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Sample records for electronic structure analysis

  1. Analysis of boron carbides' electronic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Iris A.; Beckel, Charles L.

    1986-01-01

    The electronic properties of boron-rich icosahedral clusters were studied as a means of understanding the electronic structure of the icosahedral borides such as boron carbide. A lower bound was estimated on bipolaron formation energies in B12 and B11C icosahedra, and the associated distortions. While the magnitude of the distortion associated with bipolaron formation is similar in both cases, the calculated formation energies differ greatly, formation being much more favorable on B11C icosahedra. The stable positions of a divalent atom relative to an icosahedral borane was also investigated, with the result that a stable energy minimum was found when the atom is at the center of the borane, internal to the B12 cage. If incorporation of dopant atoms into B12 cages in icosahedral boride solids is feasible, novel materials might result. In addition, the normal modes of a B12H12 cluster, of the C2B10 cage in para-carborane, and of a B12 icosahedron of reduced (D sub 3d) symmetry, such as is found in the icosahedral borides, were calculated. The nature of these vibrational modes will be important in determining, for instance, the character of the electron-lattice coupling in the borides, and in analyzing the lattice contribution to the thermal conductivity.

  2. Advances in structural and functional analysis of membrane proteins by electron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Wisedchaisri, Goragot; Reichow, Steve L.; Gonen, Tamir

    2011-01-01

    Summary Electron crystallography is a powerful technique for the study of membrane protein structure and function in the lipid environment. When well-ordered two-dimensional crystals are obtained the structure of both protein and lipid can be determined and lipid-protein interactions analyzed. Protons and ionic charges can be visualized by electron crystallography and the protein of interest can be captured for structural analysis in a variety of physiologically distinct states. This review highlights the strengths of electron crystallography and the momentum that is building up in automation and the development of high throughput tools and methods for structural and functional analysis of membrane proteins by electron crystallography. PMID:22000511

  3. Structural analysis of nano structured carbon by transmission electron microscopy and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshida, K.; Murata, M.; Fujiwara, K.; Itaya, T.; Yanagisawa, T.; Kimura, K.; Nakazawa, T.; Kim, Y. A.; Endo, M.; Kim, B.-H.; Yang, K. S.

    2013-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is one of the highest resolution analysis methods of materials. The three dimensional recognition of the materials is difficult by TEM because the observation data is projection images through the materials. In this study, space structure of carbon nanotubes loaded with metal particles was analyzed by three dimensional TEM (3D-TEM) [1,2]. The nano structured carbons are also observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) with Cs corrector. Cup-stack type carbon nanotubes (CSCNTs) loaded with Pt particles (2-3 nm in diameter) prepared by GSI Creos Corporation were analyzed by these methods. Pt particles are bound selectively to the edges of hexagonal carbon layers of inside and outer surface of CSCNTs efficiently and can be expected to work well as catalysts of electrodes of fuel cell. It is sometimes difficult that the nano sized area is analyzed by selected area electron diffraction (SAD) because the selected area aperture cannot be so small. The HRTEM and image processing technique give similar results of SAD when it works and revealed to be useful to analyze nano structured carbons.

  4. Research Update: Spatially resolved mapping of electronic structure on atomic level by multivariate statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belianinov, Alex; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Lin, Wenzhi; Sales, Brian C.; Sefat, Athena S.; Jesse, Stephen; Pan, Minghu; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-12-01

    Atomic level spatial variability of electronic structure in Fe-based superconductor FeTe0.55Se0.45 (Tc = 15 K) is explored using current-imaging tunneling-spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data differentiates regions of dissimilar electronic behavior that can be identified with the segregation of chalcogen atoms, as well as boundaries between terminations and near neighbor interactions. Subsequent clustering analysis allows identification of the spatial localization of these dissimilar regions. Similar statistical analysis of modeled calculated density of states of chemically inhomogeneous FeTe1-xSex structures further confirms that the two types of chalcogens, i.e., Te and Se, can be identified by their electronic signature and differentiated by their local chemical environment. This approach allows detailed chemical discrimination of the scanning tunneling microscopy data including separation of atomic identities, proximity, and local configuration effects and can be universally applicable to chemically and electronically inhomogeneous surfaces.

  5. Research Update: Spatially resolved mapping of electronic structure on atomic level by multivariate statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Belianinov, Alex; Panchapakesan, G.; Lin, Wenzhi; Sales, Brian C.; Sefat, Athena Safa; Jesse, Stephen; Pan, Minghu; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-12-02

    Atomic level spatial variability of electronic structure in Fe-based superconductor FeTe0.55Se0.45 (Tc = 15 K) is explored using current-imaging tunneling-spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data differentiates regions of dissimilar electronic behavior that can be identified with the segregation of chalcogen atoms, as well as boundaries between terminations and near neighbor interactions. Subsequent clustering analysis allows identification of the spatial localization of these dissimilar regions. Similar statistical analysis of modeled calculated density of states of chemically inhomogeneous FeTe1 x Sex structures further confirms that the two types of chalcogens, i.e., Te and Se, can be identified by their electronic signature and differentiated by their local chemical environment. This approach allows detailed chemical discrimination of the scanning tunneling microscopy data including separation of atomic identities, proximity, and local configuration effects and can be universally applicable to chemically and electronically inhomogeneous surfaces.

  6. Analysis of the electronic structure of crystals through band structure unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, A. B.; Kosobutsky, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we consider an alternative implementation of the band structure unfolding method within the framework of the density functional theory, which combines the advantages of the basis of localized functions and plane waves. This approach has been used to analyze the electronic structure of the ordered CuCl x Br1- x copper halide alloys and F 0 center in MgO that enables us to reveal qualitatively the features remaining hidden when using the standard supercell method, because of the complex band structure of systems with defects.

  7. Electrostatic wave structures and their stability analysis in nonextensive magnetised electron-positron-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, T. S.; Bala, Parveen; Bains, A. S.

    2015-05-01

    A rigorous theoretical study based on Zakharov Kuznetsov (ZK) equation of ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs), their stability analysis in a magnetized e- p- i plasma is presented. The plasma model consists of inertial ions, magnetic field, electrons and positrons obeying q-nonextensive velocity distribution. Reductive perturbation method is used to derive ZK equation. The solitary wave structures are dependent on chosen plasma model, whose parameters influence the solitary characteristics. Particularly, nonextensivity, proportion of positron concentration, magnetic field and difference between electron and positron temperatures play crucial role in the solitary structures. The present work is also extended to give stability analysis and parametric ranges for the existence of stable and unstable solitons. This research work may be useful to understand the physics of nonlinear electrostatic excitations in different astrophysical and cosmic scenarios like stellar polytropes, hadron matter and quark-gluon plasma.

  8. Research Update: Spatially resolved mapping of electronic structure on atomic level by multivariate statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Belianinov, Alex Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Lin, Wenzhi; Jesse, Stephen; Pan, Minghu; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Sales, Brian C.; Sefat, Athena S.

    2014-12-01

    Atomic level spatial variability of electronic structure in Fe-based superconductor FeTe{sub 0.55}Se{sub 0.45} (T{sub c} = 15 K) is explored using current-imaging tunneling-spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data differentiates regions of dissimilar electronic behavior that can be identified with the segregation of chalcogen atoms, as well as boundaries between terminations and near neighbor interactions. Subsequent clustering analysis allows identification of the spatial localization of these dissimilar regions. Similar statistical analysis of modeled calculated density of states of chemically inhomogeneous FeTe{sub 1−x}Se{sub x} structures further confirms that the two types of chalcogens, i.e., Te and Se, can be identified by their electronic signature and differentiated by their local chemical environment. This approach allows detailed chemical discrimination of the scanning tunneling microscopy data including separation of atomic identities, proximity, and local configuration effects and can be universally applicable to chemically and electronically inhomogeneous surfaces.

  9. Research Update: Spatially resolved mapping of electronic structure on atomic level by multivariate statistical analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Belianinov, Alex; Panchapakesan, G.; Lin, Wenzhi; Sales, Brian C.; Sefat, Athena Safa; Jesse, Stephen; Pan, Minghu; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-12-02

    Atomic level spatial variability of electronic structure in Fe-based superconductor FeTe0.55Se0.45 (Tc = 15 K) is explored using current-imaging tunneling-spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data differentiates regions of dissimilar electronic behavior that can be identified with the segregation of chalcogen atoms, as well as boundaries between terminations and near neighbor interactions. Subsequent clustering analysis allows identification of the spatial localization of these dissimilar regions. Similar statistical analysis of modeled calculated density of states of chemically inhomogeneous FeTe1 x Sex structures further confirms that the two types of chalcogens, i.e., Te and Se, can be identified by their electronic signaturemore » and differentiated by their local chemical environment. This approach allows detailed chemical discrimination of the scanning tunneling microscopy data including separation of atomic identities, proximity, and local configuration effects and can be universally applicable to chemically and electronically inhomogeneous surfaces.« less

  10. Atom-by-atom structural and chemical analysis by annular dark-field electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Chisholm, Matthew F; Nicolosi, Valeria; Pennycook, Timothy J; Corbin, George J; Dellby, Niklas; Murfitt, Matthew F; Own, Christopher S; Szilagyi, Zoltan S; Oxley, Mark P; Pantelides, Sokrates T; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2010-03-25

    Direct imaging and chemical identification of all the atoms in a material with unknown three-dimensional structure would constitute a very powerful general analysis tool. Transmission electron microscopy should in principle be able to fulfil this role, as many scientists including Feynman realized early on. It images matter with electrons that scatter strongly from individual atoms and whose wavelengths are about 50 times smaller than an atom. Recently the technique has advanced greatly owing to the introduction of aberration-corrected optics. However, neither electron microscopy nor any other experimental technique has yet been able to resolve and identify all the atoms in a non-periodic material consisting of several atomic species. Here we show that annular dark-field imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope optimized for low voltage operation can resolve and identify the chemical type of every atom in monolayer hexagonal boron nitride that contains substitutional defects. Three types of atomic substitutions were found and identified: carbon substituting for boron, carbon substituting for nitrogen, and oxygen substituting for nitrogen. The substitutions caused in-plane distortions in the boron nitride monolayer of about 0.1 A magnitude, which were directly resolved, and verified by density functional theory calculations. The results demonstrate that atom-by-atom structural and chemical analysis of all radiation-damage-resistant atoms present in, and on top of, ultra-thin sheets has now become possible. PMID:20336141

  11. Electron Microscopy and Image Processing: Essential Tools for Structural Analysis of Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Belnap, David M

    2015-01-01

    Macromolecular electron microscopy typically depicts the structures of macromolecular complexes ranging from ∼200 kDa to hundreds of MDa. The amount of specimen required, a few micrograms, is typically 100 to 1000 times less than needed for X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Micrographs of frozen-hydrated (cryogenic) specimens portray native structures, but the original images are noisy. Computational averaging reduces noise, and three-dimensional reconstructions are calculated by combining different views of free-standing particles ("single-particle analysis"). Electron crystallography is used to characterize two-dimensional arrays of membrane proteins and very small three-dimensional crystals. Under favorable circumstances, near-atomic resolutions are achieved. For structures at somewhat lower resolution, pseudo-atomic models are obtained by fitting high-resolution components into the density. Time-resolved experiments describe dynamic processes. Electron tomography allows reconstruction of pleiomorphic complexes and subcellular structures and modeling of macromolecules in their cellular context. Significant information is also obtained from metal-coated and dehydrated specimens. PMID:26521712

  12. Gold nanoparticles with different capping systems: an electronic and structural XAS analysis.

    PubMed

    López-Cartes, C; Rojas, T C; Litrán, R; Martínez-Martínez, D; de la Fuente, J M; Penadés, S; Fernández, A

    2005-05-12

    Gold nanoparticles (NPs) have been prepared with three different capping systems: a tetralkylammonium salt, an alkanethiol, and a thiol-derivatized neoglycoconjugate. Also gold NPs supported on a porous TiO(2) substrate have been investigated. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to determine the electronic behavior of the different capped/supported systems regarding the electron/hole density of d states. Surface and size effects, as well as the role of the microstructure, have been also studied through an exhaustive analysis of the EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) data. Very small gold NPs functionalized with thiol-derivatized molecules show an increase in d-hole density at the gold site due to Au-S charge transfer. This effect is overcoming size effects (which lead to a slightly increase of the d-electron density) for high S:Au atomic ratios and core-shell microstructures where an atomically abrupt Au-S interface likely does not exist. It has been also shown that thiol functionalization of very small gold NPs is introducing a strong distortion as compared to fcc order. To the contrary, electron transfer from reduced support oxides to gold NPs can produce a higher increase in d-electron density at the gold site, as compared to naked gold clusters. PMID:16852039

  13. The gas-phase structure of azetidine: Microwave spectroscopy, and electron diffraction and normal coordinate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Horst; Schrem, Gisela; Oberhammer, Heinz

    1984-03-01

    The geometric structure of azetidine has been determined by a combined analysis of electron diffraction and microwave data, implementing the results of a normal coordinate analysis. The following geometric parameters ( rz values) for the ring skeleton have been obtained: C sbnd N = 1.473 (3), C sbnd C = 1.563 (3)Å, CNC = 91.2 (0.4)° and puckering angle θ = 29.7 (1.4)°. The microwave spectra were analyzed for the ground state of the parent and N-deuterated species and for the υ = 1 and υ = 2 states of the puckering vibration of the parent species. Dipole moments and nitrogen quadrupole coupling constants were determined. The structural parameters are compared to previous experimental and theoretical results for azetidine and are discussed in context with the isoelectronic cyclobutane and oxetane.

  14. The Mechanism of Covalent Bonding: Analysis within the Huckel Model of Electronic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordholm, Sture; Back, Andreas; Backsay, George B.

    2007-01-01

    The commonly used Huckel model of electronic structure is employed to study the mechanisms of covalent bonding, a quantum effect related to electron dynamics. The model also explains the conjugation and aromaticity of planar hydrocarbon molecules completely.

  15. STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVE COMPLEX III IN THE PHOTOSYNTHETIC ELECTRON TRANSFER CHAIN OF CHLOROFLEXUS AURANTIACUS

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xinliu; Xin, Yueyong; Bell, Patrick D.; Wen, Jianzhong; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    The green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, which belongs to the phylum of filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs, does not contain a cytochrome bc or bf type complex as is found in all other known groups of phototrophs. This suggests that a functional replacement exists to link the reaction center photochemistry to cyclic electron transfer as well as respiration. Earlier work identified a potential substitute of the cytochrome bc complex, now named alternative complex III (ACIII), which has been purified, identified and characterized from C. aurantiacus. ACIII functions as a menaquinol:auracyanin oxidoreductase in the photosynthetic electron transfer chain, and a related but distinct complex functions in respiratory electron flow to a terminal oxidase. In this work, we focus on elucidating the structure of the photosynthetic ACIII. We found that AC III is an integral-membrane protein complex of around 300 kDa that consists of 8 subunits of 7 different types. Among them, there are 4 metalloprotein subunits, including a 113 kDa iron-sulfur cluster-containing polypeptide, a 25 kDa penta-heme c-containing subunit and two 20 kDa mono-heme c-containing subunits in the form of a homodimer. A variety of analytical techniques were employed in determining the ACIII substructure, including HPLC combined with ESI-MS, metal analysis, potentiometric titration and intensity analysis of heme-staining SDS-PAGE. A preliminary structural model of the ACIII complex is proposed based on the analytical data and chemical cross-linking in tandem with mass analysis using MALDI-TOF, as well as transmembrane and transit peptide analysis. PMID:20614874

  16. Symmetry analysis of phosphorene: electronic structure with spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengke; Appelbaum, Ian; Appelbaum's Group Team

    2015-03-01

    We present a symmetry analysis of electronic band structure including spin-orbit interaction close to the insulating gap edge in monolayer black phosphorus (``phosphorene''). Expressions for energy dispersion relation and spin-dependent eigenstates for electrons and holes are found via simplification of a perturbative expansion in wave vector k away from the zone center using elementary group theory. Importantly, we expose the underlying symmetries giving rise to substantial anisotropy in optical absorption, charge, and spin transport properties, and reveal the mechanism responsible for valence band distortion and possible lack of a true direct gap. We discovered that, spin flip processes are decoupled by symmetry from flexural phonons, allowing us to predict a spin lifetime comparable to bulk Si, vastly greater than graphene.

  17. Analysis of vibrational, structural, and electronic properties of rivastigmine by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, O.; Sinha, L.; Misra, N.; Narayan, V.; Kumar, N.; Kumar, A.

    2010-09-01

    The present work deals with the structural, electronic, and vibrational analysis of rivastigmine. Rivastigmine, an antidementia medicament, is credited with significant therapeutic effects on the cognitive, functional, and behavioural problems that are commonly associated with Alzheimer’s dementia. For rivastigmine, a number of minimum energy conformations are possible. The geometry of twelve possible conformers has been analyzed and the most stable conformer was further optimized at a higher basis set. The electronic properties and vibrational frequencies were then calculated using a density functional theory at the B3LYP level with the 6-311+G(d, p) basis set. The different molecular surfaces have also been drawn to understand the activity of the molecule. A narrower frontier orbital energy gap in rivastigmine makes it softer and more reactive than water and dimethylfuran. The calculated value of the dipole moment is 2.58 debye.

  18. Structure-analysis method for electronic cleansing in cathartic and noncathartic CT colonography

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wenli; Zalis, Michael E.; Näppi, Janne; Harris, Gordon J.; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Electronic cleansing (EC) is an emerging method for segmentation of fecal material in CT colonography (CTC) that is used for reducing or eliminating the requirement for cathartic bowel preparation and hence for improving patients’ adherence to recommendations for colon cancer screening. In EC, feces tagged by an x-ray-opaque oral contrast agent are removed from the CTC images, effectively cleansing the colon after image acquisition. Existing EC approaches tend to suffer from the following cleansing artifacts: degradation of soft-tissue structures because of pseudo-enhancement caused by the surrounding tagged fecal materials, and pseudo soft-tissue structures and false fistulas caused by partial volume effects at the boundary between the air lumen and the tagged regions, called the air-tagging boundary (AT boundary). In this study, we developed a novel EC method, called structure-analysis cleansing, which effectively avoids these cleansing artifacts. In our method, submerged soft-tissue structures are recognized by their local morphologic signatures that are characterized based on the eigenvalues of a three-dimensional Hessian matrix. A structure-enhancement function is formulated for enhancing of the soft-tissue structures. In addition, thin folds sandwiched between the air lumen and tagged regions are enhanced by analysis of the local roughness based on multi-scale volumetric curvedness. Both values of the structure-enhancement function and the local roughness are integrated into the speed function of a level set method for delineating the tagged fecal materials. Thus, submerged soft-tissue structures as well as soft-tissue structures adhering to the tagged regions are preserved, whereas the tagged regions are removed along with the associated AT boundaries from CTC images. Evaluation of the quality of the cleansing based on polyps and folds in a colon phantom, as well as on polyps in clinical cathartic and noncathartic CTC cases with fluid and stool tagging

  19. UV-Photoelectron Spectroscopy of BN Indoles: Experimental and Computational Electronic Structure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive electronic structure analysis of two BN isosteres of indole using a combined UV-photoelectron spectroscopy (UV-PES)/computational chemistry approach. Gas-phase He I photoelectron spectra of external BN indole I and fused BN indole II have been recorded, assessed by density functional theory calculations, and compared with natural indole. The first ionization energies of these indoles are natural indole (7.9 eV), external BN indole I (7.9 eV), and fused BN indole II (8.05 eV). The computationally determined molecular dipole moments are in the order: natural indole (2.177 D) > fused BN indole II (1.512 D) > external BN indole I (0.543 D). The λmax in the UV–vis absorption spectra are in the order: fused BN indole II (292 nm) > external BN indole I (282 nm) > natural indole (270 nm). The observed relative electrophilic aromatic substitution reactivity of the investigated indoles with dimethyliminium chloride as the electrophile is as follows: fused BN indole II > natural indole > external BN indole I, and this trend correlates with the π-orbital coefficient at the 3-position. Nucleus-independent chemical shifts calculations show that the introduction of boron into an aromatic 6π-electron system leads to a reduction in aromaticity, presumably due to a stronger bond localization. Trends and conclusions from BN isosteres of simple monocyclic aromatic systems such as benzene and toluene are not necessarily translated to the bicyclic indole core. Thus, electronic structure consequences resulting from BN/CC isosterism will need to be evaluated individually from system to system. PMID:25089659

  20. CTM4DOC: electronic structure analysis from X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Jaime, Mario Ulises; Zhang, Kaili; Vura-Weis, Josh; de Groot, Frank M F

    2016-09-01

    Two electronic structure descriptions, one based on orbitals and the other based on term symbols, have been implemented in a new Matlab-based program, CTM4DOC. The program includes a graphical user interface that allows the user to explore the dependence of details of electronic structure in transition metal systems, both in the ground and core-hole excited states, on intra-atomic electron-electron, crystal-field and charge-transfer interactions. The program can also track the evolution of electronic structure features as the crystal-field parameters are systematically varied, generating Tanabe-Sugano-type diagrams. Examples on first-row transition metal systems are presented and the implications on the interpretation of X-ray spectra and on the understanding of low-spin, high-spin and mixed-spin systems are discussed. PMID:27577785

  1. STM analysis of WTe 2 surfaces — correlation with crystal and electronic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, A.; Myhra, S.; Sofield, C. J.

    1994-10-01

    WTe 2 surfaces with [001] orientation have been studied in UHV by STM. The features in atomically resolved images exhibited an unequivocal dependence on the polarity of the tunnel voltage, and were in good agreement with results in the literature from calculations of the spatial dependence of the charge density across the unit cell. The analysis showed that "top" and "bottom" Te sites accounted for the observed features. Artefacts were observed; these are ascribed to tip effects, and are likely to have affected the interpretation of STM images in earlier studies. Vacancy defects located at the "top" Te sites in the surface were identified; the consequential redistribution of charge density and effects on the local electronic structure have been investigated.

  2. Molecular structure, NBO analysis, electronic absorption and vibrational spectral analysis of 2-Hydroxy-4-Methoxybenzophenone: reassignment of fundamental modes.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Lynnette; Sajan, D; Chaitanya, K; Suthan, T; Rajesh, N P; Isac, Jayakumary

    2014-01-01

    Vibrational frequencies of 2-Hydroxy-4-Methoxybenzophenone (HMB) have been reassigned with the aid of normal coordinate analysis (NCA) following the scaled quantum mechanical force field (SQMFF) methodology. The conformational analyses were performed and the energies of the different possible conformers were determined. The geometry of different conformers of the compounds were optimized with B3LYP method using 6-311++G(d,p) basis set to characterize all stationary points as minima. The optimized structural parameters of the most stable conformer were used in the vibrational frequency calculations. The force constants obtained from the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method have been utilized in the normal coordinate analysis. The temperature dependence of the thermodynamic properties, heat capacity at constant pressure (Cp), entropy (S) and enthalpy change (ΔH) for the compound was also determined by B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. The total electron density and Molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecules were constructed by Natural Bond Orbital analysis using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method to display electrostatic potential (electron+nuclei) distribution, molecular shape, size, and dipole moments of the molecule. The electronic properties, HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. PMID:24184624

  3. Theoretical Analysis on the Band Structure Variance of the Electron Doped 1111 Iron-based Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Usui, H.; Iimura, S.; Sato, Y.; Matsuishi, S.; Hosono, H.; Kuroki, K.

    We perform first principles band calculation of electron doped iron-based superconductors adopting the virtual crystal approximation. We find that when electrons are doped by element substitution in the blocking layer, the band structure near the Fermi level is affected due to the increase of the positive charge in the layer. On the other hand, when Fe in the conducting layer is substituted by Co, the band structure is barely affected. This difference should be a key factor in understanding the phase diagram of the heavily doped electron doped systems LnFeAsO1-xHx.

  4. CTM4DOC: electronic structure analysis from X-ray spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Jaime, Mario Ulises; Zhang, Kaili; Vura-Weis, Josh; de Groot, Frank M. F.

    2016-01-01

    Two electronic structure descriptions, one based on orbitals and the other based on term symbols, have been implemented in a new Matlab-based program, CTM4DOC. The program includes a graphical user interface that allows the user to explore the dependence of details of electronic structure in transition metal systems, both in the ground and core-hole excited states, on intra-atomic electron–electron, crystal-field and charge-transfer interactions. The program can also track the evolution of electronic structure features as the crystal-field parameters are systematically varied, generating Tanabe–Sugano-type diagrams. Examples on first-row transition metal systems are presented and the implications on the interpretation of X-ray spectra and on the understanding of low-spin, high-spin and mixed-spin systems are discussed. PMID:27577785

  5. DFT analysis on the molecular structure, vibrational and electronic spectra of 2-(cyclohexylamino)ethanesulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Renuga Devi, T S; Sharmi kumar, J; Ramkumaar, G R

    2015-02-25

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 2-(cyclohexylamino)ethanesulfonic acid were recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-50 cm(-1) respectively. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated using Hartee-Fock and Density functional method (B3LYP) with the correlation consistent-polarized valence double zeta (cc-pVDZ) basis set and 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The most stable conformer was optimized and the structural and vibrational parameters were determined based on this. The complete assignments were performed based on the Potential Energy Distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes, calculated using Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA) 4 program. With the observed FTIR and FT-Raman data, a complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out. Thermodynamic properties and Atomic charges were calculated using both Hartee-Fock and density functional method using the cc-pVDZ basis set and compared. The calculated HOMO-LUMO energy gap revealed that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using Gauge Including Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method and were compared with experimental results. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalization have been analyzed using Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. The first order hyperpolarizability (β) and Molecular Electrostatic Potential (MEP) of the molecule was computed using DFT calculations. The electron density based local reactivity descriptor such as Fukui functions were calculated to explain the chemical reactivity site in the molecule. PMID:25262144

  6. DFT analysis on the molecular structure, vibrational and electronic spectra of 2-(cyclohexylamino)ethanesulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renuga Devi, T. S.; Sharmi kumar, J.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2015-02-01

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 2-(cyclohexylamino)ethanesulfonic acid were recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1 respectively. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated using Hartee-Fock and Density functional method (B3LYP) with the correlation consistent-polarized valence double zeta (cc-pVDZ) basis set and 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The most stable conformer was optimized and the structural and vibrational parameters were determined based on this. The complete assignments were performed based on the Potential Energy Distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes, calculated using Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA) 4 program. With the observed FTIR and FT-Raman data, a complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out. Thermodynamic properties and Atomic charges were calculated using both Hartee-Fock and density functional method using the cc-pVDZ basis set and compared. The calculated HOMO-LUMO energy gap revealed that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using Gauge Including Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method and were compared with experimental results. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalization have been analyzed using Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. The first order hyperpolarizability (β) and Molecular Electrostatic Potential (MEP) of the molecule was computed using DFT calculations. The electron density based local reactivity descriptor such as Fukui functions were calculated to explain the chemical reactivity site in the molecule.

  7. The role of electronic structure calculation in mechanistic analysis of electron transfer reactions in the liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, M. D.

    1987-08-01

    Model calculations have been employed to elucidate the mechanism of electron transfer reactions in aqueous solution. The contribution of inner shell OH bonds to activation barriers has been estimated from calculation for metal ion hydrates. Calculated electron transfer matrix elements H sub if for redox processes of the type, ML sub 6 sup 2(+)+ ML sub 6 sup 3(+) in equilibrium ML sub 6 sup 3(+) + ML sub 6 sup 2(+), M = Fe, Co, or Ru, L = H2O or NH3, have been analyzed in terms of various orbital concepts. The matrix elements are based on ab initio wavefunctions for model supermolecule clusters of the type, (ML sub n ...L sub n M) sup 5(+), with n = 1 or 3. The analysis shows that the many-electron H sub if quantities can in fact be expressed to good approximation as effective 1-electron expressions of the type, H sub if proportional to lambda' sup 2 N sub c h sub L1Lr, where lambda' is the metal-ligand covalency parameter, h sub L1Lr is a local 1-electron matrix element for ligand orbitals in contact in the transition state, and N sub c is the number of such contacts. A least-squares fit of the data implies a value of approx. 5000/cm for h sub L1Lr, showing that significant coupling can occur in the absence of formal bonding between reactants.

  8. Electron Structure of Francium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koufos, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    This talk presents the first calculations of the electronic structure of francium for the bcc, fcc and hcp structures, using the Augmented Plane Wave (APW) method in its muffin-tin and linearized general potential forms. Both the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA), were used to calculate the electronic structure and total energy of francium (Fr). The GGA and LDA both found the total energy of the hcp structure slightly below that of the fcc and bcc structure, respectively. This is in agreement with similar results for the other alkali metals using the same methodology. The equilibrium lattice constant, bulk modulus and superconductivity parameters were calculated. We found that under pressures, in the range of 1-5 GPa, Fr could be a superconductor at a critical temperature of about 4K.

  9. Atomic structure of "multilayer silicene" grown on Ag(111): Dynamical low energy electron diffraction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Kazuaki; Shirasawa, Tetsuroh; Lin, Chun-Liang; Nagao, Ryo; Tsukahara, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Toshio; Arafune, Ryuichi; Kawai, Maki; Takagi, Noriaki

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the atomic structure of the "multilayer silicene" grown on the Ag(111) single crystal surface by using low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We measured the intensity of the LEED spot as a function of the incident electron energy (I-V curve) and analyzed the I-V curve using a dynamical LEED theory. We have found that the Si(111)(√{ 3} ×√{ 3})-Ag model well reproduces the I-V curve whereas the models consisting of the honeycomb structure of Si do not. The bias dependence of the STM image of multilayer silicene agrees with that of the Si(111)(√{ 3} ×√{ 3})-Ag reconstructed surface. Consequently, we have concluded that the multilayer silicene grown on Ag(111) is identical to the Si(111)(√{ 3} ×√{ 3})-Ag reconstructed structure.

  10. Structural analysis of vimentin and keratin intermediate filaments by cryo-electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Norlen, Lars . E-mail: lars.norlen@ki.se; Masich, Sergej; Goldie, Kenneth N.; Hoenger, Andreas

    2007-06-10

    Intermediate filaments are a large and structurally diverse group of cellular filaments that are classified into five different groups. They are referred to as intermediate filaments (IFs) because they are intermediate in diameter between the two other cytoskeletal filament systems that is filamentous actin and microtubules. The basic building block of IFs is a predominantly {alpha}-helical rod with variable length globular N- and C-terminal domains. On the ultra-structural level there are two major differences between IFs and microtubules or actin filaments: IFs are non-polar, and they do not exhibit large globular domains. IF molecules associate via a coiled-coil interaction into dimers and higher oligomers. Structural investigations into the molecular building plan of IFs have been performed with a variety of biophysical and imaging methods such as negative staining and metal-shadowing electron microscopy (EM), mass determination by scanning transmission EM, X-ray crystallography on fragments of the IF stalk and low-angle X-ray scattering. The actual packing of IF dimers into a long filament varies between the different families. Typically the dimers form so called protofibrils that further assemble into a filament. Here we introduce new cryo-imaging methods for structural investigations of IFs in vitro and in vivo, i.e., cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography, as well as associated techniques such as the preparation and handling of vitrified sections of cellular specimens.

  11. Structural and chemical analysis of CdSe/ZnSe nanostructures by transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peranio, N.; Rosenauer, A.; Gerthsen, D.; Sorokin, S. V.; Sedova, I. V.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2000-06-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of the structure and chemical composition of 0.5 to 3.0 ML (monolayer) CdSe sheets that are buried in a ZnSe matrix is presented. The CdSe layers were grown by migration-enhanced epitaxy at a growth temperature of 280 °C. We find two-dimensional (2D) CdxZn1-xSe layers with a total thickness of approximately 3 nm for all samples independent of the nominal CdSe content that contain inclusions (islands) with an enlarged Cd concentration. Plan-view TEM revealed two types of islands: First, small 2D islands with a lateral size of less than 10 nm, and second, large 2D islands with a lateral size between 30 and 130 nm. The combination of two-beam dark-field imaging and the new composition evaluation by lattice fringe analysis (CELFA) procedure allow the precise measurement of the Cd-concentration profiles of the CdxZn1-xSe layers. The CELFA evaluation yields a full width at half maximum value of (10+/-1) ML. The most probable origin of the broadening is a strong interdiffusion of Cd and Zn with an additional contribution of the segregation of the Cd atoms. The diffusion length of the Cd diffusion in ZnSe during the growth of the ZnSe cap layer is LD=(3.6+/-0.8) ML and the segregation probability is estimated to be R=(0.6+/-0.2). It is shown that neither objective lens aberrations nor specimen tilt are the main sources for the observed enormous broadening of the CdSe interlayers.

  12. Quantum-information analysis of electronic states of different molecular structures

    SciTech Connect

    Barcza, G.; Legeza, Oe.; Marti, K. H.; Reiher, M.

    2011-01-15

    We have studied transition metal clusters from a quantum information theory perspective using the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method. We demonstrate the competition between entanglement and interaction localization and discuss the application of the configuration interaction-based dynamically extended active space procedure, which significantly reduces the effective system size and accelerates the speed of convergence for complicated molecular electronic structures. Our results indicate the importance of taking entanglement among molecular orbitals into account in order to devise an optimal DMRG orbital ordering and carry out efficient calculations on transition metal clusters. Apart from these algorithmic observations, which lead to a recipe for black-box DMRG calculations, our work provides physical understanding of electron correlation in molecular and cluster structures in terms of entropy measures of relevance also to recent work on tensor-network representations of electronic states. We also identify those molecular orbitals which are highly entangled and discuss the consequences for chemical bonding and for the structural transition from an dioxygen binding copper cluster to an bis-oxygen-bridged system with broken O-O bond.

  13. Analysis of the Molecules Structure and Vertical Electron Affinity of Organic Gas Impact on Electric Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Juntao; Xiao, Dengming; Zhao, Xiaoling; Deng, Yunkun

    2016-05-01

    It is necessary to find an efficient selection method to pre-analyze the gas electric strength from the perspective of molecule structure and the properties for finding the alternative gases to sulphur hexafluoride (SF6). As the properties of gas are determined by the gas molecule structure, the research on the relationship between the gas molecule structure and the electric strength can contribute to the gas pre-screening and new gas development. In this paper, we calculated the vertical electron affinity, molecule orbits distribution and orbits energy of gas molecules by the means of density functional theory (DFT) for the typical structures of organic gases and compared their electric strengths. By this method, we find part of the key properties of the molecule which are related to the electric strength, including the vertical electron affinity, the lowest unoccupied molecule orbit (LUMO) energy, molecule orbits distribution and negative-ion system energy. We also listed some molecule groups such as unsaturated carbons double bonds (C=C) and carbonitrile bonds (C≡N) which have high electric strength theoretically by this method. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51177101 and 51337006)

  14. Energetic electron processes fluorescence effects for structured nanoparticles X-ray analysis and nuclear medicine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborda, A.; Desbrée, A.; Carvalho, A.; Chaves, P. C.; Reis, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are widely used as contrast agents for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and can be modified for improved imaging or to become tissue-specific or even protein-specific. The knowledge of their detailed elemental composition characterisation and potential use in nuclear medicine applications, is, therefore, an important issue. X-ray fluorescence techniques such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) or X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), can be used for elemental characterisation even in problematic situations where very little sample volume is available. Still, the fluorescence coefficient of Fe is such that, during the decay of the inner-shell ionised atomic structure, keV Auger electrons are produced in excess to X-rays. Since cross-sections for ionisation induced by keV electrons, for low atomic number atoms, are of the order of 103 barn, care should be taken to account for possible fluorescence effects caused by Auger electrons, which may lead to the wrong quantification of elements having atomic number lower than the atomic number of Fe. Furthermore, the same electron processes will occur in iron oxide nanoparticles containing 57Co, which may be used for nuclear medicine therapy purposes. In the present work, simple approximation algorithms are proposed for the quantitative description of radiative and non-radiative processes associated with Auger electrons cascades. The effects on analytical processes and nuclear medicine applications are quantified for the case of iron oxide nanoparticles, by calculating both electron fluorescence emissions and energy deposition on cell tissues where the nanoparticles may be embedded.

  15. Two-Dimensional Crystallization of Gastric H(+),K(+)-ATPase for Structural Analysis by Electron Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Electron crystallography of two-dimensional (2D) crystals has provided important information on the structural biology of P-type ATPases. Here, I describe the procedure for making 2D crystals of gastric H(+),K(+)-ATPase purified from pig stomach. The 2D crystals are produced by dialyzing detergent-solubilized H(+),K(+)-ATPase mixed with synthetic phospholipids. Removal of the detergent induces the reconstitution of H(+),K(+)-ATPase molecules into the lipid bilayer. In the presence of fluorinated phosphate analogs, or in combination with transporting cations or the specific antagonist SCH28080, H(+),K(+)-ATPase forms crystalline 2D arrays. The molecular conformation and morphology of the 2D crystals vary depending on the crystallizing conditions. Using these 2D crystals, three-dimensional structures of H(+),K(+)-ATPase can be generated by data correction from ice-embedded 2D crystals using cryo-electron microscopy, followed by processing the recorded images using electron crystallography methods. PMID:26695054

  16. Analysis of the electronic structure of ZrO{sub 2} by Compton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahammad, F. M.; Mahammed, S. F.; Kumar, R.; Vijay, Y. K.; Sharma, B. K.; Sharma, G.

    2013-07-15

    The electronic structure of ZrO{sub 2} is studied using the Compton scattering technique. The first-ever Compton profile measurement on polycrystalline ZrO{sub 2} was obtained using 59.54 keV gamma-rays emanating from the {sup 241}Am radioisotope. To explain the experimental data, we compute theoretical Compton profile values using the method of linear combination of atomic orbitals in the framework of density functional theory. The correlation scheme proposed by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof and the exchange scheme of Becke are considered. The ionic-model-based calculations for a number of configurations, i.e., Zr{sup +x}(O{sup -x/2}){sub 2} (0 {<=} x {<=} 2), are also performed to estimate the charge transfer on compound formation, and the study supports transfer of 1.5 electrons from Zr to O atoms.

  17. Networks of silicon nanowires: A large-scale atomistic electronic structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keleş, Ümit; Liedke, Bartosz; Heinig, Karl-Heinz; Bulutay, Ceyhun

    2013-11-01

    Networks of silicon nanowires possess intriguing electronic properties surpassing the predictions based on quantum confinement of individual nanowires. Employing large-scale atomistic pseudopotential computations, as yet unexplored branched nanostructures are investigated in the subsystem level as well as in full assembly. The end product is a simple but versatile expression for the bandgap and band edge alignments of multiply-crossing Si nanowires for various diameters, number of crossings, and wire orientations. Further progress along this line can potentially topple the bottom-up approach for Si nanowire networks to a top-down design by starting with functionality and leading to an enabling structure.

  18. Networks of silicon nanowires: A large-scale atomistic electronic structure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Keleş, Ümit; Bulutay, Ceyhun; Liedke, Bartosz; Heinig, Karl-Heinz

    2013-11-11

    Networks of silicon nanowires possess intriguing electronic properties surpassing the predictions based on quantum confinement of individual nanowires. Employing large-scale atomistic pseudopotential computations, as yet unexplored branched nanostructures are investigated in the subsystem level as well as in full assembly. The end product is a simple but versatile expression for the bandgap and band edge alignments of multiply-crossing Si nanowires for various diameters, number of crossings, and wire orientations. Further progress along this line can potentially topple the bottom-up approach for Si nanowire networks to a top-down design by starting with functionality and leading to an enabling structure.

  19. Electronic structure and pair potential energy analysis of 4-n-methoxy-4'-cyanobiphenyl: A nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dipendra; Dwivedi, M. K.; Tiwari, S. N.

    2016-05-01

    Electronic structure properties of 4-n-methoxy-4'-cyanobiphenyl, a pure nematic liquid crystal have been examined using an ab‒initio, HF/6‒31G(d,p) technique with GAMESS program. Conformational and charge distribution analysis have been carried out. MEP, HOMO and LUMO surfaces have been scanned. Ionization potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, global hardness and softness of the liquid crystal molecule have been calculated. Further, stacking, side by side and end to end interactions between a molecular pair have been evaluated. Results have been used to elucidate the physico-chemical and liquid crystalline properties of the system.

  20. Power electronics reliability analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mark A.; Atcitty, Stanley

    2009-12-01

    This report provides the DOE and industry with a general process for analyzing power electronics reliability. The analysis can help with understanding the main causes of failures, downtime, and cost and how to reduce them. One approach is to collect field maintenance data and use it directly to calculate reliability metrics related to each cause. Another approach is to model the functional structure of the equipment using a fault tree to derive system reliability from component reliability. Analysis of a fictitious device demonstrates the latter process. Optimization can use the resulting baseline model to decide how to improve reliability and/or lower costs. It is recommended that both electric utilities and equipment manufacturers make provisions to collect and share data in order to lay the groundwork for improving reliability into the future. Reliability analysis helps guide reliability improvements in hardware and software technology including condition monitoring and prognostics and health management.

  1. Analysis of boron carbides' electronic structure. Final technical report, 18 July 1984-17 August 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, I.A.; Beckel, C.L.

    1986-08-01

    The electronic properties of boron-rich icosahedral clusters were studied as a means of understanding the electronic structure of the icosahedral borides such as boron carbide. A lower bound was estimated on bipolaron formation energies in B/sub 12/ and B/sub 11/C icosahedra, and the associated distortions. While the magnitude of the distortion associated with bipolaron formation is similar in both cases, the calculated formation energies differ greatly, formation being much more favorable on B11C icosahedra. The stable positions of a divalent atom relative to an icosahedral borane was also investigated, with the result that a stable energy minimum was found when the atom is at the center of the borane, internal to the B/sub 12/ cage. If incorporation of dopant atoms into B/sub 12/ cages in icosahedral boride solids is feasible, novel materials might result. In addition, the normal modes of a B/sub 12/H/sub 12/ cluster, of the C/sub 2/B/sub 10/ cage in para-carborane, and of a B/sub 12/ icosahedron of reduced (D sub 3d) symmetry, such as is found in the icosahedral borides, were calculated. The nature of these vibrational modes will be important in determining, for instance, the character of the electron-lattice coupling in the borides, and in analyzing the lattice contribution to the thermal conductivity.

  2. Performance analysis of electronic structure codes on HPC systems: a case study of SIESTA.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Fabiano

    2014-01-01

    We report on scaling and timing tests of the SIESTA electronic structure code for ab initio molecular dynamics simulations using density-functional theory. The tests are performed on six large-scale supercomputers belonging to the PRACE Tier-0 network with four different architectures: Cray XE6, IBM BlueGene/Q, BullX, and IBM iDataPlex. We employ a systematic strategy for simultaneously testing weak and strong scaling, and propose a measure which is independent of the range of number of cores on which the tests are performed to quantify strong scaling efficiency as a function of simulation size. We find an increase in efficiency with simulation size for all machines, with a qualitatively different curve depending on the supercomputer topology, and discuss the connection of this functional form with weak scaling behaviour. We also analyze the absolute timings obtained in our tests, showing the range of system sizes and cores favourable for different machines. Our results can be employed as a guide both for running SIESTA on parallel architectures, and for executing similar scaling tests of other electronic structure codes. PMID:24748385

  3. Soot Structure and Reactivity Analysis by Raman Microspectroscopy, Temperature-Programmed Oxidation, and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, Markus; Schuster, Manfred E.; Su, Dangsheng; Schlögl, Robert; Niessner, Reinhard; Ivleva, Natalia P.

    2009-11-01

    Raman microspectroscopy (RM), temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were combined to get comprehensive information on the relationship between structure and reactivity of soot in samples of spark discharge (GfG), heavy duty engine diesel (EURO VI and IV) soot, and graphite powder upon oxidation by oxygen at increasing temperatures. GfG soot and graphite powder represent the higher and lower reactivity limits. Raman microspectroscopic analysis was conducted by determination of spectral parameters using a five band fitting procedure (G, D1-D4) as well as by evaluation of the dispersive character of the D mode. The analysis of spectral parameters shows a higher degree of disorder and a higher amount of molecular carbon for untreated GfG soot samples than for samples of untreated EURO VI and EURO IV soot. The structural analysis based on the dispersive character of the D mode revealed substantial differences in ordering descending from graphite powder, EURO IV, VI to GfG soot. HRTEM images and EELS analysis of EURO IV and VI samples indicated a different morphology and a higher structural order as compared to GfG soot in full agreement with the Raman analysis. These findings are also confirmed by the reactivity of soot during oxidation (TPO), where GfG soot was found to be the most reactive and EURO IV and VI soot samples exhibited a moderate reactivity.

  4. Theoretical analysis of structures and electronic spectra in molecular cadmium chalcogenide clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Kiet A.; Pachter, Ruth; Day, Paul N.; Su, Haibin

    2015-06-01

    We present calculated structural and optical properties of molecular cadmium chalcogenide nonstoichiometric clusters with a size range of less than 1 nm to more than 2 nm with well-defined chemical compositions and structures in comparison to experimental characterization and previous theoretical work. A unified treatment of these clusters to obtain a fundamental understanding of the size, ligand, and solvation effects on their optical properties has not been heretofore presented. The clusters belong to three topological classes, specifically supertetrahedral (Tn), penta-supertetrahedral (Pn), and capped supertetrahedral (Cn), where n is the number of metal layers in each cluster. The tetrahedrally shaped Tn clusters examined in this work are Cd(ER)42- (T1), Cd4(ER)102- (T2), and Cd 10 E4 ' ( ER ) 16 4 - (T3), where R is an organic group, E and E' are chalcogen atoms (sulfur or selenium). The first member of the Pn series considered is M8E'(ER)162-. For the Cn series, we consider the first three members, M 17 E4 ' ( ER ) 28 2 - , M 32 E14 ' ( ER ) 36 L 4 , and M 54 E32 ' ( ER ) 48 L 4 4 - (L = neutral ligand). Mixed ligand clusters with capping ER groups replaced by halogen or neutral ligands were also considered. Ligands and solvent were found to have a large influence on the color and intensity of the electronic absorption spectra of small clusters. Their effects are generally reduced with increasing cluster sizes. Blueshifts were observed for the first electronic transition with reduced size for both cadmium sulfide and cadmium selenide series. Due to weakly absorbing and forbidden transitions underlying the one-photon spectra, more care is needed in interpreting the quantum confinement from the clusters' lowest-energy absorption bands.

  5. High resolution electron diffraction analysis of structural changes associated with the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. -G.

    1994-04-01

    Changes in protein structure that occur during the formation of the M photointermediate of bacteriorhodopsin can be directly visualized by electron diffraction techniques. Samples containing a high percentage of the M intermediate were trapped by rapidly cooling the crystals with liquid nitrogen following illumination with filtered green light at 240K and 260K respectively. Difference Fourier projection maps for M minus bR at two temperatures and for M{sub 260K} minus M{sub 240K} are presented. While it is likely that a unique M-substate is trapped when illuminated at 260K produces a mixture of the M{sub 240K} substate and a second M-substate which may have a protein structure similar to the N-intermediate. The diffraction data clearly show that statistically significant structural changes occur upon formation of the M{sub 240K} specimen and then further upon formation of the second substate which is present in the mixture that is produced at 260K. A preliminary 3-D difference map, based on data collected with samples tilted up to 30{degree}, has been constructed at a resolution of 3.5{angstrom} parallel to the membrane plane and a resolution of 8.5{angstrom} perpendicular to the membrane. The data have been analyzed by a number of different criteria to ensure that the differences seen reflect real conformation changes at a level which is significantly above the noise in the map. Furthermore, a comparison of the positions of specific backbone and side-chain groups relative to significant difference peaks suggests that it will be necessary to further refine the atomic resolution model before it will be possible to interpret the changes in chemical structure that occur in the protein at this stage of the photocycle.

  6. Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    After an 800-foot-tall offshore oil recovery platform collapsed, the engineers at Engineering Dynamics, Inc., Kenner, LA, needed to learn the cause of the collapse, and analyze the proposed repairs. They used STAGSC-1, a NASA structural analysis program with geometric and nonlinear buckling analysis. The program allowed engineers to determine the deflected and buckling shapes of the structural elements. They could then view the proposed repairs under the pressure that caused the original collapse.

  7. Vibrational analysis, electronic structure and nonlinear optical properties of Levofloxacin by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunasekaran, Sethu; Rajalakshmi, K.; Kumaresan, Subramanian

    2013-08-01

    The Fourier transform (FT-IR) spectrum of Levofloxacin was recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and a complete vibrational assignment of fundamental vibrational modes of the molecule was carried out using density functional method. The observed fundamental modes have been compared with the harmonic vibrational frequencies computed using DFT (B3LYP) method by employing 6-31 G (d, p) basis sets. The most stable geometry of the molecule under investigation has been determined from the potential energy scan. The first-order hyperpolarizability (βo) and other related properties (μ, αo) of Levofloxacin are calculated using density functional theory (DFT) on a finite field approach. UV-vis spectrum of the molecule was recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies were performed by DFT using 6-31 G (d, p) basis sets. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital analysis (NBO). The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that, the charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The other molecular properties like molecular electrostatic potential (MESP), Mulliken population analysis and thermodynamic properties of the title molecule have been calculated.

  8. Vibrational analysis, electronic structure and nonlinear optical properties of levofloxacin by density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Gunasekaran, Sethu; Rajalakshmi, K; Kumaresan, Subramanian

    2013-08-01

    The Fourier transform (FT-IR) spectrum of Levofloxacin was recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and a complete vibrational assignment of fundamental vibrational modes of the molecule was carried out using density functional method. The observed fundamental modes have been compared with the harmonic vibrational frequencies computed using DFT (B3LYP) method by employing 6-31 G (d, p) basis sets. The most stable geometry of the molecule under investigation has been determined from the potential energy scan. The first-order hyperpolarizability (βo) and other related properties (μ, αo) of Levofloxacin are calculated using density functional theory (DFT) on a finite field approach. UV-vis spectrum of the molecule was recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies were performed by DFT using 6-31 G (d, p) basis sets. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital analysis (NBO). The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that, the charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The other molecular properties like molecular electrostatic potential (MESP), Mulliken population analysis and thermodynamic properties of the title molecule have been calculated. PMID:23685802

  9. Three-dimensional analysis of wakefields generated by flat electron beams in planar dielectric-loaded structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalcea, D.; Piot, P.; Stoltz, P.

    2012-08-01

    An electron bunch passing through a dielectric-lined waveguide generates Čerenkov radiation that can result in a high-peak axial electric field suitable for acceleration of a subsequent bunch. Axial fields beyond gigavolt-per-meter are attainable in structures with sub-mm sizes depending on the achievement of suitable electron bunch parameters. A promising configuration consists of using a planar dielectric structure driven by flat electron bunches. In this paper we present a three-dimensional analysis of wakefields produced by flat beams in planar dielectric structures thereby extending the work of Tremaine, Rosenzweig, and Schoessow, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81063-651X 56, 7204 (1997)10.1103/PhysRevE.56.7204] on the topic. We especially provide closed-form expressions for the normal frequencies and field amplitudes of the excited modes and benchmark these analytical results with finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell numerical simulations. Finally, we implement a semianalytical algorithm into a popular particle-tracking program thereby enabling start-to-end high-fidelity modeling of linear accelerators based on dielectric-lined planar waveguides.

  10. Analysis of the structure of dimeric DNA catenanes by electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Levene, S D; Donahue, C; Boles, T C; Cozzarelli, N R

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed the structure of open-circular and supercoiled dimeric DNA catenanes generated by site-specific recombination in vitro. Electron microscopy of open-circular catenanes shows that the number of duplex crossings in a plane is a linear function of the number of catenane interlinks (Ca/2), and that the length of the catenane axis is constant, independent of Ca. These relationships are similar to those observed with supercoiled DNA. Statistical analyses reveal, however, that the conformations of the individual rings of the catenanes are similar to those of unlinked circles. The distribution of distances between randomly chosen points on separate rings depends strongly on Ca and is consistent with a sharp decrease in the center-of-mass separation between rings with increasing Ca. Singly linked supercoiled catenanes are seen by microscopy to be linked predominantly through terminal loops in the respective superhelices. The observations suggest that chain entropy is a major factor determining the conformation of DNA catenanes. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:8519958

  11. Electronic image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahm, J.; Grosskopf, R.; Jaeger, H.; Trautwein, F.

    1980-12-01

    An electronic system for image analysis was developed on the basis of low and medium cost integrated circuits. The printed circuit boards were designed, using the principles of modern digital electronics and data processing. The system consists of modules for automatic, semiautomatic and visual image analysis. They can be used for microscopical and macroscopical observations. Photographs can be evaluated, too. The automatic version is controlled by software modules adapted to various applications. The result is a system for image analysis suitable for many different measurement problems. The features contained in large image areas can be measured. For automatic routine analysis controlled by processing calculators the necessary software and hardware modules are available.

  12. CrN electronic structure and vibrational modes: An optical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. Y.; Gall, D.

    2010-07-01

    The optical properties of paramagnetic CrN over the wavelength range 250nm-30μm were determined from transmission and reflection spectra of 44-11000-nm -thick epitaxial CrN(001) layers that were grown on MgO(001) by ultrahigh vacuum magnetron sputtering at 700°C and were found to be pure cubic single crystals by x-ray diffraction ω-2θ , ω , and φ scan analyses. The imaginary part of the dielectric function exhibits a steep onset at ℏω=0.64eV as well as peaks at ℏω=1.5 and 2.9 eV due to direct interband transitions and indicates a depletion in the density of states at the Fermi level with an upper limit for free carriers of 3×1019cm-3 . This is attributed to local magnetic moments that cause splitting of the t2g bands and the formation of an indirect band gap of 0.19±0.46eV , as estimated by comparing the optical transition energies with reported direct gap energies from calculations with different magnetic ordering and Coulomb interaction terms. The dielectric function shows a strong resonance at ℏω0=48.7±0.2meV , and values of ɛdc=53±5 and ɛ∞=22±2 below and above the resonance, respectively, providing values for transverse and longitudinal optical phonon frequencies at the zone center of 11.7 THz and 18.2 THz (corresponding to ℏω=48.7±0.2 and 75.6±6.8meV ), respectively, and a Born effective charge of 4.4±0.9 . The vibrational frequencies are confirmed by Raman spectroscopy peaks at 800, 1170, and 1330cm-1 which are attributed to 2TO(X), 2LO(X), and 2LO(L) modes and correspond to single-phonon energies of 49.6 meV, 72.5 meV, and 82.5 meV, respectively. They are quantitatively comparable to those reported for ScN, a semiconductor with the same crystal structure as cubic CrN. In conclusion, both electronic interband transitions and optical phonon frequencies suggest that CrN is a Mott-Hubbard-type insulator with a small to negligible indirect band gap.

  13. Ab initio structural and electronic analysis of CH3SH self-assembled on a Cu(110) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, S.; Chiodo, L.; Della Sala, F.; Cingolani, R.; Rinaldi, R.

    2007-05-01

    Ab initio Density Functional Theory calculations are here reported to characterize the adsorption of methanethiol at the Cu(110) surface. Theoretical results suggest that the binding of the adsorbate to the substrate is rather weak and the molecular geometry is correspondingly almost unaffected by the adsorption. Otherwise, when CH3SH deprotonates producing methanethiolate, a stronger chemical bond is realized between the sulfur atom of CH3S radical and Cu surface atoms. A detailed study of structural and electronic properties of methanethiolate on Cu(110) for a p(2×2) and a c(2×2) overlayer structure has been carried out. We find that, in the most stable configuration, the molecule adsorbs in the shortbridge site. The chemical bond arises due to a strong hybridization among p orbitals of sulfur and d states from the substrate, as it is deduced by an analysis of partial densities of states and charge densities.

  14. Structural Dynamics of Electronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, E.

    2013-03-01

    The published work on analytical ("mathematical") and computer-aided, primarily finite-element-analysis (FEA) based, predictive modeling of the dynamic response of electronic systems to shocks and vibrations is reviewed. While understanding the physics of and the ability to predict the response of an electronic structure to dynamic loading has been always of significant importance in military, avionic, aeronautic, automotive and maritime electronics, during the last decade this problem has become especially important also in commercial, and, particularly, in portable electronics in connection with accelerated testing of various surface mount technology (SMT) systems on the board level. The emphasis of the review is on the nonlinear shock-excited vibrations of flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) experiencing shock loading applied to their support contours during drop tests. At the end of the review we provide, as a suitable and useful illustration, the exact solution to a highly nonlinear problem of the dynamic response of a "flexible-and-heavy" PCB to an impact load applied to its support contour during drop testing.

  15. Molecular-orbital analysis of the electronic structure and determination of quantitative structure-activity and structure-toxicity relationships for water-soluble ionol derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Bushelev, S.N.

    1985-08-01

    In this paper the authors attempt to establish a quantitative relationship between experimental data on antitumor activity and the toxicity of ionol and its derivatives on the one hand, and on the other hand the electronic structure parameters of the compounds obtained as a result of the quantum chemical calculation.

  16. Electronically Recorded Music as a Communication Medium: A Structural Analysis with Selected Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Earl; Mabry, Edward A.

    During the past decade, the influence of electronically recorded music and the message it transmits have caused media scholars to reexamine and modify the theories upon which the basic process of communication is dependent. While the five primary functions (source, transmitter, channel, receiver, and destination) remain unchanged, an additional…

  17. Natural bond orbital analysis, electronic structure and vibrational spectral analysis of N-(4-hydroxyl phenyl) acetamide: A density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindasamy, P.; Gunasekaran, S.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2014-09-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of N-(4-hydroxy phenyl) acetamide (N4HPA) of painkiller agent were recorded in the region 4000-450 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1 respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to calculate the optimized geometrical parameter, atomic charges, and vibrational wavenumbers and intensity of the vibrational bands. The computed vibrational wave numbers were compared with the FT-IR and FT-Raman experimental data. The computational calculations at DFT/B3LYP level with 6-31G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The complete vibrational assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes calculated using Vibrational energy distribution analysis (VEDA 4) program. The oscillator’s strength calculated by TD-DFT and N4HPA is approach complement with the experimental findings. The NMR chemical shifts 13C and 1H were recorded and calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) and electron density surfaces of the molecule were constructed. The Natural charges and intermolecular contacts have been interpreted using Natural Bond orbital (NBO) analysis the HOMO-LUMO energy gap has been calculated. The thermodynamic properties like entropy, heat capacity and zero vibrational energy have been calculated.

  18. Dynamical low-energy electron diffraction analysis of the structure of nitric oxide on Pt( 1 1 1 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, M.; Tatsumi, N.; Fukutani, K.; Okano, T.

    2002-08-01

    The adsorption structure of NO on the Pt(1 1 1) surface at low temperature (90-130 K) was studied by dynamical analysis of low-energy electron diffraction and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy. Three different 2×2 patterns were identified and their experimental intensity vs. voltage curves ( I- V curves) were compared with dynamically calculated I- V curves for the models including the tilted (bent) NO geometry. The differences of I- V curves can be recognized by virtue of the wider incident electron energy range than the previous dynamical analysis. The most promising interpretation is that NO occupies three sites sequentially depending on the NO coverage. In this interpretation, NO first adsorbs at the threefold fcc hollow site, next at the atop site and last at the threefold hcp hollow site. The NO saturation coverage is 0.75 ML ( 1 ML=1.5×10 -15 molecules/cm 2). The NO species at the atop site is tilted and those at both hollow sites are upright. Our new model agrees well with the recent density functional theory calculation and explains the experimental results better than the previous model, in which NO transits from the bridge site to the atop site with increasing coverage.

  19. Three-Dimensional Structural Analysis of MgO-Supported Osmium Clusters by Electron Microscopy with Single-Atom Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Aydin, C.; Kulkarni, Apoorva; Chi, Miaofang; Browning, Nigel D.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2013-05-10

    Size, shape, nuclearity: Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to determine the 3D structures of MgO-supported Os3, Os4, Os5, and Os10 clusters, which have structures nearly matching those of osmium carbonyl compounds with known crystal structures. The samples are among the best-defined supported catalysts.

  20. Electronics for Piezoelectric Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warkentin, D. J.; Tani, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper briefly presents work addressing some of the basic considerations for the electronic components used in smart structures incorporating piezoelectric elements. After general remarks on the application of piezoelectric elements to the problem of structural vibration control, three main topics are described. Work to date on the development of techniques for embedding electronic components within structural parts is presented, followed by a description of the power flow and dissipation requirements of those components. Finally current work on the development of electronic circuits for use in an 'active wall' for acoustic noise is introduced.

  1. Analysis of the structural, electronic and optic properties of Ni doped MgSiP2 semiconductor chalcopyrite compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocak, Belgin; Ciftci, Yasemin Oztekin

    2016-03-01

    The structural, electronic band structure and optic properties of the Ni doped MgSiP2 chalcopyrite compound have been performed by using first-principles method in the density functional theory (DFT) as implemented in Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP). The generalized gradient approximation (GGA) in the scheme of Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof (PBE) is used for the exchange and correlation functional. The present lattice constant (a) follows generally the Vegard's law. The electronic band structure, total and partial density of states (DOS and PDOS) are calculated. We present data for the frequency dependence of imaginary and real parts of dielectric functions of Ni doped MgSiP2. For further investigation of the optical properties the reflectivity, refractive index, extinction coefficient and electron energy loss function are also predicted. Our obtained results indicate that the lattice constants, electronic band structure and optical properties of this compound are dependent on the substitution concentration of Ni.

  2. Electronic structure and photophysical properties of polyimides

    SciTech Connect

    LaFemina, J.P.; Kafafi, S.A.

    1992-04-01

    The quantum mechanical AM1 and CNDO/S3 models were used to examine the effect of isoelectronic substitutions on the conformation, electronic structure, and optical absorption spectra for a series of aromatic polyimides. An analysis of the geometric changes at the substitution site and its effect on the electronic structure allowed for the prediction of changes in the ICT band of the optical absorption spectra.

  3. Electronic structure analysis of glycine oligopeptides and glycine-tryptophan oligopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Yu, Shuai; Yang, Mengshi; Xu, Can; Wang, Yu; Chen, Liang

    2014-03-01

    Using the density functional theory (DFT), we have studied the energy gap, charge distribution, density of states and chemical activity of glycine (Gn) oligopeptides and glycine-tryptophan (GWn) oligopeptides. The results show that: (1) with the increasing of Gn residues, the chemical activity of Gn oligopeptides focuses on the terminal amino and carboxyl groups, which may be the main cause of self-assembly behaviors in Gn oligopeptide chains; (2) the chemical reaction activity has size effect. The size effect disappears when the residue number exceeds 7. The Gn oligopeptides with 7 residues is the shortest chain which has the same reaction activity as that of longer size peptide; (3) the activity of GWn oligopeptides presents size effect and odd-even effect. However, the size effect and odd-even effect both vanish when the chain of GWn oligopeptides is longer than 12 residues. (4) It is difficult in self-assembly for GWn oligopeptide chains, because its activity mainly focuses on the indole ring and the Gn residues at the end of oligopeptides. (5) The big side groups result in the very near energy level of LUMO and LUMO+1 of GWn oligopeptide chains. It shows that the electron-accepting ability of oligopeptide chainsis composed of two orbitals addition. The results in the paper may help us understand the changes of physical and chemical properties of peptide synthesis process.

  4. Electron spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    The Surface Science Laboratories at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) are equipped with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) facilities. These techniques provide information from the uppermost atomic layers of a sample, and are thus truly surface sensitive. XPS provides both elemental and chemical state information without restriction on the type of material that can be analyzed. The sample is placed into an ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber and irradiated with x-rays which cause the ejection of photoelectrons from the sample surface. Since x-rays do not normally cause charging problems or beam damage, XPS is applicable to a wide range of samples including metals, polymers, catalysts, and fibers. AES uses a beam of high energy electrons as a surface probe. Following electronic rearrangements within excited atoms by this probe, Auger electrons characteristic of each element present are emitted from the sample. The main advantage of electron induced AES is that the electron beam can be focused down to a small diameter and localized analysis can be carried out. On the rastering of this beam synchronously with a video display using established scanning electron microscopy techniques, physical images and chemical distribution maps of the surface can be produced. Thus very small features, such as electronic circuit elements or corrosion pits in metals, can be investigated. Facilities are available on both XPS and AES instruments for depth-profiling of materials, using a beam of argon ions to sputter away consecutive layers of material to reveal sub-surface (and even semi-bulk) analyses.

  5. Tight-binding analysis of the electronic structure of dilute bismide alloys of GaP and GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Muhammad; Broderick, Christopher A.; Lindsay, Andrew; O'Reilly, Eoin P.

    2011-12-01

    We develop an atomistic, nearest-neighbor sp3s* tight-binding Hamiltonian to investigate the electronic structure of dilute bismide alloys of GaP and GaAs. Using this model, we calculate that the incorporation of dilute concentrations of Bi in GaP introduces Bi-related defect states in the band gap, which interact with the host matrix valence band edge via a Bi composition dependent band anticrossing (BAC) interaction. By extending this analysis to GaBixAs1-x, we demonstrate that the observed strong variation of the band gap (Eg) and spin-orbit-splitting energy (ΔSO) with Bi composition can be well explained in terms of a BAC interaction between the extended states of the GaAs valence band edge and highly localized Bi-related defect states lying in the valence band, with the change in Eg also having a significant contribution from a conventional alloy reduction in the conduction band edge energy. Our calculated values of Eg and ΔSO are in good agreement with experiment throughout the investigated composition range (x≤13%). In particular, our calculations reproduce the experimentally observed crossover to an Eg<ΔSO regime at approximately 10.5% Bi composition in bulk GaBixAs1-x. Recent x-ray spectroscopy measurements have indicated the presence of Bi pairs and clusters even for Bi compositions as low as 2%. We include a systematic study of different Bi nearest-neighbor environments in the alloy to achieve a quantitative understanding of the effect of Bi pairing and clustering on the GaBixAs1-x electronic structure.

  6. Electron density analysis of the effects of sugars on the structure of lipid bilayers at low hydration - a preliminary study

    SciTech Connect

    Lenné, T.; Kent, B.; Koster, K.L.; Garvey, C.J.; Bryant, G.

    2012-02-06

    -saccharides affect the average distance between lipid chains in the bilayer, supporting the predictions of the HFE. In this paper we further investigate the effects of sugars on membrane structure by conducting electron density analysis of recent data. This preliminary analysis sheds additional light onto the effects of sugars on membrane structure.

  7. Structural physiology based on electron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    There are many questions in brain science, which are extremely interesting but very difficult to answer. For example, how do education and other experiences during human development influence the ability and personality of the adult? The molecular mechanisms underlying such phenomena are still totally unclear. However, technological and instrumental advancements of electron microscopy have facilitated comprehension of the structures of biological components, cells, and organelles. Electron crystallography is especially good for studying the structure and function of membrane proteins, which are key molecules of signal transduction in neural and other cells. Electron crystallography is now an established technique to analyze the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, which are close to their natural biological environment. By utilizing cryo-electron microscopes with helium cooled specimen stages, which were developed through a personal motivation to understand functions of neural systems from a structural point of view, structures of membrane proteins were analyzed at a resolution higher than 3 Å. This review has four objectives. First, it is intended to introduce the new research field of structural physiology. Second, it introduces some of the personal struggles, which were involved in developing the cryo-electron microscope. Third, it discusses some of the technology for the structural analysis of membrane proteins based on cryo-electron microscopy. Finally, it reviews structural and functional analyses of membrane proteins. PMID:21416541

  8. Theoretical electronic structure of structurally modified graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Marc David

    Graphene has emerged as a promising replacement for silicon in next-generation electronics and optoelectronic devices. If graphene is to be used in semiconductor devices, however, it must acquire an electronic band gap. Numerous approaches have been proposed to control the band gap of graphene, including the periodic patterning of defects. However, the mechanism for band gap opening and the associated physics in graphene patterned with defects remain unclear. Using both analytic theory and first-principles calculations, we show that periodic patterning of defects on graphene can open a large and tunable band gap, induce strong absorption peaks at optical wavelengths, and host a giant band gap quantum spin Hall phase. First, a geometric rule is analytically derived for the arrangements of defects that open a band gap in graphene, with one ninth of all possible patterns opening a band gap. Next, we perform ab-initio density functional calculations to compare the effects of structural vacancies, hexagonal BN dopants, and passivants on the electronic structure of graphene. Qualitatively, these three types of structural defects behave the same, with only slight differences in their resulting band structures. By adjusting the shape of structural defects, we show how to move the Dirac cones in reciprocal space in accordance with the tight-binding model for the anisotropic honeycomb lattice, while the fundamental mechanism for band gap opening remains the same. To quantitatively predict the band gap and optical properties of these materials, we employ many-body perturbation theory with Green's functions (GW/Bethe-Salpeter equation) to directly include electron-electron and electron-hole interactions. Structurally modified graphene shows a strong renormalization of the fundamental band gap over single particle descriptions, and a strong electron-hole interaction as indicated by strong exciton binding energies (> 0.5 eV). Finally, we show that structurally modified graphene

  9. Minerals and aligned collagen fibrils in tilapia fish scales: structural analysis using dark-field and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Mitsuhiro; Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tagaya, Motohiro; Chen, Song; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ikoma, Toshiyuki

    2011-10-01

    The mineralized structure of aligned collagen fibrils in a tilapia fish scale was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques after a thin sample was prepared using aqueous techniques. Electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy data indicated that a mineralized internal layer consisting of aligned collagen fibrils contains hydroxyapatite crystals. Bright-field imaging, dark-field imaging, and energy-filtered TEM showed that the hydroxyapatite was mainly distributed in the hole zones of the aligned collagen fibrils structure, while needle-like materials composed of calcium compounds including hydroxyapatite existed in the mineralized internal layer. Dark-field imaging and three-dimensional observation using electron tomography revealed that hydroxyapatite and needle-like materials were mainly found in the matrix between the collagen fibrils. It was observed that hydroxyapatite and needle-like materials were preferentially distributed on the surface of the hole zones in the aligned collagen fibrils structure and in the matrix between the collagen fibrils in the mineralized internal layer of the scale. PMID:21899811

  10. First-principles Wannier function analysis of the electronic structure of PdTe: weaker magnetism and superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Ekuma, Chinedu E; Lin, Chia-Hui; Moreno, Juana; Ku, Wei; Jarrell, Mark

    2013-10-01

    We report a first-principles Wannier function study of the electronic structure of PdTe. Its electronic structure is found to be a broad three-dimensional Fermi surface with highly reduced correlation effects. In addition, the higher filling of the Pd d-shell, its stronger covalency resulting from the closer energy of the Pd d and Te p shells, and the larger crystal field effects of the Pd ion due to its near octahedral coordination, all serve to weaken significantly electronic correlations in the particle-hole (spin, charge, and orbital) channel. In comparison to the Fe chalcogenides, e.g. FeSe, we highlight the essential features (quasi-two-dimensionality, proximity to half-filling, weaker covalency, and higher orbital degeneracy) of Fe-based high-temperature superconductors. PMID:24025790

  11. Electronic structure and correlation effects in actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Albers, R.C.

    1998-12-01

    This report consists of the vugraphs given at a conference on electronic structure. Topics discussed are electronic structure, f-bonding, crystal structure, and crystal structure stability of the actinides and how they are inter-related.

  12. Electron Scattering and Nuclear Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trower, W. P.; Ficenec, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Presents information about the nucleus gained by studies of electron scattering. Discusses what can be implied about the shape of the charge distribution, the nucleus positions, the vibrational modes of the nucleus, the momentum of the nucleus, and the granularity and core structures of the nucleus. (DS)

  13. Electronic Structure Principles and Aromaticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chattaraj, P. K.; Sarkar, U.; Roy, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between aromaticity and stability in molecules on the basis of quantities such as hardness and electrophilicity is explored. The findings reveal that aromatic molecules are less energetic, harder, less polarizable, and less electrophilic as compared to antiaromatic molecules, as expected from the electronic structure principles.

  14. Thermopower analysis of the electronic structure around the metal-insulator transition in V1-xWxO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katase, Takayoshi; Endo, Kenji; Ohta, Hiromichi

    2014-10-01

    The electronic structure across the metal-insulator (MI) transition of electron-doped V1-xWxO2 epitaxial films (x =0-0.06) grown on α-Al2O3 substrates was studied by means of thermopower (S) measurements. Significant increase of |S | values accompanied by MI transition was observed, and the transition temperatures of S (TS) decreased with x in a good linear relation with MI transition temperatures. |S| values of V1-xWxO2 films at T>TS were constant at low values of 23μVK-1 independently of x, which reflects a metallic electronic structure, whereas those at Telectronic structures with a parabolic density of state around the conduction band bottom.

  15. Geometrical and electronic structure of fluoro-substituted benzene radical anions based on quantum chemical analysis of hyperfine interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchegoleva, L. N.; Bilkis, I. I.; Schastnev, P. V.

    1983-12-01

    The INDO method has been employed to calculate the isotropic and anisotropic hyperfine interactions for some geometrical structures of the C 6F 6-, C 6HF 5-, 1,2,4,5-F 4C 6H 2- radical anions. The π and σ states of planar radical anions have been considered together with three types of non-planar structures: (a) with out-of-plane distortions of the benzene ring following the "chair" pattern: (b) with neighbouring fluorine atoms displaced in opposite directions from the ring plane due to their electrostatic repulsion: (c) with symmetric (of type) displacement of CF bonds due to the interaction between the ground and lowest excited σ-electron states within the pseudo-Jahn-Teller effect. It is the last model that describes all experimental data on magnetic resonance parameters. This model is also preferable for energy reasons. Most likely, this type of non-planar structures reflects the basic features of the real geometry of the above radical anions whose ground state may be termed as pseudo-π-electronic since the unpaired electron occupies an orbital that is a linear combination of the π and σ orbitals of the corresponding planar structure with a prevailing π component.

  16. Electronic structure of black sodalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, Otto F.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Lenosky, Thomas

    1998-06-01

    The electronic structure of black sodalite, Na8(AlSiO4)6, is determined in the local-spin-density approximation (LSDA). This structure has six Na atoms to compensate the six Al atoms, leaving two excess Na atoms. A band-gap electronic state is induced in the wide oxide gap by the excess sodium, and has ``particle in a box'' behavior. Magnetic orderings of these gap states are studied. Analytic models show that an antiferromagnetic ordering is lowest in energy in the LSDA. A self-consistent LSDA calculation shows the system to change from a metal to an antiferromagnetic insulator when spin orderings are allowed. Hopping and Hubbard-U parameters are estimated, and the many-body correlated Hubbard model is solved using a constrained path Monte Carlo technique, which again predicts the system to be antiferromagnetic with a Tc of order 50 K.

  17. Electronic structure of Calcium hexaborides

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byounghak; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2005-06-15

    We present a theoretical study of crystal and electronic structures of CaB6 within a screened-exchange local density approximation (sX-LDA). Our ab initio total energy calculations show that CaB6 is a semiconductor with a gap of >1.2 eV, in agreement with recent experimental observations. We show a very sensitive band gap dependence on the crystal internal parameter, which might partially explain the scatter of previous theoretical results. Our calculation demonstrates that it is essential to study this system simultaneously for both crystal structures and electronic properties, and that the sX-LDA provides an ideal method for this problem.

  18. Structural analysis, electronic and optical properties of the synthesized Sb2S3 nanowires with small band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Validžić, I. Lj; Mitrić, M.; Abazović, N. D.; Jokić, B. M.; Milošević, A. S.; Popović, Z. S.; Vukajlović, F. R.

    2014-03-01

    We report a simple colloidal synthesis of two types of Sb2S3 nanowires with small band gap and high aspect ratio. Field-emission scanning electron and transmission electron microscopies confirmed formation of high aspect ratio Sb2S3 nanowires, separated in the form of bundles and coalesced with each other in long bars. Diffuse reflectance and absorption spectroscopies revealed that the optical band-gap energies of the synthesized nanowires separated in the form of bundles are 1.56 and 1.59 eV, and coalesced with each other in long bars are 1.36 and 1.28 eV, respectively. The structure refinement showed that Sb2S3 powders belong to the orthorhombic structure with space group Pnma (no. 62). It was found that Sb2S3 nanowires separated in the form of bundles predominantly grow along the [0 1 0] direction being in the needle-like shape. The nanowires coalesced with each other in long bars rise in the form of long bars, are ribbon-like in shape and have expressed {1 0 1} facets which grow along the [0 1 0] direction. No peaks in photoluminescence spectra were observed in the spectral range from 250 to 600 nm. In order to shed more light on the experimental results concerning the band-gap energies and, in the literature generally poorly investigated electronic properties of the synthesized material, we performed theoretical calculations of the electronic structure and optical properties of the Sb2S3 samples synthesized here. This was done on the basis of density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation, and also with an improved version of the exchange potential suggested recently by Tran and Blaha. The main characteristic is the significant improvement of the band gap value.

  19. Defect Induced Electronic Structure of Uranofullerene

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xing; Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Wei; Xin, Minsi; Huai, Ping; Zhang, Ruiqin; Wang, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between the inner atoms/cluster and the outer fullerene cage is the source of various novel properties of endohedral metallofullerenes. Herein, we introduce an adatom-type spin polarization defect on the surface of a typical endohedral stable U2@C60 to predict the associated structure and electronic properties of U2@C61 based on the density functional theory method. We found that defect induces obvious changes in the electronic structure of this metallofullerene. More interestingly, the ground state of U2@C61 is nonet spin in contrast to the septet of U2@C60. Electronic structure analysis shows that the inner U atoms and the C ad-atom on the surface of the cage contribute together to this spin state, which is brought about by a ferromagnetic coupling between the spin of the unpaired electrons of the U atoms and the C ad-atom. This discovery may provide a possible approach to adapt the electronic structure properties of endohedral metallofullerenes. PMID:23439318

  20. Feature extraction and fusion for protein structure identification in cryo-electron microscopic images using independent component analysis and the projection-slice synthetic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riasati, Vahid R.; Braunreiter, Dennis

    2006-04-01

    In this paper we utilize the Projection-Slice Synthetic Discriminant Function Filters, PSDF, in concert with an Independent Component Analysis technique to simultaneously reduce the data set that represents each of the training images and to emphasize subtle differences in each of the training images. These differences are encoded into the PSDF in order to improve the filter sensitivity for the recognition and identification of protein images formed from a cryo-electron microscopic imaging process. The PSDF and Independent Component Analysis provide a premise not only for the identification of the class of structures under consideration, but also for detecting the orientation of the structures in these images. The protein structures found in cryo-electron microscopic imaging represent a class of objects that have low resolution and contrast and subtle variation. This poses a challenge in design of filters to recognize these structures due to false targets that often have similar characteristics as the protein structures. The incorporation of a component analysis and eigen values conditioning in forming the filter provides an enhanced approach of de-correlating images prior to their incorporation into the filter. We present our method of filter synthesis and the results of the application of this modified filter to a protein structure recognition problem.

  1. Hybrid Shubnikov--de Haas-photoluminescence analysis of two-dimensional electron density in strained quantum well structures with heavily doped contact layers

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, M.L.; Simmons, J.A. ); Ho, P.; Martin, P.A. )

    1994-06-27

    A hybrid analysis technique is presented to accurately extract the two-dimensional (2D) electron density of PHEMT structures in which multiple subbands are occupied and severe parallel conduction by heavily doped contact layers occurs. Complications due to shorted Hall voltages by the parallel contact layer, which precludes simple Hall analysis, and to multiple subband occupation, which requires high magnetic-field sweeps in Shubnikov--de Haas (SdH) measurements, are eliminated by this hybrid analysis that combines SdH measurements with photoluminescence measurements to extract the total 2D density. Comparisons with other methods demonstrate the high accuracy of this new technique.

  2. Electronic structure of graphite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hae Kyung; Yang, Cheolsoo; Kim, Bong Soo; Kim, Ki-Jeong

    2011-03-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure of graphite oxide by photoelectron spectroscopy at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Korea. The typical sp 2 hybridization states found in graphite were also seen in graphite oxide. However, the π state disappeared near the Fermi level because of bonding between the π and oxygen-related states originating from graphite oxide, indicating electron transfer from graphite to oxygen and resulting in a downward shift of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) state to higher binding energies. The band gap opening increased to about 1.8 eV, and additional oxygen-related peaks were observed at 8.5 and 27 eV. This research was supported by the Basic Science Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF), funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2010-0004592), and partly by the MEST (2009-0087138). Experiments at the PLS were supported in part by POSTECH and MEST.

  3. Electronic instrumentation for smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanar, George J.

    1995-04-01

    The requirements of electronic instrumentation for smart structures are similar to those of data acquisition systems at our national particle physics laboratories. Modern high energy and heavy ion physics experiments may have tens of thousands of channels of data sources producing data that must be converted to digital form, compacted, stored and interpreted. In parallel, multiple sensors distributed in and around smart structures generate either binary or analog signals that are voltage, charge, or time like in their information content. In all cases, they must be transmitted, converted and preserved into a unified digital format for real-time processing. This paper will review the current status of practical large scale electronic measurement systems with special attention to architectures and physical organization. Brief surveys of the current state of the art will include preamplifiers and amplifiers, comparators and discriminators, voltage or charge analog-to-digital converters, time internal meters or time-to-digital converters, and finally, counting or scalar systems. The paper will conclude by integrating all of these ideas in a concept for an all-digital readout of a smart structure using the latest techniques used in physics research today.

  4. Electron microprobe analysis of cryolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, F.; Bravo Silva, P.; Ferreira, J.; Piedade, A. P.; Vieira, M. T. F.

    2014-03-01

    A sample of cryolite was studied with a JEOL JXA 8500-F electron microprobe under several operating conditions. A TAP crystal was used to analyse Na and Al and a LDE1 crystal to analyse F. As F and Na are both highly "volatile" elements, special care must be taken during analysis. The measurement order of Na, F and Al is not irrelevant and optimum conditions may also result in different combinations of accelerating voltage, beam current, beam size or counting times. Relevant X-ray signals were recorded in order to investigate the behaviour of the Na Ka and F Ka counts with elapsed time. The incident beam current was also recorded at the same time. In a clear contrast to what has normally been reported in the EPMA analysis of aluminosilicates and silicate glasses, we found that the Na X-ray counts increase with time. This increment of X-rays intensities for sodium in cryolite depends on the operating conditions and is accompanied by a strong migration of fluorine from the beam excitation volume, leading to a decrease in F X-ray counting rates. It was also observed that higher incident beam currents induce higher radiation damage in the mineral. The current instability is consistent with possible electron induced dissociation in the cryolite structure. An analytical protocol was achieved for 6 kV and 15kV accelerating voltage for the correct EPMA analysis of cryolite.

  5. Electronic structure of lithium amide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamakura, N.; Takeda, Y.; Saitoh, Y.; Yamagami, H.; Tsubota, M.; Paik, B.; Ichikawa, T.; Kojima, Y.; Muro, T.; Kato, Y.; Kinoshita, T.

    2011-01-01

    The electronic structure of the insulator lithium amide (LiNH2), which is a lightweight complex hydride being considered as a high-capacity hydrogen storage material, is investigated by N 1s soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The XES and XAS spectra show a band gap between the valence and conduction bands. The valence band in the XES spectrum consists of three peaks, which extend up to ~-8 eV from the valence band top. The band calculation within the local-density approximation (LDA) for LiNH2shows energetically separated three peaks in the occupied N 2p partial density of states (pDOS) and the band gap. The energy distribution of three peaks in the XES spectrum agrees with that in the calculated pDOS except for the peak at the highest binding energy, which is attributed to the strongly hybridized state between N 2p and H 1s. The XES experiment has clarified that the strongly hybridized state with H 1s in LiNH2is located at binding energy higher than that of the LDA calculation, while the overall feature of the electronic structure of LiNH2experimentally obtained by XES and XAS is consistent with the calculated result.

  6. Electronic structure and electron momentum density in TiSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaleb, A. M.; Mohammad, F. M.; Sahariya, Jagrati; Sharma, Mukesh; Ahuja, B. L.

    2013-03-01

    We report the electron momentum density in titanium monosilicide using 241Am Compton spectrometer. Experimental Compton profile has been compared with the theoretical profiles computed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO). The energy bands, density of states and Fermi surface structures of TiSi are reported using the LCAO and the full potential linearized augmented plane wave methods. Theoretical anisotropies in directional Compton profiles are interpreted in terms of energy bands. To confirm the conducting behavior, we also report the real space analysis of experimental Compton profile of TiSi.

  7. Analysis of the fine structure of Sn11 +-Sn14 + ions by optical spectroscopy in an electron-beam ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windberger, A.; Torretti, F.; Borschevsky, A.; Ryabtsev, A.; Dobrodey, S.; Bekker, H.; Eliav, E.; Kaldor, U.; Ubachs, W.; Hoekstra, R.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Versolato, O. O.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally re-evaluate the fine structure of Sn11 +-Sn14 + ions. These ions are essential in bright extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) plasma-light sources for next-generation nanolithography, but their complex electronic structure is an open challenge for both theory and experiment. We combine optical spectroscopy of magnetic dipole M 1 transitions, in a wavelength range covering 260 to 780 nm, with charge-state selective ionization in an electron beam ion trap. Our measurements confirm the predictive power of ab initio calculations based on Fock space coupled cluster theory. We validate our line identification using semiempirical cowan calculations with adjustable wave-function parameters. Available Ritz combinations further strengthen our analysis. Comparison with previous work suggests that line identifications in the EUV need to be revisited.

  8. Structure analysis of OmpC, one of the major proteins in the outer membrane of E. coli, by high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.F.

    1983-07-01

    This dissertation is concerned with the structure analysis of a pore-forming membrane protein, OmpC, which is one of the major proteins in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. In order to obtain structural information it was necessary to develop a suitable technique for preparing two-dimensional crystalline arrays of this membrane protein in an unfixed, unstained and hydrated condition. Electron micrographs were recorded at exposures of less than 5 electrons/A/sup 2/ in order to avoid severe radiation damage. The resulting images were crystallographically averaged, in order to overcome the statistical limitations associated with the low electron exposures. The resulting images, which extend to a resolution of approx. 13.5 A, lend themselves to a natural interpretation that is consistent with the mass density of protein, water and lipid, prior data from 2-D and 3-D structure studies of negatively stained specimens at approx. = 20 A resolution, and published spectroscopic data on the peptide chain secondary structure.

  9. Quantum chemical investigation on the structural and electronic properties of α-, β-, and γ-cyclodextrin complexes: DFT and QTAIM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehestani, M.; Pourestarabadi, S.; Zeidabadinejad, L.

    2016-06-01

    To characterize the structural, thermochemical and electronic aspects in complexes of leucine, vanillin and mechlorethamine with α-, β-, and γ-cyclodextrins (CDs), a density functional theory (DFT) study has been conducted in combination with quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analysis. The QTAIM method has been utilized to explore the nature of various possible interactions between leucine, vanillin and mechlorethamine with CDs in terms of bond critical points (BCPs). HOMO and LUMO and atomic charges studies show charge transfer occurs between drugs and cyclodextrins. This behavior has been also investigated via QTAIM charge analysis. On the other hand, based on QTAIM electronic energy indicators we have discussed electrostatic character of interactions between vanillin, leucine and mechlorethamine with inner surface CDs in the coordination sphere.

  10. Electronic structure analysis and properties of Sr{sub 2}CeO{sub 4} grown by sol–gel method

    SciTech Connect

    Talik, E.; Lipińska, L.; Skrzypek, D.; Skuta, A.; Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, ul. Wólczyńska 133, 01-919 Warszawa ; Zajdel, P.; Guzik, A.; Duda, H.

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► Sr{sub 2}CeO{sub 4} nanopowders were obtained by sol–gel method. ► SEM/EDX imaging and chemical analysis have been done. ► XPS electronic structure was examined and discussed. ► The terminal and equatorial Ce-O bonds contributions were determined in O2p states. ► The energy gap was estimated by valence band and electrical measurements. -- Abstract: Sr{sub 2}CeO{sub 4} is a very promising material due to its various industrial applications, e.g. for the construction of field emission displays and light emitting diodes. In this work, the phosphor was synthesized by the sol–gel method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) methods. They proved to be very good structural properties of the material and identified negligible impurities from the technological process. The decomposition of the surface of the nanocrystals was found but this did not decrease the spectral features of the compound. The analysis of the XPS O2p lines revealed contributions of two kinds of bonds: terminal and equatorial ones, in the ratio of 2/4. They are separated by 1.2 eV what is in agreement with the observed absorption spectra. A presence of the decomposed layers may produce asymmetric widening of the emission spectra towards a lower energy.

  11. Electronic structure theory: Applications and geometrical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coh, Sinisa

    This thesis contains several applications of the first-principles electronic-structure theory with special emphasis in parts of the thesis on the geometrical aspects of the theory. We start by reviewing the basics of the first-principles electronic-structure methods which are then used throughout the thesis. The first application of these methods is on the analysis of the stability and lattice dynamics of alpha- and beta-cristobalite phases of SiO2. We also map the complete low-energy landscape connecting these two structures and give implications on the phase transition in this compound. Next we study a family of Pbnm perovskites that are promising candidates for silicon-compatible high-K dielectrics. We calculate their structure and dielectric response, and compare with experimental results where available. The third application of these methods is to the large isosymmetric reorientation of oxygen octahedra rotation axes in epitaxially strained perovskites. We explain the origin of the peculiar energy landscape topology as a function of epitaxial strain. In the part of the thesis devoted to the geometrical aspects of electronic structure theory, we begin by extending the concept of electronic polarization to a Chern insulators. These insulators are characterized by a non-zero off-diagonal sigma_xy conductivity tensor component, quantized in units of e 2/h. Finally we discuss another geometrical quantity, the Chern-Simons orbital magnetoelectric coupling. We present a first-principles based calculation of this quantity in several compounds, and motivated by recent developments in the theory of topological insulators, we speculate about the existence of "large-theta materials," in which this kind of coupling could be unusually large.

  12. Nanostructured SnO2 thick films for gas sensor application: analysis of structural and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskovic, Goran; Aleksic, Obrad S.; Nikolic, Maria V.; Nicolics, Johann; Radosavljevic, Goran; Vasiljevic, Zorka Z.; Lukovic, Miloljub D.; Smetana, Walter

    2016-03-01

    This research is focused on structural and electrical characterisation of tin oxide (SnO2) applied as a thick film and investigation of its properties as gas sensitive material. Micron sized SnO2 powder was milled in an agate mill for six hours to fabricate SnO2 nanopowder, which was afterwards sieved by 325 mesh sieve and characterized by XRD and SEM. This powder was used as functional part in the production of thick film tin oxide paste containing a resin vehicle with 4 wt. % nanosize glass frits acting as permanent binder. The glass frits where additionally milled for twelve hours in the agate mills to nanosized powder and sieved by a 325 mesh sieve as well. The achieved thick film paste was screen printed on alumina and fired at 850oC peak temperature for 10 minutes in air. After the sintering process, thick film samples where characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The reflectivity was measured on the same samples by UV-VIS spectrophotometer: the band gap was determined from the slope of reflectance. After that a matrix of different interdigitated electrode structure of PdAg paste was printed and sintered using the mentioned sintering conditions. The tin oxide thick film was printed over the interdigitated electrodes as a top layer and sintered again under the same conditions. The total electrical resistance was measured as a function of the electrode spacing and temperature. A negative temperature coefficient (NTC) was identified and measured in the range from room temperature (27°C) to 180°C in a climate chamber. Finally the samples were placed into a gas reactor with NOx and CO gas and the resistance was measured in the same temperature range (27°C-200°C).

  13. An Electron-Poor C64 Nanographene by Palladium-Catalyzed Cascade C-C Bond Formation: One-Pot Synthesis and Single-Crystal Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Sabine; Shoyama, Kazutaka; Schmidt, David; Würthner, Frank

    2016-05-23

    Herein, we report the one-pot synthesis of an electron-poor nanographene containing dicarboximide groups at the corners. We efficiently combined palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling and dehydrohalogenation to synthesize an extended two-dimensional π-scaffold of defined size in a single chemical operation starting from N-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-4,5-dibromo-1,8-naphthalimide and a tetrasubstituted pyrene boronic acid ester as readily accessible starting materials. The reaction of these precursors under the conditions commonly used for Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling afforded a C64 nanographene through the formation of ten C-C bonds in a one-pot process. Single-crystal X-ray analysis unequivocally confirmed the structure of this unique extended aromatic molecule with a planar geometry. The optical and electrochemical properties of this largest ever synthesized planar electron-poor nanographene skeleton were also analyzed. PMID:27058998

  14. Surface structure and electronic properties of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siekhaus, W. J.; Somorjai, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    A surface potential model is developed to explain dopant effects on chemical vapor deposition. Auger analysis of the interaction between allotropic forms of carbon and silicon films has shown Si-C formation for all forms by glassy carbon. LEED intensity measurements have been used to determine the mean square displacement of surface atoms of silicon single crystals, and electron loss spectroscopy has shown the effect of structure and impurities on surface states located within the band gap. A thin film of Al has been used to enhance film crystallinity at low temperature.

  15. Electronic structure of herbicides: Atrazine and bromoxynil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Kovač, Branka

    2011-06-01

    The electronic structures of herbicides atrazine and bromoxynil have been investigated by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), quantum chemical calculations and comparison with X-ray diffraction, molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies. Their electronic and molecular structures are discussed in the context of their biological activity. This is the first report which correlates the molecular mechanism of biological activity of these herbicides with their experimentally determined electronic and molecular structures.

  16. Wavelet analysis of electron-density maps.

    PubMed

    Main, P; Wilson, J

    2000-05-01

    The wavelet transform is a powerful technique in signal processing and image analysis and it is shown here that wavelet analysis of low-resolution electron-density maps has the potential to increase their resolution. Like Fourier analysis, wavelet analysis expresses the image (electron density) in terms of a set of orthogonal functions. In the case of the Fourier transform, these functions are sines and cosines and each one contributes to the whole of the image. In contrast, the wavelet functions (simply called wavelets) can be quite localized and may only contribute to a small part of the image. This gives control over the amount of detail added to the map as the resolution increases. The mathematical details are outlined and an algorithm which achieves a resolution increase from 10 to 7 A using a knowledge of the wavelet-coefficient histograms, electron-density histogram and the observed structure amplitudes is described. These histograms are calculated from the electron density of known structures, but it seems likely that the histograms can be predicted, just as electron-density histograms are at high resolution. The results show that the wavelet coefficients contain the information necessary to increase the resolution of electron-density maps. PMID:10771431

  17. Structure-function relationships of the yeast fatty acid synthase: negative-stain, cryo-electron microscopy, and image analysis studies of the end views of the structure.

    PubMed

    Stoops, J K; Kolodziej, S J; Schroeter, J P; Bretaudiere, J P; Wakil, S J

    1992-07-15

    The yeast fatty acid synthase (M(r) = 2.5 x 10(6)) is organized in an alpha 6 beta 6 complex. In these studies, the synthase structure has been examined by negative-stain and cryo-electron microscopy. Side and end views of the structure indicate that the molecule, shaped similar to a prolate ellipsoid, has a high-density band of protein bisecting its major axis. Stained and frozen-hydrated average images of the end views show an excellent concordance and a hexagonal ring having three each alternating egg- and kidney-shaped features with low-protein-density protrusions extending outward from the egg-shaped features. Images also show that the barrel-like structure is not hollow but has a Y-shaped central core, which appears to make contact with the three egg-shaped features. Numerous side views of the structure give good evidence that the beta subunits have an archlike shape. We propose a model for the synthase that has point-group symmetry 32 and six equivalent sites of fatty acid synthesis. The protomeric unit is alpha 2 beta 2. The ends of each of the two archlike beta subunits interact with opposite sides of the two dichotomously arranged disclike alpha subunits. Three such protomeric units form the ring. We propose that the six fatty acid synthesizing centers are composed of two complementary half-alpha subunits and a beta subunit, an arrangement having all the partial activities of the multifunctional enzyme required for fatty acid synthesis. PMID:1631160

  18. Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Nonlinear structural analysis techniques for engine structures and components are addressed. The finite element method and boundary element method are discussed in terms of stress and structural analyses of shells, plates, and laminates.

  19. Detailed structural analysis of epitaxial MBE-grown Fe/Cr superlattices by x-ray diffraction and transmission-electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M.E.; Santamaria, J.; Kim, S.; Schuller, Ivan K.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2005-03-15

    We have performed a detailed quantitative structural analysis of epitaxial [Fe(3 nm)/Cr(1.2 nm)]{sub 20} superlattices by low- and high-angle x-ray diffraction, and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy on cross-section samples. The interface roughness was changed systematically by varying the substrate temperature (150-250 deg. C) maintaining all other growth parameters fixed. Direct imaging of the interfaces allows examining the roughness of the individual interfaces and its evolution with thickness. A statistical analysis of the local interface width for the individual layers supplies the roughness static and dynamic exponents. High-temperature samples (250 deg. C) show roughness decreasing with thickness as a result of surface-diffusion-dominated growth. Low-temperature samples (150 deg. C) show anomalous non-self-affine roughness characterized by a time-dependent local interface width.

  20. Electronic correlation contributions to structural energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    2015-03-01

    The recursion method is used to calculate electronic excitation spectra including electron-electron interactions within the Hubbard model. The effects of correlation on structural energies are then obtained from these spectra and applied to stacking faults. http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.2288 Supported by the Richmond F. Snyder Fund and Gifts.

  1. Electronic Structure and Bonding in Complex Biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi

    2005-03-01

    For over a century vitamin B12 and its enzyme cofactor derivates have persistently attracted research efforts for their vital biological role, unique Co-C bonding, rich red-ox chemistry, and recently their candidacies as drug delivery vehicles etc. However, our understanding of this complex metalorganic molecule's efficient enzyme activated catalytic power is still controversial. We have for the first time calculated the electronic structure, Mulliken effective charge and bonding of a whole Vitamin B12 molecule without any structural simplification by first- principles approaches based on density functional theory using structures determined by high resolution X-ray diffraction. A partial density of states analysis shows excellent agreement with X-ray absorption data and has been used successfully to interpret measured optical absorption spectra. Mulliken bonding analysis of B12 and its derivatives reveal noticeable correlations between the two axial ligands which could be exploited by the enzyme to control the catalytic process. Our calculated X-ray near edge structure of B12 and its derivates using Slater's transition state theory are also in good agreement with experiments. The same approach has been applied to other B12 derivatives, ferrocene peptides, and recently DNA molecules.

  2. Electronic structure of lithium tetraborate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, David J.

    Due to many of its attributes, Li2B4O7 provides a possible material for incorporation as either a primary or companion material in future solid state neutron detectors. There is however a lack of fundamental characterization information regarding this useful material, particularly its electronic configuration. To address this, an investigation of Li2B4O7(110) and Li2B 4O7(100) was undertaken, utilizing photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopic techniques. The measured band gap depended on crystallographic direction with the band gaps ranging from 8.9+/-0.5 eV to 10.1+/-0.5 eV. The measurement yielded a density of states that qualitatively agreed with the theoretical results from model bulk band structure calculations for Li2B4O7; albeit with a larger band gap than predicted, but consistent with the known deficiencies of Local Density Approximation and Density Functional Theory calculations. The occupied states of both surfaces were extremely flat; to the degree that resolving periodic dispersion of the occupied states was inconclusive, within the resolution of the system. However, both surfaces demonstrated clear periodic dispersion within the empty states very close to theoretical Brillouin zone values. These attributes also translated to a lighter charge carrier effective mass in the unoccupied states. Of the two surfaces, Li2B4O 7(110) yielded the more consistent values in orthogonal directions for energy states. The presence of a bulk band gap surface state and image potential state in Li2B4O7(110) was indicative of a defect-free surface. The absence of both in the more polar, more dielectric Li2B4O7(100) was attributed to the presence of defects determined to be O vacancies. The results from Li2B 4O7(110) were indicative of a more stable surface than Li 2B4O7(100). In addition, Li 1s bulk and surface core level components were determined at the binding energies of -56.5+0.4 and -53.7+0.5 eV. Resonance features were observed along the [001

  3. Electronic Structure of B12 coenzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi; Ching, W. Y.; Randaccio, Lucio

    2001-06-01

    We have carried out an ab-initio local density functional calculations of the two most important B12 coenzymes, adoensyl-cobalamin (Ado-Cbl) and methyl-cobalamin (Me-Cbl). The crystal structures were determined by accurate X-ray synchrotron radiation measurements. Both crystals have space group P2121 with four molecules, or about 800 atoms, per unit cell. Our electronic structure calculation is based on one full molecule including the side chains. Results are analyzed in terms of atom and orbital resolved partial density of states (PDOS), Mulliken effective charges and bond orders. The PDOS analysis shows that the Co complexes of both B12 coenzymes had a HOMO/LUMO gap of about 1.5 eV. The Co-C bond order in Me-Cbl is smaller than that in Ado-Cbl. This appears to be in contradiction with the measured bond dissociated energies. However, this could also indicate the importance of the effects of solvents, which were not included in the calculation. We are investigating whether the effect of the solvents could dramatically modify the electronic structures of Ado-Cbl and Me-Cbl.

  4. Analysis of the Electronic Structure of Aqueous Urea and Its Derivatives: A Systematic Soft X-Ray-TD-DFT Approach.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Marc F; Golnak, Ronny; Ehrhard, Felix; Schön, Daniela; Xiao, Jie; Atak, Kaan; Bande, Annika; Aziz, Emad F

    2016-08-16

    Soft X-ray emission (XE), absorption (XA), and resonant inelastic scattering (RIXS) experiments have been conducted at the nitrogen K-edge of urea and its derivatives in aqueous solution and were compared with density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory calculations. This comprehensive study provides detailed information on the occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals of urea, thiourea, acetamide, dimethylurea, and biuret at valence levels. By identifying the electronic transitions that contribute to the experimental spectral features, the energy gap between the highest occupied and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of each molecule is determined. Moreover, a theoretical approach is introduced to simulate resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra by adding an extra electron to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, thereby mimicking the real initial state of the core-electron absorption before the subsequent relaxation process. PMID:27416871

  5. Electron tomography of dislocation structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.S.; House, S.D.; Kacher, J.; Tanaka, M.; Higashida, K.; Robertson, I.M.

    2014-01-15

    Recent developments in the application of electron tomography for characterizing microstructures in crystalline solids are described. The underlying principles for electron tomography are presented in the context of typical challenges in adapting the technique to crystalline systems and in using diffraction contrast imaging conditions. Methods for overcoming the limitations associated with the angular range, the number of acquired images, and uniformity of image contrast are introduced. In addition, a method for incorporating the real space coordinate system into the tomogram is presented. As the approach emphasizes development of experimental solutions to the challenges, the solutions developed and implemented are presented in the form of examples.

  6. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is a compilation of X-ray tables and spectra recorded from various mineral matrices. Spectra were obtained using electron microprobe, equipped with LiF geared, curved crystal X-ray spectrometers, utilizing typical analytical operating conditions: 15 Kv acceleration potential, 0.02 microampere sample current as measured on a clinopyroxene standard (CP19). Tables and spectra are presented for the majority of elements, fluorine through uranium, occurring in mineral samples from lunar, meteoritic and terrestrial sources. Tables for each element contain relevant analytical information, i.e., analyzing crystal, X-ray peak, background and relative intensity information, X-ray interferences and a section containing notes on the measurement. Originally intended to cover silicates and oxide minerals the tables and spectra have been expanded to cover other mineral phases. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is intended as a spectral base to which additional spectra can be added as the analyst encounters new mineral matrices.

  7. Electron gun controlled smart structure

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John Alan; Redmond, James M.; Henson, Tammy D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and system for actively controlling the shape of a sheet of electroactive material; the system comprising: one or more electrodes attached to the frontside of the electroactive sheet; a charged particle generator, disposed so as to direct a beam of charged particles (e.g. electrons) onto the electrode; a conductive substrate attached to the backside of the sheet; and a power supply electrically connected to the conductive substrate; whereby the sheet changes its shape in response to an electric field created across the sheet by an accumulation of electric charge within the electrode(s), relative to a potential applied to the conductive substrate. Use of multiple electrodes distributed across on the frontside ensures a uniform distribution of the charge with a single point of e-beam incidence, thereby greatly simplifying the beam scanning algorithm and raster control electronics, and reducing the problems associated with "blooming". By placing a distribution of electrodes over the front surface of a piezoelectric film (or other electroactive material), this arrangement enables improved control over the distribution of surface electric charges (e.g. electrons) by creating uniform (and possibly different) charge distributions within each individual electrode. Removal or deposition of net electric charge can be affected by controlling the secondary electron yield through manipulation of the backside electric potential with the power supply. The system can be used for actively controlling the shape of space-based deployable optics, such as adaptive mirrors and inflatable antennae.

  8. Electron beam coupling to a metamaterial structure

    SciTech Connect

    French, David M.; Shiffler, Don; Cartwright, Keith

    2013-08-15

    Microwave metamaterials have shown promise in numerous applications, ranging from strip lines and antennas to metamaterial-based electron beam driven devices. In general, metamaterials allow microwave designers to obtain electromagnetic characteristics not typically available in nature. High Power Microwave (HPM) sources have in the past drawn inspiration from work done in the conventional microwave source community. In this article, the use of metamaterials in an HPM application is considered by using an effective medium model to determine the coupling of an electron beam to a metamaterial structure in a geometry similar to that of a dielectric Cerenkov maser. Use of the effective medium model allows for the analysis of a wide range of parameter space, including the “mu-negative,”“epsilon-negative,” and “double negative” regimes of the metamaterial. The physics of such a system are modeled analytically and by utilizing the particle-in-cell code ICEPIC. For this geometry and effective medium representation, optimum coupling of the electron beam to the metamaterial, and thus the optimum microwave or RF production, occurs in the epsilon negative regime of the metamaterial. Given that HPM tubes have been proposed that utilize a metamaterial, this model provides a rapid method of characterizing a source geometry that can be used to quickly understand the basic physics of such an HPM device.

  9. Reversible Hydrogen Storage Materials – Structure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Ian M.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  10. Electronic structure of rare-earth hexaborides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, S.; Nanba, T.; Tomikawa, M.; Kunii, S.; Kasuya, T.

    1992-11-01

    Reflectivity spectra of all rare-earth hexaboride RB6 (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Yb, and Y) single crystals have been measured systematically in the energy region from 1 meV to 40 eV at 300 K in order to investigate the electronic state and the contribution of the 4f electron to the band structure. The analysis of the optical conductivity and the loss-function spectra, which were derived from the Kramers-Kronig transformation of the reflectivity spectra, allowed us to make clear the origin of the peak structure in the spectrum due to the various interband transitions. The origins of the main peaks in the spectrum were assigned to the interband transitions from the bonding to the antibonding bands of the boron 2s and 2p states and to the rare-earth 5d state. The intra-atomic transition from the 4f and the 5p to the 5d(t2g) states in the rare-earth ion was also observed.

  11. Structural change of graphite during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pedraza, D.F. )

    1992-01-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was irradiated at room temperature with 300-keV electrons. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were employed to study the structure of electron-irradiated graphite. Results consistently indicated absence of long-range order periodicity in the basal plane, and loose retention of the c-axis periodicity. Structure was modeled based on a mixture of sixfold and non-sixfold atom rings. Formation of non-sixfold atom rings was related to the observed buckling and discontinuity of the original graphite basal plane.

  12. Structural change of graphite during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J.; Pedraza, D.F.

    1992-12-31

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was irradiated at room temperature with 300-keV electrons. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were employed to study the structure of electron-irradiated graphite. Results consistently indicated absence of long-range order periodicity in the basal plane, and loose retention of the c-axis periodicity. Structure was modeled based on a mixture of sixfold and non-sixfold atom rings. Formation of non-sixfold atom rings was related to the observed buckling and discontinuity of the original graphite basal plane.

  13. About zitterbewegung and electron structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Waldyr A.; Vaz, Jayme; Recami, Erasmo; Salesi, Giovanni

    1993-12-01

    We start from the spinning electron model by Barut and Zanghi, which has been recently translated into the Clifford algebra language. We ``complete'' such a translation, first of all, by expressing in the Clifford formalism a particular Barut-Zanghi (BZ) solution, which refers (at the classical limit) to an ``internal'' helical motion with a time-like speed (and is here shown to originate from the superposition of positive and negative frequency solutions of the Dirac equation). Then, we show how to construct solutions of the Dirac equation describing helical motions with light-like speed, which meet very well the standard interpretation of the velocity operator in the Dirac equation theory (and agree with the solution proposed by Hestenes, on the basis - however - of ad-hoc assumptions that are unnecessary in the present approach). The above results appear to support the conjecture that the zitterbewegung motion (a helical motion, at the classical limit) is responsible for the electron spin.

  14. Electronic structure of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Oelhafen, P.; Lapka, R.; Gubler, U.; Krieg, J.; DasGupta, A.; Guentherodt, H.J.; Mizoguchi, T.; Hague, C.; Kuebler, J.; Nagel, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is organized in six sections and deals with (1) the glassy transition metal alloys, their d-band structure, the d-band shifts on alloying and their relation to the alloy heat of formation (..delta..H) and the glass forming ability, (2) the glass to crystal phase transition viewed by valence band spectroscopy, (3) band structure calculations, (4) metallic glasses prepared by laser glazing, (5) glassy normal metal alloys, and (6) glassy hydrides.

  15. Electron-phonon renormalization of the electronic structure of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustino, Feliciano; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2011-03-01

    The calculation of band structures from first-principles has reached a high level of accuracy. Calculations combining density-functional theory with many-body perturbation theory often are in good agreement with measurements by photoemission, tunneling, and other spectroscopic probes. While significant efforts have been devoted to improving the description of electron-electron interactions in these calculations, the effect of lattice vibrations has largely been overlooked so far. In this work we study from first principles the electron-phonon renormalization of the band gap of diamond. The calculated temperature dependence of the gap and the broadening of the absorption edge are in excellent agreement with spectroscopic ellipsometry data. Interestingly we find a gap renormalization due to zero-point vibrations as large as 0.6 eV. We discuss the implications of our findings for the electronic structure of other carbon-based bulk materials and nanostructures.

  16. Chemometric analysis of correlations between electronic absorption characteristics and structural and/or physicochemical parameters for ampholytic substances of biological and pharmaceutical relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judycka-Proma, U.; Bober, L.; Gajewicz, A.; Puzyn, T.; Błażejowski, J.

    2015-03-01

    Forty ampholytic compounds of biological and pharmaceutical relevance were subjected to chemometric analysis based on unsupervised and supervised learning algorithms. This enabled relations to be found between empirical spectral characteristics derived from electronic absorption data and structural and physicochemical parameters predicted by quantum chemistry methods or phenomenological relationships based on additivity rules. It was found that the energies of long wavelength absorption bands are correlated through multiparametric linear relationships with parameters reflecting the bulkiness features of the absorbing molecules as well as their nucleophilicity and electrophilicity. These dependences enable the quantitative analysis of spectral features of the compounds, as well as a comparison of their similarities and certain pharmaceutical and biological features. Three QSPR models to predict the energies of long-wavelength absorption in buffers with pH = 2.5 and pH = 7.0, as well as in methanol, were developed and validated in this study. These models can be further used to predict the long-wavelength absorption energies of untested substances (if they are structurally similar to the training compounds).

  17. Instructional Approach to Molecular Electronic Structure Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykstra, Clifford E.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a graduate quantum mechanics projects in which students write a computer program that performs ab initio calculations on the electronic structure of a simple molecule. Theoretical potential energy curves are produced. (MLH)

  18. Computational Chemistry Using Modern Electronic Structure Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Stephen; Dines, Trevor J.; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Withnall, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Various modern electronic structure methods are now days used to teach computational chemistry to undergraduate students. Such quantum calculations can now be easily used even for large size molecules.

  19. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy of a Chiral Plasmonic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, G. W.; Karimullah, A.; Williamson, SDR; Kadodwala, M.; MacLaren, D. A.

    2015-10-01

    A detailed analysis of the plasmonic excitations within a nanopatterned gold chiral biosensor element, measured by scanning transmission electron microscopy electron energy loss spectroscopy, is presented. We discuss aspects of data acquisition, processing, analysis and simulation. The localised surface plasmonic resonance modes in the structure are extracted using non-negative matrix factorisation and we use simulations to correlate notable deviations from the idealised spectrum to nanometric fabrication imperfections. The methodology presented has wide applicability to a variety of metamaterials.

  20. MCSNA: Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    2007-01-29

    The objective of this work is to develop and/or apply advanced diagnostics to the understanding of aging of Pu. Advanced characterization techniques such as photoelectron and x-ray absorption spectroscopy will provide fundamental data on the electronic structure of Pu phases. These data are crucial for the validation of the electronic structure methods. The fundamental goal of this project is to narrow the parameter space for the theoretical modeling of Pu aging. The short-term goal is to perform experiments to validate electronic structure calculations of Pu. The long-term goal is to determine the effects of aging upon the electronic structure of Pu. Many of the input parameters for aging models are not directly measurable. These parameters will need to be calculated or estimated. Thus a First Principles-Approach Theory is needed, but it is unclear what terms are important in the Hamiltonian. (H{Psi} = E{Psi}) Therefore, experimental data concerning the 5f electronic structure are needed, to determine which terms in the Hamiltonian are important. The data obtained in this task are crucial for reducing the uncertainty of Task LL-01-developed models and predictions. The data impact the validation of electronic structure methods, the calculation of defect properties, the evaluation of helium diffusion, and the validation of void nucleation models. The importance of these activities increases if difficulties develop with the accelerating aging alloy approach.

  1. Foil support structure for large electron guns

    SciTech Connect

    Brucker, J.P.; Rose, E.A.

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes a novel support structure for a vacuum diode used to pump a gaseous laser with an electron beam. Conventional support structures are designed to hold a foil flat and rigid. This new structure takes advantage of the significantly greater strength of metals in pure tension, utilizing curved shapes for both foil and support structure. The shape of the foil is comparable to the skin of a balloon, and the shape of the support structures is comparable to the cables of a suspension bridge. This design allows a significant reduction in foil thickness and support structure mass, resulting in a lower electron-beam loss between diode and laser gas. In addition, the foil is pre-formed in the support structure at pressures higher than operating pressure. Therefore, the foil is operated far from the yield point. Increased reliability is anticipated.

  2. Electronic structure calculations in arbitrary electrostatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Mark A.; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Lee, Elizabeth M. Y.; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of electronic structure of molecules in electrostatic environments is of considerable relevance for surface-enhanced spectroscopy and molecular electronics. We have developed and implemented a novel approach to the molecular electronic structure in arbitrary electrostatic environments that is compatible with standard quantum chemical methods and can be applied to medium-sized and large molecules. The scheme denoted CheESE (chemistry in electrostatic environments) is based on the description of molecular electronic structure subject to a boundary condition on the system/environment interface. Thus, it is particularly suited to study molecules on metallic surfaces. The proposed model is capable of describing both electrostatic effects near nanostructured metallic surfaces and image-charge effects. We present an implementation of the CheESE model as a library module and show example applications to neutral and negatively charged molecules.

  3. Secondary electron emission from surfaces with small structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhanoev, A. R.; Spahn, F.; Yaroshenko, V.; Lühr, H.; Schmidt, J.

    2015-09-01

    It is found that for objects possessing small surface structures with differing radii of curvature the secondary electron emission (SEE) yield may be significantly higher than for objects with smooth surfaces of the same material. The effect is highly pronounced for surface structures of nanometer scale, often providing a more than 100 % increase of the SEE yield. The results also show that the SEE yield from surfaces with structure does not show a universal dependence on the energy of the primary, incident electrons as it is found for flat surfaces in experiments. We derive conditions for the applicability of the conventional formulation of SEE using the simplifying assumption of universal dependence. Our analysis provides a basis for studying low-energy electron emission from nanometer structured surfaces under a penetrating electron beam important in many technological applications.

  4. Structural and Mechanistic Analysis through Electronic Spectra: Aqueous Hyponitrite Radical (N2O2-) and Nitrosyl Hyponitrite Anion (N3O3-)

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, Marat; Lymar, Sergei V.

    2011-11-03

    Aqueous hyponitrite radical (N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}) and nitrosyl hyponitrite anion (N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}) species are important intermediates in the reductive chemistry of NO. The structures and absorption spectra of various hydrated isomers of these compounds were investigated in this work using high-level quantum mechanical calculations combined with the explicit classical description of the aqueous environment. For N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}, comparison of the calculated spectra and energetics with the experimental data reveals that: (1) upon the one-electron oxidation of trans-hyponitrite (ON=NO{sub 2}{sup -}), the trans configuration of the resulting ON=NO{sup -} radical is preserved; (2) although cis- and trans-ON=NO{sup -} are energetically nearly equivalent, the barrier for the trans-cis isomerization is prohibitively high due to the partial double character of the NN bond; (3) the UV spectrum of ON=NO{sup -} was misinterpreted in the earlier pulse radiolysis work and its more recent revision has been justified. For the N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -} ion, the symmetric isomer is the dominant observable species, and the asymmetric isomer contributes little to the experimental spectrum. Coherent analysis of the calculated and experimental data suggests a re-interpretation of the N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -} + NO reaction mechanism, according to which the reaction evenly bifurcates to yield both the symmetric and asymmetric isomers of N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}. While the latter isomer rapidly decomposes to the final NO{sub 2}{sup -} + N{sub 2}O products, the former isomer is stable toward this decomposition but its formation is reversible with the homolysis equilibrium constant Khom = 2.2 - 10{sup -7} M. Collectively, these results demonstrate that advanced theoretical modeling can be of significant benefit in structural and mechanistic analysis of UV spectra.

  5. The Electronic Structure of Amorphous Carbon Nanodots.

    PubMed

    Margraf, Johannes T; Strauss, Volker; Guldi, Dirk M; Clark, Timothy

    2015-06-18

    We have studied hydrogen-passivated amorphous carbon nanostructures with semiempirical molecular orbital theory in order to provide an understanding of the factors that affect their electronic properties. Amorphous structures were first constructed using periodic calculations in a melt/quench protocol. Pure periodic amorphous carbon structures and their counterparts doped with nitrogen and/or oxygen feature large electronic band gaps. Surprisingly, descriptors such as the elemental composition and the number of sp(3)-atoms only influence the electronic structure weakly. Instead, the exact topology of the sp(2)-network in terms of effective conjugation defines the band gap. Amorphous carbon nanodots of different structures and sizes were cut out of the periodic structures. Our calculations predict the occurrence of localized electronic surface states, which give rise to interesting effects such as amphoteric reactivity and predicted optical band gaps in the near-UV/visible range. Optical and electronic gaps display a dependence on particle size similar to that of inorganic colloidal quantum dots. PMID:25731776

  6. Analysis of electronic structure of amorphous InGaZnO/SiO{sub 2} interface by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ueoka, Y.; Ishikawa, Y.; Maejima, N.; Matsui, F.; Matsui, H.; Yamazaki, H.; Urakawa, S.; Horita, M.; Daimon, H.; Uraoka, Y.

    2013-10-28

    The electronic structures of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) on a SiO{sub 2} layers before and after annealing were observed by constant final state X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (CFS-XPS) and X-ray adsorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES). From the results of angle-resolved CFS-XPS, the change in the electronic state was clearly observed in the a-IGZO bulk rather than in the a-IGZO/SiO{sub 2} interface. This suggests that the electronic structures of the a-IGZO bulk strongly affected the thin-film transistor characteristics. The results of XANES indicated an increase in the number of tail states upon atmospheric annealing (AT). We consider that the increase in the number of tail states decreased the channel mobility of AT samples.

  7. Structural and Mechanistic Analysis through Electronic Spectra: Aqueous Hyponitrite Radical (N(2)O(2)(-)) and Nitrosyl Hyponitrite Anion (N(3)O(3)(-))

    SciTech Connect

    Lymar S. V.; Valiev M.

    2011-11-03

    Aqueous hyponitrite radical (N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}) and nitrosyl hyponitrite anion (N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}) are important intermediates in the reductive chemistry of NO. The structures and absorption spectra of various hydrated isomers of these compounds were investigated in this work using high-level quantum mechanical calculations combined with the explicit classical description of the aqueous environment. For N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}, comparison of the calculated spectra and energetics with the experimental data reveals that (1) upon the one-electron oxidation of trans-hyponitrite (ON{double_bond}NO{sup 2-}), the trans configuration of the resulting ON{double_bond}NO{sup -} radical is preserved; (2) although cis- and trans-ON{double_bond}NO{sup -} are energetically nearly equivalent, the barrier for the trans-cis isomerization is prohibitively high because of the partial double character of the NN bond; (3) the calculations confirm that the UV spectrum of ONNO{sup -} was misinterpreted in the earlier pulse radiolysis work, and its more recent revision has been justified. For the N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -} ion, the symmetric isomer the dominant observable species, and the asymmetric isomer contributes insignificantly to the experimental spectrum. Coherent analysis of the calculated and experimental data suggests a reinterpretation of the N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -} + NO reaction mechanism according to which the reaction evenly bifurcates to yield both the symmetric and asymmetric isomers of N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}. While the latter isomer rapidly decomposes to the final NO{sub 2}{sup -} + N{sub 2}O products, the former isomer is stable toward this decomposition, but its formation is reversible with the homolysis equilibrium constant K{sub hom} = 2.2 x 10{sup -7} M. Collectively, these results demonstrate that advanced theoretical modeling can be of significant benefit in structural and mechanistic analysis on the basis of the electronic spectra of aqueous transients.

  8. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis: Sample analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, W. B.

    1989-01-01

    Exposure conditions in atomic oxygen (ESCA) was performed on an SSL-100/206 Small Spot Spectrometer. All data were taken with the use of a low voltage electron flood gun and a charge neutralization screen to minimize charging effects on the data. The X-ray spot size and electron flood gun voltage used are recorded on the individual spectra as are the instrumental resolutions. Two types of spectra were obtained for each specimen: (1) general surveys, and (2) high resolution spectra. The two types of data reduction performed are: (1) semiquantitative compositional analysis, and (2) peak fitting. The materials analyzed are: (1) kapton 4, 5, and 6, (2) HDPE 19, 20, and 21, and (3) PVDF 4, 5, and 6.

  9. Structure and electronic properties of (+)-catechin: aqueous solvent effects.

    PubMed

    Bentz, Erika N; Pomilio, Alicia B; Lobayan, Rosana M

    2014-02-01

    We report a study of the structure of (+)-catechin, which belongs to the family of the flavan-3-ols-one of the five most widely distributed phenolic groups. The biological activities and pharmaceutical utility of these compounds are related to antioxidant activity due to their ability to scavenge free radicals. A breakthrough in the study of the conformational space of this compound, so far absent in the literature, is presented herein. A detailed analysis of the electronic distribution, charge delocalization effects, and stereoelectronic effects is presented following application of the theory of atoms in molecules (AIM) and natural bond orbital analysis. The stability order, and the effects of electron delocalization in the structures were analyzed in depth. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was also obtained, assessing changes in the electronic distribution in aqueous solution, the effects of the solvent on the intrinsic electronic properties, and molecular geometry. The effect of the aqueous solvent on MEP was also quantified, and rationalized by charge delocalization mechanisms, relating them to structural changes and topological properties of the electronic charge density. To further analyze the effects of the aqueous solvent, as well as investigating the molecular and structural properties of these compounds in a biological environment, the polarizabilities for all conformers characterized were also calculated. All results were interpreted on the basis of our accumulated knowledge on (4α→6", 2α→O→1")-phenylflavans in previous reports, thus enriching and deepening the analysis of both types of structure. PMID:24526380

  10. Structure and Dynamics with Ultrafast Electron Microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwick, Bradley

    In this talk I will describe how combining ultrafast lasers and electron microscopes in novel ways makes it possible to directly `watch' the time-evolving structure of condensed matter, both at the level of atomic-scale structural rearrangements in the unit cell and at the level of a material's nano- microstructure. First, I will briefly describe my group's efforts to develop ultrafast electron diffraction using radio- frequency compressed electron pulses in the 100keV range, a system that rivals the capabilities of xray free electron lasers for diffraction experiments. I will give several examples of the new kinds of information that can be gleaned from such experiments. In vanadium dioxide we have mapped the detailed reorganization of the unit cell during the much debated insulator-metal transition. In particular, we have been able to identify and separate lattice structural changes from valence charge density redistribution in the material on the ultrafast timescale. In doing so we uncovered a previously unreported optically accessible phase/state of vanadium dioxide that has monoclinic crystallography like the insulator, but electronic structure and properties that are more like the rutile metal. We have also combined these dynamic structural measurements with broadband ultrafast spectroscopy to make detailed connections between structure and properties for the photoinduced insulator to metal transition. Second, I will show how dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM) can be used to make direct, real space images of nano-microstructural evolution during laser-induced crystallization of amorphous semiconductors at unprecedented spatio-temporal resolution. This is a remarkably complex process that involves several distinct modes of crystal growth and the development of intricate microstructural patterns on the nanosecond to ten microsecond timescales all of which can be imaged directly with DTEM.

  11. Electronic structure of carbon-boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanginés-Mendoza, Raúl; Martinez, Edgar

    2013-03-01

    Structures of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (CNTs, BNNTs) are quite similar, conversely, electronic properties are radically different from each other. Carbon nanotubes, whose electronic properties can be either metallic or semiconducting depending on their chiral structure, boron nitride nanotubes are always semiconductors with bandgaps over 4 eV. We have looked to hybrid systems, to predict a new kind of nanostructures with novel electronic properties. In this way, we explore the electronic properties of C-BN nanotubes. In particular, we studied the electronic structure of armchair C-BN nanotubes. The calculations were performed using the pseudopotential LCAO method with a Generalized Gradient Approximation for the exchange-correlation energy functional. The band structure of most of these systems have semiconductor character with an indirect gap smaller than its analogous BNNTs. In addition, the most prominent feature of these systems is the existence of flat bands both at the valence band top and at the conduction band minimum. Such flat bands results in sharp and narrow peaks on the total density of states. The behavior of these flat bands mainly indicates that electrons are largely localized. Thus, a detailed analysis on the electronic band structure shows that hybridization between those orbitals on the interfaces is responsible to exhibit localization effects on the hybrid systems.This research was supported by Conacyt under Grant No. 133022.

  12. Electronic structure of disordered conjugated polymers: Polythiophenes

    SciTech Connect

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2008-11-26

    Electronic structure of disordered semiconducting conjugated polymers was studied. Atomic structure was found from a classical molecular dynamics simulation and the charge patching method was used to calculate the electronic structure with the accuracy similar to the one of density functional theory in local density approximation. The total density of states, the local density of states at different points in the system and the wavefunctions of several states around the gap were calculated in the case of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and polythiophene (PT) systems to gain insight into the origin of disorder in the system, the degree of carrier localization and the role of chain interactions. The results indicated that disorder in the electronic structure of alkyl substituted polythiophenes comes from disorder in the conformation of individualchains, while in the case of polythiophene there is an additional contribution due to disorder in the electronic coupling between the chains. Each of the first several wavefunctions in the conduction and valence band of P3HT is localized over several rings of a single chain. It was shown that the localization can be caused in principle both by ring torsions and chain bending, however the effect of ring torsions is much stronger. PT wavefunctions are more complicated due to larger interchain electronic coupling and are not necessarily localized on a single chain.

  13. Membrane protein structure determination by electron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban; Stokes, David L.

    2012-01-01

    During the past year, electron crystallography of membrane proteins has provided structural insights into the mechanism of several different transporters and into their interactions with lipid molecules within the bilayer. From a technical perspective there have been important advances in high-throughput screening of crystallization trials and in automated imaging of membrane crystals with the electron microscope. There have also been key developments in software, and in molecular replacement and phase extension methods designed to facilitate the process of structure determination. PMID:22572457

  14. The Electronic Structure of Heavy Element Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bursten, Bruce E.

    2000-07-25

    The area of study is the bonding in heavy element complexes, and the application of more sophisticated electronic structure theories. Progress is recounted in several areas: (a) technological advances and current methodologies - Relativistic effects are extremely important in gaining an understanding of the electronic structure of compounds of the actinides, transactinides, and other heavy elements. Therefore, a major part of the continual benchmarking was the proper inclusion of the appropriate relativistic effects for the properties under study. (b) specific applications - These include organoactinide sandwich complexes, CO activation by actinide atoms, and theoretical studies of molecules of the transactinide elements. Finally, specific directions in proposed research are described.

  15. Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Takane, Yoshio

    2004-01-01

    We propose an alternative method to partial least squares for path analysis with components, called generalized structured component analysis. The proposed method replaces factors by exact linear combinations of observed variables. It employs a well-defined least squares criterion to estimate model parameters. As a result, the proposed method…

  16. Electronic structure in the crossover regimes in lower dimensional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batabyal, R.; Dev, B. N.

    2014-11-01

    Modern growth and fabrication techniques can produce lower dimensional structures in the crossover regimes. Such structures in the crossover regimes can provide tunability of various properties of materials. For example, a zero-dimensional (0-D) structure (quantum dot) evolving towards a 3-D structure (bulk) shows electronic structure, which is neither 0-D-like, nor 3-D-like in the dimensional crossover regime. Within the crossover regime the electronic density of states (DOS) at Fermi level (Ef) keeps on changing as the size of the system changes. DOS at Ef determines many properties of materials, such as electronic specific heat, spin susceptibility, etc. Such properties can be tuned by controlling the size of the system in the crossover regimes. Keeping the importance of DOS at Ef in mind, we determine their values and other details of electronic structure of lower dimensional structures, in the 0-D to 1-D, 1-D to 2-D, 2-D to 3-D, 0-D to 2-D, 0-D to 3-D and 1-D to 3-D crossover regimes, in a simple free electron model. We compare our results with analytical theory and experimental results, wherever available. We also present some results obtained by scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements on Ag islands on Si(1 1 1) substrates evolving from a 0-D to a 2-D structure. This simple model is quite useful in understanding lower dimensional structures in the crossover regimes and, in general, in nanoscale science. Fabrication of such structures would provide control on materials properties.

  17. Structure refinement from precession electron diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Jacob, Damien; Cuvillier, Priscille; Klementová, Mariana; Sinkler, Wharton; Marks, Laurence D

    2013-03-01

    Electron diffraction is a unique tool for analysing the crystal structures of very small crystals. In particular, precession electron diffraction has been shown to be a useful method for ab initio structure solution. In this work it is demonstrated that precession electron diffraction data can also be successfully used for structure refinement, if the dynamical theory of diffraction is used for the calculation of diffracted intensities. The method is demonstrated on data from three materials - silicon, orthopyroxene (Mg,Fe)(2)Si(2)O(6) and gallium-indium tin oxide (Ga,In)(4)Sn(2)O(10). In particular, it is shown that atomic occupancies of mixed crystallographic sites can be refined to an accuracy approaching X-ray or neutron diffraction methods. In comparison with conventional electron diffraction data, the refinement against precession diffraction data yields significantly lower figures of merit, higher accuracy of refined parameters, much broader radii of convergence, especially for the thickness and orientation of the sample, and significantly reduced correlations between the structure parameters. The full dynamical refinement is compared with refinement using kinematical and two-beam approximations, and is shown to be superior to the latter two. PMID:23403968

  18. Graphene Oxide: Synthesis, Characterization, Electronic Structure, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Derek A.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre

    While graphite oxide was first identified in 1855 [1, 2], the recent discovery of stable graphene sheets has led to renewed interest in the chemical structure and potential applications of graphene oxide sheets. These structures have several physical properties that could aid in the large scale development of a graphene electronics industry. Depending on the degree of oxidization, graphene oxide layers can be either semiconducting or insulating and provide an important complement to metallic graphene layers. In addition, the electronic and optical properties of these films can be controlled by the selective removal or addition of oxygen. For example, selective oxidationof graphene sheets could lead to electronic circuit fabrication on the scale of a single atomic layer. Graphene oxide is also dispersible in water and other solvents and this provides a facile route for graphene deposition on a wide range of substrates for macroelectronics applications. Although graphite oxide has been known for roughly 150 years, key questions remain in regards to its chemical structure, electronic properties, and fabrication. Answering these issues has taken on special urgency with the development of graphene electronics. In this chapter, we will provide an overview of the field with special focus on synthesis, characterization, and first principles analysis of bonding and electronic structures. Finally, we will also address some of the most promising applications for graphene oxide in electronics and other industries.

  19. Analysis of Geological Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Neville J.; Cosgrove, John W.

    1990-08-01

    A knowledge of structural geology is fundamental to understanding the processes by which the earth's crust has evolved. It is a subject of fundamental importance to students of geology, experienced field geologists and academic researchers as well as to petroleum and mining engineers. In contrast to many structural textbooks which dwell upon geometrical descriptions of geological structures, this book emphasises mechanical principles and the way in which they can be used to understand how and why a wide range of geological structures develop. Structures on all scales are considered but the emphasis of the book is on those that can be seen on the scale of hand specimen or outcrop. Drawing on their considerable teaching experience the authors present a coherent and lucid analysis of geological structures which will be welcomed by a wide variety of earth scientists.

  20. Probabilistic Structural Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Stefko, George L.; Riha, David S.; Thacker, Ben H.; Nagpal, Vinod K.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2010-01-01

    NASA/NESSUS 6.2c is a general-purpose, probabilistic analysis program that computes probability of failure and probabilistic sensitivity measures of engineered systems. Because NASA/NESSUS uses highly computationally efficient and accurate analysis techniques, probabilistic solutions can be obtained even for extremely large and complex models. Once the probabilistic response is quantified, the results can be used to support risk-informed decisions regarding reliability for safety-critical and one-of-a-kind systems, as well as for maintaining a level of quality while reducing manufacturing costs for larger-quantity products. NASA/NESSUS has been successfully applied to a diverse range of problems in aerospace, gas turbine engines, biomechanics, pipelines, defense, weaponry, and infrastructure. This program combines state-of-the-art probabilistic algorithms with general-purpose structural analysis and lifting methods to compute the probabilistic response and reliability of engineered structures. Uncertainties in load, material properties, geometry, boundary conditions, and initial conditions can be simulated. The structural analysis methods include non-linear finite-element methods, heat-transfer analysis, polymer/ceramic matrix composite analysis, monolithic (conventional metallic) materials life-prediction methodologies, boundary element methods, and user-written subroutines. Several probabilistic algorithms are available such as the advanced mean value method and the adaptive importance sampling method. NASA/NESSUS 6.2c is structured in a modular format with 15 elements.

  1. Structural model of porcine factor VIII and factor VIIIa molecules based on scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images and STEM mass analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Mosesson, M W; Fass, D N; Lollar, P; DiOrio, J P; Parker, C G; Knutson, G J; Hainfeld, J F; Wall, J S

    1990-01-01

    Porcine plasma factor VIII (fVIII) molecules are heterodimers composed of a 76,000-mol wt light chain (-A3-C1-C2) and a heavy chain ranging in molecular weight from 82,000 (A1-A2) to 166,000 (A1-A2-B). Proteolytic activation of fVIII by thrombin results in fVIIIa heterotrimers lacking B domains (A1, A2, A3-C1-C2). In this study, immunoaffinity purified fVIII was further fractionated by mono S or mono Q chromatography to prepare heterodimers containing a light chain and an A1-A2-B heavy chain (fVIII 166/76) or an A1-A2 heavy chain (fVIII 82/76). Mass analysis of scanning transmission electron microscopic (STEM) images of fVIII 166/76 indicated that heterodimers (mass 237 +/- 20 kD) had irregularly globular core structures 10-12 nm across, and frequently displayed a diffuse, occasionally globular to ovoid satellite structure extending 5-14 nm from the core, and attached to it by a thin stalk. Factor VIII 82/76 molecules (mass 176 +/- 20 kD) had the same core structures as fVIII 166/76 molecules, but lacked the satellite structure. These findings indicate that A1-A2 domains of heavy chains and the light chains of the fVIII procofactor molecule are closely associated and constitute the globular core structure, whereas the B domainal portion of heavy chains comprises the peripheral satellite appendage. Factor VIII core structures commonly displayed a finger-like projection near the origin of the B domainal stalk that was also a consistent feature of the free heavy chains (mass 128-162 kD) found in fVIII 166/76 preparations. Factor VIII light chain monomers (mass, 76 +/- 16 kD) were globular to c-shaped particles 6-8 nm across. These chains commonly possessed a v-shaped projection originating from its middle region, that could also be observed at the periphery of fVIII core molecules. Factor VIIIa preparations contained heterotrimers (mass 162 +/- 13 kD) that had the same dimensions as fVIII core structures, lacked the B domainal appendage, and sometimes possessed the

  2. Electronic structure engineering of various structural phases of phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sumandeep; Kumar, Ashok; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K

    2016-07-21

    We report the tailoring of the electronic structures of various structural phases of phosphorene (α-P, β-P, γ-P and δ-P) based homo- and hetero-bilayers through in-plane mechanical strains, vertical pressure and transverse electric field by employing density functional theory. In-plane biaxial strains have considerably modified the electronic bandgap of both homo- and hetero-bilayers while vertical pressure induces metallization in the considered structures. The γ-P homo-bilayer structure showed the highest ultimate tensile strength (UTS ∼ 6.21 GPa) upon in-plane stretching. Upon application of a transverse electric field, the variation in the bandgap of hetero-bilayers was found to be strongly dependent on the polarity of the applied field which is attributed to the counterbalance between the external electric field and the internal field induced by different structural phases and heterogeneity in the arrangements of atoms of each surface of the hetero-bilayer system. Our results demonstrate that the electronic structures of the considered hetero- and homo-bilayers of phosphorene could be modified by biaxial strain, pressure and electric field to achieve the desired properties for future nano-electronic devices. PMID:27334095

  3. Electronic structure of bacterial surface protein layers

    SciTech Connect

    Maslyuk, Volodymyr V.; Mertig, Ingrid; Bredow, Thomas; Mertig, Michael; Vyalikh, Denis V.; Molodtsov, Serguei L.

    2008-01-15

    We report an approach for the calculation of the electronic density of states of the dried two-dimensional crystalline surface protein layer (S layer) of the bacterium Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602. The proposed model is based on the consideration of individual amino acids in the corresponding conformation of the peptide chain which additively contribute to the electronic structure of the entire protein complex. The derived results agree well with the experimental data obtained by means of photoemission (PE), resonant PE, and near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  4. Electronic structures of carbon nanotube peopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuk, Young

    2003-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been successfully used for nanometer-sized devices such as diodes and transistors. These discrete devices utilize the spatially varying electronic structures of processed nanotubes by creating defect junctions or introducing substitutional or interstitial dopants. It was recently found that adsorption or insertion of molecules inside or outside of a nanotube modifies the electronic structure as observed with a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (LTSTM). We report a method to form spatial variation of the electronic structure by inserting various molecules such as fullerenes, metallo-fullerenes, metals or insulators. The results suggest that one can synthesize this band gap-engineered 1-dimensional wire by self-assembly instead of epitaxial growth. We propose a new type of device structure made by this processing technology. 1. J. Lee, H.J. Kim, G. Kim, Y.-W. Son, J. Ihm, S.J. Kahng, H. Kato, Z.W. Wang, T. Okazaki, H. Shinohara, and Y. Kuk, Nature, 415, 1005 (2002)

  5. Electron Crystallography – The Waking Beauty of Structural Biology

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Christopher R; Unger, Vinzenz M

    2012-01-01

    Since its debut in the mid 70ties, electron crystallography has been a valuable alternative in the structure determination of biological macromolecules. Its reliance on single- or double-layered two-dimensionally ordered arrays and the ability to obtain structural information from small and disordered crystals make this approach particularly useful for the study of membrane proteins in a lipid bilayer environment. Despite its unique advantages, technological hurdles have kept electron crystallography from reaching its full potential. Addressing the issues, recent initiatives developed high-throughput pipelines for crystallization and screening. Adding progress in automating data collection, image analysis and phase extension methods, electron crystallography is poised to raise its profile and may lead the way in exploring the structural biology of macromolecular complexes. PMID:22525160

  6. Electronic structure of oxygen functionalized graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simbeck, Adam; Gu, Deyang; Kharche, Neerav; Nayak, Saroj

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the electronic and magnetic properties of armchair graphene nanoribbons whose edges are passivated by oxygen. Using a first-principles density functional approach and the many-body GW method we find that oxygen-passivation results in a rich geometrical environment which in turn determines the electronic and magnetic properties of the ribbon. For planar systems we report magnetic ground states whose electronic structure depends upon the magnetic coupling between edges. For non-planar ribbons we report a nonmagnetic ground state with a band gap that decreases as a function of increasing ribbon width. Our results will be discussed in light of previous experimental and computational studies. Interconnect Focus Center (MARCO program), State of New York, NSF IGERT program, Grant no. 0333314, and computing resources of the Computationial Center for Nanotechnology Innovation (CCNI), RPI

  7. Probing Structural and Electronic Dynamics with Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Plemmons, DA; Suri, PK; Flannigan, DJ

    2015-05-12

    In this Perspective, we provide an overview,of the field of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM). We begin by briefly discussing the emergence of methods for probing ultrafast structural dynamics and the information that can be obtained. Distinctions are drawn between the two main types a probes for femtosecond (fs) dynamics fast electrons and X-ray photons and emphasis is placed on hour the nature of charged particles is exploited in ultrafast electron-based' experiments:. Following this, we describe the versatility enabled by the ease with which electron trajectories and velocities can be manipulated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM): hardware configurations, and we emphasize how this is translated to the ability to measure scattering intensities in real, reciprocal, and energy space from presurveyed and selected rianoscale volumes. Owing to decades of ongoing research and development into TEM instrumentation combined with advances in specimen holder technology, comprehensive experiments can be conducted on a wide range of materials in various phases via in situ methods. Next, we describe the basic operating concepts, of UEM, and we emphasize that its development has led to extension of several of the formidable capabilities of TEM into the fs domain, dins increasing the accessible temporal parameter spade by several orders of magnitude. We then divide UEM studies into those conducted in real (imaging), reciprocal (diffraction), and energy (spectroscopy) spate. We begin each of these sections by providing a brief description of the basic operating principles and the types of information that can be gathered followed by descriptions of how these approaches are applied in UM, the type of specimen parameter space that can be probed, and an example of the types of dynamics that can be resolved. We conclude with an Outlook section, wherein we share our perspective on some future directions of the field pertaining to continued instrument development and

  8. Structural analysis of glucans

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Glucans are most widespread polysaccharides in the nature. There is a large diversity in their molecular weight and configuration depending on the original source. According to the anomeric structure of glucose units it is possible to distinguish linear and branched α-, β- as well as mixed α,β-glucans with various glycoside bond positions and molecular masses. Isolation of glucans from raw sources needs removal of ballast compounds including proteins, lipids, polyphenols and other polysaccharides. Purity control of glucan fractions is necessary to evaluate the isolation and purification steps; more rigorous structural analyses of purified polysaccharides are required to clarify their structure. A set of spectroscopic, chemical and separation methods are used for this purpose. Among them, NMR spectroscopy is known as a powerful tool in structural analysis of glucans both in solution and in solid state. Along with chemolytic methods [methylation analysis (MA), periodate oxidation, partial chemical or enzymatic hydrolysis, etc.], correlation NMR experiments are able to determine the exact structure of tested polysaccharides. Vibration spectroscopic methods (FTIR, Raman) are sensitive to anomeric structure of glucans and can be used for purity control as well. Molecular weight distribution, homogeneity and branching of glucans can be estimated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), laser light scattering (LLS) and viscometry. PMID:25332993

  9. COI Structural Analysis Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, Todd; Stahl, H. Philip (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report discusses the structural analysis of the Next Generation Space Telescope Mirror System Demonstrator (NMSD) developed by Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) in support of the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) project. The mirror was submitted to Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for cryogenic testing and evaluation. Once at MSFC, the mirror was lowered to approximately 40 K and the optical surface distortions were measured. Alongside this experiment, an analytical model was developed and used to compare to the test results. A NASTRAN finite element model was provided by COI and a thermal model was developed from it. Using the thermal model, steady state nodal temperatures were calculated based on the predicted environment of the large cryogenic test chamber at MSFC. This temperature distribution was applied in the structural analysis to solve for the deflections of the optical surface. Finally, these deflections were submitted for optical analysis and comparison to the interferometer test data.

  10. Electronic Structure of Iridium Clusters on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Bradford A.; Bradley, Aaron J.; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Coh, Sinisa; Zettl, Alex; Crommie, Michael F.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-03-01

    Graphene was predicted to exhibit non-trivial Z2 topology, but its exceedingly weak spin-orbit coupling prevented this from being observed. Previous theoretical work has proposed enhancing the spin-orbit coupling strength by depositing individual adatoms adsorbed onto the surface of graphene. We show experimental evidence that the iridium adatoms cluster, with a cluster size of at least two atoms. We investigate through theoretical calculations the orientation of the iridium dimers on graphene, contrast the electronic structure of iridium dimers with iridium monomers, and compare the theoretical iridium dimer electronic structure calculations with the experimental results determined via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR10-1006184 and U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at LBNL's NERSC facility.

  11. Electronic structure of the multivacancies in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shang Yuan; Mao, Deqiang; Li, Mingfu

    A complete set of equations for determining the energy levels and the wavefunctions with different symmetries of electronic states of several well-known multivacancies in Si is given using the Koster-Slater Green's function method. By using an empirical tight binding Hamiltonian for the band structure of the host and the central-cell perturbation approximation for the defect, only the on-site and the off-site Green's functions of the host and their derivatives with respect to energy E appear in these equations. The electronic structure of the ideal multivacancies, especially the divacancy, are investigated and compared with known experimental results and previous qualitative analyses. Some misunderstandings of the experimental results are analyzed. The wavefunctions of some multivacancy states are accurately evaluated and compared with the EPR and ENDOR data for the first time.

  12. Electronic structure tuning of diamondoids through functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rander, Torbjörn; Staiger, Matthias; Richter, Robert; Zimmermann, Tobias; Landt, Lasse; Wolter, David; Dahl, Jeremy E.; Carlson, Robert M. K.; Tkachenko, Boryslav A.; Fokina, Natalie A.; Schreiner, Peter R.; Möller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the changes in electronic structures induced by chemical functionalization of the five smallest diamondoids using valence photoelectron spectroscopy. Through the variation of three parameters, namely functional group (thiol, hydroxy, and amino), host cluster size (adamantane, diamantane, triamantane, [121]tetramantane, and [1(2,3)4]pentamantane), and functionalization site (apical and medial) we are able to determine to what degree these affect the electronic structures of the overall systems. We show that unlike, for example, in the case of halobenzenes, the ionization potential does not show a linear dependence on the electronegativity of the functional group. Instead, a linear correlation exists between the HOMO-1 ionization potential and the functional group electronegativity. This is due to localization of the HOMO on the functional group and the HOMO-1 on the diamondoid cage. Density functional theory supports our interpretations.

  13. Structural and electronic properties of sodium nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Luis A.; Reyes-Nava, Juan A.; Garzon, Ignacio L.

    2006-03-01

    Recent advances on mass selection of sodium nanoclusters and their characterization by photoemission electron spectroscopy [1] have given useful data for a variety of clusters sizes. These data may lead to assignments of the relevant structures by comparing the measured photoelectron spectra (PES) with the electronic density of states (DOS) obtained from DFT calculations. In this work, the lowest energy structures modeled by the many-body Gupta potential, are obtained by using molecular dynamics simulations for Nan (n= 178, 204, 271, 298-300, 309). DFT calculations were then performed for neutral, positively- and negatively-charged Nan clusters. A comparison between the DOS of clusters of the same size but different charge will be presented, as well as between the available experimental PES and the theoretical obtained DOS.[1] H. Haberland, T. Hippler, J. Donges, O. Kostko, M. Schmidt, B. von Issendorff, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 035701 (2005).

  14. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Neetu; Srivastava, Vipul

    2016-05-01

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a0), bulk modulus (B0), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  15. Structure and Electronic Properties of Polycrystalline Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Mckenna, Keith P.; Shluger, AL

    2013-07-07

    We present an overview of the theoretical approaches that can be employed to model polycrystalline oxides along with a discussion of their limitations and associated challenges. We then present results for two metal oxide materials, MgO and HfO2, where theory and experiment have come together to provide insight into the structure and electronic properties of grain boundaries. Finally, we conclude with a discussion and outlook.

  16. Polycrystalline graphene with single crystalline electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lola; Lochocki, Edward B; Avila, José; Kim, Cheol-Joo; Ogawa, Yui; Havener, Robin W; Kim, Dong-Ki; Monkman, Eric J; Shai, Daniel E; Wei, Haofei I; Levendorf, Mark P; Asensio, María; Shen, Kyle M; Park, Jiwoong

    2014-10-01

    We report the scalable growth of aligned graphene and hexagonal boron nitride on commercial copper foils, where each film originates from multiple nucleations yet exhibits a single orientation. Thorough characterization of our graphene reveals uniform crystallographic and electronic structures on length scales ranging from nanometers to tens of centimeters. As we demonstrate with artificial twisted graphene bilayers, these inexpensive and versatile films are ideal building blocks for large-scale layered heterostructures with angle-tunable optoelectronic properties. PMID:25207847

  17. Smart electronics and MEMS for aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper, smart electronics and MEMS are employed to sense and control the drag in aircraft structures. The sensors are fabricated with interdigital transducers printed on a piezoelectric polymer. They in turn are mounted onto an ultra thin Penn State's novel RF antenna (Patent field). The sensor are designed to measure both pressure and shear of the fluid flow on aerospace structures. The wave form measurements may be monitored at a remote location either at the cockpit or elsewhere via the antennas in the sensors and an outside antenna. The integrated MEMS actuators which comprise of cantilever-, diaphram- and microbridge-based MEMS with suitable smart electronics etched onto the structure are controlled by the built-in antennas through feedback and feedforward control architecture. The integration of such materials and smart electronics into the skin of airfoil is ideal for sensing and controlling drag. The basic idea of this concept involves detection of the point of transition from laminar to turbulent flow and transmitting acoustical energy into the boundary layer so that the low energy fluid particles accelerate in the transverse direction and mix with the high energy flow outside of the boundary layer. 3D microriblets can be fabricated using stereo lithography and UV curable conducting polymers. The control of drag using these active microriblets are outlined.

  18. DFT investigation on the electronic structure of Faujasite

    SciTech Connect

    Popeneciu, Horea; Calborean, Adrian; Tudoran, Cristian; Buimaga-Iarinca, Luiza

    2013-11-13

    We report here first-principle pseudopotential DFT calculations to investigate relevant aspects of the electronic structure of zeolites based FAU. Fundamental molecular issues of the band-gap and electronic population analysis were reviewed under GGA/RPBE level of theory, corroborated with a DZP basis set and Troullier-Martins norm conserving pseudo-potentials. The atom-projected density of states and the analysis of HOMO-LUMO frontier orbitals at Gamma point were performed. Their electronic transfers are discussed through the alignment and relative positions of orbitals in order to determine the way that the molecule interacts with adsorbed molecules and other practical applications. Mulliken population analysis was employed for describing atomic charge distribution in the chosen systems.

  19. DFT investigation on the electronic structure of Faujasite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popeneciu, Horea; Calborean, Adrian; Tudoran, Cristian; Buimaga-Iarinca, Luiza

    2013-11-01

    We report here first-principle pseudopotential DFT calculations to investigate relevant aspects of the electronic structure of zeolites based FAU. Fundamental molecular issues of the band-gap and electronic population analysis were reviewed under GGA/RPBE level of theory, corroborated with a DZP basis set and Troullier-Martins norm conserving pseudo-potentials. The atom-projected density of states and the analysis of HOMO-LUMO frontier orbitals at Gamma point were performed. Their electronic transfers are discussed through the alignment and relative positions of orbitals in order to determine the way that the molecule interacts with adsorbed molecules and other practical applications. Mulliken population analysis was employed for describing atomic charge distribution in the chosen systems.

  20. Design oriented structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Desirable characteristics and benefits of design oriented analysis methods are described and illustrated by presenting a synoptic description of the development and uses of the Equivalent Laminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) computer code. ELAPS is a design oriented structural analysis method which is intended for use in the early design of aircraft wing structures. Model preparation is minimized by using a few large plate segments to model the wing box structure. Computational efficiency is achieved by using a limited number of global displacement functions that encompass all segments over the wing planform. Coupling with other codes is facilitated since the output quantities such as deflections and stresses are calculated as continuous functions over the plate segments. Various aspects of the ELAPS development are discussed including the analytical formulation, verification of results by comparison with finite element analysis results, coupling with other codes, and calculation of sensitivity derivatives. The effectiveness of ELAPS for multidisciplinary design application is illustrated by describing its use in design studies of high speed civil transport wing structures.

  1. Heterogeneous electron transfer at nanoscopic electrodes: importance of electronic structures and electric double layers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengli; Liu, Yuwen; Chen, Junxiang

    2014-08-01

    Heterogeneous electron-transfer (ET) processes at solid electrodes play key roles in molecular electronics and electrochemical energy conversion and sensing. Electrode nanosization and/or nanostructurization are among the major current strategies for performance promotion in these fields. Besides, nano-sized/structured electrodes offer great opportunities to characterize electrochemical structures and processes with high spatial and temporal resolution. This review presents recent insights into the nanoscopic size and structure effects of electrodes and electrode materials on heterogeneous ET kinetics, by emphasizing the importance of the electric double-layer (EDL) at the electrode/electrolyte interface and the electronic structure of electrode materials. It is shown, by general conceptual analysis and recent example demonstrations of representative electrode systems including electrodes of nanometer sizes and gaps and of nanomaterials such as sp(2) hybridized nanocarbons and semiconductor quantum dots, how the heterogeneous ET kinetics, the electronic structures of electrodes, the EDL structures at the electrode/electrolyte interface and the nanoscopic electrode sizes and structures may be related. PMID:24871071

  2. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  3. Electronic structure theory of the superheavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliav, Ephraim; Fritzsche, Stephan; Kaldor, Uzi

    2015-12-01

    High-accuracy calculations of atomic properties of the superheavy elements (SHE) up to element 122 are reviewed. The properties discussed include ionization potentials, electron affinities and excitation energies, which are associated with the spectroscopic and chemical behavior of these elements, and are therefore of considerable interest. Accurate predictions of these quantities require high-order inclusion of relativity and electron correlation, as well as large, converged basis sets. The Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian, which includes all terms up to second order in the fine-structure constant α, serves as the framework for the treatment; higher-order Lamb shift terms are considered in some selected cases. Electron correlation is treated by either the multiconfiguration self-consistent-field approach or by Fock-space coupled cluster theory. The latter is enhanced by the intermediate Hamiltonian scheme, allowing the use of larger model (P) spaces. The quality of the calculations is assessed by applying the same methods to lighter homologs of the SHEs and comparing with available experimental information. Very good agreement is obtained, within a few hundredths of an eV, and similar accuracy is expected for the SHEs. Many of the properties predicted for the SHEs differ significantly from what may be expected by straightforward extrapolation of lighter homologs, demonstrating that the structure and chemistry of SHEs are strongly affected by relativity. The major scientific challenge of the calculations is to find the electronic structure and basic atomic properties of the SHE and assign its proper place in the periodic table. Significant recent developments include joint experimental-computational studies of the excitation spectrum of Fm and the ionization energy of Lr, with excellent agreement of experiment and theory, auguring well for the future of research in the field.

  4. Resolving Presynaptic Structure by Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Guy A.; Jackson, Dakota R.; Spirou, George A.

    2016-01-01

    A key goal in neurobiology is to generate a theoretical framework that merges structural, physiological and molecular explanations of brain function. These categories of explanation do not advance in synchrony; advances in one category define new experiments in other categories. For example, the synapse was defined physiologically and biochemically before it was visualized using electron microscopy. Indeed, the original descriptions of synapses in the 1950s were lent credence by the presence of spherical vesicles in presynaptic terminals that were considered to be the substrate for quantal neurotransmission. In the last few decades, our understanding of synaptic function has again been driven by physiological and molecular techniques. The key molecular players for synaptic vesicle structure, mobility and fusion were identified and applications of the patch clamp technique permitted physiological estimation of neurotransmitter release and receptor properties. These advances demand higher resolution structural images of synapses. During the 1990s a second renaissance in cell biology driven by EM was fueled by improved techniques for electron tomography (ET) with the ability to compute virtual images with nm resolution between image planes. Over the last fifteen years, ET has been applied to the presynaptic terminal with special attention to the active zone and organelles of the nerve terminal. In this review, we first summarize the technical improvements that have led to a resurgence in utilization of ET and then we summarize new insights gained by the application of ET to reveal the high-resolution structure of the nerve terminal. PMID:25683026

  5. Resolving presynaptic structure by electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Guy A; Jackson, Dakota R; Spirou, George A

    2015-05-01

    A key goal in neurobiology is to generate a theoretical framework that merges structural, physiological, and molecular explanations of brain function. These categories of explanation do not advance in synchrony; advances in one category define new experiments in other categories. For example, the synapse was defined physiologically and biochemically before it was visualized using electron microscopy. Indeed, the original descriptions of synapses in the 1950s were lent credence by the presence of spherical vesicles in presynaptic terminals that were considered to be the substrate for quantal neurotransmission. In the last few decades, our understanding of synaptic function has again been driven by physiological and molecular techniques. The key molecular players for synaptic vesicle structure, mobility and fusion were identified and applications of the patch clamp technique permitted physiological estimation of neurotransmitter release and receptor properties. These advances demand higher resolution structural images of synapses. During the 1990s a second renaissance in cell biology driven by EM was fueled by improved techniques for electron tomography (ET) with the ability to compute virtual images with nm resolution between image planes. Over the last 15 years, ET has been applied to the presynaptic terminal with special attention to the active zone and organelles of the nerve terminal. In this review, we first summarize the technical improvements that have led to a resurgence in utilization of ET and then we summarize new insights gained by the application of ET to reveal the high-resolution structure of the nerve terminal. PMID:25683026

  6. Computational engine structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Johns, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    A significant research activity at the NASA Lewis Research Center is the computational simulation of complex multidisciplinary engine structural problems. This simulation is performed using computational engine structural analysis (CESA) which consists of integrated multidisciplinary computer codes in conjunction with computer post-processing for problem-specific application. A variety of the computational simulations of specific cases are described in some detail in this paper. These case studies include: (1) aeroelastic behavior of bladed rotors, (2) high velocity impact of fan blades, (3) blade-loss transient response, (4) rotor/stator/squeeze-film/bearing interaction, (5) blade-fragment/rotor-burst containment, and (6) structural behavior of advanced swept turboprops. These representative case studies are selected to demonstrate the breath of the problems analyzed and the role of the computer including post-processing and graphical display of voluminous output data.

  7. Electronic structure theory of weakly interacting bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Shiang; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2016-06-01

    We derive electronic structure models for weakly interacting bilayers such as graphene-graphene and graphene-hexagonal boron nitride, based on density functional theory calculations followed by Wannier transformation of electronic states. These transferable interlayer coupling models can be applied to investigate the physics of bilayers with arbitrary translations and twists. The functional form, in addition to the dependence on the distance, includes the angular dependence that results from higher angular momentum components in the Wannier pz orbitals. We demonstrate the capabilities of the method by applying it to a rotated graphene bilayer, which produces the analytically predicted renormalization of the Fermi velocity, Van Hove singularities in the density of states, and moiré pattern of the electronic localization at small twist angles. We further extend the theory to obtain the effective couplings by integrating out neighboring layers. This approach is instrumental for the design of van der Walls heterostructures with desirable electronic features and transport properties and for the derivation of low-energy theories for graphene stacks, including proximity effects from other layers.

  8. Spin Structure Functions from Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Seonho Choi

    2012-09-01

    The spin structure of the nucleon can play a key testing ground for Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD) at wide kinematic ranges from smaller to large four momentum transfer Q{sup 2}. The pioneering experiments have confirmed several QCD sum rules at high Q{sup 2} where a perturbative picture holds. For a full understanding of QCD at various scales, various measurements were made at intermediate and small Q{sup 2} region and their interpretation would be a challenging task due to the non-perturbative nature. Jefferson Lab has been one of the major experimental facilities for the spin structure with its polarized electron beams and various polarized targets. A few QCD sum rules have been compared with the measured spin structure functions g{sub 1}(x, Q{sup 2}) and g{sub 2}(x, Q{sup 2}) at low Q{sup 2} and surprising results have been obtained for the spin polarizabilities, {gamma}{sub 0} and {delta}{sub LT} . As for the proton spin structure functions, the lack of data for g{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) structure functions has been complemented with a new experiment at Jefferson Lab, SANE. The results from SANE will provide a better picture of the proton spin structure at a wide kinematic range in x and Q{sup 2}.

  9. Ligand K-edge XAS, DFT, and TDDFT analysis of pincer linker variations in Rh(i) PNP complexes: reactivity insights from electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyounghoon; Wei, Haochuan; Blake, Anastasia V; Donahue, Courtney M; Keith, Jason M; Daly, Scott R

    2016-06-14

    Here we report P K-edge, Cl K-edge, and Rh L3-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data for Rh[C5H3N-2,6-(XP(t)Bu2)2]Cl, where X = O ((tBu)PONOP; ) or CH2 ((tBu)PNP; ). Solid-state XAS data for and were compared to density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations to identify how changing the PNP pincer linker from O to CH2 affected electronic structure and bonding at Rh(i). Pronounced differences in XAS peak intensities and energies were observed. The P K-edge XAS data revealed a large increase in Rh 4dx(2)-y(2) and P 3p orbital-mixing (Rh-P σ*) in compared to , and pronounced transition energy variations reflected marked differences in orbital energies and compositions. By comparison, the Cl K-edge XAS data revealed only subtle differences in Rh-Cl covalency, although larger splitting between the Rh-Cl π* and σ* transitions was observed in . Analysis of the occupied MOs from DFT (HOMO, HOMO-1, HOMO-2, and HOMO-3) and comparison to the unoccupied MOs involved in XAS revealed a relatively uniform energy increase (ca. 0.3-0.5 eV) for all five 4d-derived molecular orbitals in Rh((tBu)PNP)Cl () compared to Rh((tBu)PONOP)Cl (). The energy shift was relatively invariant with respect to differences in orbital symmetry, bonding type (σ or π), and orbital mixing, which suggested that the increase could be attributed to electrostatic effects. The change in d-orbital energies are consistent with known reactivity differences of Rh((tBu)PONOP)(+) and Rh((tBu)PNP)(+) towards CO, H2, and CH2Cl2, and are explained here by considering how d-orbital energies affect covalent L → M σ bonding and M → L π backbonding. PMID:27216135

  10. The complex mixed Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin-full-wave approach and its application to the two dimensional mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z. X.

    2015-05-15

    The complex mixed Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB)-full-wave approach is applied to the 2D mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves in tokamak plasmas. The parallel mode structure is calculated with the full-wave approach, while the radial envelope is calculated with the complex WKB method. The tilting of the global mode structure along radius is demonstrated analytically. The effects of the phase and amplitude variation of the radial envelope on the parallel mode structure are included in terms of a complex radial wave vector in the parallel mode equation. It is shown that the radial equilibrium non-uniformity leads to the asymmetry of the parallel mode structure not only in configuration space but also in spectrum space. The mixed approach provides a practical way to analyze the asymmetric component of the global mode structure due to radial equilibrium non-uniformity.

  11. The complex mixed Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin-full-wave approach and its application to the two dimensional mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. X.

    2015-05-01

    The complex mixed Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB)-full-wave approach is applied to the 2D mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves in tokamak plasmas. The parallel mode structure is calculated with the full-wave approach, while the radial envelope is calculated with the complex WKB method. The tilting of the global mode structure along radius is demonstrated analytically. The effects of the phase and amplitude variation of the radial envelope on the parallel mode structure are included in terms of a complex radial wave vector in the parallel mode equation. It is shown that the radial equilibrium non-uniformity leads to the asymmetry of the parallel mode structure not only in configuration space but also in spectrum space. The mixed approach provides a practical way to analyze the asymmetric component of the global mode structure due to radial equilibrium non-uniformity.

  12. Extraordinary electronic properties in uncommon structure types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mazhar Nawaz

    In this thesis I present the results of explorations into several uncommon structure types. In Chapter 1 I go through the underlying idea of how we search for new compounds with exotic properties in solid state chemistry. The ideas of exploring uncommon structure types, building up from the simple to the complex, using chemical intuition and thinking by analogy are discussed. Also, the history and basic concepts of superconductivity, Dirac semimetals, and magnetoresistance are briefly reviewed. In chapter 2, the 1s-InTaS2 structural family is introduced along with the discovery of a new member of the family, Ag0:79VS2; the synthesis, structure, and physical properties of two different polymorphs of the material are detailed. Also in this chapter, we report the observation of superconductivity in another 1s structure, PbTaSe2. This material is especially interesting due to it being very heavy (resulting in very strong spin orbit coulping (SOC)), layered, and noncentrosymmetric. Electronic structure calculations reveal the presence of a bulk 3D Dirac cone (very similar to graphene) that is gapped by SOC originating from the hexagonal Pb layer. In Chapter 3 we show the re-investigation of the crystal structure of the 3D Dirac semimetal, Cd3As2. It is found to be centrosymmetric, rather than noncentrosymmetric, and as such all bands are spin degenerate and there is a 4-fold degenerate bulk Dirac point at the Fermi level, making Cd3As2 a 3D electronic analog to graphene. Also, for the first time, scanning tunneling microscopy experiments identify a 2x2 surface reconstruction in what we identify as the (112) cleavage plane of single crystals; needle crystals grow with a [110] long axis direction. Lastly, in chapter 4 we report the discovery of "titanic" (sadly dubbed ⪉rge, nonsaturating" by Nature editors and given the acronym XMR) magnetoresistance (MR) in the non-magnetic, noncentrosymmetric, layered transition metal dichalcogenide WTe2; over 13 million% at 0.53 K in

  13. Pu electronic structure and photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, John J; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Graham, Kevin S; Bauer, Eric D; Moore, David P; Mitchell, Jeremy N; Kennison, John A; Martin, Richard L; Roy, Lindsay E; Scuseria, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structure of PuCoGa{sub 5}, Pu metal, and PuO{sub 2} is explored using photoelectron spectroscopy. Ground state electronic properties are inferred from temperature dependent photoemission near the Fermi energy for Pu metal. Angle-resolved photoemission details the energy vs. crystaJ momentum landscape near the Fermi energy for PuCoGa{sub 5} which shows significant dispersion in the quasiparticle peak near the Fermi energy. For the Mott insulators AnO{sub 2}(An = U, Pu) the photoemission results are compared against hybrid functional calculations and the model prediction of a cross over from ionic to covalent bonding is found to be reasonable.

  14. Grid Stiffened Structure Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Grid Stiffened Analysis Tool contract is contract performed by Boeing under NASA purchase order H30249D. The contract calls for a "best effort" study comprised of two tasks: (1) Create documentation for a composite grid-stiffened structure analysis tool, in the form of a Microsoft EXCEL spread sheet, that was developed by originally at Stanford University and later further developed by the Air Force, and (2) Write a program that functions as a NASTRAN pre-processor to generate an FEM code for grid-stiffened structure. In performing this contract, Task 1 was given higher priority because it enables NASA to make efficient use of a unique tool they already have; Task 2 was proposed by Boeing because it also would be beneficial to the analysis of composite grid-stiffened structures, specifically in generating models for preliminary design studies. The contract is now complete, this package includes copies of the user's documentation for Task 1 and a CD ROM & diskette with an electronic copy of the user's documentation and an updated version of the "GRID 99" spreadsheet.

  15. Structural Analysis Made 'NESSUSary'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Everywhere you look, chances are something that was designed and tested by a computer will be in plain view. Computers are now utilized to design and test just about everything imaginable, from automobiles and airplanes to bridges and boats, and elevators and escalators to streets and skyscrapers. Computer-design engineering first emerged in the 1970s, in the automobile and aerospace industries. Since computers were in their infancy, however, architects and engineers during the time were limited to producing only designs similar to hand-drafted drawings. (At the end of 1970s, a typical computer-aided design system was a 16-bit minicomputer with a price tag of $125,000.) Eventually, computers became more affordable and related software became more sophisticated, offering designers the "bells and whistles" to go beyond the limits of basic drafting and rendering, and venture into more skillful applications. One of the major advancements was the ability to test the objects being designed for the probability of failure. This advancement was especially important for the aerospace industry, where complicated and expensive structures are designed. The ability to perform reliability and risk assessment without using extensive hardware testing is critical to design and certification. In 1984, NASA initiated the Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) project at Glenn Research Center to develop analysis methods and computer programs for the probabilistic structural analysis of select engine components for current Space Shuttle and future space propulsion systems. NASA envisioned that these methods and computational tools would play a critical role in establishing increased system performance and durability, and assist in structural system qualification and certification. Not only was the PSAM project beneficial to aerospace, it paved the way for a commercial risk- probability tool that is evaluating risks in diverse, down- to-Earth application

  16. Electronic Structure of Buried Interfaces - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Zachary

    2015-08-25

    In the electronics behind computer memory storage, the speed and size are dictated by the performance of permanent magnets inside devices called read heads. Complicated magnets made of stacked layers of thin films can be engineered to have properties that yield more energy storage and faster switching times compared to conventional iron or cobalt magnets. The reason is that magnetism is a result of subtle interactions amongst electrons; just how neurons come together on large scales to make cat brains and dog brains, ensembles of electrons interact and become ferromagnets and paramagnets. These interactions make magnets too difficult to study in their entirety, so I focus on the interfaces between layers, which are responsible for the coupling materials physicists hope to exploit to produce next-generation magnets. This project, I study a transition metal oxide material called LSCO, Lanthanum Cobaltite, which can be a paramagnet or a ferromagnet depending on how you tweak the electronic structure. It exhibits an exciting behavior: its sum is greater than the sum of its parts. When another similar material called a LSMO, Lanthanum Manganite, is grown on top of it, their interface has a different type of magnetism from the LSCO or the LSMO! I hope to explain this by demonstrating differently charged ions in the interface. The typical method for quantifying this is x-ray absorption, but all conventional techniques look at every layer simultaneously, averaging the interfaces and the LSCO layers that we want to characterize separately. Instead, I must use a new reflectivity technique, which tracks the intensity of reflected x-rays at different angles, at energies near the absorption peaks of certain elements, to track changes in the electronic structure of the material. The samples were grown by collaborators at the Takamura group at U.C. Davis and probed with this “resonant reflectivity” technique on Beamline 2-1 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

  17. Electronic and magnetic structures of chain structured iron selenide compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Setty, Chandan; Chen, X. H.; Hu, Jiangping

    2014-08-01

    Electronic and magnetic structures of iron selenide compounds Ce2O2FeSe2 (2212*) and BaFe2Se3 (123*) are studied by the first-principles calculations. We find that while all these compounds are composed of one-dimensional (1D) Fe chain (or ladder) structures, their electronic structures are not close to be quasi-1D. The magnetic exchange couplings between two nearest-neighbor (NN) chains in 2212* and between two NN two-leg-ladders in 123* are both antiferromagnetic (AFM), which is consistent with the presence of significant third NN AFM coupling, a common feature shared in other iron-chalcogenides, FeTe (11*) and K y Fe2- x Se2 (122*). In magnetic ground states, each Fe chain of 2212* is ferromagnetic and each two-leg ladder of 123* form a block-AFM structure. We suggest that all magnetic structures in iron-selenide compounds can be unified into an extended J 1- J 2- J 3 model. Spin-wave excitations of the model are calculated and can be tested by future experiments on these two systems.

  18. Electronic structure and optical properties of resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Zhi-Fan; Zhou, Rong-Feng

    2013-03-01

    We used the density of functional theory (DFT) to study the electronic structure and density of states of resin by ab initio calculation. The results show the band gap of resin is 1.7 eV. The covalent bond is combined C/O atoms with H atoms. The O 2p orbital is the biggest effect near the Fermi level. The results of optical properties show the reflectivity is low, and the refractive index is 1.7 in visible light range. The highest absorption coefficient peak is in 490 nm and the value is 75,000.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann Model for Electronic Structure Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, M.; Herrmann, H. J.; Succi, S.

    2015-09-01

    Recently, a new connection between density functional theory and kinetic theory has been proposed. In particular, it was shown that the Kohn-Sham (KS) equations can be reformulated as a macroscopic limit of the steady-state solution of a suitable single-particle kinetic equation. By using a discrete version of this new formalism, the exchange and correlation energies of simple atoms and the geometrical configuration of the methane molecule were calculated accurately. Here, we discuss the main ideas behind the lattice kinetic approach to electronic structure computations, offer some considerations for prospective extensions, and also show additional numerical results, namely the geometrical configuration of the water molecule.

  20. Electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended inliquid

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hongjian; Guo, Jinghua; Yin, Yadong; Augustsson, Andreas; Dong, Chungli; Nordgren, Joseph; Chang, Chinglin; Alivisatos, Paul; Thornton, Geoff; Ogletree, D. Frank; Requejo, Felix G.; de Groot, Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2007-07-16

    The electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended in liquid as a function of size has been investigated using in-situ x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. A sharp absorption peak associated with the ligand molecules is found that increases in intensity upon reducing the nanocrystal size. X-ray Raman features due to d-d and to charge-transfer excitations of ligand molecules are identified. The study reveals the local symmetry of the surface of {var_epsilon}-Co phase nanocrystals, which originates from a dynamic interaction between Co nanocrystals and surfactant + solvent molecules.

  1. Structured Data in Structural Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, Donald L.; Hopkins, Stewart

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of computer data structures in finite-element structural analysis programs. A number of data structure types that have been shown to be useful in such programs are introduced and described. A simple finite-element model is used to demonstrate how the given set of data structure types naturally lend themselves to developing software for the model. Different methods of implementing data structures in the context of a program are discussed.

  2. (19) F NMR and DFT Analysis Reveal Structural and Electronic Transition State Features for RhoA-Catalyzed GTP Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yi; Molt, Robert W; Waltho, Jonathan P; Richards, Nigel G J; Blackburn, G Michael

    2016-03-01

    Molecular details for RhoA/GAP catalysis of the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP are poorly understood. We use (19) F NMR chemical shifts in the MgF3 (-) transition state analogue (TSA) complex as a spectroscopic reporter to indicate electron distribution for the γ-PO3 (-) oxygens in the corresponding TS, implying that oxygen coordinated to Mg has the greatest electron density. This was validated by QM calculations giving a picture of the electronic properties of the transition state (TS) for nucleophilic attack of water on the γ-PO3 (-) group based on the structure of a RhoA/GAP-GDP-MgF3 (-) TSA complex. The TS model displays a network of 20 hydrogen bonds, including the GAP Arg85' side chain, but neither phosphate torsional strain nor general base catalysis is evident. The nucleophilic water occupies a reactive location different from that in multiple ground state complexes, arising from reorientation of the Gln-63 carboxamide by Arg85' to preclude direct hydrogen bonding from water to the target γ-PO3 (-) group. PMID:26822702

  3. Teaching Case: Analysis of an Electronic Voting System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Nik; Toohey, Danny

    2014-01-01

    This teaching case discusses the analysis of an electronic voting system. The development of the case was motivated by research into information security and management, but as it includes procedural aspects, organizational structure and personnel, it is a suitable basis for all aspects of systems analysis, planning and design tasks. The material…

  4. Analysis of low energy electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of low energy electrons in the plasma sheet and in the auroral zone were analyzed. Data from the MIT plasma experiment on the OGO-3 satellite and from the Lockheed experiment on the OV1-18 satellite were processed and compared. The OV1-18 carried thirteen magnetic electron spectrometers designed to measure the intensity, angular, and energy distributions of the auroral electrons and protons in the energy range below 50 keV. Two computer programs were developed for reduction of the OV1-18 data. One program computed the various plasma properties at one second intervals as a function of Universal Time and pitch angle; the other program produced survey plots showing the outputs of the various detectors on the satellite as a function of time on a scale of approximately 100 seconds per cm. The OV1-18 data exhibit the high degree of variability associated with substorm controlled phenomena.

  5. Atom location by electron channeling analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S.J.

    1984-07-01

    For many years the orientation dependence of the characteristic x-ray emission close to a Bragg reflection has been regarded as a hindrance to accurate microanalysis, and a random incident beam direction has always been recommended for accurate composition analysis. However, this orientation dependence can be put to use to extract information on the lattice location of foreign atoms within the crystalline matrix. Here a generalization of the technique is described which is applicable to any crystal structure including monatomic crystals, and can quantitatively determine substitutional fractions of impurities. The technique was referred to as electron channeling analysis, by analogy with the closely related and widely used bulk technique of ion channeling analysis, and was developed for lattice location studies of dopants in semiconductors at high spatial resolution. Only two spectra are required for each channeling analysis, one in each of the channeling conditions described above. If the matrix and dopant x-ray yields vary identically between the two orientations then the dopant necessarily lies within the reflecting matrix planes. If the dopant x-ray yield does not vary the dopant atoms are randomly located with respect to the matrix planes. 10 references, 2 figures.

  6. Correlation of Local Structure and Electronic Properties of Glass Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lordi, Vincenzo; Adelstein, Nicole

    2015-03-01

    Wide band gap glasses such as silica and its derivatives are typically considered insulators. However, electronic transport in glasses can be important for certain applications, such as when used as the host material for a scintillator radiation detector. Here we explore the relationship between local structure in glass materials and the corresponding electronic properties of carrier transport and charge trapping. We present a novel analysis that decomposes the distribution of localized band tail states in terms of specific local structural features in the glass. Comparison of the structure-related transport properties of different glass compositions is given, using silica and sodium silicate as prototypes. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. The CECAM Electronic Structure Library: community-driven development of software libraries for electronic structure simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Micael

    The CECAM Electronic Structure Library (ESL) is a community-driven effort to segregate shared pieces of software as libraries that could be contributed and used by the community. Besides allowing to share the burden of developing and maintaining complex pieces of software, these can also become a target for re-coding by software engineers as hardware evolves, ensuring that electronic structure codes remain at the forefront of HPC trends. In a series of workshops hosted at the CECAM HQ in Lausanne, the tools and infrastructure for the project were prepared, and the first contributions were included and made available online (http://esl.cecam.org). In this talk I will present the different aspects and aims of the ESL and how these can be useful for the electronic structure community.

  8. Electronic structure of germanium selenide investigated using ultra-violet photo-electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, P.; Lohani, H.; Kundu, A. K.; Patel, R.; Solanki, G. K.; Menon, Krishnakumar S. R.; Sekhar, B. R.

    2015-07-01

    The valence band electronic structure of GeSe single crystals has been investigated using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The experimentally observed bands from ARPES, match qualitatively with our LDA-based band structure calculations along the Γ-Z, Γ-Y and Γ-T symmetry directions. The valence band maximum occurs nearly midway along the Γ-Z direction, at a binding energy of -0.5 eV, substantiating the indirect band gap of GeSe. Non-dispersive features associated with surface states and indirect transitions have been observed. The difference in hybridization of Se and Ge 4p orbitals leads to the variation of dispersion along the three symmetry directions. The predominance of the Se 4pz orbitals, evidenced from theoretical calculations, may be the cause for highly dispersive bands along the Γ-T direction. Detailed electronic structure analysis reveals the significance of the cation-anion 4p orbitals hybridization in the valence band dispersion of IV-VI semiconductors. This is the first comprehensive report of the electronic structure of a GeSe single crystal using ARPES in conjugation with theoretical band structure analysis.

  9. Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Moore, K T; Chung, B W; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J; Ebbinghaus, B B; Butterfield, M T; Teslich, Jr., N E; Bliss, R A; Morton, S A; Yu, S W; Komesu, T; Waddill, G D; der Laan, G v; Kutepov, A L

    2005-10-13

    The standard method to determine the band structure of a condensed phase material is to (1) obtain a single crystal with a well defined surface and (2) map the bands with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (occupied or valence bands) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (unoccupied or conduction bands). Unfortunately, in the case of Pu, the single crystals of Pu are either nonexistent, very small and/or having poorly defined surfaces. Furthermore, effects such as electron correlation and a large spin-orbit splitting in the 5f states have further complicated the situation. Thus, we have embarked upon the utilization of unorthodox electron spectroscopies, to circumvent the problems caused by the absence of large single crystals of Pu with well-defined surfaces. Our approach includes the techniques of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy [1], x-ray absorption spectroscopy [1,2,3,4], electron energy loss spectroscopy [2,3,4], Fano Effect measurements [5], and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy [6], including the utilization of micro-focused beams to probe single-crystallite regions of polycrystalline Pu samples. [2,3,6

  10. Towards scalable electronic structure calculations for alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stocks, G.M.; Nicholson, D.M.C.; Wang, Y.; Shelton, W.A.; Szotek, Z.; Temmermann, W.M.

    1994-06-01

    A new approach to calculating the properties of large systems within the local density approximation (LDA) that offers the promise of scalability on massively parallel supercomputers is outlined. The electronic structure problem is formulated in real space using multiple scattering theory. The standard LDA algorithm is divided into two parts. Firstly, finding the self-consistent field (SCF) electron density, Secondly, calculating the energy corresponding to the SCF density. We show, at least for metals and alloys, that the former problem is easily solved using real space methods. For the second we take advantage of the variational properties of a generalized Harris-Foulkes free energy functional, a new conduction band Fermi function, and a fictitious finite electron temperature that again allow us to use real-space methods. Using a compute-node {R_arrow} atom equivalence the new method is naturally highly parallel and leads to O(N) scaling where N is the number of atoms making up the system. We show scaling data gathered on the Intel XP/S 35 Paragon for systems up to 512-atoms/simulation cell. To demonstrate that we can achieve metallurgical-precision, we apply the new method to the calculation the energies of disordered CuO{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5} alloys using a large random sample.

  11. Molecular structure, natural bond analysis, vibrational and electronic spectra, surface enhanced Raman scattering and Mulliken atomic charges of the normal modes of [Mn(DDTC)2] complex.

    PubMed

    Téllez S, Claudio A; Costa, Anilton C; Mondragón, M A; Ferreira, Glaucio B; Versiane, O; Rangel, J L; Lima, G Müller; Martin, A A

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental bands have been assigned for the Fourier Transform Infrared and Raman spectra of the bis(diethyldithiocarbamate)Mn(II) complex, [Mn(DDTC)2]. The calculations have been based on the DFT/B3LYP method, second derivative spectra and band deconvolution analysis. The UV-vis experimental spectra were measured in acetonitrile solution, and the calculated electronic spectrum was obtained using the TD/B3LYP method with 6-311G(d, p) basis set for all atoms. Charge transfer bands and those d-d spin forbidden were assigned in the UV-vis spectrum. The natural bond orbital analysis was carried out using the DFT/B3LYP method and the Mn(II) hybridization leading to the planar geometry of the framework was discussed. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was also performed. Mulliken charges of the normal modes were obtained and related to the SERS enhanced bands. PMID:27344520

  12. Electron Heat Flux in Pressure Balance Structures at Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Yohei; Suess, Steven T.; Sakurai, Takashi; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common feature in the high-latitude solar wind near solar minimum. Rom previous studies, PBSs are believed to be remnants of coronal plumes and be related to network activity such as magnetic reconnection in the photosphere. We investigated the magnetic structures of the PBSs, applying a minimum variance analysis to Ulysses/Magnetometer data. At 2001 AGU Spring meeting, we reported that PBSs have structures like current sheets or plasmoids, and suggested that they are associated with network activity at the base of polar plumes. In this paper, we have analyzed high-energy electron data at Ulysses/SWOOPS to see whether bi-directional electron flow exists and confirm the conclusions more precisely. As a result, although most events show a typical flux directed away from the Sun, we have obtained evidence that some PBSs show bi-directional electron flux and others show an isotropic distribution of electron pitch angles. The evidence shows that plasmoids are flowing away from the Sun, changing their flow direction dynamically in a way not caused by Alfven waves. From this, we have concluded that PBSs are generated due to network activity at the base of polar plumes and their magnetic structures axe current sheets or plasmoids.

  13. Structure and navigation for electronic publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillinghast, John; Beretta, Giordano B.

    1998-01-01

    The sudden explosion of the World Wide Web as a new publication medium has given a dramatic boost to the electronic publishing industry, which previously was a limited market centered around CD-ROMs and on-line databases. While the phenomenon has parallels to the advent of the tabloid press in the middle of last century, the electronic nature of the medium brings with it the typical characteristic of 4th wave media, namely the acceleration in its propagation speed and the volume of information. Consequently, e-publications are even flatter than print media; Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet share the same computer screen with a home-made plagiarized copy of Deep Throat. The most touted tool for locating useful information on the World Wide Web is the search engine. However, due to the medium's flatness, sought information is drowned in a sea of useless information. A better solution is to build tools that allow authors to structure information so that it can easily be navigated. We experimented with the use of ontologies as a tool to formulate structures for information about a specific topic, so that related concepts are placed in adjacent locations and can easily be navigated using simple and ergonomic user models. We describe our effort in building a World Wide Web based photo album that is shared among a small network of people.

  14. Multigrid Methods in Electronic Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Emil

    1996-03-01

    Multigrid techniques have become the method of choice for a broad range of computational problems. Their use in electronic structure calculations introduces a new set of issues when compared to traditional plane wave approaches. We have developed a set of techniques that address these issues and permit multigrid algorithms to be applied to the electronic structure problem in an efficient manner. In our approach the Kohn-Sham equations are discretized on a real-space mesh using a compact representation of the Hamiltonian. The resulting equations are solved directly on the mesh using multigrid iterations. This produces rapid convergence rates even for ill-conditioned systems with large length and/or energy scales. The method has been applied to both periodic and non-periodic systems containing over 400 atoms and the results are in very good agreement with both theory and experiment. Example applications include a vacancy in diamond, an isolated C60 molecule, and a 64-atom cell of GaN with the Ga d-electrons in valence which required a 250 Ry cutoff. A particular strength of a real-space multigrid approach is its ready adaptability to massively parallel computer architectures. The compact representation of the Hamiltonian is especially well suited to such machines. Tests on the Cray-T3D have shown nearly linear scaling of the execution time up to the maximum number of processors (512). The MPP implementation has been used for studies of a large Amyloid Beta Peptide (C_146O_45N_42H_210) found in the brains of Alzheimers disease patients. Further applications of the multigrid method will also be described. (in collaboration D. J. Sullivan and J. Bernholc)

  15. Electronic and structural properties of metallic microclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.

    1992-04-01

    The first part of this thesis presents a first-order pseudopotential calculation at T=O of the total energy of small sodium clusters of size N<800. The calculation is based on a local-pseudopotential scheme and local-density correlation and exchange. A temperature-size (T-N) phase-diagram is then derived using the T=O results and Lindemann`s criterion for melting. The phase-diagram contains three regions of stability: (1) a liquid (jellium) phase at temperatures above the melting line T{sub M}(N) where cluster-stability occurs at electronic magic numbers: (2) a phase related to complete geometrical shells of body-centered-cubic structure at temperatures below the melting line; and (3) a close-packed structure at very low temperatures and sufficiently large N. The melting line drops to T{sub M}(N)=O for N<65, where electronic magic numbers are stable even at T=O. The phase diagram reduces asymptotically to the known phases of sodium as N{yields}{infinity}, including the known martensitic transformation at T{approximately}5 K. The second and the last part of this thesis consists of a study of small-cluster many-body systems by means of an on-site ``local`` chemical potential which allows the continuous variation of local electron-density. This method yields a criterion to distinguish particular features of a small cluster that are likely to survive in the large-N thermodynamic limit from those discontinuities that arise only from finite-size effects.

  16. Electronic and structural properties of metallic microclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.

    1992-04-01

    The first part of this thesis presents a first-order pseudopotential calculation at T=O of the total energy of small sodium clusters of size N<800. The calculation is based on a local-pseudopotential scheme and local-density correlation and exchange. A temperature-size (T-N) phase-diagram is then derived using the T=O results and Lindemann's criterion for melting. The phase-diagram contains three regions of stability: (1) a liquid (jellium) phase at temperatures above the melting line T{sub M}(N) where cluster-stability occurs at electronic magic numbers: (2) a phase related to complete geometrical shells of body-centered-cubic structure at temperatures below the melting line; and (3) a close-packed structure at very low temperatures and sufficiently large N. The melting line drops to T{sub M}(N)=O for N<65, where electronic magic numbers are stable even at T=O. The phase diagram reduces asymptotically to the known phases of sodium as N{yields}{infinity}, including the known martensitic transformation at T{approximately}5 K. The second and the last part of this thesis consists of a study of small-cluster many-body systems by means of an on-site local'' chemical potential which allows the continuous variation of local electron-density. This method yields a criterion to distinguish particular features of a small cluster that are likely to survive in the large-N thermodynamic limit from those discontinuities that arise only from finite-size effects.

  17. Conformational stability, molecular structure, vibrational, electronic, 1H and 13C spectral analysis of 3-pyridinemethanol using ab-initio/DFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaranjani, T.; Periandy, S.; Xavier, S.

    2016-03-01

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 3-pyridinemethanol (3PYRM) have been recorded in the regions 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm-1 respectively. The vibrational analysis of 3PYRM was carried out using wavenumbers computed by HF and DFT (B3LYP) methods with 6-311++G (d, p) basis set, along with experimental values. The conformational analyses were performed and the energies of the different possible conformers were determined. The total electron density and MESP surfaces of the molecules were constructed using B3LYP/6-311++G (d, p) method to display nucleophilic and electrophilic region globally. The HOMO and LUMO energies were measured and different reactivity descriptors are discussed the active sites of the molecule. Natural Bond Orbital Analysis is discussed and possible transition are correlated with the electronic transitions. Milliken's net charges and the atomic natural charges are also predicted. The 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts were computed at the B3LYP/6-311++G (2d, p) level by applying GIAO theory and compared with the experimental spectra recorded using the high resolution of 100 MHz and 400 MHz NMR spectrometer with electromagnetic field strength 9.1T, respectively. The temperature dependence of the thermodynamic properties; heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy for the title compounds were also determined by B3LYP/6-311++G (d, p) method.

  18. DFT electronic structure calculations, spectroscopic studies, and normal coordinate analysis of 2-[(5-nitro-1,3-thiazol-2-yl)carbamoyl]phenyl acetate.

    PubMed

    Muthu, S; Elamuruguporchelvi, E; Varghese, Anitha

    2015-03-01

    The solid phase FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 2-[(5-nitro-1,3-thiazol-2-yl)carbamoyl]phenyl acetate (25N2LCPA) have been recorded 450-4000cm(-1) and 100-4000cm(-1) respectively. The normal coordinate analysis was carried out to confirm the precision of the assignments. DFT calculations have been performed giving energies, optimized structures, harmonic vibrational frequencies and IR intensities. The structure of the molecule was optimized and the structural characteristics were determined by density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP method with 6-31+G(d,p) basis set. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with aid of normal coordinate analysis (NCA) following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology. The Vibrational frequencies are calculated in the above method and are compared with experimental frequencies which yield good agreement between observed and calculated frequencies. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. In addition, Frontiers molecular orbital and molecular electrostatic potential were computed by using Density Functional Theory (DFT) B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) basis set. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs in the molecule. PMID:25544190

  19. Structural Analysis of Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Sirovich, Lawrence; Stoeckle, Mark Y.; Zhang, Yu

    2010-01-01

    Large, recently-available genomic databases cover a wide range of life forms, suggesting opportunity for insights into genetic structure of biodiversity. In this study we refine our recently-described technique using indicator vectors to analyze and visualize nucleotide sequences. The indicator vector approach generates correlation matrices, dubbed Klee diagrams, which represent a novel way of assembling and viewing large genomic datasets. To explore its potential utility, here we apply the improved algorithm to a collection of almost 17000 DNA barcode sequences covering 12 widely-separated animal taxa, demonstrating that indicator vectors for classification gave correct assignment in all 11000 test cases. Indicator vector analysis revealed discontinuities corresponding to species- and higher-level taxonomic divisions, suggesting an efficient approach to classification of organisms from poorly-studied groups. As compared to standard distance metrics, indicator vectors preserve diagnostic character probabilities, enable automated classification of test sequences, and generate high-information density single-page displays. These results support application of indicator vectors for comparative analysis of large nucleotide data sets and raise prospect of gaining insight into broad-scale patterns in the genetic structure of biodiversity. PMID:20195371

  20. Electronic structure of Ca, Sr, and Ba under pressure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Animalu, A. O. E.; Heine, V.; Vasvari, B.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic band structure calculations phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure

  1. Mn Doping Effects on the Electronic Band Structure of PbS Quantum Dot Thin Films: A Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, Andrew J.; Rimal, Gaurab; Tang, Jinke; Chien, Teyu

    A thorough understanding of the phenomena associated with doping of transition metals in semiconductors is important for the development of semiconducting electronic technologies such as semiconducting quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSC). Manganese doping is of particular interest in a PbS QD as it is potentially capable of increasing overall QDSSC performance. Here we present scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies about the effects of Manganese doping on the energy band structures of PbS semiconducting QD thin films, grown using pulsed laser deposition. As a result of Manganese doping in the PbS QD thin films, a widening of the electronic band gap was observed, which is responsible for the observed increase in resistivity. Furthermore, a loss of long range periodicity observed by XRD, upon incorporation of Manganese, indicates that the Manganese dopants also induce a large amount of grain boundaries. This work was supported by the following: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, DEFG02-10ER46728 and the National Science Foundation Grant #0948027.

  2. Dynamics of multiple flux tubes in sawtoothing KSTAR plasmas heated by electron cyclotron waves: I. Experimental analysis of the tube structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, G. H.; Yun, G. S.; Nam, Y.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Bierwage, A.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Jeong, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; the KSTAR Team

    2015-01-01

    Multiple (two or more) flux tubes are commonly observed inside and/or near the q = 1 flux surface in KSTAR tokamak plasmas with localized electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive (ECH/CD). Detailed 2D and quasi-3D images of the flux tubes obtained by an advanced imaging diagnostic system showed that the flux tubes are m/n = 1/1 field-aligned structures co-rotating around the magnetic axis. The flux tubes typically merge together and become like the internal kink mode of the usual sawtooth, which then collapses like a usual sawtooth crash. A systematic scan of ECH/CD beam position showed a strong correlation with the number of flux tubes. In the presence of multiple flux tubes close to the q = 1 surface, the radially outward heat transport was enhanced, which explains naturally temporal changes of electron temperature. We emphasize that the multiple flux tubes are a universal feature distinct from the internal kink instability and play a critical role in the control of sawteeth using ECH/CD.

  3. Multilevel domain decomposition for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrault, M. . E-mail: maxime.barrault@edf.fr; Cances, E. . E-mail: cances@cermics.enpc.fr; Hager, W.W. . E-mail: hager@math.ufl.edu; Le Bris, C. . E-mail: lebris@cermics.enpc.fr

    2007-03-01

    We introduce a new multilevel domain decomposition method (MDD) for electronic structure calculations within semi-empirical and density functional theory (DFT) frameworks. This method iterates between local fine solvers and global coarse solvers, in the spirit of domain decomposition methods. Using this approach, calculations have been successfully performed on several linear polymer chains containing up to 40,000 atoms and 200,000 atomic orbitals. Both the computational cost and the memory requirement scale linearly with the number of atoms. Additional speed-up can easily be obtained by parallelization. We show that this domain decomposition method outperforms the density matrix minimization (DMM) method for poor initial guesses. Our method provides an efficient preconditioner for DMM and other linear scaling methods, variational in nature, such as the orbital minimization (OM) procedure.

  4. Electronic structures of reconstructed zigzag silicene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yi E-mail: wangyanli-04@tsinghua.org.cn; Wang, Yanli E-mail: wangyanli-04@tsinghua.org.cn

    2014-02-24

    Edge states and magnetism are crucial for spintronic applications of nanoribbons. Here, using first-principles calculations, we explore structural stabilities and electronic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) with Klein and pentagon-heptagon reconstructions. Comparing to unreconstructed zigzag edges, deformed bare pentagon-heptagon ones are favored under H-poor conditions, while H-rich surroundings stabilize di-hydrogenated Klein edges. These Klein edges have analogous magnetism to zigzag ones, which also possess the electric-field-induced half-metallicity of nanoribbons. Moreover, diverse magnetic states can be achieved by asymmetric Klein and zigzag edges into ZSiNRs, which could be transformed from antiferromagnetic-semiconductors to bipolar spin-gapless-semiconductors and ferromagnetic-metals depending on edge hydrogenations.

  5. Electronic Structure Calculations of Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Steve; Ziolkowski, Marcin; Marler, Joan

    2016-05-01

    Exotic systems like Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) are attracting more attention based on their properties and possible interactions. Abundance of HCIs in the solar wind and their interaction with the upper atmosphere puts them in the attention of astro- and atmospheric physicists. Also, their unique properties originating in the high charge make them an excellent candidate for precision measurements and the next generation of atomic clocks. For a better understanding of the dynamics of processes involving HCIs a combined theoretical and experimental effort is needed to study their basic properties and interactions. Both theory and experiment need to be combined due to the extreme nature of these systems. We present preliminary insight into electronic structure of light HCIs, their interactions with neutral atoms and dynamics of charge transfer processes.

  6. Structural and electronic analysis of lanthanide complexes: reactivity may not necessarily be independent of the identity of the lanthanide atom--a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Schinzel, Sandra; Bindl, Martin; Visseaux, Marc; Chermette, Henry

    2006-10-01

    Density functional theory calculations were used to study a given complex for the whole series of lanthanide cations: [Ln(C3H5)Cp(OMe)] (1) [Ln = La (Z = 57)-Lu (Z = 71)], the radioactive lanthanide promethium (Z = 61) excepted. Contrary to the common assumptions, the calculations suggested a significant, albeit indirect, contribution of f electrons to bonding. Relativistic effects were considered in the calculations of the bonding energies, as well as in geometry optimizations in both spin-restricted and unrestricted formalisms. The unrestricted orbitals were finally used for the analysis of the charges and the composition of the frontier orbitals. It was confirmed that the ionic character was more pronounced for complexes of the late lanthanides. PMID:17004742

  7. Electron Liquids in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Aron Pinczuk

    2009-05-25

    The groups led by Stormer and Pinczuk have focused this project on goals that seek the elucidation of novel many-particle effects that emerge in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) as the result from fundamental quantum interactions. This experimental research is conducted under extreme conditions of temperature and magnetic field. From the materials point of view, the ultra-high mobility systems in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum structures continue to be at the forefront of this research. The newcomer materials are based on graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite. The graphene research is attracting enormous attention from many communities involved in condensed matter research. The investigated many-particle phenomena include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, composite fermions, and Dirac fermions, and a diverse group of electron solid and liquid crystal phases. The Stormer group performed magneto-transport experiments and far-infrared spectroscopy, while the Pinczuk group explores manifestations of such phases in optical spectra.

  8. Surface structure determinations of ordered sulfur overlayers on Mo(100) and Re(0001) by low-energy electron diffraction intensity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jentz, D.W.

    1992-11-01

    A newly developed method for surface structure determination, tensor LEED, combined with automated search was used to analyze the structures. The ordered structures of S on Mo(100) which were studied formed a c(2 {times} 2), c(4 {times} 2), and p(2 {times} l) periodicities at coverages of 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 ML (monolayers, of one sulfur atom per one molybdenum atom) respectively. A MO{sub 2}S-like overlayer, which formed at coverages greater than 1.0 ML, is also discussed. Calculations for the c(2 {times} 2) structure gave a best fit geometry with S adsorbed in a four-fold symmetric hollow site and the second layer buckled by 0.09{Angstrom}. The S-Mo bond length is 2.45{Angstrom} and the Pendry R-factor is 0.21. Preliminary calculations for the c(4 {times} 2) structure did not yield an acceptable fit. The three models tried are discussed. Calculations for p(2 {times} l) data did not yield an acceptable geometry either. The types of models that were tried are discussed. Implications of this analysis are discussed along with results of a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) investigation. The ordered structures on the RE(0001) surface studied have p(2 {times} 2) and (2{radical}3 {times} 2{radical}3)R30{degree} periodicities and occurred at S coverages of 0.25 and 0.5 ML respectively. Best fit structure for p(2 {times} 2) structure has S adsorbed in a three-fold hollow hcp site and exhibits a buckling of the first and second Re layers. The first layer is buckled by 0.05{Angstrom} and the second layer is buckled by 0.06{Angstrom}. Re-S bond length is 2.32{Angstrom} and Pendry R-factor is 0.21. Preliminary results of dynamical LEED investigation of (2{radical}3 {times} 2{radical}3)R30{degree} structure show reasonable agreement with a model with a 6-S atom basis.

  9. FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV spectral investigation; computed frequency estimation analysis and electronic structure calculations on 4-hydroxypteridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindarajan, M.; Karabacak, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this work, the vibrational spectral analysis was carried out by using FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy in the range 100-4000 cm-1 and 400-4000 cm-1 respectively, for 4-hydroxypteridine (C6H4N4O, 4HDPETN) molecule. The potential energy curve shows that 4HDPETN molecule has two stable structures. The computational results diagnose the most stable conformer of the 4HDPETN as the S1 structure. The molecular structure, fundamental vibrational frequencies and intensities of the vibrational bands were interpreted with the aid of structure optimizations and normal coordinate force field calculations based density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio HF methods and different basis sets combination. The complete vibrational assignments of wavenumbers were made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED). The results of the calculations were applied to simulated spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. The scaled B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) results show the best agreement with the experimental values over the other method. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) complements with the experimental findings. In addition, molecular electrostatic potential, nonlinear optical and thermodynamic properties of the title compound were performed. Mulliken and natural charges of the title molecule were also calculated and interpreted.

  10. Local atomic order, electronic structure and electron transport properties of Cu-Zr metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Antonowicz, J. Pietnoczka, A.; Pękała, K.; Latuch, J.; Evangelakis, G. A.

    2014-05-28

    We studied atomic and electronic structures of binary Cu-Zr metallic glasses (MGs) using combined experimental and computational methods including X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, electrical resistivity, thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and ab-initio calculations. The results of MD simulations and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicate that atomic order of Cu-Zr MGs and can be described in terms of interpenetrating icosahedral-like clusters involving five-fold symmetry. MD configurations were used as an input for calculations of theoretical electronic density of states (DOS) functions which exhibits good agreement with the experimental X-ray absorption near-edge spectra. We found no indication of minimum of DOS at Fermi energy predicted by Mott's nearly free electron (NFE) model for glass-forming alloys. The theoretical DOS was subsequently used to test Mott's model describing the temperature variation of electrical resistivity and thermoelectric power of transition metal-based MGs. We demonstrate that the measured temperature variations of electrical resistivity and TEP remain in a contradiction with this model. On the other hand, the experimental temperature dependence of electrical resistivity can be explained by incipient localization of conduction electrons. It is shown that weak localization model works up to relatively high temperatures when localization is destroyed by phonons. Our results indicate that electron transport properties of Cu-Zr MGs are dominated by localization effects rather than by electronic structure. We suggest that NFE model fails to explain a relatively high glass-forming ability of binary Cu-Zr alloys.

  11. Local atomic order, electronic structure and electron transport properties of Cu-Zr metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonowicz, J.; Pietnoczka, A.; Pekała, K.; Latuch, J.; Evangelakis, G. A.

    2014-05-01

    We studied atomic and electronic structures of binary Cu-Zr metallic glasses (MGs) using combined experimental and computational methods including X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, electrical resistivity, thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and ab-initio calculations. The results of MD simulations and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicate that atomic order of Cu-Zr MGs and can be described in terms of interpenetrating icosahedral-like clusters involving five-fold symmetry. MD configurations were used as an input for calculations of theoretical electronic density of states (DOS) functions which exhibits good agreement with the experimental X-ray absorption near-edge spectra. We found no indication of minimum of DOS at Fermi energy predicted by Mott's nearly free electron (NFE) model for glass-forming alloys. The theoretical DOS was subsequently used to test Mott's model describing the temperature variation of electrical resistivity and thermoelectric power of transition metal-based MGs. We demonstrate that the measured temperature variations of electrical resistivity and TEP remain in a contradiction with this model. On the other hand, the experimental temperature dependence of electrical resistivity can be explained by incipient localization of conduction electrons. It is shown that weak localization model works up to relatively high temperatures when localization is destroyed by phonons. Our results indicate that electron transport properties of Cu-Zr MGs are dominated by localization effects rather than by electronic structure. We suggest that NFE model fails to explain a relatively high glass-forming ability of binary Cu-Zr alloys.

  12. Atomic and electronic structure of Ni-Nb metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, C. C.; Yang, Y.-F. Xi, X. K.

    2013-12-07

    Solid state {sup 93}Nb nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been employed to investigate the atomic and electronic structures in Ni-Nb based metallic glass (MG) model system. {sup 93}Nb nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) isotropic metallic shift of Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 35}Sn{sub 5} has been found to be ∼100 ppm lower than that of Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 35}Zr{sub 5} MG, which is correlated with their intrinsic fracture toughness. The evolution of {sup 93}Nb NMR isotropic metallic shifts upon alloying is clearly an electronic origin, as revealed by both local hyperfine fields analysis and first-principle computations. This preliminary result indicates that, in addition to geometrical considerations, atomic form factors should be taken into a description of atomic structures for better understanding the mechanical behaviors of MGs.

  13. On the Electronic Structure of Cocaine and its Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón, David A.; Dias Soeiro Cordeiro, Maria Natália; Mosquera, Ricardo A.

    2009-11-01

    This work aims at describing the electronic features of cocaine and how they are modified by the different substituents present in its metabolites. The QTAIM analysis of B3LYP and MP2 electron densities obtained with the 6-311++G** 6d basis set for cocaine and its principal metabolites indicates: (i) its positive charge is shared among the amino hydrogen, those of the methylamino group, and all of the hydrogens attached to the bicycle structure; (ii) the zwitterionic structure of benzoylecgonine can be described as two partial charges of 0.63 au, the negative one shared by the oxygens of the carboxylate group, whereas the positive charge is distributed among all the hydrogens that bear the positive charge in cocaine; (iii) its hydrogen bond is strengthened in the derivatives without benzoyloxy group and is also slightly strengthened as the size of the alkyl ester group at position 2 increases.

  14. Strongly correlated electron materials. I. Theory of the quasiparticle structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Aguilar, F.; Costa-Quintana, J.; Puig-Puig, L. )

    1993-07-01

    In this paper we give a method for analyzing the renormalized electronic structure of the Hubbard systems. The first step is the determination of effective interactions from the random-phase approximation (RPA) and from an extended RPA (ERPA) that introduces vertex effects within the bubble polarization. The second step is the determination of the density of states deduced from the spectral functions. Its analysis leads us to conclude that these systems can exhibit three types of resonances in their electronic structures: the lower-, middle-, and upper-energy resonances. Furthermore, we analyze the conditions for which there is only one type of resonance and the causes that lead to the disappearance of the heavy-fermion state. We finally introduce the RPA and ERPA effective interactions within the strong-coupling theory and we give the conditions for obtaining coupling and superconductivity.

  15. Rationalizing the effect of halogenation on the molecular structure of simple cyclobutene derivatives by topological real-space analysis of their electron density.

    PubMed

    Lo Presti, Leonardo; Ellern, Arkady; Destro, Riccardo; Soave, Raffaella; Lunelli, Bruno

    2011-11-17

    The accurate gas-phase equilibrium structures on the ground-state potential energy surface of the complete series of fluorinated and chlorinated cyclobutene derivatives with C(2v) symmetry have been evaluated at DFT PBE0/6-311++G(d,p) theory level. The optimized geometries have been compared with all the available experimental data reported in the literature, as obtained by microwave spectroscopy (MW) and gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) techniques. For hexafluorocyclobutene and 1,2-dichloro-3,3',4,4'-tetrafluorocyclobut-1-ene, the results of accurate low-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments have also been considered. Structural changes within the cyclobutene ring, as induced by fluorination and chlorination at allylic and vinylic positions, have been correlated with changes in the corresponding theoretical charge densities. To this aim, several local and nonlocal topological descriptors provided by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules, QTAIM, have been employed, with particular emphasis on the delocalization indices and integrated source function decomposition schemes. Key factors for the resulting molecular structures are the chemical nature and the steric hindrance of the substituents, as well as quantum-mechanical effects, such as delocalization and partial conjugation. When fluorine atoms replace hydrogens at allylic or vinylic positions, the corresponding Csp(3)-Csp(3) or Csp(2)═Csp(2) bonds between the substituted carbons undergo a significant strengthening, while chlorination has just the opposite effect. In the latter case the steric hindrance between bulky chlorine atoms occupying vicinal positions is crucial in determining the single Csp(3)-Csp(3) bond length. These findings are discussed in the context of the reactivity of chemically related chlorofluorocarbon compounds. PMID:21790170

  16. Qualitative structures of electron-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma with q-nonextensive hot electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Asit; Chatterjee, Prasanta

    2015-11-01

    The qualitative structures of electron-acoustic waves are investigated in an unmagnetized plasma containing cold electron fluid, q-nonextensive hot electrons and stationary ions. Applying the phase plane analysis, we present all phase portraits of the dynamical system and corresponding solitary- and periodic-wave solutions. Considering an external periodic perturbation, we study the chaotic structure of the perturbed dynamical system. The non-extensive parameter ( q), the ratio between hot electron and cold electron number density at equilibrium ( α) and speed of the traveling wave ( v) play crucial roles for electron-acoustic solitary, periodic and chaotic structures. The results may have relevance in laboratory plasmas as well as space plasma environments.

  17. Electronically induced structure transformations in graphite & silver, studied using ultrafast electron crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Ramani K.

    photoexcited graphite surface. It is shown that such photoemission plays a minor role in the refraction shifts observed in the UEC study and a sub-surface dipole field is sufficient to explain the structural and charge relaxations observed. Investigations utilizing scanning electron microscope imaging of structures generated from laser ablation of graphite reveals the creation of geometrically faceted crystalline features, whose Raman spectrum exhibit sp3 like characteristics, though unambiguous identification of diamond structures generated requires further study. In the case of silver nanocrystals (Ag NC), photoexcitation near the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is observed to lead to fragmentation at fluences below their melting threshold. By isolating each NC from other neighboring NCs in a surface supported geometry, the normally irreversible process becomes reversible and amenable to multi-shot pump-probe diffraction investigations just below the fragmentation threshold. Transient structural, thermal and Coulombic signatures of the pre-fragmented state are extracted from the UEC investigation and combined with a progressive Reverse Monte-Carlo structure refinement scheme to visualize the atomic dynamics leading up to the fragmentation. Such multi-faceted analysis reveals the fragmentation to proceed through the creation and growth of undercoordinated defect sites along which the lattice is weakened. These defects are likely seeded by the strong coupling between SPR dephasing pathways and inter-band transitions that can lead to bond-softening effects and local valence instabilities. The creation of sufficient number of such defect sites at elevated fluences are believed to lead to the eventual fragmentation of the entire NC. This thesis also details the design and principle of UEC systems employed in a surface probing geometry for the study of nanostructures and interfaces.

  18. Compressed Sensing Electron Tomography for Determining Biological Structure.

    PubMed

    Guay, Matthew D; Czaja, Wojciech; Aronova, Maria A; Leapman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    There has been growing interest in applying compressed sensing (CS) theory and practice to reconstruct 3D volumes at the nanoscale from electron tomography datasets of inorganic materials, based on known sparsity in the structure of interest. Here we explore the application of CS for visualizing the 3D structure of biological specimens from tomographic tilt series acquired in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). CS-ET reconstructions match or outperform commonly used alternative methods in full and undersampled tomogram recovery, but with less significant performance gains than observed for the imaging of inorganic materials. We propose that this disparity stems from the increased structural complexity of biological systems, as supported by theoretical CS sampling considerations and numerical results in simulated phantom datasets. A detailed analysis of the efficacy of CS-ET for undersampled recovery is therefore complicated by the structure of the object being imaged. The numerical nonlinear decoding process of CS shares strong connections with popular regularized least-squares methods, and the use of such numerical recovery techniques for mitigating artifacts and denoising in reconstructions of fully sampled datasets remains advantageous. This article provides a link to the software that has been developed for CS-ET reconstruction of electron tomographic data sets. PMID:27291259

  19. Compressed Sensing Electron Tomography for Determining Biological Structure

    PubMed Central

    Guay, Matthew D.; Czaja, Wojciech; Aronova, Maria A.; Leapman, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    There has been growing interest in applying compressed sensing (CS) theory and practice to reconstruct 3D volumes at the nanoscale from electron tomography datasets of inorganic materials, based on known sparsity in the structure of interest. Here we explore the application of CS for visualizing the 3D structure of biological specimens from tomographic tilt series acquired in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). CS-ET reconstructions match or outperform commonly used alternative methods in full and undersampled tomogram recovery, but with less significant performance gains than observed for the imaging of inorganic materials. We propose that this disparity stems from the increased structural complexity of biological systems, as supported by theoretical CS sampling considerations and numerical results in simulated phantom datasets. A detailed analysis of the efficacy of CS-ET for undersampled recovery is therefore complicated by the structure of the object being imaged. The numerical nonlinear decoding process of CS shares strong connections with popular regularized least-squares methods, and the use of such numerical recovery techniques for mitigating artifacts and denoising in reconstructions of fully sampled datasets remains advantageous. This article provides a link to the software that has been developed for CS-ET reconstruction of electron tomographic data sets. PMID:27291259

  20. Oligothiophene wires: impact of torsional conformation on the electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Kislitsyn, D A; Taber, B N; Gervasi, C F; Zhang, L; Mannsfeld, S C B; Prell, J S; Briseno, A L; Nazin, G V

    2016-02-14

    Charge transport in polymer- and oligomer-based semiconductor materials depends strongly on the structural ordering of the constituent molecules. Variations in molecular conformations influence the electronic structures of polymers and oligomers, and thus impact their charge-transport properties. In this study, we used Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy (STM/STS) to investigate the electronic structures of different alkyl-substituted oligothiophenes displaying varied torsional conformations on the Au(111) surface. STM imaging showed that on Au(111), oligothiophenes self-assemble into chain-like structures, binding to each other via interdigitated alkyl ligands. The molecules adopted distinct planar conformations with alkyl ligands forming cis- or trans- mutual orientations. For each molecule, by using STS mapping, we identify a progression of particle-in-a-box-like states corresponding to the LUMO, LUMO+1 and LUMO+2 orbitals. Analysis of STS data revealed very similar unoccupied molecular orbital energies for different possible molecular conformations. By using density functional theory calculations, we show that the lack of variation in molecular orbital energies among the different oligothiophene conformers implies that the effect of the Au-oligothiophene interaction on molecular orbital energies is nearly identical for all studied torsional conformations. Our results suggest that cis-trans torsional disorder may not be a significant source of electronic disorder and charge carrier trapping in organic semiconductor devices based on oligothiophenes. PMID:26804474

  1. Compressed Sensing Electron Tomography for Determining Biological Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay, Matthew D.; Czaja, Wojciech; Aronova, Maria A.; Leapman, Richard D.

    2016-06-01

    There has been growing interest in applying compressed sensing (CS) theory and practice to reconstruct 3D volumes at the nanoscale from electron tomography datasets of inorganic materials, based on known sparsity in the structure of interest. Here we explore the application of CS for visualizing the 3D structure of biological specimens from tomographic tilt series acquired in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). CS-ET reconstructions match or outperform commonly used alternative methods in full and undersampled tomogram recovery, but with less significant performance gains than observed for the imaging of inorganic materials. We propose that this disparity stems from the increased structural complexity of biological systems, as supported by theoretical CS sampling considerations and numerical results in simulated phantom datasets. A detailed analysis of the efficacy of CS-ET for undersampled recovery is therefore complicated by the structure of the object being imaged. The numerical nonlinear decoding process of CS shares strong connections with popular regularized least-squares methods, and the use of such numerical recovery techniques for mitigating artifacts and denoising in reconstructions of fully sampled datasets remains advantageous. This article provides a link to the software that has been developed for CS-ET reconstruction of electron tomographic data sets.

  2. Electronics. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) contains a competency list verified by expert workers and developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This OCAP identifies the occupational, academic, and employability skills (competencies)…

  3. Spectroscopic, electronic structure and natural bond analysis of 2-aminopyrimidine and 4-aminopyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Prabavathi, N; Nilufer, A; Krishnakumar, V; Akilandeswari, L

    2012-10-01

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 2-aminopyrimidine (2-AP) and 4-aminopyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (4-APP) has been recorded in the region 4000-400 and 3500-100 cm(-1), respectively. The tautomeric stability, optimized geometry, frequency and intensity of the vibrational bands of 2-AP and 4-APP were obtained by the DFT level using 6-31G(d) and 6-31G(d,p) basis sets. The harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated and the scaled values have been compared with experimental FTIR and FT-Raman spectra. A detailed interpretation of the infrared and Raman spectra of 2-AP and 4-APP are also reported based on total energy distribution (TED). The observed and the calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The experimental spectra also coincide satisfactorily with those of theoretically simulated spectra. The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra have been simulated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The theoretical UV-Vis spectrum of the compound using CIS method and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within molecule. The first order hyperpolarizability (β(0)) of these novel molecular system and related properties (β, α(0) and Δα) of 2-AP and 4-APP are calculated using DFT/6-31G(d) method on the finite-field approach. The Mulliken charges, the values of electric dipole moment (μ) of the molecule were computed using DFT calculations. The change in electron density (ED) in the σ(∗) antibonding orbitals and stabilization energies E(2) have been calculated by natural bond (NBO) analysis to give clear evidence of stabilization originating in the hyper conjugation of hydrogen-bonded interactions. PMID:22683558

  4. Spectroscopic, electronic structure and natural bond analysis of 2-aminopyrimidine and 4-aminopyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabavathi, N.; Nilufer, A.; Krishnakumar, V.; Akilandeswari, L.

    2012-10-01

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 2-aminopyrimidine (2-AP) and 4-aminopyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (4-APP) has been recorded in the region 4000-400 and 3500-100 cm-1, respectively. The tautomeric stability, optimized geometry, frequency and intensity of the vibrational bands of 2-AP and 4-APP were obtained by the DFT level using 6-31G(d) and 6-31G(d,p) basis sets. The harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated and the scaled values have been compared with experimental FTIR and FT-Raman spectra. A detailed interpretation of the infrared and Raman spectra of 2-AP and 4-APP are also reported based on total energy distribution (TED). The observed and the calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The experimental spectra also coincide satisfactorily with those of theoretically simulated spectra. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra have been simulated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The theoretical UV-Vis spectrum of the compound using CIS method and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within molecule. The first order hyperpolarizability (β0) of these novel molecular system and related properties (β, α0 and Δα) of 2-AP and 4-APP are calculated using DFT/6-31G(d) method on the finite-field approach. The Mulliken charges, the values of electric dipole moment (μ) of the molecule were computed using DFT calculations. The change in electron density (ED) in the σ∗ antibonding orbitals and stabilization energies E(2) have been calculated by natural bond (NBO) analysis to give clear evidence of stabilization originating in the hyper conjugation of hydrogen-bonded interactions.

  5. RESCU: A real space electronic structure method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud-Rioux, Vincent; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Hong

    2016-02-01

    In this work we present RESCU, a powerful MATLAB-based Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT) solver. We demonstrate that RESCU can compute the electronic structure properties of systems comprising many thousands of atoms using modest computer resources, e.g. 16 to 256 cores. Its computational efficiency is achieved from exploiting four routes. First, we use numerical atomic orbital (NAO) techniques to efficiently generate a good quality initial subspace which is crucially required by Chebyshev filtering methods. Second, we exploit the fact that only a subspace spanning the occupied Kohn-Sham states is required, and solving accurately the KS equation using eigensolvers can generally be avoided. Third, by judiciously analyzing and optimizing various parts of the procedure in RESCU, we delay the O (N3) scaling to large N, and our tests show that RESCU scales consistently as O (N2.3) from a few hundred atoms to more than 5000 atoms when using a real space grid discretization. The scaling is better or comparable in a NAO basis up to the 14,000 atoms level. Fourth, we exploit various numerical algorithms and, in particular, we introduce a partial Rayleigh-Ritz algorithm to achieve efficiency gains for systems comprising more than 10,000 electrons. We demonstrate the power of RESCU in solving KS-DFT problems using many examples running on 16, 64 and/or 256 cores: a 5832 Si atoms supercell; a 8788 Al atoms supercell; a 5324 Cu atoms supercell and a small DNA molecule submerged in 1713 water molecules for a total 5399 atoms. The KS-DFT is entirely converged in a few hours in all cases. Our results suggest that the RESCU method has reached a milestone of solving thousands of atoms by KS-DFT on a modest computer cluster.

  6. An analysis of electron guns for welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabchevski, S. P.; Mladenov, G. M.; Wojcicki, S.; Dabek, J.

    1996-06-01

    Results from numerical experiments and direct measurements for the analysis of an axially symmetric triode electron gun with thermionic cathode for electron beam welding are presented and discussed. Computer simulation is carried out using the new version of the GUN-EBT software package. The self-consistent model takes into account the energy spectrum of emitted electrons and formation of a potential minimum in front of the cathode. The method underlying the investigation incorporates not only the commonly used trajectory analysis (ray tracing) but also an analysis in the phase space (phase analysis) which allows the emittance of the beams to be evaluated. It is demonstrated that computer simulation of beam formation provides ample information for the assessment both of the quality of generated beams and operational performance of the guns.

  7. Structure, electronic and magnetic properties of hexagonal boron nitride sheets doped by 5d transition metal atoms: First-principles calculations and molecular orbital analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaofu; Geng, Zhaohui; Cai, Danyun; Pan, Tongxi; Chen, Yixin; Dong, Liyuan; Zhou, Tiege

    2015-01-01

    A first-principles calculation based on density functional theory is carried out to reveal the geometry, electronic structures and magnetic properties of hexagonal boron nitride sheets (h-BNSs) doped by 5d transitional mental atoms (Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au and Hg) at boron-site (B5d) and nitrogen-site (N5d). Results of pure h-BNS, h-BNS with B vacancy (VB) and N vacancy (VN) are also given for comparison. It is shown that all the h-BNSs doped with 5d atoms possess a C3v local symmetry except for NLu and NHg which have a clear deviation. For the same 5d dopant, the binding energy of B5d is larger than that of N5d, which indicates the substitution of a 5d atom for B is preferred. The total densities of states are presented, where impurity energy levels exist. Besides, the total magnetic moments (TMMs) change regularly with the increment of the 5d atomic number. Theoretical analyses by molecular orbital under C3v symmetry explain the impurity energy levels and TMMs.

  8. The electronic structure of hard materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winarski, Robert Paul

    This research dissertation involves an experimental as well as a theoretical examination of the electronic structure of hard materials. The materials that are presented in this dissertation cover a wide class of materials, consisting of transition metal borides, irradiated polymer films, theoretically predicted superhard semiconductors, doped intermetallic alloys, and transition metal carbides. The borides are traditionally used in high temperature, hard coating applications, such as rocket nozzle linings, extreme wear surfaces, and corrosion coatings. Measurements of the borides appear to show that the bonding in these hard materials is primarily between the boron atoms in these systems. Also of note are the remarkably short interatomic distances between the boron atoms and between the boron and metal atoms in these materials. Irradiated polymer films are being developed for electronic applications, in the hopes that circuits can be developed that can benefit from the high thermal stability, dielectric properties, and mechanical properties provided by these materials. C3N4 is a theoretically predicted superhard material, and some of the first soft x-ray emission measurements of well-characterized samples of this compound are discussed in this work. Intermetallic alloys, in particular Ni3Al, are rather hard, but brittle metallic alloys. It has been found that the addition of boron atoms, in rather low concentrations, can increase the ductility of these alloys, allowing them to be utilized in a wider variety of applications. Measurements of this system have examined a question regarding the positioning of the boron atoms in the structures of this alloy. Finally, the transition metal carbides are used extensively as coatings in industrial applications such as cutting and grinding tools, and polishing compounds. Measurements of these materials suggest that the high degree of covalency between the metal and carbon atoms is primarily responsible for the hardness of

  9. Multi-million atom electronic structure calculations for quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Muhammad

    stark shift, coherent coupling of electronic states in a quantum dot molecule etc.; (3) to assess the potential use of the quantum dots in real device implementation and to provide physical insight to the experimentalists. Full three dimensional strain and electronic structure simulations of quantum dot structures containing multi-million atoms are done using NEMO 3-D. Both single and vertically stacked quantum dot structures are analyzed in detail. The results show that the strain and the piezoelectricity significantly impact the electronic structure of these devices. This work shows that the InAs quantum dots when placed in the InGaAs quantum well red shifts the emission wavelength. Such InAs/GaAs-based optical devices can be used for optical-fiber based communication systems at longer wavelengths (1.3um -- 1.5um). Our atomistic simulations of InAs/InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots quantitatively match with the experiment and give the critical insight of the physics involved in these structures. A single quantum dot molecule is studied for coherent quantum coupling of electronic states under the influence of static electric field applied in the growth direction. Such nanostructures can be used in the implementation of quantum information technologies. A close quantitative match with the experimental optical measurements allowed us to get a physical insight into the complex physics of quantum tunnel couplings of electronic states as the device operation switches between atomic and molecular regimes. Another important aspect is to design the quantum dots for a desired isotropic polarization of the optical emissions. Both single and coupled quantum dots are studied for TE/TM ratio engineering. The atomistic study provides a detailed physical analysis of these computationally expensive large nanostructures and serves as a guide for the experimentalists for the design of the polarization independent devices for the optical communication systems.

  10. Phosphorene Nanoribbons: Electronic Structure and Electric Field Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleimanikahnoj, Sina; Knezevic, Irena

    Phosphorene, a newcomer among the 2D van der Waals materials, has attracted the attention of many scientists due to its promising electronic properties. Monolayer phosphorene has a direct band gap of 2 eV located at the Gamma point of the Brillouin zone. Increasing the number of layers reduces the bandgap due to the van der Waals interaction. The direct nature of the bandgap makes phosphorene particularly favorable for electronic transport and optoelectronic applications. While multilayer phosphorene sheets have been studied, the electronic properties of their 1D counterparts are still unexplored. An accurate tight-binding model was recently proposed for multilayer phosphorene nanoribbons. Employing this model along with the non-equilibrium Green's function method, we calculate the band structure and electronic properties of phosphorene nanoribbons. We show that, depending on the edge termination, phosphorene nanoribbons can be metallic or semiconducting. Our analysis also shows that the electronic properties of phosphorene nanoribbons are highly tunable by in-plane and out-of-plane electric fields. In metallic ribbons, the conductance can be switched off by a threshold electric field, similar to field effect devices. Support by the NSF through the University of Wisconsin MRSEC Seed (NSF Award DMR-1121288).

  11. Electronic structure and shearing in nanolaminated ternary carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Music, Denis; Sun, Zhimei; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2006-07-01

    We have studied shearing in M 2AlC phases (M=Sc,Y,La,Ti,Zr,Hf,V,Nb,Ta,Cr,Mo,W) using ab initio calculations. We propose that these phases can be classified into two groups based on the valence electron concentration induced changes in C 44. One group comprises M=V B and VIB, where the C 44 values are approximately 170 GPa and independent of the corresponding MC. The other group includes M=IIIB and IVB, where the C 44 shows a linear dependency with the corresponding MC. This may be understood based on the electronic structure: shear resistant bands are filled in M 2AlC phases with M=V B and VIB, while they are not completely filled when M=IIIB and IVB. This notion is also consistent with our stress-strain analysis. These valence electron concentration induced changes in shear behaviour were compared to previously published valence electron concentration induced changes in compression behaviour [Z. Sun, D. Music, R. Ahuja, S. Li, J.M. Schneider, Phys. Rev. B 70 (2004) 092102]. These classification proposals exhibit identical critical valence electron concentration values for the group boundary. However, the physical mechanisms are not identical: the classification proposal for the bulk modulus is based on MC-A coupling, while shearing is based on MC-MC coupling.

  12. Electronic structure and chemical bonding in PuO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teterin, Yu. A.; Maslakov, K. I.; Teterin, A. Yu.; Ivanov, K. E.; Ryzhkov, M. V.; Petrov, V. G.; Enina, D. A.; Kalmykov, St. N.

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of the x-ray photoelectron spectra structure in the binding energy (BE) range of 0 eV-˜35 eV for plutonium dioxide (PuO2) valence electrons was done. The BEs and structure of the core electronic shells (35 eV-1250 eV BE), as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the finite fragments of the PuO2 lattice and the data of other authors, were taken into account. The experimental data show that the many-body effects and the multiplet splitting contribute to the spectral structure much less than the outer (0 eV-˜15 eV) and the inner (˜15 eV-˜35 eV) valence molecular orbitals (OVMO and IVMO, respectively). The filled Pu 5f electronic states were shown to form in the PuO2 valence band. The Pu 6p electrons participate in the formation of both the IVMO and the OVMO (bands). The filled Pu 6p3/2 and the O 2s electronic shells were found to take maximum part in the IVMO formation. The MO composition and the sequence order in the BE range of 0 eV-˜35 eV in PuO2 were established. The experimental and theoretical data allowed a quantitative MO scheme for PuO2, which is fundamental for understanding both the chemical bond nature in plutonium dioxide and the interpretation of other x-ray spectra of PuO2.

  13. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented. PMID:25475529

  14. FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV spectral investigation: computed frequency estimation analysis and electronic structure calculations on chlorobenzene using HF and DFT.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, M; Karabacak, M; Udayakumar, V; Periandy, S

    2012-03-01

    In this work, the vibrational spectral analysis was carried out by using FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy in the range 100-4000 cm(-1) and 400-4000 cm(-1) respectively, for the title molecule. The molecular structure, fundamental vibrational frequencies and intensity of the vibrational bands are interpreted with the aid of structure optimizations and normal coordinate force field calculations based on Hartree Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) method and different basis sets combination. The complete vibrational assignments of wavenumbers were made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED). The scaled B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) results show the best agreement with the experimental values over the other methods. The effects due to the substitution of halogen bond were investigated. The results of the calculations were applied to simulated spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), and thermodynamic properties were performed. The thermodynamic properties of the title compound at different temperatures have been calculated, revealing the correlations between heat capacity (C), entropy (S), and enthalpy changes (H) and temperatures. PMID:22197345

  15. FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV spectral investigation: Computed frequency estimation analysis and electronic structure calculations on chlorobenzene using HF and DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindarajan, M.; Karabacak, M.; Udayakumar, V.; Periandy, S.

    2012-03-01

    In this work, the vibrational spectral analysis was carried out by using FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy in the range 100-4000 cm-1 and 400-4000 cm-1 respectively, for the title molecule. The molecular structure, fundamental vibrational frequencies and intensity of the vibrational bands are interpreted with the aid of structure optimizations and normal coordinate force field calculations based on Hartree Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) method and different basis sets combination. The complete vibrational assignments of wavenumbers were made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED). The scaled B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) results show the best agreement with the experimental values over the other methods. The effects due to the substitution of halogen bond were investigated. The results of the calculations were applied to simulated spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), and thermodynamic properties were performed. The thermodynamic properties of the title compound at different temperatures have been calculated, revealing the correlations between heat capacity (C), entropy (S), and enthalpy changes (H) and temperatures.

  16. Quantitative WDS analysis using electron probe microanalyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Ul-Hamid, Anwar . E-mail: anwar@kfupm.edu.sa; Tawancy, Hani M.; Mohammed, Abdul-Rashid I.; Al-Jaroudi, Said S.; Abbas, Nureddin M.

    2006-04-15

    In this paper, the procedure for conducting quantitative elemental analysis by ZAF correction method using wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS) in an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) is elaborated. Analysis of a thermal barrier coating (TBC) system formed on a Ni-based single crystal superalloy is presented as an example to illustrate the analysis of samples consisting of a large number of major and minor elements. The analysis was performed by known standards and measured peak-to-background intensity ratios. The procedure for using separate set of acquisition conditions for major and minor element analysis is explained and its importance is stressed.

  17. Influence of Electron Correlation on the Electronic Structure and Magnetism of Transition-Metal Phthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Brumboiu, Iulia Emilia; Haldar, Soumyajyoti; Lüder, Johann; Eriksson, Olle; Herper, Heike C; Brena, Barbara; Sanyal, Biplab

    2016-04-12

    There exists an extensive literature on the electronic structure of transition-metal phthalocyanines (TMPcs), either as single molecules or adsorbed on surfaces, where explicit intra-atomic Coulomb interactions of the strongly correlated orbitals are included in the form of a Hubbard U term. The choice of U is, to a large extent, based solely on previous values reported in the literature for similar systems. Here, we provide a systematic analysis of the influence of electron correlation on the electronic structure and magnetism of several TMPcs (MnPc, FePc, CoPc, NiPc, and CuPc). By comparing calculated results to valence-band photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, and by determining the Hubbard term from linear response, we show that the choice of U is not as straightforward and can be different for each different TMPc. This, in turn, highlights the importance of individually estimating the value of U for each system before performing any further analysis and shows how this value can influence the final results. PMID:26925803

  18. Electronic structure study on 2D hydrogenated Icosagens nitride nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, S.; Marutheeswaran, S.; Ramaclus, Jerald V.; Paul, Dolon Chapa

    2014-12-01

    Metal nitride nanosheets has attracted remarkable importance in surface catalysis due to its characteristic ionic nature. In this paper, using density functional theory, we investigate geometric stability and electronic properties of hydrogenated Icosagen nitride nanosheets. Binding energy of the sheets reveals hydrogenation is providing more stability. Band structure of the hydrogenated sheets is found to be n-type semiconductor. Partial density of states shows metals (B, Al, Ga and In) and its hydrogens dominating in the Fermi region. Mulliken charge analysis indications that hydrogenated nanosheets are partially hydridic surface nature except boron nitride.

  19. Graph-based linear scaling electronic structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Mniszewski, Susan M.; Negre, Christian F. A.; Cawkwell, Marc J.; Swart, Pieter J.; Mohd-Yusof, Jamal; Germann, Timothy C.; Wall, Michael E.; Bock, Nicolas; Rubensson, Emanuel H.; Djidjev, Hristo

    2016-06-01

    We show how graph theory can be combined with quantum theory to calculate the electronic structure of large complex systems. The graph formalism is general and applicable to a broad range of electronic structure methods and materials, including challenging systems such as biomolecules. The methodology combines well-controlled accuracy, low computational cost, and natural low-communication parallelism. This combination addresses substantial shortcomings of linear scaling electronic structure theory, in particular with respect to quantum-based molecular dynamics simulations.

  20. Probing Actinide Electronic Structure through Pu Cluster Calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ryzhkov, Mickhail V.; Mirmelstein, Alexei; Yu, Sung-Woo; Chung, Brandon W.; Tobin, James G.

    2013-02-26

    The calculations for the electronic structure of clusters of plutonium have been performed, within the framework of the relativistic discrete-variational method. Moreover, these theoretical results and those calculated earlier for related systems have been compared to spectroscopic data produced in the experimental investigations of bulk systems, including photoelectron spectroscopy. Observation of the changes in the Pu electronic structure as a function of size provides powerful insight for aspects of bulk Pu electronic structure.

  1. Graph-based linear scaling electronic structure theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Mniszewski, Susan M; Negre, Christian F A; Cawkwell, Marc J; Swart, Pieter J; Mohd-Yusof, Jamal; Germann, Timothy C; Wall, Michael E; Bock, Nicolas; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Djidjev, Hristo

    2016-06-21

    We show how graph theory can be combined with quantum theory to calculate the electronic structure of large complex systems. The graph formalism is general and applicable to a broad range of electronic structure methods and materials, including challenging systems such as biomolecules. The methodology combines well-controlled accuracy, low computational cost, and natural low-communication parallelism. This combination addresses substantial shortcomings of linear scaling electronic structure theory, in particular with respect to quantum-based molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:27334148

  2. Refractory metals in molten salts: Theory and simulation of geometry, electronic structure, and electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koslowski, Thorsten

    2000-12-01

    In this work, we present a theoretical and numerical study of the microscopic and electronic structure of solutions of refractory metal halides in alkali halide melts, [NbCl5]x[KCl]1-x and [TaCl5]x[KCl]1-x with 0⩽x⩽0.5. The geometry of the melts is described by ensembles of charged hard spheres, the electronic structure is modeled by a tight-binding Hamiltonian, which is extended by a reaction field to describe the diabatic energy profile of the electronic self-exchange in many-orbital mixed-valence systems. Despite its simplicity, the model leads to the formation of distorted octahedral [NbCl6]- and [TaCl6]- clusters, as evident both from the inspection of the simulation geometries and from the analysis of the partial pair distribution functions. Even in the presence of the strong potential energy fluctuations characteristic of ionic liquids, the octahedral structure is manifest in the density of states in a t2g-eg splitting of the conduction band. The Hamiltonian that describes mixed-valence systems is solved self-consistently. Using an attractive Hubbard parameter of 1.5 eV, we show that the numerical results can be interpreted by Marcus' theory of outer-sphere electron transfer reactions with a reorganization energy of 2.2 eV, an electronic coupling parameter of 0.12 eV, and an activation energy of 0.42 eV. Both anion-d metal cation and intervalence charge transfer excitations contribute to the optical absorption spectrum, the latter leads to a pronounced polaron absorption peak. These findings are compared to recent experimental results.

  3. Ultrastructural Analysis of Drosophila Ovaries by Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hurd, Thomas R; Sanchez, Carlos G; Teixeira, Felipe K; Petzold, Chris; Dancel-Manning, Kristen; Wang, Ju-Yu S; Lehmann, Ruth; Liang, Feng-Xia A

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster ovary is a powerful, genetically tractable system through which one can elucidate the principles underlying cellular function and organogenesis in vivo. In order to understand the intricate process of oogenesis at the subcellular level, microscopic analysis with the highest possible resolution is required. In this chapter, we describe the preparation of ovaries for ultrastructural analysis using transmission electron microscopy and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy. We discuss and provide protocols for chemical fixation of Drosophila ovaries that facilitate optimal imaging with particular attention paid to preserving and resolving mitochondrial membrane morphology and structure. PMID:26324436

  4. Ultrastructural Analysis of Drosophila Ovaries by Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Thomas R.; Sanchez, Carlos G.; Teixeira, Felipe K.; Petzold, Chris; Dancel-Manning, Kristen; Wang, Ju-Yu S.; Lehmann, Ruth; Liang, Feng-Xia A.

    2016-01-01

    i. Summary The Drosophila melanogaster ovary is a powerful, genetically tractable system through which one can elucidate the principles underlying cellular function and organogenesis in vivo. In order to understand the intricate process of oogenesis at the subcellular level, microscopic analysis with the highest possible resolution is required. In this chapter, we describe the preparation of ovaries for ultrastructural analysis using transmission electron microscopy and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy. We discuss and provide protocols for chemical fixation of Drosophila ovaries that facilitate optimal imaging with particular attention paid to preserving and resolving mitochondrial membrane morphology and structure. PMID:26324436

  5. Molecular structure, electronic properties, NLO, NBO analysis and spectroscopic characterization of Gabapentin with experimental (FT-IR and FT-Raman) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Leena; Karabacak, Mehmet; Narayan, V.; Cinar, Mehmet; Prasad, Onkar

    2013-05-01

    Gabapentin (GP), structurally related to the neurotransmitter GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), mimics the activity of GABA and is also widely used in neurology for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain. It exists in zwitterionic form in solid state. The present communication deals with the quantum chemical calculations of energies, geometrical structure and vibrational wavenumbers of GP using density functional (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. In view of the fact that amino acids exist as zwitterions as well as in the neutral form depending on the environment (solvent, pH, etc.), molecular properties of both the zwitterionic and neutral form of GP have been analyzed. The fundamental vibrational wavenumbers as well as their intensities were calculated and compared with experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The fundamental assignments were done on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method. The electric dipole moment, polarizability and the first hyperpolarizability values of the GP have been calculated at the same level of theory and basis set. The nonlinear optical (NLO) behavior of zwitterionic and neutral form has been compared. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper-conjugative interactions and charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital analysis. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrum of the title molecule has also been calculated using TD-DFT method. The thermodynamic properties of both the zwitterionic and neutral form of GP at different temperatures have been calculated.

  6. Dramatic changes in electronic structure revealed by fractionally charged nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Aron J.; Mori-Sánchez, Paula

    2014-01-28

    Discontinuous changes in the electronic structure upon infinitesimal changes to the Hamiltonian are demonstrated. These are revealed in one and two electron molecular systems by full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations when the realm of the nuclear charge is extended to be fractional. FCI electron densities in these systems show dramatic changes in real space and illustrate the transfer, hopping, and removal of electrons. This is due to the particle nature of electrons seen in stretched systems and is a manifestation of an energy derivative discontinuity at constant number of electrons. Dramatic errors of density functional theory densities are seen in real space as this physics is missing from currently used approximations. The movements of electrons in these simple systems encapsulate those in real physical processes, from chemical reactions to electron transport and pose a great challenge for the development of new electronic structure methods.

  7. Core-hole effect on XANES and electronic structure of minor actinide dioxides with fluorite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Chikashi; Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Nakada, Masami; Akabori, Mitsuo; Hirata, Masaru; Kaji, Yoshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    The authors investigated theoretically core-hole effects on X-ray absorption near-edge structures (XANES) of Np and Am LIII in neptunium dioxide (NpO2) and americium dioxide (AmO2) with CaF2-type crystal lattices using the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FP-LAPW) method. The peak creation mechanism of XANES was shown by examining the electronic structures of these oxides, which indicated that core-hole screening was more marked for AmO2 than for NpO2 because of the difference in the charge transfer between these oxides. Furthermore, the results of charge density analysis suggested that the white line was assigned to the quasi-bound state composed of the localized Np d or Am d components and O components, and that the tail structure was created as a result of delocalized standing waves between the Np or Am atoms.

  8. Electronic spectra of structurally deformed lutein.

    PubMed

    Macernis, Mindaugas; Sulskus, Juozas; Duffy, Christopher D P; Ruban, Alexander V; Valkunas, Leonas

    2012-10-11

    Quantum chemical calculations have been employed for the investigation of the lowest excited electronic states of lutein, with particular reference to its function within light harvesting antenna complexes of higher plants. Through comparative analysis obtained by using different methods based on gas-phase calculations of the spectra, it was determined that variations in the lengths of the long C-C valence bonds and the dihedral angles of the polyene chain are the dominant factors in determining the spectral properties of Lut 1 and Lut 2 corresponding to the deformed lutein molecules taken from crystallographic data of the major pigment-protein complex of photosystem II. By MNDO-CAS-CI method, it was determined that the two singlet B(u) states of lutein (nominally 1B(u)(-)* and 1B(u)(+)) arise as a result of mixing of the canonical 1B(u)(-) and 1B(u)(+) states of the all-trans polyene due to the presence of the ending rings in lutein. The 1B(u)(-)* state of lutein is optically allowed, while the 1B(u)(-) of a pure all-trans polyene chain is optically forbidden. As demonstrated, the B(u) states are much more sensitive to minor distortions of the conjugated chain due to mixing of the canonical states, resulting in states of poorly defined particle-hole symmetry. Conversely, the A(g) states are relatively robust with respect to geometric distortion, and their respective inversion and particle-hole symmetries remain relatively well-defined. PMID:22974387

  9. Toward a theory of the initiation of cancer by ionizing radiation: track structure analysis for electrons and alpha particles in water

    SciTech Connect

    Pagnamenta, A.; Marshall, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Following a method of Kim differential cross sections have been constructed in analytical form for the ionization of water by electrons and alpha particles. By generalizing Wideroe's bookkeeping mmethod the number of higher order delta rays were found. (ACR)

  10. Semiempirical electronic structure calculation on Ca and Pb apatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Maria; Terra, Joice; Ellis, D. E.

    A systematic study is made on the electronic structure of stoichiometric calcium and lead apatites, using the tight binding extended Hückel method (eHT). The aim is to investigate the applicability of the semiempirical theory to study this family of compounds. A10(BO4)6X2 (A = Ca, Pb) apatites, differing by substitutions in the BO4 tetrahedral unit (B = P, As, and V) and X-channel ion (X = OH, Cl), are considered. The calculations show that eHT is suitable to describe basic properties especially concerning trends with atomic substitution and geometry changes. Band structure, Mulliken charge distribution, and bond orders are in good agreement with results of ab initio density functional theory (DFT) found in the literature. Large variations in the optical gap due to vanadium and lead substitutions are newly found. Changes in the anion X-channel affect the optical gap, which is in close agreement with DFT results. Analysis involving subnets are performed to determine the role of halogenic orbitals in the electronic structure of chloroapatites, showing evidence of covalent Cl bonding. It was also found that Pb=OH bonding in hydroxy-vanadinite Pb10(VO4)6(OH)2, recently synthesized, is weaker than that of Ca=OH in vanadate Ca10(VO4)6(OH)2. Arsenium is found to be more weakely bound to the O-tetrahedron than phosphorous, although Ca=O bond is increased with the substitution. We investigate, in addition, the electronic structure of a model system Ca10(AsO4)6(OH)2, obtained from direct As substitution in the vanadate Ca10(VO4)6(OH)2.

  11. Electronic band structure and photoemission: A review and projection

    SciTech Connect

    Falicov, L.M.

    1987-09-01

    A brief review of electronic-structure calculations in solids, as a means of interpreting photoemission spectra, is presented. The calculations are, in general, of three types: ordinary one-electron-like band structures, which apply to bulk solids and are the basis of all other calculations; surface modified calculations, which take into account, self-consistently if at all possible, the presence of a vacuum-solid interface and of the electronic modifications caused thereby; and many-body calculations, which go beyond average-field approximations and consider dynamic rearrangement effects caused by electron-electron correlations during the photoemission process. 44 refs.

  12. Spatial and electron structure of substituted gold clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarzhemsky, V. G.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Bulychev, N. A.; Dyakov, Y. A.; Kosheleva, O. K.; Chen, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    The structure of intermetallic clusters Au12M (M=Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os) and features of their interaction with electron donors and acceptor atoms, i.e. H and F, were investigated making use computer calculation based of density functional theory. In was found that metal clusters with effective electron number equal to 18 have more symmetrical shape then that with a number of electrons differing from 18. The interaction of gold nanoparticles with silica was modeled by attachment of SiO4H groups and the connection of the electronic structure with electronic transitions in spaser is discussed.

  13. Electronic structure of interfaces between hexagonal and rhombohedral graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taut, M.; Koepernik, K.

    2016-07-01

    An analysis of the electronic structure of interfaces between hexagonal (A B ) and rhombohedral (A B C ) graphite based on density functional theory is presented. Both of the two simplest interface structures host (localized) interface bands, which are located around the K point in the Brillouin zone, and which give rise to strong peaks in the density of states at the Fermi level. All interface bands near the Fermi energy are localized at monomers (single atoms with dangling pz orbitals), whereas those around 0.5 eV belong to pz-bonded trimers, which are introduced by the interface and which are not found in the two adjacent bulk substances. There is also an interface band at the (A B ) side of the interface which resembles one of the interface states near a stacking fault in (A B ) graphite.

  14. Electronic Structure and Properties of Deformed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Liu; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical framework based on Huckel tight-binding model has been formulated to analyze the electronic structure of carbon nanotubes under uniform deformation. The model successfully quantifies the dispersion relation, density of states and bandgap change of nanotubes under uniform stretching, compression, torsion and bending. Our analysis shows that the shifting of the Fermi point away from the Brillouin zone vertices is the key reason for these changes. As a result of this shifting, the electronic structure of deformed carbon nanotubes varies dramatically depending on their chirality and deformation mode. Treating the Fermi point as a function of strain and tube chirality, the analytical solution preserves the concise form of undeformed carbon nanotubes. It predicts the shifting, merging and splitting of the Van Hove singularities in the density of states and the zigzag pattern of bandgap change under strains. Four orbital tight-binding simulations of carbon nanotubes under uniform stretching, compression, torsion and bending have been performed to verify the analytical solution. Extension to more complex systems are being performed to relate this analytical solution to the spectroscopic characterization, device performance and proposed quantum structures induced by the deformation. The limitations of this model will also be discussed.

  15. Investigation of crystal structure and associated electronic structure of Sr 6BP 5O 20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenberg, Helmut; Laubach, Sonja; Schmidt, P. C.; McSweeney, R.; Knapp, M.; Mishra, K. C.

    2006-04-01

    Strontium borophosphate phosphate (Sr 6BP 5O 20, SrBP), activated by divalent europium ions is a bluish-green phosphor emitting in a broad band with the emission peak near 480 nm. In this paper, we report the crystal structure of SrBP determined from an analysis of the X-ray diffraction pattern of a prismatic single crystal (size 60 μm×50 μm×40 μm). This crystal was chosen from undoped phosphor powder samples prepared for this purpose by solid-state reaction. SrBP is observed to crystallize in a body-centered tetragonal lattice with the lattice parameters a=9.7895(7) Å and c=19.032(3) Å, the associated space group being I4¯c2 (space group 120). Using the structural data from this study, we have also calculated its electronic structure using the augmented spherical wave method and the local density approximation (LDA). We show the ordering of the electronic states by the density of states (DOS) and the partial DOS plots. The LDA gives a direct optical band gap at the Γ point of about 5 eV. The significance of the crystal structure and associated electronic structure is discussed with respect to maintenance of this phosphor in Hg-discharge lamps.

  16. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Self-consistent nonlinear analysis of a frequency-quadrupling terahertz gyroklystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Di-Wei; Yuan, Xue-Song; Yan, Yang; Liu, Sheng-Gang

    2009-12-01

    This paper analyses a three-cavity frequency-quadrupling terahertz gyroklystron with successive frequency-doubling in each cavity with self-consistent nonlinear theory. The beam-wave interaction efficiency and the electron bunching process are studied. The variation of output efficiency with the length of drift tubes and output power and the variation of Ohmic loss with the length of output cavity are considered. Numerical simulations predict an optimal output efficiency of 1.8%, a power output of more than 2 kW and a gain of 33 dB after taking into account Ohmic losses when the frequency-quadrupling gyroklystron, driven by a 40-kV, 3-A electron beam and 1 Watt input power, operates at 225 GHz.

  17. Detailed glycan structural characterization by electronic excitation dissociation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiang; Jiang, Yan; Chen, Yajie; Huang, Yiqun; Costello, Catherine E; Lin, Cheng

    2013-11-01

    The structural complexity and diversity of glycans parallel their multilateral functions in living systems. To better understand the vital roles glycans play in biological processes, it is imperative to develop analytical tools that can provide detailed glycan structural information. This was conventionally achieved by multistage tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) analysis using collision-induced dissociation (CID) as the fragmentation method. However, the MS(n) approach lacks the sensitivity and throughput needed to analyze complex glycan mixtures from biological sources, often available in limited quantities. We define herein the critical parameters for a recently developed fragmentation technique, electronic excitation dissociation (EED), which can yield rich structurally informative fragment ions during liquid chromatographic (LC)-MS/MS analysis of glycans. We further demonstrate that permethylation, reducing end labeling and judicious selection of the metal charge carrier, can greatly facilitate spectral interpretation. With its high sensitivity, throughput, and compatibility with online chromatographic separation techniques, EED appears to hold great promise for large-scale glycomics studies. PMID:24080071

  18. Time-resolved scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frömter, Robert; Kloodt, Fabian; Rößler, Stefan; Frauen, Axel; Staeck, Philipp; Cavicchia, Demetrio R.; Bocklage, Lars; Röbisch, Volker; Quandt, Eckhard; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of investigating periodically driven magnetization dynamics in a scanning electron microscope with polarization analysis based on spin-polarized low-energy electron diffraction. With the present setup, analyzing the time structure of the scattering events, we obtain a temporal resolution of 700 ps, which is demonstrated by means of imaging the field-driven 100 MHz gyration of the vortex in a soft-magnetic FeCoSiB square. Owing to the efficient intrinsic timing scheme, high-quality movies, giving two components of the magnetization simultaneously, can be recorded on the time scale of hours.

  19. CODSTRAN - Composite durability structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    CODSTRAN (COmposite Durability STRucture ANalysis) a NASA Lewis Center computer program for the prediction of defect growth and fracture of composite structures when subjected to service loads is presented. Organization, capabilities and present status are discussed. Organizational aspects include executive, input, output, analysis and composite mechanics modules. Capabilities include: durability assessment of large structures and complex structural parts from composites, structural response due to static, cyclic, transient impact and thermal loads, and criteria for static, cyclic, and dynamic fracture. At the present state of development some of CODSTRAN's analysis capabilities include composite mechanics, static failures, and lamination residual stresses. An application in which CODSTRAN is used to predict the defect growth in a flat specimen, with a center through-slit under tension is studied. When completed, CODSTRAN will account for geometry and material nonlinearities, environmental effects as well as static, cyclic and dynamic fracture.

  20. Syntheses and electronic structures of decamethylmetallocenes

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, J.L.

    1981-04-01

    The synthesis of decamethylmanganocene ((eta-C/sub 5/(CH/sub 3/)/sub 5/)/sub 2/Mn or (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn)) is described. Magnetic susceptibility and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies show that (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn is a low-spin, 17-electron compound with an orbitally degenerate, /sup 2/E/sub 2g/ (e/sub 2g//sup 3/ a/sub 1g//sup 2/) ground state. An x-ray crystallographic study of (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn shows that it is a monomeric, D/sub 5d/ decamethylmetallocene with metal to ring carbon distances that are about 0.3 A shorter than those determined for high-spin manganocenes. The syntheses of new (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M (M = Mg,V,Cr,Co, and Ni) and ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M)PF/sub 6/ (M = Cr,Co, and Ni) compounds are described. In addition, a preparative route to a novel, dicationic decamethylmetallocene, ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Ni)(PF/sub 6/)/sub 2/ is reported. Infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, magnetic susceptibility, and/or x-ray crystallographic studies indicate that all the above compounds are D/sub 5d/ or D/sub 5h/ decamethylmetallocenes with low-spin electronic configurations. Cyclic voltammetry studies verify the reversibility and the one-electron nature of the (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M ..-->.. ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M)/sup +/ (M = Cr,Mn,Fe,Co,Ni), ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn)/sup -/ ..-->.. (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn and ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Ni)/sup +/ ..-->.. (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Ni)/sup 2 +/ redox reactions. These studies reveal that the neutral decamethylmetallocenes are much more easily oxidized than their metallocene counterparts. This result attests to the electron-donating properties of the ten substituent methyl groups. Proton and carbon-13 NMR data are reported for the diamagnetic Mg(II), Mn(I), Fe(II), Co(III), and Ni(IV) decamethylmetallocenes and for ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/V(CO)/sub 2/)/sup +/. The uv-visible absorption spectra of the 15-, 18- and 20- electron decamethylmetallocenes are also reported.

  1. Energetics and electronic structure of UAl4 with point defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniznik, L.; Alonso, P. R.; Gargano, P. H.; Rubiolo, G. H.

    2015-11-01

    UAl4 ideal and defect structures were studied within the framework of the Density Functional Theory. The structural and magnetic ordering of UAl4 in paramagnetic, ferromagnetic, and antiferromagnetic states have been investigated, within the collinear and non-collinear spin approximation, using the GGA model, as embedded in the program package VASP. An antiferromagnetic (0 1 bar 1) layer structure with spins aligned to the [010] direction was found to be energetically preferred. The analysis of density of states and bonding charge density point out that the bonding mechanism consists primarily of band mixing between the U 5f and Al 3p states. Supercells were built from UAl4 unit cells with the established magnetic structure. For those supercells we calculated the energy of formation of vacancies and antisite defects taking into account the existence of three distinct aluminum sites. Point defect formation energies, local lattice relaxations, as well as the defect induced magnetic ordering and electronic density redistribution, are discussed. It is shown that antiferromagnetism is locally broken. Al antisites and U antisites in Al 4e Wyckoff positions are the constitutional point defects in Al-rich and U-rich oI20 UAl4, respectively. In this way we have presented here the first set of data which makes it possible to discuss and quantify the point defects concentrations in the experimental composition range for existence of this uranium aluminide.

  2. Regularized Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun

    2009-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) has been proposed as a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, GSCA may suffer from multi-collinearity, i.e., high correlations among exogenous variables. GSCA has yet no remedy for this problem. Thus, a regularized extension of GSCA is proposed that integrates a ridge…

  3. Structural phase transition and electronic properties of NdBi

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Ashvini K.; Patiya, Jagdish; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2015-06-24

    The structural and electronic properties of NdBi from an electronic structure calculation have been presented. The calculation is performed using self-consistent tight binding linear muffin tin orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA). The calculated equilibrium structural parameters are in good agreement with the available experimental results. It is found that this compound shows metallic behavior under ambient condition and undergoes a structural phase transition from the NaCl structure to the CsCl structure at the pressure 20.1 GPa. The electronic structures of NdBi under pressure are investigated. It is found that NdBi have metallization and the hybridizations of atoms in NdBi under pressure become stronger.

  4. Electron Precipitation Associated with Small-Scale Auroral Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michell, R.; Samara, M.; Grubbs, G. A., II; Hampton, D. L.; Bonnell, J. W.; Ogasawara, K.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from the Ground-to-Rocket Electrons Electrodynamics Correlative Experiment (GREECE) sounding rocket mission, where we combined high-resolution ground-based auroral imaging with high time-resolution precipitating electron measurements. The GREECE payload successfully launched from Poker Flat, Alaska on 03 March 2014 and reached an apogee of approximately 335 km. The narrow field-of-view auroral imaging was taken from Venetie, AK, which is directly under apogee. This enabled the small-scale auroral features at the magnetic footpoint of the rocket payload to be imaged in detail. The electron precipitation was measured with the Acute Precipitating Electron Spectrometer (APES) onboard the payload. Features in the electron data are matched up with their corresponding auroral structures and boundaries, enabling measurement of the exact electron distributions responsible for the specific small-scale auroral features. These electron distributions will then be used to infer what the potential electron acceleration processes were.

  5. Electronic structure and stability of some silicon compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Abu-Izneid, Tareq; Kovač, Branka

    2010-05-01

    The electronic structures of N,1,3-tris(1,1-dimethylethyl)-cyclodisilazan-2-amine ( I) and 2,3,5,5-tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)cyclopentadiene ( II) have been investigated by HeI and HeII UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and quantum chemical calculations. We discuss the influence of substituent effects on their electronic structure and thermodynamic stability. Our study shows that trimethylsilyl substituents have strong influence on the electronic structure of cyclopentadiene via inductive effect. Their influence on thermodynamic stability is also pronounced. In substituted cyclodisilazanes hyperconjugative influence of alkylsilyl groups was shown to cause relative thermodynamic stabilization of the cyclodisilazane system.

  6. Electronic Structure Contributions to Reactivity in Xanthine Oxidase Family Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Benjamin W.; Kirk, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    We review the xanthine oxidase (XO) family of pyranopterin molybdenum enzymes with a specific emphasis on electronic structure contributions to reactivity. In addition to xanthine and aldehyde oxidoreductases, which catalyze the 2-electron oxidation of aromatic heterocycles and aldehyde substrates, this mini-review highlights recent work on the closely related carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) that catalyzes the oxidation of CO using a unique Mo-Cu heterobimetallic active site. A primary focus of this mini-review relates to how spectroscopy and computational methods have been used to develop an understanding of critical relationships between geometric structure, electronic structure, and catalytic function. PMID:25425163

  7. Spectral differences in real-space electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, D. K.; Mazziotti, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Real-space grids for electronic structure calculations are efficient because the potential is diagonal while the second derivative in the kinetic energy may be sparsely evaluated with finite differences or finite elements. In applications to vibrational problems in chemical physics a family of methods known as spectral differences has improved finite differences by several orders of magnitude. In this paper the use of spectral differences for electronic structure is studied. Spectral differences are implemented in two electronic structure programs PARSEC and HARES which currently employ finite differences. Applications to silicon clusters and lattices indicate that spectral differences achieve the same accuracy as finite differences with less computational work.

  8. Defect structural evolution in high purity tungsten irradiated with electrons using high voltage electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzumi, S.; Yoshiie, T.; Satoh, Y.; Xu, Q.; Mori, H.; Kawai, M.

    2005-08-01

    Four types of high purity tungsten were irradiated with 2 MeV electrons to 5 dpa using a high voltage electron microscope, and defect structural evolutions were examined as a function of the irradiation temperature and the concentration of impurity atoms. Three of materials were made by sintering of tungsten powder with purity of 99.999% (5N-W), 99.99% (PF-W) and 99.95% (N-W), and one was a chemical vapor deposited tungsten of 99.9999% (CVD-W) purity. The formation of interstitial type dislocation loops is observed above room temperature by electron irradiation. In sintered tungsten, the number density of loops increases with increasing density of impurity atoms, i.e., N-W > PF-W > 5N-W. The density of loops in CVD-W is relatively high, contrary to its purity. In CVD-W, a heterogeneous formation of loops is observed at above 573 K. Loops are aligned on layers, and no loops are formed between the layers. All four types of specimens have a change in slop of the temperature dependence of loop number density at around 500 K which is caused by impurity atoms. Results of radioactivation analysis and hardness testing are also presented.

  9. Kinetic effects on robustness of electron magnetohydrodynamic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, M.; Sakagami, H.; Das, A.

    2013-04-15

    Following recent remarkable progress in the development of high-power short-pulse lasers, exploration is ongoing into hitherto unknown phenomena at fast time scales of electrons, the understanding of which is becoming crucial. For a simplified description of such phenomena, the Electron Magnetohydrodynamics (EMHDs) fluid description is often adopted. For the possibility of electron transport in high-density plasma, exact solutions of the EMHD model in the form of electron vortex currents, together with their associated magnetic fields, have been considered. However, the fluid EMHD model does not incorporate kinetic effects. Here, the finite Larmor radius effects owing to a finite electron temperature on the robustness of the exact EMHD structures are investigated using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that larger EMHD vortex structures can sustain themselves for long periods, even in high temperature plasma; however, sustaining structures at higher temperatures tends to be difficult. With increasing temperature, electrons with finite Larmor radii become disengaged from the localized region. It is also shown that structures localized in smaller regions are more difficult to sustain. A quantitative criterion in terms of the structure size and Larmor radius has been established by simulations over a wide range of parameters. Finally, we conclude that a structure, larger than about eight times the typical Larmor radius at r=R, could form and exist even under the effects of finite electron temperature.

  10. An analysis of nuclear-electronic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derow, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    It is known that electrons can act in waves and so can protons and neutrons, and that they have a negative, positive and neutral charge, respectively. It seems the motion of the positive charge and motion of the negative charge of the atom keep them from merging and yet the attractive forces stop them from parting, apart from when radiation activity is observed. The neutral charge may add a motion which loosens the attraction of the positive protonic attractive force for the negative electronic force. It seems thus the atom is relatively immobilized negative, positive and neutral waves held in confined motion. These waves can be loosed into travelling as waves by forces which break the balance of intra-atomic attractive forces and thus cause the emission of sub-atomic ``particles'' as waves. Thus the attractive forces in normal circumstances balance the ``wave motion'' forces, keeping stable atomic structure intact.

  11. Recent advances in electronic structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piecuch, Piotr; Kowalski, Karol; Pimienta, Ian S. O.; McGuire, Michael J.

    The recently developed new approach to the many-electron correlation problem in atoms and molecules, termed the method of moments of coupled-cluster (CC) equations (MMCC), is reviewed. The ground-state MMCC formalism and its extension to excited electronic states via the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOMCC) approach are discussed. The main principle of all MMCC methods is that of the non-iterative energy corrections which, when added to the ground- and excited-state energies obtained in the standard CC calculations, such as CCSD or EOMCCSD, recover the exact, full configuration interaction (CI) energies. Three types of the MMCC approximations are reviewed in detail: (i) the CI-corrected MMCC methods, which can be applied to ground and excited states; (ii) the renormalized and completely renormalized CC methods for ground states; and (iii) the quasi-variational MMCC approaches for the ground-state problem, including the quadratic MMCC models. It is demonstrated that the MMCC formalism provides a new theoretical framework for designing 'black-box' CC approaches that lead to an excellent description of entire potential energy surfaces of ground- and excited-state molecular systems with an ease of use of the standard single-reference methods. The completely renormalized (CR) CCSD(T) and CCSD(TQ) methods and their quadratic and excited-state MMCC analogues remove the failing of the standard CCSD, CCSD(T), EOMCCSD and similar methods at larger internuclear separations and for states that normally require a genuine multireference description. All theoretical ideas are illustrated by numerical examples involving bond breaking, excited vibrational states, reactive potential energy surfaces and difficult cases of excited electronic states. The description of the existing and well-established variants of the MMCC theory, such as CR-CCSD(T), is augmented by the discussion of future prospects and potentially useful recent developments, including the extension of the black

  12. Electronic-structure calculation for metals by local optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, C.; Min, B.I.; Benedek, R.; Garner, J.

    1989-03-15

    Recent work by Car and Parrinello has generated considerable interest in the calculation of electronic structure by nonlinear optimization. The technique introduced by these authors, dynamical simulated annealing, is designed for problems that involve energy barriers. When local optimization suffices to determine the energy minimum, more direct methods are available. In this paper we apply the algorithm suggested by Williams and Soler to calculate the electronic structure of metals, using a plane-wave expansion for the electronic orbitals and an electron-ion pseudopotential of the Kleinman-Bylander form. Radial pseudopotentials were taken from the compilation of Bachelet, Hamann, and Schlueter. Calculations are performed to optimize the electronic structure (i) with fixed atomic configuration, or (ii) with the atomic volume being optimized simultaneously. It is found that the dual optimization (ii) converges in essentially the same number of steps as the static lattice optimization (i). Numerical results are presented for Li, K, Al, and simple-cubic P.

  13. Summary report : working group 5 on 'electron beam-driven plasma and structure based acceleration concepts'.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M. E.; Katsouleas, T.

    2000-10-19

    The talks presented and the work performed on electron beam-driven accelerators in plasmas and structures are summarized. Highlights of the working group include new experimental results from the E-157 Plasma Wakefield Experiment, the E-150 Plasma Lens Experiment and the Argonne Dielectric Structure Wakefield experiments. The presentations inspired discussion and analysis of three working topics: electron hose instability, ion channel lasers and the plasma afterburner.

  14. Topological analysis of the electron delocalization range.

    PubMed

    Janesko, Benjamin G

    2016-08-01

    The electron delocalization range function EDR( r→;d) (Janesko et al., J. Chem. Phys. 2014, 141, 144104) quantifies the extent to which an electron at point r→ in a calculated wavefunction delocalizes over distance d. This work shows how topological analysis distills chemically useful information out of the EDR. Local maxima (attractors) in the EDR occur in regions such as atomic cores, covalent bonds, and lone pairs where the wavefunction is dominated by a single orbital lobe. The EDR characterizes each attractor in terms of a delocalization length D and a normalization N≤1, which are qualitatively consistent with the size of the orbital lobe and the number of lobes in the orbital. Attractors identify the progressively more delocalized atomic shells in heavy atoms, the interplay of delocalization and strong (nondynamical) correlation in stretched and dissociating covalent bonds, the locations of valence and weakly bound electrons in anionic water clusters, and the chemistry of different reactive sites on metal clusters. Application to ammonia dissociation over silicon illustrates how this density-matrix-based analysis can give insight into realistic systems. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27296767

  15. Modeling Polymorphic Molecular Crystals with Electronic Structure Theory.

    PubMed

    Beran, Gregory J O

    2016-05-11

    Interest in molecular crystals has grown thanks to their relevance to pharmaceuticals, organic semiconductor materials, foods, and many other applications. Electronic structure methods have become an increasingly important tool for modeling molecular crystals and polymorphism. This article reviews electronic structure techniques used to model molecular crystals, including periodic density functional theory, periodic second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, fragment-based electronic structure methods, and diffusion Monte Carlo. It also discusses the use of these models for predicting a variety of crystal properties that are relevant to the study of polymorphism, including lattice energies, structures, crystal structure prediction, polymorphism, phase diagrams, vibrational spectroscopies, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Finally, tools for analyzing crystal structures and intermolecular interactions are briefly discussed. PMID:27008426

  16. Electron structure: Shape, size, and generalized parton distributions in QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Gerald A.

    2014-12-01

    The shape of the electron is studied using lowest-order perturbation theory. Quantities used to probe the structure of the proton—form factors, generalized parton distributions, transverse densities, Wigner distributions and the angular momentum content—are computed for the electron-photon component of the electron wave function. The influence of longitudinally polarized photons, demanded by the need for infrared regularization via a nonzero photon mass, is included. The appropriate value of the photon mass depends on experimental conditions, and consequently the size of the electron (as defined by the slope of its Dirac form factor) bound in a hydrogen atom is found to be about four times larger than when the electron is in a continuum scattering state. The shape of the electron, as determined from the transverse density and generalized parton distributions, is shown not to be round, and the continuum electron is shown to be far less round than the bound electron. An electron distribution function (analogous to the quark distribution function) is defined, and that of the bound electron is shown to be suppressed compared to that of the continuum electron. If the relative transverse momentum of the virtual electron and photon is large compared with the electron mass, the virtual electron and photon each carry nearly the total angular momentum of the physical electron (1 /2 ), with the orbital angular momentum being nearly (-1 /2 ). Including the nonzero photon mass leads to the suppression of end-point contributions to form factors. Implications for proton structure and color transparency are discussed.

  17. Basis functions for electronic structure calculations on spheres.

    PubMed

    Gill, Peter M W; Loos, Pierre-François; Agboola, Davids

    2014-12-28

    We introduce a new basis function (the spherical Gaussian) for electronic structure calculations on spheres of any dimension D. We find general expressions for the one- and two-electron integrals and propose an efficient computational algorithm incorporating the Cauchy-Schwarz bound. Using numerical calculations for the D = 2 case, we show that spherical Gaussians are more efficient than spherical harmonics when the electrons are strongly localized. PMID:25554128

  18. Electron Diffraction Determination of Nanoscale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, Joel H

    2013-03-01

    Dominant research results on adsorption on gold clusters are reviewed, including adsorption of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} on gold cluster cations and anions, kinetics of CO adsorption to middle sized gold cluster cations, adsorption of CO on Au{sub n}{sup +} with induced changes in structure, and H{sub 2}O enhancement of CO adsorption.

  19. Linear Scaling Electronic Structure Methods with Periodic Boundary Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavo E. Scuseria

    2008-02-08

    The methodological development and computational implementation of linear scaling quantum chemistry methods for the accurate calculation of electronic structure and properties of periodic systems (solids, surfaces, and polymers) and their application to chemical problems of DOE relevance.

  20. Revealing the hidden correlated electronic structure of strained graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craco, L.; Selli, D.; Seifert, G.; Leoni, S.

    2015-05-01

    We explore the effect of isotropic strain on the electronic structure of graphene. It is shown that the interplay between one-particle band narrowing and sizable multiorbital Coulomb interactions induces a transition from a Dirac-liquid semimetal to an orbital selective metal characterized by narrow π -orbital Kondo clouds and abrupt downshift of σ* states. The correlated electronic structure we derive is promising in the sense that it leads to results that might explain the reshaped electronic structure of graphene nanobubbles probed in scanning tunneling microscopy. Our proposal is a key step in understanding the intricate and interdependent changes in orbital and electronic degrees of freedom of strained materials with hexagonal lattice structure.

  1. Stacking dependent electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides heterobilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yea-Lee; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Ihm, Jisoon

    The systematic study of the electronic structures and optical properties of the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) heterobilayers can significantly improve the designing of new electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we theoretically study the electronic structures and optical properties of TMD heterobilayers using the first-principles methods. The band structures of TMD heterobilayer are shown to be determined by the band alignments of the each layer, the weak interlayer interactions, and angle dependent stacking patterns. The photoluminescence spectra are investigated using the calculated band structures, and the optical absorption spectra are examined by the GW approximations including the electron-hole interaction through the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. It is expected that the weak interlayer interaction gives rise to the substantial interlayer optical transition which will be corresponding to the interlayer exciton.

  2. Electronic Structure of Germanium Nanocrystal Films Probed with Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bostedt, C

    2002-05-01

    The fundamental structure--property relationship of semiconductor quantum dots has been investigated. For deposited germanium nanocrystals strong quantum confinement effects have been determined with synchrotron radiation based x-ray absorption and photoemission techniques. The nanocrystals are condensed out of the gas phase with a narrow size distribution and subsequently deposited in situ onto various substrates. The particles are crystalline in the cubic phase with a structurally disordered surface shell and the resulting film morphology depends strongly on the substrate material and condition. The disordered surface region has an impact on the overall electronic structure of the particles. In a size-dependent study, the conduction and valence band edge of germanium nanocrystals have been measured for the first time and compared to the bulk crystal. The band edges move to higher energies as the particle size is decreased, consistent with quantum confinement theory. To obtain a more accurate analysis of confinement effects in the empty states, a novel analysis method utilizing an effective particle size for the x-ray absorption experiment, which allows a deconvolution of absorption edge broadening effects, has been introduced. Comparison of the present study to earlier studies on silicon reveals that germanium exhibits stronger quantum confinement effects than silicon. Below a critical particle size of 2.3 {+-} 0.7 nm, the band gap of germanium becomes larger than that of silicon--even if it is the opposite for bulk materials. This result agrees phenomenologically with effective mass and tight binding theories but contradicts the findings of recent pseudopotential calculations. The discrepancy between theory and experiments is attributed to the differences in the theoretical models and experimental systems. The experimentally observed structural disorder of the particle surface has to be included in the theoretical models.

  3. Embedded Electronic Nose for VOC Mixture Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botre, B.; Gharpure, D.; Shaligram, A.

    2009-05-23

    This paper details the work done towards a low cost, small size, portable embedded electronic nose (e-nose) and its application for analysis of different VOC mixtures. The sensor array is composed of commercially available metal oxide semiconductor sensors by Figaro. The embedded E-nose consists of an ADuC831 and has an RS 232 interface for Desktop PC for higher level data collection and NN training. The ESP tool with database facility and multilayer perceptron neural network (MLP NN) is employed to interface the embedded hardware and to process the electronic nose signals before being classified. The use of embedded e-nose for the quantification of VOCs in mixtures is investigated.

  4. May Auger electron spectroscopy provide surface structural information?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, M.; Soria, F.

    1986-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of Auger electron spectroscopy peak energies, lineshapes and heights allows to determine the chemical composition of the surface layer, and in binary (111) semiconductors even the composition of the outermost surface bilayer, if the composition of a standard surface is known. Surface structural information can also be obtained by the interaction of these surfaces with some gases used as markers, when the gas absorption proceeds by an over/underlayer mechanism, as it happens in the initial stages of the interaction of oxygen with differently prepared GaAs(111) surfaces. Thus, we have been able to confirm the structure of the (111) 2 × 2 Ga surface, and to determine the oxygen absorption sites and occupation sequence, by comparison of the experimental intensities with calculations which model the surface structure and absorption sites. This formalism has also been applied to ( overline1overline1overline1) 1 × 1 facetted surfaces, where very different absorption behaviour is seen for surfaces prepared at different ion energies, but annealed at the same temperature.

  5. Evolution of the electronic structure during the epitaxial growth of Au on Pt(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengió, S.; Walczak, L.; Vobornik, I.; Segovia, P.; Michel, E. G.

    2016-04-01

    We report an angle-resolved photoemission study of the electronic structure of Au layers grown epitaxially on Pt(100) in the coverage range 1-10 monolayers (ML). Our results include an analysis of the electronic band structure and the Fermi surface, combined with structural information from low-energy electron diffraction. The Au films grow epitaxially with a (1 × 1) pattern up to 4-5 ML. We monitor the electronic band structure near the surface Xbar-point vs. Au coverage. In the 1-3 ML range we observe interface electronic states related to the formation of a Au-Pt alloy in this coverage range. Starting at 2-3 ML coverage, we identify quantum well states from the incipient Au sp band, which converge into a bulk like Au sp band near 6 ML. After 5-6 ML, a (1 × 7) pattern is observed, due to the formation of a surface reconstruction in the epitaxial Au film with a topmost hexagonal layer, as in the reconstruction of bulk Au(100). We identify specific electronic states of quasi-one-dimensional character coming from the corrugated hexagonal layer. We obtain a complete picture and understanding of the electronic structure of Au/Pt(100), including sp Au band formation, hybridization and electronic confinement, and with implications in the understanding of the distinct electronic behavior of Au layers and particles in the nm size range.

  6. The power of using continuous-wave and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance methods for the structure analysis of ferric forms and nitric oxide-ligated ferrous forms of globins.

    PubMed

    Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Desmet, Filip

    2008-01-01

    For several decades now, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been a valuable spectroscopic tool for the characterization of globin proteins. In the early years, the majority of EPR studies were performed using standard continuous-wave EPR techniques at conventional microwave frequencies. In the last years, the field of EPR has known tremendous technological developments, including the introduction of advanced pulsed EPR and high-frequency EPR techniques. After a short overview of the basics of EPR and recent advances in the field, we will illustrate how these different EPR methods can provide information about the dynamics and geometric and electronic structures of heme proteins. Although the main focus of this chapter lies on the EPR analysis of nitric oxide-ligated ferrous heme proteins and ferric heme systems, we also briefly outline the possibility of site-directed spin labeling of heme proteins. The last section highlights the future potential and challenges in using this magnetic resonance technique in globin research. PMID:18433634

  7. Molecular structure, vibrational and electronic properties of 4-Phenyl-3H-1,3-thiazol-2-ol using density functional theory and comparison of drug efficacy of keto and enol forms by QSAR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachan, Alok K.; Pathak, Shilendra K.; Chand, Satish; Srivastava, Ruchi; Prasad, Onkar; Belaidi, Salah; Sinha, Leena

    2014-11-01

    4-Phenyl-3H-1,3-thiazol-2-ol can exist in two tautomeric forms - keto and enol. Comprehensive investigation of molecular geometry and electronic structure in ground as well as in the first excited state of 4-Phenyl-3H-1,3-thiazol-2-ol (enol) has been carried out. To determine lowest-energy molecular conformation of the title molecule, the selected torsion angles were varied in steps of 10° and molecular energy profile was calculated from -180° to +180°. Experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of title compound were compared with the spectral data obtained by DFT/B3LYP method. Dipole moment, polarizability, first static hyperpolarizability and molecular electrostatic potential surface map have been calculated to get a better insight of the properties of title molecule. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis has been done to study the stability of the molecule arising from charge delocalization. UV-Vis spectrum of the title compound was also recorded and electronic properties such as frontier orbitals and band gap energies were calculated by TD-DFT approach. To compare the drug efficacy of enolic and keto forms, QSAR properties of both forms have also been computed and discussed.

  8. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  9. Imaging Hydrated Microbial Extracellular Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Buck, Edgar C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-02-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryo-electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in the collapse of hydrated gel-like EPS into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  10. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: comparative analysis by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dohnalkova, Alice C; Marshall, Matthew J; Arey, Bruce W; Williams, Kenneth H; Buck, Edgar C; Fredrickson, James K

    2011-02-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigation of microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations, and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions by conventional electron microscopy approaches with imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding the nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment. PMID:21169451

  11. CO interaction with Au atoms adsorbed on terrace, edge and corner sites of the MgO(1 0 0) surface. Electronic structure and vibrational analysis from DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferullo, Ricardo M.; Fuente, Silvia A.; Belelli, Patricia G.; Castellani, Norberto J.

    2009-05-01

    The interaction of CO with Au atoms adsorbed on terrace and low-coordinates sites (edge and corner) of the MgO(1 0 0) surface was studied using the density functional theory (DFT) in combination with embedded cluster models. Surface anionic (O 2-) and neutral oxygen vacancy (F s) sites were considered. In all the cases, the CO stretching frequencies are shifted with respect to free CO with values between -232 and -358 cm -1. In particular, the values for Au on F s at edge and corner are shifted to higher stretching frequencies by 100 and 59 cm -1, respectively, with respect to the value on a perfect MgO(1 0 0) surface. This result is in agreement with recent scanning tunneling microscopy and infrared spectroscopy experiments where a corresponding shift of 70 cm -1 was observed by comparing the measurements on perfect and O-deficient MgO(1 0 0) surfaces. However, these results are different than expected because Au atoms on F s centers are negatively charged and, therefore, according to the generally accepted scheme the CO frequency should be red-shifted with respect to the adsorption on anionic five-coordinated site where the Au atom is essentially neutral. The following picture emerges from the present results: the single occupied HOMO(α) of Au atom on F s at low-coordinated sites consists in two lobes extended sideward the Au atom. For symmetry reasons, this MO overlaps efficiently with the 2π ∗ MO of CO. This bonding contribution to the Au-CO link is counteracted by a Pauli repulsion between the 5σ MO of CO and more internal orbitals (the HOMO-1(α) and the HOMO(β)) centered on Au. In consequence, CO is forced to vibrate against a region with a high electron density. This is the so-called "wall effect" which by itself contributes to higher CO frequency values.

  12. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  13. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J.R.

    1984-10-10

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  14. New Insight into Carbon Nanotube Electronic Structure Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Jiang, Deen

    2009-01-01

    The fundamental role of aryl diazonium salts for post synthesis selectivity of carbon nanotubes is investigated using extensive electronic structure calculations. The resulting understanding for diazonium salt based selective separation of conducting and semiconducting carbon nanotubes shows how the primary contributions come from the interplay between the intrinsic electronic structure of the carbon nanotubes and that of the anion of the salt. We demonstrate how the electronic transport properties change upon the formation of charge transfer complexes and upon their conversion into covalently attached functional groups. Our results are found to correlate well with experiments and provide for the first time an atomistic description for diazonium salt based chemical separation of carbon nanotubes

  15. Improving Boundary Conditions for Electronic Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benesh, G. A.; Haydock, Roger

    Boundary conditions imposed on a local system joined to a much larger substrate system routinely introduce unphysical reflections that affect the calculation of electronic properties such as energies, charge densities, and densities of states. These problems persist in atomic cluster, slab, and supercell calculations alike. However, wave functions in real, physical systems do not reflect at artificial boundaries. Instead, they carry current smoothly across the surface separating the local system from the underlying medium. Haydock and Nex have derived a non-reflecting boundary condition that works well for discrete systems [Phys. Rev. B 75, 205121 (2006)]. Solutions satisfying their maximal breaking of time-reversal symmetry (MBTS) boundary condition carry current away from the boundary at a maximal rate--in much the same way as exact wave functions in physical systems. The MBTS approach has now been extended to studies employing continuous basis functions. In model systems, MBTS boundary conditions work well for calculating wave functions, eigenenergies, and densities of states. Results are reported for an Al(001) surface. Comparisons are made with slab calculations, embedding calculations, and experiment.

  16. CODSTRAN: Composite durability structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    CODSTRAN (COmposite Durability STRuctural ANalysis) is an integrated computer program being developed for the prediction of defect growth and fracture of composite structures subjected to service loads and environments. CODSTRAN is briefly described with respect to organization, capabilities and present status. Application of CODSTRAN current capability to a flat composite laminate with a center slit which was subjected to axial tension loading predicted defect growth which is in good agreement with C-scan ultrasonic test records.

  17. Electronic and magnetic structure of the Cr(001) surface.

    PubMed

    Habibi, P; Barreteau, C; Smogunov, A

    2013-04-10

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are carried out to study the electronic and magnetic structure of the (001) surface of chromium. Our aim is to identify and characterize the most prominent electronic surface states and make the connection with the main experimental results. We show that a low dispersive minority spin surface state at the center of the surface Brillouin zone plays a crucial role. This surface state of Δ1 symmetry at 0.58 eV above the Fermi level exhibits a predominantly dz(2) as well as pz orbital character. Local density of states (LDOS) analysis in the vacuum above the surface shows that the sharp feature originating from this surface state persists far away above the surface because of the slow decay rate of the pz wavefunction. Finally, by artificially lowering the surface magnetic moment [Formula: see text] on the outermost surface layer we find excellent agreement with experiments for [Formula: see text]. In addition, we propose that some extra spin polarized scanning tunneling spectroscopy (SP-STS) experiments should be made at smaller tip-surface distances to reveal additional features originating from the majority spin dz(2) surface state. PMID:23478357

  18. Energetics and Electronic Structure of h-BN Nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Ayaka; Okada, Susumu

    2016-08-01

    We studied the energetics and electronic structure of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanoribbons with hydrogenated and clean edges with respect to the detailed edge shapes using density functional theory. Our calculations showed that the stability of h-BN edges strongly depends on the edge termination. In the case of hydrogenated edges, the formation energy is constant for all edge angles ranging from armchair to zigzag, indicating that h-BN may exhibit rich variation in their edge atomic arrangements under static conditions. The hydrogenated h-BN nanoribbons are insulators with an energy gap of 4 eV irrespective of edge shape, in which the lowest branch of the conduction band exhibits nearly free electron states nature distributed in the vacuum region outside the ribbons. In contrast, the formation energy of h-BN nanoribbons with clean edges monotonically increases as the edge angle is changed from armchair to zigzag. Our analysis reveals that the increase of density of states at the Fermi level arising from dangling bond states leads to this monotonic increase of edge formation energy in h-BN nanoribbons with clean edges.

  19. Energetics and Electronic Structure of h-BN Nanoflakes.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Ayaka; Okada, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    We studied the energetics and electronic structure of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanoribbons with hydrogenated and clean edges with respect to the detailed edge shapes using density functional theory. Our calculations showed that the stability of h-BN edges strongly depends on the edge termination. In the case of hydrogenated edges, the formation energy is constant for all edge angles ranging from armchair to zigzag, indicating that h-BN may exhibit rich variation in their edge atomic arrangements under static conditions. The hydrogenated h-BN nanoribbons are insulators with an energy gap of 4 eV irrespective of edge shape, in which the lowest branch of the conduction band exhibits nearly free electron states nature distributed in the vacuum region outside the ribbons. In contrast, the formation energy of h-BN nanoribbons with clean edges monotonically increases as the edge angle is changed from armchair to zigzag. Our analysis reveals that the increase of density of states at the Fermi level arising from dangling bond states leads to this monotonic increase of edge formation energy in h-BN nanoribbons with clean edges. PMID:27481626

  20. Energetics and Electronic Structure of h-BN Nanoflakes

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Ayaka; Okada, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    We studied the energetics and electronic structure of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanoribbons with hydrogenated and clean edges with respect to the detailed edge shapes using density functional theory. Our calculations showed that the stability of h-BN edges strongly depends on the edge termination. In the case of hydrogenated edges, the formation energy is constant for all edge angles ranging from armchair to zigzag, indicating that h-BN may exhibit rich variation in their edge atomic arrangements under static conditions. The hydrogenated h-BN nanoribbons are insulators with an energy gap of 4 eV irrespective of edge shape, in which the lowest branch of the conduction band exhibits nearly free electron states nature distributed in the vacuum region outside the ribbons. In contrast, the formation energy of h-BN nanoribbons with clean edges monotonically increases as the edge angle is changed from armchair to zigzag. Our analysis reveals that the increase of density of states at the Fermi level arising from dangling bond states leads to this monotonic increase of edge formation energy in h-BN nanoribbons with clean edges. PMID:27481626

  1. MATERIALS WITH COMPLEX ELECTRONIC/ATOMIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. PARKIN; L. CHEN; ET AL

    2000-09-01

    We explored both experimentally and theoretically the behavior of materials at stresses close to their theoretical strength. This involves the preparation of ultra fine scale structures by a variety of fabrication methods. In the past year work has concentrated on wire drawing of in situ composites such as Cu-Ag and Cu-Nb. Materials were also fabricated by melting alloys in glass and drawing them into filaments at high temperatures by a method known as Taylor wire technique. Cu-Ag microwires have been drawn by this technique to produce wires 10 {micro}m in diameter that consist of nanoscale grains of supersaturated solid solution. Organogels formed from novel organic gelators containing cholesterol tethered to squaraine dyes or trans-stilbene derivatives have been studied from several different perspectives. The two types of molecules are active toward several organic liquids, gelling in some cases at w/w percentages as low as 0.1. While relatively robust, acroscopically dry gels are formed in several cases, studies with a variety of probes indicate that much of the solvent may exist in domains that are essentially liquid-like in terms of their microenvironment. The gels have been imaged by atomic force microscopy and conventional and fluorescence microscopy, monitoring both the gelator fluorescence in the case of the stilbene-cholesterol gels and, the fluorescence of solutes dissolved in the solvent. Remarkably, our findings show that several of the gels are composed of similarly appearing fibrous structures visible at the nano-, micro-, and macroscale.

  2. Structural properties of amorphous silicon produced by electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamasaki, J.; Takeda, S.

    1999-07-01

    The structural properties of the amorphous Si (a-Si), which was created from crystalline silicon by 2 MeV electron irradiation at low temperatures about 25 K, are examined in detail by means of transmission electron microscopy and transmission electron diffraction. The peak positions in the radial distribution function (RDF) of the a-Si correspond well to those of a-Si fabricated by other techniques. The electron-irradiation-induced a-Si returns to crystalline Si after annealing at 550 C.

  3. Analysis of valence-electron structures of Y/sub 3/Al/sub 5/O/sub 12/(YAG) and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Cr/sub 2/O/sub 2/ (Ruby), a study of certain properties of these laser materials related to their valence-electron structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.H.; Yu, L.H.

    1982-01-01

    A direct method of determination of the valence-electron structure from its crystal structure has been presented by the writer at XIIth International Congress of Crystallography, at Ottawa, 1981. Here the method is applied to determine the valence-electron structures of Y/sub 3/Al/sub 5/O/sub 12/ (YAG) and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (ruby) to see how certain properties of these laser materials are related to their valence-electron structures. The first point observed is the very strong, continuous, but zig-zag three-dimensional fractional covalent M-O bond nets (M = Al or Cr) being connected with the high melting points, the great resistance against the puncture by the strong laser beam. In the case of Nd-YAG, the distortion caused by the replacement of the Y atoms by almost the same size Nd atoms is small. On the other hand, because of the similarity of the valence-electron structures of ..cap alpha..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, the replacement of Al atoms by the little larger size Cr atoms in small amount is easily understood. The large atomic spins of magnetic moment m/sub B/ = 2.76 ..mu../sub B/ (= experiment value, the theoretical m/sub B/ = 2.70/sub 2/ ..mu../sub B/) of Cr atoms pointing parallel to the c axis of the hexagonal lattice, is found to be due to the direction of the spin situated in the space of lowest density space of the valence-electron cloud distribution. This agrees with the result of ..cap alpha..-Fe disclosed in the paper Electron theory of the magnetic moment structures of ..cap alpha..-Fe, epsilon-Co, Ni from neutron diffraction experiments presented at the Symposium on Neutron Scattering, Argonne National Laboratory, 1981. This will be found also true in many other oxides like ..cap alpha..-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, FeTiO/sub 3/, MnTiO/sub 3/ and so on.

  4. Nano-structured electron transporting materials for perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hefei; Huang, Ziru; Wei, Shiyuan; Zheng, Lingling; Xiao, Lixin; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-03-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells have been developing rapidly in the past several years, and their power conversion efficiency has reached over 20%, nearing that of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Because the diffusion length of the hole in perovskites is longer than that of the electron, the performance of the device can be improved by using an electron transporting layer, e.g., TiO2, ZnO and TiO2/Al2O3. Nano-structured electron transporting materials facilitate not only electron collection but also morphology control of the perovskites. The properties, morphology and preparation methods of perovskites are reviewed in the present article. A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between the structure and property will benefit the precise control of the electron transporting process and thus further improve the performance of perovskite solar cells.

  5. Nano-structured electron transporting materials for perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hefei; Huang, Ziru; Wei, Shiyuan; Zheng, Lingling; Xiao, Lixin; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-03-17

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells have been developing rapidly in the past several years, and their power conversion efficiency has reached over 20%, nearing that of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Because the diffusion length of the hole in perovskites is longer than that of the electron, the performance of the device can be improved by using an electron transporting layer, e.g., TiO2, ZnO and TiO2/Al2O3. Nano-structured electron transporting materials facilitate not only electron collection but also morphology control of the perovskites. The properties, morphology and preparation methods of perovskites are reviewed in the present article. A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between the structure and property will benefit the precise control of the electron transporting process and thus further improve the performance of perovskite solar cells. PMID:26457406

  6. Fruit volatile analysis using an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Simona; Lloyd, Nathan W; Ebeler, Susan E; Zakharov, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Numerous and diverse physiological changes occur during fruit ripening, including the development of a specific volatile blend that characterizes fruit aroma. Maturity at harvest is one of the key factors influencing the flavor quality of fruits and vegetables. The validation of robust methods that rapidly assess fruit maturity and aroma quality would allow improved management of advanced breeding programs, production practices and postharvest handling. Over the last three decades, much research has been conducted to develop so-called electronic noses, which are devices able to rapidly detect odors and flavors. Currently there are several commercially available electronic noses able to perform volatile analysis, based on different technologies. The electronic nose used in our work (zNose, EST, Newbury Park, CA, USA), consists of ultra-fast gas chromatography coupled with a surface acoustic wave sensor (UFGC-SAW). This technology has already been tested for its ability to monitor quality of various commodities, including detection of deterioration in apple; ripeness and rot evaluation in mango; aroma profiling of thymus species; C(6) volatile compounds in grape berries; characterization of vegetable oil and detection of adulterants in virgin coconut oil. This system can perform the three major steps of aroma analysis: headspace sampling, separation of volatile compounds, and detection. In about one minute, the output, a chromatogram, is produced and, after a purging cycle, the instrument is ready for further analysis. The results obtained with the zNose can be compared to those of other gas-chromatographic systems by calculation of Kovats Indices (KI). Once the instrument has been tuned with an alkane standard solution, the retention times are automatically converted into KIs. However, slight changes in temperature and flow rate are expected to occur over time, causing retention times to drift. Also, depending on the polarity of the column stationary phase, the

  7. Electronic structure of a graphene superlattice with massive Dirac fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Jonas R. F.

    2015-02-28

    We study the electronic and transport properties of a graphene-based superlattice theoretically by using an effective Dirac equation. The superlattice consists of a periodic potential applied on a single-layer graphene deposited on a substrate that opens an energy gap of 2Δ in its electronic structure. We find that extra Dirac points appear in the electronic band structure under certain conditions, so it is possible to close the gap between the conduction and valence minibands. We show that the energy gap E{sub g} can be tuned in the range 0 ≤ E{sub g} ≤ 2Δ by changing the periodic potential. We analyze the low energy electronic structure around the contact points and find that the effective Fermi velocity in very anisotropic and depends on the energy gap. We show that the extra Dirac points obtained here behave differently compared to previously studied systems.

  8. Electronic, Thermal and Structural Properties of Graphene Oxide Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Pan; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, V.

    2013-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of the electronic, thermal, and structural properties of a series of graphene oxide frameworks (GOFs) using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The molecular structure of GOFs is systematically studied by varying the nature and concentration of linear boronic acid pillars and the thermal stability is assessed using ab initio molecular dynamics. The results demonstrate that GOFs are thermally stable up to 550 K and that electronic properties, such as their band gap, can be modified controllably by an appropriate choice of pillaring unit and pillar concentration. The tunability of the electronic structure using non-chemical means, e.g., mechanical strain, is also quantified. Overall, this class of materials is predicted to offer highly tunable materials electronic properties ranging from metallic to semiconducting.

  9. Electronic, Thermal, and Structural Properties of Graphene Oxide Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Pan; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, V.

    2013-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of the electronic, thermal, and structural properties of a series of graphene oxide frameworks (GOFs) using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The molecular structure of GOFs is systematically studied by varying the nature and concentration of linear boronic acid pillars, and the thermal stability is assessed using ab initio molecular dynamics. The results demonstrate that GOFs are thermally stable up to 550 K and that electronic properties, such as their band gap, can be modified controllably by an appropriate choice of pillaring unit and pillar concentration. The tunability of the electronic structure using nonchemical means, e.g., mechanical strain, is also quantified. Overall, this class of materials is predicted to offer highly tunable materials electronic properties ranging from metallic to semiconducting.

  10. Magnetic field structure influence on primary electron cusp losses for micro-scale discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Dankongkakul, Ben; Araki, Samuel J.; Wirz, Richard E.

    2014-04-15

    An experimental effort was used to examine the primary electron loss behavior for micro-scale (≲3 cm diameter) discharges. The experiment uses an electron flood gun source and an axially aligned arrangement of ring-cusps to guide the electrons to a downstream point cusp. Measurements of the electron current collected at the point cusp show an unexpectedly complex loss pattern with azimuthally periodic structures. Additionally, in contrast to conventional theory for cusp losses, the overall radii of the measured collection areas are over an order of magnitude larger than the electron gyroradius. Comparing these results to Monte Carlo particle tracking simulations and a simplified analytical analysis shows that azimuthal asymmetries of the magnetic field far upstream of the collection surface can substantially affect the electron loss structure and overall loss area.

  11. Electronic correlation in magnetic contributions to structural energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    For interacting electrons the density of transitions [see http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.2288] replaces the density of states in calculations of structural energies. Extending previous work on paramagnetic metals, this approach is applied to correlation effects on the structural stability of magnetic transition metals. Supported by the H. V. Snyder Gift to the University of Oregon.

  12. ESTIMATION OF ELECTRON AFFINITY BASED ON STRUCTURE ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electron affinity for a wide range of organic molecules was calculated from molecular structure using the chemical reactivity models developed in SPARC. hese models are based on fundamental chemical structure theory applied to the prediction of chemical reactivities for organic m...

  13. Electronic properties in a quantum well structure of Weyl semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Wen-Long; Wang, Xue-Feng; Oleś, Andrzej M.; Zhou, Jiao-Jiao

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the confined states and transport of three-dimensional Weyl electrons around a one-dimensional external rectangular electrostatic potential. The confined states with finite transverse wave vector exist at energies higher than the half well depth or lower than the half barrier height. The rectangular potential appears completely transparent to the normal incident electrons but not otherwise. The tunneling transmission coefficient is sensitive to their incident angle and shows resonant peaks when their energy coincides with the confined spectra. In addition, for the electrons in the conduction (valence) band through a potential barrier (well), the transmission spectrum has a gap of width increasing with the incident angle. Interestingly, the electron linear zero-temperature conductance over the potential can approach zero when the Fermi energy is aligned to the top and bottom energies of the potential, when only electron beams normal to the potential interfaces can pass through. The considered structure can be used to collimate the Weyl electron beams.

  14. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Christopher T.; Burgess, David; Camporeale, Enrico; Sundberg, Torbjorn

    2015-01-01

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  15. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, Christopher T. Burgess, David; Sundberg, Torbjorn; Camporeale, Enrico

    2015-01-15

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  16. Electronic structure of Co-doped ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neffati, Ahmed; Souissi, Hajer; Kammoun, Souha

    2012-10-01

    The optical transmission spectra, the photoluminescence (PL), and the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra of the cobalt doped zinc oxide nanorods Zn1-xCoxO (x = 0.01, 0.10) were measured by Loan et al. [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 42, 065412 (2009)] in the region 1.5-4 eV. These spectra exhibit a group of ultraviolet narrow lines in the region of 3.0-3.4 eV related to the near-band-edge emission of the host ZnO materials and a group of emission lines in the red region of 1.8-1.9 eV assigned to the radiative transitions within the tetrahedral Co2+ ions in the ZnO host crystal. The group of lines in the visible region provides important information about the electronic structure of the cobalt doped zinc oxide nanorods. This work investigates a theoretical crystal-field analysis of the visible lines associated to the Co2+ ion transition occupying a Td site symmetry in ZnO host crystal. A satisfactory correlations were obtained between experimental and calculated energy levels. The electronic structure was compared with the reported for cobalt transition ion doped in ZnO nanoparticles and bulk crystals [Volbers et al., Appl. Phys. A 88, 153 (2007) and H. J. Schulz and M. Thiede, Phys. Rev. B 35, 18 (1987)]. In order to explain the existence of excitation peaks observed near the band edge of the ZnO host, an energy transfer mechanism is proposed.

  17. Structural, electronic, and magnetic characteristics of Np2Co17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevy, I.; Hen, A.; Orion, I.; Colineau, E.; Eloirdi, R.; Griveau, J.-C.; Gaczyński, P.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.; Sanchez, J.-P.; Winterrose, M. L.; Magnani, N.; Shick, A. B.; Caciuffo, R.

    2012-01-01

    A previously unknown neptunium-transition-metal binary compound Np2Co17 has been synthesized and characterized by means of powder x-ray diffraction, 237Np Mössbauer spectroscopy, superconducting-quantum-interference-device magnetometry, and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). The compound crystallizes in a Th2Ni17-type hexagonal structure with room-temperature lattice parameters a=8.3107(1) Å and c=8.1058(1) Å. Magnetization curves indicate the occurrence of ferromagnetic order below TC>350 K. Mössbauer spectra suggest a Np3+ oxidation state and give an ordered moment of μNp=1.57(4) μB and μNp=1.63(4) μB for the Np atoms located, respectively, at the 2b and 2d crystallographic positions of the P63/mmc space group. Combining these values with a sum-rule analysis of the XMCD spectra measured at the neptunium M4,5 absorption edges, one obtains the spin and orbital contributions to the site-averaged Np moment [μS=-1.88(9) μB, μL=3.48(9) μB]. The ratio between the expectation value of the magnetic-dipole moment and the spin magnetic moment (mmd/μS=+1.36) is positive as predicted for localized 5f electrons and lies between the values calculated in intermediate-coupling (IC) and jj approximations. The expectation value of the angular part of the spin-orbit-interaction operator is in excellent agreement with the IC estimate. The ordered moment averaged over the four inequivalent Co sites, as obtained from the saturation value of the magnetization, is μCo≃1.6 μB. The experimental results are discussed against the predictions of first-principles electronic-structure calculations based on the spin-polarized local-spin-density approximation plus the Hubbard interaction.

  18. Structural studies of photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer in cyclopentadienylnickelnitrosyl

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.X.; Bowman, M.K.; Wang, Zhiyu; Norris, J.R. |; Montano, P.A. |

    1994-03-01

    A structural study based on EXAFS, FTIR, and optical absorption spectroscopies has been conducted on a photogenerated, metastable state of cyclopentadienylnickelnitrosyl (CpNiNO) produced by a reversible photochemical reaction. The photogenerated, metastable state with distinctively different EXAFS, IR, and optical absorption spectra from those of the ground state molecules was created by irradiating the sample with the 365 nm line of a mercury lamp at 20K . At the same temperature, the reverse reaction was induced by irradiation with the 313 nm line from the mercury lamp. Based on the analysis of the EXAFS data, the photogenerated, metastable state of CpNiNO has undergone considerable nuclear rearrangements compared to its ground state. The nuclear movement is characterized by a 0.12{angstrom} elongation of Ni-N bond and by a bending of Ni-N-O. A shift of the N-O stretching frequency from 1824 to 1387 cm{sup {minus}1} was observed in the photoinduced reaction with 365 nm light, implying that a NO{sup {minus}} like species results from intramolecular electron transfer from Ni to NO. The changes in the absorption spectra for the same reaction showed reduced absorption of the 385 nm band and a newly generated broad band near IR region. Temperature dependence of the Debye-Waller factor of CpNiNO was in good agreement with the diatomic harmonic oscillator for the Ni-N bond, but deviated for the Ni-O and the Ni-C bonds. Based on the structures obtained from EXAFS, ZINDO calculations for both the ground state and the photogenerated, metastable state of CpNiNO reproduced the general features of the observed absorption spectra and qualitatively explained the wavelength dependence of the reaction. The calculated partial charges on each atom in the ground state and the photogenerated, metastable state of CpNiNO are consistent with intramolecular electron transfer upon photoexcitation by 365 nm light.

  19. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  20. Role of interface band structure on hot electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garramone, John J.

    Knowledge of electron transport through materials and interfaces is fundamentally and technologically important. For example, metal interconnects within integrated circuits suffer increasingly from electromigration and signal delay due to an increase in resistance from grain boundary and sidewall scattering since their dimensions are becoming shorter than the electron mean free path. Additionally, all semiconductor based devices require the transport of electrons through materials and interfaces where scattering and parallel momentum conservation are important. In this thesis, the inelastic and elastic scattering of hot electrons are studied in nanometer thick copper, silver and gold films deposited on silicon substrates. Hot electrons are electron with energy greater than kBT above the Fermi level (EF). This work was performed utilizing ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) which is a three terminal scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) technique that measures the percentage of hot electrons transmitted across a Schottky barrier interface. Hot electron attenuation lengths of the metals were extracted by measuring the BEEM current as a function of metal overlayer thickness for both hot electron and hot hole injection at 80 K and under ultra high vacuum. The inelastic and elastic scattering lengths were extracted by fitting the energetic dependence of the measured attenuation lengths to a Fermi liquid based model. A sharp increase in the attenuation length is observed at low injection energies, just above the Schottky barrier height, only for metals on Si(001) substrates. In contrast, the attenuation length measured on Si(111) substrates shows a sharp decrease. These results indicate that interface band structure and parallel momentum conservation have significant impact upon the transport of hot electrons across non epitaxial metal-semiconductor interfaces. In addition, they help to separate effects upon hot electron transport that are inherent to the metal

  1. Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  2. Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  3. Goeppert-Mayer Award Recipient: Electron Scattering and Nucleon Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beise, Elizabeth

    1998-04-01

    Electron scattering from hydrogen and light nuclear targets has long been recognized as one of the best tools for understanding the electromagnetic structure of protons, neutrons and few-nucleon systems. In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the field through advances in polarized beams and polarized targets. Improvements in polarized electron sources has made it feasible to also study the structure of the nucleon through parity-violating electron scattering, where the nucleon's neutral weak structure is probed. In this talk, a summary of the present experimental status of the nucleon's electroweak structure will be presented, with an emphasis on recent results from the MIT-Bates and Jefferson Laboratories.

  4. Structural analysis of aligned RNAs.

    PubMed

    Voss, Björn

    2006-01-01

    The knowledge about classes of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) is growing very fast and it is mainly the structure which is the common characteristic property shared by members of the same class. For correct characterization of such classes it is therefore of great importance to analyse the structural features in great detail. In this manuscript I present RNAlishapes which combines various secondary structure analysis methods, such as suboptimal folding and shape abstraction, with a comparative approach known as RNA alignment folding. RNAlishapes makes use of an extended thermodynamic model and covariance scoring, which allows to reward covariation of paired bases. Applying the algorithm to a set of bacterial trp-operon leaders using shape abstraction it was able to identify the two alternating conformations of this attenuator. Besides providing in-depth analysis methods for aligned RNAs, the tool also shows a fairly well prediction accuracy. Therefore, RNAlishapes provides the community with a powerful tool for structural analysis of classes of RNAs and is also a reasonable method for consensus structure prediction based on sequence alignments. RNAlishapes is available for online use and download at http://rna.cyanolab.de. PMID:17020924

  5. Structural Analysis of Communication Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conville, Richard L.

    This paper discusses the question of the legitimacy of applying structural analysis to actual human behavior and illustrates its legitimacy by using the reasoning in an essay by Paul Ricoeur. It then asks if the principles of communication development (obliqueness, exchange, and dying) derived from Helen Keller's experience of communication…

  6. Structural Analysis in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Nicholas A.; Lewis, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an applied method of assessing and manipulating environmental factors influencing student behavior. The assessment procedure is called structural analysis (SA) and can be a part of a functional behavioral assessment (FBA) process or a stand-alone set of procedures for teachers to use in their classrooms.…

  7. Membrane protein structures without crystals, by single particle electron cryomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R

    2015-01-01

    It is an exciting period in membrane protein structural biology with a number of medically important protein structures determined at a rapid pace. However, two major hurdles still remain in the structural biology of membrane proteins. One is the inability to obtain large amounts of protein for crystallization and the other is the failure to get well-diffracting crystals. With single particle electron cryomicroscopy, both these problems can be overcome and high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and other labile protein complexes can be obtained with very little protein and without the need for crystals. In this review, I highlight recent advances in electron microscopy, detectors and software, which have allowed determination of medium to high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and complexes that have been difficult to study by other structural biological techniques. PMID:26435463

  8. Structural Analysis and Design Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Collier Research and Development Corporation received a one-of-a-kind computer code for designing exotic hypersonic aircraft called ST-SIZE in the first ever Langley Research Center software copyright license agreement. Collier transformed the NASA computer code into a commercial software package called HyperSizer, which integrates with other Finite Element Modeling and Finite Analysis private-sector structural analysis program. ST-SIZE was chiefly conceived as a means to improve and speed the structural design of a future aerospace plane for Langley Hypersonic Vehicles Office. Including the NASA computer code into HyperSizer has enabled the company to also apply the software to applications other than aerospace, including improved design and construction for offices, marine structures, cargo containers, commercial and military aircraft, rail cars, and a host of everyday consumer products.

  9. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Weare, J.; Ong, E.; Baden, S.

    1996-12-01

    We have applied structured adaptive mesh refinement techniques to the solution of the LDA equations for electronic structure calculations. Local spatial refinement concentrates memory resources and numerical effort where it is most needed, near the atomic centers and in regions of rapidly varying charge density. The structured grid representation enables us to employ efficient iterative solver techniques such as conjugate gradients with multigrid preconditioning. We have parallelized our solver using an object-oriented adaptive mesh refinement framework.

  10. Electronic Structure and Phase Stability of PdPt Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Koyama, Michihisa

    2016-03-01

    To understand the origin of the physicochemical nature of bimetallic PdPt nanoparticles, we theoretically investigated the phase stability and electronic structure employing the PdPt nanoparticles models consisting of 711 atoms (ca. 3 nm). For the Pd-Pt core-shell nanoparticle, the PdPt solid-solution phase was found to be a thermodynamically stable phase in the nanoparticle as the result of difference in surface energy of Pd and Pt nanoparticles and configurational entropy effect, while it is well known that the Pd and Pt are the immiscible combination in the bulk phase. The electronic structure of nanoparticles is conducted to find that the electron transfer occurs locally within surface and subsurface layers. In addition, the electron transfer from Pd to Pt at the interfacial layers in core-shell nanoparticles is observed, which leads to unique geometrical and electronic structure changes. Our results show a clue for the tunability of the electronic structure of nanoparticles by controlling the arrangement in the nanoparticles. PMID:26862885

  11. Impact of potassium doping on the electronic structure of tetracene and pentacene: An electron energy-loss study.

    PubMed

    Roth, Friedrich; Knupfer, Martin

    2015-10-21

    We report the doping induced changes of the electronic structure of tetracene and pentacene probed by electron energy-loss spectroscopy in transmission. A comparison between the dynamic response of undoped and potassium-intercalated tetracene and pentacene emphasizes the appearance of a new excitation feature in the former gap upon potassium addition. Interestingly, the momentum dependency of this new excitation shows a negative dispersion. Moreover, the analysis of the C 1s and K 2p core-level excitation results in a significantly lower doping level compared to potassium doped picene, a recently discovered superconductor. Therefore, the present electronic structure investigations open a new pathway to better understand the exceptional differences between acenes and phenacene and their divergent behavior upon alkali doping. PMID:26493923

  12. Impact of potassium doping on the electronic structure of tetracene and pentacene: An electron energy-loss study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Friedrich; Knupfer, Martin

    2015-10-01

    We report the doping induced changes of the electronic structure of tetracene and pentacene probed by electron energy-loss spectroscopy in transmission. A comparison between the dynamic response of undoped and potassium-intercalated tetracene and pentacene emphasizes the appearance of a new excitation feature in the former gap upon potassium addition. Interestingly, the momentum dependency of this new excitation shows a negative dispersion. Moreover, the analysis of the C 1s and K 2p core-level excitation results in a significantly lower doping level compared to potassium doped picene, a recently discovered superconductor. Therefore, the present electronic structure investigations open a new pathway to better understand the exceptional differences between acenes and phenacene and their divergent behavior upon alkali doping.

  13. Impact of potassium doping on the electronic structure of tetracene and pentacene: An electron energy-loss study

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Friedrich

    2015-10-21

    We report the doping induced changes of the electronic structure of tetracene and pentacene probed by electron energy-loss spectroscopy in transmission. A comparison between the dynamic response of undoped and potassium-intercalated tetracene and pentacene emphasizes the appearance of a new excitation feature in the former gap upon potassium addition. Interestingly, the momentum dependency of this new excitation shows a negative dispersion. Moreover, the analysis of the C 1s and K 2p core-level excitation results in a significantly lower doping level compared to potassium doped picene, a recently discovered superconductor. Therefore, the present electronic structure investigations open a new pathway to better understand the exceptional differences between acenes and phenacene and their divergent behavior upon alkali doping.

  14. Structure of a Bacterial Cell Surface Decaheme Electron Conduit

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Edwards, Marcus; Gates, Andrew J.; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alex S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.

    2011-05-23

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves deca-heme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outermembrane (OM) electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular inter-cytochrome electron exchange along ‘nanowire’ appendages. We present a 3.2 Å crystal structure of one of these deca-heme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the ten hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65 Å octa-heme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45 Å tetra-heme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g. minerals), soluble substrates (e.g. flavins) and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  15. Electronic structure of the acetonitrile and acetonitrile dimer anions: a topological investigation.

    PubMed

    Timerghazin, Qadir K; Peslherbe, Gilles H

    2008-01-17

    Acetonitrile molecules are known for their intriguing ability to accommodate an excess electron in either a diffuse dipole-bound orbital, away from the valence electrons, or in its valence orbitals, depending on the environment. In this work, we report a computational investigation of the monomer and dimer acetonitrile anions, with the main goal of gaining further insight into the unusual electronic structure of these species. To this end, the topology of the electron density distribution has been examined in detail with the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (AIM). The excess electron is found to affect the topology of the electron density very differently for two dipole-bound-electron isomers of the acetonitrile dimer anion: for the head-to-tail isomer, the electron density simply decays away from the atomic nuclei, and the presence of the excess electron only manifests itself in the Laplacian of the electron density as a very diffuse region of "dipole-bound" charge concentration; in contrast, for the "solvated-electron" head-to-head isomer, a maximum of electron density without a corresponding atomic nucleus is observed, which topologically corresponds to a pseudo-atom of electron density. The acetonitrile dimer appears to be the smallest solvent cluster anion to exhibit such a non-nuclear attractor due to the presence of a solvated electron. Although the "solvated-electron" isomer is thermodynamically less stable than the head-to-tail isomer at 0 K, its floppy nature leads to a higher vibrational entropy that makes it the most stable acetonitrile dimer, anionic or neutral, above 150 K. As for the acetonitrile dimer anion with a valence-bound electron, its structure is characterized by acetonitrile molecules connected to each other at the cyanide carbon atoms; the AIM analysis reveals that, although this C-C bond is relatively weak, with an estimated bond order of 0.6, it possesses genuine covalent character and is not a "pseudo-bond" as previously speculated

  16. Theoretical Analysis of the Electron Spiral Toroid Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc; Micheletti, David A.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the analysis of the Electron Spiral Toroid (EST) concept being promoted by Electron Power Systems Inc. (EPS). The EST is described as a toroidal plasma structure composed Of ion and electron shells. It is claimed that the EST requires little or no external confinement, despite the extraordinarily large energy densities resulting from the self-generating magnetic fields. The present analysis is based upon documentation made available by EPS, a previous description of the model by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and direct discussions with EPS and MIT. It is found that claims of absolute stability and large energy storage capacities of the EST concept have not been substantiated. Notably, it can be demonstrated that the ion fluid is fundamentally unstable. Although various scenarios for ion confinement were subsequently suggested by EPS and MIT, none were found to be plausible. Although the experimental data does not prove the existence of EST configurations, there is undeniable experimental evidence that some type of plasma structures whose characteristics remain to be determined are observed. However, more realistic theoretical models must first be developed to explain their existence and properties before applications of interest to NASA can he assessed and developed.

  17. Electronic structure of Fe-based amorphous alloys studied using electron-energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. J.; Gu, X. J.; Poon, S. J.; Shiflet, G. J.

    2008-01-01

    The local atomic electronic structures of Fe-Mo-C-B metallic glasses are investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The fracture behavior of this Fe-based amorphous alloy system undergoes the transition from being ductile to exhibiting brittleness when alloyed with Cr or Er atoms. In addition, the glass-forming ability is also enhanced. This plastic-to-brittle transition is suggested to correlate with the change of local atomic short-range order or bonding configurations. Therefore, the bonding configuration of Fe-Mo-C-B-Er(Cr) amorphous alloys is investigated by studying the electronic structure of Fe and C atoms using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. It is shown that the normalized EELS white line intensities of Fe-L2,3 edges decrease slightly with an increasing amount of Er additions, while no noticeable difference is obtained with Cr additions. As for the C K edge, a prominent change of edge shape is observed for both alloy systems, where the first peak corresponding to a 1s→1π* transition increases with increasing Er and Cr additions. Accordingly, it is concluded that changes in the local atomic and electronic structure occur around Fe and C atoms when Er and Cr are introduced into the alloys. Furthermore, it is pointed out that the formation of Er-C and Cr-C carbide like local order inferred from the observed C K edge spectra can provide a plausible explanation for the plastic-to-brittle transition observed in these Fe-based amorphous alloys. In spite of the complexity of electronic and atomic structure in this multicomponent Fe-based metallic glass system, this study could serve as a starting point for providing a qualitative interpretation between electronic structure and plasticity in the Fe-Mo-C-B amorphous alloy system. Complimentary techniques, such as x-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscope are also employed, providing a more complete structural characterization.

  18. The Electronic Structure of Single-Layer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, David Alan

    Single-layer graphene has been widely researched in recent years due to its perceived technological applicability and its scientific importance as a unique model system with relativistic Dirac Fermions. Because of its unique geometric and electronic structure, the properties of graphene can be tuned or manipulated in several ways. This tunability is important for technological applications in its own right, and it also allows us to study the fundamental properties of Dirac Fermions, including unique many-body interactions and the nature of the quasiparticles at half-filling. This thesis is a detailed examination of the electronic and structural properties of graphene, studied with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and other surface science techniques like low-energy electron microscopy and diffraction. This thesis is organized as follows. Chapter 1 gives an introduction to the electronic and structural properties of single-layer graphene. It provides a brief historical overview of major theoretical and experimental milestones and sets the stage for the important theoretical and experimental questions that this thesis addresses. Chapters 2 and 3 describe the experimental setup. Chapter 2 discusses the experimental techniques used in this thesis with particular focus on the mechanics of ARPES. Chapter 3 discusses the different graphene growth techniques that were used to create our sample with particular focus on our characterization of epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001). Chapters 4 and 5 form the meat of this thesis: they provide a thorough discussion of the electronic properties of graphene as studied by ARPES. Chapter 4 describes how various perturbations can result in the manipulation of the bare electronic band structure, including the deposition of atomic or molecular species on top of an epitaxial graphene sheet as well as the interactions between graphene and its substrate. Chapter 5 describes the many-body physics in single-layer graphene. It

  19. Enhancement of electron mobility in asymmetric coupled quantum well structures

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Nayak, R. K.; Sahu, T. Panda, A. K.

    2014-02-21

    We study the low temperature multisubband electron mobility in a structurally asymmetric GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As delta doped double quantum well. We calculate the subband energy levels and wave functions through selfconsistent solution of the coupled Schrodinger equation and Poisson's equation. We consider ionized impurity scattering, interface roughness scattering, and alloy disorder scattering to calculate the electron mobility. The screening of the scattering potentials is obtained by using static dielectric response function formalism within the random phase approximation. We analyze, for the first time, the effect of asymmetric structure parameters on the enhancement of multisubband electron mobility through intersubband interactions. We show that the asymmetric variation of well width, doping concentration, and spacer width considerably influences the interplay of scattering mechanisms on mobility. Our results of asymmetry induced enhancement of electron mobility can be utilized for low temperature device applications.

  20. Electronic structure of the silicon vacancy color center in diamond.

    PubMed

    Hepp, Christian; Müller, Tina; Waselowski, Victor; Becker, Jonas N; Pingault, Benjamin; Sternschulte, Hadwig; Steinmüller-Nethl, Doris; Gali, Adam; Maze, Jeronimo R; Atatüre, Mete; Becher, Christoph

    2014-01-24

    The negatively charged silicon vacancy (SiV) color center in diamond has recently proven its suitability for bright and stable single photon emission. However, its electronic structure so far has remained elusive. We here explore the electronic structure by exposing single SiV defects to a magnetic field where the Zeeman effect lifts the degeneracy of magnetic sublevels. The similar responses of single centers and a SiV ensemble in a low strain reference sample prove our ability to fabricate almost perfect single SiVs, revealing the true nature of the defect's electronic properties. We model the electronic states using a group-theoretical approach yielding a good agreement with the experimental observations. Furthermore, the model correctly predicts polarization measurements on single SiV centers and explains recently discovered spin selective excitation of SiV defects. PMID:24484153

  1. Efficient Analysis of Complex Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2000-01-01

    Last various accomplishments achieved during this project are : (1) A Survey of Neural Network (NN) applications using MATLAB NN Toolbox on structural engineering especially on equivalent continuum models (Appendix A). (2) Application of NN and GAs to simulate and synthesize substructures: 1-D and 2-D beam problems (Appendix B). (3) Development of an equivalent plate-model analysis method (EPA) for static and vibration analysis of general trapezoidal built-up wing structures composed of skins, spars and ribs. Calculation of all sorts of test cases and comparison with measurements or FEA results. (Appendix C). (4) Basic work on using second order sensitivities on simulating wing modal response, discussion of sensitivity evaluation approaches, and some results (Appendix D). (5) Establishing a general methodology of simulating the modal responses by direct application of NN and by sensitivity techniques, in a design space composed of a number of design points. Comparison is made through examples using these two methods (Appendix E). (6) Establishing a general methodology of efficient analysis of complex wing structures by indirect application of NN: the NN-aided Equivalent Plate Analysis. Training of the Neural Networks for this purpose in several cases of design spaces, which can be applicable for actual design of complex wings (Appendix F).

  2. Structural and electronic properties of uranium-encapsulated Au₁₄ cage.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Dai, Xing; Kang, Seung-gu; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo Andres; Xin, Minsi; Meng, Yan; Han, Jie; Wang, Zhigang; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-01-01

    The structural properties of the uranium-encapsulated nano-cage U@Au14 are predicted using density functional theory. The presence of the uranium atom makes the Au14 structure more stable than the empty Au14-cage, with a triplet ground electronic state for U@Au14. Analysis of the electronic structure shows that the two frontier single-occupied molecular orbital electrons of U@Au14 mainly originate from the 5f shell of the U atom after charge transfer. Meanwhile, the bonding orbitals and charge population indicate that the designed U@Au14 nano-cage structure is stabilized by ionocovalent interactions. The current findings provide theoretical basis for future syntheses and further study of actinide doped gold nanoclusters, which might subsequently facilitate applications of such structure in radio-labeling, nanodrug carrier and other biomedical applications. PMID:25069968

  3. Structural analysis of vibroacoustical processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gromov, A. P.; Myasnikov, L. L.; Myasnikova, Y. N.; Finagin, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    The method of automatic identification of acoustical signals, by means of the segmentation was used to investigate noises and vibrations in machines and mechanisms, for cybernetic diagnostics. The structural analysis consists of presentation of a noise or vibroacoustical signal as a sequence of segments, determined by the time quantization, in which each segment is characterized by specific spectral characteristics. The structural spectrum is plotted as a histogram of the segments, also as a relation of the probability density of appearance of a segment to the segment type. It is assumed that the conditions of ergodic processes are maintained.

  4. Structured Functional Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Haochang; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Greven, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Summary Motivated by modern observational studies, we introduce a class of functional models that expand nested and crossed designs. These models account for the natural inheritance of the correlation structures from sampling designs in studies where the fundamental unit is a function or image. Inference is based on functional quadratics and their relationship with the underlying covariance structure of the latent processes. A computationally fast and scalable estimation procedure is developed for high-dimensional data. Methods are used in applications including high-frequency accelerometer data for daily activity, pitch linguistic data for phonetic analysis, and EEG data for studying electrical brain activity during sleep. PMID:25327216

  5. Structured functional principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Shou, Haochang; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M; Greven, Sonja

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by modern observational studies, we introduce a class of functional models that expand nested and crossed designs. These models account for the natural inheritance of the correlation structures from sampling designs in studies where the fundamental unit is a function or image. Inference is based on functional quadratics and their relationship with the underlying covariance structure of the latent processes. A computationally fast and scalable estimation procedure is developed for high-dimensional data. Methods are used in applications including high-frequency accelerometer data for daily activity, pitch linguistic data for phonetic analysis, and EEG data for studying electrical brain activity during sleep. PMID:25327216

  6. Structural and electronic properties of dense liquid and amorphous nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Boates, B; Bonev, S A

    2011-02-11

    We present first-principles calculations of the structural and electronic properties of liquid nitrogen in the pressure-temperature range of 0-200 GPa and 2000-6000 K. The molecular-polymerization and molecular-atomic liquid phase boundaries have been mapped over this region. We find the polymeric liquid to be metallic, similar to what has been reported for the higher-temperature atomic fluid. An explanation of the electronic properties is given based on the structure and bonding character of the transformed liquids. We discuss the structural and bonding differences between the polymeric liquid and insulating solid cubic-gauche nitrogen to explain the differences in their electronic properties. Furthermore, we discuss the mechanism responsible for charge transport in polymeric nitrogen systems to explain the conductivity of the polymeric fluid and the semi-conducting nature of low-temperature amorphous nitrogen.

  7. The electronic structure of diodes probed under bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Park, Jeong; Gabor, Somorjai

    2009-03-01

    Chemists have known for decades that when metal nano-particles are affixed to a catalytically inactive oxide surface, the catalytic turnover rate of the array is more than 10 times that of a metal surface alone. However, the mechanism behind the effect is not clear. To understand the catalytic activity of the interface between the metal nano-structures and the oxide substrate, we have investigated the electronic structure of Pt and Pd doped diodes on a TiO2 substrate. The devices were put under bias during the measurements in an attempt to reproduce the potential differences found over the diode when used as a catalyst. This is challenging for electron based measuring techniques, but using photon-in, photon-out techniques we have successfully probed the electronic structure of Pt and Pd doped diodes under bias. The results from soft x-ray absorption and emission will be presented.

  8. Atomic and electronic structure of exfoliated black phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ryan J.; Topsakal, Mehmet; Jeong, Jong Seok; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Low, Tony; Robbins, Matthew C.; Haratipour, Nazila; Koester, Steven J.

    2015-11-15

    Black phosphorus, a layered two-dimensional crystal with tunable electronic properties and high hole mobility, is quickly emerging as a promising candidate for future electronic and photonic devices. Although theoretical studies using ab initio calculations have tried to predict its atomic and electronic structure, uncertainty in its fundamental properties due to a lack of clear experimental evidence continues to stymie our full understanding and application of this novel material. In this work, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and ab initio calculations are used to study the crystal structure of few-layer black phosphorus. Directly interpretable annular dark-field images provide a three-dimensional atomic-resolution view of this layered material in which its stacking order and all three lattice parameters can be unambiguously identified. In addition, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is used to measure the conduction band density of states of black phosphorus, which agrees well with the results of density functional theory calculations performed for the experimentally determined crystal. Furthermore, experimental EELS measurements of interband transitions and surface plasmon excitations are also consistent with simulated results. Finally, the effects of oxidation on both the atomic and electronic structure of black phosphorus are analyzed to explain observed device degradation. The transformation of black phosphorus into amorphous PO{sub 3} or H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} during oxidation may ultimately be responsible for the degradation of devices exposed to atmosphere over time.

  9. Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of small metal clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of metal clusters, in particular clusters of Group IIA and IIB atoms were conducted. Early in the project it became clear that electron correlation involving d orbitals plays a more important role in the binding of these clusters than had been previously anticipated. This necessitated that computer codes for calculating two electron integrals and for constructing the resulting CI Hamiltonions be replaced with newer, more efficient procedures. Program modification, interfacing and testing were performed. Results of both plans are reported.

  10. Electronic structure of spatially aligned graphene nanoribbons on Au(788).

    PubMed

    Linden, S; Zhong, D; Timmer, A; Aghdassi, N; Franke, J H; Zhang, H; Feng, X; Müllen, K; Fuchs, H; Chi, L; Zacharias, H

    2012-05-25

    We report on a bottom-up approach of the selective and precise growth of subnanometer wide straight and chevron-type armchair nanoribbons (GNRs) on a stepped Au(788) surface using different specific molecular precursors. This process creates spatially well-aligned GNRs, as characterized by STM. High-resolution direct and inverse photoemission spectroscopy of occupied and unoccupied states allows the determination of the energetic position and momentum dispersion of electronic states revealing the existence of band gaps of several electron volts for straight 7-armchair, 13-armchair, and chevron-type GNRs in the electronic structure. PMID:23003288

  11. Super instruction architecture of petascale electronic structure software: the story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotrich, V. F.; Ponton, J. M.; Perera, A. S.; Deumens, E.; Bartlett, R. J.; Sanders, B. A.

    2010-11-01

    Theoretical methods in chemistry lead to algorithms for the computation of electronic energies and other properties of electronic wave functions that require large numbers of floating point operations and involve large data sets. Thus, computational chemists are very interested in using massively parallel computer systems and in particular the new petascale systems. In this paper we discuss a new programming paradigm that was developed at the Quantum Theory Project to construct electronic structure software that can scale to large numbers of cores of the order of 100,000 and beyond to solve problems in materials engineering relevant to the problems facing society today.

  12. Banded Electron Structure Formation in the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    Banded electron structures in energy-time spectrograms have been observed in the inner magnetosphere concurrent with a sudden relaxation of geomagnetic activity. In this study, the formation of these banded structures is considered with a global, bounce-averaged model of electron transport, and it is concluded that this structure is a natural occurrence when plasma sheet electrons are captured on closed drift paths near the Earth. These bands do not appear unless there is capture of plasma sheet electrons; convection along open drift paths making open pass around the Earth do not have time to develop this feature. The separation of high-energy bands from the injection population due to the preferential advection of the gradient-curvature drift creates spikes in the energy distribution, which overlap to form a series of bands in the energy spectrograms. The lowest band is the bulk of the injected population in the sub-key energy range. Using the Kp history for an observed banded structure event, a cloud of plasma sheet electrons is captured and the development of their distribution function is examined and discussed.

  13. Electron- and photon-stimulated desorption: probes of structure and bonding at surfaces.

    PubMed

    Madey, T E

    1986-10-17

    Techniques for analyzing the structure and composition of solid surfaces with electron and photon beams often cause radiation damage in samples. Damage-producing processes compete with information-producing events during measurements, and beam damage can be a serious perturbation in quantitative surface analysis. There are, however, substantial benefits of electron- and photonstimulated damage processes for studying molecules adsorbed on surfaces. Direct information about the geometric structure of surface molecules can be obtained from measurements of the angular distributions of ions released by electron- or photon-stimulated desorption. The directions of ion emission are determined by the orientation of the surface bonds that are ruptured by beam irradiation. Moreover, photon-stimulated desorption studies that make use of synchrotron radiation reveal the fundamental electronic excitations that lead to bondbreaking processes at surfaces. These measurements provide new insights into radiation-damage processes in areas as diverse as x-ray optics and semiconductor electronics. PMID:17834529

  14. Comparison of electronic structure between monolayer silicenes on Ag (111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun-Liang, Lin; Ryuichi, Arafune; Maki, Kawai; Noriaki, Takagi

    2015-08-01

    The electronic structures of monolayer silicenes (4 × 4 and ) grown on Ag (111) surface are studied by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. While both phases have similar electronic structures around the Fermi level, significant differences are observed in the higher energy unoccupied states. The DFT calculations show that the contributions of Si 3pz orbitals to the unoccupied states are different because of their different buckled configurations. Project supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) through Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Nos. 24241040 and 25110008) and the World Premier International Research Center Initiative (WPI), MEXT, Japan.

  15. Structural and luminescent properties of electron-irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, N. A.; Loshachenko, A. S.; Aruev, P. N.; Kalyadin, A. E.; Shek, E. I.; Zabrodskiy, V. V.; Shtel'makh, K. F.; Vdovin, V. I.; Xiang, Luelue; Yang, Deren

    2014-02-21

    Structural defects induced by electron irradiation of p-Cz-Si wafers were identified. The influence of the annealing conditions in a chlorine-containing atmosphere on the structural and luminescent properties of the samples was examined. Light-emitting diodes based on electron-irradiated and high-temperature-annealed wafers were fabricated by a vapour-phase epitaxy technique and their luminescence properties were studied. A high-intensity dislocation-related D1 line was observed at 1.6 μm in the room-temperature electroluminescence spectrum.

  16. Chemistry and Electronic Structure of Iron-Based Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Safa-Sefat, Athena; Singh, David J

    2011-01-01

    The solid state provides a richly varied fabric for intertwining chemical bonding, electronic structure, and magnetism. The discovery of superconductivity in iron pnictides and chalcogenides has revealed new aspects of this interplay, especially involving magnetism and superconductivity. Moreover, it has challenged prior thinking about high-temperature superconductivity by providing a set of materials that differ in many crucial aspects from the previously known cuprate superconductors. Here we review some of what is known about the superconductivity and its interplay with magnetism, chemistry, and electronic structure in Fe-based superconductors.

  17. Orientation-dependent C-60 electronic structures revealed byphotoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brouet, V.; Yang, W.L.; Zhou, X.J.; Choi, H.J.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L.; Goldoni, A.; Parmigiani, F.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z.X.

    2008-01-17

    We observe, with angle-resolved photoemission, a dramaticchange in the electronic structure of two C60 monolayers, deposited,respectively, on Ag (111) and (100) substrates, and similarly doped withpotassium to half filling of the C60 lowest unoccupied molecular orbital.The Fermi surface symmetry, the bandwidth, and the curvature of thedispersion at gamma point are different. Orient ations of the C60molecules on the two substrates are known to be the main structuraldifference between the two monolayers, and we present new band-structurecalculations for some of these orientations. We conclude thatorientations play a key role in the electronic structure offullerides.

  18. The electronic structure and chemical bonding of vitamin B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurmaev, E. Z.; Moewes, A.; Ouyang, L.; Randaccio, L.; Rulis, P.; Ching, W. Y.; Bach, M.; Neumann, M.

    2003-05-01

    The electronic structure and chemical bonding of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) and B12-derivative (methylcobalamin) are studied by means of X-ray emission (XES) and photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy. The obtained results are compared with ab initio electronic structure calculations using the orthogonalized linear combination of the atomic orbital method (OLCAO). We show that the chemical bonding in vitamin B12 is characterized by the strong Co-C bond and relatively weak axial Co-N bond. It is further confirmed that the Co-C bond in cyanocobalamin is stronger than that of methylcobalamin resulting in their different biological activity.

  19. Uncertainty Analysis of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    2000-01-01

    A two-phase approach and a computational procedure are presented for predicting the variability in the nonlinear response of composite structures associated with variations in the geometric and material parameters of the structure. In the first phase, hierarchical sensitivity analysis is used to identify the major parameters, which have the most effect on the response quantities of interest. In the second phase, the major parameters are taken to be fuzzy parameters, and a fuzzy set analysis is used to determine the range of variation of the response, associated with preselected variations in the major parameters. The effectiveness of the procedure is demonstrated by means of a numerical example of a cylindrical panel with four T-shaped stiffeners and a circular cutout.

  20. Electron transport analysis in water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Satoru; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Kohki; Itoh, Hidenori

    2016-07-01

    A reliable set of electron collision cross sections for water vapor, including elastic, rotational, vibrational, and electronic excitation, electron attachment, and ionization cross sections, is estimated by the electron swarm method. In addition, anisotropic electron scattering for elastic and rotational excitation collisions is considered in the cross section set. Electron transport coefficients such as electron drift velocity, longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and effective ionization coefficient are calculated from the cross section set by Monte Carlo simulation in a wide range of E/N values, where E and N are the applied electric field and the number density of H2O molecules, respectively. The calculated transport coefficients are in good agreement with those measured. The obtained results confirm that the anisotropic electron scattering is important for the calculation at low E/N values. Furthermore, the cross section set assuming the isotropic electron scattering is proposed for practical use.

  1. High charge short electron bunches for wakefield accelerator structures development.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M. E.

    1998-09-25

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator group develops accelerating structures based on dielectric loaded waveguides. We use high charge short electron bunches to excite wakefields in dielectric loaded structures, and a second (low charge) beam to probe the wakefields left behind by the drive beam. We report measurements of beam parameters and also initial results of the dielectric loaded accelerating structures. We have studied acceleration of the probe beam in these structures and we have also made measurements on the RF pulses that are generated by the drive beam. Single drive bunches, as well as multiple bunches separated by an integer number of RF periods have been used to generate the accelerating wakefields.

  2. The electronic structure of homogeneous ferromagnetic (Ga, Mn)N epitaxial films

    SciTech Connect

    Piskorska-Hommel, E.; Winiarski, M. J.; Kunert, G.; Falta, J.; Demchenko, I. N.; Roshchupkina, O. D.; Grenzer, J.; Hommel, D.; Holý, V.

    2015-02-14

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) techniques, namely, X-ray Near Edge Structure (XANES), Extended XAFS (EXAFS), and Anomalous X-ray Diffraction (AXRD) were used to investigate the local atomic and electronic structure of (Ga, Mn)N magnetic layers with Mn concentrations of up to 10% grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy. The XANES and AXRD analysis prove the Mn incorporation on substitutional GaN lattice sites. EXAFS results indicate the good quality of the structure under examination, although 0.5 nitride atom vacancies were found. The Wien2k code was applied to interpret the XANES spectra quantitatively, i.e., to determine the electronic structure of the Mn atoms. It was shown that accounting for the core-hole effect is necessary to reconstruct effectively the XANES spectra. Conducted charge density analysis based on DFT calculations identified the valency of Mn atom to be of 2.4+.

  3. New quinternary selenides: Syntheses, characterizations, and electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Ming-Yan; Lee, Chi-Shen

    2013-06-01

    Five quinternary selenides, Sr₂.₆₃Y₀.₃₇Ge₀.₆₃Sb₂.₃₇Se₈ (I), Sr₂.₆₃La₀.₃₇Ge₀.₆₃Sb₂.₃₇Se₈ (II), Sr₂.₇₁La₀.₂₉Sn₀.₇₇Bi₂.₂₃Se₈ (III), Ba₂.₆₇ La₀.₃₃ Sn₀.₆₇Sb₂.₃₃Se₈ (IV), and Ba₂.₆₇ La₀.₃₃Sn₀.₆₇Bi₂.₃₃Se₈ (V), were synthesized by solid-state reaction in fused silica tubes. These compounds are isostructural and crystallize in the Sr₃GeSb₂Se₈ structural-type, which belongs to the orthorhombic space group Pnma (no. 62). Three structural units, 1[MSe₃], 1[M₄Se₁₀] (M=Tt, Pn) and M´ (M´=groups II and III element), comprise the entire one-dimensional structure, separated by M´. Measurements of electronic resistivity and diffused reflectance suggest that IV and V have semiconducting properties. Electronic structure calculations confirm the site preferences of Sr/La element discovered by crystal structure refinement. - Graphical abstract: Quinternary selenides Ae₂.₆₇M₀.₃₃Tt₀.₆₇Pn₂.₃₃Se₈ (Ae, M, Tt, Pn=Sr/Ba, Y/La, Ge/Sn, Sb/Bi) were synthesized and their site preferences were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and electronic structure calculation. Highlights: • Five new quinternary selenides were synthesized and characterized. • Structural units, 1[MSe₃] and 1[M₄Se₁₀] (M=Tt, Pn), construct the one-dimensional structure. • Calculations of electronic structure confirm site preference of Sr/La sites.

  4. HOST structural analysis program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert L.

    1986-01-01

    Hot-section components of aircraft gas turbine engines are subjected to severe thermal structural loading conditions, especially during the startup and takeoff portions of the engine cycle. The most severe and damaging stresses and strains are those induced by the steep thermal gradients induced during the startup transient. These transient stresses and strains are also the most difficult to predict, in part because the temperature gradients and distributions are not well known or readily predictable and, in part, because the cyclic elastic-viscoplastic behavior of the materials at these extremes of temperature and strain are not well known or readily predictable. A broad spectrum of structures related technology programs is underway to address these deficiencies at the basic as well as the applied level. The three key program elements in the HOST structural analysis program are computations, constitutive modeling, and experiments for each research activity. Also shown are tables summarizing each of the activities.

  5. Structure, Electronic and Nonlinear Optical Properties of Furyloxazoles and Thienyloxazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagli, Ozlem; Gok, Rabia; Bahat, Mehmet; Ozbay, Akif

    2016-04-01

    Geometry optimization, electronic and nonlinear optical properties of isomers of furyloxazole and thienyloxazole molecules are carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p) level. The conformational analysis of 12 compounds have been studied as a function of torsional angle between rings. Electronic and NLO properties such as dipole moment, energy gap, polarizability and first hyperpolarizability were also calculated.

  6. Electronic structure and electron correlation in weakly confining spherical quantum dot potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimani, Peter Borgia Ndungu

    The electronic structure and electron correlations in weakly confining spherical quantum dots potentials are investigated. Following a common practice, the investigation starts with the restricted Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation. Then electron correlation is added in steps in a series of approximations based on the single particle Green's function approach: (i) Second-order Green function (GF) (ii) 2ph-Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) and (iii) an extended version thereof (XTDA) which introduces ground-state correlation into the TDA. The study includes as well Hartree-Fock V (N-1) potential approximation in which framework the Hartree-Fock virtual orbitals are calculated in the field of the N-1 electrons as opposed to the regular but unphysical N-electron field Hartree-Fock calculation of virtual orbitals. For contrast and comparison, the same approximation techniques are applied to few-electron closed-shell atoms and few-electron negative ions for which pertinent data is readily available. The results for the weakly confining spherical quantum dot potentials and the standard atomic systems exhibit fundamental similarities as well as significant differences. For the most part the results of these calculations are in favor of application of HF, GF, and TDA techniques in the modeling of three-dimensional weakly confining quantum dot potentials. The observed differences emphasize the significance of confinement and electronic features unique to quantum dots such as the increased binding of electrons with higher angular momentum and the modified shell filling sequences.

  7. Electronic structure, hydrogen bonding and spectroscopic profile of a new 1,2,4-triazole-5(4H)-thione derivative: A combined experimental and theoretical (DFT) analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Tamimi, Abdul-Malek S.

    2016-09-01

    Density functional theory has been implemented to study the electronic structure, molecular properties and vibrational spectra of 3-(adamantan-1-yl)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-5(4H)-thione, a novel 1,2,4-triazole-5(4H)-thione derivative. Hydrogen bonded dimer of the title molecule has been studied using B3LYP, M06-2X and X3LYP functionals at 6-311++ G(d,p) level of theory. The intermolecular hydrogen bonding has been studied using NBO analysis of the dimer. Bader's AIM theory was also used to evaluate the strength as well as the hydrogen bonding characteristics. Experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of the title molecule were related with the spectral data obtained with DFT/B3LYP method. The 1H NMR chemical shifts of the title molecule were calculated by the GIAO method and compared with experimental results. Dipole moment, polarizability (α), first order static hyperpolarizability (β) along with molecular electrostatic potential surface have been calculated. Frequency-dependent first hyperpolarizabilities, β(-2ω;ω,ω) and β(-ω;ω,0) have also been evaluated to study the non-linear optical behavior of the title compound. UV-Vis spectrum of the title molecule was recorded and TD-DFT method has been used to calculate six lowest excited states and the corresponding excitation energies.

  8. Simple setup for gas-phase H/D exchange mass spectrometry coupled to electron transfer dissociation and ion mobility for analysis of polypeptide structure on a liquid chromatographic time scale.

    PubMed

    Mistarz, Ulrik H; Brown, Jeffery M; Haselmann, Kim F; Rand, Kasper D

    2014-12-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) is a fast and sensitive, yet unharnessed analytical approach for providing information on the structural properties of biomolecules, in a complementary manner to mass analysis. Here, we describe a simple setup for ND3-mediated millisecond gas-phase HDX inside a mass spectrometer immediately after ESI (gas-phase HDX-MS) and show utility for studying the primary and higher-order structure of peptides and proteins. HDX was achieved by passing N2-gas through a container filled with aqueous deuterated ammonia reagent (ND3/D2O) and admitting the saturated gas immediately upstream or downstream of the primary skimmer cone. The approach was implemented on three commercially available mass spectrometers and required no or minor fully reversible reconfiguration of gas-inlets of the ion source. Results from gas-phase HDX-MS of peptides using the aqueous ND3/D2O as HDX reagent indicate that labeling is facilitated exclusively through gaseous ND3, yielding similar results to the infusion of purified ND3-gas, while circumventing the complications associated with the use of hazardous purified gases. Comparison of the solution-phase- and gas-phase deuterium uptake of Leu-Enkephalin and Glu-Fibrinopeptide B, confirmed that this gas-phase HDX-MS approach allows for labeling of sites (heteroatom-bound non-amide hydrogens located on side-chains, N-terminus and C-terminus) not accessed by classical solution-phase HDX-MS. The simple setup is compatible with liquid chromatography and a chip-based automated nanoESI interface, allowing for online gas-phase HDX-MS analysis of peptides and proteins separated on a liquid chromatographic time scale at increased throughput. Furthermore, online gas-phase HDX-MS could be performed in tandem with ion mobility separation or electron transfer dissociation, thus enabling multiple orthogonal analyses of the structural properties of peptides and proteins in a single automated LC-MS workflow. PMID:25375223

  9. Chiral phosphorus nanotubes: structure, bonding, and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Escamilla, H N; Quijano-Briones, J J; Tlahuice-Flores, A

    2016-05-14

    The study of black phosphorus nanotubes (PNTs) had been devoted to zigzag and armchair structures, with no consideration of chiral structures to date. In this communication, we studied the structural and electronic (band structure) properties of chiral nanotubes using a periodic plane wave-pseudopotential approach. We found that some chiral nanotubes display similar bandgaps and binding energies per atom (BEA) as armchair PNTs and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) calculations attest their thermal stability. Interestingly, we determined that the bandgap is tuned by varying the PNTs chirality and it is not related to their diameters. This feature can be exploited in optical and electronic applications wherein a direct and sizable bandgap is required. PMID:27094567

  10. Free electron laser-driven ultrafast rearrangement of the electronic structure in Ti

    PubMed Central

    Principi, E.; Giangrisostomi, E.; Cucini, R.; Bencivenga, F.; Battistoni, A.; Gessini, A.; Mincigrucci, R.; Saito, M.; Di Fonzo, S.; D'Amico, F.; Di Cicco, A.; Gunnella, R.; Filipponi, A.; Giglia, A.; Nannarone, S.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2015-01-01

    High-energy density extreme ultraviolet radiation delivered by the FERMI seeded free-electron laser has been used to create an exotic nonequilibrium state of matter in a titanium sample characterized by a highly excited electron subsystem at temperatures in excess of 10 eV and a cold solid-density ion lattice. The obtained transient state has been investigated through ultrafast absorption spectroscopy across the Ti M2,3-edge revealing a drastic rearrangement of the sample electronic structure around the Fermi level occurring on a time scale of about 100 fs. PMID:26798835

  11. Hartree-Fock electronic structure calculations for free atoms and immersed atoms in an electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Kenneth Charles

    Electronic structure calculations for free and immersed atoms are performed in the context of unrestricted Hartree-Fock Theory. Spherical symmetry is broken, lifting degeneracies in electronic configurations involving the magnetic quantum number mℓ. Basis sets, produced from density functional theory, are then explored for completeness. Comparison to spectroscopic data is done by a configurational interaction of the appropriate L and S symmetry. Finally, a perturbation technique by Lowdin is used to couple the bound atomic states to a neutral, uniform background electronic gas (jellium).

  12. Electron-Phonon Renormalization of Electronic Band Structures of C Allotropes and BN Polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutchton, Roxanne M.; Marchbanks, Christopher; Wu, Zhigang

    The effect of lattice vibration on electronic band structures has been mostly neglected in first-principles calculations because the electron-phonon (e-ph) renormalization of quasi-particle energies is often small (< 100 meV). However, in certain materials, such as diamond, the electron-phonon coupling reduces the band gap by nearly 0.5 eV, which is comparable to the many-body corrections of the electronic band structures calculated using the density functional theory (DFT). In this work, we compared two implementations of the Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the EPW code and the ABINIT package respectively. Our computations of Si and diamond demonstrate that the ABINIT implementation converges much faster. Using this method, the e-ph renormalizations of electronic structures of three C allotropes (diamond, graphite, graphene) and four BN polymorphs (zincblend, wurtzite, mono-layer, and layered-hexagonal) were calculated. Our results suggest that (1) all of the zero-point renormalizations of band gaps in these materials, except for graphene, are larger than 100 meV, and (2) there are large variations in e-ph renormalization of band gaps due to differences in crystal structure. This work was supported by a U.S. DOE Early Career Award (Grant No. DE-SC0006433). Computations were carried out at the Golden Energy Computing Organization at CSM and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

  13. Electronic structure of hydrogenated diamond: Microscopical insight into surface conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobucci, S.; Alippi, Paola; Calvani, P.; Girolami, M.; Offi, F.; Petaccia, L.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    We have correlated the surface conductivity of hydrogen-terminated diamond to the electronic structure in the Fermi region. Significant density of electronic states (DOS) in proximity of the Fermi edge has been measured by photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) on surfaces exposed to air, corresponding to a p -type electric conductive regime, while upon annealing a depletion of the DOS has been achieved, resembling the diamond insulating state. The surface and subsurface electronic structure has been determined, exploiting the different probing depths of PES applied in a photon energy range between 7 and 31 eV. Ab initio density functional calculations including surface charge depletion and band-bending effects favorably compare with electronic states measured by angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Such states are organized in the energy-momentum space in a twofold structure: one, bulk-derived, band disperses in the Γ -X direction with an average hole effective mass of (0.43 ±0.02 ) m0 , where m0 is the bare electron mass; a second flatter band, with an effective mass of (2.2 ±0.9 ) m0 , proves that a hole gas confined in the topmost layers is responsible for the conductivity of the (2 ×1 ) hydrogen-terminated diamond (100 ) surface.

  14. A structural basis for electron transfer in bacterial photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J.R.; DiMagno, T.J.; Angerhofer, A.; Chang, C.H.; El-Kabbani, O.; Schiffer, M.

    1989-01-01

    Triplet data for the primary donor in single crystals of bacterial reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas viridis are interpreted in terms of the corresponding x-ray structures. The analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance data from single crystals (triplet zero field splitting and cation and triplet linewidth of the primary special pair donor of bacterial reaction centers) is extended to systems of a non-crystalline nature. A unified interpretation based on frontier molecular orbitals concludes that the special pair behaves like a supermolecule in all wild-type bacteria investigated here. However, in heterodimers of Rb. capsulatus (His/sup M200/ changed to Leu or Phe with the result that the M-half of the special pair is converted to bacteriopheophytin) the special pair possesses the EPR properties more appropriately described in terms of a monomer. In all cases the triplet state and cation EPR properties appear to be dominated by the highest occupied molecular orbitals. These conclusions derived from EPR experiments are supplemented by data from Stark spectroscopy of reaction centers from Rb. capsulatus. 41 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. Fission of Entangled Spins: An Electronic Structure Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xintian; Luzanov, Anatoliy; Krylov, Anna

    2014-03-01

    Electronic structure aspects of singlet fission process are discussed. Correlated adiabatic wave functions of the bright singlet and dark multiexciton states of tetracene and pentacene dimers are analyzed in terms of their character (excitonic, charge-resonance, multiexciton). At short interfragment separation (3.5-4.0 angstroms), both multiexcitonic and singly-excited singlet states have noticeable charge-resonance contributions that fall off quickly at longer distances. Non-adiabatic couplings between the states are discussed. The limitations of diabatic framework in the context of singlet fission are explained. Based on the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, we propose using the norm of one-particle transition density matrix, | | γ | | , as a proxy for couplings. The analysis of | | γ | | and state characters reveals that the couplings between the multiexciton and singly-excited states depend strongly on the weights of charge-resonance configurations in these states. To characterize energetics relevant to triplets separation step, we consider multiexciton binding energy (Eb) defined as the difference between the quintet and singlet multiexciton states. The effect of fragment orientation on the couplings and Eb is analyzed.

  16. Topological analyses of time-dependent electronic structures: application to electron-transfers in methionine enkephalin.

    PubMed

    Pilmé, Julien; Luppi, Eleonora; Bergès, Jacqueline; Houée-Lévin, Chantal; de la Lande, Aurélien

    2014-08-01

    We have studied electron transfers (ET) between electron donors and acceptors, taking as illustrative example the case of ET in methionine enkephalin. Recent pulse and gamma radiolysis experiments suggested that an ultrafast ET takes place from the C-terminal tyrosine residue to the N-terminal, oxidized, methionine residue. According to standard theoretical frameworks like the Marcus theory, ET can be decomposed into two successive steps: i) the achievement through thermal fluctuations, of a set of nuclear coordinates associated with degeneracy of the two electronic states, ii) the electron tunneling from the donor molecular orbital to the acceptor molecular orbital. Here, we focus on the analysis of the time-dependent electronic dynamics during the tunneling event. This is done by extending the approaches based on the topological analyses of stationary electronic density and of the electron localization function (ELF) to the time-dependent domain. Furthermore, we analyzed isosurfaces of the divergence of the current density, showing the paths that are followed by the tunneling electron from the donor to the acceptor. We show how these functions can be calculated with constrained density functional theory. Beyond this work, the topological tools used here can open up new opportunities for the electronic description in the time-dependent domain. PMID:25060148

  17. Probabilistic methods for structural response analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y.-T.; Burnside, O. H.; Cruse, T. A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper addresses current work to develop probabilistic structural analysis methods for integration with a specially developed probabilistic finite element code. The goal is to establish distribution functions for the structural responses of stochastic structures under uncertain loadings. Several probabilistic analysis methods are proposed covering efficient structural probabilistic analysis methods, correlated random variables, and response of linear system under stationary random loading.

  18. Geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tsung-Lung; Lu, Wen-Cai

    2015-06-28

    The geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes are studied in this article. It is found that the potassium-rubrene (K{sub 1}RUB) complexes inherit the main symmetry characteristics from their pristine counterparts and are thus classified into D{sub 2}- and C{sub 2h}-like complexes according to the relative orientations of the four phenyl side groups. The geometric structures of K{sub 1}RUB are governed by two general effects on the total energy: Deformation of the carbon frame of the pristine rubrene increases the total energy, while proximity of the potassium ion to the phenyl ligands decreases the energy. Under these general rules, the structures of D{sub 2}- and C{sub 2h}-like K{sub 1}RUB, however, exhibit their respective peculiarities. These peculiarities can be illustrated by their energy profiles of equilibrium structures. For the potassium adsorption-sites, the D{sub 2}-like complexes show minimum-energy basins, whereas the C{sub 2h}-like ones have single-point minimum-energies. If the potassium atom ever has the energy to diffuse from the minimum-energy site, the potassium diffusion path on the D{sub 2}-like complexes is most likely along the backbone in contrast to the C{sub 2h}-like ones. Although the electronic structures of the minimum-energy structures of D{sub 2}- and C{sub 2h}-like K{sub 1}RUB are very alike, decompositions of their total spectra reveal insights into the electronic structures. First, the spectral shapes are mainly determined by the facts that, in comparison with the backbone carbons, the phenyl carbons have more uniform chemical environments and far less contributions to the electronic structures around the valence-band edge. Second, the electron dissociated from the potassium atom mainly remains on the backbone and has little effects on the electronic structures of the phenyl groups. Third, the two phenyls on the same side of the backbone as the potassium atom have more similar chemical environments

  19. Geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tsung-Lung; Lu, Wen-Cai

    2015-06-01

    The geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes are studied in this article. It is found that the potassium-rubrene (K1RUB) complexes inherit the main symmetry characteristics from their pristine counterparts and are thus classified into D2- and C2h-like complexes according to the relative orientations of the four phenyl side groups. The geometric structures of K1RUB are governed by two general effects on the total energy: Deformation of the carbon frame of the pristine rubrene increases the total energy, while proximity of the potassium ion to the phenyl ligands decreases the energy. Under these general rules, the structures of D2- and C2h-like K1RUB, however, exhibit their respective peculiarities. These peculiarities can be illustrated by their energy profiles of equilibrium structures. For the potassium adsorption-sites, the D2-like complexes show minimum-energy basins, whereas the C2h-like ones have single-point minimum-energies. If the potassium atom ever has the energy to diffuse from the minimum-energy site, the potassium diffusion path on the D2-like complexes is most likely along the backbone in contrast to the C2h-like ones. Although the electronic structures of the minimum-energy structures of D2- and C2h-like K1RUB are very alike, decompositions of their total spectra reveal insights into the electronic structures. First, the spectral shapes are mainly determined by the facts that, in comparison with the backbone carbons, the phenyl carbons have more uniform chemical environments and far less contributions to the electronic structures around the valence-band edge. Second, the electron dissociated from the potassium atom mainly remains on the backbone and has little effects on the electronic structures of the phenyl groups. Third, the two phenyls on the same side of the backbone as the potassium atom have more similar chemical environments than the other two on the opposite side, which leads to the largely enhanced

  20. Electronic Structure and Properties of Organic Bulk-Heterojunction Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Street, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    The electronic structure and physical mechanisms of carrier generation and transport in the organic bulk heterojunction are reviewed. The electronic structure describes the bands and band-tail states, the band alignment at the bulk-heterojunction interface, and the overall density-of-states model. The different electronic character of excitons and mobile charge is discussed, the former being highly molecular and the latter more delocalized. Dissociation of the exciton via the charge-transfer (CT) states is attributed to weak binding of the CT state arising from charge delocalization. Carrier transport and charge collection is strongly influenced by the presence of localized band-tail states. Recombination is attributed primarily to transitions from mobile carriers to band-tail or deep trap states. PMID:26603977

  1. Surface crystallography and electronic structure of potassium yttrium tungstate

    SciTech Connect

    Atuchin, V. V.; Pokrovsky, L. D.; Khyzhun, O. Yu.; Sinelnichenko, A. K.; Ramana, C. V.

    2008-08-01

    Structural and electronic characteristics of KY(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} (KYW) (010) crystal surfaces have been studied using reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that the crystal structure and chemical composition of the mechanically polished pristine surface is stoichiometrically well maintained as expected for KYW crystals. Combined measurements of RHEED and XPS as a function of 1.5 keV Ar{sup +} ion irradiation of the KYW (010) surfaces indicate amorphization, partial loss of potassium atoms, and partial transformation of chemical valence state of tungsten from W{sup 6+} to a lower valence state, W{sup 0} state predominantly, which induces electronic states at the top of valence band.

  2. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. PMID:26866276

  3. Flat pack interconnection structure simplifies modular electronic assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzin, L.

    1967-01-01

    Flat pack interconnection structure composed of stick modules simplifies modular electronic assemblies by allowing a single axis mother board. Two of the wiring planes are located in the stick module, which is the lower level of assembly, with the third wiring plane in the mother board.

  4. The electronic structure of grain boundaries in Nb

    SciTech Connect

    Sowa, E.C.; Gonis, A. ); Zhang, X.G. )

    1990-11-01

    We present first-principles calculations of the electronic structure of Nb grain boundaries. These are the first such calculations for a bcc metal using the real-space multiple-scattering theory (RSMST). Local densities of states near a {Sigma}5 twist grain boundary are compared to those for bulk Nb. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  5. The electronic structure of heavy fermions: Narrow temperature independent bands

    SciTech Connect

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Smith, J.L.; Andrews, A.B.

    1996-08-01

    The electronic structure of both Ce and U heavy fermions appears to consist of extremely narrow temperature independent bands. There is no evidence from photoemission for a collective phenomenon normally referred to as the Kondo resonance. In uranium compounds a small dispersion of the bands is easily measurable.

  6. The electronic structure engineering of organic dye sensitizers for solar cells: The case of JK derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cai-Rong; Ma, Jin-Gang; Zhe, Jian-Wu; Jin, Neng-Zhi; Shen, Yu-Lin; Wu, You-Zhi; Chen, Yu-Hong; Liu, Zi-Jiang; Chen, Hong-Shan

    2015-11-01

    The design and development of novel dye sensitizers are effective method to improve the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) because dye sensitizers have significant influence on photo-to-current conversion efficiency. In the procedure of dye sensitizer design, it is very important to understand how to tune their electronic structures and related properties through the substitution of electronic donors, acceptors, and conjugated bridges in dye sensitizers. Here, the electronic structures and excited-state properties of organic JK dye sensitizers are calculated by using density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent DFT methods. Based upon the calculated results, we investigated the role of different electronic donors, acceptors, and π-conjugated bridges in the modification of electronic structures, absorption properties, as well as the free energy variations for electron injection and dye regeneration. In terms of the analysis of transition configurations and molecular orbitals, the effective chromophores which are favorable for electron injection in DSSCs are addressed. Meanwhile, considering the absorption spectra and free energy variation, the promising electronic donors, π-conjugated bridges, and acceptors are presented to design dye sensitizers. PMID:26116996

  7. Electron irradiation-induced change of structure and damage mechanisms in multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian-Qun; Li, Xing-Ji; Liu, Chao-Ming; Ma, Guo-Liang; Gao, Feng

    2015-11-01

    Owing to their unique structure and excellent electrical property, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as an ideal candidate for making future electronic components have great application potentiality. In order to meet the requirements for space application in electronic components, it is necessary to study structural changes and damage mechanisms of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), caused by the irradiations of 70 and 110 keV electrons. In the paper, the changes of structure and damage mechanisms in the irradiated MWCNTs, induced by the irradiations of 70 and 110 keV electrons, are investigated. The changes in surface morphology and structure of the irradiated MWCNT film are characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. It is found that the MWCNTs show different behaviors in structural changes after 70 and 110 keV electron irradiation due to different damage mechanisms. SEM results reveal that the irradiation of 70 keV electrons does not change surface morphology of the MWCNT film, while the irradiation of 110 keV electrons with a high fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2 leads to evident morphological changes, such as the formation of a rough surface, the entanglement of nanotubes and the shrinkage of nanotubes. Based on Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and XRD analyses, it is confirmed that the irradiation of 70 keV electrons increases the interlayer spacing of the MWCNTs and disorders their structure through electronic excitations and ionization effects, while the irradiation of 110 keV electrons obviously reduces the interlayer spacing of the MWCNTs and improves their graphitic order through knock-on atom displacements. The improvement of the irradiated MWCNTs by 110 keV electrons is attributed to the restructuring of defect sites induced by knock-on atom displacements. EPR spectroscopic analyses reveal that the MWCNTs exposed

  8. Controlling electron-phonon scattering with metamaterial plasmonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, Krzysztof; Wu, Xueyuan; Kong, Jiantao; Broido, David

    Electron-plasmon scattering can be faster than electron-phonon scattering. While in metals plasmons occur in the UV range, phonons dominate behavior at much lower frequencies (far IR range), and this typically decouples these phenomena. In metamaterial plasmonic structures, however, plasma effects can be tuned down to the far IR range, allowing for their interference with phonons. It was recently shown, that such interference can protect hot electron energy induced in a solar cell, from dissipation into heat. In this work we explore the possibility of using such an effect to control the electron-phonon interaction and transport in semiconductors. We demonstrate, that this could lead to a novel path to enhancing the electrical and thermal conductivities and the thermoelectric figure of merit.

  9. Correlative Light Electron Microscopy: Connecting Synaptic Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Begemann, Isabell; Galic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Many core paradigms of contemporary neuroscience are based on information obtained by electron or light microscopy. Intriguingly, these two imaging techniques are often viewed as complementary, yet separate entities. Recent technological advancements in microscopy techniques, labeling tools, and fixation or preparation procedures have fueled the development of a series of hybrid approaches that allow correlating functional fluorescence microscopy data and ultrastructural information from electron micrographs from a singular biological event. As correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) approaches become increasingly accessible, long-standing neurobiological questions regarding structure-function relation are being revisited. In this review, we will survey what developments in electron and light microscopy have spurred the advent of correlative approaches, highlight the most relevant CLEM techniques that are currently available, and discuss its potential and limitations with respect to neuronal and synapse-specific applications. PMID:27601992

  10. Correlative Light Electron Microscopy: Connecting Synaptic Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Begemann, Isabell; Galic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Many core paradigms of contemporary neuroscience are based on information obtained by electron or light microscopy. Intriguingly, these two imaging techniques are often viewed as complementary, yet separate entities. Recent technological advancements in microscopy techniques, labeling tools, and fixation or preparation procedures have fueled the development of a series of hybrid approaches that allow correlating functional fluorescence microscopy data and ultrastructural information from electron micrographs from a singular biological event. As correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) approaches become increasingly accessible, long-standing neurobiological questions regarding structure-function relation are being revisited. In this review, we will survey what developments in electron and light microscopy have spurred the advent of correlative approaches, highlight the most relevant CLEM techniques that are currently available, and discuss its potential and limitations with respect to neuronal and synapse-specific applications. PMID:27601992

  11. Electronic Structure of Crystalline 4He at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Ho Kwang; Shirley, Eric L.; Ding, Yang; Eng, Peter; Cai, Yong Q.; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Jinfu Shu, A=Kao, Chi-Chang; Hemley, Russell J.; Kao, Chichang; Mao, Wendy L.; /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci. /SLAC

    2011-01-10

    Using inelastic X-ray scattering techniques, we have succeeded in probing the high-pressure electronic structure of helium crystal at 300 K which has the widest known electronic energy bandgap of all materials, that was previously inaccessible to measurements due to the extreme energy and pressure range. We observed rich electron excitation spectrum, including a cut-off edge above 23 eV, a sharp exciton peak showing linear volume dependence, and a series of excitations and continuum at 26 to 45 eV. We determined electronic dispersion along the {Gamma}-M direction over two Brillouin zones, and provided a quantitative picture of the helium exciton beyond the simplified Wannier-Frenkel description.

  12. Effect of Structural Relaxation on the Electronic Structure of Graphene on Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    PubMed

    Slotman, G J; van Wijk, M M; Zhao, Pei-Liang; Fasolino, A; Katsnelson, M I; Yuan, Shengjun

    2015-10-30

    We performed calculations of electronic, optical, and transport properties of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride with realistic moiré patterns. The latter are produced by structural relaxation using a fully atomistic model. This relaxation turns out to be crucially important for electronic properties. We describe experimentally observed features such as additional Dirac points and the "Hofstadter butterfly" structure of energy levels in a magnetic field. We find that the electronic structure is sensitive to many-body renormalization of the local energy gap. PMID:26565485

  13. Effect of Structural Relaxation on the Electronic Structure of Graphene on Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotman, G. J.; van Wijk, M. M.; Zhao, Pei-Liang; Fasolino, A.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Yuan, Shengjun

    2015-10-01

    We performed calculations of electronic, optical, and transport properties of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride with realistic moiré patterns. The latter are produced by structural relaxation using a fully atomistic model. This relaxation turns out to be crucially important for electronic properties. We describe experimentally observed features such as additional Dirac points and the "Hofstadter butterfly" structure of energy levels in a magnetic field. We find that the electronic structure is sensitive to many-body renormalization of the local energy gap.

  14. Crystal structure and electronic properties of a thiolate-protected Au24 nanocluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Anindita; Li, Tao; Li, Gao; Nobusada, Katsuyuki; Zeng, Chenjie; Rosi, Nathaniel L.; Jin, Rongchao

    2014-05-01

    Solving the total structures of gold nanoclusters is of critical importance for understanding their electronic, optical and catalytic properties. Herein, we report the X-ray structure of a charge-neutral Au24(SCH2Ph-tBu)20 nanocluster. This structure features a bi-tetrahedral Au8 kernel protected by four tetrameric staple-like motifs. Electronic structure analysis is further carried out and the optical absorption spectrum is interpreted. The Au24(SCH2Ph-tBu)20, Au23(S-c-C6H11)16 and Au25(SCH2CH2Ph)18 nanoclusters constitute the first crystallographically characterized ``trio''.Solving the total structures of gold nanoclusters is of critical importance for understanding their electronic, optical and catalytic properties. Herein, we report the X-ray structure of a charge-neutral Au24(SCH2Ph-tBu)20 nanocluster. This structure features a bi-tetrahedral Au8 kernel protected by four tetrameric staple-like motifs. Electronic structure analysis is further carried out and the optical absorption spectrum is interpreted. The Au24(SCH2Ph-tBu)20, Au23(S-c-C6H11)16 and Au25(SCH2CH2Ph)18 nanoclusters constitute the first crystallographically characterized ``trio''. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental and supporting Fig. S1-S3. CCDC NUMBER(1000102). For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01350f

  15. Unravelling electronic and structural requisites of triplet-triplet energy transfer by advanced electron paramagnetic resonance and density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Valentin, M.; Salvadori, E.; Barone, V.; Carbonera, D.

    2013-10-01

    Advanced electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques, in combination with Density Functional theory (DFT), have been applied to the comparative study of carotenoid triplet states in two major photosynthetic antenna complexes, the Peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein of dinoflagellates and the light-harvesting complex II of higher plants. Carotenoid triplet states are populated by triplet-triplet energy transfer (TTET) from chlorophyll molecules to photoprotect the system from singlet oxygen formation under light-stress conditions. The TTET process is strongly dependent on the relative arrangement and on the electronic properties of the triplet states involved. The proposed spectroscopic approach exploits the concept of spin conservation during TTET, which leads to recognisable spin polarisation effects in the time-resolved and field-swept echo-detected EPR spectra. The electron spin polarisation produced at the carotenoid acceptor site depends on the initial polarisation of the chlorophyll donor and on the relative geometrical arrangement of the donor-acceptor zero-field splitting axes. We have demonstrated that a proper analysis of the spectra in the framework of spin angular momentum conservation allows to derive the pathways of TTET and to gain insight into the structural requirements of this mechanism for those antenna complexes, whose X-ray structure is available. We have further proved that this method, developed for natural antenna complexes of known X-ray structure, can be extended to systems lacking structural information in order to derive the relative arrangement of the partners in the energy transfer process. The structural requirements for efficient TTET, obtained from time-resolved and pulse EPR, have been complemented by a detailed description of the electronic structure of the carotenoid triplet state, provided by pulse Electron-Nuclear DOuble Resonance (ENDOR) experiments. Triplet-state hyperfine couplings of the α- and β-protons of the

  16. Writing Electron Dot Structures: Abstract of Issue 9905M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnell, Kenneth R.

    1999-10-01

    Writing Electron Dot Structures is a computer program for Mac OS that provides drill with feedback for students learning to write electron dot structures. While designed for students in the first year of college general chemistry it may also be used by high school chemistry students. A systematic method similar to that found in many general chemistry texts is employed:

    1. determine the number of valence shell electrons,
    2. select the central atom,
    3. construct a skeleton,
    4. add electrons to complete octets,
    5. examine the structure for resonance forms.
    During the construction of a structure, the student has the option of quitting, selecting another formula, or returning to a previous step. If an incorrect number of electrons is entered the student may not proceed until the correct number is entered. The symbol entered for the central atom must follow accepted upper/lower case practice, and entry of the correct symbol must be accomplished before proceeding to the next step. A periodic table is accessible and feedback provides assistance for these steps. Construction of the skeleton begins with the placement of the central atom. Atoms can be added, moved, or removed. Prompts and feedback keep the student informed of progress and problems. A correct skeleton is required before proceeding to the next step. Completion of the structure begins with the addition of electron pairs to form the required bonds. Remaining electrons are added to complete the formation of multiple bonds, assure compliance with the octet rule, and form expanded octets. Resonance forms are made by moving or removing and replacing electron pairs in the existing skeleton. Prompts and feedback guide the student through this process. A running tally of bond pairs, unshared pairs, octets, electrons used, and electrons remaining is provided during this step. Structural and Electronic Investigations of Complex Intermetallic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Hyunjin

    2008-01-01

    In solid state chemistry, numerous investigations have been attempted to address the relationships between chemical structure and physical properties. Such questions include: (1) How can we understand the driving forces of the atomic arrangements in complex solids that exhibit interesting chemical and physical properties? (2) How do different elements distribute themselves in a solid-state structure? (3) Can we develop a chemical understanding to predict the effects of valence electron concentration on the structures and magnetic ordering of systems by both experimental and theoretical means? Although these issues are relevant to various compound classes, intermetallic compounds are especially interesting and well suited for a joint experimental and theoretical effort. For intermetallic compounds, the questions listed above are difficult to answer since many of the constituent atoms simply do not crystallize in the same manner as in their separate, elemental structures. Also, theoretical studies suggest that the energy differences between various structural alternatives are small. For example, Al and Ga both belong in the same group on the Periodic Table of Elements and share many similar chemical properties. Al crystallizes in the fcc lattice with 4 atoms per unit cell and Ga crystallizes in an orthorhombic unit cell lattice with 8 atoms per unit cell, which are both fairly simple structures (Figure 1). However, when combined with Mn, which itself has a very complex cubic crystal structure with 58 atoms per unit cell, the resulting intermetallic compounds crystallize in a completely different fashion. At the 1:1 stoichiometry, MnAl forms a very simple tetragonal lattice with two atoms per primitive unit cell, while MnGa crystallizes in a complicated rhombohedral unit cell with 26 atoms within the primitive unit cell. The mechanisms influencing the arrangements of atoms in numerous crystal structures have been studied theoretically by calculating electronic

  17. Structure-phase states evolution in Al-Si alloy under electron-beam treatment and high-cycle fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalov, Sergey Alsaraeva, Krestina Gromov, Victor Semina, Olga; Ivanov, Yurii

    2015-10-27

    By methods of scanning and transmission electron diffraction microscopy the analysis of structure-phase states and defect substructure of silumin subjected to high-intensity electron beam irradiation in various regimes and subsequent fatigue loading up to failure was carried out. It is revealed that the sources of fatigue microcracks are silicon plates of micron and submicron size are not soluble in electron beam processing. The possible reasons of the silumin fatigue life increase under electron-beam treatment are discussed.

  18. Analysis of Electron Beam Damage of Crystalline Pharmaceutical Materials by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S'ari, M.; Cattle, J.; Hondow, N.; Blade, H.; Cosgrove, S.; Brydson, R. M.; Brown, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the impact of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and low dose electron diffraction on ten different crystalline pharmaceutical compounds, covering a diverse chemical space and with differing physical properties. The aim was to establish if particular chemical moieties were more susceptible to damage within the electron beam. We have measured crystalline diffraction patterns for each and indexed nine out of ten of them. Characteristic electron dosages are reported for each material, with no apparent correlation between chemical structure and stability within the electron beam. Such low dose electron diffraction protocols are suitable for the study of pharmaceutical compounds.

  19. Electronics speckle interferometry applications for NDE of spacecraft structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. V.; Samuel, R.; Ananthan, A.; Dasgupta, S.; Nair, P. S.

    2008-09-01

    The spacecraft components viz., central cylinder, deck plates, solar panel substrates, antenna reflectors are made of aluminium/composite honeycomb sandwich construction. Detection of these defects spacecraft structural components is important to assess the integrity of the spacecraft structure. Electronic Speckle Interferometry (ESI) techniques identify the defects as anomalous regions in the interferometric fringe patterns of the specklegram while the component is suitably stressed to give rise to differential displacement/strain around the defective region. Calibration studies, different phase shifting methods associated with ESI and the development of a prototype Twin Head ESSI System (THESSIS) and its use for the NDE of a typical satellite structural component are presented.

  1. HOST structural analysis program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Hot section components of aircraft gas turbine engines are subjected to severe thermal structural loading conditions, especially during the start up and take off portions of the engine cycle. The most severe and damaging stresses and strains are those induced by the steep thermal gradients induced during the start up transient. These transient stresses and strains are also the most difficult to predict, in part because of the temperature gradients and distributions are not well known or readily predictable, and also because the cyclic elastic viscoplastic behavior of the materials at these extremes of temperature and strain are not well known or readily predictable. A broad spectrum of structures related technology programs is underway to address these deficiencies. One element of the structures program is developing improved time varying thermal mechanical load models for the entire engine mission cycle from start up to shutdown. Another major part of the program is the development of new and improved nonlinear 3-D finite elements and associated structural analysis programs, including the development of temporal elements with time dependent properties to account for creep effects in the materials and components.

  2. Electronic Structure Studies of Silicon Carbide Cationic Nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Prachi

    2005-03-01

    As a continuation of our studies on the high stabilities and associated electronic structure properties of Si8C2 to Si14C2 and Si20Cn (n=3-6) clusters,^1 we report here detailed ab initio electronic and geometric structure studies of small SimCn^+ (1< m, n < 4) cationic clusters. The theoretical formalism used is the local density approximation (LDA) to density functional theory (DFT) and the Gaussian03 suite of programs^2 with an all electron 6-311++G** basis set has been used. Complete geometry optimizations of different possible structures have been carried out. The stability of the clusters varies with the ratio of the number of silicon to carbon atoms in the cluster. In contrast to the neutral clusters,^3 cationic clusters appear to prefer more open structures. Results will be presented for binding energies, relative energies, fragmentation energies, vibrational frequencies, and adiabatic ionization potentials^3 for the optimized clusters. Detailed comparisons with published data in the literature will also be presented. * Work supported, in part, by the Welch Foundation, Houston, Texas (Grant No. Y-1525) ^1M. N. Huda and A. K. Ray, Phys. Rev. A (R) 69, 011201 (2004); Eur. Phys. J. D 31, 63 (2004). ^2 Gaussian03, Revision A.1, M. J. Frisch et al., Gaussian Inc., Pittsburgh, PA , 2003. ^3 P. Pradhan and A. K. Ray, J. Mol. Structure (Theochem), in press.

  3. Ultrafast Structural Dynamics of Tertiary Amines upon Electronic Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xinxin; Minitti, Michael P.; Deb, Sanghamitra; Zhang, Yao; Budarz, James; Weber, Peter M.

    2011-06-01

    The structural response of several tertiary amines to electronic excitation has been investigated using Rydberg Fingerprint Spectroscopy. The 3p Rydberg states are reached by excitation with a 5.93 eV photon while 3s states are populated by electronic relaxation from 3p state. We observe binding energy shifts on ultrafast time scales in all peaks that reflect the structural change of the molecular ion cores. The shifts are in the range of 15 meV to 30 meV, within time scales of less than 500 fs, depending on the specific molecular systems and the nature of the electronic state. In cases where the p states are spectrally separate, the trends of the energy shifts are different for the p_z and p_x_y Rydberg states whereas the p_z and s states are similar. This suggests that the response of the Rydberg states to structural displacements depends on the symmetry. Very fast binding energy shifts, observed on sub-picosecond time scales, are attributed to the structural adjustment from a pyramidal to a planar structure upon Rydberg excitation. The quantitative values of the binding energy shifts can also be affected by laser chirp, which we model using simulations.

  4. Defective graphene and nanoribbons: electronic, magnetic and structural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Thiago; Azevedo, Sérgio; Machado, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    We make use of first-principles calculations, based on the density functional theory (DFT), to investigate the alterations at the structural, energetic, electronic and magnetic properties of graphene and zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) due to the inclusion of different types of line and punctual defects. For the graphene it is found that the inclusion of defects breaks the translational symmetry of the crystal with drastic changes at its electronic structure, going from semimetallic to semiconductor and metallic. Regarding the magnetic properties, no magnetization is observed for the defective graphene. We also show that the inclusion of defects at ZGNRs is a good way to create and control pronounced peaks at the Fermi level. Furthermore, defective ZGNRs structures show magnetic moment by supercell up to 2.0 μ B . For the non defective ZGNRs is observed a switch of the magnetic coupling between opposite ribbon edges from the antiferromagnetic to the ferrimagnetic and ferromagnetic configurations.

  5. Characterization of electronic structure of periodically strained graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Aslani, Marjan; Garner, C. Michael Nishi, Yoshio; Kumar, Suhas; Nordlund, Dennis; Pianetta, Piero

    2015-11-02

    We induced periodic biaxial tensile strain in polycrystalline graphene by wrapping it over a substrate with repeating pillar-like structures with a periodicity of 600 nm. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined to have introduced biaxial strains in graphene in the range of 0.4% to 0.7%. Its band structure was characterized using photoemission from valance bands, shifts in the secondary electron emission, and x-ray absorption from the carbon 1s levels to the unoccupied graphene conduction bands. It was observed that relative to unstrained graphene, strained graphene had a higher work function and higher density of states in the valence and conduction bands. We measured the conductivity of the strained and unstrained graphene in response to a gate voltage and correlated the changes in their behavior to the changes in the electronic structure. From these sets of data, we propose a simple band diagram representing graphene with periodic biaxial strain.

  6. Characterization of electronic structure of periodically strained graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Aslani, Marjan; Garner, C. Michael; Kumar, Suhas; Nordlund, Dennis; Pianetta, Piero; Nishi, Yoshio

    2015-11-03

    We induced periodic biaxial tensile strain in polycrystalline graphene by wrapping it over a substrate with repeating pillar-like structures with a periodicity of 600 nm. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined to have introduced biaxial strains in graphene in the range of 0.4% to 0.7%. Its band structure was characterized using photoemission from valance bands, shifts in the secondary electron emission, and x-ray absorption from the carbon 1s levels to the unoccupied graphene conduction bands. It was observed that relative to unstrained graphene, strained graphene had a higher work function and higher density of states in the valence and conduction bands. Furthermore, we measured the conductivity of the strained and unstrained graphene in response to a gate voltage and correlated the changes in their behavior to the changes in the electronic structure. From these sets of data, we propose a simple band diagram representing graphene with periodic biaxial strain.

  7. 3D structure of individual nanocrystals in solution by electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jungwon; Elmlund, Hans; Ercius, Peter; Yuk, Jong Min; Limmer, David T.; Chen, Qian; Kim, Kwanpyo; Han, Sang Hoon; Weitz, David A.; Zettl, A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge about the synthesis, growth mechanisms, and physical properties of colloidal nanoparticles has been limited by technical impediments. We introduce a method for determining three-dimensional (3D) structures of individual nanoparticles in solution. We combine a graphene liquid cell, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, a direct electron detector, and an algorithm for single-particle 3D reconstruction originally developed for analysis of biological molecules. This method yielded two 3D structures of individual platinum nanocrystals at near-atomic resolution. Because our method derives the 3D structure from images of individual nanoparticles rotating freely in solution, it enables the analysis of heterogeneous populations of potentially unordered nanoparticles that are synthesized in solution, thereby providing a means to understand the structure and stability of defects at the nanoscale.

  8. Density functional theory + U analysis of the electronic structure and defect chemistry of LSCF (La0.5Sr0.5Co0.25Fe0.75O3-δ).

    PubMed

    Ritzmann, Andrew M; Dieterich, Johannes M; Carter, Emily A

    2016-04-28

    Reducing operating temperatures is a key step in making solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology viable. A promising strategy for accomplishing this goal is employing mixed ion-electron conducting (MIEC) cathodes. La1-xSrxCo1-yFeyO3-δ (LSCF) is the most widely employed MIEC cathode material; however, rational optimization of the composition of LSCF requires fundamental insight linking its electronic structure to its defect chemistry. To provide the necessary insight, density functional theory plus U (DFT+U) calculations are used to investigate the electronic structure of LSCF (xSr = 0.50, yCo = 0.25). The DFT+U calculations show that LSCF has a significantly different electronic structure than La1-xSrxFeO3 because of the addition of cobalt, but that minimal electronic structure differences exist between La0.5Sr0.5Co0.25Fe0.75O3 and La0.5Sr0.5Co0.5Fe0.5O3. The oxygen vacancy formation energy (ΔEf,vac) is calculated for residing in different local environments within La0.5Sr0.5Co0.25Fe0.75O3. These results show that configurations have the highest ΔEf,vac, while have the lowest ΔEf,vac and may act as traps for . We conclude that compositions with more Fe than Co are preferred because the additional sites would lead to higher overall ΔEf,vac (and lower concentrations), while the trapping strength of the sites is relatively weak (∼0.3 eV). PMID:27079696

  9. Electronic structure and crystal phase stability of palladium hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Houari, Abdesalem; Matar, Samir F.; Eyert, Volker

    2014-11-07

    The results of electronic structure calculations for a variety of palladium hydrides are presented. The calculations are based on density functional theory and used different local and semilocal approximations. The thermodynamic stability of all structures as well as the electronic and chemical bonding properties are addressed. For the monohydride, taking into account the zero-point energy is important to identify the octahedral Pd-H arrangement with its larger voids and, hence, softer hydrogen vibrational modes as favorable over the tetrahedral arrangement as found in the zincblende and wurtzite structures. Stabilization of the rocksalt structure is due to strong bonding of the 4d and 1s orbitals, which form a characteristic split-off band separated from the main d-band group. Increased filling of the formerly pure d states of the metal causes strong reduction of the density of states at the Fermi energy, which undermines possible long-range ferromagnetic order otherwise favored by strong magnetovolume effects. For the dihydride, octahedral Pd-H arrangement as realized, e.g., in the pyrite structure turns out to be unstable against tetrahedral arrangement as found in the fluorite structure. Yet, from both heat of formation and chemical bonding considerations, the dihydride turns out to be less favorable than the monohydride. Finally, the vacancy ordered defect phase Pd{sub 3}H{sub 4} follows the general trend of favoring the octahedral arrangement of the rocksalt structure for Pd:H ratios less or equal to one.

  10. Electronic structures of Ascaris trypsin inhibitor in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Haoping

    2003-11-01

    The electronic structures of Ascaris trypsin inhibitor in solution are obtained by the first-principles, all-electron, ab initio calculation using the self-consistent cluster-embedding (SCCE) method. The inhibitor, made up of 62 amino acid residues with 912 atoms, has two three-dimensional solution structures: 1ata and 1atb. The calculated ground-state energy of structure 1atb is lower than that of structure 1ata by 6.12 eV. The active sites are determined and explained: only structure 1atb has a N terminal at residue ARG+31. This shows that the structure 1atb is the stable and active form of the inhibitor, which is in agreement with the experimental results. The calculation reveals that some parts of the inhibitor can be easily changed while the inhibitor’s biological activity may be kept. This kind of information may be helpful in fighting viruses such as AIDS, SARS, and flu, since these viruses have higher variability. The calculation offers an independent theoretical estimate of the precision of structure determination.

  11. Analysis of DCC domain structure

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J.; Thews, R.L.

    1997-10-01

    Wavelet-type methods are employed for the analysis of pion field configurations that have been obtained by dynamical simulations in idealized scenarios relevant to the formation of disoriented chiral condensates. It is illustrated how the measurement of the isospin domain structure depends on the ability to zoom in on limited parts of the phase space, due to the interplay between the pion correlation length and the effective source geometry. The need for advanced analysis methods is underscored by the fact that the extracted neutral-fraction distribution would differ significantly from the ideal form, even under perfect experimental conditions, and, moreover, by the circumstance that thermal sources with suitably adjusted temperatures can lead to distributions that may be practically indistinguishable from those arising from DCC-type nonequilibrium evolutions. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Analysis of DCC domain structure

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J.; Thews, R.L.

    1997-05-07

    Wavelet-type methods are employed for the analysis of pion field configurations that have been obtained by dynamical simulations in idealized scenarios relevant to the formation of disoriented chiral condensates. It is illustrated how the measurement of the isospin domain structure depends on the ability to zoom in on limited parts of the phase space, due to the interplay between the pion correlation length and the effective source geometry. The need for advanced analysis methods is underscored by the fact that the extracted neutral-fraction distribution would differ significantly from the ideal form, even under perfect experimental conditions, and, moreover, by the circumstance that thermal sources with suitably adjusted temperatures can lead to distributions that may be practically indistinguishable from those arising from DCC-type nonequilibrium evolutions.

  13. ANALYSIS OF ELECTRON CLOUD AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    IRISO,U.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; CAMERON,P.; DREES,A.; FISCHER,W.; ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    Pressure rises with high intense beams are among the main luminosity limitations at RHIC. Observations during the latest runs show beam induced electron multipacting as one of the causes for these pressure rises. Experimental studies are carried out at RHIC using devoted instrumentation to understand the mechanism leading to electron clouds. In the following, we report the experimental electron cloud data and the analyzed results using computer simulation codes.

  14. Mapping the Electronic States of One Dimensional Peapod Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbaker, D. J.

    2003-03-01

    A key issue of potential technological importance is how the electronic properties of single wall carbon nanotubes are altered by their interactions with other molecules. We address this question by examining the properties of carbon heterostructures formed by the encapsulation of C_60 molecules within the hollow interiors of single wall nanotubes.^1 We study the properties of these novel macromolecules (dubbed 'peapods') using a low temperature, ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Our experiments reveal that while no discernable change in the atomic structure of the encapsulating nanotubes is evident, the presence of interior C_60 molecules can dramatically affect the electronic structure of the nanotube cage. Constant current STM images of peapods display pronounced spatial modulation of the electronic density at sample biases greater than 1V, with a periodicity consistent with the intermolecular spacing of close-packed C_60 molecules inside the nanotube. This effect has been observed on peapods displaying both semiconducting and metallic densities of states. Coincident with this modulation is the appearance of characteristic features in the electronic band structure measured via tunneling spectroscopy. Theoretical modeling^2,3 indicates these features arise from coupling between the valence states of the encapsulated fullerenes, leading to the formation of a hybrid electronic band. Our experiments demonstrate that encapsulation of molecules is a viable route for selectively altering the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes. ^1B.W. Smith and D.E. Luzzi, Chem. Phys. Lett. 321, 169 (2000). ^2D.J. Hornbaker et al. Science 295, 828 (2002). ^3C. Kane et al. Phys. Rev. B (submitted).

  15. DFT simulation, quantum chemical electronic structure, spectroscopic and structure-activity investigations of 2-benzothiazole acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, V; Thillai Govindaraja, S; Jose, Sujin P; Mohan, S

    2014-07-15

    The Fourier transform infrared and FT-Raman spectra of 2-benzothiazole acetonitrile (BTAN) have been recorded in the range 4000-450 and 4000-100 cm(-1) respectively. The conformational analysis of the compound has been carried out to obtain the stable geometry of the compound. The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound are carried out using the experimental FTIR and FT-Raman data and quantum chemical studies. The experimental vibrational frequencies are compared with the wavenumbers derived theoretically by B3LYP gradient calculations employing the standard 6-31G(**), high level 6-311++G(**) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The structural parameters, thermodynamic properties and vibrational frequencies of the normal modes obtained from the B3LYP methods are in good agreement with the experimental data. The (1)H (400 MHz; CDCl3) and (13)C (100 MHz;CDCl3) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra are also recorded. The electronic properties, the energies of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals are measured by DFT approach. The kinetic stability of the molecule has been determined from the frontier molecular orbital energy gap. The charges of the atoms and the structure-chemical reactivity relations of the compound are determined by its chemical potential, global hardness, global softness, electronegativity, electrophilicity and local reactivity descriptors by conceptual DFT methods. The non-linear optical properties of the compound have been discussed by measuring the polarisability and hyperpolarisability tensors. PMID:24662754

  16. Shigella flexneri Spa15 Crystal Structure Verified in Solution by Double Electron Electron Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Lillington, James E.D.; Lovett, Janet E.; Johnson, Steven; Roversi, Pietro; Timmel, Christiane R.; Lea, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Shigella flexneri Spa15 is a chaperone of the type 3 secretion system, which binds a number of effectors to ensure their stabilization prior to secretion. One of these effectors is IpgB1, a mimic of the human Ras-like Rho guanosine triphosphatase RhoG. In this study, Spa15 alone and in complex with IpgB1 has been studied by double electron electron resonance, an experiment that gives distance information showing the spacial separation of attached spin labels. This distance is explained by determining the crystal structure of the spin-labeled Spa15 where labels are seen to be buried in hydrophobic pockets. The double electron electron resonance experiment on the Spa15 complex with IpgB1 shows that IpgB1 does not bind Spa15 in the same way as is seen in the homologous Salmonella sp. chaperone:effector complex InvB:SipA. PMID:21075116

  17. Toward the origin of exciton electronic structure in phycobiliproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womick, Jordan M.; Miller, Stephen A.; Moran, Andrew M.

    2010-07-01

    Femtosecond laser spectroscopies are used to examine the electronic structures of two proteins found in the phycobilisome antenna of cyanobacteria, allophycocyanin (APC) and C-phycocyanin (CPC). The wave function composition involving the pairs of phycocyanobilin pigments (i.e., dimers) found in both proteins is the primary focus of this investigation. Despite their similar geometries, earlier experimental studies conducted in our laboratory and elsewhere observe clear signatures of exciton electronic structure in APC but not CPC. This issue is further investigated here using new experiments. Transient grating (TG) experiments employing broadband quasicontinuum probe pulses find a redshift in the signal spectrum of APC, which is almost twice that of CPC. Dynamics in the TG signal spectra suggest that the sub-100 fs dynamics in APC and CPC are respectively dominated by internal conversion and nuclear relaxation. A specialized technique, intraband electronic coherence spectroscopy (IECS), photoexcites electronic and nuclear coherences with nearly full suppression of signals corresponding to electronic populations. The main conclusion drawn by IECS is that dephasing of intraband electronic coherences in APC occurs in less than 25 fs. This result rules out correlated pigment fluctuations as the mechanism enabling exciton formation in APC and leads us to propose that the large Franck-Condon factors of APC promote wave function delocalization in the vibronic basis. For illustration, we compute the Hamiltonian matrix elements involving the electronic origin of the α84 pigment and the first excited vibronic level of the β84 pigment associated with a hydrogen out-of-plane wagging mode at 800 cm-1. For this pair of vibronic states, the -51 cm-1 coupling is larger than the 40 cm-1 energy gap, thereby making wave function delocalization a feasible prospect. By contrast, CPC possesses no pair of vibronic levels for which the intermolecular coupling is larger than the energy

  18. Antistiction technique using elastomer contact structure in woven electronic textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Takamatsu, Seiichi; Miyake, Koji; Itoh, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present an antistiction technique using an elastomer contact structure in woven electronic textiles (e-textiles). A coating of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) in the form of a solid conductive film on a hemispherical silicone elastomer structure is employed in creating an electrical circuit embedded into the fabric of a woven e-textile, where the contact structure reduces the contact area and capillary force generated by the moisture in air between weft and warp ribbons. Stiction occurs between a weft and a warp without the contact structure under an RH of 80%, and the detachment of the stuck ribbon requires a delamination load of about 0.2 N. On the other hand, in the case of contact between the contact structure and the ribbon coated with plain PEDOT:PSS, stiction does not occur as the relative humidity increases from 20 to 80%.

  19. Electronic structure of III-V zinc-blende semiconductors from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Yin, Haitao; Cao, Ronggen; Zahid, Ferdows; Zhu, Yu; Liu, Lei; Wang, Jian; Guo, Hong

    2013-06-01

    For analyzing quantum transport in semiconductor devices, accurate electronic structures are critical for quantitative predictions. Here we report theoretical analysis of electronic structures of all III-V zinc-blende semiconductor compounds. Our calculations are from density functional theory with the semilocal exchange proposed recently [Tran and Blaha, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.102.226401 102, 226401 (2009)], within the linear muffin tin orbital scheme. The calculated band gaps and effective masses are compared to experimental data and good quantitative agreement is obtained. Using the theoretical scheme presented here, quantum transport in nanostructures of III-V compounds can be confidently predicted.

  20. Electronic and magnetic structures of CeTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, J. H.; Youn, S. J.; Park, Min Sik; Min, B. I.

    2005-05-01

    We have investigated electronic structures of CeTe2 to explore the correlation between the magnetic, charge density wave, and superconducting phases by using the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and LSDA +U (U =on-site Coulomb interaction) methods. We have found that the contribution near EF from Ce 4f states is negligible, suggesting that Ce 4f electrons are not the superconducting carriers. The total energy calculation indicates that the ABBA-type antiferromagnetic configuration is the most stable, while the stability is weakened by pressure. We have discussed the possible superconducting mechanism in the magnetic phase of CeTe1.82.

  1. The surface electronic structure of silicon terminated (100) diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, A. K.; Tadich, A.; Sear, M. J.; Qi, D.; Wee, A. T. S.; Stacey, A.; Pakes, C. I.

    2016-07-01

    A combination of synchrotron-based x-ray spectroscopy and contact potential difference measurements have been used to examine the electronic structure of the (3 × 1) silicon terminated (100) diamond surface under ultra high vacuum conditions. An occupied surface state which sits 1.75 eV below the valence band maximum has been identified, and indications of mid-gap unoccupied surface states have been found. Additionally, the pristine silicon terminated surface is shown to possess a negative electron affinity of ‑0.86 ± 0.1 eV.

  2. Electronic structure basis for the extraordinary magnetoresistance in WTe2.

    PubMed

    Pletikosić, I; Ali, Mazhar N; Fedorov, A V; Cava, R J; Valla, T

    2014-11-21

    The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered nonmagnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at low temperatures, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetoresistance follows. A change in the Fermi surface with temperature was found and a high-density-of-states band that may take over conduction at higher temperatures and cause the observed turn-on behavior of the magnetoresistance in WTe2 was identified. PMID:25479512

  3. Electronic Structure Basis for the Extraordinary Magnetoresistance in WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletikosić, I.; Ali, Mazhar N.; Fedorov, A. V.; Cava, R. J.; Valla, T.

    2014-11-01

    The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered nonmagnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at low temperatures, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetoresistance follows. A change in the Fermi surface with temperature was found and a high-density-of-states band that may take over conduction at higher temperatures and cause the observed turn-on behavior of the magnetoresistance in WTe2 was identified.

  4. Grid-based electronic structure calculations: The tensor decomposition approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhuba, M. V.; Oseledets, I. V.

    2016-05-01

    We present a fully grid-based approach for solving Hartree-Fock and all-electron Kohn-Sham equations based on low-rank approximation of three-dimensional electron orbitals. Due to the low-rank structure the total complexity of the algorithm depends linearly with respect to the one-dimensional grid size. Linear complexity allows for the usage of fine grids, e.g. 81923 and, thus, cheap extrapolation procedure. We test the proposed approach on closed-shell atoms up to the argon, several molecules and clusters of hydrogen atoms. All tests show systematical convergence with the required accuracy.

  5. The surface electronic structure of silicon terminated (100) diamond.

    PubMed

    Schenk, A K; Tadich, A; Sear, M J; Qi, D; Wee, A T S; Stacey, A; Pakes, C I

    2016-07-01

    A combination of synchrotron-based x-ray spectroscopy and contact potential difference measurements have been used to examine the electronic structure of the (3 × 1) silicon terminated (100) diamond surface under ultra high vacuum conditions. An occupied surface state which sits 1.75 eV below the valence band maximum has been identified, and indications of mid-gap unoccupied surface states have been found. Additionally, the pristine silicon terminated surface is shown to possess a negative electron affinity of -0.86 ± 0.1 eV. PMID:27211214

  6. Structure and dynamics in two-electron atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, Edward Somerville

    In this dissertation, I present experimental studies of two-electron atoms. I have been primarily concerned with the effects of external perturbations on dielectronic recombination (DR). Specifically I have examined dielectronic recombination in the presence of electric, microwave, and combined electric and magnetic fields. These measurements illustrate that any external perturbation must have a coupling in excess of the autoionization rate to affect the DR rate. I have also studied the structure of two-electron atoms using microwave resonance techniques. In particular I present experiments which provide new insight into the core polarization model and which provide techniques for measuring both bound and autoionizing energy levels with microwaves.

  7. Dual-phase steel structure visualized by extremely slow electrons.

    PubMed

    Mikmeková, Šárka; Yamada, Katsumi; Noro, Hisato

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical properties of complex steels are affected by their multi-phase structure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is routinely used for characterizing dual-phase (DP) steels, although the identification of steel constituents is not straightforward. In fact, there are several ways of enabling the ferrite-martensite segmentation by SEM, and a wide range of electron energies can be utilized. This study demonstrates the phase identification of DP steels at high, low and extremely low landing energies of the primary electrons from tens of keV to tens of eV. Visualization of the specimen surface at very low landing energies has been achieved by inserting an earthed detector between the pole piece and the negatively biased specimen. This 'cathode lens mode' enables the use of the full energy range up to the primary electron energies. It has been found that extremely slow electrons (<100 eV) are exceptionally suitable for separation of the martensite from the ferrite matrix due to high surface sensitivity, enabling visualization of very fine features. Moreover, the channelling contrast is significantly suppressed at the landing energy of tens of eV of the primary electrons, which enables separation of the phases clearly even in the images acquired at low magnification. The contrast between the phases at tens of eV can be explained by the different thickness of native oxide covering the martensite and the ferrite phase. PMID:26497974

  8. Real-time feedback from iterative electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Vaucher, Alain C; Haag, Moritz P; Reiher, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Real-time feedback from iterative electronic structure calculations requires to mediate between the inherently unpredictable execution times of the iterative algorithm used and the necessity to provide data in fixed and short time intervals for real-time rendering. We introduce the concept of a mediator as a component able to deal with infrequent and unpredictable reference data to generate reliable feedback. In the context of real-time quantum chemistry, the mediator takes the form of a surrogate potential that has the same local shape as the first-principles potential and can be evaluated efficiently to deliver atomic forces as real-time feedback. The surrogate potential is updated continuously by electronic structure calculations and guarantees to provide a reliable response to the operator for any molecular structure. To demonstrate the application of iterative electronic structure methods in real-time reactivity exploration, we implement self-consistent semiempirical methods as the data source and apply the surrogate-potential mediator to deliver reliable real-time feedback. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26678030

  9. Electronic structure and insulating gap in epitaxial VO2 polymorphs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Shinbuhm; Meyer, Tricia L.; Sohn, Changhee; Lee, Donghwa; Nichols, John A.; Lee, Dongkyu; Seo, Sung Seok Ambrose; Freeland, John W.; Noh, Tae Won; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-12-24

    Here, determining the origin of the insulating gap in the monoclinic VO2(M1) is a long-standing issue. The difficulty of this study arises from the simultaneous occurrence of structural and electronic transitions upon thermal cycling. Here, we compare the electronic structure of the M1 phase with that of single crystalline insulating VO2(A) and VO2(B) thin films to better understand the insulating phase of VO2. As these A and B phases do not undergo a structural transition upon thermal cycling, we comparatively study the origin of the gap opening in the insulating VO2 phases. By x-ray absorption and optical spectroscopy, we findmore » that the shift of unoccupied t2g orbitals away from the Fermi level is a common feature, which plays an important role for the insulating behavior in VO2 polymorphs. The distinct splitting of the half-filled t2g orbital is observed only in the M1 phase, widening the bandgap up to ~0.6 eV. Our approach of comparing all three insulating VO2 phases provides insight into a better understanding of the electronic structure and the origin of the insulating gap in VO2.« less

  10. Geometric, electronic, and magnetic structure of FexOy+ clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logemann, R.; de Wijs, G. A.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Kirilyuk, A.

    2015-10-01

    Correlation between geometry, electronic structure, and magnetism of solids is both intriguing and elusive. This is particularly strongly manifested in small clusters, where a vast number of unusual structures appear. Here, we employ density functional theory in combination with a genetic search algorithm GGA +U and a hybrid functional to determine the structure of gas phase FexOy+/0 clusters. For FexOy+ cation clusters we also calculate the corresponding vibration spectra and compare them with experiments. We successfully identify Fe3O4+ , Fe4O5+ , Fe4O6+ , Fe5O7+ and propose structures for Fe6O8+ . Within the triangular geometric structure of Fe3O4+ , a noncollinear, ferrimagnetic, and ferromagnetic state are comparable in energy. Fe4O5+ and Fe4O6+ are ferrimagnetic with a residual magnetic moment of 1 μB due to ionization. Fe5O7+ is ferrimagnetic due to the odd number of Fe atoms. We compare the electronic structure with bulk magnetite and find Fe4O5+ , Fe4O6+ , Fe6O8+ to be mixed valence clusters. In contrast, in Fe3O4+ and Fe5O7+ , all Fe are found to be trivalent.

  11. Measurement of the electron structure function F2e at LEP energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Belous, K.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, N.; De Min, A.; de Paula, L.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Gonçalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Slominski, W.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Szwed, J.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tomé, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Van Dam, P.; Van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2014-10-01

    The hadronic part of the electron structure function F2e has been measured for the first time, using e+e- data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies of √{ s} = 91.2- 209.5 GeV. The data analysis is simpler than that of the measurement of the photon structure function. The electron structure function F2e data are compared to predictions of phenomenological models based on the photon structure function. It is shown that the contribution of large target photon virtualities is significant. The data presented can serve as a cross-check of the photon structure function F2γ analyses and help in refining existing parameterisations.

  12. Electronic structure of the unoccupied electron energy states in FeSe1-xTex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Pramita; Lohani, Himanshu; Maniraj, M.; Nayak, Jayita; Zargar, R. A.; Awana, V. P. S.; Barman, Sudipta Roy; Sekhar, Biju Raja

    2015-10-01

    Inverse photoemission spectroscopic (IPES) measurements along with LDA based band structure calculations have been used to investigate the unoccupied electronic structure of FeSe1-xTex system. The observed doping and temperature dependent pseudogap in this system is found to be linked to the change in the chalcogen height in their geometric structure. The depletion in spectral weight from the near EF states at low temperature in IPES has been correlated with the enhancement of the 3z2-r2 orbitals in the photoemission spectroscopy (PES). The Coulomb correlation energy U, estimated from the combined PES and IPES spectra, signifies the enhancement in electron correlations in FeSe1-xTex, with doping. The formation of pseudogap in PES and IPES confirms the importance of correlations in the 11 family of Fe superconductors.

  13. Semiconducting properties of amorphous GaZnSnO thin film based on combinatorial electronic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B. K.; Park, J. S.; Kim, D. H.; Chung, K. B.

    2014-05-05

    Semiconducting properties and electronic structures of amorphous GaZnSnO (GZTO) thin films are investigated with respect to metal cationic composition. An increase of the cationic Sn ratio resulted in an increase of the carrier concentration and a decrease of the mobility of the films. Combinatorial analysis revealed that the electrical characteristics of GZTO films are strongly correlated to changes in electronic structure. The increase in carrier concentration is related to the generation of vacancies by the changes of oxygen coordination around the cationic metal and the shallow band edge state below the conduction band. On the other hand, the decrease of mobility can be explained by the deep band edge state, and the difference between the experimental conduction band and simulated conduction band by the combinatorial electronic structure based on the chemical composition.

  14. Progress in thermostructural analysis of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Mahaney, J.; Pandey, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element space structures research focused on the interdisciplinary problems of heating, thermal, and structural analysis is discussed. Slender member shadowing effects, and cable stiffened structures are described.

  15. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B.; Wakeham, N.; Ghimire, N. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Ronning, F.

    2016-01-01

    The change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. Density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [ℤ2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions. PMID:27271852

  16. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R D; Rosa, P F S; Scott, B; Wakeham, N; Ghimire, N J; Bauer, E D; Thompson, J D; Ronning, F

    2016-01-01

    The change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. Density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [ℤ2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions. PMID:27271852

  17. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B.; Wakeham, N.; Ghimire, N. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Ronning, F.

    2016-06-01

    The change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. Density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [ℤ2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions.

  18. Electronic Structure of Crystalline 4He at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, H.K.; Cai, Y.; Shirley, E.L.; Ding, Y.; Eng, P.; Chow, P.; Xiao, Y.; Shu, J.; Hemley, R.J.; Kao, C.C.; Mao, W.L.

    2010-10-29

    Using inelastic x-ray scattering techniques, we have succeeded in probing the high-pressure electronic structure of helium at 300 K. Helium has the widest known valence-conduction band gap of all materials a property whose high-pressure response has been inaccessible to direct measurements. We observed a rich electron excitation spectrum, including a cutoff edge above 23 eV, a sharp exciton peak showing linear volume dependence, and a series of excitations and continuum at 26 to 45 eV. We determined the electronic dispersion along the {Gamma}-M direction over two Brillouin zones, and provided a quantitative picture of the helium exciton beyond the simplified Wannier-Frenkel description.

  19. Linear Multigrid Techniques in Self-consistent Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fattebert, J-L

    2000-05-23

    Ab initio DFT electronic structure calculations involve an iterative process to solve the Kohn-Sham equations for an Hamiltonian depending on the electronic density. We discretize these equations on a grid by finite differences. Trial eigenfunctions are improved at each step of the algorithm using multigrid techniques to efficiently reduce the error at all length scale, until self-consistency is achieved. In this paper we focus on an iterative eigensolver based on the idea of inexact inverse iteration, using multigrid as a preconditioner. We also discuss how this technique can be used for electrons described by general non-orthogonal wave functions, and how that leads to a linear scaling with the system size for the computational cost of the most expensive parts of the algorithm.

  20. Spatially Resolved Electronic Structures of Atomically Precise Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Han; Wei, Dacheng; Sun, Jiatao; Wong, Swee Liang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Neto, A. H. Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2012-12-01

    Graphene has attracted much interest in both academia and industry. The challenge of making it semiconducting is crucial for applications in electronic devices. A promising approach is to reduce its physical size down to the nanometer scale. Here, we present the surface-assisted bottom-up fabrication of atomically precise armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) with predefined widths, namely 7-, 14- and 21-AGNRs, on Ag(111) as well as their spatially resolved width-dependent electronic structures. STM/STS measurements reveal their associated electron scattering patterns and the energy gaps over 1 eV. The mechanism to form such AGNRs is addressed based on the observed intermediate products. Our results provide new insights into the local properties of AGNRs, and have implications for the understanding of their electrical properties and potential applications.

  1. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B.; Wakeham, N.; Ghimire, N. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Ronning, F.

    2016-01-01

    We report that the change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. In conclusion, density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [Z2 invariant (0;111)] withoutmore » Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions.« less

  2. Spatially Resolved Electronic Structures of Atomically Precise Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Han; Wei, Dacheng; Sun, Jiatao; Wong, Swee Liang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Neto, A. H. Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2012-01-01

    Graphene has attracted much interest in both academia and industry. The challenge of making it semiconducting is crucial for applications in electronic devices. A promising approach is to reduce its physical size down to the nanometer scale. Here, we present the surface-assisted bottom-up fabrication of atomically precise armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) with predefined widths, namely 7-, 14- and 21-AGNRs, on Ag(111) as well as their spatially resolved width-dependent electronic structures. STM/STS measurements reveal their associated electron scattering patterns and the energy gaps over 1 eV. The mechanism to form such AGNRs is addressed based on the observed intermediate products. Our results provide new insights into the local properties of AGNRs, and have implications for the understanding of their electrical properties and potential applications. PMID:23248746

  3. Structural stability and electronic properties of small gold clusters induced by 3p electron atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Yang, Su-Bin; Feng, Xiao-Juan; Zhao, Li-Xia; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Luo, You-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The geometries and electronic properties of gold clusters doped with atoms containing 3 p valence electrons (MAu n ; M = Al, Si, P, S, Cl; n = 2-8) have been systematically investigated using density functional theory (DFT) at the PBE/LANL2DZ level. A number of low-energy isomers are identified for neutral MAu n clusters. It is found that doping with different 3 p impurity atoms can drastically influence the geometrical structures, relative stabilities, electronic properties, and growth-pattern behaviors of gold clusters, which is very different from the case of 3 d transition-metal impurity doped Au n clusters. Partially filled 3 p electron impurities can stabilize Au clusters. In particular, SiAu4 cluster with T d symmetry have been found to have highly stable geometries and electronic structures with binding energies of 2.43 eV per atom (0.96 eV higher than pristine Au5 clusters), large HOMO-LUMO gaps (2.17 eV), and vertical ionization potentials of 8.68 eV. Using scalar relativistic molecular dynamics at T = 300 K, we show that the T d symmetry structure of SiAu4 is stable. The frontier molecular orbitals (HOMO and LUMO) and the partial densities of states (PDOS) show that strong hybridization occurs between the atomic orbitals of Si and Au atoms, resulting in strong Si-Au bonding. In addition, the vertical ionization potential, the vertical electron affinity, and charge transfers of MAu n clusters have also been analyzed. Our results are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  4. Electronic structure and optic absorption of phosphorene under strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Houjian; Yang, Mou; Wang, Ruiqiang

    2016-07-01

    We studied the electronic structure and optic absorption of phosphorene (monolayer of black phosphorus) under strain. Strain was found to be a powerful tool for the band structure engineering. The in-plane strain in armchair or zigzag direction changes the effective mass components along both directions, while the vertical strain only has significant effect on the effective mass in the armchair direction. The band gap is narrowed by compressive in-plane strain and tensile vertical strain. Under certain strain configurations, the gap is closed and the energy band evolves to the semi-Dirac type: the dispersion is linear in the armchair direction and is gapless quadratic in the zigzag direction. The band-edge optic absorption is completely polarized along the armchair direction, and the polarization rate is reduced when the photon energy increases. Strain not only changes the absorption edge (the smallest photon energy for electron transition), but also the absorption polarization.

  5. Observation of Electronic Structure Minima in High-Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Woerner, Hans Jakob; Villeneuve, D. M.; Niikura, Hiromichi; Bertrand, Julien B.; Corkum, P. B.

    2009-03-13

    We report detailed measurements of the high-harmonic spectra generated from argon atoms. The spectra exhibit a deep minimum that is shown to be independent of the laser intensity, and is thus a clear measure of the electronic structure of the atom. We show that exact field-free continuum wave functions reproduce the minimum, but plane wave and Coulomb wave functions do not. This remarkable observation suggests that electronic structure can be accurately determined in high-harmonic experiments despite the presence of the strong laser field. Our results clarify the relation between high-harmonic generation and photoelectron spectroscopy. The use of exact continuum functions also resolves the ambiguity associated with the choice of the dispersion relation.

  6. Molecular structures of porphyrin-quinone models for electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Fajer, J.; Barkigia, K.M.; Melamed, D.; Sweet, R.M.; Kurreck, H.; Gersdorff, J. von; Plato, M.; Rohland, H.C.; Elger, G.; Moebius, K.

    1996-08-15

    Synthetic porphyrin-quinone complexes are commonly used to mimic electron transport in photosynthetic reaction centers and to probe the effects of energetics, distances, and relative orientations on rates of electron transfer between donor-acceptor couples. The structures of two such models have been determined by X-ray diffraction. The redox pairs consist of a zinc porphyrin covalently linked to benzoquinone in cis and trans configurations via a cyclohexanediyl bridge. The crystallographic studies were undertaken to provide a structural foundation for the extensive body of experimental and theoretical results that exists for these compounds in both the ground and photoinduced charge-separated states. The results validate conclusions reached from theoretical calculations, EPR and two-dimensional NMR results for these states. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. A Synchrotron Investigation Of The Electronic Structure Of Lanthanide Zirconates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Richard; Kennedy, Brendan; Ling, Christopher; Stampfl, Anton P. J.

    2010-03-01

    abstract- The lanthanide zirconates are of interest for use in inert matrix fuels and nuclear wasteforms. For use in these applications, the material's structure must be resistant to radiation damage and its thermal, thermodynamic and mechanical properties must be known. The rare earth zirconates are interesting model systems to explore such problems. In such materials the f-electrons may play a localized valence decisive role in determining their thermo-mechanical properties. We have undertaken a synthesis of the full range of the lanthanide zirconate series using solid state techniques. We have performed X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) with synchrotron radiation on a selection of the series, in conjunction with a density functional theory (DFT) determination of the electronic structure. -

  8. Electronic Structure and Geometries of Small Compound Metal Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-14

    During the tenure of the DOE grant DE-FG05-87EI145316 we have concentrated on equilibrium geometries, stability, and the electronic structure of transition metal-carbon clusters (met-cars), clusters designed to mimic the chemistry of atoms, and reactivity of homo-nuclear metal clusters and ions with various reactant molecules. It is difficult to describe all the research the authors have accomplished as they have published 38 papers. In this report, they outline briefly the salient features of their work on the following topics: (1) Designer Clusters: Building Blocks for a New Class of Solids; (2) Atomic Structure, Stability, and Electronic Properties of Metallo-Carbohedrenes; (3) Reactivity of Metal Clusters with H{sub 2} and NO; and (4) Anomalous Spectroscopy of Li{sub 4} Clusters.

  9. Electronic Structure of Silicon Nanowires Matrix from Ab Initio Calculations.

    PubMed

    Monastyrskii, Liubomyr S; Boyko, Yaroslav V; Sokolovskii, Bogdan S; Potashnyk, Vasylyna Ya

    2016-12-01

    An investigation of the model of porous silicon in the form of periodic set of silicon nanowires has been carried out. The electronic energy structure was studied using a first-principle band method-the method of pseudopotentials (ultrasoft potentials in the basis of plane waves) and linearized mode of the method of combined pseudopotentials. Due to the use of hybrid exchange-correlation potentials (B3LYP), the quantitative agreement of the calculated value of band gap in the bulk material with experimental data is achieved. The obtained results show that passivation of dangling bonds with hydrogen atoms leads to substantial transformation of electronic energy structure. At complete passivation of the dangling silicon bonds by hydrogen atoms, the band gap value takes the magnitude which substantially exceeds that for bulk silicon. The incomplete passivation gives rise to opposite effect when the band gap value decreases down the semimetallic range. PMID:26768147

  10. Structure and Process of Infrared Hot Electron Transistor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Richard

    2012-01-01

    An infrared hot-electron transistor (IHET) 5 × 8 array with a common base configuration that allows two-terminal readout integration was investigated and fabricated for the first time. The IHET structure provides a maximum factor of six in improvement in the photocurrent to dark current ratio compared to the basic quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP), and hence it improved the array S/N ratio by the same factor. The study also showed for the first time that there is no electrical cross-talk among individual detectors, even though they share the same emitter and base contacts. Thus, the IHET structure is compatible with existing electronic readout circuits for photoconductors in producing sensitive focal plane arrays. PMID:22778655

  11. Elongation method for electronic structure calculations of random DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Orimoto, Yuuichi; Liu, Kai; Aoki, Yuriko

    2015-10-30

    We applied ab initio order-N elongation (ELG) method to calculate electronic structures of various deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) models. We aim to test potential application of the method for building a database of DNA electronic structures. The ELG method mimics polymerization reactions on a computer and meets the requirements for linear scaling computational efficiency and high accuracy, even for huge systems. As a benchmark test, we applied the method for calculations of various types of random sequenced A- and B-type DNA models with and without counterions. In each case, the ELG method maintained high accuracy with small errors in energy on the order of 10(-8) hartree/atom compared with conventional calculations. We demonstrate that the ELG method can provide valuable information such as stabilization energies and local densities of states for each DNA sequence. In addition, we discuss the "restarting" feature of the ELG method for constructing a database that exhaustively covers DNA species. PMID:26337429

  12. Quantum mirages formed by coherent projection of electronic structure

    PubMed

    Manoharan; Lutz; Eigler

    2000-02-01

    Image projection relies on classical wave mechanics and the use of natural or engineered structures such as lenses or resonant cavities. Well-known examples include the bending of light to create mirages in the atmosphere, and the focusing of sound by whispering galleries. However, the observation of analogous phenomena in condensed matter systems is a more recent development, facilitated by advances in nanofabrication. Here we report the projection of the electronic structure surrounding a magnetic Co atom to a remote location on the surface of a Cu crystal; electron partial waves scattered from the real Co atom are coherently refocused to form a spectral image or 'quantum mirage'. The focusing device is an elliptical quantum corral, assembled on the Cu surface. The corral acts as a quantum mechanical resonator, while the two-dimensional Cu surface-state electrons form the projection medium. When placed on the surface, Co atoms display a distinctive spectroscopic signature, known as the many-particle Kondo resonance, which arises from their magnetic moment. By positioning a Co atom at one focus of the ellipse, we detect a strong Kondo signature not only at the atom, but also at the empty focus. This behaviour contrasts with the usual spatially-decreasing response of an electron gas to a localized perturbation. PMID:10676952

  13. Atomistic simulations of divacancy defects in armchair graphene nanoribbons: Stability, electronic structure, and electron transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun; Zeng, Hui; Wei, Jianwei; Li, Biao; Xu, Dahai

    2014-01-01

    Using the first principles calculations associated with nonequilibrium Green's function, we have studied the electronic structures and quantum transport properties of defective armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) in the presence of divacancy defects. The triple pentagon-triple heptagon (555-777) defect in the defective AGNR is energetically more favorable than the pentagon-octagon-pentagon (5-8-5) defect. Our calculated results reveal that both 5-8-5-like defect and 555-777-like defect in AGNR could improve the electron transport. It is anticipated that defective AGNRs can exhibit large range variations in transport behaviors, which are strongly dependent on the distributions of the divacancy defect.

  14. Electronic Structure of NiPdP Amorphous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swihart, J. C.; Nicholson, D. M. C.; Shelton, W. A.; Wang, Y.

    1996-03-01

    The understanding of the structure, properties and required cooling rates for bulk amorphous alloys is hindered by the the large number of constituents in the typical alloy. One of the compositionally simplest systems that can be cast into bulk specimens is Ni_0.4Pd_0.4P_0.2. Furthermore, the thoroughly studied structure of amorphous Ni_0.8P_0.2 provides a useful starting point for its investigation. We use the locally selfconsistent multiple scattering (LSMS) method to determine the electronic structure, mass density, and energy as Pd is substituted at random for Ni in the Ni_0.8P_0.2 amorphous structure. Work supported by Laboratory Directors Research Development program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Division of Materials Science, and the Mathematical Information and Computational Science Division of the Office of Computational Technology Research, US DOE under subcontract DEAC05-84OR21400 with Lockheed-Martin Energy Systems, Inc.

  15. Final Technical Report: Electronic Structure Workshop (ES13)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shiwei

    2015-02-26

    The 25th Annual Workshop on Recent Developments in Electronic Structure Methods (ES2013) was successfully held at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg VA on June 11-14, 2013. The workshop website is at http://es13.wm.edu/ , which contains updated information on the workshop and a permanent archive of the scientific contents. DOE's continued support has been instrumental to the success of the workshop.

  16. Electronic and chemical structure of metal-silicon interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, P. J.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews our current understanding of the near-noble metal silicides and the interfaces formed with Si(100). Using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, we compare the chemical composition and electronic structure of the room temperature metal-silicon and reacted silicide-silicon interfaces. The relationship between the interfacial chemistry and the Schottky barrier heights for this class of metals on silicon is explored.

  17. Structure and electronic properties of nanodiamond and its fluorination effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Kazuyuki; Kogane, Kenta; Touhara, Hidekazu; Hattori, Yoshiyuki

    2015-03-01

    Fluorination of nano-sized diamond (ND) is expected not only to stabilize the surface structure, but also to introduce functional groups on the surface, the conduction carriers, and so on. In this study, we evaluate the structure and magnetic properties of ND and fluorinated ND (FND) in order to consider the change in the electronic state and the surface structure by fluorination. Fluorination of ND was carried out by the direct reaction between gaseous fluorine (1 atm) and commercially available detonation diamond at 623 - 873 K. X-ray Diffraction study reveals the structural stability of core part of ND during fluorination. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy exhibits F1s peak at the lower binding energy region than that for physisorbed molecular fluorine, indicating the formation of the chemical bonding between C and F in the sample. The Electron Paramagnetic Resonance results suggest that fluorination induces not only changes in the surface structure but also relaxation of defects in the core part.

  18. Electronic Structure Studies of Amorphous Hydrogenated Boron Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sky Driver, M.; Sandstrom, Joseph; Boyko, Teak; Moewes, Alexander; Caruso, Anthony

    2010-03-01

    Boron carbide is a technologically relevant material with importance in voltaic transduction. However, the local physical, chemical and electronic structure of low temperature deposited thin films of amorphous boron carbide is far from understood, hindering its progress in application. X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies (XAS/XES) were applied to thin films of B4C and B5C:Hx to study the near Fermi edge structure; the films were prepared by RF magnetron sputtering and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and were thermally treated after deposition from 400 to 800 C. XES spectra indicate a physical structure transition from amorphous to nanocrystalline at 700 C, a much lower temperature than expected from traditional physical vapor deposition or flash annealing temperatures reported. These structural differences are of significant interest to transport measurements and will be discussed as a correlation. Further, x-ray and ultraviolet photoemission were also collected as a compliment to XES/XAS and will be discussed in the context of understanding the local intra vs. intermolecular electronic structure of these boron-rich molecular based solids.

  19. Collisional electron spectroscopy method for gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanova, M. S.; Pramatarov, P. M.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Peyeva, R. A.; Patrikov, T. B.

    2016-05-01

    Recently developed collisional electron spectroscopy (CES) method, based on identification of gas impurities by registration of groups of nonlocal fast electrons released by Penning ionization of the impurity particles by helium metastable atoms, is verified experimentally. Detection and identification of atoms and molecules of gas impurities in helium at pressures of 14 - 90 Torr with small admixtures of Ar, Kr, CO2, and N2 are carried out. The nonlocal negative glow plasma of short dc microdischarge is used as most suitable medium. Records of the energy spectra of penning electrons are performed by means of an additional electrode - sensor, located at the boundary of the discharge volume. Maxima appear in the electron energy spectra at the characteristic energies corresponding to Penning ionization of the impurity particles by helium metastable atoms.

  20. On the filamentary structure of energetic electrons during flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J.; Swisdak, M.; Shay, M.

    2007-12-01

    Simulations and analytic arguments are presented that demonstrate that magnetic reconnection in the tenuous high temperature corona does not occur as a single large-scale x-line. Rather the narrow current layers that form at x-lines form secondary magnetic islands at small spatial scales. An electron acceleration model based on the interaction of particles with many contracting islands has been developed. A consequence of particle acceleration in any multi-island system is that energetic particles are released in narrow streams with characteristic widths of the order of the electron skin depth. This is because electrons are released from islands as they reconnect with the macro-scale field of the corona or magnetosphere. The characteristic width of the released energetic electron streams correspond to the width of the reconnection dissipation region. Thus, energetic electrons do not propagate away from the reconnection site in the corona as a single large-scale front but as a filamentary web. As a result, the return current problem is transformed: the narrow filaments of energetic particles propagate parallel to the magnetic field as kinetic Alfven waves with propagation speeds comparable to the thermal velocity of the energetic particles. Simple estimates suggest that the conversion of particle to kinetic Alfven wave energy is efficient so that the wave and particle energy propagates together as a radiation front from the corona toward the solar surface. The structure and dynamics of this radiation front are being explored.

  1. Atomic structures and electronic properties of phosphorene grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yu; Zhou, Si; Zhang, Junfeng; Bai, Yizhen; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-06-01

    Grain boundary (GB) is one main type of defects in two-dimensional (2D) crystals, and has significant impact on the physical properties of 2D materials. Phosphorene, a recently synthesized 2D semiconductor, possesses a puckered honeycomb lattice and outstanding electronic properties. It is very interesting to know the possible GBs present in this novel material, and how their properties differ from those in the other 2D materials. Based on first-principles calculations, we explore the atomic structure, thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of phosphorene GBs. A total of 19 GBs are predicted and found to be energetically stable with formation energies much lower than those in graphene. These GBs do not severely affect the electronic properties of phosphorene: the band gap of perfect phosphorene is preserved, and the electron mobilities are only moderately reduced in these defective systems. Our theoretical results provide vital guidance for experimental tailoring the electronic properties of phosphorene as well as the device applications using phosphorene materials.

  2. Electronic Structure Studies of Silicon Carbide Anionic Nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Prachi

    2005-03-01

    As a continuation of our studies on the high stabilities and electronic structure properties of Si8C2 to Si14C2 clusters and Si60Cn (n=3-6) clusters,^1 we report here ab initio studies of small SimCn^- (1< m, n < 4) anionic clusters. The theoretical formalism used is the local density approximation (LDA) to density functional theory (DFT) and the Gaussian03 suite of programs^2 with an all electron 6-311++G** basis set has been used. Complete geometry optimizations of different possible structures have been carried out. Carbon-rich and silicon rich species show distinctly different patterns with respect to the vertical detachment energies. For carbon-rich aggregates, the VDE's show an even odd alternation, similar to that of the carbon anions. We present results on binding energies, relative energies, fragmentation energies, vertical detachment energies, vibrational frequencies, and adiabatic electron affinities^3 for the optimized clusters. Detailed comparisons with published data in the literature will also be presented. * Work supported, in part, by the Welch Foundation, Houston, Texas (Grant No. Y-1525). ^1M. N. Huda and A. K. Ray, Phys. Rev. A (R) 69, 011201 (2004); Eur. Phys. J. D 31, 63 (2004). ^2 Gaussian03, Revision A.1, M. J. Frisch et al., Gaussian Inc., Pittsburgh, PA , 2003. ^3 P. Pradhan and A. K. Ray, J. Mol. Structure (Theochem), in press.

  3. Structural basis of interprotein electron transfer in bacterial sulfite oxidation

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Aaron P; Laming, Elise L; Casas Garcia, G Patricia; Kvansakul, Marc; Guss, J Mitchell; Trewhella, Jill; Calmes, Benoit; Bernhardt, Paul V; Kappler, Ulrike; Maher, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    Interprotein electron transfer underpins the essential processes of life and relies on the formation of specific, yet transient protein-protein interactions. In biological systems, the detoxification of sulfite is catalyzed by the sulfite-oxidizing enzymes (SOEs), which interact with an electron acceptor for catalytic turnover. Here, we report the structural and functional analyses of the SOE SorT from Sinorhizobium meliloti and its cognate electron acceptor SorU. Kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of the SorT/SorU interaction show the complex is dynamic in solution, and that the proteins interact with Kd = 13.5 ± 0.8 μM. The crystal structures of the oxidized SorT and SorU, both in isolation and in complex, reveal the interface to be remarkably electrostatic, with an unusually large number of direct hydrogen bonding interactions. The assembly of the complex is accompanied by an adjustment in the structure of SorU, and conformational sampling provides a mechanism for dissociation of the SorT/SorU assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09066.001 PMID:26687009

  4. Structural basis of interprotein electron transfer in bacterial sulfite oxidation.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Aaron P; Laming, Elise L; Casas Garcia, G Patricia; Kvansakul, Marc; Guss, J Mitchell; Trewhella, Jill; Calmes, Benoit; Bernhardt, Paul V; Hanson, Graeme R; Kappler, Ulrike; Maher, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    Interprotein electron transfer underpins the essential processes of life and relies on the formation of specific, yet transient protein-protein interactions. In biological systems, the detoxification of sulfite is catalyzed by the sulfite-oxidizing enzymes (SOEs), which interact with an electron acceptor for catalytic turnover. Here, we report the structural and functional analyses of the SOE SorT from Sinorhizobium meliloti and its cognate electron acceptor SorU. Kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of the SorT/SorU interaction show the complex is dynamic in solution, and that the proteins interact with Kd = 13.5 ± 0.8 μM. The crystal structures of the oxidized SorT and SorU, both in isolation and in complex, reveal the interface to be remarkably electrostatic, with an unusually large number of direct hydrogen bonding interactions. The assembly of the complex is accompanied by an adjustment in the structure of SorU, and conformational sampling provides a mechanism for dissociation of the SorT/SorU assembly. PMID:26687009

  5. Finite element analysis of helicopter structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Application of the finite element analysis is now being expanded to three dimensional analysis of mechanical components. Examples are presented for airframe, mechanical components, and composite structure calculations. Data are detailed on the increase of model size, computer usage, and the effect on reducing stress analysis costs. Future applications for use of finite element analysis for helicopter structures are projected.

  6. Comprehensive studies of the electronic structure of pristine and potassium doped chrysene investigated by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Friedrich; Mahns, Benjamin; Schönfelder, Ronny; Hampel, Silke; Nohr, Markus; Büchner, Bernd; Knupfer, Martin

    2012-09-01

    We have performed electron energy-loss spectroscopy studies in order to investigate the electronic properties of chrysene molecular solids. The valence band electronic excitation spectra and the C 1s core level excitations have been measured for pristine and potassium doped chrysene. The core level studies show a fine structure which signals the presence of four close lying conduction bands close to the Fermi level. Upon potassium doping, these bands are filled with electrons, and we have reached a doping level of about K2.7chrysene. Furthermore, undoped chrysene is characterized by an optical gap of about 3.3 eV and five, relatively weak, excitonic features following the excitation onset. Doping induces major changes in the electronic excitation spectra, with a new, prominent low energy excitation at about 1.3 eV. The results of a Kramers-Kronig analysis indicate that this new feature can be assigned to a charge carrier plasmon in the doped material, and momentum dependent studies reveal a negative plasmon dispersion.

  7. Sensitivity analysis of discrete structural systems: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, H. M.; Haftka, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    Methods for calculating sensitivity derivatives for discrete structural systems are surveyed, primarily covering literature published during the past two decades. Methods are described for calculating derivatives of static displacements and stresses, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, transient structural response, and derivatives of optimum structural designs with respect to problem parameters. The survey is focused on publications addressed to structural analysis, but also includes a number of methods developed in nonstructural fields such as electronics, controls, and physical chemistry which are directly applicable to structural problems. Most notable among the nonstructural-based methods are the adjoint variable technique from control theory, and the Green's function and FAST methods from physical chemistry.

  8. Construction and Analysis of Electronic circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Ashley N.

    2004-01-01

    The Aviation Environmental Technical Branch produces many various types of aeronautical research that benefits the NASA mission for space exploration and in turn, produces new technology for our nation. One of the present goals of the Aviation Environmental Technical Branch is to create better engines for airplanes by testing supersonic jet propulsion and safe fuel combustion. During the summer of 2004, I was hired by Vincent Sattenvhite Chief executive of the Aviation Environmental Technical Branch to Assist Yves Lamothe with a fuel igniter circuit. Yves Lamothe is an electrical engineer who is currently working on safe fuel combustion testing. This testing is planned to determine the minimum ignition energy for fuel and air vapors of current and alternative fuels under simulated flight conditions. An air temperature bath will provide simulated flight profile temperatures and the heat fluxes to the test chamber. I was assigned with Yves to help complete the igniter circuit which consists of a 36k voltage supply an oscilloscope, and a high voltage transistor switch. During my tenure in the L.E.C.I.R.P. program I studied the basics of electricity and circuitry along with two other projects that I completed. In the beginning of my internship, I devote all of my time to research the aspects of circuitry so that I would be prepared for the projects that I was assigned to do. I read about lessons on; the basic physical concepts of electronics, Electrical units, Basic dc circuits, direct current circuit analysis, resistance and cell batteries, various types of magnetism , Alternating current basics, inductance, and power supplies. I received work sheets and math equations from my Mentor so that I could be able to apply these concepts into my work. After I complete my studies, I went on to construct a LED chaser circuit which displays a series of light patterns using a 555 timer. I incorporated a switch and motion detector into the circuit to create basic alarm system

  9. Probabilistic structural analysis methods of hot engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Development of probabilistic structural analysis methods for hot engine structures is a major activity at Lewis Research Center. Recent activities have focused on extending the methods to include the combined uncertainties in several factors on structural response. This paper briefly describes recent progress on composite load spectra models, probabilistic finite element structural analysis, and probabilistic strength degradation modeling. Progress is described in terms of fundamental concepts, computer code development, and representative numerical results.

  10. Interdependence of spin structure, anion height and electronic structure of BaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Smritijit; Ghosh, Haranath

    2016-05-01

    Superconducting as well as other electronic properties of Fe-based superconductors are quite sensitive to the structural parameters specially, on anion height which is intimately related to zAs, the fractional z co-ordinate of As atom. Due to presence of strong magnetic fluctuation in these Fe-based superconductors, optimized structural parameters (lattice parameters a, b, c) including zAs using density functional theory (DFT) under generalized gradient approximation (GGA) does not match experimental values accurately. In this work, we show that the optimized value of zAs is strongly influenced by the spin structures in the orthorhombic phase of BaFe2As2 system. We take all possible spin structures for the orthorhombic BaFe2As2 system and then optimize zAs. Using these optimized structures we calculate electronic structures like density of states, band structures etc., for each spin configurations. From these studies we show that the electronic structure, orbital order which is responsible for structural as well as related to nematic transition, are significantly influenced by the spin structures.

  11. Probabilistic structural analysis methods development for SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of probabilistic structural analysis methods is a major part of the SSME Structural Durability Program and consists of three program elements: composite load spectra, probabilistic finite element structural analysis, and probabilistic structural analysis applications. Recent progress includes: (1) the effects of the uncertainties of several factors on the HPFP blade temperature pressure and torque, (2) the evaluation of the cumulative distribution function of structural response variables based on assumed uncertainties on primitive structural variables, and (3) evaluation of the failure probability. Collectively, the results obtained demonstrate that the structural durability of critical SSME components can be probabilistically evaluated.

  12. Measurement of electronic structure at nanoscale solid-solid interfaces by surface-sensitive electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.-Q.; Henrich, Victor E.; Altman, Eric I.

    2008-01-07

    We explore the use of electron spectroscopy that samples the near-surface region of a crystal to study the electronic structure at the buried interfaces between two dissimilar transition-metal oxides. The interface is probed by comparing experimental ultraviolet photoelectron spectra to model spectra and by taking sequential differences between the experimental spectra as one oxide is grown on another. Using (100) Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NiO and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-CoO interfaces grown by molecular beam epitaxy, we show that there is a much higher density of electronic states at the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-CoO interface than at the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NiO interface. The origin of this difference is discussed.

  13. Architecture of dermatophyte cell Walls: Electron microscopic and biochemical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.; Kitajima, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 83 references on the cell wall structure of dermatophytes is presented. Topics discussed include separation and preparation of cell walls; microstructure of cell walls by electron microscopy; chemical composition of cell walls; structural model of cell walls; and morphological structure of cell walls.

  14. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on Electronic Structure and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cuprate Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.J.

    2010-04-30

    In addition to the record high superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}), high temperature cuprate superconductors are characterized by their unusual superconducting properties below T{sub c}, and anomalous normal state properties above T{sub c}. In the superconducting state, although it has long been realized that superconductivity still involves Cooper pairs, as in the traditional BCS theory, the experimentally determined d-wave pairing is different from the usual s-wave pairing found in conventional superconductors. The identification of the pairing mechanism in cuprate superconductors remains an outstanding issue. The normal state properties, particularly in the underdoped region, have been found to be at odd with conventional metals which is usually described by Fermi liquid theory; instead, the normal state at optimal doping fits better with the marginal Fermi liquid phenomenology. Most notable is the observation of the pseudogap state in the underdoped region above T{sub c}. As in other strongly correlated electrons systems, these unusual properties stem from the interplay between electronic, magnetic, lattice and orbital degrees of freedom. Understanding the microscopic process involved in these materials and the interaction of electrons with other entities is essential to understand the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity. Since the discovery of high-T{sub c} superconductivity in cuprates, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has provided key experimental insights in revealing the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors. These include, among others, the earliest identification of dispersion and a large Fermi surface, an anisotropic superconducting gap suggestive of a d-wave order parameter, and an observation of the pseudogap in underdoped samples. In the mean time, this technique itself has experienced a dramatic improvement in its energy and momentum resolutions, leading to a series of new discoveries not

  15. Modeling and simulation of electronic structure, material interface and random doping in nano electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-06-20

    The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic devices, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical effects in integrated circuits. Modeling and simulation of this class of problems have emerged as an important topic in applied and computational mathematics. This work presents mathematical models and computational algorithms for the simulation of nano-scale MOSFETs. We introduce a unified two-scale energy functional to describe the electrons and the continuum electrostatic potential of the nano-electronic device. This framework enables us to put microscopic and macroscopic descriptions in an equal footing at nano scale. By optimization of the energy functional, we derive consistently-coupled Poisson-Kohn-Sham equations. Additionally, layered structures are crucial to the electrostatic and transport properties of nano transistors. A material interface model is proposed for more accurate description of the electrostatics governed by the Poisson equation. Finally, a new individual dopant model that utilizes the Dirac delta function is proposed to understand the random doping effect in nano electronic devices. Two mathematical algorithms, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method and the Dirichlet-to-Neumann mapping (DNM) technique, are introduced to improve the computational efficiency of nano-device simulations. Electronic structures are computed via subband decomposition and the transport properties, such as the I-V curves and electron density, are evaluated via the non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) formalism. Two distinct device configurations, a double-gate MOSFET and a four-gate MOSFET, are considered in our three-dimensional numerical simulations. For these devices, the current fluctuation and voltage threshold lowering effect induced by the discrete dopant model are explored. Numerical convergence

  16. Modeling and simulation of electronic structure, material interface and random doping in nano electronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic devices, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical effects in integrated circuits. Modeling and simulation of this class of problems have emerged as an important topic in applied and computational mathematics. This work presents mathematical models and computational algorithms for the simulation of nano-scale MOSFETs. We introduce a unified two-scale energy functional to describe the electrons and the continuum electrostatic potential of the nano-electronic device. This framework enables us to put microscopic and macroscopic descriptions in an equal footing at nano scale. By optimization of the energy functional, we derive consistently-coupled Poisson-Kohn-Sham equations. Additionally, layered structures are crucial to the electrostatic and transport properties of nano transistors. A material interface model is proposed for more accurate description of the electrostatics governed by the Poisson equation. Finally, a new individual dopant model that utilizes the Dirac delta function is proposed to understand the random doping effect in nano electronic devices. Two mathematical algorithms, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method and the Dirichlet-to-Neumann mapping (DNM) technique, are introduced to improve the computational efficiency of nano-device simulations. Electronic structures are computed via subband decomposition and the transport properties, such as the I-V curves and electron density, are evaluated via the non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) formalism. Two distinct device configurations, a double-gate MOSFET and a four-gate MOSFET, are considered in our three-dimensional numerical simulations. For these devices, the current fluctuation and voltage threshold lowering effect induced by the discrete dopant model are explored. Numerical convergence

  17. Software abstractions and computational issues in parallel structure adaptive mesh methods for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Weare, J.; Ong, E.; Baden, S.

    1997-05-01

    We have applied structured adaptive mesh refinement techniques to the solution of the LDA equations for electronic structure calculations. Local spatial refinement concentrates memory resources and numerical effort where it is most needed, near the atomic centers and in regions of rapidly varying charge density. The structured grid representation enables us to employ efficient iterative solver techniques such as conjugate gradient with FAC multigrid preconditioning. We have parallelized our solver using an object- oriented adaptive mesh refinement framework.

  18. 3D structure of eukaryotic flagella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Flagella/cilia are motile organelles with more than 400 proteins. To understand the mechanism of such complex systems, we need methods to describe molecular arrange-ments and conformations three-dimensionally in vivo. Cryo-electron tomography enabled us such a 3D structural analysis. Our group has been working on 3D structure of flagella/cilia using this method and revealed highly ordered and beautifully organized molecular arrangement. 3D structure gave us insights into the mechanism to gener-ate bending motion with well defined waveforms. In this review, I summarize our recent structural studies on fla-gella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography, mainly focusing on dynein microtubule-based ATPase motor proteins and the radial spoke, a regulatory protein complex. PMID:27493552

  19. In Situ Cryo-Electron Tomography: A Post-Reductionist Approach to Structural Biology.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shoh; Engel, Benjamin D; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2016-01-29

    Cryo-electron tomography is a powerful technique that can faithfully image the native cellular environment at nanometer resolution. Unlike many other imaging approaches, cryo-electron tomography provides a label-free method of detecting biological structures, relying on the intrinsic contrast of frozen cellular material for direct identification of macromolecules. Recent advances in sample preparation, detector technology, and phase plate imaging have enabled the structural characterization of protein complexes within intact cells. Here, we review these technical developments and outline a detailed computational workflow for in situ structural analysis. Two recent studies are described to illustrate how this workflow can be adapted to examine both known and unknown cellular complexes. The stage is now set to realize the promise of visual proteomics-a complete structural description of the cell's native molecular landscape. PMID:26456135

  20. Atomic and electronic structures of an extremely fragile liquid

    PubMed Central

    Kohara, Shinji; Akola, Jaakko; Patrikeev, Leonid; Ropo, Matti; Ohara, Koji; Itou, Masayoshi; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Yahiro, Jumpei; Okada, Junpei T.; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Mizuno, Akitoshi; Masuno, Atsunobu; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Usuki, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    The structure of high-temperature liquids is an important topic for understanding the fragility of liquids. Here we report the structure of a high-temperature non-glass-forming oxide liquid, ZrO2, at an atomistic and electronic level. The Bhatia–Thornton number–number structure factor of ZrO2 does not show a first sharp diffraction peak. The atomic structure comprises ZrO5, ZrO6 and ZrO7 polyhedra with a significant contribution of edge sharing of oxygen in addition to corner sharing. The variety of large oxygen coordination and polyhedral connections with short Zr–O bond lifetimes, induced by the relatively large ionic radius of zirconium, disturbs the evolution of intermediate-range ordering, which leads to a reduced electronic band gap and increased delocalization in the ionic Zr–O bonding. The details of the chemical bonding explain the extremely low viscosity of the liquid and the absence of a first sharp diffraction peak, and indicate that liquid ZrO2 is an extremely fragile liquid. PMID:25520236

  1. Influence of Electron-Withdrawing Substituents on the Electronic Structure of Oxidized Ni and Cu Salen Complexes.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Linus; Herasymchuk, Khrystyna; Thomas, Fabrice; Storr, Tim

    2015-06-15

    Nickel (Ni(Sal(CF3))) and copper (Cu(Sal(CF3))) complexes of an electron-poor salen ligand were prepared, and their one-electron oxidized counterparts were studied using an array of spectroscopic and theoretical methods. The electrochemistry of both complexes exhibited quasi-reversible redox processes at higher potentials in comparison to the M(Sal(R)) (R = (t)Bu, OMe, NMe2) analogues, in line with the electron-withdrawing nature of the para-CF3 substituent. Chemical oxidation, monitored by ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectroscopy, afforded their corresponding one-electron oxidized products. Ligand-based oxidation was observed for [Ni(Sal(CF3))](+•), as evidenced by sharp NIR transitions in the UV-vis-NIR spectrum and a broad isotropic signal at g = 2.067 by solution electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Such sharp NIR transitions observed for [Ni(Sal(CF3))](+•) are indicative of a delocalized electronic structure, which is in good agreement with electrochemical measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In addition, the increased Lewis acidity of [Ni(Sal(CF3))](+•), evident from the EPR g-value and DFT calculations, was further quantified by the binding affinity of axial ligands to [Ni(Sal(CF3))](+•). For [Cu(Sal(CF3))](+), an intense ligand-to-metal charge transfer band at 18 700 cm(-1) in the UV-vis-NIR spectrum was observed, which is diagnostic for the formation of a Cu(III) species [J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2008, 130, 15448-15459]. The Cu(III) character for [Cu(Sal(CF3))](+) is further confirmed by (19)F NMR analysis. Taken together, these results show that the electron-deficient salen ligand H2Sal(CF3) increases the Lewis acidity of the coordinating metal center. PMID:26016716

  2. Impact of lattice distortion and electron doping on α-MoO3 electronic structure

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng-Ru; He, Yao; Cao, Chao; Lu, Zheng-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Band structure of transition metal oxides plays a critical role in many applications such as photo-catalysis, photovoltaics, and electroluminescent devices. In this work we report findings that the band structure of MoO3 can be significantly altered by a distortion in the octahedral coordination structure. We discovered that, in addition to epitaxial type of structural strain, chemical force such as hydrogen inclusion can also cause extended lattice distortion. The lattice distortion in hydrogenated MoO3 led to a significant reduction of the energy gap, overshadowing the Moss-Burstein effect of band filling. Charge doping simulations revealed that filling of conduction band drives the lattice distortion. This suggests that any charge transfer or n-type electron doping could lead to lattice distortion and consequentially a reduction in energy gap. PMID:25410814

  3. A new parametrizable model of molecular electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laikov, Dimitri N.

    2011-10-01

    A new electronic structure model is developed in which the ground state energy of a molecular system is given by a Hartree-Fock-like expression with parametrized one- and two-electron integrals over an extended (minimal + polarization) set of orthogonalized atom-centered basis functions, the variational equations being solved formally within the minimal basis but the effect of polarization functions being included in the spirit of second-order perturbation theory. It is designed to yield good dipole polarizabilities and improved intermolecular potentials with dispersion terms. The molecular integrals include up to three-center one-electron and two-center two-electron terms, all in simple analytical forms. A method to extract the effective one-electron Hamiltonian of nonlocal-exchange Kohn-Sham theory from the coupled-cluster one-electron density matrix is designed and used to get its matrix representation in a molecule-intrinsic minimal basis as an input to the parametrization procedure - making a direct link to the correlated wavefunction theory. The model has been trained for 15 elements (H, Li-F, Na-Cl, 720 parameters) on a set of 5581 molecules (including ions, transition states, and weakly bound complexes) whose first- and second-order properties were computed by the coupled-cluster theory as a reference, and a good agreement is seen. The model looks promising for the study of large molecular systems, it is believed to be an important step forward from the traditional semiempirical models towards higher accuracy at nearly as low a computational cost.

  4. A new parametrizable model of molecular electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Laikov, Dimitri N

    2011-10-01

    A new electronic structure model is developed in which the ground state energy of a molecular system is given by a Hartree-Fock-like expression with parametrized one- and two-electron integrals over an extended (minimal + polarization) set of orthogonalized atom-centered basis functions, the variational equations being solved formally within the minimal basis but the effect of polarization functions being included in the spirit of second-order perturbation theory. It is designed to yield good dipole polarizabilities and improved intermolecular potentials with dispersion terms. The molecular integrals include up to three-center one-electron and two-center two-electron terms, all in simple analytical forms. A method to extract the effective one-electron Hamiltonian of nonlocal-exchange Kohn-Sham theory from the coupled-cluster one-electron density matrix is designed and used to get its matrix representation in a molecule-intrinsic minimal basis as an input to the parametrization procedure--making a direct link to the correlated wavefunction theory. The model has been trained for 15 elements (H, Li-F, Na-Cl, 720 parameters) on a set of 5581 molecules (including ions, transition states, and weakly bound complexes) whose first- and second-order properties were computed by the coupled-cluster theory as a reference, and a good agreement is seen. The model looks promising for the study of large molecular systems, it is believed to be an important step forward from the traditional semiempirical models towards higher accuracy at nearly as low a computational cost. PMID:21992295

  5. The structure and electronic properties of hexagonal Fe2Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chi Pui; Tam, Kuan Vai; Xiong, Shi Jie; Cao, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2016-06-01

    On the basis of first principle calculations, we show that a hexagonal structure of Fe2Si is a ferromagnetic crystal. The result of the phonon spectra indicates that it is a stable structure. Such material exhibits a spin-polarized and half-metal-like band structure. From the calculations of generalized gradient approximation, metallic and semiconducting behaviors are observed with a direct and nearly 0 eV band gap in various spin channels. The densities of states in the vicinity of the Fermi level is mainly contributed from the d-electrons of Fe. We calculate the reflection spectrum of Fe2Si, which has minima at 275nm and 3300nm with reflectance of 0.27 and 0.49, respectively. Such results may provide a reference for the search of hexagonal Fe2Si in experiments. With this band characteristic, the material may be applied in the field of novel spintronics devices.

  6. Electronic structure of SrRuO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Fujioka, K.; Okamoto, J.; Mizokawa, T.; Fujimori, A.; Hase, I.; Abbate, M.; Lin, H.J.; Chen, C.T.; Takeda, Y.; Takano, M.

    1997-09-01

    We have measured photoemission and oxygen 1s x-ray absorption spectra of the ferromagnetic metal SrRuO{sub 3} and compared them with a first-principles band-structure calculation. The overall distribution of Ru 4d and O 2p spectral weight is in good agreement with that predicted by the band-structure calculation. However, the observed spectral line shape of the Ru 4d band is spread over a wide energy range and the emission intensity at the Fermi level is weakened compared to the band-structure calculation. This implies the importance of electron correlation in the Ru oxide. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Model for the hyperfine structure of electronically excited KCs molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbán, A.; Vexiau, R.; Krieglsteiner, O.; Nägerl, H.-C.; Dulieu, O.; Crubellier, A.; Bouloufa-Maafa, N.

    2015-09-01

    A model for determining the hyperfine structure of the excited electronic states of diatomic bialkali heteronuclear molecules is formulated from the atomic hyperfine interactions and is applied to the case of bosonic 39KCs and fermionic 40KCs molecules. The hyperfine structure of the potential-energy curves of the states correlated to the K (4 s 2S1 /2) +Cs (6 p 2P1 /2 ,3 /2) dissociation limits is described in terms of different coupling schemes depending on the internuclear distance R . These results provide a step in the calculation of the hyperfine structure of rovibrational levels of these excited molecular states in the perspective of the identification of efficient paths for creating ultracold ground-state KCs molecules.

  8. Density functional theory studies of the structure and electronic structure of pure and defective low index surfaces of ceria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Michael; Grigoleit, Sonja; Sayle, Dean C.; Parker, Stephen C.; Watson, Graeme W.

    2005-02-01

    We present periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations of bulk ceria and its low index surfaces (1 1 1), (1 1 0) and (1 0 0). We find that the surface energies increase in the order (1 1 1) > (1 1 0) > (1 0 0), while the magnitude of the surface relaxations follows the inverse order. The electronic properties of the bulk and surfaces are analysed by means of the electronic density of states and the electron density. We demonstrate that the bonding in pure ceria is partially covalent and analysis of the resulting electronic states confirms the presence of localised Ce 4f states above the Fermi level. The surface atoms show only a small change in the charge distribution in comparison to the bulk and from the DOS the main differences are due to the changes in the oxygen 2p and cerium 5 d states. Investigation of the atomic and electronic structure of an oxygen vacancy on the (1 0 0) surface shows the problems DFT can have with the description of strongly localised systems, wrongly predicting electron delocalisation over all of the cerium atoms in the simulation cell. We demonstrate an improvement in the description of the strongly correlated cerium 4f states in partially reduced ceria by applying the DFT+U methodology, which leads to the appearance of a new gap state between the valence band and the empty Ce 4f band. Analysis of the partial charge density shows that these states are localised on the Ce III ions neighbouring the oxygen vacancy. In terms of classical defect chemistry, the vacancy is bound by two neighbouring Ce III ions, which have been reduced from Ce IV, i.e. VO··+2CeCe'. The remaining Ce ions are in the Ce IV oxidation state. The localisation of Ce 4f electrons modifies the predicted structure of the defective surface.

  9. Interacting Thin Film Systems Probed by Electron Induced Extended Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idzerda, Yves Ulrich

    In order to obtain information on the structure and dynamics of various systems including interacting thin films, it is necessary to be able to measure local structure information with surface sensitivity. Three techniques of Electron Induced Extended Fine Structure (EIEFS), the electron analog of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS), are described, compared, and applied to thin film systems. Surface Extended Electron Loss Fine Structure (SEELFS), Extended Appearence Potential Fine Structure (EAPFS) and Auger-Monitored Extended Fine Structure (AMEFS), are all local structure probes with varying degrees of surface sensitivity, and all yield similar information. Our results show that each technique can be measured by commercially available electron optics, SEELFS and AMEFS by either a cylindrical mirror analyzer (CMA) or by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) optics and EAPFS by the LEED optics. We have addressed questions concerning proper phase shifts for the analysis, short data ranges, required use of undifferentiated data, and experimental difficulties. Investigations of carbon, oxygen, sodium, potassium, cesium, and sulfur on Cu(111) and titanium on silicon demonstrate that SEELFS is applicable to single monolayer coverages of very low Z adsorbates and thin films. Many of the theoretical difficulties surrounding the analysis of SEELFS can be circumvented by the use of standards and the ratio technique analysis developed for EXAFS. We also find in our studies of silicon, titanium, and aluminum oxide that systems with plasmon losses in the region of interest cannot be analyzed, but systems with other characteristic losses which are very sharp or very broad can be. Examination of EAPFS shows that it is more surface sensitive and is applicable to single monolayer coverages (of a broader range of elements than SEELFS) and thin films. Unfortunately, EAPFS is not applicable to single crystal systems with low electron binding energies where diffraction

  10. Ergonomic task analysis in electronics industries: some case studies.

    PubMed

    Tan, G L

    1996-06-01

    The analyses of a few tasks were carried out in an electronics factory. The main objectives are to identify the ergonomic and biomechanical hazards of problem work tasks, to analyze each task systematically in order to evaluate the workers' exposures to the risk factors of force, posture pressure and repetition and to make recommendations to reduce the risks and hazards. The methodology includes objective measures--detailed analysis by going through training manuals, job description and production records. Subjective measures include interviewing the operator and supervisors informally, the operators were also required to fill in a structured questionnaire. The paper concludes by making recommendations to reduce the ergonomic hazards by engineering solutions, redesign or administrative controls or the implementation of procedures. PMID:9551132

  11. Probabilistic structural analysis methods of hot engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Development of probabilistic structural analysis methods for hot engine structures at Lewis Research Center is presented. Three elements of the research program are: (1) composite load spectra methodology; (2) probabilistic structural analysis methodology; and (3) probabilistic structural analysis application. Recent progress includes: (1) quantification of the effects of uncertainties for several variables on high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFT) turbine blade temperature, pressure, and torque of the space shuttle main engine (SSME); (2) the evaluation of the cumulative distribution function for various structural response variables based on assumed uncertainties in primitive structural variables; and (3) evaluation of the failure probability. Collectively, the results demonstrate that the structural durability of hot engine structural components can be effectively evaluated in a formal probabilistic/reliability framework.

  12. Structural Transitions and Electron Transfer in Coffinite, USiO4, at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F.; Pointeau, V; ShuLLer, L; reaMan, D; Lang, M; Liu, Z; Hu, J; Panero, W; Becker, U; Ewing, R

    2009-01-01

    The compressibility, phase stability, and vibrational properties of coffinite (USiO4) were studied by in situ X-ray diffraction and infrared (IR) measurements at high pressures. An irreversible phase transition from the zircon-type to scheelite-type structure was found to occur at 14-17 GPa. Accompanying the structural transition, partial amorphization was also evident in the XRD analysis. The predicted transition pressure calculated by density functional theory is in good agreement with the experimental results. IR spectra also suggest that water is incorporated into the coffinite structure, and a pressure-induced electron transfer (U4+ -> U5+) may also occur.

  13. Electronic structure of LaPt2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, I.; Yanagisawa, T.

    2013-01-01

    Iron-pnictide superconductor (Ba, K)Fe2As2 has the ThCr2Si2-type crystal structure. On the other hand, recently found arsenide superconductor SrPt2As2 has the CaBe2Ge2-type structure, which is a different polymorphic form of the ThCr2Si2-type structure. LaPt2Si2 shows superconductivity with Tc = 2.2 K and the above-shown two different crystal structures have been reported previously. In this paper we have calculated the electronic structure of LaPt2Si2 from first-principles. From the total energy calculation, we show that the CaBe2Ge2-type structure is more stable in this compound. The density of states at the Fermi level (D(EF)) mainly consists of Pt1-d orbitals, while the Pt2-d orbitals contribute to D(EF) only half of Pt1-d orbitals. In contrast to iron-pnictide system, the total density of states at the Fermi level does not depend so much on the distortion of the PtX4 tetrahedra and/or the height of the X atom from the two-dimensional Pt plane. The calculated electronic specific heat coefficient is 7.0 mJ/mol K2 for LaPt2Si2, which is comparable with that of SrPt2As2, but larger than the experimental value 4 mJ/mol K2.

  14. Electron microscopic examination of wastewater biofilm formation and structural components.

    PubMed Central

    Eighmy, T T; Maratea, D; Bishop, P L

    1983-01-01

    This research documents in situ wastewater biofilm formation, structure, and physiochemical properties as revealed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Cationized ferritin was used to label anionic sites of the biofilm glycocalyx for viewing in thin section. Wastewater biofilm formation paralleled the processes involved in marine biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a dramatic increase in cell colonization and growth over a 144-h period. Constituents included a variety of actively dividing morphological types. Many of the colonizing bacteria were flagellated. Filaments were seen after primary colonization of the surface. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a dominant gram-negative cell wall structure in the biofilm constituents. At least three types of glycocalyces were observed. The predominant glycocalyx possessed interstices and was densely labeled with cationized ferritin. Two of the glycocalyces appeared to mediate biofilm adhesion to the substratum. The results suggest that the predominant glycocalyx of this thin wastewater biofilm serves, in part, to: (i) enclose the bacteria in a matrix and anchor the biofilm to the substratum and (ii) provide an extensive surface area with polyanionic properties. Images PMID:6881965

  15. Low energy electrons and swift ion track structure in PADC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, Michel; Quinto, Michele A.; Weck, Philippe F.; Champion, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    The current work aims at providing an accurate description of the ion track-structure in poly-allyl dyglycol carbonate (PADC) by using an up-to-date Monte-Carlo code-called TILDA-V (a French acronym for Transport d'Ions Lourds Dans l'Aqua & Vivo). In this simulation the ion track-structure in PADC is mainly described in terms of ejected electrons with a particular attention done to the Low Energy Electrons (LEEs). After a brief reminder of the most important channels through which LEEs are prone to break a chemical bond, we will report on the simulated energetic distributions of LEEs along an ion track in PADC for particular incident energies located on both sides of the Bragg-peak position. Finally, based on the rare data dealing with LEEs interaction with polymers or organic molecules, we will emphasise the role played by the LEEs in the formation of a latent track in PADC, and more particularly the one played by the sub-ionization electrons.

  16. Metallic carbon nanotubes with metal contacts: electronic structure and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zienert, A.; Schuster, J.; Gessner, T.

    2014-10-01

    We study quasi-ballistic electron transport in metallic (6,0) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of variable length in contact with Al, Cu, Pd, Pt, Ag, and Au electrodes by using the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism in combination with either density functional theory or self-consistent extended Hückel theory. We find good agreement between both. Visualizing the local device density of states of the systems gives a descriptive link between electronic structure and transport properties. In comparison with bare finite and infinite tubes, we show that the electronic structure of short metallic CNTs is strongly modified by the presence of the metallic electrodes, which leads to pronounced size effects in the conductance. The mean conductances and linear response currents allow a ranking of the metals regarding their ability to form low-Ohmic contacts with the nanotube: Ag≲ Au\\lt Cu\\ll Pt≈ Pd\\ll Al. These findings are contrasted with similar trends in contact distance, binding energy, calculated work function of the metal surfaces, and various results from literature.

  17. The Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Coated Fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, David C.; Pederson, Mark R.; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    1998-03-01

    Clusters composed of fullerene molecules with an outer shell of transition metal atoms in the composition C_60M_62 (M being a transition metal) have been produced with laser vaporisation techniques(F. Tast, N. Malinowski, S. Frank, M. Heinebrodt, I.M.L. Billas, and T. P. Martin, Z. Phys D 40), 351 (1997).. We have studied several of these very large systems with a parallel version of the all-electron NRLMOL cluster code. Optimized geometries of the metal encased fullerenes C_60Ti_62 and C_60V_62 are presented along with their HOMO-LUMO gaps, electron affinities, ionization energies, and cohesive energies. We compare the stability of these clusters to relaxed met-car structures (e.g. Ti_8C_12) and to relaxed rocksalt metal-carbide fragments (TiC)n with n=8 and 32. In addition to metal-coated fullerenes we consider the possibility of a trilayered structure consisting of a small shell of metal atoms enclosed by a metal coated fullerene. The nature of bonding in these systems is analyzed by studying the electronic charge distributions.

  18. Structural Fingerprinting of Nanocrystals in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvimov, Sergei; Plachinda, Pavel; Moeck, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Three novel strategies for the structurally identification of nanocrystals in a transmission electron microscope are presented. Either a single high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image [1] or a single precession electron diffractogram (PED) [2] may be employed. PEDs from fine-grained crystal powders may also be utilized. Automation of the former two strategies is in progress and shall lead to statistically significant results on ensembles of nanocrystals. Open-access databases such as the Crystallography Open Database which provides more than 81,500 crystal structure data sets [3] or its mainly inorganic and educational subsets [4] may be utilized. [1] http://www.scientificjournals.org/journals 2007/j/of/dissertation.htm [2] P. Moeck and S. Rouvimov, in: {Drugs and the Pharmaceutical Sciences}, Vol. 191, 2009, 270-313 [3] http://cod.ibt.lt, http://www.crystallography.net, http://cod.ensicaen.fr, http://nanocrystallography.org, http://nanocrystallography.net, http://journals.iucr.org/j/issues/2009/04/00/kk5039/kk5039.pdf [4] http://nanocrystallography.research.pdx.edu/CIF-searchable

  19. Multiscale approach to the electronic structure of doped semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinai, Ofer; Hofmann, Oliver T.; Rinke, Patrick; Scheffler, Matthias; Heimel, Georg; Kronik, Leeor

    2015-02-01

    The inclusion of the global effects of semiconductor doping poses a unique challenge for first-principles simulations, because the typically low concentration of dopants renders an explicit treatment intractable. Furthermore, the width of the space-charge region (SCR) at charged surfaces often exceeds realistic supercell dimensions. Here, we present a multiscale technique that fully addresses these difficulties. It is based on the introduction of a charged sheet, mimicking the SCR-related field, along with free charge which mimics the bulk charge reservoir, such that the system is neutral overall. These augment a slab comprising "pseudoatoms" possessing a fractional nuclear charge matching the bulk doping concentration. Self-consistency is reached by imposing charge conservation and Fermi level equilibration between the bulk, treated semiclassically, and the electronic states of the slab, which are treated quantum-mechanically. The method, called CREST—the charge-reservoir electrostatic sheet technique—can be used with standard electronic structure codes. We validate CREST using a simple tight-binding model, which allows for comparison of its results with calculations encompassing the full SCR explicitly. Specifically, we show that CREST successfully predicts scenarios spanning the range from no to full Fermi level pinning. We then employ it with density functional theory, obtaining insight into the doping dependence of the electronic structures of the metallic "clean-cleaved" Si(111) surface and its semiconducting (2 ×1 ) reconstructions.

  20. Low energy electrons and swift ion track structure in PADC

    SciTech Connect

    Fromm, Michel; Quinto, Michele A.; Weck, Philippe F.; Champion, Christophe

    2015-05-27

    The current work aims at providing an accurate description of the ion track-structure in poly-allyl dyglycol carbonate (PADC) by using an up-to-date Monte-Carlo code-called TILDA-V (a French acronym for Transport d’Ions Lourds Dans l’Aqua & Vivo). In this simulation the ion track-structure in PADC is mainly described in terms of ejected electrons with a particular attention done to the Low Energy Electrons (LEEs). After a brief reminder of the most important channels through which LEEs are prone to break a chemical bond, we will report on the simulated energetic distributions of LEEs along an ion track in PADC for particular incident energies located on both sides of the Bragg-peak position. Lastly, based on the rare data dealing with LEEs interaction with polymers or organic molecules, we will emphasise the role played by the LEEs in the formation of a latent track in PADC, and more particularly the one played by the sub-ionization electrons.