and pulse width modulation (PWM) controllers.

  14. Advanced superconducting materials for electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, M. R.

    1980-10-01

    Developments in the fabrication of tunnel junctions using Nb- and V-base transition-metal compounds and alloys are summarized. Particular attention is given to the advances in codeposition of these refractory high-transition-temperature superconductors and the properties of thin films deposited by the dual-electron-beam coevaporation technique. Problems associated with these materials are identified, and prospects for the future are discussed. Of the materials reviewed, Nb3Sn is singled out as one deserving further development.

  15. Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, Theodore H. H.

    1991-01-01

    The following tasks on the study of advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures are described: (1) constructions of special elements which contain traction-free circular boundaries; (2) formulation of new version of mixed variational principles and new version of hybrid stress elements; (3) establishment of methods for suppression of kinematic deformation modes; (4) construction of semiLoof plate and shell elements by assumed stress hybrid method; and (5) elastic-plastic analysis by viscoplasticity theory using the mechanical subelement model.

  16. Application of advanced coating techniques to rocket engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    The materials problem in the space shuttle main engine (SSME) is reviewed. Potential coatings and the method of their application for improved life of SSME components are discussed. A number of advanced coatings for turbine blade components and disks are being developed and tested in a multispecimen thermal fatigue fluidized bed facility at IIT Research Institute. This facility is capable of producing severe strains of the degree present in blades and disk components of the SSME. The potential coating systems and current efforts at IITRI being taken for life extension of the SSME components are summarized.

  17. Model-Driven Engineering Support for Building C# Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derezińska, Anna; Ołtarzewski, Przemysław

    Realization of Model-Driven Engineering (MDE) vision of software development requires a comprehensive and user-friendly tool support. This paper presents a UML-based approach for building trustful C# applications. UML models are refined using profiles for assigning class model elements to C# concepts and to elements of implementation project. Stereotyped elements are verified on life and during model to code transformation in order to prevent creation of an incorrect code. The Transform OCL Fragments into C# system (T.O.F.I.C.) was created as a feature of the Eclipse environment. The system extends the IBM Rational Software Architect tool.

  18. Continuous detonation wave engine studies for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidenko, D. M.; Jouot, F.; Kudryavtsev, A. N.; Dupré, G.; Gökalp, I.; Daniau, E.; Falempin, F.

    2009-09-01

    Continuous Detonation Wave Rocket Engine (CDWRE) for space application is considered in the framework of French R&D and scientific research. A CDWRE demonstrator and a dedicated test bench are designed by MBDA France. At ICARE-CNRS, theoretical and experimental studies on the CDWRE internal processes are under progress. Twodimensional (2D) Euler simulations of a CDWRE combustion chamber have been performed to investigate the effect of geometrical and injection parameters on the internal process and combustion chamber performance. An experimental study is prepared to investigate liquid oxygen breakup and vaporization in a helium flow as well as detonation initiation and propagation in a spray of liquid oxygen/gaseous hydrogen.

  19. Robotic applications at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Griebenow, B.E.; Marts, D.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has several programs and projected programs that involve work in hazardous environments. Robotics/remote handling technology is being considered for an active role in these programs. The most appealing aspect of using robotics is in the area of personnel safety. Any task requiring an individual to enter a hazardous or potentially hazardous environment can benefit substantially from robotics by removing the operator from the environment and having him conduct the work remotely. Several INEL programs were evaluated based on their applications for robotics and the results and some conclusions are discussed in this paper. 1 fig.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance in environmental engineering: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Lens, P N; Hemminga, M A

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to applications in the field of environmental science and engineering. The underlying principles of high resolution solution and solid state NMR, relaxation time measurements and imaging are presented. Then, the use of NMR is illustrated and reviewed in studies of biodegradation and biotransformation of soluble and solid organic matter, removal of nutrients and xenobiotics, fate of heavy metal ions, and transport processes in bioreactor systems. PMID:10335581

  1. Nanoscale biomaterial interface modification for advanced tissue engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, V.; Zykova, A.; Smolik, J.; Rogovska, R.; Donkov, N.; Goltsev, A.; Dubrava, T.; Rassokha, I.; Georgieva, V.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, various stem cells, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), have been found to have considerable potential for application in tissue engineering and future advanced therapies due to their biological capability to differentiate into specific lineages. Modified surface properties, such as composition, nano-roughness and wettability, affect the most important processes at the biomaterial interface. The aim of the present is work is to study the stem cells' (MSCs) adhesive potential, morphology, phenotypical characteristics in in vitro tests, and to distinguish betwen the different factors influencing the cell/biomaterial interaction, such as nano-topography, surface chemistry and surface free energy.

  2. Radiation design criteria handbook. [design criteria for electronic parts applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, A. G.; Martin, K. E.; Douglas, S.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation design criteria for electronic parts applications in space environments are provided. The data were compiled from the Mariner/Jupiter Saturn 1977 electronic parts radiation test program. Radiation sensitive device types were exposed to radiation environments compatible with the MJS'77 requirements under suitable bias conditions. A total of 189 integrated circuits, transistors, and other semiconductor device types were tested.

  3. 20 CFR 321.1 - Filing applications electronically.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Section 321.1 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT ELECTRONIC FILING OF APPLICATIONS AND CLAIMS FOR BENEFITS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT... under the Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act may be filed electronically through the Board's...

  4. 20 CFR 321.1 - Filing applications electronically.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Section 321.1 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT ELECTRONIC FILING OF APPLICATIONS AND CLAIMS FOR BENEFITS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT... under the Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act may be filed electronically through the Board's...

  5. 20 CFR 321.1 - Filing applications electronically.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Section 321.1 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT ELECTRONIC FILING OF APPLICATIONS AND CLAIMS FOR BENEFITS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT... under the Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act may be filed electronically through the Board's...

  6. 20 CFR 321.1 - Filing applications electronically.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 321.1 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT ELECTRONIC FILING OF APPLICATIONS AND CLAIMS FOR BENEFITS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT... under the Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act may be filed electronically through the Board's...

  7. 20 CFR 321.1 - Filing applications electronically.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Section 321.1 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT ELECTRONIC FILING OF APPLICATIONS AND CLAIMS FOR BENEFITS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT... under the Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act may be filed electronically through the Board's...

  8. Gap engineering using Hellmann-Feynmann forces: method and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasai, Kiran; Biawas, Parthapratim; Drabold, D. A.

    Materials with optimized band gap are needed in many specialized applications. In this talk, we demonstrate that Hellmann-Feynman forces associated with the gap states can be used to find atomic coordinates that yield desired electronic density of states. Using tight-binding models, we show that this approach may be used to arrive at electronically designed models of amorphous silicon and carbon. We provide a simple recipe to include a priori electronic information in the formation of computer models of materials, and prove that this information may have profound structural consequences. We'll briefly discuss implementation of the method in ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations and highlight the latest feats of the method ranging from modeling amorphous semi-conducting materials to understanding the structure and properties of memory materials. K. Prasai, P. Biswas, and D. A. Drabold, Scientific reports, 5 (2015).

  9. The common engine concept for ALS application - A cost reduction approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, E. K.; Schindler, C. M.

    1989-01-01

    Future launch systems require the application of propulsion systems which have been designed and developed to meet mission model needs while providing high degrees of reliability and cost effectiveness. Vehicle configurations which utilize different propellant combinations for booster and core stages can benefit from a common engine approach where a single engine design can be configured to operate on either set of propellants and thus serve as either a booster or core engine. Engine design concepts and mission application for a vehicle employing a common engine are discussed. Engine program cost estimates were made and cost savings, over the design and development of two unique engines, estimated.

  10. Vertical and Horizontal Integration of Laboratory Curricula and Course Projects across the Electronic Engineering Technology Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhan, Wei; Goulart, Ana; Morgan, Joseph A.; Porter, Jay R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the details of the curricular development effort with a focus on the vertical and horizontal integration of laboratory curricula and course projects within the Electronic Engineering Technology (EET) program at Texas A&M University. Both software and hardware aspects are addressed. A common set of software tools are…

  11. Engineering, Trade, and Technical Cluster. Task Analyses. Drafting and Design Technology, Precision Machining Technology, Electronics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum and Resource Center.

    Developed in Virginia, this publication contains task analysis guides to support selected tech prep programs that prepare students for careers in the engineering, trade, and technical cluster. Three occupations are profiled: drafting and design technology, precision machining technology, and electronics technology. Each guide contains the…

  12. Stationary Engineers Apprenticeship. Related Training Modules. 5.1-5.17 Electricity/Electronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This packet of 17 learning modules on electricity/electronics is one of 20 such packets developed for apprenticeship training for stationary engineers. Introductory materials are a complete listing of all available modules and a supplementary reference list. Each module contains some or all of these components: goal, performance indicators,…

  13. 48 CFR 836.606-73 - Application of 6 percent architect-engineer fee limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... architect-engineer fee limitation. 836.606-73 Section 836.606-73 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 836.606-73 Application of 6 percent architect-engineer fee...

  14. 48 CFR 836.606-73 - Application of 6 percent architect-engineer fee limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... architect-engineer fee limitation. 836.606-73 Section 836.606-73 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 836.606-73 Application of 6 percent architect-engineer fee...

  15. 48 CFR 836.606-73 - Application of 6 percent architect-engineer fee limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... architect-engineer fee limitation. 836.606-73 Section 836.606-73 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 836.606-73 Application of 6 percent architect-engineer fee...

  16. 48 CFR 836.606-73 - Application of 6 percent architect-engineer fee limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... architect-engineer fee limitation. 836.606-73 Section 836.606-73 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 836.606-73 Application of 6 percent architect-engineer fee...

  17. Evaluation of Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu Phuoc; Knuth, Williams; Michaels, Scott; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Rocket-based combined-cycle engines (RBBC) being considered at NASA for future generation launch vehicles feature clusters of small rocket thrusters as part of the engine components. Depending on specific RBBC concepts, these thrusters may be operated at various operating conditions including power level and/or propellant mixture ratio variations. To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for the subject cycle engine application. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concepts not only offer the system simplicity but they also would enhance the combustion performance. The test results showed that the chamber performance was markedly high even at a low chamber length-to- diameter ratio (L/D). This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging.

  18. Osteochondral tissue engineering: scaffolds, stem cells and applications

    PubMed Central

    Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Salih, Vehid; Beier, Justus P; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2012-01-01

    Osteochondral tissue engineering has shown an increasing development to provide suitable strategies for the regeneration of damaged cartilage and underlying subchondral bone tissue. For reasons of the limitation in the capacity of articular cartilage to self-repair, it is essential to develop approaches based on suitable scaffolds made of appropriate engineered biomaterials. The combination of biodegradable polymers and bioactive ceramics in a variety of composite structures is promising in this area, whereby the fabrication methods, associated cells and signalling factors determine the success of the strategies. The objective of this review is to present and discuss approaches being proposed in osteochondral tissue engineering, which are focused on the application of various materials forming bilayered composite scaffolds, including polymers and ceramics, discussing the variety of scaffold designs and fabrication methods being developed. Additionally, cell sources and biological protein incorporation methods are discussed, addressing their interaction with scaffolds and highlighting the potential for creating a new generation of bilayered composite scaffolds that can mimic the native interfacial tissue properties, and are able to adapt to the biological environment. PMID:22452848

  19. CESAR: Cryogenic Electronics for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revéret, V.; de la Broïse, X.; Fermon, C.; Pannetier-Lecoeur, M.; Pigot, C.; Rodriguez, L.; Sauvageot, J.-L.; Jin, Y.; Marnieros, S.; Bouchier, D.; Putzeys, J.; Long, Y.; Kiss, C.; Kiraly, S.; Barbera, M.; Lo Cicero, U.; Brown, P.; Carr, C.; Whiteside, B.

    2014-08-01

    Ultra-low temperature sensors provide unprecedented performances in X-ray and far infrared astronomy by taking advantage of physical properties of matter close to absolute zero. CESAR is an FP7 funded project started in December 2010, that gathers six European laboratories around the development of high performances cryogenic electronics. The goal of the project is to provide far-IR, X-ray and magnetic sensors with signal-processing capabilities at the heart of the detectors. We present the major steps that constitute the CESAR work, and the main results achieved so far.

  20. Inspection applications with higher electron beam energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, D. R.; Jones, J. L.; Yoon, W. Y.; Haskell, K. J.; Sterbentz, J. W.; Zabriskie, J. M.; Hunt, A. W.; Harmon, F.; Kinlaw, M. T.

    2005-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory has developed prototype shielded nuclear material detection systems based on pulsed photonuclear assessment (PPA) techniques for the inspection of cargo containers. During this work, increased nuclear material detection capabilities have been demonstrated at higher electron beam energies than those allowed by federal regulations for cargo inspection. This paper gives a general overview of a nuclear material detection system, the PPA technique and discusses the benefits of using these higher energies. This paper also includes a summary of the numerical and test results from LINAC operations up to 24 MeV and discusses some of the federal energy limitations associated with cargo inspection.

  1. A review on stereolithography and its applications in biomedical engineering.

    PubMed

    Melchels, Ferry P W; Feijen, Jan; Grijpma, Dirk W

    2010-08-01

    Stereolithography is a solid freeform technique (SFF) that was introduced in the late 1980s. Although many other techniques have been developed since then, stereolithography remains one of the most powerful and versatile of all SFF techniques. It has the highest fabrication accuracy and an increasing number of materials that can be processed is becoming available. In this paper we discuss the characteristic features of the stereolithography technique and compare it to other SFF techniques. The biomedical applications of stereolithography are reviewed, as well as the biodegradable resin materials that have been developed for use with stereolithography. Finally, an overview of the application of stereolithography in preparing porous structures for tissue engineering is given. PMID:20478613

  2. A Simplified Rasterstereography Measuring Technique With Application To Biomedical Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elad, D.; Zeltser, R.; Sahar, M.; Avidor, J. M.; Einav, S.; Rosenberg, N.

    1989-04-01

    Noncontact measurements of the topography of irregular biological surfaces are important needs for biological investigators. Direct measurements with a mechanical probe are not recommended or are not feasible, especially when the biological surface interacts with another physical medium. Existing stereophotogrammetric techniques are usually designed for static measurements and are based on complex optical systems, or require lengthy computations to produce accuracies which are beyond the practical biomedical needs. This work presents a novel noncontact technique for dynamic visualization and measurement of three-dimensional surfaces of moving boundaries for applications to biomedical studies. The system is similar to rasterstereography, but involves advanced methods of image processing and linearizations that simplify the geometry reconstruction procedure. The accuracy of the measured three-dimensional geometry is better than most practical applications in biomedical engineering. Measurements of the geometry of a collapsible tube under static and dynamic conditions are presented.

  3. 46 CFR 11.504 - Application of deck service for limited engineer endorsements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application of deck service for limited engineer... OFFICERS AND SEAMEN REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.504 Application of deck service for limited engineer endorsements. Service gained in the...

  4. 46 CFR 11.504 - Application of deck service for limited engineer endorsements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Application of deck service for limited engineer... OFFICERS AND SEAMEN REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.504 Application of deck service for limited engineer endorsements. Service gained in the...

  5. 46 CFR 11.504 - Application of deck service for limited engineer endorsements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application of deck service for limited engineer... OFFICERS AND SEAMEN REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.504 Application of deck service for limited engineer endorsements. Service gained in the...

  6. 46 CFR 11.504 - Application of deck service for limited engineer endorsements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application of deck service for limited engineer... OFFICERS AND SEAMEN REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.504 Application of deck service for limited engineer endorsements. Service gained in the...

  7. Pulsed electron accelerator for radiation technologies in the enviromental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenev, Sergey

    1997-05-01

    The project of pulsed electron accelerator for radiation technologies in the environmental applications is considered. An accelerator consists of high voltage generator with vacuum insulation and vacuum diode with plasma cathode on the basis discharge on the surface of dielectric of large dimensions. The main parameters of electron accelerators are following: kinetic energy 0.2 - 2.0 MeV, electron beam current 1 - 30 kA and pulse duration 1- 5 microseconds. The main applications of accelerator for decomposition of wastewaters are considered.

  8. Cryogenic Applications of Commercial Electronic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Ernest D.; Benford, Dominic J.; Forgione, Joshua B.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a range of techniques useful for constructing analog and digital circuits for operation in a liquid Helium environment (4.2K), using commercially available low power components. The challenges encountered in designing cryogenic electronics include finding components that can function usefully in the cold and possess low enough power dissipation so as not to heat the systems they are designed to measure. From design, test, and integration perspectives it is useful for components to operate similarly at room and cryogenic temperatures; however this is not a necessity. Some of the circuits presented here have been used successfully in the MUSTANG and in the GISMO camera to build a complete digital to analog multiplexer (which will be referred to as the Cryogenic Address Driver board). Many of the circuit elements described are of a more general nature rather than specific to the Cryogenic Address Driver board, and were studied as a part of a more comprehensive approach to addressing a larger set of cryogenic electronic needs.

  9. Cryogenic applications of commercial electronic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Ernest D.; Benford, Dominic J.; Forgione, Joshua B.; Harvey Moseley, S.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a range of techniques useful for constructing analog and digital circuits for operation in a liquid Helium environment (4.2 K), using commercially available low power components. The challenges encountered in designing cryogenic electronics include finding components that can function usefully in the cold and possess low enough power dissipation so as not to heat the systems they are designed to measure. From design, test, and integration perspectives it is useful for components to operate similarly at room and cryogenic temperatures; however this is not a necessity. Some of the circuits presented here have been used successfully in the MUSTANG [1] and in the GISMO [2] camera to build a complete digital to analog multiplexer (which will be referred to as the Cryogenic Address Driver board). Many of the circuit elements described are of a more general nature rather than specific to the Cryogenic Address Driver board, and were studied as a part of a more comprehensive approach to addressing a larger set of cryogenic electronic needs.

  10. Strategies in biomimetic surface engineering of nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yong-Kuan; Winnik, Françoise M.

    2012-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) play an increasingly important role in biomedical sciences and in nanomedicine. Yet, in spite of significant advances, it remains difficult to construct drug-loaded NPs with precisely defined therapeutic effects, in terms of release time and spatial targeting. The body is a highly complex system that imposes multiple physiological and cellular barriers to foreign objects. Upon injection in the blood stream or following oral administation, NPs have to bypass numerous barriers prior to reaching their intended target. A particularly successful design strategy consists in masking the NP to the biological environment by covering it with an outer surface mimicking the composition and functionality of the cell's external membrane. This review describes this biomimetic approach. First, we outline key features of the composition and function of the cell membrane. Then, we present recent developments in the fabrication of molecules that mimic biomolecules present on the cell membrane, such as proteins, peptides, and carbohydrates. We present effective strategies to link such bioactive molecules to the NPs surface and we highlight the power of this approach by presenting some exciting examples of biomimetically engineered NPs useful for multimodal diagnostics and for target-specific drug/gene delivery applications. Finally, critical directions for future research and applications of biomimetic NPs are suggested to the readers.

  11. Review: photopolymerizable and degradable biomaterials for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Ifkovits, Jamie L; Burdick, Jason A

    2007-10-01

    Photopolymerizable and degradable biomaterials are finding widespread application in the field of tissue engineering for the engineering of tissues such as bone, cartilage, and liver. The spatial and temporal control afforded by photoinitiated polymerizations has allowed for the development of injectable materials that can deliver cells and growth factors, as well as for the fabrication of scaffolding with complex structures. The materials developed for these applications range from entirely synthetic polymers (e.g., poly(ethylene glycol)) to purely natural polymers (e.g., hyaluronic acid) that are modified with photoreactive groups, with degradation based on the hydrolytic or enzymatic degradation of bonds in the polymer backbone or crosslinks. The degradation behavior also ranges from purely bulk to entirely surface degrading, based on the nature of the backbone chemistry and type of degradable units. The mechanical properties of these polymers are primarily based on factors such as the network crosslinking density and polymer concentration. As we better understand biological features necessary to control cellular behavior, smarter materials are being developed that can incorporate and mimic many of these factors. PMID:17658993

  12. A versatile digital video engine for safeguards and security applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, W.R.; Johnson, C.S.; DeKeyser, P.

    1996-08-01

    The capture and storage of video images have been major engineering challenges for safeguard and security applications since the video camera provided a method to observe remote operations. The problems of designing reliable video cameras were solved in the early 1980`s with the introduction of the CCD (charged couple device) camera. The first CCD cameras cost in the thousands of dollars but have now been replaced by cameras costing in the hundreds. The remaining problem of storing and viewing video images in both attended and unattended video surveillance systems and remote monitoring systems is being solved by sophisticated digital compression systems. One such system is the PC-104 three card set which is literally a ``video engine`` that can provide power for video storage systems. The use of digital images in surveillance systems makes it possible to develop remote monitoring systems, portable video surveillance units, image review stations, and authenticated camera modules. This paper discusses the video card set and how it can be used in many applications.

  13. Preparation of Laponite Bioceramics for Potential Bone Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Ju, Yaping; Li, Jipeng; Zhang, Yongxing; Li, Jinhua; Liu, Xuanyong; Shi, Xiangyang; Zhao, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    We report a facile approach to preparing laponite (LAP) bioceramics via sintering LAP powder compacts for bone tissue engineering applications. The sintering behavior and mechanical properties of LAP compacts under different temperatures, heating rates, and soaking times were investigated. We show that LAP bioceramic with a smooth and porous surface can be formed at 800°C with a heating rate of 5°C/h for 6 h under air. The formed LAP bioceramic was systematically characterized via different methods. Our results reveal that the LAP bioceramic possesses an excellent surface hydrophilicity and serum absorption capacity, and good cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility as demonstrated by resazurin reduction assay of rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) and hemolytic assay of pig red blood cells, respectively. The potential bone tissue engineering applicability of LAP bioceramic was explored by studying the surface mineralization behavior via soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF), as well as the surface cellular response of rMSCs. Our results suggest that LAP bioceramic is able to induce hydroxyapatite deposition on its surface when soaked in SBF and rMSCs can proliferate well on the LAP bioceramic surface. Most strikingly, alkaline phosphatase activity together with alizarin red staining results reveal that the produced LAP bioceramic is able to induce osteoblast differentiation of rMSCs in growth medium without any inducing factors. Finally, in vivo animal implantation, acute systemic toxicity test and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-staining data demonstrate that the prepared LAP bioceramic displays an excellent biosafety and is able to heal the bone defect. Findings from this study suggest that the developed LAP bioceramic holds a great promise for treating bone defects in bone tissue engineering. PMID:24955961

  14. Terahertz electronics for sensing and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Short channel field effect transistors can detect terahertz radiation. Such detection is enabled by the excitation of the plasma waves rectified due to the device nonlinearities. The resulting response has nanometer scale spatial resolution and can be modulated in the sub THz range. This technology could enable a variety of sensing, imaging, and wireless communication applications, including detection of biological and chemical hazardous agents, cancer detection, shortrange covert communications (in THz and sub-THz windows), and applications in radio astronomy. Field effect transistors implemented using III-V, III-N, Si, SiGe, and graphene have been used to detect THz radiation. Using silicon transistors in plasmonic regimes is especially appealing because of compatibility with standard readout silicon VLSI components.

  15. Electronic journals: Their use by teachers/researchers of engineering and social sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Fernanda; Machado, Diana; Fernandes, Alberto; Ribeiro, Fernanda

    2015-02-01

    Libraries must attend the needs of their different users. Academics are usually a particular kind of users with specific needs. Universities are environments where scientific communication is essential and where electronic format of journals is becoming more and more frequently used. This way it becomes increasingly important to understand how academics from different scientific areas use the available electronic resources. The aim of this study is to better understand the existing differences among the users of electronic journals in Engineering and Social Sciences. The research undertaken was mainly focused on the study of the use of electronic journals by teachers/researchers from the Faculties of Engineering and of Arts from the University of Porto, Portugal. In this study an international survey was used in order to characterize the levels of use and access of electronic journals by these communities. The ways of seeking and using scientific information, namely in terms frequency of access, the number of articles consulted, the use of databases and the preference of publishing in electronic journals were analyzed. A set of comparisons were established and results indicate an extensive use of the electronic format, regardless the faculty. However, some differences emerge when it comes to details. Such is the case of the usage rate of reference management software which is considerably more used by Engineering academics than Social Science ones. Generally, electronic journals meeting the information needs of its users and are increasingly used as a preferred means of research. Though, some particular differences in the use of them have emerged, when comparing academics from these two faculties.

  16. Electronic journals: Their use by teachers/researchers of engineering and social sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Fernanda Machado, Diana Fernandes, Alberto Ribeiro, Fernanda

    2015-02-09

    Libraries must attend the needs of their different users. Academics are usually a particular kind of users with specific needs. Universities are environments where scientific communication is essential and where electronic format of journals is becoming more and more frequently used. This way it becomes increasingly important to understand how academics from different scientific areas use the available electronic resources. The aim of this study is to better understand the existing differences among the users of electronic journals in Engineering and Social Sciences. The research undertaken was mainly focused on the study of the use of electronic journals by teachers/researchers from the Faculties of Engineering and of Arts from the University of Porto, Portugal. In this study an international survey was used in order to characterize the levels of use and access of electronic journals by these communities. The ways of seeking and using scientific information, namely in terms frequency of access, the number of articles consulted, the use of databases and the preference of publishing in electronic journals were analyzed. A set of comparisons were established and results indicate an extensive use of the electronic format, regardless the faculty. However, some differences emerge when it comes to details. Such is the case of the usage rate of reference management software which is considerably more used by Engineering academics than Social Science ones. Generally, electronic journals meeting the information needs of its users and are increasingly used as a preferred means of research. Though, some particular differences in the use of them have emerged, when comparing academics from these two faculties.

  17. Silicon Carbide Sensors and Electronics for Harsh Environment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Laura J.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor has been studied for electronic and sensing applications in extreme environment (high temperature, extreme vibration, harsh chemical media, and high radiation) that is beyond the capability of conventional semiconductors such as silicon. This is due to its near inert chemistry, superior thermomechanical and electronic properties that include high breakdown voltage and wide bandgap. An overview of SiC sensors and electronics work ongoing at NASA Glenn Research Center (NASA GRC) will be presented. The main focus will be two technologies currently being investigated: 1) harsh environment SiC pressure transducers and 2) high temperature SiC electronics. Work highlighted will include the design, fabrication, and application of SiC sensors and electronics, with recent advancements in state-of-the-art discussed as well. These combined technologies are studied for the goal of developing advanced capabilities for measurement and control of aeropropulsion systems, as well as enhancing tools for exploration systems.

  18. Aligned carbon nanotubes: from controlled synthesis to electronic applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bilu; Wang, Chuan; Liu, Jia; Che, Yuchi; Zhou, Chongwu

    2013-10-21

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess superior geometrical, electronic, chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties and are very attractive for applications in electronic devices and circuits. To make this a reality, the nanotube orientation, density, diameter, electronic property, and even chirality should be well controlled. This Feature article focuses on recent achievements researchers have made on the controlled growth of horizontally aligned SWNTs and SWNT arrays on substrates and their electronic applications. Principles and strategies to control the morphology, structure, and properties of SWNTs are reviewed in detail. Furthermore, electrical properties of field-effect transistors fabricated on both individual SWNTs and aligned SWNT arrays are discussed. State-of-the-art electronic devices and circuits based on aligned SWNTs and SWNT arrays are also highlighted. PMID:23969970

  19. A Survey of Power Electronics Applications in Aerospace Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kankam, M. David; Elbuluk, Malik E.

    2001-01-01

    The insertion of power electronics in aerospace technologies is becoming widespread. The application of semiconductor devices and electronic converters, as summarized in this paper, includes the International Space Station, satellite power system, and motor drives in 'more electric' technology applied to aircraft, starter/generators and reusable launch vehicles. Flywheels, servo systems embodying electromechanical actuation, and spacecraft on-board electric propulsion are discussed. Continued inroad by power electronics depends on resolving incompatibility of using variable frequency for 400 Hz-operated aircraft equipment. Dual-use electronic modules should reduce system development cost.

  20. Electron deposition in water vapor, with atmospheric applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olivero, J. J.; Stagat, R. W.; Green, A. E. S.

    1972-01-01

    Examination of the consequences of electron impact on water vapor in terms of the microscopic details of excitation, dissociation, ionization, and combinations of these processes. Basic electron-impact cross-section data are assembled in many forms and are incorporated into semianalytic functions suitable for analysis with digital computers. Energy deposition in water vapor is discussed, and the energy loss function is presented, along with the 'electron volts per ion pair' and the efficiencies of energy loss in various processes. Several applications of electron and water-vapor interactions in the atmospheric sciences are considered, in particular, H2O comets, aurora and airglow, and lightning.

  1. Computational Study of Primary Electrons in the Cusp Region of an Ion Engine's Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J. (Technical Monitor); Deshpande, Shirin S.; Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Menart, James A.

    2004-01-01

    In this work a computer code called PRIMA is used to study the motion of primary electrons in the magnetic cusp region of the discharge chamber of an ion engine. Even though the amount of wall area covered by the cusps is very small, the cusp regions are important because prior computational analyses have indicated that most primary electrons leave the discharge chamber through the cusps. The analysis presented here focuses on the cusp region only. The affects of the shape and size of the cusp region on primary electron travel are studied as well as the angle and location at which the electron enters the cusp region. These affects are quantified using the confinement length and the number density distributions of the primary electrons. In addition to these results comparisons of the results from PRIMA are made to experimental results for a cylindrical discharge chamber with two magnetic rings. These comparisons indicate the validity of the computer code called PRIMA.

  2. Advances in Electronic-Nose Technologies Developed for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Alphus D.; Baietto, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    The research and development of new electronic-nose applications in the biomedical field has accelerated at a phenomenal rate over the past 25 years. Many innovative e-nose technologies have provided solutions and applications to a wide variety of complex biomedical and healthcare problems. The purposes of this review are to present a comprehensive analysis of past and recent biomedical research findings and developments of electronic-nose sensor technologies, and to identify current and future potential e-nose applications that will continue to advance the effectiveness and efficiency of biomedical treatments and healthcare services for many years. An abundance of electronic-nose applications has been developed for a variety of healthcare sectors including diagnostics, immunology, pathology, patient recovery, pharmacology, physical therapy, physiology, preventative medicine, remote healthcare, and wound and graft healing. Specific biomedical e-nose applications range from uses in biochemical testing, blood-compatibility evaluations, disease diagnoses, and drug delivery to monitoring of metabolic levels, organ dysfunctions, and patient conditions through telemedicine. This paper summarizes the major electronic-nose technologies developed for healthcare and biomedical applications since the late 1980s when electronic aroma detection technologies were first recognized to be potentially useful in providing effective solutions to problems in the healthcare industry. PMID:22346620

  3. Applications and fabrication of flasks for hostile environment electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, R.R.; Craik, G.C.

    1988-02-01

    The use of electronic instrumentation in a high temperature environment such as a wellbore requires a choice between two design techniques. The preferred technique is to design a system with high temperature electronics. When there are obstacles to such a design, a workable second choice is to use a Dewar flask to provide a protected environment. Design options for building a flask and engineering information on how to use flasks is provided. Selected well logging services are made possible by using Dewar flask technology.

  4. Engineering of DNA-mediated assemblies for biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Phyllis F.

    Traditionally known as the genetic code, in recent years DNA has been engineered in new ways and applied toward novel applications in materials science and bio-nanotechnology. The nanometer features and highly specific base-pairing of DNA has enabled its use to build complex 2- and 3D nano-architectures and nano-structures. Specific DNA scaffolds include branched DNA junctions, 2D and 3D DNA "tiles" and "bricks", and DNA hydrogels that can be used for applications across various fields of materials science. Another unique feature of DNA is its ability to bind other materials through molecular recognition which has made the use of DNA aptamer or DNA-protein conjugates highly useful for applications in biosensing and identification. The main focus of this thesis is to demonstrate the use of DNA as an invaluable tool for engineering specific nanostructures for biosensing. The first chapter introduces the basics of DNA and current research in various DNA structures and assemblies and their applications. The second and third chapters describe the self-assembly of two structurally different nanomaterials using DNA, carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles. In the second chapter, the successful large-scale alignment of carbon nanotubes on a surface is shown. The study goes into the factors that affect the quality of alignment, including salt concentration, length of DNA, and annealing. In the third chapter, we show how DNA can be used to engineer discrete gold nanocrystal assemblies-"nanodumbbells"- that can adopt different structural conformations through DNA interactions. By incorporating DNA aptamers in the nanoparticle structure, these nanodumbbells can be used to sense particular analytes in solution. Chapter 4 continues the study of the nanodumbbell structures and their potential use as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) biosensors. A large measurable difference in Raman signal was experimentally obtained from the two distinct nanodumbbell conformations. This

  5. Handbook of data on selected engine components for solar thermal applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A data base on developed and commercially available power conversion system components for Rankine and Brayton cycle engines, which have potential application to solar thermal power-generating systems is presented. The status of the Stirling engine is discussed.

  6. Application of the Electronic Tongue to Milk Quality Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legin, A.; Rudnitskaya, A.; Lvova, L.; Vlasov, Yu.; D'Amico, A.; di Natale, C.; Paolesse, R.

    2000-12-01

    Electronic tongue comprising an array of 31 different chemical sensors with pattern recognition engine has been utilized for milk recognition and quality monitoring. The ability of the system to distinguish between milk samples produced by different manufacturers and theramlly treated in different ways and to monitor the process of milk spoilage has been demonstrated. The measurements and processing of the sensor array response without reference electrode have been successfully performed.

  7. Plastics disassembly versus bulk recycling: engineering design for end-of-life electronics resource recovery.

    PubMed

    Rios, Pedro; Stuart, Julie Ann; Grant, Ed

    2003-12-01

    Annual plastic flows through the business and consumer electronics manufacturing supply chain include nearly 3 billion lb of high-value engineering plastics derived from petroleum. The recovery of resource value from this stream presents critical challenges in areas of materials identification and recycling process design that demand new green engineering technologies applied together with life cycle assessment and ecological supply chain analysis to create viable plastics-to-plastics supply cycles. The sustainable recovery of potentially high-value engineering plastics streams requires that recyclers either avoid mixing plastic parts or purify later by separating smaller plastic pieces created in volume reduction (shredding) steps. Identification and separation constitute significant barriers in the plastics-to-plastics recycling value proposition. In the present work, we develop a model that accepts randomly arriving electronic products to study scenarios by which a recycler might identify and separate high-value engineering plastics as well as metals. Using discrete eventsimulation,we compare current mixed plastics recovery with spectrochemical plastic resin identification and subsequent sorting. Our results show that limited disassembly with whole-part identification can produce substantial yields in separated streams of recovered engineering thermoplastics. We find that disassembly with identification does not constitute a bottleneck, but rather, with relatively few workers, can be configured to pull the process and thus decrease maximum staging space requirements. PMID:14700333

  8. Tissue Engineering Applications of Three-Dimensional Bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yangde

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in tissue engineering have adapted the additive manufacturing technology, also known as three-dimensional printing, which is used in several industrial applications, for the fabrication of bioscaffolds and viable tissue and/or organs to overcome the limitations of other in vitro conventional methods. 3D bioprinting technology has gained enormous attention as it enabled 3D printing of a multitude of biocompatible materials, different types of cells and other supporting growth factors into complex functional living tissues in a 3D format. A major advantage of this technology is its ability for simultaneously 3D printing various cell types in defined spatial locations, which makes this technology applicable to regenerative medicine to meet the need for suitable for transplantation suitable organs and tissues. 3D bioprinting is yet to successfully overcome the many challenges related to building 3D structures that closely resemble native organs and tissues, which are complex structures with defined microarchitecture and a variety of cell types in a confined area. An integrated approach with a combination of technologies from the fields of engineering, biomaterials science, cell biology, physics, and medicine is required to address these complexities. Meeting this challenge is being made possible by directing the 3D bioprinting to manufacture biomimetic-shaped 3D structures, using organ/tissue images, obtained from magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography, and employing computer-aided design and manufacturing technologies. Applications of 3D bioprinting include the generation of multilayered skin, bone, vascular grafts, heart valves, etc. The current 3D bioprinting technologies need to be improved with respect to the mechanical strength and integrity in the manufactured constructs as the presently used biomaterials are not of optimal viscosity. A better understanding of the tissue/organ microenvironment, which consists of multiple types of

  9. Plasma Assisted Combustion: Fundamental Studies and Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefkowitz, Joseph K.

    Successful and efficient ignition in short residence time environments or ultra-lean mixtures is a key technological challenge for the evolution of advanced combustion devices in terms of both performance and efficiency. To meet this challenge, interest in plasma assisted combustion (PAC) has expanded over the past 20 years. However, understanding of the underlying physical processes of ignition by plasma discharge remains elementary. In order to shed light on the key processes involved, two main thrusts of research were undertaken in this dissertation. First, demonstration of the applicability of plasma discharges in engines and engine-like environments was carried out using a microwave discharge and a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge in an internal combustion engine and a pulsed detonation engine, respectively. Major conclusions include the extension of lean ignition limits for both engines, significant reduction of ignition time for mixtures with large minimum ignition energy, and the discovery of the inter-pulse coupling effect of nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges at high frequency. In order to understand the kinetic processes that led to these improvements, the second thrust of research directly explored the chemical kinetic processes of plasma discharges with hydrocarbon fuels. For this purpose, a low pressure flow reactor with a NRP dielectric barrier discharge cell was assembled. The discharge cell was fitted with a Herriott type multipass mirror arrangement, which allowed quantitative laser absorption spectroscopy to be performed in situ during the plasma discharge. Experiments on methane and ethylene mixtures with oxygen, argon, and helium revealed the importance of low temperature oxidation pathways in PAC. In particular, oxygen addition reactions were shown to be of primary importance in the oxidation of these small hydrocarbons in the temperature range of 300-600 K. Kinetic modeling tools, including both a coupled plasma and

  10. Graphene Oxide: Synthesis, Characterization, Electronic Structure, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Derek A.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre

    While graphite oxide was first identified in 1855 [1, 2], the recent discovery of stable graphene sheets has led to renewed interest in the chemical structure and potential applications of graphene oxide sheets. These structures have several physical properties that could aid in the large scale development of a graphene electronics industry. Depending on the degree of oxidization, graphene oxide layers can be either semiconducting or insulating and provide an important complement to metallic graphene layers. In addition, the electronic and optical properties of these films can be controlled by the selective removal or addition of oxygen. For example, selective oxidationof graphene sheets could lead to electronic circuit fabrication on the scale of a single atomic layer. Graphene oxide is also dispersible in water and other solvents and this provides a facile route for graphene deposition on a wide range of substrates for macroelectronics applications. Although graphite oxide has been known for roughly 150 years, key questions remain in regards to its chemical structure, electronic properties, and fabrication. Answering these issues has taken on special urgency with the development of graphene electronics. In this chapter, we will provide an overview of the field with special focus on synthesis, characterization, and first principles analysis of bonding and electronic structures. Finally, we will also address some of the most promising applications for graphene oxide in electronics and other industries.

  11. Transfer Printed Crystalline Nanomembrane for Versatile Electronic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung-Hun

    Flexible electronics have traditionally been addressed low-frequency applications, since the materials for the traditional flexible electronics, such as polymer and non-crystalline inorganic semiconductors, have poor electronic properties. Fast flexible electronics that operate at radio frequencies (RF), particularly at microwave frequencies, could lead to a number of novel RF applications where rigid chip-based solid-state electronics cannot easily fulfill. Single-crystal semiconductor nanomembranes (NM) that can be released from a number of wafer sources are mechanically very flexible yet exhibit outstanding electronic properties that are equivalent to their bulky counterparts. These thin flexible single-crystal materials can furthermore be placed, via transfer printing techniques, to nearly any substrate, including flexible polymers, thus creating the opportunity to realize RF flexible electronics. In this thesis, various RF transistors made of semiconductor NMs on plastic substrates will be discussed. In addition, as a photonic application, the demonstration of large-area Si NM surface normal ultra-compact photonic crystal reflectors fabricated using the laser interference lithography technique (LIL) will be discussed. Particularly, the mechanism of LIL and NM transfer without using an adhesive layer will be introduced and their optical performance will be addressed. Lastly, the realization of selective substitutional boron doping, using heavily doped Si NM as a doping source, will be discussed. A detailed mechanism using computational modeling and experimental analyses will be provided. The fabrication of high voltage diamond p-i diodes and their performance will be discussed.

  12. Engineering Graphene Conductivity for Flexible and High-Frequency Applications.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Alexander J; Carey, J David

    2015-10-14

    Advances in lightweight, flexible, and conformal electronic devices depend on materials that exhibit high electrical conductivity coupled with high mechanical strength. Defect-free graphene is one such material that satisfies both these requirements and which offers a range of attractive and tunable electrical, optoelectronic, and plasmonic characteristics for devices that operate at microwave, terahertz, infrared, or optical frequencies. Essential to the future success of such devices is therefore the ability to control the frequency-dependent conductivity of graphene. Looking to accelerate the development of high-frequency applications of graphene, here we demonstrate how readily accessible and processable organic and organometallic molecules can efficiently dope graphene to carrier densities in excess of 10(13) cm(-2) with conductivities at gigahertz frequencies in excess of 60 mS. In using the molecule 3,6-difluoro-2,5,7,7,8,8-hexacyanoquinodimethane (F2-HCNQ), a high charge transfer (CT) of 0.5 electrons per adsorbed molecule is calculated, resulting in p-type doping of graphene. n-Type doping is achieved using cobaltocene and the sulfur-containing molecule tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) with a CT of 0.41 and 0.24 electrons donated per adsorbed molecule, respectively. Efficient CT is associated with the interaction between the π electrons present in the molecule and in graphene. Calculation of the high-frequency conductivity shows dispersion-less behavior of the real component of the conductivity over a wide range of gigahertz frequencies. Potential high-frequency applications in graphene antennas and communications that can exploit these properties and the broader impacts of using molecular doping to modify functional materials that possess a low-energy Dirac cone are also discussed. PMID:26387636

  13. Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellinen, Terhi; Huuskonen-Snicker, Eeva; Olkkonen, Martta-Kaisa; Eskelinen, Pekka

    2014-05-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been used in Finland since 1980's for civil engineering applications. First applications in this field were road surveys and dam inspections. Common GPR applications in road surveys include the thickness evaluation of the pavement, subgrade soil evaluation and evaluation of the soil moisture and frost susceptibility. Since the 1990's, GPR has been used in combination with other non-destructive testing (NDT) methods in road surveys. Recently, more GPR applications have been adopted, such as evaluating bridges, tunnels, railways and concrete elements. Nowadays, compared with other countries GPR is relatively widely used in Finland for road surveys. Quite many companies, universities and research centers in Finland have their own GPR equipment and are involved in the teaching and research of the GPR method. However, further research and promotion of the GPR techniques are still needed since GPR could be used more routinely. GPR has been used to evaluate the air void content of asphalt pavements for years. Air void content is an important quality measure of pavement condition for both the new and old asphalt pavements. The first Finnish guideline was released in 1999 for the method. Air void content is obtained from the GPR data by measuring the dielectric value as continuous record. To obtain air void content data, few pavement cores must be taken for calibration. Accuracy of the method is however questioned because there are other factors that affect the dielectric value of the asphalt layer, in addition to the air void content. Therefore, a research project is currently carried out at Aalto University in Finland. The overall objective is to investigate if the existing GPR technique used in Finland is accurate enough to be used as QC/QA tool in assessing the compaction of asphalt pavements. The project is funded by the Finnish Transport Agency. Further research interests at Aalto University include developing new microwave asphalt

  14. Turbine-engine applications of thermographic-phosphor temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, B.W.; Turley, W.D.; Allison, S.W.

    1995-12-31

    The thermographic-phosphor (TP) method can measure temperature, heat flux, strain, and other physical quantities remotely in hostile and/or inaccessible environments such as the first-stage turbine components in turbine engines. It is especially useful in situations in which no other known method works well. This paper is a brief review of engine tests that demonstrated the utility of the TP method. For the most part, the results presented here are discussed only qualitatively. The papers in the bibliography describe these and other experiments and results in detail. The first viewgraph summarizes the many desirable features of the TP method. The second viewgraph describes TPs, and the third summarizes how the TP method works. To measure single-point temperatures in turbine-engine applications, we use the decay-time method, which depends on the fact that the luminescence following an impulse of ultraviolet excitation decays, with a characteristic decay time that. Is a monotonically decreasing function of temperature over some range of temperatures. The viewgraph is a set of calibration curves showing the behavior of some useful emission lines for ten important TPs. Consider Lu PO{sub 4}:Eu as an example. Below the {open_quotes}quenching{close_quotes} temperature near 900 Y, the decay time is nearly constant. Above it, the decay time decreases exponentially with the temperature. This strong functional dependence means that one can have a fairly large error in the lifetime measurement, as in environments with poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), yet still obtain high accuracy in the temperature measurement. Our more-recent data up to 1900 K show the same behavior.

  15. Multifunctional silk-heparin biomaterials for vascular tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Seib, F. Philipp; Herklotz, Manuela; Burke, Kelly A.; Maitz, Manfred F.; Werner, Carsten; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, silk has been proposed for numerous biomedical applications that go beyond its traditional use as a suture material. Silk sutures are well tolerated in humans, but the use of silk for vascular engineering applications still requires extensive biocompatibility testing. Some studies have indicated a need to modify silk to yield a hemocompatible surface. This study examined the potential of low molecular weight heparin as a material for refining silk properties by acting as a carrier for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and improving silk hemocompatibility. Heparinized silk showed a controlled VEGF release over 6 days; the released VEGF was bioactive and supported the growth of human endothelial cells. Silk samples were then assessed using a humanized hemocompatibility system that employs whole blood and endothelial cells. The overall thrombogenic response for silk was very low and similar to the clinical reference material polytetrafluoroethylene. Despite an initial inflammatory response to silk, apparent as complement and leukocyte activation, the endothelium was maintained in a resting, anticoagulant state. The low thrombogenic response and the ability to control VEGF release support the further development of silk for vascular applications. PMID:24099708

  16. Sonication induced silk fibroin cryogels for tissue engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadakia, P. U.; Jain, E.; Hixon, K. R.; Eberlin, C. T.; Sell, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we report a method to form macroporous silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds through a combination of ultrasonication followed by cryogelation at subzero temperatures. The resultant sonication induced SF cryogels encompassed larger pore sizes (151 ± 56 μm) and higher mechanical stability (127.15 ± 24.71 kPa) than their hydrogel counterparts made at room temperature. Furthermore, the addition of dopants like Manuka honey and bone char in SF cryogels did not affect cryogel synthesis but decreased the pore size in a concentration dependent manner. With no crack propagation at 50% strain and promising stability under cyclic loads, mineralization and cellular infiltration potential were analyzed for bone tissue engineering purposes. Although the scaffolds showed limited mineralization, encouraging cellular infiltration results yield promise for other tissue engineering applications. The use of mild processing conditions, a simplistic procedure, and the lack of organic solvents or chemical cross-linkers renders the combination of sonication and cryogelation as an attractive fabrication technique for 3D SF macroporous scaffolds.

  17. Freeze-cast hydroxyapatite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Dogan, Fatih; Bal, B Sonny

    2008-06-01

    Freeze casting of aqueous suspensions was investigated as a method for preparing porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds for eventual application to bone tissue engineering. Suspensions of HA particles (10-20 volume percent) were frozen unidirectionally in a cylindrical mold placed on a cold steel substrate (-20 degrees C). After sublimation of the ice, sintering for 3 h at 1350 degrees C produced constructs with dense HA lamellae, with porosity of approximately 50%, and inter-lamellar pore widths of 5-30 microm. These constructs had compressive strengths of 12 +/- 1 MPa and 5 +/- 1 MPa in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the freezing direction, respectively. Manipulation of the microstructure was achieved by modifying the solvent composition of the suspension used for freeze casting. The use of water-glycerol mixtures (20 wt% glycerol) resulted in the production of constructs with finer pores (1-10 microm) and a larger number of dendritic growth connecting the HA lamellae, and higher strength. On the other hand, the use of water-dioxane mixtures (60 wt% dioxane) resulted in a cellular-type microstructure with larger pores (90-110 microm). The mechanical response showed high strain tolerance (5-10% at the maximum stress), high strain for failure (>20%) and sensitivity to the loading rate. The favorable mechanical behavior of the porous constructs, coupled with the ability to modify their microstructure, indicates the potential of the present freeze casting route for the production of porous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. PMID:18458369

  18. Hydroxyapatite-titanium bulk composites for bone tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Alok; Biswas, Krishanu; Basu, Bikramjit

    2015-02-01

    The research work on bulk hydroxyapatite (HA)-based composites are driven by the need to develop biomaterials with better mechanical properties without compromising its bioactivity and biocompatibility properties. Despite several years of research, the mechanical properties of the HA-based composites still need to be enhanced to match the properties of natural cortical bone. In this regard, the scope of this review on the HA-based bulk biomaterials is limited to the processing and the mechanical as well as biocompatibility properties for bone tissue engineering applications of a model system that is hydroxyapatite-titanium (HA-Ti) bulk composites. It will be discussed in this review how HA-Ti based bulk composites can be processed to have better fracture toughness and strength without compromising biocompatibility. The advantages of the functionally gradient materials to integrate the mechanical and biocompatibility properties is a promising approach in hard tissue engineering and has been emphasized here in reference to the limited literature reports. On the biomaterials fabrication aspect, the recent results are discussed to demonstrate that advanced manufacturing techniques, like spark plasma sintering can be adopted as a processing route to restrict the sintering reactions, while enhancing the mechanical properties. Various toughening mechanisms related to careful tailoring of microstructure are discussed. The in vitro cytocompatibilty, cell fate processes as well as in vivo biocompatibility results are also reviewed and the use of flow cytometry to quantify in vitro cell fate processes is being emphasized. PMID:24737723

  19. Engineering derivatives from biological systems for advanced aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfield, Daniel L.; Hering, Dean H.; Cole, David

    1991-01-01

    The present study consisted of a literature survey, a survey of researchers, and a workshop on bionics. These tasks produced an extensive annotated bibliography of bionics research (282 citations), a directory of bionics researchers, and a workshop report on specific bionics research topics applicable to space technology. These deliverables are included as Appendix A, Appendix B, and Section 5.0, respectively. To provide organization to this highly interdisciplinary field and to serve as a guide for interested researchers, we have also prepared a taxonomy or classification of the various subelements of natural engineering systems. Finally, we have synthesized the results of the various components of this study into a discussion of the most promising opportunities for accelerated research, seeking solutions which apply engineering principles from natural systems to advanced aerospace problems. A discussion of opportunities within the areas of materials, structures, sensors, information processing, robotics, autonomous systems, life support systems, and aeronautics is given. Following the conclusions are six discipline summaries that highlight the potential benefits of research in these areas for NASA's space technology programs.

  20. Renewable energy technology from underpinning physics to engineering application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infield, D. G.

    2008-03-01

    The UK Energy Research Centre (UKERC) in it's submission to the DTI's 2006 Energy Review reminded us that the ''UK has abundant wind, wave and tidal resources available; its mild climate lends itself to bio-energy production, and solar radiation levels are sufficient to sustain a viable solar industry''. These technologies are at different stages of development but they all draw on basic and applied Science and Engineering. The paper will briefly review the renewable energy technologies and their potential for contributing to a sustainable energy supply. Three research topics will be highlighted that bridge the gap between the physics underpinning the energy conversion, and the engineering aspects of development and deployment; all three are highly relevant to the Government's programme on micro-generation. Two are these are taken from field of thin film photovoltaics (PV), one related to novel device development and the other to a measurement technique for assessing the manufacturing quality of PV modules and their performance. The third topic concerns the development of small building integrated wind turbines and examines the complex flow associated with such applications. The paper will conclude by listing key research challenges that are central to the search for efficient and cost-effective renewable energy generation.

  1. Development of braided fiber seals for engine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Zhong; Mutharasan, Rajakkannu; Ko, Frank K.; Du, Guang-Wu; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1993-01-01

    A new type of braided fiber seal was developed for high temperature engine applications. Development work performed includes seal design, fabrication, leakage flow testing, and flow resistance modeling. This new type of seal utilizes the high flow resistance of tightly packed fibers and the conformability of textile structures. The seal contains a core part with aligned fibers, and a sheath with braided fiber layers. Seal samples are made by using the conventional braiding process. Leakage flow measurements are then performed. Mass flow rate versus the simulated engine pressure and preload pressure is recorded. The flow resistance of the seal is analyzed using the Ergun equation for flow through porous media, including both laminar and turbulent effects. The two constants in the Ergun equation are evaluated for the seal structures. Leakage flow of the seal under the test condition is found to be in the transition flow region. The analysis is used to predict the leakage flow performance of the seal with the determined design parameters.

  2. Engineered CVD Diamond Coatings for Machining and Tribological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumpala, Ravikumar; Chandran, Maneesh; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2015-07-01

    Diamond is an allotropes of carbon and is unique because of its extreme hardness (~100 GPa), low friction coefficient (<0.05), high thermal conductivity (~2000 Wm-1 K-1), and high chemical inertness. Diamond is being synthesized artificially in bulk form as well as in the form of surface coatings for various engineering applications. The mechanical characteristics of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond coatings such as hardness, adhesion, friction coefficient, and fracture toughness can be tuned by controlling the grain size of the coatings from a few microns to a few nanometers. In this review, characteristics and performance of the CVD diamond coatings deposited on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrates were discussed with an emphasis on WC-Co grade selection, substrate pretreatment, nanocrystallinity and microcrystallinity of the coating, mechanical and tribological characteristics, coating architecture, and interfacial adhesion integrity. Engineered coating substrate architecture is essential for CVD diamond coatings to perform well under harsh and highly abrasive machining and tribological conditions.

  3. Microscale Bioadhesive Hydrogel Arrays for Cell Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ravi Ghanshyam; Purwada, Alberto; Cerchietti, Leandro; Inghirami, Giorgio; Melnick, Ari; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K; Singh, Ankur

    2014-09-01

    Bioengineered hydrogels have been explored in cell and tissue engineering applications to support cell growth and modulate its behavior. A rationally designed scaffold should allow for encapsulated cells to survive, adhere, proliferate, remodel the niche, and can be used for controlled delivery of biomolecules. Here we report a microarray of composite bioadhesive microgels with modular dimensions, tunable mechanical properties and bulk modified adhesive biomolecule composition. Composite bioadhesive microgels of maleimide functionalized polyethylene glycol (PEG-MAL) with interpenetrating network (IPN) of gelatin ionically cross-linked with silicate nanoparticles were engineered by integrating microfabrication with Michael-type addition chemistry and ionic gelation. By encapsulating clinically relevant anchorage-dependent cervical cancer cells and suspension leukemia cells as cell culture models in these composite microgels, we demonstrate enhanced cell spreading, survival, and metabolic activity compared to control gels. The composite bioadhesive hydrogels represent a platform that could be used to study independent effect of stiffness and adhesive ligand density on cell survival and function. We envision that such microarrays of cell adhesive microenvironments, which do not require harsh chemical and UV crosslinking conditions, will provide a more efficacious cell culture platform that can be used to study cell behavior and survival, function as building blocks to fabricate 3D tissue structures, cell delivery systems, and high throughput drug screening devices. PMID:25328548

  4. Materials for engine applications above 3000 deg F: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Nancy J.; Dicarlo, James A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Levine, Stanley R.; Nesbitt, James A.; Probst, Hubert B.; Sanders, William A.; Stearns, Carl A.

    1987-01-01

    Materials for future generations of aeropropulsion systems will be required to perform at ever-increasing temperatures and have properties superior to the current state of the art. Improved engine efficiency can reduce specific fuel consumption and thus increase range and reduce operating costs. The ultimate payoff gain is expected to come when materials are developed which can perform without cooling at gas temperatures to 2200 C (4000 F). An overview is presented of materials for applications above 1650 C (3000 F), some pertinent physical property data, and the rationale used: (1) to arrive at recommendations of material systems that qualify for further investigation, and (2) to develop a proposed plan of research. From an analysis of available thermochemical data it was included that such materials systems must be composed of oxide ceramics. The required structural integrity will be achieved by developing these materials into fiber-reinforced ceramic composites.

  5. Development of biosensors and their application in metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Jensen, Michael K; Keasling, Jay D

    2015-10-01

    In a sustainable bioeconomy, many commodities and high value chemicals, including pharmaceuticals, will be manufactured using microbial cell factories from renewable feedstocks. These cell factories can be efficiently generated by constructing libraries of diversified genomes followed by screening for the desired phenotypes. However, methods available for microbial genome diversification far exceed our ability to screen and select for those variants with optimal performance. Genetically encoded biosensors have shown the potential to address this gap, given their ability to respond to small molecule binding and ease of implementation with high-throughput analysis. Here we describe recent progress in biosensor development and their applications in a metabolic engineering context. We also highlight examples of how biosensors can be integrated with synthetic circuits to exert feedback regulation on the metabolism for improved performance of cell factories. PMID:26056948

  6. Negative-strand RNA viruses: genetic engineering and applications.

    PubMed Central

    Palese, P; Zheng, H; Engelhardt, O G; Pleschka, S; García-Sastre, A

    1996-01-01

    The negative-strand RNA viruses are a broad group of animal viruses that comprise several important human pathogens, including influenza, measles, mumps, rabies, respiratory syncytial, Ebola, and hantaviruses. The development of new strategies to genetically manipulate the genomes of negative-strand RNA viruses has provided us with new tools to study the structure-function relationships of the viral components and their contributions to the pathogenicity of these viruses. It is also now possible to envision rational approaches--based on genetic engineering techniques--to design live attenuated vaccines against some of these viral agents. In addition, the use of different negative-strand RNA viruses as vectors to efficiently express foreign polypeptides has also become feasible, and these novel vectors have potential applications in disease prevention as well as in gene therapy. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8876139

  7. Computer graphics application in the engineering design integration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, C. R.; Abel, R. W.; Hirsch, G. N.; Alford, G. E.; Colquitt, W. N.; Stewart, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    The computer graphics aspect of the Engineering Design Integration (EDIN) system and its application to design problems were discussed. Three basic types of computer graphics may be used with the EDIN system for the evaluation of aerospace vehicles preliminary designs: offline graphics systems using vellum-inking or photographic processes, online graphics systems characterized by direct coupled low cost storage tube terminals with limited interactive capabilities, and a minicomputer based refresh terminal offering highly interactive capabilities. The offline line systems are characterized by high quality (resolution better than 0.254 mm) and slow turnaround (one to four days). The online systems are characterized by low cost, instant visualization of the computer results, slow line speed (300 BAUD), poor hard copy, and the early limitations on vector graphic input capabilities. The recent acquisition of the Adage 330 Graphic Display system has greatly enhanced the potential for interactive computer aided design.

  8. Systems Engineering Model and Training Application for Desktop Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Jeffrey T.

    2010-01-01

    Provide a graphical user interface based simulator for desktop training, operations and procedure development and system reference. This simulator allows for engineers to train and further understand the dynamics of their system from their local desktops. It allows the users to train and evaluate their system at a pace and skill level based on the user's competency and from a perspective based on the user's need. The simulator will not require any special resources to execute and should generally be available for use. The interface is based on a concept of presenting the model of the system in ways that best suits the user's application or training needs. The three levels of views are Component View, the System View (overall system), and the Console View (monitor). These views are portals into a single model, so changing the model from one view or from a model manager Graphical User Interface will be reflected on all other views.

  9. Corps of Engineers applications for remote sensing of the environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, M. K., Jr.; Jarman, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    An objective overview is presented of the application of remote sensing technology in the Corps of Engineers. Examples are given of attempts to use the current state of the art to achieve particular disciplinary or mission oriented goals. The Corps, presently engaged in both research and development and technology transfer, has encountered some interesting situations. Practical operational utilization depends not only on technology, but also economic benefit/cost factors and some unprecedented legal, political, and social issues. Yet, at a time when increased agency commitment to operational usage is being sought, an assessment of the state of the art reveals that sensor technology, data processing and analysis, and models still require further development. There is a challenge in synchronizing technology push with the demand pull of dimly perceived user needs. They should complement each other rather than oppose. The goal is to use the combined push-pull effect to lead to increased productivity and responsiveness by the Corps.

  10. Recent advances to obtain real - Time displacements for engineering applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents recent developments and approaches (using GPS technology and real-time double-integration) to obtain displacements and, in turn, drift ratios, in real-time or near real-time to meet the needs of the engineering and user community in seismic monitoring and assessing the functionality and damage condition of structures. Drift ratios computed in near real-time allow technical assessment of the damage condition of a building. Relevant parameters, such as the type of connections and story structural characteristics (including geometry) are used in computing drifts corresponding to several pre-selected threshold stages of damage. Thus, drift ratios determined from real-time monitoring can be compared to pre-computed threshold drift ratios. The approaches described herein can be used for performance evaluation of structures and can be considered as building health-monitoring applications.

  11. Monte Carlo applications at Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, L.L.; Morford, R.J.; Wilcox, A.D.

    1980-03-01

    Twenty applications of neutron and photon transport with Monte Carlo have been described to give an overview of the current effort at HEDL. A satisfaction factor was defined which quantitatively assigns an overall return for each calculation relative to the investment in machine time and expenditure of manpower. Low satisfaction factors are frequently encountered in the calculations. Usually this is due to limitations in execution rates of present day computers, but sometimes a low satisfaction factor is due to computer code limitations, calendar time constraints, or inadequacy of the nuclear data base. Present day computer codes have taken some of the burden off of the user. Nevertheless, it is highly desirable for the engineer using the computer code to have an understanding of particle transport including some intuition for the problems being solved, to understand the construction of sources for the random walk, to understand the interpretation of tallies made by the code, and to have a basic understanding of elementary biasing techniques.

  12. Magnetic collimation of fast electrons in specially engineered targets irradiated by ultraintense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Hongbo; Zhu Shaoping; Wu Sizhong; Chen Mo; Zhou Cangtao; He, X. T.; Yu Wei; Nagatomo, Hideo

    2011-02-15

    The efficient magnetic collimation of fast electron flow transporting in overdense plasmas is investigated with two-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell numerical simulations. It is found that the specially engineered targets exhibiting either high-resistivity-core-low-resistivity-cladding structure or low-density-core-high-density-cladding structure can collimate fast electrons. Two main mechanisms to generate collimating magnetic fields are found. In high-resistivity-core-low-resistivity-cladding structure targets, the magnetic field at the interfaces is generated by the gradients of the resistivity and fast electron current, while in low-density-core-high-density-cladding structure targets, the magnetic field is generated by the rapid changing of the flow velocity of the background electrons in transverse direction (perpendicular to the flow velocity) caused by the density jump. The dependences of the maximal magnetic field on the incident laser intensity and plasma density, which are studied by numerical simulations, are supported by our analytical calculations.

  13. Laser-activated remote phosphor light engine for projection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Martin; Mehl, Oliver; Hartwig, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    Recent developments in blue emitting laser diodes enable attractive solutions in projection applications using phosphors for efficient light conversion with very high luminance levels. Various commercially available projectors incorporating this technology have entered the market in the past years. While luminous flux levels are still comparable to lamp-based systems, lifetime expectations of classical lamp systems are exceeded by far. OSRAM GmbH has been exploring this technology for several years and has introduced the PHASER® brand name (Phosphor + laser). State-of-the-art is a rotating phosphor wheel excited by blue laser diodes to deliver the necessary primary colors, either sequentially for single-imager projection engines, or simultaneously for 3-panel systems. The PHASER® technology enables flux and luminance scaling, which allows for smaller imagers and therefore cost-efficient projection solutions. The resulting overall efficiency and ANSI lumen specification at the projection screen of these systems is significantly determined by the target color gamut and the light transmission efficiency of the projection system. With increasing power and flux level demand, thermal issues, especially phosphor conversion related, dominate the opto-mechanical system design requirements. These flux levels are a great challenge for all components of an SSL-projection system (SSL:solid-state lighting). OSRAḾs PHASER® light engine platform is constantly expanded towards higher luminous flux levels as well as higher luminance levels for various applications. Recent experiments employ blue laser pump powers of multiple 100 Watts to excite various phosphors resulting in luminous flux levels of more than 40 klm.

  14. How Power Electronics Engineers Should Write and Present Technical Papers in English

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, Hirofumi

    This paper describes techniques that Japanese power electronics engineers can use to improve the quality of their technical papers written in English and the accompanying technical presentations. These techniques are based on the experience that the author has gained by participating in international conferences. Such techniques are important to discuss because the significant differences exist in writing and presentation styles between Japanese and American engineers. The author believes that such style differences are caused by differences between the Japanese and American cultures. The objective of this paper is to help Japanese engineers understand these cultural differences and improve their technical communication skills in English. The paper also includes some practical tips on writing and presentation techniques for improving the quality of their technical communications in English.

  15. Applications and Advances in Electronic-Nose Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Alphus D.; Baietto, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    Electronic-nose devices have received considerable attention in the field of sensor technology during the past twenty years, largely due to the discovery of numerous applications derived from research in diverse fields of applied sciences. Recent applications of electronic nose technologies have come through advances in sensor design, material improvements, software innovations and progress in microcircuitry design and systems integration. The invention of many new e-nose sensor types and arrays, based on different detection principles and mechanisms, is closely correlated with the expansion of new applications. Electronic noses have provided a plethora of benefits to a variety of commercial industries, including the agricultural, biomedical, cosmetics, environmental, food, manufacturing, military, pharmaceutical, regulatory, and various scientific research fields. Advances have improved product attributes, uniformity, and consistency as a result of increases in quality control capabilities afforded by electronic-nose monitoring of all phases of industrial manufacturing processes. This paper is a review of the major electronic-nose technologies, developed since this specialized field was born and became prominent in the mid 1980s, and a summarization of some of the more important and useful applications that have been of greatest benefit to man. PMID:22346690

  16. Plasma Cleaning and Its Applications for Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isabell, Thomas C.; Fischione, Paul E.; O'Keefe, Catherine; Guruz, Murat U.; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    1999-03-01

    The effectiveness of applying a high-frequency, low-energy, reactive gas plasma for the removal of hydrocarbon contamination from specimens and components for electron microscopy has been investigated with a variety of analytical techniques. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of specimens that have been plasma cleaned shows an elimination of the carbonaceous contamination from the specimen. With extended cleaning times the removal of existing carbon contamination debris due to previously conducted microanalysis is shown. Following plasma cleaning, specimens may be examined in the electron microscope for several hours without exhibiting evidence of recontamination. The effectiveness of plasma cleaning is not limited to applications for TEM specimens. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) specimens that have been plasma cleaned likewise show an elimination of carbonaceous contamination. Furthermore, other electron microscopy parts and accessories, such as aperture strips, specimen clamping rings, and Wehnelts, among others, can benefit from plasma cleaning.

  17. Biological applications of ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.C.

    1997-10-01

    This review examines the possibilities for biological research using the three ultraviolet free-electron lasers that are nearing operational status in the US. The projected operating characteristics of major interest in biological research of the free-electron lasers at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and Duke University are presented. Experimental applications in the areas of far- and vacuum ultraviolet photophysics and photochemistry, structural biology, environmental photobiology, and medical research are discussed and the prospects for advances in these areas, based upon the characteristics of the new ultraviolet free-electron lasers, are evaluated.

  18. Simulation of Laser Cooling and Trapping in Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Thompson, Robert; Yu, Nan; Lunblad, Nathan

    2005-01-01

    An advanced computer code is undergoing development for numerically simulating laser cooling and trapping of large numbers of atoms. The code is expected to be useful in practical engineering applications and to contribute to understanding of the roles that light, atomic collisions, background pressure, and numbers of particles play in experiments using laser-cooled and -trapped atoms. The code is based on semiclassical theories of the forces exerted on atoms by magnetic and optical fields. Whereas computer codes developed previously for the same purpose account for only a few physical mechanisms, this code incorporates many more physical mechanisms (including atomic collisions, sub-Doppler cooling mechanisms, Stark and Zeeman energy shifts, gravitation, and evanescent-wave phenomena) that affect laser-matter interactions and the cooling of atoms to submillikelvin temperatures. Moreover, whereas the prior codes can simulate the interactions of at most a few atoms with a resonant light field, the number of atoms that can be included in a simulation by the present code is limited only by computer memory. Hence, the present code represents more nearly completely the complex physics involved when using laser-cooled and -trapped atoms in engineering applications. Another advantage that the code incorporates is the possibility to analyze the interaction between cold atoms of different atomic number. Some properties that cold atoms of different atomic species have, like cross sections and the particular excited states they can occupy when interacting with each other and light fields, play important roles not yet completely understood in the new experiments that are under way in laboratories worldwide to form ultracold molecules. Other research efforts use cold atoms as holders of quantum information, and more recent developments in cavity quantum electrodynamics also use ultracold atoms to explore and expand new information-technology ideas. These experiments give a hint

  19. The gas electron multiplier (GEM): Operating principles and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauli, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Introduced by the author in 1997, The Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) constitutes a powerful addition to the family of fast radiation detectors; originally developed for particle physics experiments, the device and has spawned a large number of developments and applications; a web search yields more than 400 articles on the subject. This note is an attempt to summarize the status of the design, developments and applications of the new detector.

  20. Pixel readout electronics for LHC and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanquart, L.; Bonzom, V.; Comes, G.; Delpierre, P.; Fischer, P.; Hausmann, J.; Keil, M.; Lindner, M.; Meuser, S.; Wermes, N.

    2000-01-01

    The demanding requirements for pixel readout electronics for high-energy physics experiments and biomedical applications are reviewed. Some examples of the measured analog performance of prototype chips are given. The readout architectures of the PIxel Readout for the ATlas Experiment (PIRATE) chip suited for LHC experiments and of the Multi Picture Element Counter (MPEC) counting chip targeted for biomedical applications are presented. First results with complete chip-sensor assemblies are also shown.

  1. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Eo, Seong-Hui; Abbas, Qamar; Ahmed, Madiha

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes.

  2. Design and engineering of a man-made diffusive electron-transport protein.

    PubMed

    Fry, Bryan A; Solomon, Lee A; Dutton, P Leslie; Moser, Christopher C

    2016-05-01

    Maquettes are man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences. Here we focus on water-soluble maquettes designed and engineered to perform diffusive electron transport of the kind typically carried out by cytochromes, ferredoxins and flavodoxins and other small proteins in photosynthetic and respiratory energy conversion and oxido-reductive metabolism. Our designs were tested by analysis of electron transfer between heme maquettes and the well-known natural electron transporter, cytochrome c. Electron-transfer kinetics were measured from seconds to milliseconds by stopped-flow, while sub-millisecond resolution was achieved through laser photolysis of the carbon monoxide maquette heme complex. These measurements demonstrate electron transfer from the maquette to cytochrome c, reproducing the timescales and charge complementarity modulation observed in natural systems. The ionic strength dependence of inter-protein electron transfer from 9.7×10(6) M(-1) s(-1) to 1.2×10(9) M(-1) s(-1) follows a simple Debye-Hückel model for attraction between +8 net charged oxidized cytochrome c and -19 net charged heme maquette, with no indication of significant protein dipole moment steering. Successfully recreating essential components of energy conversion and downstream metabolism in man-made proteins holds promise for in vivo clinical intervention and for the production of fuel or other industrial products. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26423266

  3. On the applicability of one- and many-electron quantum chemistry models for hydrated electron clusters.

    PubMed

    Turi, László

    2016-04-21

    We evaluate the applicability of a hierarchy of quantum models in characterizing the binding energy of excess electrons to water clusters. In particular, we calculate the vertical detachment energy of an excess electron from water cluster anions with methods that include one-electron pseudopotential calculations, density functional theory(DFT) based calculations, and ab initio quantum chemistry using MP2 and eom-EA-CCSD levels of theory. The examined clusters range from the smallest cluster size (n = 2) up to nearly nanosize clusters with n = 1000 molecules. The examined cluster configurations are extracted from mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics trajectories of cluster anions with n = 1000 water molecules using two different one-electron pseudopotenial models. We find that while MP2 calculations with large diffuse basis set provide a reasonable description for the hydrated electron system, DFT methods should be used with precaution and only after careful benchmarking. Strictly tested one-electron psudopotentials can still be considered as reasonable alternatives to DFT methods, especially in large systems. The results of quantum chemistry calculations performed on configurations, that represent possible excess electron binding motifs in the clusters, appear to be consistent with the results using a cavitystructure preferring one-electron pseudopotential for the hydrated electron, while they are in sharp disagreement with the structural predictions of a non-cavity model. PMID:27389224

  4. On the applicability of one- and many-electron quantum chemistry models for hydrated electron clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turi, László

    2016-04-01

    We evaluate the applicability of a hierarchy of quantum models in characterizing the binding energy of excess electrons to water clusters. In particular, we calculate the vertical detachment energy of an excess electron from water cluster anions with methods that include one-electron pseudopotential calculations, density functional theory (DFT) based calculations, and ab initio quantum chemistry using MP2 and eom-EA-CCSD levels of theory. The examined clusters range from the smallest cluster size (n = 2) up to nearly nanosize clusters with n = 1000 molecules. The examined cluster configurations are extracted from mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics trajectories of cluster anions with n = 1000 water molecules using two different one-electron pseudopotenial models. We find that while MP2 calculations with large diffuse basis set provide a reasonable description for the hydrated electron system, DFT methods should be used with precaution and only after careful benchmarking. Strictly tested one-electron psudopotentials can still be considered as reasonable alternatives to DFT methods, especially in large systems. The results of quantum chemistry calculations performed on configurations, that represent possible excess electron binding motifs in the clusters, appear to be consistent with the results using a cavity structure preferring one-electron pseudopotential for the hydrated electron, while they are in sharp disagreement with the structural predictions of a non-cavity model.

  5. Functionalized hybrid nanofibers to mimic native ECM for tissue engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karuppuswamy, Priyadharsini; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Navaneethan, Balchandar; Laiva, Ashang Luwang; Sridhar, Sreepathy; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-12-01

    Nanotechnology being one of the most promising technologies today shows an extremely huge potential in the field of tissue engineering to mimic the porous topography of natural extracellular matrix (ECM). Natural polymers are incorporated into the synthetic polymers to fabricate functionalized hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds, which improve cell and tissue compatibility. The present study identified the biopolymers - aloe vera, silk fibroin and curcumin incorporated into polycaprolactone (PCL) as suitable substrates for tissue engineering. Different combinations of PCL with natural polymers - PCL/aloe vera, PCL/silk fibroin, PCL/aloe vera/silk fibroin, PCL/aloe vera/silk fibroin/curcumin were electrospun into nanofibrous scaffolds. The fabricated two dimensional nanofibrous scaffolds showed high surface area, appropriate mechanical properties, hydrophilicity and porosity, required for the regeneration of diseased tissues. The nanofibrous scaffolds were characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM), porometry, Instron tensile tester, VCA optima contact angle measurement and FTIR to analyze the fiber diameter and morphology, porosity and pore size distribution, mechanical strength, wettability, chemical bonds and functional groups, respectively. The average fiber diameter of obtained fibers ranged from 250 nm to 350 nm and the tensile strength of PCL scaffolds at 4.49 MPa increased upto 8.3 MPa for PCL/silk fibroin scaffolds. Hydrophobicity of PCL decreased with the incorporation of natural polymers, especially for PCL/aloe vera scaffolds. The properties of as-spun nanofiber scaffolds showed their potential as promising scaffold materials in tissue engineering applications.

  6. High-temperature electronics applications in space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurgens, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    One of the most exciting applications of high-temperature electronics is related to the exploration of the planet Venus. On this planet the atmospheric temperatures range from about 170 K at elevations of 100 km to a searing 730 K near the surface. Mechanisms for exploring the atmosphere might include balloons, airplanes, surface landers, and surface-launched probes. Balloons, for example, could fly in the region from 20 (320 C at 22 bars) to 60 km (-20 C at 0.2 bar). Suitable balloon fabrics presently exclude excursions to lower altitudes; however, adequate electronic systems could survive to 325 C. Small airplanes would require more sophisticated electronics for guidance and control. Long life surface landers would most likely be developed first, as these could be used to measure long-term variations in weather. Ranging transponders would be important for ephemeris development, measurement of spin state, and studies of general relativity. Surface temperatures of 460 C and pressures of 90 bars present a challenge to the developers of such instruments. Other space applications for high-temperature electronics include transponders for the surface of Mercury, near solar drag-free orbiters, and deep atmospheric penetrators for Jupiter and Saturn. Each of these has its own particular problems with respect to instrumentation adequate to meet the desired scientific goals. This paper is primarily concerned with defining possible mission applications, the required electronic systems, and the approaches that are currently being studied for their development.

  7. Molecular-level engineering of THz/IR-sensitive materials for future biological sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolard, Dwight; Recine, Gregory; Bykhovski, Alexei; Zhang, Weidong

    2010-08-01

    While the unique spectral information associated with chemical and biological molecules within the terahertz frequency regime (~ 3.0-3.0 millimeters) motivates its use for practical sensing applications, limiting factors at the macroscale (weak spectral absorption, broad line widths and masking geometrical effects introduced by the samples) provides motivation for man-engineered sensing materials that allow for the transduction of the spectral information about target molecules from the nanoscale. This brief letter will overview work being performed by our research group to define molecular-level functionality that will be useful for realizing "THz/IR-sensitive" materials. Here the goal is to define switchable molecular components that when incorporated into larger DNA-based nanoscaffolds lead to THz and/or IR regime electronic and/or photonic material properties that are dictated in a predictable manner by novel functionality paradigms. In particular, theoretical modeling and design studies are being performed to engineer organic and biological switches that can be incorporated into DNA-based architectures that enable the precise extraction of nanoscale information (e.g., composition, dynamics, conformation) through electronic/photonic transformations to the macroscale. Hence, these studies seek to define new spectral-based sensing modalities useful for characterizing bio-molecules

  8. Engineering functional nanostructures for materials and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramani, Chandramouleeswaran

    Engineering nanostructures with complete control over the shape, composition, organization of the surface structures, and function remains a major challenge. In my work, I have fabricated nanostructures using functional polymer motifs and nanoparticles (NPs) via supramolecular and non-supramolecular interactions. In one of the approaches to generate nanostructures, I have integrated top-down approaches such as nanoimprint lithography, electron-beam lithography, and photolithography with the self-assembly (bottom-up) of NPs to provide nanostructures with tailored shape and function. In this strategy, I have developed a geometrically assisted orthogonal assembly of nanoparticles onto polymer features at precisely defined locations. This versatile NP functionalization method can be used to fabricate protein resistant patterned surfaces to provide essentially complete control over cellular alignment, making them promising biofunctional structures for cell patterning. In another approach, I have utilized self-assembly of dendrimers and NPs without preformed templates to generate nanostructures that can be used as chemoselective membranes for the separation of small and biomacromolecules.

  9. Nanometer-sized extracellular matrix coating on polymer-based scaffold for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Noriyuki; Sivaraman, Srikanth; Amoroso, Nicholas J; Wagner, William R; Nishiguchi, Akihiro; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru; Nagatomi, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Surface modification can play a crucial role in enhancing cell adhesion to synthetic polymer-based scaffolds in tissue engineering applications. Here, we report a novel approach for layer-by-layer (LbL) fabrication of nanometer-size fibronectin and gelatin (FN-G) layers on electrospun fibrous poly(carbonate urethane)urea (PCUU) scaffolds. Alternate immersions into the solutions of fibronectin and gelatin provided thickness-controlled FN-G nano-layers (PCUU(FN-G) ) which maintained the scaffold's 3D structure and width of fibrous bundle of PCUU as evidenced by scanning electron miscroscopy. The PCUU(FN-G) scaffold improved cell adhesion and proliferation of bladder smooth muscles (BSMCs) when compared to uncoated PCUU. The high affinity of PCUU(FN-G) for cells was further demonstrated by migration of adherent BSMCs from culture plates to the scaffold. Moreover, the culture of UROtsa cells, human urothelium-derived cell line, on PCUU(FN-G) resulted in an 11-15 μm thick multilayered cell structure with cell-to-cell contacts although many UROtsa cells died without forming cell connections on PCUU. Together these results indicate that this approach will aid in advancing the technology for engineering bladder tissues in vitro. Because FN-G nano-layers formation is based on nonspecific physical adsorption of fibronectin onto polymer and its subsequent interactions with gelatin, this technique may be applicable to other polymer-based scaffold systems for various tissue engineering/regenerative medicine applications. PMID:26194176

  10. Application for certification 1982 model year heavy-duty diesel engines - Mercedes-Benz

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing.

  11. Landfill gas application development of the Caterpillar G3600 spark-ignited gas engine

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, G.P.

    1995-10-01

    A G3600 engine was developed to operate on landfill gas to demonstrate engine performance and identify any operational problems caused by this application. Fuel system and engine performance development were completed using simulated landfill gas containing carbon dioxide and natural gas at the Caterpillar Technical Center. The engine was packaged as a generator set and has operated for 12,000 hours on landfill gas. Engine performance goals similar to those for G3600 natural gas applications were achieved during development and were attained during the field test. Development work and field test endurance results are presented in this paper.

  12. Update of development on the new Audi NSU rotary engine generation. [for application to aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanbasshuysen, R.

    1978-01-01

    Rotary engines with a chamber volume of 750 cc as a two rotor automotive powerplant, called KKM 871 are described. This engine is compared to a 3 liter or 183 cubic inch, six-cylinder reciprocating engine. Emphasis is placed on exhaust emission control and fuel economy.

  13. Detroit Diesel Engine Technology for Light Duty Truck Applications - DELTA Engine Update

    SciTech Connect

    Freese, Charlie

    2000-08-20

    The early generation of the DELTA engine has been thoroughly tested and characterized in the virtual lab, during engine dynamometer testing, and on light duty trucks for personal transportation. This paper provides an up-to-date account of program findings. Further, the next generation engine design and future program plans will be briefly presented.

  14. Thick Films: Electronic Applications. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, fabrication, and evaluation of thick film electronic devices. Thick film solar cells, thick films for radiation conduction, deposition processes, conductive inks are among the topics discussed. Applications in military and civilian avionics are examined.

  15. Semiconductor Devices and Applications. Electronics Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, John; And Others

    This module is the fifth of 10 modules in the competency-based electronics series. Introductory materials include a listing of competencies addressed in the module, a parts/equipment list, and a cross-reference table of instructional materials. Sixteen instructional units cover: semiconductor materials; diodes; diode applications and…

  16. Science and applications of low-emittance electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    van Bibber, K

    2000-08-20

    The capability of making very low-emittance electron beams of temporally short, high charge bunches has opened up exciting new possibilities in basic and applied science. Two notable applications are high energy electron-positron linear colliders for particle physics, and fourth-generation light sources consisting of linac-driven Free-Electron Lasers (FEL), both of which represent significant programmatic potential for the Laboratory in the future. The technologies contributing to low-emittance electron beams and their applications, namely precision fabrication, ultra-short pulse lasers, and RF photocathode injectors, are all areas of Lab expertise, and the work carried out under this LDRD project further expanded our core-competency in advanced concept accelerators. Furthermore, high energy accelerators have become a cornerstone of the SBSS program, as illustrated by the recent development of proton radiography as a prime technology candidate for the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF), which enhanced the significance of this project all the more. This was a one-year project to both advance the technology of, and participate in the science enabled by very low-emittance electron beams. The work centered around the two themes above, namely electron-positron linear colliders, and the new fourth-generation light sources. This work built upon previous LDRD investments, and was intended to emphasize accelerator physics experiments.

  17. Electron microscopic study of soot particulate matter emissions from aircraft turbine engines.

    PubMed

    Liati, Anthi; Brem, Benjamin T; Durdina, Lukas; Vögtli, Melanie; Dasilva, Yadira Arroyo Rojas; Eggenschwiler, Panayotis Dimopoulos; Wang, Jing

    2014-09-16

    The microscopic characteristics of soot particulate matter (PM) in gas turbine exhaust are critical for an accurate assessment of the potential impacts of the aviation industry on the environment and human health. The morphology and internal structure of soot particles emitted from a CFM 56-7B26/3 turbofan engine were analyzed in an electron microscopic study, down to the nanoscale, for ∼ 100%, ∼ 65%, and ∼ 7% static engine thrust as a proxy for takeoff, cruising, and taxiing, respectively. Sampling was performed directly on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids with a state-of-the-art sampling system designed for nonvolatile particulate matter. The electron microscopy results reveal that ∼ 100% thrust produces the highest amount of soot, the highest soot particle volume, and the largest and most crystalline primary soot particles with the lowest oxidative reactivity. The opposite is the case for soot produced during taxiing, where primary soot particles are smallest and most reactive and the soot amount and volume are lowest. The microscopic characteristics of cruising condition soot resemble the ones of the ∼ 100% thrust conditions, but they are more moderate. Real time online measurements of number and mass concentration show also a clear correlation with engine thrust level, comparable with the TEM study. The results of the present work, in particular the small size of primary soot particles present in the exhaust (modes of 24, 20, and 13 nm in diameter for ∼ 100%, ∼ 65% and ∼ 7% engine thrust, respectively) could be a concern for human health and the environment and merit further study. This work further emphasizes the significance of the detailed morphological characteristics of soot for assessing environmental impacts. PMID:25180674

  18. Remote sensing applications for transportation and traffic engineering studies: A review of the literature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epps, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Current references were surveyed for the application of remote sensing to traffic and transportation studies. The major problems are presented that concern traffic engineers and transportation managers, and the literature references that discuss remote sensing applications are summarized.

  19. Phase engineering of monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenide through coupled electron doping and lattice deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Bin; Lan, Guoqiang; Song, Jun; Guo, Yinsheng; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-09

    First-principles calculations were performed to investigate the phase stability and transition within four monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) systems, i.e., MX{sub 2} (M = Mo or W and X = S or Se) under coupled electron doping and lattice deformation. With the lattice distortion and electron doping density treated as state variables, the energy surfaces of different phases were computed, and the diagrams of energetically preferred phases were constructed. These diagrams assess the competition between different phases and predict conditions of phase transitions for the TMDs considered. The interplay between lattice deformation and electron doping was identified as originating from the deformation induced band shifting and band bending. Based on our findings, a potential design strategy combining an efficient electrolytic gating and a lattice straining to achieve controllable phase engineering in TMD monolayers was demonstrated.

  20. Phase engineering of monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenide through coupled electron doping and lattice deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Bin; Lan, Guoqiang; Guo, Yinsheng; Mi, Zetian; Song, Jun

    2015-11-01

    First-principles calculations were performed to investigate the phase stability and transition within four monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) systems, i.e., MX2 (M = Mo or W and X = S or Se) under coupled electron doping and lattice deformation. With the lattice distortion and electron doping density treated as state variables, the energy surfaces of different phases were computed, and the diagrams of energetically preferred phases were constructed. These diagrams assess the competition between different phases and predict conditions of phase transitions for the TMDs considered. The interplay between lattice deformation and electron doping was identified as originating from the deformation induced band shifting and band bending. Based on our findings, a potential design strategy combining an efficient electrolytic gating and a lattice straining to achieve controllable phase engineering in TMD monolayers was demonstrated.

  1. Fabrication techniques and applications of flexible graphene-based electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luqi, Tao; Danyang, Wang; Song, Jiang; Ying, Liu; Qianyi, Xie; He, Tian; Ningqin, Deng; Xuefeng, Wang; Yi, Yang; Tian-Ling, Ren

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, flexible electronic devices have become a hot topic of scientific research. These flexible devices are the basis of flexible circuits, flexible batteries, flexible displays and electronic skins. Graphene-based materials are very promising for flexible electronic devices, due to their high mobility, high elasticity, a tunable band gap, quantum electronic transport and high mechanical strength. In this article, we review the recent progress of the fabrication process and the applications of graphene-based electronic devices, including thermal acoustic devices, thermal rectifiers, graphene-based nanogenerators, pressure sensors and graphene-based light-emitting diodes. In summary, although there are still a lot of challenges needing to be solved, graphene-based materials are very promising for various flexible device applications in the future. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 60936002, 61025021, 61434001, 61574083), the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2015CB352100), the National Key Project of Science and Technology (No. 2011ZX02403-002) and the Special Fund for Agroscientific Research in the Public Interest of China (No. 201303107). M.A.M is additionally supported by the Postdoctoral Fellowship (PDF) Program of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada and China's Postdoctoral Science Foundation (CPSF).

  2. Reliability of Electronics for Cryogenic Space Applications Being Assessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2005-01-01

    Many future NASA missions will require electronic parts and circuits that can operate reliably and efficiently in extreme temperature environments below typical device specification temperatures. These missions include the Mars Exploration Laboratory, the James Webb Space Telescope, the Europa Orbiter, surface rovers, and deep-space probes. In addition to NASA, the aerospace and commercial sectors require cryogenic electronics in applications that include advanced satellites, military hardware, medical instrumentation, magnetic levitation, superconducting energy management and distribution, particle confinement and acceleration, and arctic missions. Besides surviving hostile space environments, electronics capable of low-temperature operation would enhance circuit performance, improve system reliability, extend lifetime, and reduce development and launch costs. In addition, cryogenic electronics are expected to result in more efficient systems than those at room temperature.

  3. High efficiency digital cooler electronics for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkconnell, C. S.; Luong, T. T.; Shaw, L. S.; Murphy, J. B.; Moody, E. A.; Lisiecki, A. L.; Ellis, M. J.

    2014-06-01

    Closed-cycle cryogenic refrigerators, or cryocoolers, are an enabling technology for a wide range of aerospace applications, mostly related to infrared (IR) sensors. While the industry focus has tended to be on the mechanical cryocooler thermo mechanical unit (TMU) alone, implementation on a platform necessarily consists of the combination of the TMU and a mating set of command and control electronics. For some applications the cryocooler electronics (CCE) are technologically simple and low cost relative to the TMU, but this is not always the case. The relative cost and complexity of the CCE for a space-borne application can easily exceed that of the TMU, primarily due to the technical constraints and cost impacts introduced by the typical space radiation hardness and reliability requirements. High end tactical IR sensor applications also challenge the state of the art in cryocooler electronics, such as those for which temperature setpoint and frequency must be adjustable, or those where an informative telemetry set must be supported, etc. Generally speaking for both space and tactical applications, it is often the CCE that limits the rated lifetime and reliability of the cryocooler system. A family of high end digital cryocooler electronics has been developed to address these needs. These electronics are readily scalable from 10W to 500W output capacity; experimental performance data for nominally 25W and 100W variants are presented. The combination of a FPGA-based controller and dual H-bridge motor drive architectures yields high efficiency (>92% typical) and precision temperature control (+/- 30 mK typical) for a wide range of Stirling-class mechanical cryocooler types and vendors. This paper focuses on recent testing with the AIM INFRAROT-MODULE GmbH (AIM) SX030 and AIM SF100 cryocoolers.

  4. The United Stirling P40 engine for solar dish concentrator application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortegren, L.; Sjostedt, L. E.

    1980-01-01

    The United Stirling P40 engine is a key component in a solar concentration based energy conversion system, to be demonstrated and tested during 1980-81. The inherent characteristics of modern Stirling engines is reviewed focusing on the baseline P40 double-acting engine. The extent of modifications required for the solar application is reviewed and performance data are predicted. Finally, the potential of an advanced solar Stirling engine is briefly considered.

  5. Integrated graphene/nanoparticle hybrids for biological and electronic applications.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kim Truc; Zhao, Yanli

    2014-06-21

    The development of novel graphene/nanoparticle hybrid materials is currently the subject of tremendous research interest. The intrinsic exceptional assets of both graphene (including graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide) and nanoparticles render their hybrid materials synergic properties that can be useful in various applications. In this feature review, we highlight recent developments in graphene/nanoparticle hybrids and their promising potential in electronic and biological applications. First, the latest advances in synthetic methods for the preparation of the graphene/nanoparticle hybrids are introduced, with the emphasis on approaches to (1) decorate nanoparticles onto two-dimensional graphene and (2) wrap nanoparticles with graphene sheets. The pros and cons of large-scale synthesis are also discussed. Then, the state-of-the-art of graphene/nanoparticle hybrids in electronic and biological applications is reviewed. For electronic applications, we focus on the advantages of using these hybrids in transparent conducting films, as well as energy harvesting and storage. Biological applications, electrochemical biosensing, bioimaging, and drug delivery using the hybrids are showcased. Finally, the future research prospects and challenges in this rapidly developing area are discussed. PMID:24752364

  6. Integrated graphene/nanoparticle hybrids for biological and electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Kim Truc; Zhao, Yanli

    2014-05-01

    The development of novel graphene/nanoparticle hybrid materials is currently the subject of tremendous research interest. The intrinsic exceptional assets of both graphene (including graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide) and nanoparticles render their hybrid materials synergic properties that can be useful in various applications. In this feature review, we highlight recent developments in graphene/nanoparticle hybrids and their promising potential in electronic and biological applications. First, the latest advances in synthetic methods for the preparation of the graphene/nanoparticle hybrids are introduced, with the emphasis on approaches to (1) decorate nanoparticles onto two-dimensional graphene and (2) wrap nanoparticles with graphene sheets. The pros and cons of large-scale synthesis are also discussed. Then, the state-of-the-art of graphene/nanoparticle hybrids in electronic and biological applications is reviewed. For electronic applications, we focus on the advantages of using these hybrids in transparent conducting films, as well as energy harvesting and storage. Biological applications, electrochemical biosensing, bioimaging, and drug delivery using the hybrids are showcased. Finally, the future research prospects and challenges in this rapidly developing area are discussed.

  7. Creating standardized electronic data sheets for applications and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, L. J.; Lanza, D.

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) continues to develop infrastructure to enable the modular construction of satellites using an open network architecture and off-the-shelf avionics for space systems. Recent efforts have included the refinement of an ontology to formalize a standard language for the exchange of data and commands between components, including hardware and software, which is still evolving. AFRL is also focusing effort on creating standard interfaces using electronic data sheets based on this recently defined ontology. This paper will describe the development of standard interfaces that are documented in terms of an electronic datasheet for a specific application. The datasheet will identify the standard interfaces between hardware devices and software applications that are needed for a specific satellite function, in this case, a spacecraft guidance, navigation, and control (GN& C) application for Sun pointing. Finally, the benefits of using standardized interfaces will be discussed.

  8. Synthesis of Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Janet; Hull, David; Gorican, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Boron Nitride nanotubes (BNNT) are of interest to the scientific and technical communities for many of the same reasons that carbon nanotubes (CNT) have attracted large amounts of attention. Both materials have potentially unique and significant properties which may have important structural and electronic applications in the future. However of even more interest than their similarities may be the differences between carbon and boron nanotubes. Whilt boron nitride nanotubes possess a very high modulus similaar to CNT, they are also more chemically and thermally inert. Additionally BNNT possess more uniform electronic properties, having a uniform band gap of approximately 5.5 eV while CNT vary from semi-conductin to conductor behavior. Boron Nitride nanotubes have been synthesized by a variety of methods such as chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge and reactive milling. Consistently producing a reliable product has proven difficult. Progress in synthesis of 1-2 gram sized batches of Boron Nitride nanotubes will be discussed as well as potential uses for this unique material.

  9. Smart Document System (SDS) used in managing DOE order`s with electronic Engineering Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.; Robbins, D.

    1993-12-01

    The Microsoft (MS) Windows product is widely available for PC`s. There exists many thousands of them at Sandia. All of the MS applications in Windows have a Help file. This help file informs the user ``how to`` use and run that application. It is an ``on-line`` manual. The ``Help Compiler`` was obtained from Microsoft. Use of this compiler enables one to insert text in a form the MS ``Help Engine`` recognizes. This means all of the features of the Help file: Hypertext (hot links), browsing, searching, indexing, bookmarks, annotation, are available for your text. This turns a document into a ``Smart Document.`` The use of this Smart Document System (SDS) for Engineering Procedures (EPs) is described.

  10. Application of an acoustofluidic perfusion bioreactor for cartilage tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siwei; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Andriotis, Orestis G.; Ching, Kuan Y.; Jonnalagadda, Umesh S.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.; Hill, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage grafts generated using conventional static tissue engineering strategies are characterised by low cell viability, suboptimal hyaline cartilage formation and, critically, inferior mechanical competency, which limit their application for resurfacing articular cartilage defects. To address the limitations of conventional static cartilage bioengineering strategies and generate robust, scaffold-free neocartilage grafts of human articular chondrocytes, the present study utilised custom-built microfluidic perfusion bioreactors with integrated ultrasound standing wave traps. The system employed sweeping acoustic drive frequencies over the range of 890 to 910 kHz and continuous perfusion of the chondrogenic culture medium at a low-shear flow rate to promote the generation of three-dimensional agglomerates of human articular chondrocytes, and enhance cartilage formation by cells of the agglomerates via improved mechanical stimulation and mass transfer rates. Histological examination and assessment of micromechanical properties using indentation-type atomic force microscopy confirmed that the neocartilage grafts were analogous to native hyaline cartilage. Furthermore, in the ex vivo organ culture partial thickness cartilage defect model, implantation of the neocartilage grafts into defects for 16 weeks resulted in the formation of hyaline cartilage-like repair tissue that adhered to the host cartilage and contributed to significant improvements to the tissue architecture within the defects, compared to the empty defects. The study has demonstrated the first successful application of the acoustofluidic perfusion bioreactors to bioengineer scaffold-free neocartilage grafts of human articular chondrocytes that have the potential for subsequent use in second generation autologous chondrocyte implantation procedures for the repair of partial thickness cartilage defects. PMID:25272195

  11. Virtual Collaborative Environments for System of Systems Engineering and Applications for ISAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, David A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes an system of systems or metasystems approach and models developed to help prepare engineering organizations for distributed engineering environments. These changes in engineering enterprises include competition in increasingly global environments; new partnering opportunities caused by advances in information and communication technologies, and virtual collaboration issues associated with dispersed teams. To help address challenges and needs in this environment, a framework is proposed that can be customized and adapted for NASA to assist in improved engineering activities conducted in distributed, enhanced engineering environments. The approach is designed to prepare engineers for such distributed collaborative environments by learning and applying e-engineering methods and tools to a real-world engineering development scenario. The approach consists of two phases: an e-engineering basics phase and e-engineering application phase. The e-engineering basics phase addresses skills required for e-engineering. The e-engineering application phase applies these skills in a distributed collaborative environment to system development projects.

  12. Engineering light-matter interaction for emerging optical manipulation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Palima, Darwin; Novitsky, Andrey; Gao, Dongliang; Ding, Weiqiang; Zhukovsky, Sergei V.; Gluckstad, Jesper

    2014-06-01

    In this review, we explore recent trends in optical micromanipulation by engineering light-matter interaction and controlling the mechanical effects of optical fields. One central theme is exploring the rich phenomena beyond the now established precision measurements based on trapping micro beads with tightly focused beams. Novel synthesized beams, exploiting the linear and angular momentum of light, open new possibilities in optical trapping and micromanipulation. Similarly, novel structures are promising to enable new optical micromanipulation modalities. Moreover, an overview of the amazing features of the optics of tractor beams and backward-directed energy fluxes will be presented. Recently the so-called effect of negative propagation of the beams (existence of the backward energy fluxes) has been confirmed for X-waves and Airy beams. In the review, we will also discuss the negative pulling force of structured beams and negative energy fluxes in the vicinity of fibers. The effect is achieved due to the interaction of multipoles or, in another interpretation, the momentum conservation. Both backward-directed Poynting vector and backward optical forces are counter-intuitive and give an insight into new physics and technologies. Exploiting the degrees of freedom in synthesizing novel beams and designed microstructures offer attractive prospects for emerging optical manipulation applications.

  13. Properties and biotechnological applications of natural and engineered haloalkane dehalogenases.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yuji; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Masataka

    2015-12-01

    Haloalkane dehalogenases (HLDs) convert halogenated compounds to corresponding alcohols, halides, and protons. They belong to α/β-hydrolases, and their principal catalytic mechanism is SN2 nucleophilic substitution followed by the addition of water. Since HLDs generally have broad and different substrate specificities, they have various biotechnological applications. HLDs have previously been believed to be present only in bacterial strains that utilize xenobiotic halogenated compounds, and three archetypal HLDs, i.e., DhlA, DhaA, and LinB, have been intensively investigated by biochemical, structural, and computational analyses. Furthermore, by using the resulting data and target-selected random mutagenesis approaches, these HLDs have been successfully engineered to improve their substrate specificities and activities. In addition, important insights into protein evolution have been obtained by studying these HLDs. At the same time, the genome and metagenome information has revealed that HLD homologues are widely distributed in many bacterial strains, including ones that have not been reported to degrade halogenated compounds. Some of these cryptic HLD homologues have been experimentally confirmed to be "true" HLDs with unique substrate specificities and enantioselectivities. Although their biological functions and physiological roles remain mysterious, these potential HLDs are considered promising materials for the development of new biocatalysts. PMID:26373728

  14. Application of Hydrogels in Heart Valve Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing; Xu, Bin; Puperi, Daniel S.; Wu, Yan; West, Jennifer L.; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2015-01-01

    With an increasing number of patients requiring valve replacement, there is heightened interest in advancing heart valve tissue engineering (HVTE) to provide solutions to the many limitations of current surgical treatments. A variety of materials have been developed as scaffolds for HVTE including natural polymers, synthetic polymers, and decellularized valvular matrices. Among them, biocompatible hydrogels are generating growing interest. Natural hydrogels, such as collagen and fibrin, generally show good bioactivity, but poor mechanical durability. Synthetic hydrogels, on the other hand, have tunable mechanical properties; however, appropriate cell-matrix interactions are difficult to obtain. Moreover, hydrogels can be used as cell carriers when the cellular component is seeded into the polymer meshes or decellularized valve scaffolds. In this review, we discuss current research strategies for HVTE with an emphasis on hydrogel applications. The physicochemical properties and fabrication methods of these hydrogels, as well as their mechanical properties and bioactivities are described. Performance of some hydrogels including in vitro evaluation using bioreactors and in vivo tests in different animal models are also discussed. For future HVTE, it will be compelling to examine how hydrogels can be constructed from composite materials to replicate mechanical properties and mimic biological functions of the native heart valve. PMID:25955010

  15. Applications of Substrate Integrated Waveguide (SIW) Structure in Microwave Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhi

    This thesis is focused on some applications of the Substrate Integrated Waveguide (SIW) structure in microwave engineering. It is mainly divided into two parts, covering a dual-band high Q filter and a broadband high gain ring slot antenna, both of which are based on SIW resonators. This work indicates strong potential of SIW structure in communication system and discusses its unique advantages in detail. In the first part of the thesis, a dual-band high Q second order filter is designed to work at around 10 GHz and 14 GHz. SIW cavities are chosen in order to fulfill the low loss requirements. Two kinds of perturbation theories are applied in this structure to make two second order pass bands. Transmission lines of proper length are designed to connect the cavities together and make them work efficiently. In the second part of the thesis, a broadband high gain SIW ring slot antenna working at around 18 GHz is discussed. The bandwidth of the antenna is approximately 12.7% and the gain is around 7 dB. The cavity mode is properly chosen to reach the high antenna gain requirement. The working mechanism of its broadband property is discussed in detail to reach a reasonable argument.

  16. Hollow fibre membrane bioreactors for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Wung, Nelly; Acott, Samuel M; Tosh, David; Ellis, Marianne J

    2014-12-01

    Hollow fibre membrane bioreactors (HFB) provide a novel approach towards tissue engineering applications in the field of regenerative medicine. For adherent cell types, HFBs offer an in vivo-like microenvironment as each fibre replicates a blood capillary and the mass transfer rate across the wall is independent from the shear stresses experienced by the cell. HFB also possesses the highest surface area to volume ratio of all bioreactor configurations. In theory, these factors enable a high quantity of the desired cellular product with less population variation, and favourable operating costs. Experimental analyses of different cell types and bioreactor designs show encouraging steps towards producing a clinically relevant device. This review discusses the basic HFB design for cell expansion and in vitro models; compares data produced on commercially available systems and addresses the operational differences between theory and practice. HFBs are showing some potential for mammalian cell culture but further work is needed to fully understand the complexities of cell culture in HFBs and how best to achieve the high theoretical cell yields. PMID:25064452

  17. Cobalt doped proangiogenic hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering application.

    PubMed

    Kulanthaivel, Senthilguru; Roy, Bibhas; Agarwal, Tarun; Giri, Supratim; Pramanik, Krishna; Pal, Kunal; Ray, Sirsendu S; Maiti, Tapas K; Banerjee, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    The present study delineates the synthesis and characterization of cobalt doped proangiogenic-osteogenic hydroxyapatite. Hydroxyapatite samples, doped with varying concentrations of bivalent cobalt (Co(2+)) were prepared by the ammoniacal precipitation method and the extent of doping was measured by ICP-OES. The crystalline structure of the doped hydroxyapatite samples was confirmed by XRD and FTIR studies. Analysis pertaining to the effect of doped hydroxyapatite on cell cycle progression and proliferation of MG-63 cells revealed that the doping of cobalt supported the cell viability and proliferation up to a threshold limit. Furthermore, such level of doping also induced differentiation of the bone cells, which was evident from the higher expression of differentiation markers (Runx2 and Osterix) and better nodule formation (SEM study). Western blot analysis in conjugation with ELISA study confirmed that the doped HAp samples significantly increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF in MG-63 cells. The analysis described here confirms the proangiogenic-osteogenic properties of the cobalt doped hydroxyapatite and indicates its potential application in bone tissue engineering. PMID:26478356

  18. Polycaprolactone Scaffolds Fabricated via Bioextrusion for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Domingos, Marco; Dinucci, Dinuccio; Cometa, Stefania; Alderighi, Michele; Bártolo, Paulo Jorge; Chiellini, Federica

    2009-01-01

    The most promising approach in Tissue Engineering involves the seeding of porous, biocompatible/biodegradable scaffolds, with donor cells to promote tissue regeneration. Additive biomanufacturing processes are increasingly recognized as ideal techniques to produce 3D structures with optimal pore size and spatial distribution, providing an adequate mechanical support for tissue regeneration while shaping in-growing tissues. This paper presents a novel extrusion-based system to produce 3D scaffolds with controlled internal/external geometry for TE applications.The BioExtruder is a low-cost system that uses a proper fabrication code based on the ISO programming language enabling the fabrication of multimaterial scaffolds. Poly(ε-caprolactone) was the material chosen to produce porous scaffolds, made by layers of directionally aligned microfilaments. Chemical, morphological, and in vitro biological evaluation performed on the polymeric constructs revealed a high potential of the BioExtruder to produce 3D scaffolds with regular and reproducible macropore architecture, without inducing relevant chemical and biocompatibility alterations of the material. PMID:20126577

  19. Polycaprolactone Scaffolds Fabricated via Bioextrusion for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Domingos, Marco; Dinucci, Dinuccio; Cometa, Stefania; Alderighi, Michele; Bártolo, Paulo Jorge; Chiellini, Federica

    2009-01-01

    The most promising approach in Tissue Engineering involves the seeding of porous, biocompatible/biodegradable scaffolds, with donor cells to promote tissue regeneration. Additive biomanufacturing processes are increasingly recognized as ideal techniques to produce 3D structures with optimal pore size and spatial distribution, providing an adequate mechanical support for tissue regeneration while shaping in-growing tissues. This paper presents a novel extrusion-based system to produce 3D scaffolds with controlled internal/external geometry for TE applications.The BioExtruder is a low-cost system that uses a proper fabrication code based on the ISO programming language enabling the fabrication of multimaterial scaffolds. Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) was the material chosen to produce porous scaffolds, made by layers of directionally aligned microfilaments. Chemical, morphological, and in vitro biological evaluation performed on the polymeric constructs revealed a high potential of the BioExtruder to produce 3D scaffolds with regular and reproducible macropore architecture, without inducing relevant chemical and biocompatibility alterations of the material. PMID:20126577

  20. CO2 laser-driven Stirling engine. [space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G.; Perry, R. L.; Carney, B.

    1978-01-01

    A 100-W Beale free-piston Stirling engine was powered remotely by a CO2 laser for long periods of time. The engine ran on both continuous-wave and pulse laser input. The working fluid was helium doped with small quantities of sulfur hexafluoride, SF6. The CO2 radiation was absorbed by the vibrational modes of the sulfur hexafluoride, which in turn transferred the energy to the helium to drive the engine. Electrical energy was obtained from a linear alternator attached to the piston of the engine. Engine pressures, volumes, and temperatures were measured to determine engine performance. It was found that the pulse radiation mode was more efficient than the continuous-wave mode. An analysis of the engine heat consumption indicated that heat losses around the cylinder and the window used to transmit the beam into the engine accounted for nearly half the energy input. The overall efficiency, that is, electrical output to laser input, was approximately 0.75%. However, this experiment was not designed for high efficiency but only to demonstrate the concept of a laser-driven engine. Based on this experiment, the engine could be modified to achieve efficiencies of perhaps 25-30%.

  1. Electronic structure and magnetism in g-C{sub 4}N{sub 3} controlled by strain engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L. Z.; Liu, X. X.; Wu, X. L. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2015-03-30

    Regulation of magnetism and half-metallicity has attracted much attention because of its potential in spintronics. The magnetic properties and electronic structure of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 4}N{sub 3}) with external strain are determined theoretically based on the density function theory and many-body perturbation theory (G{sub 0}W{sub 0}). Asymmetric deformation induced by uniaxial strain not only regulates the magnetic characteristics but also leads to a transformation from half-metallicity to metallicity. However, this transition cannot occur in the structure with symmetric deformation induced by biaxial strain. Our results suggest the use of strain engineering in metal-free spintronics applications.

  2. Electrodeposited MCrAlY Coatings for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Electrolytic codeposition is a promising alternative process for fabricating MCrAlY coatings. The coating process involves two steps, i.e., codeposition of CrAlY-based particles and a metal matrix of Ni, Co, or (Ni,Co), followed by a diffusion heat treatment to convert the composite coating to the desired MCrAlY microstructure. Despite the advantages such as low cost and non-line-of-sight, this coating process is less known than electron beam-physical vapor deposition and thermal spray processes for manufacturing high-temperature coatings. This article provides an overview of the electro-codeposited MCrAlY coatings for gas turbine engine applications, highlighting the unique features of this coating process and some important findings in the past 30 years. Challenges and research opportunities for further optimization of this type of MCrAlY coatings are also discussed.

  3. Electronically steerable millimeter wave antenna techniques for space shuttle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummer, W. H.

    1975-01-01

    A large multi-function antenna aperture and related components are described which will perform electronic steering of one or more beams for two of the three applications envisioned: (1) communications, (2) radar, and (3) radiometry. The array consists of a 6-meter folded antenna that fits into two pallets. The communications frequencies are 20 and 30 GHz, while the radar is to operate at 13.9 GHz. Weight, prime power, and volumes are given parametrically; antenna designs, electronics configurations, and mechanical design were studied.

  4. Protein engineering of cytochrome b562 for quinone binding and light-induced electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Sam; Wallace, Brett B.; Smith, Trevor A.; Ghiggino, Kenneth P.; Wydrzynski, Tom

    2004-01-01

    The central photochemical reaction in photosystem II of green algae and plants and the reaction center of some photosynthetic bacteria involves a one-electron transfer from a light-activated chlorin complex to a bound quinone molecule. Through protein engineering, we have been able to modify a protein to mimic this reaction. A unique quinone-binding site was engineered into the Escherichia coli cytochrome b562 by introducing a cysteine within the hydrophobic interior of the protein. Various quinones, such as p-benzoquinone and 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone, were then covalently attached to the protein through a cysteine sulfur addition reaction to the quinone ring. The cysteine placement was designed to bind the quinone ≈10 Å from the edge of the bound porphyrin. Fluorescence measurements confirmed that the bound hydroquinone is incorporated toward the protein's hydrophobic interior and is partially solvent-shielded. The bound quinones remain redox-active and can be oxidized and rereduced in a two-electron process at neutral pH. The semiquinone can be generated at high pH by a one-electron reduction, and the midpoint potential of this can be adjusted by ≈500 mV by binding different quinones to the protein. The heme-binding site of the modified cytochrome was then reconstituted with the chlorophyll analogue zinc chlorin e6. By using EPR and fast optical techniques, we show that, in the various chlorin–protein–quinone complexes, light-induced electron transfer can occur from the chlorin to the bound oxidized quinone but not the hydroquinone, with electron transfer rates in the order of 108 s–1. PMID:15585583

  5. Applications of Systems Engineering to the Research, Design, and Development of Wind Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dykes, K.; Meadows, R.; Felker, F.; Graf, P.; Hand, M.; Lunacek, M.; Michalakes, J.; Moriarty, P.; Musial, W.; Veers, P.

    2011-12-01

    This paper surveys the landscape of systems engineering methods and current wind modeling capabilities to assess the potential for development of a systems engineering to wind energy research, design, and development. Wind energy has evolved from a small industry in a few countries to a large international industry involving major organizations in the manufacturing, development, and utility sectors. Along with this growth, significant technology innovation has led to larger turbines with lower associated costs of energy and ever more complex designs for all major subsystems - from the rotor, hub, and tower to the drivetrain, electronics, and controls. However, as large-scale deployment of the technology continues and its contribution to electricity generation becomes more prominent, so have the expectations of the technology in terms of performance and cost. For the industry to become a sustainable source of electricity, innovation in wind energy technology must continue to improve performance and lower the cost of energy while supporting seamless integration of wind generation into the electric grid without significant negative impacts on local communities and environments. At the same time, issues associated with wind energy research, design, and development are noticeably increasing in complexity. The industry would benefit from an integrated approach that simultaneously addresses turbine design, plant design and development, grid interaction and operation, and mitigation of adverse community and environmental impacts. These activities must be integrated in order to meet this diverse set of goals while recognizing trade-offs that exist between them. While potential exists today to integrate across different domains within the wind energy system design process, organizational barriers such as different institutional objectives and the importance of proprietary information have previously limited a system level approach to wind energy research, design, and

  6. Particular bi-fuel application of spark ignition engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raţiu, S.; Alexa, V.; Kiss, I.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a comparative test concerning the operation of a spark-ignition engine, make: Dacia 1300, model: 810.99, fuelled alternatively with gasoline and LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas). The tests carried out show, on the one hand, the maintenance of power and torque performances in both engine fuelling cases, for all the engine operation regimes, and, on the other hand, a considerable decrease in CO and HC emissions when using poor mixtures related to LPG fuelling.

  7. Citrate-Based Biomaterials and Their Applications in Regenerative Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Richard T.; Yang, Jian; Ameer, Guillermo A.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in biomaterials science and engineering are crucial to translating regenerative engineering, an emerging field that aims to recreate complex tissues, into clinical practice. In this regard, citrate-based biomaterials have become an important tool owing to their versatile material and biological characteristics including unique antioxidant, antimicrobial, adhesive, and fluorescent properties. This review discusses fundamental design considerations, strategies to incorporate unique functionality, and examples of how citrate-based biomaterials can be an enabling technology for regenerative engineering. PMID:27004046

  8. Electron-phonon interaction and scattering in Si and Ge: Implications for phonon engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Tandon, Nandan; Albrecht, J. D.; Ram-Mohan, L. R.

    2015-07-28

    We report ab-initio results for electron-phonon (e-ph) coupling and display the existence of a large variation in the coupling parameter as a function of electron and phonon dispersion. This variation is observed for all phonon modes in Si and Ge, and we show this for representative cases where the initial electron states are at the band gap edges. Using these e-ph matrix elements, which include all possible phonon modes and electron bands within a relevant energy range, we evaluate the imaginary part of the electron self-energy in order to obtain the associated scattering rates. The temperature dependence is seen through calculations of the scattering rates at 0 K and 300 K. The results provide a basis for understanding the impacts of phonon scattering vs. orientation and geometry in the design of devices, and in analysis of transport phenomena. This provides an additional tool for engineering the transfer of energy from carriers to the lattice.

  9. The applications of fibre optics in gas turbine engine instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, I.

    1984-05-01

    Fiber optic instrumentation in aircraft engines is reviewed. Data transmission, endoscopy, flame detection, radiation pyrometry, laser anemometry, blade tip clearance sensors, and pinhole cameras are described.

  10. Biomedical, Artificial Intelligence, and DNA Computing Photonics Applications and Web Engineering, Wilga, May 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2012-05-01

    This paper is the fifth part (out of five) of the research survey of WILGA Symposium work, May 2012 Edition, concerned with Biomedical, Artificial Intelligence and DNA Computing technologies. It presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from different technical universities from this country during the Jubilee XXXth SPIE-IEEE Wilga 2012, May Edition, symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposium embraced, among others, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonics-electronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET tokamak and pi-of-the sky experiments development. The symposium is an annual summary in the development of numerable Ph.D. theses carried out in this country in the area of advanced electronic and photonic systems. It is also a great occasion for SPIE, IEEE, OSA and PSP students to meet together in a large group spanning the whole country with guests from this part of Europe. A digest of Wilga references is presented [1-270].

  11. Application for certification, 1992 model-year heavy-duty diesel engines - Mercedes Benz

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines that he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the application contains the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.

  12. Application for certification, 1986 model year heavy-duty vehicles/engines - Mercedes-Benz truck

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the application contains the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.

  13. Application for certification 1984 model year heavy-duty engines - Mercedes-Benz

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the application contains the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.

  14. Application for certification 1992 model year heavy-duty diesel engines - Mercedes-Benz

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Each year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the application contains the results of emission testing, a statement or compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.

  15. Investigations for the improvement of space shuttle main engine electron beam welding equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smock, R. A.; Taylor, R. A.; Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Progress made in the testing, evaluation, and correction of MSFC's 7.5 kW electron beam welder in support of space shuttle main engine component welding is summarized. The objective of this project was to locate and correct the deficiencies in the welder. Some 17 areas were deficient in the 7.5 kW ERI welding system and the associated corrective action was taken to improve its operational performance. An overall improvement of 20 times the original reliability was obtained at full rated capacity after the modifications were made.

  16. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Luigi; Rosenzweig, J.; Serafini, Luca

    2007-09-01

    Plenary sessions. RF deflector based sub-Ps beam diagnostics: application to FEL and advanced accelerators / D. Alesini. Production of fermtosecond pulses and micron beam spots for high brightness electron beam applications / S.G. Anderson ... [et al.]. Wakefields of sub-picosecond electron bunches / K.L.F. Bane. Diamond secondary emitter / I. Ben-Zvi ... [et al.]. Parametric optimization for an X-ray free electron laser with a laser wiggler / R. Bonifacio, N. Piovella and M.M. Cola. Needle cathodes for high-brightness beams / C.H. Boulware ... [et al.]. Non linear evolution of short pulses in FEL cascaded undulators and the FEL harmonic cascade / L. Giannessi and P. Musumeci. High brightness laser induced multi-meV electron/proton sources / D. Giulietti ... [et al.]. Emittance limitation of a conditioned beam in a strong focusing FEL undulator / Z. Huang, G. Stupakov and S. Reiche. Scaled models: space-charge dominated electron storage rings / R.A. Kishek ... [et al.]. High brightness beam applications: energy recovered linacs / G.A. Krafft. Maximizing brightness in photoinjectors / C. Limborg-Deprey and H. Tomizawa. Ultracold electron sources / O.J. Luiten ... [et al.]. Scaling laws of structure-based optical accelerators / A. Mizrahi, V. Karagodsky and L. Schächter. High brightness beams-applications to free-electron lasers / S. Reiche. Conception of photo-injectors for the CTF3 experiment / R. Roux. Superconducting RF photoinjectors: an overview / J. Sekutowicz. Status and perspectives of photo injector developments for high brightness beams / F. Stephan. Results from the UCLA/FNLP underdense plasma lens experiment / M.C. Thompson ... [et al.]. Medical application of multi-beam compton scattering monochromatic tunable hard X-ray source / M. Uesaka ... [et al.]. Design of a 2 kA, 30 fs RF-photoinjector for waterbag compression / S.B. Van Der Geer, O.J. Luiten and M.J. De Loos. Proposal for a high-brightness pulsed electron source / M. Zolotorev ... [et al

  17. Trends for Electron Beam Accelerator Applications in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machi, Sueo

    2011-02-01

    Electron beam (EB) accelerators are major pieces of industrial equipment used for many commercial radiation processing applications. The industrial use of EB accelerators has a history of more than 50 years and is still growing in terms of both its economic scale and new applications. Major applications involve the modification of polymeric materials to create value-added products, such as heat-resistant wires, heat-shrinkable sheets, automobile tires, foamed plastics, battery separators and hydrogel wound dressing. The surface curing of coatings and printing inks is a growing application for low energy electron accelerators, resulting in an environmentally friendly and an energy-saving process. Recently there has been the acceptance of the use of EB accelerators in lieu of the radioactive isotope cobalt-60 as a source for sterilizing disposable medical products. Environmental protection by the use of EB accelerators is a new and important field of application. A commercial plant for the cleaning flue gases from a coal-burning power plant is in operation in Poland, employing high power EB accelerators. In Korea, a commercial plant uses EB to clean waste water from a dye factory.

  18. Selenium nanomaterials: applications in electronics, catalysis and sensors.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Savita; Mehta, S K

    2014-02-01

    This review provides insights into the synthesis, functionalization, and applications of selenium nanoparticles in electronics, optics, catalysis and sensors. The variation of physicochemical properties such as particle size, surface area, and shape of the selenium nanoparticles and the effect of experimental conditions has also been discussed. An overview has also been provided on the fundamental electrical and optical properties of selenium nanomaterials as well as their utilization in different research fields. The work presents an insight on selenium nanoparticles with interesting properties and their future applications. PMID:24749448

  19. The application of similar image retrieval in electronic commerce.

    PubMed

    Hu, YuPing; Yin, Hua; Han, Dezhi; Yu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Traditional online shopping platform (OSP), which searches product information by keywords, faces three problems: indirect search mode, large search space, and inaccuracy in search results. For solving these problems, we discuss and research the application of similar image retrieval in electronic commerce. Aiming at improving the network customers' experience and providing merchants with the accuracy of advertising, we design a reasonable and extensive electronic commerce application system, which includes three subsystems: image search display subsystem, image search subsystem, and product information collecting subsystem. This system can provide seamless connection between information platform and OSP, on which consumers can automatically and directly search similar images according to the pictures from information platform. At the same time, it can be used to provide accuracy of internet marketing for enterprises. The experiment shows the efficiency of constructing the system. PMID:24883411

  20. The Application of Similar Image Retrieval in Electronic Commerce

    PubMed Central

    Hu, YuPing; Yin, Hua; Han, Dezhi; Yu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Traditional online shopping platform (OSP), which searches product information by keywords, faces three problems: indirect search mode, large search space, and inaccuracy in search results. For solving these problems, we discuss and research the application of similar image retrieval in electronic commerce. Aiming at improving the network customers' experience and providing merchants with the accuracy of advertising, we design a reasonable and extensive electronic commerce application system, which includes three subsystems: image search display subsystem, image search subsystem, and product information collecting subsystem. This system can provide seamless connection between information platform and OSP, on which consumers can automatically and directly search similar images according to the pictures from information platform. At the same time, it can be used to provide accuracy of internet marketing for enterprises. The experiment shows the efficiency of constructing the system. PMID:24883411