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Sample records for electroslag refined iron

  1. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of electroslag refined iron alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, G. K.

    1976-01-01

    Nitronic 40 (21Cr-6N-9Mn), HY-130, 9Ni-4Co, and D-6 alloys were prepared and evaluated in the form of 15.2 mm thick plates. Smooth bar tensile tests, double-edge sharp notch fracture toughness tests Charpy V-notch impact tests were conducted on appropriate heat treated specimens of the four steel plates at 22 C, -50 C, -100 C, -150 C, and -196 C. Similar material characterization, including metallographic evaluation studies on air melt and vacuum arc melt grades of same four alloy steels were conducted for comparative purposes. A cost analysis of manufacturing plates of air melt, electroslag remelt and vacuum arc remelt grades was performed. The results of both material characterization and cost analyses pointed out certain special benefits of electroslag processing iron base alloys.

  2. Melting of uranium-contaminated metal cylinders by electroslag refining

    SciTech Connect

    Uda, T.; Ozawa, Y.; Iba, H.

    1987-12-01

    Melt refining as a means of uranium decontamination of metallic wastes by electroslag refining was examined. Electroslag refining was selected because it is easy to scale up to the necessary industrial levels. Various thicknesses of iron and aluminum cylinders with uranium concentrations close to actual metallic wastes were melted by adding effective fluxes for decontamination. Thin-walled iron and aluminum cylinders with a fill ratio (electrode/mold cross-section ratio) of 0.05 could be melted, and the energy efficiency obtained was 16 to 25%. The ingot uranium concentration of the iron obtained was 0.01 to 0.015 ppm, which was close to the contamination level of the as-received specimen, while for aluminum it was 3 to 5 ppm, which was a few times higher than the as-received specimen contamination level of --0.9 ppm. To melt a thin aluminum cylinder in a steady state, with this fill ratio of 0.05, instantaneous electrode driving response control was desired. Electroslag refining gave better decontamination and energy economization results than by a resistance furnace.

  3. Process for electroslag refining of uranium and uranium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, P.S. Jr.; Agee, W.A.; Bullock, J.S. IV; Condon, J.B.

    1975-07-22

    A process is described for electroslag refining of uranium and uranium alloys wherein molten uranium and uranium alloys are melted in a molten layer of a fluoride slag containing up to about 8 weight percent calcium metal. The calcium metal reduces oxides in the uranium and uranium alloys to provide them with an oxygen content of less than 100 parts per million. (auth)

  4. Investigation of Oxide Inclusions and Primary Carbonitrides in Inconel 718 Superalloy Refined through Electroslag Remelting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi-Chun; Shi, Cheng-Bin; Guo, Han-Jie; Wang, Fei; Ren, Hao; Feng, Di

    2012-12-01

    The effect of remelting atmosphere and calcium treatment during electroslag remelting (ESR) of Inconel 718 superalloy on the oxide inclusions and primary carbonitrides was investigated. The results show that after ESR refining combined with calcium treatment, the original oxide inclusions in the electrode, mainly MgO·Al2O3 spinels and some MgO inclusions, were modified to CaO-Al2O3 system inclusions or the inclusions of MgO·Al2O3 spinel core surrounded by CaO-MgO-Al2O3 system inclusion layer. Without the calcium treatment in ESR process, all the oxide inclusions in superalloy ingots are MgO·Al2O3 spinels. All the oxide inclusions in ESR ingots act as the nucleation site for carbonitride (Nb,Ti)CN with two-layer structure precipitation, except for those with a single (Nb,Ti)CN layer containing a small amount of Ti and N in the ingot refined by a proper amount of calcium addition in ESR process. The carbonitrides (Nb,Ti)CN formed directly on the oxide inclusion have a small amount of Nb and C as well as a relatively fixed atomic ratio of Nb/Ti (about 0.6:1). There is a Nb-rich and C-rich (Nb,Ti)CN layer on the pre-existing (Nb,Ti)CN formed on the oxide inclusion. The size of the observed carbonitrides is in the range of 5 μm to 15 μm. The calcium treatment in the ESR process has a significant effect on the morphology of carbonitrides in superalloy ingot due to modification of oxide inclusions by Ca-treatment resulting in the change of precipitation and growth conditions for carbonitrides. The morphologies of carbonitrides were changed from clustered block or single octahedral to skeleton-like after calcium treatment.

  5. Evaluation of the Mechanical Properties of Electroslag Refined Fe-12Ni Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, G. K.

    1978-01-01

    Three Fe-12Ni alloys, individually alloyed with small amounts of V, Ti, and Al, were manufactured through different melting techniques, with special emphasis on electroslag remelting, in order to achieve different levels of metal purity and associated costs. The relative effectiveness of these melting techniques was evaluated from tensile and slow bend fracture toughness behavior at 25 C and -196 C after tempering the test specimens at various temperatures. The best melting procedure was vacuum induction melting (VIM) with or without electroslag remelting (ESR). VIM+ESR is the recommended procedure since ESR provides increased yield of plate product, a reduction of overall manufacturing costs and, depending on the alloy composition, improved tensile and fracture toughness properties.

  6. Effect of nitrogen alloying and the electroslag refining process on the properties of AISI M41 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattar, Taha; El Fawakhry, Kamal; Halfa, Hossam; El Demerdash, Mahmoud

    2006-12-01

    Nitrogen produces very beneficial effects in high-speed steel and can therefore be regarded as a significant alloying element in ferrous materials. In order to attain the goal of this study, to investigate the effect of nitrogen alloying and the electroslag refining (ESR) process on the properties of AISI M41 steel, two high-speed steels were melted in an air induction furnace (IF). The first one is a standard AISI M41 high-speed steel. The second one is nitrogen-alloyed M41. The produced ingots were used as consumable electrodes in ESR under three different CaF2-based fluxes. The steel produced from the IF and ESR was heat treated. Hardness, secondary hardness, and microstructure were also studied. It was concluded that both ESR and nitrogen alloying improve the hardness profile of the quenched-tempered high-speed steels. The highest secondary hardness and highest softening resistance were attained by ESR of high-nitrogen high-speed steel (M41N) under CaF2/CaO/Al2O3: 55/30/15 slag. The ESR improves the shape, size, and distribution of precipitates in the produced ingot. Quenching and tempering treatment conditions the retained austenite that is present in the as-cast steel by precipitation of carbide and forming martensite on cooling to room temperature.

  7. Properties of electroslag castings. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1985-08-01

    The quality, response to heat treatment, and mechanical properties of electroslag-cast step blocks from Cameron Iron Works and from Selectrotech, Inc., are described. The mechanical properties include Charpy impact, tensile, and creep. Properties of the electroslag castings were compared to determine the differences between casters, between wrought and electroslag cast properties, and between sand and electroslag castings. Results are presented to show that the electroslag casting process has a potential for producing properties similar to those of wrought material for 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo and 9 Cr-1 Mo steel and similar to those of sand-cast material for type 316 stainless steel. 5 refs., 46 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Electroslag remelting of a vanadium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Nafziger, R.H.; Smolik, G.R.; Carmack, W.J.

    1996-12-31

    The Bureau of Mines, in cooperation with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, has electroslag melted a V-5Ti-5Cr alloy using a fused CaF{sub 2} flux. The alloy is a candidate for use in future fusion reactors. One objective of this research was to evaluate the feasibility of the electroslag melting process in separating simulated radioactive isotopes from the V alloy to demonstrate recyclability. Small amounts of Ca, Y, and Mn were added as surrogates for radioactive isotopes. Results showed that this vanadium alloy can be electroslag melted satisfactorily. The impurities added intentionally were removed or decreased successfully. Among the major alloying constituents, Cr was retained but there were some Ti losses. The latter may be controlled with process refinements. This research suggests that the electroslag melting process could be a suitable method for recycling V alloys after use in future fusion reactors, or for processing other reactive metal alloys with more immediate applications. 3 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  9. Evaluation of electroslag castings

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.; Sikka, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    Results of evaluations of electroslag castings of ferritic (2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo and 9 Cr-1 Mo) and austenitic (CF8M or type 316) steels are presented. The castings have been characterized for surface finish, cracking, solidification structure, chemical composition, hardness, ferrite distribution, tensile properties, Charpy impact properties, and creep properties. Pertinent data are compared with equivalent data for sand castings and wrought products of the same materials. Based on the results of these studies, the properties of electroslag castings compare favorably with those of sand castings and wrought materials.

  10. Resistance electroslag (RES) surfacing

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, S.G.

    1985-08-01

    RES-surfacing is an abbreviation of resistance electroslag surfacing. The ElectroSlag Welding (ESW) process is wellknown for the welding of heavy-walled materials. During the past few years, a RES-surfacing system has been developed, in which a strip electrode is used in an ESW process. This is a development of the submerged arc welding (SAW) surfacing process using strip electrodes, which has been used in industry for many years. The basic difference between the SAW- and RES-surfacing processes is in the way of obtaining penetration in the base metal, and in fusion of the strip electrode and flux. In the SAW process, the required heat is derived from an electric arc; in the RES-process, it is obtained by resistance heating (i.e., the Joule effect) as a result of current flowing through a shallow molten pool of electrically conductive slag. To satisfy the basic differences in the processes, specific combinations of strip electrodes and fluxes have been developed. The welding equipment used for RES-surfacing is basically the same as for SAW-surfacing, except for minor modifications of the welding head due to heat radiation from the visible molten slag pool, and the use of additional equipment for magnetic control of the molten pool. result of the magnetic control of the molten pool.

  11. Electroslag component casting. [Nickel aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    This project is directed toward the development of electroslag-casting (ESC) technology for use in coal conversion components such as valve bodies, pump housings, and pipe fittings. The aim is also to develop a sufficient data base to permit electroslag casting to become an ASME Code-accepted process. It is also intended to transfer the ESC process technology to private industry. A total of 32 electroslag castings of 2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, type 316, and nickel aluminide were procured from four facilities for evaluation (Table 1). The most complex castings procured during this program were the valve bodies shown in Figure 2. The castings were subjected to various heat treatments (Table 2), checked for chemical composition uniformity from top to bottom, and subjected to macrostructural evaluation and mechanical properties testing. Results are discussed. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Electroslag remelt processing of irradiated vanadium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmack, W. J.; Smolik, G. R.; McCarthy, K. A.

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes experimental efforts to investigate the potential of a slag remelting process for reducing radioactivity of irradiated vanadium alloys used in a fusion power production facility. The experiment determined the removal characteristics of four surrogate transmutation isotopes significant to accident safety expected in a V5Ti5Cr alloy irradiated under fusion conditions (Ca, Y, to simulate Sc, Mn, and Ar). Removal of these isotopes could decrease the accident risk of reprocessing irradiated vanadium and reusing it in fusion reactors. An electroslag remelt furnace was used in the experiment to melt and react the constituents using a calcium fluoride slag. The process achieved 90% removal of calcium and over 99% removal of yttrium. Analyses indicate that 40% of the manganese has been removed. Argon analysis of the refined ingots indicates that 99% of the argon was removed from the vanadium alloy.

  13. Manufacturing technology for improved low-cost electroslag materials and components for application in fossil-energy systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, G.K.

    1982-03-01

    Safe, reliable and long term service of critical components used in fossil energy systems are major objectives of DOE's materials research and fabrication technology programs. The use of electroslag refined materials and electroslag cast components in chemical processing, petrochemical, nuclear power generation and fossil energy conversion systems has become quite common in the USSR, Japan, Western and Eastern European countries. Elecroslag cast components as lower cost alternates to forged components have performed exceedingly well in such critical applications. The aim of this program is to broaden the technology base of the novel electroslag casting process for improving its application potential in the fossil energy systems construction industry. The specific objectives of this project were to determine (a) the economics and (b) the technical factors which determine the value of using electroslag casting process for the manufacture of components of various fossil energy systems. The castings of carbon steel so produced have exhibited mechanical properties equal to and in some instances superior to similar shapes produced by conventional forging method. The possibilities of attaining lower final cost of the electroslag cast component compared to similar shaped forging appear very promising. Specification approval based on current code standards is a deterrent to acceptability of electroslag cast materials and components for many industrial applications. These and other process aspects which need further investigations are outlined.

  14. Optimizing electroslag cladding with finite element modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.V.; Atteridge, D.G.; Meekisho, L.

    1996-12-31

    Electroslag cladding of nickel alloys onto carbon steel propeller shafts was optimized in terms of interpass temperatures. A two dimensional finite element model was used in this study to analyze the heat transfer induced by multipass electroslag cladding. Changes of interpass temperatures during a cladding experiment with uniform initial temperature distribution on a section of shaft were first simulated. It was concluded that uniform initial temperature distribution would lead to interpass temperatures out of the optimal range if continuous cladding is expected. The difference in the cooling conditions among experimental and full size shafts and its impact on interpass temperatures during the cladding were discussed. Electroslag cladding onto a much longer shaft, virtually an semi infinite long shaft, was analyzed with specific reference to the practical applications of electroslag cladding. Optimal initial preheating temperature distribution was obtained for continuous cladding on full size shafts which would keep the interpass temperatures within the required range.

  15. Electroslag remelting with used fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, N.F.; Sokha, Yu.S.; Oleinik, Yu.S.; Prokhorov, A.N.; Ol'shanskaya, T.V.

    1988-05-01

    The Ukranian Scientific-Research Institute of Specialty Steel collaborated with plants engaged in the production of quality metals to introduce a low-waste electroslag remelting (ESR) technology employing used fluxes. It was established that the fluoride (type ANF-1) and fluoride-oxide (type ANF-6) fluxes which are widely used in ESR still have a high content of calcium fluoride and alumina and a low impurity content after 8-10 h of ESR. In the ESR of steels with used fluxes, the content of monitored components in the final slags changes negligibly, while the content of most impurities decreases. The used flux is also characterized by a low concentration of phosphorus and sulfur. It was found that flux can be used 3-5 times when it makes up 50% of the flux mixture in the charge. The savings realized from the use of spent flux in ESR amounts to 4-9 rubles/ton steel.

  16. Commercialization effort in support of electroslag-casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of an effort to revive interest in the electroslag casting (ESC) of components in the United States. The ESC process is an extension of a well established electroslag-remelting (ESR) process. Both processes use the electrode of a material that is continuously melted and cast in a water-cooled copper mold. For simple shapes, the mold can be movable, allowing the continuous casting of long lengths. In an effort to revive US industries` interest in ESC, the following approaches were taken: (1) US industries with prior experience in ESC or currently operating an ESR unit were contacted, followed up with telephone conversation, and/or sent copies of prior published reports on the topic, and, in some cases, personal visits were made; (2) with two companies, a potential interest in ESC was worked out by initially conducting ESR; and (3) to further strengthen the industrial interest, the newly developed iron-aluminide alloy, FA-129, was chosen as the material of choice for this study. The two industrial companies that worked with ORNL were Special Metals Corporation (New Hartford, New York) and Precision Rolled Products, Inc. (PRP) [Florham Park, New Jersey]. Even with its advantages, a survey of the industry indicated that ESC technology has a very limited chance of advancement in the United States. However, the processing of rounds and slabs by the ESR process is a well established commercial technology and will continue to expand. 16 figs, 3 tabs, 12 refs.

  17. Properties of electroslag castings: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1984-11-01

    This part of several reports to be published on the properties of electroslag castings of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and type 316 stainless steel describes the properties of three electroslag-cast valve bodies of type 316 stainless steel. These castings were electroslag cast at the University of British Columbia in Canada from ORNL-supplied electrodes. The castings have been characterized for surface finish, cracking, solidification structure, chemical analysis, hardness, ferrite distribution, tensile properties, Charpy impact properties, and creep properties. Tensile data on these castings were compared with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code minimum values for sand castings. The creep data were compared with the data on sand castings and the ASME code minimum curve for wrought material. 29 figures, 7 tables.

  18. Method and apparatus for controlling electroslag remelting

    DOEpatents

    Maguire, Michael C.; Zanner, Frank J.; Damkroger, Brian K.; Miszkiel, Mark E.; Aronson, Eugene A.

    1994-01-01

    Method and apparatus for controlling electrode immersion depth in an electroslag remelting furnace. The phase difference of the alternating current circuit established in the furnace is calculated in real time and employed to more accurately control immersion depth than possible with voltage-swing systems.

  19. Symposium on electroslag component casting: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.; Hobday, J.M.

    1984-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Surface Coal Gasification, has established a Materials Program to develop and apply appropriate materials to coal gasification plant components. The overall goals of the Surface Gasification Materials Program (SGMP) are to improve operational reliability and system durability and to reduce fabrication and operating costs of coal gasification plant components. The SGMP Electroslag Component Casting Project is directed to the development of electroslag casting (ESC) technology for use in coal conversion components such as valve bodies, pump housings, and pipe fittings. The aim is to develop a sufficient data base to permit ESC to become an ASME Code-accepted process. It is also intended to transfer the ESC process technology to private industry. This symposium was planned to discuss not only the SGMP Electroslag Component Casting Project but the activities and experiences of other organizations as well. The symposium addressed descriptions of electroslag processes; a worldwide perspective on the status of ESC technology; and details of production, mechanical properties, economics, and use of ESC for coal gasification components. Ten papers were presented, and a panel discussion was held to provide participants an opportunity to express their opinions and to offer recommendations on the content of the DOE program. This document constitutes the proceedings of that symposium. The papers included here are minimally edited transcripts of the presentations made at the symposium. All papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  20. Electroslag welding of titanium and its alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, V.Y.

    1985-02-01

    The objective of this review is to examine the specific requirements of the electroslag welding process when applied to thick-wall components made from titanium or its various alloys. The review includes process variations, flux and equipment development requirements, specifics of the various techniques, wire and shielding gas supply problems, welding conditions, properties of the welds, quality control, and other topics.

  1. Constant voltage electro-slag remelting control

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, Max E.

    1996-01-01

    A system for controlling electrode gap in an electro-slag remelt furnace has a constant regulated voltage and an eletrode which is fed into the slag pool at a constant rate. The impedance of the circuit through the slag pool is directly proportional to the gap distance. Because of the constant voltage, the system current changes are inversely proportional to changes in gap. This negative feedback causes the gap to remain stable.

  2. Constant voltage electro-slag remelting control

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, M.E.

    1996-10-22

    A system for controlling electrode gap in an electro-slag remelt furnace has a constant regulated voltage and an electrode which is fed into the slag pool at a constant rate. The impedance of the circuit through the slag pool is directly proportional to the gap distance. Because of the constant voltage, the system current changes are inversely proportional to changes in gap. This negative feedback causes the gap to remain stable. 1 fig.

  3. Electroslag remelting of the metal wastes of nickel alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebtsov, S. N.; Korostelev, A. B.

    2012-06-01

    The electroslag remelting of the metal wastes of nickel alloys is studied, and the obtained results demonstrate that the chemical composition and the physicomechanical and service properties of the ingots meet the requirements of the specifications for these alloys. The electroslag remelting ingots are then used as a charge for remelting in a vacuum induction furnace according to a standard technology.

  4. Electroslag processing: State-of-the-art assessment: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.C.

    1987-10-01

    Electroslag processing is the remelting of an electrode in which the molten material falls in droplets through a molten slag pool. The melting is by direct electric current and the mold can be round or rectangular for ingots (electroslag remelting, ESR) or shaped for finished components (electroslag casting, ESC). Advantages of ESR and ESC are improved cleanliness and homogeneity over air melting and a lower cost than vacuum melting. ESC offers the additional advantage of bypassing investment in forging. Electroslag remelting is widely used in this country for the production of tool steels and some high-quality carbon and alloy steels. Electroslag casting has had only very limited use in the United States, mainly for the production of rolling mill rolls. In this report, the development and use of electroslag processes on a worldwide basis are presented along with their possible impact on Western market economies. Information about the status of US producers is also presented along with how the electroslag process relates to their business. Also discussed is the development of the process in the US; and how it relates to competitive methods.

  5. Control of electrode depth in electroslag remelting

    DOEpatents

    Melgaard, David K.; Shelmidine, Gregory J.; Damkroger, Brian K.

    2002-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace by driving the electrode at a nominal speed based upon melting rate and geometry while making minor proportional adjustments based on a measured metric of the electrode immersion depth. Electrode drive speed is increased if a measured metric of electrode immersion depth differs from a set point by a predetermined amount, indicating that the tip is too close to the surface of a slag pool. Impedance spikes are monitored to adjust the set point for the metric of electrode immersion depth based upon one or more properties of the impedance spikes.

  6. Steel castings by the electroslag casting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikka, V. K.; Mitchell, A.

    1984-10-01

    Electroslag casting facilities in Canada and the United States were reviewed. Several value body castings of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and 18% Cr-8% Ni (Mo) steels were made at the University of British Columbia facility. These castings were examined for surface finish, chemical segregation, and macrostructure in the as-cast condition and after various heat treatments. Castings were subjected to tensile, charpy impact, and creep testing. Results of these tests were compared with similar data on wrought material and where applicable, with data on sand castings.

  7. Steel castings by the electroslag casting technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Mitchell, A.

    1984-10-01

    Electroslag casting facilities in Canada and the United States were reviewed. Several valve body castings of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and 18% Cr-8% Ni(Mo) steels were made at the University of British Columbia facility. These castings were examined for surface finish, chemical segregation, and macrostructure in the as-cast condition and after various heat treatments. Castings were subjected to tensile, Charpy impact, and creep testing. Results of these tests were compared with similar data on wrought material and, where applicable, with data on sand castings. 22 figures.

  8. Modeling transport phenomena during electroslag remelting of alloy 625

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fezi, Kyle

    A numerical model is used to examine the transport phenomena during Electroslag Remelting (ESR), primarily the phenomenon of macrosegregation. Another model has been developed to study morphological effects on macrosegregation during the ESR process, including grain growth kinetics and solid grain movement. Both models are built on an existing model that is capable of solving mass, momentum, species, and energy conservation equations during multicomponent solidification. ESR is a secondary melting process used to enhance the metallurgical structure and refine the chemistry of an ingot. ESR consists of passing an alternating current through a consumable electrode immersed in an electrically resistive slag that generates enough heat to melt the electrode. There are limitations for ESR due to an increase in segregation levels with ingot diameter. In order to produce larger ingots than current practice, several constant current ESR runs are simulated to explain possible ways to minimize the segregation levels. Low currents are found to decrease the segregation level as well as shifting the initial composition to decrease the solutal buoyancy force. The columnar-to-equiaxed transition model is used to examine the effect of having free-floating equiaxed grains in the center of a casting. The CET is shifted by changing the thermal boundary conditions, the free-floating equiaxed particle diameter, and the possible number of heterogeneous nucleation sites. Comparisons are drawn between the static castings of the CET model and the ESR ingots.

  9. Macrosegregation During Electroslag Remelting of Alloy 625

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fezi, Kyle; Yanke, Jeffrey; Krane, Matthew John M.

    2015-04-01

    A numerical model of electroslag remelting is used to examine the effects of ingot diameter, mushy zone permeability, process current levels, and initial composition on macrosegregation in alloy 625. Composition variations are made within the standard ranges for alloy 625 to alter the solutal contribution to buoyancy-driven flows and macrosegregation. Average steady-state macrosegregation and radial composition distributions are compared to identify processing conditions that best ameliorate this defect. Also, a novel approach to evaluate macrosegregation of an ingot is used, comparing the composition distribution to the alloy specification. As expected, increasing the ingot size from 51 cm (20 in.) to 76 cm (30 in.) increases the overall segregation, especially at the centerline. The segregation tends to decrease with decreasing interdendritic liquid velocity and sump depth. Processing ingots with a low current and an initial composition in the low end of the specification range is the best choice to reduce macrosegregation.

  10. Comprehensive Mathematical Model for Simulating Electroslag Remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yan-Wu; Jiang, Zhou-Hua; Fan, Jin-Xi; Cao, Yu-Long; Hou, Dong; Cao, Hai-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Droplet formation and departure from an electrode tip affect the temperature distribution in liquid slag and a molten steel pool, as well as the removal of nonmetallic inclusions in the electroslag remelting process. In this article, magneto-hydrodynamics modules coupled with a volume of fluid (VOF) model (as described in VOF model theory) for tracking phase distribution have been employed to develop the electrode fusion model and to investigate formation and departure of a droplet from the electrode tip. Subsequently, the remelting rate and molten steel pool have been achieved based on the electrode fusion model. Results indicate that a droplet can increase the flow rate of liquid slag, especially the region of droplet fall through the slag pool; yet it has little impact on the flow distribution. Asymmetric flow can take place in a slag pool due to the action of the droplet. The depth of the molten steel pool increases in the presence of droplets, but the width of the mushy zone decreases. In addition, the shape of the electrode tip is not constant but changes with its fusion. The remelting rate is calculated instead of being imposed in this work. The development of the model supports further understanding of the process and the ability to set the appropriate operating parameters, especially for expensive and easy segregation materials.

  11. Influence of casting size and graphite nodule refinement on fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.C.; Hsu, C.H.; Chang, C.C.; Feng, H.P.

    1998-10-01

    Casting size affects the solidification cooling rate and microstructure of casting materials. Graphite nodules existing in the structure of ductile iron are an inherent and inert second phase that cannot be modified in subsequent heat-treatment processing. The matrix and the fineness of the second phase undoubtedly have some impact on the fracture toughness of the as-cast material, as does the subsequent heat treatment, as it alters the microstructure. This research applied austempering heat treatment to ductile iron of different section sizes and graphite nodule finenesses. The influence of these variables on the plane strain fracture toughness (K{sub IC}) of the castings so treated was compared to that of the as-cast state. Metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed to correlate the properties attained to the microstructural observation.

  12. Effect of mold rotation on the bifilar electroslag remelting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiao-fang; Chang, Li-zhong; Wang, Jian-jun

    2015-10-01

    A novel electroslag furnace with a rotating mold was fabricated, and the effects of mold rotational speed on the electroslag remelting process were investigated. The results showed that the chemical element distribution in ingots became uniform and that their compact density increased when the mold rotational speed was increased from 0 to 28 r/min. These results were attributed to a reasonable mold speed, which resulted in a uniform temperature in the slag pool and scattered the metal droplets randomly in the metal pool. However, an excessive rotational speed caused deterioration of the solidification structure. When the mold rotational speeds was increased from 0 to 28 r/min, the size of Al2O3 inclusions in the electroslag ingot decreased from 4.4 to 1.9 μm. But the excessive mold rotational speed would decrease the ability of the electroslag remelting to remove the inclusions. The remelting speed gradually increased, which resulted in reduced power consumption with increasing mold rotational speed. This effect was attributed to accelerated heat exchange between the consumable electrode and the molten slag, which resulted from mold rotation. Nevertheless, when the rotational speed reached 28 r/min, the remelting speed did not change because of limitations of metal heat conduction. Mold rotation also improved the surface quality of the ingots by promoting a uniform temperature distribution in the slag pool.

  13. Electrode immersion depth determination and control in electroslag remelting furnace

    DOEpatents

    Melgaard, David K.; Beaman, Joseph J.; Shelmidine, Gregory J.

    2007-02-20

    An apparatus and method for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace comprising adjusting electrode drive speed by an amount proportional to a difference between a metric of electrode immersion and a set point, monitoring impedance or voltage, and calculating the metric of electrode immersion depth based upon a predetermined characterization of electrode immersion depth as a function of impedance or voltage.

  14. Electroslag Strip Cladding of Steam Generators With Alloy 690

    SciTech Connect

    Consonni, M.; Maggioni, F.; Brioschi, F.

    2006-07-01

    The present paper details the results of electroslag cladding and tube-to-tubesheet welding qualification tests conducted by Ansaldo-Camozzi ESC with Alloy 690 (Alloy 52 filler metal) on steel for nuclear power stations' steam generators shell, tubesheet and head; the possibility of submerged arc cladding on first layer was also considered. Test results, in terms of chemical analysis, mechanical properties and microstructure are reproducible and confidently applicable to production cladding and show that electroslag process can be used for Alloy 52 cladding with exceptionally stable and regular operation and high productivity. The application of submerged arc cladding process to the first layer leads to a higher base metal dilution, which should be avoided. Moreover, though the heat affected zone is deeper with electroslag cladding, in both cases no coarsened grain zone is found due to recrystallization effect of second cladding layer. Finally, the application of electroslag process to cladding of Alloy 52 with modified chemical composition, was proved to be highly beneficial as it strongly reduces hot cracking sensitivity, which is typical of submerged arc cladded Alloy 52, both during tube-to-tubesheet welding and first re-welding. (authors)

  15. Possibility of producing multilayer ingots by electroslag remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumanov, I. V.; Porsev, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    A new method is proposed for the production of multilayer ingots by electroslag remelting of a composite electrode consisting of different steel grades. This method differs from the well-known technology in electrode rotation, which makes it possible to substantially decrease the transition zone length. A scheme is suggested to produce a thick bimetal plate.

  16. System for control of electroslag casting in a collar mold

    SciTech Connect

    McEnerney , J.W.; Dewey, B.R.; Hutton, J.T.; David, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes the initial development of an electroslag casting control system. The main emphasis of our work and the results reported herein deal with the attempts to develop techniques for locating and controlling the liquid slag-metal interface. Thermocouples embedded in the mold wall provide a simple but accurate means for locating the interface.

  17. Electroslag remelting of the metal wastes of nickel alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebtsov, S. N.; Korostelev, A. B.

    2011-12-01

    The electroslag remelting (ESR) of the metal wastes of nickel alloys is studied. It is shown that the chemical composition, physicomechanical properties, and service properties of the formed castings meet the requirements of the specifications for these alloys. ESR workpieces are used as a charge for remelting in a vacuum induction furnace according to a standard technology.

  18. Experience of production of hollow tubular ingots by electroslag melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dub, V. S.; Levkov, L. Ya.; Shurygin, D. A.; Kriger, Yu. N.; Orlov, S. V.; Markov, S. I.; Nakhabina, M. S.

    2015-06-01

    The manufacture of hollow ingots by electroslag melting is a promising trend in producing high-quality important products for and thermal and nuclear power engineering, petrochemistry, machine building, and some other industries. The prerequisites of development and challenging problems in this field are considered. The results obtained by Russian enterprises are presented.

  19. Refinement of adsorptive coatings for fluorescent riboflavin-receptor-targeted iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkova, Yoanna; Beztsinna, Nataliia; Jayapaul, Jabadurai; Weiler, Marek; Arns, Susanne; Shi, Yang; Lammers, Twan; Kiessling, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is a riboflavin derivative that can be exploited to target the riboflavin transporters (RFTs) and the riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) in cells with high metabolic activity. In this study we present the synthesis of different FMN-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) and their efficiency as targeting contrast agents. Since FMN alone cannot stabilize the nanoparticles, we used adenosine phosphates - AMP, ADP and ATP - as spacers to obtain colloidally stable nanoparticles. Nucleotides with di- and triphosphate groups were intended to increase the USPIO charge and thus improve zeta potential and stability. However, all nanoparticles formed negatively charged clusters with similar properties in terms of zeta potential (-28 ± 2 mV), relaxivity (228-259 mM(-1)  s(-1) at 3 T) and hydrodynamic radius (53-85 nm). Molecules with a higher number of phosphate groups, such as ADP and ATP, have a higher adsorption affinity towards iron oxide, which, instead of providing more charge, led to partial desorption and replacement of FMN. Hence, we obtained USPIOs carrying different amounts of targeting agent, which significantly influenced the nanoparticles' uptake. The nanoparticles' uptake by different cancer cells and HUVECs was evaluated photometrically and with MR relaxometry, showing that the cellular uptake of the USPIOs increases with the FMN amount on their surface. Thus, for USPIOs targeted with riboflavin derivatives the use of spacers with increasing numbers of phosphate groups does not improve either zeta potential or the particles' stability, but rather detaches the targeting moieties from their surface, leading to lower cellular uptake. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26265388

  20. Behavior of nitrogen in a nitrogen-containing chromium-manganese steel during electroslag remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linchevskii, B. V.; Rigina, L. G.; Takhirov, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    Electroslag remelting of a high-alloyed steel with high contents of nitrogen, chromium, and manganese in an electroslag furnace has been studied. CaF2-MgO-SiO2 slag developed at TsNIITMASh and allowing remelting process at a temperature of 1520-1560°C is used as a flux. It is found that electroslag remelting of high-alloyed steels with a high nitrogen concentration does not change the nitrogen content.

  1. Characterizing and improving the toughness of thick-sectioned 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo electroslag weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, G.R.; Frost, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    Efforts to improve the toughness of electroslag weldments consisted of four endeavors: process control, changes caused in 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel by electroslag welding and post-weld heat treatment, electrochemical reactions during the electroslag welding, and toughness testing.

  2. A parametric study of the electroslag welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, W.S.; Eagar, T.W.

    1982-12-01

    Screening experiments were conducted on electroslag welds to statistically evaluate the effect of independent process variables upon dependent process responses consisting of heat affected zone size, dilution, form factor, welding speed and heat input. The results of multiple electrode electroslag welds made with and without the use of a supplementary filler material are presented as well. Methods of reducing the size of the heat affected zone while maintaining an acceptable form factor were determined. It can be concluded that significant reductions in heat affected zone size, with resultant improvements in weldment impact properties, are not to be expected when the heat input to the process is reduced by as much as a factor of five.

  3. Electroslag welding of 75 to 100 ton ingots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, C. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A new process for joining large cross-section components by electroslag welding is reported that utilizes four consumable electrodes made of the same material as the ingots. A bifilar current supply provides the very large energy input to the consumerable nozzle for heating the ingots being welded. This process produces better and more homogeneous mechanical properties, better chemical composition and structure uniformity, and requires no prior or simultaneous heating of ingots during welding. It is now possible to obtain medium size ingots and join as many as are required to produce 500 or 600 ton ingots.

  4. Electroslag melting of tubular blanks with a curvilinear axis

    SciTech Connect

    Alikin, A.P.; Parshutin, I.A.; Fomin, A.S.; Sidorov, V.M.

    1987-03-01

    The authors propose a new method for replacing the current method for the fabrication of a pipeline bend which involves separate pressing followed by subsequent welding of the two halves of the bend. Their method consists of continuous electroslag casting of the bend. They conduct a comparative analysis which demonstrates the reduction in labor and energy intensity of their method over the old method and also carry out ultrasonic and mechanical tests to validate the reduction in defects and the increase in mechanical properties in which their method results.

  5. Electroslag welding of the longitudinal joints of air cooler chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Khakimov, A.N.; Antonov, V.V.; Malyarevskaya, E.K.; Prygaev, A.K.

    1986-09-01

    This paper presents a method and equipment for electroslag welding with regulation of the thermal cycle. The method enables one, as the result of external action on the parameters of the welding production cycles, to provide the optimum zonal structural and mechanical uniformity, and consequently, the level of properties of the weld joint which eliminates the expensive normalizing procedure. The welding conditions for chambers of 90G2S and 16GS steels and the cooling parameters are shown. The mechanical properties of weld joints made with the method are presented.

  6. Steel castings by the electroslag casting technique. [CF8M

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Mitchell, A.

    1984-01-01

    ELectroslag casting facilities in Canada and the United States were reviewed. Several valve body castings of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and 18% Cr-8% Ni(Mo) steels were made at the University of British Columbia facility. These castings were examined for surface finish, chemical segregation, and macrostructure in the as-cast condition and after various heat treatments. Castings were subjected to tensile, Charpy impact, and creep testing. Results of these tests were compared with similar data on wrought material and sand castings.

  7. Comparative cavitation erosion test on steels produced by ESR and AOD refining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dojčinović, M.

    2011-09-01

    Cavitation erosion studies of steels produced by Electroslag Refining (ESR) and Argon Oxygen Decarburization (AOD refining) have been carried out. The experiments were conducted using the modified ultrasonically induced cavitation test method. Erosion rates were measured and the morphology of damages under cavitation action was studied by scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy techniques. The present work is aimed at understanding the cavitation erosion behaviour of electroslag refined steel (ESR) compared with the steel produced by Argon Oxygen Decarburization (AOD refining), commonly used in the production of hydraulic machinery parts (Pelton blades). The results exhibited lower cavitation rate of ESR steel compared with AOD steel, as a consequence of its better mechanical properties and homogeneous and fine-grained microstructure.

  8. Possibility of the production of consumable electrodes for electroslag remelting using prereduced pellets: Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorona, E. A.; Chumanov, V. I.

    2010-06-01

    The high cost of the metal produced by electroslag remelting is caused by the significant costs of the manufacture of consumable electrodes. From an economic efficiency standpoint, it is reasonable to further develop the methods of forming consumable electrodes by pouring into a special-purpose mold. One of the ways to decrease the cost of electroslag metal is the formation of consumable electrodes from prereduced pellets. In this work, the problems related to the use of prereduced pellets for electroslag remelting are considered.

  9. Impact of Electromagnetic Stirring on Grain Structure of Electroslag Remelting Ingot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Yan, Hongguang; Wang, Fang; Li, Baokuan

    2015-08-01

    A transient, two-dimensional axisymmetric model was developed to understand the effect of the electromagnetic stirring (EMS) on the grain morphology of the electroslag remelting ingot. The cellular automaton-finite element technique was employed to describe the nucleation and growth of the grain. The Joule heating and Lorentz force created by the current of the furnace, as well as the Lorentz force induced by the EMS device, are included. The effect of the EMS current on the grain structure was investigated using the model. A reasonable agreement between the experiment and simulation was obtained. The growth direction of the upper grain without the EMS is approximately 45° with respect to the vertical axis, while changes to the radial were caused by EMS. The grain was considerably refined by the EMS, and the average area of the grain decreased from 9.381 × 10-7 m2 to 6.781 × 10-7 m2 with the current of the EMS ranging from 0 A to 500 A. Both the local solidification time and second dendrite arm spacing decreased with the increasing stirring intensity. The metal pool depth, however, increased with the EMS, which definitely contributed to the macrosegregation formation. The upper ingot with EMS was darker than that without EMS in the experiment. The EMS technique should be used with caution.

  10. Characteristics of inclusions in high-Al steel during electroslag remelting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Cheng-bin; Chen, Xi-chun; Guo, Han-jie

    2012-04-01

    The characteristics of inclusions in high-Al steel refined by electroslag remelting (ESR) were investigated by image analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results show that the size of almost all the inclusions observed in ESR ingots is less than 5 μm. Inclusions smaller than 3 μm take nearly 75% of the total inclusions observed in each ingot. Inclusions observed in ESR ingots are pure AlN as dominating precipitates and some fine spherical Al2O3 inclusions with a size of 1 μm or less. It is also found that protective gas operation and slag deoxidation treatment during ESR process have significant effects on the number of inclusions smaller than 2 μm but little effects on that of inclusions larger than 2 μm. Thermodynamic calculations show that AlN inclusions are unable to precipitate in the liquid metal pool under the present experimental conditions, while the precipitation of AlN inclusions could take place at the solidifying front due to the microsegregation of Al and N in liquid steel during solidification.

  11. BREAD BAKING DOES NOT ALTER THE BIOAVAILABILITY OF HYDROGEN-REDUCED IRON POWDER ADDED TO REFINED WHEAT FLOUR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elemental iron powders are widely used to fortify flour and cereal products. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that baking enhances the bioavailability of elemental iron powders by oxidizing Fe0 to Fe2+ or Fe3+. In the present study we used an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell culture model an...

  12. Using cast-on electroslag technology for manufacturing nuclear power station equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovich, V.I.; Borodin, M.A.; Chistyakov, G.A.; Karpov, O.S.; Kriger, Yu.N.

    1984-01-01

    An application of a new electroslag cast-on process for manufacturing nuclear power station equipment is described. This process is compared with a welding process for manufacturing a D /SUB s/ -400-mm gate valve bonnet.

  13. Effect of Slag on Inclusions During Electroslag Remelting Process of Die Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yan-Wu; Jiang, Zhou-Hua; Cao, Yu-Long; Yu, Ang; Hou, Dong

    2014-08-01

    Many factors influence the non-metallic inclusions in electroslag steel including furnace atmosphere and inclusions' content in the consumable electrode, slag amount and its composition, power input, melting rate, filling ratio, and so on. Fluoride containing slag, which influences the non-metallic inclusions to a great extent, has been widely used for the electroslag remelting process. The current paper focuses on the effect of fluoride containing slag on the inclusions in electroslag ingots based on the interaction of the slag-metal interface and electroslag remelting process. In this work, die steel of CR-5A and several slags have been employed for investigating the effect of slag on inclusions in an electrical resistance furnace under argon atmosphere in order to eliminate the effect of ambient oxygen. Specimens were taken at different times for analyzing the content, dimensions, and type of non-metallic inclusions. Results of quantitative metallographic analysis indicate that a multi-component slag has better capacity for controlling the amount of inclusions; especially protective gas atmosphere has also been adopted. The findings of inclusions in electroslag steel by SEM-EDS analysis reveal that most non-metallic inclusions in electroslag steel are MgO-Al2O3 inclusions for multi-component slags, but it is Al2O3 inclusions when remelting using conventional 70 wt pct CaF2-30 wt pct Al2O3 slag. The maximal inclusions' size using multi-component slags is less than that using conventional binary slag. Small filling ratio as well as protective gas atmosphere is favorable for controlling the non-metallic inclusions in electroslag steel. All the results obtained will be compared to the original state inclusions in steel, which contribute to choice of slag for electroslag remelting.

  14. The Estimation and Control of the Electroslag Remelting Melt Rate by Mechanism-Based Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wanzhou; Wang, Weiyu; Hu, Yuechen; Chen, Yixing

    2012-04-01

    The process control of industrial electroslag remelting production is addressed in this work. This article proposes a mechanism-based model using electrode displacement to estimate the melt rate, designs the remelting process control system, and uses practical application data to verify the validity of the model. The soft measurement of the melt rate based on mechanism modeling is proved to be an economical and reliable solution to the online melt rate estimation and control for large industrial electroslag remelting furnaces.

  15. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  16. Magnetohydronamic and thermal behavior of electroslag remelting slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardy, A.; Ablitzer, D.; Wadier, J. F.

    1991-02-01

    The paper is based on the development and use of a mathematical model that simulates the electroslag remelting (ESR) operation. The model assumes axisymmetrical geometry and steady state. Maxwell equations are first solved to determine the electromagnetic forces and Joule heating. Next, coupled fluid flow and heat transfer equations are written for the two liquids (slag and liquid metal). The k- ɛ model is used to represent turbulence. The system of coupled partial differential equations is then solved, using a control volume method. Using the operating parameters as inputs, the model calculates the current density, velocity, and temperature throughout the fluids. This paper is concerned with fluid flow and heat transfer in the slag phase. After being validated by comparing its results with experimental observation, the model is used to evaluate the influence of operating variables, such as the fill ratio, and the thermophysical properties of the slag.

  17. Electromagnetic stirring with alternating current during electroslag remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Alec; Hernandez-Morales, Bernardo

    1990-08-01

    An alternating current (AC)-operated electromagnetic stirring (EMS) device, using line frequency, was designed and built to operate on a laboratory electroslag remelting (ESR) furnace for 150-mm-diameter ingots. Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted employing both 4340 alloy steel and INCONEL 718 alloy as electrode material. The initiation of stirring is accompanied by a thin strip of segregated material and favors the formation of spot segregation. Changes produced in the fluid flow conditions in the liquid pool ahead of the solidification front result in a transition from a highly directional columnar to an unoriented, branched structure. Except for small pockets of segregated liquid, the flow of molten metal does not penetrate into the mushy zone. Both electrode material and molten metal pool shape play an important role on the extent of promoting an equiaxed structure.

  18. Electroslag-casting process and properties. [2. 25Cr-1 Mo and modified 9Cr-1Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1986-09-01

    The electroslag-casting process is an extension of the electroslag-remelting process. The castings produced by this technique have the advantages of smooth defect-free finish, freedom from conventional casting defects, more reproducible mechanical properties, and properties comparable to those of forged products. This report describes the current status of electroslag-casting facilities in Canada and the United States. It also describes the variety of electroslag castings of 2.25Cr-1Mo, modified 9Cr-1Mo, and type 316 stainless steel made during the last four years and the detailed chemical analysis, microstructural characterization, and mechanical property characterization. The mechanical properties are compared with those of the forged and wrought material. This report provides sufficient information about the electroslag-casting process and the properties of the castings to permit consideration of the process for approval by ASTM and ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code committees. 27 refs., 53 figs., 34 tabs.

  19. IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document surveys the effects of organic and inorganic iron that are relevant to humans and their environment. The biology and chemistry of iron are complex and only partially understood. Iron participates in oxidation reduction processes that not only affect its geochemical m...

  20. Influence of the Mold Current on the Electroslag Remelting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, Mathilde; Dussoubs, Bernard; Jardy, Alain; Escaffre, Jessica; Poisson, Henri

    2016-08-01

    The electroslag remelting process is widely used to produce high value-added alloys. The use of numerical simulation has proven to be a valuable way to improve its understanding. In collaboration with Aubert & Duval, the Institute Jean Lamour has developed a numerical transient model of the process. The consumable electrode is remelted within a mold assumed to be electrically insulated by the solidified slag skin. However, this assumption has been challenged by some recent studies: the solidified slag skin may actually allow a part of the melting current to reach the mold. In this paper, the evolution of our model, in order to take into account this possibility, is presented and discussed. Numerical results are compared with experimental data, while several sensitivity studies show the influence of some slag properties and operating parameters on the quality of the ingot. Even, a weakly conductive solidified slag skin at the inner surface of the mold may be responsible for a non-negligible amount of current circulating between the slag and crucible, which in turn modifies the fluid flow and heat transfer in the slag and ingot liquid pool. The fraction of current concerned depends mainly on the electrical conductivities of both the liquid and solidified slag.

  1. Influence of the Mold Current on the Electroslag Remelting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, Mathilde; Dussoubs, Bernard; Jardy, Alain; Escaffre, Jessica; Poisson, Henri

    2016-06-01

    The electroslag remelting process is widely used to produce high value-added alloys. The use of numerical simulation has proven to be a valuable way to improve its understanding. In collaboration with Aubert & Duval, the Institute Jean Lamour has developed a numerical transient model of the process. The consumable electrode is remelted within a mold assumed to be electrically insulated by the solidified slag skin. However, this assumption has been challenged by some recent studies: the solidified slag skin may actually allow a part of the melting current to reach the mold. In this paper, the evolution of our model, in order to take into account this possibility, is presented and discussed. Numerical results are compared with experimental data, while several sensitivity studies show the influence of some slag properties and operating parameters on the quality of the ingot. Even, a weakly conductive solidified slag skin at the inner surface of the mold may be responsible for a non-negligible amount of current circulating between the slag and crucible, which in turn modifies the fluid flow and heat transfer in the slag and ingot liquid pool. The fraction of current concerned depends mainly on the electrical conductivities of both the liquid and solidified slag.

  2. Modeling, estimation, and control of electroslag remelting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Seokyoung

    2005-12-01

    Electroslag Remelting (ESR) is used widely throughout the specialty metals industry to produce superalloy and special steel cast ingots. High quality ESR casting requires that the electrode melting rate be controlled at all times during the process. This is especially difficult when process conditions are such that the temperature distribution in the electrode has not achieved, or has been driven away from, steady state. This condition is encountered during the beginning and closing stages of the ESR process and also during some process disturbances such as when the melt zone passes through a transverse crack. To address these transient melting situations, a new method of ESR melt rate control has been developed that incorporates an accurate, reduced-order melting model to continually estimate the temperature distribution in the electrode. The related state variables are estimated by the observer algorithms. Due to the highly nonlinear characteristics of the process, more sophisticated estimators than the Kalman filter are proposed. The unscented Kalman filter (UKF) based on the unscented transform and the particle filtering technique were chosen for possible candidates and applied in the controller design. During the highly transient periods during melting, the UKF showed the best performance for controlling the melt rate. Particle filtering can deal with non-Gaussian noises and the accuracy is totally based on the number of the Monte Carlo runs. Unfortunately, the particle filter is relatively slow in the real-time applications for controlling the ESR process with current computer technology.

  3. Fabrication and mechanical properties of Fe sub 3 Al-based iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; McKamey, C.G.; Howell, C.R.; Baldwin, R.H.

    1990-03-01

    Iron aluminides based on Fe{sub 3}Al are ordered intermetallic alloys that offer good oxidation resistance, excellent sulfidation resistance, and lower material cost than many stainless steels. These materials also conserve strategic elements such as chromium and have a lower density than stainless steels. However, limited ductility at ambient temperature and a sharp drop in strength have been major deterrents to their acceptance for structural applications. This report presents results on iron aluminides with room-temperature elongations of 15 to 20%. Ductility values were improved by a combination of thermomechanical processing and heat-treatment control. This method of ductility improvement has been demonstrated for a range of compositions. Melting, casting, and processing of 7-kg (15-lb) heats produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and 70-kg (150-lb) commercial heats are described. Vacuum melting and other refining processes such as electroslag remelting are recommended for commercial heats. The Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides are hot workable by forging or extruding at temperatures in the range of 850 to 1100{degree}C. rolling at 800{degree}C is recommended with a final 50% reduction at 650{degree}C. Tensile and creep properties of 7- and 70-kg (15- and 150-lb) heats are presented. The presence of impurities such as manganese an silicon played an important role in reducing the ductility of commercially melted heats. 7 refs., 60 figs., 12 tabs.

  4. Molds for electroslag casting systems. [2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, G.K.

    1985-07-01

    This report describes the basic types of molds used for the manufacture of electroslag castings. The report also provides guidelines for the design of such molds based on heat generation and heat transfer considerations pertaining to the electroslag casting process. The designs of the two-step and three-step molds used for the manufacture of electroslag castings of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, 316 stainless steel and 9 Cr-1 Mo steel are provided as examples of cost effective mold construction using cooled copper liners for metal-slag containment. 5 refs., 12 figs.

  5. Directly induced swing for closed loop control of electroslag remelting furnace

    DOEpatents

    Damkroger, B.

    1998-04-07

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace, imposing a periodic fluctuation on electrode drive speed and thereby generating a predictable voltage swing signal. The fluctuation is preferably done by imposition of a sine, square, or sawtooth wave on the drive dc offset signal. 8 figs.

  6. Directly induced swing for closed loop control of electroslag remelting furnace

    DOEpatents

    Damkroger, Brian

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace, imposing a periodic fluctuation on electrode drive speed and thereby generating a predictable voltage swing signal. The fluctuation is preferably done by imposition of a sine, square, or sawtooth wave on the drive dc offset signal.

  7. Graphite intercalation compounds - new materials in the technology of electroslag remelting of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroshenko, A.P.; Radchenko, V.N.; Savos`kin, M.V.; Ivanov, E.L.; Popov, A.F.

    1995-10-10

    Thermally cleaving graphite intercalation compounds have been used for producing heat-insulating and gas-tight coatings during electroslag remelting of steel, which decreases the specific consumption of electric power and the burnout of highly active components of the alloy. The authors have shown that thermally cleaved graphite coatings on the surface of slag baths can almost completely prevent heat loss.

  8. Electroslag melting of blanks for valve bodies of atomic electric power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovich, V.I.; Borodin, M.A.; Chistyakov, G.A.; Kriger, Yu.N.

    1983-01-01

    The application of electroslag melting (ESM) makes it possible to obtain high quality castings. In the power engineering industry, the ESM method is used to manufacture blanks for the control valves of atomic electric power plants which were formerly made by forging. Valve body blanks made from sand steel castings are cheaper than blanks obtained by ESM, but of inferior quality.

  9. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    ... organ failure, coma, convulsions, and death. Child-proof packaging and warning labels on iron supplements have greatly ... levodopa that the body absorbs, making it less effective. Levodopa, found in Sinemet® and Stalevo®, is used ...

  10. Flux entrapment and Titanium Nitride defects during electroslag remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Jonathan D.

    Electroslag remelted (ESR) ingots of INCOLOY alloys 800 and 825 are particularly prone to macroscale slag inclusions and microscale cleanliness issues. Formation of these structures near the ingot surface can cause significant production yield losses (˜10%) due to the necessity of extensive surface grinding. Slag inclusions from near the outer radius of the toe end of alloy 800 and 825 ingots were found to be approximately 1 to 3 mm in size and have a multiphase microstructure consisting of CaF2, CaTiO3, MgAl 2O4, MgO and some combination of Ca12Al14 O32F2 and/or Ca12Al14O 33. These inclusions were often surrounded by fields of 1 to 10 μm cuboidal TiN particles. A large number of TiN cuboids were observed in the ESR electrode with similar size and morphology to those observed surrounding slag inclusions in the ESR ingots, suggesting that the TiN particles are relics from ESR electrode production process. Samples taken sequentially throughout the EAF-AOD processes showed that the TiN cuboidals that are found in ESR ingots form between tapping the AOD vessel into the AOD ladle and the casting of ESR electrodes. Analysis of slag skin at various heights of alloy 825 ingots revealed that the phase fraction of CaF2 decreased, whereas TiCaO 3 and Ca12Al14O32F2 increased, from toe to head. The observed increase in TiO2 content suggests that at most a two-fold increase in viscosity of the slag would be expected. Similar analysis of alloy 800 ingots did not reveal significant trends in slag skin composition, possibly due to differences in ingot geometry or the presence of Al toe additions during the remelting of alloy 800. Directional solidification experiments were conducted to determine the solidification sequences of two common ESR slags: Code 316 (33% CaF2, 33% CaO, and 33% Al2O3) and Code 59 (50% CaF2, 20% CaO, 22% Al2O3, 5% MgO, and 3% TiO2). In both cases the changes in slag phase fraction as a function of solidification time were not as significant as predicted

  11. Operation of molds and mandrels during electroslag casting of hollow billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokhonskii, L. A.; Kuznetsov, L. N.; Kissel'Man, M. A.; Demidov, V. A.; Pavlova, N. P.; Polovinkin, V. N.

    2007-12-01

    One method of electroslag casting is the remelting of a metallic consumable electrode in a short movable mold as they move toward each other. The main advantages of this method are the saving of copper required to make the mold, a decrease in the electric-furnace height, and a decrease in energy consumption. The most important disadvantage of this method is the erosion of the mold and mandrel copper walls. The wear of the mold’s copper walls depends on the electric current through the mold and the specific surface power released in the slag bath-mold wall contact zone. The erosion-induced fracture of the movable mold and mandrel cannot be fully avoided during electroslag casting; however, the wear (fracture) rate can be reduced using several measures. A procedure is proposed for calculation of a rational geometry of the broadened portion of the movable mold in order to estimate the electrical parameters and the wear resistance of the equipment designed for the electroslag casting of hollow steel billets.

  12. Mechanical-property characterization of an electroslag-cast valve body of CF8M composition

    SciTech Connect

    Hotsur, Y.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1983-11-01

    This initial investigation into electroslag casting involves the mechanical property study of a type 316 stainless steel (CF8M) valve body section (obtained from the University of British Columbia). The casting was subjected to tensile, creep, Charpy V-notch, and microhardness testing as well as an optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electrom microscopy. Tensile tests were conducted in the as-cast and solution-annealed conditions at room and elevated temperatures. Charpy impact testing was performed at room temperature on as-cast and solution-annealed specimens. Creep-deformation properties of the casting were obtianed at 649/sup 0/C (1200/sup 0/F) within a stress range from 90 to 170 MPa (13 to 25 ksi) in the as-cast state. Investigations into the creep behavior of this stainless steel electroslag casting are ongoing. Mechanical testing was conducted on specimens from three levels of the casting in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Comparisons made between the as-cast and solution-annealed specimens indicate that annealed specimens (in most cases) have better mechanical properties. This can be attributed to the dissolution of precipitated Fe-Cr-Mo microconstituents (sigma, chi, metal carbides, etc.) during the solution treatment. In general, though, preliminary results show that the electroslag castings have properties competitive with those of conventional sand castings.

  13. Control of MgO·Al2O3 Spinel Inclusions during Protective Gas Electroslag Remelting of Die Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Cheng-Bin; Chen, Xi-Chun; Guo, Han-Jie; Zhu, Zi-Jiang; Sun, Xiao-Lin

    2013-04-01

    The effect of calcium treatment and/or aluminum-based deoxidant addition on the oxygen control and modification of MgO·Al2O3 spinel inclusions during protective gas electroslag remelting (P-ESR) of H13 die steel with low oxygen content was experimentally studied. It is found that all the inclusions in the consumable electrode are MgO·Al2O3 spinels, besides a few MgO·Al2O3 spinels surrounded by an outer (Ti,V)N or MnS layer. After P-ESR refining combined with proper calcium treatment, all the original MgO·Al2O3 spinels in the electrode (except for the original MgO·Al2O3 spinels having been removed in the P-ESR process) were modified to mainly CaO-MgO-Al2O3 and some CaO-Al2O3 inclusions, both of which have a low melting point and homogeneous compositions. In the case of only Al-based deoxidant addition, all the oxide inclusions remaining in ESR ingots are MgO·Al2O3 spinels. The operation of Al-based deoxidant addition and/or calcium treatment during P-ESR of electrode steel containing low oxygen content is invalid to further reduce the oxygen content and oxide inclusions amount compared with remelting only under protective gas atmosphere. All the original sulfide inclusions were removed after the P-ESR process. Most of the inclusions in ESR ingots are about 2 μm in size. The mechanisms of non-metallic inclusions evolution and modification of MgO·Al2O3 spinels by calcium treatment during the P-ESR process were proposed.

  14. Multipurpose electroslag remelting furnace for modern energy and heavy engineering industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dub, A. V.; Dub, V. S.; Kriger, Yu. N.; Levkov, L. Ya.; Shurygin, D. A.; Kissel'man, M. A.; Nekhamin, C. M.; Chernyak, A. I.; Bessonov, A. V.; Kamantsev, S. V.; Sokolov, S. O.

    2012-12-01

    In 2011, a unique complex based on a multipurpose unit-type electroslag remelting (ESR) furnace is created to meet the demand for large high-quality solid and hollow billets for the products of power, atomic, petrochemical, and heavy machine engineering. This complex has modern low-frequency power supplies with a new control level that ensure a high homogeneity and quality of the billets and an increase in the engineering-and-economical performance of the production. A unique pilot ESR furnace is erected to adjust technological conditions and the main control system elements.

  15. A Coupled Cellular Automaton-Finite-Element Mathematical Model for the Multiscale Phenomena of Electroslag Remelting H13 Die Steel Ingot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baokuan; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Fang; Chen, Mingqiu

    2014-07-01

    A coupled cellular automaton-finite-element mathematical model has been developed to investigate the multiscale phenomena of the electroslag remelting (ESR) H13 steel ingot. The heat transfer equation is solved to obtain the temperature distribution and liquid metal pool profile by a coarser finite-element (FE) mesh. Then, a regular network of square cells with a much finer scale is drawn for the simulation of microstructure with the cellular automaton (CA) technique. The continuous nucleation, which is based on the Gaussian distribution, is implemented to describe the heterogeneous nucleation. The growth kinetics of the dendritic tip is taken into account by the Kure-Giovanola-Trivedi model. At each time step, the temperature at the CA cell locations is interpolated from the temperature at four adjacent FE elements. The solute transfer is calculated using the FE method. Moreover, the evolution of the multiscale phenomena with growing of the ingot is considered by the varying boundary conditions. A reasonable agreement is demonstrated between the calculation and experiment. The results indicate that the shallow U-shaped metal pool would change to the deep V-shaped metal pool with the growing of the ingot. The vertical columnar grains appear at the bottom of the ingot, and an inverse V-shaped grain structure can be observed at the upper part of the ingot. It can be inferred that improving the undercooling can refine the microstructure and motivate the growing of the columnar grain during the ESR process.

  16. Increasing the efficiency of the electroslag process and improving the metal quality by rotating a consumable electrode: Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumanov, V. I.; Chumanov, I. V.

    2010-06-01

    The effect of centrifugal forces on the melting, transport, and solidification of a metal during electroslag remelting of a consumable electrode is comprehensively studied, and the parameters that can increase the technical and economic indices of remelting and the metal quality are revealed.

  17. The application of tubes produced by the electroslag melting process in tubing of thermal power plants and boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemykina, T. I.; Koz'minskii, A. N.

    2013-06-01

    The results of a chemical analysis to determine the short-term mechanical and metallographic properties of boiler tubes manufactured by the electroslag melting process are presented. The paper also contains the data on the long-term strength of the above tubes.

  18. A Comprehensive Model of the Electroslag Remelting Process: Description and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, V.; Jardy, A.; Dussoubs, B.; Ablitzer, D.; Rybéron, S.; Schmitt, V.; Hans, S.; Poisson, H.

    2009-06-01

    Electroslag remelting (ESR) is widely used for the production of high-value-added alloys such as special steels or nickel-based superalloys. Because of high trial costs and the complexity of the mechanisms involved, trial-and-error-based approaches are not well suited for fundamental studies or for optimization of the process. Consequently, a transient-state numerical model has been developed that accounts for electromagnetic phenomena and coupled heat and momentum transfers in an axisymmetrical geometry. The model simulates the continuous growth of the electroslag-remelted ingot through a mesh-splitting method. In addition, solidification of the metal is modeled by an enthalpy-based technique. A turbulence model is implemented to compute the motion of liquid phases (slag and metal), while the mushy zone is described as a porous medium the permeability of which varies with the liquid fraction, thus enabling accurate calculation of solid/liquid interaction. The coupled partial differential equations (PDEs) are solved using a finite-volume technique. The computed results are compared to the experimental observation of an industrial remelted ingot; the melt pool depth and shape, in particular, are investigated, in order to validate the model. These results provide valuable information about the process performance and the influence of the operating parameters. In this way, we present an example of a model used as a support in analyzing the influence of the electrode fill ratio.

  19. Prediction of carbon steel heat-affected zone microstructure induced by electroslag cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.V.; Atteridge, D.G.

    1994-12-31

    One of the major concerns in developing electroslag cladding technique is the mechanical properties of the clad heat-affected zone. During the cladding operation, the base metal adjacent to the clad deposit undergoes intensive heating and fast cooling. Mechanical properties of this area are different from, and in most cases inferior to, those of the base metal due to the formation of undesirable microstructure which results from the thermal cycle. To optimize mechanical properties of clad components, steps must be taken to optimize the HAZ microstructure, which is determined by the cladding heat input, geometry of the components, chemistry of the steel, and the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformations. There are four main methods for predicting HAZ hardness and microstructure: weld simulation experiments, CCT diagrams, regression analysis based on the carbon equivalents of steels and hardenability studies, and the computational models based on phase transformationkineticss and thermodynamics. The computational approach was adopted in the study to predict the carbon steel HAZ microstructure evolution during electroslag cladding because it is a general approach applicable to a wide range of chemical compositions and welding conditions. The computation model in the study incorporates a grain growth model and a model for austenite decomposition. The empirical grain growth kinetics models and the reaction kinetics model for austenite decomposition originally proposed by Kirkaldy and Venugopalan were calibrated with experimental studies and then coded into a computer program to predict microstructure development. Reasonable agreement was observed between the computer predictions and experimental observations; discrepanciesweree also discussed.

  20. Characterizing and improving the toughness of thick-sectioned 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo electroslag weldments. Quarterly report, October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, G.R.; Frost, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Effects of electrochemical reactions on electroslag welds of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel were evaluated using a CaF/sub 2/-10% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ flux. Results indicate that a major fraction of the chemical modification observed in the dc electroslag welding process can be attributed to electrochemical reactions, which offer the possibility for enhanced control of the chemistry of the fusion zone. 11 figures. (DLC)

  1. Characterizing and improving the toughness of thick-sectioned 2-1/4 Cr-1Mo electroslag weldments. Final report, June 30, 1978-October 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, G.R.; Frost, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    A functional relation between the major electroslag welding process variables of potential, current, and electrode velocity has been developed. A two-dimensional heat transport model has been developed for heat flow in the parent metal plates of electroslag welds. An energy balance has been developed for the electroslag welding process. Two-dimensional process variable plots have been developed which predict the correct operating conditions required for weld penetration in electroslag welds of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. It was shown that oxygen pickup, tramp element pickup, and alloy element oxidation losses in electroslag welding are primarily caused by electrochemical rather than thermochemical reactions. An electrochemical cell was used to study cathode reactions and to obtain current efficiency data for oxygen pickup, alloy element oxidation losses, and Al pickup in 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo electroslag welds. A relation has been developed for alloy and tramp element concentration changes. Welding and post-weld heat treatment procedures have been developed which provide excellent toughness in the fusion zones of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel welds without a re-austenization heat treatment. An experimental determination has been made of the microstructures which produce high toughness in 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel weld fusion zones. 21 figures.

  2. Effect of Slag Thickness on Macrosegregation and Transition Zone Width of Electroslag Remelting Dual Alloy Ingot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Yan, Hongguang; Ren, Neng; Li, Baokuan

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the slag thickness on macrosegregation and transition zone (TZ) width of electroslag remelting (ESR) dual alloy ingot was investigated. To produce a dual alloy ingot, an electrode, constituted by a CrMoV bar and a NiCrMoV alloy bar, was remelted by using the ESR process. The slag thickness ranged from 50 mm to 70 mm. The results indicate that the slag temperature and melt rate first increase and then decrease with the increasing of the slag thickness. The metal sump depth, however, monotonically decreases. The most pronounced macrosegregation is found when the slag thickness is 50 mm and is alleviated with a thicker slag. The minimal TZ width appears when the slag thickness is 60 mm. Processing the ESR dual alloy ingot with a 60-mm slag layer is the best choice for reducing the TZ width and macrosegregation in the present work.

  3. Research on droplet formation and dripping behavior during the electroslag remelting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yu-long; Dong, Yan-wu; Jiang, Zhou-hua; Cao, Hai-bo; Hou, Dong; Feng, Qian-long

    2016-04-01

    A better understanding of droplet formation and dripping behavior would be useful in the efficient removal of impurity elements and nonmetallic inclusions from liquid metals. In the present work, we developed a transparent experimental apparatus to study the mechanisms of droplet formation and the effects of filling ratio on droplet behavior during the electroslag remelting (ESR) process. A high-speed camera was used to clearly observe, at small time scales, the droplet formation and dripping phenomenon at the slag/metal interface during a stable ESR process. The results illustrate that a two-stage process for droplet formation and dripping occurs during the ESR process and that the droplet diameter exhibits a parabolic distribution with increasing filling ratio because of the different shape and thermal state of the electrode tip. This work also confirms that a relatively large filling ratio reduces electricity consumption and improves ingot quality.

  4. Criteria determining the selection of slags for the melt decontamination of radioactively contaminated stainless steel by electroslag remelting

    SciTech Connect

    Buckentin, J.M.R.; Damkroger, B.K.; Shelmidine, G.J.; Atteridge, D.G.

    1997-03-01

    Electroslag remelting is an excellent process choice for the melt decontamination of radioactively contaminated metals. ESR furnaces are easily enclosed and do not make use of refractories which could complicate thermochemical interactions between molten metal and slag. A variety of cleaning mechanisms are active during melting; radionuclides may be partitioned to the slag by means of thermochemical reaction, electrochemical reaction, or mechanical entrapment. At the completion of melting, the slag is removed from the furnace in solid form. The electroslag process as a whole is greatly affected by the chemical and physical properties of the slag used. When used as a melt decontamination scheme, the ESR process may be optimized by selection of the slag. In this research, stainless steel bars were coated with non-radioactive surrogate elements in order to simulate surface contamination. These bars were electroslag remelted using slags of various chemistries. The slags investigated were ternary mixtures of calcium fluoride, calcium oxide, and alumina. The final chemistries of the stainless steel ingots were compared with those predicted by the use of a Free Energy Minimization Modeling technique. Modeling also provided insight into the chemical mechanisms by which certain elements are captured by a slag. Slag selection was also shown to have an impact on the electrical efficiency of the process as well as the surface quality of the ingots produced.

  5. Effect of Slag on Titanium, Silicon, and Aluminum Contents in Superalloy During Electroslag Remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhou-Hua; Hou, Dong; Dong, Yan-Wu; Cao, Yu-Long; Cao, Hai-Bo; Gong, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Many factors influence the chemical composition in electroslag remelting (ESR) steel, including atmosphere in crucible, melting rate, slag composition, deoxidation, and so on. Fluoride-based slag, which is exposed to liquid metal directly, influences the chemical composition of ESR ingots to a large extent. The present paper focuses on the effect of slag on the titanium, silicon, and aluminum contents in ingots based on the interaction of the slag and metal. In present work, superalloy of GH8825 and several slags containing different CaO contents have been employed for investigating the effect of slag on titanium, silicon, and aluminum contents in an electrical resistance furnace under argon atmosphere. Results indicate that the higher CaO content in slag has better capacity for avoiding loss of titanium caused by the reaction of titanium with silica in slag, especially in case of remelting superalloy with high titanium and low silicon content. The CaO has a great effect on the activities of TiO2, SiO2, and Al2O3. Thermodynamic analysis is applied to investigate the CaO behavior. Based on the ion and molecule coexistence theory of slag, activity model is established to calculate the activities of components containing titanium, silicon, and aluminum elements in a six-component slag consisting of CaO-CaF2-Al2O3-SiO2-TiO2-MgO. The components containing titanium, silicon, and aluminum in slag are mainly CaO·TiO2, 2CaO·SiO2, CaO·SiO2, CaO·Al2O3, and MgO·Al2O3. With the increase of CaO mass fraction in slag, the activity coefficient of SiO2 decreases significantly, whereas slightly change happens for Al2O3. As a result, the lg ({{γ_{{{{SiO}}2 }} } {/ {{{γ_{{{{SiO}}2 }} } {γ_{{{{TiO}}2 }} }}} {γ_{{{{TiO}}2 }} }}) decreases with increasing CaO content, which is better for preventing loss of titanium caused by the reaction of titanium with silica in slag. The slag with high CaO and appropriate TiO2 content is suitable for electroslag remelting of GH8825.

  6. Effect of electroslag remelting on carbides in 8Cr13MoV martensitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qin-tian; Li, Jing; Shi, Cheng-bin; Yu, Wen-tao

    2015-11-01

    The effect of electroslag remelting (ESR) on carbides in 8Cr13MoV martensitic stainless steel was experimentally studied. Phases precipitated from liquid steel during solidification were calculated using the Thermo-Calc software. The carbon segregation was analyzed by original position analysis (OPA), and the carbides were analyzed by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy- dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results indicated that more uniform carbon distribution and less segregation were obtained in the case of samples subjected to the ESR process. After ESR, the amount of netty carbides decreased significantly, and the chromium and vanadium contents in the grain-boundary carbides was reduced. The total area and average size of carbides were obviously smaller after the ESR process. In the sample subjected to ESR, the morphology of carbides changed from lamellar and angular to globular or lump, whereas the types of carbides did not change; both M23C6 and M7C3 were present before and after the ESR process.

  7. Electroslag surfacing of steel shafting with Ni alloy 625 and 70Cu-30Ni strip

    SciTech Connect

    Devletian, J.H.; Gao, Y.P.; Wood, W.E.

    1996-12-31

    A comprehensive study of electroslag surfacing (ESS) of steel with Ni Alloy 625 and 70Cu-30Ni strip electrodes was conducted to establish the feasibility of replacing forged bearing sleeves on propulsion shafting with integral weld surfacing. The base material was MIL-S-23284, Class 1 steel in the form of 41--66 cm (16--26 in.) diameter shafting and 76 mm (3 in.) thick flat plate. All ESS was carried out at a heat input level of approximately 5.9kJ/mm (150 kJ/in.) using 30 x 0.5 mm (1.2 x 0.02 in.) strip electrodes. Assessments of mechanical properties and microstructure of Ni Alloy 625 surfacing and 70Cu-30Ni surfacing were conducted to establish the structure-property relationships in these complex alloy systems. In addition, a solidification cracking test was developed to determine the relative cracking susceptibilities of these strip surfacing alloys. Although the Ni Alloy 625 surfacing contained small islands of interdendritic MC type carbides and Laves phase, the mechanical properties of this surfacing were satisfactory. The 70Cu-30Ni surfacing required a buttering layer of 30Cu-70Ni or pure Ni to prevent solidification cracking. The inherent ductility-dip sensitivity of 70Cu-30Ni surfacing was overcome by the development of a suitable ESS procedure.

  8. Comprehensive model for a slag bath in electroslag remelting process with a current-conductive mould

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fu-bin; Zang, Xi-min; Jiang, Zhou-hua; Geng, Xin; Yao, Man

    2012-04-01

    A mathematical model was developed to describe the interaction of multiple physical fields in a slag bath during electroslag remelting (ESR) process with a current-conductive mould. The distributions of current density, magnetic induction intensity, electromagnetic force, Joule heating, fluid flow and temperature were simulated. The model was verified by temperature measurements during remelting 12CrMoVG steel with a slag of 50wt%-70wt% CaF2, 20wt%-30wt% CaO, 10wt%-20wt% Al2O3, and ≤10wt% SiO2 in a 600 mm diameter current-conductive mould. There is a good agreement between the calculated temperature results and the measured data in the slag bath. The calculated results show that the maximum values of current density, electromagnetic force and Joule heating are in the region between the corner electrodes and the conductivity element. The characteristics of current density distribution, magnetic induction intensity, electromagnetic force, Joule heating, velocity patterns and temperature profiles in the slag bath during ESR process with current-conductive mould were analyzed.

  9. Flux Entrapment and Titanium Nitride Defects in Electroslag Remelting of INCOLOY Alloys 800 and 825

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Jonathan D.; deBarbadillo, John J.; Krane, Matthew J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Electroslag remelted (ESR) ingots of INCOLOY alloys 800 and 825 are particularly prone to macroscale slag inclusions and microscale cleanliness issues. Formation of these structures near the ingot surface can cause significant production yield losses (~10 pct) due to the necessity of extensive surface grinding. Slag inclusions from near the outer radius of the toe end of alloy 800 and 825 ingots were found to be approximately 1 to 3 mm in size and have a multiphase microstructure consisting of CaF2, CaTiO3, MgAl2O4, MgO, and some combination of Ca12Al14O32F2 and/or Ca12Al14O33. These inclusions were often surrounded by fields of 1- to 10- μm cuboidal TiN particles. A large number of TiN cuboids were observed in the ESR electrode with similar size and morphology to those observed surrounding slag inclusions in the ESR ingots, suggesting that the TiN particles are relics from the ESR electrode production process. Samples taken sequentially throughout the AOD processes showed that the TiN cuboidals that are found in ESR ingots form between tapping the AOD vessel into the AOD ladle and the casting of ESR electrodes.

  10. Statistical analysis of the results of tests of weld joints of petroleum apparatus made by electroslag welding with control of the thermal cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Khakimov, A.N.; Agafonov, V.V.; Efimenko, L.A.; Zakharov, V.A.

    1984-01-01

    Electroslag welding with control of the thermal cycles provides weld joints with the required mechanical properties, reduces the labor requirements and saves on costs. A statistical analysis of the results of sample compounds of weld joints of apparatus from specified sources derives strength indices, and the mechanical test results are treated by the methods of mathematical statistics with the use of a computer. It is found that electroslag welding can be used in the production of apparatus of 20K, 20 YuCh, 09G2S, and 16GS steels.

  11. Investigation of Heat Transfer and Magnetohydrodynamic Flow in Electroslag Remelting Furnace Using Vibrating Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Qiang; Lou, Yanchun; Chen, Rui; Song, Zhaowei; Li, Baokuan

    2016-01-01

    A transient three-dimensional (3D) coupled mathematical model has been developed to understand the effect of a vibrating electrode on the electromagnetic, two-phase flow and temperature fields as well as the solidification in the electroslag remelting (ESR) process. With the magnetohydrodynamic model, the Joule heating and Lorentz force, which are the source terms in the energy and momentum equations, are recalculated at each iteration as a function of the phase distribution. The influence of the vibrating electrode on the formation of the metal droplet is demonstrated by the volume of fluid approach. Additionally, the solidification of the metal is modeled by an enthalpy-based technique, in which the mushy zone is treated as a porous medium with porosity equal to the liquid fraction. The present work is the first attempt to investigate the innovative technology of the ESR process with a vibrating electrode by a transient 3D comprehensive model. A reasonable agreement between the experiment and simulation is obtained. The results indicate that the whole process is presented as a periodic activity. When the metal droplets fall from the tip of the electrode, the horizontal component of velocity will generate electrode vibration. This will lead to the distribution variation of the flow field in the slag layer. The variation of temperature distribution occurs regularly and is periodically accompanied by the behavior of the falling metal droplets. With the decreasing vibrating frequency and amplitude, the relative velocity of the electrode and molten slag increase accordingly. The diameter of the molten droplets, the maximum temperature and the depth of the molten pool gradually become smaller, lower and shallower.

  12. Production of sheet rolled products made of a nitrogen-bearing high-strength corrosion-resistant steel using electroslag remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutman, E. R.; Durynin, V. A.; Kalinin, G. Yu.; Khar'kov, O. A.; Tsukanov, V. V.

    2009-12-01

    A commercial electroslag remelting process is designed for the production of nitrogen-bearing steel. This process is shown to make a high-quality sheet product with higher strength characteristics and impact toughness as compared to rolled products of the nitrogen-bearing steel melted in an open electric arc furnace.

  13. A Comprehensive 3D Mathematical Model of the Electroslag Remelting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Li, Ying

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive 3D mathematical model was proposed to predict the electromagnetic field, the multiphase flow field, the temperature field, and the pool profile of an industrial electroslag remelting (ESR) system. Especially, the metal droplets formation and falling in the slag pool during the ESR process are taken into account using the volume of fluid method. In addition, the electromagnetic and solidification phenomena are modeled using the magnetic vector potential method and the enthalpy-porosity method, respectively. The predicted results were found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements, regarding the magnetic flux density, the pool profile, the energy consumption, and the melt rate. And the model developed in the present work has been proved to be a powerful tool to provide a useful insight into the multi-physical phenomena in the ESR system. The results show that the Joule heating is mainly distributed in the slag pool due to the lower electrical conductivity of slag, and provides the thermal energy for melting the electrode. The molten metal on the conical electrode surface is washed away by the Lorentz force and the gravity force and gradually accumulates at the electrode tip. When the drop at the electrode tip reaches the critical size, the small droplets form due to the necking effect and depart from the conical electrode tip. In the slag pool, there are two axisymmetric vortexes with downward flows under the conical electrode tip, where the Lorentz force and the falling droplets are dominant, and another two axisymmetric vortexes with downward flows near the mold surface, where the thermal buoyancy is dominant. However, in the metal pool, there are only two vortexes with downward flows at the solidification front, where a high thermal gradient exists. The slag is significantly hotter and more uniform than the metal, because of an abundant of Joule heating and intensive turbulence in the slag pool. The molten metal is directionally

  14. Steel refining with an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Blander, Milton; Cook, Glenn M.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus for processing a metallic fluid containing iron oxide, container for a molten metal including an electrically conductive refractory disposed for contact with the molten metal which contains iron oxide, an electrolyte in the form of a basic slag on top of the molten metal, an electrode in the container in contact with the slag electrically separated from the refractory, and means for establishing a voltage across the refractory and the electrode to reduce iron oxide to iron at the surface of the refractory in contact with the iron oxide containing fluid. A process is disclosed for refining an iron product containing not more than about 10% by weight oxygen and not more than about 10% by weight sulfur, comprising providing an electrolyte of a slag containing one or more of calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, silica or alumina, providing a cathode of the iron product in contact with the electrolyte, providing an anode in contact with the electrolyte electrically separated from the cathode, and operating an electrochemical cell formed by the anode, the cathode and the electrolyte to separate oxygen or sulfur present in the iron product therefrom.

  15. Steel refining with an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Blander, M.; Cook, G.M.

    1988-05-17

    Apparatus is described for processing a metallic fluid containing iron oxide, container for a molten metal including an electrically conductive refractory disposed for contact with the molten metal which contains iron oxide, an electrolyte in the form of a basic slag on top of the molten metal, an electrode in the container in contact with the slag electrically separated from the refractory, and means for establishing a voltage across the refractory and the electrode to reduce iron oxide to iron at the surface of the refractory in contact with the iron oxide containing fluid. A process is disclosed for refining an iron product containing not more than about 10% by weight oxygen and not more than about 10% by weight sulfur, comprising providing an electrolyte of a slag containing one or more of calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, silica or alumina, providing a cathode of the iron product in contact with the electrolyte, providing an anode in contact with the electrolyte electrically separated from the cathode, and operating an electrochemical cell formed by the anode, the cathode and the electrolyte to separate oxygen or sulfur present in the iron product therefrom. 2 figs.

  16. Steel refining with an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Blander, M.; Cook, G.M.

    1985-05-21

    Disclosed is an apparatus for processing a metallic fluid containing iron oxide, container for a molten metal including an electrically conductive refractory disposed for contact with the molten metal which contains iron oxide, an electrolyte in the form of a basic slag on top of the molten metal, an electrode in the container in contact with the slag electrically separated from the refractory, and means for establishing a voltage across the refractory and the electrode to reduce iron oxide to iron at the surface of the refractory in contact with the iron oxide containing fluid. A process is disclosed for refining an iron product containing not more than about 10% by weight sulfur, comprising providing an electrolyte of a slag containing one or more of calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, silica or alumina, providing a cathode of the iron product in contact with the electrolyte, providing an anode in contact with the electrolyte electrically separated from the cathode, and operating an electrochemical cell formed by the anode, the cathode and the electrolyte to separate oxygen or sulfur present in the iron product therefrom.

  17. Solvent refining process

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, T.C.; Sequeira, A.J.; Smith, B.F.

    1981-10-13

    An improved process is described for solvent refining lubricating oil base stocks from petroleum fractions containing both aromatic and nonaromatic constituents. The process utilizes n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone as a selective solvent for aromatic hydrocarbons wherein the refined oil fraction and the extract fraction are freed of final traces of solvent by stripping with gaseous ammonia. The process has several advantages over conventional processes including a savings in energy required for the solvent refining process, and reduced corrosion of the process equipment.

  18. Parametric Rietveld refinement

    PubMed Central

    Stinton, Graham W.; Evans, John S. O.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the method of parametric Rietveld refinement is described, in which an ensemble of diffraction data collected as a function of time, temperature, pressure or any other variable are fitted to a single evolving structural model. Parametric refinement offers a number of potential benefits over independent or sequential analysis. It can lead to higher precision of refined parameters, offers the possibility of applying physically realistic models during data analysis, allows the refinement of ‘non-crystallographic’ quantities such as temperature or rate constants directly from diffraction data, and can help avoid false minima. PMID:19461841

  19. CSM-3. 2. 2: characterizing and improving the toughness of thick-sectioned 2-1/4 Cr-1Mo electroslag weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, G.R.; Frost, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The electroslag welding process produces large single pass welds by consuming a wire electrode in an ohmically heated flux pool. The process has been particularly appealing for thick-section welding because of its high deposition rate. The welding potential and electrode velocity control the deposition rate, heat input, and thermal history of the heat affected zone. The electrode polarity, current density, and flux and metal compositions control electrochemical reactions which have a dominant influence on the weld metal chemistry. The post weld heat treatment strongly affects the final mechanical properties of the weldment, especially in 2-1/4 Cr-1Mo steel. The objective of this program is to characterize the effects of process variables, chemical variables, and post weld heat treatment, and to apply straight-foreword metallurgical knowledge in optimizing the properties of 4-inch thick 2-1/4 Cr-1Mo steel electroslag weldments.

  20. Dual solvent refining process

    SciTech Connect

    Woodle, R.A.

    1982-04-20

    A dual solvent refining process is claimed for solvent refining petroleum based lubricating oil stocks with n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone as selective solvent for aromatic oils wherein a highly paraffinic oil having a narrow boiling range approximating the boiling point of n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone is employed as a backwash solvent. The process of the invention results in an increased yield of refined lubricating oil stock of a predetermined quality and simplifies separation of the solvents from the extract and raffinate oil fractions.

  1. Iron Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... detect and help diagnose iron deficiency or iron overload. In people with anemia , these tests can help ... also be ordered when iron deficiency or iron overload is suspected. Early iron deficiency often goes unnoticed. ...

  2. Numerical Investigation of Influence of Electrode Immersion Depth on Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Electroslag Remelting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Cai, Hui; Pan, Liping; He, Zhu; Liu, Shuang; Li, Baokuan

    2016-07-01

    The influence of the electrode immersion depth on the electromagnetic, flow and temperature fields, as well as the solidification progress in an electroslag remelting furnace have been studied by a transient three-dimensional coupled mathematical model. Maxwell's equations were solved by the electrical potential approach. The Lorentz force and Joule heating were added into the momentum and energy conservation equations as a source term, respectively, and were updated at each time step. The volume of fluid method was invoked to track the motion of the metal droplet and slag-metal interface. The solidification was modeled by an enthalpy-porosity formulation. An experiment was carried out to validate the model. The total amount of Joule heating decreases from 2.13 × 105 W to 1.86 × 105 W when the electrode immersion depth increases from 0.01 m to 0.03 m. The variation law of the slag temperature is different from that of the Joule heating. The volume average temperature rises from 1856 K to 1880 K when the immersion depth increases from 0.01 m to 0.02 m, and then drops to 1869 K if the immersion depth continuously increases to 0.03 m. As a result, the deepest metal pool, which is around 0.03 m, is formed when the immersion depth is 0.02 m.

  3. Modeling of Electromagnetic Field and Liquid Metal Pool Shape in an Electroslag Remelting Process with Two Series-Connected Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baokuan; Wang, Bo; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka

    2014-06-01

    A three-dimensional finite-element model has been developed to understand the electromagnetic field and liquid metal pool shape in an electroslag remelting (ESR) process with two series-connected electrodes. The magnetic vector potential is introduced into the Maxwell's equations, and the nodal-based method is used to solve a three-dimensional harmonic electromagnetic field. The heat transfer of the solidifying processes of ingot is modeled by a source-based enthalpy method, and the Joule heating is included in an inner source. The results show the main part of the current flows through the slag cap and a little enters into ingot in a two-series-connected electrode ESR system. As the interaction of self-induced and mutual-induced of two electrodes occurs, the skin effect is significantly suppressed by the neighbor effect. A symmetrical pattern of magnetic flux density in a two-series-connected electrode ESR system is displayed. The magnetic flux density between two electrodes is reinforced and reduced at the outside of two electrodes. The maximum Joule heat power density is located at the interface of slag and electrodes, and it decreases with an increase of the electrode immersion depth. The averaged Joule heat power density increases when slag cap thickness is reduced. With the increase of ingot height, the liquid metal pool shape changes from arc shaped to "V" shaped. When the ingot height is more than the diameter in the ESR processes, the liquid metal pool shape is constant.

  4. Effect of Power Control Function on Heat Transfer and Magnetohydrodynamic Two-Phase Flow in Electroslag Remelting Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Rong, Wenjie; Li, Baokuan

    2015-11-01

    A transient three-dimensional (3D) coupled mathematical model of electroslag remelting (ESR) furnace has been developed to investigate the impact of power control function on the heat transfer and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) two-phase flow. Maxwell's equations are solved by electrical potential method. The volume of fluid (VOF) approach is implemented to describe the two phase flow. The Lorentz force and the Joule heating are updated at each iteration as a function of phase distribution. The solidification is modeled by enthalpy-porosity formulation. A reasonable agreement between the experiment and simulation is obtained. The melt rate increases 15.83% in the remelting process with a constant current of 1600 A. With the power control function, the current would be reduced if the melt rate is 1.05 times larger than its initial value. The fluctuation range of the melt rate therefore decreases to 7.23%. Moreover, the fluctuation is limited within 5.12% if we start the power control program when the melt rate is 1.03 times higher than its initial value. Not only the metal pool depth but also the input power decreases under the effect of the current control function.

  5. Solidification behavior of FA-129 iron-aluminide alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.; Maziasz, P.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1992-07-01

    Samples of FA-129 iron-aluminide alloy have been processed by various casting processes, including vacuum arc-melting followed by chill casting into water-cooled copper molds, air melting followed by casting into graphite molds, and electroslag melting and casting into large ingots. The resulting microstructures obtained in these processes are examined and compared. Selected samples are homogenized at various temperatures and times. Optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) are used to identify the morphology, constituents, and compositions of various phases. Interrupted solidification experiments are used to study the evolution of cast structure. Some observations are made on the effect of dissolved hydrogen in the melt on as-cast soundness.

  6. Solidification behavior of FA-129 iron-aluminide alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.; Maziasz, P.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1992-01-01

    Samples of FA-129 iron-aluminide alloy have been processed by various casting processes, including vacuum arc-melting followed by chill casting into water-cooled copper molds, air melting followed by casting into graphite molds, and electroslag melting and casting into large ingots. The resulting microstructures obtained in these processes are examined and compared. Selected samples are homogenized at various temperatures and times. Optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) are used to identify the morphology, constituents, and compositions of various phases. Interrupted solidification experiments are used to study the evolution of cast structure. Some observations are made on the effect of dissolved hydrogen in the melt on as-cast soundness.

  7. Refining of Polysulfide Pulps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copur, Yalcin

    This study compares the modified kraft process, polysulfide pulping, one of the methods to obtain higher pulp yield, with conventional kraft method. More specifically, the study focuses on the refining effects of polysulfide pulp, which is an area with limited literature. Physical, mechanical and chemical properties of kraft and polysulfide pulps (4% elemental sulfur addition to cooking digester) cooked under the same conditions were studied as regards to their behavior under various PFI refining (0, 3000, 6000, 9000 revs.). Polysulfide (PS) pulping, compared to the kraft method, resulted in higher pulp yield and higher pulp kappa number. Polysulfide also gave pulp having higher tensile and burst index. However, the strength of polysulfide pulp, tear index at a constant tensile index, was found to be 15% lower as compared to the kraft pulp. Refining studies showed that moisture holding ability of chemical pulps mostly depends on the chemical nature of the pulp. Refining effects such as fibrillation and fine content did not have a significant effect on the hygroscopic behavior of chemical pulp.

  8. REFINE WETLAND REGULATORY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tribes will work toward refining a regulatory program by taking a draft wetland conservation code with permitting incorporated to TEB for review. Progress will then proceed in developing a permit tracking system that will track both Tribal and fee land sites within reservati...

  9. Choices, Frameworks and Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Roy H.; Islam, Nayeem; Johnson, Ralph; Kougiouris, Panos; Madany, Peter

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for designing operating systems using object-oriented frameworks. A framework can be refined into subframeworks. Constraints specify the interactions between the subframeworks. We describe how we used object-oriented frameworks to design Choices, an object-oriented operating system.

  10. Iron Chelation

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron overload and need treatment. What is iron overload? Iron chelation therapy is used when you have ... may want to perform: How quickly does iron overload happen? This is different for each person. It ...

  11. Fabrication and processing of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Viswanathan, S.

    1992-07-01

    The Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys have been shown to exhibit room-temperature ductility values of 15 to 19% by the control of composition and thermomechanical processing steps. The scale-up of one of the compositions to 2270-kg (5000-lb) electroslag-remelted (ESR) round ingot and 3272-kg (7200-lb) vacuum-induction-melted (VIM) slab ingot is described. Microstructural and mechanical property data are presented on small pieces sectioned from these ingots. The effects of final rolling temperature and the final annealing treatment on room-temperature ductility were investigated for the ESR ingot. A study of iron-aluminide binary alloys revealed that the environmental effects on room-temperature ductility values were absent for {le}8.5 wt % Al. The increasing aluminum content and the development of ordered structure resulted in increased environmental effects. Applications and a brief description of their status are described. Based on the combined property and cost advantage, continued development of iron aluminide is recommended.

  12. Fabrication and processing of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Viswanathan, S.

    1992-01-01

    The Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys have been shown to exhibit room-temperature ductility values of 15 to 19% by the control of composition and thermomechanical processing steps. The scale-up of one of the compositions to 2270-kg (5000-lb) electroslag-remelted (ESR) round ingot and 3272-kg (7200-lb) vacuum-induction-melted (VIM) slab ingot is described. Microstructural and mechanical property data are presented on small pieces sectioned from these ingots. The effects of final rolling temperature and the final annealing treatment on room-temperature ductility were investigated for the ESR ingot. A study of iron-aluminide binary alloys revealed that the environmental effects on room-temperature ductility values were absent for {le}8.5 wt % Al. The increasing aluminum content and the development of ordered structure resulted in increased environmental effects. Applications and a brief description of their status are described. Based on the combined property and cost advantage, continued development of iron aluminide is recommended.

  13. Issues in adaptive mesh refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, William Wenlong

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present an approach for a patch-based adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) for multi-physics simulations. The approach consists of clustering, symmetry preserving, mesh continuity, flux correction, communications, and management of patches. Among the special features of this patch-based AMR are symmetry preserving, efficiency of refinement, special implementation offlux correction, and patch management in parallel computing environments. Here, higher efficiency of refinement means less unnecessarily refined cells for a given set of cells to be refined. To demonstrate the capability of the AMR framework, hydrodynamics simulations with many levels of refinement are shown in both two- and three-dimensions.

  14. Structure and properties of dies obtained from scrap of 5KhNM and R6M5 steels by electroslag remelting

    SciTech Connect

    Timchenko, E.I.; Semenova, L.M.; Berezkin, Yu.A.; Zaitseva, I.D.

    1987-11-01

    It is known that in a number of cases cast dies of tool steels for hot working possess increased life. In the Lozovaya Forging and Machining Plant in electroslag remelting (ESR) of worn dies, a method is used making it possible to improve the quality of the cast blanks (dies) by additional alloying of them. A consumable composite electrode made of worn dies of 5KhNM steel reforged into bars and butt welded and scrap of R6M5 tool steel welded along the whole length of the main electrode in the form of a solid bar is used. Practically none of the chromium, molybdenum, tungsten, and vanadium additionally added in electroslag remelting burns off and therefore it is sufficient to add the expensive R6M5 steel scrap once. The improved characteristics of the steel are maintained in subsequent operations in the production chain. A comparative investigation was made of the character of the structure in the as-cast, annealed, hardened, and tempered conditions of 5KhNMVF steel produced by the above method and of 5KhNM steel produced by different methods.

  15. Ferrocene-like iron bis(dicarbollide), [3-Fe(III)-(1,2-C(2)B(9)H(11))(2)](-). The first experimental and theoretical refinement of a paramagnetic (11)B NMR spectrum.

    PubMed

    Pennanen, Teemu O; Machácek, Jan; Taubert, Stefan; Vaara, Juha; Hnyk, Drahomír

    2010-07-14

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of paramagnetic molecules (pNMR) provides detailed information on the structure and bonding of metallo-organic systems. The physical mechanisms underlying chemical shifts are considerably more complicated in the presence of unpaired electrons than in the case of diamagnetic compounds. We report for the first time a combined first-principles theoretical as well as experimental liquid-state (11)B NMR study of a paramagnetic compound, applied on the [3-Fe(III)-(1,2-C(2)B(9)H(11))(2)](-) metallaborane, which is an electronically open-shell structure where the iron centre binds two hemispherical boron-carbon cages. We show that this combined theoretical and experimental analysis constitutes a firm basis for the assignment of experimental (11)B NMR chemical shifts in paramagnetic metallaboranes. In the calculations, the roles of the different physical contributions to the pNMR chemical shift are elaborated, and the performance of different popular exchange-correlation functionals of density-functional theory as well as basis sets, are evaluated. A dynamic correction to the calculated shifts via first-principles molecular dynamics simulations is found to be important. Solvent effects on the chemical shifts were computed and found to be of minor significance. PMID:20464023

  16. Worldwide refining and gas processing directory

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    Statistics are presented on the following: US refining; Canada refining; Europe refining; Africa refining; Asia refining; Latin American refining; Middle East refining; catalyst manufacturers; consulting firms; engineering and construction; US gas processing; international gas processing; plant maintenance providers; process control and simulation systems; and trade associations.

  17. Minimally refined biomass fuel

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, Richard K.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1984-01-01

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water solubilizes the carbohydrates; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the vicosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  18. Iron overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is an ingredient in many mineral and vitamin supplements. Iron supplements are also sold by themselves. Types include: Ferrous sulfate (Feosol, Slow Fe) Ferrous gluconate (Fergon) Ferrous fumarate (Femiron, Feostat) Other products may also contain iron.

  19. Production and Refining of Magnesium Metal from Turkey Originating Dolomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiray, Yeliz; Yücel, Onuralp

    2012-06-01

    In this study crown magnesium produced from Turkish calcined dolomite by the Pigeon Process was refined and corrosion tests were applied. By using factsage thermodynamic program metalothermic reduction behavior of magnesium oxide and silicate formation structure during this reaction were investigated. After thermodynamic studies were completed, calcination of dolomite and it's metalothermic reduction at temperatures of 1473 K, 1523 K and within a vacuum (varied from 20 to 200 Pa) and refining of crown magnesium was studied. Different flux compositions consisting of MgCl2, KCl, CaCl2, MgO, CaF2, NaCl, and SiO2 with and without B2O3 additions were selected for the refining process. These tests were carried out at 963 K for 15, 30 and 45 minutes setting time. Considerable amount of iron was transferred into the sludge phase and its amount decreased from 0.08% to 0.027%. This refined magnesium was suitable for the production of various magnesium alloys. As a result of decreasing iron content, minimum corrosion rate of refined magnesium was obtained 2.35 g/m2/day. The results are compared with previous studies.

  20. Refines Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    WRI

    2002-05-15

    Refinery processes that convert heavy oils to lighter distillate fuels require heating for distillation, hydrogen addition or carbon rejection (coking). Efficiency is limited by the formation of insoluble carbon-rich coke deposits. Heat exchangers and other refinery units must be shut down for mechanical coke removal, resulting in a significant loss of output and revenue. When a residuum is heated above the temperature at which pyrolysis occurs (340 C, 650 F), there is typically an induction period before coke formation begins (Magaril and Aksenova 1968, Wiehe 1993). To avoid fouling, refiners often stop heating a residuum before coke formation begins, using arbitrary criteria. In many cases, this heating is stopped sooner than need be, resulting in less than maximum product yield. Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed innovative Coking Index concepts (patent pending) which can be used for process control by refiners to heat residua to the threshold, but not beyond the point at which coke formation begins when petroleum residua materials are heated at pyrolysis temperatures (Schabron et al. 2001). The development of this universal predictor solves a long standing problem in petroleum refining. These Coking Indexes have great potential value in improving the efficiency of distillation processes. The Coking Indexes were found to apply to residua in a universal manner, and the theoretical basis for the indexes has been established (Schabron et al. 2001a, 2001b, 2001c). For the first time, a few simple measurements indicates how close undesired coke formation is on the coke formation induction time line. The Coking Indexes can lead to new process controls that can improve refinery distillation efficiency by several percentage points. Petroleum residua consist of an ordered continuum of solvated polar materials usually referred to as asphaltenes dispersed in a lower polarity solvent phase held together by intermediate polarity materials usually referred to as

  1. Hirshfeld atom refinement

    PubMed Central

    Capelli, Silvia C.; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-01-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly–l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree–Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints – even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu’s), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu’s. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å2 as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements – an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å. PMID:25295177

  2. Replacement, reduction and refinement.

    PubMed

    Flecknell, Paul

    2002-01-01

    In 1959, William Russell and Rex Burch published "The Principles of Humane Experimental Technique". They proposed that if animals were to be used in experiments, every effort should be made to Replace them with non-sentient alternatives, to Reduce to a minimum the number of animals used, and to Refine experiments which used animals so that they caused the minimum pain and distress. These guiding principles, the "3 Rs" of animal research, were initially given little attention. Gradually, however, they have become established as essential considerations when animals are used in research. They have influenced new legislation aimed at controlling the use of experimental animals, and in the United Kingdom they have become formally incorporated into the Animal (Scientific) Procedures Act. The three principles, of Replacement, Reduction and Refinement, have also proven to be an area of common ground for research workers who use animals, and those who oppose their use. Scientists, who accept the need to use animals in some experiments, would also agree that it would be preferable not to use animals. If animals were to be used, as few as possible should be used and they should experience a minimum of pain or distress. Many of those who oppose animal experimentation, would also agree that until animal experimentation is stopped, Russell and Burch's 3Rs provide a means to improve animal welfare. It has also been recognised that adoption of the 3Rs can improve the quality of science. Appropriately designed experiments that minimise variation, provide standardised optimum conditions of animals care and minimise unnecessary stress or pain, often yield better more reliable data. Despite the progress made as a result of attention to these principles, several major problems have been identified. When replacing animals with alternative methods, it has often proven difficult to formally validate the alternative. This has proven a particular problem in regulatory toxicology

  3. Thailand: refining cultural values.

    PubMed

    Ratanakul, P

    1990-01-01

    In the second of a set of three articles concerned with "bioethics on the Pacific Rim," Ratanakul, director of a research center for Southeast Asian cultures in Thailand, provides an overview of bioethical issues in his country. He focuses on four issues: health care allocation, AIDS, determination of death, and euthanasia. The introduction of Western medicine into Thailand has brought with it a multitude of ethical problems created in part by tension between Western and Buddhist values. For this reason, Ratanakul concludes that "bioethical enquiry in Thailand must not only examine ethical dilemmas that arise in the actual practice of medicine and research in the life sciences, but must also deal with the refinement and clarification of applicable Thai cultural and moral values." PMID:2318624

  4. Towards automated crystallographic structure refinement with phenix.refine.

    PubMed

    Afonine, Pavel V; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Echols, Nathaniel; Headd, Jeffrey J; Moriarty, Nigel W; Mustyakimov, Marat; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Zwart, Peter H; Adams, Paul D

    2012-04-01

    phenix.refine is a program within the PHENIX package that supports crystallographic structure refinement against experimental data with a wide range of upper resolution limits using a large repertoire of model parameterizations. It has several automation features and is also highly flexible. Several hundred parameters enable extensive customizations for complex use cases. Multiple user-defined refinement strategies can be applied to specific parts of the model in a single refinement run. An intuitive graphical user interface is available to guide novice users and to assist advanced users in managing refinement projects. X-ray or neutron diffraction data can be used separately or jointly in refinement. phenix.refine is tightly integrated into the PHENIX suite, where it serves as a critical component in automated model building, final structure refinement, structure validation and deposition to the wwPDB. This paper presents an overview of the major phenix.refine features, with extensive literature references for readers interested in more detailed discussions of the methods. PMID:22505256

  5. Towards automated crystallographic structure refinement with phenix.refine

    PubMed Central

    Afonine, Pavel V.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Echols, Nathaniel; Headd, Jeffrey J.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Mustyakimov, Marat; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Zwart, Peter H.; Adams, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    phenix.refine is a program within the PHENIX package that supports crystallographic structure refinement against experimental data with a wide range of upper resolution limits using a large repertoire of model parameterizations. It has several automation features and is also highly flexible. Several hundred parameters enable extensive customizations for complex use cases. Multiple user-defined refinement strategies can be applied to specific parts of the model in a single refinement run. An intuitive graphical user interface is available to guide novice users and to assist advanced users in managing refinement projects. X-ray or neutron diffraction data can be used separately or jointly in refinement. phenix.refine is tightly integrated into the PHENIX suite, where it serves as a critical component in automated model building, final structure refinement, structure validation and deposition to the wwPDB. This paper presents an overview of the major phenix.refine features, with extensive literature references for readers interested in more detailed discussions of the methods. PMID:22505256

  6. Preparation and fabrication of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Baldwin, R.H.; Blakely, K.S.; Hatfield, E.C.; Howell, C.R.; McKamey, C.G.

    1991-01-01

    The Fe{sub 3}AL-based iron aluminides are under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for a range of fossil energy applications. The room-temperature ductility, which was the major drawback for their use, has been increased from 8% to a more usable range of 15 to 20%. The commercial application of these alloys requires information regarding their melting and fabrication. This paper presents the recent data regarding alloy compositions, melting and fabrication, and properties. The Fe{sup 3}AL alloy (FA-129) was vacuum-induction melted in a MgO crucible, with a slight pickup of magnesium. This magnesium pickup was not detrimental to the processing of the ingot. The magnesium content has been subsequently reduced by either vacuum-arc remelting or electroslag remelting. The ingots were hot worked without any problems at ORNL, Special Metals Corporation (New Hartford, New York), and Precision Rolled Products (Reno, Nevada). Tensile and creep properties of the ingots in this study were similar to those observed in previous heats. 10 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Dose refinement. ARAC's role

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J. S.; Sullivan, T. J.; Baskett, R. L.

    1998-06-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, since the late 1970's has been involved in assessing consequences from nuclear and other hazardous material releases into the atmosphere. ARAC's primary role has been emergency response. However, after the emergency phase, there is still a significant role for dispersion modeling. This work usually involves refining the source term and, hence, the dose to the populations affected as additional information becomes available in the form of source term estimates release rates, mix of material, and release geometry and any measurements from passage of the plume and deposition on the ground. Many of the ARAC responses have been documented elsewhere. 1 Some of the more notable radiological releases that ARAC has participated in the post-emergency phase have been the 1979 Three Mile Island nuclear power plant (NPP) accident outside Harrisburg, PA, the 1986 Chernobyl NPP accident in the Ukraine, and the 1996 Japan Tokai nuclear processing plant explosion. ARAC has also done post-emergency phase analyses for the 1978 Russian satellite COSMOS 954 reentry and subsequent partial burn up of its on board nuclear reactor depositing radioactive materials on the ground in Canada, the 1986 uranium hexafluoride spill in Gore, OK, the 1993 Russian Tomsk-7 nuclear waste tank explosion, and lesser releases of mostly tritium. In addition, ARAC has performed a key role in the contingency planning for possible accidental releases during the launch of spacecraft with radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) on board (i.e. Galileo, Ulysses, Mars-Pathfinder, and Cassini), and routinely exercises with the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) in preparation for offsite consequences of radiological releases from NPPs and nuclear weapon accidents or incidents. Several accident post-emergency phase assessments are discussed in this paper in order to illustrate

  8. Refinement of protein dynamic structure: normal mode refinement.

    PubMed Central

    Kidera, A; Go, N

    1990-01-01

    An x-ray crystallographic refinement method, referred to as the normal mode refinement, is proposed. The Debye-Waller factor is expanded in terms of the effective normal modes whose amplitudes and eigenvectors are experimentally determined by the crystallographic refinement. In contrast to the conventional method, the atomic motions are treated generally as anisotropic and concerted. This method is assessed by using the simulated x-ray data given by a Monte Carlo simulation of human lysozyme. In this article, we refine the dynamic structure by fixing the average static structure to exact coordinates. It is found that the normal mode refinement, using a smaller number of variables, gives a better R factor and more information on the dynamics (anisotropy and collectivity in the motion). Images PMID:2339115

  9. Gradualness facilitates knowledge refinement.

    PubMed

    Rada, R

    1985-05-01

    To facilitate knowledge refinement, a system should be designed so that small changes in the knowledge correspond to small changes in the function or performance of the system. Two sets of experiments show the value of small, heuristically guided changes in a weighted rule base. In the first set, the ordering among numbers (reflecting certainties) makes their manipulation more straightforward than the manipulation of relationships. A simple credit assignment and weight adjustment strategy for improving numbers in a weighted, rule-based expert system is presented. In the second set, the rearrangement of predicates benefits from additional knowledge about the ``ordering'' among predicates. A third set of experiments indicates the importance of the proper level of granularity when augmenting a knowledge base. Augmentation of one knowledge base by analogical reasoning from another knowledge base did not work with only binary relationships, but did succeed with ternary relationships. To obtain a small improvement in the knowledge base, a substantial amount of structure had to be treated as a unit. PMID:21869290

  10. Iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world. PMID:1745900

  11. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    New features added to the refinement program SHELXL since 2008 are described and explained. The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as ‘a CIF’) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors.

  12. Surface Gasification Materials Program: Semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1986. [Iron aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The objective of the Surface Gasification Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for application to the specific needs of coal gasification systems. One of the goals of the program is to evaluate innovative fabrication methods which have the potential to lower costs and improve reliability and safety for gasifier vessels and components. Another goal is to conduct engineering-scale development and application of materials for coal gasification systems to ensure that the materials of construction for pilot plants and future large-scale plants can be properly selected and specified. This semiannual progress report covers: (1) protective coatings and claddings - application/evaluation; (2) electroslag component casting; (3) materials development for solid oxide oxygen production unit; and (4) development of iron aluminides.

  13. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Diachin, L; Hornung, R; Plassmann, P; WIssink, A

    2005-03-04

    As large-scale, parallel computers have become more widely available and numerical models and algorithms have advanced, the range of physical phenomena that can be simulated has expanded dramatically. Many important science and engineering problems exhibit solutions with localized behavior where highly-detailed salient features or large gradients appear in certain regions which are separated by much larger regions where the solution is smooth. Examples include chemically-reacting flows with radiative heat transfer, high Reynolds number flows interacting with solid objects, and combustion problems where the flame front is essentially a two-dimensional sheet occupying a small part of a three-dimensional domain. Modeling such problems numerically requires approximating the governing partial differential equations on a discrete domain, or grid. Grid spacing is an important factor in determining the accuracy and cost of a computation. A fine grid may be needed to resolve key local features while a much coarser grid may suffice elsewhere. Employing a fine grid everywhere may be inefficient at best and, at worst, may make an adequately resolved simulation impractical. Moreover, the location and resolution of fine grid required for an accurate solution is a dynamic property of a problem's transient features and may not be known a priori. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a technique that can be used with both structured and unstructured meshes to adjust local grid spacing dynamically to capture solution features with an appropriate degree of resolution. Thus, computational resources can be focused where and when they are needed most to efficiently achieve an accurate solution without incurring the cost of a globally-fine grid. Figure 1.1 shows two example computations using AMR; on the left is a structured mesh calculation of a impulsively-sheared contact surface and on the right is the fuselage and volume discretization of an RAH-66 Comanche helicopter [35]. Note the

  14. Iron catalyzed coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Givens, Edwin N.

    1983-01-01

    A process is described for the solvent refining of coal into a gas product, a liquid product and a normally solid dissolved product. Particulate coal and a unique co-catalyst system are suspended in a coal solvent and processed in a coal liquefaction reactor, preferably an ebullated bed reactor. The co-catalyst system comprises a combination of a stoichiometric excess of iron oxide and pyrite which reduce predominantly to active iron sulfide catalysts in the reaction zone. This catalyst system results in increased catalytic activity with attendant improved coal conversion and enhanced oil product distribution as well as reduced sulfide effluent. Iron oxide is used in a stoichiometric excess of that required to react with sulfur indigenous to the feed coal and that produced during reduction of the pyrite catalyst to iron sulfide.

  15. Electroslag and electrogas welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    These two new joining methods perform welding in the vertical position, and therein lies the secret of their impressive advantages in material handling, in weld preparation, in welding speed, in freedom from distortion, and in weld soundness. Once the work has been set in the proper vertical position for welding, no further plate handling is required. The molten filler metal is held in place by copper shoes or dams, and the weld is completed in one pass.

  16. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    PubMed Central

    Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as ‘a CIF’) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors. PMID:25567568

  17. Adaptive Mesh Refinement in CTH

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, David

    1999-05-04

    This paper reports progress on implementing a new capability of adaptive mesh refinement into the Eulerian multimaterial shock- physics code CTH. The adaptivity is block-based with refinement and unrefinement occurring in an isotropic 2:1 manner. The code is designed to run on serial, multiprocessor and massive parallel platforms. An approximate factor of three in memory and performance improvements over comparable resolution non-adaptive calculations has-been demonstrated for a number of problems.

  18. Refining the shifted topological vertex

    SciTech Connect

    Drissi, L. B.; Jehjouh, H.; Saidi, E. H.

    2009-01-15

    We study aspects of the refining and shifting properties of the 3d MacMahon function C{sub 3}(q) used in topological string theory and BKP hierarchy. We derive the explicit expressions of the shifted topological vertex S{sub {lambda}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(q) and its refined version T{sub {lambda}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(q,t). These vertices complete results in literature.

  19. Thermodynamics of Impurity Removal in Solvent Refining of Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafaghodikhajavi, Leili

    In a new approach to metallurgical refining of silicon by solvent refining, iron has been successfully utilized as the getter element. Unlike most metallic impurities, phosphorus and boron have relatively large distribution coefficients that render them unresponsive to solidification refining processes. Consequently it is crucial to study the efficiency of phosphorus and boron removal through solvent refining with iron. This research focuses on thermodynamics of phosphorus and boron distribution between silicon crystals and the iron-silicon melt. Aiming to establish the thermodynamic fundamentals of the process, the present study was performed to investigate the distribution coefficient of phosphorus and boron between silicon and the alloy melt. Based on the values obtained for distribution coefficient of phosphorus and boron at different temperatures, impurity removal is 2-3 times more effective compared with conventional directional solidification process. The values of interaction parameter of phosphorus on iron were obtained as -5297+/-359 (1310 °C), -4324+/-292 (1260 °C) and -2893+/-268 (1210 °C). The values of interaction parameter of boron on iron were: -813+/-53 (1310 °C), -830+/-92 (1260 °C), -863+/-91 (1210 °C). Large negative values obtained for both interaction parameters, indicate strong affinity between iron and either phosphorus or boron. Self interaction parameter of phosphorus were as follows: 243+/-38 (1310 °C), 137+/-22 (1260 °C) and 18+/-2 (1210 °C), indicating the repulsion between phosphorus atoms. Self interaction parameter of boron were as follow: -96+/-12 (1310 °C), -111+/-28 (1260 °C) and -159+/-45 (1210 °C) implying an attraction between boron atoms in silicon. The distribution coefficient of phosphorus at infinite dilution were obtained as: 0.34+/-0.01 (1310 °C), 0.28+/-0.01 (1260 °C) and 0.24+/-0.00 (1210 °C). The same parameter for boron were: 0.49+/-0.01 (1310 °C), 0.41+/-0.03 (1260 °C) and 0.33+/-0.04 (1210

  20. Development of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.; Sikka, V.K.; Andleigh, V.K.

    1995-06-01

    The primary reason for the poor room-temperature ductility of Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys is generally accepted to be environmental embrittlement due to hydrogen produced by the reaction of aluminum with water vapor present in the test atmosphere. In the as-cast condition, another possible reason for the low room-temperature ductility is the large grain size (0.5 to 3 mm) of the cast material. While recent studies on iron aluminides in the wrought condition have led to higher room-temperature ductility and increased high-temperature strength, limited studies have been conducted on iron aluminides in the as-cast condition. The purpose of this study was to induce grain refinement of the as-cast alloy through alloying additions to the melt and study the effect on room-temperature ductility as measured by the strain corresponding to the maximum stress obtained in a three-point bend test. A base charge of Fe-28% Al-5% Cr alloy was used; as in previous studies this ternary alloy exhibited the highest tensile ductility of several alloys tested. Iron aluminide alloys are being considered for many structural uses, especially for applications where their excellent corrosion resistance is needed. Several alloy compositions developed at ORNL have been licensed to commercial vendors for development of scale-up procedures. With the licensees and other vendors, several applications for iron aluminides are being pursued.

  1. Nitriding iron at lower temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tong, W P; Tao, N R; Wang, Z B; Lu, J; Lu, K

    2003-01-31

    The microstructure in the surface layer of a pure iron plate was refined at the nanometer scale by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment that generates repetitive severe plastic deformation of the surface layer. The subsequent nitriding kinetics of the treated iron with the nanostructured surface layer were greatly enhanced, so that the nitriding temperature could be as low as 300 degrees C, which is much lower than conventional nitriding temperatures (above 500 degrees C). This enhanced processing method demonstrates the technological significance of nanomaterials in improving traditional processing techniques and provides a new approach for selective surface reactions in solids. PMID:12560546

  2. Model Refinement Using Eigensystem Assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peiman G.

    2000-01-01

    IA novel approach for the refinement of finite-element-based analytical models of flexible structures is presented. The proposed approach models the possible refinements in the mass, damping, and stiffness matrices of the finite element model in the form of a constant gain feedback with acceleration, velocity, and displacement measurements, respectively. Once the free elements of the structural matrices have been defined, the problem of model refinement reduces to obtaining position, velocity, and acceleration gain matrices with appropriate sparsity that reassign a desired subset of the eigenvalues of the model, along with partial mode shapes, from their baseline values to those obtained from system identification test data. A sequential procedure is used to assign one conjugate pair of eigenvalues at each step using symmetric output feedback gain matrices, and the eigenvectors are partially assigned, while ensuring that the eigenvalues assigned in the previous steps are not disturbed. The procedure can also impose that gain matrices be dissipative to guarantee the stability of the refined model. A numerical example, involving finite element model refinement for a structural testbed at NASA Langley Research Center (Controls-Structures-Interaction Evolutionary model) is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  3. Zone refining of plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, M.S.

    1994-08-01

    The zone refining process was applied to Pu metal containing known amounts of impurities. Rod specimens of plutonium metal were melted into and contained in tantalum boats, each of which was passed horizontally through a three-turn, high-frequency coil in such a manner as to cause a narrow molten zone to pass through the Pu metal rod 10 times. The impurity elements Co, Cr, Fe, Ni, Np, U were found to move in the same direction as the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. The elements Al, Am, and Ga moved in the opposite direction of the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. As the impurity alloy was zone refined, {delta}-phase plutonium metal crystals were produced. The first few zone refining passes were more effective than each later pass because an oxide layer formed on the rod surface. There was no clear evidence of better impurity movement at the slower zone refining speed. Also, constant or variable coil power appeared to have no effect on impurity movement during a single run (10 passes). This experiment was the first step to developing a zone refining process for plutonium metal.

  4. Bauxite Mining and Alumina Refining

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, Neale; Olney, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe bauxite mining and alumina refining processes and to outline the relevant physical, chemical, biological, ergonomic, and psychosocial health risks. Methods: Review article. Results: The most important risks relate to noise, ergonomics, trauma, and caustic soda splashes of the skin/eyes. Other risks of note relate to fatigue, heat, and solar ultraviolet and for some operations tropical diseases, venomous/dangerous animals, and remote locations. Exposures to bauxite dust, alumina dust, and caustic mist in contemporary best-practice bauxite mining and alumina refining operations have not been demonstrated to be associated with clinically significant decrements in lung function. Exposures to bauxite dust and alumina dust at such operations are also not associated with the incidence of cancer. Conclusions: A range of occupational health risks in bauxite mining and alumina refining require the maintenance of effective control measures. PMID:24806720

  5. Multigrid for locally refined meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Y.

    1999-12-01

    A multilevel method for the solution of finite element schemes on locally refined meshes is introduced. For isotropic diffusion problems, the condition number of the two-level method is bounded independently of the mesh size and the discontinuities in the diffusion coefficient. The curves of discontinuity need not be aligned with the coarse mesh. Indeed, numerical applications with 10 levels of local refinement yield a rapid convergence of the corresponding 10-level, multigrid V-cycle and other multigrid cycles which are more suitable for parallelism even when the discontinuities are invisible on most of the coarse meshes.

  6. A coupled model of TiN inclusion growth in GCr15SiMn during solidification in the electroslag remelting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liang; Cheng, Guo-guang; Li, Shi-jian; Zhao, Min; Feng, Gui-ping; Li, Tao

    2015-12-01

    TiN inclusions observed in an ingot produced by electroslag remelting (ESR) are extremely harmful to GCr15SiMn steel. Therefore, accurate predictions of the growth size of these inclusions during steel solidification are significant for clean ESR ingot production. On the basis of our previous work, a coupled model of solute microsegregation and TiN inclusion growth during solidification has been established. The results demonstrate that compared to a non-coupled model, the coupled model predictions of the size of TiN inclusions are in good agreement with experimental results using scanning electron microscopy with energy disperse spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). Because of high cooling rate, the sizes of TiN inclusions in the edge area of the ingots are relatively small compared to the sizes in the center area. During the ESR process, controlling the content of Ti in the steel is a feasible and effective method of decreasing the sizes of TiN inclusions.

  7. Conformal refinement of unstructured quadrilateral meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Garmella, Rao

    2009-01-01

    We present a multilevel adaptive refinement technique for unstructured quadrilateral meshes in which the mesh is kept conformal at all times. This means that the refined mesh, like the original, is formed of only quadrilateral elements that intersect strictly along edges or at vertices, i.e., vertices of one quadrilateral element do not lie in an edge of another quadrilateral. Elements are refined using templates based on 1:3 refinement of edges. We demonstrate that by careful design of the refinement and coarsening strategy, we can maintain high quality elements in the refined mesh. We demonstrate the method on a number of examples with dynamically changing refinement regions.

  8. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  9. Method for refining contaminated iridium

    DOEpatents

    Heshmatpour, B.; Heestand, R.L.

    1982-08-31

    Contaminated iridium is refined by alloying it with an alloying agent selected from the group consisting of manganese and an alloy of manganese and copper, and then dissolving the alloying agent from the formed alloy to provide a purified iridium powder.

  10. Method for refining contaminated iridium

    DOEpatents

    Heshmatpour, Bahman; Heestand, Richard L.

    1983-01-01

    Contaminated iridium is refined by alloying it with an alloying agent selected from the group consisting of manganese and an alloy of manganese and copper, and then dissolving the alloying agent from the formed alloy to provide a purified iridium powder.

  11. A Title I Refinement: Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazelton, Alexander E.; And Others

    Through joint planning with a number of school districts and the Region X Title I Technical Assistance Center, and with the help of a Title I Refinement grant, Alaska has developed a system of data storage and retrieval using microcomputers that assists small school districts in the evaluation and reporting of their Title I programs. Although this…

  12. Vacuum Refining of Molten Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarian, Jafar; Tangstad, Merete

    2012-12-01

    Metallurgical fundamentals for vacuum refining of molten silicon and the behavior of different impurities in this process are studied. A novel mass transfer model for the removal of volatile impurities from silicon in vacuum induction refining is developed. The boundary conditions for vacuum refining system—the equilibrium partial pressures of the dissolved elements and their actual partial pressures under vacuum—are determined through thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. It is indicated that the vacuum removal kinetics of the impurities is different, and it is controlled by one, two, or all the three subsequent reaction mechanisms—mass transfer in a melt boundary layer, chemical evaporation on the melt surface, and mass transfer in the gas phase. Vacuum refining experimental results of this study and literature data are used to study the model validation. The model provides reliable results and shows correlation with the experimental data for many volatile elements. Kinetics of phosphorus removal, which is an important impurity in the production of solar grade silicon, is properly predicted by the model, and it is observed that phosphorus elimination from silicon is significantly increased with increasing process temperature.

  13. GRAIN REFINEMENT OF URANIUM BILLETS

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, L.

    1964-02-25

    A method of refining the grain structure of massive uranium billets without resort to forging is described. The method consists in the steps of beta- quenching the billets, annealing the quenched billets in the upper alpha temperature range, and extrusion upset of the billets to an extent sufficient to increase the cross sectional area by at least 5 per cent. (AEC)

  14. Multigrid for refined triangle meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Yair

    1997-02-01

    A two-level preconditioning method for the solution of (locally) refined finite element schemes using triangle meshes is introduced. In the isotropic SPD case, it is shown that the condition number of the preconditioned stiffness matrix is bounded uniformly for all sufficiently regular triangulations. This is also verified numerically for an isotropic diffusion problem with highly discontinuous coefficients.

  15. 40 CFR 80.235 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a small refiner? 80.235 Section 80.235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Provisions § 80.235 How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner? (a) Applications for small refiner....225(d), which must be submitted by June 1, 2002. (b) Applications for small refiner status must...

  16. 40 CFR 80.235 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a small refiner? 80.235 Section 80.235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Provisions § 80.235 How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner? (a) Applications for small refiner....225(d), which must be submitted by June 1, 2002. (b) Applications for small refiner status must...

  17. Fuel and oxygen addition for metal smelting or refining process

    DOEpatents

    Schlichting, Mark R.

    1994-01-01

    A furnace 10 for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron 20 is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance 40, through which a center stream of particulate coal 53 is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer 30. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon 51 enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen 52 is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream 51. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus 84 to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer 30, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace.

  18. Fuel and oxygen addition for metal smelting or refining process

    DOEpatents

    Schlichting, M.R.

    1994-11-22

    A furnace for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance, through which a center stream of particulate coal is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace. 7 figs.

  19. Grain refinement of permanent mold cast copper base alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sadayappan, M.; Thomson, J. P.; Elboujdaini, M.; Gu, G. Ping; Sahoo, M.

    2004-04-29

    Grain refinement behavior of copper alloys cast in permanent molds was investigated. This is one of the least studied subjects in copper alloy castings. Grain refinement is not widely practiced for leaded copper alloys cast in sand molds. Aluminum bronzes and high strength yellow brasses, cast in sand and permanent molds, were usually fine grained due to the presence of more than 2% iron. Grain refinement of the most common permanent mold casting alloys, leaded yellow brass and its lead-free replacement EnviroBrass III, is not universally accepted due to the perceived problem of hard spots in finished castings and for the same reason these alloys contain very low amounts of iron. The yellow brasses and Cu-Si alloys are gaining popularity in North America due to their low lead content and amenability for permanent mold casting. These alloys are prone to hot tearing in permanent mold casting. Grain refinement is one of the solutions for reducing this problem. However, to use this technique it is necessary to understand the mechanism of grain refinement and other issues involved in the process. The following issues were studied during this three year project funded by the US Department of Energy and the copper casting industry: (1) Effect of alloying additions on the grain size of Cu-Zn alloys and their interaction with grain refiners; (2) Effect of two grain refining elements, boron and zirconium, on the grain size of four copper alloys, yellow brass, EnviroBrass II, silicon brass and silicon bronze and the duration of their effect (fading); (3) Prediction of grain refinement using cooling curve analysis and use of this method as an on-line quality control tool; (4) Hard spot formation in yellow brass and EnviroBrass due to grain refinement; (5) Corrosion resistance of the grain refined alloys; (6) Transfer the technology to permanent mold casting foundries; It was found that alloying elements such as tin and zinc do not change the grain size of Cu-Zn alloys

  20. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac-Neice, Peter; Olson, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement Library (PARAMESH) is a package of Fortran 90 subroutines designed to provide a computer programmer with an easy route to extension of (1) a previously written serial code that uses a logically Cartesian structured mesh into (2) a parallel code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Alternatively, in its simplest use, and with minimal effort, PARAMESH can operate as a domain-decomposition tool for users who want to parallelize their serial codes but who do not wish to utilize adaptivity. The package builds a hierarchy of sub-grids to cover the computational domain of a given application program, with spatial resolution varying to satisfy the demands of the application. The sub-grid blocks form the nodes of a tree data structure (a quad-tree in two or an oct-tree in three dimensions). Each grid block has a logically Cartesian mesh. The package supports one-, two- and three-dimensional models.

  1. Entitlements exemptions for new refiners

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-29

    The practice of exempting start-up inventories from entitlement requirements for new refiners has been called into question by the Office of Hearings and Appeals and other responsible Departmental officials. ERA with the assistance of the Office of General Counsel considering resolving the matter through rulemaking; however, by October 26, 1979 no rulemaking had been published. Because of the absence of published standards for use in granting these entitlements to new refineries, undue reliance was placed on individual judgements that could result in inequities to applicants and increase the potential for fraud and abuse. Recommendations are given as follows: (1) if the program for granting entitlements exemptions to new refiners is continued, the Administrator, ERA should promptly take action to adopt an appropriate regulation to formalize the program by establishing standards and controls that will assure consistent and equitable application; in addition, files containing adjustments given to new refiners should be made complete to support benefits already allowed; and (2) whether the program is continued or discontinued, the General Counsel and the Administrator, ERA, should coordiate on how to evaluate the propriety of inventory adjustments previously granted to new refineries.

  2. Characterization of tetraethylene glycol passivated iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Eloiza da Silva; Viali, Wesley Renato; da Silva, Sebastião William; Coaquira, José Antonio Huamaní; Garg, Vijayendra Kumar; de Oliveira, Aderbal Carlos; Morais, Paulo César; Jafelicci Júnior, Miguel

    2014-10-01

    The present study describes the synthesis and characterization of iron@iron oxide nanoparticles produced by passivation of metallic iron in tetraethylene glycol media. Structural and chemical characterizations were performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pomegranate-like core@shell nanoparticulate material in the size range of 90-120 nm was obtained. According to quantitative phase analysis using Rietveld structure refinement the synthesized iron oxide was identified as magnetite (Fe3O4) whereas the iron to magnetite mass fractions was found to be 47:53. These findings are in good agreement with the data obtained from Mössbauer and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The XPS data revealed the presence of a surface organic layer with higher hydrocarbon content, possibly due to the tetraethylene glycol thermal degradation correlated with iron oxidation. The room-temperature (300 K) saturation magnetization measured for the as-synthesized iron and for the iron-iron oxide were 145 emu g-1 and 131 emu g-1, respectively. The measured saturation magnetizations are in good agreement with data obtained from TEM, XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  3. A General Coupled Mathematical Model of Electromagnetic Phenomena, Two-Phase Flow, and Heat Transfer in Electroslag Remelting Process Including Conducting in the Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; He, Zhu; Li, Baokuan; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka

    2014-12-01

    A transient three-dimensional finite-volume mathematical model has been developed to investigate the coupled physical fields in the electroslag remelting (ESR) process. Through equations solved by the electrical potential method, the electric current, electromagnetic force (EMF), and Joule heating fields are demonstrated. The mold is assumed to be conductive rather than insulated. The volume of fluid approach is implemented for the two-phase flow. Moreover, the EMF and Joule heating, which are the source terms of the momentum and energy sources, are recalculated at each iteration as a function of the phase distribution. The solidification is modeled by an enthalpy-porosity formulation, in which the mushy zone is treated as a porous medium with porosity equal to the liquid fraction. An innovative marking method of the metal pool profile is proposed in the experiment. The effect of the applied current on the ESR process is understood by the model. Good agreement is obtained between the experiment and calculation. The electric current flows to the mold lateral wall especially in the slag layer. A large amount of Joule heating around the metal droplet varies as it falls. The hottest region appears under the outer radius of the electrode tip, close to the slag/metal interface instead of the electrode tip. The metal pool becomes deeper with more power. The maximal temperature increases from 1951 K to 2015 K (1678 °C to 1742 °C), and the maximum metal pool depth increases from 34.0 to 59.5 mm with the applied current ranging from 1000 to 2000 A.

  4. Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected Refiners Differently, 1995

    EIA Publications

    1996-01-01

    This article focuses on the costs of producing reformulated gasoline (RFG) as experienced by different types of refiners and on how these refiners fared this past summer, given the prices for RFG at the refinery gate.

  5. A Refined Cauchy-Schwarz Inequality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Peter R.

    2007-01-01

    The author presents a refinement of the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality. He shows his computations in which refinements of the triangle inequality and its reverse inequality are obtained for nonzero x and y in a normed linear space.

  6. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since the pioneering research by Shoden in 1953. However, we recently developed a new method for determining ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron by computer-assisted serum ferritin kinetics. Serum ferritin increase or decrease curves were measured in patients with normal storage iron levels (chronic hepatitis C and iron deficiency anemia treated by intravenous iron injection), and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusion dependent anemia). We thereby confirmed the existence of two iron pathways where iron flows followed the numbered order (1) labile iron, (2) ferritin and (3) hemosiderin in iron deposition and mobilization among many previously proposed but mostly unproven routes. We also demonstrated the increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron in iron deposition and mobilization. The author first demonstrated here the change in proportion between pre-existing ferritin iron and new ferritin iron synthesized by removing iron from hemosiderin in the course of iron removal. In addition, the author disclosed the cause of underestimation of storage iron turnover rate which had been reported by previous investigators in estimating storage iron turnover rate of normal subjects. PMID:25741033

  7. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Derbidge, T. Craig; Mulholland, James A.; Foster, Edward P.

    1986-01-01

    An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

  8. Grain Refinement of Deoxidized Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balart, María José; Patel, Jayesh B.; Gao, Feng; Fan, Zhongyun

    2016-08-01

    This study reports the current status of grain refinement of copper accompanied in particular by a critical appraisal of grain refinement of phosphorus-deoxidized, high residual P (DHP) copper microalloyed with 150 ppm Ag. Some deviations exist in terms of the growth restriction factor (Q) framework, on the basis of empirical evidence reported in the literature for grain size measurements of copper with individual additions of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.5 wt pct of Mo, In, Sn, Bi, Sb, Pb, and Se, cast under a protective atmosphere of pure Ar and water quenching. The columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) has been observed in copper, with an individual addition of 0.4B and with combined additions of 0.4Zr-0.04P and 0.4Zr-0.04P-0.015Ag and, in a previous study, with combined additions of 0.1Ag-0.069P (in wt pct). CETs in these B- and Zr-treated casts have been ascribed to changes in the morphology and chemistry of particles, concurrently in association with free solute type and availability. No further grain-refining action was observed due to microalloying additions of B, Mg, Ca, Zr, Ti, Mn, In, Fe, and Zn (~0.1 wt pct) with respect to DHP-Cu microalloyed with Ag, and therefore are no longer relevant for the casting conditions studied. The critical microalloying element for grain size control in deoxidized copper and in particular DHP-Cu is Ag.

  9. Surface Gasification Materials Program semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1986. [Fe/sub 3/Al (iron aluminides)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    The objective of the Surface Gasification Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for application to the specific needs of coal gasification systems. One of the goals of the program is to evaluate innovative fabrication methods which have the potential to lower costs and improve reliability and safety for gasifier vessels and components. Another goal is to conduct engineering-scale development and application of materials for coal gasification systems to ensure that the materials of construction for pilot plants and future large-scale plants can be properly selected and specified. Contents of this semiannual progress report include: (1) protective coatings and claddings - application/evaluation; (2) corrosion of structural ceramics in coal gasification environments; (3) electroslag component casting; and (4) development of iron aluminides. 8 figs., 14 tabs.

  10. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) project by The Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co. at the SRC Pilot Plant in Fort Lewis, Washington and the Gulf Science and Technology Company Process Development Unit (P-99) in Harmarville, Pennsylvania, for the Department of Energy during the month of October, 1980. The Fort Lewis Pilot Plant was shut down the entire month of October, 1980 for inspection and maintenance. PDU P-99 completed two runs during October investigating potential start-up modes for the Demonstration Plant.

  11. Risk-based system refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, V.L.; Berg, R.S.; Dalton, L.J.

    1998-06-01

    When designing a high consequence system, considerable care should be taken to ensure that the system can not easily be placed into a high consequence failure state. A formal system design process should include a model that explicitly shows the complete state space of the system (including failure states) as well as those events (e.g., abnormal environmental conditions, component failures, etc.) that can cause a system to enter a failure state. In this paper the authors present such a model and formally develop a notion of risk-based refinement with respect to the model.

  12. 40 CFR 80.1340 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a small refiner? 80.1340 Section 80.1340 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Small Refiner Provisions § 80.1340 How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner? (a) Applications for...

  13. 40 CFR 80.1340 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a small refiner? 80.1340 Section 80.1340 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Small Refiner Provisions § 80.1340 How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner? (a) Applications for...

  14. Zone refining of plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate zone refining techniques for the purification of plutonium metal. The redistribution of 10 impurity elements from zone melting was examined. Four tantalum boats were loaded with plutonium impurity alloy, placed in a vacuum furnace, heated to 700{degrees}C, and held at temperature for one hour. Ten passes were made with each boat. Metallographic and chemical analyses performed on the plutonium rods showed that, after 10 passes, moderate movement of certain elements were achieved. Molten zone speeds of 1 or 2 inches per hour had no effect on impurity element movement. Likewise, the application of constant or variable power had no effect on impurity movement. The study implies that development of a zone refining process to purify plutonium is feasible. Development of a process will be hampered by two factors: (1) the effect on impurity element redistribution of the oxide layer formed on the exposed surface of the material is not understood, and (2) the tantalum container material is not inert in the presence of plutonium. Cold boat studies are planned, with higher temperature and vacuum levels, to determine the effect on these factors. 5 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  15. Iron Dextran Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Iron dextran injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells ... treated with iron supplements taken by mouth. Iron dextran injection is in a class of medications called ...

  16. Iron and alloys of iron. [lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastri, Sankar

    1992-01-01

    All lunar soil contains iron in the metallic form, mostly as an iron-nickel alloy in concentrations of a few tenths of 1 percent. Some of this free iron can be easily separated by magnetic means. It is estimated that the magnetic separation of 100,000 tons of lunar soil would yield 150-200 tons of iron. Agglutinates contain metallic iron which could be extracted by melting and made into powder metallurgy products. The characteristics and potential uses of the pure-iron and iron-alloy lunar products are discussed. Processes for working iron that might be used in a nonterrestrial facility are also addressed.

  17. Materials refining on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2007-05-01

    Oxygen, metals, silicon, and glass are raw materials that will be required for long-term habitation and production of structural materials and solar arrays on the Moon. A process sequence is proposed for refining these materials from lunar regolith, consisting of separating the required materials from lunar rock with fluorine. The fluorine is brought to the Moon in the form of potassium fluoride, and is liberated from the salt by electrolysis in a eutectic salt melt. Tetrafluorosilane produced by this process is reduced to silicon by a plasma reduction stage; the fluorine salts are reduced to metals by reaction with metallic potassium. Fluorine is recovered from residual MgF and CaF2 by reaction with K2O.

  18. Algorithm refinement for fluctuating hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Sarah A.; Bell, John B.; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2007-07-03

    This paper introduces an adaptive mesh and algorithmrefinement method for fluctuating hydrodynamics. This particle-continuumhybrid simulates the dynamics of a compressible fluid with thermalfluctuations. The particle algorithm is direct simulation Monte Carlo(DSMC), a molecular-level scheme based on the Boltzmann equation. Thecontinuum algorithm is based on the Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes (LLNS)equations, which incorporate thermal fluctuations into macroscopichydrodynamics by using stochastic fluxes. It uses a recently-developedsolver for LLNS, based on third-order Runge-Kutta. We present numericaltests of systems in and out of equilibrium, including time-dependentsystems, and demonstrate dynamic adaptive refinement by the computationof a moving shock wave. Mean system behavior and second moment statisticsof our simulations match theoretical values and benchmarks well. We findthat particular attention should be paid to the spectrum of the flux atthe interface between the particle and continuum methods, specificallyfor the non-hydrodynamic (kinetic) time scales.

  19. Adaptive mesh refinement in titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Colella, Phillip; Wen, Tong

    2005-01-21

    In this paper, we evaluate Titanium's usability as a high-level parallel programming language through a case study, where we implement a subset of Chombo's functionality in Titanium. Chombo is a software package applying the Adaptive Mesh Refinement methodology to numerical Partial Differential Equations at the production level. In Chombo, the library approach is used to parallel programming (C++ and Fortran, with MPI), whereas Titanium is a Java dialect designed for high-performance scientific computing. The performance of our implementation is studied and compared with that of Chombo in solving Poisson's equation based on two grid configurations from a real application. Also provided are the counts of lines of code from both sides.

  20. Weldability of thermally grain-refined Fe-12Ni-0. 25Ti for cryogenic structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.E.

    1980-02-01

    The weldability of a research alloy designed for structural use in liquid helium temperature, cryogenic environments was investigated. Plates of iron-12 weight percent nickel-0.25 weight percent titanium were grain refined by the four-step, grain refining thermal treatment developed for this alloy and welded with Inconel Number 92 weld wire using the Gas Metal Arc (GMA) welding process with argon-15% helium gas shielding. Both a single pass and a double-sided, 2 pass electron beam (EB) weld were also made without filler metal addition. Weldments were radiographed and sectioned and the charpy V-notch specimens removed were tested at liquid nitrogen and helium temperatures.

  1. Iron and iron derived radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Silicon refinement by chemical vapor transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, J.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon refinement by chemical vapor transport is discussed. The operating characteristics of the purification process, including factors affecting the rate, purification efficiency and photovoltaic quality of the refined silicon were studied. The casting of large alloy plates was accomplished. A larger research scale reactor is characterized, and it is shown that a refined silicon product yields solar cells with near state of the art conversion efficiencies.

  3. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, R.P.; Edwards, G.R.; David, S.A.

    1996-08-01

    Iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure when gas-tungsten arc welded. This microstructure is susceptible to hydrogen cracking when water vapor is present in the welding environment. Because fusion zone microstructural refinement can reduce the hydrogen cracking susceptibility, titanium was used to inoculate the weld pool in iron aluminide alloy FA-129. Although the fusion zone microstructure was significantly refined by this method, the fracture stress was found to decrease with titanium additions. This decrease is attributed to an increase in inclusions at the grain boundaries.

  4. Refining the shallow slip deficit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaohua; Tong, Xiaopeng; Sandwell, David T.; Milliner, Christopher W. D.; Dolan, James F.; Hollingsworth, James; Leprince, Sebastien; Ayoub, Francois

    2016-03-01

    Geodetic slip inversions for three major (Mw > 7) strike-slip earthquakes (1992 Landers, 1999 Hector Mine and 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah) show a 15-60 per cent reduction in slip near the surface (depth < 2 km) relative to the slip at deeper depths (4-6 km). This significant difference between surface coseismic slip and slip at depth has been termed the shallow slip deficit (SSD). The large magnitude of this deficit has been an enigma since it cannot be explained by shallow creep during the interseismic period or by triggered slip from nearby earthquakes. One potential explanation for the SSD is that the previous geodetic inversions lack data coverage close to surface rupture such that the shallow portions of the slip models are poorly resolved and generally underestimated. In this study, we improve the static coseismic slip inversion for these three earthquakes, especially at shallow depths, by: (1) including data capturing the near-fault deformation from optical imagery and SAR azimuth offsets; (2) refining the interferometric synthetic aperture radar processing with non-boxcar phase filtering, model-dependent range corrections, more complete phase unwrapping by SNAPHU (Statistical Non-linear Approach for Phase Unwrapping) assuming a maximum discontinuity and an on-fault correlation mask; (3) using more detailed, geologically constrained fault geometries and (4) incorporating additional campaign global positioning system (GPS) data. The refined slip models result in much smaller SSDs of 3-19 per cent. We suspect that the remaining minor SSD for these earthquakes likely reflects a combination of our elastic model's inability to fully account for near-surface deformation, which will render our estimates of shallow slip minima, and potentially small amounts of interseismic fault creep or triggered slip, which could `make up' a small percentages of the coseismic SSD during the interseismic period. Our results indicate that it is imperative that slip inversions include

  5. Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Microelectronic Device Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom; Lou, John; Norton, Charles

    1999-01-01

    Finite element and finite volume methods are used in a variety of design simulations when it is necessary to compute fields throughout regions that contain varying materials or geometry. Convergence of the simulation can be assessed by uniformly increasing the mesh density until an observable quantity stabilizes. Depending on the electrical size of the problem, uniform refinement of the mesh may be computationally infeasible due to memory limitations. Similarly, depending on the geometric complexity of the object being modeled, uniform refinement can be inefficient since regions that do not need refinement add to the computational expense. In either case, convergence to the correct (measured) solution is not guaranteed. Adaptive mesh refinement methods attempt to selectively refine the region of the mesh that is estimated to contain proportionally higher solution errors. The refinement may be obtained by decreasing the element size (h-refinement), by increasing the order of the element (p-refinement) or by a combination of the two (h-p refinement). A successful adaptive strategy refines the mesh to produce an accurate solution measured against the correct fields without undue computational expense. This is accomplished by the use of a) reliable a posteriori error estimates, b) hierarchal elements, and c) automatic adaptive mesh generation. Adaptive methods are also useful when problems with multi-scale field variations are encountered. These occur in active electronic devices that have thin doped layers and also when mixed physics is used in the calculation. The mesh needs to be fine at and near the thin layer to capture rapid field or charge variations, but can coarsen away from these layers where field variations smoothen and charge densities are uniform. This poster will present an adaptive mesh refinement package that runs on parallel computers and is applied to specific microelectronic device simulations. Passive sensors that operate in the infrared portion of

  6. Automated knowledge-base refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, Raymond J.

    1994-01-01

    Over the last several years, we have developed several systems for automatically refining incomplete and incorrect knowledge bases. These systems are given an imperfect rule base and a set of training examples and minimally modify the knowledge base to make it consistent with the examples. One of our most recent systems, FORTE, revises first-order Horn-clause knowledge bases. This system can be viewed as automatically debugging Prolog programs based on examples of correct and incorrect I/O pairs. In fact, we have already used the system to debug simple Prolog programs written by students in a programming language course. FORTE has also been used to automatically induce and revise qualitative models of several continuous dynamic devices from qualitative behavior traces. For example, it has been used to induce and revise a qualitative model of a portion of the Reaction Control System (RCS) of the NASA Space Shuttle. By fitting a correct model of this portion of the RCS to simulated qualitative data from a faulty system, FORTE was also able to correctly diagnose simple faults in this system.

  7. Anomalies in the refinement of isoleucine

    SciTech Connect

    Berntsen, Karen R. M.; Vriend, Gert

    2014-04-01

    The side-chain torsion angles of isoleucines in X-ray protein structures are a function of resolution, secondary structure and refinement software. Detailing the standard torsion angles used in refinement software can improve protein structure refinement. A study of isoleucines in protein structures solved using X-ray crystallography revealed a series of systematic trends for the two side-chain torsion angles χ{sub 1} and χ{sub 2} dependent on the resolution, secondary structure and refinement software used. The average torsion angles for the nine rotamers were similar in high-resolution structures solved using either the REFMAC, CNS or PHENIX software. However, at low resolution these programs often refine towards somewhat different χ{sub 1} and χ{sub 2} values. Small systematic differences can be observed between refinement software that uses molecular dynamics-type energy terms (for example CNS) and software that does not use these terms (for example REFMAC). Detailing the standard torsion angles used in refinement software can improve the refinement of protein structures. The target values in the molecular dynamics-type energy functions can also be improved.

  8. Pneumatic conveying of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Lennon, Dennis R.

    1984-11-06

    A method for pneumatically conveying solvent refined coal to a burner under conditions of dilute phase pneumatic flow so as to prevent saltation of the solvent refined coal in the transport line by maintaining the transport fluid velocity above approximately 95 ft/sec.

  9. Anomalies in the refinement of isoleucine

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, Karen R. M.; Vriend, Gert

    2014-01-01

    A study of isoleucines in protein structures solved using X-ray crystallography revealed a series of systematic trends for the two side-chain torsion angles χ1 and χ2 dependent on the resolution, secondary structure and refinement software used. The average torsion angles for the nine rotamers were similar in high-resolution structures solved using either the REFMAC, CNS or PHENIX software. However, at low resolution these programs often refine towards somewhat different χ1 and χ2 values. Small systematic differences can be observed between refinement software that uses molecular dynamics-type energy terms (for example CNS) and software that does not use these terms (for example REFMAC). Detailing the standard torsion angles used in refinement software can improve the refinement of protein structures. The target values in the molecular dynamics-type energy functions can also be improved. PMID:24699648

  10. North Dakota Refining Capacity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Hill; Kurt Swenson; Carl Tuura; Jim Simon; Robert Vermette; Gilberto Marcha; Steve Kelly; David Wells; Ed Palmer; Kuo Yu; Tram Nguyen; Juliam Migliavacca

    2011-01-05

    According to a 2008 report issued by the United States Geological Survey, North Dakota and Montana have an estimated 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil in an area known as the Bakken Formation. With the size and remoteness of the discovery, the question became 'can a business case be made for increasing refining capacity in North Dakota?' And, if so what is the impact to existing players in the region. To answer the question, a study committee comprised of leaders in the region's petroleum industry were brought together to define the scope of the study, hire a consulting firm and oversee the study. The study committee met frequently to provide input on the findings and modify the course of the study, as needed. The study concluded that the Petroleum Area Defense District II (PADD II) has an oversupply of gasoline. With that in mind, a niche market, naphtha, was identified. Naphtha is used as a diluent used for pipelining the bitumen (heavy crude) from Canada to crude markets. The study predicted there will continue to be an increase in the demand for naphtha through 2030. The study estimated the optimal configuration for the refinery at 34,000 barrels per day (BPD) producing 15,000 BPD of naphtha and a 52 percent refinery charge for jet and diesel yield. The financial modeling assumed the sponsor of a refinery would invest its own capital to pay for construction costs. With this assumption, the internal rate of return is 9.2 percent which is not sufficient to attract traditional investment given the risk factor of the project. With that in mind, those interested in pursuing this niche market will need to identify incentives to improve the rate of return.

  11. Refinement of boards' role required.

    PubMed

    Umbdenstock, R J

    1987-01-01

    The governing board's role in health care is not changing, but new competitive forces necessitate a refinement of the board's approach to fulfilling its role. In a free-standing, community, not-for-profit hospital, the board functions as though it were the "owner." Although it does not truly own the facility in the legal sense, the board does have legal, fiduciary, and financial responsibilities conferred on it by the state. In a religious-sponsored facility, the board fulfills these same obligations on behalf of the sponsoring institute, subject to the institute's reserved powers. In multi-institutional systems, the hospital board's power and authority depend on the role granted it by the system. Boards in all types of facilities are currently faced with the following challenges: Fulfilling their basic responsibilities, such as legal requirements, financial duties, and obligations for the quality of care. Encouraging management and the board itself to "think strategically" in attacking new competitive market forces while protecting the organization's traditional mission and values. Assessing recommended strategies in light of consequences if constituencies think the organization is abandoning its commitments. Boards can take several steps to match their mode of operation with the challenges of the new environment. Boards must rededicate themselves to the hospital's mission. Trustees must expand their understanding of health care trends and issues and their effect on the organization. Boards must evaluate and help strengthen management's performance, rather than acting as a "watchdog" in an adversarial position. Boards must think strategically, rather than focusing solely on operational details. Boards must evaluate the methods they use for conducting business. PMID:10280356

  12. Ferrous iron content of intravenous iron formulations.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ajay; Pratt, Raymond D; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2016-06-01

    The observed biological differences in safety and efficacy of intravenous (IV) iron formulations are attributable to physicochemical differences. In addition to differences in carbohydrate shell, polarographic signatures due to ferric iron [Fe(III)] and ferrous iron [Fe(II)] differ among IV iron formulations. Intravenous iron contains Fe(II) and releases labile iron in the circulation. Fe(II) generates toxic free radicals and reactive oxygen species and binds to bacterial siderophores and other in vivo sequestering agents. To evaluate whether differences in Fe(II) content may account for some observed biological differences between IV iron formulations, samples from multiple lots of various IV iron formulations were dissolved in 12 M concentrated HCl to dissociate and release all iron and then diluted with water to achieve 0.1 M HCl concentration. Fe(II) was then directly measured using ferrozine reagent and ultraviolet spectroscopy at 562 nm. Total iron content was measured by adding an excess of ascorbic acid to reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II), and Fe(II) was then measured by ferrozine assay. The Fe(II) concentration as a proportion of total iron content [Fe(III) + Fe(II)] in different lots of IV iron formulations was as follows: iron gluconate, 1.4 and 1.8 %; ferumoxytol, 0.26 %; ferric carboxymaltose, 1.4 %; iron dextran, 0.8 %; and iron sucrose, 10.2, 15.5, and 11.0 % (average, 12.2 %). The average Fe(II) content in iron sucrose was, therefore, ≥7.5-fold higher than in the other IV iron formulations. Further studies are needed to investigate the relationship between Fe(II) content and increased risk of oxidative stress and infections with iron sucrose. PMID:26956439

  13. Hepatic iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gregory J; Frazer, David M

    2005-11-01

    The liver performs three main functions in iron homeostasis. It is the major site of iron storage, it regulates iron traffic into and around the body through its production of the peptide hepcidin, and it is the site of synthesis of major proteins of iron metabolism such as transferrin and ceruloplasmin. Most of the iron that enters the liver is derived from plasma transferrin under normal circumstances, and transferrin receptors 1 and 2 play important roles in this process. In pathological situations, non-transferrin-bound iron, ferritin, and hemoglobin/haptoglobin and heme/hemopexin complexes assume greater importance in iron delivery to the organ. Iron is stored in the liver as ferritin and, with heavy iron loading, as hemosiderin. The liver can divest itself of iron through the plasma membrane iron exporter ferroportin 1, a process that also requires ceruloplasmin. Hepcidin can regulate this iron release through its interaction with ferroportin. PMID:16315136

  14. Iron Sucrose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Iron sucrose injection is used treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due to too little iron) in people with chronic kidney disease (damage to the kidneys which may worsen over ...

  15. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Lennon, Dennis R.; Snedden, Richard B.; Foster, Edward P.; Bellas, George T.

    1990-05-15

    A burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired successfully without any performance limitations and without the coking of the solvent refined coal on the burner components. The burner is provided with a tangential inlet of primary air and pulverized fuel, a vaned diffusion swirler for the mixture of primary air and fuel, a center water-cooled conical diffuser shielding the incoming fuel from the heat radiation from the flame and deflecting the primary air and fuel steam into the secondary air, and a watercooled annulus located between the primary air and secondary air flows.

  16. Strategies for hp-adaptive Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, William F.

    2008-09-01

    In the hp-adaptive version of the finite element method for solving partial differential equations, the grid is adaptively refined in both h, the size of the elements, and p, the degree of the piecewise polynomial approximation over the element. The selection of which elements to refine is determined by a local a posteriori error indicator, and is well established. But the determination of whether the element should be refined by h or p is still open. In this paper, we describe several strategies that have been proposed for making this determination. A numerical example to illustrate the effectiveness of these strategies will be presented.

  17. Refining of metallurgical-grade silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietl, J.

    1986-01-01

    A basic requirement of large scale solar cell fabrication is to provide low cost base material. Unconventional refining of metallurical grade silicon represents one of the most promising ways of silicon meltstock processing. The refining concept is based on an optimized combination of metallurgical treatments. Commercially available crude silicon, in this sequence, requires a first pyrometallurgical step by slagging, or, alternatively, solvent extraction by aluminum. After grinding and leaching, high purity qualtiy is gained as an advanced stage of refinement. To reach solar grade quality a final pyrometallurgical step is needed: liquid-gas extraction.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  19. Phosphorus localisation and quantification in archaeological iron artefacts by micro-PIXE analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Delphine; Dillmann, Philippe

    2001-07-01

    Several recent studies showed that ores containing important amount of phosphorus were used in ancient Europe to obtain iron by two different processes called the direct one and the indirect one. Phosphorus content was quantified by micro-PIXE in several archaeological and reconstituted iron samples. A heterogeneous phosphorus distribution in the sample was observed. Phosphorus repartition ratios between entrapped slag inclusion and metallic matrix were calculated. The results confirm the fact that refining of phosphorus pig iron was possible with ancient refining processes. Moreover it seems that the phosphorus distribution ratio could be a discriminating factor to identify the ironmaking process.

  20. Refined Phenotyping of Modic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Määttä, Juhani H.; Karppinen, Jaro; Paananen, Markus; Bow, Cora; Luk, Keith D.K.; Cheung, Kenneth M.C.; Samartzis, Dino

    2016-01-01

    . The strength of the associations increased with the number of MC. This large-scale study is the first to definitively note MC types and specific morphologies to be independently associated with prolonged severe LBP and back-related disability. This proposed refined MC phenotype may have direct implications in clinical decision-making as to the development and management of LBP. Understanding of these imaging biomarkers can lead to new preventative and personalized therapeutics related to LBP. PMID:27258491

  1. U.S. Refining Capacity Utilization

    EIA Publications

    1995-01-01

    This article briefly reviews recent trends in domestic refining capacity utilization and examines in detail the differences in reported crude oil distillation capacities and utilization rates among different classes of refineries.

  2. 1991 worldwide refining and gas processing directory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book ia an authority for immediate information on the industry. You can use it to find new business, analyze market trends, and to stay in touch with existing contacts while making new ones. The possibilities for business applications are numerous. Arranged by country, all listings in the directory include address, phone, fax and telex numbers, a description of the company's activities, names of key personnel and their titles, corporate headquarters, branch offices and plant sites. This newly revised edition lists more than 2000 companies and nearly 3000 branch offices and plant locations. This east-to-use reference also includes several of the most vital and informative surveys of the industry, including the U.S. Refining Survey, the Worldwide Construction Survey in Refining, Sulfur, Gas Processing and Related Fuels, the Worldwide Refining and Gas Processing Survey, the Worldwide Catalyst Report, and the U.S. and Canadian Lube and Wax Capacities Report from the National Petroleum Refiner's Association.

  3. Orthogonal polynomials for refinable linear functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurie, Dirk; de Villiers, Johan

    2006-12-01

    A refinable linear functional is one that can be expressed as a convex combination and defined by a finite number of mask coefficients of certain stretched and shifted replicas of itself. The notion generalizes an integral weighted by a refinable function. The key to calculating a Gaussian quadrature formula for such a functional is to find the three-term recursion coefficients for the polynomials orthogonal with respect to that functional. We show how to obtain the recursion coefficients by using only the mask coefficients, and without the aid of modified moments. Our result implies the existence of the corresponding refinable functional whenever the mask coefficients are nonnegative, even when the same mask does not define a refinable function. The algorithm requires O(n^2) rational operations and, thus, can in principle deliver exact results. Numerical evidence suggests that it is also effective in floating-point arithmetic.

  4. Refiners to the front: Unsung heroes revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-29

    Crude-oil purchasing and finished-product selling can be linked to a constant volley, with two potentially deadly pricing games going on simultaneously. Nothing new to refiners, who are often viewed by those upstream and downstream of them as a necessary evil mid-point between the wellhead and the retail pump. Recent comparative stability in the margins refiners achieve on a barrel of crude oil, however, confers good things to producers and product marketers. This issue editorializes against taking refiners for granted. This issue also presents the following: (a) ED refining netback data series for the US Gulf and West Coasts Rotterdam, and Singapore as of September 22, 1989; and (b) ED fuel price/tax series for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere, September 1989 edition. 6 fig., 5 tabs.

  5. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  6. Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.; Eder, D.; Masters, N.; Fisher, A.; Anderson, R.; Gunney, B.; Wang, P.; Benson, D.; Dixit, P.

    2009-09-29

    This is a simulation code involving an ALE (arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) hydrocode with AMR (adaptive mesh refinement) and pluggable physics packages for material strength, heat conduction, radiation diffusion, and laser ray tracing developed a LLNL, UCSD, and Berkeley Lab. The code is an extension of the open source SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Interface) code/library. The code can be used in laser facilities such as the National Ignition Facility. The code is alsi being applied to slurry flow (landslides).

  7. Slagmelt ladle refining technology feasibility. Volume 1. Final report, November 1991-May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    The objective of the program was to study the feasibility of a natural gas-based SLAGMELT (trademark) technology for ladle treatment of steel produced in primary melters to refine molten metal, and to bring it to desired casting temperature. In the Slagmelt process synthetic top slag set in motion by impinging jets of natural gas/oxygen combustion products provides adequate heat transfer to molten steel, protection against rapid oxidation, and refining action. It was anticipated that the substitute of electric energy used in conventional ladle furnaces by natural gas would reduce capital and operating costs of refining. Laboratory experiments were conducted using a single unit steel scrap melter, liquid steel overheater/refiner of 800 lbs metal/slag capacity with 350 kW (1.2 MBtu/hr) combustion power. It has been shown that molten bath can be heated up to 1650 C at 2 to 5 F/min rate with about 30% thermal efficiency. Significant refining characterized by reduction of carbon and sulfur content has been observed. These positive features were accompanied by a substantial (about 10%) and undesirable oxidation of iron. Economic estimates indicate that with the oxidation problem resolved, the gas-fired ladle should have operating costs similar to those of the electric ladle, with capital cost substantially lower. This is volume 1 of 3.

  8. Structure refinement from precession electron diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Jacob, Damien; Cuvillier, Priscille; Klementová, Mariana; Sinkler, Wharton; Marks, Laurence D

    2013-03-01

    Electron diffraction is a unique tool for analysing the crystal structures of very small crystals. In particular, precession electron diffraction has been shown to be a useful method for ab initio structure solution. In this work it is demonstrated that precession electron diffraction data can also be successfully used for structure refinement, if the dynamical theory of diffraction is used for the calculation of diffracted intensities. The method is demonstrated on data from three materials - silicon, orthopyroxene (Mg,Fe)(2)Si(2)O(6) and gallium-indium tin oxide (Ga,In)(4)Sn(2)O(10). In particular, it is shown that atomic occupancies of mixed crystallographic sites can be refined to an accuracy approaching X-ray or neutron diffraction methods. In comparison with conventional electron diffraction data, the refinement against precession diffraction data yields significantly lower figures of merit, higher accuracy of refined parameters, much broader radii of convergence, especially for the thickness and orientation of the sample, and significantly reduced correlations between the structure parameters. The full dynamical refinement is compared with refinement using kinematical and two-beam approximations, and is shown to be superior to the latter two. PMID:23403968

  9. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked. PMID:26935626

  10. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  11. After more than a century, iron sponge still soaks up hydrogen sulfide problems

    SciTech Connect

    Anerousis, J.P. )

    1994-09-01

    The oldest and simplest method for removing H[sub 2]S and other sulfur compounds, such as mercaptans, from gaseous streams is the iron sponge process. The basic technique consists of passing a sour gas stream (one containing H[sub 2]S or mercaptans, or both) across a bed of hydrated iron oxide. The chemical reaction produces iron sulfide and a small amount of by-product water. Although not a common practice, the spent material may be regenerated by exposing it to oxygen, which converts the mixed iron sulfides to their original iron oxide form. The iron sponge technique originated in Europe more than 100 years ago, and the earliest operators used a naturally occurring form of hydrated iron oxide known as bog iron or bog ore. As refinements were made in the process, it was found that more efficient sulfur removal could be attained by uniformly distributing the iron oxide hydrate across a substrate, and that active iron oxide could be prepared synthetically. Continual improvements in the synthetic iron sponge's composition focused on such issues as the crystalline forms of the hydrated iron oxide, size distribution of the active iron oxide particulates, overall chemical composition, size and nature of the typical wood substrate, moisture content, and degree of buffering. Modern iron sponge products are prepared with careful attention to each of these issues. The synthetic materials are characterized by high quality and uniform composition, and their overall characteristics optimize performance in typical gas-sweetening applications.

  12. Mammalian iron transport.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gregory Jon; Vulpe, Christopher D

    2009-10-01

    Iron is essential for basic cellular processes but is toxic when present in excess. Consequently, iron transport into and out of cells is tightly regulated. Most iron is delivered to cells bound to plasma transferrin via a process that involves transferrin receptor 1, divalent metal-ion transporter 1 and several other proteins. Non-transferrin-bound iron can also be taken up efficiently by cells, although the mechanism is poorly understood. Cells can divest themselves of iron via the iron export protein ferroportin in conjunction with an iron oxidase. The linking of an oxidoreductase to a membrane permease is a common theme in membrane iron transport. At the systemic level, iron transport is regulated by the liver-derived peptide hepcidin which acts on ferroportin to control iron release to the plasma. PMID:19484405

  13. Pathways of iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Marcel E; Umbreit, Jay N

    2002-01-01

    Iron is vital for all living organisms but excess iron can be lethal because it facilitates free radical formation. Thus iron absorption is carefully regulated to maintain an equilibrium between absorption and body loss of iron. In countries where meat is a significant part of the diet, most body iron is derived from dietary heme because heme binds few of the dietary chelators that bind inorganic iron. Uptake of heme into enterocytes occurs as a metalloporphyrin in an endosomal process. Intracellular iron is released from heme by heme oxygenase to enter plasma as inorganic iron. Ferric iron is absorbed via a beta(3) integrin and mobilferrin pathway (IMP) which is unshared with other nutritional metals. Ferrous iron uptake is facilitated by a DMT-1 pathway which is shared with manganese. In the iron deficient gut, large quantities of both mobilferrin and DMT-1 are found in goblet cells and intraluminal mucins suggesting that they are secreted with mucin into the intestinal lumen to bind iron to facilitate uptake by the cells. In the cytoplasm, IMP and DMT associate in a large protein complex called paraferritin which serves as a ferrireductase. Paraferritin solublizes iron binding proteins and reduces iron to make iron available for production of iron containing proteins such as heme. Iron uptake by intestinal absorptive cells is regulated by the iron concentration within the cell. Except in hemochromatosis it remains in equilibrium with total body stores via transferrin receptors on the basolateral membrane of absorptive cells. Increased intracellular iron either up-regulates or satiates iron binding proteins on regulatory proteins to alter their location in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:12547224

  14. Parallel tetrahedral mesh refinement with MOAB.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2008-12-01

    In this report, we present the novel functionality of parallel tetrahedral mesh refinement which we have implemented in MOAB. This report details work done to implement parallel, edge-based, tetrahedral refinement into MOAB. The theoretical basis for this work is contained in [PT04, PT05, TP06] while information on design, performance, and operation specific to MOAB are contained herein. As MOAB is intended mainly for use in pre-processing and simulation (as opposed to the post-processing bent of previous papers), the primary use case is different: rather than refining elements with non-linear basis functions, the goal is to increase the number of degrees of freedom in some region in order to more accurately represent the solution to some system of equations that cannot be solved analytically. Also, MOAB has a unique mesh representation which impacts the algorithm. This introduction contains a brief review of streaming edge-based tetrahedral refinement. The remainder of the report is broken into three sections: design and implementation, performance, and conclusions. Appendix A contains instructions for end users (simulation authors) on how to employ the refiner.

  15. Software for Refining or Coarsening Computational Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daines, Russell; Woods, Jody

    2002-01-01

    A computer program performs calculations for refinement or coarsening of computational grids of the type called "structured" (signifying that they are geometrically regular and/or are specified by relatively simple algebraic expressions). This program is designed to facilitate analysis of the numerical effects of changing structured grids utilized in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Unlike prior grid-refinement and -coarsening programs, this program is not limited to doubling or halving: the user can specify any refinement or coarsening ratio, which can have a noninteger value. In addition to this ratio, the program accepts, as input, a grid file and the associated restart file, which is basically a file containing the most recent iteration of flow-field variables computed on the grid. The program then refines or coarsens the grid as specified, while maintaining the geometry and the stretching characteristics of the original grid. The program can interpolate from the input restart file to create a restart file for the refined or coarsened grid. The program provides a graphical user interface that facilitates the entry of input data for the grid-generation and restart-interpolation routines.

  16. Software for Refining or Coarsening Computational Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daines, Russell; Woods, Jody

    2003-01-01

    A computer program performs calculations for refinement or coarsening of computational grids of the type called structured (signifying that they are geometrically regular and/or are specified by relatively simple algebraic expressions). This program is designed to facilitate analysis of the numerical effects of changing structured grids utilized in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Unlike prior grid-refinement and -coarsening programs, this program is not limited to doubling or halving: the user can specify any refinement or coarsening ratio, which can have a noninteger value. In addition to this ratio, the program accepts, as input, a grid file and the associated restart file, which is basically a file containing the most recent iteration of flow-field variables computed on the grid. The program then refines or coarsens the grid as specified, while maintaining the geometry and the stretching characteristics of the original grid. The program can interpolate from the input restart file to create a restart file for the refined or coarsened grid. The program provides a graphical user interface that facilitates the entry of input data for the grid-generation and restart-interpolation routines.

  17. Number systems, α-splines and refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zube, Severinas

    2004-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the smooth refinable function on a plane relative with complex scaling factor . Characteristic functions of certain self-affine tiles related to a given scaling factor are the simplest examples of such refinable function. We study the smooth refinable functions obtained by a convolution power of such charactericstic functions. Dahlke, Dahmen, and Latour obtained some explicit estimates for the smoothness of the resulting convolution products. In the case α=1+i, we prove better results. We introduce α-splines in two variables which are the linear combination of shifted basic functions. We derive basic properties of α-splines and proceed with a detailed presentation of refinement methods. We illustrate the application of α-splines to subdivision with several examples. It turns out that α-splines produce well-known subdivision algorithms which are based on box splines: Doo-Sabin, Catmull-Clark, Loop, Midedge and some -subdivision schemes with good continuity. The main geometric ingredient in the definition of α-splines is the fundamental domain (a fractal set or a self-affine tile). The properties of the fractal obtained in number theory are important and necessary in order to determine two basic properties of α-splines: partition of unity and the refinement equation.

  18. Zeolites as catalysts in oil refining.

    PubMed

    Primo, Ana; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2014-11-21

    Oil is nowadays the main energy source and this prevalent position most probably will continue in the next decades. This situation is largely due to the degree of maturity that has been achieved in oil refining and petrochemistry as a consequence of the large effort in research and innovation. The remarkable efficiency of oil refining is largely based on the use of zeolites as catalysts. The use of zeolites as catalysts in refining and petrochemistry has been considered as one of the major accomplishments in the chemistry of the XXth century. In this tutorial review, the introductory part describes the main features of zeolites in connection with their use as solid acids. The main body of the review describes important refining processes in which zeolites are used including light naphtha isomerization, olefin alkylation, reforming, cracking and hydrocracking. The final section contains our view on future developments in the field such as the increase in the quality of the transportation fuels and the coprocessing of increasing percentage of biofuels together with oil streams. This review is intended to provide the rudiments of zeolite science applied to refining catalysis. PMID:24671148

  19. 40 CFR 80.1340 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Small Refiner... for small refiner status must be sent to: Attn: MSAT2 Benzene, Mail Stop 6406J, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20460. For commercial delivery: MSAT2...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1340 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Small Refiner... for small refiner status must be sent to: Attn: MSAT2 Benzene, Mail Stop 6406J, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20460. For commercial delivery: MSAT2...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1340 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How does a refiner obtain approval as... refiner status must be submitted to EPA by December 31, 2007. (b) For U.S. Postal delivery, applications...), for the period January 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005. (ii) The information submitted to EIA...

  2. Minimally refined biomass fuels: an economic shortcut

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, R.K.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1980-07-01

    An economic shortcut can be realized if the sugars from which ethanol is made are utilized directly as concentrated aqueous solutions for fuels rather than by further refining them through fermentation and distillation steps. Simple evaporation of carbohydrate solutions from sugar cane or sweet sorghum, or from hydrolysis of starch or cellulose content of many plants yield potential liquid fuels of energy contents (on a volume basis) comparable to highly refined liquid fuels like methanol and ethanol. The potential utilization of such minimally refined biomass derived fuels is discussed and the burning of sucrose-ethanol-water solutions in a small modified domestic burner is demonstrated. Other potential uses of sugar solutions or emulsion and microemulsions in fuel oils for use in diesel or turbine engines are proposed and discussed.

  3. Algorithm refinement for the stochastic Burgers' equation

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Foo, Jasmine; Garcia, Alejandro L. . E-mail: algarcia@algarcia.org

    2007-04-10

    In this paper, we develop an algorithm refinement (AR) scheme for an excluded random walk model whose mean field behavior is given by the viscous Burgers' equation. AR hybrids use the adaptive mesh refinement framework to model a system using a molecular algorithm where desired while allowing a computationally faster continuum representation to be used in the remainder of the domain. The focus in this paper is the role of fluctuations on the dynamics. In particular, we demonstrate that it is necessary to include a stochastic forcing term in Burgers' equation to accurately capture the correct behavior of the system. The conclusion we draw from this study is that the fidelity of multiscale methods that couple disparate algorithms depends on the consistent modeling of fluctuations in each algorithm and on a coupling, such as algorithm refinement, that preserves this consistency.

  4. Terahertz spectroscopy for quantifying refined oil mixtures.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-nan; Li, Jian; Zeng, Zhou-mo; Li, Jie; Tian, Zhen; Wang, Wei-kui

    2012-08-20

    In this paper, the absorption coefficient spectra of samples prepared as mixtures of gasoline and diesel in different proportions are obtained by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. To quantify the components of refined oil mixtures, a method is proposed to evaluate the best frequency band for regression analysis. With the data in this frequency band, dualistic linear regression fitting is used to determine the volume fraction of gasoline and diesel in the mixture based on the Beer-Lambert law. The minimum of regression fitting R-Square is 0.99967, and the mean error of fitted volume fraction of 97# gasoline is 4.3%. Results show that refined oil mixtures can be quantitatively analyzed through absorption coefficient spectra in terahertz frequency, which it has bright application prospects in the storage and transportation field for refined oil. PMID:22907017

  5. Quantum algebraic approach to refined topological vertex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awata, H.; Feigin, B.; Shiraishi, J.

    2012-03-01

    We establish the equivalence between the refined topological vertex of Iqbal-Kozcaz-Vafa and a certain representation theory of the quantum algebra of type W 1+∞ introduced by Miki. Our construction involves trivalent intertwining operators Φ and Φ* associated with triples of the bosonic Fock modules. Resembling the topological vertex, a triple of vectors ∈ {mathbb{Z}^2} is attached to each intertwining operator, which satisfy the Calabi-Yau and smoothness conditions. It is shown that certain matrix elements of Φ and Φ* give the refined topological vertex C λ μν ( t, q) of Iqbal-Kozcaz-Vafa. With another choice of basis, we recover the refined topological vertex C λ μ ν ( q, t) of Awata-Kanno. The gluing factors appears correctly when we consider any compositions of Φ and Φ*. The spectral parameters attached to Fock spaces play the role of the Kähler parameters.

  6. Refining Linear Fuzzy Rules by Reinforcement Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.; Khedkar, Pratap S.; Malkani, Anil

    1996-01-01

    Linear fuzzy rules are increasingly being used in the development of fuzzy logic systems. Radial basis functions have also been used in the antecedents of the rules for clustering in product space which can automatically generate a set of linear fuzzy rules from an input/output data set. Manual methods are usually used in refining these rules. This paper presents a method for refining the parameters of these rules using reinforcement learning which can be applied in domains where supervised input-output data is not available and reinforcements are received only after a long sequence of actions. This is shown for a generalization of radial basis functions. The formation of fuzzy rules from data and their automatic refinement is an important step in closing the gap between the application of reinforcement learning methods in the domains where only some limited input-output data is available.

  7. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2015-06-09

    A system and method for reactively refining hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20 degrees and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure, using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. A reaction portion of the system and method delivers lightweight, volatile hydrocarbons to an associated contacting unit which operates in mixed subcritical/supercritical or supercritical modes. Using thermal diffusion, multiphase contact, or a momentum generating pressure gradient, the contacting unit separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques.

  8. Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-09-29

    This is a simulation code involving an ALE (arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) hydrocode with AMR (adaptive mesh refinement) and pluggable physics packages for material strength, heat conduction, radiation diffusion, and laser ray tracing developed a LLNL, UCSD, and Berkeley Lab. The code is an extension of the open source SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Interface) code/library. The code can be used in laser facilities such as the National Ignition Facility. The code is alsi being appliedmore » to slurry flow (landslides).« less

  9. Image segmentation by background extraction refinements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Arturo A.; Mitchell, O. Robert

    1990-01-01

    An image segmentation method refining background extraction in two phases is presented. In the first phase, the method detects homogeneous-background blocks and estimates the local background to be extracted throughout the image. A block is classified homogeneous if its left and right standard deviations are small. The second phase of the method refines background extraction in nonhomogeneous blocks by recomputing the shoulder thresholds. Rules that predict the final background extraction are derived by observing the behavior of successive background statistical measurements in the regions under the presence of dark and/or bright object pixels. Good results are shown for a number of outdoor scenes.

  10. Diversity and Evolutionary History of Iron Metabolism Genes in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Groussman, Ryan D.; Parker, Micaela S.; Armbrust, E. Virginia

    2015-01-01

    refined view of iron use strategies in diatoms elucidates the history of these adaptations, and provides potential molecular markers for determining the iron nutritional status of different diatom species in environmental samples. PMID:26052941

  11. Removal of Boron from Silicon by Solvent Refining Using Ferrosilicon Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajavi, Leili Tafaghodi; Morita, Kazuki; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Barati, Mansoor

    2015-04-01

    The distribution of boron between purified solid silicon and iron-silicon melt was evaluated to investigate the possibility of boron removal from silicon by solvent refining with iron-silicon alloys. The distribution coefficient, defined as the ratio of the mole fraction of boron in solid to that of liquid, was found to be strongly dependent on boron concentration. Solvent refining at lower temperatures resulted in smaller distribution coefficient values. The boron removal percentages for the lowest boron concentration examined in this study were 70 pct [1583 K (1310 °C)], 65 pct [1533 K (1260 °C)], and 65 pct [1483 K (1210 °C)]. The values obtained for interaction parameter of boron on iron in solid silicon are as follows: -813 ± 53 [1583 K (1310 °C)], -830 ± 92 [1533 K (1260 °C)], -863 ± 91 [1483 K (1210 °C)]. Lower temperature resulted in smaller distribution coefficient and higher silicon yield.

  12. Iron and Diabetes Risk

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Judith A.; McClain, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    Iron overload is a risk factor for diabetes. The link between iron and diabetes was first recognized in pathologic conditions—hereditary hemochromatosis and thalassemia—but high levels of dietary iron also impart diabetes risk. Iron plays a direct and causal role in diabetes pathogenesis mediated both by β-cell failure and insulin resistance. Iron is also a factor in the regulation of metabolism in most tissues involved in fuel homeostasis, with the adipocyte in particular serving an iron-sensing role. The underlying molecular mechanisms mediating these effects are numerous and incompletely understood, but include oxidant stress and modulation of adipokines and intracellular signal transduction pathways. PMID:23473030

  13. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  14. 40 CFR 80.551 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner under this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a small refiner under this subpart? 80.551 Section 80.551 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine Diesel Fuel; and ECA Marine Fuel Small Refiner Hardship Provisions § 80.551 How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner under this subpart?...

  15. 40 CFR 80.551 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner under this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a small refiner under this subpart? 80.551 Section 80.551 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine Diesel Fuel; and ECA Marine Fuel Small Refiner Hardship Provisions § 80.551 How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner under this subpart?...

  16. Fluoride evaporation and crystallization behavior of CaF2-CaO-Al2O3-(TiO2) slag for electroslag remelting of Ti-containing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Cheng-bin; Cho, Jung-wook; Zheng, Ding-li; Li, Jing

    2016-06-01

    To elucidate the behavior of slag films in an electroslag remelting process, the fluoride evaporation and crystallization of CaF2-CaO-Al2O3-(TiO2) slags were studied using the single hot thermocouple technique. The crystallization mechanism of TiO2-bearing slag was identified based on kinetic analysis. The fluoride evaporation and incubation time of crystallization in TiO2-free slag are found to considerably decrease with decreasing isothermal temperature down to 1503 K. Fish-bone and flower-like CaO crystals precipitate in TiO2-free slag melt, which is accompanied by CaF2 evaporation from slag melt above 1503 K. Below 1503 K, only near-spherical CaF2 crystals form with an incubation time of less than 1 s, and the crystallization is completed within 1 s. The addition of 8.1wt% TiO2 largely prevents the fluoride evaporation from slag melt and promotes the slag crystallization. TiO2 addition leads to the precipitation of needle-like perovskite (CaTiO3) crystals instead of CaO crystals in the slag. The crystallization of perovskite (CaTiO3) occurs by bulk nucleation and diffusion-controlled one-dimensional growth.

  17. Robust Refinement as Implemented in TOPAS

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, K.; Stephens, P

    2010-01-01

    A robust refinement procedure is implemented in the program TOPAS through an iterative reweighting of the data. Examples are given of the procedure as applied to fitting partially overlapped peaks by full and partial models and also of the structures of ibuprofen and acetaminophen in the presence of unmodeled impurity contributions

  18. 27 CFR 21.127 - Shellac (refined).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Shellac (refined). 21.127 Section 21.127 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants §...

  19. 27 CFR 21.127 - Shellac (refined).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Shellac (refined). 21.127 Section 21.127 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants §...

  20. 27 CFR 21.127 - Shellac (refined).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Shellac (refined). 21.127 Section 21.127 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants §...

  1. Gravitational Collapse With Distributed Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebling, Steven; Lehner, Luis; Motl, Patrick; Neilsen, David; Rahman, Tanvir; Reula, Oscar

    2006-04-01

    Gravitational collapse is studied using distributed adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The AMR infrastructure includes a novel treatment of adaptive boundaries which allows for high orders of accuracy. Results of the collapse of Brill waves to black holes are presented. Combining both vertex centered and cell centered fields in the same evolution is discussed.

  2. Refiners respond to strategic driving forces

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, R.G.

    1996-05-01

    Better days should lie ahead for the international refining industry. While political unrest, lingering uncertainty regarding environmental policies, slowing world economic growth, over capacity and poor image will continue to plague the industry, margins in most areas appear to have bottomed out. Current margins, and even modestly improved margins, do not cover the cost of capital on certain equipment nor provide the returns necessary to achieve reinvestment economics. Refiners must determine how to improve the financial performance of their assets given this reality. Low margins and returns are generally characteristic of mature industries. Many of the business strategies employed by emerging businesses are no longer viable for refiners. The cost-cutting programs of the `90s have mainly been realized, leaving little to be gained from further reduction. Consequently, refiners will have to concentrate on increasing efficiency and delivering higher value products to survive. Rather than focusing solely on their competition, companies will emphasize substantial improvements in their own operations to achieve financial targets. This trend is clearly shown by the growing reliance on benchmarking services.

  3. Energy Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining Processes

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2006-10-01

    The petroleum refining energy bandwidth report analyzes the most energy-intensive unit operations used in U.S. refineries: crude oil distillation, fluid catalytic cracking, catalytic hydrotreating, catalytic reforming, and alkylation. The "bandwidth" provides a snapshot of the energy losses that can potentially be recovered through best practices and technology R&D.

  4. Laser furnace technology for zone refining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser experiment facility is constructed to investigate the problems in using a laser beam to zone refine semiconductor and metal crystals. The hardware includes a computer to control scan mirrors and stepper motors to provide a variety of melt zone patterns. The equipment and its operating procedures are described.

  5. Extended query refinement for medical image retrieval.

    PubMed

    Deserno, Thomas M; Güld, Mark O; Plodowski, Bartosz; Spitzer, Klaus; Wein, Berthold B; Schubert, Henning; Ney, Hermann; Seidl, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    The impact of image pattern recognition on accessing large databases of medical images has recently been explored, and content-based image retrieval (CBIR) in medical applications (IRMA) is researched. At the present, however, the impact of image retrieval on diagnosis is limited, and practical applications are scarce. One reason is the lack of suitable mechanisms for query refinement, in particular, the ability to (1) restore previous session states, (2) combine individual queries by Boolean operators, and (3) provide continuous-valued query refinement. This paper presents a powerful user interface for CBIR that provides all three mechanisms for extended query refinement. The various mechanisms of man-machine interaction during a retrieval session are grouped into four classes: (1) output modules, (2) parameter modules, (3) transaction modules, and (4) process modules, all of which are controlled by a detailed query logging. The query logging is linked to a relational database. Nested loops for interaction provide a maximum of flexibility within a minimum of complexity, as the entire data flow is still controlled within a single Web page. Our approach is implemented to support various modalities, orientations, and body regions using global features that model gray scale, texture, structure, and global shape characteristics. The resulting extended query refinement has a significant impact for medical CBIR applications. PMID:17497197

  6. Ocean iron cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Philip W.

    Interest in the biogeochemical cycle of iron has grown rapidly over the last two decades, due to the potential role of this element in modulating global climate in the geological past and ocean productivity in the present day. This trace metal has a disproportionately large effect (1 × 105 C:Fe) on photosynthetic carbon fixation by phytoplankton. In around one third of the open ocean, so-called high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions, the resident phytoplankton have low growth rates despite an abundance of plant nutrients. This is due to the low supply of iron. Iron is present in the ocean in three phases, dissolved, colloidal, and particulate (biogenic and lithogenic). However, iron chemistry is complex with interactions between chemistry and biology such as the production of iron-binding siderophores by oceanic bacteria. This results in the interplay of inorganic chemistry, photochemistry, and organic complexation. Sources of new iron include dust deposition, upwelling of iron-rich deep waters, and the resuspension and lateral transport of sediments. Sinks for iron are mainly biological as evidenced by the vertical nutrient-like profile for dissolved iron in the ocean. Iron is rapidly recycled by the upper ocean biota within a so-called "ferrous wheel." The fe ratio [(new iron)/(new + regenerated iron)] provides an index of the relative supply of iron to the biota by new versus recycled iron. Over the last 15 years, interest in the potential role of iron in shaping climate in the geological past resulted in some of the most ambitious experiments in oceanography: large-scale (i.e., 50-1000 km2) iron enrichment of HNLC waters. They have provided valuable insights into how iron supply influences the biogeochemical cycles of elements such as carbon, sulfur, silicon, nitrogen, and phosphate.

  7. Impurity segregation in zone-refined precursors for crystalline halide scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swider, S.; Lam, S.; Motakef, S.; Donohoe, E.; Coers, L.; Taylor, S.; Spencer, S.

    2015-06-01

    Successful growth of halide scintillator crystals depends on a supply of ultra-high purity (UHP) precursor materials. Metallic interstitials and substitutions may provide traps that quench luminescence. Oxygen impurities can create competing compounds within a matrix, such as oxyhalides, that disrupt crystallinity and nucleate cracks. Using mass spectroscopy and oxygen combustion analysis, we analyzed impurities in SrI2, EuI2, and YCl3 precursors before and after zone refining. The data show most alkali and alkali earth impurities segregated easily. However, with the exception of iron, many transition metals were incorporated into the solid. Reliable oxygen measurements proved difficult to achieve. Additional oxygen was measured in nitrates and sulfates, via ion chromatography. Zone refining reduced the overall impurity content, but levels remained above a 10 ppm target.

  8. Iron losses in sweat

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, M.; Magnusson, B.; Persson, H.; Hallberg, L.

    1986-03-01

    The losses of iron in whole body cell-free sweat were determined in eleven healthy men. A new experimental design was used with a very careful cleaning procedure of the skin and repeated consecutive sampling periods of sweat in a sauna. The purpose was to achieve a steady state of sweat iron losses with minimal influence from iron originating from desquamated cells and iron contaminating the skin. A steady state was reached in the third sauna period (second sweat sampling period). Iron loss was directly related to the volume of sweat lost and amounted to 22.5 micrograms iron/l sweat. The findings indicate that iron is a physiological constituent of sweat and derived not only from contamination. Present results imply that variations in the amount of sweat lost will have only a marginal effect on the variation in total body iron losses.

  9. Iron Sucrose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... stop working). Iron sucrose injection is in a class of medications called iron replacement products. It works ... hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs; loss of consciousness; or seizures. If you experience a severe reaction, ...

  10. Serum iron test

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM. Disorders of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and overload. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  11. Total iron binding capacity

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM. Disorders of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and overload. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  12. Iron and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... 24 months old. Serve iron-rich foods alongside foods containing vitamin C — such as tomatoes, broccoli, oranges, and strawberries — which improves the body's absorption of iron. Avoid serving coffee ...

  13. Iron supplements (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  14. Iron in diet

    MedlinePlus

    Diet - iron; Ferric acid; Ferrous acid; Ferritin ... The human body needs iron to make the oxygen-carrying proteins hemoglobin and myoglobin. Hemoglobin is found in red blood cells and myoglobin is found ...

  15. Lance for fuel and oxygen injection into smelting or refining furnace

    DOEpatents

    Schlichting, Mark R.

    1994-01-01

    A furnace 10 for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron 20 is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance 40, through which a center stream of particulate coal 53 is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer 30. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon 51 enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen 52 is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream 51. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus 84 to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer 30, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace.

  16. Lance for fuel and oxygen injection into smelting or refining furnace

    DOEpatents

    Schlichting, M.R.

    1994-12-20

    A furnace for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance, through which a center stream of particulate coal is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace. 7 figures.

  17. GalaxyRefineComplex: Refinement of protein-protein complex model structures driven by interface repacking

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Lim; Lee, Hasup; Seok, Chaok

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein docking methods have been widely used to gain an atomic-level understanding of protein interactions. However, docking methods that employ low-resolution energy functions are popular because of computational efficiency. Low-resolution docking tends to generate protein complex structures that are not fully optimized. GalaxyRefineComplex takes such low-resolution docking structures and refines them to improve model accuracy in terms of both interface contact and inter-protein orientation. This refinement method allows flexibility at the protein interface and in the overall docking structure to capture conformational changes that occur upon binding. Symmetric refinement is also provided for symmetric homo-complexes. This method was validated by refining models produced by available docking programs, including ZDOCK and M-ZDOCK, and was successfully applied to CAPRI targets in a blind fashion. An example of using the refinement method with an existing docking method for ligand binding mode prediction of a drug target is also presented. A web server that implements the method is freely available at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/refinecomplex. PMID:27535582

  18. GalaxyRefineComplex: Refinement of protein-protein complex model structures driven by interface repacking.

    PubMed

    Heo, Lim; Lee, Hasup; Seok, Chaok

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein docking methods have been widely used to gain an atomic-level understanding of protein interactions. However, docking methods that employ low-resolution energy functions are popular because of computational efficiency. Low-resolution docking tends to generate protein complex structures that are not fully optimized. GalaxyRefineComplex takes such low-resolution docking structures and refines them to improve model accuracy in terms of both interface contact and inter-protein orientation. This refinement method allows flexibility at the protein interface and in the overall docking structure to capture conformational changes that occur upon binding. Symmetric refinement is also provided for symmetric homo-complexes. This method was validated by refining models produced by available docking programs, including ZDOCK and M-ZDOCK, and was successfully applied to CAPRI targets in a blind fashion. An example of using the refinement method with an existing docking method for ligand binding mode prediction of a drug target is also presented. A web server that implements the method is freely available at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/refinecomplex. PMID:27535582

  19. Microstructural evolution and intermetallic formation in Al-8wt% Si-0.8wt% Fe alloy due to grain refiner and modifier additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Amir; Ranjbar, Khalil; Sami, Sattar

    2012-08-01

    An alloy of Al-8wt% Si-0.8wt% Fe was cast in a metallic die, and its microstructural changes due to Ti-B refiner and Sr modifier additions were studied. Apart from usual refinement and modification of the microstructure, some mutual influences of the additives took place, and no mutual poisoning effects by these additives, in combined form, were observed. It was noticed that the dimensions of the iron-rich intermetallics were influenced by the additives causing them to become larger. The needle-shaped intermetallics that were obtained from refiner addition became thicker and longer when adding the modifier. It was also found that α-Al and eutectic silicon phases preferentially nucleate on different types of intermetallic compounds. The more iron content of the intermetallic compounds and the more changes in their dimensions occurred. Formation of the shrinkage porosities was also observed.

  20. Iron, radiation, and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, R G; Kalkwarf, D R

    1990-01-01

    Increased iron content of cells and tissue may increase the risk of cancer. In particular, high available iron status may increase the risk of a radiation-induced cancer. There are two possible mechanisms for this effect: iron can catalyze the production of oxygen radicals, and it may be a limiting nutrient to the growth and development of a transformed cell in vivo. Given the high available iron content of the western diet and the fact that the world is changing to the western model, it is important to determine if high iron increases the risk of cancer. PMID:2269234

  1. Iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be reviewed, followed by a discussion of diagnostic testing and therapeutic recommendations for dogs and cats with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:22942439

  2. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2014-11-25

    This is a method to reactively refine hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20.degree. and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. The reaction portion of the method delivers lighter weight, more volatile hydrocarbons to an attached contacting device that operates in mixed subcritical or supercritical modes. This separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques. This method produces valuable products with fewer processing steps, lower costs, increased worker safety due to less processing and handling, allow greater opportunity for new oil field development and subsequent positive economic impact, reduce related carbon dioxide, and wastes typical with conventional refineries.

  3. Dinosaurs can fly -- High performance refining

    SciTech Connect

    Treat, J.E.

    1995-09-01

    High performance refining requires that one develop a winning strategy based on a clear understanding of one`s position in one`s company`s value chain; one`s competitive position in the products markets one serves; and the most likely drivers and direction of future market forces. The author discussed all three points, then described measuring performance of the company. To become a true high performance refiner often involves redesigning the organization as well as the business processes. The author discusses such redesigning. The paper summarizes ten rules to follow to achieve high performance: listen to the market; optimize; organize around asset or area teams; trust the operators; stay flexible; source strategically; all maintenance is not equal; energy is not free; build project discipline; and measure and reward performance. The paper then discusses the constraints to the implementation of change.

  4. Research Burnout: a refined multidimensional scale.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra N; Dalal, Nikunj; Mishra, Sanjay

    2004-12-01

    In a prevailing academic climate where there are high expectations for faculty to publish and generate grants, the exploration of Research Burnout among higher education faculty has become increasingly important. Unfortunately, it is a topic that has not been well researched empirically. In 1997 Singh and Bush developed a unidimensional scale to measure Research Burnout. A closer inspection of the definition of this construct and the composition of its items suggests, however, that the construct may be multidimensional and analogous to Maslach's Psychological Burnout Scale. In this paper, we propose a refined, multidimensional Research Burnout scale and test its factorial validity using confirmatory factor analysis. The nomological validity of this refined scale is established by examining hypothesized relationships between Research Burnout and other constructs such as Intrinsic Motivation for doing research, Extrinsic Pressures to do research, and Knowledge Obsolescence. PMID:15762409

  5. Refining quadrilateral and brick element meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Schneiders, R.; Debye, J.

    1995-12-31

    We consider the problem of refining unstructured quadrilateral and brick element meshes. We present an algorithm which is a generalization of an algorithm developed by Cheng et. al. for structured quadrilateral element meshes. The problem is solved for the two-dimensional case. Concerning three dimensions we present a solution for some special cases and a general solution that introduces tetrahedral and pyramidal transition elements.

  6. Substance abuse in the refining industry

    SciTech Connect

    Little, A. Jr. ); Ross, J.K. ); Lavorerio, R. ); Richards, T.A. )

    1989-01-01

    In order to provide some background for the NPRA Annual Meeting Management Session panel discussion on Substance Abuse in the Refining and Petrochemical Industries, NPRA distributed a questionnaire to member companies requesting information regarding the status of their individual substance abuse policies. The questionnaire was designed to identify general trends in the industry. The aggregate responses to the survey are summarized in this paper, as background for the Substance Abuse panel discussions.

  7. Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-07-15

    SAMRAI is an object-oriented support library for structured adaptice mesh refinement (SAMR) simulation of computational science problems, modeled by systems of partial differential equations (PDEs). SAMRAI is developed and maintained in the Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) under ASCI ITS and PSE support. SAMRAI is used in a variety of application research efforts at LLNL and in academia. These applications are developed in collaboration with SAMRAI development team members.

  8. Iron toxicity in yeast.

    PubMed

    Wiśnicka, R; Krzepiłko, A; Wawryn, J; Biliński, T

    1997-01-01

    It has been found that yeast cells are sensitive to iron overload only when grown on glucose as a carbon source. Effective concentration of ferrous iron is much higher than that found in natural environments. Effects of ferrous iron are strictly oxygen dependent, what suggest that the formation of hydroxyl radicals in the Fenton reaction is a cause of the toxicity. Respiratory deficiency and pretreatment of cells with antimycin A prevent toxic effects in the late exponential phase of growth, whereas uncouplers and 2mM magnesium salts completely protect even the most vulnerable exponential cells. Generally, toxic effects correlate with the ability of cells to take up this metal. The results presented suggest that during ferrous iron overload iron is transported through the unspecific divalent cation uptake system which is known in fungi. The data suggest that recently described high and low affinity systems of iron uptake in yeast are the only source of iron in natural environments. PMID:9516981

  9. [Iron function and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Though iron is an essential micronutrient for humans, the excess state is acknowledged to be associated with oncogenesis. For example, iron overload in the liver of the patients with hereditary hemocromatosis highly increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, as to asbestos-related mesothelioma, such kinds of asbestos with a higher iron content are considered to be more carcinogenic. Iron is a useful element, which enables fundamental functions for life such as oxygen carrying and electron transport. However, in the situation where organisms are unable to have good control of it, iron turns into a dangerous element which catalyzes generation of reactive oxygen. In this review, I first outline the relationships between iron and cancer in general, then give an explanation about iron-related animal carcinogenesis models. PMID:27455808

  10. Humanoid Mobile Manipulation Using Controller Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Robert; Burridge, Robert; Diftler, Myron; Graf, Jodi; Goza, Mike; Huber, Eric; Brock, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    An important class of mobile manipulation problems are move-to-grasp problems where a mobile robot must navigate to and pick up an object. One of the distinguishing features of this class of tasks is its coarse-to-fine structure. Near the beginning of the task, the robot can only sense the target object coarsely or indirectly and make gross motion toward the object. However, after the robot has located and approached the object, the robot must finely control its grasping contacts using precise visual and haptic feedback. This paper proposes that move-to-grasp problems are naturally solved by a sequence of controllers that iteratively refines what ultimately becomes the final solution. This paper introduces the notion of a refining sequence of controllers and characterizes this type of solution. The approach is demonstrated in a move-to-grasp task where Robonaut, the NASA/JSC dexterous humanoid, is mounted on a mobile base and navigates to and picks up a geological sample box. In a series of tests, it is shown that a refining sequence of controllers decreases variance in robot configuration relative to the sample box until a successful grasp has been achieved.

  11. Humanoid Mobile Manipulation Using Controller Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Robert; Burridge, Robert; Diftler, Myron; Graf, Jodi; Goza, Mike; Huber, Eric

    2006-01-01

    An important class of mobile manipulation problems are move-to-grasp problems where a mobile robot must navigate to and pick up an object. One of the distinguishing features of this class of tasks is its coarse-to-fine structure. Near the beginning of the task, the robot can only sense the target object coarsely or indirectly and make gross motion toward the object. However, after the robot has located and approached the object, the robot must finely control its grasping contacts using precise visual and haptic feedback. In this paper, it is proposed that move-to-grasp problems are naturally solved by a sequence of controllers that iteratively refines what ultimately becomes the final solution. This paper introduces the notion of a refining sequence of controllers and characterizes this type of solution. The approach is demonstrated in a move-to-grasp task where Robonaut, the NASA/JSC dexterous humanoid, is mounted on a mobile base and navigates to and picks up a geological sample box. In a series of tests, it is shown that a refining sequence of controllers decreases variance in robot configuration relative to the sample box until a successful grasp has been achieved.

  12. Parallel object-oriented adaptive mesh refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Balsara, D.; Quinlan, D.J.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper we study adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) for elliptic and hyperbolic systems. We use the Asynchronous Fast Adaptive Composite Grid Method (AFACX), a parallel algorithm based upon the of Fast Adaptive Composite Grid Method (FAC) as a test case of an adaptive elliptic solver. For our hyperbolic system example we use TVD and ENO schemes for solving the Euler and MHD equations. We use the structured grid load balancer MLB as a tool for obtaining a load balanced distribution in a parallel environment. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement poses difficulties in expressing both the basic single grid solver, whether elliptic or hyperbolic, in a fashion that parallelizes seamlessly. It also requires that these basic solvers work together within the adaptive mesh refinement algorithm which uses the single grid solvers as one part of its adaptive solution process. We show that use of AMR++, an object-oriented library within the OVERTURE Framework, simplifies the development of AMR applications. Parallel support is provided and abstracted through the use of the P++ parallel array class.

  13. Using Induction to Refine Information Retrieval Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baudin, Catherine; Pell, Barney; Kedar, Smadar

    1994-01-01

    Conceptual information retrieval systems use structured document indices, domain knowledge and a set of heuristic retrieval strategies to match user queries with a set of indices describing the document's content. Such retrieval strategies increase the set of relevant documents retrieved (increase recall), but at the expense of returning additional irrelevant documents (decrease precision). Usually in conceptual information retrieval systems this tradeoff is managed by hand and with difficulty. This paper discusses ways of managing this tradeoff by the application of standard induction algorithms to refine the retrieval strategies in an engineering design domain. We gathered examples of query/retrieval pairs during the system's operation using feedback from a user on the retrieved information. We then fed these examples to the induction algorithm and generated decision trees that refine the existing set of retrieval strategies. We found that (1) induction improved the precision on a set of queries generated by another user, without a significant loss in recall, and (2) in an interactive mode, the decision trees pointed out flaws in the retrieval and indexing knowledge and suggested ways to refine the retrieval strategies.

  14. Grain Refinement of Permanent Mold Cast Copper Base Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    M.Sadayappan; J.P.Thomson; M.Elboujdaini; G.Ping Gu; M. Sahoo

    2005-04-01

    Grain refinement is a well established process for many cast and wrought alloys. The mechanical properties of various alloys could be enhanced by reducing the grain size. Refinement is also known to improve casting characteristics such as fluidity and hot tearing. Grain refinement of copper-base alloys is not widely used, especially in sand casting process. However, in permanent mold casting of copper alloys it is now common to use grain refinement to counteract the problem of severe hot tearing which also improves the pressure tightness of plumbing components. The mechanism of grain refinement in copper-base alloys is not well understood. The issues to be studied include the effect of minor alloy additions on the microstructure, their interaction with the grain refiner, effect of cooling rate, and loss of grain refinement (fading). In this investigation, efforts were made to explore and understand grain refinement of copper alloys, especially in permanent mold casting conditions.

  15. California refining in balance as Phase 2 deadline draws near

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, K.

    1996-01-01

    The impact of California`s 1996 RFG program on US markets and its implications for refiners worldwide is analyzed. The preparations in the last few months before refiners must produce California Phase 2 RFG are addressed. Subsequent articles will consider the process improvements made by refiners, the early implementation of the program, and what has been learned about refining, gasoline distribution, environmental benefits and consumer acceptance that can be replicated around the world.

  16. The ubiquity of iron.

    PubMed

    Frey, Perry A; Reed, George H

    2012-09-21

    The importance of iron in living systems can be traced to the many complexes within which it is found, to its chemical mobility in undergoing oxidation-reduction reactions, and to the abundance of iron in Earth's crust. Iron is the most abundant element, by mass, in the Earth, constituting about 80% of the inner and outer cores of Earth. The molten outer core is about 8000 km in diameter, and the solid inner core is about 2400 km in diameter. Iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust. It is the chemically functional component of mononuclear iron complexes, dinuclear iron complexes, [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters, [Fe-Ni-S] clusters, iron protophorphyrin IX, and many other complexes in protein biochemistry. Metals such as nickel, cobalt, copper, and manganese are present in the crust and could in principle function chemically in place of iron, but they are scarce in Earth's crust. Iron is plentiful because of its nuclear stability in stellar nuclear fusion reactions. It seems likely that other solid planets, formed by the same processes as Earth, would also foster the evolution of life and that iron would be similarly important to life on those planets as it is on Earth. PMID:22845493

  17. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment. PMID:26314490

  18. Coloured Petri Net Refinement Specification and Correctness Proof with Coq

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choppy, Christine; Mayero, Micaela; Petrucci, Laure

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we address the formalisation of symmetric nets, a subclass of coloured Petri nets, refinement in COQ. We first provide a formalisation of the net models, and of their type refinement in COQ. Then the COQ proof assistant is used to prove the refinement correctness lemma. An example adapted from a protocol example illustrates our work.

  19. 48 CFR 208.7304 - Refined precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Refined precious metals... Government-Owned Precious Metals 208.7304 Refined precious metals. See PGI 208.7304 for a list of refined precious metals managed by DSCP....

  20. 48 CFR 208.7304 - Refined precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Refined precious metals... Government-Owned Precious Metals 208.7304 Refined precious metals. See PGI 208.7304 for a list of refined precious metals managed by DSCP....

  1. 48 CFR 208.7304 - Refined precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Refined precious metals... Government-Owned Precious Metals 208.7304 Refined precious metals. See PGI 208.7304 for a list of refined precious metals managed by DSCP....

  2. 48 CFR 208.7304 - Refined precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Refined precious metals... Government-Owned Precious Metals 208.7304 Refined precious metals. See PGI 208.7304 for a list of refined precious metals managed by DSCP....

  3. 48 CFR 208.7304 - Refined precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Refined precious metals... Government-Owned Precious Metals 208.7304 Refined precious metals. See PGI 208.7304 for a list of refined precious metals managed by DSCP....

  4. The blind leading the blind: Mutual refinement of approximate theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedar, Smadar T.; Bresina, John L.; Dent, C. Lisa

    1991-01-01

    The mutual refinement theory, a method for refining world models in a reactive system, is described. The method detects failures, explains their causes, and repairs the approximate models which cause the failures. The approach focuses on using one approximate model to refine another.

  5. Effect of SiO2 on the Crystallization Behaviors and In-Mold Performance of CaF2-CaO-Al2O3 Slags for Drawing-Ingot-Type Electroslag Remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Cheng-Bin; Li, Jing; Cho, Jung-Wook; Jiang, Fang; Jung, In-Ho

    2015-10-01

    The crystallization characteristics of CaF2-CaO-Al2O3 slags with varying amounts of SiO2 were experimentally studied. The effects of slag crystallization behaviors on the horizontal heat transfer and lubrication performance in drawing-ingot-type electroslag remelting (ESR) were also evaluated in terms of as-cast ingots surface quality and drawing-ingot operation. The results show that increasing SiO2 addition from 0 to 6.8 mass pct strongly suppresses the crystallization of ESR type CaF2-CaO-Al2O3 slags. The crystallization temperature of the studied slags decreases with the increase in SiO2 addition. The liquidus temperatures of the slags also show a decreasing trend with increasing SiO2 content. In CaF2-CaO-Al2O3-(SiO2) slags, faceted 11CaO·7Al2O3·CaF2 crystals precipitate first during continuous cooling of the slag melts, followed by the formation of CaF2 at lower temperatures. 11CaO·7Al2O3·CaF2 was confirmed to be the dominant crystalline phase in the studied slags. CaF2-CaO-Al2O3 slags with a small amount of SiO2 addition are favorable for providing sound lubrication and horizontal heat transfer in mold for drawing-ingot-type ESR, which consequently bring the improvement in the surface quality of ESR ingot and drawing-ingot operating practice as demonstrated by plant trials.

  6. Brain iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moos, Torben

    2002-11-01

    Iron is essential for virtually all types of cells and organisms. The significance of the iron for brain function is reflected by the presence of receptors for transferrin on brain capillary endothelial cells. The transport of iron into the brain from the circulation is regulated so that the extraction of iron by brain capillary endothelial cells is low in iron-replete conditions and the reverse when the iron need of the brain is high as in conditions with iron deficiency and during development of the brain. Whereas there is good agreement that iron is taken up by means of receptor-mediated uptake of iron-transferrin at the brain barriers, there are contradictory views on how iron is transported further on from the brain barriers and into the brain extracellular space. The prevailing hypothesis for transport of iron across the BBB suggests a mechanism that involves detachment of iron from transferrin within barrier cells followed by recycling of apo-transferrin to blood plasma and release of iron as non-transferrin-bound iron into the brain interstitium from where the iron is taken up by neurons and glial cells. Another hypothesis claims that iron-transferrin is transported into the brain by means of transcytosis through the BBB. This thesis deals with the topic "brain iron homeostasis" defined as the attempts to maintain constant concentrations of iron in the brain internal environment via regulation of iron transport through brain barriers, cellular iron uptake by neurons and glia, and export of iron from brain to blood. The first part deals with transport of iron-transferrin complexes from blood to brain either by transport across the brain barriers or by uptake and retrograde axonal transport in motor neurons projecting beyond the blood-brain barrier. The transport of iron and transport into the brain was examined using radiolabeled iron-transferrin. Intravenous injection of [59Fe-125]transferrin led to an almost two-fold higher accumulation of 59Fe than of

  7. Mechanisms of mammalian iron homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pantopoulos, Kostas; Porwal, Suheel Kumar; Tartakoff, Alan; Devireddy, L.

    2012-01-01

    Iron is vital for almost all organisms because of its ability to donate and accept electrons with relative ease. It serves as a cofactor for many proteins and enzymes necessary for oxygen and energy metabolism, as well as for several other essential processes. Mammalian cells utilize multiple mechanisms to acquire iron. Disruption of iron homeostasis is associated with various human diseases: iron deficiency resulting from defects in acquisition or distribution of the metal causes anemia; whereas iron surfeit resulting from excessive iron absorption or defective utilization causes abnormal tissue iron deposition, leading to oxidative damage. Mammals utilize distinct mechanisms to regulate iron homeostasis at the systemic and cellular levels. These involve the hormone hepcidin and iron regulatory proteins, which collectively ensure iron balance. This review outlines recent advances in iron regulatory pathways, as well as in mechanisms underlying intracellular iron trafficking, an important but less-studied area of mammalian iron homeostasis. PMID:22703180

  8. Iron and transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Waldvogel-Abramovski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Blood bankers have focused their energy to secure blood transfusion, and only recently have studies been published on the effect of blood donation on iron metabolism. In many facilities, hemoglobin measurement is only performed just before or even during blood donation, but the determination of iron stores is largely ignored. The 2013 paradox of transfusion medicine is due to the fact that blood donation may be harmful and leads to iron deficiency with or without anemia, but for other individuals, it may be a healthy measure preventing type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to discuss iron metabolism in the perspective of blood donation, notably regarding their possible genetic profiles that eventually will discriminate "good" iron absorbers from "bad" iron responders. PMID:24148756

  9. IRON IN MULTIPLE MYELOMA

    PubMed Central

    VanderWall, Kristina; Daniels-Wells, Tracy R; Penichet, Manuel; Lichtenstein, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a non-curable B cell malignancy in which iron metabolism plays an important role. Patients with this disorder almost universally suffer from a clinically significant anemia, which is often symptomatic, and which is due to impaired iron utilization. Recent studies indicate that the proximal cause of dysregulated iron metabolism and anemia in these patients is cytokine-induced upregulation of hepcidin expression. Malignant myeloma cells are dependent on an increased influx of iron and therapeutic efforts are being made to target this requirement. The studies detailing the characteristics and biochemical abnormalities in iron metabolism causing anemia and the initial attempts to target iron therapeutically are described in this review. PMID:23879589

  10. Cellular iron transport.

    PubMed

    Garrick, Michael D; Garrick, Laura M

    2009-05-01

    Iron has a split personality as an essential nutrient that also has the potential to generate reactive oxygen species. We discuss how different cell types within specific tissues manage this schizophrenia. The emphasis in enterocytes is on regulating the body's supply of iron by regulating transport into the blood stream. In developing red blood cells, adaptations in transport manage the body's highest flux of iron. Hepatocytes buffer the body's stock of iron. Macrophage recycle the iron from effete red cells among other iron management tasks. Pneumocytes provide a barrier to prevent illicit entry that, when at risk of breaching, leads to a need to handle the dangers in a fashion essentially shared with macrophage. We also discuss or introduce cell types including renal cells, neurons, other brain cells, and more where our ignorance, currently still vast, needs to be removed by future research. PMID:19344751

  11. Melting of iron-aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1990-01-01

    The melting of Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and commercial vendors is described. The melting processes evaluated includes are melting, air-induction melting (AIM), vacuum-induction melting (VIM), and electroslag remelting (ESR). The quality of the ingots studied are base on internal soundness and the surface finish obtained. The ingots were analyzed for recovery of various elements during melting. The impurity levels observed in the alloys by various melting processes were compared. Recommendations are made for viable processes for commercial melting of these alloys. 1 ref., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Refining and defining the Program Dependence Web

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, P.L. ); Krishna, K.; Ballance, R.A. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1993-05-01

    The Program Dependence Web (PDW) is an intermediate representation for a computer program, which can be interpreted under control-driven, data-driven or demand-driven disciplines. This document completes the definition for the PDW. This includes operational definitions for the nodes and arcs and a description of how PDWs are interpreted. The general structure for conditionals and loops is shown, accompanied by examples. The definition provided here is a refinement of the original one: a new node, the [beta] node,'' replaces the [mu] node, and the [eta][sup [Tau

  13. Refining and defining the Program Dependence Web

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, P.L.; Krishna, K.; Ballance, R.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Program Dependence Web (PDW) is an intermediate representation for a computer program, which can be interpreted under control-driven, data-driven or demand-driven disciplines. This document completes the definition for the PDW. This includes operational definitions for the nodes and arcs and a description of how PDWs are interpreted. The general structure for conditionals and loops is shown, accompanied by examples. The definition provided here is a refinement of the original one: a new node, the ``{beta} node,`` replaces the {mu} node, and the {eta}{sup {Tau}} node is eliminated.

  14. Adaptive refinement tools for tetrahedral unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul (Inventor); Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An exemplary embodiment providing one or more improvements includes software which is robust, efficient, and has a very fast run time for user directed grid enrichment and flow solution adaptive grid refinement. All user selectable options (e.g., the choice of functions, the choice of thresholds, etc.), other than a pre-marked cell list, can be entered on the command line. The ease of application is an asset for flow physics research and preliminary design CFD analysis where fast grid modification is often needed to deal with unanticipated development of flow details.

  15. Austempered Ductile Iron Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilc, Jozef; Šajgalík, Michal; Holubják, Jozef; Piešová, Marianna; Zaušková, Lucia; Babík, Ondrej; Kuždák, Viktor; Rákoci, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    This article deals with the machining of cast iron. In industrial practice, Austempered Ductile Iron began to be used relatively recently. ADI is ductile iron that has gone through austempering to get improved properties, among which we can include strength, wear resistance or noise damping. This specific material is defined also by other properties, such as high elasticity, ductility and endurance against tenigue, which are the properties, that considerably make the tooling characteristic worse.

  16. Refinement Of Hexahedral Cells In Euler Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Thomas, Scott D.

    1996-01-01

    Topologically Independent Grid, Euler Refinement (TIGER) computer program solves Euler equations of three-dimensional, unsteady flow of inviscid, compressible fluid by numerical integration on unstructured hexahedral coordinate grid refined where necessary to resolve shocks and other details. Hexahedral cells subdivided, each into eight smaller cells, as needed to refine computational grid in regions of high flow gradients. Grid Interactive Refinement and Flow-Field Examination (GIRAFFE) computer program written in conjunction with TIGER program to display computed flow-field data and to assist researcher in verifying specified boundary conditions and refining grid.

  17. Empirical Analysis and Refinement of Expert System Knowledge Bases

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Sholom M.; Politakis, Peter; Ginsberg, Allen

    1986-01-01

    Recent progress in knowledge base refinement for expert systems is reviewed. Knowledge base refinement is characterized by the constrained modification of rule-components in an existing knowledge base. The goals are to localize specific weaknesses in a knowledge base and to improve an expert system's performance. Systems that automate some aspects of knowledge base refinement can have a significant impact on the related problems of knowledge base acquisition, maintenance, verification, and learning from experience. The SEEK empiricial analysis and refinement system is reviewed and its successor system, SEEK2, is introduced. Important areas for future research in knowledge base refinement are described.

  18. Physics of iron

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, O.

    1993-10-01

    This volume comprises papers presented at the AIRAPT Conference, June 28 to July 1993. The iron sessions at the meeting were identified as the Second Ironworkers Convention. The renewal of interest stems from advances in technologies in both diamond-anvil cell (DAC) and shock wave studies as well as from controversies arising from a lack of consensus among both experimentalists and theoreticians. These advances have produced new data on iron in the pressure-temperature regime of interest for phase diagrams and for temperatures of the core/mantle and inner-core/outer-core boundaries. Particularly interesting is the iron phase diagram inferred from DAC studies. A new phase, {beta}, with a {gamma}-{beta}-{epsilon} triple point at about 30 GPa and 1190 K, and possible sixth phase, {omega}, with an {epsilon}-{Theta}-melt triple point at about 190 GPa and 4000 K are deemed possible. The importance of the equation of state of iron in consideration of Earth`s heat budget and the origin of its magnetic field invoke the interest of theoreticians who argue on the basis of molecular dynamics and other first principles methods. While the major thrust of both meetings was on the physics of pure iron, there was notable contributions on iron alloys. Hydrogen-iron alloys, iron-sulfur liquids, and the comparability to rhenium in phase diagram studies are discussed. The knowledge of the physical properties of iron were increased by several contributions.

  19. Physiology of Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Waldvogel-Abramowski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M.; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary A revolution occurred during the last decade in the comprehension of the physiology as well as in the physiopathology of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent knowledge that has accumulated, allowing a better comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in iron homeostasis. Iron metabolism is very fine tuned. The free molecule is very toxic; therefore, complex regulatory mechanisms have been developed in mammalian to insure adequate intestinal absorption, transportation, utilization, and elimination. ‘Ironomics’ certainly will be the future of the understanding of genes as well as of the protein-protein interactions involved in iron metabolism. PMID:25053935

  20. 35. GREY IRON TUMBLERS, IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ROTATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. GREY IRON TUMBLERS, IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ROTATE CASTINGS WITH SHOT TO REMOVE AND SURFACE OXIDES AND REMAINING EXCESS METALS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  1. Deformable elastic network refinement for low-resolution macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Schröder, Gunnar F.; Levitt, Michael; Brunger, Axel T.

    2014-09-01

    An overview of applications of the deformable elastic network (DEN) refinement method is presented together with recommendations for its optimal usage. Crystals of membrane proteins and protein complexes often diffract to low resolution owing to their intrinsic molecular flexibility, heterogeneity or the mosaic spread of micro-domains. At low resolution, the building and refinement of atomic models is a more challenging task. The deformable elastic network (DEN) refinement method developed previously has been instrumental in the determinion of several structures at low resolution. Here, DEN refinement is reviewed, recommendations for its optimal usage are provided and its limitations are discussed. Representative examples of the application of DEN refinement to challenging cases of refinement at low resolution are presented. These cases include soluble as well as membrane proteins determined at limiting resolutions ranging from 3 to 7 Å. Potential extensions of the DEN refinement technique and future perspectives for the interpretation of low-resolution crystal structures are also discussed.

  2. Fully implicit adaptive mesh refinement MHD algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Bobby

    2005-10-01

    In the macroscopic simulation of plasmas, the numerical modeler is faced with the challenge of dealing with multiple time and length scales. The former results in stiffness due to the presence of very fast waves. The latter requires one to resolve the localized features that the system develops. Traditional approaches based on explicit time integration techniques and fixed meshes are not suitable for this challenge, as such approaches prevent the modeler from using realistic plasma parameters to keep the computation feasible. We propose here a novel approach, based on implicit methods and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). Our emphasis is on both accuracy and scalability with the number of degrees of freedom. To our knowledge, a scalable, fully implicit AMR algorithm has not been accomplished before for MHD. As a proof-of-principle, we focus on the reduced resistive MHD model as a basic MHD model paradigm, which is truly multiscale. The approach taken here is to adapt mature physics-based technologyootnotetextL. Chac'on et al., J. Comput. Phys. 178 (1), 15- 36 (2002) to AMR grids, and employ AMR-aware multilevel techniques (such as fast adaptive composite --FAC-- algorithms) for scalability. We will demonstrate that the concept is indeed feasible, featuring optimal scalability under grid refinement. Results of fully-implicit, dynamically-adaptive AMR simulations will be presented on a variety of problems.

  3. Rapid Glass Refiner Development Program, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-20

    A rapid glass refiner (RGR) technology which could be applied to both conventional and advanced class melting systems would significantly enhance the productivity and the competitiveness of the glass industry in the United States. Therefore, Vortec Corporation, with the support of the US Department of Energy (US DOE) under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-90ID12911, conducted a research and development program for a unique and innovative approach to rapid glass refining. To provide focus for this research effort, container glass was the primary target from among the principal glass types based on its market size and potential for significant energy savings. Container glass products represent the largest segment of the total glass industry accounting for 60% of the tonnage produced and over 40% of the annual energy consumption of 232 trillion Btu/yr. Projections of energy consumption and the market penetration of advanced melting and fining into the container glass industry yield a potential energy savings of 7.9 trillion Btu/yr by the year 2020.

  4. Evolutionary Optimization of a Geometrically Refined Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, P. V.; Tinker, M. L.; Dozier, G. V.

    2007-01-01

    Structural optimization is a field of research that has experienced noteworthy growth for many years. Researchers in this area have developed optimization tools to successfully design and model structures, typically minimizing mass while maintaining certain deflection and stress constraints. Numerous optimization studies have been performed to minimize mass, deflection, and stress on a benchmark cantilever truss problem. Predominantly traditional optimization theory is applied to this problem. The cross-sectional area of each member is optimized to minimize the aforementioned objectives. This Technical Publication (TP) presents a structural optimization technique that has been previously applied to compliant mechanism design. This technique demonstrates a method that combines topology optimization, geometric refinement, finite element analysis, and two forms of evolutionary computation: genetic algorithms and differential evolution to successfully optimize a benchmark structural optimization problem. A nontraditional solution to the benchmark problem is presented in this TP, specifically a geometrically refined topological solution. The design process begins with an alternate control mesh formulation, multilevel geometric smoothing operation, and an elastostatic structural analysis. The design process is wrapped in an evolutionary computing optimization toolset.

  5. Evolutionary optimization of a Genetically Refined Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Patrick V.; Tinker, Michael L.; Dozier, Gerry

    2005-01-01

    Structural optimization is a field of research that has experienced noteworthy growth for many years. Researchers in this area have developed optimization tools to successfully design and model structures, typically minimizing mass while maintaining certain deflection and stress constraints. Numerous optimization studies have been performed to minimize mass, deflection and stress on a benchmark cantilever truss problem. Predominantly traditional optimization theory is applied to this problem. The cross-sectional area of each member is optimized to minimize the aforementioned objectives. This paper will present a structural optimization technique that has been previously applied to compliant mechanism design. This technique demonstrates a method that combines topology optimization, geometric refinement, finite element analysis, and two forms of evolutionary computation: Genetic Algorithms and Differential Evolution to successfully optimize a benchmark structural optimization problem. An non-traditional solution to the benchmark problem is presented in this paper, specifically a geometrically refined topological solution. The design process begins with an alternate control mesh formulation, multilevel geometric smoothing operation, and an elastostatic structural analysis. The design process is wrapped in an evolutionary computing optimization toolset.

  6. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation Information Page Synonym(s): Hallervorden-Spatz Disease, ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation? Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) ...

  7. Perspectives on nutritional iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, L

    2001-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency (ID) is caused by an intake of dietary iron insufficient to cover physiological iron requirements. Studies on iron absorption from whole diets have examined relationships between dietary iron bioavailability/absorption, iron losses, and amounts of stored iron. New insights have been obtained into regulation of iron absorption and expected rates of changes of iron stores or hemoglobin iron deficits when bioavailability or iron content of the diet has been modified and when losses of iron occur. Negative effects of ID are probably related to age, up to about 20 years, explaining some of earlier controversies. Difficulties in establishing the prevalence of mild ID are outlined. The degree of underestimation of the prevalence of mild ID when using multiple diagnostic criteria is discussed. It is suggested that current low-energy lifestyles are a common denominator for the current high prevalence not only of ID but also of obesity, diabetes, and osteoporosis. PMID:11375427

  8. 40 CFR 80.235 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) The total corporate crude oil capacity of each refinery as reported to the Energy Information... and had an average crude oil capacity less than or equal to 155,000 bpcd. Where appropriate, the employee and crude oil capacity criteria for such refiners will be based on the most recent 12 months...

  9. 40 CFR 80.235 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) The total corporate crude oil capacity of each refinery as reported to the Energy Information... and had an average crude oil capacity less than or equal to 155,000 bpcd. Where appropriate, the employee and crude oil capacity criteria for such refiners will be based on the most recent 12 months...

  10. Replacing electrolytic iron in a fortification-mix with NaFeEDTA increases both iron and zinc availabilities in traditional African maize porridges.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Johanita

    2016-08-15

    While replacing electrolytic iron with NaFeEDTA in multi-micronutrient fortification-mixes is a popular option, there is no information about the effect on the iron and zinc availabilities in African staple foods. This study evaluated the effects of adding a multi-micronutrient fortification-mix, with no iron, electrolytic iron or NaFeEDTA on the availabilities of iron and zinc from thick and fermented special-grade maize porridges using a Caco-2 cell model. Replacing electrolytic iron with NaFeEDTA significantly (p ⩽ 0.05) increased iron and, importantly zinc, availabilities in both the thick (2.16% vs. 1.45% and 2.51% vs. 2.29%, respectively) and fermented (3.35% vs. 2.66% and 3.04% vs. 2.61%, respectively) porridges. Some of the NaFeEDTA complexes perhaps partially dissociated because of pH changes during simulated digestion, binding with zinc and increasing its availability. NaFeEDTA in a multi-micronutrient fortification-mix, added to less refined, high phytate maize meal, would be more effective than electrolytic iron in addressing both iron and zinc deficiencies in low socio-economic populations of sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27006207

  11. Interface driven magnetic interactions in nanostructured thin films of iron nanocrystallites embedded in a copper matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Desautels, R. D. Lierop, J. van; Shueh, C.; Lin, K.-W.; Freeland, J. W.

    2015-05-07

    We have fabricated thin films of iron nanocrystallites embedded in a copper matrix using a dual ion beam assisted deposition technique. A secondary End-Hall ion beam bombarded the iron atoms during deposition altering significantly the morphology of the films and allowing for control of the intermixing between iron and copper components. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and x-ray reflectometry experiments indicated that the morphology of the films was that of iron nanocrystallites embedded in a copper matrix. Rietveld refinements of the diffraction pattern identified fcc-copper and amorphous iron. An increased amount of disorder was observed with a reduction in the amount of deposited iron from a 1:1 Fe:Cu ratio to 0.25:0.75 Fe:Cu ratio. Interfacial copper-iron alloys were identified by DC susceptibility experiments through their reduced T{sub C,Alloy} (370, 310, and 280 K) compared with that of bulk iron (∼1000 K). Element specific x-ray absorption and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism experiments were performed to identify the contributions to the magnetism from the iron and the copper-iron alloy.

  12. Taking iron supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... The stools are tarry-looking as well as black If they have red streaks Cramps, sharp pains, or soreness in the stomach occur Liquid forms of iron may stain your teeth. Try mixing the iron with water or other liquids (such as fruit juice or ...

  13. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  14. Study of archaeological artefacts to refine the model of iron long-term indoor atmospheric corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, J.; Legrand, L.; Bellot-Gurlet, L.; Foy, E.; Reguer, S.; Rocca, E.; Dillmann, P.; Neff, D.; Mirambet, F.; Perrin, S.; Guillot, I.

    2008-09-01

    The study of long-term indoor atmospheric corrosion is involved in the field of the interim storage of nuclear wastes. Indeed study of archaeological artefacts is one of the only mean to gather information on very long periods. Concerning ancient items, due to the complexity of the system, it is necessary to couple many analytical techniques from the macro to the microscopic scale. This enables to propose a description of the Amiens cathedral chain rust layers, made of a matrix of goethite, with lepidocrocite and akaganeite locally present and marbling of a poor crystallized phase associated to ferrihydrite. Electrochemical measurements permit to study the reduction capacity of the rust layer and to draw reduction mechanisms of the so-called active phases, by in situ experiments coupled with X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  15. Carbide/nitride grain refined rare earth-iron-boron permanent magnet and method of making

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R. William; Branagan, Daniel J.

    1996-01-23

    A method of making a permanent magnet wherein 1) a melt is formed having a base alloy composition comprising RE, Fe and/or Co, and B (where RE is one or more rare earth elements) and 2) TR (where TR is a transition metal selected from at least one of Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Al) and at least one of C and N are provided in the base alloy composition melt in substantially stoichiometric amounts to form a thermodynamically stable compound (e.g. TR carbide, nitride or carbonitride). The melt is rapidly solidified in a manner to form particulates having a substantially amorphous (metallic glass) structure and a dispersion of primary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates. The amorphous particulates are heated above the crystallization temperature of the base alloy composition to nucleate and grow a hard magnetic phase to an optimum grain size and to form secondary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates dispersed at grain boundaries. The crystallized particulates are consolidated at an elevated temperature to form a shape. During elevated temperature consolidation, the primary and secondary precipitates act to pin the grain boundaries and minimize deleterious grain growth that is harmful to magnetic properties.

  16. Carbide/nitride grain refined rare earth-iron-boron permanent magnet and method of making

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R.W.; Branagan, D.J.

    1996-01-23

    A method of making a permanent magnet is disclosed wherein (1) a melt is formed having a base alloy composition comprising RE, Fe and/or Co, and B (where RE is one or more rare earth elements) and (2) TR (where TR is a transition metal selected from at least one of Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Al) and at least one of C and N are provided in the base alloy composition melt in substantially stoichiometric amounts to form a thermodynamically stable compound (e.g. TR carbide, nitride or carbonitride). The melt is rapidly solidified in a manner to form particulates having a substantially amorphous (metallic glass) structure and a dispersion of primary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates. The amorphous particulates are heated above the crystallization temperature of the base alloy composition to nucleate and grow a hard magnetic phase to an optimum grain size and to form secondary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates dispersed at grain boundaries. The crystallized particulates are consolidated at an elevated temperature to form a shape. During elevated temperature consolidation, the primary and secondary precipitates act to pin the grain boundaries and minimize deleterious grain growth that is harmful to magnetic properties. 33 figs.

  17. Hypersensitivity from intravenous iron products.

    PubMed

    Bircher, Andreas J; Auerbach, Michael

    2014-08-01

    In the last several years, intravenous therapy with iron products has been more widely used. Although it has been a standard procedure in dialysis-associated anemia since the early 1990s, its use is expanding to a host of conditions associated with iron deficiency, especially young women with heavy uterine bleeding and pregnancy. Free iron is associated with unacceptable high toxicity inducing severe, hemodynamically significant symptoms. Subsequently, formulations that contain the iron as an iron carbohydrate nanoparticle have been designed. With newer formulations, including low-molecular-weight iron dextran, iron sucrose, ferric gluconate, ferumoxytol, iron isomaltoside, and ferric carboxymaltose, serious adverse events are rare. PMID:25017687

  18. Microbes: mini iron factories.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kumar Batuk

    2014-12-01

    Microbes have flourished in extreme habitats since beginning of the Earth and have played an important role in geological processes like weathering, mineralization, diagenesis, mineral formation and destruction. Biotic mineralization is one of the most fascinating examples of how microbes have been influencing geological processes. Iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria are capable of precipitating wide varieties of iron oxides (magnetite), carbonates (siderite) and sulphides (greigite) via controlled or induced mineralization processes. Microbes have also been considered to play an important role in the history of evolution of sedimentary rocks on Earth from the formation of banded iron formations during the Archean to modern biotic bog iron and ochre deposits. Here, we discuss the role that microbes have been playing in precipitation of iron and the role and importance of interdisciplinary studies in the field of geology and biology in solving some of the major geological mysteries. PMID:25320452

  19. Iron studies in hemophilia

    SciTech Connect

    Lottenberg, R.; Kitchens, C.S.; Roessler, G.S.; Noyes, W.D.

    1981-12-01

    Although iron deficiency is not recognized as a usual complication of hemophilia, we questioned whether intermittent occult loss of blood in urine or stool might predispose hemophiliacs to chronic iron deficiency. Seven men with factor VII and one with factor IX deficiency were studied. Blood studied, bone marrow aspirates, urine and stool samples, and ferrokinetics with total-body counting up to five months were examined. These data showed no excessive loss of blood during the study period; however, marrow iron stores were decidedly decreased, being absent in four subjects. We suggest that in some hemophiliacs, iron deposits in tissues such as synovial membranes may form a high proportion of the body's total iron stores.

  20. Nitrogenase FeMoco investigated by spatially resolved anomalous dispersion refinement

    PubMed Central

    Spatzal, Thomas; Schlesier, Julia; Burger, Eva-Maria; Sippel, Daniel; Zhang, Limei; Andrade, Susana L.A.; Rees, Douglas C.; Einsle, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    The [Mo:7Fe:9S:C] iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMoco) of nitrogenase is the largest known metal cluster and catalyses the 6-electron reduction of dinitrogen to ammonium in biological nitrogen fixation. Only recently its atomic structure was clarified, while its reactivity and electronic structure remain under debate. Here we show that for its resting S=3/2 state the common iron oxidation state assignments must be reconsidered. By a spatially resolved refinement of the anomalous scattering contributions of the 7 Fe atoms of FeMoco, we conclude that three irons (Fe1/3/7) are more reduced than the other four (Fe2/4/5/6). Our data are in agreement with the recently revised oxidation state assignment for the molybdenum ion, providing the first spatially resolved picture of the resting-state electron distribution within FeMoco. This might provide the long-sought experimental basis for a generally accepted theoretical description of the cluster that is in line with available spectroscopic and functional data. PMID:26973151

  1. Proving refinement transformations for deriving high-assurance software

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, V.L.; Boyle, J.M.

    1996-05-01

    The construction of a high-assurance system requires some evidence, ideally a proof, that the system as implemented will behave as required. Direct proofs of implementations do not scale up well as systems become more complex and therefore are of limited value. In recent years, refinement-based approaches have been investigated as a means to manage the complexity inherent in the verification process. In a refinement-based approach, a high-level specification is converted into an implementation through a number of refinement steps. The hope is that the proofs of the individual refinement steps will be easier than a direct proof of the implementation. However, if stepwise refinement is performed manually, the number of steps is severely limited, implying that the size of each step is large. If refinement steps are large, then proofs of their correctness will not be much easier than a direct proof of the implementation. The authors describe an approach to refinement-based software development that is based on automatic application of refinements, expressed as program transformations. This automation has the desirable effect that the refinement steps can be extremely small and, thus, easy to prove correct. They give an overview of the TAMPR transformation system that the use for automated refinement. They then focus on some aspects of the semantic framework that they have been developing to enable proofs that TAMPR transformations are correctness preserving. With this framework, proofs of correctness for transformations can be obtained with the assistance of an automated reasoning system.

  2. Level 5: user refinement to aid the fusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik P.; Plano, Susan

    2003-04-01

    The revised JDL Fusion model Level 4 process refinement covers a broad spectrum of actions such as sensor management and control. A limitation of Level 4 is the purpose of control - whether it be for user needs or system operation. Level 5, User Refinement, is a modification to the Revised JDL model that distinguishes between machine process refinement and user refinement. User refinement can either be human control actions or refinement of the user's cognitive model. In many cases, fusion research concentrates on the machine and does not take full advantage of the human as not only a qualified expert to refine the fusion process, but also as customer for whom the fusion system is designed. Without user refinement, sensor fusion is incomplete, inadequate, and the user neglects its worthiness. To capture user capabilities, we explore the concept of user refinement through decision and action based on situational leadership models. We develop a Fuse-Act Situational User Refinement (FASUR) model that details four refinement behaviors: Neglect, Consult, Rely, and Interact and five refinement functions: Planning, Organizing, Coordinating, Directing, and Controlling. Process refinement varies for different systems and different user information needs. By designing a fusion system with a specific user in mind, vis Level 5, a fusion architecture can meet user's information needs for varying situations, extend user sensing capabilities for action, and increase the human-machine interaction.

  3. Addition of Dispersoid Titanium Oxide Inclusions in Steel and Their Influence on Grain Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiviö, Miia; Holappa, Lauri; Iung, Thierry

    2010-12-01

    In this article, the addition of dispersoid titanium oxide inclusions into liquid steel, the effect of additions on the inclusions found in the steel and on grain refinement, and acicular ferrite formation were studied. Different TiO2-containing materials and addition procedures into liquid steel were tested in experimental heats to obtain inclusions that promote grain refinement and acicular ferrite formation in C-Mn-Cr steel. Different additives with metallic Ti and TiO2 were added into the steel melt just before casting or into the mold during casting to create Ti-containing inclusions. The aluminum content in steel was lowered by an addition of iron oxide. The samples taken from steel melts and ingots were studied with a scanning electron microscope to find inclusions and to analyze them. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the Al content should be low (<50 ppm) to obtain Ti oxide dominating inclusions, whereas Al2O3 were formed at higher Al contents. When TiO2 was added late before casting, the oxide inclusions were Ti oxides and were mixed with Ti, Al, and Mn oxides. Small inclusions around 1 μm were detected in the samples with TiO x or TiN as the main component. It could be concluded that the additions resulted in a clearly higher number and in a smaller size of TiO x inclusions than just by adding metallic Ti. Selected samples were brought for subsequent hot rolling and heat-treatment experiments to find out the grain-refining effect and the eventual formation of acicular ferrite. Grain refinement was observed clearly, but the presence of acicular ferrite could not be confirmed definitely.

  4. The evolution and refinements of varicocele surgery

    PubMed Central

    Marmar, Joel L

    2016-01-01

    Varicoceles had been recognized in clinical practice for over a century. Originally, these procedures were utilized for the management of pain but, since 1952, the repairs had been mostly for the treatment of male infertility. However, the diagnosis and treatment of varicoceles were controversial, because the pathophysiology was not clear, the entry criteria of the studies varied among centers, and there were few randomized clinical trials. Nevertheless, clinicians continued developing techniques for the correction of varicoceles, basic scientists continued investigations on the pathophysiology of varicoceles, and new outcome data from prospective randomized trials have appeared in the world's literature. Therefore, this special edition of the Asian Journal of Andrology was proposed to report much of the new information related to varicoceles and, as a specific part of this project, the present article was developed as a comprehensive review of the evolution and refinements of the corrective procedures. PMID:26732111

  5. Formal language theory: refining the Chomsky hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Gerhard; Rogers, James

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this article gives a brief overview of the four levels of the Chomsky hierarchy, with a special emphasis on context-free and regular languages. It then recapitulates the arguments why neither regular nor context-free grammar is sufficiently expressive to capture all phenomena in the natural language syntax. In the second part, two refinements of the Chomsky hierarchy are reviewed, which are both relevant to the extant research in cognitive science: the mildly context-sensitive languages (which are located between context-free and context-sensitive languages), and the sub-regular hierarchy (which distinguishes several levels of complexity within the class of regular languages). PMID:22688632

  6. Performance of a streaming mesh refinement algorithm.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2004-08-01

    In SAND report 2004-1617, we outline a method for edge-based tetrahedral subdivision that does not rely on saving state or communication to produce compatible tetrahedralizations. This report analyzes the performance of the technique by characterizing (a) mesh quality, (b) execution time, and (c) traits of the algorithm that could affect quality or execution time differently for different meshes. It also details the method used to debug the several hundred subdivision templates that the algorithm relies upon. Mesh quality is on par with other similar refinement schemes and throughput on modern hardware can exceed 600,000 output tetrahedra per second. But if you want to understand the traits of the algorithm, you have to read the report!

  7. Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations of Relativistic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Anderson, M.; Lehner, L.; Olabarrieta, I.; Tohline, J. E.; Liebling, S. L.; Rahman, T.; Hirschman, E.; Neilsen, D.

    2006-09-01

    We present recent results from our efforts to evolve relativistic binaries composed of compact objects. We simultaneously solve the general relativistic hydrodynamics equations to evolve the material components of the binary and Einstein's equations to evolve the space-time. These two codes are coupled through an adaptive mesh refinement driver (had). One of the ultimate goals of this project is to address the merger of a neutron star and black hole and assess the possible observational signature of such systems as gamma ray bursts. This work has been supported in part by NSF grants AST 04-07070 and PHY 03-26311 and in part through NASA's ATP program grant NAG5-13430. The computations were performed primarily at NCSA through grant MCA98N043 and at LSU's Center for Computation & Technology.

  8. Visualization Tools for Adaptive Mesh Refinement Data

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Gunther H.; Beckner, Vincent E.; Childs, Hank; Ligocki,Terry J.; Miller, Mark C.; Van Straalen, Brian; Bethel, E. Wes

    2007-05-09

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a highly effective method for simulations that span a large range of spatiotemporal scales, such as astrophysical simulations that must accommodate ranges from interstellar to sub-planetary. Most mainstream visualization tools still lack support for AMR as a first class data type and AMR code teams use custom built applications for AMR visualization. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Science Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) is currently working on extending VisIt, which is an open source visualization tool that accommodates AMR as a first-class data type. These efforts will bridge the gap between general-purpose visualization applications and highly specialized AMR visual analysis applications. Here, we give an overview of the state of the art in AMR visualization research and tools and describe how VisIt currently handles AMR data.

  9. Visualization of Scalar Adaptive Mesh Refinement Data

    SciTech Connect

    VACET; Weber, Gunther; Weber, Gunther H.; Beckner, Vince E.; Childs, Hank; Ligocki, Terry J.; Miller, Mark C.; Van Straalen, Brian; Bethel, E. Wes

    2007-12-06

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a highly effective computation method for simulations that span a large range of spatiotemporal scales, such as astrophysical simulations, which must accommodate ranges from interstellar to sub-planetary. Most mainstream visualization tools still lack support for AMR grids as a first class data type and AMR code teams use custom built applications for AMR visualization. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Science Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) is currently working on extending VisIt, which is an open source visualization tool that accommodates AMR as a first-class data type. These efforts will bridge the gap between general-purpose visualization applications and highly specialized AMR visual analysis applications. Here, we give an overview of the state of the art in AMR scalar data visualization research.

  10. GRChombo: Numerical relativity with adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, Katy; Figueras, Pau; Finkel, Hal; Kunesch, Markus; Lim, Eugene A.; Tunyasuvunakool, Saran

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we introduce {\\mathtt{GRChombo}}: a new numerical relativity code which incorporates full adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) using block structured Berger-Rigoutsos grid generation. The code supports non-trivial 'many-boxes-in-many-boxes' mesh hierarchies and massive parallelism through the message passing interface. {\\mathtt{GRChombo}} evolves the Einstein equation using the standard BSSN formalism, with an option to turn on CCZ4 constraint damping if required. The AMR capability permits the study of a range of new physics which has previously been computationally infeasible in a full 3 + 1 setting, while also significantly simplifying the process of setting up the mesh for these problems. We show that {\\mathtt{GRChombo}} can stably and accurately evolve standard spacetimes such as binary black hole mergers and scalar collapses into black holes, demonstrate the performance characteristics of our code, and discuss various physics problems which stand to benefit from the AMR technique.

  11. GC-directed control improves refining

    SciTech Connect

    Hail, G.F. )

    1991-02-01

    The increasing role of refinery product quality control is significant. Driven not only for meeting product specification and economic goals, refiners must also satisfy new purchaser demands. That is, the emphasis to monitor product quality on-line in an accurate, timely manner is greater now than ever, due largely to the expanding use of statistical methods (SQC/SPC) in analyzing and manipulating process operation. Consequently, the need for reliable composition control is essential in maintaining refinery prosperity. Process gas chromatographs are frequently used to monitor the performance of distillation, absorption and stripping towers by providing near-real-time stream composition, particular component concentration, or calculated parameter (Rvp, Btu content, etc.) information. This paper reports that appreciably greater benefit can be achieved when process gas chromatographs (or GCs) provide on-line feedback data to process control schemes.

  12. Essays on refining markets and environmental policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oladunjoye, Olusegun Akintunde

    This thesis is comprised of three essays. The first two essays examine empirically the relationship between crude oil price and wholesale gasoline prices in the U.S. petroleum refining industry while the third essay determines the optimal combination of emissions tax and environmental research and development (ER&D) subsidy when firms organize ER&D either competitively or as a research joint venture (RJV). In the first essay, we estimate an error correction model to determine the effects of market structure on the speed of adjustment of wholesale gasoline prices, to crude oil price changes. The results indicate that market structure does not have a strong effect on the dynamics of price adjustment in the three regional markets examined. In the second essay, we allow for inventories to affect the relationship between crude oil and wholesale gasoline prices by allowing them to affect the probability of regime change in a Markov-switching model of the refining margin. We find that low gasoline inventory increases the probability of switching from the low margin regime to the high margin regime and also increases the probability of staying in the high margin regime. This is consistent with the predictions of the competitive storage theory. In the third essay, we extend the Industrial Organization R&D theory to the determination of optimal environmental policies. We find that RJV is socially desirable. In comparison to competitive ER&D, we suggest that regulators should encourage RJV with a lower emissions tax and higher subsidy as these will lead to the coordination of ER&D activities and eliminate duplication of efforts while firms internalize their technological spillover externality.

  13. Error bounds from extra precise iterative refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Demmel, James; Hida, Yozo; Kahan, William; Li, Xiaoye S.; Mukherjee, Soni; Riedy, E. Jason

    2005-02-07

    We present the design and testing of an algorithm for iterative refinement of the solution of linear equations, where the residual is computed with extra precision. This algorithm was originally proposed in the 1960s [6, 22] as a means to compute very accurate solutions to all but the most ill-conditioned linear systems of equations. However two obstacles have until now prevented its adoption in standard subroutine libraries like LAPACK: (1) There was no standard way to access the higher precision arithmetic needed to compute residuals, and (2) it was unclear how to compute a reliable error bound for the computed solution. The completion of the new BLAS Technical Forum Standard [5] has recently removed the first obstacle. To overcome the second obstacle, we show how a single application of iterative refinement can be used to compute an error bound in any norm at small cost, and use this to compute both an error bound in the usual infinity norm, and a componentwise relative error bound. We report extensive test results on over 6.2 million matrices of dimension 5, 10, 100, and 1000. As long as a normwise (resp. componentwise) condition number computed by the algorithm is less than 1/max{l_brace}10,{radical}n{r_brace} {var_epsilon}{sub w}, the computed normwise (resp. componentwise) error bound is at most 2 max{l_brace}10,{radical}n{r_brace} {center_dot} {var_epsilon}{sub w}, and indeed bounds the true error. Here, n is the matrix dimension and w is single precision roundoff error. For worse conditioned problems, we get similarly small correct error bounds in over 89.4% of cases.

  14. 40 CFR 409.30 - Applicability; description of the liquid cane sugar refining subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... liquid cane sugar refining subcategory. 409.30 Section 409.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Cane Sugar Refining Subcategory § 409.30 Applicability; description of the liquid cane sugar refining... cane sugar into liquid refined sugar....

  15. Iron economy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Glaesener, Anne G.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.

    2013-01-01

    While research on iron nutrition in plants has largely focused on iron-uptake pathways, photosynthetic microbes such as the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii provide excellent experimental systems for understanding iron metabolism at the subcellular level. Several paradigms in iron homeostasis have been established in this alga, including photosystem remodeling in the chloroplast and preferential retention of some pathways and key iron-dependent proteins in response to suboptimal iron supply. This review presents our current understanding of iron homeostasis in Chlamydomonas, with specific attention on characterized responses to changes in iron supply, like iron-deficiency. An overview of frequently used methods for the investigation of iron-responsive gene expression, physiology and metabolism is also provided, including preparation of media, the effect of cell size, cell density and strain choice on quantitative measurements and methods for the determination of metal content and assessing the effect of iron supply on photosynthetic performance. PMID:24032036

  16. On macromolecular refinement at subatomic resolution withinteratomic scatterers

    SciTech Connect

    Afonine, Pavel V.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Adams, Paul D.; Lunin, Vladimir Y.; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre

    2007-11-09

    A study of the accurate electron density distribution in molecular crystals at subatomic resolution, better than {approx} 1.0 {angstrom}, requires more detailed models than those based on independent spherical atoms. A tool conventionally used in small-molecule crystallography is the multipolar model. Even at upper resolution limits of 0.8-1.0 {angstrom}, the number of experimental data is insufficient for the full multipolar model refinement. As an alternative, a simpler model composed of conventional independent spherical atoms augmented by additional scatterers to model bonding effects has been proposed. Refinement of these mixed models for several benchmark datasets gave results comparable in quality with results of multipolar refinement and superior of those for conventional models. Applications to several datasets of both small- and macro-molecules are shown. These refinements were performed using the general-purpose macromolecular refinement module phenix.refine of the PHENIX package.

  17. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Weare, J.; Ong, E.; Baden, S.

    1996-12-01

    We have applied structured adaptive mesh refinement techniques to the solution of the LDA equations for electronic structure calculations. Local spatial refinement concentrates memory resources and numerical effort where it is most needed, near the atomic centers and in regions of rapidly varying charge density. The structured grid representation enables us to employ efficient iterative solver techniques such as conjugate gradients with multigrid preconditioning. We have parallelized our solver using an object-oriented adaptive mesh refinement framework.

  18. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  19. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  20. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  1. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  2. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  3. High Speed Photography Of Wood Pulping In A Disc Refiner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atack, D.; Clayton, D. L.; Quinn, A. E.; Stationwala, M. I.

    1985-02-01

    Some of the mechanisms involved in the reduction of wood chips to papermaking pulp in a commercial disc refiner have been determined by high speed photography. Flow patterns of pulp through the refiner, including an unexpected recirculation pattern, have been recorded. Cine-photography was also employed to show how wood chips are transported by a ribbon screw feeder into the refiner. Some aspects of photographing in a hostile environment are described. The following salient observations have been made during these studies. Chips and dilution water fall to the base of the feeder housing and are fed along it to the refiner eye, where the chips are reduced to coarse pulp. This coarse pulp proceeds through the breaker bars into the refining zone. Some pulp in the inner part of the refining zone flows back to the breaker bars along grooves of the stationary plates, giving rise to considerable recirculation. Pulp in the outer part of the refining zone moves radially outwards. For a short fraction of its passage through the refiner, most of the fibrous material is constrained to move in the direction of rotation of the moving plates. Some of this material is stapled momentarily in a tangential orientation across the bars of both sets of plates. The immobilized fibres are then subjected to the refining action between the relatively moving bars before being disgorged into the adjacent grooves.

  4. New Process for Grain Refinement of Aluminum. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Joseph A. Megy

    2000-09-22

    A new method of grain refining aluminum involving in-situ formation of boride nuclei in molten aluminum just prior to casting has been developed in the subject DOE program over the last thirty months by a team consisting of JDC, Inc., Alcoa Technical Center, GRAS, Inc., Touchstone Labs, and GKS Engineering Services. The Manufacturing process to make boron trichloride for grain refining is much simpler than preparing conventional grain refiners, with attendant environmental, capital, and energy savings. The manufacture of boride grain refining nuclei using the fy-Gem process avoids clusters, salt and oxide inclusions that cause quality problems in aluminum today.

  5. Improved ligand geometries in crystallographic refinement using AFITT in PHENIX.

    PubMed

    Janowski, Pawel A; Moriarty, Nigel W; Kelley, Brian P; Case, David A; York, Darrin M; Adams, Paul D; Warren, Gregory L

    2016-09-01

    Modern crystal structure refinement programs rely on geometry restraints to overcome the challenge of a low data-to-parameter ratio. While the classical Engh and Huber restraints work well for standard amino-acid residues, the chemical complexity of small-molecule ligands presents a particular challenge. Most current approaches either limit ligand restraints to those that can be readily described in the Crystallographic Information File (CIF) format, thus sacrificing chemical flexibility and energetic accuracy, or they employ protocols that substantially lengthen the refinement time, potentially hindering rapid automated refinement workflows. PHENIX-AFITT refinement uses a full molecular-mechanics force field for user-selected small-molecule ligands during refinement, eliminating the potentially difficult problem of finding or generating high-quality geometry restraints. It is fully integrated with a standard refinement protocol and requires practically no additional steps from the user, making it ideal for high-throughput workflows. PHENIX-AFITT refinements also handle multiple ligands in a single model, alternate conformations and covalently bound ligands. Here, the results of combining AFITT and the PHENIX software suite on a data set of 189 protein-ligand PDB structures are presented. Refinements using PHENIX-AFITT significantly reduce ligand conformational energy and lead to improved geometries without detriment to the fit to the experimental data. For the data presented, PHENIX-AFITT refinements result in more chemically accurate models for small-molecule ligands. PMID:27599738

  6. Refiners react to changes in the pipeline infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, K.A.

    1997-06-01

    Petroleum pipelines have long been a critical component in the distribution of crude and refined products in the U.S. Pipelines are typically the most cost efficient mode of transportation for reasonably consistent flow rates. For obvious reasons, inland refineries and consumers are much more dependent on petroleum pipelines to provide supplies of crude and refined products than refineries and consumers located on the coasts. Significant changes in U.S. distribution patterns for crude and refined products are reshaping the pipeline infrastructure and presenting challenges and opportunities for domestic refiners. These changes are discussed.

  7. Adaptive h -refinement for reduced-order models: ADAPTIVE h -refinement for reduced-order models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carlberg, Kevin T.

    2014-11-05

    Our work presents a method to adaptively refine reduced-order models a posteriori without requiring additional full-order-model solves. The technique is analogous to mesh-adaptive h-refinement: it enriches the reduced-basis space online by ‘splitting’ a given basis vector into several vectors with disjoint support. The splitting scheme is defined by a tree structure constructed offline via recursive k-means clustering of the state variables using snapshot data. This method identifies the vectors to split online using a dual-weighted-residual approach that aims to reduce error in an output quantity of interest. The resulting method generates a hierarchy of subspaces online without requiring large-scale operationsmore » or full-order-model solves. Furthermore, it enables the reduced-order model to satisfy any prescribed error tolerance regardless of its original fidelity, as a completely refined reduced-order model is mathematically equivalent to the original full-order model. Experiments on a parameterized inviscid Burgers equation highlight the ability of the method to capture phenomena (e.g., moving shocks) not contained in the span of the original reduced basis.« less

  8. Coal desulfurization. [using iron pentacarbonyl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Organic sulfur is removed from coal by treatment with an organic solution of iron pentacarbonyl. Organic sulfur compounds can be removed by reaction of the iron pentacarbonyl with coal to generate CO and COS off-gases. The CO gas separated from COS can be passed over hot iron fillings to generate iron pentacarbonyl.

  9. Effect of Ti additive on (Cr, Fe)7C3 carbide in arc surfacing layer and its refined mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yefei; Yang, Yulin; Yang, Jian; Hao, Feifei; Li, Da; Ren, Xuejun; Yang, Qingxiang

    2012-06-01

    Arc surfacing layer of hypoeutectic high chromium cast iron (HCCI) expects refiner carbides in the microstructure to improve its mechanical properties. In this paper, Ti additive as a strong carbide forming element was added in the hypoeutectic HCCI arc surfacing layer. Microstructure of titaniferous hypoeutectic HCCI was studied by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electronic microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometer. Furthermore, the M(M = Cr, Fe)7C3 carbide refinement mechanism was explained by the phase diagram calculation and lattice misfit theory. The results show that, the M7C3 carbide in arc surfacing microstructure of hypoeutectic HCCI has been refined with 2 wt.% Ti additive, and TiC carbide can be observed in/around the M7C3 carbide. With Ti addictive increasing, the micro-hardness along the depth in profile section of layer becomes more uniform, and the wear resistance has been improved. According to the phase diagram calculation, MC carbide precipitates prior to M7C3 carbide in Fe-Cr-C-Ti alloy. In addition, the lattice misfit between (1 1 0)TiC and (0C is 9.257%, which indicates that the TiC as heterogeneous nuclei of the M7C3 is medium effective. Therefore, the M7C3 carbide can be refined.

  10. Iron in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some foods reduce iron absorption. For example, commercial black or pekoe teas contain substances that bind to ... nih.gov/pubmed/19297463 . Mason JB. Vitamins, trace minerals, and other micronutrients. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, ...

  11. Refined seismic stratigraphy in prograding carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Pomar, L. )

    1991-03-01

    Complete exposure of the upper Miocene Reef Complex in the sea cliffs of Mallorca (Spain) allows for a more refined interpretation of seismic lines with similar progradational patterns. A 6 km long high-resolution cross section in the direction of reef progradation displays four hierarchical orders of accretional units. Although all these units are of higher order, they all exhibit similar characteristics as a third order depositional sequence and can likewise be interpreted as the result of high order sea-level cycles. The accretional units are composed of lagoonal horizontal beds, reefal sigmoids and gently dipping slope deposits. They are bounded by erosion surfaces at the top and basinwards by their correlative conformities. These architectural patterns are similar to progradational sequences seen on seismic lines. On seismic lines, the progradational pattern often shows the following geometrical details: (1) discontinuous climbing high-energy reflectors, (2) truncation of clinoforms by these high-energy reflectors with seaward dips, (3) transparent areas intercalated between clinoforms. Based on facies distribution in the outcrops of Mallorca the high-energy reflectors are interpreted as sectors where the erosion surfaces truncated the reef wall and are overlain by lagoonal sediments deposited during the following sealevel rise. The more transparent zones seem to correspond with areas of superposition of undifferentiated lagoonal beds. Offlapping geometries can also be detected in highest quality seismic lines. The comparison between seismic and outcrop data provides a more accurate prediction of lithologies, facies distribution, and reservoir properties on seismic profiles.

  12. Electron beam cold hearth refining in Vallejo

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, J.H.C.

    1994-12-31

    Electron Beam Cold Hearth Refining Furnace (EBCHR) in Vallejo, California is alive, well, and girding itself for developing new markets. A brief review of the twelve years experience with EBCHR in Vallejo. Acquisition of the Vallejo facility by Axel Johnson Metals, Inc. paves the way for the development of new products and markets. A discussion of some of the new opportunities for the advancement of EBCHR technology. Discussed are advantages to the EBCHR process which include: extended surface area of molten metal exposed to higher vacuum; liberation of insoluble oxide particles to the surface of the melt; higher temperatures that allowed coarse solid particles like carbides and carbonitrides to be suspended in the fluid metal as fine micro-segregates, and enhanced removal of volatile trace impurities like lead, bismuth and cadmium. Future work for the company includes the continued recycling of alloys and also fabricating stainless steel for the piping of chip assembly plants. This is to prevent `killer defects` that ruin a memory chip.

  13. Spatially Refined Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing Efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henze, Daven K.; Shindell, Drew Todd; Akhtar, Farhan; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Pinder, Robert W.; Loughlin, Dan; Kopacz, Monika; Singh, Kumaresh; Shim, Changsub

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is an important metric for assessing potential climate impacts of future emissions changes. However, the radiative consequences of emissions perturbations are not readily quantified nor well understood at the level of detail necessary to assess realistic policy options. To address this challenge, here we show how adjoint model sensitivities can be used to provide highly spatially resolved estimates of the DRF from emissions of black carbon (BC), primary organic carbon (OC), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ammonia (NH3), using the example of emissions from each sector and country following multiple Representative Concentration Pathway (RCPs). The radiative forcing efficiencies of many individual emissions are found to differ considerably from regional or sectoral averages for NH3, SO2 from the power sector, and BC from domestic, industrial, transportation and biomass burning sources. Consequently, the amount of emissions controls required to attain a specific DRF varies at intracontinental scales by up to a factor of 4. These results thus demonstrate both a need and means for incorporating spatially refined aerosol DRF into analysis of future emissions scenario and design of air quality and climate change mitigation policies.

  14. Refining clinical diagnosis with likelihood ratios.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David A; Schulz, Kenneth F

    Likelihood ratios can refine clinical diagnosis on the basis of signs and symptoms; however, they are underused for patients' care. A likelihood ratio is the percentage of ill people with a given test result divided by the percentage of well individuals with the same result. Ideally, abnormal test results should be much more typical in ill individuals than in those who are well (high likelihood ratio) and normal test results should be most frequent in well people than in sick people (low likelihood ratio). Likelihood ratios near unity have little effect on decision-making; by contrast, high or low ratios can greatly shift the clinician's estimate of the probability of disease. Likelihood ratios can be calculated not only for dichotomous (positive or negative) tests but also for tests with multiple levels of results, such as creatine kinase or ventilation-perfusion scans. When combined with an accurate clinical diagnosis, likelihood ratios from ancillary tests improve diagnostic accuracy in a synergistic manner. PMID:15850636

  15. Transhiatal Esophagectomy: Clinical Experience and Refinements

    PubMed Central

    Orringer, Mark B.; Marshall, Becky; Iannettoni, Mark D.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To review the authors’ clinical experience with transhiatal esophagectomy (THE) and the refinements in this procedure that have evolved. Background Increased use of THE during the past two decades has generated controversy about the merits and safety of this approach compared with transthoracic esophageal resection. The authors’ large THE experience provides a valuable basis for benchmarking data regarding the procedure. Methods The results of THE were analyzed retrospectively using the authors’ prospectively established esophageal resection database and follow-up information on these patients. Results From 1976 to 1998, THE was performed in 1085 patients, 26% with benign disease and 74% with cancer. The procedure was possible in 98.6% of cases. Stomach was the esophageal substitute in 96%. The hospital mortality rate was 4%. Blood loss averaged 689 cc. Major complications were anastomotic leak (13%), atelectasis/pneumonia (2%), intrathoracic hemorrhage, recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis, chylothorax, and tracheal laceration (<1% each). Actuarial survival of patients with carcinoma equaled or exceeded that reported after transthoracic esophagectomy. Late functional results were good or excellent in 70%. With preoperative pulmonary and physical conditioning, a side-to-side stapled cervical esophagogastric anastomosis (<3% incidence of leak), and postoperative epidural anesthesia, the need for an intensive care unit stay has been eliminated and the length of stay reduced to 7 days. Conclusion THE is possible in most patients requiring esophageal resection and can be performed with greater safety and fewer complications than the traditional transthoracic approaches. PMID:10493486

  16. Elliptic Solvers for Adaptive Mesh Refinement Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D.J.; Dendy, J.E., Jr.; Shapira, Y.

    1999-06-03

    We are developing multigrid methods that will efficiently solve elliptic problems with anisotropic and discontinuous coefficients on adaptive grids. The final product will be a library that provides for the simplified solution of such problems. This library will directly benefit the efforts of other Laboratory groups. The focus of this work is research on serial and parallel elliptic algorithms and the inclusion of our black-box multigrid techniques into this new setting. The approach applies the Los Alamos object-oriented class libraries that greatly simplify the development of serial and parallel adaptive mesh refinement applications. In the final year of this LDRD, we focused on putting the software together; in particular we completed the final AMR++ library, we wrote tutorials and manuals, and we built example applications. We implemented the Fast Adaptive Composite Grid method as the principal elliptic solver. We presented results at the Overset Grid Conference and other more AMR specific conferences. We worked on optimization of serial and parallel performance and published several papers on the details of this work. Performance remains an important issue and is the subject of continuing research work.

  17. A parallel adaptive mesh refinement algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, James J.; Hanebutte, Ulf R.

    1993-01-01

    Over recent years, Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) algorithms which dynamically match the local resolution of the computational grid to the numerical solution being sought have emerged as powerful tools for solving problems that contain disparate length and time scales. In particular, several workers have demonstrated the effectiveness of employing an adaptive, block-structured hierarchical grid system for simulations of complex shock wave phenomena. Unfortunately, from the parallel algorithm developer's viewpoint, this class of scheme is quite involved; these schemes cannot be distilled down to a small kernel upon which various parallelizing strategies may be tested. However, because of their block-structured nature such schemes are inherently parallel, so all is not lost. In this paper we describe the method by which Quirk's AMR algorithm has been parallelized. This method is built upon just a few simple message passing routines and so it may be implemented across a broad class of MIMD machines. Moreover, the method of parallelization is such that the original serial code is left virtually intact, and so we are left with just a single product to support. The importance of this fact should not be underestimated given the size and complexity of the original algorithm.

  18. Time Critical Isosurface Refinement and Smoothing

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, V.; Bajaj, C.L.

    2000-07-10

    Multi-resolution data-structures and algorithms are key in Visualization to achieve real-time interaction with large data-sets. Research has been primarily focused on the off-line construction of such representations mostly using decimation schemes. Drawbacks of this class of approaches include: (i) the inability to maintain interactivity when the displayed surface changes frequently, (ii) inability to control the global geometry of the embedding (no self-intersections) of any approximated level of detail of the output surface. In this paper we introduce a technique for on-line construction and smoothing of progressive isosurfaces. Our hybrid approach combines the flexibility of a progressive multi-resolution representation with the advantages of a recursive sub-division scheme. Our main contributions are: (i) a progressive algorithm that builds a multi-resolution surface by successive refinements so that a coarse representation of the output is generated as soon as a coarse representation of the input is provided, (ii) application of the same scheme to smooth the surface by means of a 3D recursive subdivision rule, (iii) a multi-resolution representation where any adaptively selected level of detail surface is guaranteed to be free of self-intersections.

  19. Refining and blending of aviation turbine fuels.

    PubMed

    White, R D

    1999-02-01

    Aviation turbine fuels (jet fuels) are similar to other petroleum products that have a boiling range of approximately 300F to 550F. Kerosene and No.1 grades of fuel oil, diesel fuel, and gas turbine oil share many similar physical and chemical properties with jet fuel. The similarity among these products should allow toxicology data on one material to be extrapolated to the others. Refineries in the USA manufacture jet fuel to meet industry standard specifications. Civilian aircraft primarily use Jet A or Jet A-1 fuel as defined by ASTM D 1655. Military aircraft use JP-5 or JP-8 fuel as defined by MIL-T-5624R or MIL-T-83133D respectively. The freezing point and flash point are the principle differences between the finished fuels. Common refinery processes that produce jet fuel include distillation, caustic treatment, hydrotreating, and hydrocracking. Each of these refining processes may be the final step to produce jet fuel. Sometimes blending of two or more of these refinery process streams are needed to produce jet fuel that meets the desired specifications. Chemical additives allowed for use in jet fuel are also defined in the product specifications. In many cases, the customer rather than the refinery will put additives into the fuel to meet their specific storage or flight condition requirements. PMID:10189575

  20. Astrocytes refine cortical connectivity at dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Risher, W Christopher; Patel, Sagar; Kim, Il Hwan; Uezu, Akiyoshi; Bhagat, Srishti; Wilton, Daniel K; Pilaz, Louis-Jan; Singh Alvarado, Jonnathan; Calhan, Osman Y; Silver, Debra L; Stevens, Beth; Calakos, Nicole; Soderling, Scott H; Eroglu, Cagla

    2014-01-01

    During cortical synaptic development, thalamic axons must establish synaptic connections despite the presence of the more abundant intracortical projections. How thalamocortical synapses are formed and maintained in this competitive environment is unknown. Here, we show that astrocyte-secreted protein hevin is required for normal thalamocortical synaptic connectivity in the mouse cortex. Absence of hevin results in a profound, long-lasting reduction in thalamocortical synapses accompanied by a transient increase in intracortical excitatory connections. Three-dimensional reconstructions of cortical neurons from serial section electron microscopy (ssEM) revealed that, during early postnatal development, dendritic spines often receive multiple excitatory inputs. Immuno-EM and confocal analyses revealed that majority of the spines with multiple excitatory contacts (SMECs) receive simultaneous thalamic and cortical inputs. Proportion of SMECs diminishes as the brain develops, but SMECs remain abundant in Hevin-null mice. These findings reveal that, through secretion of hevin, astrocytes control an important developmental synaptic refinement process at dendritic spines. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04047.001 PMID:25517933

  1. Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Sri R. (Inventor); Prakash, G.K. Surya (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments include an iron-air rechargeable battery having a composite electrode including an iron electrode and a hydrogen electrode integrated therewith. An air electrode is spaced from the iron electrode and an electrolyte is provided in contact with the air electrode and the iron electrodes. Various additives and catalysts are disclosed with respect to the iron electrode, air electrode, and electrolyte for increasing battery efficiency and cycle life.

  2. Iron deficiency in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Lawrence P

    2010-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) and related anaemia (IDA) during pregnancy are highly prevalent worldwide in both developed and developing nations although the causes are often different. At conception, many women lack sufficient iron stores to meet the increased requirements of pregnancy, which are calculated at approximately 1200 mg. Appraisal of iron status in pregnant women is problematic, however the most reliable available diagnostic test is a serum ferritin < 20 µg/L. ID is often associated with other nutritional disorders, and there is frequently a secondary cause or association. A greater oral intake is usually insufficient to meet the increased demands of pregnancy, however regular oral supplements (given either daily or intermittently) can often meet maternal needs and avoid associated neonatal complications of IDA. Over-treatment with iron should be avoided, but intravenous administration is useful when deficiency is discovered late, is severe, or if the woman is intolerant of oral formulations. This paper reviews the current literature, and addresses differences in the prevalence and causes of ID betwen developed and developing nations. It examines gestational iron requirements, distinguishes between ID and IDA, and highlights difficulties in diagnostic testing. Finally, it appraises the evidence for and against different treatment regimens, ranging from food fortification to intravenous iron infusions, according to availability and to need.

  3. An update on iron physiology

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Manuel; Villar, Isabel; García-Erce, José Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient, as it is required for adequate erythropoietic function, oxidative metabolism and cellular immune responses. Although the absorption of dietary iron (1-2 mg/d) is regulated tightly, it is just balanced with losses. Therefore, internal turnover of iron is essential to meet the requirements for erythropoiesis (20-30 mg/d). Increased iron requirements, limited external supply, and increased blood loss may lead to iron deficiency (ID) and iron-deficiency anemia. Hepcidin, which is made primarily in hepatocytes in response to liver iron levels, inflammation, hypoxia and anemia, is the main iron regulatory hormone. Once secreted into the circulation, hepcidin binds ferroportin on enterocytes and macrophages, which triggers its internalization and lysosomal degradation. Thus, in chronic inflammation, the excess of hepcidin decreases iron absorption and prevents iron recycling, which results in hypoferremia and iron-restricted erythropoiesis, despite normal iron stores (functional ID), and anemia of chronic disease (ACD), which can evolve to ACD plus true ID (ACD + ID). In contrast, low hepcidin expression may lead to iron overload, and vice versa. Laboratory tests provide evidence of iron depletion in the body, or reflect iron-deficient red cell production. The appropriate combination of these laboratory tests help to establish a correct diagnosis of ID status and anemia. PMID:19787824

  4. 21 CFR 184.1375 - Iron, elemental.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron, elemental. 184.1375 Section 184.1375 Food... GRAS § 184.1375 Iron, elemental. (a) Iron, elemental (CAS Reg. No. 7439-89-6) is metallic iron obtained by any of the following processes: reduced iron, electrolytic iron, and carbonyl iron. (1)...

  5. Trends in catalysis research to meet future refining needs

    SciTech Connect

    Absi-Halabi, M.; Stanislaus, A.; Qabazard, H.

    1997-02-01

    The main emphasis of petroleum refining during the `70s and early `80s was to maximize conversion of heavy oils to gasoline and middle distillate products. While this objective is still important, the current focus that began in the late `80s is to develop cleaner products. This is a result of strict environmental constraints to reduce emissions from both the products and refineries. Developing catalysts with improved activity, selectivity and stability for use in processes producing such environmentally acceptable fuels is the most economical and effective route for refiners. Novel technologies such as biocatalysis and catalytic membranes are examples of current successful laboratory-scale attempts to resolve anticipated future industry problems. Since catalysts play a key role in refining processes, it is important to examine the challenges facing catalysis research to meet future refining developments. The paper discusses the factors influencing refining, advancements in refining technology and catalysis, short-term future trends in refining catalysts research, and long-term trends in refining catalysts. 56 refs.

  6. 21. INTERIOR VIEW OF REFINING MILL, SHOWING LOCATIONS OF NOS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. INTERIOR VIEW OF REFINING MILL, SHOWING LOCATIONS OF NOS. 1, 2, AND 3 MILLS, LOOKING SOUTH. SOME OF THE MACHINERY IN THIS SECTION HAS BEEN REMOVED. - Clay Spur Bentonite Plant & Camp, Refining Mill, Clay Spur Siding on Burlington Northern Railroad, Osage, Weston County, WY

  7. Solvent refining of lube oils the MP advantage

    SciTech Connect

    Jahnke, F.C.

    1986-01-01

    The current trend in lube oil solvent refining is towards the increased use of MP (N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone) as the solvent. This paper explains why by providing an economic analysis of using MP versus furfural refining. Included are a grassroots comparison; an analysis of converting an existing unit to MP; and a brief review of why MP provides an advantage.

  8. Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    This report summarizes revisions to the design basis for the linear programing refining model that is being used in the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. This revision primarily reflects the addition of data for the upgrading of direct coal liquids.

  9. Refining primary lead by granulation-leaching-electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojebuoboh, F.; Wang, S.; Maccagni, M.

    2003-04-01

    This article describes the development of a new process in which lead bullion obtained from smelting concentrates is refined by leaching-electrowinning. In the last half century, the challenge to treat and refine lead in order to minimize emissions of lead and lead compounds has intensified. Within the primary lead industry, the treatment aspect has transformed from the sinter-blast furnace model to direct smelting, creating gains in hygiene, environmental control, and efficiency. The refining aspect has remained based on kettle refining, or to a lesser extent, the Betts electrolytic refining. In the mid-1990s, Asarco investigated a concept based on granulating the lead bullion from the blast furnace. The granular material was fed into the Engitec Fluobor process. This work resulted in the operation of a 45 kg/d pilot plant that could produce lead sheets of 99.9% purity.

  10. Image denoising filter based on patch-based difference refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Wook; Kang, Moon Gi

    2012-06-01

    In the denoising literature, research based on the nonlocal means (NLM) filter has been done and there have been many variations and improvements regarding weight function and parameter optimization. Here, a NLM filter with patch-based difference (PBD) refinement is presented. PBD refinement, which is the weighted average of the PBD values, is performed with respect to the difference images of all the locations in a refinement kernel. With refined and denoised PBD values, pattern adaptive smoothing threshold and noise suppressed NLM filter weights are calculated. Owing to the refinement of the PBD values, the patterns are divided into flat regions and texture regions by comparing the sorted values in the PBD domain to the threshold value including the noise standard deviation. Then, two different smoothing thresholds are utilized for each region denoising, respectively, and the NLM filter is applied finally. Experimental results of the proposed scheme are shown in comparison with several state-of-the-arts NLM based denoising methods.

  11. Novel process for recycling magnesium alloy employing refining and solid oxide membrane electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaofei

    Magnesium is the least dense engineering metal, with an excellent stiffness-to-weight ratio. Magnesium recycling is important for both economic and environmental reasons. This project demonstrates feasibility of a new environmentally friendly process for recycling partially oxidized magnesium scrap to produce very pure magnesium at low cost. It combines refining and solid oxide membrane (SOM) based oxide electrolysis in the same reactor. Magnesium and its oxide are dissolved in a molten flux. This is followed by argon-assisted evaporation of dissolved magnesium, which is subsequently condensed in a separate condenser. The molten flux acts as a selective medium for magnesium dissolution, but not aluminum or iron, and therefore the magnesium collected has high purity. Potentiodynamic scans are performed to monitor the magnesium content change in the scrap as well as in solution in the flux. The SOM electrolysis is employed in the refining system to enable electrolysis of the magnesium oxide dissolved in the flux from the partially oxidized scrap. During the SOM electrolysis, oxygen anions are transported out of the flux through a yttria stabilized zirconia membrane to a liquid silver anode where they are oxidized. Simultaneously, magnesium cations are transported through the flux to a steel cathode where they are reduced. The combination of refining and SOM electrolysis yields close to 100% removal of magnesium metal from partially oxidized magnesium scrap. The magnesium recovered has a purity of 99.6w%. To produce pure oxygen it is critical to develop an inert anode current collector for use with the non-consumable liquid silver anode. In this work, an innovative inert anode current collector is successfully developed and used in SOM electrolysis experiments. The current collector employs a sintered strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (La0.8Sr0.2MnO 3-delta or LSM) bar, an Inconel alloy 601 rod, and a liquid silver contact in between. SOM electrolysis experiments

  12. Reitveld refinement study of PLZT ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rakesh; Bavbande, D. V.; Bafna, V. H.; Mohan, D.; Kothiyal, G. P.; Mishra, R.

    2013-02-05

    PLZT ceramics of composition Pb{sub 0.93}La{sub 0.07}(Zr{sub 0.60}Ti{sub 0.40})O{sub 3}, have been milled for 6hrs and 24hrs were prepared by solid state synthesis route. The 6hrs milled and 24hrs milled samples are represented as PLZT-6 and PLZT-24 ceramics respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern was recorded at room temperature. The XRD pattern has been analyzed by employing Rietveld refinement method. Phase identification shows that all the peaks observed in PLZT-6 and PLZT-24 ceramics could be indexed to P4mm space group with tetragonal symmetry. The unit cell parameters of 6hrs milled PLZT ceramics are found to be a=b=4.0781(5)A and c=4.0938(7)A and for 24hrs milled PLZT ceramics unit cell parameters are a=b=4.0679(4)A and c=4.1010(5)A . The axial ratio c/a and unit cell volume of PLZT-6 are 1.0038 and 68.09(2)A{sup 3} respectively. In PLZT-24 samples, the axial ratio c/a value is 1.0080 which is little more than that of the 6hr milled PLZT sample whereas the unit cell volume decrease to 67.88 (1) A{sup 3}. An average crystallite size was estimated by using Scherrer's formula. Dielectric properties were obtained by measuring the capacitance and tand loss using Stanford LCR meter.

  13. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  14. Iron absorption in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-05-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  15. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  16. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  17. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  18. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  19. Multiple-shocks induced nanocrystallization in iron

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Tomoki; Hirose, Akio; Sano, Tomokazu; Arakawa, Kazuto

    2014-07-14

    We found that multiple shots of femtosecond laser-driven shock pulses changed coarse crystalline iron grains with a size of 140 μm into nanocrystals with a high density of dislocations, which had never been observed in conventional shock processes. We performed metallurgical microstructure observations using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and hardness measurements using nanoindentation on cross-sections of shocked iron. TEM images showed that grains with sizes from 10 nm through 1 μm exist within 2 μm of the surface, where the dislocation density reached 2 × 10{sup 15 }m{sup −2}. Results of the hardness measurements showed a significant increase in hardness in the nanocrystallized region. We suggest that the formation of a high density of dislocations, which is produced by a single shock, induces local three-dimensional pile-up by the multiple-shocks, which causes grain refinement at the nanoscale.

  20. Mammalian iron metabolism and its control by iron regulatory proteins☆

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cole P.; Shen, Lacy; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular iron homeostasis is maintained by iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP1 and IRP2). IRPs bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) located in the untranslated regions of mRNAs encoding protein involved in iron uptake, storage, utilization and export. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in understanding how IRPs are regulated by iron-dependent and iron-independent mechanisms and the pathological consequences of IRP2 deficiency in mice. The identification of novel IREs involved in diverse cellular pathways has revealed that the IRP–IRE network extends to processes other than iron homeostasis. A mechanistic understanding of IRP regulation will likely yield important insights into the basis of disorders of iron metabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. PMID:22610083

  1. Iron-sensitive fluorescent probes: monitoring intracellular iron pools.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongmin; Abbate, V; Hider, R C

    2015-02-01

    Several iron-sensitive fluorophores have been investigated in a range of cell types in order to quantify iron(II) levels in the cytosol and the cytoplasm. Both iron(II) and iron(III) cause fluorescence quenching of these probes and changes in cytosolic iron levels can be monitored in a reproducible manner. However the precise quantification of iron(II) in the cytosol is complicated by the uncertainty of the structure of many of the quenched species that exist under in vivo conditions. Precise knowledge of these structures is essential for quantitative purposes. The lysosomal and mitochondrial iron pools have only been the subject of relatively few studies at the time of writing. Calcein-AM has been widely adopted for the monitoring of changes in iron levels in a range different cell types. PMID:25315476

  2. REFMAC5 for the refinement of macromolecular crystal structures

    PubMed Central

    Murshudov, Garib N.; Skubák, Pavol; Lebedev, Andrey A.; Pannu, Navraj S.; Steiner, Roberto A.; Nicholls, Robert A.; Winn, Martyn D.; Long, Fei; Vagin, Alexei A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes various components of the macromolecular crystallographic refinement program REFMAC5, which is distributed as part of the CCP4 suite. REFMAC5 utilizes different likelihood functions depending on the diffraction data employed (amplitudes or intensities), the presence of twinning and the availability of SAD/SIRAS experimental diffraction data. To ensure chemical and structural integrity of the refined model, REFMAC5 offers several classes of restraints and choices of model parameterization. Reliable models at resolutions at least as low as 4 Å can be achieved thanks to low-resolution refinement tools such as secondary-structure restraints, restraints to known homologous structures, automatic global and local NCS restraints, ‘jelly-body’ restraints and the use of novel long-range restraints on atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) based on the Kullback–Leibler divergence. REFMAC5 additionally offers TLS parameterization and, when high-resolution data are available, fast refinement of anisotropic ADPs. Refinement in the presence of twinning is performed in a fully automated fashion. REFMAC5 is a flexible and highly optimized refinement package that is ideally suited for refinement across the entire resolution spectrum encountered in macromolecular crystallography. PMID:21460454

  3. Querying genomic databases: refining the connectivity map.

    PubMed

    Segal, Mark R; Xiong, Hao; Bengtsson, Henrik; Bourgon, Richard; Gentleman, Robert

    2012-01-01

    constitutes an ordered list. These involve using metrics proposed for analyzing partially ranked data, these being of interest in their own right and not widely used. Secondly, we advance an alternate inferential approach based on generating empirical null distributions that exploit the scope, and capture dependencies, embodied by the database. Using these refinements we undertake a comprehensive re-evaluation of Connectivity Map findings that, in general terms, reveal that accommodating ordered queries is less critical than the mode of inference. PMID:22499690

  4. An Environmentally Friendly Process Involving Refining and Membrane-Based Electrolysis for Magnesium Recovery from Partially Oxidized Scrap Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaofei; Pal, Uday B.; Powell, Adam C.

    2013-10-01

    Magnesium is recovered from partially oxidized scrap alloy by combining refining and solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis. In this combined process, a molten salt eutectic flux (45 wt.% MgF2-55 wt.% CaF2) containing 10 wt.% MgO and 2 wt.% YF3 was used as the medium for magnesium recovery. During refining, magnesium and its oxide are dissolved from the scrap into the molten flux. Forming gas is bubbled through the flux and the dissolved magnesium is removed via the gas phase and condensed in a separate condenser at a lower temperature. The molten flux has a finite solubility for magnesium and acts as a selective medium for magnesium dissolution, but not aluminum or iron, and therefore the magnesium recovered has high purity. After refining, SOM electrolysis is performed in the same reactor to enable electrolysis of the dissolved magnesium oxide in the molten flux producing magnesium at the cathode and oxygen at the SOM anode. During SOM electrolysis, it is necessary to decrease the concentration of the dissolved magnesium in the flux to improve the faradaic current efficiency and prevent degradation of the SOM. Thus, for both refining and SOM electrolysis, it is very important to measure and control the magnesium solubility in the molten flux. High magnesium solubility facilitates refining whereas lower solubility benefits the SOM electrolysis process. Computational fluid dynamics modeling was employed to simulate the flow behavior of the flux stirred by the forming gas. Based on the modeling results, an optimized design of the stirring tubes and its placement in the flux are determined for efficiently removing the dissolved magnesium and also increasing the efficiency of the SOM electrolysis process.

  5. Earth's core iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geophysicist J. Michael Brown of Texas A & M University noted recently at the Spring AGU Meeting in Baltimore that the structure and phase of metallic iron at pressures of the earth's inner core (approximately 3.3 Mbar) could have great significance in defining geometrical aspects of the core itself. Brown worked at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory with R.B. McQueen to redetermine the phase relations of metallic iron in a series of new shock-wave experiments. They found the melting point of iron at conditions equal to those at the boundary of the earth's outer (liquid) and inner (solid) cores to be 6000°±500°C (Geophysical Research Letters, 7, 533-536, 1980).

  6. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement within the PUMAA3D Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freitag, Lori; Jones, Mark; Plassmann, Paul

    1995-01-01

    To enable the solution of large-scale applications on distributed memory architectures, we are designing and implementing parallel algorithms for the fundamental tasks of unstructured mesh computation. In this paper, we discuss efficient algorithms developed for two of these tasks: parallel adaptive mesh refinement and mesh partitioning. The algorithms are discussed in the context of two-dimensional finite element solution on triangular meshes, but are suitable for use with a variety of element types and with h- or p-refinement. Results demonstrating the scalability and efficiency of the refinement algorithm and the quality of the mesh partitioning are presented for several test problems on the Intel DELTA.

  7. Refined numerical solution of the transonic flow past a wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, S.-M.; Fung, K.-Y.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical procedure combining the ideas of solving a modified difference equation and of adaptive mesh refinement is introduced. The numerical solution on a fixed grid is improved by using better approximations of the truncation error computed from local subdomain grid refinements. This technique is used to obtain refined solutions of steady, inviscid, transonic flow past a wedge. The effects of truncation error on the pressure distribution, wave drag, sonic line, and shock position are investigated. By comparing the pressure drag on the wedge and wave drag due to the shocks, a supersonic-to-supersonic shock originating from the wedge shoulder is confirmed.

  8. Adaptive mesh refinement for stochastic reaction-diffusion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bayati, Basil; Chatelain, Philippe; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2011-01-01

    We present an algorithm for adaptive mesh refinement applied to mesoscopic stochastic simulations of spatially evolving reaction-diffusion processes. The transition rates for the diffusion process are derived on adaptive, locally refined structured meshes. Convergence of the diffusion process is presented and the fluctuations of the stochastic process are verified. Furthermore, a refinement criterion is proposed for the evolution of the adaptive mesh. The method is validated in simulations of reaction-diffusion processes as described by the Fisher-Kolmogorov and Gray-Scott equations.

  9. INTERIOR VIEW OF IRON TREATMENT (DESULPHURIZATION) AREA. MOLTEN IRON PROCEEDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF IRON TREATMENT (DESULPHURIZATION) AREA. MOLTEN IRON PROCEEDS FROM CUPOLA TO IRON TREATMENT AREAS BEFORE BEING TRANSFERRED TO PIPE CASTING MACHINES. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Melting & Treatment Areas, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  10. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency - children ... able to absorb iron well, even though the child is eating enough iron Slow blood loss over ... bleeding in the digestive tract Iron deficiency in children can also be related to lead poisoning .

  11. Silver-iron batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstroem, O.

    1980-04-01

    Production methods for iron electrodes were studied. It was found that a sintering temperature of 700 C gave the best strength and capacity. Production methods and additions for silver electrodes were also studied. The capacity of the produced iron and silver electrodes were 1100 mAh/cu cm. Different separators were investigated. Cellophane I and II from Du Pont was found to be the best. In tests open cells achieved 60 percent of the calculated capacity. In order to minimize the increase of the pressure in closed cells different additions to the electrodes were studied.

  12. Iron Meteorite on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has found an iron meteorite on Mars, the first meteorite of any type ever identified on another planet. The pitted, basketball-size object is mostly made of iron and nickel. Readings from spectrometers on the rover determined that composition. Opportunity used its panoramic camera to take the images used in this approximately true-color composite on the rover's 339th martian day, or sol (Jan. 6, 2005). This composite combines images taken through the panoramic camera's 600-nanometer (red), 530-nanometer (green), and 480-nanometer (blue) filters.

  13. Iron in Infection and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cassat, James E.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for both humans and pathogenic microbes. Because of its ability to exist in one of two oxidation states, iron is an ideal redox catalyst for diverse cellular processes including respiration and DNA replication. However, the redox potential of iron also contributes to its toxicity, thus iron concentration and distribution must be carefully controlled. Given the absolute requirement for iron by virtually all human pathogens, an important facet of the innate immune system is to limit iron availability to invading microbes in a process termed nutritional immunity. Successful human pathogens must therefore possess mechanisms to circumvent nutritional immunity in order to cause disease. In this review, we discuss regulation of iron metabolism in the setting of infection and delineate strategies used by human pathogens to overcome iron-withholding defenses. PMID:23684303

  14. Protein degradation and iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Joel W; Bruick, Richard K

    2012-09-01

    Regulation of both systemic and cellular iron homeostasis requires the capacity to sense iron levels and appropriately modify the expression of iron metabolism genes. These responses are coordinated through the efforts of several key regulatory factors including F-box and Leucine-rich Repeat Protein 5 (FBXL5), Iron Regulatory Proteins (IRPs), Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF), and ferroportin. Notably, the stability of each of these proteins is regulated in response to iron. Recent discoveries have greatly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing iron-sensing and protein degradation within these pathways. It has become clear that iron's privileged roles in both enzyme catalysis and protein structure contribute to its regulation of protein stability. Moreover, these multiple pathways intersect with one another in larger regulatory networks to maintain iron homeostasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. PMID:22349011

  15. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency. PMID:25636824

  16. Nitrided iron catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in the eighties

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    A survey covers the preparation and structure of nitrided iron catalysts and their activity, selectivity, and stability for the reaction of synthesis gas in comparison with iron catalysts pretreated by various other methods, as measured in laboratory reactors; a comparison of product distributions obtained in fluidized-bed, slurry, and oil-circulation fixed bed pilot plants with nitrided catalysts and by the Kellogg entrained catalyst process SASOL, which uses a reduced iron catalyst; and possible methods for refining the Fischer-Tropsch products from nitrided iron catalysts for producing gasoline, including bauxite treatment, the Mobil process for converting oxygenates to high-octane gasoline and C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ olefins, and an alkylation-polymerization process for converting the C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ fraction to high-octane blending stocks.

  17. Nonbiological fractionation of iron isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Roe, J. E.; Barling, J.; Nealson, K. H.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory experiments demonstrate that iron isotopes can be chemically fractionated in the absence of biology. Isotopic variations comparable to those seen during microbially mediated reduction of ferrihydrite are observed. Fractionation may occur in aqueous solution during equilibration between inorganic iron complexes. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms of iron isotope fractionation and suggest that nonbiological processes may contribute to iron isotope variations observed in sediments.

  18. Toughness Properties of Nodular Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Walter L.

    1985-01-01

    The German government recently certified ductile iron for construction of nuclear waste transport containers. This approved use of ductile iron for such a critical application represents the culmination of ten years worth of research bringing to light the surprising toughness of ductile iron. This article explains how modern fracture mechanics and microstructure/property relationships have altered the stereotype of ductile iron as a low toughness material.

  19. Enzymes of respiratory iron oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R. II.

    1991-01-01

    This report focuses on the progress made in three areas of research concerned with enzymes involved in respiratory iron oxidation. The three areas are as follows: development of an improved procedure for the routine large scale culture of iron oxidizing chemolithotrophs based on the in-situ electrolysis of the soluble iron in the growth medium; to perform iron oxidation kinetic studies on whole cells using the oxygen electrode; and to identify, separate, purify, and characterize the individual cellular components.

  20. GRAIL Refinements to Lunar Seismic Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee; Gernero, Edward; Lin, Pei-Ying; Thorne, Michael; Schmerr, Nicholas; Han, Shin-Chan

    2012-01-01

    such as moonquake location, timing errors, and potential seismic heterogeneities. In addition, the modeled velocities may vary with a 1-to-1 trade ]off with the modeled reflector depth. The GRAIL (Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory) mission, launched in Sept. 2011, placed two nearly identical spacecraft in lunar orbit. The two satellites make extremely high-resolution measurements of the lunar gravity field, which can be used to constrain the interior structure of the Moon using a "crust to core" approach. GRAIL fs constraints on crustal thickness, mantle structure, core radius and stratification, and core state (solid vs. molten) will complement seismic investigations in several ways. Here we present a progress report on our efforts to advance our knowledge of the Moon fs internal structure using joint gravity and seismic analyses. We will focus on methodology, including 1) refinements to the seismic core constraint accomplished through array processing of Apollo seismic data, made by applying a set of travel time corrections based on GRAIL structure estimates local to each Apollo seismic station; 2) modeling deep lunar structure through synthetic seismograms, to test whether the seismic core model can reproduce the core reflections observed in the Apollo seismograms; and 3) a joint seismic and gravity inversion in which we attempt to fit a family of seismic structure models with the gravity constraints from GRAIL, resulting in maps of seismic velocities and densities that vary from a nominal model both laterally and with depth.

  1. Influence of light and temperature on the marine iron cycle: From theoretical to global modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliabue, Alessandro; Bopp, Laurent; Aumont, Olivier; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2009-06-01

    Iron regulates net primary production (NPP) in a number of ocean regions and exists in a variety of different forms in seawater, not all of which are bioavailable. We used a relatively complex iron cycle model to examine variability in iron speciation as a function of irradiance/temperature and parameterize its first-order impact in a global ocean biogeochemistry model (OBM), which necessitated certain assumptions regarding the representation of iron chemistry. Overall, we find that higher irradiance (typical of shallower mixed layers) promotes the conversion of dissolved iron (dFe) into bioavailable forms (bFe) and increases bFe concentration by 5-53%, depending on parameter values. Temperature plays a secondary role in controlling bFe, with cold mixed layers increasing bFe concentrations. For a given irradiance and temperature, the presence of bioavailable Fe ligands increases bFe/dFe. When bioavailable Fe ligands are present, then reducing the photolability, increasing the log conditional stability, or increasing the concentration of such ligands all act to increase bFe/dFe. Such processes are currently not represented in global OBMs, where iron is typically parameterized as one pool, and we find that NPP can vary by >±20% regionally if the impact of temperature and irradiance on bFe is included, even under a constant circulation. Additionally, iron chemistry is important in controlling the depth over which phytoplankton iron limitation can be alleviated and the subsequent efficiency of iron-based NPP. We also suggest organically complexed dFe must be bioavailable if distributions of phytoplankton biomass and macronutrients are to be reconciled with observations. Our results are important in understanding the role of the irradiance/mixing regime in governing the supply of iron to phytoplankton under a changing climate. New data sets on iron speciation and rate processes will aid in refining our model.

  2. High resolution single particle refinement in EMAN2.1.

    PubMed

    Bell, James M; Chen, Muyuan; Baldwin, Philip R; Ludtke, Steven J

    2016-05-01

    EMAN2.1 is a complete image processing suite for quantitative analysis of grayscale images, with a primary focus on transmission electron microscopy, with complete workflows for performing high resolution single particle reconstruction, 2-D and 3-D heterogeneity analysis, random conical tilt reconstruction and subtomogram averaging, among other tasks. In this manuscript we provide the first detailed description of the high resolution single particle analysis pipeline and the philosophy behind its approach to the reconstruction problem. High resolution refinement is a fully automated process, and involves an advanced set of heuristics to select optimal algorithms for each specific refinement task. A gold standard FSC is produced automatically as part of refinement, providing a robust resolution estimate for the final map, and this is used to optimally filter the final CTF phase and amplitude corrected structure. Additional methods are in-place to reduce model bias during refinement, and to permit cross-validation using other computational methods. PMID:26931650

  3. Rack gasoline and refining margins - wanted: a summer romance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-13

    For the first time since late 1987, apparent refining margins on the US benchmark crude oil (based on spot purchase prices) are virtually zero. This felicitous bit of news comes loaded with possibilities of positive (maybe even good.) margins in coming months, if the differential between crude buying prices and the value of the refined barrel continues to improve. What refiners in the US market are watching most closely right now are motorists. This issue also contains the following: (1) ED refining netback data for the US Gulf and Western Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore, prices for early April 1988; and (2) ED fuel price/tax series for countries of the Western Hemisphere, April 1988 edition. 5 figures, 5 tables.

  4. Finite element mesh refinement criteria for stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittur, Madan G.; Huston, Ronald L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses procedures for finite-element mesh selection and refinement. The objective is to improve accuracy. The procedures are based on (1) the minimization of the stiffness matrix race (optimizing node location); (2) the use of h-version refinement (rezoning, element size reduction, and increasing the number of elements); and (3) the use of p-version refinement (increasing the order of polynomial approximation of the elements). A step-by-step procedure of mesh selection, improvement, and refinement is presented. The criteria for 'goodness' of a mesh are based on strain energy, displacement, and stress values at selected critical points of a structure. An analysis of an aircraft lug problem is presented as an example.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT REPORT: SOLVENT REFINED COAL (SRC) SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is an integrated evaluation of air emissions, water effluents, solid wastes, toxic substances, control/disposal alternatives, environmental regulatory requirements, and environmental effects associated with solvent refined coal (SRC) systems. It considers the SRC-I(sol...

  6. QM/MM X-ray Refinement of Zinc Metalloenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Hayik, Seth A.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Zinc metalloenzymes play an important role in biology. However, due to the limitation of molecular force field energy restraints used in X-ray refinement at medium or low resolutions, the precise geometry of the zinc coordination environment can be difficult to distinguish from ambiguous electron density maps. Due to the difficulties involved in defining accurate force fields for metal ions, the QM/MM (Quantum-Mechanical /Molecular-Mechanical) method provides an attractive and more general alternative for the study and refinement of metalloprotein active sites. Herein we present three examples that indicate that QM/MM based refinement yields a superior description of the crystal structure based on R and Rfree values and on the inspection of the zinc coordination environment. It is concluded that QM/MM refinement is a useful general tool for the improvement of the metal coordination sphere in metalloenzyme active sites. PMID:20116858

  7. Controlling Reflections from Mesh Refinement Interfaces in Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.; Van Meter, James R.

    2005-01-01

    A leading approach to improving the accuracy on numerical relativity simulations of black hole systems is through fixed or adaptive mesh refinement techniques. We describe a generic numerical error which manifests as slowly converging, artificial reflections from refinement boundaries in a broad class of mesh-refinement implementations, potentially limiting the effectiveness of mesh- refinement techniques for some numerical relativity applications. We elucidate this numerical effect by presenting a model problem which exhibits the phenomenon, but which is simple enough that its numerical error can be understood analytically. Our analysis shows that the effect is caused by variations in finite differencing error generated across low and high resolution regions, and that its slow convergence is caused by the presence of dramatic speed differences among propagation modes typical of 3+1 relativity. Lastly, we resolve the problem, presenting a class of finite-differencing stencil modifications which eliminate this pathology in both our model problem and in numerical relativity examples.

  8. Fate of oxidized triglycerides during refining of seed oils.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Tommaso; Caponio, Francesco; Delcuratolo, Debora

    2003-07-30

    The evolution of oxidized triglycerides (ox-TG) during industrial refining was studied in soybean, sunflower, peanut, and corn oils. The analytical techniques used were silica gel column chromatography and high-performance size exclusion chromatography. The decrease in ox-TG during refining (42.3% on average) was accompanied by an increase in triglyceride oligopolymers (TGP). The inverse correlation between the two lipid groups suggests that the decrease in ox-TG during refining was due in part to the occurrence of polymerization reactions. An inverse correlation was also found between the percentage sum of ox-TG + TGP and percent TGP, indicating that a part of the ox-TG also underwent degradation or transformation reactions. On average, almost 58% of the ox-TG remained unchanged during refining and, of the rest, about half was involved in polymerization reactions and half in degradation or transformation reactions. PMID:14705891

  9. 21 CFR 184.1375 - Iron, elemental.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron, elemental. 184.1375 Section 184.1375 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1375 Iron, elemental. (a) Iron, elemental (CAS Reg. No. 7439-89-6) is metallic iron obtained by any of the following processes: reduced iron, electrolytic iron,...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1375 - Iron, elemental.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron, elemental. 184.1375 Section 184.1375 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1375 Iron, elemental. (a) Iron, elemental (CAS Reg. No. 7439-89-6) is metallic iron obtained by any of the following processes: reduced iron, electrolytic iron,...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1375 - Iron, elemental.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron, elemental. 184.1375 Section 184.1375 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1375 Iron, elemental. (a) Iron, elemental (CAS Reg. No. 7439-89-6) is metallic iron obtained by any of the following processes: reduced iron, electrolytic iron, and...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1375 - Iron, elemental.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron, elemental. 184.1375 Section 184.1375 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1375 Iron, elemental. (a) Iron, elemental (CAS Reg. No. 7439-89-6) is metallic iron obtained by any of the following processes: reduced iron, electrolytic iron,...

  13. Intracellular iron minerals in a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Glasauer, Susan; Langley, Sean; Beveridge, Terry J

    2002-01-01

    Among prokaryotes, there are few examples of controlled mineral formation; the formation of crystalline iron oxides and sulfides [magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4)] by magnetotactic bacteria is an exception. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacterium that is capable of dissimilatory iron reduction, produced microscopic intracellular grains of iron oxide minerals during growth on two-line ferrihydrite in a hydrogen-argon atmosphere. The minerals, formed at iron concentrations found in the soil and sedimentary environments where these bacteria are active, could represent an unexplored pathway for the cycling of iron by bacteria. PMID:11778045

  14. Mesh quality control for multiply-refined tetrahedral grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Strawn, Roger

    1994-01-01

    A new algorithm for controlling the quality of multiply-refined tetrahedral meshes is presented in this paper. The basic dynamic mesh adaption procedure allows localized grid refinement and coarsening to efficiently capture aerodynamic flow features in computational fluid dynamics problems; however, repeated application of the procedure may significantly deteriorate the quality of the mesh. Results presented show the effectiveness of this mesh quality algorithm and its potential in the area of helicopter aerodynamics and acoustics.

  15. VIEW OF RBC (REFINED BICARBONATE) BUILDING LOOKING NORTHEAST. DEMOLITION IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF RBC (REFINED BICARBONATE) BUILDING LOOKING NORTHEAST. DEMOLITION IN PROGRESS. "ARM & HAMMER BAKING SODA WAS MADE HERE FOR OVER 50 YEARS AND THEN SHIPPED ACROSS THE STREET TO THE CHURCH & DWIGHT PLANT ON WILLIS AVE. (ON THE RIGHT IN THIS PHOTO). LAYING ON THE GROUND IN FRONT OF C&D BUILDING IS PART OF AN RBC DRYING TOWER. - Solvay Process Company, Refined Bicarbonate Building, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  16. Adaptive mesh and algorithm refinement using direct simulation Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A.L.; Bell, J.B.; Crutchfield, W.Y.; Alder, B.J.

    1999-09-01

    Adaptive mesh and algorithm refinement (AMAR) embeds a particle method within a continuum method at the finest level of an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) hierarchy. The coupling between the particle region and the overlaying continuum grid is algorithmically equivalent to that between the fine and coarse levels of AMR. Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is used as the particle algorithm embedded within a Godunov-type compressible Navier-Stokes solver. Several examples are presented and compared with purely continuum calculations.

  17. The refinement of dose assessment of the THOR BNCT beam.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Liu, Hong-Ming; Chou, Wen-Tsae

    2011-12-01

    A refined dose assessment method has been used now in the THOR BNCT facility, which takes into account more delicate corrections, carefully handled calibration factors, and the spectrum- and kerma-weighted k(t) value. The refined method solved the previous problem of negative derived neutron dose in phantom at deeper positions. With the improved dose assessment, the calculated and measured gamma-ray dose rates match perfectly in a 15×15×15 cm(3) PMMA phantom. PMID:21377883

  18. Refiners match Rvp reduction measures to operating problems

    SciTech Connect

    Musumeci, J.

    1997-02-03

    Reduction in gasoline vapor pressure specifications have created operational challenges for many refiners. Removal of butanes from gasoline blendstocks has become more critical to meeting product vapor pressure requirements. Some refiners have made major unit modifications, such as adding alkylation capacity for butane conversion. Others have debottlenecked existing fractionation equipment, thus increasing butane removal. Three case studies will illustrate vapor pressure reduction solutions. The solutions include: changing unit operating targets, maintaining existing equipment, and debottlenecking minor equipment.

  19. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or blood in the stool Heavy menstrual bleeding (women) Pain in the upper belly (from ulcers) Weight loss (in people with cancer) ... an injection into the muscle. Pregnant and breastfeeding women ... bone marrow. Iron-rich foods include: Chicken and turkey Dried ...

  20. Iron dominated magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided.

  1. Canada's iron creek meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spratt, C. E.

    1989-04-01

    An iron mass, of meteoritical origin, found on a hilltop in the southern Canadian prairies, is unique to Canadian scientific history. It is the third largest meteorite to have been found in Canada (at one time it was reported to be Canada's largest single meteorite mass). A brief historical account, and a corrected official weight (145 kilograms), of this interesting meteorite is presented.

  2. Taking iron supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Iron Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  3. Extracting Iron from Cereal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students can investigate and evaluate the amount of iron found in most fortified breakfast cereals or cream of wheat. Includes a list of necessary materials, safety precautions, experimental procedure, disposal protocol, and nutritional explanation, utilization, and variations. (JJK)

  4. Iron, transferrin and myelinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M. H.; Devès, G.; Baron, B.; Guillou, F.

    2003-09-01

    Transferrin (Tf), the iron binding protein of vertebrates serum, is known to be synthesized by oligodendrocytes (Ols) in the central nervous system. It has been postulated that Tf is involved in Ols maturation and myelinogenesis. This link is particularly important in the understanding of a severe human pathology: the multiple sclerosis, which remains without efficient treatment. We generated transgenic mice containing the complete human Tf gene and extensive regulatory sequences from the 5 ' and 3 ' untranslated regions that specifically overexpress Tf in Ols. Brain cytoarchitecture of the transgenic mice appears to be normal in all brain regions examined, total myelin content is increased by 30% and motor coordination is significantly improved when compared with non-transgenic littermates. Tf role in the central nervous system may be related to its affinity for metallic cations. Normal and transgenic mice were used for determination of trace metals (iron, copper and zinc) and minerals (potassium and calcium) concentration in cerebellum and corpus callosum. The freeze-dried samples were prepared to allow proton-induced X-ray emission and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analyses with the nuclear microprobe in Bordeaux. Preliminary results were obtained and carbon distribution was revealed as a very good analysis to distinguish precisely the white matter region. A comparison of metallic and mineral elements contents in brain between normal and transgenic mice shows that iron, copper and zinc levels remained constant. This result provides evidence that effects of Tf overexpression in the brain do not solely relate to iron transport.

  5. Ferrous Sulfate (Iron)

    MedlinePlus

    (fer' us)Accidental overdose of products containing iron is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under the age of 6. Keep this product out of the reach of children. In case of an accidental overdose, call your doctor or a poison ...

  6. Ultrasonic Sensor to Characterize Wood Pulp During Refining

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, Margaret S.; Panetta, Paul D.; Bond, Leonard J.; McCaw, M. W.

    2006-12-22

    A novel sensor concept has been developed for measuring the consistency, the degree of refining, the water retention value (WRV), and the consistency of wood pulp during the refining process. The measurement time is less than 5 minutes and the sensor can operate in a slip-stream of the process line or as an at-line instrument. The consistency is obtained from a calibration, in which the attenuation of ultrasound through the pulp suspension is measured as a function of the solids weight percentage. The degree of refining and the WRV are determined from settling measurements. The settling of a pulp suspension (consistency less than 0.5 Wt%) is observed, after the mixer that keeps the pulp uniformly distributed is turned off. The attenuation of ultrasound as a function of time is recorded and these data show a peak, after a certain delay, defined as the “peak time.” The degree of refining increases with the peak time, as demonstrated by measuring pulp samples with different degrees of refining. The WRV can be determined using the relative peak time, defined as the ratio T2/T1, where T1 is an initial value of the peak time and T2 is the value after additional refining. This method offers an additional WRV test for the industry, because the freeness test is not specific for the WRV.

  7. Effect of refining on quality and composition of sunflower oil.

    PubMed

    Pal, U S; Patra, R K; Sahoo, N R; Bakhara, C K; Panda, M K

    2015-07-01

    An experimental oil refining unit has been developed and tested for sunflower oil. Crude pressed sunflower oil obtained from a local oil mill was refined using chemical method by degumming, neutralization, bleaching and dewaxing. The quality and composition of crude and refined oil were analysed compared. Reduction in phosphorous content from 6.15 ppm to 0, FFA content from 1.1 to 0.24 % (oleic acid), peroxide value from 22.5 to 7.9 meq/kg, wax content from 1,420 to 200 ppm and colour absorbance value from 0.149 to 0.079 (in spectrophotometer at 460 nm) were observed from crude to refined oil. It was observed that refining did not have significant effect on fatty acid compositions as found in the percentage peak area in the GC-MS chromatogram. The percentage of unsaturated fatty acid in both the oils were recorded to be about 95 % containing 9-Octadecenoic acid (Oleic acid) and 11,14-Eicosadienoic acid (elongated form of linoleic acid). The research results will be useful to small entrepreneurs and farmers for refining of sunflower oil for better marketability. PMID:26139933

  8. Ultrasonic sensor to characterize wood pulp during refining.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, M S; Panetta, P D; Bond, L J; McCaw, M W

    2006-12-22

    A novel sensor concept has been developed for measuring the degree of refining, the water retention value (WRV), and the weight percentage of wood pulp during the refining process. The measurement time is less than 5 min and the sensor can operate in a slip-stream of the process line or as an at-line instrument. The degree of refining and the WRV are determined from settling measurements. The settling of a pulp suspension (with a weight percentage less than 0.5 wt%) is observed, after the mixer, which keeps the pulp uniformly distributed, is turned off. The attenuation of ultrasound as a function of time is recorded and these data show a peak at a time designated as the "peak time." The peak time T increases with the degree of refining, as demonstrated by measuring pulp samples with known degrees of refining. The WRV can be determined using the relative peak time, defined as the ratio T(2)/T(1), where T(1) is an initial peak time and T(2) is the value after additional refining. This method offers an alternative WRV test for the industry to the current time-consuming method. PMID:16920173

  9. Iron Aluminide Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.

    1998-11-20

    Iron aluminides with the B2 structure are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant. They are thermodynamically compatible with a wide range of ceramics such as TiC, WC, TiB{sub 2}, and ZrB{sub 2}. In addition, liquid iron aluminides wet these ceramics very well. Therefore, FeAl/ceramic composites may be produced by techniques such as liquid phase sintering of powder mixtures, or pressureless melt infiltration of ceramic powders with liquid FeAl. These techniques, the resulting microstructure, and their advantages as well as limitations are described. Iron aluminide composites can be very strong. Room temperature flexure strengths as high as 1.8 GPa have been observed for FeAl/WC. Substantial gains in strength at elevated temperatures (1073 K) have also been demonstrated. Above 40 vol.% WC the room temperature flexure strength becomes flaw-limited. This is thought to be due to processing flaws and limited interfacial strength. The fracture toughness of FeAl/WC is unexpectedly high and follows a mile of mixtures. Interestingly, sufficiently thin (< 1 {micro}m) FeAl ligaments between adjacent WC particles fracture not by cleavage, but in a ductile manner. For these thin ligaments the dislocation pile-ups formed during deformation are not long enough to nucleate cleavage fracture, and their fracture mode is therefore ductile. For several reasons, this brittle-to-ductile size transition does not improve the fracture toughness of the composites significantly. However, since no cleavage cracks are nucleated in sufficiently thin FeAl ligaments, slow crack growth due to ambient water vapor does not occur. Therefore, as compared to monolithic iron aluminizes, environmental embrittlement is dramatically reduced in iron aluminide composites.

  10. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Mulac, B.L.; Edwards, G.R.; Burt, R.P.; David, S.A.

    1997-12-01

    When gas-tungsten arc welded, iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure which is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Titanium inoculation effectively refined the fusion zone microstructure in iron aluminide weldments, but the inoculated weldments had a reduced fracture strength despite the presence of a finer microstructure. The weldments fractured by transgranular cleavage which nucleated at cracked second phase particles. With titanium inoculation, second phase particles in the fusion zone changed shape and also became more concentrated at the grain boundaries, which increased the particle spacing in the fusion zone. The observed decrease in fracture strength with titanium inoculation was attributed to increased spacing of second phase particles in the fusion zone. Current research has focused on the weldability of zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides. Preliminary work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has shown that zirconium and carbon additions affect the weldability of the alloy as well as the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of the weldments. A sigmajig hot cracking test apparatus has been constructed and tested at Colorado School of Mines. Preliminary characterization of hot cracking of three zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides, each containing a different total concentration of zirconium at a constant zirconium/carbon ratio of ten, is in progress. Future testing will include low zirconium alloys at zirconium/carbon ratios of five and one, as well as high zirconium alloys (1.5 to 2.0 atomic percent) at zirconium/carbon ratios of ten to forty.

  11. Iron-Catalyzed Boron Removal from Molten Silicon in Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Morita, Kazuki

    2016-05-01

    A high-temperature process of refining metallurgical-grade silicon to solar-grade silicon was developed. In this gas purging treatment, boron impurity in silicon reacts with ammonia and the products are removed as volatiles at high temperature. 1 mass pct metallic iron was added to molten silicon as a catalyst, improving the boron removal ratio from 14 to 80 pct at 1723 K (1450 °C). At 1823 K (1550 °C), this reaction could reduce boron concentration from more than 120 ppmw to <1 ppmw within 6 hours, meeting the purity requirement of solar-grade silicon. Nickel was tested in place of iron but showed no catalytic effect on boron removal. The result confirmed the catalytic role of iron in boron removal from molten silicon in ammonia. Possible mechanisms of catalysis, influence from iron concentration, and temperature effect on the catalytic reaction were explored. An apparent activation energy of 329 ± 129 kJ mol-1 was calculated from experimental data.

  12. The effects of zirconium and carbon on the hot cracking resistance of iron aluminides. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Mulac, B.L.; Edwards, G.R.; David, S.A.

    1998-02-01

    Iron aluminides have been of interest for about 60 years because of their good high temperature strengths (below 600{degrees}C) and excellent oxidation and sulfidation resistance, as well as their relatively low cost and conservation of strategic elements. These advantageous properties have driven the development of iron aluminides as potential structural materials. However, the industrial application of iron aluminides has been inhibited because of a sharp reduction in strength at temperatures higher than 600{degrees}C and low ductility at ambient temperatures due to hydrogen embrittlement. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has shown in recent years that room temperature properties of alloys containing 28% Al (all compositions are in atomic percent unless otherwise noted) can be improved through thermomechanical processing and alloying. Iron aluminides must have good weldability if they are to be used as structural materials. A coarse fusion zone microstructure is formed when iron aluminides are welded, increasing their susceptibility to cold cracking in water vapor. A recent study at Colorado School of Mines has shown that refining the fusion zone microstructure by weld pool oscillation effectively reduces cold cracking. Weld pool inoculation has been shown to refine fusion zone microstructures, but coarse carbide distribution caused this approach to reducing cold cracking to be ineffective.

  13. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  14. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  15. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  16. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  17. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  18. Iron status in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Fairweather-Tait, Susan J.; Wawer, Anna A.; Gillings, Rachel; Jennings, Amy; Myint, Phyo K.

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is prevalent in older age, particularly after the age of 80. Serum ferritin concentrations also decline, although there is no evidence to suggest that changes in iron stores are an inevitable consequence of ageing. Chronic inflammation is a common condition in older people, making the measurement of iron status difficult, and it is likely that elevated levels of circulating hepcidin are responsible for changes in iron metabolism that result in systemic iron depletion. Other contributory factors are poor diet and some medications, such as aspirin. Anaemia in older age has undesirable health outcomes, including increased susceptibility to falling and depression. However, there are concerns about possible adverse effects of iron supplements, either in relation to pro-inflammatory effects in the gut or inappropriate tissue iron deposition. Brain iron levels are increased with age-related degenerative diseases, but it is not known if this is the cause or a consequence of the disease, and genetic factors are likely to play a role. In order to maintain body iron within the normal range a personalised approach is required, taking into account all of the factors that may affect iron metabolism and the available strategies for preventing iron deficiency or overload. PMID:24275120

  19. Iron and cancer: recent insights.

    PubMed

    Manz, David H; Blanchette, Nicole L; Paul, Bibbin T; Torti, Frank M; Torti, Suzy V

    2016-03-01

    Iron is an essential dietary element. However, the ability of iron to cycle between oxidized and reduced forms also renders it capable of contributing to free radical formation, which can have deleterious effects, including promutagenic effects that can potentiate tumor formation. Dysregulation of iron metabolism can increase cancer risk and promote tumor growth. Cancer cells exhibit an enhanced dependence on iron relative to their normal counterparts, a phenomenon we have termed iron addiction. Work conducted in the past few years has revealed new cellular processes and mechanisms that deepen our understanding of the link between iron and cancer. Control of iron efflux through the combined action of ferroportin, an iron efflux pump, and its regulator hepcidin appears to play an important role in tumorigenesis. Ferroptosis is a form of iron-dependent cell death involving the production of reactive oxygen species. Specific mechanisms involved in ferroptosis, including depletion of glutathione and inhibition of glutathione peroxidase 4, have been uncovered. Ferritinophagy is a newly identified mechanism for degradation of the iron storage protein ferritin. Perturbations of mechanisms that control transcripts encoding proteins that regulate iron have been observed in cancer cells, including differences in miRNA, methylation, and acetylation. These new insights may ultimately provide new therapeutic opportunities for treating cancer. PMID:26890363

  20. Protein Degradation and Iron Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Joel W.; Bruick, Richard K.

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of both systemic and cellular iron homeostasis requires the capacity to sense iron levels and appropriately modify the expression of iron metabolism genes. These responses are coordinated through the efforts of several key regulatory factors including F-box and Leucine-rich Repeat Protein 5 (FBXL5), Iron Regulatory Proteins (IRPs), Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF), and ferroportin. Notably, the stability of each of these proteins is regulated in response to iron. Recent discoveries have greatly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing iron-sensing and protein degradation within these pathways. It has become clear that iron’s privileged roles in both enzyme catalysis and protein structure contribute to its regulation of protein stability. Moreover, these multiple pathways intersect with one another in larger regulatory networks to maintain iron homeostasis. PMID:22349011

  1. Ferrioxamine excretion in iron-loaded man

    SciTech Connect

    Pippard, M.J.; Callender, S.T.; Finch, C.A.

    1982-08-01

    Factors affecting iron excretion after subcutaneous desferrioxamine infusion were evaluated in individuals with iron overload. Urinary iron varied directly, whereas stool iron varied inversely with the level of erythropoiesis. Ascorbic acid greatly enhanced urinary iron excretion but had a less constant effect on stool iron. Stool iron losses contributed a greater proportion of total iron excretion at higher chelator dosage. These studies indicate the importance of biliary iron excretion in monitoring the effectiveness of desferrioxamine. They also suggest that large chelator doses may remove established iron overload much more rapidly than has previously been realized.

  2. Degradation of chlorofluorocarbons using granular iron and bimetallic irons.

    PubMed

    Jeen, Sung-Wook; Lazar, Snezana; Gui, Lai; Gillham, Robert W

    2014-03-01

    Degradation of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC11) and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (CFC113) by granular iron and bimetallic (nickel- or palladium-enhanced) irons was studied in flow-through column tests. Both compounds were rapidly degraded, following pseudo-first-order kinetics with respect to the parent compounds. The average pseudo-first-order rate constants for CFC11 were similar among different materials, except for palladium-enhanced iron (PdFe), in which the rate of degradation was about two times faster than for the other materials. In the case of CFC113, the rate constants for bimetallic irons were about two to three times greater than for the regular iron material. The smaller than expected differences in degradation rate constants of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) between regular iron and bimetallic irons suggested little, if any, catalytic effect of the bimetallic materials in the initial degradation step. Subsequent degradation steps involved catalytic hydrogenation, however, playing a significant role in further degradation of reaction intermediates. The degradation intermediates and final products of CFC11 and CFC113 suggested that degradation proceeded through hydrogenolysis and α/β-elimination in the presence of regular iron (Fe) and nickel-enhanced iron (NiFe). Even though there is only minor benefit in the use of bimetallic iron in terms of degradation kinetics of the parent CFCs, enhanced degradation rates of intermediates such as chlorotriflouroethene (CTFE) in subsequent reaction steps could be beneficial. PMID:24492233

  3. Magnetorotational iron core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symbalisty, E. M. D.

    1984-01-01

    During its final evolutionary stages, a massive star, as considered in current astrophysical theory, undergoes rapid collapse, thereby triggering a sequence of a catastrophic event which results in a Type II supernova explosion. A remnant neutron star or a black hole is left after the explosion. Stellar collapse occurs, when thermonuclear fusion has consumed the lighter elements present. At this stage, the core consists of iron. Difficulties arise regarding an appropriate model with respect to the core collapse. The present investigation is concerned with the evolution of a Type II supernova core including the effects of rotation and magnetic fields. A simple neutrino model is developed which reproduced the spherically symmetric results of Bowers and Wilson (1982). Several two-dimensional computational models of stellar collapse are studied, taking into account a case in which a 15 solar masses iron core was artificially given rotational and magnetic energy.

  4. Iron pages of HTSC

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparov, V. A.

    2010-08-15

    Experimental data are presented on the superconducting and electronic properties of iron-based high-temperature superconductors in the normal and superconducting states. The following topics are discussed: lattice structure; structure of magnetic vortices; magnetic penetration depth; Fermi surface; isotope effect; and critical magnetic fields both in oxide compounds of 1111 type and oxide-free compounds of 122, 111, and 011 types as a function of the doping level, temperature, and external pressure.

  5. Bayesian ensemble refinement by replica simulations and reweighting.

    PubMed

    Hummer, Gerhard; Köfinger, Jürgen

    2015-12-28

    We describe different Bayesian ensemble refinement methods, examine their interrelation, and discuss their practical application. With ensemble refinement, the properties of dynamic and partially disordered (bio)molecular structures can be characterized by integrating a wide range of experimental data, including measurements of ensemble-averaged observables. We start from a Bayesian formulation in which the posterior is a functional that ranks different configuration space distributions. By maximizing this posterior, we derive an optimal Bayesian ensemble distribution. For discrete configurations, this optimal distribution is identical to that obtained by the maximum entropy "ensemble refinement of SAXS" (EROS) formulation. Bayesian replica ensemble refinement enhances the sampling of relevant configurations by imposing restraints on averages of observables in coupled replica molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the strength of the restraints should scale linearly with the number of replicas to ensure convergence to the optimal Bayesian result in the limit of infinitely many replicas. In the "Bayesian inference of ensembles" method, we combine the replica and EROS approaches to accelerate the convergence. An adaptive algorithm can be used to sample directly from the optimal ensemble, without replicas. We discuss the incorporation of single-molecule measurements and dynamic observables such as relaxation parameters. The theoretical analysis of different Bayesian ensemble refinement approaches provides a basis for practical applications and a starting point for further investigations. PMID:26723635

  6. Bayesian ensemble refinement by replica simulations and reweighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummer, Gerhard; Köfinger, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We describe different Bayesian ensemble refinement methods, examine their interrelation, and discuss their practical application. With ensemble refinement, the properties of dynamic and partially disordered (bio)molecular structures can be characterized by integrating a wide range of experimental data, including measurements of ensemble-averaged observables. We start from a Bayesian formulation in which the posterior is a functional that ranks different configuration space distributions. By maximizing this posterior, we derive an optimal Bayesian ensemble distribution. For discrete configurations, this optimal distribution is identical to that obtained by the maximum entropy "ensemble refinement of SAXS" (EROS) formulation. Bayesian replica ensemble refinement enhances the sampling of relevant configurations by imposing restraints on averages of observables in coupled replica molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the strength of the restraints should scale linearly with the number of replicas to ensure convergence to the optimal Bayesian result in the limit of infinitely many replicas. In the "Bayesian inference of ensembles" method, we combine the replica and EROS approaches to accelerate the convergence. An adaptive algorithm can be used to sample directly from the optimal ensemble, without replicas. We discuss the incorporation of single-molecule measurements and dynamic observables such as relaxation parameters. The theoretical analysis of different Bayesian ensemble refinement approaches provides a basis for practical applications and a starting point for further investigations.

  7. Refinement performance and mechanism of an Al-50Si alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, H.S.; Liu, X.F.

    2008-11-15

    The microstructure and melt structure of primary silicon particles in an Al-50%Si (wt.%) alloy have been investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe micro-analysis and a high temperature X-ray diffractometer. The results show that the Al-50Si alloy can be effectively refined by a newly developed Si-20P master alloy, and the melting temperature is crucial to the refinement process. The minimal overheating degree {delta}T{sub min} ({delta}T{sub min} is the difference between the minimal overheating temperature T{sub min} and the liquidus temperature T{sub L}) for good refinement is about 260 deg. C. Primary silicon particles can be refined after adding 0.2 wt.% phosphorus amount at sufficient temperature, and their average size transforms from 2-4 mm to about 30 {mu}m. The X-ray diffraction data of the Al-50Si melt demonstrate that structural change occurs when the melting temperature varies from 1100 deg. C to 1300 deg. C. Additionally, the relationship between the refinement mechanism and the melt structure is discussed.

  8. An adaptive mesh refinement algorithm for the discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Jessee, J.P.; Fiveland, W.A.; Howell, L.H.; Colella, P.; Pember, R.B.

    1996-03-01

    The discrete ordinates form of the radiative transport equation (RTE) is spatially discretized and solved using an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm. This technique permits the local grid refinement to minimize spatial discretization error of the RTE. An error estimator is applied to define regions for local grid refinement; overlapping refined grids are recursively placed in these regions; and the RTE is then solved over the entire domain. The procedure continues until the spatial discretization error has been reduced to a sufficient level. The following aspects of the algorithm are discussed: error estimation, grid generation, communication between refined levels, and solution sequencing. This initial formulation employs the step scheme, and is valid for absorbing and isotopically scattering media in two-dimensional enclosures. The utility of the algorithm is tested by comparing the convergence characteristics and accuracy to those of the standard single-grid algorithm for several benchmark cases. The AMR algorithm provides a reduction in memory requirements and maintains the convergence characteristics of the standard single-grid algorithm; however, the cases illustrate that efficiency gains of the AMR algorithm will not be fully realized until three-dimensional geometries are considered.

  9. Refined BPS State Counting from Nekrasov's Formula and Macdonald Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awata, Hidetoshi; Kanno, Hiroaki

    It has been argued that Nekrasov's partition function gives the generating function of refined BPS state counting in the compactification of M theory on local Calabi-Yau spaces. We show that a refined version of the topological vertex we previously proposed (arXiv:hep-th/0502061) is a building block of Nekrasov's partition function with two equivariant parameters. Compared with another refined topological vertex by Iqbal, Kozcaz and Vafa (arXiv:hep-th/0701156), our refined vertex is expressed entirely in terms of the specialization of the Macdonald symmetric functions which is related to the equivariant character of the Hilbert scheme of points on ℂ2. We provide diagrammatic rules for computing the partition function from the web diagrams appearing in geometric engineering of Yang-Mills theory with eight supercharges. Our refined vertex has a simple transformation law under the flop operation of the diagram, which suggests that homological invariants of the Hopf link are related to the Macdonald functions.

  10. Refined food addiction: a classic substance use disorder.

    PubMed

    Ifland, J R; Preuss, H G; Marcus, M T; Rourke, K M; Taylor, W C; Burau, K; Jacobs, W S; Kadish, W; Manso, G

    2009-05-01

    Overeating in industrial societies is a significant problem, linked to an increasing incidence of overweight and obesity, and the resultant adverse health consequences. We advance the hypothesis that a possible explanation for overeating is that processed foods with high concentrations of sugar and other refined sweeteners, refined carbohydrates, fat, salt, and caffeine are addictive substances. Therefore, many people lose control over their ability to regulate their consumption of such foods. The loss of control over these foods could account for the global epidemic of obesity and other metabolic disorders. We assert that overeating can be described as an addiction to refined foods that conforms to the DSM-IV criteria for substance use disorders. To examine the hypothesis, we relied on experience with self-identified refined foods addicts, as well as critical reading of the literature on obesity, eating behavior, and drug addiction. Reports by self-identified food addicts illustrate behaviors that conform to the 7 DSM-IV criteria for substance use disorders. The literature also supports use of the DSM-IV criteria to describe overeating as a substance use disorder. The observational and empirical data strengthen the hypothesis that certain refined food consumption behaviors meet the criteria for substance use disorders, not unlike tobacco and alcohol. This hypothesis could lead to a new diagnostic category, as well as therapeutic approaches to changing overeating behaviors. PMID:19223127

  11. Tungsten in iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, E. R. D.

    1978-01-01

    Tungsten concentrations have been determined by instrumental neutron activation in 104 iron meteorites, and range from 0.07 to 5 microg/g. In individual groups, concentrations vary by factors of between 1.5 and 8, but there are negative W-Ni correlations in 8 groups: IAB, IC, IIAB, IID, IIE, IIIAB, IIICD, and IIIF. The lowest W concentrations are found in groups IAB and IIICD, which also have the smallest slopes on a W-Ni plot. Eighteen anomalous irons have W concentrations between 5 microg/g (Butler) and 0.11 microg/g (Rafrueti). The distribution of W in irons shows similarities to that of other refractory sideophilic elements (except Mo), but is closest to the distribution of Ru and Pt. Assuming that chemical trends in group IIIAB were produced by fractional crystallization, a value of 1.6 can be deduced for the distribution coefficient of W between solid and liquid metal, as compared with 0.89 for Mo. Experimental evidence in support of these values is tenuous.

  12. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  13. Measurement of iron absorption from meals contaminated with iron

    SciTech Connect

    Hallberg, L.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.

    1981-12-01

    A method is described to measure in vitro the extent of isotopic exchange between the native nonheme food iron and added inorganic reduction to radioiron tracer. The food is digested with pepsin and trypsin in the presence of radioiron. The exchangeability of food iron is calculated from the specific activity in the food and in an extract of bathophenantroline in isoamyl alcohol obtained after digesting this food. The precision and accuracy of the method is illustrated by two kinds of studies, those in which different amounts of contamination iron are added to a meal and those evaluating contamination iron in natural meals. The present method will make it possible to measure validly iron absorption from meals contaminated with unknown amounts of iron of unknown exchangeability with the extrinsic radioiron tracer.

  14. Formation of glutathionyl dinitrosyl iron complexes protects against iron genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Hanna; Sadło, Jarosław; Męczyńska, Sylwia; Stępkowski, Tomasz M; Wójciuk, Grzegorz; Kruszewski, Marcin

    2015-07-28

    Dinitrosyl iron(i) complexes (DNICs), intracellular NO donors, are important factors in nitric oxide-dependent regulation of cellular metabolism and signal transduction. It has been shown that NO diminishes the toxicity of iron ions and vice versa. To gain insight into the possible role of DNIC in this phenomenon, we examined the effect of GS-DNIC formation on the ability of iron ions to mediate DNA damage, by treatment of the pUC19 plasmid with physiologically relevant concentrations of GS-DNIC. It was shown that GS-DNIC formation protects against the genotoxic effect of iron ions alone and iron ions in the presence of a naturally abundant antioxidant, GSH. This sheds new light on the iron-related protective effect of NO under the circumstances of oxidative stress. PMID:26079708

  15. Iron homeostasis and eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Allison; Hadziahmetovic, Majda; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Iron is necessary for life, but excess iron can be toxic to tissues. Iron is thought to damage tissues primarily by generating oxygen free radicals through the Fenton reaction. We present an overview of the evidence supporting iron's potential contribution to a broad range of eye disease using an anatomical approach. Firstly, iron can be visualized in the cornea as iron lines in the normal aging cornea as well as in diseases like keratoconus and pterygium. In the lens, we present the evidence for the role of oxidative damage in cataractogenesis. Also, we review the evidence that iron may play a role in the pathogenesis of the retinal disease age-related macular degeneration. Although currently there is no direct link between excess iron and development of optic neuropathies, ferrous iron's ability to form highly reactive oxygen species may play a role in optic nerve pathology. Lastly, we discuss recent advances in prevention and therapeutics for eye disease with antioxidants and iron chelators,. PMID:19059309

  16. Ferric iron reduction by sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, T D; Gustafson, J

    1976-01-01

    Acidophilic bacteria of the genera Thiobacillus and Sulfolobus are able to reduce ferric iron when growing on elemental sulfur as an energy source. It has been previously thought that ferric iron serves as a nonbiological oxidant in the formation of acid mine drainage and in the leaching of ores, but these results suggest that bacterial catalysis may play a significant role in the reactivity of ferric iron. PMID:825043

  17. Elliptic Solvers with Adaptive Mesh Refinement on Complex Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip, B.

    2000-07-24

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a numerical technique for locally tailoring the resolution computational grids. Multilevel algorithms for solving elliptic problems on adaptive grids include the Fast Adaptive Composite grid method (FAC) and its parallel variants (AFAC and AFACx). Theory that confirms the independence of the convergence rates of FAC and AFAC on the number of refinement levels exists under certain ellipticity and approximation property conditions. Similar theory needs to be developed for AFACx. The effectiveness of multigrid-based elliptic solvers such as FAC, AFAC, and AFACx on adaptively refined overlapping grids is not clearly understood. Finally, a non-trivial eye model problem will be solved by combining the power of using overlapping grids for complex moving geometries, AMR, and multilevel elliptic solvers.

  18. Toward parallel, adaptive mesh refinement for chemically reacting flow simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, K.D.; Shadid, J.N.; Salinger, A.G. Hutchinson, S.A.; Hennigan, G.L.

    1997-12-01

    Adaptive numerical methods offer greater efficiency than traditional numerical methods by concentrating computational effort in regions of the problem domain where the solution is difficult to obtain. In this paper, the authors describe progress toward adding mesh refinement to MPSalsa, a computer program developed at Sandia National laboratories to solve coupled three-dimensional fluid flow and detailed reaction chemistry systems for modeling chemically reacting flow on large-scale parallel computers. Data structures that support refinement and dynamic load-balancing are discussed. Results using uniform refinement with mesh sequencing to improve convergence to steady-state solutions are also presented. Three examples are presented: a lid driven cavity, a thermal convection flow, and a tilted chemical vapor deposition reactor.

  19. RNA Structure Refinement using the ERRASER-Phenix pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Fang-Chieh; Echols, Nathaniel; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Das, Rhiju

    2015-01-01

    Summary The final step of RNA crystallography involves the fitting of coordinates into electron density maps. The large number of backbone atoms in RNA presents a difficult and tedious challenge, particularly when experimental density is poor. The ERRASER-Phenix pipeline can improve an initial set of RNA coordinates automatically based on a physically realistic model of atomic-level RNA interactions. The pipeline couples diffraction-based refinement in Phenix with the Rosetta-based real-space refinement protocol ERRASER (Enumerative Real-Space Refinement ASsisted by Electron density under Rosetta). The combination of ERRASER and Phenix can improve the geometrical quality of RNA crystallographic models while maintaining or improving the fit to the diffraction data (as measured by Rfree). Here we present a complete tutorial for running ERRASER-Phenix through the Phenix GUI, from the command-line, and via an application in the Rosetta On-line Server that Includes Everyone (ROSIE). PMID:26227049

  20. Lessons Learned From Using Focus Groups to Refine Digital Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Avis, Jillian LS; van Mierlo, Trevor; Fournier, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in applying novel eHealth approaches for the prevention and management of various health conditions, with the ultimate goal of increasing positive patient outcomes and improving the effectiveness and efficiency of health services delivery. Coupled with the use of innovative approaches is the possibility for adverse outcomes, highlighting the need to strategically refine digital practices prior to implementation with patients. One appropriate method for modification purposes includes focus groups. Although it is a well-established method in qualitative research, there is a lack of guidance regarding the use of focus groups for digital intervention refinement. To address this gap, the purpose of our paper is to highlight several lessons our research team has learned in using focus groups to help refine digital interventions prior to use with patients. PMID:26232313

  1. Construction and Application of a Refined Hospital Management Chain.

    PubMed

    Lihua, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Large scale development was quite common in the later period of hospital industrialization in China. Today, Chinese hospital management faces such problems as service inefficiency, high human resources cost, and low rate of capital use. This study analyzes the refined management chain of Wuxi No.2 People's Hospital. This consists of six gears namely, "organizational structure, clinical practice, outpatient service, medical technology, and nursing care and logistics." The gears are based on "flat management system targets, chief of medical staff, centralized outpatient service, intensified medical examinations, vertical nursing management and socialized logistics." The core concepts of refined hospital management are optimizing flow process, reducing waste, improving efficiency, saving costs, and taking good care of patients as most important. Keywords: Hospital, Refined, Management chain PMID:27180468

  2. Automated Assume-Guarantee Reasoning by Abstraction Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.; Giannakopoulous, Dimitra; Glannakopoulou, Dimitra

    2008-01-01

    Current automated approaches for compositional model checking in the assume-guarantee style are based on learning of assumptions as deterministic automata. We propose an alternative approach based on abstraction refinement. Our new method computes the assumptions for the assume-guarantee rules as conservative and not necessarily deterministic abstractions of some of the components, and refines those abstractions using counter-examples obtained from model checking them together with the other components. Our approach also exploits the alphabets of the interfaces between components and performs iterative refinement of those alphabets as well as of the abstractions. We show experimentally that our preliminary implementation of the proposed alternative achieves similar or better performance than a previous learning-based implementation.

  3. Optical measurement of pulp quantity in a rotating disc refiner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alahautala, Taito; Lassila, Erkki; Hernberg, Rolf; Härkönen, Esko; Vuorio, Petteri

    2004-11-01

    An optical method based on light extinction was used in measuring pulp quantity in the plate gap of a 10 MW thermomechanical pulping refiner for the first time. The relationship between pulp quantity and light extinction was determined by empirical laboratory experiments. The empirical relationship was then applied to interpret the image data obtained from field measurements. The results show the local distribution of pulp in the refiner plate gap for different rotor plate positions and refiner operation points. The maximum relative uncertainty in the measured pulp quantity was 50%. Relative pulp distributions were measured at higher accuracy. The measurements have influenced the development of a laser-based optical diagnostic method that can be applied to the quantitative visualization of technically demanding industrial processes.

  4. Alloy performance in high temperature oil refining environments

    SciTech Connect

    Sorell, G.; Humphries, M.J.; McLaughlin, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The performance of steels and alloys in high temperature petroleum refining applications is strongly influenced by detrimental interactions with aggressive process environments. These are encountered in conventional refining processes and especially in processing schemes for fuels conversion and upgrading. Metal-environment interactions can shorten equipment life and cause impairment of mechanical properties, metallurgical stability and weldability. Corrosion and other high temperature attack modes discussed are sulfidation, hydrogen attack, carburization, and metal dusting. Sulfidation is characterized by bulky scales that are generally ineffective corrosion barriers. Metal loss is often accompanied by sub-surface sulfide penetration. Hydrogen attack and carburization proceed without metal loss and are detectable only by metallographic examination. In advanced stages, these deterioration modes cause severe impairment of mechanical properties. Harmful metal-environment interactions are characterized and illustrated with data drawn from test exposures and plant experience. Alloys employed for high temperature oil refining equipment are identified, including some promising newcomers.

  5. The US petroleum refining industry in the 1980's

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-11

    As part of the EIA program on petroleum, The US Petroleum Refining Industry in the 1980's, presents a historical analysis of the changes that took place in the US petroleum refining industry during the 1980's. It is intended to be of interest to analysts in the petroleum industry, state and federal government officials, Congress, and the general public. The report consists of six chapters and four appendices. Included is a detailed description of the major events and factors that affected the domestic refining industry during this period. Some of the changes that took place in the 1980's are the result of events that started in the 1970's. The impact of these events on US refinery configuration, operations, economics, and company ownership are examined. 23 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Survey shows over 1,000 refining catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1991-10-14

    The Journal's latest survey of worldwide refining catalysts reveals that there are more than 1,040 unique catalyst designations in commercial use in 19 processing categories - an increase of some 140 since the compilation of refining catalysts was last published. As a matter of interest, some 700 catalysts were determined during the first survey. The processing categories surveyed in this paper are: Catalytic naphtha reforming. Dimerization, Isomerization (C{sub 4}), Isomerization (C{sub 5} and C{sub 6}), Isomerization (xylenes), Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC), Hydrocracking, Mild hydrocracking, hydrotreating/hydrogenation/ saturation, Hydrorefining, Polymerization, Sulfur (elemental) recovery, Steam hydrocarbon reforming, Sweetening, Clause unit tail gas treatment, Oxygenates, Combustion promoters (FCC), Sulfur oxides reduction (FCC), and Other refining processes.

  7. Refiners discuss fluid catalytic cracking at technology meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-24

    At the National Petroleum Refiners Association`s question and answer session on refining and petrochemical technology, engineers and technical specialists from around the world gather each year to exchange experience and information on refining and petrochemical issues. Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts were a topic of great interest at the most recent NPRA Q and A session, held Oct. 11--13, 1994, in Washington, DC. The discussions of FCC catalysts included questions about: reduction of olefins in FCC naphtha; tolerance of FCC catalysts to oxygen enrichment; use of mild hydrocracking catalyst in an FCC feed hydrotreater. At this renowned meeting, a panel of industry representatives answers presubmitted questions. Moderator and NPRA technical director Terrence S. Higgins then invites audience members to respond or ask additional questions on the subjects under discussion. This paper presents the discussions of the above three topics.

  8. Segregation Coefficients of Impurities in Selenium by Zone Refining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Sha, Yi-Gao

    1998-01-01

    The purification of Se by zone refining process was studied. The impurity solute levels along the length of a zone-refined Se sample were measured by spark source mass spectrographic analysis. By comparing the experimental concentration levels with theoretical curves the segregation coefficient, defined as the ratio of equilibrium concentration of a given solute in the solid to that in the liquid, k = x(sub s)/x(sub l) for most of the impurities in Se are found to be close to unity, i.e., between 0.85 and 1.15, with the k value for Si, Zn, Fe, Na and Al greater than 1 and that for S, Cl, Ca, P, As, Mn and Cr less than 1. This implies that a large number of passes is needed for the successful implementation of zone refining in the purification of Se.

  9. Intestinal Iron Homeostasis and Colon Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiang; Shah, Yatrik M.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths in industrialized countries. Understanding the mechanisms of growth and progression of CRC is essential to improve treatment. Iron is an essential nutrient for cell growth. Iron overload caused by hereditary mutations or excess dietary iron uptake has been identified as a risk factor for CRC. Intestinal iron is tightly controlled by iron transporters that are responsible for iron uptake, distribution, and export. Dysregulation of intestinal iron transporters are observed in CRC and lead to iron accumulation in tumors. Intratumoral iron results in oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and DNA damage with consequent promotion of oncogene activation. In addition, excess iron in intestinal tumors may lead to increase in tumor-elicited inflammation and tumor growth. Limiting intratumoral iron through specifically chelating excess intestinal iron or modulating activities of iron transporter may be an attractive therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:23812305

  10. Fast transport simulation with an adaptive grid refinement.

    PubMed

    Haefner, Frieder; Boy, Siegrun

    2003-01-01

    One of the main difficulties in transport modeling and calibration is the extraordinarily long computing times necessary for simulation runs. Improved execution time is a prerequisite for calibration in transport modeling. In this paper we investigate the problem of code acceleration using an adaptive grid refinement, neglecting subdomains, and devising a method by which the Courant condition can be ignored while maintaining accurate solutions. Grid refinement is based on dividing selected cells into regular subcells and including the balance equations of subcells in the equation system. The connection of coarse and refined cells satisfies the mass balance with an interpolation scheme that is implicitly included in the equation system. The refined subdomain can move with the average transport velocity of the subdomain. Very small time steps are required on a fine or a refined grid, because of the combined effect of the Courant and Peclet conditions. Therefore, we have developed a special upwind technique in small grid cells with high velocities (velocity suppression). We have neglected grid subdomains with very small concentration gradients (zero suppression). The resulting software, MODCALIF, is a three-dimensional, modularly constructed FORTRAN code. For convenience, the package names used by the well-known MODFLOW and MT3D computer programs are adopted, and the same input file structure and format is used, but the program presented here is separate and independent. Also, MODCALIF includes algorithms for variable density modeling and model calibration. The method is tested by comparison with an analytical solution, and illustrated by means of a two-dimensional theoretical example and three-dimensional simulations of the variable-density Cape Cod and SALTPOOL experiments. Crossing from fine to coarse grid produces numerical dispersion when the whole subdomain of interest is refined; however, we show that accurate solutions can be obtained using a fraction of the

  11. Pagophagia in iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tatsumi; Kawati, Yasunori

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between pagophagia (ice pica) and iron deficiency anemia was studied. All 81 patients with iron deficiency anemia defined as hemoglobin <12.0 g/dl and ferritin level <12 ng/ml were interviewed about their habits of eating ice or other non-food substances. Pagophagia was defined as compulsive and repeated ingestion of at least one tray of ice or ice eating which was relieved after iron administration. Pagophagia was present in 13 patients (16.0%). All patients who received oral iron were periodically assessed employing a questionnaire on pagophagia and laboratory data. Iron therapy can cure the pagophagia earlier than hemoglobin recovery and repair of tissue iron deficiency. Although the pathogenesis of pagophagia is unclear, a biochemical approach involving the central nervous system might elucidate the mechanism underlying these abnormal behaviors. PMID:24850454

  12. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1989-11-14

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

  13. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, Michael R.; Arnold, Robert G.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  14. Iron metabolism in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Walker, B L; Tiong, J W; Jefferies, W A

    2001-01-01

    Most living things require iron to exist. Iron has many functions within cells but is rarely found unbound because of its propensity to catalyze the formation of toxic free radicals. Thus the regulation of iron requirements by cells and the acquisition and uptake of iron into tissues in multicellular organisms is tightly regulated. In humans, understanding iron transport and utility has recently been advanced by a "great conjunction" of molecular genetics in simple organisms, identifying genes involved in genetic diseases of metal metabolism and by the application of traditional cell physiology approaches. We are now able to approach a rudimentary understanding of the "iron cycle" within mammals. In the future, this information will be applied toward modulating the outcome of therapies designed to overcome diseases involving metals. PMID:11597005

  15. The Irony of Iron – Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity. PMID:26779157

  16. The Irony of Iron - Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean.

    PubMed

    Emerson, David

    2015-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity. PMID:26779157

  17. Diffraction-geometry refinement in the DIALS framework.

    PubMed

    Waterman, David G; Winter, Graeme; Gildea, Richard J; Parkhurst, James M; Brewster, Aaron S; Sauter, Nicholas K; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2016-04-01

    Rapid data collection and modern computing resources provide the opportunity to revisit the task of optimizing the model of diffraction geometry prior to integration. A comprehensive description is given of new software that builds upon established methods by performing a single global refinement procedure, utilizing a smoothly varying model of the crystal lattice where appropriate. This global refinement technique extends to multiple data sets, providing useful constraints to handle the problem of correlated parameters, particularly for small wedges of data. Examples of advanced uses of the software are given and the design is explained in detail, with particular emphasis on the flexibility and extensibility it entails. PMID:27050135

  18. Laser furnace and method for zone refining of semiconductor wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, Donald B. (Inventor); zur Burg, Frederick W. (Inventor); Penn, Wayne M. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A method of zone refining a crystal wafer (116 FIG. 1) comprising the steps of focusing a laser beam to a small spot (120) of selectable size on the surface of the crystal wafer (116) to melt a spot on the crystal wafer, scanning the small laser beam spot back and forth across the surface of the crystal wafer (116) at a constant velocity, and moving the scanning laser beam across a predetermined zone of the surface of the crystal wafer (116) in a direction normal to the laser beam scanning direction and at a selectible velocity to melt and refine the entire crystal wafer (116).

  19. Spherical Harmonic Decomposition of Gravitational Waves Across Mesh Refinement Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiske, David R.; Baker, John; vanMeter, James R.; Centrella, Joan M.

    2005-01-01

    We evolve a linearized (Teukolsky) solution of the Einstein equations with a non-linear Einstein solver. Using this testbed, we are able to show that such gravitational waves, defined by the Weyl scalars in the Newman-Penrose formalism, propagate faithfully across mesh refinement boundaries, and use, for the first time to our knowledge, a novel algorithm due to Misner to compute spherical harmonic components of our waveforms. We show that the algorithm performs extremely well, even when the extraction sphere intersects refinement boundaries.

  20. Diffraction-geometry refinement in the DIALS framework

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, David G.; Winter, Graeme; Gildea, Richard J.; Parkhurst, James M.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2016-01-01

    Rapid data collection and modern computing resources provide the opportunity to revisit the task of optimizing the model of diffraction geometry prior to integration. A comprehensive description is given of new software that builds upon established methods by performing a single global refinement procedure, utilizing a smoothly varying model of the crystal lattice where appropriate. This global refinement technique extends to multiple data sets, providing useful constraints to handle the problem of correlated parameters, particularly for small wedges of data. Examples of advanced uses of the software are given and the design is explained in detail, with particular emphasis on the flexibility and extensibility it entails. PMID:27050135

  1. Ideal Downward Refinement in the EL Description Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Jens; Haase, Christoph

    With the proliferation of the Semantic Web, there has been a rapidly rising interest in description logics, which form the logical foundation of the W3C standard ontology language OWL. While the number of OWL knowledge bases grows, there is an increasing demand for tools assisting knowledge engineers in building up and maintaining their structure. For this purpose, concept learning algorithms based on refinement operators have been investigated. In this paper, we provide an ideal refinement operator for the description logic EL and show that it is computationally feasible on large knowledge bases.

  2. Molybdenum Isotopes in Some Iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, L.; Masuda, A.

    1992-07-01

    Measurement of all seven stable Mo isotopes in iron meteorites has been continued for study of possible direct evidences for processes of nucleosynthesis in the pre-solar stage and information on extinct radioactive nuclides. Mo in iron meteorite was extracted by using recently developed chemical separation method [1], then loaded on 5 pass zone refined Re ribbon. Molybdenum isotope analysis was performed [2] in a VG SECTOR 54-30 thermal ionization mass spectrometer using a Faraday collector in peak jumping mode. The measured ratios of Mo were normalized provisionally to ^94Mo/^98Mo = 0.3802. Particular caution was drawn on the isobaric interferences of Zr, Ru, etc., which were negligible as a result. A small but distinct anomaly of Mo isotopes was found in Acuna iron meteorite. The normalized data show a growth trend from ^92Mo to ^97Mo, and this increment decreased suddenly at ^98Mo, then slightly increased at ^100Mo. The isotope variations might be explained as a result of excess s-process component (^95Mo to ^98Mo) contained in the sample. Gibeon suggested that isotopic anomalies at ^92Mo, ^95Mo, and ^97Mo are about -3-epsilon, -1.2-epsilon, and -0.5-epsilon respectively. It is difficult to give a perfect explanation to the observed data at present. However, it is interesting to note that ^92Mo (N=50) has a closed shell and only ^95Mo and ^97Mo are even-odd nuclides in all seven stable Mo isotopes and the 30-keV Maxwellian-averaged neutron capture cross sections for ^95Mo and ^97Mo are about 3 times bigger than others [3]. The depletions at ^95Mo and ^97Mo might be attributed to the higher cross section for their destruction by (n, gamma) reaction. The apparent opposite aberrations are found for Odessa iron. We reported anomalies of Mo isotopes in a specimen of Sikhote-Alin iron meteorite [4,5]. Further investigations have shown that the isotopic compositions of Mo in this iron are heterogeneous and that the "general anomaly" of Mo isotopes is related with the

  3. Enzymes of respiratory iron oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R. II.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes experimental progress in characterizing and identifying redox proteins in a number of iron-oxidizing bacteria. Sections of the paper are entitled (1) In Situ electrolysis was explored to achieve enhanced yields of iron-oxidizing bacteria, (2)Structure/function studies were performed on redox-active biomolecules from Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, (3) Novel redox-active biomolecules were demonstrated in other iron autotrophs, and (4) New probes of metalloprotein electron-transfer reactions were synthesized and characterized.

  4. Replacing London's cast iron mains

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, A. ); Mathews, P. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper discusses the cast iron gas distribution systems that exist in many cities and contains considerable amounts of pipe that vary in age from 20 to 150 years. In many ways, cast iron is an excellent material. It is inherently corrosion resistant, easy to install and cheap. However, it is also brittle and smaller diameter cast iron pipe has a relatively low beam strength. This can lead, under some circumstances, to failure without external warning, with typically a full-circumferential failure. In congested areas this can lead to serious consequences. As a result, cast iron replacement programs are a common feature in such urban gas distribution systems.

  5. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  6. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  7. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  8. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  9. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  10. Iron oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  11. 40 CFR 80.555 - What provisions are available to a large refiner that acquires a small refiner or one or more of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What provisions are available to a large refiner that acquires a small refiner or one or more of its refineries? 80.555 Section 80.555... Marine Fuel Small Refiner Hardship Provisions § 80.555 What provisions are available to a large...

  12. Effects of iron deficiency on iron binding and internalization into acidic vacuoles in Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Paz, Yakov; Shimoni, Eyal; Weiss, Meira; Pick, Uri

    2007-07-01

    Uptake of iron in the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina is mediated by a transferrin-like protein (TTf), which binds and internalizes Fe(3+) ions. Recently, we found that iron deficiency induces a large enhancement of iron binding, which is associated with accumulation of three other plasma membrane proteins that associate with TTf. In this study, we characterized the kinetic properties of iron binding and internalization and identified the site of iron internalization. Iron deficiency induces a 4-fold increase in Fe binding, but only 50% enhancement in the rate of iron uptake and also increases the affinity for iron and bicarbonate, a coligand for iron binding. These results indicate that iron deprivation leads to accumulation and modification of iron-binding sites. Iron uptake in iron-sufficient cells is preceded by an apparent time lag, resulting from prebound iron, which can be eliminated by unloading iron-binding sites. Iron is tightly bound to surface-exposed sites and hardly exchanges with medium iron. All bound iron is subsequently internalized. Accumulation of iron inhibits further iron binding and internalization. The vacuolar inhibitor bafilomycin inhibits iron uptake and internalization. Internalized iron was localized by electron microscopy within vacuolar structures that were identified as acidic vacuoles. Iron internalization is accompanied by endocytosis of surface proteins into these acidic vacuoles. A novel kinetic mechanism for iron uptake is proposed, which includes two pools of bound/compartmentalized iron separated by a rate-limiting internalization stage. The major parameter that is modulated by iron deficiency is the iron-binding capacity. We propose that excessive iron binding in iron-deficient cells serves as a temporary reservoir for iron that is subsequently internalized. This mechanism is particularly suitable for organisms that are exposed to large fluctuations in iron availability. PMID:17513481

  13. Studies of hypervalent iron

    SciTech Connect

    Bielski, B.H.J.

    1989-01-01

    The iron (IV), (V) and (VI) oxidation states are of great interest because of their role in catalytic oxidation/hydroxylation reactions. This report summarizes the information currently available on the kinetic and chemical properties of the water-soluble ions of FeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, FeO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}} and FeO{sub 4}{sup 4{minus}}, their protonated forms, and/or simple complex derivatives. The discussion includes their radiation-induced formation, decay kinetics, reactivity with other compounds, determination of their respective pK{sub a} values as well as spectral properties. 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE MOVING DOWN TRACK IN PREPARATION FOR DISTRIBUTION TO DE LAVAUD MACHINES. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Melting & Treatment Areas, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  15. IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE MOVING DOWN TRACK IN PREPARATION FOR DISTRIBUTION TO DE LAVAUD MACHINES, LADLE TRANSFER CRANE ON FAR LEFT. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Melting & Treatment Areas, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  16. MALLEABLE IRON BULL LADLE, HOLDS IRON AFTER IT IS TAPPED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MALLEABLE IRON BULL LADLE, HOLDS IRON AFTER IT IS TAPPED OUT OF THE CUPOLA UNTIL IT NEEDED BY POURERS ON THE CONVEYOR LINES WHO FILL MOBILE LADLES ATTACHED TO OVERHEAD RAIL SYSTEMS AS THE BULL LADLE TIPS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  17. Iron uptake and iron-repressible polypeptides in Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed Central

    Lucier, T S; Fetherston, J D; Brubaker, R R; Perry, R D

    1996-01-01

    Pigmented (Pgm+) cells of Yersinia pestis are virulent, are sensitive to pesticin, adsorb exogenous hemin at 26 degrees C (Hms+), produce iron-repressible outer membrane proteins, and grow at 37 degrees C in iron-deficient media. These traits are lost upon spontaneous deletion of a chromosomal 102-kb pgm locus (Pgm-). Here we demonstrate that an Hms+ but pesticin-resistant (Pst(r)) mutant acquired a 5-bp deletion in the pesticin receptor gene (psn) encoding IrpB to IrpD. Growth and assimilation of iron by Pgm- and Hms+ Pst(r) mutants were markedly inhibited by ferrous chelators at 37 degrees C; inhibition by ferric and ferrous chelators was less effective at 26 degrees C. Iron-deficient growth at 26 degrees C induced iron-regulated outer membrane proteins of 34, 28.5, and 22.5 kDa and periplasmic polypeptides of 33.5 and 30 kDa. These findings provide a basis for understanding the psn-driven system of iron uptake, indicate the existence of at least one additional 26 degrees C-dependent iron assimilation system, and define over 30 iron-repressible proteins in Y. pestis. PMID:8757829

  18. The Levitational Zone Refining (LZR) of photovoltaic silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hukin, D. A.

    1990-07-01

    The horizontal zone refining of silicon by induction heating within a water cooled segmented copper boat has produced material with average solar efficiences of 11.3% (max. 14%). The LZR process is totally non-contaminating and produces ingots 125 mm square up to 2 m long, with low carbon and undetectable oxygen content.

  19. Computations of Aerodynamic Performance Databases Using Output-Based Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Handle complex geometry problems; Control discretization errors via solution-adaptive mesh refinement; Focus on aerodynamic databases of parametric and optimization studies: 1. Accuracy: satisfy prescribed error bounds 2. Robustness and speed: may require over 105 mesh generations 3. Automation: avoid user supervision Obtain "expert meshes" independent of user skill; and Run every case adaptively in production settings.

  20. Examining the Aging Semantic Differential: Suggestions for Refinement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polizzi, Kenneth G.; Steitz, Jean A.

    1998-01-01

    Review of studies using the Aging Semantic Differential to measure attitudes toward the elderly identified problems: familiarity and variety of objects, men-only design, and age of the instrument. Ways to refine it include updating adjectives and their positions, identifying attitudinal objects, and accounting for gender differences. (SK)