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Sample records for electrospray characteristic curves

  1. Electrospray characteristic curves: in pursuit of improved performance in the nano-flow regime

    PubMed Central

    Marginean, Ioan; Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Tang, Keqi

    2008-01-01

    Depending on its coordinates in the parameter space, an electrospray can manifest in one of several known regimes – stable, quasi-stable, transitional-chaotic, and non-axial – that ultimately impact measurement sensitivity and precision. An electrospray operating in cone-jet regime provides large and stable spray current, as well as smaller initial droplets that are prerequisites for higher sensitivity and quality mass spectrometric analyses. However, the dynamic conditions encountered in gradient elution-based liquid separations create difficulties for continuous operation in this regime throughout the analysis. We present a preliminary study aimed at stabilizing the electrospray in the cone-jet regime. On the basis of spray current measurements obtained using solvent conditions typically found in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, an improved description of the cone-jet stability island is provided by including transitions to and from the recently described astable regime. Additionally, the experimental conditions in which the astable regime marks the transition between pulsating and cone-jet regimes are further clarified. PMID:17896826

  2. Characteristic Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkiewicz, Thomas A.; Kirk, James R.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to help students gain a better understanding of the characteristics of various electronic components by incorporating a dual-trace oscilloscope in the X-Y mode in addition to direct observations of phase shifts of various signals into a laboratory exercise. (ZWH)

  3. Effect of pressure on electrospray characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Marginean, Ioan; Page, Jason S.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study of pulsating electrosprays operated at subambient pressure is reported. The pressure domain that affords stable electrospray operation appears to be limited by the vapor pressure of the liquid. The voltage driving the electrospray is shown to have a logarithmic dependence on pressure. The observed scaling amends the relationship currently used to calculate the electric field at the tip of the meniscus of an electrified liquid. PMID:19997584

  4. Effect of pressure on electrospray characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Marginean, Ioan; Page, Jason S.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-11-02

    An experimental study of sub-ambient pressure electrosprays is reported. The pressure domain that affords stable electrospray operation appears to be limited by the vapor pressure of the liquid. The voltage driving the electrospray is shown to have a logarithmic dependence on the pressure. This scaling amends the relationship currently in use to calculate the electric field at the tip of the meniscus of an electrified liquid

  5. The Characteristic Curves of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumaier, Arnold; Deiters, Ulrich K.

    2016-09-01

    In 1960, E. H. Brown defined a set of characteristic curves (also known as ideal curves) of pure fluids, along which some thermodynamic properties match those of an ideal gas. These curves are used for testing the extrapolation behaviour of equations of state. This work is revisited, and an elegant representation of the first-order characteristic curves as level curves of a master function is proposed. It is shown that Brown's postulate—that these curves are unique and dome-shaped in a double-logarithmic p, T representation—may fail for fluids exhibiting a density anomaly. A careful study of the Amagat curve (Joule inversion curve) generated from the IAPWS-95 reference equation of state for water reveals the existence of an additional branch.

  6. Euler characteristics and elliptic curves.

    PubMed

    Coates, J; Howson, S

    1997-10-14

    Let E be a modular elliptic curve over [symbol, see text], without complex multiplication; let p be a prime number where E has good ordinary reduction; and let Finfinity be the field obtained by adjoining [symbol, see text] to all p-power division points on E. Write Ginfinity for the Galois group of Finfinity over [symbol, see text]. Assume that the complex L-series of E over [symbol, see text] does not vanish at s = 1. If p >/= 5, we make a precise conjecture about the value of the Ginfinity-Euler characteristic of the Selmer group of E over Finfinity. If one makes a standard conjecture about the behavior of this Selmer group as a module over the Iwasawa algebra, we are able to prove our conjecture. The crucial local calculations in the proof depend on recent joint work of the first author with R. Greenberg. PMID:11607752

  7. Curved characteristics behind blast waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laporte, O.; Chang, T. S.

    1972-01-01

    The behavior of nonisentropic flow behind a propagating blast wave is theoretically studied. Exact solutions, expressed in closed form in terms of elementary functions, are presented for three sets of curved characteristicseind a self-similar, strong blast wave.

  8. Item Characteristic Curves: A New Theoretical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Perez, Miguel A.; Frary, Robert B.

    A new approach to the development of the item characteristic curve (ICC), which expresses the functional relationship between the level of performance on a given task and an independent variable that is relevant to the task, is presented. The approach focuses on knowledge states, decision processes, and other circumstances underlying responses to…

  9. Accurate determination of characteristic relative permeability curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Michael H.; Benson, Sally M.

    2015-09-01

    A recently developed technique to accurately characterize sub-core scale heterogeneity is applied to investigate the factors responsible for flowrate-dependent effective relative permeability curves measured on core samples in the laboratory. The dependency of laboratory measured relative permeability on flowrate has long been both supported and challenged by a number of investigators. Studies have shown that this apparent flowrate dependency is a result of both sub-core scale heterogeneity and outlet boundary effects. However this has only been demonstrated numerically for highly simplified models of porous media. In this paper, flowrate dependency of effective relative permeability is demonstrated using two rock cores, a Berea Sandstone and a heterogeneous sandstone from the Otway Basin Pilot Project in Australia. Numerical simulations of steady-state coreflooding experiments are conducted at a number of injection rates using a single set of input characteristic relative permeability curves. Effective relative permeability is then calculated from the simulation data using standard interpretation methods for calculating relative permeability from steady-state tests. Results show that simplified approaches may be used to determine flowrate-independent characteristic relative permeability provided flow rate is sufficiently high, and the core heterogeneity is relatively low. It is also shown that characteristic relative permeability can be determined at any typical flowrate, and even for geologically complex models, when using accurate three-dimensional models.

  10. CURV 3: Characteristics and mission applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, W. W.; Brady, L. K.

    1984-03-01

    The Cable-Controlled Underwater Recovery Vehicle (CURV) program was begun by NOSC for the specific purpose of developing economical systems to recover test ordnance at NOSC's Long Beach and San Clemente Island test ranges. CURV 3 is the latest in this series of tethered, unmanned, remotely controlled vehicles and its present capabilities far exceed the original CURV 1. Originally conceived for use as a search and recovery vehicle, CURV has evolved into a versatile and easily adaptable multipurpose work vehicle capable of performing search and recovery tasks as well as pursuing test, evaluation, exploration, and work projects. Basically, CURV is a composite of integrated subsystems including such items as propulsion, search and navigation, optics, hydraulics, and tools. Because it is unmanned and does not require life support or other complex support systems, CURV is able to perform most undersea tasks more economically and efficiently than maned systems. Also, since it is powered and controlled from the surface, CURV has a continuous, unlimited operating capability. Under emergency conditions, the vehicle can operate to 10,000-foot depths. CURV can be easily transported to any spot in the world. Upon arrival of the vehicle, control van, cable, and support gear can be mounted on a suitable ship of opportunity.

  11. Analytic formulas for magnetron characteristic curves

    SciTech Connect

    Riyopoulos, S.

    1995-12-31

    A closed non-linear set of equations is obtained based on the guiding center fluid model to describe steady-state magnetron operation. Spoke charge effects are included self-consistently, by introducing a mean-field approximation so that the effective AC potential preserves the geometric similarity with the vacuum solutions. New characteristic equations, relating the anode current 1 and the RF power P to the applied DC voltage V at given RF frequency, are obtained. Previously obtained V-I equations disagree with experiments in that (a) anode current and RF power go to zero when the resonance condition V = V{sub s} is met, (b) the operation voltage V is a double-valued function of the current I; there exist two nearly symmetric operation points around V{sub s} at the same current I. Yet magnetrons, and the related crossed-field amplifiers, are known to exhibit stable operation with single valued V-I characteristics well below V{sub s}. Although zero gain at synchronism applies to other microwave devices (TWT`s, FEL`s), experimental results and particle simulations of crossed field devices suggest otherwise. The new formulas show reasonable agreement with experiments.

  12. Electromagnetic characteristics of Hilbert curve-based metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruirui; Li, Sucheng; Gu, Chendong; Anwar, Shahzad; Hou, Bo; Lai, Yun

    2014-08-01

    As the typical building blocks of metamaterials, the cut wire and the split ring resonator have been extensively studied in recent years. Besides them, the space-filling curve-based metamaterials are receiving great attentions because of their intrinsic subwavelength and multi-bands characteristics. In this work, we have investigated experimentally and numerically the electromagnetic characteristics of such Hilbert curve metamaterial in the microwave frequency regime and found a deeply subwavelength magnetic resonance supported by the fractal pattern and featuring the wavelength-to-size ratio more than 20. The subwavelength electromagnetic properties of the Hilbert curve will be beneficial to realize high-performance metamaterials.

  13. Electrospray device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demmons, Nathaniel (Inventor); Martin, Roy (Inventor); Hruby, Vladimir (Inventor); Roy, Thomas (Inventor); Spence, Douglas (Inventor); Ehrbar, Eric (Inventor); Zwahlen, Jurg (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An electrospray device includes an electrospray emitter adapted to receive electrospray fluid; an extractor plate spaced from the electrospray emitter and having at least one aperture; and a power supply for applying a first voltage between the extractor plate and emitter for generating at least one Taylor cone emission through the aperture to create an electrospray plume from the electrospray fluid, the extractor plate as well as accelerator and shaping plates may include a porous, conductive medium for transporting and storing excess, accumulated electrospray fluid away from the aperture.

  14. Continuous columns for determining moisture characteristic curves of soilless substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sound water management is essential for effectively producing nursery crops. Understanding substrate water availability is a critical component to managing irrigation properly. The objective of this paper is to report a method for generating moisture characteristic curves of soilless substrate tha...

  15. Characteristic coloring curve for white bread during baking.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Masanobu; Inoue, Michiko; Araki, Tetsuya; Iwabuchi, Hisakatsu; Sagara, Yasuyuki

    2011-01-01

    The effect of heating conditions on the crust color formation was investigated during the baking of white bread. The surface temperatures were monitored with thermocouples attached to the inside surface of the loaf pan cover. The trace of the surface color in the L(*)a(*)b(*) color coordinate system is defined as the characteristic coloring curve. The overall baking process was classified into the following four stages based on the characteristic coloring curve: i) pre-heating (surface temperature < 110 °C), ii) Maillard reaction (110-150 °C), iii) caramelization (150-200 °C), and iv) over-baking (surface temperature>200 °C). A linear relationship was observed between the L(*) decrease and the increase in weight loss of a sample at each oven air temperature. The L(*) value appeared to be suitable as an indicator to control the surface color by baking conditions. PMID:21307578

  16. Influence of sample characteristics on probability of detection curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annis, P. E. Charles

    2014-02-01

    POD curves are typically constructed as statistical models of responses to known characteristics of the POD demonstration samples. MIL-HDBK-1823A provides some guidance in choosing the number of samples - viz. at least 40 targets for tests that provide a quantitative response (â) and 60 for binary responses (hit/miss) - but says little about the size range or how they should be placed within that range. Here we report on how the number of targets, their size range, and their distribution (uniform, skewed left or right) with respect to a true POD vs. size relationship influences the POD curve that is estimated from these targets. From the parameter estimates we compute confidence bounds to quantity statistical uncertainty. The work is for binary response data and is based on a novel simulation method for computing the confidence bounds which would prohibitively time-consuming using conventional Monte Carlo methods.

  17. Therapy operating characteristic curves: tools for precision chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Harrison H; Alberts, David S; Woolfenden, James M; Caucci, Luca; Hoppin, John W

    2016-04-01

    The therapy operating characteristic (TOC) curve, developed in the context of radiation therapy, is a plot of the probability of tumor control versus the probability of normal-tissue complications as the overall radiation dose level is varied, e.g., by varying the beam current in external-beam radiotherapy or the total injected activity in radionuclide therapy. This paper shows how TOC can be applied to chemotherapy with the administered drug dosage as the variable. The area under a TOC curve (AUTOC) can be used as a figure of merit for therapeutic efficacy, analogous to the area under an ROC curve (AUROC), which is a figure of merit for diagnostic efficacy. In radiation therapy, AUTOC can be computed for a single patient by using image data along with radiobiological models for tumor response and adverse side effects. The mathematical analogy between response of observers to images and the response of tumors to distributions of a chemotherapy drug is exploited to obtain linear discriminant functions from which AUTOC can be calculated. Methods for using mathematical models of drug delivery and tumor response with imaging data to estimate patient-specific parameters that are needed for calculation of AUTOC are outlined. The implications of this viewpoint for clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27175376

  18. Exploring Alternative Characteristic Curve Approaches to Linking Parameter Estimates from the Generalized Partial Credit Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James S.; Bao, Han; Huang, Chun-Wei; Gagne, Phill

    Characteristic curve approaches for linking parameters from the generalized partial credit model were examined for cases in which common (anchor) items are calibrated separately in two groups. Three of these approaches are simple extensions of the test characteristic curve (TCC), item characteristic curve (ICC), and operating characteristic curve…

  19. Characteristics of low-temperature plasma ionization for ambient mass spectrometry compared to electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Albert, Anastasia; Engelhard, Carsten

    2012-12-18

    Ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) is an attractive method for direct analysis with applications in homeland security, forensics, and human health. For example, low-temperature plasma probe (LTP) ionization was successfully used to detect, e.g., explosives, drugs, and pesticides directly on the target. Despite the fact that the field is gaining significant attention, few attempts have been made to classify ambient ionization techniques based on their ionization characteristics and performance compared to conventional ionization sources used in mass spectrometry. In the present study, relative ionization efficiencies (RIEs) for a large group of compound families were determined with LTP-Orbitrap-MS and compared to those obtained with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). RIEs were normalized against one reference compound used across all methods to ensure comparability of the results. Typically, LTP analyte ionization through protonation/deprotonation (e.g., 4-acetamidophenol) was observed; in some cases (e.g., acenaphthene) radicals were formed. Amines, amides, and aldehydes were ionized successfully with LTP. A benefit of LTP over conventional methods is the possibility to successfully ionize PAHs and imides. Here, the studied model compounds could be detected by neither APCI nor ESI. LTP is a relatively soft ionization method because little fragmentation of model compounds was observed. It is considered to be an attractive method for the ionization of low molecular weight compounds over a relatively wide polarity range. PMID:23134531

  20. JSC Mars-1 Soil Moisture Characteristic and Soil Freezing Characteristic Curves for Modeling Bulk Vapor Flow and Soil Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinwiddie, C. L.; Sizemore, H. G.

    2008-03-01

    A new JSC Mars-1 particle size distribution is used to establish soil moisture characteristic and soil freezing characteristic curves that are needed for modeling bulk (Darcy) vapor flow and soil freezing in the variably saturated subsurface of Mars.

  1. A proposed method to estimate receiver operating characteristic curves for chemical and biological sensor standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, H. T.; Merrill, Ezra L.

    2005-05-01

    The Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC) has long been used in medical applications to compare screening and diagnostic methods. As the threshold used by any screening or diagnostic method is changed, the operating characteristics of the method, such as the number of true positive and false negative determinations changes as well. The ROC curve is one way to characterize the changes in order to compare different methods. This definition, however, is difficult to apply to chemical and biological sensors detecting the release of a toxic agent given that there is more than one ROC curve. There is a continuum of ROC curves corresponding to a continuum of release levels. A new definition of ROC curves has been adopted for chemical and biological sensors which will reduce the continuum of curves to a single curve. This paper presents a methodology to estimate ROC curves using this new definition.

  2. 7 CFR 42.143 - Operating Characteristic (OC) curves for on-line sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... sampling and inspection. 42.143 Section 42.143 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... Miscellaneous § 42.143 Operating Characteristic (OC) curves for on-line sampling and inspection. (a) This section contains the Operating Characteristic (OC) curve for each of the on-line cumulative sum...

  3. 7 CFR 42.143 - Operating Characteristic (OC) curves for on-line sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... sampling and inspection. 42.143 Section 42.143 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... Miscellaneous § 42.143 Operating Characteristic (OC) curves for on-line sampling and inspection. (a) This section contains the Operating Characteristic (OC) curve for each of the on-line cumulative sum...

  4. Fitting Item Characteristic Curves with Spline Functions. [Program Statistics Research Technical Report Series].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winsberg, Suzanne; And Others

    In most item response theory models a particular mathematical form is assumed for all item characteristic curves, e.g., a logistic function. It could be desirable, however, to estimate the shape of the item characteristic curves without prior restrictive assumptions about its mathematical form. We have developed a practical method of estimating…

  5. Modelling Soil Water Characteristic Curves for the Investigation of Hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallin, Ingrid; Matthews, Peter; Laudone, Maurizio; Van Keulen, Geertje; Doerr, Stefan; Francis, Lewis; Dudley, Ed; Gazze, Andrea; Quinn, Gerry; Whalley, Richard; Ashton, Rhys

    2016-04-01

    Soil hydrophobicity presents a major challenge for the future, as it reduces both plant-available water and irrigation efficiency, and can increase flooding hazards and erosion. A collaborative research project has been set up in the UK to study hydrophobicity over a wide range of length scales. At core scale, we are investigating the wetting behaviour of water repellent soils in order to model percolation through hydrophobic pore spaces. To that end, water retention measurements were carried out on both wettable and forcibly-wetted water-repellent soils collected from three locations in England and Wales. The data were then fitted with both the commonly used Van Genuchten model and an alternative model from PoreXpert, a software program that analyses and models porous materials. The Van Genuchten model fits a curve to the data using parameters related to air entry suction, irreducible water content and pore size distribution. By contrast, PoreXpert uses a Boltzmann-annealed simplex to find a best-fit curve based on parameters directly related to the void structure of the soil: the size of the voids, the shape of the void size distribution, and how the voids are connected to each other. Both Van Genuchten and PoreXpert fit the experimental data well, but where Van Genuchten forces an S-shaped curve that can mask small variations, PoreXpert gives a closer fit of no pre-defined shape that captures subtle differences between data points. This allows us to calculate differences in the effective pore and throat size distributions, and provides a mechanistic framework from which to model additional hydrologic behaviour in water repellent soil. Simulations of capillary induced wetting based on these mechanistic postulates are then compared to wicking experiments at the core scale, which can then be upscaled and applied to other soils.

  6. Receiver operating characteristic-curve limits of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysoczanski, Artur; Voigtman, Edward

    2014-10-01

    Using a simple UV LED-excited ruby fluorescence measurement system, we demonstrate that it is easily possible to obtain unbiased detection limits, despite the system deliberately having non-linear response function and non-Gaussian noise. Even when the noise precision model is heteroscedastic, but otherwise only roughly linear, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method readily yields results that are in accordance with a priori canonical specifications of false positives and false negatives at the detection limit. The present work demonstrates that obtaining unbiased detection limits is not abstruse and need not be mathematically complicated. Rather, detection limits continue to serve a useful purpose as part of the characterization of chemical measurement systems.

  7. A digital oscilloscope setup for the measurement of a transistor's characteristic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Buyl, Pierre

    2010-12-01

    Measuring the I-V characteristics of a transistor constitutes an important step in an introductory electronics course. We demonstrate the use of a digital oscilloscope with a USB connection to perform a measurement of the characteristic curves with no additional custom circuitry. The setup is presented alongside the open-source software that allows the signal acquisition and analysis of the results.

  8. Magnetic hysteresis curve influenced by power-semiconductor characteristics in pulse-width-modulation inverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisaki, Keisuke; Liu, Sungju

    2014-05-01

    The influence of power semiconductor characteristic in Pulse-width-modulation (PWM) inverter on the magnetic hysteresis curve in silicon steel is discussed through the measured magnetic hysteresis curves. The magnetic hysteresis curve of PWM inverter-fed silicon steel has a lot of minor loops as closed loops and open loops, which make an influence on the iron loss. Two shapes of minor loops are found to be caused by the voltage shifts and they are derived from the on-voltage of the semiconductors in PWM inverter circuit. Therefore, it is concluded that the power-semiconductor characteristic in PWM inverter makes an influence on the magnetic hysteresis curve in silicon steel.

  9. Developing Moisture Characteristic Curves and Their Descriptive Functions at Low Tensions for Soilless Substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moisture characteristic curves (MCC) relate the water content (') in a substrate to the matric potential ('m) at a given tension or height (h). Most techniques for developing MCC are not well-suited coarse substrates such as those composed of bark used in container nursery substrates. The objectiv...

  10. On the Use of Nonparametric Item Characteristic Curve Estimation Techniques for Checking Parametric Model Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Young-Sun; Wollack, James A.; Douglas, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the model fit of a 2PL through comparison with the nonparametric item characteristic curve (ICC) estimation procedures. Results indicate that three nonparametric procedures implemented produced ICCs that are similar to that of the 2PL for items simulated to fit the 2PL. However for misfitting items,…

  11. Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Analysis of Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised Scores in Epilepsy Surgery Candidates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, William B.

    1997-01-01

    Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) scores were analyzed for 82 epilepsy surgery candidates and used in combination with receiver operating characteristic curves to classify patients with left (LTL) and right (RTL) temporal lobe seizure onset. Results indicate that WMS-R scores used alone or in combination provide relatively poor discrimination…

  12. Evaluation of a computer program used to estimate water characteristic curve

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soil water characteristic curve, h(theta), can be used to estimate a variety of parameters in unsaturated soils. One practical application of h(theta) is its use by DRAINMOD, a drainage model that has been widely used in shallow water table regions, to determine the water table depth–drainage v...

  13. A Comparison of Methods for Nonparametric Estimation of Item Characteristic Curves for Binary Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Young-Sun

    2007-01-01

    This study compares the performance of three nonparametric item characteristic curve (ICC) estimation procedures: isotonic regression, smoothed isotonic regression, and kernel smoothing. Smoothed isotonic regression, employed along with an appropriate kernel function, provides better estimates and also satisfies the assumption of strict…

  14. Effects on Scale Linking of Different Definitions of Criterion Functions for the IRT Characteristic Curve Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seonghoon; Kolen, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Under item response theory, the characteristic curve methods (Haebara and Stocking-Lord methods) are used to link two ability scales from separate calibrations. The linking methods use their respective criterion functions that can be defined differently according to the symmetry- and distribution-related schemes. The symmetry-related scheme…

  15. Experimental study of characteristic curves of centrifugal pumps working as turbines in different specific speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Derakhshan, Shahram; Nourbakhsh, Ahmad

    2008-01-15

    Pump manufacturers do not normally provide the characteristic curves of their pumps working as turbines. Therefore, establishing a correlation between the performances of direct (pump) and reverse (turbine) modes is essential in selecting the proper machine. In this paper, several centrifugal pumps (N{sub s} < 60 (m, m{sup 3}/s)) were tested as turbines. Using experimental data, some relations were derived to predict the best efficiency point of a pump working as a turbine, based on pump hydraulic characteristics. Validity of the presented method was shown using some referenced experimental data. Two equations were presented to estimate the complete characteristic curves of centrifugal pumps as turbines based on their best efficiency point. Deviations of suggested method from experimental data were considered and discussed. Finally, a procedure was presented for selecting a suitable pump to work as a turbine in a small hydro-site. (author)

  16. Use of a submersible pressure outflow cell for determination of moisture characteristic curves on rock core

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, L.E.; Flint, A.L.

    1993-06-01

    A simple device for developing moisture characteristic data curves, the submersible pressure outflow cell, was modified for application to rock core at matric potentials of 0 to -0.5 megapascals (MPa) and possibly to -1.0 Mpa. An automated system was developed to continuously and simultaneously collect data from many cells, obtain sorption and desorption characteristic curves to provide hysteretic information, and data from multi-step outflow experiments. The latter can be used to estimate unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The system has resolved many of the problems inherent in standard measurement techniques. Model simulation of imbibition using the hysteretic data collected are in close agreement with laboratory measurements of imbibition, data collected are in close agreement with laboratory measurements of imbibition, suggesting the moisture characteristic data correctly describes the core properties.19 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Modeling geologic storage of carbon dioxide: Comparison ofnon-hysteretic and hysteretic characteristic curves

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Christine

    2006-07-17

    Numerical models of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2)in brine-bearing formations use characteristic curves to represent theinteractions of non-wetting-phase CO2 and wetting-phase brine. When aproblem includes both injection of CO2 (a drainage process) and itssubsequent post-injection evolution (a combination of drainage andwetting), hysteretic characteristic curves are required to correctlycapture the behavior of the CO2 plume. In the hysteretic formulation,capillary pressure and relative permeability depend not only on thecurrent grid-block saturation, but also on the history of the saturationin the grid block. For a problem that involves only drainage or onlywetting, a non-hysteretic formulation, in which capillary pressure andrelative permeability depend only on the current value of the grid-blocksaturation, is adequate. For the hysteretic formulation to be robustcomputationally, care must be taken to ensure the differentiability ofthe characteristic curves both within and beyond the turning-pointsaturations where transitions between branches of the curves occur. Twoexample problems involving geologic CO2 storage are simulated withTOUGH2, a multiphase, multicomponent code for flow and transport codethrough geological media. Both non-hysteretic and hysteretic formulationsare used, to illustrate the applicability and limitations ofnon-hysteretic methods.The first application considers leakage of CO2from the storage formation to the ground surface, while the secondexamines the role of heterogeneity within the storageformation.

  18. Modified inverse square sensitometry for the determination of the characteristic curve of radiographic screen/film systems.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, A; Hiraki, Y; Ohkawa, Y; Yamada, T; Hashimoto, K; Aono, K

    1986-02-01

    To determine the characteristic curve of the radiographic screen/film systems in a short focal spot-film distance, the inverse square sensitometric method was modified by changing the radiation intensity with two kinds of filters. The characteristic curves obtained in the two exposure series with these two kinds of filters were overlapped to obtain a complete one. The characteristic curve thus obtained was almost the same as the one obtained by the original inverse square sensitometric method. The accuracy of the characteristic curves obtained by the modified method was well-reflected in the clinical radiographs. PMID:3962729

  19. 7 CFR 42.142 - Curve for obtaining Operating Characteristic (OC) curve information for skip lot sampling and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... information for skip lot sampling and inspection. EC02SE91.019 Notes: 1. This curve applies only to the specific skip lot sampling and inspection plan described in § 42.121 and § 42.123. 2. Pa and Pas are...) curve information for skip lot sampling and inspection. 42.142 Section 42.142 Agriculture Regulations...

  20. Comparison Of Methods Used To Measure The Characteristic Curve Of Radiographic Screen/Film Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Louis K.; Haus, Arthur G.; Barnes, Gary T.; Bencomo, Jose A.; Amtey, Sharad R.

    1980-08-01

    A systematic study was performed to investigate the accuracy and precision attained by four methods for determining the characteristic curve of radiographic screen/film systems. The four methods include: inverse square sensitometry, KVP adjusted bootstrap sensitometry step-wedge bootstrap sensitometry, and step wedge attenuation sensitometry. The inverse square method was used as the reference standard for accuracy. The extent of and the sources of the inaccurcies involved when using the alternative methods is discussed.

  1. Linking Parameters Estimated with the Generalized Graded Unfolding Model: A Comparison of the Accuracy of Characteristic Curve Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson Koenig, Judith; Roberts, James S.

    2007-01-01

    Methods for linking item response theory (IRT) parameters are developed for attitude questionnaire responses calibrated with the generalized graded unfolding model (GGUM). One class of IRT linking methods derives the linking coefficients by comparing characteristic curves, and three of these methods---test characteristic curve (TCC), item…

  2. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT: PHOTOMETRIC LIGHT CURVES AND OPTICAL VARIABILITY CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Jonelle L.; Bentz, Misty C.; Barth, Aaron J.; Minezaki, Takeo; Sakata, Yu; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Baliber, Nairn; Bennert, Vardha Nicola; Street, Rachel A.; Treu, Tommaso; Li Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Stern, Daniel; Brown, Timothy M.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2009-11-01

    The Lick AGN Monitoring Project targeted 13 nearby Seyfert 1 galaxies with the intent of measuring the masses of their central black holes using reverberation mapping. The sample includes 12 galaxies selected to have black holes with masses roughly in the range 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} M {sub sun}, as well as the well-studied active galactic nucleus (AGN) NGC 5548. In conjunction with a spectroscopic monitoring campaign, we obtained broadband B and V images on most nights from 2008 February through 2008 May. The imaging observations were carried out by four telescopes: the 0.76 m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope, the 2 m Multicolor Active Galactic Nuclei Monitoring telescope, the Palomar 60 inch (1.5 m) telescope, and the 0.80 m Tenagra II telescope. Having well-sampled light curves over the course of a few months is useful for obtaining the broad-line reverberation lag and black hole mass, and also allows us to examine the characteristics of the continuum variability. In this paper, we discuss the observational methods and the photometric measurements, and present the AGN continuum light curves. We measure various variability characteristics of each of the light curves. We do not detect any evidence for a time lag between the B- and V-band variations, and we do not find significant color variations for the AGNs in our sample.

  3. Performance characteristics of a curved-channel microchannel plate with a curved input face and a plane output face

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Timothy, J. Gethyn

    1989-01-01

    The presently performance-evaluated format, in which a high-gain curved-channel microchannel plate (M2MCP) has a spherical concave input face and a plane output face, allows the input face of the MCP (1) to match such curved focal surfaces as that of a Rowland-circle spectrometer mounting, while (2) having a high-resolution plane readout array in proximity focus with the output face. This MCP has been evaluated in a discrete-anode multicathode microchannel array detector system. The saturated modal gain was found to be inversely proportional to the length/diameter ratio of the channels and directly proportional to the applied MCP voltage.

  4. Evaluation of curving characteristics of flexible liquid crystal displays fabricated using polycarbonate substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Akihito; Ishinabe, Takahiro; Fujikake, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    The improvement of the contrast ratio of flexible liquid crystal displays (LCDs) fabricated using plastic substrates in a curved state is an important problem to achieve high-quality flexible LCDs. In this study, we evaluated the distributions of in-plane phase retardation and slow axis direction of polycarbonate substrates and the effects of curvature on the electro-optical properties of flexible LCDs. As a result, we clarified that the polycarbonate substrates have high uniformity in the in-plane phase retardation and slow axis direction, and that the change in the phase retardation of the polycarbonate substrate caused by the curvature deformation has a small effect on the electro-optical characteristics of flexible LCDs. We successfully achieved a high contrast ratio of 1042:1 by fabricating the device using polycarbonate substrates. This result indicates that it is possible to realize high-quality images in flexible LCDs fabricated using polycarbonate substrates even in the curved state.

  5. Full receiver operating characteristic curve estimation using two alternative forced choice studies.

    PubMed

    Massanes, Francesc; Brankov, Jovan G

    2016-01-01

    Task-based medical image quality is typically measured by the degree to which a human observer can perform a diagnostic task in a psychophysical human observer study. During a typical study, an observer is asked to provide a numerical score quantifying his confidence as to whether an image contains a diagnostic marker or not. Such scores are then used to measure the observers' diagnostic accuracy, summarized by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and the area under ROC curve. These types of human studies are difficult to arrange, costly, and time consuming. In addition, human observers involved in this type of study should be experts on the image genre to avoid inconsistent scoring through the lengthy study. In two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) studies, known to be faster, two images are compared simultaneously and a single indicator is given. Unfortunately, the 2AFC approach cannot lead to a full ROC curve or a set of image scores. The aim of this work is to propose a methodology in which multiple rounds of the 2AFC studies are used to re-estimate an image confidence score (a.k.a. rating, ranking) and generate the full ROC curve. In the proposed approach, we treat image confidence score as an unknown rating that needs to be estimated and 2AFC as a two-player match game. To achieve this, we use the ELO rating system, which is used for calculating the relative skill levels of players in competitor-versus-competitor games such as chess. The proposed methodology is not limited to ELO, and other rating methods such as TrueSkill™, Chessmetrics, or Glicko can be also used. The presented results, using simulated data, indicate that a full ROC curve can be recovered using several rounds of 2AFC studies and that the best pairing strategy starts with the first round of pairing abnormal versus normal images (as in the classical 2AFC approach) followed by a number of rounds using random pairing. In addition, the proposed method was tested in a pilot human

  6. An examination of errors in characteristic curve measurements of radiographic screen/film systems.

    PubMed

    Wagner, L K; Barnes, G T; Bencomo, J A; Haus, A G

    1983-01-01

    The precision and accuracy achieved in the measurement of characteristic curves for radiographic screen/film systems is quantitatively investigated for three techniques: inverse square, kVp bootstrap, and step-wedge bootstrap. Precision of all techniques is generally better than +/- 1.5% while the agreement among all intensity-scale techniques is better than 2% over the useful exposure latitude. However, the accuracy of the sensitometry will depend on several factors, including linearity and energy dependence of the calibration instrument, that may introduce larger errors. Comparisons of time-scale and intensity-scale methods are made and a means of measuring reciprocity law failure is demonstrated. PMID:6877185

  7. Study on the effect of transition curve to the dynamic characteristics of high-temperature superconducting maglev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Nan; Zheng, Botian; Gou, Yanfeng; Chen, Ping; Zheng, Jun; Deng, Zigang

    2015-12-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) maglev technology is becoming more and more mature, and many key technologies have been deeply studied. However, the transition curve plays a key role in HTS maglev system, and related studies have not been carried out. In this paper series of simulations were conducted to test the lateral and vertical vibration of HTS maglev when passing through curves. Two magnetic guideways, of which one has transition curves but the other does not, are designed to test the vibration characteristics of a mini HTS maglev model running though curves. Results show that after adding transition curves between straight line and circular curve the vibration of HTS maglev model in lateral and vertical directions are all weakened in different degrees. It proves that adding transition curve into HTS maglev system is favorable and necessary.

  8. Characteristics of dewatering induced drawdown curve under blocking effect of retaining wall in aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yong-Xia; Shen, Shui-Long; Yuan, Da-Jun

    2016-08-01

    For deep excavation pits that require the pumping of confined groundwater, a combination of a retaining wall and dewatering with large-diameter wells is usually adopted during excavation to improve safety. Since a retaining wall has a much lower hydraulic conductivity than the surrounding material in the aquifer, blocking of seepage to prolong the seepage path of the groundwater outside of the pit is effective. The retaining walls used during excavation dewatering cause hydraulic head drawdown inside the pit much faster than outside the pit. Thus, difference in hydraulic head between inside and outside of the pit increases. To investigate the mechanism of the blocking effect, numerical simulation using the finite difference method (FDM) was conducted to analyze the effects of pumping in the pit. The FDM results show that drawdown varies along the depth of the confined aquifer. The influence factors of drawdown inside and outside the pit include insertion depth of retaining walls, anisotropy of a confined aquifer and screen length of pumping wells. In addition, FDM results also show that the drawdown-time curve can be divided into four stages: in Stage I, drawdown inside the pit is very small and outside the pit it is almost zero; in Stage II, drawdown increases quickly with time; in Stage III, the drawdown curve is parallel to the Cooper-Jacob curve on semi-log axes; and in Stage IV, the drawdown becomes constant. These characteristics of the drawdown curve under the blocking effect of a retaining wall in an aquifer provide a way of estimating hydrogeological parameters according to pumping test results.

  9. Assessing the Classification Accuracy of Early Numeracy Curriculum-Based Measures Using Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laracy, Seth D.; Hojnoski, Robin L.; Dever, Bridget V.

    2016-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to investigate the ability of early numeracy curriculum-based measures (EN-CBM) administered in preschool to predict performance below the 25th and 40th percentiles on a quantity discrimination measure in kindergarten. Areas under the curve derived from a sample of 279 students ranged…

  10. An evolutionary approach to modelling the soil-water characteristic curve in unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahangar-Asr, A.; Johari, A.; Javadi, A. A.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper a new approach is presented based on evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR) for modelling of soil-water characteristic curve in unsaturated soils. EPR is an evolutionary data mining technique that generates a transparent and structured representation of the behaviour of a system directly from data. This method can operate on large quantities of data in order to capture nonlinear and complex relationships between variables of the system. It also has the additional advantage that it allows the user to gain insight into the behaviour of the system. Results from pressure plate tests carried out on clay, silty clay, sandy loam, and loam are used for developing and validating the EPR model. The model inputs are the initial void ratio, initial gravimetric water content, logarithm of suction normalised with respect to atmospheric air pressure, clay content, and silt content. The model output is the gravimetric water content corresponding to the assigned input suction. The EPR model predictions are compared with the experimental results as well as the models proposed by previous researches. The results show that the proposed approach is very effective and robust in modelling the soil-water characteristic curve in unsaturated soils. The merits and advantages of the proposed approach are highlighted.

  11. Soil water repellency characteristic curves for soil profiles with natural organic carbon gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Ken; Müller, Karin; Moldrup, Per; de Jonge, Lis; Clothier, Brent; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2014-05-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) is a phenomenon that influences many soil hydrologic processes such as reduction of infiltration, increase in overland flow, and enhanced preferential flow. SWR has been observed in various soil types and textures, and the degree of SWR is greatly controlled by soil moisture content and levels of organic matter and clay. One of the key topics in SWR research is how to describe accurately the seasonal and temporal variation of SWR with the controlling factors such as soil moisture, organic matter, and clay contents for soil profiles with natural organic carbon gradients. In the present study, we summarize measured SWR data for soil profiles under different land uses and vegetation in Japan and New Zealand, and compared these with literature data. We introduce the contact angle-based evaluation of SWR and predictive models for soil water repellency characteristic curves, in which the contact angle is a function of the moisture content. We also discuss a number of novel concepts, including i) the reduction in the contact angle with soil-water contact time to describe the time dependence of SWR, ii) the relationship between the contact angles from the measured scanning curves under controlled wetting and drying cycles, and iii) the initial contact angles measured by the sessile drop method.

  12. Application of Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curves for Explosives Detection Using Different Sampling and Detection Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Young, Mimy; Fan, Wen; Raeva, Anna; Almirall, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Reported for the first time are receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves constructed to describe the performance of a sorbent-coated disk, planar solid phase microextraction (PSPME) unit for non-contact sampling of a variety of volatiles. The PSPME is coupled to ion mobility spectrometers (IMSs) for the detection of volatile chemical markers associated with the presence of smokeless powders, model systems of explosives containing diphenylamine (DPA), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) and nitroglycerin (NG) as the target analytes. The performance of the PSPME-IMS was compared with the widely accepted solid-phase microextraction (SPME), coupled to a GC-MS. A set of optimized sampling conditions for different volume containers (1–45 L) with various sample amounts of explosives, were studied in replicates (n = 30) to determine the true positive rates (TPR) and false positive detection rates (FPR) for the different scenarios. These studies were obtained in order to construct the ROC curves for two IMS instruments (a bench-top and field-portable system) and a bench top GC-MS system in low and high clutter environments. Both static and dynamic PSPME sampling were studied in which 10–500 mg quantities of smokeless powders were detected within 10 min of static sampling and 1 min of dynamic sampling.

  13. Interrelations among the soil-water retention, hydraulic conductivity, and suction-stress characteristic curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Ning; Kaya, Murat; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    The three fundamental constitutive relations that describe fluid flow, strength, and deformation behavior of variably saturated soils are the soil-water retention curve (SWRC), hydraulic conductivity function (HCF), and suction-stress characteristic curve (SSCC). Until recently, the interrelations among the SWRC, HCF, and SSCC have not been well established. This work sought experimental confirmation of interrelations among these three constitutive functions. Results taken from the literature for six soils and those obtained for 11 different soils were used. Using newly established analytical relations among the SWRC, HCF, and SSCC and these test results, the authors showed that these three constitutive relations can be defined by a common set of hydromechanical parameters. The coefficient of determination for air-entry pressures determined independently using hydraulic and mechanical methods is >0.99, >0.98 for the pore size parameter, and 0.94 for the residual degree of saturation. One practical implication is that one of any of the four experiments (axis-translation, hydraulic, shear-strength, or deformation) is sufficient to quantify all three constitutive relations.

  14. Numerical study of base pressure characteristic curve for a four-engine clustered nozzle configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study is to benchmark a four-engine clustered nozzle base flowfield with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The CFD model is a three-dimensional pressure-based, viscous flow formulation. An adaptive upwind scheme is employed for the spatial discretization. The upwind scheme is based on second and fourth order central differencing with adaptive artificial dissipation. Qualitative base flow features such as the reverse jet, wall jet, recompression shock, and plume-plume impingement have been captured. The computed quantitative flow properties such as the radial base pressure distribution, model centerline Mach number and static pressure variation, and base pressure characteristic curve agreed reasonably well with those of the measurement. Parametric study on the effect of grid resolution, turbulence model, inlet boundary condition and difference scheme on convective terms has been performed. The results showed that grid resolution had a strong influence on the accuracy of the base flowfield prediction.

  15. Optimal algorithm for automatic detection of microaneurysms based on receiver operating characteristic curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lili; Luo, Shuqian

    2010-11-01

    Microaneurysms (MAs) are the first manifestations of the diabetic retinopathy (DR) as well as an indicator for its progression. Their automatic detection plays a key role for both mass screening and monitoring and is therefore in the core of any system for computer-assisted diagnosis of DR. The algorithm basically comprises the following stages: candidate detection aiming at extracting the patterns possibly corresponding to MAs based on mathematical morphological black top hat, feature extraction to characterize these candidates, and classification based on support vector machine (SVM), to validate MAs. Feature vector and kernel function of SVM selection is very important to the algorithm. We use the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to evaluate the distinguishing performance of different feature vectors and different kernel functions of SVM. The ROC analysis indicates the quadratic polynomial SVM with a combination of features as the input shows the best discriminating performance.

  16. Prediction of dynamic and aerodynamic characteristics of the centrifugal fan with forward curved blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanský, Jiří; Kalmár, László; Gášpár, Roman

    2013-12-01

    The main aim of this paper is determine the centrifugal fan with forward curved blades aerodynamic characteristics based on numerical modeling. Three variants of geometry were investigated. The first, basic "A" variant contains 12 blades. The geometry of second "B" variant contains 12 blades and 12 semi-blades with optimal length [1]. The third, control variant "C" contains 24 blades without semi-blades. Numerical calculations were performed by CFD Ansys. Another aim of this paper is to compare results of the numerical simulation with results of approximate numerical procedure. Applied approximate numerical procedure [2] is designated to determine characteristics of the turbulent flow in the bladed space of a centrifugal-flow fan impeller. This numerical method is an extension of the hydro-dynamical cascade theory for incompressible and inviscid fluid flow. Paper also partially compares results from the numerical simulation and results from the experimental investigation. Acoustic phenomena observed during experiment, during numerical simulation manifested as deterioration of the calculation stability, residuals oscillation and thus also as a flow field oscillation. Pressure pulsations are evaluated by using frequency analysis for each variant and working condition.

  17. Soil-Water Characteristic Curves of Red Clay treated by Ionic Soil Stabilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, D.; Xiang, W.

    2009-12-01

    The relationship of red clay particle with water is an important factor to produce geological disaster and environmental damage. In order to reduce the role of adsorbed water of red clay in WuHan, Ionic Soil Stabilizer (ISS) was used to treat the red clay. Soil Moisture Equipment made in U.S.A was used to measure soil-water characteristic curve of red clay both in natural and stabilized conditions in the suction range of 0-500kPa. The SWCC results were used to interpret the red clay behavior due to stabilizer treatment. In addition, relationship were compared between the basic soil and stabilizer properties such as water content, dry density, liquid limit, plastic limit, moisture absorption rate and stabilizer dosages. The analysis showed that the particle density and specific surface area increase, the dehydration rate slows and the thickness of water film thins after treatment with Ionic Soil Stabilizer. After treatment with the ISS, the geological disasters caused by the adsorbed water of red clay can be effectively inhibited.

  18. Potential Distribution and Transmission Characteristics in a Curved Quadrupole Ion Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoyu; Xiong, Caiqiao; Xu, Gaoping; Liu, Hao; Tang, Yin; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Rui; Qiao, Haoxue; Tseng, Yao-Hsin; Peng, Wen-Ping; Nie, Zongxiu; Chen, Yi

    2011-02-01

    The potential distribution in the curved quadrupole is exactly characterized by the Laplace equation, and an approximate solution to the Laplace equation is calculated. We represent the Laplace equation under the coordinates named minimal rotation frame (MRF) and derive an expression on the hexapole and octopole superposition. Our conclusion is in agreement with the results by the numerical (SIMION) method. Based on the Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) method reported in our previous work, the nonlinear effects of ion motion are investigated in detail. The frequency shift of ion motion can be well eliminated by coupling the hexapole component with a positive octopole component, and the transmission efficiency of ions is found to decrease dramatically with the increase of the ionic kinetic energy in the z-direction. Furthermore, the transmission characteristics of ions are discussed with regards to the phase-space theory. The results show that the centrifugally introduced axis shift is mainly responsible for the ion losses. A modified direct current (dc) voltage supply pattern is hence proposed to compensate for this effect.

  19. The Obsessive Compulsive Scale of the Child Behavior Checklist Predicts Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudziak, James J.; Althoff, Robert R.; Stanger, Catherine; van Beijsterveldt, C. E. M.; Nelson, Elliot C.; Hanna, Gregory L.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Todd, Richard D.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine a score on the Obsessive Compulsive Scale (OCS) from the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) to screen for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) in children and to rigorously test the specificity and sensitivity of a single cutpoint. Methods: A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis…

  20. A Statistical Comparison of the Blossom Blight Forecasts of MARYBLYT and Cougarblight with Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blossom blight forecasting is an important aspect of fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora, management for both apple and pear. A comparison of the forecast accuracy of two common fire blight forecasters, MARYBLYT and Cougarblight, was performed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve ...

  1. Tsunami Simulation using CIP Method with Characteristic Curve Equations and TVD-MacCormack Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukazawa, Souki; Tosaka, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    After entering 21st century, we already had two big tsunami disasters associated with Mw9 earthquakes in Sumatra and Japan. To mitigate the damages of tsunami, the numerical simulation technology combined with information technologies could provide reliable predictions in planning countermeasures to prevent the damage to the social system, making safety maps, and submitting early evacuation information to the residents. Shallow water equations are still solved not only for global scale simulation of the ocean tsunami propagation but also for local scale simulation of overland inundation in many tsunami simulators though three-dimensional model starts to be used due to improvement of CPU. One-dimensional shallow water equations are below: partial bm{Q}/partial t+partial bm{E}/partial x=bm{S} in which bm{Q}=( D M )), bm{E}=( M M^2/D+gD^2/2 )), bm{S}=( 0 -gDpartial z/partial x-gn2 M|M| /D7/3 )). where D[m] is total water depth; M[m^2/s] is water flux; z[m] is topography; g[m/s^2] is the gravitational acceleration; n[s/m1/3] is Manning's roughness coefficient. To solve these, the staggered leapfrog scheme is used in a lot of wide-scale tsunami simulator. But this scheme has a problem that lagging phase error occurs when courant number is small. In some practical simulation, a kind of diffusion term is added. In this study, we developed two wide-scale tsunami simulators with different schemes and compared usual scheme and other schemes in practicability and validity. One is a total variation diminishing modification of the MacCormack method (TVD-MacCormack method) which is famous for the simulation of compressible fluids. The other is the Cubic Interpolated Profile (CIP) method with characteristic curve equations transformed from shallow water equations. Characteristic curve equations derived from shallow water equations are below: partial R_x±/partial t+C_x±partial R_x±/partial x=∓ g/2partial z/partial x in which R_x±=√{gD}± u/2, C_x±=u± √{gD}. where u

  2. Field-Obtained Soil Water Characteristic Curves and Hydraulic Conductivity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, Ishimwe

    A compacted clay liner (test pad) was constructed and instrumented with volumetric water content and soil matric potential sensors to determine soil water characteristic curves (SWCC) and hydraulic conductivity (k) functions. Specifically, the compacted clay liner was subjected to an infiltration cycle during a sealed double ring infiltrometer (SDRI) test followed by a drying cycle. After the drying cycle, Shelby tube samples were collected from the compacted clay liner and flexible wall permeability (FWP) tests were conducted on sub-samples to determine the saturated hydraulic conductivity. Moreover, two computer programs (RETC and UNSAT-H) were utilized to model the SWCCs and k-functions of the soil based on obtained measurements including the volumetric water content, the soil matric potential, and the saturated hudraulic conductivity (ks). Results obtained from the RETC program (s, r, α, n and ks) were ingested into UNSAT-H program to calculate the movement of water (rate and location) through the compacted clay liner. Although a linear wetting front (location of water infiltration as a function of time) is typically utilized for SDRI calculations, the use of a hyperbolic wetting front is recommended as a hyperbolic wetting front was modeled from the testing results. The suggested shape of the wetting front is associated with utilization of the desorption SWCC instead of the sorption SWCC and with relatively high values of ks (average value of 7.2E-7 cm/sec) were measured in the FWP tests while relatively low values of ks (average value of 1.2E-7 cm/sec) were measured in the SDRI test.

  3. Is there Link between the Type of the Volumetric Strain Curve and Elastic Constants, Porosity, Stress and Strain Characteristics ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchik, V.

    2013-03-01

    The stress [crack damage stress ( σ cd) and uniaxial compressive strength ( σ c)] and strain characteristics [maximum total volumetric strain ( ɛ cd), axial failure strain ( ɛ af)], porosity ( n) and elastic constants [elastic modulus ( E) and Poisson's ratio ( ν)] and their ratios were coordinated with the existence of two different types (type 1 and type 2) of volumetric strain curve. Type 1 volumetric strain curve has a reversal point and, therefore, σ cd is less than the uniaxial compressive strength ( σ c). Type 2 has no reversal point, and the bulk volume of rock decreases until its failure occurs (i.e., σ cd = σ c). It is confirmed that the ratio between the elastic modulus ( E) and the parameter λ = n/ ɛ cd strongly affects the crack damage stress ( σ cd) for both type 1 and type 2 volumetric strain curves. It is revealed that heterogeneous carbonate rock samples exhibit different types of the volumetric strain curve even within the same rock formation, and the range of σ cd/ σ c = 0.54-1 for carbonate rocks is wider than the range (0.71 < σ cd/ σ c < 0.84) obtained by other researchers for granites, sandstones and quartzite. It is established that there is no connection between the type of the volumetric strain curve and values of n, E, σ cd, ν, E/(1 - 2 ν), M R = E/ σ c and E/ λ. On the other hand, the type of volumetric strain curve is connected with the values of λ and the ratio between the axial failure strain ( ɛ af) and the maximum total volumetric strain ( ɛ cd). It is argued that in case of small ɛ af/ ɛ cd-small λ, volumetric strain curve follows the type 2.

  4. An 8 h characteristic time-scale in submillimetre light curves of Sagittarius A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason; Kelly, Brandon; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Marrone, Daniel P.; Stone, Jordan; Plambeck, Richard

    2014-08-01

    We compile and analyse long-term (≈10 yr) submillimetre (submm - 1.3, 0.87, 0.43 mm) wavelength light curves of the Galactic Centre black hole, Sagittarius A*. The 0.87 and 0.43 mm data are taken from the literature, while the majority of the 1.3 mm light curve is from previously unpublished SMA and CARMA data. We show that on minute to a few hour time-scales, the variability is consistent with a red noise process with a 230 GHz power-spectrum slope of β =2.3^{+0.8}_{-0.6} at 95 per cent confidence. The light curve is decorrelated (white noise) on long (month to year) times. We measure a transition time between red and white noise of τ = 8_{-4}^{+3} h at 230 GHz at 95 per cent confidence, with consistent results at 345 and 690 GHz. This corresponds to ≈10 orbital times or ≈1 inflow (viscous) time at R = 3Rs, a typical radius producing the 230 GHz emission as measured by very long baseline interferometry and found in theoretical accretion flow and jet models. This time-scale is shorter (longer) than those measured by some analyses of radio (near-infrared) light curves. It is roughly consistent with the analogous time-scale inferred in studies of quasar optical light curves after accounting for the difference in emission radius. We find evidence that the submm variability persists at least down to the innermost stable circular orbit, if not the event horizon. These results can be compared quantitatively with similar analyses at different wavebands to test for connections between the variability mechanisms, and with light curves from theoretical models of accreting black holes.

  5. 7 CFR 42.140 - Operating Characteristic (OC) curves for on-line sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... must be obtained from the applicable sampling plan tables. (c) The curves show the ability of the... Plan. An examination of this table reveals that there is one single and one double sampling plan that... double sampling plan that requires the initial inspection of 228 individual containers. The lot will...

  6. 7 CFR 42.140 - Operating Characteristic (OC) curves for on-line sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... must be obtained from the applicable sampling plan tables. (c) The curves show the ability of the... Plan. An examination of this table reveals that there is one single and one double sampling plan that... double sampling plan that requires the initial inspection of 228 individual containers. The lot will...

  7. 7 CFR 42.140 - Operating Characteristic (OC) curves for on-line sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... must be obtained from the applicable sampling plan tables. (c) The curves show the ability of the... Plan. An examination of this table reveals that there is one single and one double sampling plan that... double sampling plan that requires the initial inspection of 228 individual containers. The lot will...

  8. 7 CFR 42.140 - Operating Characteristic (OC) curves for on-line sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... must be obtained from the applicable sampling plan tables. (c) The curves show the ability of the... Plan. An examination of this table reveals that there is one single and one double sampling plan that... double sampling plan that requires the initial inspection of 228 individual containers. The lot will...

  9. The soil water characteristic as new class of closed-form parametric expressions for the flow duration curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadegh, M.; Vrugt, J. A.; Gupta, H. V.; Xu, C.

    2016-04-01

    The flow duration curve is a signature catchment characteristic that depicts graphically the relationship between the exceedance probability of streamflow and its magnitude. This curve is relatively easy to create and interpret, and is used widely for hydrologic analysis, water quality management, and the design of hydroelectric power plants (among others). Several mathematical expressions have been proposed to mimic the FDC. Yet, these efforts have not been particularly successful, in large part because available functions are not flexible enough to portray accurately the functional shape of the FDC for a large range of catchments and contrasting hydrologic behaviors. Here, we extend the work of Vrugt and Sadegh (2013) and introduce several commonly used models of the soil water characteristic as new class of closed-form parametric expressions for the flow duration curve. These soil water retention functions are relatively simple to use, contain between two to three parameters, and mimic closely the empirical FDCs of 430 catchments of the MOPEX data set. We then relate the calibrated parameter values of these models to physical and climatological characteristics of the watershed using multivariate linear regression analysis, and evaluate the regionalization potential of our proposed models against those of the literature. If quality of fit is of main importance then the 3-parameter van Genuchten model is preferred, whereas the 2-parameter lognormal, 3-parameter GEV and generalized Pareto models show greater promise for regionalization.

  10. Physical Characteristics of Faint Meteors by Light Curve and High-resolution Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasinghe, Dilini; Campbell-Brown, Margaret D.; Stokan, Edward

    2014-11-01

    The physical structure of a meteoroid may be inferred from optical observations, particularly the light curve, of a meteor. For example: a classically shaped (late peaked) light curve is seen as evidence of a solid single body, whereas a symmetric light curve may indicate a dustball structure. High-resolution optical observations show how the meteoroid fragments: continuously, leaving a long wake, or discretely, leaving several distinct pieces. Calculating the orbit of the meteoroid using two station data then allows the object to be associated with asteroidal or cometary parent bodies. Optical observations thus provide simultaneous information on meteoroid structure, fragmentation mode, and origin.CAMO (the Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory) has been continuously collecting faint (masses < 10-4 kg) two station optical meteors with image-intensified narrow field (with a resolution of up to 3 meters per pixel) and wide field (26 by 19 degrees) cameras since 2010. The narrow field, telescopic cameras allow the meteor fragmentation to be studied using a pair of mirrors to track the meteor. The wide-field cameras provide the light curve and trajectory solution.We present preliminary results from classifying light curves and high-resolution optical observations for 3000 faint meteors recorded since 2010. We find that most meteors (both asteroidal and cometary) show long trails, while meteors with short trails are the second most common morphology. It is expected that meteoroids that experience negligible fragmentation have the shortest trails, so our results imply that the majority of small meteoroids fragment during ablation. A surprising observation is that almost equal fractions of asteroidal and cometary meteors fragment (showing long trails), implying a similar structure for both types of meteoroids.

  11. Influence of recirculation on Y-Q characteristic curve of hydrodynamic pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klas, Roman; Pochylý, František; Rudolf, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Contribution is focused on discussion of different design modifications of the volute, impeller and rotor-stator cavity in case of very low specific speed pump with recirculation channels. Amount of the liquid flowing through the recirculation channels has significant effect on delivery height, stability of the head curve and hydraulic efficiency. Analysis of these effects is based on the evaluation of the dissipated power in different internal parts of the pump and for different flow rates. It has already been proved in our previous research that volute has substantial impact on stability of the head curve. It is apparent that similar effect can also be attributed to distribution and shape of the recirculation channels. This fact is connected with the inflow into the channels and with magnitude of the flow rate through the recirculation channels. Influence of mentioned parameters on recirculation is discussed in present paper.

  12. Running characteristics of the magnetically levitated train in a curved track section

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, S.; Ohsaki, H.; Masada, E.

    1997-09-01

    A three-dimensional running simulation program of the train motion which includes both electromagnetic and mechanical systems has been developed. For verification of running stability, the motion of the Maglev train with four bogies and three cars running into the curved section was calculated. Because the spring strength of the secondary suspension between bogies and cabins was much smaller than that of the electrodynamic suspension, interaction among bogies was small. The lateral displacement reached 0.045m, which is about 50% of the lateral air gap. Therefore train can run without touching the wall of the guideway. As this lateral air gap caused roll torque, total roll angle of the bogie became 12.5% larger than the cant angle of the curved section.

  13. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

    2014-06-13

    Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

  14. Characteristics of thermoluminescence glow curves for materials exhibiting more than one glow peak

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, P.W.

    1982-01-01

    The properties of thermoluminescence glow curves, containing one or more glow peaks, have been determined for situations where the assumptions invoked to obtain the usual first and second order kinetics do not apply. First order kinetics occurs only when retrapping is negligible. If more than one glow peak is present and retrapping occurs between different types of traps the glow peaks can be approximated, except in the wings, by the usual first and second order expressions; but often physically unrealistic parameters are obtained. These studies indicate that dating is best accomplished with minerals exhibiting first order kinetics. 6 figures, 1 table.

  15. Understanding the effect of watershed characteristic on the runoff using SCS curve number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damayanti, Frieta; Schneider, Karl

    2015-04-01

    Runoff modeling is a key component in watershed management. The temporal course and amount of runoff is a complex function of a multitude of parameters such as climate, soil, topography, land use, and water management. Against the background of the current rapid environmental change, which is due to both i) man-made changes (e.g. urban development, land use change, water management) as well as ii) changes in the natural systems (e.g. climate change), understanding and predicting the impacts of these changes upon the runoff is very important and affects the wellbeing of many people living in the watershed. A main tool for predictions is hydrologic models. Particularly process based models are the method of choice to assess the impact of land use and climate change. However, many regions which experience large changes in the watersheds can be described as rather data poor, which limits the applicability of such models. This is particularly also true for the Telomoyo Watershed (545 km2) which is located in southern part of Central Java province. The average annual rainfall of the study area reaches 2971 mm. Irrigated paddy field are the dominating land use (35%), followed by built-up area and dry land agriculture. The only available soil map is the FAO soil digital map of the world, which provides rather general soil information. A field survey accompanied by a lab analysis 65 soil samples of was carried out to provide more detailed soil texture information. The soil texture map is a key input in the SCS method to define hydrological soil groups. In the frame of our study on 'Integrated Analysis on Flood Risk of Telomoyo Watershed in Response to the Climate and Land Use Change' funded by the German Academic Exchange service (DAAD) we analyzed the sensitivity of the modeled runoff upon the choice of the method to estimate the CN values using the SCS-CN method. The goal of this study is to analyze the impact of different data sources on the curve numbers and the

  16. Electrosprayed nanoparticles for drug delivery and pharmaceutical applications

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology based Pharma has emerged significantly and has influenced the Pharma industry up to a considerable extent. Nanoparticles technology holds a good share of the nanotech Pharma and is significant in comparison with the other domains. Electrospraying technology answers the potential needs of nanoparticle production such as scalability, reproducibility, effective encapsulation etc. Many drugs have been electrosprayed with and without polymer carriers. Drug release characteristics are improved with the incorporation of biodegradable polymer carriers which sustain the release of encapsulated drug. Electrospraying is acknowledged as an important technique for the preparation of nanoparticles with respect to pharmaceutical applications. Herein we attempted to consolidate the reports pertaining to electrospraying and their corresponding therapeutic application area. PMID:23512013

  17. Assessment of the Large Meteoroid Characteristics from the Light Curves Obtained by Satellite and Groundbased Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemtchinov, I. V.; Spalding, R. E.; Jacobs, C.; Tagliaferri, E.; Artem'eva, N. A.; Golub, A. P.; Kosarev, I. B.; Popova, O. P.; Svettsov, V. V.; Shuvalov, V. V.

    1995-09-01

    A relatively small number of satellites at high altitude orbits (20,000 km or higher) provide coverage of most of the Earth's surface. It is possible to have essentially continuous, day and night, all weather coverage over the entire surface of the Earth [1]. Space based infrared sensors have detected over 200 bright flashes in the atmosphere since 1972. Average number of flashes per year is 30. In addition optical sensors have detected 16 light curves in the visible (mainly during the last year). These bright flashes have been caused by explosive disintegration of large meteoroids in the atmosphere. Information from IR sensors and light curves have been analyzed. This analysis give important information on the energy - frequency distribution of the impacting meteoroids, their sizes, strengths and even composition. For an example, preatmospheric kinetic energies of meteoroids which caused 15 April 1988, 1 October 1990, 4 October 1991 and 1 February 1994 events are 8-9, 5-8, 1-2, and 40 kt TNT respectively. Three of them were stones or chondrites and deposited their energy at the altitudes of 30 to 45 km. Last one was probably an iron (initial velocity 24 km/sec, angle of trajectory inclination 45 degrees [2]) and penetrated to the altitude of about 20 km (strength of about 100 Mdyn/cm^2). Radiation-hydrodynamic 1D, 2D and even 3D numerical simulations [3,4] of the meteoroid flight in the atmosphere for various sizes, velocities, heights of flights have been conducted and used in the analysis. They were based on the detailed tables of spectral opacities for hot air and ablated material for various wavelengths, temperatures, densities, and composition (iron, stone, chondrite and cometary material). Radiation heat transfer, ablation, fragmentation, and dispersion of fragments have been taken into account. Detailed spectra of the emitted radiation has been obtained. Data from satellite network has been compared with the data from ground based photographic networks and

  18. Modeling the Flow Curve Characteristics of 410 Martensitic Stainless Steel Under Hot Working Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Amir; Dehghani, Kamran; Ebrahimi, Golam Reza; Keshmiri, Hamid

    2010-11-01

    The hot deformation behavior of AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel was investigated by conducting hot compression tests between 1173 K (900 °C) and 1423 K (1150 °C) and between strain rates of 0.001 s-1 to 1 s-1. The hyperbolic sine function described the relation well between flow stress at a given strain and the Zener-Hollomon parameter ( Z). The variation of flow stress with deformation temperature gave the average value of apparent activation energy as 448 kJ/mol. The strain and stress corresponding to two important points associated with flow curve ( i.e., peak strain and the onset of steady-state flow) were related to the Z parameter using power-law equations. A model also was proposed based on the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) equation to estimate the fractional softening of dynamic recrystallization at any given strain. This model can be used readily for the prediction of flow stress. The values of n and k, material constants in the JMAK equation, were determined for the studied material. The strains regarding the peak and the onset of steady-state flow were formulated in term of applied strain rate and the constants of the JMAK equation. A good agreement was found between the predicted strains and those obtained by the experimental work.

  19. The Soil-Water Characteristic Curve of Unsaturated Tropical Residual Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, M. F.; Setapa, A. S.; Tajudin, S. A. A.; Madun, A.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Marto, A.

    2016-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the SWCC of unsaturated tropical residual soil in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Undisturbed soil samples at five locations of high-risk slopes area were taken at a depth of 0.5 m using block sampler. In the determination of the SWCC, the pressure plate extractor with the capacity of 1500 kN/m2 has been used. The index properties of the soil such as natural moisture content, Atterberg limits, specific gravity, and soil classification are performed according to BS 1377: Part 2: 1990. The results of index properties show that the natural moisture content of the soil is between 36% to 46%, the plasticity index is between 10% - 26%, the specific gravity is between 2.51 - 2.61 and the soils is classified as silty organic clay of low plasticity. The SWCC data from the pressure plate extractor have been fitted with the Fredlund and Xing equation. The results show that the air entry value and residual matric suction for residual soils are in the range of 17 kN/m2 to 24 kN/m2 and 145 kN/m2 to 225 kN/m2 respectively. From the fitting curve, it is found that the average value of the Fredlund and Xing parameters such as a, n and m are in the range of 0.24-0.299, 1.7-4.8 and 0.142-0.440 respectively.

  20. Investigation of Liner Characteristics in the NASA Langley Curved Duct Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Brown, Martha C.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    The Curved Duct Test Rig (CDTR), which is designed to investigate propagation of sound in a duct with flow, has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The duct incorporates an adaptive control system to generate a tone in the duct at a specific frequency with a target Sound Pressure Level and a target mode shape. The size of the duct, the ability to isolate higher order modes, and the ability to modify the duct configuration make this rig unique among experimental duct acoustics facilities. An experiment is described in which the facility performance is evaluated by measuring the sound attenuation by a sample duct liner. The liner sample comprises one wall of the liner test section. Sound in tones from 500 to 2400 Hz, with modes that are parallel to the liner surface of order 0 to 5, and that are normal to the liner surface of order 0 to 2, can be generated incident on the liner test section. Tests are performed in which sound is generated without axial flow in the duct and with flow at a Mach number of 0.275. The attenuation of the liner is determined by comparing the sound power in a hard wall section downstream of the liner test section to the sound power in a hard wall section upstream of the liner test section. These experimentally determined attenuations are compared to numerically determined attenuations calculated by means of a finite element analysis code. The code incorporates liner impedance values educed from measured data from the NASA Langley Grazing Incidence Tube, a test rig that is used for investigating liner performance with flow and with (0,0) mode incident grazing. The analytical and experimental results compare favorably, indicating the validity of the finite element method and demonstrating that finite element prediction tools can be used together with experiment to characterize the liner attenuation.

  1. Factors Affecting The Experimental Line Spread Function (Lsf) Measurement And Modulation Transfer Function (Mtf) Calculation Including Deviation In Characteristic Curve Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahle, Marcia E.; Haus, Arthur G.

    1980-08-01

    The major potential errors in the slit method measurement of the line spread function (LSF) and the modu-lation transfer function (MTF) of radiographic screen-film systems are reviewed. These errors are compared with the potential error introduced in the LSF due to an erroneous representation of the characteristic curve (sensitometric data). If a deviation in the sensitometric data results in a lower average gradient of the characteristic curve, the MTF will show higher resolution capabilities.

  2. Regional Curves for Bankfull Channel Characteristics in the Appalachian Plateaus, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Messinger, Terence

    2009-01-01

    Streams in the Appalachian Plateaus Physiographic Province in West Virginia were classified as a single region on the basis of bankfull characteristics. Regression lines for annual peak flow and drainage area measured at streamgages in the study area at recurrence intervals between 1.2 and 1.7 years fell within the 99-percent confidence interval of the regression line for bankfull flow. Channel characteristics were intermediate among those from surrounding states and regions where comparable studies have been done. The stream reaches that were surveyed were selected for apparent stability, and to represent gradients of drainage area, elevation, and mean annual precipitation. Profiles of high-water marks left by bankfull and near-bankfull peaks were surveyed, either as part of slope-area flow measurements at ungaged reaches, or to transfer known flow information to cross sections for gaged reaches. The slope-area measurements made it possible to include ungaged sites in the study, but still relate bankfull dimensions to peak flow and frequency.

  3. Receiver-operating characteristic curves for somatic cell scores and California mastitis test in Valle del Belice dairy sheep.

    PubMed

    Riggio, Valentina; Pesce, Lorenzo L; Morreale, Salvatore; Portolano, Baldassare

    2013-06-01

    Using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve methodology this study was designed to assess the diagnostic effectiveness of somatic cell count (SCC) and the California mastitis test (CMT) in Valle del Belice sheep, and to propose and evaluate threshold values for those tests that would optimally discriminate between healthy and infected udders. Milk samples (n=1357) were collected from 684 sheep in four flocks. The prevalence of infection, as determined by positive bacterial culture was 0.36, 87.7% of which were minor and 12.3% major pathogens. Of the culture negative samples, 83.7% had an SCC<500,000/mL and 97.4% had <1,000,000cells/mL. When the associations between SC score (SCS) and whole sample status (culture negative vs. infected), minor pathogen status (culture negative vs. infected with minor pathogens), major pathogen status (culture negative vs. infected with major pathogens), and CMT results were evaluated, the estimated area under the ROC curve was greater for glands infected with major compared to minor pathogens (0.88 vs. 0.73), whereas the area under the curve considering all pathogens was similar to the one for minor pathogens (0.75). The estimated optimal thresholds were 3.00 (CMT), 2.81 (SCS for the whole sample), 2.81 (SCS for minor pathogens), and 3.33 (SCS for major pathogens). These correctly classified, respectively, 69.0%, 73.5%, 72.6% and 91.0% of infected udders in the samples. The CMT appeared only to discriminate udders infected with major pathogens. In this population, SCS appeared to be the best indirect test of the bacteriological status of the udder. PMID:23317658

  4. Effects of bottom bracings on torsional dynamic characteristics of horizontally curved twin I-girder bridges with different curvatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awall, Md. Robiul; Hayashikawa, Toshiro; Matsumoto, Takashi; He, Xingwen

    2012-03-01

    Curved twin I-girder bridges (CTIGBs) have low torsional stiffness that makes them vulnerable to dynamic loads. This study investigates the effects of bottom bracings on the torsional dynamic characteristics of CTIGBs. Five types of bottom bracings are designed to investigate their effects on the dynamic characteristics of CTIGBs with different curvatures under free and forced vibrations. To perform numerical investigations, three-dimensional (3-D) finite element (FE) bridge and vehicle models are established using commercial ANSYS code, and then a vehicle-bridge interaction analysis approach is proposed. Road roughness profiles generated from power spectral density and cross spectral functions are also taken into account in the analyses. The numerical results show that torsional frequencies increase significantly after providing bottom bracings, and the increasing rate depends on the type of bottom bracings and their locations of installation. Bottom bracings can act as load transmitting members from one main girder to the others. Large negative bearing forces that have occurred in bridges with small radii of curvatures can be remarkably reduced by providing bottom bracing systems. It is found that the performances of several bottom bracing systems are effective in improving the torsional dynamic characteristics of the bridges in this study.

  5. Concentration-response relationship for fluvoxamine using remission as an endpoint: a receiver operating characteristics curve analysis in major depression.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yutaro; Fukui, Naoki; Sawamura, Kazushi; Sugai, Takuro; Watanabe, Junzo; Ono, Shin; Inoue, Yoshimasa; Ozdemir, Vural; Someya, Toshiyuki

    2008-06-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring studies of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants thus far failed to identify a clear concentration-response relationship in major depression. Majority of the previous studies defined clinical response as 50% or greater reduction from baseline in depression rating scale scores. Because many patients who meet these criteria still present symptoms associated with functional impairment, there is a need to consider "remission" as an alternative end point in concentration-response analyses of SSRIs. The present 12-week prospective study investigated the relationship between fluvoxamine (an SSRI) plasma concentration and remission in outpatients with depression. We used a flexible dose titration study designed to mimic clinical practice within the therapeutic dose range of fluvoxamine (25-200 mg/d). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve was computed to determine the optimal fluvoxamine plasma concentration for remission using 269 concentration data obtained from 80 patients. Analysis of the ROC curve from the entire study sample did not reveal a fluvoxamine concentration significantly predicting remission. By contrast, ROC analysis specifically in patients with moderate to severe depression (N = 51; baseline 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score > or = 20) found a fluvoxamine concentration of 61.4 ng/mL as a significant predictor of remission. In conclusion, therapeutic drug monitoring may be useful for rational titration and individualization of fluvoxamine dose and predicting remission in patients with moderate to severe depression, who may presumably display lesser placebo component in pharmacodynamic response. PMID:18480690

  6. Peak flow rate and recession-curve characteristics of a karst spring in the Inner Bluegrass, central Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Felton, G.K.; Currens, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    The flow rate at the terminal spring of a 1929 ha karst ground-water catchment has been continuously monitored for 2 years, and 108 identifiable events were analyzed. The peak flow rates followed a beta frequency distribution with parameters ?? = 0.365 and ?? = 1.135. Events were separated into high-flow and low-flow. High-flow events had characteristics attributable to pipe flow. Correlation and stepwise regression were used to develop peak flow rate prediction equations for the combined 108 events and for the 81 low-flow events. The portion of the recession curve identified as pipe flow was a watershed constant and time invariant. The base flow was seasonal, increasing in the winter to approximately 0.071 m3s-1 and decreasing in the summer to approximately 0.014 m3s-1. ?? 1994.

  7. Applications of electrospinning/electrospraying in drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Jahangiri, Azin; Adibkia, Khosro

    2016-01-01

    During recent years, nanoscaled materials have gained much attention because of their applications in the field of pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences. Electrospinning/electrospraying, as simple, effective and single-step methods, are used in the preparation of nanostructured materials (nanofibers and nanobeads). They offer an opportunity for direct encapsulation of the different types of drug molecules. The generated nanomaterials possess high surface area with porous characteristics, and the liberation of the loaded drugs follows a controlled-release pattern. Because of their wide applications in medical/pharmaceutical researches, the aim of this editorial is to highlight the importance of electrospinning/electrospraying technologies in drug delivery. PMID:27340617

  8. Fractal Characteristics of Soil Retention Curve and Particle Size Distribution with Different Vegetation Types in Mountain Areas of Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiang; Gao, Peng; Wang, Bing; Liu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Based on fractal theory, the fractal characteristics of soil particle size distribution (PSD) and soil water retention curve (WRC) under the five vegetation types were studied in the mountainous land of Northern China. Results showed that: (1) the fractal parameters of soil PSD and soil WRC varied greatly under each different vegetation type, with Quercus acutissima Carr. and Robina pseudoacacia Linn. mixed plantation (QRM) > Pinus thunbergii Parl. and Pistacia chinensis Bunge mixed plantation (PPM) > Pinus thunbergii Parl. (PTP) > Juglans rigia Linn. (JRL) > abandoned grassland (ABG); (2) the soil fractal dimensions of woodlands (QRM, PPM, PTP and JRL) were significantly higher than that in ABG, and mixed forests (QRM and PPM) were higher than that in pure forests (PTP and JRL); (3) the fractal dimension of soil was positively correlated with the silt and clay content but negatively correlated with the sand content; and (4) the fractal dimension of soil PSD was positively correlated with the soil WRC. These indicated that the fractal parameters of soil PSD and soil WRC could act as quantitative indices to reflect the physical properties of the soil, and could be used to describe the influences of the Return Farmland to Forests Projects on soil structure. PMID:26633458

  9. Fractal Characteristics of Soil Retention Curve and Particle Size Distribution with Different Vegetation Types in Mountain Areas of Northern China.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiang; Gao, Peng; Wang, Bing; Liu, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Based on fractal theory, the fractal characteristics of soil particle size distribution (PSD) and soil water retention curve (WRC) under the five vegetation types were studied in the mountainous land of Northern China. Results showed that: (1) the fractal parameters of soil PSD and soil WRC varied greatly under each different vegetation type, with Quercus acutissima Carr. and Robina pseudoacacia Linn. mixed plantation (QRM) > Pinus thunbergii Parl. and Pistacia chinensis Bunge mixed plantation (PPM) > Pinus thunbergii Parl. (PTP) > Juglans rigia Linn. (JRL) > abandoned grassland (ABG); (2) the soil fractal dimensions of woodlands (QRM, PPM, PTP and JRL) were significantly higher than that in ABG, and mixed forests (QRM and PPM) were higher than that in pure forests (PTP and JRL); (3) the fractal dimension of soil was positively correlated with the silt and clay content but negatively correlated with the sand content; and (4) the fractal dimension of soil PSD was positively correlated with the soil WRC. These indicated that the fractal parameters of soil PSD and soil WRC could act as quantitative indices to reflect the physical properties of the soil, and could be used to describe the influences of the Return Farmland to Forests Projects on soil structure. PMID:26633458

  10. Characteristics of concentration-inhibition curves of individual chemicals and applicability of the concentration addition model for mixture toxicity prediction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Wang, Xiaochang C; Ma, Xiaoyan

    2015-03-01

    The concentration addition (CA) model has been widely applied to predict mixture toxicity. However, its applicability is difficult to evaluate due to the complexity of interactions among substances. Considering that the concentration-response curve (CRC) of each component of the mixture is closely related to the prediction of mixture toxicity, mathematical treatments were used to derive a characteristic index kECx (k was the slope of the tangent line of a CRC at concentration ECx). The implication is that the CA model would be applicable for predicting the mixture toxicity only when chemical components have similar kECx in the whole or part of the concentration range. For five selected chemicals whose toxicity was detected using luminescent bacteria, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) showed much higher kECx values than the others and its existence in the binary mixtures brought about overestimation of the mixture toxicity with the CA model. The higher the mass ratio of SDBS in a multi-mixture was, the more the toxicity prediction deviated from measurements. By applying the method proposed in this study to analyze some published data, it is confirmed that some components having significantly different kECx values from the other components could explain the large deviation of the mixture toxicity predicted by the CA model. PMID:25499050

  11. Electrospray of Solution Processed Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Nicholas; Chiarot, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Electrospray is a technique that uses large electric fields to generate a spray of highly-charged, monodispersed droplets from a liquid solvent. Colloidal inks, consisting of nanoparticles dispersed in a volatile solvent, can be atomized using electrospray. In this study, we investigate the deposit structure of nanoparticle inks printed onto three different substrates: bare glass, silanized-patterned glass, and glass coated with a liquid film. The deposition morphology of colloidal inks printed onto these surfaces is predicted using mathematical modeling and statistical analysis. The goal of intervening at the substrate with surface patterns and liquid films is to exert control over the microstructure of the printed deposit. The advantage of electrospray is that it is an additive process which drastically reduces material waste that is inherent in other thin-film material processes.

  12. Machine learning-based receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for crisp and fuzzy classification of DNA microarrays in cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Leif E.; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to obtain classification area under the curve (AUC) as a function of feature standardization, fuzzification, and sample size from nine large sets of cancer-related DNA microarrays. Classifiers used included k nearest neighbor (kNN), näive Bayes classifier (NBC), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA), learning vector quantization (LVQ1), logistic regression (LOG), polytomous logistic regression (PLOG), artificial neural networks (ANN), particle swarm optimization (PSO), constricted particle swarm optimization (CPSO), kernel regression (RBF), radial basis function networks (RBFN), gradient descent support vector machines (SVMGD), and least squares support vector machines (SVMLS). For each data set, AUC was determined for a number of combinations of sample size, total sum[−log(p)] of feature t-tests, with and without feature standardization and with (fuzzy) and without (crisp) fuzzification of features. Altogether, a total of 2,123,530 classification runs were made. At the greatest level of sample size, ANN resulted in a fitted AUC of 90%, while PSO resulted in the lowest fitted AUC of 72.1%. AUC values derived from 4NN were the most dependent on sample size, while PSO was the least. ANN depended the most on total statistical significance of features used based on sum[−log(p)], whereas PSO was the least dependent. Standardization of features increased AUC by 8.1% for PSO and -0.2% for QDA, while fuzzification increased AUC by 9.4% for PSO and reduced AUC by 3.8% for QDA. AUC determination in planned microarray experiments without standardization and fuzzification of features will benefit the most if CPSO is used for lower levels of feature significance (i.e., sum[−log(p)] ~ 50) and ANN is used for greater levels of significance (i.e., sum[−log(p)] ~ 500). When only standardization of features is performed, studies are likely to benefit most by using CPSO for low

  13. A statistical comparison of the reliability of the blossom blight forecasts of MARYBLYT and cougarblight with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blossom blight forecasting is an important aspect of fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora, management for both apple and pear. A comparison of the forecast accuracy of two common fire blight forecasters, MARYBLYT and Cougarblight, was performed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve...

  14. Item Characteristic Curve Estimation of Signal Detection Theory-Based Personality Data: A Two-Stage Approach to Item Response Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kevin M.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2003-01-01

    Developed an item characteristic curve estimation of signal detection theory based personality data. Results for 266 college students taking the Overclaiming Questionnaire (D. Paulhus and N. Bruce, 1990) suggest that this method is a reasonable approach to describing item functioning and that there are advantages to this method over traditional…

  15. Electrospray Collection of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dziekan, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A report describes ElectroSpray Ionization based Electrostatic Precipitation (ESIEP) for collecting lunar dust particles. While some HEPA filtration processes may remove a higher fraction (>99.9 percent) of the particles, the high efficiency may not be appropriate from an overall system standpoint, especially in light of the relatively large power requirement that such systems demand. The new electrospray particle capture technology is described as a variant of electrostatic precipitation that eliminates the current drawbacks of electrostatic precipitation. The new approach replaces corona prone field with a mist of highly charged micro-droplets generated by electrospray ionization (ESI) as the mechanism by which incoming particles are attracted and captured. In electrospray, a miniscule flow rate (microliters/minute) of liquid (typically water and a small amount of salt to enhance conductivity) is fed from the tip of a needle held at a high voltage potential relative to an opposite counter electrode. At sufficient field strength, a sharp liquid meniscus forms , which emits a jet of highly charged droplets that drift through the surrounding gas and are collected on the walls of a conductive tube. Particles in the gas have a high probability of contact with the droplets either by adhering to the droplets or otherwise acquiring a high level of charge, causing them to be captured on the collecting electrode as well. The spray acts as a filtration material that is continuously introduced and removed from the gas flow, and thus can never become clogged.

  16. The fate of electrospray drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basaran, Osman; Collins, Robert; Sambath, Krishnaraj; Harris, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Drops subjected to strong electric fields emit thin fluid jets from conical structures (Taylor cones) that form at their surfaces. Such behavior has practical, e.g. electrospray mass spectrometry, and fundamental, e.g. raindrops in thunderclouds, implications. Theoretical analysis of the temporal development of such EHD tip-streaming phenomena is challenging given the large disparity in length scales between the macroscopic drops and the microscopic jets. Furthermore, there exist conflicting theories and measurements on the size and charge of these small electrospray droplets. We use theory and simulation to show that conductivity can be tuned to yield three scaling regimes for droplet radius and charge, a finding missed by previous studies. The amount of charge Q that electrospray droplets carry determines whether they are coulombically stable and charged below the Rayleigh limit of stability R or are unstable and hence prone to further explosions once formed. Previous experiments reported droplet charge values ranging from 1/10th to in excess of R. Simulations unequivocally show that electrospray droplets are coulombically stable at the instant they are created and that there exists a universal scaling law for droplet charge, Q=0.44 R.

  17. Salt Tolerance of Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI)

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Ayanna U.; Talaty, Nari; Cooks, R G; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2007-01-01

    Suppression of ion intensity in the presence of high salt matrices is common in most mass spectrometry ionization techniques. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is an ionization method that exhibits salt tolerance, and this is investigated. DESI analysis was performed on three different drug mixtures in the presence of 0, 0.2, 2, 5, 10, and 20% NaCl:KCl weight by volume from seven different surfaces. At physiological concentrations individual drugs in each mixture were observed with each surface. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was used to provide additional confirmation for select compounds. Multiple stage experiments, to MS5, were performed for select compounds. Even in the absence of added salt, the benzodiazepine containing mixture yielded sodium and potassium adducts of carbamazepine which masked the ions of interest. These adducts were eliminated by adding 0.1% 7M ammonium acetate to the standard methanol:water (1:1) spray solvent. Comparison of the salt tolerance of DESI with that of electrospray ionization (ESI) demonstrated much better signal/noise characteristics for DESI in this study. The salt tolerance of DESI was also studied by performing limit of detection and dynamic range experiments. Even at a salt concentration significantly above physiological concentrations, select surfaces were effective in providing spectra that allowed the ready identification of the compounds of interest. The already high salt tolerance of DESI can be optimized further by appropriate choices of surface and spray solution.

  18. 7 CFR 42.141 - Obtaining Operating Characteristic (OC) curve information for skip lot sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... sampling plan for normal condition of container inspection from Table I or Table I-A of § 42.109. (b) For a... sampling plan of size 168 for normal inspection (Table I of § 42.109) along with an AQL for total defects of 6.5. The OC curve for this sampling plan is curve N and R3. Also, assume that the quality of...

  19. 7 CFR 42.141 - Obtaining Operating Characteristic (OC) curve information for skip lot sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... sampling plan for normal condition of container inspection from Table I or Table I-A of § 42.109. (b) For a... sampling plan of size 168 for normal inspection (Table I of § 42.109) along with an AQL for total defects of 6.5. The OC curve for this sampling plan is curve N and R3. Also, assume that the quality of...

  20. 7 CFR 42.141 - Obtaining Operating Characteristic (OC) curve information for skip lot sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... sampling plan for normal condition of container inspection from Table I or Table I-A of § 42.109. (b) For a... sampling plan of size 168 for normal inspection (Table I of § 42.109) along with an AQL for total defects of 6.5. The OC curve for this sampling plan is curve N and R3. Also, assume that the quality of...

  1. 7 CFR 42.141 - Obtaining Operating Characteristic (OC) curve information for skip lot sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... sampling plan for normal condition of container inspection from Table I or Table I-A of § 42.109. (b) For a... sampling plan of size 168 for normal inspection (Table I of § 42.109) along with an AQL for total defects of 6.5. The OC curve for this sampling plan is curve N and R3. Also, assume that the quality of...

  2. 7 CFR 42.141 - Obtaining Operating Characteristic (OC) curve information for skip lot sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... sampling plan for normal condition of container inspection from Table I or Table I-A of § 42.109. (b) For a... sampling plan of size 168 for normal inspection (Table I of § 42.109) along with an AQL for total defects of 6.5. The OC curve for this sampling plan is curve N and R3. Also, assume that the quality of...

  3. Radial arrays of nano-electrospray ionization emitters and methods of forming electrosprays

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Ryan T [West Richland, WA; Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2010-10-19

    Electrospray ionization emitter arrays, as well as methods for forming electrosprays, are described. The arrays are characterized by a radial configuration of three or more nano-electrospray ionization emitters without an extractor electrode. The methods are characterized by distributing fluid flow of the liquid sample among three or more nano-electrospray ionization emitters, forming an electrospray at outlets of the emitters without utilizing an extractor electrode, and directing the electrosprays into an entrance to a mass spectrometry device. Each of the nano-electrospray ionization emitters can have a discrete channel for fluid flow. The nano-electrospray ionization emitters are circularly arranged such that each is shielded substantially equally from an electrospray-inducing electric field.

  4. Physical characteristics of faint meteors by light curve and high-resolution observations, and the implications for parent bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasinghe, Dilini; Campbell-Brown, Margaret D.; Stokan, Edward

    2016-04-01

    Optical observations of faint meteors (10-7 < mass < 10-4 kg) were collected by the Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory between 2010 April and 2014 May. These high-resolution (metre scale) observations were combined with two-station light-curve observations and the meteoroid orbit to classify meteors and attempt to answer questions related to meteoroid fragmentation, strength, and light-curve shape. The F parameter was used to classify the meteor light-curve shape; the observed morphology was used to classify the fragmentation mode; and the Tisserand parameter described the origin of the meteoroid. We find that most meteor light curves are symmetric (mean F parameter 0.49), show long distinct trails (continuous fragmentation), and are cometary in origin. Meteors that show no obvious fragmentation (presumably single body objects) show mostly symmetric light curves, surprisingly, and this indicates that light-curve shape is not an indication of fragility or fragmentation behaviour. Approximately 90 per cent of meteors observed with high-resolution video cameras show some form of fragmentation. Our results also show, unexpectedly, that meteors which show negligible fragmentation are more often on high-inclination orbits (i > 60°) than low-inclination ones. We also find that dynamically asteroidal meteors fragment as often as dynamically cometary meteors, which may suggest mixing in the early Solar system, or contamination between the dynamic groups.

  5. Estimated Bankfull Discharge for Selected Michigan Rivers and Regional Hydraulic Geometry Curves for Estimating Bankfull Characteristics in Southern Michigan Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rachol, Cynthia M.; Boley-Morse, Kristine

    2009-01-01

    Regional hydraulic geometry curves are power-function equations that relate riffle dimensions and bankfull discharge to drainage-basin size. They are defined by data collected through surveys conducted at stable stream reaches and can be used to aid watershed managers, design engineers, and others involved in determination of the best course of action for an unstable stream. Hydraulic geometry curves provide a mechanism through which comparisons can be made between riffle dimensions collected at an unstable stream to those collected at stable streams within the same region. In 2005, a study was initiated to delineate regional hydraulic geometry curves for Michigan. After in-office review of 343 U.S. Geological Survey streamgaging stations and an extensive field reconnaissance effort, 44 stable reaches were selected for this study. Detailed surveys that included cross-sectional and longitudinal profiles and pebble counts were conducted at selected streamgages, which were distributed throughout Michigan. By use of survey data from riffle cross sections and water-surface slope, bankfull discharge was estimated and compared to flood-recurrence intervals using regional flood equations. This comparison shows that bankfull discharges in Michigan recur more frequently than every 2 years. Regional hydraulic geometry curves were developed rather than statewide curves owing to large differences in factors that control channel geometry across the State. However, after the data were subdivided according to ecoregions, it was determined that there were enough data to delineate regional hydraulic geometry curves only for the Southern Lower Michigan Ecoregion. For this ecoregion, geometry curve equations and their coefficients of determination are: Width = 8.19 x DA0.44; R2 = 0.69, Depth = 0.67 x DA0.27; R2 = 0.28, Area = 4.38 x DA0.74; R2 = 0.59, where DA is the drainage area and R2 is the coefficient of determination. By use of discharge estimates for the Southern Lower Michigan

  6. Digital electrospray for controlled deposition.

    PubMed

    Deng, Weiwei; Waits, C Mike; Gomez, Alessandro

    2010-03-01

    Many novel functional structures are now fabricated by controlled deposition as a maskless, bottom-up fabrication technique. These applications require rapid and precise deposition of minute amounts of solutions/suspensions or their ultimate particle products in predefined patterns. The electrospray is a promising alternative to the commonly used inkjet printing because it can easily handle highly viscous liquid, avoid high shear rates, and has low risk of clogging. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept digital electrospray. This system consists of a 61-nozzle array microfabricated in silicon and a 61-element digital extractor fabricated using flexible polyimide substrates. "Digital" refers to the state of each electrospray source that can be tuned either on or off independently and responsively. We showed a resolution of 675 mum and a response frequency up to 100 Hz. With similar design and industry standard fabrication procedures, it is feasible to scale up the system to O(1000) sources with spatial resolution better than 250 mum and a O(kHz) response frequency. The latter is controlled by the viscous damping time. PMID:20370220

  7. Analytical performance characteristics of nanoelectrospray emitters as a function of conductive coating.

    PubMed

    Smith, Douglas R; Moy, Marie A; Dolan, Anthony R; Wood, Troy D

    2006-04-01

    As miniaturization of electrospray continues to become more prevalent in the mass spectrometry arsenal, numerous types of conductive coatings have been developed with miniaturized electrospray emitters. Different conductive coatings have different properties that may lead to differences in analytical performance. This paper investigates and compares the analytical properties of a series of applied conductive coatings for low-flow electrospray ionization developed in this laboratory vs. commercially-available types. Evaporated graphite is thoroughly compared with commercially available polyaniline (PANI) coated emitters and metal coated emitters. Each set of emitters was investigated to determine various performance characteristics, including susceptibility to electrical discharge in both positive and negative ionization modes, as well as emitter reproducibility and generation of a standard curve to determine each emitter coating's limit of detection and limit of quantitation. Furthermore, evaporated graphite and polyaniline coated fused silica capillaries were investigated to determine which coating is more stable over long-term analyses and during electrical discharge. PMID:16568172

  8. Correlation of free-response and receiver-operating-characteristic area-under-the-curve estimates: Results from independently conducted FROC/ROC studies in mammography

    PubMed Central

    Zanca, Federica; Hillis, Stephen L.; Claus, Filip; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Celis, Valerie; Provoost, Veerle; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Bosmans, Hilde

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: From independently conducted free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) experiments, to study fixed-reader associations between three estimators: the area under the alternative FROC (AFROC) curve computed from FROC data, the area under the ROC curve computed from FROC highest rating data, and the area under the ROC curve computed from confidence-of-disease ratings. Methods: Two hundred mammograms, 100 of which were abnormal, were processed by two image-processing algorithms and interpreted by four radiologists under the FROC paradigm. From the FROC data, inferred-ROC data were derived, using the highest rating assumption. Eighteen months afterwards, the images were interpreted by the same radiologists under the conventional ROC paradigm; conventional-ROC data (in contrast to inferred-ROC data) were obtained. FROC and ROC (inferred, conventional) data were analyzed using the nonparametric area-under-the-curve (AUC), (AFROC and ROC curve, respectively). Pearson correlation was used to quantify the degree of association between the modality-specific AUC indices and standard errors were computed using the bootstrap-after-bootstrap method. The magnitude of the correlations was assessed by comparison with computed Obuchowski-Rockette fixed reader correlations. Results: Average Pearson correlations (with 95% confidence intervals in square brackets) were: Corr(FROC, inferred ROC) = 0.76[0.64, 0.84] > Corr(inferred ROC, conventional ROC) = 0.40[0.18, 0.58] > Corr (FROC, conventional ROC) = 0.32[0.16, 0.46]. Conclusions: Correlation between FROC and inferred-ROC data AUC estimates was high. Correlation between inferred- and conventional-ROC AUC was similar to the correlation between two modalities for a single reader using one estimation method, suggesting that the highest rating assumption might be questionable. PMID:23039631

  9. Correlation of free-response and receiver-operating-characteristic area-under-the-curve estimates: Results from independently conducted FROC/ROC studies in mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Zanca, Federica; Hillis, Stephen L.; Claus, Filip; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Celis, Valerie; Provoost, Veerle; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Bosmans, Hilde

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: From independently conducted free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) experiments, to study fixed-reader associations between three estimators: the area under the alternative FROC (AFROC) curve computed from FROC data, the area under the ROC curve computed from FROC highest rating data, and the area under the ROC curve computed from confidence-of-disease ratings. Methods: Two hundred mammograms, 100 of which were abnormal, were processed by two image-processing algorithms and interpreted by four radiologists under the FROC paradigm. From the FROC data, inferred-ROC data were derived, using the highest rating assumption. Eighteen months afterwards, the images were interpreted by the same radiologists under the conventional ROC paradigm; conventional-ROC data (in contrast to inferred-ROC data) were obtained. FROC and ROC (inferred, conventional) data were analyzed using the nonparametric area-under-the-curve (AUC), (AFROC and ROC curve, respectively). Pearson correlation was used to quantify the degree of association between the modality-specific AUC indices and standard errors were computed using the bootstrap-after-bootstrap method. The magnitude of the correlations was assessed by comparison with computed Obuchowski-Rockette fixed reader correlations. Results: Average Pearson correlations (with 95% confidence intervals in square brackets) were: Corr(FROC, inferred ROC) = 0.76[0.64, 0.84] > Corr(inferred ROC, conventional ROC) = 0.40[0.18, 0.58] > Corr (FROC, conventional ROC) = 0.32[0.16, 0.46]. Conclusions: Correlation between FROC and inferred-ROC data AUC estimates was high. Correlation between inferred- and conventional-ROC AUC was similar to the correlation between two modalities for a single reader using one estimation method, suggesting that the highest rating assumption might be questionable.

  10. Frequency curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, H.C.

    1968-01-01

    This manual describes graphical and mathematical procedures for preparing frequency curves from samples of hydrologic data. It also discusses the theory of frequency curves, compares advantages of graphical and mathematical fitting, suggests methods of describing graphically defined frequency curves analytically, and emphasizes the correct interpretations of a frequency curve.

  11. Investigation of the ionisation density dependence of the glow curve characteristics of LIF:MG,TI (TLD-100)

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Y. S.; Horowitz, A.; Oster, L.; Marino, S.; Datz, H.; Margaliot, M.

    2008-01-01

    The dependence of the shape of the glow curve of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) on ionisation density was investigated using irradiation with 90Sr/90Y beta rays, 60 and 250 kVp X rays, various heavy-charged particles and 0.2 and 14 MeV neutrons. Special attention is focused on the properties of high-temperature thermoluminescence; specifically, the behaviour of the high-temperature ratio (HTR) of Peaks 7 and 8 as a function of batch and annealing protocol. The correlation of Peaks 7 and 8 with average linear-energy-transfer (LET) is also investigated. The HTR of Peak 7 is found to be independent of LET for values of LET approximately >30 keV µm−1. The behaviour of the HTR of Peak 8 with LET is observed to be erratic, which suggests that applications using the HTR should separate the contributions of Peaks 7 and 8 using computerised glow curve deconvolution. The behaviour of the HTR following neutron irradiation is complex and not fully understood. The shape of composite Peak 5 is observed to be broader following high ionisation alpha particle irradiation, suggesting that the combined use of the HTR and the shape of Peak 5 could lead to improved ionisation density discrimination for particles of high LET. PMID:18667402

  12. Single event AC - DC electrospraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachewicz, U.; Dijksman, J. F.; Marijnissen, J. C. M.

    2008-12-01

    Electrospraying is an innovative method to deposit very small amounts of, for example, biofluids (far less than 1 p1) that include DNA or protein molecules. An electric potential is applied between a nozzle filled with liquid and a counter electrode placed at 1-2 millimeter distance from the nozzle. In our set-up we use an AC field superposed on a DC field to control the droplet generation process. Our approach is to create single events of electrospraying triggered by one single AC pulse. During this pulse, the equilibrium meniscus (determined by surface tension, static pressure and the DC field) of the liquid changes rapidly into a cone and subsequently into a jet formed at the cone apex. Next, the jet breaks-up into fine droplets and the spraying stops. The meniscus returns to its equilibrium shape again. So far we obtained a stable and reproducible single event process for ethanol and ethylene glycol with water using glass pipettes. The results will be used to generate droplets on demand in a controlled way and deposit them on a pre-defined place on the substrate.

  13. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for classification of 18F-NaF uptake on PET/CT*

    PubMed Central

    Valadares, Agnes Araujo; Duarte, Paulo Schiavom; Carvalho, Giovanna; Ono, Carla Rachel; Coura-Filho, George Barberio; Sado, Heitor Naoki; Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the cutoff values established by ROC curves to classify 18F-NaF uptake as normal or malignant. Materials and Methods PET/CT images were acquired 1 hour after administration of 185 MBq of 18F-NaF. Volumes of interest (VOIs) were drawn on three regions of the skeleton as follows: proximal right humerus diaphysis (HD), proximal right femoral diaphysis (FD) and first vertebral body (VB1), in a total of 254 patients, totalling 762 VOIs. The uptake in the VOIs was classified as normal or malignant on the basis of the radiopharmaceutical distribution pattern and of the CT images. A total of 675 volumes were classified as normal and 52 were classified as malignant. Thirty-five VOIs classified as indeterminate or nonmalignant lesions were excluded from analysis. The standardized uptake value (SUV) measured on the VOIs were plotted on an ROC curve for each one of the three regions. The area under the ROC (AUC) as well as the best cutoff SUVs to classify the VOIs were calculated. The best cutoff values were established as the ones with higher result of the sum of sensitivity and specificity. Results The AUCs were 0.933, 0.889 and 0.975 for UD, FD and VB1, respectively. The best SUV cutoffs were 9.0 (sensitivity: 73%; specificity: 99%), 8.4 (sensitivity: 79%; specificity: 94%) and 21.0 (sensitivity: 93%; specificity: 95%) for UD, FD and VB1, respectively. Conclusion The best cutoff value varies according to bone region of analysis and it is not possible to establish one value for the whole body. PMID:26929455

  14. Confidence Intervals for the Probability of Superiority Effect Size Measure and the Area under a Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruscio, John; Mullen, Tara

    2012-01-01

    It is good scientific practice to the report an appropriate estimate of effect size and a confidence interval (CI) to indicate the precision with which a population effect was estimated. For comparisons of 2 independent groups, a probability-based effect size estimator (A) that is equal to the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve…

  15. Estimating and comparing time-dependent areas under receiver operating characteristic curves for censored event times with competing risks.

    PubMed

    Blanche, Paul; Dartigues, Jean-François; Jacqmin-Gadda, Hélène

    2013-12-30

    The area under the time-dependent ROC curve (AUC) may be used to quantify the ability of a marker to predict the onset of a clinical outcome in the future. For survival analysis with competing risks, two alternative definitions of the specificity may be proposed depending of the way to deal with subjects who undergo the competing events. In this work, we propose nonparametric inverse probability of censoring weighting estimators of the AUC corresponding to these two definitions, and we study their asymptotic properties. We derive confidence intervals and test statistics for the equality of the AUCs obtained with two markers measured on the same subjects. A simulation study is performed to investigate the finite sample behaviour of the test and the confidence intervals. The method is applied to the French cohort PAQUID to compare the abilities of two psychometric tests to predict dementia onset in the elderly accounting for death without dementia competing risk. The 'timeROC' R package is provided to make the methodology easily usable. PMID:24027076

  16. A Bayesian approach to incorporating maximum entropy-derived signal parameter statistics into the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culver, R. Lee; Sibul, Leon H.; Bradley, David L.; Ballard, Jeffrey A.; Camin, H. John

    2005-09-01

    Our goal is to develop a probabilistic sonar performance prediction methodology that can make use of limited knowledge of random or uncertain environment, target, and sonar system parameters, but does not make unwarranted assumptions. The maximum entropy method (MEM) can be used to construct probability density functions (pdfs) for relevant environmental and source parameters, and an ocean acoustic propagation model can use those pdfs to predict the variability of received signal parameter. At this point, the MEM can be used once again to produce signal parameter pdfs. A Bayesian framework allows these pdfs to be incorporated into the signal processor to produce ROC curves in which, for example, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is a random variable for which a pdf has been calculated. One output of such a processor could be a range-dependent probability of detection for fixed probability of false alarm, which would be more useful than the conventional range of the day that is still in use in some areas. [Work supported by ONR Code 321US.

  17. Electrospray Ionization on Solid Substrates

    PubMed Central

    So, Pui-Kin; Hu, Bin; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Development of electrospray ionization on solid substrates (solid-substrate ESI) avoids the clogging problem encountered in conventional capillary-based ESI, allows more convenient sampling and permits new applications. So far, solid-substrate ESI with various materials, e.g., metals, paper, wood, fibers and biological tissue, has been developed, and applications ranging from analysis of pure compounds to complex mixtures as well as in vivo study were demonstrated. Particularly, the capability of solid-substrate ESI in direct analysis of complex samples, e.g., biological fluids and foods, has significantly facilitated mass spectrometric analysis in real-life applications and led to increasingly important roles of these techniques nowadays. In this review, various solid-substrate ESI techniques and their applications are summarized and the prospects in this field are discussed. PMID:26819900

  18. Electrospray Droplet Impact/SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraoka, Kenzo

    A new type of cluster SIMS, named as electrospray droplet impact (EDI), has been developed in our laboratory. It was found that peptides deposited on the stainless steel substrate were ionized/desorbed without the accumulation of radiation products. The organic samples with film thickness thinner than 10 monolayers are desorbed/ionized with little damage underneath the surface. In general, rather strong negative ions as well as positive ions are generated. The mechanism for the ionization/desorption in EDI is much less complicated than those for MALDI and SIMS due to the fact that only very thin sample layers take part in the shock-wave excited selvedge and higher-order side reactions are largely suppressed.

  19. Thin-channel electrospray emitter

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2004-08-31

    An electrospray device includes a high voltage electrode chamber. The high voltage electrode chamber includes an inlet for receiving a fluid to be ionized and for directing the fluid into the chamber and at least one electrode having an exposed surface within the chamber. A flow channel directs fluid over a surface of the electrode and out of the chamber. The length of the flow channel over the electrode is greater than the height of the flow channel over the electrode, thereby producing enhanced mass transport to the working electrode resulting in improved electrolysis efficiency. An outlet is provided for transmitting the fluid out from the electrode chamber. A method of creating charged droplets includes flowing a fluid over an electrode where the length over the electrode is greater than the height of the fluid flowing over the electrode.

  20. Remote mass spectrometric sampling of electrospray- and desorption electrospray-generated ions using an air ejector.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R Brent; Bereman, Michael S; Muddiman, David C; Hawkridge, Adam M

    2007-10-01

    A commercial air ejector was coupled to an electrospray ionization linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ) to transport remotely generated ions from both electrospray (ESI) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) sources. We demonstrate the remote analysis of a series of analyte ions that range from small molecules and polymers to polypeptides using the AE-LTQ interface. The details of the ESI-AE-LTQ and DESI-AE-LTQ experimental configurations are described and preliminary mass spectrometric data are presented. PMID:17716909

  1. Remote Mass Spectrometric Sampling of Electrospray- and Desorption Electrospray-Generated Ions Using an Air Ejector

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, R. Brent; Bereman, Michael S.; Muddiman, David C.; Hawkridge, Adam M.

    2007-01-01

    A commercial air ejector was coupled to an electrospray ionization linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ) to transport remotely generated ions from both electrospray (ESI) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) sources. We demonstrate the remote analysis of a series of analyte ions that range from small molecules and polymers to polypeptides using the AE-LTQ interface. The details of the ESI-AE-LTQ and DESI-AE-LTQ experimental configurations are described and preliminary mass spectrometric data is presented. PMID:17716909

  2. Electrospray ion source with reduced analyte electrochemistry

    DOEpatents

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2013-07-30

    An electrospray ion (ESI) source and method capable of ionizing an analyte molecule without oxidizing or reducing the analyte of interest. The ESI source can include an emitter having a liquid conduit, a working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, a spray tip, a secondary working electrode, and a charge storage coating covering partially or fully the liquid contacting surface of the working electrode. The liquid conduit, the working electrode and the secondary working electrode can be in liquid communication. The electrospray ion source can also include a counter electrode proximate to, but separated from, said spray tip. The electrospray ion source can also include a power system for applying a voltage difference between the working electrodes and a counter-electrode. The power system can deliver pulsed voltage changes to the working electrodes during operation of said electrospray ion source to minimize the surface potential of the charge storage coating.

  3. Electrospray ion source with reduced analyte electrochemistry

    DOEpatents

    Kertesz, Vilmos [Knoxville, TN; Van Berkel, Gary [Clinton, TN

    2011-08-23

    An electrospray ion (ESI) source and method capable of ionizing an analyte molecule without oxidizing or reducing the analyte of interest. The ESI source can include an emitter having a liquid conduit, a working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, a spray tip, a secondary working electrode, and a charge storage coating covering partially or fully the liquid contacting surface of the working electrode. The liquid conduit, the working electrode and the secondary working electrode can be in liquid communication. The electrospray ion source can also include a counter electrode proximate to, but separated from, said spray tip. The electrospray ion source can also include a power system for applying a voltage difference between the working electrodes and a counter-electrode. The power system can deliver pulsed voltage changes to the working electrodes during operation of said electrospray ion source to minimize the surface potential of the charge storage coating.

  4. Generating Electrospray Ionization on Ballpoint Tips.

    PubMed

    Ji, Baocheng; Xia, Bing; Gao, Yuanji; Ma, Fengwei; Ding, Lisheng; Zhou, Yan

    2016-05-17

    In this study, we report a simple and economical ballpoint electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (BP-ESI-MS) technique. This combines a small ballpoint tip with a syringe pump for the direct loading and ionization of various samples in different phases (including solution, semisolid, and solid) and allows for additional applications in surface analysis. The tiny metal ball on the ballpoint tip exhibits a larger surface for ionization than that of a conventional sharp tip end, resulting in higher ionization efficiency and less sample consumption. The adamant properties of the ballpoint tip allow sampling by simply penetrating or scraping various surfaces, such as a fruit peel, paper, or fabric. Complex samples, such as fine herbal powders and small solid samples, could be stored in the hollow space in the ballpoint socket and subsequently extracted online, which greatly facilitated MS analysis with little to no sample preparation. Positive ion mode was attempted, and various compounds, including amino acids, carbohydrates, flavonoids, and alkaloids, were detected from different types of samples. The results demonstrated that the special and excellent physical characteristics of ballpoint tips allowed for fast and convenient sampling and ionization for mass spectrometry analysis by the BP-ESI-MS method. PMID:27111601

  5. Statistical evidences of seismo-ionospheric precursors applying receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve on the GPS total electron content in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuh-Ing; Huang, Chi-Shen; Liu, Jann-Yenq

    2015-12-01

    Evidence of the seismo-ionospheric precursor (SIP) is reported by statistically investigating the relationship between the total electron content (TEC) in global ionosphere map (GIM) and 56 M ⩾ 6.0 earthquakes during 1998-2013 in China. A median-based method together with the z test is employed to examine the TEC variations 30 days before and after the earthquake. It is found that the TEC significantly decreases 0600-1000 LT 1-6 days before the earthquake, and anomalously increases in 3 time periods of 1300-1700 LT 12-15 days; 0000-0500 LT 15-17 days; and 0500-0900 LT 22-28 days before the earthquake. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve is then used to evaluate the efficiency of TEC for predicting M ⩾ 6.0 earthquakes in China during a specified time period. Statistical results suggest that the SIP is the significant TEC reduction in the morning period of 0600-1000 LT. The SIP is further confirmed since the area under the ROC curve is positively associated with the earthquake magnitude.

  6. Flow-duration curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Searcy, James Kincheon

    1959-01-01

    The flow-duration curve is a cumulative frequency curve that shows the percent of time specified discharges were equaled or exceeded during a given period. It combines in one curve the flow characteristics of a stream throughout the range of discharge, without regard to the sequence of occurrence. If the period upon which the curve is based represents the long-term flow of a stream, the curve may be used to predict the distribution of future flows for water- power, water-supply, and pollution studies. This report shows that differences in geology affect the low-flow ends of flow-duration curves of streams in adjacent basins. Thus, duration curves are useful in appraising the geologic characteristics of drainage basins. A method for adjusting flow-duration curves of short periods to represent long-term conditions is presented. The adjustment is made by correlating the records of a short-term station with those of a long-term station.

  7. Variable ranking based on the estimated degree of separation for two distributions of data by the length of the receiver operating characteristic curve.

    PubMed

    Maswadeh, Waleed M; Snyder, A Peter

    2015-05-30

    Variable responses are fundamental for all experiments, and they can consist of information-rich, redundant, and low signal intensities. A dataset can consist of a collection of variable responses over multiple classes or groups. Usually some of the variables are removed in a dataset that contain very little information. Sometimes all the variables are used in the data analysis phase. It is common practice to discriminate between two distributions of data; however, there is no formal algorithm to arrive at a degree of separation (DS) between two distributions of data. The DS is defined herein as the average of the sum of the areas from the probability density functions (PDFs) of A and B that contain a≥percentage of A and/or B. Thus, DS90 is the average of the sum of the PDF areas of A and B that contain ≥90% of A and/or B. To arrive at a DS value, two synthesized PDFs or very large experimental datasets are required. Experimentally it is common practice to generate relatively small datasets. Therefore, the challenge was to find a statistical parameter that can be used on small datasets to estimate and highly correlate with the DS90 parameter. Established statistical methods include the overlap area of the two data distribution profiles, Welch's t-test, Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) test, Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test, and the area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve (AUC). The area between the ROC curve and diagonal (ACD) and the length of the ROC curve (LROC) are introduced. The established, ACD, and LROC methods were correlated to the DS90 when applied on many pairs of synthesized PDFs. The LROC method provided the best linear correlation with, and estimation of, the DS90. The estimated DS90 from the LROC (DS90-LROC) is applied to a database, as an example, of three Italian wines consisting of thirteen variable responses for variable ranking consideration. An important highlight of the DS90-LROC method is utilizing the LROC curve methodology to

  8. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the rocking curves measured for MoK{sub α} X-ray characteristic lines in the double-crystal nondispersive scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenkov, N. V. Chukhovskii, F. N.; Blagov, A. E.

    2015-03-15

    The rocking curves (RCs) for MoK{sub α1} and MoK{sub α2} characteristic X-ray lines have been experimentally and theoretically studied in the nondispersive scheme of an X-ray double-crystal TPC-K diffractometer. The results of measurements and theoretical calculations of double-crystal RCs for characteristic X-rays from tubes with a molybdenum anode and different widths of slits show that a decrease in the slit width leads to an increase in the relative contribution of the MoK{sub α2}-line RC in comparison with the intensity of the tails of the MoK{sub α1}-line RC. It is shown that the second peak of the MoK{sub α2} line becomes increasingly pronounced in the tail of the MoK{sub α1}-line RC with a decrease in the slit width. Two plane-parallel Si plates (input faces (110), diffraction vector h 〈220〉) were used as a monochromator crystal and a sample. The results of measuring double-crystal RCs are in good agreement with theoretical calculations.

  9. Production and properties of electrosprayed sericin nanopowder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazeri, Najmeh; Tavanai, Hossein; Moradi, Ali Reza

    2012-06-01

    Sericin is a proteinous substrate that envelops fibroin (silk) fiber, and its recovery provides significant economical and social benefits. Sericin is an antibacterial agent that resists oxidation and absorbs moisture and UV light. In powder form, sericin has a wide range of applications in food, cosmetics and drug delivery. Asides from other techniques of producing powder, such as precipitation and spray drying, electrospraying can yield solid nanoparticles, particularly in the submicron range. Here, we report the production of sericin nanopowder by electrospraying. Sericin sponge was recovered from Bombyx mori cocoons through a high-temperature, high-pressure process, followed by centrifugation and freeze drying of the sericin solution. The electrospraying solution was prepared by dissolving the sericin sponge in dimethyl sulfoxide. We demonstrate that electrospraying is capable of producing sericin nanopowder with an average particle size of 25 nm, which is by far smaller than the particles produced by other techniques. The electrosprayed sericin nanopowder consists of small crystallites and exhibits a high moisture absorbance.

  10. Task-based detectability comparison of exponential transformation of free-response operating characteristic (EFROC) curve and channelized Hotelling observer (CHO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khobragade, P.; Fan, Jiahua; Rupcich, Franco; Crotty, Dominic J.; Gilat Schmidt, Taly

    2016-03-01

    This study quantitatively evaluated the performance of the exponential transformation of the free-response operating characteristic curve (EFROC) metric, with the Channelized Hotelling Observer (CHO) as a reference. The CHO has been used for image quality assessment of reconstruction algorithms and imaging systems and often it is applied to study the signal-location-known cases. The CHO also requires a large set of images to estimate the covariance matrix. In terms of clinical applications, this assumption and requirement may be unrealistic. The newly developed location-unknown EFROC detectability metric is estimated from the confidence scores reported by a model observer. Unlike the CHO, EFROC does not require a channelization step and is a non-parametric detectability metric. There are few quantitative studies available on application of the EFROC metric, most of which are based on simulation data. This study investigated the EFROC metric using experimental CT data. A phantom with four low contrast objects: 3mm (14 HU), 5mm (7HU), 7mm (5 HU) and 10 mm (3 HU) was scanned at dose levels ranging from 25 mAs to 270 mAs and reconstructed using filtered backprojection. The area under the curve values for CHO (AUC) and EFROC (AFE) were plotted with respect to different dose levels. The number of images required to estimate the non-parametric AFE metric was calculated for varying tasks and found to be less than the number of images required for parametric CHO estimation. The AFE metric was found to be more sensitive to changes in dose than the CHO metric. This increased sensitivity and the assumption of unknown signal location may be useful for investigating and optimizing CT imaging methods. Future work is required to validate the AFE metric against human observers.

  11. Electrospray-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct ambient analysis of solids.

    PubMed

    Shiea, Jentaie; Huang, Min-Zon; Hsu, Hsiu-Jung; Lee, Chi-Yang; Yuan, Cheng-Hui; Beech, Iwona; Sunner, Jan

    2005-01-01

    A new method of electrospray-assisted laser desorption/ionization (ELDI) mass spectrometry, which combines laser desorption with post-ionization by electrospray, was applied to rapid analysis of solid materials under ambient conditions. Analytes were desorbed from solid metallic and insulating substrata using a pulsed nitrogen laser. Post-ionization produced high-quality mass spectra characteristic of electrospray, including protein multiple charging. For the first time, mass spectra of intact proteins were obtained using laser desorption without adding a matrix. Bovine cytochrome c and an illicit drug containing methaqualone were chosen in this study to demonstrate the applicability of ELDI to the analysis of proteins and synthetic organic compounds. PMID:16299699

  12. Growth curves and age-related changes in carcass characteristics, organs, serum parameters, and intestinal transporter gene expression in domestic pigeon (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Gao, C Q; Yang, J X; Chen, M X; Yan, H C; Wang, X Q

    2016-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to fit growth curves, and determine age-related changes in carcass characteristics, organs, serum biochemical parameters, and gene expression of intestinal nutrient transporters in domestic pigeon (Columba livia). In experiment 1, body weight (BW) of 30 pigeons was respectively determined at 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days old to fit growth curves and to describe the growth of pigeons. In experiment 2, eighty-four 1-day-old squabs were grouped by weight into 7 groups. On d 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35, twelve birds from each group were randomly selected for slaughter and post-slaughter analysis. The results showed that BW of pigeons increased rapidly from d 1 to d 28 (a 25.7-fold increase), and then had little change until d 35. The Logistic, Gompertz, and Von Bertalanffy functions can all be well fitted with the growth curve of domestic pigeons (R2>0.90) and the Gompertz model showed the highest R2value among the models (R2=0.9997). The equation of Gompertz model was Y=507.72×e-(3.76exp(-0.17t))(Y=BW of pigeon (g); t=time (day)). In addition, breast meat yield (%) increased with age throughout the experiment, whereas the leg meat yield (%) reached to the peak on d 14. Serum total protein, albumin, globulin, and glucose concentration were increased with age, whereas serum uric acid concentration was decreased (P<0.05). Furthermore, the gene expressions of nutrient transporters (y+LAT2, LAT1, B0AT1, PepT1, and NHE2) in jejunum of pigeon were increased with age. The results of correlation analysis showed the gene expressions of B0AT1, PepT1, and NHE2 had positive correlations with BW (0.73

  13. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  14. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Severs, J.C.

    1999-11-30

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an analyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  15. Surface tension effects on submerged electrosprays

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Álvaro G.; Loscertales, Ignacio G.; Barrero, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Electrosprays are a powerful technique to generate charged micro/nanodroplets. In the last century, the technique has been extensively studied, developed, and recognized with a shared Nobel price in Chemistry in 2002 for its wide spread application in mass spectrometry. However, nowadays techniques based on microfluidic devices are competing to be the next generation in atomization techniques. Therefore, an interesting development would be to integrate the electrospray technique into a microfluidic liquid-liquid device. Several works in the literature have attempted to build a microfluidic electrospray with disputable results. The main problem for its integration is the lack of knowledge of the working parameters of the liquid-liquid electrospray. The “submerged electrosprays” share similar properties as their counterparts in air. However, in the microfluidic generation of micro/nanodroplets, the liquid-liquid interfaces are normally stabilized with surface active agents, which might have critical effects on the electrospray behavior. In this work, we review the main properties of the submerged electrosprays in liquid baths with no surfactant, and we methodically study the behavior of the system for increasing surfactant concentrations. The different regimes found are then analyzed and compared with both classical and more recent experimental, theoretical and numerical studies. A very rich phenomenology is found when the surface tension is allowed to vary in the system. More concretely, the lower states of electrification achieved with the reduced surface tension regimes might be of interest in biological or biomedical applications in which excessive electrification can be hazardous for the encapsulated entities. PMID:24155865

  16. Evaluating and comparing biomarkers with respect to the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve in two-phase case–control studies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase sampling design, where biomarkers are subsampled from a phase-one cohort sample representative of the target population, has become the gold standard in biomarker evaluation. Many two-phase case–control studies involve biased sampling of cases and/or controls in the second phase. For example, controls are often frequency-matched to cases with respect to other covariates. Ignoring biased sampling of cases and/or controls can lead to biased inference regarding biomarkers' classification accuracy. Considering the problems of estimating and comparing the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) for a binary disease outcome, the impact of biased sampling of cases and/or controls on inference and the strategy to efficiently account for the sampling scheme have not been well studied. In this project, we investigate the inverse-probability-weighted method to adjust for biased sampling in estimating and comparing AUC. Asymptotic properties of the estimator and its inference procedure are developed for both Bernoulli sampling and finite-population stratified sampling. In simulation studies, the weighted estimators provide valid inference for estimation and hypothesis testing, while the standard empirical estimators can generate invalid inference. We demonstrate the use of the analytical variance formula for optimizing sampling schemes in biomarker study design and the application of the proposed AUC estimators to examples in HIV vaccine research and prostate cancer research. PMID:26883772

  17. Evaluating and comparing biomarkers with respect to the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve in two-phase case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Two-phase sampling design, where biomarkers are subsampled from a phase-one cohort sample representative of the target population, has become the gold standard in biomarker evaluation. Many two-phase case-control studies involve biased sampling of cases and/or controls in the second phase. For example, controls are often frequency-matched to cases with respect to other covariates. Ignoring biased sampling of cases and/or controls can lead to biased inference regarding biomarkers' classification accuracy. Considering the problems of estimating and comparing the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) for a binary disease outcome, the impact of biased sampling of cases and/or controls on inference and the strategy to efficiently account for the sampling scheme have not been well studied. In this project, we investigate the inverse-probability-weighted method to adjust for biased sampling in estimating and comparing AUC. Asymptotic properties of the estimator and its inference procedure are developed for both Bernoulli sampling and finite-population stratified sampling. In simulation studies, the weighted estimators provide valid inference for estimation and hypothesis testing, while the standard empirical estimators can generate invalid inference. We demonstrate the use of the analytical variance formula for optimizing sampling schemes in biomarker study design and the application of the proposed AUC estimators to examples in HIV vaccine research and prostate cancer research. PMID:26883772

  18. Perspective Biological Markers for Autism Spectrum Disorders: Advantages of the Use of Receiver Operating Characteristic Curves in Evaluating Marker Sensitivity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders. Recognized causes of ASD include genetic factors, metabolic diseases, toxic and environmental factors, and a combination of these. Available tests fail to recognize genetic abnormalities in about 70% of ASD children, where diagnosis is solely based on behavioral signs and symptoms, which are difficult to evaluate in very young children. Although it is advisable that specific psychotherapeutic and pedagogic interventions are initiated as early as possible, early diagnosis is hampered by the lack of nongenetic specific biological markers. In the past ten years, the scientific literature has reported dozens of neurophysiological and biochemical alterations in ASD children; however no real biomarker has emerged. Such literature is here reviewed in the light of Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis, a very valuable statistical tool, which evaluates the sensitivity and the specificity of biomarkers to be used in diagnostic decision making. We also apply ROC analysis to some of our previously published data and discuss the increased diagnostic value of combining more variables in one ROC curve analysis. We also discuss the use of biomarkers as a tool for advancing our understanding of nonsyndromic ASD. PMID:26648598

  19. Highly curved microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Cully, S.; Warren, J.; Gaines, G. A.; Priedhorsky, W.; Bloch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Several spherically curved microchannel plate (MCP) stack configurations were studied as part of an ongoing astrophysical detector development program, and as part of the development of the ALEXIS satellite payload. MCP pairs with surface radii of curvature as small as 7 cm, and diameters up to 46 mm have been evaluated. The experiments show that the gain (greater than 1.5 x 10 exp 7) and background characteristics (about 0.5 events/sq cm per sec) of highly curved MCP stacks are in general equivalent to the performance achieved with flat MCP stacks of similar configuration. However, gain variations across the curved MCP's due to variations in the channel length to diameter ratio are observed. The overall pulse height distribution of a highly curved surface MCP stack (greater than 50 percent FWHM) is thus broader than its flat counterpart (less than 30 percent). Preconditioning of curved MCP stacks gives comparable results to flat MCP stacks, but it also decreases the overall gain variations. Flat fields of curved MCP stacks have the same general characteristics as flat MCP stacks.

  20. Bradford Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseau, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of informetric distributions shows that generalized Leimkuhler functions give proper fits to a large variety of Bradford curves, including those exhibiting a Groos droop or a rising tail. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is used to test goodness of fit, and least-square fits are compared with Egghe's method. (Contains 53 references.) (LRW)

  1. Morphology of water electrosprays in the simple-jet mode.

    PubMed

    Agostinho, L L F; Tamminga, G; Yurteri, C U; Brouwer, S P; Fuchs, E C; Marijnissen, J C M

    2012-12-01

    Experiments were conducted in order to study and characterize electrohydrodynamic atomization in the simple-jet mode for inviscid liquids. The operational window of this mode regarding the electric potential and liquid flow rate is presented. From the data it could be concluded that this mode can be divided by the characteristics of its breakup mechanism and that these characteristics are a function of the liquid Weber number and the electric Bond number for a given setup. Additionally we were also able to calculate the average charge per droplet and define the average size of primary and satellite droplets. The dispersion of the spray was also studied regarding its relation to the liquid Weber number and to the electric Bond number. We conclude that simple-jet mode electrosprays are a good option for applications which require monodisperse micrometer droplets with high throughput. PMID:23368048

  2. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Richard D.; Udseth, Harold R.; Barinaga, Charles J.

    1995-01-01

    An improvement to the system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample that comprises improvements to an electrospray ionization source for interfacing to mass spectrometers and other detection devices. The improvement consists of establishing a unique electrical circuit pattern and nozzle configuration, a metallic coated and conical shaped capillary outlet, coupled with sizing of the capillary to obtain maximum sensitivity.

  3. Assessing the spatial variability in peak season CO2 exchange characteristics across the Arctic tundra using a~light response curve parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbufong, H. N.; Lund, M.; Aurela, M.; Christensen, T. R.; Eugster, W.; Friborg, T.; Hansen, B. U.; Humphreys, E. R.; Jackowicz-Korczynski, M.; Kutzbach, L.; Lafleur, P. M.; Oechel, W. C.; Parmentier, F. J. W.; Rasse, D. P.; Rocha, A. V.; Sachs, T.; van der Molen, M. M.; Tamstorf, M. P.

    2014-05-01

    This paper aims to assess the functional and spatial variability in the response of CO2 exchange to irradiance across the Arctic tundra during peak season using light response curve (LRC) parameters. This investigation allows us to better understand the future response of Arctic tundra under climatic change. Data was collected using the micrometeorological eddy covariance technique from 12 circumpolar Arctic tundra sites, in the range of 64-74° N. The LRCs were generated for 14 days with peak net ecosystem exchange (NEE) using an NEE -irradiance model. Parameters from LRCs represent site specific traits and characteristics describing: (a) NEE at light saturation (Fcsat), (b) dark respiration (Rd), (c) light use efficiency (α), (d) NEE when light is at 1000 μmol m-2 s-1 (Fc1000), (e) potential photosynthesis at light saturation (Psat) and (f) the light compensation point (LCP). Parameterization of LRCs was successful in predicting CO2 flux dynamics across the Arctic tundra. Yet we did not find any trends in LRC parameters across the whole Arctic tundra but there were indications for temperature and latitudinal differences within sub-regions like Russia and Greenland. Together, LAI and July temperature had a high explanatory power of the variance in assimilation parameters (Fcsat, Fc1000 and Psat), thus illustrating the potential for upscaling CO2 exchange for the whole Arctic tundra. Dark respiration was more variable and less correlated to environmental drivers than was assimilation parameters. Thus, indicating the inherent need to include other parameters such as nutrient availability, substrate quantity and quality in flux monitoring activities.

  4. Assessing the spatial variability in peak season CO2 exchange characteristics across the Arctic tundra using a light response curve parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbufong, H. N.; Lund, M.; Aurela, M.; Christensen, T. R.; Eugster, W.; Friborg, T.; Hansen, B. U.; Humphreys, E. R.; Jackowicz-Korczynski, M.; Kutzbach, L.; Lafleur, P. M.; Oechel, W. C.; Parmentier, F. J. W.; Rasse, D. P.; Rocha, A. V.; Sachs, T.; van der Molen, M. K.; Tamstorf, M. P.

    2014-09-01

    This paper aims to assess the spatial variability in the response of CO2 exchange to irradiance across the Arctic tundra during peak season using light response curve (LRC) parameters. This investigation allows us to better understand the future response of Arctic tundra under climatic change. Peak season data were collected during different years (between 1998 and 2010) using the micrometeorological eddy covariance technique from 12 circumpolar Arctic tundra sites, in the range of 64-74° N. The LRCs were generated for 14 days with peak net ecosystem exchange (NEE) using an NEE-irradiance model. Parameters from LRCs represent site-specific traits and characteristics describing the following: (a) NEE at light saturation (Fcsat), (b) dark respiration (Rd), (c) light use efficiency (α), (d) NEE when light is at 1000 μmol m-2 s-1 (Fc1000), (e) potential photosynthesis at light saturation (Psat) and (f) the light compensation point (LCP). Parameterization of LRCs was successful in predicting CO2 flux dynamics across the Arctic tundra. We did not find any trends in LRC parameters across the whole Arctic tundra but there were indications for temperature and latitudinal differences within sub-regions like Russia and Greenland. Together, leaf area index (LAI) and July temperature had a high explanatory power of the variance in assimilation parameters (Fcsat, Fc1000 and Psat, thus illustrating the potential for upscaling CO2 exchange for the whole Arctic tundra. Dark respiration was more variable and less correlated to environmental drivers than were assimilation parameters. This indicates the inherent need to include other parameters such as nutrient availability, substrate quantity and quality in flux monitoring activities.

  5. One Step Encapsulation of Small Molecule Drugs in Liposomes via Electrospray-Remote Loading.

    PubMed

    Duong, Anthony D; Collier, Michael A; Bachelder, Eric M; Wyslouzil, Barbra E; Ainslie, Kristy M

    2016-01-01

    Resiquimod is a Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/8 agonist that has previously been used as a vaccine adjuvant, as a topical treatment of viral lesions and skin cancer, and as an antiviral treatment. We report on the combined application of remote loading and electrospray to produce liposomal resiquimod, with the broader goals of improving drug encapsulation efficiency and scalability of liposome production methods. Drug loading in liposomes increased from less than 1% to greater that 3% by mass when remote loading was used, whether the liposomes were generated by thin-film hydration or electrospray methods. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) determined mean vesicle diameters of 137 ± 11 nm and 103 ± 4 for the thin-film and electrospray methods, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed spherical vesicles with sizes consistent with the DLS measurements. In vitro drug release profiles found that most of the drug remained within the liposomes at both pH 5.5 and 7.4. The in vitro bioactivity of the liposomal drug was also demonstrated by the increase in nitrite production when RAW macrophages were exposed to the drug. Our findings indicate that the remotely loaded liposomes formed via the scalable electrospray method have characteristics comparable to those produced via conventional batch methods. The methods discussed here are not limited to the enhanced delivery of resiquimod. Rather, they should be readily adaptable to other compounds compatible with remote loading. PMID:26568143

  6. Electrospray ionization of volatiles in breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Lozano, P.; de La Mora, J. Fernández

    2007-08-01

    Recent work by Zenobi and colleagues [H. Chen, A. Wortmann, W. Zhang, R. Zenobi, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 46 (2007) 580] reports that human breath charged by contact with an electrospray (ES) cloud yields many mass peaks of species such as urea, glucose, and other ions, some with molecular weights above 1000 Da. All these species are presumed to be involatile, and to originate from breath aerosols by so-called extractive electrospray ionization EESI [H. Chen, A. Venter, R.G. Cooks, Chem. Commun. (2006) 2042]. However, prior work by Fenn and colleagues [C.M. Whitehouse, F. Levin, C.K. Meng, J.B. Fenn, Proceedings of the 34th ASMS Conference on Mass Spectrometry and Allied Topics, Denver, 1986 p. 507; S. Fuerstenau, P. Kiselev, J.B. Fenn, Proceedings of the 47th ASMS Conference on Mass Spectrometry, 1999, Dallas, TX, 1999] and by Hill and colleagues [C. Wu, W.F. Siems, H.H. Hill Jr., Anal. Chem. 72 (2000) 396] have reported the ability of electrospray drops to ionize a variety of low vapor pressure substances directly from the gas phase, without an apparent need for the vapor to be brought into the charging ES in aerosol form. The Ph.D. Thesis of Martínez-Lozano [P. Martínez-Lozano Sinués, Ph.D. Thesis, Department of Thermal and Fluid Engineering, University Carlos III of Madrid; April 5, 2006 (in Spanish); http://hdl.handle.net/10016/655] had also previously argued that the numerous human breath species observed via a similar ES ionization approach were in fact ionized directly from the vapor. Here, we observe that passage of the breath stream through a submicron filter does not eliminate the majority of the breath vapors seen in the absence of the filter. We conclude that direct vapor charging is the leading mechanism in breath ionization by electrospray drops, though aerosol ionization may also play a role.

  7. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    DOEpatents

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.; Barinaga, C.J.

    1995-06-13

    An improvement to the system and method is disclosed for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample that comprises improvements to an electrospray ionization source for interfacing to mass spectrometers and other detection devices. The improvement consists of establishing a unique electrical circuit pattern and nozzle configuration, a metallic coated and conical shaped capillary outlet, coupled with sizing of the capillary to obtain maximum sensitivity. 10 figs.

  8. Modeling Electrospray Deposition of Nanoparticle Inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ao; Fideles da Silva, Jefferson; Yong, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Electrospray of nanoparticle inks is of great importance to the manufacturing of functional materials. In this study, we develop a new three-dimensional multiphysics method to model the electrospray of colloidal suspension to a flat substrate. The Lagrangian Particle Tracking (LPT) transport equation is coupled to mass and heat transfer using convective droplet vaporization model, which allow us to track each particle-laden ink droplets and dry nanoparticles in the electrospray plume and probe the deposit structures. Herein, we consider dilute inks that are experimentally relevant, assuming monodisperse nanoparticles. We characterize the overall statistics of the plume and the dynamics of individual ink droplet or dry nanoparticle. It is shown that the segregation effect affects not only primary and satellite droplets but also dry nanoparticles. We observe nanoparticles deposit structure changing process, in particular time evolution of the density profile along radial direction. Our results show that the region of high nanoparticle density transitioning from only the edge to both the edge and center, which agrees with previous experimental studies.

  9. Perspective on Electrospray Ionization and Its Relation to Electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozniak, Boguslaw P.; Cole, Richard B.

    2015-03-01

    The phenomenon of electrospraying of liquids is presented from the perspective of the electrochemistry involved. Basics of current and liquid flow in the capillary and spray tip are discussed, followed by specifics of charging and discharging of the sprayed liquid surface. Fundamental theories and numerical modeling relating electrospray current to solution and spray parameters are described and then compared with our own experimentally obtained data. The method of mapping potentials and currents inside the electrospray capillary by using an inserted electrically-isolated small wire probe electrode is discussed in detail with illustrations from new and published data. Based on these experimentally obtained results, a new mathematical model is derived. The introduced "nonlinear resistor electrospray capillary model" divides the electrospray capillary into small sections, adds their contributions, and then, by transition to infinitely small section thickness, produces analytical formulas that relate current and potential maps to other properties of the electrospraying liquid: primarily conductivity and current density. The presentation of the model is undertaken from an elementary standpoint, and it offers the possibility to obtain quantitative information regarding operating parameters from typical analytical systems subjected to electrospray. The model stresses simplicity and ease of use; examples applying experimental data are shown and some predictions of the model are also presented. The developed nonlinear resistor electrospray capillary model is intended to provide a new quantitative basis for improving the understanding of electrochemical transformations occurring in the electrospray emitter. A supplemental material section gives full derivation of the model and discusses other consequences.

  10. A Growth Curve Analysis of the Joint Influences of Parenting Affect, Child Characteristics and Deviant Peers on Adolescent Illicit Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pires, Paulo; Jenkins, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    This study purports that parental rejection and warmth are critical to the development of adolescent drug use, and investigates a model that also considers children's vulnerability and deviant peer affiliations. It tests mediation through the proximal risk factor of deviant peers. Poisson growth curve modeling was used to examine participants from…

  11. Transport and Deposition of Electrosprayed Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Nicholas; Chiarot, Paul

    2015-11-01

    In an electrospray, high electric potentials are utilized to generate a fine aerosol of a conductive solvent. For this study, the solvent consisted of nanoparticles dispersed in alcohol. The nanoparticle suspensions act as printable nanoparticle inks. In this process, a glass capillary tube is held as a high electric potential relative to a grounded reference plate located below the tip. Droplets are ejected from the tube and are directed towards the ground plate. If the solvent is sufficiently volatile, it will rapidly evaporate while the droplets are in flight (due to the high surface area to volume ratio) leaving behind dry, highly charged nanoparticles. The droplets/nanoparticles are deposited onto a target substrate that is place onto the grounded plate. The transport of any individual droplet/nanoparticle from the emitter tip to the target substrate is a stochastic process. This transport can be modeled using a Monte Carlo simulation. The probability of an individual particle being deposited at a given location on the target substrate is directly related to the electric potential at that location. In other words, the probability function that determines the deposition is directly related to the electric potential at the substrate. The total potential is comprised of the applied electric potential required to generate the electrospray, the induced charge on the surface of the target dielectric, and the charge on the individual particles themselves. We report on the structure of droplet/nanoparticle deposits printed using electrospray. The evolution of the deposit is investigated over time using experimental studies and Monte Carlo simulations. The deposit structure passes through four distinct regimes that are characterized by repeatable bulk features.

  12. The electrospray: Fundamentals and combustion applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Alessandro

    1993-01-01

    Liquid fuel dispersion in practical systems is typically achieved by spraying the fuel into a polydisperse distribution of droplets evaporating and burning in a turbulent gaseous environment. In view of the nearly unsurmountable difficulties of this two-phase flow, it would be useful to use an experimental arrangement that allow a systematic study of spray evolution and burning in configurations of gradually increasing levels of complexity, starting from laminar sprays to fully turbulent ones. An Electrostatic Spray (ES) of charged droplets lends itself to this type of combustion experiments under well-defined conditions and can be used to synthesize gradually more complex spray environments. In its simplest configuration, a liquid is fed into a small metal tube maintained at several kilovolts relative to a ground electrode few centimeters away. Under the action of the electric field, the liquid meniscus at the outlet of the capillary takes a conical shape, with a thin jet emerging from the cone tip. This jet breaks up farther downstream into a fine spray of charged droplets. Several advantages distinguish the electrospray from alternative atomization techniques: the self-dispersion property of the spray due to coulombic repulsion; the absence of droplet coalescence; the potential control of the trajectories of charged droplets by suitable disposition of electrostatic fields; and the decoupling of atomization, which is strictly electrostatic, from gas flow processes. Furthermore, as recently shown in our laboratory, the electrospray can produce quasi-monodisperse droplets over a very broad size range (1-100 microns). The ultimate objective of this research project is to study the formation and burning of electrosprays of liquid fuels first in laminar regimes and then in turbulent ones. Combustion will eventually be investigated in conditions of three-dimensional droplet-droplet interaction, for which experimental studies have been limited to either qualitative

  13. Coaxial electrospray of microparticles and nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Leilei; Huang, Jiwei; Si, Ting; Xu, Ronald X

    2013-01-01

    Coaxial electrospray is an electrohydrodynamic process that produces multilayer microparticles and nanoparticles by introducing coaxial electrified jets. In comparison with other microencapsulation/nanoencapsulation processes, coaxial electrospray has several potential advantages such as high encapsulation efficiency, effective protection of bioactivity and uniform size distribution. However, process control in coaxial electrospray is challenged by the multiphysical nature of the process and the complex interplay of multiple design, process and material parameters. This paper reviews the previous works and the recent advances in design, modeling and control of a coaxial electrospray process. The review intends to provide general guidance for coaxial electrospray and stimulate further research and development interests in this promising microencapsulation/nanoencapsulation process. PMID:23249155

  14. Conical singularities inside cone-jet electrosprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Alvaro G.; Loscertales, Ignacio G.; Barrero, Antonio

    2007-11-01

    In coaxial jet electrosprays inside liquid baths, a conductive liquid forms a cone-jet electrospray in a bath containing a dielectric liquid. An additional dielectric liquid is injected inside the Taylor cone forming a liquid meniscus. In certain circumstances, however, we have observed that the dielectric menisci present extremely sharp tips, without mass emission, that can be stabilized and made completely steady. In this presentation we will first explore the parametrical range of liquid properties, mainly viscosities and surface tensions, under which these sharp tips take place. Secondly, we have developed a simple analytical model for the very complex electro-hydrodynamical flow, which predicts the angle of the tip as a function of the liquid properties. Therefore, we are able to compare it with the results of the experiments. When the liquid meniscus is slowly fed, the cusped interface turns into a spout which flows coated by the conducting liquid forming the electrified coaxial jet which has been successfully employed for the production of double emulsions (Marin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 014502, 2007).

  15. Simple and double emulsions via electrospray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrero, Antonio; Loscertales, Ignacio G.

    2005-11-01

    Generation of nanoemulsions is of great interest in medical and pharmaceutical applications; drug delivery or antiviral emulsions are typical examples. The use of electrosprays for dispersing liquids inside liquid insulator baths have been recently reported, (Barrero et al. J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 272, 104, 2004). Capsules, nanotubes and coaxial nanofibers have been obtained from electrified coaxial jets (Loscertales et al. Science 295, n. 5560, 1695, 2002; J. American Chem. Soc. 126, 5376, 2004). Here we present a method for making double emulsions (both water-oil-water and o/w/o) based on the generation of compound electrosprays inside insulator liquid baths. Basically, a conducting liquid injected throughout a capillary needle is electroatomized in cone-jet mode inside a dielectric liquid bath. A third insulating liquid is injected inside the Taylor cone to form a second meniscus. Then, a steady coaxial jet, in which the insulating liquid is coated by the conducting one, develops. A double emulsion forms as a result of the jet breaking up into compound droplets electrically charged. Experimental results carried out with glycerine and different oils in a bath of heptane are reported.

  16. The thermoluminescence characteristics and the glow curves of Thulium doped silica fiber exposed to 10MV photon and 21MeV electron radiation.

    PubMed

    Alawiah, A; Alina, M S; Bauk, S; Abdul-Rashid, H A; Gieszczyk, W; Noramaliza, M N; Mahdiraji, G A; Tamchek, N; Zulkifli, M I; Bradley, D A; Marashdeh, M W

    2015-04-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves and kinetics parameters of Thulium (Tm) doped silica cylindrical fibers (CF) are presented. A linear accelerator (LINAC) was used to deliver high-energy radiation of 21MeV electrons and 10MV photons. The CFs were irradiated in the dose range of 0.2-10Gy. The experimental glow curve data was reconstructed by using WinREMS. The WinGCF software was used for the kinetic parameters evaluation. The TL sensitivity of Tm-doped silica CF is about 2 times higher as compared to pure silica CF. Tm-doped silica CF seems to be more sensitive to 21MeV electrons than to 10MV photons. Surprisingly, no supralinearity was displayed and a sub-linear response of Tm-doped silica CF was observed within the analyzed dose range for both 21MeV electrons and 10MV photons. The Tm-doped silica CF glow curve consists of 5 individual glow peaks. The Ea of peak 4 and peak 5 was highly dependent on dose when irradiated with photons. We also noticed that the electron radiation (21MeV) caused a shift of glow peak by 7-13°C to the higher temperature region compared with photons radiation (10MV). Our Tm-doped fibers seem to give high TL response after 21MeV electrons, which gives around 2 times higher peak integral as compared with 10MV photon radiation. We concluded that peak 4 is the first-order kinetic peak and can be used as the main dosimetric peak of Tm-doped silica CF. PMID:25644081

  17. Curves and Their Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Robert C.

    This volume, a reprinting of a classic first published in 1952, presents detailed discussions of 26 curves or families of curves, and 17 analytic systems of curves. For each curve the author provides a historical note, a sketch or sketches, a description of the curve, a discussion of pertinent facts, and a bibliography. Depending upon the curve,…

  18. Comparison of radionuclide (RN), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of a vascular necrosis (AVN) of the hip using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, A.; Kundel, H.; Mitchell, M.; Velchik, M.; Makler, T.; Steinberg, M.; Kressel, H.

    1985-05-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of RN, CT, and MR imaging for AVN was determined retrospectively using ROC curves. The abnormal images were drawn from 35 patients who had proven AVN. The MR images were made using an experimental GE resistive magnet operating at 0.12 Tesla corresponding to a proton resonant of 5.1 MHz. Most of the CT images were made using a GE 9800 CT Scanner. RN images were obtained using 99m-Tc MDP. Planar as well as pinhole images of both hips were acquired on each case. Three test sets, one for each modality was assembled. Each of the imaging modalities had a sensitivity of 85%, and a specificity of 85% at the optimal point on the ROC curve. These data demonstrates that MR imaging is not significantly different from other modalities for discrimination between AVN and normal hips. The test set did not include patients with disease other than AVN. The authors are planning to perform a blinded prospective study for more definitive results.

  19. Divergent selection for shape of growth curve in Japanese quail. 3. Onset of sexual maturity and basic characteristics of early lay.

    PubMed

    Hyánková, L; Novotná, B

    2007-10-01

    1. The onset of lay, quality of eggs during early lay and gonadal development of both sexes were analysed in meat-type lines of Japanese quail, HG and LG divergently selected for high and low relative weight gain between 11 and 28 d of age, respectively, and constant body weight (BW) at 49 d of age. 2. The LG line was sexually mature at an earlier age and lower BW than the HG line. This corresponded with the trend during embryonic and early postnatal development. 3. Analysis of gonads also confirmed earlier sexual development in the LG than in the HG line. In both lines, the growth of testes was detected about one week earlier than the growth of ovary. 4. Despite the different age and BW at onset of lay, HG and LG quail commenced lay at the same degree of maturity (about 90% of adult BW). This implied that the onset of sexual maturity could be identified as a point on the growth curve which terminates the linear phase. 5. When compared with the LG line, the HG line was characterised by a longer acceleration and shorter retardation phase of the growth curve. This difference is seen as an important determinant of line differences in growth and reproductive performance. PMID:17952726

  20. Real-time measurement of UV-inactivated Escherichia coli bacterial particles by electrospray-assisted UVAPS spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae Hee; Lee, Jung Eun; Bae, Gwi Nam

    2011-08-01

    The ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS) is a novel commercially available aerosol spectrometer for real-time continuous monitoring of viable bioaerosols, based on fluorescence from living microorganisms. In a previous study, we developed an electrospray-assisted UVAPS using biological electrospray techniques, which have the advantage of generating non-agglomerated single particles by the repulsive electrical forces. With this electrospraying of suspensions containing microorganisms, the analytical system can supply more accurate and quantitative information about living microorganisms than with conventional aerosolization. Using electrospray-assisted UVAPS, we investigated the characteristics of bacterial particles with various viabilities in real-time. Escherichia coli was used as the test microorganism, and its initial viability was controlled by the degree of exposure to UV irradiation. In the stable cone-jet domain, the particle size distributions of test bacterial particles remained almost uniform regardless of the degree of UV inactivation. However, the fluorescence spectra of the bacterial particles changed with the degree of UV inactivation. The fluorescence characteristics of UV-inactivated bacterial particles tended to show a similar decline with viability, determined by the sampling and culture method, although the percentage showing fluorescence was higher than that showing viability. PMID:21621246

  1. Nanoparticle preparation of Mefenamic acid by electrospray drying

    SciTech Connect

    Zolkepali, Nurul Karimah Bakar, Noor Fitrah Abu Anuar, Nornizar; Naim, M. Nazli; Bakar, Mohd Rushdi Abu

    2014-02-24

    Nanoparticles preparation of Mefenamic acid (MA) by using an electrospray drying method was conducted in this study. Electrospray drying is a process that uses electrostatic force to disperse a conductive liquid stream into fine charged droplets through the coulomb fission of charges in the liquid and finally dry into fine particles. Electrospray drying modes operation usually in Taylor cone jet, and it was formed by controlling applied voltage and liquid flow rate. A conductive liquid (2.77–8.55μScm{sup −1}) which is MA solution was prepared by using acetone with concentration 0.041 and 0.055 M before pumping at a flow rate of 3–6ml/h. By applying the applied voltage at 1.3–1.5 kV, Taylor cone jet mode was formed prior to the electrospray. During electrospray drying process, solvent evaporation from the droplet was occurring that leads to coulomb disruption and may generate to nanoparticles. The dried nanoparticles were collected on a grounded substrate that was placed at varying distance from the electrospray. MA particle with size range of 100–400 nm were produced by electrospray drying process. Characterization of particles by using X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) show that particles formed into polymorph I.

  2. The effect of electrospray solvent composition on desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) efficiency and spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Green, F M; Salter, T L; Gilmore, I S; Stokes, P; O'Connor, G

    2010-04-01

    In desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) the interaction between the electrospray and the surface is key to two important analytical parameters, the spatial resolution and the sensitivity. We evaluate the effect of the electrospray solvent type, organic solvent fraction with water, analyte solubility and substrate wettability on DESI erosion diameter and material transferral into useful ion signal. To do this five amino acids, glycine, alanine, valine, leucine and phenylalanine are prepared as thin films on three substrates, UV/ozone treated glass, glass and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Four different solvents, acetonitrile (ACN), methanol (MeOH), ethanol (EtOH) and propan-2-ol (IPA), are used with organic solvent fractions with water varying from 0.1 to 1. These model systems allow the solubility or wettability to be kept constant as other parameters are varied. Additionally, comparison with electrospray ionisation (ESI) allows effects of ionisation efficiency to be determined. It is shown that the DESI efficiency is linearly dependent on the solubility (for these materials at least) and for analytes with solubilities below 1.5 g kg(-1), additional strategies may be required for DESI to be effective. We show that the DESI erosion diameter improves linearly with organic solvent fraction, with an organic solvent fraction of 0.9 instead of 0.5 leading to a 2 fold improvement. Furthermore, this leads to a 35 fold increase in DESI efficiency, defined as the molecular ion yield per unit area. It is shown that these improvements correlate with smaller droplet sizes rather than surface wetting or ionisation. PMID:20349538

  3. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard P.; Udseth, Harold R.; Olivares, Jose A.

    1989-01-01

    A system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample includes: forming a solution of the sample, separating the solution by capillary electrophoresis into an eluent of constituents longitudinally separated according to their relative electrophoretic mobilities, electrospraying the eluent to form a charged spray in which the molecular constituents have a temporal distribution; and detecting or collecting the separated constituents in accordance with the temporal distribution in the spray. A first high-voltage (e.g., 5-100 KVDC) is applied to the solution. The spray is charged by applying a second high voltage (e.g., .+-.2-8 KVDC) between the eluent at the capillary exit and a cathode spaced in front of the exit. A complete electrical circuit is formed by a conductor which directly contacts the eluent at the capillary exit, or by conduction through a sheath electrode discharged in an annular sheath flow about the capillary exit.

  4. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Udseth, Harold R.; Olivares, Jose A.

    1994-10-18

    A system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample includes: forming a solution of the sample, separating the solution by capillary electrophoresis into an eluent of constituents longitudinally separated according to their relative electrophoretic mobilities, electrospraying the eluent to form a charged spray in which the molecular constituents have a temporal distribution; and detecting or collecting the separated constituents in accordance with the temporal distribution in the spray. A first high-voltage (e.g., 5-100 KVDC) is applied to the solution. The spray is charged by applying a second high voltage (e.g., .+-.2-8 KVDC) between the eluent at the capillary exit and a cathode spaced in front of the exit. A complete electrical circuit is formed by a conductor which directly contacts the eluent at the capillary exit, or by conduction through a sheath electrode discharged in an annular sheath flow about the capillary exit.

  5. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    DOEpatents

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.; Olivares, J.A.

    1994-10-18

    A system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample include: forming a solution of the sample, separating the solution by capillary electrophoresis into an eluent of constituents longitudinally separated according to their relative electrophoretic mobilities, electrospraying the eluent to form a charged spray in which the molecular constituents have a temporal distribution; and detecting or collecting the separated constituents in accordance with the temporal distribution in the spray. A first high-voltage (e.g., 5--100 kVDC) is applied to the solution. The spray is charged by applying a second high voltage (e.g.,{+-}2--8 kVDC) between the eluent at the capillary exit and a cathode spaced in front of the exit. A complete electrical circuit is formed by a conductor which directly contacts the eluent at the capillary exit, or by conduction through a sheath electrode discharged in an annular sheath flow about the capillary exit. 21 figs.

  6. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    DOEpatents

    Smith, R.P.; Udseth, H.R.; Olivares, J.A.

    1989-12-05

    A system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample includes: forming a solution of the sample, separating the solution by capillary electrophoresis into an eluent of constituents longitudinally separated according to their relative electrophoretic mobilities, electrospraying the eluent to form a charged spray in which the molecular constituents have a temporal distribution; and detecting or collecting the separated constituents in accordance with the temporal distribution in the spray. A first high-voltage (e.g., 5--100 kVDC) is applied to the solution. The spray is charged by applying a second high voltage (e.g., [+-]2--8 kVDC) between the eluent at the capillary exit and a cathode spaced in front of the exit. A complete electrical circuit is formed by a conductor which directly contacts the eluent at the capillary exit, or by conduction through a sheath electrode discharged in an annular sheath flow about the capillary exit. 21 figs.

  7. Electrospray and tandem mass spectrometry in biochemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, W J; Jonsson, A P; Liu, S; Rai, D K; Wang, Y

    2001-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, biological MS has changed out of all recognition. This is primarily due to the development in the 1980s of 'soft ionization' methods that permit the ionization and vaporization of large, polar, and thermally labile biomolecules. These developments in ionization mode have driven the design and manufacture of smaller and cheaper mass analysers, making the mass spectrometer a routine instrument in the biochemistry laboratory today. In the present review the revolutionary 'soft ionization' methods will be discussed with particular reference to electrospray. The mass analysis of ions will be described, and the concept of tandem MS introduced. Where appropriate, examples of the application of MS in biochemistry will be provided. Although the present review will concentrate on the MS of peptides/proteins and lipids, all classes of biomolecules can be analysed, and much excellent work has been done in the fields of carbohydrate and nucleic acid biochemistry. PMID:11311115

  8. Standard Mastery Curves and Skew Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warries, Egbert

    The objective of the study is to convince educational researchers of the necessity for "standard mastery curves" for the graphical representation of scores on summative tests for a group of students. Attention is drawn to the study of theoretical and empirical skew curves in education and biology. Use of standard mastery curves and study of skew…

  9. Electrospray tandem mass spectrometric analysis of a dimeric conjugate, salvialeriafone and related compounds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Electrospray tandem mass spectrometry approach is widely used for the rapid characterization of natural products. This paper describes the gas-phased ESI-MS/MS fragmentation of abietane-type diterpenoids and their novel dimeric conjugate, salvialeriafone (1) using both positive and negative ion electrospray ionization quadropole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-QqTOF-MS/MS) hybrid instrument. Diterpenoids are widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom and posses interesting biological activities. Results ESI-QqTOF-MS (positive ion mode) of diterpenoids 1–6 under collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometric analysis (CID-MS/MS) showed the characteristic losses of water, carbonmonoxide and propene molecules, while analysis in negative ion mode showed the characteristic losses of water, carbon monoxide, methane molecules and methyl radical. Results demonstrated the differences in the product ions and base peaks due to the differences in the skeleton. A novel dimeric conjugate, salvialeriafone (1) showed characteristic fragmentation pattern and was found to be more prone to form radical ions, as compared to monomeric diterpenoids. The fragmentation pathways of characteristic fragments were proposed with the aid of HRESIMS. Conclusions Extensive tandem mass spectrometric studies of salvialeriafone (1) and related diterpenoids 2–6 were conducted and their characteristic fragments were identified. The knowledge of the fragmentation pattern of these diterpenoids will be useful for the characterization of new dimers of this class of compounds. PMID:23079186

  10. A research program to reduce interior noise in general aviation airplanes. Influence of depressurization and damping material on the noise reduction characteristics of flat and curved stiffened panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navaneethan, R.; Streeter, B.; Koontz, S.; Roskam, J.

    1981-01-01

    Some 20 x 20 aluminum panels were studied in a frequency range from 20 Hz to 5000 Hz. The noise sources used were a swept sine wave generator and a random noise generator. The effect of noise source was found to be negligible. Increasing the pressure differential across the panel gave better noise reduction below the fundamental resonance frequency due to an increase in stiffness. The largest increase occurred in the first 1 psi pressure differential. The curved, stiffened panel exhibited similar behavior, but with a lower increase of low frequency noise reduction. Depressurization on these panels resulted in decreased noise reduction at higher frequencies. The effect of damping tapes on the overall noise reduction values of the test specimens was small away from the resonance frequency. In the mass-law region, a slight and proportional improvement in noise reduction was observed by adding damping material. Adding sound absorbtion material to a panel with damping material beneficially increased noise reduction at high frequencies.

  11. An investigation of thermocapillary effects on the wetting characteristics of a heated, capillary re-supplied, curved meniscus within a capillary pore

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, D.M.; Hallinan, K.P.

    1996-12-31

    An investigation of thermocapillary effects on a heated, evaporating meniscus formed by a wetting liquid in a vertical capillary tube has been completed. Experiments were conducted to primarily observe how the wetting characteristics of the working fluid (pentane) are affected by the dynamics associated with the heating of and evaporation from a meniscus. The results have demonstrated that interfacial thermocapillary stresses arising from liquid-vapor interfacial temperature gradients can noticeably degrade the ability of the liquid to wet the pore.

  12. Electrospray-printed nanostructured graphene oxide gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Anthony P; Velásquez-García, Luis F

    2015-12-18

    We report low-cost conductometric gas sensors that use an ultrathin film made of graphene oxide (GO) nanoflakes as transducing element. The devices were fabricated by lift-off metallization and near-room temperature, atmospheric pressure electrospray printing using a shadow mask. The sensors are sensitive to reactive gases at room temperature without requiring any post heat treatment, harsh chemical reduction, or doping with metal nanoparticles. The sensors' response to humidity at atmospheric pressure tracks that of a commercial sensor, and is linear with changes in humidity in the 10%-60% relative humidity range while consuming <6 μW. Devices with GO layers printed by different deposition recipes yielded nearly identical response characteristics, suggesting that intrinsic properties of the film control the sensing mechanism. The gas sensors successfully detected ammonia at concentrations down to 500 ppm (absolute partial pressure of ∼5 × 10(-4) T) at ∼1 T pressure, room temperature conditions. The sensor technology can be used in a great variety of applications including air conditioning and sensing of reactive gas species in vacuum lines and abatement systems. PMID:26579701

  13. Electrospray-printed nanostructured graphene oxide gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Anthony P.; Velásquez-García, Luis F.

    2015-12-01

    We report low-cost conductometric gas sensors that use an ultrathin film made of graphene oxide (GO) nanoflakes as transducing element. The devices were fabricated by lift-off metallization and near-room temperature, atmospheric pressure electrospray printing using a shadow mask. The sensors are sensitive to reactive gases at room temperature without requiring any post heat treatment, harsh chemical reduction, or doping with metal nanoparticles. The sensors’ response to humidity at atmospheric pressure tracks that of a commercial sensor, and is linear with changes in humidity in the 10%-60% relative humidity range while consuming <6 μW. Devices with GO layers printed by different deposition recipes yielded nearly identical response characteristics, suggesting that intrinsic properties of the film control the sensing mechanism. The gas sensors successfully detected ammonia at concentrations down to 500 ppm (absolute partial pressure of ˜5 × 10-4 T) at ˜1 T pressure, room temperature conditions. The sensor technology can be used in a great variety of applications including air conditioning and sensing of reactive gas species in vacuum lines and abatement systems.

  14. Thin Film Formation and Morphology of Electrosprayed Polydimethylsiloxane.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Florian M; Töpper, Tino; Osmani, Bekim; Deyhle, Hans; Kovacs, Gabor; Müller, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Low-voltage dielectric actuators (DEAs) can be fabricated using submicrometer-thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films. The two established techniques, namely spin coating and molecular beam deposition, however, are inappropriate to produce multistack DEAs in an efficient way. Therefore, we propose an alternative deposition technique, i.e., the alternating current electrospray deposition (ACESD) of 5 vol % PDMS in ethyl acetate solution and subsequent ultraviolet light curing. Atomic force microscopy makes possible the three-dimensional analysis of cured droplet-like islands. These circular islands, prepared on 2 in. Si(100) wafers from four polymers with molecular masses between 800 and 62 700 g/mol, reveal a characteristic morphology with an increasing height-to-diameter ratio. Using the 6000 g/mol polymer for ACESD, the film morphology evolution was tracked by applying conventional optical microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. When the deposition was terminated after 13 s, circular islands with a mean height of 30 nm were found, while terminating the deposition after about 155 s led to a confluent layer with a mean height of 91 ± 10 nm. Potential electrostatic interactions between the droplets could not be identified through the analysis of spatial island distribution. Nevertheless, ACESD is a budget-priced and competitive deposition technique that can be employed to fabricate submicrometer-thin PDMS films with true nanometer roughness. PMID:26978236

  15. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  16. Laser electrospray mass spectrometry of adsorbed molecules at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John J.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Simon, Kuriakose; Levis, Robert J.

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure mass analysis of solid phase biomolecules is performed using laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS). A non-resonant femtosecond duration laser pulse vaporizes native samples at atmospheric pressure for subsequent electrospray ionization and transfer into a mass spectrometer. LEMS was used to detect a complex molecule (irinotecan HCl), a complex mixture (cold medicine formulation with active ingredients: acetaminophen, dextromethorphan HBr and doxylamine succinate), and a biological building block (deoxyguanosine) deposited on steel surfaces without a matrix molecule.

  17. Explicit superconic curves.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sunggoo

    2016-09-01

    Conics and Cartesian ovals are extremely important curves in various fields of science. In addition, aspheric curves based on conics are useful in optical design. Superconic curves, recently suggested by Greynolds, are extensions of both conics and Cartesian ovals and have been applied to optical design. However, they are not extensions of aspheric curves based on conics. In this work, we investigate another type of superconic curves. These superconic curves are extensions of not only conics and Cartesian ovals but also aspheric curves based on conics. Moreover, these are represented in explicit form, while Greynolds's superconic curves are in implicit form. PMID:27607506

  18. Impact of molecular weight on the formation of electrosprayed chitosan microcapsules as delivery vehicles for bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Mascaraque, Laura G; Sanchez, Gloria; López-Rubio, Amparo

    2016-10-01

    The molecular weight of chitosan is one of its most determinant characteristics, which affects its processability and its performance as a biomaterial. However, information about the effect of this parameter on the formation of electrosprayed chitosan microcapsules is scarce. In this work, the impact of chitosan molecular weight on its electrosprayability was studied and correlated with its effect on the viscosity, surface tension and electrical conductivity of solutions. A Discriminant Function Analysis revealed that the morphology of the electrosprayed chitosan materials could be correctly predicted using these three parameters for almost 85% of the samples. The suitability of using electrosprayed chitosan capsules as carriers for bioactive agents was also assessed by loading them with a model active compound, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). This encapsulation, with an estimated efficiency of around 80% in terms of preserved antioxidant activity, showed the potential to prolong the antiviral activity of EGCG against murine norovirus via gradual bioactive release combined with its protection against degradation in simulated physiological conditions. PMID:27312621

  19. Aerodynamic mass spectrometry interfacing of microdevices without electrospray tips.

    PubMed

    Grym, Jakub; Otevrel, Marek; Foret, Frantisek

    2006-10-01

    A new concept for electrospray coupling of microfluidic devices with mass spectrometry was developed. The sampling orifice of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer was modified with an external adapter assisting in formation and transport of the electrosprayed plume from the multichannel polycarbonate microdevice. The compact disk sized microdevice was designed with radial channels extending to the circumference of the disk. The electrospray exit ports were formed by the channel openings on the surface of the disk rim. No additional tips at the channel exits were used. Electrospray was initiated directly from the channel openings by applying high voltage between sample wells and the entrance of the external adapter. The formation of the spatially unstable droplet at the electrospray openings was eliminated by air suction provided by a pump connected to the external adapter. Compared with the air intake through the original mass spectrometer sampling orifice, more than an order of magnitude higher flow rate was achieved for efficient transport of the electrospray plume into the mass spectrometer. Additional experiments with electric potentials applied between the entrance sections of the external adapter and the mass spectrometer indicated that the air flow was the dominant transport mechanism. Basic properties of the system were tested using mathematical modeling and characterized using ESI/TOF-MS measurements of peptide and protein samples. PMID:17102844

  20. Quantitative Caffeine Analysis Using a Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry System

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Michael J; Deibel, Michael A.; Tomkins, Bruce A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative determination of caffeine on reversed-phase C8 thin-layer chromatography plates using a surface sampling electrospray ionization system with tandem mass spectrometry detection is reported. The thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method employed a deuterium-labeled caffeine internal standard and selected reaction monitoring detection. Up to nine parallel caffeine bands on a single plate were sampled in a single surface scanning experiment requiring 35 min at a surface scan rate of 44 {mu}m/s. A reversed-phase HPLC/UV caffeine assay was developed in parallel to assess the mass spectrometry method performance. Limits of detection for the HPLC/UV and thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry methods determined from the calibration curve statistics were 0.20 ng injected (0.50 {mu}L) and 1.0 ng spotted on the plate, respectively. Spike recoveries with standards and real samples ranged between 97 and 106% for both methods. The caffeine content of three diet soft drinks (Diet Coke, Diet Cherry Coke, Diet Pepsi) and three diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape, Speed Stack Fruit Punch) was measured. The HPLC/UV and mass spectrometry determinations were in general agreement, and these values were consistent with the quoted values for two of the three diet colas. In the case of Diet Cherry Coke and the diet sports drinks, the determined caffeine amounts using both methods were consistently higher (by 8% or more) than the literature values.

  1. Protein Viability on Au Nanoparticles during an Electrospray and Electrostatic-Force-Directed Assembly Process

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mao, Shun; Lu, Ganhua; Yu, Kehan; Chen, Junhong

    2010-01-01

    We study the protein viability on Au nanoparticles during an electrospray and electrostatic-force-directed assembly process, through which Au nanoparticle-antibody conjugates are assembled onto the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to fabricate carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) biosensors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and field-effect transistor (FET) measurements have been used to investigate the antibody activity after the nanoparticle assembly. Upon the introduction of matching antigens, the colored reaction from the ELISA and the change in the electrical characteristic of the CNTFET device confirm that the antibody activity is preserved during the assembly process.

  2. On the mechanism of extractive electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Law, Wai Siang; Wang, Rui; Hu, Bin; Berchtold, Christian; Meier, Lukas; Chen, Huanwen; Zenobi, Renato

    2010-06-01

    Extractive electrospray ionization (EESI) is a powerful ambient ionization technique that can provide comprehensive mass spectrometric (MS) information on aerosols, complex liquids, or suspensions without any sample pretreatment. An understanding of the EESI mechanism is critical for defining its range of application, the advantages, and limitations of EESI, and for improving its repeatability, sensitivity, and selectivity. However, no systematic study of EESI mechanisms has been conducted so far. In this work, fluorescence studies in the EESI plume using rhodamine 6G and H-acid sodium salt directly demonstrate that liquid-phase interactions occur between charged ESI droplets and neutral sample droplets. Moreover, the effect of the composition of the primary ESI spray and sample spray on signals of the analyte in EESI-MS was investigated systematically. The results show that the analyte signals strongly depend on its solubility in the solvents involved, indicating that selective extraction is the dominant mechanism involved in the EESI process. This mechanistic study provides valuable insights for optimizing the performance of EESI in future applications. PMID:20443546

  3. Gas phase salt clusters from electrosprayed alkaline earth colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, R. Marshall; Shen, Nanzhu; Nicoll, Jeremy; Tarnawiecki, Boris; Dejsupa, Chadin; Dearden, David V.

    1997-03-01

    Several distributions of small polynuclear ions of general form [nM + mA + pS]q+ (where M represents an alkaline earth cation (Mg, Ca, Sr or Ba), n = 2-10, A represents a halide, acetate or nitrate counterion originating in the divalent salt, and S represents an acetic acid or methanol adduct) are detected by FTICR when water/methanol solutions of alkaline earth salts are electrosprayed. For example, the largest cluster ion derived from 6.3 mM solutions of calcium acetate acidified with 2%x acetic acid have n= 10, m = 18, p = 5 and q = 2. Characteristics of these solutions suggest the presence of colloidal dispersions. These characteristics include stability upon aging, light scattering response and the requisite pre-etching of the glass containers. Aqueous mixtures of two group II salts produce mixed-salt cluster ions. For instance, from a mixture of calcium and magnesium acetate we trap mixed-cation clusters characterized by a complete set of binary partitions of n, for n = 2-6. Specifically, the manifold of clusters with four cations contains 4:0, 3:1, 2:2, 1:3 and 0:4 ratios of magnesium to calcium. Isolated alkaline earth clusters react with a low-pressure background of 18-crown-6 (C6) by salt abstraction exclusively. In general, the more facile abstraction from a mixed cluster produces a pair of products in which the neutral conforms to the hard-soft acid-base principle. The reactions of C6 with [MgSr(OAc)3]+ provide evidence for the existence of isomeric clusters at m/z 289. This is supported by bimodal kinetics and preliminary results of ab initio calculations.

  4. Rapid identification of acetophenones in two Cynanchum species using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Shan, Lei; Huang, Hao; Yang, Xianwen; Liang, Xu; Xing, Aiting; Huang, Haiqiang; Liu, Xinru; Su, Juan; Zhang, Weidong

    2009-04-01

    Acetophenones in Cynanchum species, especially cynandione A and its derivatives, whose utilization and toxicity in herbal drugs and folk medicines has caused great interest in the chemical investigation, have extensive biological activities. In this paper, a facile method based on high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS(n)) was developed for the analysis of cynandione A derivatives in the roots of the Cynanchum wilfordii and C. auriculatum. ESI-MS/MS and ESI-MS(n) analysis of cynandiones A and B in negative ion mode were firstly performed employing two mass spectrometers each equipped with an ion-trap and a quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass analyzer. The results drawn from both instruments were similar to each other. Characteristic fragmentation pathways were proposed by comparing the spectra of two standards acquired in the experiments. The fragment ions at m/z 283 and 268 were obtained, and then were used as diagnostic ions to screen and identify cynandione A derivatives from the roots of above two species, together with an HPLC-MS(n) method. Total of 28 cynandione A derivatives comprising 4 reported and 24 novel components were identified or tentatively identified. Furthermore, breakdown curves were constructed to distinguish two types of isomers among these compounds. To our knowledge, this is the first report on characterization of acetophenones by HPLC-ESI-MS(n), which allows a rapid and complete analysis of cynandione A derivatives in roots of Cynanchum species. PMID:19201126

  5. Separation and characterization of phenolic compounds from dry-blanched peanut skins by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Kosińska-Cagnazzo, Agnieszka; Kerr, William L; Amarowicz, Ryszard; Swanson, Ruthann B; Pegg, Ronald B

    2014-08-22

    A large variety of phenolic compounds, including phenolic acids (hydroxybenzoic acids, hydroxycinnamic acids, and their esters), stilbenes (trans-resveratrol and trans-piceatannol), flavan-3-ols (e.g., (-)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin, and their polymers {the proanthocyanidins, PACs}), other flavonoids (e.g., isoflavones, flavanols, and flavones, etc.) and biflavonoids (e.g., morelloflavone), were identified in dry-blanched peanut skins (PS) by this study. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS(n)) was applied to separate and identify the phenolic constituents. Reversed-phase HPLC was employed to separate free phenolic compounds as well as PAC monomers, dimers, and trimers. PACs with a degree of polymerization (DP) of >4 were chromatographed via hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Tentative identification of the separated phenolics was based solely on molecular ions and MS(n) fragmentation patterns acquired by ESI-MS in the negative-ion mode. The connection sequence of PAC oligomers (DP <5) could be deduced mainly through characteristic quinone methide (QM) cleavage ions. When the DP reached 6, only a proportion of the flavan-3-ols could be ascertained in the PACs because of the extremely complicated fragmentation patterns involved. The identification of free phenolic acids, stilbenes, and flavonoids was achieved by authentic commercial standards and also by published literature data. Quantification was performed based on peak areas of the UV (free phenolic compounds) or fluorescence (PACs) signals from the HPLC chromatograms and calibration curves of commercial standards. Overall, PS contain significantly more PACs compared to free phenolic compounds. PMID:25016324

  6. A method to determine the onset voltage of single and arrays of electrospray emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Krpoun, Renato; Shea, Herbert R.

    2008-09-15

    This paper reports on an accurate and rapid method to compute the onset voltage of a single or an array of electrospray emitters with complex geometries and on the correlation of the simulation with experimental data. This method permits the exact determination of the onset voltage based only on the surface tension of the sprayed liquid and on the emitter geometry. The approach starts by determining the voltage at which electrostatic forces and surface tension forces are equal for a sharpening conic surface at the tip of a capillary as a function of the apex radius of the liquid. By tracing the curve of this computed equilibrium voltage as a function of the apex radius, the onset voltage for a liquid surface with the Taylor half-angle of 49.3 deg. or larger can be determined. For smaller cone half-angles the method is only applicable to ionic sprays as an approximate knowledge of the critical field for ion emission is necessary. The combination of analytical models and finite element tools used to compute the necessary parameters is described. The method is validated on a complex microelectromechanical system emitter geometry as well as on a linear array of electrospray emitters. Finally an empirical model of the behavior of the electric field near the apex of a conic surface with asymptotes at a fixed half-angle is proposed, which allows establishing a simple method for onset voltage determination.

  7. A user-friendly, menu-driven, language-free laser characteristics curves graphing program for desk-top IBM PC compatible computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klutz, Glenn

    1989-01-01

    A facility was established that uses collected data and feeds it into mathematical models that generate improved data arrays by correcting for various losses, base line drift, and conversion to unity scaling. These developed data arrays have headers and other identifying information affixed and are subsequently stored in a Laser Materials and Characteristics data base which is accessible to various users. The two part data base: absorption - emission spectra and tabulated data, is developed around twelve laser models. The tabulated section of the data base is divided into several parts: crystalline, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties; aborption and emission spectra information; chemical name and formulas; and miscellaneous. A menu-driven, language-free graphing program will reduce and/or remove the requirement that users become competent FORTRAN programmers and the concomitant requirement that they also spend several days to a few weeks becoming conversant with the GEOGRAF library and sequence of calls and the continual refreshers of both. The work included becoming thoroughly conversant with or at least very familiar with GEOGRAF by GEOCOMP Corp. The development of the graphing program involved trial runs of the various callable library routines on dummy data in order to become familiar with actual implementation and sequencing. This was followed by trial runs with actual data base files and some additional data from current research that was not in the data base but currently needed graphs. After successful runs, with dummy and real data, using actual FORTRAN instructions steps were undertaken to develop the menu-driven language-free implementation of a program which would require the user only know how to use microcomputers. The user would simply be responding to items displayed on the video screen. To assist the user in arriving at the optimum values needed for a specific graph, a paper, and pencil check list was made available to use on the trial runs.

  8. Electrospray methodologies for characterization and deposition of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modesto Lopez, Luis Balam

    Electrospray is an aerosolization method that generates highly charged droplets from solutions or suspensions and, after a series of solvent evaporation -- droplet fission cycles, it results in particles carrying multiple charges. Highly charged particles are used in a variety of applications, including particle characterization, thin film deposition, nanopatterning, and inhalation studies among several others. In this work, a soft X-ray photoionization was coupled with an electrospray to obtain monodisperse, singly charged nanoparticles for applications in online size characterization with electrical mobility analysis. Photoionization with the soft X-ray charger enhanced the diffusion neutralization rate of the highly charged bacteriophages, proteins, and solid particles. The effect of nanoparticle surface charge and nanoparticle agglomeration in liquids on the electrospray process was studied experimentally and a modified expression to calculate the effective electrical conductivity of nanosuspensions was proposed. The effective electrical conductivity of TiO2 nanoparticle suspensions is strongly dependent on the electrical double layer and the agglomeration dynamics of the particles; and such dependence is more remarkable in liquids with low ionic strength. TiO2 nanoparticle agglomerates with nearly monodisperse sizes in the nanometer and submicrometer ranges were generated, by electrospraying suspensions with tuned effective electrical conductivity, and used to deposit photocatalytic films for water-splitting. Nanostructured films of iron oxide with uniform distribution of particles over the entire deposition area were formed with an electrospray system. The micro-Raman spectra of the iron oxide films showed that transverse and longitudinal optical modes are highly sensitive to the crystallize size of the electrospray-deposited films. The fabrication of films of natural light-harvesting complexes, with the aim of designing biohybrid photovoltaic devices, was

  9. Increasing Protein Charge State When Using Laser Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, Santosh; Flanigan, Paul M.; Perez, Johnny J.; Archer, Jieutonne J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2015-05-01

    Femtosecond (fs) laser vaporization is used to transfer cytochrome c, myoglobin, lysozyme, and ubiquitin from the condensed phase into an electrospray (ES) plume consisting of a mixture of a supercharging reagent, m-nitrobenzyl alcohol ( m-NBA), and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), acetic acid (AA), or formic acid (FA). Interaction of acid-sensitive proteins like cytochrome c and myoglobin with the highly charged ES droplets resulted in a shift to higher charge states in comparison with acid-stable proteins like lysozyme and ubiquitin. Laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS) measurements showed an increase in both the average charge states (Zavg) and the charge state with maximum intensity (Zmode) for acid-sensitive proteins compared with conventional electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) under equivalent solvent conditions. A marked increase in ion abundance of higher charge states was observed for LEMS in comparison with conventional electrospray for cytochrome c (ranging from 19+ to 21+ versus 13+ to 16+) and myoglobin (ranging from 19+ to 26+ versus 18+ to 21+) using an ES solution containing m-NBA and TFA. LEMS measurements as a function of electrospray flow rate yielded increasing charge states with decreasing flow rates for cytochrome c and myoglobin.

  10. A compact high resolution electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, T; Kirk, A T; Ahrens, A; Raddatz, C-R; Thoben, C; Zimmermann, S

    2016-04-01

    Electrospray is a commonly used ionization method for the analysis of liquids. An electrospray is a dispersed nebular of charged droplets produced under the influence of a strong electrical field. Subsequently, ions are produced in a complex process initiated by evaporation of neutral solvent molecules from these droplets. We coupled an electrospray ionization source to our previously described high resolution ion mobility spectrometer with 75mm drift tube length and a drift voltage of 5kV. When using a tritium source for chemical gas phase ionization, a resolving power of R=100 was reported for this setup. We replaced the tritium source and the field switching shutter by an electrospray needle, a desolvation region with variable length and a three-grid shutter for injecting ions into the drift region. Preliminary measurements with tetraalkylammonium halides show that the current configuration with the electrospray ionization source maintains the resolving power of R=100. In this work, we present the characterization of our setup. One major advantage of our setup is that the desolvation region can be heated separately from the drift region so that the temperature in the drift region stays at room temperature even up to desolvation region temperatures of 100°C. We perform parametric studies for the investigation of the influence of temperature on solvent evaporation with different ratios of water and methanol in the solvent for different analyte substances. Furthermore, the setup is operated in negative mode and spectra of bentazon with different solvents are presented. PMID:26838374

  11. Electrospray Ionization-Induced Protein Unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong; Kitova, Elena N.; Johnson, Margaret A.; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth K. S.; Klassen, John S.

    2012-12-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) measurements were performed under a variety of solution conditions on a highly acidic sub-fragment (B3C) of the C-terminal carbohydrate-binding repeat region of Clostridium difficile toxin B, and two mutants (B4A and B4B) containing fewer acidic residues. ESI-MS measurements performed in negative ion mode on aqueous ammonium acetate solutions of B3C at low ionic strength ( I < 80 mM) revealed evidence, based on the measured charge state distribution, of protein unfolding. In contrast, no evidence of unfolding was detected from ESI-MS measurements made in positive ion mode at low I or in either mode at higher I. The results of proton nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism spectroscopy measurements and gel filtration chromatography performed on solutions of B3C under low and high I conditions suggest that the protein exists predominantly in a folded state in neutral aqueous solutions with I > 10 mM. The results of ESI-MS measurements performed on B3C in a series of solutions with high I at pH 5 to 9 rule out the possibility that the structural changes are related to ESI-induced changes in pH. It is proposed that unfolding of B3C, observed in negative mode for solutions with low I, occurs during the ESI process and arises due to Coulombic repulsion between the negatively charged residues and liquid/droplet surface charge. ESI-MS measurements performed in negative ion mode on B4A and B4B also reveal a shift to higher charge states at low I but the magnitude of the changes are smaller than observed for B3C.

  12. Quantitative determination of medroxyprogesterone acetate in plasma by liquid chromatography/electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, S M; Kim, D H

    2001-01-01

    A sensitive and rapid liquid chromatography/electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method has been developed for the quantitative determination of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in human plasma. Plasma samples (1.0 mL) were simply extracted with pentane and the extracts were analyzed by HPLC with the detection of the analyte in the selective reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The determination of MPA was accurate and reproducible, with a limit of quantitation of 0.05 ng/mL in plasma. The standard calibration curve for MPA was linear (r = 0.998) over the concentration range 0.05-6.0 ng/mL in human plasma. Analysis precision over the concentration range of MPA was lower than 18.8% (relative standard deviation, RSD) and accuracy was between 96.2 and 108.7%. PMID:11675672

  13. Size and distribution controllable silica microballs fabricated by electrospraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bojing; Wu, Pan; Jiang, Qi; Gu, Wenhua

    2015-10-01

    Silica microballs have a wide range of applications in the field of optics, electronics, biotechnology chemical industry, and so on. In this work, a new approach, electrospraying, was used to coat the silica microballs onto the glass substrate, and the coating results were compared to spin-coating and dip-coating. Good microball size control could be achieved using the electrospraying method. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) results showed that amorphous silica microballs were obtained. From Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images, we can see that uniform microball size was achieved. In general, the results are better than what can be achieved by spin-coating, and comparable to that of dip-coating. However, electrospraying has great potential in mass production, especially for large-area fabrication.

  14. Low pressure electrospray ionization system and process for effective transmission of ions

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Keqi; Page, Jason S; Kelly, Ryan T; Smith, Richard D

    2012-05-08

    Systems and methods that provide up to complete transmission of ions between coupled stages with low effective ion losses. An "interfaceless" electrospray ionization system is further described that operates an electrospray at a reduced pressure such that standard electrospray sample solutions can be directly sprayed into an electrodynamic ion funnel which provides ion focusing and transmission of ions into a mass analyzer. Furthermore, chambers maintained at different pressures can allow for more optimal operating conditions for an electrospray emitter and an ion guide.

  15. Cochlear microphonic broad tuning curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayat, Mohammad; Teal, Paul D.; Searchfield, Grant D.; Razali, Najwani

    2015-12-01

    It is known that the cochlear microphonic voltage exhibits much broader tuning than does the basilar membrane motion. The most commonly used explanation for this is that when an electrode is inserted at a particular point inside the scala media, the microphonic potentials of neighbouring hair cells have different phases, leading to cancelation at the electrodes location. In situ recording of functioning outer hair cells (OHCs) for investigating this hypothesis is exceptionally difficult. Therefore, to investigate the discrepancy between the tuning curves of the basilar membrane and those of the cochlear microphonic, and the effect of phase cancellation of adjacent hair cells on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves, we use an electromechanical model of the cochlea to devise an experiment. We explore the effect of adjacent hair cells (i.e., longitudinal phase cancellation) on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves in different locations. The results of the experiment indicate that active longitudinal coupling (i.e., coupling with active adjacent outer hair cells) only slightly changes the broadness of the CM tuning curves. The results also demonstrate that there is a π phase difference between the potentials produced by the hair bundle and the soma near the place associated with the characteristic frequency based on place-frequency maps (i.e., the best place). We suggest that the transversal phase cancellation (caused by the phase difference between the hair bundle and the soma) plays a far more important role than longitudinal phase cancellation in the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves. Moreover, by increasing the modelled longitudinal resistance resulting the cochlear microphonic curves exhibiting sharper tuning. The results of the simulations suggest that the passive network of the organ of Corti determines the phase difference between the hair bundle and soma, and hence determines the sharpness of the

  16. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  17. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  18. Multiplexed electrospray deposition for protein microarray with micromachined silicon device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Parijat

    2007-07-01

    Multiplexed electrospray deposition device capable of delivering picoliter volumes made by silicon micromachining technology has been developed as a deposition tool for making protein microarrays in a noncontact mode. Upon application of potential difference in the range of 7-9kV, biomolecules dissolved in suitable buffer with nonionic surfactant and loaded on the electrospray tips were dispensed on the substrate with microfabricated hydrogel features (1-10μm) in cone-jet mode. Schiff base chemistry followed by reductive amination was utilized for covalent immobilization.

  19. Novel Erythrocyte-like Graphene Microspheres with High Quality and Mass Production Capability via Electrospray Assisted Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yayang; Wu, Guan; Tian, Xike; Tao, Xiaoming; Chen, Wei

    2013-11-01

    We report for the first time a novel erythrocyte-like graphene microsphere (ELGMs) which can be produced with high quality and mass production capability via electrospray assisted self-assembly. Through simple electrospray treatment of GO suspension into coagulation bath followed by chemical reduction, large quantity of ELGMs with uniform morphology and size can be obtained with production rate of around 2.4 mg/h. Compared with other 3D structures, the ELGMs have a very interesting structural characteristic of perfect exterior doughnut shape and interior porous network. Accordingly, the as-prepared porous ELGMs exhibit excellent capability for fast and recyclable removal of oil and toxic organic solvents from water, reaching up to 216 times of its weight in absorption efficiency, which is tens of times higher than that of conventional sorbent materials. It is strongly believed that the novel hierarchical graphene structures and synergy among different techniques will lead to more future advances in graphene applications.

  20. Encapsulation of bioactive compound from extracted jasmine flower using β-Cyclodextrin via electrospray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmam., S.; Naim., M. N.; Ng., E.; Mokhtar, M. Nn; Abu Bakar, N. F.

    2016-06-01

    The ability of electrospray to encapsulate the bioactive compound extracted from Jasmine flower with β-Cyclodextrion (β-CD) without any thermal-assisted processing was demonstrated in this study. The extraction of Jasmine compound were conducted using sonicator at 70 000 Hz, for 10 minutes and followed by mixing of the filtered compound with β-CD. Then, the mixture was electrosprayed under a stable Taylor cone jet mode at the voltage of 4 - 5 kV, with flow rate of 0.2 ml/hour. The aluminum substrate that used for collecting the deposit was placed at 30 cm from the needle's tip to allow the occurrence of evaporation and droplet fission until the droplet transform to solid particles. Characteristics of solidified bioactive compound from Jasmine flower (non-encapsulated compound) and solidified bioactive compound with β-CD (encapsulated compound) were studied in this work. From SEM images, it can be observed that the particles size distribution of encapsulated compound deposits have better deposition array and did not aggregate with each other compared to the non-encapsulated compound. FE-SEM images of encapsulated compound deposits indicate more solid crystal looks while non-encapsulated compound was obtained in the porous form. The electrospray process in this work has successfully encapsulated the Jasmine compound with β-CD without any thermal-assisted process. The encapsulation occurrence was determined using FTIR analysis. Identical peaks that referred to the β-CD were found on the encapsulated compound demonstrated that most deposits were encapsulated with β-CD.

  1. Fundamentals of Biomolecule Analysis by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinecke, Andrea; Ryzhov, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is a soft ionization technique that allows transfer of fragile biomolecules directly from solution into the gas phase. An instrumental analysis laboratory experiment is designed that would introduce the students to the ESI technique, major parameters of the ion trap mass spectrometers and some caveats in…

  2. Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry of proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was evaluated for the detection of proteins ranging in molecular mass from 12 to 66 kDa. Proteins were uniformly deposited on a solid surface without pretreatment and analyzed with a DESI source coupled to a quadrupole ion trap mass spec...

  3. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of intact bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) was used to differentiate 7 bacterial species based on their measured DESI-mass spectral profile. Both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were tested and included Escherichia coli, Staphyloccocus aureus, Enterococcus sp., Bordete...

  4. Molecular resolution and fragmentation of fulvic acid by electrospray ionization/multistage tandem mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Rostad, C.E.; Gates, Paul M.; Furlong, E.T.; Ferrer, I.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular weight distributions of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia, were investigated by electrospray ionization/quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI/QMS), and fragmentation pathways of specific fulvic acid masses were investigated by electrospray ionization/ion trap multistage tandem mass spectrometry (ESI/MST/MS). ESI/QMS studies of the free acid form of low molecular weight poly(carboxylic acid) standards in 75% methanol/25% water mobile phase found that negative ion detection gave the optimum generation of parent ions that can be used for molecular weight determinations. However, experiments with poly(acrylic acid) mixtures and specific high molecular weight standards found multiply charged negative ions that gave a low bias to molecular mass distributions. The number of negative charges on a molecule is dependent on the distance between charges. ESI/MST/MS of model compounds found characteristic water loss from alcohol dehydration and anhydride formation, as well as CO2 loss from decarboxylation, and CO loss from ester structures. Application of these fragmentation pathways to specific masses of fulvic acid isolated and fragmented by ESI/MST/MS is indicative of specific structures that can serve as a basis for future structural confirmation after these hypothesized structures are synthesized.

  5. Detection of trace levels of lead in aqueous liquids using extractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunxiao; Zhang, Xinglei; Xiao, Saijin; Jia, Bin; Cui, Shasha; Shi, Jianbo; Xu, Ning; Xie, Xi; Gu, Haiwei; Chen, Huanwen

    2012-08-30

    A sensitive approach, based on semi-quantitative measurement of the characteristic fragments in multi-stage extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS(n)), was developed for fast detection of trace levels of lead in aqueous liquids including mineral water, lake water, tap water, energy drinks, soft drinks, beer, orange juice, and tea. A disodium ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA) aqueous solution was electrosprayed to produce negatively charged primary ions which then intersected the neutral sample plume to generate anions of EDTA-Pb(II) complexes. The charged EDTA-Pb(II) complexes were characterized with multistage collision induced dissociation (CID) experiments. The limit of detection (LOD) using EESI-MS(3) was estimated to be at the level of 10(-13)g/mL for directly detecting lead in many of these samples. The linear dynamic range was higher than 2 orders of magnitude. A single sample analysis could be completed within 2 min with reasonable semi-quantitative performance, e.g., relative standard deviations (RSDs) for deionized water were 4.6-7.6% during 5 experimental runs (each of them had 10 repeated measurements). Coca-cola and Huiyuan orange juice, representative beverage samples with complex matrices, generated recovery rates of 91.5% and 129%, respectively. Our experimental data demonstrated that EESI-MS is a useful tool for the fast detection of lead in various solutions, and EESI-MS showed promises for fast screening of lead-contaminated aqueous liquid samples. PMID:22939131

  6. Direct electrospray deposition of graphene onto paper and effect of binder on its surface resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Kee; Park, Kwan Woo; Hwang, Sung Wook; Lee, Sang Bong; Shim, Jin Kie

    2013-10-01

    The electrospray-deposited patterns of graphene onto filter paper were characterized to study the effect of cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP) binder on the surface resistance of the resulting paper. The amount of CAP determines the extent of penetration of graphene into the heterogeneous networks, because graphene gets anchored and crowded into the network with CAP. A graphene-dispersed ink was prepared in water using sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate, and this ink was used to fabricate graphene-coated paper (GCP) by electrospray deposition technique. The SEM images of the GCP revealed the impregnation of graphene into the filter paper. The mechanical properties and surface resistance of the GCP were studied using a universal testing machine (UTM) and indigenous four-probe meter, respectively. The low-cost GCP prepared in this study showed relatively low surface resistance (96.2 omega/sq) owing to the effective electro-conducting pathway provided by the crowded and impregnated deposition of grapheme onto the filter paper. Consequently, CAP improved the electrical and mechanical characteristics of GCP, even though only a small amount of graphene was used during deposition. PMID:24245203

  7. A ToF-MS with a highly efficient electrostatic ion guide for characterization of ionic liquid electrospray sources.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Subha; Ataman, Caglar; Courtney, Daniel G; Dandavino, Simon; Shea, Herbert

    2014-08-01

    We report on the development of a time-of-flight (ToF) mass spectrometer with a highly efficient electrostatic ion guide for enhancing detectability in ToF mass spectrometry. This 65-cm long ion guide consists of 13 cascaded stages of Einzel lens to collect a large fraction of emitted charges over a wide emission angle and energy spread for time-of-flight measurements. Simulations show that the ion guide can collect 100% of the charges with up to 23° emission half-angle or 30% energy spread irrespective of their specific charge. We demonstrate this ion guide as applied to electrospray ion sources. Experiments performed with tungsten needle electrospraying the ionic liquid EMI-BF4 showed that up to 80% of the emitted charges could be collected at the end of the flight tube. Flight times of monomers and dimers emitted from the needles were measured in both positive and negative emission polarities. The setup was also used to characterize the electrospray from microfabricated silicon capillary emitters and nearly 30% charges could be collected even from a 40(°) emission half-angle. This setup can thus increase the fraction of charge collection for ToF measurement and spray characteristics can be obtained from a very large fraction of the emission in real time. PMID:24833357

  8. A ToF-MS with a Highly Efficient Electrostatic Ion Guide for Characterization of Ionic Liquid Electrospray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Subha; Ataman, Caglar; Courtney, Daniel G.; Dandavino, Simon; Shea, Herbert

    2014-08-01

    We report on the development of a time-of-flight (ToF) mass spectrometer with a highly efficient electrostatic ion guide for enhancing detectability in ToF mass spectrometry. This 65-cm long ion guide consists of 13 cascaded stages of Einzel lens to collect a large fraction of emitted charges over a wide emission angle and energy spread for time-of-flight measurements. Simulations show that the ion guide can collect 100% of the charges with up to 23° emission half-angle or 30% energy spread irrespective of their specific charge. We demonstrate this ion guide as applied to electrospray ion sources. Experiments performed with tungsten needle electrospraying the ionic liquid EMI-BF4 showed that up to 80% of the emitted charges could be collected at the end of the flight tube. Flight times of monomers and dimers emitted from the needles were measured in both positive and negative emission polarities. The setup was also used to characterize the electrospray from microfabricated silicon capillary emitters and nearly 30% charges could be collected even from a 40° emission half-angle. This setup can thus increase the fraction of charge collection for ToF measurement and spray characteristics can be obtained from a very large fraction of the emission in real time.

  9. Analytical investigation of curved steel girder behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Michael Donald

    Horizontally curved bridges meet an increasing demand for complex highway geometries in congested urban areas. A popular type of curved bridge consists of steel I-girders interconnected by cross-frames and a composite concrete deck slab. Prior to hardening of the concrete deck each I-girder is susceptible to a lateral torsional buckling-type failure. Unlike a straight I-girder, a curved I-girder resists major components of stress resulting from strong axis bending, weak axis bending and warping. The combination of these stresses reduce the available strength of a curved girder versus that of an equivalent straight girder. Experiments demonstrating the ultimate strength characteristics of curved girders are few in number. Of the available experimental research, few studies have used full scale-tests and boundary conditions indicative of those found in an actual bridge structure. Unlike straight girders, curved girders are characterized by nonlinear out-of-plane deformations which, depending upon the magnitude of curvature, may occur at very low load levels. Because of the inherent nonlinear behaviour, some have questioned the application of the term lateral torsional buckling to curved girders; rather curved girders behave in a manner consistent with a deflection-amplification problem. Even with the advent of sophisticated analytical techniques, there is a glaring void in the documented literature regarding calibration of these techniques with known experimental curved girder behaviour. Presented here is an analytical study of the nonlinear modelling of curved steel girders and bridges. This is accomplished by incorporating large deflection and nonlinear material behaviour into three dimensional finite element models generated using the program ANSYS. Emphasis is placed on the calibration of the finite method with known experimental ultimate strength data. It is demonstrated that accurate predictions of load deformation and ultimate strength are attainable via the

  10. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  11. The Skipping Rope Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmark, Arne; Essen, Hanno

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium of a flexible inextensible string, or chain, in the centrifugal force field of a rotating reference frame is investigated. It is assumed that the end points are fixed on the rotation axis. The shape of the curve, the skipping rope curve or "troposkien", is given by the Jacobi elliptic function sn. (Contains 3 figures.)

  12. Thin-Layer Chromatography/Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: Investigation of Goldenseal Alkaloids

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2007-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was investigated as a means to qualitatively identify and to quantify analytes directly from developed normal-phase thin layer chromatography plates. The atmospheric sampling capillary of a commercial ion trap mass spectrometer was extended to permit sampling and ionization of analytes in bands separated on intact TLC plates (up to 10 cm x 10 cm). A surface positioning software package and the appropriate hardware enabled computer-controlled surface scanning along the length of development lanes or at fixed RF value across the plates versus the stationary desorption electrospray emitter. Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and related alkaloids and commercial dietary supplements were used as standards and samples. Alkaloid standards and samples were spotted and separated on aluminum- or glass-backed plates using established literature methods. The mass spectral signal levels as a function of desorption spray solvent were investigated with acetonitrile proving superior to methanol. The detection levels (ca. 5 ng each or 14 -28 pmol) in mass spectral full scan mode were determined statistically from the calibration curves (2.5 - 100 pmol) for the standards berberine, palmatine and hydrastinine spotted as a mixture and separated on the plates. Qualitative screening of the major alkaloids present in six different over-the-counter "goldenseal" dietary supplements was accomplished by obtaining full scan mass spectra during surface scans along the development lane in the direction of increasing RF value. In one sample, alkaloids were detected that strongly suggested the presence of at least one additional herb undeclared on the product label. These same data indicated the misidentification of one of the alkaloids in the TLC literature. Quantities of the alkaloids present in two of the samples determined using the mass spectral data were in reasonable agreement with the label values indicating the quantitative ability of

  13. Search for liquids electrospraying the smallest possible nanodrops in vacuo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Matilla, R.; Fernández-García, J.; Congdon, H.; Fernández de la Mora, J.

    2014-12-01

    Prior work with electrosprays in vacuum of mixtures of ionic liquids (ILs) and the moderately high boiling point (Tb) solvents formamide (FM) and propylene carbonate (PC) (Tb of 210 and 241 °C) has shown that the charged drops produced have reasonably narrow charge/mass distributions, controllable over a wide mass/charge range. This enables their use as propellants in electrical propulsion with specific impulse Isp varying from a few hundred to a few thousand seconds (10 kV beam energy) and with excellent propulsion efficiency. However, some limitations are imposed by the finite room temperature volatility of FM and PC. Here, we seek improved performance from propellants based on the polar but viscous solvent Sulfolane (SF; ɛ = 43.2, μ = 10.3 cP) and the low viscosity but less polar solvent tributyl phosphate (TBP; ɛ = 8.9, μ = 3.4 cP), both with Tb > 280 °C. Neither TBP nor its low viscosity mixtures with SF achieve the electrical conductivities needed to yield high Isp. Most ILs used in SF/IL mixtures tested were based on the 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium (EMI) or 1,3-dimethylimidazolium (DMI) cations, including EMI-BF4, EMI-N(CN)2, and DMI-N(CN)2. These combinations reach high conductivities, some approaching 3 S/m, but have limited propulsive performance because evaporation of ions directly from the electrified meniscus produces undesirable mixed beams of drops and ions. Exceptional characteristics are found in mixtures of SF with ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), where the small EA+ cation is strongly bound to the solvent, greatly delaying ion evaporation from the meniscus. Evidence on the formation of nano-jets with diameters as small as 1 nm is seen. Although unprecedented, this finding agrees with what would be expected if ion evaporation were suppressed. SF/EAN mixtures thus provide the best available sources to produce the smallest possible nanodrops, minimally polluted by ions.

  14. Search for liquids electrospraying the smallest possible nanodrops in vacuo

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Matilla, R.; Fernández-García, J.; Congdon, H.; Fernández de la Mora, J.

    2014-12-14

    Prior work with electrosprays in vacuum of mixtures of ionic liquids (ILs) and the moderately high boiling point (T{sub b}) solvents formamide (FM) and propylene carbonate (PC) (T{sub b} of 210 and 241 °C) has shown that the charged drops produced have reasonably narrow charge/mass distributions, controllable over a wide mass/charge range. This enables their use as propellants in electrical propulsion with specific impulse I{sub sp} varying from a few hundred to a few thousand seconds (10 kV beam energy) and with excellent propulsion efficiency. However, some limitations are imposed by the finite room temperature volatility of FM and PC. Here, we seek improved performance from propellants based on the polar but viscous solvent Sulfolane (SF; ε = 43.2, μ = 10.3 cP) and the low viscosity but less polar solvent tributyl phosphate (TBP; ε = 8.9, μ = 3.4 cP), both with T{sub b} > 280 °C. Neither TBP nor its low viscosity mixtures with SF achieve the electrical conductivities needed to yield high I{sub sp}. Most ILs used in SF/IL mixtures tested were based on the 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium (EMI) or 1,3-dimethylimidazolium (DMI) cations, including EMI-BF{sub 4}, EMI-N(CN){sub 2}, and DMI-N(CN){sub 2}. These combinations reach high conductivities, some approaching 3 S/m, but have limited propulsive performance because evaporation of ions directly from the electrified meniscus produces undesirable mixed beams of drops and ions. Exceptional characteristics are found in mixtures of SF with ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), where the small EA{sup +} cation is strongly bound to the solvent, greatly delaying ion evaporation from the meniscus. Evidence on the formation of nano-jets with diameters as small as 1 nm is seen. Although unprecedented, this finding agrees with what would be expected if ion evaporation were suppressed. SF/EAN mixtures thus provide the best available sources to produce the smallest possible nanodrops, minimally polluted by

  15. Examination of Bacterial Characteristics of Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors in Three Pilot-Scale Plants for Treating Low-Strength Wastewater by Application of the Colony-Forming-Curve Analysis Method

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Naoaki; Tokiwa, Yutaka; Tanaka, Yasuo; Fujiki, Kiichi; Taroda, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    1992-01-01

    Characteristic sludge ecosystems arising in anaerobic membrane bioreactors of three pilot-scale plants treating low-strength (less than 1 g of biological oxygen demand per liter) sewage or soybean-processing wastewater were examined by analysis of the colony-forming-curves (CFC) obtained by counting colonies at suitable intervals. The wastewaters, containing high amounts of suspended solids (SS) (SS/chemical oxygen demand ratio, 0.51 to 0.80), were treated by using two types of bioreactors: (i) a hydrolyzation reactor for solubilization and acidification of SS in wastewater and (ii) a methane fermentation reactor for producing methane. The colony counts for the two sewage treatment plants continued to increase even after 3 weeks of incubation, whereas those for soybean-processing wastewater reached an approximately constant level within 3 weeks of incubation. The CFCs were analyzed by correlating the rate of colony appearance on roll tubes with the physiological types of bacteria present in the bioreactors. It was found that there were large numbers of slow-colony-forming anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactors and that the viable populations consisted of a few groups with different growth rates. It is considered that the slow-growing colonies appearing after 10 days of incubation were the dominant microflora in the sewage treated by hydrolyzation reactors. In particular, highly concentrated sludge (30.0 g of mixed-liquor volatile SS per liter) retained by the membrane separation module contained a large number of such bacteria. Slow-growing colonies of these bacteria could be counted by using a sludge extract medium prepared from only the supernatant of autoclaved sludge. In addition, the highest colony counts were almost always obtained with the sludge extract medium, meaning that most of the anaerobic bacteria in these sludges have complex nutrient requirements for growth. This report also indicates the usefulness of application of the CFC analysis method to

  16. Scanning mass spectrometry probe: a scanning probe electrospray ion source for imaging mass spectrometry of submerged interfaces and transient events in solution.

    PubMed

    Kottke, Peter A; Degertekin, F Levent; Fedorov, Andrei G

    2010-01-01

    The scanning mass spectrometry (SMS) probe is a new electrospray ion source. Motivated by the need for untargeted chemical imaging of dynamic events in solution, we have exploited an approach to electrospray ionization (ESI) that allows continuous sampling from a highly localized volume (approximately picoliters) in a liquid environment, softly ionizes molecules in the sample to render them amenable for mass spectrometric analysis, and sends the ions to the mass spectrometer. The key underlying concepts for our approach are (1) treating the electrospray capillary inlet as a chemical scanning probe and (2) locating the electrospray point as close as possible to the sampling point, thus providing the shortest response time possible. This approach enables chemical monitoring or imaging of submerged interfaces, providing access to details of spatial heterogeneity and temporal changes within liquid samples. It also permits direct access to liquid/ liquid interfaces for ESI-MS analysis. In this letter we report the first demonstrations of these capabilities of the SMS probe and describe some of the probe's basic characteristics. PMID:19904914

  17. Mechanics of Curved Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2011-03-01

    Despite an almost two thousand year history, origami, the art of folding paper, remains a challenge both artistically and scientifically. Traditionally, origami is practiced by folding along straight creases. A whole new set of shapes can be explored, however, if, instead of straight creases, one folds along arbitrary curves. We present a mechanical model for curved fold origami in which the energy of a plastically-deformed crease is balanced by the bending energy of developable regions on either side of the crease. Though geometry requires that a sheet buckle when folded along a closed curve, its shape depends on the elasticity of the sheet. NSF DMR-0846582.

  18. Multishell encapsulation using a triple coaxial electrospray system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woojin; Kim, Sang Soo

    2010-06-01

    To overcome the limitations of the conventional encapsulation methods and improve the potential use of the electrospray method as a drug delivery system, an electrospray system using a triple coaxial nozzle was developed to generate multishell capsules. Two conducting fluids, ethylene glycol and 4-hydroxybutyl acrylate, and one nonconducting fluid, olive oil, were chosen to manufacture the multishell capsules. The capsules were solidified by a photopolymerization device. We investigated the size distributions and visualized the capsules changing fluid flow rates. Dispersive Raman spectra were also monitored to determine the chemical composition of the capsules. The multishell capsules were generated in the overlapped cone-jet mode regime of the conducting fluids, and the sizes and shell thicknesses were controlled by the flow rates and applied voltages. PMID:20459114

  19. A corona discharge initiated electrochemical electrospray ionization technique.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, John R; Hess, Sonja

    2009-11-01

    We report here the development of a corona discharge (CD) initiated electrochemical (EC) electrospray ionization (ESI) technique using a standard electrospray ion source. This is a new ionization technique distinct from ESI, electrochemistry inherent to ESI, APCI, and techniques using hydroxyl radicals produced under atmospheric pressure conditions. By maximizing the observable CD at the tip of a stainless steel ESI capillary, efficient electrochemical oxidation of electrochemically active compounds is observed. For electrochemical oxidation to be observed, the ionization potential of the analyte must be lower than Fe. Ferrocene labeled compounds were chosen as the electrochemically active moiety. The electrochemical cell in the ESI source was robust, and generated ions with selectivity according to the ionization potential of the analytes and up to zeptomolar sensitivity. Our results indicate that CD initiated electrochemical ionization has the potential to become a powerful technique to increase the dynamic range, sensitivity, and selectivity of ESI experiments. PMID:19747843

  20. Micro- and nanoparticles by electrospray: advances and applications in foods.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Hernández, José A; Torres-Chávez, Patricia I; Ramírez-Wong, Benjamín; Rascón-Chu, Agustín; Plascencia-Jatomea, Maribel; Barreras-Urbina, Carlos G; Rangel-Vázquez, Norma A; Rodríguez-Félix, Francisco

    2015-05-20

    Micro- and nanotechnology are tools being used strongly in the area of food technology. The electrospray technique is booming because of its importance in developing micro- and nanoparticles containing an active ingredient as bioactive compounds, enhancing molecules of flavors, odors, and packaging coatings, and developing polymers that are obtained from food (proteins, carbohydrates), as chitosan, alginate, gelatin, agar, starch, or gluten. The electrospray technique compared to conventional techniques such as nanoprecipitation, emulsion-diffusion, double-emulsification, and layer by layer provides greater advantages to develop micro- and nanoparticles because it is simple, low cost, uses a low amount of solvents, and products are obtained in one step. This technique could also be applied in the agrifood sector for the preparation of controlled and/or prolonged release systems of fertilizer or agrochemicals, for which more research must be conducted. PMID:25938374

  1. Electrosprayed inulin microparticles for microbiota triggered targeting of colon.

    PubMed

    Jain, Arvind K; Sood, Vishesh; Bora, Meghali; Vasita, Rajesh; Katti, Dhirendra S

    2014-11-01

    Inulin, a naturally occurring polysaccharide, was acetylated to make it processable by electrospraying, a facile and single step method for microparticle fabrication. Electrospraying process parameters were optimized for fabrication of spherical and monodisperse indomethacin (IDM) loaded inulin acetate (INA) microparticles. The apparent entrapment efficiency of IDM was determined to be 100%, whereas working encapsulation efficiency was estimated to be 35.39 ± 1.63%. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed molecular dispersion of IDM in an amorphous state within the INA matrix. Finally, the results from in vitro release study performed in simulated gastro-intestinal fluids demonstrated that IDM was released only in simulated colonic fluid that contained inulinase. Therefore, this study demonstrates that acetylation of inulin does not alter its susceptibility to inulinase and that microparticles fabricated from INA can be developed as a colon targeting drug delivery system. PMID:25129739

  2. Sampling probe for microarray read out using electrospray mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2004-10-12

    An automated electrospray based sampling system and method for analysis obtains samples from surface array spots having analytes. The system includes at least one probe, the probe including an inlet for flowing at least one eluting solvent to respective ones of a plurality of spots and an outlet for directing the analyte away from the spots. An automatic positioning system is provided for translating the probe relative to the spots to permit sampling of any spot. An electrospray ion source having an input fluidicly connected to the probe receives the analyte and generates ions from the analyte. The ion source provides the generated ions to a structure for analysis to identify the analyte, preferably being a mass spectrometer. The probe can be a surface contact probe, where the probe forms an enclosing seal along the periphery of the array spot surface.

  3. Photovoltaic and optical properties of perovskite thin films fabricated using Marangoni flow assisted electrospraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarang, Som; Ishihara, Hidetaka; Chen, Yen-Chang; Lin, Oliver; Tung, Vincent C.; Ghosh, Sayantani

    2016-02-01

    We have developed an electrospraying technique inspired from Marangoni flow seen in nature. We demonstrate our ability to synthesise highly crystalline uniform perovskite thin films with enhanced coverage and high absorption. Due to a difference in the vapour pressure of DMSO and NMP, a gradient force is developed that helps in propagating the incoming precursor droplet to coalesce and merge with other droplets thus inducing a dynamic self-assembly within the thin film. This results in thin films with high uniformity and good morphological and topological characteristics, that collectivelty resulted in a respectable PCE of greater than 14%. Optical studies are conducted in parallel to better understand the energy phase space of perovskite crystals. The high temperature tetragonal phase showed a high recombination rate of 180 ns, ideal for photovoltaic performances, while the low temperature measurements reveal considerable complexity in spectral and dynamic properties that demand further invesgtiation.

  4. Profiling an electrospray plume using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Douglas; Portelius, Erik; Zhu, Yu; Feigerle, Charles; Cook, Kelsey D

    2005-12-15

    We report the use of silver nanoparticles to obtain surface-enhanced Raman spectra of Crystal Violet in an electrospray plume. Surface enhancement allowed detection at low concentrations with the high specificity afforded by vibrational spectroscopy. SERS spectra were used to obtain an axial concentration profile closely matching that obtained in previous fluorescence experiments. SERS can provide more analyte structural information than has been obtainable from fluorescence studies of the plume. PMID:16351168

  5. Ultrasonically Aided Electrospray source for monodisperse, charged nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Weidong

    This dissertation presents a new method of producing nearly monodisperse electrospray using charged capillary standing waves. This method, based on the Ultrasonically Aided Electrospraying (UAE) technology concept invented by the author, includes the steps of dispensing a liquid on the top surface of a diaphragm so as to form a liquid film on the surface of the diaphragm, setting the diaphragm into vibration using piezoelectric transducers so as to induce capillary standing waves in the liquid film, applying electric charge to the capillary standing waves so that electrospray is extracted from the crests of the capillary standing waves. Theoretical analysis on the formation of charged particles from charged capillary standing waves at critically stable condition is performed. An experimental UAE system is designed, built, and tested and the performance of this new technology concept is assessed. Experimental results validate the capabilities of the UAE concept. The method has several applications including electric space propulsion, nano particulate technologies, nanoparticle spray coating and painting techniques, semiconductor fabrication and biomedical processes. Two example applications in electric space propulsion and nanoparticle spray coating are introduced.

  6. Curve Stitching in LOGO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muscat, Jean-Paul

    1992-01-01

    Uses LOGO to enhance the applicability of curve stitching in the mathematics curriculum. Presents the formulas and computer programs for the construction of parabolas, concentric circles, and epicycloids. Diagrams of constructed figures are provided. (MDH)

  7. A Novel Route to Recognizing Quaternary Ammonium Cations Using Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shackman, Holly M.; Ding, Wei; Bolgar, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing and elucidating structures is a commonplace and necessary activity in the pharmaceutical industry with mass spectrometry and NMR being the primary tools for analysis. Although many functional groups are readily identifiable, quaternary ammonium cations have proven to be difficult to unequivocally identify using these techniques. Due to the lack of an N-H bond, quaternary ammonium groups can only be detected in the 1H NMR spectra by weak signals generated from long-range 14N-H coupling, which by themselves are inconclusive evidence of a quaternary ammonium functional group. Due to their low intensity, these signals are frequently not detected. Additionally, ions cannot be differentiated in a mass spectrum as an M+ or [M + H]+ ion without prior knowledge of the compound's structure. In order to utilize mass spectrometry as a tool for determining this functionality, ion cluster formation of quaternary ammonium cations and non-quaternary amines was studied using electrospray ionization. Several mobile phase modifiers were compared; however, the addition of small amounts of trifluoroacetic acid proved superior in producing characteristic and intense [M +2TFA]- clusters for compounds containing quaternary ammonium cations when using negative electrospray. By fragmenting this characteristic ion using CID, nearly all compounds studied could be unambiguously identified as containing a quaternary ammonium cation or a non-quaternary amine attributable to the presence (non-quaternary amine) or absence (quaternary ammonium cation) of the resulting [2TFA + H]- ion in the product spectra. This method of analysis provides a rapid, novel, and reliable technique for indicating the presence of quaternary ammonium cations in order to aid in structural elucidation.

  8. Are Driving and Overtaking on Right Curves More Dangerous than on Left Curves?

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Sarbaz; Thomson, Robert; Lannér, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    that drivers behave differently depending on the curve direction where both speed and acceleration were higher on right than left curves. The implication of this study is that curve direction should be taken into consideration to a greater extent when designing and redesigning curves. It appears that the driver and the vehicle are influenced by different infrastructure factors depending on the curve direction. In addition, the results suggest that the vehicle dynamics response alone cannot explain the higher crash risk in right curves. Further studies of the links between driver, vehicle, and highway characteristics are needed, such as naturalistic driving studies, to identify the key safety indicators for highway safety. PMID:21050608

  9. Curved centerline air intake for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruehr, W. C.; Younghans, J. L.; Smith, E. B. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An inlet for a gas turbine engine was disposed about a curved centerline for the purpose of accepting intake air that is flowing at an angle to engine centerline and progressively turning that intake airflow along a curved path into alignment with the engine. This curved inlet is intended for use in under the wing locations and similar regions where airflow direction is altered by aerodynamic characteristics of the airplane. By curving the inlet, aerodynamic loss and acoustic generation and emission are decreased.

  10. Low pressure electrospray ionization system and process for effective transmission of ions

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Keqi; Page, Jason S.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-03-02

    A system and method are disclosed that provide up to complete transmission of ions between coupled stages with low effective ion losses. A novel "interfaceless" electrospray ionization system is further described that operates the electrospray at a reduced pressure such that standard electrospray sample solutions can be directly sprayed into an electrodynamic ion funnel which provides ion focusing and transmission of ions into a mass analyzer.

  11. A study of electrospray ionization emitters with differing geometries with respect to flow rate and electrospray voltage.

    PubMed

    Reschke, Brent R; Timperman, Aaron T

    2011-12-01

    The performance of several electrospray ionization emitters with different orifice inside diameters (i.d.s), geometries, and materials are compared. The sample solution is delivered by pressure driven flow, and the electrospray ionization voltage and flow rate are varied systematically for each emitter investigated, while the signal intensity of a standard is measured. The emitters investigated include a series of emitters with a tapered outside diameters (o.d.) and unaltered i.d.s, a series of emitters with tapered o.d.s and i.d.s, an emitter with a monolithic frit and a tapered o.d., and an emitter fabricated from polypropylene. The results show that for the externally etched emitters, signal was nearly independent of i.d. and better ion utilization was achieved at lower flow rates. Furthermore, emitters with a 50 μm i.d. and an etched o.d. produced about 1.5 times more signal than etched emitters with smaller i.d.s and about 3.5 times more signal than emitters with tapered inner and outer dimensions. Additionally, the work presented here has important implications for applications in which maximizing signal intensity and reducing frictional resistance to flow are necessary. Overall, the work provides an initial assessment of the critical parameters that contribute to maximizing the signal for electrospray ionization sources interfaced with pressure driven flows. PMID:21989703

  12. A Study of Electrospray Ionization Emitters with Differing Geometries with Respect to Flow Rate and Electrospray Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reschke, Brent R.; Timperman, Aaron T.

    2011-12-01

    The performance of several electrospray ionization emitters with different orifice inside diameters (i.d.s), geometries, and materials are compared. The sample solution is delivered by pressure driven flow, and the electrospray ionization voltage and flow rate are varied systematically for each emitter investigated, while the signal intensity of a standard is measured. The emitters investigated include a series of emitters with a tapered outside diameters (o.d.) and unaltered i.d.s, a series of emitters with tapered o.d.s and i.d.s, an emitter with a monolithic frit and a tapered o.d., and an emitter fabricated from polypropylene. The results show that for the externally etched emitters, signal was nearly independent of i.d. and better ion utilization was achieved at lower flow rates. Furthermore, emitters with a 50 μm i.d. and an etched o.d. produced about 1.5 times more signal than etched emitters with smaller i.d.s and about 3.5 times more signal than emitters with tapered inner and outer dimensions. Additionally, the work presented here has important implications for applications in which maximizing signal intensity and reducing frictional resistance to flow are necessary. Overall, the work provides an initial assessment of the critical parameters that contribute to maximizing the signal for electrospray ionization sources interfaced with pressure driven flows.

  13. Selection of the Optimum Electrospray Voltage for Gradient Elution LC-MS Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Marginean, Ioan; Kelly, Ryan T.; Moore, Ronald J.; Prior, David C.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-04-01

    Changes in liquid composition during gradient elution liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS) analyses affect the electrospray operation. To establish methodologies for judicious selection of the electrospray voltage, we monitored in real-time the effect of the LC gradient on the spray current. The optimum range of the electrospray voltage shifted to lower values as the concentration of organic solvent in the eluent increased during reversed-phase LC analyses. These results provided the means to rationally select the voltage that ensured successful electrospray operation throughout gradient elution LC-MS experiments. A small run-to-run drift in the spray current was observed for electrosprays operated at constant voltage. This could be the result of fouling or degradation of the electrospray emitter, which affected the electric field driving the electrospray. Algorithms using feedback from spray current measurements to maintain the electrospray voltage within the optimum operating range throughout gradient elution LC-MS were evaluated. The electrospray operation with voltage regulation and at constant, judiciously selected voltage during gradient elution LC-MS measurements produced data with similar reproducibility.

  14. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture-Electrospray Ionization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-27

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed non-contact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect 355 nm UV laser ablated material in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appear to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the softness of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. A series of benzlypyridinium salts, known as thermometer ions, were used to comparemore » internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. This data indicates ions formed directly by UV laser ablation, if any, are likely an extremely small constituent of the total ion signal observed. Instead, neutral molecules, clusters or particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream then electrosprayed are the predominant source of ion signal observed. The electrospray ionization process used controls the softness of the technique.« less

  15. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture-Electrospray Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-27

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed non-contact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect 355 nm UV laser ablated material in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appear to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the softness of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. A series of benzlypyridinium salts, known as thermometer ions, were used to compare internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. This data indicates ions formed directly by UV laser ablation, if any, are likely an extremely small constituent of the total ion signal observed. Instead, neutral molecules, clusters or particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream then electrosprayed are the predominant source of ion signal observed. The electrospray ionization process used controls the softness of the technique.

  16. Using electrospray-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry to characterize organic compounds separated on thin-layer chromatography plates.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Yao; Huang, Min-Zong; Chang, Hui-Chiu; Shiea, Jentaie

    2007-11-15

    Electrospray-assisted laser desorption/ionization (ELDI), an ionization method that combines laser desorption and electrospray ionization (ESI), can be used under ambient conditions to characterize organic compounds (including FD&C dyes, amines, extracts of a drug tablet) separated in the central track on a thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plate coated with either reversed-phase C18 particles or normal-phase silica gel. After drying, the TLC plate was placed on an acrylic sample holder set in front of the sampling skimmer of an ion trap mass analyzer. The chemicals at the center of the TLC plate were analyzed by pushing the sample holder into the path of a laser beam with a syringe pump. The molecules in the sample spot were desorbed by continuously irradiating the surface of the TLC plate with a pulsed nitrogen laser. Then, the desorbed sample molecules entered an ESI plume where they were ionized through the reactions with the charged species (including protons, hydronium ions and their cluster ions, solvent ions, and charged droplets) generated by electrospraying a methanol/water solution. MS/MS analyses were also performed to further characterize the analytes. The detection limit of TLC/ELDI/MS is approximately 10(-6) M. This was evaluated by using FD&C red dye as the standard. A linear relationship was found for the calibration curve with the concentration of FD&C red dye ranged from 10(-3) to 10(-6) M. PMID:17929897

  17. IGMtransmission: Transmission curve computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Christopher M.; Meiksin, Avery; Stock, David

    2015-04-01

    IGMtransmission is a Java graphical user interface that implements Monte Carlo simulations to compute the corrections to colors of high-redshift galaxies due to intergalactic attenuation based on current models of the Intergalactic Medium. The effects of absorption due to neutral hydrogen are considered, with particular attention to the stochastic effects of Lyman Limit Systems. Attenuation curves are produced, as well as colors for a wide range of filter responses and model galaxy spectra. Photometric filters are included for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Keck telescope, the Mt. Palomar 200-inch, the SUBARU telescope and UKIRT; alternative filter response curves and spectra may be readily uploaded.

  18. Evaporation and discharge dynamics of highly charged multicomponent droplets generated by electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Ronald L; Beauchamp, J L

    2010-01-28

    We investigate the Rayleigh discharge and evaporation dynamics of highly charged two-component droplets consisting principally of methanol with 2-methoxyethanol, tert-butanol, or m-nitrobenzyl alcohol. A phase Doppler anemometer (PDA) characterizes droplets generated by electrospray ionization (ESI) according to size, velocity, and charge as they move through a uniform electric field within an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). Repeated field reversals result in droplet "ping-pong" through the PDA. This generates individual droplet histories of solvent evaporation behavior and the dynamics of charge loss to progeny droplets during Rayleigh discharge events. On average, methanol droplets discharge at 127% their Rayleigh limit of charge, q(R), and release 25% of the net charge. Charge loss from methanol/2-methoxyethanol droplets behaves similarly to pure 2-methoxyethanol droplets which release approximately 28% of their net charge. Binary methanol droplets containing up to 50% tert-butanol discharge at a lower percent q(R) than pure methanol and release a greater fraction of their net charge. Mixed 99% methanol/1% m-nitrobenzyl alcohol droplets possess discharge characteristics similar to those of methanol. However, droplets of methanol containing 2% m-nitrobenzyl evaporate down to a fixed size and charge that remains constant with no observable discharges. Quasi-steady-state evaporation models accurately describe observed evaporation phenomena in which methanol/tert-butanol droplets evaporate at a rate similar to that of pure methanol and methanol/2-methoxyethanol droplets evaporate at a rate similar to that of 2-methoxyethanol. We compare these results to previous Rayleigh discharge experiments and discuss the implications for binary solvents in electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and field-induced droplet ionization mass spectrometry (FIDI-MS). PMID:19848399

  19. Classification of ASKAP Vast Radio Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbapragada, Umaa; Lo, Kitty; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Reed, Colorado; Murphy, Tara; Thompson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The VAST survey is a wide-field survey that observes with unprecedented instrument sensitivity (0.5 mJy or lower) and repeat cadence (a goal of 5 seconds) that will enable novel scientific discoveries related to known and unknown classes of radio transients and variables. Given the unprecedented observing characteristics of VAST, it is important to estimate source classification performance, and determine best practices prior to the launch of ASKAP's BETA in 2012. The goal of this study is to identify light curve characterization and classification algorithms that are best suited for archival VAST light curve classification. We perform our experiments on light curve simulations of eight source types and achieve best case performance of approximately 90% accuracy. We note that classification performance is most influenced by light curve characterization rather than classifier algorithm.

  20. Quantitative analysis of human serum corticosterone by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ghulam, A; Kouach, M; Racadot, A; Boersma, A; Vantyghem, M C; Briand, G

    1999-04-30

    An original method based upon high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has been developed for corticosterone (B) quantification in human serum. After extraction by diethyl ether using triamcinolone (T) as an internal standard, solutes are separated on a C18 microbore column (250 X 1.0 mm, I.D.), using acetonitrile-water-formic acid (40:59.9:0.1, v/v/v) as the mobile phase (flow-rate 40 microl/min). Detection is performed on an API 1 single quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with a ESI interface and operated in positive ionization mode. Corticosterone quantifications were realized by computing peak area ratios (B/T) of the serum extracts analyzed in SIM mode (m/z 347 and m/z 395 for B and T. respectively), and comparing them with the calibration curve (r=0.998). PMID:10360442

  1. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  2. The Bacterial Growth Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulton, Richard J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure that allows students to view an entire bacterial growth curve during a two- to three-hour student laboratory period is described. Observations of the lag phase, logarithmic phase, maximum stationary phase, and phase of decline are possible. A nonpathogenic, marine bacterium is used in the investigation. (KR)

  3. Textbook Factor Demand Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Joe C.

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that teachers and textbook graphics follow the same basic pattern in illustrating changes in demand curves when product prices increase. Asserts that the use of computer graphics will enable teachers to be more precise in their graphic presentation of price elasticity. (CFR)

  4. Oxidation Artifacts in the Electrospray Mass Spectrometry of Aβ Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Maolian; Cook, Kelsey D.

    2008-01-01

    Gradual corrosion of stainless steel electrospray emitters under conditions of normal use generates surface irregularities that can promote electrical discharge. The increased emission current affects the electrochemical reactions associated with the spray process. When sampling the peptide Aβ(1–40), this is manifest by oxidation of methionine at position 35 to methionine sulfoxide. The resultant mass shift and reduced sensitivity can adversely affect H/D exchange experiments. These effects can be avoided by adding a redox buffer or (preferably) by re-polishing the emitter, especially to a rounded geometry. PMID:17249640

  5. Numerical simulation of electrospray in the cone-jet mode.

    PubMed

    Herrada, M A; López-Herrera, J M; Gañán-Calvo, A M; Vega, E J; Montanero, J M; Popinet, S

    2012-08-01

    We present a robust and computationally efficient numerical scheme for simulating steady electrohydrodynamic atomization processes (electrospray). The main simplification assumed in this scheme is that all the free electrical charges are distributed over the interface. A comparison of the results with those calculated with a volume-of-fluid method showed that the numerical scheme presented here accurately describes the flow pattern within the entire liquid domain. Experiments were performed to partially validate the numerical predictions. The simulations reproduced accurately the experimental shape of the liquid cone jet, providing correct values of the emitted electric current even for configurations very close to the cone-jet stability limit. PMID:23005852

  6. Desorption electrospray ionization imaging of small organics on mineral surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Rachel V; Fernández, Facundo M

    2015-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI)-mass spectrometry facilitates the ambient chemical analysis of a variety of surfaces. Here we describe the protocol for using DESI imaging to measure the distributions of small prebiotically relevant molecules on granite surfaces. Granites that contain a variety of juxtaposed mineral species were reacted with formamide in order to study the role of local mineral environment on the production of purines and pyrimidines. The mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) methods described here can also be applied to the surface analysis of rock samples involved in other applications such as petroleum or environmental chemistries. PMID:25361668

  7. Generation of fluorescent nanodroplets of liquid crystal utilizing electrospray deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohdaira, Yasuo; Oka, Hisaki; Shinbo, Kazunari; Baba, Akira; Kato, Keizo; Kaneko, Futao

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent nanodroplets of liquid crystal (LC) were generated by the electrospray deposition of LC solvent containing rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) dye molecules. The shape and density of the nanodroplets strongly depended on the concentration of LC diluted with ethanol solution. The fluorescent spectra from the Rh6G molecules in LC nanodroplets were obviously blue-shifted compared with the LC films of the bulk state. Furthermore, the LC nanodroplets were dispersed on a metallic nanograting formed by optically modifying an azobenzene thin-film layer under the metallic film. The nanodroplets were size-selectively aligned on the metallic nanograting.

  8. Studying the Chemistry of Cationized Triacylglycerols Using Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Density Functional Theory Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossert, J. Stuart; Herrera, Lisandra Cubero; Ramaley, Louis; Melanson, Jeremy E.

    2014-08-01

    Analysis of triacylglycerols (TAGs), found as complex mixtures in living organisms, is typically accomplished using liquid chromatography, often coupled to mass spectrometry. TAGs, weak bases not protonated using electrospray ionization, are usually ionized by adduct formation with a cation, including those present in the solvent (e.g., Na+). There are relatively few reports on the binding of TAGs with cations or on the mechanisms by which cationized TAGs fragment. This work examines binding efficiencies, determined by mass spectrometry and computations, for the complexation of TAGs to a range of cations (Na+, Li+, K+, Ag+, NH4 +). While most cations bind to oxygen, Ag+ binding to unsaturation in the acid side chains is significant. The importance of dimer formation, [2TAG + M]+ was demonstrated using several different types of mass spectrometers. From breakdown curves, it became apparent that two or three acid side chains must be attached to glycerol for strong cationization. Possible mechanisms for fragmentation of lithiated TAGs were modeled by computations on tripropionylglycerol. Viable pathways were found for losses of neutral acids and lithium salts of acids from different positions on the glycerol moiety. Novel lactone structures were proposed for the loss of a neutral acid from one position of the glycerol moiety. These were studied further using triple-stage mass spectrometry (MS3). These lactones can account for all the major product ions in the MS3 spectra in both this work and the literature, which should allow for new insights into the challenging analytical methods needed for naturally occurring TAGs.

  9. Dual enzyme activities assay by quantitative electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Tingting; Zhang, Li; Wang, Haoyang; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Yurong; Guo, Yinlong

    2012-01-01

    A practical and rapid method based on electrospray ionization quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-ToF MS) was developed for detecting activities of both acetylcholinesterase IAChEI and glutathione S-transferase (GST). The simultaneous study of these two enzyme activities is significant for studying human bio-functions, especially for those who take in toxic compounds and have a risk of disease. Here, the enzyme activities were represented by the conversion of enzymatic substrates and determined by quantitatively analyzing enzymatic substrates. Different internal standards were used to quantify each enzymatic substrate and the good linearity of calibration curves demonstrated the feasibility of the internal standards. The Michaelis-Menten constants (Km) of both GST and AChE were measured by this method and were consistent with values previously reported. Furthermore, we applied this approach to detect GST and AChE activities of whole bloods from four deceased and healthy people. The variation in enzyme activity was in accord with information from gas chromatography mass spectrometry [GC/MS). The screening of AChE and GST provided reliable results and strong forensic evidence. This method offers an alternative choice for detecting enzyme activities and is anticipated to have wide applications in pharmaceutical research and prevention in toxic compounds. PMID:23654197

  10. Microscale extraction of perchlorate in drinking water with low level detection by electrospray-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, M L; Urbansky, E T; Kelty, C A

    2000-06-21

    Improper treatment and disposal of perchlorate can be an environmental hazard in regions where solid rocket motors are used, tested, or stored. The solubility and mobility of perchlorate lends itself to ground water contamination, and some of these sources are used for drinking water. Perchlorate in drinking water has been determined at sub-mug l(-1) levels by extraction of the ion-pair formed between the perchlorate ion and a cationic surfactant with electrospray-mass spectrometry detection. Confidence in the selective quantification of the perchlorate ion is increased through both the use of the mass based detection as well as the selectivity of the ion pair. This study investigates several extraction solvents and experimental work-up procedures in order to achieve high sample throughput. The method detection limit for perchlorate based on 3.14sigma(n-1) of seven replicate injections was 300 ng l(-1) (parts-per-trillion) for methylene chloride extraction and 270 ng l(-1) for methyl isobutyl ketone extraction. Extraction with methylene chloride produces linear calibration curves, enabling standard addition to be used to quantify perchlorate in drinking water. Perchlorate determination of a contaminated water compared favorably with results determined by ion chromatography. PMID:18967987