Science.gov

Sample records for electrophoretic nmr measurements

  1. Convection Compensated Electrophoretic NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiuhong; Wei, Zhaohui

    2001-06-01

    A novel method of convection compensated ENMR (CC-ENMR) has been developed to detect electrophoretic motion of ionic species in the presence of bulk solution convection. This was accomplished using a gradient moment nulling technique to remove spectral artifacts from heat-induced convection and using the polarity switch of the applied electric field to retain spin phase modulations due to electrophoretic flow. Experiments were carried out with a mixture of 100 mM L-aspartic acid and 100 mM 4,9-dioxa-1,12-dodecanediamine to demonstrate this new method of ENMR. CC-ENMR enhances our previously developed capillary array ENMR (CA-ENMR) in solving the convection problem. The combined CA- and CC-ENMR approach strengthens the potential of multidimensional ENMR in simultaneous structural determination of coexisting proteins and protein conformations in biological buffer solutions of high ionic strength. Structural mapping of interacting proteins during biochemical reactions becomes possible in the future using ENMR techniques, which may have a profound impact on the understanding of biological events, including protein folding, genetic control, and signal transduction in general.

  2. On electrophoretic NMR. Exploring high conductivity samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielejewski, Michał; Giesecke, Marianne; Furó, István

    2014-06-01

    The performance of a new electrophoretic NMR (eNMR) method that uses a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill echo train with repeated electric field reversal is investigated. We show that this pulse sequence, with acronym CPMGER, yields strongly reduced artifacts from convective flow effects caused by the simultaneous presence of electroosmotic and thermal driving forces. We demonstrate the achieved improvements in various aqueous solutions. Ultimately, the method can be used for obtaining electrophoretic mobilities by eNMR without relying on uncharged reference molecules, otherwise a significant limitation for electrophoretic experiments performed with nuclei other than 1H.

  3. Sensitive and robust electrophoretic NMR: Instrumentation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallberg, Fredrik; Furó, István; Yushmanov, Pavel V.; Stilbs, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Although simple as a concept, electrophoretic NMR (eNMR) has so far failed to find wider application. Problems encountered are mainly due to disturbing and partly irreproducible convection-like bulk flow effects from both electro-osmosis and thermal convection. Additionally, bubble formation at the electrodes and rf noise pickup has constrained the typical sample geometry to U-tube-like arrangements with a small filling factor and a low resulting NMR sensitivity. Furthermore, the sign of the electrophoretic mobility cancels out in U-tube geometries. We present here a new electrophoretic sample cell based on a vertically placed conventional NMR sample tube with bubble-suppressing palladium metal as electrode material. A suitable radiofrequency filter design prevents noise pickup by the NMR sample coil from the high-voltage leads which extend into the sensitive sample volume. Hence, the obtained signal-to-noise ratio of this cell is one order of magnitude higher than that of our previous U-tube cells. Permitted by the retention of the sign of the displacement-related signal phase in the new cell design, an experimental approach is described where bulk flow effects by electro-osmosis and/or thermal convection are compensated through parallel monitoring of a reference signal from a non-charged species in the sample. This approach, together with a CPMG-like pulse train scheme provides a superior first-order cancellation of non-electrophoretic bulk flow effects.

  4. Measurement of deformations by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytchenkoff, Dimitri; Rodts, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Two NMR data acquisition protocols together with corresponding data processing algorithms for locating macroscopic objects, measuring distances between them or monitoring their displacements or deformations with microscopic precision are presented and discussed. The performance of the methods is demonstrated by applying them to the measurement of deformations of a freely supported beam under loading. We believe that our methods will find their applications in mechanics, civil engineering and medicine.

  5. Measurement of vorticity diffusion by NMR microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer R; Callaghan, Paul T

    2010-05-01

    In a Newtonian fluid, vorticity diffuses at a rate determined by the kinematic viscosity. Here we use rapid NMR velocimetry, based on a RARE sequence, to image the time-dependent velocity field on startup of a fluid-filled cylinder and therefore measure the diffusion of vorticity. The results are consistent with the solution to the vorticity diffusion equation where the angular velocity on the outside surface of the fluid, at the cylinder's rotating wall, is fixed. This method is a means of measuring kinematic viscosity for low viscosity fluids without the need to measure stress. PMID:20189854

  6. NMR measurements in SSC dipole D00001

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.; Hanft, R.W.; Strait, J.B.

    1986-09-12

    The first 16.5 m long SSC dipole magnet (D00001) had its field intensity measured as a function of position with a custom made NMR magnetometer. A short description of the probe is presented. The data obtained (most of it near 2 T spaced apart by one inch) shows an average transfer function of 1.02830 T/KA with position dependent values deviating from the average by up to .00130 T/KA revealing contruction inhomogeneities that were measured with a sensitivity of 25 ppM.

  7. Using Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays to Measure Equilibrium Dissociation Constants: GAL4-p53 Binding DNA as a Model System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffler, Michael A.; Walters, Ryan D.; Kugel, Jennifer F.

    2012-01-01

    An undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment is described that will teach students the practical and theoretical considerations for measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (K[subscript D]) for a protein/DNA interaction using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). An EMSA monitors the migration of DNA through a native gel;…

  8. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and μXRCT

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO₂ storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectly predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.

  9. NMR Measurements of Granular Flow and Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Eiichi

    1998-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can be used to measure statistical distributions of granular flow velocity and fluctuations of velocity, as well as spatial distributions of particulate concentration, flow velocity, its fluctuations, and other parameters that may be derived from these. All measurements have been of protons in liquid-containing particles such as mustard seeds or pharmaceutical pills. Our favorite geometry has been the slowly rotating partially filled rotating drum with granular flow taking place along the free surface of the particles. All the above-mentioned parameters have been studied as well as a spatial distribution of particulate diffusion coefficients, energy dissipation due to collisions, as well as segregation of non-uniform mixtures of granular material. Finally, we describe some motions of granular material under periodic vibrations.

  10. NMR measurements in solutions of dialkylimidazolium haloaluminates

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.; Saboungi, M.L.; Klingler, R.J.; Chen, M.J.; Rathke, J.W.

    1992-06-01

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 35}Cl NMR spectra of AlCl{sub 3}-1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) melts were measured for initial compositions ranging from 50 to 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} at various temperatures. It was shown by changing the preaquisition delay time (DE value) that the dominant aluminum species are AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} in the melt formed by mixing 50 mol % with EMIC and Al{sub 2}Cl{sub 7}{sup {minus}} in the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} melt. In the equimolar mixture, the chemical shift of {sup 27}Al NMR spectrum is 103.28 ppm and the line width is 22.83Hz. In the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixture, the chemical shift is 103.41 ppm and the line width is 2624Hz. A third species observed at 97 ppm in the {sup 27}Al spectra for the 55 and 60 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixtures is identified to be a product of the reaction with residual water. The relaxation rates for each species in the melts were determined.

  11. Easy measurement and analysis method of zeta potential and electrophoretic mobility of water-dispersed colloidal particles by using a self-mixing solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, S.; Ohtomo, T.; Otsuka, K.

    2013-08-01

    We describe a highly sensitive method of measuring electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential of water-dispersed colloidal particles by using a self-mixing laser Doppler velocimeter with a laser-diode-pumped, thin-slice solid-state laser with extremely high optical sensitivity. The power spectra of laser output modulated by reinjected laser light scattered by the electrophoretic particles were observed. The power spectrum cannot be described by the well-known formula for translational motion or flowing Brownian motion, i.e., a combination of Doppler shift, diffusion, and translation. The power spectra shape is found to reflect the velocity distribution of electrophoretic particles in a capillary tube due to the electro-osmotic flow contribution. Not only evaluation of the electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential but also the particle diameter undergoing electrophoretic motion can be performed from the shape of the power spectrum.

  12. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and μXRCT

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO₂ storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectlymore » predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.« less

  13. Increasing the quantitative bandwidth of NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Power, J E; Foroozandeh, M; Adams, R W; Nilsson, M; Coombes, S R; Phillips, A R; Morris, G A

    2016-02-18

    The frequency range of quantitative NMR is increased from tens to hundreds of kHz by a new pulse sequence, CHORUS. It uses chirp pulses to excite uniformly over very large bandwidths, yielding accurate integrals even for nuclei such as (19)F that have very wide spectra. PMID:26789115

  14. Electrophoretic Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Robert S.

    2001-01-01

    Electrophoretic focusing is a new method of continuous flow electrophoresis that introduces precision flow control to achieve high resolution separations. The electric field is applied perpendicular to an incoming sample lamina and buffer but also perpendicular to the broad faces of the thin rectangular chamber. A uniform fluid cross-flow then enters and exits the separation chamber through the same broad faces which are porous. A balance is achieved by adjusting either the electric field or the cross-flow so the desired sample fraction with its specific migration velocity encounters an opposing flow of the same velocity. Applying an electric field transverse to the incoming sample lamina and opposing this field with a carefully configured buffer flow, a sample constituent can be selected and focused into a narrow stream for subsequent analysis. Monotonically changing either electric field or buffer cross-flow will yield a scan of all constituents of the sample. Stopping the scan increases the collection time for minor constituents to improve their analysis. Using the high voltage gradients and/or cross-flow to rapidly deflect extraneous sample through the porous screens and into either of the side (purge) chambers, the selected sample is focused in the center plane of the separation chamber and collected without contact or interaction with the separation chamber walls. Results will be presented on the separation of a range of materials including dyes, proteins, and monodisperse polystyrene latexes. Sources of sample dispersion inherent in other electrokinetic techniques will be shown to be negligible for a variety of sample concentrations, buffer properties and operating conditions.

  15. Characterization of the Cell Surface Properties of Drinking Water Pathogens by Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbon and Electrophoretic Mobility Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface characteristics of microbial cells directly influence their mobility and behavior within aqueous environments. The cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of microbial cells impact a number of interactions and processes including aggregati...

  16. Characterization of the cell surface properties of drinking water pathogens by microbial adhesion to hydrocarbon and electrophoretic mobility measurements.

    PubMed

    Popovici, Jonathan; White, Colin P; Hoelle, Jill; Kinkle, Brian K; Lytle, Darren A

    2014-06-01

    The surface characteristics of microbial cells directly influence their mobility and behavior within aqueous environments. The cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of microbial cells impact a number of interactions and processes including aggregation, adhesion to surfaces, and stability of the cells within the aqueous environments. These cell characteristics are unique to the bacterial species and are a reflection of the large diversity of surface structures, proteins, and appendages of microorganisms. CSH and EPM of bacterial cells contribute substantially to the effectiveness of drinking water treatment to remove them, and therefore an investigation of these properties will be useful in predicting their removal through drinking water treatment processes and transport through drinking water distribution systems. EPM and CSH measurements of six microbiological pathogen or surrogate species suspended in phosphate-buffered water are reported in this work. Two strains of Vibrio cholerae were hydrophobic, while three strains of Escherichia coli were hydrophilic. Bacillus cereus was categorized as moderately hydrophobic. The strains of E. coli had the highest (most negative) EPM. Based on the measurements, E. coli species is predicted to be most difficult to remove from water while V. cholerae will be the easiest to remove. PMID:24815929

  17. Improvements in Technique of NMR Imaging and NMR Diffusion Measurements in the Presence of Background Gradients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Jianyu

    In this work, modification of the cosine current distribution rf coil, PCOS, has been introduced and tested. The coil produces a very homogeneous rf magnetic field, and it is inexpensive to build and easy to tune for multiple resonance frequency. The geometrical parameters of the coil are optimized to produce the most homogeneous rf field over a large volume. To avoid rf field distortion when the coil length is comparable to a quarter wavelength, a parallel PCOS coil is proposed and discussed. For testing rf coils and correcting B _1 in NMR experiments, a simple, rugged and accurate NMR rf field mapping technique has been developed. The method has been tested and used in 1D, 2D, 3D and in vivo rf mapping experiments. The method has been proven to be very useful in the design of rf coils. To preserve the linear relation between rf output applied on an rf coil and modulating input for an rf modulating -amplifying system of NMR imaging spectrometer, a quadrature feedback loop is employed in an rf modulator with two orthogonal rf channels to correct the amplitude and phase non-linearities caused by the rf components in the rf system. The modulator is very linear over a large range and it can generate an arbitrary rf shape. A diffusion imaging sequence has been developed for measuring and imaging diffusion in the presence of background gradients. Cross terms between the diffusion sensitizing gradients and background gradients or imaging gradients can complicate diffusion measurement and make the interpretation of NMR diffusion data ambiguous, but these have been eliminated in this method. Further, the background gradients has been measured and imaged. A dipole random distribution model has been established to study background magnetic fields Delta B and background magnetic gradients G_0 produced by small particles in a sample when it is in a B_0 field. From this model, the minimum distance that a spin can approach a particle can be determined by measuring

  18. Development and Characterization of NMR Measurements for Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Zachary; Whitney, Heather

    2012-03-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are systems of water, gelatin, and monomers which form polymers upon irradiation. The gelatin matrix retains dose distribution in 3D form, facilitating truly integrated measurements of complex dose plans for radiation therapy. Polymer gels have two proton pools coupled by exchange: free solvent protons and bound polymerized macromolecular protons. Measuring magnetization transfer (MT) and relaxation affords useful insights into particle rigidity and chemical exchange effects on relaxation in polymer gels. Polymer gel dose response has been previously quantified with several techniques, most often in terms of MRI parameters, usually at field strengths of 1.5 T and below. The research described here investigates the dose response of a revised MAGIC gel dosimeter via both high-field imaging and simpler nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This includes both transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates (R2 and R1) and quantitative MT parameters. We investigated estimating polymer molecular weight for a given applied dose using the Rouse model and R2 data from the imaging study. Finally, we began development of NMR methods for studying dose response, requiring adaption of NMR experiments to accommodate for radiation damping.

  19. Zeta potential determination by streaming current modelization and measurement in electrophoretic microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Louis; Kleimann, Pascal; Morin, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Electrophoresis in capillary and microfluidic systems, used in analytical chemistry to separate charged species, are quite sensitive to surface phenomena in terms of separation performances. In order to improve theses performances, new surface functionalization techniques are required. There is a need for methods to provide fast and accurate quantification about surface charges at liquid/solid interfaces. We present a fast, simple, and low-cost technique for the measurement of the zeta-potential, via the modelization and the measurement of streaming currents. Due to the small channel cross section in microfluidic devices, the streaming current modelization is easier than the streaming potential measurement. The modelization combines microfluidic simulations based on the Navier-Stokes equation and charge repartition simulations based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. This method has been validated with square and circular cross section shape fused-silica capillaries and can be easily transposed to any lab-on-chip microsystems. PMID:14730576

  20. NMR temperature measurements using a paramagnetic lanthanide complex.

    PubMed

    Zuo, C S; Metz, K R; Sun, Y; Sherry, A D

    1998-07-01

    NMR thermometry has previously suffered from poor thermal resolution owing to the relatively weak dependence of chemical shift on temperature in diamagnetic molecules. In contrast, the shifts of nuclear spins near a paramagnetic center exhibit strong temperature dependencies. The chemical shifts of the thulium 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetrakis(methylene phosphonate) complex (TmDOTP5-) have been studied as a function of temperature, pH, and Ca2+ concentration over ranges which may be encountered in vivo. The results demonstrate that the 1H and 31P shifts in TmDOTP5- are highly sensitive to temperature and may be used for NMR thermometry with excellent accuracy and resolution. A new technique is also described which permits simultaneous measurements of temperature and pH changes from the shifts of multiple TmDOTP5- spectral lines. PMID:9654468

  1. Rheo-NMR Measurements of Cocoa Butter Crystallized Under

    SciTech Connect

    Mudge, E.; Mazzanti, G

    2009-01-01

    Modifications of a benchtop NMR instrument were made to apply temperature control to a shearing NMR cell. This has enabled the determination in situ of the solid fat content (SFC) of cocoa butter under shearing conditions. The cocoa butter was cooled at 3 C/min to three final temperatures of 17.5, 20.0, and 22.5 C with applied shear rates between 45 and 720 s-1. Polymorphic transitions of the cocoa butter were determined using synchrotron X-ray diffraction with an identical shearing system constructed of Lexan. Sheared samples were shown to have accelerated phase transitions compared to static experiments. In experiments where form V was confirmed to be the dominant polymorph, the final SFC averaged around 50%. However, when other polymorphic forms were formed, a lower SFC was measured because the final temperature was within the melting range of that polymorph and only partial crystallization happened. A shear rate of 720 s-1 delayed phase transitions, likely due to viscous heating of the sample. Pulsed NMR is an invaluable tool for determining the crystalline fraction in hydrogen containing materials, yet its use for fundamental and industrial research on fat or alkanes crystallization under shear has only recently been developed.

  2. Improved spin-echo-edited NMR diffusion measurements.

    PubMed

    Otto, W H; Larive, C K

    2001-12-01

    The need for simple and robust schemes for the analysis of ligand-protein binding has resulted in the development of diffusion-based NMR techniques that can be used to assay binding in protein solutions containing a mixture of several ligands. As a means of gaining spectral selectivity in NMR diffusion measurements, a simple experiment, the gradient modified spin-echo (GOSE), has been developed to reject the resonances of coupled spins and detect only the singlets in the (1)H NMR spectrum. This is accomplished by first using a spin echo to null the resonances of the coupled spins. Following the spin echo, the singlet magnetization is flipped out of the transverse plane and a dephasing gradient is applied to reduce the spectral artifacts resulting from incomplete cancellation of the J-coupled resonances. The resulting modular sequence is combined here with the BPPSTE pulse sequence; however, it could be easily incorporated into any pulse sequence where additional spectral selectivity is desired. Results obtained with the GOSE-BPPSTE pulse sequence are compared with those obtained with the BPPSTE and CPMG-BPPSTE experiments for a mixture containing the ligands resorcinol and tryptophan in a solution of human serum albumin. PMID:11740906

  3. Characterization of U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes on hematite: EXAFS and electrophoretic mobility measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, John R.; Reitmeyer, Rebecca; Lenhart, John J.; Davis, James A.

    2000-01-01

    We have measured U(VI) adsorption on hematite using EXAFS spectroscopy and electrophoresis under conditions relevant to surface waters and aquifers (0.01 to 10 μM dissolved uranium concentrations, in equilibrium with air, pH 4.5 to 8.5). Both techniques suggest the existence of anionic U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes. Fits to EXAFS spectra indicate that U(VI) is simultaneously coordinated to surface FeO6 octahedra and carbonate (or bicarbonate) ligands in bidentate fashions, leading to the conclusion that the ternary complexes have an inner-sphere metal bridging (hematite-U(VI)-carbonato) structure. Greater than or equal to 50% of adsorbed U(VI) was comprised of monomeric hematite-U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes, even at pH 4.5. Multimeric U(VI) species were observed at pH ≥ 6.5 and aqueous U(VI) concentrations approximately an order of magnitude more dilute than the solubility of crystalline β-UO2(OH)2. Based on structural constraints, these complexes were interpreted as dimeric hematite-U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes. These results suggest that Fe-oxide-U(VI)-carbonato complexes are likely to be important transport-limiting species in oxic aquifers throughout a wide range of pH values.

  4. Two Phase Flow Measurements by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, Stephen A; Fukushima, Eiichi

    2006-08-14

    In concentrated suspensions, there is a tendency for the solid phase to migrate from regions of high shear rate to regions of low shear (Leighton & Acrivos, 1987). In the early years that our effort was funded by the DOE Division of Basic Energy Science, quantitative measurement of this process in neutrally buoyant suspensions was a major focus (Abbott, et al., 1991; Altobelli, et al., 1991). Much of this work was used to improve multi-phase numerical models at Sandia National Laboratories. Later, our collaborators at Sandia and the University of New Mexico incorporated body forces into their numerical models of suspension flow (Rao, Mondy, Sun, et al., 2002). We developed experiments that allow us to study flows driven by buoyancy, to characterize these flows in well-known and useful engineering terms (Altobelli and Mondy, 2002) and to begin to explore the less well-understood area of flows with multiple solid phases (Beyea, Altobelli, et al., 2003). We also studied flows that combine the effects of shear and buoyancy, and flows of suspensions made from non-Newtonian liquids (Rao, Mondy, Baer, et al, 2002). We were able to demonstrate the usefulness of proton NMR imaging of liquid phase concentration and velocity and produced quantitative data not obtainable by other methods. Fluids flowing through porous solids are important in geophysics and in chemical processing. NMR techniques have been widely used to study liquid flow in porous media. We pioneered the extension of these studies to gas flows (Koptyug, et al, 2000, 2000, 2001, 2002). This extension allows us to investigate a wider range of Peclet numbers, and to gather data on problems of interest in catalysis. We devised two kinds of NMR experiments for three-phase systems. Both experiments employ two NMR visible phases and one phase that gives no NMR signal. The earlier method depends on the two visible phases differing in a NMR relaxation property. The second method (Beyea, Altobelli, et al., 2003) uses two

  5. Electrical transport in a disordered medium: NMR measurement of diffusivity and electrical mobility of ionic charge carriers.

    PubMed

    Heil, S R; Holz, M

    1998-11-01

    Electrical transport in porous media plays an important role in many fields of pure and applied science. The basic microscopic processes of the charge transport have attracted considerable theoretical interest for a long time. However, on a microscopic level there was up to now no experimental access to this problem. In the present paper we demonstrate, by using a suited porous system, that two combined NMR methods can offer such a first experimental access. We apply common PFG NMR methods and the special electrophoretic NMR (ENMR) technique for the measurement of self-diffusion coefficient D+ and electric mobility u+ of a cation ((C4H9)+4) in a disordered gel-like medium (Sephadex LH-20) filled with electrolyte solution. We find a, qualitatively expected, observation time-dependence of D+, but for the first time such a time-dependence is also observed for u+, which means the detection of the phenomenon of "anomalous field assisted diffusion" or "anomalous mobility." For the measurement of the short-time behavior of the mobility a new pulse sequence is presented. The time-dependent mobilities were measured at three different external electrical fields E. From the long-time behavior of D+, u+, and DH2O three independent values for the tortuosity T of the porous system could be derived. We find equality of the tortuosities T(D+) and T(u+), which represents a first experimental proof of the validity of the Einstein relation (D+ approximately u+) in a disordered medium. Finally, we discuss advantages of the possible use of "anomalous field assisted diffusion" over the commonly used "anomalous diffusion" in morphology studies by dynamic imaging in porous media. PMID:9799669

  6. Xenon NMR measurements of permeability and tortuosity in reservoir rocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruopeng; Pavlin, Tina; Rosen, Matthew Scott; Mair, Ross William; Cory, David G; Walsworth, Ronald Lee

    2005-02-01

    In this work we present measurements of permeability, effective porosity and tortuosity on a variety of rock samples using NMR/MRI of thermal and laser-polarized gas. Permeability and effective porosity are measured simultaneously using MRI to monitor the inflow of laser-polarized xenon into the rock core. Tortuosity is determined from measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient using thermal xenon in sealed samples. The initial results from a limited number of rocks indicate inverse correlations between tortuosity and both effective porosity and permeability. Further studies to widen the number of types of rocks studied may eventually aid in explaining the poorly understood connection between permeability and tortuosity of rock cores. PMID:15833638

  7. Calibrating NMR measured porosity/permeability relationships using µXRCT measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, H. E.; Smith, M. M.; Hao, Y.; Carroll, S.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonate reservoirs have garnered interest for potential use in carbon capture and storage (CCS) activities. To be suitable for long term carbon dioxide (CO2) storage, they must possess sufficient permeability either through existing connected pore space, or due to reactivity with CO2-acidified fluids. Adequate assessment of the target formation permeability will rely on accurate downhole well-logging tools. Primary among these tools is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well-logging. Application of this tool relies on our ability to relate the porosity and pore distributions measured by NMR to permeability. These methods are challenging to apply in carbonate reservoirs with complex mineralogies where pores sizes often span orders of magnitudes. We have assessed the ability of NMR methods to measure permeability using rocks from the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project Saskatchewan, Canada and the Arbuckle injection zone at the Wellington CO2 storage demonstration site, Kansas. Results of laboratory measured permeability values of these rocks indicate that the standard NMR methods for predicting permeability values can produce values off by orders of magnitude within the same flow units. In this presentation, we present the results of a combined NMR and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) study of these rock cores to better estimate downhole permeability values of carbonate rocks. The results of the study suggest that the dramatic differences in predicted permeability values derive from large differences in the matrix porosity, pore network tortuosities, and mineralogy of the various rock units. We will present new laboratory measurements, and methodologies aimed at producing a universal NMR calibration procedure for determining permeability in carbonate reservoirs. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Large-Scale NMR Measurements in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legchenko, Anatoly; Vouillamoz, Jean-Michel

    2011-03-01

    The large-scale Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements in the Earth's magnetic field (Surface NMR method) is a geophysical technique that allows non-invasive investigations of water-saturated rocks. The measuring setup consists of a wire loop on the surface that is energized by one or two pulses of oscillating current. After the pulses are cut off, the free induction decay (FID) and/or the spin echo (SE) signal from groundwater could be measured. SNMR results are averaged over the investigated volume that depends on the loop size and typically varies from 20x20x20 to 100x100x100 cubic meters. The maximum depth of groundwater detection can vary from 45 to 150 m depending on measurement conditions, although an average depth of investigation is generally considered to be about 100 m. Our recent results show that combination of FID and SE allows rendering the SNMR less dependent on the geological conditions. Because of different scales, use of rock samples for calibration of the SNMR-estimate of the water content is difficult or impossible. Thus, for interpretation of experimental data we use a mathematical model that allows computing the theoretical signal generated by groundwater. The processing of SNMR data can provide the depth, thickness and water content of investigated aquifers. For improving accuracy of the SNMR results we use calibration based on borehole pumping test data. Based on the water content and the relaxation time provided by MRS it is possible to estimate the aquifer's hydrodynamic properties.

  9. Measurement of Electrophoretic Mobility of Human Promyelocytic Leukemia Cell Lines (HL60) During Neutrophil Differentiation Using On-Chip Cell Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuhashi, Ryutaro; Akagi, Takanori; Ichiki, Takanori

    Electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of human promyelocytic leukemia cell lines (HL60) during neutrophil differentiation induced by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was measured using microcapillary electrophoresis chips. Prior to EPM measurement of HL60 cells, neutrophil differentiation of the cells was confirmed by morphological classification. Subsequently, EPM of HL60 cells was measured using an on-chip cell electrophoresis system before and after neutrophil differentiation. The EPM changed gradually with the progress of the neutrophil differentiation. From the analysis of experimental data by principal component analysis, it was revealed that there is a strong correlation between morphologic classification and EPM during the neutrophilic differentiation. The present result suggests that on-chip EPM measurement system can be used as a monitoring tool for the cell differentiation.

  10. Novel Techniques for Pulsed Field Gradient NMR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, William Wallace

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) techniques now find application in multiple quantum filtering and diffusion experiments as well as in magnetic resonance imaging and spatially selective spectroscopy. Conventionally, the gradient fields are produced by azimuthal and longitudinal currents on the surfaces of one or two cylinders. Using a series of planar units consisting of azimuthal and radial current elements spaced along the longitudinal axis, we have designed gradient coils having linear regions that extend axially nearly to the ends of the coil and to more than 80% of the inner radius. These designs locate the current return paths on a concentric cylinder, so the coils are called Concentric Return Path (CRP) coils. Coils having extended linear regions can be made smaller for a given sample size. Among the advantages that can accrue from using smaller coils are improved gradient strength and switching time, reduced eddy currents in the absence of shielding, and improved use of bore space. We used an approximation technique to predict the remaining eddy currents and a time-domain model of coil performance to simulate the electrical performance of the CRP coil and several reduced volume coils of more conventional design. One of the conventional coils was designed based on the time-domain performance model. A single-point acquisition technique was developed to measure the remaining eddy currents of the reduced volume coils. Adaptive sampling increases the dynamic range of the measurement. Measuring only the center of the stimulated echo removes chemical shift and B_0 inhomogeneity effects. The technique was also used to design an inverse filter to remove the eddy current effects in a larger coil set. We added pulsed field gradient and imaging capability to a 7 T commercial spectrometer to perform neuroscience and embryology research and used it in preliminary studies of binary liquid mixtures separating near a critical point. These techniques and coil designs will find

  11. Method and apparatus for measuring the NMR spectrum of an orientationally disordered sample

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise oreintationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions is zero.

  12. Method and sample spinning apparatus for measuring the NMR spectrum of an orientationally disordered sample

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR apparatus and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus spins the sample about an axis. The angle of the axis is mechanically varied such that the time average of two or more Legendre polynomials are zero.

  13. Measuring Level Alignment at the Metal–Molecule Interface by In Situ Electrochemical 13C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Zelakiewicz, Brian S.; Allison, Thomas C.; Tong, Yu ye J.

    2015-03-16

    A new technique to measure energy-level alignment at a metal–molecule interface between the Fermi level of the metal and the frontier orbitals of the molecule is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The method, which combines the electrochemistry of organo-ligand-stabilized Au nanoparticles with 13C NMR spectroscopy (i.e. in situ electrochemical NMR), enables measuring both occupied and unoccupied states.

  14. Cerebral blood flow measured by NMR indicator dilution in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, J.R.; Branch, C.A.; Helpern, J.A.; Smith, M.B.; Butt, S.M.; Welch, K.M.

    1989-02-01

    We developed techniques to assess the utility of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) indicator for cerebral blood flow studies in cats, using Freon-22 for the first candidate. A PIN-diode-switched NMR experiment allowed the acquisition of an arterial as well as a cerebral fluorine-19 signal proportional to concentration vs. time in a 1.89 T magnet. Mean +/- SD blood:brain partition coefficients for Freon-22 were estimated at 0.93 +/- 0.08 for gray matter and 0.77 +/- 0.12 for white matter. Using maximum-likelihood curve fitting, estimates of mean +/- SD resting cerebral blood flow were 50 +/- 19 ml/100 g-min for gray matter and 5.0 +/- 2.0 ml/100 g-min for white matter. Hypercapnia produced the expected increases in gray and white matter blood flow. The physiologic effects of Freon-22, including an increase in cerebral blood flow itself with administration of 40% by volume, may limit its use as an indicator. Nevertheless, the NMR techniques described demonstrate the feasibility of fluorine-19-labeled compounds as cerebral blood flow indicators and the promise for their use in humans.

  15. Multistage Electrophoretic Separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Nathan; Doyle, John F.; Kurk, Andy; Vellinger, John C.; Todd, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A multistage electrophoresis apparatus has been invented for use in the separation of cells, protein molecules, and other particles and solutes in concentrated aqueous solutions and suspensions. The design exploits free electrophoresis but overcomes the deficiencies of prior free-electrophoretic separators by incorporating a combination of published advances in mathematical modeling of convection, sedimentation, electro-osmotic flow, and the sedimentation and aggregation of droplets. In comparison with other electrophoretic separators, these apparatuses are easier to use and are better suited to separation in relatively large quantities characterized in the art as preparative (in contradistinction to smaller quantities characterized in the art as analytical). In a multistage electrophoretic separator according to the invention, an applied vertical steady electric field draws the electrically charged particles of interest from within a cuvette to within a collection cavity that has been moved into position of the cuvette. There are multiple collection cavities arranged in a circle; each is aligned with the cuvette for a prescribed short time. The multistage, short-migration-path character of the invention solves, possibly for the first time, the fluid-instability problems associated with free electrophoresis. The figure shows a prototype multistage electrophoretic separator that includes four sample stations and five collection stages per sample. At each sample station, an aqueous solution or suspension containing charged species to be separated is loaded into a cuvette, which is machined into a top plate. The apparatus includes a lower plate, into which 20 collection cavities have been milled. Each cavity is filled with an electrophoresis buffer solution. For the collection of an electrophoretic fraction, the lower plate is rotated to move a designated collection cavity into alignment with the opening of the cuvette. An electric field is then applied between a non

  16. NMR relaxometry measurements of Fricke gel dosimeters exposed to neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Brai, Maria; Longo, Anna; Gallo, Salvatore; Tomarchio, Elio; Tranchina, Luigi; Gagliardo, Cesare; D'Errico, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Fricke infused gel matrices offer several features making them suitable for dosimetric applications; among these there are tissue equivalence, low cost and ease of preparation. Their nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation properties can be used as a radiation detector for the dosimetry of beams used in cancer therapy. In recent years neutron capture therapy has been resumed for the treatment of various types of cancer and it requires three-dimensional mapping of the neutron fields. In this work, we investigated this particular application through NMR relaxometry and MR imaging of Fricke gels exposed to neutrons. We analyzed both the R1 and R2 relaxation rates, which relate to the longitudinal T1 and transversal T2 relaxation times. In particular, we found that the relaxation rate R2 does not depend on the neutron fluence, whereas the relaxation rate R1 increases linearly with the fluence. The magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions showed that T1-weighted images allow the characterization of samples exposed to different neutron fluences.

  17. Performance evaluation of quantitative adiabatic (13)C NMR pulse sequences for site-specific isotopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Thibaudeau, Christophe; Remaud, Gérald; Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge

    2010-07-01

    (2)H/(1)H and (13)C/(12)C site-specific isotope ratios determined by NMR spectroscopy may be used to discriminate pharmaceutically active ingredients based on the synthetic process used in production. Extending the Site-specific Natural Isotope Fractionation NMR (SNIF-NMR) method to (13)C is highly beneficial for complex organic molecules when measurements of (2)H/(1)H ratios lead to poorly defined molecular fingerprints. The current NMR methodology to determine (13)C/(12)C site-specific isotope ratios suffers from poor sensitivity and long experimental times. In this work, several NMR pulse sequences based on polarization transfer were evaluated and optimized to measure precise quantitative (13)C NMR spectra within a short time. Adiabatic 180 degrees (1)H and (13)C pulses were incorporated into distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer (DEPT) and refocused insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer (INEPT) to minimize the influence of 180 degrees pulse imperfections and of off-resonance effects on the precision of the measured (13)C peak areas. The adiabatic DEPT sequence was applied to draw up a precise site-specific (13)C isotope profile of ibuprofen. A modified heteronuclear cross-polarization (HCP) experiment featuring (1)H and (13)C spin-locks with adiabatic 180 degrees pulses is also introduced. This sequence enables efficient magnetization transfer across a wide (13)C frequency range although not enough for an application in quantitative (13)C isotopic analysis. PMID:20527737

  18. Thin film NMR T1 measurement by MRFM using cyclic adiabatic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sungmin; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Won, Soonho

    2014-03-01

    We obtained the NMR spectrum and the spin lattice relaxation time (T1) for thin film samples using Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM). The samples were Alq3, which is widely used as an organic light emitting diode (OLED), thin films of 150 nm thick and a bulk crystal. T1 was measured by using the cyclic adiabatic inversion method at a fixed frequency of 297 MHz and at 12 K. To confirm the reliability of our measurement technique we compared the result with that obtained by conventional NMR method. T1 of thin film samples was measured and compared with that of the bulk sample. thin film, MRFM.

  19. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms isolated from clinical and environmental sources were measured in 9.15 mM KH2PO4 buffered water. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1 ...

  20. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms were measured. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1s-1, and the EPMs of fifteen environmental isolates ranged from -1...

  1. Internal Referencing for ¹³C Position-Specific Isotope Analysis Measured by NMR Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bayle, Kevin; Grand, Mathilde; Chaintreau, Alain; Robins, Richard J; Fieber, Wolfgang; Sommer, Horst; Akoka, Serge; Remaud, Gérald S

    2015-08-01

    The intramolecular (13)C composition of a molecule retains evidence relevant to its (bio)synthetic history and can provide valuable information in numerous fields ranging from biochemistry to environmental sciences. Isotope ratio monitoring by (13)C NMR spectrometry (irm-(13)C NMR) is a generic method that offers the potential to conduct (13)C position-specific isotope analysis with a precision better than 1‰. Until now, determining absolute values also required measurement of the global (or bulk) (13)C composition (δ(13)Cg) by mass spectrometry. In a radical new approach, it is shown that an internal isotopic chemical reference for irm-(13)C NMR can be used instead. The strategy uses (1)H NMR to quantify both the number of moles of the reference and of the studied compound present in the NMR tube. Thus, the sample preparation protocol is greatly simplified, bypassing the previous requirement for precise purity and mass determination. The key to accurate results is suppressing the effect of radiation damping in (1)H NMR which produces signal distortion and alters quantification. The methodology, applied to vanillin with dimethylsulfone as an internal standard, has an equivalent accuracy (<1‰) to that of the conventional approach. Hence, it was possible to clearly identify vanillin from different origins based on the (13)C isotopic profiles. PMID:26158226

  2. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Instrumentation for Real-time Enzymatic Reaction Rate Measurements by NMR.

    PubMed

    Balzan, Riccardo; Fernandes, Laetitia; Comment, Arnaud; Pidial, Laetitia; Tavitian, Bertrand; Vasos, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    The main limitation of NMR-based investigations is low sensitivity. This prompts for long acquisition times, thus preventing real-time NMR measurements of metabolic transformations. Hyperpolarization via dissolution DNP circumvents part of the sensitivity issues thanks to the large out-of-equilibrium nuclear magnetization stemming from the electron-to-nucleus spin polarization transfer. The high NMR signal obtained can be used to monitor chemical reactions in real time. The downside of hyperpolarized NMR resides in the limited time window available for signal acquisition, which is usually on the order of the nuclear spin longitudinal relaxation time constant, T1, or, in favorable cases, on the order of the relaxation time constant associated with the singlet-state of coupled nuclei, TLLS. Cellular uptake of endogenous molecules and metabolic rates can provide essential information on tumor development and drug response. Numerous previous hyperpolarized NMR studies have demonstrated the relevancy of pyruvate as a metabolic substrate for monitoring enzymatic activity in vivo. This work provides a detailed description of the experimental setup and methods required for the study of enzymatic reactions, in particular the pyruvate-to-lactate conversion rate in presence of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), by hyperpolarized NMR. PMID:26967906

  3. Squid-based CW NMR system for measuring the magnetization of helium-3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Kevin Spencer

    This thesis describes the design and construction of a SQUID-based CW NMR system together with its application in a study of the two dimensional magnetism of 3He. 3He provides an exemplary system for the study of two-dimensional magnetism. Two-dimensional 3He films of varying coverages may be formed by plating 3He on relatively uniform two-dimensional substrates, such as GTA Grafoil and ZYX graphite substrates. At coverages above approximately 20 atoms/nm. 2 on these substrates, the second layer of 3He exhibits a strong ferromagnetic ordering tendency. The ferromagnetic ordering presents as a rapid onset of measured magnetization that becomes independent of the applied magnetic field as film temperatures approach 1 mK. Very low applied magnetic fields are used to probe the ferromagnetic ordering in order to minimize masking of the measured magnetization and to stay within the available bandwidth of the SQUID. Commensurate with the ferromagnetic ordering, the NMR linewidth increases dramatically at these coverages and temperatures. An increasing linewidth equates to a short decay time with respect to pulsed NMR probing of the two-dimensional 3He magnetization. The decay times at these coverages and temperatures become so short that they fall below the minimum recovery time necessary for a SQUID-based pulsed NMR system to recover from the relatively large tipping pulse and acquire meaningful data. To address this problem, we have designed a SQUID-based CW NMR system to leverage as much of an already-existing pulsed NMR system as possible but allow accurate measurement of the rapid onset of ferromagnetic ordering of the 3He films below the approximate 1 mK temperature limit of the pulsed NMR system.

  4. Borehole measurement of NMR characteristics of earth formations

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinberger, R.L.; Griffin, D.D.; Fukuhara, M.; Sezginer, A.

    1991-10-08

    This paper describes an apparatus for investigating a characteristic of earth formation traversed by a borehole, comprising a body adapted for longitudinal movement in the borehole. It comprises: first means for producing a static and substantially homogeneous magnetic field in a volume of the formation directed to one side of the body; second means for radiating the volume of formation with oscillating magnetic fields and for detecting signals representative of nuclear magnetic precession of a population of particles in the formation, the second means including: antenna means; circuit means for driving the antenna means to produce oscillating magnetic fields at a frequency in the neighborhood of the NMR precession frequency of the population of particles in the volume of the formation; and Q-switching means for rapidly switching the Q value of the antenna means form a very high value to a low value, the Q-switching means comprising a field effect transistor, and optical-electronic means for switching the transistor on and off.

  5. Surface modification of inorganic black particles for electrophoretic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Deuk; Ahn, Woo Jin; Choi, Hyoung Jin

    2014-11-01

    Inorganic black particles (Black 444) were modified with poly(methyl methacrylate) as a shell material by using dispersion polymerization to improve their dispersion stability in a medium oil for electrophoretic display applications. They were also positively charged with vinylimidazole to enhance their electrophoretic mobility. The morphology and the shape of the composite particles were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy. The thermal properties and the chemical structure of the samples were examined by using thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. In addition, the electrophoretic mobility and the zeta-potential of the black444/PMMA/vinylimidazole particles in a dielectric fluid were measured by using optical microscopy and electrophoretic light scattering. With increasing positive charge, the black444/PMMA/vinylimidazole particles showed improved electrophoretic characteristics compared to pristine Black 444.

  6. NMR shift and relaxation measurements in pulsed high-field magnets up to 58T.

    PubMed

    Kohlrautz, J; Reichardt, S; Green, E L; Kühne, H; Wosnitza, J; Haase, J

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at fields up to 58T in pulsed magnets at the Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory are reported. The challenge to resolve NMR shifts in these time-dependent fields is addressed for the first time, and it is shown that this can indeed be accomplished with high precision with an internal reference. As a result, signal averaging is possible during a single magnetic field pulse, but also for multiple pulses. Thus, even very weak signals can in principle be recorded and their shifts can be determined. In a second set of experiments, the measurement of nuclear relaxation is investigated. Using adiabatic inversion with the inherent time dependence of the magnetic field and small-angle inspection, it is shown that relaxation measurements are possible, as well. The shift experiments were performed with (27)Al NMR on a mixture of aluminum metal and a Linde type A zeolite. For the relaxation studies, (27)Al NMR and (69)Ga NMR on the metals aluminum and gallium were preformed, respectively. PMID:26760950

  7. NMR shift and relaxation measurements in pulsed high-field magnets up to 58 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlrautz, J.; Reichardt, S.; Green, E. L.; Kühne, H.; Wosnitza, J.; Haase, J.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at fields up to 58 T in pulsed magnets at the Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory are reported. The challenge to resolve NMR shifts in these time-dependent fields is addressed for the first time, and it is shown that this can indeed be accomplished with high precision with an internal reference. As a result, signal averaging is possible during a single magnetic field pulse, but also for multiple pulses. Thus, even very weak signals can in principle be recorded and their shifts can be determined. In a second set of experiments, the measurement of nuclear relaxation is investigated. Using adiabatic inversion with the inherent time dependence of the magnetic field and small-angle inspection, it is shown that relaxation measurements are possible, as well. The shift experiments were performed with 27Al NMR on a mixture of aluminum metal and a Linde type A zeolite. For the relaxation studies, 27Al NMR and 69Ga NMR on the metals aluminum and gallium were preformed, respectively.

  8. Combining SIP and NMR Measurements to Develop Improved Estimates of Permeability in Sandstone Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, K.; Binley, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Permeability is traditionally measured in-situ by inducing groundwater flow using pumping, slug, or packer tests; however, these methods require the existence of wells, can be labor intensive and can be constrained by measurement support volumes. Indirect estimates of permeability based on geophysical techniques benefit from relatively short measurement times, do not require fluid extraction, and are non-invasive when made from the surface (or minimally invasive when made in a borehole). However, estimates of permeability based on a single geophysical method often require calibration for rock type, and cannot be used to uniquely determine all of the physical properties required to accurately determine permeability. In this laboratory study we present the first critical step towards developing a method for estimating permeability based on the synergistic coupling of two complementary geophysical methods: spectral induced polarization (SIP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). To develop an improved model for estimating permeability, laboratory SIP and NMR measurements were collected on a series of sandstone cores, covering a wide range of permeabilities. Current models for estimating permeability from each individual geophysical measurement were compared to independently obtained estimates of permeability. The comparison confirmed previous research showing that estimates from SIP or NMR alone only yield the permeability within order of magnitude accuracy and must be calibrated for rock type. Next, the geophysical parameters determined from SIP and NMR were compared to independent measurements the physical properties of the sandstone cores including gravimetric porosity and pores-size distributions (obtained from mercury injection porosimetry); this comparison was used to evaluate which geophysical parameter more consistently and accurately predicted each physical property. Finally, we present an improved method for estimating permeability in sandstone cores based

  9. Permeability estimation from NMR diffusion measurements in reservoir rocks.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, M; Brancolini, A; Gossenberg, P

    1998-01-01

    It is well known that in restricted geometries, such as in porous media, the apparent diffusion coefficient (D) of the fluid depends on the observation time. From the time dependence of D, interesting information can be derived to characterise geometrical features of the porous media that are relevant in oil industry applications. In particular, the permeability can be related to the surface-to-volume ratio (S/V), estimated from the short time behaviour of D(t), and to the connectivity of the pore space, which is probed by the long time behaviour of D(t). The stimulated spin-echo pulse sequence, with pulsed magnetic field gradients, has been used to measure the diffusion coefficients on various homogeneous and heterogeneous sandstone samples. It is shown that the petrophysical parameters obtained by our measurements are in good agreement with those yielded by conventional laboratory techniques (gas permeability and electrical conductivity). Although the diffusing time is limited by T1, eventually preventing an observation of the real asymptotic behaviour, and the surface-to-volume ratio measured by nuclear magnetic resonance is different from the value obtained by BET because of the different length scales probed, the measurement remains reliable and low-time consuming. PMID:9803918

  10. [A new system using NMR technology for measurement of body composition in experimental animals].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Jun; Furutoh, Kenichi; Nishikibe, Masaru

    2004-04-01

    Measurement of body composition (fat mass) is an important item in pathophysiological and pharmacological studies using small animals (mice) in the fields of obesity and diabetes. The existing methods are, however, difficult, time consuming, and require a shielding facility. Now a novel system using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique was developed for measurement of body composition in small animals (mice) that provides noninvasive and rapid measurement without anesthetics; we introduced and evaluated this system and tried another application of this system. First, we validated this system using canola oil, soft tissues (adipose and skeletal muscle), and various kinds of rodent chows. Accuracy, precision, and reproducibility of this system were demonstrated to be equal to those in standard chemical methods. A strong positive correlation (y=x) between the results of NMR and chemical methods was found. Secondly, we evaluated accuracy and assay range of the NMR method using live mice that were fasted overnight or fed high fat diet (HFD). In fasted mice, a small but quantitative decrease of fat mass (5.1% from 9.1%) was detected. Total decrease of fat and lean mass (5.0 g) in fasted mice was equivalent to the decrease of body weight (5.0 g). In mice fed the HFD, increase of fat mass with relative decrease of lean mass were qualitatively detected in a time-dependent manner. We would like to emphasize that operation of the system was actually easy and measurements were accomplished in a short time (1 minute). Thirdly, we tried to use the NMR system for determination of hepatic fat contents using mice fasted or treated with a PPARgamma agonist; our results showed a quantitative increase in fat by fasting or in decrease in fat by the drug treatment. The changes of fat contents determined by the NMR method were well correlated with the changes in triglyceride and total cholesterol values obtained by the biochemical assays. In conclusion, body composition data

  11. In vivo 31P and multilabel 13C NMR measurements for evaluation of plant metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Rijhwani, S K; Ho, C H; Shanks, J V

    1999-01-01

    Reliable measurements of intracellular metabolites are useful for effective plant metabolic engineering. This study explored the application of in situ 31P and 13C NMR spectroscopy for long-term measurements of intracellular pH and concentrations of several metabolites in glycolysis, glucan synthesis, and central carbon metabolic pathways in plant tissues. An NMR perfusion reactor system was designed to allow Catharanthus roseus hairy root cultures to grow for 3-6 weeks, during which time NMR spectroscopy was performed. Constant cytoplasmic pH (7.40+/-0.06), observed during the entire experiment, indicated adequate oxygenation. 13C NMR spectroscopy was performed on hairy root cultures grown in solutions containing 1-13C-, 2-13C-, and 3-13C-labeled glucose in separate experiments and the flow of label was monitored. Activities of pentose phosphate pathways, nonphotosynthetic CO2 fixation, and glucan synthesis pathways were evident from the experimental results. Scrambling of label in glucans also indicated recycling of triose phosphate and their subsequent conversion to hexose phosphates. PMID:10935751

  12. Measuring fast hydrogen exchange rates by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kateb, Fatiha; Pelupessy, Philippe; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a method to measure hydrogen exchange rates based on the observation of the coherence of a neighboring spin S such as 15N that has a scalar coupling JIS to the exchanging proton I. The decay of Sx coherence under a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) multiple echo train is recorded in the presence and absence of proton decoupling. This method allows one to extract proton exchange rates up to 10 5 s -1. We could extend the pH range for the study of the indole proton in tryptophan, allowing the determination of the exchange constants of the cationic, zwitterionic, and anionic forms of tryptophan.

  13. Mesodynamics in the SARS nucleocapsid measured by NMR field cycling.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Michael W; Lei, Ming; Eisenmesser, Elan Z; Labeikovsky, Wladimir; Redfield, Alfred; Kern, Dorothee

    2009-09-01

    Protein motions on all timescales faster than molecular tumbling are encoded in the spectral density. The dissection of complex protein dynamics is typically performed using relaxation rates determined at high and ultra-high field. Here we expand this range of the spectral density to low fields through field cycling using the nucleocapsid protein of the SARS coronavirus as a model system. The field-cycling approach enables site-specific measurements of R (1) at low fields with the sensitivity and resolution of a high-field magnet. These data, together with high-field relaxation and heteronuclear NOE, provide evidence for correlated rigid-body motions of the entire beta-hairpin, and corresponding motions of adjacent loops with a time constant of 0.8 ns (mesodynamics). MD simulations substantiate these findings and provide direct verification of the time scale and collective nature of these motions. PMID:19641854

  14. Electrophoretic deposition of biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Boccaccini, A. R.; Keim, S.; Ma, R.; Li, Y.; Zhitomirsky, I.

    2010-01-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is attracting increasing attention as an effective technique for the processing of biomaterials, specifically bioactive coatings and biomedical nanostructures. The well-known advantages of EPD for the production of a wide range of microstructures and nanostructures as well as unique and complex material combinations are being exploited, starting from well-dispersed suspensions of biomaterials in particulate form (microsized and nanoscale particles, nanotubes, nanoplatelets). EPD of biological entities such as enzymes, bacteria and cells is also being investigated. The review presents a comprehensive summary and discussion of relevant recent work on EPD describing the specific application of the technique in the processing of several biomaterials, focusing on (i) conventional bioactive (inorganic) coatings, e.g. hydroxyapatite or bioactive glass coatings on orthopaedic implants, and (ii) biomedical nanostructures, including biopolymer–ceramic nanocomposites, carbon nanotube coatings, tissue engineering scaffolds, deposition of proteins and other biological entities for sensors and advanced functional coatings. It is the intention to inform the reader on how EPD has become an important tool in advanced biomaterials processing, as a convenient alternative to conventional methods, and to present the potential of the technique to manipulate and control the deposition of a range of nanomaterials of interest in the biomedical and biotechnology fields. PMID:20504802

  15. Measuring chirality in NMR in the presence of a time-dependent electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, Jamie D.; Harris, Robert A.

    2014-06-21

    Traditional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are “blind” to chirality since the spectra for left and right handed enantiomers are identical in an achiral medium. However, theoretical arguments have suggested that the effective Hamiltonian for spin-1/2 nuclei in the presence of electric and magnetic fields can be different for left and right handed enantiomers, thereby enabling NMR to be used to spectroscopically detect chirality even in an achiral medium. However, most proposals to detect the chiral NMR signature require measuring signals that are equivalent to picomolar concentrations for {sup 1}H nuclei, which are outside current NMR detection limits. In this work, we propose to use an AC electric field that is resonantly modulated at the Larmor frequency, thereby enhancing the effect of the chiral term by four to six orders of magnitude. We predict that a steady-state transverse magnetization, whose direction will be opposite for different enantiomers, will build up during application of an AC electric field. We also propose an experimental setup that uses a solenoid coil with an AC current to generate the necessary periodic electric fields that can be used to generate chiral signals which are equivalent to the signal from a {sup 1}H submicromolar concentration.

  16. Surface NMR measurement of proton relaxation times in medium to coarse-grained sand aquifer.

    PubMed

    Shushakov, O A

    1996-01-01

    A surface NMR investigation of groundwater in the geomagnetic field is under study. To detect the surface NMR a wire loop with a diameter of about 100 m, being an antenna for both an exciting field source and the NMR signal receiver, is laid out on the ground. A sinusoidal current pulse with a rectangular envelope is passed through the loop to excite the NMR signal. The carrier frequency of the oscillating current in this pulse is equal to the Larmor frequency of protons in the Earth's magnetic field. The current amplitude is changed up to 200 amps and the pulse duration is fixed and is equal to 40 ms. The exciting pulse is followed by an induction emf signal caused by the Larmor nuclear precession in geomagnetic field. The relaxation times T1, T2, and T2* were measured by the surface NMR for both groundwater in medium to coarse-grained sand at borehole and for bulk water under the ice surface of frozen lake. To determine T1, a longitudinal interference in experiments with repeated pulses was measured. A sequence with equal period between equal excitation pulses was used. The relaxation times T1, T2, measured for bulk water under the ice of the Ob reservoir were 1.0 s and 0.7 s, respectively. To estimate an influence of dissolved oxygen T1 of the same water at the same temperature was measured by lab NMR with and without pumping of oxygen. The relaxation time T1 measured for water in the medium to coarse-grained sand is 0.65 s. The relaxation time T2 estimated by spin echo sequence is found to be equal to 0.15 s. The relaxation time T2* is found to be about 80 ms. This result contradicts published earlier phenomenological correlation between relaxation time T2* and grain size of water-bearing rock. This could be as a result of unsound approach based on grain size or influence of paramagnetic impurities. PMID:8970122

  17. Chromatographic NMR in NMR solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, Caroline; Viel, Stéphane; Delaurent, Corinne; Ziarelli, Fabio; Excoffier, Grégory; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2008-10-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that pseudo-chromatographic NMR experiments could be performed using typical chromatographic solids and solvents. This first setup yielded improved separation of the spectral components of the NMR spectra of mixtures using PFG self-diffusion measurements. The method (dubbed Chromatographic NMR) was successively shown to possess, in favorable cases, superior resolving power on non-functionalized silica, compared to its LC counterpart. To further investigate the applicability of the method, we studied here the feasibility of Chromatographic NMR in common deuterated solvents. Two examples are provided, using deuterated chloroform and water, for homologous compounds soluble in these solvents, namely aromatic molecules and alcohols, respectively.

  18. NMR measurement of oil shale magnetic relaxation at high magnetic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seymour, Joseph D.; Washburn, Kathryn E.; Kirkland, Catherine M.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at low field is used extensively to provide porosity and pore-size distributions in reservoir rocks. For unconventional resources, due to low porosity and permeability of the samples, much of the signal exists at very short T2 relaxation times. In addition, the organic content of many shales will also produce signal at short relaxation times. Despite recent improvements in low-field technology, limitations still exist that make it difficult to account for all hydrogen-rich constituents in very tight rocks, such as shales. The short pulses and dead times along with stronger gradients available when using high-field NMR equipment provides a more complete measurement of hydrogen-bearing phases due to the ability to probe shorter T2 relaxation times (-5 sec) than can be examined using low-field equipment. Access to these shorter T2 times allows for confirmation of partially resolved peaks observed in low-field NMR data that have been attributed to solid organic phases in oil shales. High-field (300 MHz or 7 T) NMR measurements of spin-spin T2 and spin-lattice T1 magnetic relaxation of raw and artificially matured oil shales have potential to provide data complementary to low field (2 MHz or 0.05T) measurements. Measurements of high-field T2 and T1-T2 correlations are presented. These data can be interpreted in terms of organic matter phases and mineral-bound water known to be present in the shale samples, as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and show distributions of hydrogen-bearing phases present in the shales that are similar to those observed in low field measurements.

  19. Using NMR, SIP, and MS measurements for monitoring subsurface biogeochemical reactions at the Rifle IFRC site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosier, C. L.; Keating, K.; Williams, K. H.; Robbins, M.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Grunewald, E.; Walsh, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site is located on a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado (USA). Although removal of tailings and contaminated surface materials was completed in 1996, residual uranium contamination of groundwater and subsurface sediments remains. Since 2002, research at the site has primarily focused on quantifying uranium mobility associated with stimulated and natural biogeochemical processes. Uranium mobility at the Rifle IFRC site is typically quantified through direct sampling of groundwater; however, direct sampling does not provide information about the solid phase material outside of the borehole and continuous measurements are not always possible due to multiple constraints. Geophysical methods have been suggested as a minimally invasive alternative approach for long term monitoring of biogeochemical reactions associated with uranium remediation. In this study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), spectral induced polarization (SIP), and magnetic susceptibility (MS) are considered as potential geophysical methods for monitoring the biogeochemical reactions occurring at the Rifle IFRC site. Additionally, a pilot field study using an NMR borehole-logging tool was carried out at the Rifle IFRC site. These methods are sensitive to changes in the chemical and physical subsurface properties that occur as a result of bioremediation efforts; specifically, changes in the redox state and chemical form of iron, production of iron sulfide minerals, production of the magnetic mineral magnetite, and associated changes in the pore geometry. Laboratory experiments consisted of monitoring changes in the NMR, SIP and MS response of an acetate-amended columns packed with sediments from the Rifle IFRC site over the course of two months. The MS values remained relatively stable throughout the course of the experiment suggesting negligible production of magnetic phases (e.g. magnetite, pyrrhotite) as a result of enhanced

  20. {sup 19}F NMR measurements of NO production in hypertensive ISIAH and OXYS rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bobko, Andrey A. . E-mail: bobko@kinetics.nsc.ru; Sergeeva, Svetlana V.; Bagryanskaya, Elena G.; Markel, Arkadii L.; Khramtsov, Valery V.; Reznikov, Vladimir A.; Kolosova, Nataljya G.

    2005-05-06

    Recently we demonstrated the principal possibility of application of {sup 19}F NMR spin-trapping technique for in vivo {sup {center_dot}}NO detection [Free Radic. Biol. Med. 36 (2004) 248]. In the present study, we employed this method to elucidate the significance of {sup {center_dot}}NO availability in animal models of hypertension. In vivo {sup {center_dot}}NO-induced conversion of the hydroxylamine of the fluorinated nitronyl nitroxide (HNN) to the hydroxylamine of the iminonitroxide (HIN) in hypertensive ISIAH and OXYS rat strains and normotensive Wistar rat strain was measured. Significantly lower HIN/HNN ratios were measured in the blood of the hypertensive rats. The NMR data were found to positively correlate with the levels of nitrite/nitrate evaluated by Griess method and negatively correlate with the blood pressure. In comparison with other traditionally used methods {sup 19}F NMR spectroscopy allows in vivo evaluation of {sup {center_dot}}NO production and provides the basis for in vivo {sup {center_dot}}NO imaging.

  1. Alternative approach to the standardization of NMR spectra. Direct measurement of nuclear magnetic shielding in molecules.

    PubMed

    Jackowski, Karol; Jaszuński, Michał; Wilczek, Marcin

    2010-02-25

    Exploring the relation between shielding constants, resonance frequencies and magnetic moments of the nuclei we demonstrate that nuclear magnetic shielding can be directly observed from NMR spectra. In this approach, the absolute shielding constants of all the nuclei can be related to a single reference scale, with atomic (3)He as the primary standard. The accuracy of the data obtained using our method is confirmed comparing the (1)H and (13)C shielding constants for a series of deuterated compounds with those determined analyzing the traditional chemical shifts. Since the use of helium-3 is not in general a practical alternative, we next transfer the reference standard to the (2)H signals of external lock solvents, in this way making the method easy and ready for application with most NMR spectrometers. Finally, we illustrate our new method with the measurements of the (2/1)H primary isotope effects in several liquid deuterated solvents. PMID:20112974

  2. Precision and sensitivity optimization of quantitative measurements in solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziarelli, Fabio; Viel, Stéphane; Sanchez, Stéphanie; Cross, David; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2007-10-01

    This work presents a methodology for optimizing the precision, accuracy and sensitivity of quantitative solid state NMR measurements based on the external reference method. It is shown that the sample must be exclusively located within and completely span the coil region where the NMR response is directly proportional to the sample amount. We describe two methods to determine this "quantitative" coil volume, based on whether the probe is equipped or not with a gradient coil. In addition, to improve the sensitivity and the accuracy, an optimum rotor packing design is described, which allows the sample volume of the rotor to be matched to the quantitative coil volume. Experiments conducted on adamantane and NaCl, which are representative of a soft and hard material, respectively, show that one order of magnitude increase in experimental precision can be achieved with this methodology. Interestingly, the precision can be further improved by using the ERETIC™ method in order to compensate for most instrumental instabilities.

  3. A unified mathematical theory of electrophoretic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.; Palusinski, O. A.; Mosher, R. A.; Graham, A.; Saville, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical theory is presented which shows that each of the four classical electrophoretic modes (zone electrophoresis, moving boundary electrophoresis, isotachophoresis, and isoelectric focusing) is based on the same general principles and can collectively be described in terms of a single set of equations. This model can predict the evolution of the four electrophoretic modes as a function of time. The model system is one-dimensional, neglecting the effects of electroosmosis, temperature gradients, and any bulk flows of liquid. The model is based on equations which express the components' dissociation equilibria, the mass transport due to electromigration and diffusion, electroneutrality, and the conservation of mass and charge. The model consists of a system of coupled partial differential and nonlinear algebraic equations which can be solved numerically by use of a computer. The versatility of this model was verified using an example of a three-component system containing cacodylate, tris hydroxylmethylaminomethane, and histidine. Results show that this model not only correctly predicts the characteristic features of each electrophoretic mode, but also gives details of the concentration, pH, and conductivity profiles not easily amenable to direct experimental measurement.

  4. A portable single-sided magnet system for remote NMR measurements of pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Mikayel, Dabaghyan; Iga, Muradyan; James, Butler; Eric, Frederick; Feng, Zhou; Angelos, Kyriazis; Charles, Hardin; Samuel, Patz; Mirko, Hrovat

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report initial results from a light-weight, low field magnetic resonance device designed to make relative pulmonary density measurements at the bedside. The development of this device necessarily involves special considerations for the magnet, RF and data acquisition schemes as well as a careful analysis of what is needed to provide useful information in the ICU. A homogeneous field region is created remotely from the surface of the magnet such that when the magnet is placed against the chest, an NMR signal is measured from a small volume in the lung. In order to achieve portability, one must trade off field strength and therefore spatial resolution. We report initial measurements from a ping-pong ball size region in the lung as a function of lung volume. As expected, we measured decreased signal at larger lung volumes since lung density decreases with increasing lung volume. Using a CPMG sequence with ΔTE=3.5 ms and a 20 echo train, a signal to noise ratio ~1100 was obtained from an 8.8mT planar magnet after signal averaging for 43 s. This is the first demonstration of NMR measurements made on a human lung with a light-weight planar NMR device. We argue that very low spatial resolution measurements of different lobar lung regions will provide useful diagnostic information for clinicians treating Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as clinicians want to avoid ventilator pressures that cause either lung over distension (too much pressure) or lung collapse (too little pressure). PMID:24953556

  5. A portable single-sided magnet system for remote NMR measurements of pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Dabaghyan, Mikayel; Muradyan, Iga; Hrovat, Alan; Butler, James; Frederick, Eric; Zhou, Feng; Kyriazis, Angelos; Hardin, Charles; Patz, Samuel; Hrovat, Mirko

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we report initial results from a light-weight, low field magnetic resonance device designed to make relative pulmonary density measurements at the bedside. The development of this device necessarily involves special considerations for the magnet, RF and data acquisition schemes as well as a careful analysis of what is needed to provide useful information in the ICU. A homogeneous field region is created remotely from the surface of the magnet such that when the magnet is placed against the chest, an NMR signal is measured from a small volume in the lung. In order to achieve portability, one must trade off field strength and therefore spatial resolution. We report initial measurements from a ping-pong ball size region in the lung as a function of lung volume. As expected, we measured decreased signal at larger lung volumes since lung density decreases with increasing lung volume. Using a CPMG sequence with ΔTE=3.5 ms and a 20 echo train, a signal to noise ratio ~1100 was obtained from an 8.8mT planar magnet after signal averaging for 43 s. This is the first demonstration of NMR measurements made on a human lung with a light-weight planar NMR device. We argue that very low spatial resolution measurements of different lobar lung regions will provide useful diagnostic information for clinicians treating Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as clinicians want to avoid ventilator pressures that cause either lung over distension (too much pressure) or lung collapse (too little pressure). PMID:24953556

  6. Fractional order analysis of Sephadex gel structures: NMR measurements reflecting anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Richard L.; Akpa, Belinda S.; Neuberger, Thomas; Webb, Andrew G.

    2011-12-01

    We report the appearance of anomalous water diffusion in hydrophilic Sephadex gels observed using pulse field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The NMR diffusion data was collected using a Varian 14.1 Tesla imaging system with a home-built RF saddle coil. A fractional order analysis of the data was used to characterize heterogeneity in the gels for the dynamics of water diffusion in this restricted environment. Several recent studies of anomalous diffusion have used the stretched exponential function to model the decay of the NMR signal, i.e., exp[-( bD) α], where D is the apparent diffusion constant, b is determined the experimental conditions (gradient pulse separation, durations and strength), and α is a measure of structural complexity. In this work, we consider a different case where the spatial Laplacian in the Bloch-Torrey equation is generalized to a fractional order model of diffusivity via a complexity parameter, β, a space constant, μ, and a diffusion coefficient, D. This treatment reverts to the classical result for the integer order case. The fractional order decay model was fit to the diffusion-weighted signal attenuation for a range of b-values (0 < b < 4000 s mm -2). Throughout this range of b values, the parameters β, μ and D, were found to correlate with the porosity and tortuosity of the gel structure.

  7. Detection of the water level in fractured phreatic aquifers using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) geophysical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gev, Israel; Goldman, Mark; Rabinovich, Boris; Rabinovich, Michael; Issar, Arie

    1996-06-01

    Correlation of geophysical data collected using the NMR method in the Negev Desert, Israel, with hydrogeological data from nearby observation wells is presented. The experiment was conducted near Kibbutz Revivim in the Besor drainage system (Fig. 1). The objective of the survey was to detect groundwater layers in the Quaternary cover filling and Eocene fractured aquifers down to a depth of 100 m. The experiment was performed using a combination of two different geophysical techniques, namely the NMR and time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) methods. The geophysical results were verified by measuring the water level in three observation wells, two of which were drilled several months after the geophysical survey was carried out. The water level measured in these follow-up observation wells shortly after drilling did not coincide with the geophysical data. However, it settled over a period of time and finally stabilized at a depth very similar to that obtained from the NMR measurements. This phenomenon is caused by the fractured nature of the phreatic aquifer. Since the flow of water in such aquifers is confined by the fractures, the appearance of water in the well during or shortly after drilling is determined solely by the intersection of the well and the fracture. Our experiments showed that geophysical measurements in fractured phreatic aquifers may have a distinct advantage over direct borehole measurements, since the former average the depth to the water table over large areas (several thousand square meters) while the latter are limited by the area of the borehole cross-section (several tens of square centimeters).

  8. Using NMR decay-time measurements to monitor and characterize DNAPL and moisture in subsurface porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy A. White; Russel C. Hertzog; Christian Straley

    2007-12-01

    Knowing how environmental properties affect dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) solvent flow in the subsurface is essential for developing models of flow and transport in the vadose zone necessary for designing remediation and long-term stewardship strategies. For example, one must know if solvents are flowing in water-wetted or solvent-wetted environments, the pore-size distribution of the region containing DNAPLs, and the impact of contaminated plumes and their transport mechanisms in porous media. Our research investigates the capability and limitations of low-field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation decay-rate measurements for determining environmental properties affecting DNAPL solvent flow in the subsurface. The measurements that can be performed with the laboratory low-field system can also be performed in situ in the field with the current generation of commercial borehole logging tools. The oil and gas industry uses NMR measurements in deep subsurface, consolidated formations to determine porosity and hydrocarbon content and to estimate formation permeability. These determinations rely on the ability of NMR to distinguish between water and hydrocarbons in the pore space and to obtain the distribution of pore sizes from relaxation decay-rate distributions. In this paper we will show how NMR measurement techniques can be used to characterize, monitor, and evaluate the dynamics of mixed-fluids (water-DNAPL) in unconsolidated near-surface porous environments and describe the use of proton NMR T2 (spin-spin relaxation time) measurements in unconsolidated sandy-soil samples to identify and characterize the presence of DNAPLs in these environments. The potential of NMR decay-rate distributions for characterizing DNAPL fluids in the subsurface and understanding their flow mechanisms has not previously been exploited; however, near-surface unsaturated vadose zone environments do provide unique challenges for using NMR measurements. These

  9. Electrophoretic Deposition for Fabricating Microbatteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William; Whitacre, Jay; Bugga, Ratnakumar

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of fabrication of cathodes of microbatteries is based on electrophoretic deposition. Heretofore, sputtering (for deposition) and the use of photoresist and liftoff (for patterning) have been the primary methods of fabricating components of microbatteries. The volume of active electrode material that can be deposited by sputtering is limited, and the discharge capacities of prior microbatteries have been limited accordingly. In addition, sputter deposition is slow. In contrast, electrophoretic deposition is much faster and has shown promise for increasing discharge capacities by a factor of 10, relative to those of microbatteries fabricated by prior methods.

  10. Measurement and Quantification of Heterogeneity, Flow, and Mass Transfer in Porous Media Using NMR Low-Field Techiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paciok, E.; Olaru, A. M.; Haber, A.; van Landeghem, M.; Haber-Pohlmeier, S.; Sucre, O. E.; Perlo, J.; Casanova, F.; Blümich, B.; RWTH Aachen Mobile Low-Field NMR

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is renowned for its unique potential to both reveal and correlate spectroscopic, relaxometric, spatial and dynamic properties in a large variety of organic and inorganic systems. NMR has no restrictions regarding sample opacity and is an entirely non-invasive method, which makes it the ideal tool for the investigation of porous media. However, for years NMR research of soils was limited by the use of high-field NMR devices, which necessitated elaborate NMR experiments and were not applicable to bulky samples or on-site field measurements. The evolution of low-field NMR devices during the past 20 years has brought forth portable, small-scale NMR systems with open and closed magnet arrangements specialized to specific NMR applications. In combination with recent advances in 2D-NMR Laplace methodology [1], low-field NMR has opened up the possibility to study real-life microporous systems ranging from granular media to natural soils and oil well boreholes. Thus, information becomes available, which before has not been accessible with high-field NMR. In this work, we present our recent progress in mobile low-field NMR probe design for field measurements of natural soils: a slim-line logging tool, which can be rammed into the soil of interest on-site. The performance of the device is demonstrated in measurements of moisture profiles of model soils [2] and field measurements of relaxometric properties and moisture profiles of natural soils [3]. Moreover, an improved concept of the slim-line logging tool is shown, with a higher excitation volume and a better signal-to-noise due to an improved coil design. Furthermore, we present our recent results in 2D exchange relaxometry and simulation. These include relaxation-relaxation experiments on natural soils with varying degree of moisture saturation, where we could draw a connection between the relaxometric properties of the soil to its pore size-related diffusivity and to its clay content

  11. Measurement of nuclear magnetic dipole—dipole couplings in magic angle spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert; Dabbagh, Gary

    1990-10-01

    We describe a method for measuring nuclear magnetic dipole—dipole couplings in NMR spectra of solids undergoing rapid magic angle spinning (MAS). We show in theory, simulations, and experiments that the couplings, which are averaged out by MAS alone, can be recovered by applying simple resonant radiofrequency pulse sequences in synchrony with the sample rotation. Experimental 13C dipolar powder pattern spectra of polycrystalline ( 13CH 3) 2C(OH)SO 3Na obtained in a two-dimensional experiment based on this method are presented. The method provides a means of determining internuclear distances in polycrystalline and noncrystalline solids while retaining the high resolution and sensitivity afforded by MAS.

  12. Electrophoretic Process For Purifying Wastewater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Twitty, Garland E.; Sharnez, Rizwan; Egen, Ned B.

    1992-01-01

    Microbes, poisonous substances, and colloidal particles removed by combination of electric fields. Electrophoretic process removes pathogenicorganisms, toxins, toxic metals, and cooloidal soil particles from wastewater. Used to render domestic, industrial, and agricultural wastewater streams potable. Process also useful in bioregenerative and other closed systems like in space stations and submarines, where water must be recycled.

  13. Optimized slim-line logging NMR tool to measure soil moisture in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlo, Josefina; Danieli, Ernesto; Perlo, Juan; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2013-08-01

    We report the optimization of a slim-line logging NMR tool carried out by maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio of the NMR measurements. The tool, based on cylindrical permanent magnets of 20 cm length and 5 cm diameter, has a penetration depth of about 2 cm measured from its surface. This is obtained thanks to a large radio frequency coil whose dimensions are comparable to the sensor size. An analytical expression of the SNR as a function of parameters which take into account the interaction between the radio frequency coil and the magnet shielding is developed. In view of the external constrains such as the one imposed by the excavation hole, a proper tool size is determined in the optimization process. Due to its size and properties, the sensor is suitable to measure water content in the vadose zone, which is the zone comprised within the first meters of the Earth surface and whose study is important for improving water management in agriculture and for refining climate models.

  14. Optimized slim-line logging NMR tool to measure soil moisture in situ.

    PubMed

    Perlo, Josefina; Danieli, Ernesto; Perlo, Juan; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2013-08-01

    We report the optimization of a slim-line logging NMR tool carried out by maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio of the NMR measurements. The tool, based on cylindrical permanent magnets of 20 cm length and 5 cm diameter, has a penetration depth of about 2 cm measured from its surface. This is obtained thanks to a large radio frequency coil whose dimensions are comparable to the sensor size. An analytical expression of the SNR as a function of parameters which take into account the interaction between the radio frequency coil and the magnet shielding is developed. In view of the external constrains such as the one imposed by the excavation hole, a proper tool size is determined in the optimization process. Due to its size and properties, the sensor is suitable to measure water content in the vadose zone, which is the zone comprised within the first meters of the Earth surface and whose study is important for improving water management in agriculture and for refining climate models. PMID:23757362

  15. Probing the permeability of porous media by NMR measurement of stochastic dispersion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosten, Tyler; Maier, Robert; Codd, Sarah; Vogt, Sarah; Seymour, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    A generalized short-time expansion of hydrodynamic dispersion is derived using non-linear response theory. The result is in accordance with the well-known reduced cases of shear flow in ducts and pipes. In terms of viscous dominated (low Reynolds number) flow in porous media the generalized expansion facilitates the measurement of permeability by PGSE-NMR measurement of time dependent molecular displacement dynamics. To be more precise, for porous media characterized by a homogeneous permeability coefficient along the direction of flow K, and fluid volume fraction ɛ, the effective dispersion coefficient D (t) = < | R- |2 > /6 t of molecular displacements R due to flow and diffusion for a saturating fluid of molecular diffusivity κ in viscous dominated flow is shown to be partially governed by the coefficient of permeability at short times. The short-time expansion is shown to be in agreement with pulsed field gradient spin echo NMR measurement of D (t) in a random sphere pack media and analogous pore-scale random-walk particle tracking transport simulation.

  16. Composite alignment media for the measurement of independent sets of NMR residual dipolar couplings.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Ke; Tolman, Joel R

    2005-11-01

    The measurement of independent sets of NMR residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) in multiple alignment media can provide a detailed view of biomolecular structure and dynamics, yet remains experimentally challenging. It is demonstrated here that independent sets of RDCs can be measured for ubiquitin using just a single alignment medium composed of aligned bacteriophage Pf1 particles embedded in a strained polyacrylamide gel matrix. Using this composite medium, molecular alignment can be modulated by varying the angle between the directors of ordering for the Pf1 and strained gel matrix, or by varying the ionic strength or concentration of the Pf1 particles. This approach offers significant advantages in that greater experimental control can be exercised over the acquisition of multi-alignment RDC data while a homogeneous chemical environment is maintained across all of the measured RDC data. PMID:16248635

  17. Estimating Pore Properties from NMR Relaxation Time Measurements in Heterogeneous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunewald, E.; Knight, R.

    2008-12-01

    The link between pore geometry and the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time T2 is well- established for simple systems but is poorly understood for complex media with heterogeneous pores. Conventional interpretation of NMR relaxation data employs a model of isolated pores in which each hydrogen proton samples only one pore type, and the T2-distribution is directly scaled to estimate a pore-size distribution. During an actual NMR measurement, however, each proton diffuses through a finite volume of the pore network, and so may sample multiple pore types encountered within this diffusion cell. For cases in which heterogeneous pores are strongly coupled by diffusion, the meaning of the T2- distribution is not well understood and further research is required to determine how such measurements should be interpreted. In this study we directly investigate the implications of pore coupling in two groups of laboratory NMR experiments. We conduct two suites of experiments, in which samples are synthesized to exhibit a range of pore coupling strengths using two independent approaches: (a) varying the scale of the diffusion cell and (b) varying the scale over which heterogeneous pores are encountered. In the first set of experiments, we vary the scale of the diffusion cell in silica gels which have a bimodal pore-size distribution comprised of intragrannular micropores and much larger intergrannular pores. The untreated gel exhibits strong pore coupling with a single broad peak observed in the T2-distribution. By treating the gel with varied amounts of paramagnetic iron surface coatings, we decrease the surface relaxation time, T2S, and effectively decrease both the size of the diffusion cell and the degree of pore coupling. As more iron is coated to the grain surfaces, we observe a separation of the broad T2-distribution into two peaks that more accurately represent the true bimodal pore-size distribution. In the second set of experiments, we vary the scale over

  18. Pulsed field gradient magic angle spinning NMR self-diffusion measurements in liquids.

    PubMed

    Viel, Stéphane; Ziarelli, Fabio; Pagès, Guilhem; Carrara, Caroline; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Several investigations have recently reported the combined use of pulsed field gradient (PFG) with magic angle spinning (MAS) for the analysis of molecular mobility in heterogeneous materials. In contrast, little attention has been devoted so far to delimiting the role of the extra force field induced by sample rotation on the significance and reliability of self-diffusivity measurements. The main purpose of this work is to examine this phenomenon by focusing on pure liquids for which its impact is expected to be largest. Specifically, we show that self-diffusion coefficients can be accurately determined by PFG MAS NMR diffusion measurements in liquids, provided that specific experimental conditions are met. First, the methodology to estimate the gradient uniformity and to properly calibrate its absolute strength is briefly reviewed and applied on a MAS probe equipped with a gradient coil aligned along the rotor spinning axis, the so-called 'magic angle gradient' coil. Second, the influence of MAS on the outcome of PFG MAS diffusion measurements in liquids is investigated for two distinct typical rotors of different active volumes, 12 and 50 microL. While the latter rotor led to totally unreliable results, especially for low viscosity compounds, the former allowed for the determination of accurate self-diffusion coefficients both for fast and slowly diffusing species. Potential implications of this work are the possibility to measure accurate self-diffusion coefficients of sample-limited mixtures or to avoid radiation damping interferences in NMR diffusion measurements. Overall, the outlined methodology should be of interest to anyone who strives to improve the reliability of MAS diffusion studies, both in homogeneous and heterogeneous media. PMID:18006344

  19. 19F NMR measurements of the rotational mobility of proteins in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, S P; Haggie, P M; Brindle, K M

    1997-01-01

    Three glycolytic enzymes, hexokinase, phosphoglycerate kinase, and pyruvate kinase, were fluorine labeled in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by biosynthetic incorporation of 5-fluorotryptophan. 19F NMR longitudinal relaxation time measurements on the labeled enzymes were used to assess their rotational mobility in the intact cell. Comparison with the results obtained from relaxation time measurements of the purified enzymes in vitro and from theoretical calculations showed that two of the labeled enzymes, phosphoglycerate kinase and hexokinase, were tumbling in a cytoplasm that had a viscosity approximately twice that of water. There were no detectable signals from pyruvate kinase in vivo, although it could be detected in diluted cell extracts, indicating that there was some degree of motional restriction of the enzyme in the intact cell. PMID:8994636

  20. Observation of separate cation and anion electrophoretic mobilities in pure ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyang; Madsen, Louis A.

    2014-02-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) continue to show relevance in many fields, from battery electrolytes, to carbon capture, to advanced separations. These highly ion-dense fluids present unique challenges in understanding their electrochemical properties due to deviations in behavior from existing electrolyte theories. Here we present a novel characterization of ILs using electrophoretic NMR (ENMR) to determine separate cation and anion mobilities. This method uses an applied electric field coincident with a pulsed magnetic field gradient to encode the E-field driven flow into NMR signals for cations (1H) and anions (19F). We describe the detailed design of these experiments, including quantitative analysis of artifact mitigation and necessary control experiments. We then explore mobilities and diffusion coefficients for two representative ILs: 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([C2mim][BF4]) and 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([C2mim][TfO]). We further use the individual ion mobilities to calculate the bulk net conductivity, which closely agrees with bulk conductivity measurements obtained using impedance spectroscopy. These observations represent the first reliable measurements of cation and anion mobilities in pure ILs, with errors of ±7%. We discuss this advanced experimental methodology in detail, as well as implications of these sensitive measurements for understanding conduction mechanisms in ion-dense electrolytes.

  1. Observation of separate cation and anion electrophoretic mobilities in pure ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyang; Madsen, Louis A

    2014-02-28

    Ionic liquids (ILs) continue to show relevance in many fields, from battery electrolytes, to carbon capture, to advanced separations. These highly ion-dense fluids present unique challenges in understanding their electrochemical properties due to deviations in behavior from existing electrolyte theories. Here we present a novel characterization of ILs using electrophoretic NMR (ENMR) to determine separate cation and anion mobilities. This method uses an applied electric field coincident with a pulsed magnetic field gradient to encode the E-field driven flow into NMR signals for cations ((1)H) and anions ((19)F). We describe the detailed design of these experiments, including quantitative analysis of artifact mitigation and necessary control experiments. We then explore mobilities and diffusion coefficients for two representative ILs: 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([C2mim][BF4]) and 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([C2mim][TfO]). We further use the individual ion mobilities to calculate the bulk net conductivity, which closely agrees with bulk conductivity measurements obtained using impedance spectroscopy. These observations represent the first reliable measurements of cation and anion mobilities in pure ILs, with errors of ±7%. We discuss this advanced experimental methodology in detail, as well as implications of these sensitive measurements for understanding conduction mechanisms in ion-dense electrolytes. PMID:24588161

  2. Application of (19)  F time-domain NMR to measure content in fluorine-containing drug products.

    PubMed

    Silva Elipe, Maria Victoria; Li, Lan; Nagapudi, Karthik; Kook, Alan M; Cobas, Carlos; Iglesias, Isaac; Peng, Chen

    2016-06-01

    It is necessary to show that the active content in the dosage form of drugs is within a certain narrow range of the label claim. In case of fluorinated drugs, the active content can be measured by high field solid state NMR because the excipients lack fluorine. To make NMR reachable to any laboratory, simple to use, and at a low cost, measurement of (19)  F nucleus using a 23 MHz (for (1) H) low field benchtop time-domain (TD) NMR was investigated. Three fluorinated drug products, cinacalcet, lansoprazole, and ciprofloxacin, were chosen for this study. The doses for these drug products range from 15 to 500 mg. The average drug content measured using (19)  F TD-NMR compares well with the reported label claims for the three drugs tested. (19)  F TD-NMR is a simple and non-destructive technique to measure drug content in tablets. In addition, the accessibility and simplicity of the technique makes it an excellent process analytical technology tool for development and manufacturing in the pharmaceutical industry. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25773191

  3. Design Modification of Electrophoretic Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddick, J. M.; Hirsch, I.

    1973-01-01

    The improved design of a zone electrophoretic sampler is reported that can be used in mass screening for hemoglobin S, the cause of sickle cell anemia. Considered is a high voltage multicell cellulose acetate device that requires 5 to 6 minutes electrophoresis periods; cells may be activitated individually or simultaneously. A multisample hemoglobin applicator standardizes the amount of sample applied and transfers the homolysate to the electrical wires.

  4. Intracellular free calcium concentration measured with /sup 19/F NMR spectroscopy in intact ferret hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Marban, E.; Kitakaze, M.; Kusuoka, H.; Porterfield, J.K.; Yue, D.T.; Chacko, V.P.

    1987-08-01

    Changes in the intracellular free Ca/sup 2 +/ concentration, (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/, mediate excitation-contraction coupling in the heart and contribute to cellular injury during ischemia and reperfusion. To study these processes directly, the authors measured (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ in perfused ferret (Mustela putorius furo) hearts using /sup 19/F NMR spectroscopy to detect the 5,5'-difluoro derivative of the Ca/sup 2 +/ chelator, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). To load cells, hearts were perfused with the acetoxymethyl ester derivative of 5,5'-F/sub 2/-BAPTA. They measured /sup 19/F NMR spectra and left ventricular pressure simultaneously,at rest and during pacing at various external Ca concentrations ((Ca)/sub 0/). Although contractile force was attenuated by the Ca/sup 2 +/ buffering properties of 5,5'-F/sup 2/-BAPTA, the decrease in pressure could be overcome by raising (Ca)/sub 0/. The mean value of 104 nM for (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ at rest in the perfused heart agrees well with previous measurements in isolated ventricular muscle. During pacing at 0.6-4 Hz, time-averaged (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ increased; the effect of pacing was augmented by increasing (Ca)/sub 0/. (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ more than tripled during 10-20 min of global ischemia, and returned toward control levels upon reperfusion. This approach promises to be particularly useful in investigating the physiology of intact hearts and the pathophysiology of alterations in the coronary circulation

  5. O-tert-Butyltyrosine, an NMR tag for high-molecular-weight systems and measurements of submicromolar ligand binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Na; Kuppan, Kekini Vahini; Lee, Michael David; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Huber, Thomas; Otting, Gottfried

    2015-04-01

    O-tert-Butyltyrosine (Tby) is an unnatural amino acid that can be site-specifically incorporated into proteins using established orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA systems. Here we show that the tert-butyl group presents an outstanding NMR tag that can readily be observed in one-dimensional (1)H NMR spectra without any isotope labeling. Owing to rapid bond rotations and the chemical equivalence of the protons of a solvent-exposed tert-butyl group from Tby, the singlet resonance from the tert-butyl group generates an easily detectable narrow signal in a spectral region with limited overlap with other methyl resonances. The potential of the tert-butyl (1)H NMR signal in protein research is illustrated by the observation and assignment of two resonances in the Bacillus stearothermophilus DnaB hexamer (320 kDa), demonstrating that this protein preferentially assumes a 3-fold rather than 6-fold symmetry in solution, and by the quantitative measurement of the submicromolar dissociation constant Kd (0.2 μM) of the complex between glutamate and the Escherichia coli aspartate/glutamate binding protein (DEBP, 32 kDa). The outstanding signal height of the (1)H NMR signal of the Tby tert-butyl group allows Kd measurements using less concentrated protein solutions than usual, providing access to Kd values 1 order of magnitude lower than established NMR methods that employ direct protein detection for Kd measurements. PMID:25789794

  6. NMR measurement of the spin magnetization and spin dynamics in the quantum Hall regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, S. E.; Dabbagh, G.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Tycko, R.

    1996-07-01

    We review our recent measurements of the Knight shift ( Ks( v, T)) and spin-lattice relaxation time ( T1( v,T) of the 71Ga nuclei located in n-doped GaAs quantum wells using optically pumped NMR, for Landau-level filling 0.66 < v < 1.76 and temperature 1.55K< T )drops precipitously on either side of v = 1, which is evidence that the charged excitations of the v = 1 ground state are finite-size skyrmions. For v < 1, the data are consistent with a many-body ground state which is not fully spin-polarized, with a very small spin-excitation gap that increases as v → 2/3.

  7. Velocity autocorrelation spectra in molten polymers measured by NMR modulated gradient spin-echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepišnik, Janez; Mohorič, Aleš; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried; Serša, Igor

    2014-04-01

    The segmental dynamics in molten linear polymers is studied by the NMR method of modulated gradient spin-echo, which directly probes a spectrum of molecular velocity autocorrelation function. Diffusion spectra of mono-disperse poly(isoprene-1.4) with different molecular masses, measured in the frequency range 0.1-10 kHz at a temperature of 26\\ ^{\\circ}\\text{C} , have a form similar to the spectrum of Rouse chain dynamics, which implicates the tube-Rouse motion as the dominant dynamic process in this frequency range. The scaling of the center-of-mass diffusion coefficient, given from the fitting parameters, changes from N^{-1} into N^{-2.4} at around N \\approx 3\\text{-}5 Kuhn steps, which is less than predicted by theory and simulations, while the correlation times of the tube-Rouse mode do not follow the anticipated scaling.

  8. Borehole measurement of NMR characteristics of earth formations, and interpretations thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinberg, R.L.; Griffin, D.D.; Fukuhara, M.; Sezginer, A.; Chew, W.C.; Kenyon, W.E.; Day, P.I.; Lipsicas, M.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a method of determining a characteristic of an earth formation traversed by a borehole. It comprises: measuring nuclear magnetic resonance decay signals representative of transverse (T{sub 2}) or observed (T{sub 2}*) magnetic relaxation of a population of particles in the formation following different magnetic polarization periods; selecting a set of values of the signals; comparing the set of values directly to a representation of NMR decay which includes amplitude A and longitudinal relaxation time T{sub 1} terms and simultaneously depends on both the decay time t{sub {ital dec}} and polarization periods t{sub {ital pol}} associated with the values; generating values of amplitude and T{sub 1} parameters which optimize the fit between the compared set of values and the representation; determining the formation characteristic in response to the generated values of at least one of the terms---amplitude or T{sub 1}.

  9. Dynamical theory of spin noise and relaxation: Prospects for real-time NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Field, Timothy R

    2014-11-01

    Recent developments in theoretical aspects of spin noise and relaxation and their interrelationship reveal a modified spin density, distinct from the density matrix, as the necessary object to describe fluctuations in spin systems. These fluctuations are to be viewed as an intrinsic quantum mechanical property of such systems immersed in random magnetic environments and are observed as "spin noise" in the absence of any radio frequency excitation. With the prospect of ultrafast digitization, the role of spin noise in real-time parameter extraction for (NMR) spin systems, and the advantage over standard techniques, is of essential importance, especially for systems containing a small number of spins. In this article we outline prospects for harnessing the recent dynamical theory in terms of spin-noise measurement, with attention to real-time properties. PMID:25493776

  10. Lithium ion diffusion in Li β-alumina single crystals measured by pulsed field gradient NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Mohammed Tareque Takekawa, Reiji; Iwai, Yoshiki; Kuwata, Naoaki; Kawamura, Junichi

    2014-03-28

    The lithium ion diffusion coefficient of a 93% Li β-alumina single crystal was measured for the first time using pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy with two different crystal orientations. The diffusion coefficient was found to be 1.2 × 10{sup −11} m{sup 2}/s in the direction perpendicular to the c axis at room temperature. The Li ion diffusion coefficient along the c axis direction was found to be very small (6.4 × 10{sup −13} m{sup 2}/s at 333 K), which suggests that the macroscopic diffusion of the Li ion in the β-alumina crystal is mainly two-dimensional. The diffusion coefficient for the same sample was also estimated using NMR line narrowing data and impedance measurements. The impedance data show reasonable agreement with PFG-NMR data, while the line narrowing measurements provided a lower value for the diffusion coefficient. Line narrowing measurements also provided a relatively low value for the activation energy and pre-exponential factor. The temperature dependent diffusion coefficient was obtained in the temperature range 297–333 K by PFG-NMR, from which the activation energy for diffusion of the Li ion was estimated. The activation energy obtained by PFG-NMR was smaller than that obtained by impedance measurements, which suggests that thermally activated defect formation energy exists for 93% Li β-alumina single crystals. The diffusion time dependence of the diffusion coefficient was observed for the Li ion in the 93% Li β-alumina single crystal by means of PFG-NMR experiments. Motion of Li ion in fractal dimension might be a possible explanation for the observed diffusion time dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the 93% Li β–alumina system.

  11. The Effect of Inhomogeneous Sample Susceptibility on Measured Diffusion Anisotropy Using NMR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudeau, J. D.; Dixon, W. T.; Hawkins, J.

    1995-07-01

    Water diffusion measurements in white matter of freshly excised pig spinal cord and in parenchyma of fresh celery (excluding the fibers along the edge of the stalk) were performed using NMR at 200 MHz. In white matter of pig spinal cord, the measured diffusion coefficient is anisotropic and independent of sample orientation with respect to the magnetic field, In celery parenchyma, diffusion is isotropic and independent of orientation in the magnetic field when using a diffusion sequence that gives results independent of self-induced magnetic-held gradients. However, when the standard diffusion pulse sequence that gives results dependent upon self-induced magnetic-field gradients is used, diffusion in celery appears isotropic when the stalk is oriented parallel to the magnetic field but anisotropic when oriented perpendicular. Susceptibility variations leading to anisotropic self-induced magnetic-field gradients approximately 3 kHz/cm in magnitude when the celery is oriented perpendicular to the magnetic field can explain this apparent anisotropic diffusion. A study of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in celery as a function of diffusion times ranging from 8 to 22 ms indicates that the motion is at most only slightly restricted. Therefore, although the effect is not seen in all types of samples, one must be aware that self-induced gradients may affect the ADC and may cause isotropic diffusion to appear anisotropic. In addition, NMR experiments that change diffusion-sensitizing gradient timings to study restricted diffusion change the effects of the self-induced gradients as well as the effect of barriers on the ADC, complicating interpretation.

  12. The use of dielectric and NMR measurements to determine the pore-scale location of organic contaminants. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.; Bryar, T.; Caputi, M.

    1997-07-15

    'The objective of the three-year research project is to investigate the effect of adsorbed organics on the dielectric and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) response of porous geological materials. This will allow us to assess the use of dielectric and NMR measurements at a site to determine whether organic contaminants are present in the central volume of the pore space (in a water-wet system) or are adsorbed to the solid surface. In addition, the authors propose to use laboratory dielectric and NMR measurements to study the kinetics of the adsorption and desorption of organics by conducting experiments where the authors control temperature and vary fluid chemistry. This project can be divided into three parts: sample preparation, NMR studies, dielectric studies. Over the past nine months the authors have made significant progress in sample preparation and NMR studies. As the plan is to conduct the NMR and dielectric measurements on the same set of samples, the authors delayed the start of the dielectric measurements until the first stage of NMR measurements were complete. Below the authors summarize the progress in sample preparation and NMR measurements, first briefly introducing the method used for the NMR measurements.'

  13. Measurement of Solution Viscosity via Diffusion-Ordered NMR Spectroscopy (DOSY)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Weibin; Kagan, Gerald; Hopson, Russell; Williard, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, the undergraduate chemistry curriculum includes nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Advanced NMR techniques are often taught including two-dimensional gradient-based experiments. An investigation of intermolecular forces including viscosity, by a variety of methods, is often integrated in the undergraduate physical and…

  14. Electrophoretic separator for purifying biologicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Mathematical expressions were developed to describe the interrelationships between operating requirements (capabilities), cell parameters, and system constraints in terms of design criteria definition. The mathematical model was programmed for computer solution. The model was exercised to identify performance-limiting characteristics, and analyses were conducted to predict operation in space of an experiment involving separation of four components. An engineering model of a flowing electrophoretic separator was constructed. The design is directed toward verifying improvements in resolution and throughput of a thicker cell than can be used on earth.

  15. A portable NMR sensor to measure dynamic changes in the amount of water in living stems or fruit and its potential to measure sap flow.

    PubMed

    Windt, Carel W; Blümler, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and NMR imaging (magnetic resonance imaging) offer the possibility to quantitatively and non-invasively measure the presence and movement of water. Unfortunately, traditional NMR hardware is expensive, poorly suited for plants, and because of its bulk and complexity, not suitable for use in the field. But does it need to be? We here explore how novel, small-scale portable NMR devices can be used as a flow sensor to directly measure xylem sap flow in a poplar tree (Populus nigra L.), or in a dendrometer-like fashion to measure dynamic changes in the absolute water content of fruit or stems. For the latter purpose we monitored the diurnal pattern of growth, expansion and shrinkage in a model fruit (bean pod, Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and in the stem of an oak tree (Quercus robur L.). We compared changes in absolute stem water content, as measured by the NMR sensor, against stem diameter variations as measured by a set of conventional point dendrometers, to test how well the sensitivities of the two methods compare and to investigate how well diurnal changes in trunk absolute water content correlate with the concomitant diurnal variations in stem diameter. Our results confirm the existence of a strong correlation between the two parameters, but also suggest that dynamic changes in oak stem water content could be larger than is apparent on the basis of the stem diameter variation alone. PMID:25595754

  16. Measuring diffusion-relaxation correlation maps using non-uniform field gradients of single-sided NMR devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira d'Eurydice, Marcel; Galvosas, Petrik

    2014-11-01

    Single-sided NMR systems are becoming a relevant tool in industry and laboratory environments due to their low cost, low maintenance and capacity to evaluate quantity and quality of hydrogen based materials. The performance of such devices has improved significantly over the last decade, providing increased field homogeneity, field strength and even controlled static field gradients. For a class of these devices, the configuration of the permanent magnets provides a linear variation of the magnetic field and can be used in diffusion measurements. However, magnet design depends directly on its application and, according to the purpose, the field homogeneity may significantly be compromised. This may prevent the determination of diffusion properties of fluids based on the natural inhomogeneity of the field using known techniques. This work introduces a new approach that extends the applicability of diffusion-editing CPMG experiments to NMR devices with highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields, which do not vary linearly in space. Herein, we propose a method to determine a custom diffusion kernel based on the gradient distribution, which can be seen as a signature of each NMR device. This new diffusion kernel is then utilised in the 2D inverse Laplace transform (2D ILT) in order to determine diffusion-relaxation correlation maps of homogeneous multi-phasic fluids. The experiments were performed using NMR MObile Lateral Explore (MOLE), which is a single-sided NMR device designed to maximise the volume at the sweet spot with enhanced depth penetration.

  17. Determination of the biogenic secondary organic aerosol fraction in the boreal forest by AMS and NMR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finessi, E.; Decesari, S.; Paglione, M.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Gilardoni, S.; Fuzzi, S.; Saarikoski, S.; Raatikainen, T.; Hillamo, R.; Allan, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Tiitta, P.; Laaksonen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Facchini, M. C.

    2011-08-01

    The study investigates the sources of fine organic aerosol (OA) in the boreal forest, based on measurements including both filter sampling (PM1) and online methods and carried out during a one-month campaign held in Hyytiälä, Finland, in spring 2007. Two aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMS, ToF-AMS) were employed to measure on-line air mass concentrations of major non-refractory aerosol species, while the water extracts of the filter samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for organic functional group characterization of the polar organic fraction of the aerosol. AMS and NMR spectra were processed separately by non-negative factorization algorithms, in order to apportion the main components underlying the submicrometer organic aerosol composition and depict them in terms of both mass fragmentation patterns and functional group compositions. The NMR results supported the AMS speciation of oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) into two main fractions, which could be generally labelled as more and less oxidized organics. The more oxidized component was characterized by a mass spectrum dominated by the m/z 44 peak, and in parallel by a NMR spectrum showing aromatic and aliphatic backbones highly substituted with oxygenated functional groups (carbonyls/carboxyls and hydroxyls). Such component, contributing on average 50 % of the OA mass throughout the observing period, was associated with pollution outbreaks from the Central Europe. The less oxidized component showed features consistent with less oxygenated aerosols and was enhanced in concomitance with air masses originating from the North-to-West sector, in agreement with previous investigations conducted at this site. NMR factor analysis was able to separate two distinct components under the less oxidized fraction of OA. One of these NMR-factors was associated to the formation of terrestrial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA), based on the comparison with spectral profiles obtained from

  18. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qing; Shi, Chaowei; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Longhua; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2015-02-13

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of {sup 15}N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S{sup 2}) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S{sup 2}) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S{sup 2} values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S{sup 2} parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S{sup 2} calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S{sup 2}) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models.

  19. Electrophoretic mobility of oil droplets in electrolyte and surfactant solutions.

    PubMed

    Wuzhang, Jiachen; Song, Yongxin; Sun, Runzhe; Pan, Xinxiang; Li, Dongqing

    2015-10-01

    Electrophoretic mobility of oil droplets of micron sizes in PBS and ionic surfactant solutions was measured in this paper. The experimental results show that, in addition to the applied electric field, the speed and the direction of electrophoretic motion of oil droplets depend on the surfactant concentration and on if the droplet is in negatively charged SDS solutions or in positively charged hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) solutions. The absolute value of the electrophoretic mobility increases with increased surfactant concentration before the surfactant concentration reaches to the CMC. It was also found that there are two vortices around the oil droplet under the applied electric field. The size of the vortices changes with the surfactant and with the electric field. The vortices around the droplet directly affect the drag of the flow field to the droplet motion and should be considered in the studies of electrophoretic mobility of oil droplets. The existence of the vortices will also influence the determination and the interpretation of the zeta potential of the oil droplets based on the measured mobility data. PMID:26140616

  20. NMR methods for in-situ biofilm metabolism studies: spatial and temporal resolved measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Majors, Paul D.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Wind, Robert A.

    2005-11-01

    We are developing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopy, spectroscopy and combined NMR/optical techniques to the study of biofilms. Objectives include: time and depth-resolved metabolite concentrations with isotropic spatial resolution on the order of 10 microns, metabolic pathways and flux rates, mass transport and ultimately their correlation with gene expression by optical microscopy in biofilms. These methods are being developed with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a model system, but are equally applicable to other biofilm systems of interest. Thus, spatially resolved NMR of biofilms is expected to contribute significantly to the understanding of adherent cell metabolism.

  1. Electrophoretic separator for purifying biologicals, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    A program to develop an engineering model of an electrophoretic separator for purifying biologicals is summarized. An extensive mathematical modeling study and numerous ground based tests were included. Focus was placed on developing an actual electrophoretic separator of the continuous flow type, configured and suitable for flight testing as a space processing applications rocket payload.

  2. Lateral diffusion of PEG-Lipid in magnetically aligned bicelles measured using stimulated echo pulsed field gradient 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Soong, Ronald; Macdonald, Peter M

    2005-01-01

    Lateral diffusion measurements of PEG-lipid incorporated into magnetically aligned bicelles are demonstrated using stimulated echo (STE) pulsed field gradient (PFG) proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Bicelles were composed of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) plus dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) (q = DMPC/DHPC molar ratio = 4.5) plus 1 mol % (relative to DMPC) dimyristoyl phosphatidylethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000] (DMPE-PEG 2000) at 25 wt % lipid. 1H NMR STE spectra of perpendicular aligned bicelles contained only resonances assigned to residual HDO and to overlapping contributions from a DMPE-PEG 2000 ethoxy headgroup plus DHPC choline methyl protons. Decay of the latter's STE intensity in the STE PFG 1H NMR experiment (g(z) = 244 G cm(-1)) yielded a DMPE-PEG 2000 (1 mol %, 35 degrees C) lateral diffusion coefficient D = 1.35 x 10(-11) m2 s(-1). Hence, below the "mushroom-to-brush" transition, DMPE-PEG 2000 lateral diffusion is dictated by its DMPE hydrophobic anchor. D was independent of the diffusion time, indicating unrestricted lateral diffusion over root mean-square diffusion distances of microns, supporting the "perforated lamellae" model of bicelle structure under these conditions. Overall, the results demonstrate the feasibility of lateral diffusion measurements in magnetically aligned bicelles using the STE PFG NMR technique. PMID:15475584

  3. The use of dielectric and NMR measurements to determine the pore-scale location of organic. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of the three-year research project is to investigate the effect of adsorbed organics on the dielectric and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) response of porous geological materials. This will allow the author to assess the use of dielectric and NMR measurements at a site to determine whether organic contaminants are present in the central volume of the pore space or are adsorbed to the solid surfaces. In addition, she proposes to use laboratory dielectric and NMR measurements to study the kinetics of the adsorption and desorption of organics. This report summarizes work completed after 20 months of a three-year project. The research involves the study of the NMR and dielectric behavior of sands with three types of solid surfaces: water-wet, where water spontaneously coats and adsorbs to the solid surfaces; hydrophobic, where water is repelled from the solid surfaces by an organosilane coating; and oil-wet, where oil coats the solid surfaces. The oil-wet case is representative of a contaminated soil, in which oil has become adsorbed to the solid surfaces.'

  4. Current-Distribution Measurement in Polymer Electrolyte Water Electrolysis Equipment and Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Using NMR Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokouchi, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kuniyasu; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Ito, Kohei

    In a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC), the current density through the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) is distributed along the electrode on the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). To increase the electric power density of a PEFC, it is necessary to locate local decreases in current density where electric power generation decreases due to a lack of hydrogen, flooding, and so on. Therefore, achieving a higher current density in a PEFC requires monitoring the local current density. We developed a new method to estimate the spatial distribution of current flowing through the MEA in a polymer electrolyte water electrolysis equipment (PEWEE) and a PEFC using Nuclear-Magnetic-Resonance (NMR) sensors. The magnetic field strength induced by current through the MEA in a PEWEE is acquired as the frequency shift of the NMR signal which is measured by the NMR sensor. The spatial distributions of the frequency shifts occurring along the MEA in a PEWEE and a PEFC was measured. In order to verify the method, the magnetic field strength induced by the current through the gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a PEWEE was analyzed theoretically under the assumption that the current through MEA was uniform. The frequency shift was then calculated as a function of the geometry of the GDL, current, and the position of the NMR sensor. From experimental and theoretical results, the frequency shift of the NMR signal is proportional to current density and depends on the position of the sensors. Using the measurement system, we also obtained the current distribution through the GDL in a PEFC generating electric power. In these studies, the experimental and theoretical results agree.

  5. Protein effective rotational correlation times from translational self-diffusion coefficients measured by PFG-NMR.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shenggen; Babon, Jeffrey J; Norton, Raymond S

    2008-08-01

    Molecular rotational correlation times are of interest for many studies carried out in solution, including characterization of biomolecular structure and interactions. Here we have evaluated the estimates of protein effective rotational correlation times from their translational self-diffusion coefficients measured by pulsed-field gradient NMR against correlation times determined from both collective and residue-specific (15)N relaxation analyses and those derived from 3D structure-based hydrodynamic calculations. The results show that, provided the protein diffusive behavior is coherent with the Debye-Stokes-Einstein model, translational diffusion coefficients provide rapid estimates with reasonable accuracy of their effective rotational correlation times. Effective rotational correlation times estimated from translational diffusion coefficients may be particularly beneficial in cases where i) isotopically labelled material is not available, ii) collective backbone (15)N relaxation rates are difficult to interpret because of the presence of flexible termini or loops, or iii) a full relaxation analysis is practically difficult because of limited sensitivity owing to low protein concentration, high molecular mass or low temperatures. PMID:18583018

  6. Studies of 3He polarization losses during NMR and EPR measurment and Polarized 3He target cell lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Peibo

    2014-09-01

    The 3He target cell polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping(SEOP) is used as a neutron substitute to study the inner structure of the neutron. In our lab, nuclear-magnetic-resonance(NMR) is used to measure the relative polarization and electron-paramagnetic-resonance(EPR) is used to measure the spin exchange EPR frequency shift parameter of potassium and rubidium in our target cell presented in magnetic fields. The alkali in the cell is used to facilitate the polarization of 3He. The first part of my work presents the study of the polarization losses of the cell during both NMR and EPR. With the help of improved RF coils, we keep the background noise received by pickup coils reasonably low, but three other kinds of losses are inevitable: losses during Adiabatic Fast Passage (AFP) sweep, losses due to flux change caused by different cell orientation with respect to RF fields and physical losses. Fortunately there is only flux change in NMR measurements. The second part of my work presents the study of cell lifetime improvement. The polarization decreases in a process called relaxation exponentially. The lifetime of a cell is how long it can keep its polarization. The typical lifetime of cells produced in our lab is about 22 hours. With a newly designed vacuum system. The 3He target cell polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping(SEOP) is used as a neutron substitute to study the inner structure of the neutron. In our lab, nuclear-magnetic-resonance(NMR) is used to measure the relative polarization and electron-paramagnetic-resonance(EPR) is used to measure the spin exchange EPR frequency shift parameter of potassium and rubidium in our target cell presented in magnetic fields. The alkali in the cell is used to facilitate the polarization of 3He. The first part of my work presents the study of the polarization losses of the cell during both NMR and EPR. With the help of improved RF coils, we keep the background noise received by pickup coils reasonably low, but

  7. Sensitivity and resolution of two-dimensional NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausik, Ravinath; Hürlimann, Martin D.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of 2D NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements for fluid typing applications is analyzed. In particular, we delineate the region in the diffusion - relaxation plane that can be determined with a given gradient strength and homogeneity, and compare the performance of the single and double echo encoding with the stimulated echo diffusion encoding. We show that the diffusion editing based approach is able to determine the diffusion coefficient only if the relaxation time T2 exceeds a cutoff value T2,cutoff , that scales like T2,cutoff ∝g - 2 / 3D - 1 / 3 . For stimulated echo encoding, the optimal diffusion encoding times (Td and δ), that provide the best diffusion sensitivity, rely only on the T1 /T2 ratios and not on the diffusion coefficients of the fluids or the applied gradient strengths. Irrespective of T1 , for high enough gradients (i.e. when γ2g2 DT23 >102), the Hahn echo based encoding is superior to encoding based on the stimulated echo. For weaker gradients, the stimulated echo is superior only if the T1 /T2 ratio is much larger than 1. For single component systems, the diffusion sensitivity is not adversely impacted by the uniformity of the gradients and the diffusion distributions can be well measured. The presence of non-uniform gradients can affect the determination of the diffusion distributions when you have two fluids of comparable T2 . In such situations the effective single component diffusion coefficient is always closer to the geometric mean diffusion coefficient of the two fluids.

  8. NMR-based approach to measure the free energy of transmembrane helix-helix interactions.

    PubMed

    Mineev, Konstantin S; Lesovoy, Dmitry M; Usmanova, Dinara R; Goncharuk, Sergey A; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Bocharov, Eduard V; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the energetic parameters of transmembrane helix-helix interactions is necessary for the establishment of a structure-energy relationship for α-helical membrane domains. A number of techniques have been developed to measure the free energies of dimerization and oligomerization of transmembrane α-helices, and all of these have their advantages and drawbacks. In this study we propose a methodology to determine the magnitudes of the free energy of interactions between transmembrane helices in detergent micelles. The suggested approach employs solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to determine the population of the oligomeric states of the transmembrane domains and introduces a new formalism to describe the oligomerization equilibrium, which is based on the assumption that both the dimerization of the transmembrane domains and the dissociation of the dimer can occur only upon the collision of detergent micelles. The technique has three major advantages compared with other existing approaches: it may be used to analyze both weak and relatively strong dimerization/oligomerization processes, it works well for the analysis of complex equilibria, e.g. when monomer, dimer and high-order oligomer populations are simultaneously present in the solution, and it can simultaneously yield both structural and energetic characteristics of the helix-helix interaction under study. The proposed methodology was applied to investigate the oligomerization process of transmembrane domains of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) and vascular endothelium growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), and allowed the measurement of the free energy of dimerization of both of these objects. In addition the proposed method was able to describe the multi-state oligomerization process of the VEGFR2 transmembrane domain. PMID:24036227

  9. Sensitivity and resolution of two-dimensional NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Kausik, Ravinath; Hürlimann, Martin D

    2016-09-01

    The performance of 2D NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements for fluid typing applications is analyzed. In particular, we delineate the region in the diffusion - relaxation plane that can be determined with a given gradient strength and homogeneity, and compare the performance of the single and double echo encoding with the stimulated echo diffusion encoding. We show that the diffusion editing based approach is able to determine the diffusion coefficient only if the relaxation time T2 exceeds a cutoff value T2,cutoff, that scales like T2,cutoff∝g(-2/3)D(-1/3). For stimulated echo encoding, the optimal diffusion encoding times (Td and δ), that provide the best diffusion sensitivity, rely only on the T1/T2 ratios and not on the diffusion coefficients of the fluids or the applied gradient strengths. Irrespective of T1, for high enough gradients (i.e. when γ(2)g(2)DT2(3)>10(2)), the Hahn echo based encoding is superior to encoding based on the stimulated echo. For weaker gradients, the stimulated echo is superior only if the T1/T2 ratio is much larger than 1. For single component systems, the diffusion sensitivity is not adversely impacted by the uniformity of the gradients and the diffusion distributions can be well measured. The presence of non-uniform gradients can affect the determination of the diffusion distributions when you have two fluids of comparable T2. In such situations the effective single component diffusion coefficient is always closer to the geometric mean diffusion coefficient of the two fluids. PMID:27389638

  10. Solute diffusion in ionic liquids, NMR measurements and comparisons to conventional solvents.

    PubMed

    Kaintz, Anne; Baker, Gary; Benesi, Alan; Maroncelli, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Diffusion coefficients of a variety of dilute solutes in the series of 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imides ([Prn1][Tf2N], n = 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10), trihexyltetracedecylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [P14,666][Tf2N], and assorted imidazolium ionic liquids are measured using pulsed field gradient (1)H NMR. These data, combined with available literature data, are used to try to uncover the solute and solvent characteristics most important in determining tracer diffusion rates. Discussion is framed in terms of departures from simple hydrodynamic predictions for translational friction using the ratio ζobs/ζSE, where ζobs is the observed friction, determined from the measured diffusion coefficient D via ζobs = kBT/D, and ζSE = 6πηR is the Stokes friction on a sphere of radius R (determined from the solute van der Waals volume) in a solvent with viscosity η. In the case of neutral solutes, the primary determinant of whether hydrodynamic predictions are accurate is the relative size of solute versus solvent molecules. A single correlation, albeit with considerable scatter, is found between ζobs/ζSE and the ratio of solute-to-solvent van der Waals volumes, ζobs/ζSE = {1 + a(VU/VV)(-p)}, with constants a = 1.93 and p = 1.88. In the case of small solutes, the observed friction is over 100-fold smaller than predictions of hydrodynamic models. The dipole moment of the solute has little effect on the friction, whereas solute charge has a marked effect. For monovalent solutes of size comparable to or smaller than the solvent ions, the observed friction is comparable to or even greater than what is predicted by hydrodynamics. These general trends are shown to be quite similar to what is observed for tracer diffusion in conventional solvents. PMID:23968276

  11. Sensitivity and resolution of two-dimensional NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausik, Ravinath; Hürlimann, Martin D.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of 2D NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements for fluid typing applications is analyzed. In particular, we delineate the region in the diffusion - relaxation plane that can be determined with a given gradient strength and homogeneity, and compare the performance of the single and double echo encoding with the stimulated echo diffusion encoding. We show that the diffusion editing based approach is able to determine the diffusion coefficient only if the relaxation time T2 exceeds a cutoff value T2,cutoff , that scales like T2,cutoff ∝g - 2 / 3D - 1 / 3 . For stimulated echo encoding, the optimal diffusion encoding times (Td and δ), that provide the best diffusion sensitivity, rely only on the T1 /T2 ratios and not on the diffusion coefficients of the fluids or the applied gradient strengths. Irrespective of T1 , for high enough gradients (i.e. when γ2g2DT23 >102), the Hahn echo based encoding is superior to encoding based on the stimulated echo. For weaker gradients, the stimulated echo is superior only if the T1 /T2 ratio is much larger than 1. For single component systems, the diffusion sensitivity is not adversely impacted by the uniformity of the gradients and the diffusion distributions can be well measured. The presence of non-uniform gradients can affect the determination of the diffusion distributions when you have two fluids of comparable T2 . In such situations the effective single component diffusion coefficient is always closer to the geometric mean diffusion coefficient of the two fluids.

  12. Properties of sesame oil by detailed 1H and 13C NMR assignments before and after ozonation and their correlation with iodine value, peroxide value, and viscosity measurements.

    PubMed

    Sega, Alessandro; Zanardi, Iacopo; Chiasserini, Luisa; Gabbrielli, Alessandro; Bocci, Velio; Travagli, Valter

    2010-02-01

    Gaseous ozone chemically reacts with unsaturated triglyceride substrates leading to ozonated derivatives with a wide potential applications, ranging from the petrochemical to the pharmaceutical industry. To date, an ultimate understanding of the ozone reactivity during sesame oil ozonation process as well as detailed (1)H and (13)C NMR assignments are lacking. A practical advantage of NMR is that a single NMR sample measurement can explain many issues, while similar analysis by traditional methods may require several independent and time-consuming measurements. Moreover, significant relationships among NMR spectra and both conventional chemical analysis and viscosity measurements have been found. Eventually, NMR could play an important role for quality attributes of ozonated oil derivatives. PMID:19900426

  13. A compact high-performance low-field NMR apparatus for measurements on fluids at very high pressures and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Freedman, R; Anand, V; Grant, B; Ganesan, K; Tabrizi, P; Torres, R; Catina, D; Ryan, D; Borman, C; Krueckl, C

    2014-02-01

    We discuss an innovative new high-performance apparatus for performing low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation times and diffusion measurements on fluids at very high pressures and high temperatures. The apparatus sensor design and electronics specifications allow for dual deployment either in a fluid sampling well logging tool or in a laboratory. The sensor and electronics were designed to function in both environments. This paper discusses the use of the apparatus in a laboratory environment. The operating temperature and pressure limits, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the new system exceed by a very wide margin what is currently possible. This major breakthrough was made possible by a revolutionary new sensor design that breaks many of the rules of conventional high pressure NMR sensor design. A metallic sample holder capable of operating at high pressures and temperatures is provided to contain the fluid under study. The sample holder has been successfully tested for operation up to 36 Kpsi. A solenoid coil wound on a slotted titanium frame sits inside the metallic sample holder and serves as an antenna to transmit RF pulses and receive NMR signals. The metal sample holder is sandwiched between a pair of gradient coils which provide a linear field gradient for pulsed field gradient diffusion measurements. The assembly sits in the bore of a low-gradient permanent magnet. The system can operate over a wide frequency range without the need for tuning the antenna to the Larmor frequency. The SNR measured on a water sample at room temperature is more than 15 times greater than that of the commercial low-field system in our laboratory. Thus, the new system provides for data acquisition more than 200 times faster than was previously possible. Laboratory NMR measurements of relaxations times and diffusion coefficients performed at pressures up to 25 Kpsi and at temperatures up to 175 °C with crude oils enlivened with dissolved hydrocarbon gases

  14. A compact high-performance low-field NMR apparatus for measurements on fluids at very high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, R.; Anand, V.; Grant, B.; Ganesan, K.; Tabrizi, P.; Torres, R.; Catina, D.; Ryan, D.; Borman, C.; Krueckl, C.

    2014-02-01

    We discuss an innovative new high-performance apparatus for performing low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation times and diffusion measurements on fluids at very high pressures and high temperatures. The apparatus sensor design and electronics specifications allow for dual deployment either in a fluid sampling well logging tool or in a laboratory. The sensor and electronics were designed to function in both environments. This paper discusses the use of the apparatus in a laboratory environment. The operating temperature and pressure limits, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the new system exceed by a very wide margin what is currently possible. This major breakthrough was made possible by a revolutionary new sensor design that breaks many of the rules of conventional high pressure NMR sensor design. A metallic sample holder capable of operating at high pressures and temperatures is provided to contain the fluid under study. The sample holder has been successfully tested for operation up to 36 Kpsi. A solenoid coil wound on a slotted titanium frame sits inside the metallic sample holder and serves as an antenna to transmit RF pulses and receive NMR signals. The metal sample holder is sandwiched between a pair of gradient coils which provide a linear field gradient for pulsed field gradient diffusion measurements. The assembly sits in the bore of a low-gradient permanent magnet. The system can operate over a wide frequency range without the need for tuning the antenna to the Larmor frequency. The SNR measured on a water sample at room temperature is more than 15 times greater than that of the commercial low-field system in our laboratory. Thus, the new system provides for data acquisition more than 200 times faster than was previously possible. Laboratory NMR measurements of relaxations times and diffusion coefficients performed at pressures up to 25 Kpsi and at temperatures up to 175 °C with crude oils enlivened with dissolved hydrocarbon gases

  15. A compact high-performance low-field NMR apparatus for measurements on fluids at very high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, R.; Anand, V. Ganesan, K.; Tabrizi, P.; Torres, R.; Grant, B.; Catina, D.; Ryan, D.; Borman, C.; Krueckl, C.

    2014-02-15

    We discuss an innovative new high-performance apparatus for performing low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation times and diffusion measurements on fluids at very high pressures and high temperatures. The apparatus sensor design and electronics specifications allow for dual deployment either in a fluid sampling well logging tool or in a laboratory. The sensor and electronics were designed to function in both environments. This paper discusses the use of the apparatus in a laboratory environment. The operating temperature and pressure limits, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the new system exceed by a very wide margin what is currently possible. This major breakthrough was made possible by a revolutionary new sensor design that breaks many of the rules of conventional high pressure NMR sensor design. A metallic sample holder capable of operating at high pressures and temperatures is provided to contain the fluid under study. The sample holder has been successfully tested for operation up to 36 Kpsi. A solenoid coil wound on a slotted titanium frame sits inside the metallic sample holder and serves as an antenna to transmit RF pulses and receive NMR signals. The metal sample holder is sandwiched between a pair of gradient coils which provide a linear field gradient for pulsed field gradient diffusion measurements. The assembly sits in the bore of a low-gradient permanent magnet. The system can operate over a wide frequency range without the need for tuning the antenna to the Larmor frequency. The SNR measured on a water sample at room temperature is more than 15 times greater than that of the commercial low-field system in our laboratory. Thus, the new system provides for data acquisition more than 200 times faster than was previously possible. Laboratory NMR measurements of relaxations times and diffusion coefficients performed at pressures up to 25 Kpsi and at temperatures up to 175 °C with crude oils enlivened with dissolved hydrocarbon gases

  16. High resolution NMR measurements using a 400 MHz NMR with an (RE)Ba2Cu3O7-x high-temperature superconducting inner coil: Towards a compact super-high-field NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, R.; Iguchi, S.; Hamada, M.; Matsumoto, S.; Suematsu, H.; Saito, A. T.; Li, J.; Nakagome, H.; Takao, T.; Takahashi, M.; Maeda, H.; Yanagisawa, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Use of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) inner coils in combination with conventional low-temperature superconducting (LTS) outer coils for an NMR magnet, i.e. a LTS/HTS NMR magnet, is a suitable option to realize a high-resolution NMR spectrometer with operating frequency >1 GHz. From the standpoint of creating a compact magnet, (RE: Rare earth) Ba2Cu3O7-x (REBCO) HTS inner coils which can tolerate a strong hoop stress caused by a Lorentz force are preferred. However, in our previous work on a first-generation 400 MHz LTS/REBCO NMR magnet, the NMR resolution and sensitivity were about ten times worse than that of a conventional LTS NMR magnet. The result was caused by a large field inhomogeneity in the REBCO coil itself and the shielding effect of a screening current induced in that coil. In the present paper, we describe the operation of a modified 400 MHz LTS/REBCO NMR magnet with an advanced field compensation technology using a combination of novel ferromagnetic shimming and an appropriate procedure for NMR spectrum line shape optimization. We succeeded in obtaining a good NMR line shape and 2D NOESY spectrum for a lysozyme aqueous sample. We believe that this technology is indispensable for the realization of a compact super-high-field high-resolution NMR.

  17. Solution NMR Experiment for Measurement of (15)N-(1)H Residual Dipolar Couplings in Large Proteins and Supramolecular Complexes.

    PubMed

    Eletsky, Alexander; Pulavarti, Surya V S R K; Beaumont, Victor; Gollnick, Paul; Szyperski, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    NMR residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) are exquisite probes of protein structure and dynamics. A new solution NMR experiment named 2D SE2 J-TROSY is presented to measure N-H RDCs for proteins and supramolecular complexes in excess of 200 kDa. This enables validation and refinement of their X-ray crystal and solution NMR structures and the characterization of structural and dynamic changes occurring upon complex formation. Accurate N-H RDCs were measured at 750 MHz (1)H resonance frequency for 11-mer 93 kDa (2)H,(15)N-labeled Trp RNA-binding attenuator protein tumbling with a correlation time τc of 120 ns. This is about twice as long as that for the most slowly tumbling system, for which N-H RDCs could be measured, so far, and corresponds to molecular weights of ∼200 kDa at 25 °C. Furthermore, due to the robustness of SE2 J-TROSY with respect to residual (1)H density from exchangeable protons, increased sensitivity at (1)H resonance frequencies around 1 GHz promises to enable N-H RDC measurement for even larger systems. PMID:26293598

  18. Measuring translational diffusion coefficients of peptides and proteins by PFG-NMR using band-selective RF pulses.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shenggen; Weber, Daniel K; Separovic, Frances; Keizer, David W

    2014-07-01

    Molecular translational self-diffusion, a measure of diffusive motion, provides information on the effective molecular hydrodynamic radius, as well as information on the properties of media or solution through which the molecule diffuses. Protein translational diffusion measured by pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) has seen increased application in structure and interaction studies, as structural changes or protein-protein interactions are often accompanied by alteration of their effective hydrodynamic radii. Unlike the analysis of complex mixtures by PFG-NMR, for monitoring changes of protein translational diffusion under various conditions, such as different stages of folding/unfolding, a partial region of the spectrum or even a single resonance is sufficient. We report translational diffusion coefficients measured by PFG-NMR with a modified stimulated echo (STE) sequence where band-selective pulses are employed for all three (1)H RF pulses. Compared with conventional non-selective sequence, e.g. the BPP-LED sequence, the advantage of this modified band-selective excitation short transient (BEST) version of STE (BEST-STE) sequence is multi-fold, namely: (1) potential sensitivity gain as in generalized BEST-based sequences, (2) water suppression is no longer required as the magnetization of solvent water is not perturbed during the measurement, and (3) dynamic range problems due to the presence of intense resonances from molecules other than the protein or peptide of interest, such as non-deuterated detergent micelles, are avoided. PMID:24824112

  19. Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow in cat brain using intracarotid 2H2O and 2H NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Detre, J.A.; Subramanian, V.H.; Mitchell, M.D.; Smith, D.S.; Kobayashi, A.; Zaman, A.; Leigh, J.S. Jr. )

    1990-05-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured in cat brain in vivo at 2.7 T using 2H NMR to monitor the washout of deuterated saline injected into both carotid arteries via the lingual arteries. In anesthetized cats, global CBF varied directly with PaCO{sub 2} over a range of 20-50 mm Hg, and the corresponding global CBF values ranged from 25 to 125 ml.100 g-1.min-1. Regional CBF was measured in a 1-cm axial section of cat brain using intracarotid deuterated saline and gradient-echo 2H NMR imaging. Blood flow images with a maximum pixel resolution of 0.3 x 0.3 x 1.0 cm were generated from the deuterium signal washout at each pixel. Image derived values for CBF agreed well with other determinations, and decreased significantly with hypocapnia.

  20. Increasing the sensitivity of NMR diffusion measurements by paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement, with application to ribosome–nascent chain complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cassaignau, Anaïs M. E.; Cabrita, Lisa D.

    2016-01-01

    The translational diffusion of macromolecules can be examined non-invasively by stimulated echo (STE) NMR experiments to accurately determine their molecular sizes. These measurements can be important probes of intermolecular interactions and protein folding and unfolding, and are crucial in monitoring the integrity of large macromolecular assemblies such as ribosome–nascent chain complexes (RNCs). However, NMR studies of these complexes can be severely constrained by their slow tumbling, low solubility (with maximum concentrations of up to 10 μM), and short lifetimes resulting in weak signal, and therefore continuing improvements in experimental sensitivity are essential. Here we explore the use of the paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement (PLRE) agent NiDO2A on the sensitivity of 15N XSTE and SORDID heteronuclear STE experiments, which can be used to monitor the integrity of these unstable complexes. We exploit the dependence of the PLRE effect on the gyromagnetic ratio and electronic relaxation time to accelerate recovery of 1H magnetization without adversely affecting storage on Nz during diffusion delays or introducing significant transverse relaxation line broadening. By applying the longitudinal relaxation-optimized SORDID pulse sequence together with NiDO2A to 70S Escherichia coli ribosomes and RNCs, NMR diffusion sensitivity enhancements of up to 4.5-fold relative to XSTE are achieved, alongside ~1.9-fold improvements in two-dimensional NMR sensitivity, without compromising the sample integrity. We anticipate these results will significantly advance the use of NMR to probe dynamic regions of ribosomes and other large, unstable macromolecular assemblies. PMID:26253948

  1. Electrophoretic cell separation by means of microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolka, A. J. K.; Nerren, B. H.; Margel, S.; Rembaum, A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of fixed human erythrocytes immunologically labeled with poly(vinylpyridine) or poly(glutaraldehyde) microspheres was reduced by approximately 40%. This observation was utilized in preparative scale electrophoretic separations of fixed human and turkey erythrocytes, the mobilities of which under normal physiological conditions do not differ sufficiently to allow their separation by continuous flow electrophoresis. We suggest that resolution in the electrophoretic separation of cell subpopulations, currently limited by finite and often overlapping mobility distributions, may be significantly enhanced by immunospecific labeling of target populations using microspheres.

  2. Comparison of double-quantum NMR normalization schemes to measure homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Saalwächter, Kay

    2014-08-14

    A recent implementation of a double-quantum (DQ) recoupling solid-state NMR experiment, dubbed DQ-DRENAR, provides a quantitative measure of homonuclear dipole-dipole coupling constants in multispin-1/2 systems. It was claimed to be more robust than another, previously known experiment relying on the recording of point-by-point normalized DQ build-up curves. Focusing on the POST-C7 and BaBa-xy16 DQ pulse sequences, I here present an in-depth comparison of both approaches based upon spin-dynamics simulations, stressing that they are based upon very similar principles and that they are largely equivalent when no imperfections are present. With imperfections, it is found that DQ-DRENAR/POST-C7 does not fully compensate for additional signal dephasing related to chemical shifts (CS) and their anisotropy (CSA), which over-compensates the intrinsic CS(A)-related efficiency loss of the DQ Hamiltonian and leads to an apparent cancellation effect. The simulations further show that the CS(A)-related dephasing in DQ-DRENAR can be removed by another phase cycle step or an improved super-cycled wideband version. Only the latter, or the normalized DQ build-up, are unaffected by CS(A)-related signal loss and yield clean pure dipolar-coupling information subject to unavoidable, pulse sequence specific performance reduction related to higher-order corrections of the dipolar DQ Hamiltonian. The intrinsically super-cycled BaBa-xy16 is shown to exhibit virtually no CS(A) related imperfection terms, but its dipolar performance is somewhat more challenged by CS(A) effects than POST-C7, which can however be compensated when applied at very fast MAS (>50 kHz). Practically, DQ-DRENAR uses a clever phase cycle separation to achieve a significantly shorter experimental time, which can also be beneficially employed in normalized DQ build-up experiments.

  3. Dynamic NMR microscopy measurement of the dynamics and flow partitioning of colloidal particles in a bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Cokelet, Giles R.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2011-05-01

    The flow and distribution of Newtonian, polymeric and colloid suspension fluids at low Reynolds numbers in bifurcations has importance in a wide range of disciplines, including microvascular physiology and microfluidic devices. A bifurcation consisting of circular capillaries laser etched into a hard polymer with inlet diameter 2.50 ± 0.01 mm, bifurcating to a small diameter outlet of 0.76 ± 0.01 mm and a large diameter outlet of 1.25 ± 0.01 mm is examined. Four distinct fluids (water, 0.25%wt xanthan gum, 8 and 22%vol hard-sphere colloidal suspensions) are flowed at flow rates from 10 to 30 ml/h corresponding to Reynolds numbers based on the entry flow from 0.001 to 8. PGSE NMR techniques are applied to obtain dynamic images of the fluids inside the bifurcation with spatial resolution of 59 × 59 μm/pixel in plane over a 200-μm-thick slice. Velocity in all three spatial directions is examined to determine the impact of secondary flows and characterize the transport in the bifurcation. The velocity data provide direct measurement of the volumetric distribution of the flow between the two channels as a function of flow rate. Water and the 8% colloidal suspension show a constant distribution with increasing flow rate, the xanthan gum shows an increase in fluid going into the larger outlet with higher flow rate, and the 22% colloidal suspension shows a decrease in fluid entering the larger channel with higher flow rate. For the colloidal particle flow, the distribution of colloid particles down the capillary is determined by examining the spectrally resolved propagator for the oil inside the core-shell particles in a direction perpendicular to the axial flow. Using dynamic magnetic resonance microscopy, the potential for using magnetic resonance for "particle counting" in a microscale bifurcation is thus demonstrated.

  4. Two-dimensional NMR measurement and point dipole model prediction of paramagnetic shift tensors in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, Brennan J.; Dey, Krishna K.; Davis, Michael C.; Baltisberger, Jay H.; Grandinetti, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    A new two-dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiment to separate and correlate the first-order quadrupolar and chemical/paramagnetic shift interactions is described. This experiment, which we call the shifting-d echo experiment, allows a more precise determination of tensor principal components values and their relative orientation. It is designed using the recently introduced symmetry pathway concept. A comparison of the shifting-d experiment with earlier proposed methods is presented and experimentally illustrated in the case of 2H (I = 1) paramagnetic shift and quadrupolar tensors of CuCl2ṡ2D2O. The benefits of the shifting-d echo experiment over other methods are a factor of two improvement in sensitivity and the suppression of major artifacts. From the 2D lineshape analysis of the shifting-d spectrum, the 2H quadrupolar coupling parameters are = 118.1 kHz and <ηq> = 0.88, and the 2H paramagnetic shift tensor anisotropy parameters are <ζP> = - 152.5 ppm and <ηP> = 0.91. The orientation of the quadrupolar coupling principal axis system (PAS) relative to the paramagnetic shift anisotropy principal axis system is given by ( α , β , γ ) = ( /π 2 , /π 2 , 0 ) . Using a simple ligand hopping model, the tensor parameters in the absence of exchange are estimated. On the basis of this analysis, the instantaneous principal components and orientation of the quadrupolar coupling are found to be in excellent agreement with previous measurements. A new point dipole model for predicting the paramagnetic shift tensor is proposed yielding significantly better agreement than previously used models. In the new model, the dipoles are displaced from nuclei at positions associated with high electron density in the singly occupied molecular orbital predicted from ligand field theory.

  5. Backbone dynamics of the oligomerization domain of p53 determined from 15N NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Clubb, R T; Omichinski, J G; Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1995-05-01

    The backbone dynamics of the tetrameric p53 oligomerization domain (residues 319-360) have been investigated by two-dimensional inverse detected heteronuclear 1H-15N NMR spectroscopy at 500 and 600 MHz. 15N T1, T2, and heteronuclear NOEs were measured for 39 of 40 non-proline backbone NH vectors at both field strengths. The overall correlation time for the tetramer, calculated from the T1/T2 ratios, was found to be 14.8 ns at 35 degrees C. The correlation times and amplitudes of the internal motions were extracted from the relaxation data using the model-free formalism (Lipari G, Szabo A, 1982, J Am Chem Soc 104:4546-4559). The internal dynamics of the structural core of the p53 oligomerization domain are uniform and fairly rigid, with residues 327-354 exhibiting an average generalized order parameter (S2) of 0.88 +/- 0.08. The N- and C-termini exhibit substantial mobility and are unstructured in the solution structure of p53. Residues located at the N- and C-termini, in the beta-sheet, in the turn between the alpha-helix and beta-sheet, and at the C-terminal end of the alpha-helix display two distinct internal motions that are faster than the overall correlation time. Fast internal motions (< or = 20 ps) are within the extreme narrowing limit and are of uniform amplitude. The slower motions (0.6-2.2 ns) are outside the extreme narrowing limit and vary in amplitude.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7663341

  6. Rapid amide proton exchange rates in peptides and proteins measured by solvent quenching and two-dimensional NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y. Z.; Paterson, Y.; Roder, H.

    1995-01-01

    In an effort to develop a more versatile quenched hydrogen exchange method for studies of peptide conformation and protein-ligand interactions, the mechanism of amide proton exchange for model peptides in DMSO-D2O mixtures was investigated by NMR methods. As in water, H-D exchange rates in the presence of 90% or 95% DMSO exhibit characteristic acid- and base-catalyzed processes and negligible water catalysis. However, the base-catalyzed rate is suppressed by as much as four orders of magnitude in 95% DMSO. As a result, the pH at which the exchange rate goes through a minimum is shifted up by about two pH units and the minimum exchange rate is approximately 100-fold reduced relative to that in D2O. The solvent-dependent decrease in base-catalyzed exchange rates can be attributed primarily to a large increase in pKa values for the NH group, whereas solvent effects on pKW seem less important. Addition of toluene and cyclohexane resulted in improved proton NMR chemical shift dispersion. The dramatic reduction in exchange rates observed in the solvent mixture at optimal pH makes it possible to apply 2D NMR for NH exchange measurements on peptides under conditions where rates are too rapid for direct NMR analysis. To test this solvent-quenching method, melittin was exchanged in D2O (pH 3.2, 12 degrees C), aliquots were quenched by rapid freezing, lyophilized, and dissolved in quenching buffer (70% DMSO, 25% toluene, 4% D2O, 1% cyclohexane, 75 mM dichloroacetic acid) for NMR analysis. Exchange rates for 21 amide protons were measured by recording 2D NMR spectra on a series of samples quenched at different times. The results are consistent with a monomeric unfolded conformation of melittin at acidic pH. The ability to trap labile protons by solvent quenching makes it possible to extend amide protection studies to peptide ligands or labile protons on the surface of a protein involved in macromolecular interactions. PMID:7613478

  7. Surface-NMR measurements of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 in a homogeneous sand aquifer in Skive, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walbrecker, Jan O.; Behroozmand, Ahmad A.

    2012-12-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (surface NMR) is a geophysical technique used in the exploration of shallow aquifers. It is based on measuring the NMR response of water molecules to excitation by electromagnetic pulses. By increasing the moment of applied pulses, successively deeper regions of an aquifer can be probed. The longitudinal relaxation time T1, determined from the NMR experiment, depends on pore size and can be potentially used to estimate hydraulic conductivity. A novel scheme was recently proposed that was shown theoretically to be more reliable for acquiring surface-NMR T1 data than traditional acquisition. In this proof-of-concept study we provide the first empirical evidence for the superiority of the novel scheme. We chose a survey site close to Skive, Denmark, where proximate boreholes indicate a homogeneous sandy aquifer in the top 30 m. The homogeneous composition implies that the distribution of pore sizes does not vary significantly across the formation. Because pore size is reflected by the T1 relaxation time, we therefore assume that the homogeneous aquifer can be characterized by a single T1 independent of the applied pulse moment (i.e., sampled depth region)—this is the benchmark condition we tested with our surface-NMR measurements. We collected surface-NMR T1 data employing the traditional as well as the novel acquisition scheme at various pulse moments. For each pulse moment we infer a T1 relaxation time based on extensively sampled data (14 delay-time data points). The T1 relaxation times obtained using the novel scheme show a constant value of about 820 ms (± 38 ms) for all pulse moments. In contrast, the T1 relaxation times determined using the traditional scheme vary significantly between 530 and 750 ms with pulse moment, which in an inversion would result in a spatial variation of T1 across the aquifer. The results based on the novel scheme are consistent with a homogeneous aquifer, which we expect based on the borehole

  8. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system is a device that electrophoretically separates and identifies normal and...

  9. Uncertainty measurement for automated macro program-processed quantitative proton NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Hays, Patrick A; Schoenberger, Torsten

    2014-11-01

    The evaluation of a fully automated quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (qNMR) processing program, including the determination of its processing uncertainty, and the calculations of the combined uncertainty of the qNMR result, is presented with details on the use of a trimmed purity average. Quantitative NMR spectra (1359) were collected over a 4-month period on various concentrations of pseudoephedrine HCl dissolved in D2O (0.0610 to 93.60 mg/mL) containing maleic acid (the internal standard) to yield signal-to-noise ratios ranging from 3 to 72,000 for analyte integral regions. The resulting 5436 purities exhibited a normal distribution about the best estimate of the true value. The median absolute deviation (MAD) statistical method was used to obtain a model of uncertainty relative to the signal-to-noise of the analyte's integral peaks. The model was then tested using different concentrations of known purity chloroquine diphosphate. qNMR results of numerous illicit heroin HCl samples were compared to those obtained by capillary electrophoresis. PMID:25273593

  10. In situ measurement of molecular diffusion during catalytic reaction by pulsed-field gradient NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Y.; Kaerger, J.; Hunger, B. ); Feoktistova, N.N.; Zhdanov, S.P. )

    1992-09-01

    Pulsed-field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy is applied to study the intracrystalline diffusivity of the reactant and product molecules during the conversion of cyclopropane to propene in Zeolite X. The diffusivities are found to be large enough that any influence of intracrystalline diffusion on the overall reaction in flow reactors may be excluded.

  11. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORETIC BEHAVIOR OF SEVEN SULFONYLUREAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic behavior of bensulfuron Me, sulfometuron Me, nicosulfuron (Accent), chlorimuron Et, thifensulfuron Me (Harmony), metsulfuron Me, and chlorsulfuron was studied under capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) conditio...

  12. Automated Parallel Capillary Electrophoretic System

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Kane, Thomas E.; Liu, Changsheng; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.; Kernan, John R.

    2000-02-22

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  13. Longitudinal NMR parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit during the growing process using a mobile magnetic resonance imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geya, Yuto; Kimura, Takeshi; Fujisaki, Hirotaka; Terada, Yasuhiko; Kose, Katsumi; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Gemma, Hiroshi; Sekozawa, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai, Kosui) were performed using an electrically mobile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with a 0.2 T and 16 cm gap permanent magnet. To measure the relaxation times and apparent diffusion coefficients of the pear fruit in relation to their weight, seven pear fruits were harvested almost every week during the cell enlargement period and measured in a research orchard. To evaluate the in situ relaxation times, six pear fruits were longitudinally measured for about two months during the same period. The measurements for the harvested samples showed good agreement with the in situ measurements. From the measurements of the harvested samples, it is clear that the relaxation rates of the pear fruits linearly change with the inverse of the linear dimension of the fruits, demonstrating that the relaxation mechanism is a surface relaxation. We therefore conclude that the mobile MRI system is a useful device for measuring the NMR parameters of outdoor living plants.

  14. SVD-Based Technique for Interference Cancellation and Noise Reduction in NMR Measurement of Time-Dependent Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjun; Ma, Hong; Yu, De; Zhang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment for measurement of time-dependent magnetic fields was introduced. To improve the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) of NMR data, a new method for interference cancellation and noise reduction (ICNR) based on singular value decomposition (SVD) was proposed. The singular values corresponding to the radio frequency interference (RFI) signal were identified in terms of the correlation between the FID data and the reference data, and then the RFI and noise were suppressed by setting the corresponding singular values to zero. The validity of the algorithm was verified by processing the measured NMR data. The results indicated that, this method has a significantly suppression of RFI and random noise, and can well preserve the FID signal. At present, the major limitation of the proposed SVD-based ICNR technique is that the threshold value for interference cancellation needs to be manually selected. Finally, the inversion waveform of the applied alternating magnetic field was given by fitting the processed experimental data. PMID:26959024

  15. SVD-Based Technique for Interference Cancellation and Noise Reduction in NMR Measurement of Time-Dependent Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenjun; Ma, Hong; Yu, De; Zhang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment for measurement of time-dependent magnetic fields was introduced. To improve the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) of NMR data, a new method for interference cancellation and noise reduction (ICNR) based on singular value decomposition (SVD) was proposed. The singular values corresponding to the radio frequency interference (RFI) signal were identified in terms of the correlation between the FID data and the reference data, and then the RFI and noise were suppressed by setting the corresponding singular values to zero. The validity of the algorithm was verified by processing the measured NMR data. The results indicated that, this method has a significantly suppression of RFI and random noise, and can well preserve the FID signal. At present, the major limitation of the proposed SVD-based ICNR technique is that the threshold value for interference cancellation needs to be manually selected. Finally, the inversion waveform of the applied alternating magnetic field was given by fitting the processed experimental data. PMID:26959024

  16. Charge carrier effective mass and concentration derived from combination of Seebeck coefficient and Te125 NMR measurements in complex tellurides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Levin, E. M.

    2016-06-27

    Thermoelectric materials utilize the Seebeck effect to convert heat to electrical energy. The Seebeck coefficient (thermopower), S, depends on the free (mobile) carrier concentration, n, and effective mass, m*, as S ~ m*/n2/3. The carrier concentration in tellurides can be derived from 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-lattice relaxation measurements. The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, depends on both n and m* as 1/T1~(m*)3/2n (within classical Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics) or as 1/T1~(m*)2n2/3 (within quantum Fermi-Dirac statistics), which challenges the correct determination of the carrier concentration in some materials by NMR. Here it is shown that the combination of the Seebeck coefficientmore » and 125Te NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements in complex tellurides provides a unique opportunity to derive the carrier effective mass and then to calculate the carrier concentration. This approach was used to study AgxSbxGe50–2xTe50, well-known GeTe-based high-efficiency tellurium-antimony-germanium-silver thermoelectric materials, where the replacement of Ge by [Ag+Sb] results in significant enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. Thus, values of both m* and n derived using this combination show that the enhancement of thermopower can be attributed primarily to an increase of the carrier effective mass and partially to a decrease of the carrier concentration when the [Ag+Sb] content increases.« less

  17. Real-time measurement of protein adsorption on electrophoretically deposited hydroxyapatite coatings and magnetron sputtered metallic films using the surface acoustic wave technique.

    PubMed

    Meininger, M; Schmitz, T; Wagner, T; Ewald, A; Gbureck, U; Groll, J; Moseke, C

    2016-04-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensors are highly sensitive for mass binding and are therefore used to detect protein-protein and protein-antibody interactions. Whilst the standard surface of the chips is a thin gold film, measurements on implant- or bone-like surfaces could significantly enhance the range of possible applications for this technique. The aim of this study was to establish methods to coat biosensor chips with Ti, TiN, and silver-doped TiN using physical vapor deposition as well as with hydroxyapatite by electrophoresis. To demonstrate that protein adsorption can be detected on these surfaces, binding experiments with fibronectin and fibronectin-specific antibodies have been performed with the coatings, which successfully proved the applicability of PVD and EPD for SAW biosensor functionalization. PMID:26838860

  18. 77Se Chemical Shift Tensor of L-selenocystine: Experimental NMR Measurements and Quantum Chemical Investigations of Structural Effects

    PubMed Central

    Struppe, Jochem; Zhang, Yong; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    The genetically encoded amino acid selenocysteine and its dimeric form, selenocystine, are both utilized by nature. They are found in active sites of selenoproteins, enzymes that facilitate a diverse range of reactions, including the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and regulation of redox pathways. Due to selenocysteine and selenocystine’s specialized biological roles, it is of interest to examine their 77Se NMR properties and how those can in turn be employed to study biological systems. We report the solid-state 77Se NMR measurements of the L-selenocystine chemical shift tensor, which provides the first experimental chemical shift tensor information of selenocysteine-containing systems. Quantum chemical calculations of L-selenocystine models were performed to help understand various structural effects on 77Se L-selenocystine’s chemical shift tensor. The effects of protonation state, protein environment, and substituent of selenium-bonded carbon on the isotropic chemical shift were found to be in a range of ca. 10–20 ppm. However, the conformational effect was found to be much larger, spanning ca. 600 ppm for the C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle range of −180° to +180°. Our calculations show that around the minimum energy structure with a C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle of ca. −90°, the energy costs to alter the dihedral angle in the range from −120° to −60° are within only 2.5 kcal/mol. This makes it possible to realize these conformations in a protein or crystal environment. 77Se NMR was found to be a sensitive probe to such changes and has an isotropic chemical shift range of 272±30 ppm for this energetically favorable conformation range. The energy-minimized structures exhibited calculated isotropic shifts that lay within 3–9% of those reported in previous solution NMR studies. The experimental solid-state NMR isotropic chemical shift is near the lower bound of this calculated range for these readily accessible conformations. These results

  19. (77)Se chemical shift tensor of L-selenocystine: experimental NMR measurements and quantum chemical investigations of structural effects.

    PubMed

    Struppe, Jochem; Zhang, Yong; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2015-03-01

    The genetically encoded amino acid selenocysteine and its dimeric form, selenocystine, are both utilized by nature. They are found in active sites of selenoproteins, enzymes that facilitate a diverse range of reactions, including the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and regulation of redox pathways. Due to selenocysteine and selenocystine's specialized biological roles, it is of interest to examine their (77)Se NMR properties and how those can in turn be employed to study biological systems. We report the solid-state (77)Se NMR measurements of the L-selenocystine chemical shift tensor, which provides the first experimental chemical shift tensor information on selenocysteine-containing systems. Quantum chemical calculations of L-selenocystine models were performed to help understand various structural effects on (77)Se L-selenocystine's chemical shift tensor. The effects of protonation state, protein environment, and substituent of selenium-bonded carbon on the isotropic chemical shift were found to be in a range of ca. 10-20 ppm. However, the conformational effect was found to be much larger, spanning ca. 600 ppm for the C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle range of -180° to +180°. Our calculations show that around the minimum energy structure with a C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle of ca. -90°, the energy costs to alter the dihedral angle in the range from -120° to -60° are within only 2.5 kcal/mol. This makes it possible to realize these conformations in a protein or crystal environment. (77)Se NMR was found to be a sensitive probe to such changes and has an isotropic chemical shift range of 272 ± 30 ppm for this energetically favorable conformation range. The energy-minimized structures exhibited calculated isotropic shifts that lay within 3-9% of those reported in previous solution NMR studies. The experimental solid-state NMR isotropic chemical shift is near the lower bound of this calculated range for these readily accessible conformations. These results suggest

  20. Two-dimensional NMR measurement and point dipole model prediction of paramagnetic shift tensors in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Walder, Brennan J.; Davis, Michael C.; Grandinetti, Philip J.; Dey, Krishna K.; Baltisberger, Jay H.

    2015-01-07

    A new two-dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiment to separate and correlate the first-order quadrupolar and chemical/paramagnetic shift interactions is described. This experiment, which we call the shifting-d echo experiment, allows a more precise determination of tensor principal components values and their relative orientation. It is designed using the recently introduced symmetry pathway concept. A comparison of the shifting-d experiment with earlier proposed methods is presented and experimentally illustrated in the case of {sup 2}H (I = 1) paramagnetic shift and quadrupolar tensors of CuCl{sub 2}⋅2D{sub 2}O. The benefits of the shifting-d echo experiment over other methods are a factor of two improvement in sensitivity and the suppression of major artifacts. From the 2D lineshape analysis of the shifting-d spectrum, the {sup 2}H quadrupolar coupling parameters are 〈C{sub q}〉 = 118.1 kHz and 〈η{sub q}〉 = 0.88, and the {sup 2}H paramagnetic shift tensor anisotropy parameters are 〈ζ{sub P}〉 = − 152.5 ppm and 〈η{sub P}〉 = 0.91. The orientation of the quadrupolar coupling principal axis system (PAS) relative to the paramagnetic shift anisotropy principal axis system is given by (α,β,γ)=((π)/2 ,(π)/2 ,0). Using a simple ligand hopping model, the tensor parameters in the absence of exchange are estimated. On the basis of this analysis, the instantaneous principal components and orientation of the quadrupolar coupling are found to be in excellent agreement with previous measurements. A new point dipole model for predicting the paramagnetic shift tensor is proposed yielding significantly better agreement than previously used models. In the new model, the dipoles are displaced from nuclei at positions associated with high electron density in the singly occupied molecular orbital predicted from ligand field theory.

  1. Moving NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico; Danieli, Ernesto; Gong, Qingxia; Greferath, Marcus; Haber, Agnes; Kolz, Jürgen; Perlo, Juan

    2008-12-01

    Initiated by the use of NMR for well logging, portable NMR instruments are being developed for a variety of novel applications in materials testing and process analysis and control. Open sensors enable non-destructive testing of large objects, and small, cup-size magnets become available for high throughput analysis by NMR relaxation and spectroscopy. Some recent developments of mobile NMR are reviewed which delineate the direction into which portable NMR is moving.

  2. Aggregation properties and structural studies of anticancer drug Irinotecan in DMSO solution based on NMR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amelio, N.; Aroulmoji, V.; Toraldo, A.; Sundaraganesan, N.; Anbarasan, P. M.

    2012-04-01

    Irinotecan is an antitumor drug mostly used in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Its efficacy is influenced by the chemical state of the molecule undergoing chemical equilibria, metabolic changes and photodegradation. In this work, we describe the chemical equilibria of the drug in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The energetic barrier for hindered rotation around the bond connecting the piperidino—piperidino moiety with the camptothecin-like fragment was evaluated. Furthermore, we showed how the molecule aggregates in DMSO solution forming dimeric species able to prevent its degradation. The equilibrium constant for self-aggregation was determined by NMR based on the assumption of the isodesmic model. The formation of a dimer was highlighted by NMR diffusion ordered spectroscopy (NMR-DOSY) experiments at the concentrations used. Structural features of the complex were inferred by NOE and 13C chemical shift data. Molecular modelling of the complex driven by experimental data, lead to a structure implying the formation of two hydrogen bonds involving the lactone ring whose opening is one of the main causes of drug degradation. This species is probably responsible for the improved stability of the drug at concentrations higher than 1 mM.

  3. A 1H NMR assay for measuring the photostationary States of photoswitchable ligands.

    PubMed

    Banghart, Matthew R; Trauner, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Incorporation of photoisomerizable chromophores into small molecule ligands represents a general approach for reversibly controlling protein function with light. Illumination at different wavelengths produces photostationary states (PSSs) consisting of different ratios of photoisomers. Thus optimal implementation of photoswitchable ligands requires knowledge of their wavelength sensitivity. Using an azobenzene-based ion channel blocker as an example, this protocol describes a (1)H NMR assay that can be used to precisely determine the isomeric content of photostationary states (PSSs) as a function of illumination wavelength. Samples of the photoswitchable ligand are dissolved in deuterated water and analyzed by UV/VIS spectroscopy to identify the range of illumination wavelengths that produce PSSs. The PSSs produced by these wavelengths are quantified using (1)H NMR spectroscopy under continuous irradiation through a monochromator-coupled fiber-optic cable. Because aromatic protons of azobenzene trans and cis isomers exhibit sufficiently different chemical shifts, their relative abundances at each PSS can be readily determined by peak integration. Constant illumination during spectrum acquisition is essential to accurately determine PSSs from molecules that thermally relax on the timescale of minutes or faster. This general protocol can be readily applied to any photoswitch that exhibits distinct (1)H NMR signals in each photoisomeric state. PMID:23494375

  4. Tortuosity measurement and the effects of finite pulse widths on xenon gas diffusion NMR studies of porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Hurlimann, M. D.; Sen, P. N.; Schwartz, L. M.; Patz, S.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    We have extended the utility of NMR as a technique to probe porous media structure over length scales of approximately 100-2000 microm by using the spin 1/2 noble gas 129Xe imbibed into the system's pore space. Such length scales are much greater than can be probed with NMR diffusion studies of water-saturated porous media. We utilized Pulsed Gradient Spin Echo NMR measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, D(t), of the xenon gas filling the pore space to study further the measurements of both the pore surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V(p), and the tortuosity (pore connectivity) of the medium. In uniform-size glass bead packs, we observed D(t) decreasing with increasing t, reaching an observed asymptote of approximately 0.62-0.65D(0), that could be measured over diffusion distances extending over multiple bead diameters. Measurements of D(t)/D(0) at differing gas pressures showed this tortuosity limit was not affected by changing the characteristic diffusion length of the spins during the diffusion encoding gradient pulse. This was not the case at the short time limit, where D(t)/D(0) was noticeably affected by the gas pressure in the sample. Increasing the gas pressure, and hence reducing D(0) and the diffusion during the gradient pulse served to reduce the previously observed deviation of D(t)/D(0) from the S/V(p) relation. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate between the long and short time limits in D(t). While the short time D(t) points lay above the interpolation line in the case of small beads, due to diffusion during the gradient pulse on the order of the pore size, it was also noted that the experimental D(t) data fell below the Pade line in the case of large beads, most likely due to finite size effects.

  5. Tortuosity measurement and the effects of finite pulse widths on xenon gas diffusion NMR studies of porous media.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Hürlimann, M D; Sen, P N; Schwartz, L M; Patz, S; Walsworth, R L

    2001-01-01

    We have extended the utility of NMR as a technique to probe porous media structure over length scales of approximately 100-2000 microm by using the spin 1/2 noble gas 129Xe imbibed into the system's pore space. Such length scales are much greater than can be probed with NMR diffusion studies of water-saturated porous media. We utilized Pulsed Gradient Spin Echo NMR measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, D(t), of the xenon gas filling the pore space to study further the measurements of both the pore surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V(p), and the tortuosity (pore connectivity) of the medium. In uniform-size glass bead packs, we observed D(t) decreasing with increasing t, reaching an observed asymptote of approximately 0.62-0.65D(0), that could be measured over diffusion distances extending over multiple bead diameters. Measurements of D(t)/D(0) at differing gas pressures showed this tortuosity limit was not affected by changing the characteristic diffusion length of the spins during the diffusion encoding gradient pulse. This was not the case at the short time limit, where D(t)/D(0) was noticeably affected by the gas pressure in the sample. Increasing the gas pressure, and hence reducing D(0) and the diffusion during the gradient pulse served to reduce the previously observed deviation of D(t)/D(0) from the S/V(p) relation. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate between the long and short time limits in D(t). While the short time D(t) points lay above the interpolation line in the case of small beads, due to diffusion during the gradient pulse on the order of the pore size, it was also noted that the experimental D(t) data fell below the Pade line in the case of large beads, most likely due to finite size effects. PMID:11445310

  6. Measurement of Lipid Accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris via Flow Cytometry and Liquid-State ¹H NMR Spectroscopy for Development of an NMR-Traceable Flow Cytometry Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bono Jr., Michael S.; Garcia, Ravi D.; Sri-Jayantha, Dylan V.; Ahner, Beth A.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we cultured Chlorella vulgaris cells with a range of lipid contents, induced via nitrogen starvation, and characterized them via flow cytometry, with BODIPY 505/515 as a fluorescent lipid label, and liquid-state 1H NMR spectroscopy. In doing so, we demonstrate the utility of calibrating flow cytometric measurements of algal lipid content using triacylglyceride (TAG, also known as triacylglycerol or triglyceride) content per cell as measured via quantitative 1H NMR. Ensemble-averaged fluorescence of BODIPY-labeled cells was highly correlated with average TAG content per cell measured by bulk NMR, with a linear regression yielding a linear fit with r2 = 0.9974. This correlation compares favorably to previous calibrations of flow cytometry protocols to lipid content measured via extraction, and calibration by NMR avoids the time and complexity that is generally required for lipid quantitation via extraction. Flow cytometry calibrated to a direct measurement of TAG content can be used to investigate the distribution of lipid contents for cells within a culture. Our flow cytometry measurements showed that Chlorella vulgaris cells subjected to nitrogen limitation exhibited higher mean lipid content but a wider distribution of lipid content that overlapped the relatively narrow distribution of lipid content for replete cells, suggesting that nitrogen limitation induces lipid accumulation in only a subset of cells. Calibration of flow cytometry protocols using direct in situ measurement of TAG content via NMR will facilitate rapid development of more precise flow cytometry protocols, enabling investigation of algal lipid accumulation for development of more productive algal biofuel feedstocks and cultivation protocols. PMID:26267664

  7. Electrophoretic mobilities of erythrocytes in various buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    The calibration of space flight equipment depends on a source of standard test particles, this test particle of choice is the fixed erythrocyte. Erythrocytes from different species have different electrophoretic mobilities. Electrophoretic mobility depends upon zeta potential, which, in turn depends upon ionic strength. Zeta potential decreases with increasing ionic strength, so cells have high electrophoretic mobility in space electrophoresis buffers than in typical physiological buffers. The electrophoretic mobilities of fixed human, rat, and rabbit erythrocytes in 0.145 M salt and buffers of varying ionic strength, temperature, and composition, to assess the effects of some of the unique combinations used in space buffers were characterized. Several effects were assessed: glycerol or DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) were considered for use as cryoprotectants. The effect of these substances on erythrocyte electrophoretic mobility was examined. The choice of buffer depended upon cell mobility. Primary experiments with kidney cells established the choice of buffer and cryoprotectant. A nonstandard temperature of EPM in the suitable buffer was determined. A loss of ionic strength control occurs in the course of preparing columns for flight, the effects of small increases in ionic strength over the expected low values need to be evaluated.

  8. Local electromagnetic properties of magnetic pnictides: a comparative study probed by NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Majumder, M; Ghoshray, K; Ghoshray, A; Pal, A; Awana, V P S

    2013-05-15

    (75)As and (31)P NMR studies are performed in PrCoAsO and NdCoPO respectively. The Knight shift data in PrCoAsO indicate the presence of an antiferromagnetic interaction between the 4f moments along the c axis in the ferromagnetic state of Co 3d moments. We propose a possible spin structure in this system. The (75)As quadrupolar coupling constant, νQ, increases continuously with decrease of temperature and is found to vary linearly with the intrinsic spin susceptibility, K(iso). This indicates the possibility of the presence of a coupling between charge density and spin density fluctuations. Further, the (31)P NMR Knight shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) in the paramagnetic state of NdCoPO indicate that the differences of LaCoPO and NdCoPO from SmCoPO are due to the decrement of the interlayer separation and not due to the moments of the 4f electrons. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) in NdCoPO shows weak anisotropy at 300 K. Using the self-consistent renormalization (SCR) theory of itinerant ferromagnets, it is shown that in the ab plane, the spin fluctuations are three-dimensional ferromagnetic in nature. From SCR theory the important spin-fluctuation parameters (T0, TA, F¯1) are evaluated. The similarities and dissimilarities of the NMR results in As and P based systems with different rare earths are also discussed. PMID:23604391

  9. Self-diffusion measurements by a mobile single-sided NMR sensor with improved magnetic field gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rata, D. G.; Casanova, F.; Perlo, J.; Demco, D. E.; Blümich, B.

    2006-06-01

    A simple and fast method of measuring self-diffusion coefficients of protonated systems with a mobile single-sided NMR sensor is discussed. The NMR sensor uses a magnet geometry that generates a highly flat sensitive volume where a strong and highly uniform static magnetic field gradient is defined. Self-diffusion coefficients were measured by Hahn- and stimulated echoes detected in the presence of the uniform magnetic field gradient of the static field. To improve the sensitivity of these experiments, a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence was applied after the main diffusion-encoding period. By adding the echo train the experimental time was strongly shortened, allowing the measurement of complete diffusion curves in less than 1 min. This method has been tested by measuring the self-diffusion coefficients D of various organic solvents and poly(dimethylsiloxane) samples with different molar masses. Diffusion coefficients were also measured for n-hexane absorbed at saturation in natural rubber with different cross-link densities. The results show a dependence on the concentration that is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. Moreover, the stimulated-echo sequence was successfully used to measure the diffusion coefficient as a function of the evolution time in systems with restricted diffusion. This type of experiment proves the pore geometry and gives access to the surface-to-volume ratio. It was applied to measure the diffusion of water in sandstones and sheep Achilles tendon. Thanks to the strong static gradient G0, all diffusion coefficients could be measured without having to account for relaxation during the pulse sequence.

  10. The electrophoretic mobility of montmorillonite. Zeta potential and surface conductivity effects.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Philippe; Tournassat, Christophe; Bernard, Olivier; Devau, Nicolas; Azaroual, Mohamed

    2015-08-01

    Clay minerals have remarkable adsorption properties because of their high specific surface area and surface charge density, which give rise to high electrochemical properties. These electrochemical properties cannot be directly measured, and models must be developed to estimate the electrostatic potential at the vicinity of clay mineral surfaces. In this context, an important model prediction is the zeta potential, which is thought to be representative of the electrostatic potential at the plane of shear. The zeta potential is usually deduced from electrophoretic measurements but for clay minerals, high surface conductivity decreases their mobility, thereby impeding straightforward interpretation of these measurements. By combining a surface complexation, conductivity and electrophoretic mobility model, we were able to reconcile zeta potential predictions with electrophoretic measurements on montmorillonite immersed in NaCl aqueous solutions. The electrochemical properties of the Stern and diffuse layers of the basal surfaces were computed by a triple-layer model. Computed zeta potentials have considerably higher amplitudes than measured zeta potentials calculated with the Smoluchowski equation. Our model successfully reproduced measured electrophoretic mobilities. This confirmed our assumptions that surface conductivity may be responsible for montmorillonite's low electrophoretic mobility and that the zeta potential may be located at the beginning of the diffuse layer. PMID:25875489

  11. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions. PMID:27187211

  12. Noninvasive estimation of oxygen consumption in human calf muscle through combined NMR measurements of ASL perfusion and T₂ oxymetry.

    PubMed

    Decorte, Nicolas; Buehler, Tania; Caldas de Almeida Araujo, Ericky; Vignaud, Alexandre; Carlier, Pierre G

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring muscle O2 consumption (V˙O2) noninvasively with a combination of functional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging methods, and to verify that changes in muscle V˙O2 can be detected with a temporal resolution compatible with physiological investigation and patient ease. T2-based oxymetry of arterial and venous blood was combined with the arterial-spin labeling (ASL)-based determination of muscle perfusion. These measurements were performed on 8 healthy volunteers under normoxic and hypoxic conditions in order to assess the sensitivity of measurements over a range of saturation values. Blood samples were drawn simultaneously and used to titrate blood T2 measurements versus hemoglobin O2 saturation (%HbO2) in vitro. The in vitro calibration curve of blood T2 fitted very well with the %HbO2 (r(2): 0.95). The in vivo venous T2 measurements agreed well with the in vitro measurements (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.61-0.91). Oxygen extraction at rest decreased in the calf muscles subjected to hypoxia (p = 0.031). The combination of unaltered muscle perfusion and pinched arteriovenous O2 difference (p = 0.038) pointed towards a reduced calf muscle V˙O2 during transient hypoxia (p = 0.018). The results of this pilot study confirmed that muscle O2 extraction and V˙O2 can be estimated noninvasively using a combination of functional NMR techniques. Further studies are needed to confirm the usefulness in a larger sample of volunteers and patients. PMID:25531648

  13. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as 13C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. 13C) and abundant I (e.g. 1H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of 1H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance L-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  14. Synergy between NMR measurements and MD simulations of protein/RNA complexes: application to the RRMs, the most common RNA recognition motifs.

    PubMed

    Krepl, Miroslav; Cléry, Antoine; Blatter, Markus; Allain, Frederic H T; Sponer, Jiri

    2016-07-27

    RNA recognition motif (RRM) proteins represent an abundant class of proteins playing key roles in RNA biology. We present a joint atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) and experimental study of two RRM-containing proteins bound with their single-stranded target RNAs, namely the Fox-1 and SRSF1 complexes. The simulations are used in conjunction with NMR spectroscopy to interpret and expand the available structural data. We accumulate more than 50 μs of simulations and show that the MD method is robust enough to reliably describe the structural dynamics of the RRM-RNA complexes. The simulations predict unanticipated specific participation of Arg142 at the protein-RNA interface of the SRFS1 complex, which is subsequently confirmed by NMR and ITC measurements. Several segments of the protein-RNA interface may involve competition between dynamical local substates rather than firmly formed interactions, which is indirectly consistent with the primary NMR data. We demonstrate that the simulations can be used to interpret the NMR atomistic models and can provide qualified predictions. Finally, we propose a protocol for 'MD-adapted structure ensemble' as a way to integrate the simulation predictions and expand upon the deposited NMR structures. Unbiased μs-scale atomistic MD could become a technique routinely complementing the NMR measurements of protein-RNA complexes. PMID:27193998

  15. Pulsed NMR Measurements in Superfluid 3He in Aerogel of 97.5 % Porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Osamu; Kado, Ryusuke; Obara, Ken; Yano, Hideo; Hata, Tohru; Nakagawa, Hisashi; Yokogawa, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Masaru

    2006-09-07

    Aerogel is made of thin SiO2 strands of a few nanometer diameter. Since the coherence length of superfluid 3He is much longer than the silica strand diameter and is nearly the same as the mean distance between silica strands, aerogel gives us a chance to study the effects of an impurity in superfluid 3He. To investigate what superfluid states are formed in aerogel, we performed a pulsed NMR experiment. Both the A-like and B-like phases show a tipping angle dependent frequency shift in the FID signal after an rf pulse. The dependence in the A-like phase is well explained by an expectation based on the ''robust phase'' introduced by Fomin, while the FID frequencies in the B-like phase behave similarly to those observed in the bulk B phase in a slab geometry with the initial condition of a non-Leggett configuration.

  16. Analyses of gonococcal H8 antigen. Surface location, inter- and intrastrain electrophoretic heterogeneity, and unusual two-dimensional electrophoretic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, P J; Hayes, S F; Mayer, L W; Shafer, W M; Tessier, S L

    1985-12-01

    -dimensional migration characteristics (as measured by antigenicity) were completely destroyed by proteinase K digestion. Activity of H8 polyclonal antibodies to the antigens in two-dimensional gels was completely removed by adsorption of formalin-fixed whole cells, but was not affected by adsorption with LPS. These electrophoretic characteristics may reflect the close association of some nonprotein constituent, perhaps lipid or carbohydrate or both. PMID:2415662

  17. Electron Correlations in Superconductor Rh17S15 Studied by 103Rh NMR and Specific Heat Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Takehide; Kanda, Keiji; Motoyama, Gaku; Mito, Takeshi; Ueda, Ko-ichi; Kohara, Takao; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Harima, Hisatomo

    2010-11-01

    The electronic state of superconductor Rh17S15 has been investigated by 103Rh nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and specific heat measurements. We have identified the observed NMR lines corresponding to four inequivalent Rh sites in the cubic unit cell and obtained the site-selective information of each site. The spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 indicates that the 4d electrons from the Rh 24m site are the most responsible for the large electronic specific heat coefficient γ. This conclusion is supported by the energy band calculation. Considering the experimental results and the band calculation, we concluded that the γ value is enhanced because of the electron correlations of Rh 4d bands. In the superconducting state, an exponential decrease of both 1/T1 and the electron specific heat are observed, revealing the isotropic superconducting gap with 2Δ/kBTc=4.0. In addition, the decrease of the spin part of the Knight shift indicates the spin-singlet Cooper pair formation. These results demonstrate that Rh17S15 is an s-wave superconductor with enhanced effective electron mass.

  18. Electrophoretic transport equations - Electrophoretic models based on migration only and their interrelationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thormann, Wolfgang; Mosher, Richard A.

    1985-01-01

    The general equations which describe the electrophoretic transport of components in solution are restated using Newman's general concept of mobilities. A concise derivation of the moving boundary equation and the regulating function from the continuity equation is presented. Various other regulating principles across moving and stationary boundaries are also discussed, which permits a review of the features and interrelationships of the electrophoretic models based on electromigration only. The effect of considering an interactive (dissociating) solvent on the mathematical treatment is discussed.

  19. NMR logging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  20. Protein electrophoretic migration data from custom and commercial gradient gels.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew J; Roman, Brandon; Norstrom, Eric M

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents data related to the article "A method for easily customizable gradient gel electrophoresis" (A.J. Miller, B. Roman, E.M. Norstrom, 2016) [1]. Data is presented on the rate of electrophoretic migration of proteins in both hand-poured and commercially acquired acrylamide gradient gels. For each gel, migration of 9 polypeptides of various masses was measured upon completion of gel electrophoresis. Data are presented on the migration of proteins within separate lanes of the same gel as well as migration rates from multiple gels. PMID:27622203

  1. Measuring the Longitudinal NMR Relaxation Rates of Fast Relaxing Nuclei Using a Signal Eliminating Relaxation Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, D. Flemming; Led, Jens J.

    2001-08-01

    A new experiment for selective determination of the relaxation rates of fast relaxing NMR signals is presented. The experiment is derived from the conventional inversion recovery experiment by substituting the 180° inversion pulse of this experiment with a signal eliminating relaxation filter (SERF) consisting of three 180° pulses separated by two variable delays, Δ1 and Δ2. The SERF experiment allows a selective suppression of signals with relaxation rates below a given limit while monitoring the relaxation of faster relaxing signals. The experiment was tested on a sample of 20% oxidized plastocyanin from Anabaena variabilis, where the fast exchange of an electron between the reduced (diamagnetic) and the oxidized (paramagnetic) form results in a series of average signals with widely different relaxation rates. To ensure an optimum extraction of information from the experimental data, the relaxation rates were obtained from the SERF experiment by a simultaneous analysis of all the FIDs of the experiment using a fast linear prediction model method developed previously. The reliability of the relaxation rates obtained from the SERF experiment was confirmed by a comparison of the rates with the corresponding rates obtained from a conventional inversion recovery experiment.

  2. Enhancement of electrophoretic mobility of microparticles near a solid wall--experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qian; Zhao, Cunlu; Yang, Chun

    2015-03-01

    Although the existing theories have predicted enhancement of electrophoretic mobility of microparticles near a solid wall, the relevant experimental studies are rare. This is mainly due to difficulties in experimentally controlling and measuring particle-wall separations under dynamic electrophoretic conditions. This paper reports an experimental verification of the enhancement of electrophoretic mobility of a microparticle moving near the wall of a microchannel. This is achieved by balancing dielectrophoretic and lift forces against gravitational force acting on the microparticle so as to control the gap of particle-wall separation. A simple experimental setup is configured and a fabrication method is developed to measure such separation gap. The experiments are conducted for various particle sizes under different electric field strengths. Our experimental results are compared against the available theoretical predictions in the literature. PMID:25421107

  3. Phosphorus-31 NMR magnetization transfer measurements of metabolic reaction rates in the rat heart and kidney in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Koretsky, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    /sup 31/P NMR is a unique tool to study bioenergetics in living cells. The application of magnetization transfer techniques to the measurement of steady-state enzyme reaction rates provides a new approach to understanding the regulation of high energy phosphate metabolism. This dissertation is concerned with the measurement of the rates of ATP synthesis in the rat kidney and of the creatine kinase catalyzed reaction in the rat heart in situ. The theoretical considerations of applying magnetization transfer techniques to intact organs are discussed with emphasis on the problems associated with multiple exchange reactions and compartmentation of reactants. Experimental measurements of the ATP synthesis rate were compared to whole kidney oxygen consumption and Na/sup +/ reabsorption rates to derive ATP/O values. The problems associated with ATP synthesis rate measurements in kidney, e.g. the heterogeneity of the inorganic phosphate resonance, are discussed and experiments to overcome these problems proposed. In heart, the forward rate through creatine kinase was measured to be larger than the reverse rate. To account for the difference in forward and reverse rates a model is proposed based on the compartmentation of a small pool of ATP.

  4. Reduction of magnetic field fluctuations in powered magnets for NMR using inductive measurements and sampled-data feedback control.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingzhou; Schiano, Jeffrey L; Samra, Jenna E; Shetty, Kiran K; Brey, William W

    2011-10-01

    Resistive and hybrid (resistive/superconducting) magnets provide substantially higher magnetic fields than those available in low-temperature superconducting magnets, but their relatively low spatial homogeneity and temporal field fluctuations are unacceptable for high resolution NMR. While several techniques for reducing temporal fluctuations have demonstrated varying degrees of success, this paper restricts attention to methods that utilize inductive measurements and feedback control to actively cancel the temporal fluctuations. In comparison to earlier studies using analog proportional control, this paper shows that shaping the controller frequency response results in significantly higher reductions in temporal fluctuations. Measurements of temporal fluctuation spectra and the frequency response of the instrumentation that cancels the temporal fluctuations guide the controller design. In particular, we describe a sampled-data phase-lead-lag controller that utilizes the internal model principle to selectively attenuate magnetic field fluctuations caused by the power supply ripple. We present a quantitative comparison of the attenuation in temporal fluctuations afforded by the new design and a proportional control design. Metrics for comparison include measurements of the temporal fluctuations using Faraday induction and observations of the effect that the fluctuations have on nuclear resonance measurements. PMID:21885308

  5. New reflective-type electrophoretic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsaev, A. M.; Orsaev, T. M.; Gaev, D. S.

    2001-06-01

    Advantages and problems of the electrophoretic display design are considered. To increase its lifetime a new EPD version is proposed, and operation process is described. Main distinguish feature is the present of an agile film as the third electrode. Such a display can be manufactured on the base of standard technological processes and promises to be X-Y multiplex addressed, simple and cheap for manufacturing.

  6. Solubilization of amphiphilic carboxylic acids in nonionic micelles: determination of partition coefficients from pKa measurements and NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Dupont-Leclercq, Laurence; Giroux, Sébastien; Henry, Bernard; Rubini, Patrice

    2007-10-01

    The solubilization of octylamidotartaric acid (C8T) and octanoic acid (C8C) in Triton X-100 and Brij 58 nonionic micelles has been studied by pHmetric and 1H NMR self-diffusion experiments. As both C8C and C8T exhibit acid-base properties, a distinction between the partition of the neutral acidic form, in terms of the partition coefficient KPH, and the partition of the charged basic form, in terms of the partition coefficient KP-, has been made. The acidity constants, Ka, of C8T and C8C in the presence of micelles have been evaluated from pHmetric experiments. For both solutes, an increase in the pKa is observed in micellar media due to the difference in the partition of acidic and basic forms of the solutes. A model has been developed to determine KPH and KP- from the pKa shifts observed. The values obtained by this pKa shift modeling method and those from self-diffusion coefficient measurements are in good agreement. The acidic form of C8C is incorporated to a larger extent into the Brij 58 micelles than the acidic form of C8T, whereas the opposite trend is observed for the basic forms. Both the acidic and basic forms of C8T are more easily incorporated into Brij 58 micelles than into Triton X-100 micelles. The influence of the structure of the polar head on the solubilization properties is demonstrated. Moreover, evidence for the localization of the solutes in the micelles is obtained from the comparison of the partition coefficients and from 1H NMR data. PMID:17850105

  7. Non-invasive measurement of brain glycogen by NMR spectroscopy and its application to the study of brain metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tesfaye, Nolawit; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.; Öz, Gülin

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen is the reservoir for glucose in the brain. Beyond the general agreement that glycogen serves as an energy source in the central nervous system, its exact role in brain energy metabolism has yet to be elucidated. Experiments performed in cell and tissue culture and animals have shown that glycogen content is affected by several factors including glucose, insulin, neurotransmitters, and neuronal activation. The study of in vivo glycogen metabolism has been hindered by the inability to measure glycogen non-invasively, but in the past several years, the development of a non-invasive localized 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method has enabled the study of glycogen metabolism in the conscious human. With this technique, 13C-glucose is administered intravenously and its incorporation into and wash-out from brain glycogen is tracked. One application of this method has been to the study of brain glycogen metabolism in humans during hypoglycemia: data have shown that mobilization of brain glycogen is augmented during hypoglycemia and, after a single episode of hypoglycemia, glycogen synthesis rate is increased, suggesting that glycogen stores rebound to levels greater than baseline. Such studies suggest glycogen may serve as a potential energy reservoir in hypoglycemia and may participate in the brain's adaptation to recurrent hypoglycemia and eventual development of hypoglycemia unawareness. Beyond this focused area of study, 13C NMR spectroscopy has a broad potential for application in the study of brain glycogen metabolism and carries the promise of a better understanding of the role of brain glycogen in diabetes and other conditions. PMID:21732401

  8. Local electronic state in the half-metallic ferromagnet CrO2 investigated by site-selective 53Cr NMR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Hikaru; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Yoshiaki; Itoh, Masayuki; Jin-no, Takaaki; Isobe, Masahiko; Ueda, Yutaka; Yoshida, Sho; Muraoka, Yuji; Yokoya, Takayoshi

    2016-06-01

    We have made 53Cr NMR measurements on polycrystalline and single-crystalline film samples to study the local electronic state of a half-metallic ferromagnet CrO2 which has the rutile structure with one crystallographically equivalent Cr site. We observe two kinds of 53Cr NMR spectra in the ferromagnetic state of both the samples. An analysis on the hyperfine field shows the presence of two Cr sites with different orbital occupancies, suggesting that a local orbital order takes place with breaking the local symmetry in the rutile structure. This may be ascribed to the negative charge transfer between chromium and oxygen ions.

  9. Variable temperature system using vortex tube cooling and fiber optic temperature measurement for low temperature magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rachel W; Zilm, Kurt W

    2004-06-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a variable temperature (VT) system for a high field fast magic angle spinning (MAS) probe. The probe is used in NMR investigations of biological macromolecules, where stable setting and continuous measurement of the temperature over periods of several days are required in order to prevent sample overheating and degradation. The VT system described is used at and below room temperature. A vortex tube is used to provide cooling in the temperature range of -20 to 20 degrees C, while a liquid nitrogen-cooled heat exchanger is used below -20 degrees C. Using this arrangement, the lowest temperature that is practically achievable is -140 degrees C. Measurement of the air temperature near the spinning rotor is accomplished using a fiber optic thermometer that utilizes the temperature dependence of the absorption edge of GaAs. The absorption edge of GaAs also has a magnetic field dependence that we have measured and corrected for. This dependence was calibrated at several field strengths using the well-known temperature dependence of the (1)H chemical shift difference of the protons in methanol. PMID:15140428

  10. NMR-Based Amide Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Measurements for Complex Membrane Proteins: Development and Critical Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerski, Lech; Vinogradova, Olga; Sanders, Charles R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for measuring site-specific amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates for membrane proteins in bilayers is reported and evaluated. This method represents an adaptation and extension of the approach of Dempsey and co-workers (Biophys. J. 70, 1777-1788 (1996)) and is based on reconstituting 15N-labeled membrane proteins into phospholipid bilayers, followed by lyophilization and rehydration with D2O or H2O (control). Following incubation for a time t under hydrated conditions, samples are again lyophilized and then solubilized in an organic solvent system, where 1H-15N HSQC spectra are recorded. Comparison of spectra from D2O-exposed samples to spectra from control samples yields the extent of the H-D exchange which occurred in the bilayers during time t. Measurements are site specific if specific 15N labeling is used. The first part of this paper deals with the search for a suitable solvent system in which to solubilize complex membrane proteins in an amide "exchange-trapped" form for NMR quantitation of amide peak intensities. The second portion of the paper documents application of the overall procedure to measuring site-specific amide exchange rates in diacylglycerol kinase, a representative integral membrane protein. Both the potential usefulness and the significant limitations of the new method are documented.

  11. Electrophoretic mobilities of neutral analytes and electroosmotic flow markers in aqueous solutions of Hofmeister salts.

    PubMed

    Křížek, Tomáš; Kubíčková, Anna; Hladílková, Jana; Coufal, Pavel; Heyda, Jan; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    Small neutral organic compounds have traditionally the role of EOF markers in electrophoresis, as they are expected to have zero electrophoretic mobility in external electric fields. The BGE contains, however, ions that have unequal affinities to the neutral molecules, which in turn results in their mobilization. In this study we focused on two EOF markers-thiourea and DMSO, as well as on N-methyl acetamide (NMA) as a model of the peptide bond. By means of CE and all atom molecular dynamics simulations we explored mobilization of these neutral compounds in large set of Hofmeister salts. Employing a statistical mechanics approach, we were able to reproduce by simulations the experimental electrophoretic mobility coefficients. We also established the role of the chemical composition of marker and the BGE on the measured electrophoretic mobility coefficient. For NMA, we interpreted the results in terms of the relative affinities of cations versus anions to the peptide bond. PMID:24338984

  12. Luminescent electrophoretic particles via miniemulsion polymerization for night-vision electrophoretic displays.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianwei; Wen, Ting; Qiang, Li; Ren, Jun; Tang, Fangqiong

    2013-05-01

    A novel glowing electrophoretic display (EPD) is achieved by luminescent electrophoretic particles (EPs), which is potentially to improve the situation in which the existing EPDs disable in darkness. To combine both modes of reflective and emissive displays, a trilayer luminescence EP is designed and synthesized via an improved miniemulsion polymerization. The luminescence EP is composed of a pigment core, a polystyrene interlayer, and a fluorescent coating. The particle sizes are from 140 to 170 nm, and the size distribution is narrow. Their ζ potential value is -12.4 mV, which is enough to migrate in the electrophoretic fluid by the driving of an electric field. The display performance of the particles in an EPD cell has been characterized under the bias of 20 V. Both the reflectance (491 nm) and fluorescence (521 nm) intensities of the EPD cell remained in a constant range after 30 switches. PMID:23547950

  13. Electrophoretic deposition of composite hydroxyapatite-chitosan coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Pang Xin; Zhitomirsky, Igor . E-mail: zhitom@mcmaster.ca

    2007-04-15

    Cathodic electrophoretic deposition has been utilized for the fabrication of composite hydroxyapatite-chitosan coatings on 316L stainless steel substrates. The addition of chitosan to the hydroxyapatite suspensions promoted the electrophoretic deposition of the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and resulted in the formation of composite coatings. The obtained coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, potentiodynamic polarization measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It was shown that the deposit composition can be changed by a variation of the chitosan or hydroxyapatite concentration in the solutions. Experimental conditions were developed for the fabrication of hydroxyapatite-chitosan nanocomposites containing 40.9-89.8 wt.% hydroxyapatite. The method enabled the formation of adherent and uniform coatings of thicknesses up to 60 {mu}m. X-ray studies revealed that the preferred orientation of the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in the chitosan matrix increases with decreasing hydroxyapatite content in the composite coatings. The obtained coatings provided the corrosion protection for the 316L stainless steel substrates00.

  14. Electrophoretic mobility of spherical particles in bounded domain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Wei; Pennathur, Sumita; Meinhart, Carl D

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we improve on our 3D steady-state model of electrophoretic motion of spherical particles in bounded fluidic channels (Liu et al., 2014) to include the effect of nonsymmetric electrolytes, and further validate this improved model with detailed comparisons to experimental data. Specifically, we use the experimentally-measured particle mobilities from the work of Semenov et al. (2013), Napoli et al. (2011), and Wynne et al. (2012) to determine the corresponding particle zeta potentials using our model, and compare these results with classical theory. Incorporating the effects of nonsymmetric electrolytes, EDL polarization, and confinement, we show that our improved model is applicable to a wide range of practical experimental conditions, for example, particles that have high zeta potentials in a bounded channel filled with nonsymmetric electrolyte solutions, where classical theory is not applicable. In addition, we find that when electrolyte concentration is comparable to the concentration of hydronium or hydroxide ions, the complicated composition of ions increases the particle mobility. Finally, increased electrophoretic mobility can be observed when buffer solutions (phosphate or borate) were used as electrolyte solutions in experiments as opposed to simple symmetric electrolytes. PMID:26397906

  15. Analysis of amorphous solid dispersions using 2D solid-state NMR and (1)H T(1) relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tran N; Watson, Simon A; Edwards, Andrew J; Chavda, Manisha; Clawson, Jacalyn S; Strohmeier, Mark; Vogt, Frederick G

    2010-10-01

    Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) can provide detailed structural information about amorphous solid dispersions of pharmaceutical small molecules. In this study, the ability of SSNMR experiments based on dipolar correlation, spin diffusion, and relaxation measurements to characterize the structure of solid dispersions is explored. Observation of spin diffusion effects using the 2D (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization heteronuclear correlation (CP-HETCOR) experiment is shown to be a useful probe of association between the amorphous drug and polymer that is capable of directly proving glass solution formation. Dispersions of acetaminophen and indomethacin in different polymers are examined using this approach, as well as (1)H double-quantum correlation experiments to probe additional structural features. (1)H-(19)F CP-HETCOR serves a similar role for fluorinated drug molecules such as diflunisal in dispersions, providing a rapid means to prove the formation of a glass solution. Phase separation is detected using (13)C, (19)F, and (23)Na-detected (1)H T(1) experiments in crystalline and amorphous solid dispersions that contain small domains. (1)H T(1) measurements of amorphous nanosuspensions of trehalose and dextran illustrate the ability of SSNMR to detect domain size effects in dispersions that are not glass solutions via spin diffusion effects. Two previously unreported amorphous solid dispersions involving up to three components and containing voriconazole and telithromycin are analyzed using these experiments to demonstrate the general applicability of the approach. PMID:20681586

  16. Measurement of the intracrystalline self-diffusion of xenon in zeolites by the NMR pulsed field gradient technique

    SciTech Connect

    Heink, W.; Kaerger, J.; Pfeifer, H.; Stallmach, F. )

    1990-03-14

    With use of {sup 129}Xe NMR, the NMR pulsed field gradient technique is applied to study the self-diffusion of xenon adsorbed on zeolites NaX, NaCaA, and ZSM-5. In their dependence on both the type of adsorbent and the sorbate concentration, the self-diffusion coefficients are found to follow the same patterns as previously determined for methane by {sup 1}H NMR. For NaCaA, the comparison of the present results with literature data reveals large discrepancies, while recent computer simulations of xenon self-diffusion in ZSM-5 are found to be in reasonable agreement.

  17. Solid-state Hadamard NMR spectroscopy: Simultaneous measurements of multiple selective homonuclear scalar couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakita, Veera Mohana Rao; Kupče, Eriks; Bharatam, Jagadeesh

    2015-02-01

    Unambiguous measurement of homonuclear scalar couplings (J) in multi-spin scalar network systems is not straightforward. Further, the direct measurement of J-couplings is obscured in solid-state samples due to the dipolar and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA)-dominated line broadening, even under the magic angle spinning (MAS). We present a new multiple frequency selective spin-echo method based on Hadamard matrix encoding, for simultaneous measurement of multiple homonuclear scalar couplings (J) in the solid-state. In contrast to the Hadamard encoded selective excitation schemes known for the solution-state, herein the selectivity is achieved during refocusing period. The Hadamard encoded refocusing scheme concurrently allows to create the spin-spin commutation property between number of spin-pairs of choice in uniformly labelled molecules, which, therefore avoids (1) the repetition of the double selective refocusing experiments for each spin-pair and (2) the synthesis of expensive selective labelled molecules. The experimental scheme is exemplified for determining 1JCC and 3JCC values in 13C6L-Histidine.HCl molecule, which are found to be in excellent agreement with those measured in conventional double frequency selective refocusing mode as well as in the solution-state. This method can be simply extended to 2D/3D pulse schemes and be applied to small bio-molecular solids.

  18. Solid-state Hadamard NMR spectroscopy: simultaneous measurements of multiple selective homonuclear scalar couplings.

    PubMed

    Kakita, Veera Mohana Rao; Kupče, Eriks; Bharatam, Jagadeesh

    2015-02-01

    Unambiguous measurement of homonuclear scalar couplings (J) in multi-spin scalar network systems is not straightforward. Further, the direct measurement of J-couplings is obscured in solid-state samples due to the dipolar and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA)-dominated line broadening, even under the magic angle spinning (MAS). We present a new multiple frequency selective spin-echo method based on Hadamard matrix encoding, for simultaneous measurement of multiple homonuclear scalar couplings (J) in the solid-state. In contrast to the Hadamard encoded selective excitation schemes known for the solution-state, herein the selectivity is achieved during refocusing period. The Hadamard encoded refocusing scheme concurrently allows to create the spin-spin commutation property between number of spin-pairs of choice in uniformly labelled molecules, which, therefore avoids (1) the repetition of the double selective refocusing experiments for each spin-pair and (2) the synthesis of expensive selective labelled molecules. The experimental scheme is exemplified for determining (1)JCC and (3)JCC values in (13)C6l-Histidine.HCl molecule, which are found to be in excellent agreement with those measured in conventional double frequency selective refocusing mode as well as in the solution-state. This method can be simply extended to 2D/3D pulse schemes and be applied to small bio-molecular solids. PMID:25554944

  19. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  20. Large-Area Chemically Modified Graphene Films: Electrophoretic Deposition and Characterization by Soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.; Whittaker, L; Jaye, C; Baroudi, K; Fischer, D; Banerjee, S

    2009-01-01

    A facile, rapid, and scalable electrophoretic deposition approach is developed for the fabrication of large-area chemically derived graphene films on conductive substrates based on the electrophoretic deposition of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide components. Two distinctive approaches for fabricating conformal graphene films are developed. In the first approach, graphene oxide sheets are electrophoretically deposited from an aqueous solution after the oxidation of graphite to graphite oxide and the subsequent exfoliation of graphite oxide to graphene oxide. Next, the graphene oxide films are reduced via dip-coating in an aqueous solution of hydrazine. In the second approach, graphene oxide is reduced to graphene nanosheets in a strongly alkaline solution and the reduced graphene sheets are directly electrophoretically deposited onto conductive substrates. The film thickness can be modified by the deposition time and the obtained films span several square millimeters in area. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy is used to study the surface chemistry, electronic band structure, and degree of alignment of the electrophoretically deposited films. Polarized NEXAFS measurements verify the presence of epoxide surface functionalities on the graphene basal planes and indicate significant recovery of extended p-bonded networks upon defunctionalization by hydrazine treatment. These measurements further indicate significantly improved alignment of the graphene sheet components of the films parallel to the substrate surface when defunctionalization is performed prior to electrophoretic deposition.

  1. Sizing of reverse micelles in microemulsions using NMR measurements of diffusion.

    PubMed

    Law, Susan J; Britton, Melanie M

    2012-08-14

    This paper reports the size of reverse micelles (RMs) in AOT/octane/H(2)O and CTAB/hexanol/H(2)O microemulsions using magnetic resonance (MR) pulsed field gradient (PFG) measurements of diffusion. Diffusion data were measured using the pulsed gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) experiment for surfactant molecules residing in the RM interface. Inverse Laplace transformation of these data generated diffusion coefficients for the RMs, which were converted into hydrodynamic radii using the Stokes-Einstein relation. This technique is complementary to those previously used to size RMs, such as dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), but also offers several advantages, which are discussed. RM sizes, determined using the PGSTE method, in the AOT (sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate) and CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) microemulsions were compared with previous DLS and SAXS data, showing good agreement. Methods for determining number distributions from the PGSTE data, through the use of scaling factors, were investigated. PMID:22794150

  2. Measurement of multilamellar onion dimensions under shear using frequency domain pulsed gradient NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutti, Antoine; Callaghan, Paul T.

    2007-08-01

    We present a simple method by which the dimensions of shear-induced multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), also known as onions, can be measured during the shearing process itself. This approach is based on the use of a closely spaced train of magnetic field gradient pulses applied during a CPMG echo sequence. The CPMG train compensates flow effects while the frequency-dependence of apparent diffusion can reveal the onion size. We present here a simple phenomenological model for restricted diffusion in multilamellar vesicles, which may be used to interpret the resulting diffusion spectrum. We demonstrate this approach with MLVs formed from the lamellar phase of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in water and octanol.

  3. Improvements in in-plane electrophoretic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzen, Alex

    2011-03-01

    Electronic paper is now developing fast into an accepted alternative for paper. Its applications nowadays seem focused on books, documents and newspapers. Development of credible color implementations of electrophoretic displays has been initiated, focusing on multi-layer in-plane electrophoresis, but the difficulties associated with these systems (particle drift, aperture, accuracy) were so far not solved. Electro-osmotic principles lead to openings towards multi-layer color displays as well as fast switching, high reflectance grayscale displays. Drift, aperture and accuracy can be brought to the level necessary to create in-plane switching electro-osmotic displays without the need for encapsulation

  4. Scanning and storage of electrophoretic records

    DOEpatents

    McKean, Ronald A.; Stiegman, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    An electrophoretic record that includes at least one gel separation is mounted for motion laterally of the separation record. A light source is positioned to illuminate at least a portion of the record, and a linear array camera is positioned to have a field of view of the illuminated portion of the record and orthogonal to the direction of record motion. The elements of the linear array are scanned at increments of motion of the record across the field of view to develop a series of signals corresponding to intensity of light at each element at each scan increment.

  5. Macromolecular Crowding Studies of Amino Acids Using NMR Diffusion Measurements and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virk, Amninder; Stait-Gardner, Timothy; Willis, Scott; Torres, Allan; Price, William

    2015-02-01

    Molecular crowding occurs when the total concentration of macromolecular species in a solution is so high that a considerable proportion of the volume is physically occupied and therefore not accessible to other molecules. This results in significant changes in the solution properties of the molecules in such systems. Macromolecular crowding is ubiquitous in biological systems due to the generally high intracellular protein concentrations. The major hindrance to understanding crowding is the lack of direct comparison of experimental data with theoretical or simulated data. Self-diffusion is sensitive to changes in the molecular weight and shape of the diffusing species, and the available diffusion space (i.e., diffusive obstruction). Consequently, diffusion measurements are a direct means for probing crowded systems including the self-association of molecules. In this work, nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of the self-diffusion of four amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine and phenylalanine) up to their solubility limit in water were compared directly with molecular dynamics simulations. The experimental data were then analyzed using various models of aggregation and obstruction. Both experimental and simulated data revealed that the diffusion of both water and the amino acids were sensitive to the amino acid concentration. The direct comparison of the simulated and experimental data afforded greater insights into the aggregation and obstruction properties of each amino acid.

  6. Proton and carbon NMR measurements of the effects of hydration on the wheat protein ω-gliadin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belton, P. S.; Gil, A. M.; Grant, A.; Alberti, E.; Tatham, A. S.

    1998-07-01

    The wheat protein ω-gliadin consists of a simple repeat sequence composed mainly of proline and glutamine. It thus represents a simple model for many cereal proteins and other proline and glutamine rich sequences which occur in multiple repeats. The behaviour on hydration has been examined by the measurement of proton NMR relaxation times. Sidechain motions (methyl and amino group rotation, proline ring puckering) were largely responsible for T1 relaxation. It was found that the glass transition does not affect T1 and T1 ρ relaxation and only affects transverse relaxation. Magic angle spinning experiments have been used to observe line narrowed proton spectra as well as carbon cross polarisation spectra. In the proton spectra, at high levels of hydration, backbone and sidechain NH groups are observed indicating that whole segments of the protein chain are in the mobile regime. The carbon spectra are characterised by a loss of the proline C δ signal intensity at high levels of hydration indicating the involvement of proline in the hydration process. It is concluded that the behaviour of ω-gliadin on hydration may be explained by the formation of mobile protein loops together with residual regions of strong interprotein interaction.

  7. Sterically stabilized liposomes. Reduction in electrophoretic mobility but not electrostatic surface potential.

    PubMed Central

    Woodle, M C; Collins, L R; Sponsler, E; Kossovsky, N; Papahadjopoulos, D; Martin, F J

    1992-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of liposomes containing a negatively charged derivative of phosphatidylethanolamine with a large headgroup composed of the hydrophilic polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG-PE) was determined by Doppler electrophoretic light scattering. The results show that this method is improved by the use of measurements at multiple angles to eliminate artifacts and that very small mobilities can be measured. The electrophoretic mobility of liposomes with 5 to 10 mol% PEG-PE is approximately -0.5 mu ms-1/Vcm-1 regardless of PEG-PE content compared with approximately -2 mu ms-1/Vcm-1 for similar liposomes but containing 7.5% phosphatidylglycerol (PG) instead of PEG-PE. Measurements of surface potential by distribution of an anionic fluorescent probe show that the PEG-PE imparts a negative charge identical to that by PG, consistent with the expectation of similar locations of the ionized phosphate responsible for the charge. The reduced mobility imparted by the surface bound PEG is attributed to a mechanism similar to that described for colloidal steric stabilization: hydrodynamic drag moves the hydrodynamic plane of shear, or the hydrodynamic radius, away from the charge-bearing plane, that of the phosphate moities. An extended length of approximately 50 A for the 2,000 molecular weight PEG is estimated from the reduction in electrophoretic mobility. PMID:1581503

  8. 19F Magic angle spinning NMR reporter molecules: empirical measures of surface shielding, polarisability and H-bonding.

    PubMed

    Budarin, Vitaliy L; Clark, James H; Deswarte, Fabien E I; Mueller, Karl T; Tavener, Stewart J

    2007-06-14

    Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) (19)F NMR spectra have been obtained and chemical shifts measured for 37 molecules in the gas phase and adsorbed on the surfaces of six common materials: octadecyl- and octyl-functionalised chromatography silicas, Kieselgel 100 silica, Brockmann neutral alumina, Norit activated charcoal and 3-(1-piperidino)propyl functionalised silica. From these six surfaces, octadecyl-silica is selected as a non-polar reference to which the others are compared. The change in chemical shift of a fluorine nucleus within a molecule on adsorption to a surface from the gas phase, Deltadelta(gas)(surface), is described by the empirical relationship: Deltadelta(gas)(surface) = delta(s) + (alpha(s)+pi(s))/alpha(r) (Deltadelta(gas)(reference) - delta(r)) + delta(HBA) + delta(HBD), where delta(s) and delta(r) are constants that describe the chemical shift induced by the electromagnetic field of the surface under investigation and reference surface, alpha(s) and alpha(r) are the relative surface polarisability for the surface and reference, pi(s) is an additional contribution to the surface polarisabilities due to its ability to interact with aromatic molecules, and delta(HBA) and delta(HBD) are measurements of the hydrogen acceptor and donor properties of the surface. These empirical parameters are measured for the surfaces under study. Silica and alumina are found to undergo specific interactions with aromatic reporter molecules and both accept and donate H-bonds. Activated charcoal was found to have an extreme effect on shielding but no specific interactions with the adsorbed molecules. 3-(1-Piperidino)propyl functionalised silica exhibits H-bond acceptor ability, but does not donate H-bonds. PMID:17487325

  9. “CLASSIC NMR”: An In-Situ NMR Strategy for Mapping the Time-Evolution of Crystallization Processes by Combined Liquid-State and Solid-State Measurements**

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Colan E; Williams, P Andrew; Harris, Kenneth D M

    2014-01-01

    A new in-situ NMR strategy (termed CLASSIC NMR) for mapping the evolution of crystallization processes is reported, involving simultaneous measurement of both liquid-state and solid-state NMR spectra as a function of time. This combined strategy allows complementary information to be obtained on the evolution of both the solid and liquid phases during the crystallization process. In particular, as crystallization proceeds (monitored by solid-state NMR), the solution state becomes more dilute, leading to changes in solution-state speciation and the modes of molecular aggregation in solution, which are monitored by liquid-state NMR. The CLASSIC NMR experiment is applied here to yield new insights into the crystallization of m-aminobenzoic acid. PMID:25044662

  10. Measurement of Heteronuclear Dipolar Coupling by Transferred-Echo Double-Resonance NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hing, A. W.; Vega, S.; Schaefer, J.

    A magic-angle spinning experiment called transferred-echo double resonance (TEDOR) has been introduced recently to measure the I-S dipolar coupling of heteronuclear I-S pairs of spin- {1}/{2} nuclei while eliminating unwanted background signals from uncoupled I and S spins via a coherence-transfer process. In this paper, a quantitative description of the TEDOR experiment is given in terms of the evolution of the density matrix for a pair of heteronuclear spins. The resulting equations provide a theoretical basis for evaluating the selectivity and sensitivity of TEDOR and suggest strategies for determining dipolar coupling constants directly from TEDOR data. Experimental examples illustrating these aspects of TEDOR are provided by studies performed on a range of 13C- 15N dipolar couplings found in double-labeled asparagine, alanine, glycine, and the linear peptide antibiotic, gramicidin.

  11. Autocorrelation spectra of an air-fluidized granular system measured by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasic, S.; Stepisnik, J.; Mohoric, A.; Sersa, I.; Planinsic, G.

    2006-09-01

    A novel insight into the dynamics of a fluidized granular system is given by a nuclear magnetic resonance method that yields the spin-echo attenuation proportional to the spectrum of the grain positional fluctuation. Measurements of the air-fluidized oil-filled spheres and mustard seeds at different degrees of fluidization and grain volume fractions provide the velocity autocorrelation that differs from the commonly anticipated exponential Enskog decay. An empiric formula, which corresponds to the model of grain caging at collisions with adjacent beads, fits well to the experimental data. Its parameters are the characteristic collision time, the free path between collisions and the cage-breaking rate or the diffusion-like constant, which decreases with increasing grain volume fraction. Mean-squared displacements calculated from the correlation spectrum clearly show transitions from ballistic, through sub-diffusion and into diffusion regimes of grain motion.

  12. Approximation and noise errors of measured T/sub 1/ in NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Persyk, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    Photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) of various types from four manufacturers were measured to determine their gain drift characteristics. This was in turn related to retuning frequency in Anger cameras. A well stabilized light source illuminated sets of thirty-seven PMTs, simulating ideal steady-state conditions in an Anger camera. Anode outputs were sampled at six minute intervals for periods of up to three weeks using a multichannel data logger. Data were analyzed off line. It was found that PMT gains diverged form their initial values at a rate which decreased with time. The standard deviation of the gain changes, called drift, was plotted versus time. Drift was found to generally obey a power law function: D(%) = 0.16 x t/sup 0.6/ where t is the elapsed time in hours. In testing thousands of PMTs the authors occasionally found ''flyers'' with drift rates considerably larger than the average. The authors conclude that with sets of carefully selected PMTs the frequency of tuning would generally decrease as the tubes age. They also conclude that the presence of an occasional ''flyer'' PMT in a camera would undoubtedly necessitate more frequent tuning, in some cases on a weekly basis. These findings support the observed wide variation in tuning frequency among Anger cameras without active PMT gain compensation.

  13. Diffusion of CO2 in n-hexadecane determined from NMR relaxometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Min; Song, Yongchen; Su, Bo; Zhao, Yuechao

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we discuss the feasibility in computation of diffusion coefficient (D) using the longitudinal relaxation time T1. CO2-n-hexadecane in pure solutions and in a porous medium was tested separately by measuring the T1 of n-hexadecane at varying CO2 concentration (c). The relationship between T1 and c was correlated. The results show that T1 exponentially rises with the increase of c. Thus, we proposed the method to estimate D of CO2 using T1 through the relationship above and Fick's law. We computed D from T1 and compared this method with the traditional method. The two methods agree well with differences less than 10%. The new method is characterized by simpleness, convenience and flexibility, as it computes D with the only requirement of monitoring T1. This new method will guide the use of nuclear magnetic resonance logging in in-field testing of CO2 diffusion and migration laws.

  14. Effect of acute stresses on zebra fish (Danio rerio) metabolome measured by NMR-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Mian Yahya; Marçal, Rosilene Moretti; Champagne, Danielle L; van der Kooy, Frank; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2014-09-01

    We applied an acute stress model to zebra fish in order to measure the changes in the metabolome due to biological stress. This was done by submitting the fish to fifteen minutes of acute confinement (netting) stress, and then five minutes for the open field and light/dark field tests. A polar extract of the zebra fish was then subjected to (1)H nuclear magnetic spectroscopy. Multivariate data analysis of the spectra showed a clear separation associated to a wide range of metabolites between zebra fish that were submitted to open field and light/dark field tests. Alanine, taurine, adenosine, creatine, lactate, and histidine were high in zebra fish to which the light/dark field test was applied, regardless of stress, while acetate and isoleucine/lipids appeared to be higher in zebra fish exposed to the open field test. These results show that any change in the environment, even for a small period of time, has a noticeable physiological impact. This research provides an insight of how different mechanisms are activated under different environments to maintain the homeostasis of the body. It should also contribute to establish zebra fish as a model for metabolomics studies. PMID:25098933

  15. Structure and dynamics of water in tendon from NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Peto, S; Gillis, P; Henri, V P

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic relaxation times were measured in collagen tissue when varying the orientation of the fiber with respect to the static field. T1 was found to be only slightly dependent on theta, the fiber-to-field angle, but T2 was very sensitive to the orientation, with a maximum value at the magic angle. The transverse decay curves were multiexponential. Their deconvolution displayed four components; the ones that decayed most slowly were almost independent of theta, but the two fastest ones showed a strong angular dependence that was interpreted with a cross-relaxation model. Quadrupolar dips were visible in the 1/T1 dispersion curves. These dips were independent of theta, so that the magnetization transfer could also be assumed to be independent of the fiber orientation. Finally, each component was assigned to a fraction of protons localized in the macromolecular structure and characterized by particular dynamics. The model of Woessner was applied to the water molecules tightly bound into the macromolecules, which resulted in a dynamical description of this water fraction. This description is compatible with the two-sites model of Ramachandran based on x-ray diffraction and with the extensive studies of Berendsen. However, the important indications obtained from the deconvolution lead to a less static representation of the tissue. PMID:2297563

  16. Electrophoretic Porosimetry of Sol-Gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, L. A.; Smith, D. D.; Sibille, L.; Hunt, A. J.; Ng, J.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that gravity has an effect on the formation and resulting microstructure of sol-gels. In order to more clearly resolve the effect of gravity, pores may be non-destructively analyzed in the wet gel, circumventing the shrinkage and coarsening associated with the drying procedure. We discuss the development of an electrophoretic technique, analogous to affinity chromatography, for the determination of pore size distribution and its application to silica gels. Specifically a monodisperse charged dye is monitored by an optical densitometer as it moves through the wet gel under the influence of an electric field. The transmittance data (output) represents the convolution of the dye concentration profile at the beginning of the run (input) with the pore size distribution (transfer function), i.e. linear systems theory applies. Because of the practical difficulty in producing a delta function input dye profile we prefer instead to use a step function. Average pore size is then related to the velocity of this dye front, while the pore size distribution is related to the spreading of the front. Preliminary results of this electrophoretic porosimetry and its application to ground and space-grown samples will be discussed.

  17. Solid State NMR Measurements for Preliminary Lifetime Assessments in (gamma)-Irradiated and Thermally Aged Siloxane Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Herberg, J L; Sawvel, A M; Maxwell, R S

    2005-02-03

    Siloxanes have a wide variety of applications throughout the aerospace industry which take advantage of their exceptional insulating and adhesive properties and general resilience. They also offer a wide range of tailorable engineering properties with changes in composition and filler content. They are, however, subject to degradation in radiatively and thermally harsh environments. We are using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to investigate changes in network and interfacial structure in siloxane elastomers and their correlations to changes in engineering performance in a series of degraded materials. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters such as transverse (T{sub 2}) relaxation times, cross relaxation rates, and residual dipolar coupling constants provide excellent probes of changes crosslink density and motional dynamics of the polymers caused by multi-mechanism degradation. The results of NMR studies on aged siloxanes are being used in conjunction with other mechanical tests to provide insight into component failure and degradation kinetics necessary for preliminary lifetime assessments of these materials as well as into the structure-property relationships of the polymers. NMR and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results obtained both from high resolution NMR spectrometers as well as low resolution benchtop NMR screening tools will be presented.

  18. Solid State NMR Measurements for Preliminary Lifetime Assessments in gamma-Irradiated and Thermally Aged Siloxane Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Herberg, J L; Sawvel, A M; Maxwell, R S

    2004-11-29

    Siloxanes have a wide variety of applications throughout the aerospace industry which take advantage of their exceptional insulating and adhesive properties and general resilience. They also offer a wide range of tailorable engineering properties with changes in composition and filler content. They are, however, subject to degradation in radiatively and thermally harsh environments. We are using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to investigate changes in network and interfacial structure in siloxane elastomers and their correlations to changes in engineering performance in a series of degraded materials. NMR parameters such as transverse ( T{sub 2}) relaxation times, cross relaxation rates, and residual dipolar coupling constants provide excellent probes of changes crosslink density and motional dynamics of the polymers caused by multi-mechanism degradation. The results of NMR studies on aged siloxanes are being used in conjunction with other mechanical tests to provide insight into component failure and degradation kinetics necessary for preliminary lifetime assessments of these materials as well as into the structure-property relationships of the polymers. NMR and MRI results obtained both from high resolution NMR spectrometers as well as low resolution benchtop NMR screening tools will be presented.

  19. Electrophoretic mobility of particles in concentrated solutions of electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Deinega, Yu.F.; Polyakova, V.M.; Aleksandrova, L.N.

    1986-11-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of particles of phenol-formaldehyde and aniline-formaldehyde resins in zinc sulfate solutions has been investigated. It is shown that as the electrolyte concentration rises, the electrophoretic mobility falls, reaches a minimum, and then increases. A possible mechanism for the formation of an electric double layer on the surface of particles in concentrated solutions of electrolytes is proposed.

  20. Comparison of surface NMR with non-invasive and in-situ measurements of soil water content at a floodplain field site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werban, Ulrike; Schrön, Martin; Dietrich, Peter; Walsh, David; Grunewald, Elliot; Pohle, Marco; Kathage, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of soil water content is a very relevant issue in soil and environmental studies. There is a broad spectrum of methods applied for measuring soil water content in the field either deployed in situ or non-invasively from the surface. For many reasons the latter is preferred in field studies. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the rare methods that measure the water content directly. Whereas others, e.g. geophysical methods, make use of proximal relationships for determination of soil water content. We applied a new single-sided NMR sensor to non-invasively measure in-situ soil moisture profiles at several points along two transects in a floodplain. The field site exhibits variations in soil water content due to morphology, e.g. flood channels and alluvial fan structures. Furthermore we applied at the same transects (1) in situ methods: soil sampling for gravimetrical analysis and TDR and (2) non-invasive methods: electromagnetical induction, mobile cosmic-ray neutron sensing with a rover and gamma-ray spectrometry. We will present results that confirm agreement of NMR and gravimetrical analysis from soil sampling and discuss issues that arise when using non-unique proxy methods and relationships for determination of soil water content.

  1. Electrophoretic Deposition on Porous Non-Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compson, Charles; Besra, Laxmidhar; Liu, Meilin

    2007-01-01

    A method of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) on substrates that are porous and electrically non-conductive has been invented. Heretofore, in order to perform an EPD, it has been necessary to either (1) use a substrate material that is inherently electrically conductive or (2) subject a non-conductive substrate to a thermal and/or chemical treatment to render it conductive. In the present method, instead of relying on the electrical conductivity of the substrate, one ensures that the substrate is porous enough that when it is immersed in an EPD bath, the solvent penetrates throughout the thickness, thereby forming quasi-conductive paths through the substrate. By making it unnecessary to use a conductive substrate, this method simplifies the overall EPD process and makes new applications possible. The method is expected to be especially beneficial in enabling deposition of layers of ceramic and/or metal for chemical and electrochemical devices, notably including solid oxide fuel cells.

  2. SPAR electrophoretic separation experiments, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosmi, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    The opportunity to use a sounding rocket for separation experiments is a logical continuation of earlier electrophoresis demonstrations and experiments. A free-flow electrophoresis system, developed under the Advanced Applications Flight Experiment (AAFE) Program, was designed so that it would fit into a rocket payload. The SPAR program provides a unique opportunity to complete the intial stages of microgravity testing prior to any Shuttle applications. The objective of the work described in this report was to ensure proper operating parameters for the defined experimental samples to be used in the SPAR Electrophoretic Separation Experiment. Ground based experiments were undertaken not only to define flight parameters but also to serve as a point of comparison for flight results. Possible flight experiment problem areas were also studied such as sample interaction due to sedimentation, concentration effects and storage effects. Late in the program anomalies of field strengths and buffer conductivities were also investigated.

  3. Recent patents on electrophoretic displays and materials.

    PubMed

    Christophersen, Marc; Phlips, Bernard F

    2010-11-01

    Electrophoretic displays (EPDs) have made their way into consumer products. EPDs enable displays that offer the look and form of a printed page, often called "electronic paper". We will review recent apparatus and method patents for EPD devices and their fabrication. A brief introduction into the basic display operation and history of EPDs is given, while pointing out the technological challenges and difficulties for inventors. Recently, the majority of scientific publications and patenting activity has been directed to micro-segmented EPDs. These devices exhibit high optical reflectance and contrast, wide viewing angle, and high image resolution. Micro-segmented EPDs can also be integrated with flexible transistors technologies into flexible displays. Typical particles size ranges from 200 nm to 2 micrometer. Currently one very active area of patenting is the development of full-color EPDs. We summarize the recent patenting activity for EPDs and provide comments on perceiving factors driving intellectual property protection for EPD technologies. PMID:20565384

  4. Electrochemically powered self-propelled electrophoretic nanosubmarines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumera, Martin

    2010-09-01

    In the past few years, we have witnessed rapid developments in the realization of the old nanotechnology dream, autonomous nanosubmarines. These nanomachines are self-powered, taking energy from their environment by electrocatalytic conversion of chemicals present in the solution, self-propelled by flux of the electrons within the submarine and the hydronium ions on the surface of the nanosub, powering it in the direction opposite to that of the flux of the hydronium. These nanosubmarines are responsive to external fields, able to follow complex magnetic patterns, navigate themselves in complex microfluidic channels, follow chemical gradients, carry cargo, and communicate with each other. This minireview focuses on a discussion of the fundamentals of the electrophoretic mechanism underlying the propulsion of this sort of nanosub, as well as a demonstration of the proof-of-concept capabilities of nanosubmarines.In the past few years, we have witnessed rapid developments in the realization of the old nanotechnology dream, autonomous nanosubmarines. These nanomachines are self-powered, taking energy from their environment by electrocatalytic conversion of chemicals present in the solution, self-propelled by flux of the electrons within the submarine and the hydronium ions on the surface of the nanosub, powering it in the direction opposite to that of the flux of the hydronium. These nanosubmarines are responsive to external fields, able to follow complex magnetic patterns, navigate themselves in complex microfluidic channels, follow chemical gradients, carry cargo, and communicate with each other. This minireview focuses on a discussion of the fundamentals of the electrophoretic mechanism underlying the propulsion of this sort of nanosub, as well as a demonstration of the proof-of-concept capabilities of nanosubmarines. In memory of Karel Zeman, Czech animator, who encouraged thousands of young people into science and technology, on the occasion of the 100th

  5. [ 31P]NMR measurements of hexokinase activity in intact red blood cells with 2-deoxyglucose as substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halabi, F.; Seguin, J. P.; Fonroget, J.; Goethals, G.

    [ 31P] NMR spectroscopy is demonstrated to be a suitable tool to follow the time course of 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate in intact human erythrocytes incubated with 2-deoxyglucose. It allowed to determine hexokinase Vmax and K m in near physiological conditions.

  6. High-resolution slice selection NMR for the measurement of CO2 diffusion under non-equilibrium conditions.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jesse; Damodaran, Krishnan

    2015-03-01

    We present a simple and an efficient approach using spatially selective NMR to investigate solvation and diffusion of CO2 in ionic liquids. The techniques demonstrated here are shown as novel and effective means of studying solvated gas dynamics under non-equilibrium conditions without the need for conventional high power gradients. PMID:25353108

  7. Non-invasive and quantitative evaluation of peripheral vascular resistances in rats by combined NMR measurements of perfusion and blood pressure using ASL and dynamic angiography.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Jacques C; Giacomini, Eric; Baligand, Céline; Fromes, Yves; Carlier, Pierre G

    2010-02-01

    The in vivo determination of peripheral vascular resistances (VR) is crucial for the assessment of arteriolar function. It requires simultaneous determination of organ perfusion (F) and arterial blood pressure (BP). A fully non-invasive method was developed to measure systolic and diastolic BP in the caudal artery of rats based on dynamic NMR angiography. A good agreement was found between the NMR approach and the gold standard techniques (linear regression slope = 0.98, R(2) = 0.96). This method and the ASL-MRI measurement of skeletal muscle perfusion were combined into one single NMR experiment to quantitatively evaluate the local vascular resistances in the calf muscle of anaesthetized rats, in vivo and non-invasively 1) at rest: VR = 7.0 +/- 1.0 mmHg x min 100 g x ml(-1), F = 13 +/- 3 ml min(-1) x 100 g(-1) and mean BP (MBP) = 88 +/- 10 mmHg; 2) under vasodilator challenge (milrinone): VR = 3.7 +/- 1.1 mmHg min x 100 g ml(-1), F = 21 +/- 4 ml min(-1) x 100 g(-1) and MBP = 75 +/- 14 mmHg; 3) under vasopressor challenge (norepinephrine): VR = 9.8 +/- 1.2 mmHg min 100 g ml(-1), F = 14 +/- 3 ml min(-1) x 100 g(-1) and MBP = 137 +/- 2 mmHg. PMID:19795372

  8. The structure investigations of dehydroacetic acid and 1,8-diaminonaphthalene condensation product by NMR, MS, and X-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kołodziej, B.; Morawiak, M.; Kamieński, B.; Schilf, W.

    2016-05-01

    A new unexpected product of condensation reaction of 1,8-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) and carbonyl compound (here: dehydroacetic acid (dha)) was synthesized. Discussion about the molecular structure of possible products of this reaction was done on the base of NMR studies. The structure of the titled product in both DMSO solution and in the solid state was resolved by analysis of its spectral data (X-ray structure analysis, multinuclear NMR in solution and solid state spectra) and MS measurements. The presented studies provided clear evidence that the titled product exists in diluted DMSO solution as the mixture of two kinetic free ionic species whereas in concentrated DMSO solution as well as in the solid state this system forms associated ionic pairs bonded together by hydrogen bonds.

  9. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Yuji; Roy, Beas; Ran, Sheng; Budko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2014-03-20

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility χ and the T dependence of 1/T1Tχ, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  10. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Y.; Roy, B.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2014-03-01

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility χ and the T dependence of 1/T1Tχ, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  11. Dual Species NMR Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Joshua; Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Walker, Thad

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards a dual species nuclear magnetic oscillator using synchronous spin exchange optical pumping. By applying the bias field as a sequence of alkali 2 π pulses, we generate alkali polarization transverse to the bias field. The alkali polarization is then modulated at the noble gas resonance so that through spin exchange collisions the noble gas becomes polarized. This novel method of NMR suppresses the alkali field frequency shift by at least a factor of 2500 as compared to longitudinal NMR. We will present details of the apparatus and measurements of dual species co-magnetometry using this method. Research supported by the NSF and Northrop-Grumman Corp.

  12. Acceleration of natural-abundance solid-state MAS NMR measurements on bone by paramagnetic relaxation from gadolinium-DTPA.

    PubMed

    Mroue, Kamal H; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H; Morris, Michael D; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA=Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the (1)H T1 values were calculated from data collected by (1)H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the (1)H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the (13)C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from (13)C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using (1)H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans. PMID:24881032

  13. Acceleration of natural-abundance solid-state MAS NMR measurements on bone by paramagnetic relaxation from gadolinium-DTPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans.

  14. Acceleration of Natural-Abundance Solid-State MAS NMR Measurements on Bone by Paramagnetic Relaxation from Gadolinium-DTPA

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans. PMID:24881032

  15. Charge carrier effective mass and concentration derived from combination of Seebeck coefficient and 125Te NMR measurements in complex tellurides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    Thermoelectric materials utilize the Seebeck effect to convert heat to electrical energy. The Seebeck coefficient (thermopower), S , depends on the free (mobile) carrier concentration, n , and effective mass, m*, as S ˜m*/n2 /3 . The carrier concentration in tellurides can be derived from 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-lattice relaxation measurements. The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1 /T1 , depends on both n and m* as 1 /T1˜(m*)3/2n (within classical Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics) or as 1 /T1˜(m*)2n2 /3 (within quantum Fermi-Dirac statistics), which challenges the correct determination of the carrier concentration in some materials by NMR. Here it is shown that the combination of the Seebeck coefficient and 125Te NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements in complex tellurides provides a unique opportunity to derive the carrier effective mass and then to calculate the carrier concentration. This approach was used to study A gxS bxG e50-2xT e50 , well-known GeTe-based high-efficiency tellurium-antimony-germanium-silver thermoelectric materials, where the replacement of Ge by [Ag+Sb] results in significant enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. Values of both m* and n derived using this combination show that the enhancement of thermopower can be attributed primarily to an increase of the carrier effective mass and partially to a decrease of the carrier concentration when the [Ag+Sb] content increases.

  16. Cell and Particle Interactions and Aggregation During Electrophoretic Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hua; Zeng, Shulin; Loewenberg, Michael; Todd, Paul; Davis, Robert H.

    1996-01-01

    The stability and pairwise aggregation rates of small spherical particles under the collective effects of buoyancy-driven motion and electrophoretic migration are analyzed. The particles are assumed to be non-Brownian, with thin double-layers and different zeta potentials. The particle aggregation rates may be enhanced or reduced, respectively, by parallel and antiparallel alignments of the buoyancy-driven and electrophoretic velocities. For antiparallel alignments, with the buoyancy-driven relative velocity exceeding the electrophoretic relative velocity between two widely-separated particles, there is a 'collision-forbidden region' in parameter space due to hydrodynamic interactions; thus, the suspension becomes stable against aggregation.

  17. Measurement and assignment of long-range C-H dipolar couplings in liquid crystals by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, M.; Pines, A. |; Caldarelli, S.

    1996-08-29

    We describe multidimensional NMR techniques to measure and assign {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H dipolar couplings in nematic liquid crystals with high resolution. In particular, dipolar couplings between aromatic and aliphatic sites are extracted, providing valuable information on the structural correlations between these two components of thermotropic liquid crystal molecules. The NMR techniques are demonstrated on 4-pentyl-4`-biphenylcarbonitrile (5CB), a well-characterized room-temperature nematic liquid crystal. Proton-detected local-field NMR spectroscopy is employed to obtain highly resolved C-H dipolar couplings that are separated according to the chemical shifts of the carbon sites. Each {sup 13}C cross section in the 2D spectra exhibits several doublet splittings, with the largest one resulting from the directly bonded C-H coupling. The smaller splittings originate from the long-range C-H dipolar couplings and can be assigned qualitatively by a chemical shift heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) experiment. The HETCOR experiment incorporates a mixing period for proton spin diffusion to occur, so that maximal polarization transfer can be achieved between the unbonded {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H nuclei. To assign the long-range C-H couplings quantitatively. we combined these two techniques into a novel reduced-3D experiment, in which the {sup 1}H chemical shift-displaced C-H dipolar couplings are correlated with the {sup 13}C chemical shifts. 34 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Still shimming or already measuring? - Quantitative reaction monitoring for small molecules on the sub minute timescale by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kind, J.; Thiele, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    In order to enable monitoring of rapidly occurring reactions Wagner et al. recently presented a simple scheme for 1D NMR experiments with continuous data acquisition, without inter-scan delays, using a spatially-selective and frequency-shifted excitation approach (Wagner et al., 2013). This scheme allows acquisition of proton spectra with temporal resolutions on the millisecond timescale. Such high temporal resolutions are desired in the case of reaction monitoring using stopped flow setups. In regular 1H NMR-spectra without spatial selection the line width increases for a given shim setting with changes in sample volume, susceptibility, convection and temperature or concentration gradients due to the disturbance of magnetic field homogeneity. Concerning reaction monitoring this is unfortunate as shimming prior to acquisition becomes necessary to obtain narrow signals after injection of a reactant into an NMR sample. Even automatic shim routines may last up to minutes. Thus fast reactions can hardly be monitored online without large hardware dead times in a single stopped flow experiment. This problem is reduced in the spatially-selective and frequency-shifted continuous NMR experiment as magnetic field inhomogeneties are less pronounced and negative effects on the obtained line shapes are reduced as pointed out by Bax and Freeman (1980) [2] and demonstrated by Wagner et al. (2013). Here we present the utilization of this technique for observation of reactions in small molecule systems in which chemical conversion and longitudinal relaxation occur on the same timescale. By means of the alkaline ethyl acetate hydrolysis, a stoichiometric reaction, we show advantages of spatially-selective excitation on both temporal resolution and line shapes in stopped flow experiments. Results are compared to data obtained by non-selective small angle excitation experiments.

  19. Evidence for s-wave superconductivity in noncentrosymmetric Re24Nb5 from 93Nb NMR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, C. S.; Su, T. H.; Liu, H. F.; Young, Ben-Li

    2011-08-01

    We report a 93Nb nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study on the noncentrosymmetric superconductor Re24Nb5. Below the superconducting temperature Tc(H), the spin susceptibility probed by the 93Nb NMR Knight shift gradually decreases with lowering temperature, accompanied by the broadening of the resonance spectrum. Such behavior is commonly observed in the BCS-type superconductors. The 93Nb NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) shows a well-defined coherence peak just below Tc(H), followed by a marked decrease with further decreasing temperature. Moreover, the 1/T1 data in the superconducting state were found to obey a single exponential expression, yielding a nodeless gap Δ/kB=10.3 K. This value gives the ratio of 2Δ/kBTc(H)=3.55, that is almost identical with the value of 3.5 predicted from BCS theory. On these bases, we conclude that the noncentrosymmetric Re24Nb5 compound can be characterized as a weakly coupled BCS-type superconductor.

  20. An electrophoretic profiling method for thiol-rich phytochelatins and metallothioneins.

    PubMed

    Fan, Teresa W M; Lane, Andrew N; Higashi, Richard M

    2004-01-01

    Thiol-rich peptides such as phytochelatins (PCs) and metallothioneins (MTs) are important cellular chelating agents which function in metal detoxification and/or homeostasis. The variations in molecular sizes and lack of chromophores of these peptides make their analysis difficult. This paper reports an electrophoresis-based method for a broad screen of thiol-rich peptides and proteins. The method uses the thiol-selective fluorescent tag, monobromobimane, coupled with Tricine--sodium dodecyl sulphate--urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for a sensitive determination of both PCs and MTs. Results for PCs were confirmed by two-dimensional NMR and HPLC-tandem MS analyses. Sample throughput is substantially improved over chromatography-based methods through parallel sample analysis in 1 h of electrophoretic separation. The method is versatile in that peptides ranging from glutathione to large proteins can be analysed by simple modification(s) of the extraction and electrophoretic conditions, and the nature of the method supports serendipitous detection of unexpected or novel thiol metabolites. PMID:15202602

  1. Effect of pH on the Electrophoretic Mobility of Spores of Bacillus anthracis and Its Surrogates in Aqueous Solutions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of endospores of Bacillus anthracis and surrogates were measured in aqueous solution across a broad pH range and several ionic strengths. EPM values trended around phylogenetic clustering based on the 16S rRNA gene. Measurements reported here prov...

  2. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140–600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  3. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Emilio A; Barnes, Alexander B; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2011-08-29

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140-600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  4. Cell and Particle Interactions and Aggregation During Electrophoretic Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert H.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this research were (i) to perform experiments for observing and quantifying electrophoretic aggregation, (ii) to develop a theoretical description to appropriately analyze and compare with the experimental results, (iii) to study the combined effects of electrophoretic and gravitational aggregation of large particles, and the combined effects of electrophoretic and Brownian aggregation of small particles, and (iv) to perform a preliminary design of a potential future flight experiment involving electrophoretic aggregation. Electrophoresis refers to the motion of charged particles, droplets or molecules in response to an applied electric field. Electrophoresis is commonly used for analysis and separation of biological particles or molecules. When particles have different surface charge densities or potentials, they will migrate at different velocities in an electric field. This differential migration leads to the possibility that they will collide and aggregate, thereby preventing separation.

  5. MICROSPORIDIAN TAXONOMY: APPLICATION OF ELECTROPHORETIC AND IMMUNOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A review of investigations utilizing electrophoretic and immunological methods for identification and classification of microsporidians, the group to which the first protozoan microbial pesticide belongs, indicate that these methods can be successfully used to classify strains an...

  6. A lateral electrophoretic flow diagnostic assay

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Robert; Skandarajah, Arunan; Gerver, Rachel E.; Neira, Hector D.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Immunochromatographic assays are a cornerstone tool in disease screening. To complement existing lateral flow assays (based on wicking flow) we introduce a lateral flow format that employs directed electrophoretic transport. The format is termed a “lateral e-flow assay” and is designed to support multiplexed detection using immobilized reaction volumes of capture antigen. To fabricate the lateral e-flow device, we employ mask-based UV photopatterning to selectively immobilize unmodified capture antigen along the microchannel in a barcode-like pattern. The channel-filling polyacrylamide hydrogel incorporates a photoactive moiety (benzophenone) to immobilize capture antigen to the hydrogel without a priori antigen modification. We report a heterogeneous sandwich assay using low-power electrophoresis to drive biospecimen through the capture antigen barcode. Fluorescence barcode readout is collected via a low-resource appropriate imaging system (CellScope). We characterize lateral e-flow assay performance and demonstrate a serum assay for antibodies to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). In a pilot study, the lateral e-flow assay positively identifies HCV+ human sera in 60 min. The lateral e-flow assay provides a flexible format for conducting multiplexed immunoassays relevant to confirmatory diagnosis in near-patient settings. PMID:25608872

  7. Fluid Delivery System For Capillary Electrophoretic Applications.

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Liu, Changsheng; Kane, Thomas E.; Kernan, John R.; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.

    2002-04-23

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carrousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  8. Microencapsulated Electrophoretic Films for Electronic Paper Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amundson, Karl

    2003-03-01

    Despite the dominance of liquid crystal displays, they do not perform some functions very well. While backlit liquid crystal displays can offer excellent color performance, they wash out in bright lighting and suffer from high power consumption. Reflective liquid crystal displays have limited brightness, making these devices challenging to read for long periods of time. Flexible liquid crystal displays are difficult to manufacture and keep stable. All of these attributes (long battery lifetime, bright reflective appearance, compatibility with flexible substrates) are traits that would be found in an ideal electronic paper display - an updateable substitute for paper that could be employed in electronic books, newspapers, and other applications. I will discuss technologies that are being developed for electronic-paper-like displays, and especially on particle-based technologies. A microencapsulated electrophoretic display technology is being developed at the E Ink corporation. This display film offers offer high brightness and an ink-on-paper appearance, compatibility with flexible substrates, and image stability that can lead to very low power consumption. I will present some of the physical and chemical challenges associated with making display films with high performance.

  9. Monodisperse light color nanoparticle ink toward chromatic electrophoretic displays.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Li, Yue; Li, Jian; Bi, Lei; Lu, Haipeng; Xie, Jianliang; Ren, Xiangling; Cao, Yonghai; Wang, Ning; Meng, Xianwei; Deng, Longjiang; Guo, Zhanhu

    2016-06-01

    The facile synthesis of nanoparticles for precise image control and fast response of chromatic electrophoretic displays (EPDs) is a challenge. Herein, we report a general method to prepare pink, blue, and yellow nanoparticles with low density and a tunable size of 230-310 nm. The monodispersity is down to 0.02 and surface charges are up to 666e. Importantly, our work highlights the feasibility of chromatic nanoparticles as cost-effective candidates for electrophoretic displays. PMID:27189743

  10. Viscosity of concentrated solutions and of human erythrocyte cytoplasm determined from NMR measurement of molecular correlation times. The dependence of viscosity on cell volume.

    PubMed

    Endre, Z H; Kuchel, P W

    1986-08-01

    Metabolically active human erythrocytes were incubated with [alpha-13C]glycine which led to the specific enrichment of intracellular glutathione. The cells were then studied using 13C-NMR in which the longitudinal relaxation times (T1) and nuclear Overhauser enhancements of the free glycine and glutathione were measured. The T1 values of labelled glycine were also determined in various-concentration solutions of bovine serum albumin and glycerol and also of the natural abundance 13C of glycerol in glycerol solutions. From the T1 estimates the rotational correlation time (tau r) was calculated using a formula based on a model of an isotropic spherical rotor or that of a symmetrical ellipsoidal rotor; for glycine the differences in estimates of tau r obtained using the two models were not significant. From the correlation times and by use of the Stokes-Einstein equations viscosity and translational diffusion coefficients were calculated; thus comment can be made on the likelihood of diffusion control of certain enzyme-catalysed reactions in the erythrocyte. Bulk viscosities of the erythrocyte cytoplasm and the above-mentioned solutions were measured using Ostwald capillary viscometry. Large differences existed between the latter viscosity estimates and those based upon NMR-T1 measurements. We derived an equation from the theory of the viscosity of concentrated solutions which contains two phenomenological interaction parameters, a 'shape' factor and a 'volume' factor; it was fitted to data relating to the concentration dependence of viscosity measured by both methods. We showed, by using the equation and interaction-parameter estimates for a particular probe molecule in a particular solution, that it was possible to correlate NMR viscosity and bulk viscosity; in other words, given an estimate of the bulk viscosity, it was possible to calculate the NMR 'micro' viscosity or vice versa. However, the values of the interaction parameters depend upon the relative sizes of

  11. Absolute nutrient concentration measurements in cell culture media: (1)H q-NMR spectra and data to compare the efficiency of pH-controlled protein precipitation versus CPMG or post-processing filtering approaches.

    PubMed

    Goldoni, Luca; Beringhelli, Tiziana; Rocchia, Walter; Realini, Natalia; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-09-01

    The NMR spectra and data reported in this article refer to the research article titled "A simple and accurate protocol for absolute polar metabolite quantification in cell cultures using q-NMR" [1]. We provide the (1)H q-NMR spectra of cell culture media (DMEM) after removal of serum proteins, which show the different efficiency of various precipitating solvents, the solvent/DMEM ratios, and pH of the solution. We compare the data of the absolute nutrient concentrations, measured by PULCON external standard method, before and after precipitation of serum proteins and those obtained using CPMG (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill) sequence or applying post-processing filtering algorithms to remove, from the (1)H q-NMR spectra, the proteins signal contribution. For each of these approaches, the percent error in the absolute value of every measurement for all the nutrients is also plotted as accuracy assessment. PMID:27331118

  12. A multiple pulse zero crossing NMR technique, and its application to F-19 chemical shift measurements in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burum, D. P.; Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W.-K.

    1978-01-01

    A simple multiple-pulse 'zero crossing technique' for accurately determining the first moment of a solid-state NMR spectrum is introduced. This technique was applied to obtain the F-19 chemical shift versus pressure curves up to 5 kbar for single crystals of CaF2 (0.29 + or - 0.02 ppm/kbar) and BaF2 (0.62 + or - 0.05 ppm/kbar). Results at ambient temperature and pressure are also reported for a number of other fluorine compounds. Because of its high data rate, this technique is potentially several orders of magnitude more sensitive than similar CW methods.

  13. Electrophoretic Mobility of Poly(acrylic acid)-Coated Alumina Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bhosale, Prasad S.; Chun, Jaehun; Berg, John C.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) adsorption on the electrokinetic behavior of alumina dispersions under high pH conditions was investigated as a function of polymer concentration and molecular weight as well as the presence, concentration and ion type of background electrolyte. Systems of this type are relevant to nuclear waste treatment, in which PAA is known to be an effective rheology modifier. The presence of all but the lowest molecular weight PAA studied (1800) led to decreases in dynamic electrophoretic mobility at low polymer concentrations, attributable to bridging flocculation, as verified by measurements of particle size distribution. Bridging effects increased with polymer molecular weight, and decreased with polymer concentration. Increases in background electrolyte concentration enhanced dynamic electrophoretic mobility as the polymer layers were compressed and bridging was reduced. Such enhancements were reduced as the cation was changed from Na+ to K+ to Cs+.

  14. Fabrication of nanoelectrodes for neurophysiology: cathodic electrophoretic paint insulation and focused ion beam milling

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yi; Chen, Jie; Guo, Xiaoli; Cantrell, Donald; Ruoff, Rodney; Troy, John

    2005-01-01

    The fabrication and characterization of tungsten nanoelectrodes insulated with cathodic electrophoretic paint is described together with their application within the field of neurophysiology. The tip of a 127 μm diameter tungsten wire was etched down to less than 100 nm and then insulated with cathodic electrophoretic paint. Focused ion beam (FIB) polishing was employed to remove the insulation at the electrode’s apex, leaving a nanoscale sized conductive tip of 100–1000 nm. The nanoelectrodes were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their electrochemical properties characterized by steady state linear sweep voltammetry. Electrode impedance at 1 kHz was measured too. The ability of a 700 nm tipped electrode to record well-isolated action potentials extracellularly from single visual neurons in vivo was demonstrated. Such electrodes have the potential to open new populations of neurons to study. PMID:16467926

  15. Fabrication of nanoelectrodes for neurophysiology: cathodic electrophoretic paint insulation and focused ion beam milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yi; Chen, Jie; Guo, Xiaoli; Cantrell, Donald; Ruoff, Rodney; Troy, John

    2005-09-01

    The fabrication and characterization of tungsten nanoelectrodes insulated with cathodic electrophoretic paint is described together with their application within the field of neurophysiology. The tip of a 127 µm diameter tungsten wire was etched down to less than 100 nm and then insulated with cathodic electrophoretic paint. Focused ion beam (FIB) polishing was employed to remove the insulation at the electrode's apex, leaving a nanoscale sized conductive tip of 100-1000 nm. The nanoelectrodes were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their electrochemical properties characterized by steady state linear sweep voltammetry. Electrode impedance at 1 kHz was measured too. The ability of a 700 nm tipped electrode to record well-isolated action potentials extracellularly from single visual neurons in vivo was demonstrated. Such electrodes have the potential to open new populations of neurons to study.

  16. In situ measurement of magnesium carbonate formation from CO2 using static high-pressure and -temperature 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Surface, J Andrew; Skemer, Philip; Hayes, Sophia E; Conradi, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    We explore a new in situ NMR spectroscopy method that possesses the ability to monitor the chemical evolution of supercritical CO(2) in relevant conditions for geological CO(2) sequestration. As a model, we use the fast reaction of the mineral brucite, Mg(OH)(2), with supercritical CO(2) (88 bar) in aqueous conditions at 80 °C. The in situ conversion of CO(2) into metastable and stable carbonates is observed throughout the reaction. After more than 58 h of reaction, the sample was depressurized and analyzed using in situ Raman spectroscopy, where the laser was focused on the undisturbed products through the glass reaction tube. Postreaction, ex situ analysis was performed on the extracted and dried products using Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and magic-angle spinning (1)H-decoupled (13)C NMR. These separate methods of analysis confirmed a spatial dependence of products, possibly caused by a gradient of reactant availability, pH, and/or a reaction mechanism that involves first forming hydroxy-hydrated (basic, hydrated) carbonates that convert to the end-product, anhydrous magnesite. This carbonation reaction illustrates the importance of static (unmixed) reaction systems at sequestration-like conditions. PMID:22676479

  17. Design and characterization of a calixarene inclusion compound for calibration of long-range carbon-fluorine distance measurements by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Daniel J.; Khalifah, Peter G.; Thompson, Lynmarie K.

    2010-01-01

    An inexpensive, easily synthesized calixarene:fluorotoluene host:guest inclusion complex has been designed for optimization and calibration of solid-state NMR measurements of carbon-fluorine distances using Rotational Echo DOuble Resonance (REDOR). Complexation of the fluorotoluene with the calixarene host separates the molecules such that simple two-spin behavior is observed for one site with a 4.08 Å carbon-fluorine distance. Fluorotoluene dynamics within the calixarene matrix causes motional averaging of the dipolar couplings that make it possible to easily optimize REDOR experiments and test their accuracy for relatively long distance measurements (> 6.6 Å). This provides a new tool for accurate REDOR measurements of long carbon-fluorine distances, which have important applications in the characterization of fluorine-containing drugs, proteins, and polymers. PMID:20822943

  18. Column-coupling strategies for multidimensional electrophoretic separation techniques.

    PubMed

    Kler, Pablo A; Sydes, Daniel; Huhn, Carolin

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional electrophoretic separations represent one of the most common strategies for dealing with the analysis of complex samples. In recent years we have been witnessing the explosive growth of separation techniques for the analysis of complex samples in applications ranging from life sciences to industry. In this sense, electrophoretic separations offer several strategic advantages such as excellent separation efficiency, different methods with a broad range of separation mechanisms, and low liquid consumption generating less waste effluents and lower costs per analysis, among others. Despite their impressive separation efficiency, multidimensional electrophoretic separations present some drawbacks that have delayed their extensive use: the volumes of the columns, and consequently of the injected sample, are significantly smaller compared to other analytical techniques, thus the coupling interfaces between two separations components must be very efficient in terms of providing geometrical precision with low dead volume. Likewise, very sensitive detection systems are required. Additionally, in electrophoretic separation techniques, the surface properties of the columns play a fundamental role for electroosmosis as well as the unwanted adsorption of proteins or other complex biomolecules. In this sense the requirements for an efficient coupling for electrophoretic separation techniques involve several aspects related to microfluidics and physicochemical interactions of the electrolyte solutions and the solid capillary walls. It is interesting to see how these multidimensional electrophoretic separation techniques have been used jointly with different detection techniques, for intermediate detection as well as for final identification and quantification, particularly important in the case of mass spectrometry. In this work we present a critical review about the different strategies for coupling two or more electrophoretic separation techniques and the

  19. Fully-Automated High-Throughput NMR System for Screening of Haploid Kernels of Maize (Corn) by Measurement of Oil Content.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Liu, Jin; Xu, Xiaoping; Huang, Qingming; Chen, Shanshan; Yang, Peiqiang; Chen, Shaojiang; Song, Yiqiao

    2016-01-01

    One of the modern crop breeding techniques uses doubled haploid plants that contain an identical pair of chromosomes in order to accelerate the breeding process. Rapid haploid identification method is critical for large-scale selections of double haploids. The conventional methods based on the color of the endosperm and embryo seeds are slow, manual and prone to error. On the other hand, there exists a significant difference between diploid and haploid seeds generated by high oil inducer, which makes it possible to use oil content to identify the haploid. This paper describes a fully-automated high-throughput NMR screening system for maize haploid kernel identification. The system is comprised of a sampler unit to select a single kernel to feed for measurement of NMR and weight, and a kernel sorter to distribute the kernel according to the measurement result. Tests of the system show a consistent accuracy of 94% with an average screening time of 4 seconds per kernel. Field test result is described and the directions for future improvement are discussed. PMID:27454427

  20. Fully-Automated High-Throughput NMR System for Screening of Haploid Kernels of Maize (Corn) by Measurement of Oil Content

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoping; Huang, Qingming; Chen, Shanshan; Yang, Peiqiang; Chen, Shaojiang; Song, Yiqiao

    2016-01-01

    One of the modern crop breeding techniques uses doubled haploid plants that contain an identical pair of chromosomes in order to accelerate the breeding process. Rapid haploid identification method is critical for large-scale selections of double haploids. The conventional methods based on the color of the endosperm and embryo seeds are slow, manual and prone to error. On the other hand, there exists a significant difference between diploid and haploid seeds generated by high oil inducer, which makes it possible to use oil content to identify the haploid. This paper describes a fully-automated high-throughput NMR screening system for maize haploid kernel identification. The system is comprised of a sampler unit to select a single kernel to feed for measurement of NMR and weight, and a kernel sorter to distribute the kernel according to the measurement result. Tests of the system show a consistent accuracy of 94% with an average screening time of 4 seconds per kernel. Field test result is described and the directions for future improvement are discussed. PMID:27454427

  1. Electrophoretic nanotechnology of composite electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Su, Y; Zhitomirsky, I

    2013-02-14

    The electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method has been developed for the fabrication of MnO(2)-multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films for application in electrochemical supercapacitors (ESs). For MWCNT applications, which depend on electrical conductivity, it is challenging to achieve dispersion and EPD of pristine MWCNT and avoid defects due to chemical treatment or functionalization. An important finding was the possibility of efficient dispersion and controlled EPD of MWCNT using calconcarboxylic acid (CCA). Moreover, the use of CCA allowed efficient dispersion of MnO(2) in concentrated suspensions and EPD of MnO(2) films. The comparison of the experimental data for chromotrope FB (CFB) and CCA and chemical structures of the molecules provided insight into the mechanism of CCA adsorption on MnO(2). The fabrication of stable suspensions of MnO(2) nanoparticles containing MWCNT, and controlled codeposition of both materials is a crucial aspect in the EPD of composites. The new approach was based on the use of CCA as a charging and dispersing agent for EPD of MnO(2) nanoparticles and MWCNT. The deposition yield measurements at various experimental conditions and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data, coupled with results of electron microscopy, thermogravimetric, and differential thermal analysis provided evidence of the formation of MnO(2)-MWCNT composites. The electrochemical testing results and impedance spectroscopy data showed good capacitive behavior of the composite films and the beneficial effect of MWCNTs. PMID:22662969

  2. Formation of κ-carrageenan-gelatin polyelectrolyte complexes studied by (1)H NMR, UV spectroscopy and kinematic viscosity measurements.

    PubMed

    Voron'ko, Nicolay G; Derkach, Svetlana R; Vovk, Mikhail A; Tolstoy, Peter M

    2016-10-20

    The intermolecular interactions between an anionic polysaccharide from the red algae κ-carrageenan and a gelatin polypeptide, forming stoichiometric polysaccharide-polypeptide (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes in the aqueous phase, were examined. The major method of investigation was high-resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Additional data were obtained by UV absorption spectroscopy, light scattering dispersion and capillary viscometry. Experimental data were interpreted in terms of the changing roles of electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds when κ-carrageenan-gelatin complexes are formed. At high temperatures, when biopolymer macromolecules in solution are in the state of random coil, hydrophobic interactions make a major contribution to complex stabilization. At the temperature of gelatin's coil→helix conformational transition and at lower temperatures, electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds play a defining role in complex formation. A proposed model of the κ-carrageenan-gelatin complex is discussed. PMID:27474666

  3. Mapping membrane protein backbone dynamics: a comparison of site-directed spin labeling with NMR 15N-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Solomon, Tsega L; Columbus, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The ability to detect nanosecond backbone dynamics with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in soluble proteins has been well established. However, for membrane proteins, the nitroxide appears to have more interactions with the protein surface, potentially hindering the sensitivity to backbone motions. To determine whether membrane protein backbone dynamics could be mapped with SDSL, a nitroxide was introduced at 55 independent sites in a model polytopic membrane protein, TM0026. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral parameters were compared with NMR (15)N-relaxation data. Sequential scans revealed backbone dynamics with the same trends observed for the R1 relaxation rate, suggesting that nitroxide dynamics remain coupled to the backbone on membrane proteins. PMID:25296323

  4. Electrophoretic characterization of insulin growth factor (IGF-1) functionalized magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Viota, Julián L; Rudzka, Katarzyna; Trueba, Ángel; Torres-Aleman, Ignacio; Delgado, Ángel V

    2011-05-17

    The synthesis of composite nanoparticles consisting of a magnetite core coated with a layer of the hormone insulin growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is described. The adsorption of the hormone in the different formulations is first studied by electrophoretic mobility measurements as a function of pH, ionic strength, and time. Because of the permeable character expected for both citrate and IGF-1 coatings surrounding the magnetite cores, an appropriate analysis of their electrophoretic mobility must be addressed. Recent developments of electrokinetic theories for particles covered by soft surface layers have rendered possible the evaluation of the softness degree from raw electrophoretic mobility data. In the present contribution, the data are quantitatively analyzed based on the theoretical model of the electrokinetics of soft particles. As a result, information is obtained on both the thickness and the charge density of the surrounding layer. It is shown that IGF-1 adsorbs onto the surface of citrate-coated magnetite nanoparticles, and adsorption is confirmed by dot-blot analysis. In addition, it is also demonstrated that the external layer of IGF-1 exerts a shielding effect on the surface charge of citrate-magnetite particles, as suggested by the mobility reduction upon contacting the particles with the hormone. Aging effects are demonstrated, providing an electrokinetic fingerprint of changes in adsorbed protein configuration with time. PMID:21506536

  5. Finger-powered electrophoretic transport of discrete droplets for portable digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Wang, Yide; Sungtaek Ju, Y

    2016-07-01

    We report a finger-powered digital microfluidic device based on the electrophoretic transport of discrete droplets (EPD). An array of piezoelectric elements is connected in parallel to metal electrodes immersed in dielectric fluids. When deflected in a controlled sequence via human finger power, the piezoelectric elements charge and actuate droplets across each electrode pair through electrophoretic force. Successful droplet transportation requires the piezoelectric elements to provide both sufficient charge and voltage pulse duration. We quantify these requirements using numerical models to predict the electrical charges induced on the droplets and the corresponding electrophoretic forces. The models are experimentally validated by comparing the predicted and measured droplet translational velocities. We successfully demonstrated transport and merging of aqueous droplets over a range of droplet radii (0.6-0.9 mm). We further showed direct manipulation of body fluids, including droplets of saliva and urine, using our finger-powered EPD device. To facilitate practical implementation of multistep assays based on the approach, a hand/finger-rotated drum system with a programmable pattern of protrusions is designed to induce deflections of multiple piezoelectric elements and demonstrate programmable fluidic functions. An electrode-to-piezoelectric element connection scheme to minimize the number of piezoelectric elements necessary for a sequence of microfluidic functions is also explored. The present work establishes an engineering foundation to enable design and implementation of finger-powered portable EPD microfluidic devices. PMID:27292054

  6. AN ELECTROPHORETIC STUDY OF A STREPTOCOCCAL PROTEINASE AND ITS PRECURSOR

    PubMed Central

    Shedlovsky, Theodore; Elliott, S. D.

    1951-01-01

    An electrophoretic study of crystalline preparations of a streptococcal proteinase and its precursor established their isoelectric points at pH values of 8.42 and 7.35 respectively (ionic strength 0.10). Preparations of the proteinase appeared to be electrophoretically homogeneous over a pH range of 5 to 8.5. Precursor preparations contained a relatively low concentration of the active enzyme visible as a separate peak in electrophoretic patterns of sufficiently concentrated solutions. Autocatalytic conversion of precursor to active enzyme was complete and resulted in a corresponding change in the electrophoretic pattern. Treatment of precursor preparations with trypsin produced incomplete conversion to the active enzyme and resulted in the formation of a modified precursor protein. This differed from the parent substance in electrophoretic mobility and in susceptibility to trypsin, but resembled it in immunological specificity and, as previously shown, in susceptibility to conversion to active enzyme by autocatalysis. Serological reactions of precursor and active enzyme components withdrawn from the cell after electrophoresis are described. It appears that the precursor protein may have two antigenic groups, one specific, the other shared by the active enzyme which behaves as a single antigen. PMID:14888818

  7. Electrophoretic mobility of silica particles in a mixture of toluene and ethanol at different particle concentrations.

    PubMed

    Medrano, M; Pérez, A T; Lobry, L; Peters, F

    2009-10-20

    In this paper we present measurements of the electrophoretic mobility of colloidal particles by using heterodyne detection of light scattering. The measurements have been made up to concentrations of 5.4% silica nanoparticles, with a diameter on the order of 80 nm, in a mixture of 70% toluene and 30% ethanol. To make possible the measurements at these concentrations, the liquid mixture is chosen so as to match the index of refraction of the particles, thus resulting in a transparent suspension. PMID:19754057

  8. Hyphenated low-field NMR techniques: combining NMR with NIR, GPC/SEC and rheometry.

    PubMed

    Räntzsch, Volker; Wilhelm, Manfred; Guthausen, Gisela

    2016-06-01

    Hyphenated low-field NMR techniques are promising characterization methods for online process analytics and comprehensive offline studies of soft materials. By combining different analytical methods with low-field NMR, information on chemical and physical properties can be correlated with molecular dynamics and complementary chemical information. In this review, we present three hyphenated low-field NMR techniques: a combination of near-infrared spectroscopy and time-domain NMR (TD-NMR) relaxometry, online (1) H-NMR spectroscopy measured directly after size exclusion chromatographic (SEC, also known as GPC) separation and a combination of rheometry and TD-NMR relaxometry for highly viscous materials. Case studies are reviewed that underline the possibilities and challenges of the different hyphenated low-field NMR methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25854997

  9. Volovik effect and Fermi-liquid behavior in the s-wave superconductor CaPd2As2: As75 NMR-NQR measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ding, Q. -P.; Wiecki, P.; Anand, V. K.; Sangeetha, N. S.; Lee, Y.; Johnston, D. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2016-04-07

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the collapsed-tetragonal CaPd2As2 superconductor (SC) with a transition temperature of 1.27 K have been investigated by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. The temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts indicate the absence of magnetic correlations in the normal state. In the SC state, 1/T1 measured by 75As NQR shows a clear Hebel-Slichter (HS) peak just below Tc and decreases exponentially at lower T, confirming a conventional s-wave SC. Additionally, the Volovik effect, also known as the Doppler shift effect, hasmore » been clearly evidenced by the observation of the suppression of the HS peak with applied magnetic field.« less

  10. Volovik effect and Fermi-liquid behavior in the s -wave superconductor CaPd2As2: 75As NMR-NQR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Q.-P.; Wiecki, P.; Anand, V. K.; Sangeetha, N. S.; Lee, Y.; Johnston, D. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2016-04-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the collapsed-tetragonal CaPd2As2 superconductor (SC) with a transition temperature of 1.27 K have been investigated by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. The temperature (T ) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1 /T1) and the Knight shifts indicate the absence of magnetic correlations in the normal state. In the SC state, 1 /T1 measured by 75As NQR shows a clear Hebel-Slichter (HS) peak just below Tc and decreases exponentially at lower T , confirming a conventional s -wave SC. In addition, the Volovik effect, also known as the Doppler shift effect, has been clearly evidenced by the observation of the suppression of the HS peak with applied magnetic field.