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Sample records for elekriki haste shekafande

  1. Hastings Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events October 19, Hastings Center Seminar, Garrison : Human Genetic Engineering: Wh at Can We Do? What Should We ... Events October 19, Hastings Center Seminar, Garrison : Human Genetic Engineering: Wh at Can We Do? What Should We ...

  2. Disrupting the Education Monopoly: A Conversation with Reed Hastings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    This article features an interview with Netflix CEO, Reed Hastings. In this interview, Hastings relates that he told the "Wall Street Journal" in 2008 that he started looking at education--trying to figure out why our education is lagging when our technology is increasing at great rates and there's great innovation in so many other…

  3. VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AT INTERSECTION OF HASTE STREET, CHATEAU ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AT INTERSECTION OF HASTE STREET, CHATEAU APARTMENTS BY CLARENCE CASEBOLT DAKIN, 1929 AT 2747 HASTE ON WEST SIDE OF PIEDMONT. LOOKING NORTH. Photograph by Fredrica Drotos and Michael Kelly, July 8, 2006 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 7): Hastings Groundwater Contamination Site, Hastings, NE, June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-30

    The decision document presents the selected interim remedial actions for the Well Number 3 ground water operable units. The Well Number 3 Subsite is a subsite of the Hastings Ground Water Contamination Site, Hastings, Nebraska. The interim action ROD addresses two separate areas of groundwater contamination. Plume 1 is characterized by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and chloroform (CHCl3) contamination. Plume 2 is characterized primarily by trichloroethene (TCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA), tetrachloroethene (PCE) and dichloroethene (DEC) contamination. These interim ground water remedies were developed to protect public health, welfare and the environment by controlling the migration and reducing the volume and mass of contaminants present in the ground water beneath and downgradient from each source area of the Well Number 3 Subsite.

  5. E SERIES MAGAZINES FROM HASTINGS ST. SHOWING ACCESS DRIVE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    E SERIES MAGAZINES FROM HASTINGS ST. SHOWING ACCESS DRIVE AND LOADING PLATFORMS. E 103 MAGAZINES IN FORGROUND. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Magazine Type, Eleventh, Thirteenth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth, & Seventeenth Streets, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AT INTERSECTION OF HASTE STREET, NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AT INTERSECTION OF HASTE STREET, NOTE RECONSTRUCTION OF MEDIAN FROM PREVIOUS VIEW IN PHOTOGRAPH CA-2-5. LOOKING NW. Photograph by Brian Grogan, July 8, 2007 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. 77 FR 35960 - City of Hastings, MN; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission City of Hastings, MN; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and...: Amendment of License. b. Project No.: 4306-035. c. Date filed: May 21, 2012. d. Applicant: City of Hastings... the Mississippi River in the City of Hastings in Dakota County, Minnesota. g. Filed Pursuant...

  8. The Hastings Center and the early years of bioethics.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    The Hastings Center was founded in 1969 to study ethical problems in medicine and biology. The Center arose from a confluence of three social currents: the increased public scrutiny of medicine and its practices, the concern about the moral problems being generated by technological developments, and the desire of one of its founders (Callahan) to make use of his philosophical training in a more applied way. The early years of the Center were devoted to raising money, developing an early agenda of issues, and identifying a cadre of people around the country interested in the issues. Various stresses and strains in the Center and the field are identified, and some final reflections are offered on the nature and value of the contributions made by bioethics as an academic field. PMID:22198414

  9. Multiple-try Metropolis Hastings for modeling extreme PM10 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Nor Azrita Mohd; Adam, Mohd Bakri; Ibrahim, Noor Akma

    2014-07-01

    Awareness of catastrophic events brings the attention to work out the relationship of these events by using statistical analysis of Extreme Value Theory (EVT). This study focused on extreme PM10 data using a Gumbel distribution which is one of the Extreme Value distributions. The parameters were estimated using the new Bayesian approach in extreme called Multiple Try Metropolis-Hastings algorithms. We compared this approach with another Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach which is the classical Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and the frequentist approach, Maximum Likelihood Estimation. It appears that these three approaches provide comparable results. Data are taken for Pasir Gudang station for year 1996 to 2010.

  10. 75 FR 45011 - MainStreet Savings Bank, FSB, Hastings, MI; Notice of Appointment of Receiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision MainStreet Savings Bank, FSB, Hastings, MI; Notice of Appointment of... Owners' Loan Act, the Office of Thrift Supervision has duly appointed the Federal Deposit Insurance.... Dated: July 23, 2010. By the Office of Thrift Supervision. Sandra E. Evans, Federal Register...

  11. Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm for Confirmatory Item Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Li

    2010-01-01

    Item factor analysis (IFA), already well established in educational measurement, is increasingly applied to psychological measurement in research settings. However, high-dimensional confirmatory IFA remains a numerical challenge. The current research extends the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro (MH-RM) algorithm, initially proposed for…

  12. High-Dimensional Exploratory Item Factor Analysis by a Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Li

    2010-01-01

    A Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro (MH-RM) algorithm for high-dimensional maximum marginal likelihood exploratory item factor analysis is proposed. The sequence of estimates from the MH-RM algorithm converges with probability one to the maximum likelihood solution. Details on the computer implementation of this algorithm are provided. The…

  13. General Metropolis-Hastings jump diffusions for automatic target recognition in infrared scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanterman, Aaron D.; Miller, Michael I.; Snyder, Donald L.

    1997-04-01

    To locate and recognize ground-based targets in forward- looking IR (FLIR) images, 3D faceted models with associated pose parameters are formulated to accommodate the variability found in FLIR imagery. Taking a Bayesian approach, scenes are simulated from the emissive characteristics of the CAD models and compared with the collected data by a likelihood function based on sensor statistics. This likelihood is combined with a prior distribution defined over the set of possible scenes to form a posterior distribution. To accommodate scenes with variable numbers of targets, the posterior distribution is defined over parameter vectors of varying dimension. An inference algorithm based on Metropolis-Hastings jump- diffusion processes empirically samples from the posterior distribution, generating configurations of templates and transformations that match the collected sensor data with high probability. The jumps accommodate the addition and deletion of targets and the estimation of target identities; diffusions refine the hypotheses by drifting along the gradient of the posterior distribution with respect to the orientation and position parameters. Previous results on jumps strategies analogous to the Metropolis acceptance/rejection algorithm, with proposals drawn from the prior and accepted based on the likelihood, are extended to encompass general Metropolis-Hastings proposal densities. In particular, the algorithm proposes moves by drawing from the posterior distribution over computationally tractible subsets of the parameter space. The algorithm is illustrated by an implementation on a Silicon Graphics Onyx/Reality Engine.

  14. 76 FR 58241 - Designation for the Aberdeen, SD; Decatur, IL; Hastings, NE; Fulton, IL; the State of Missouri...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ..., Federal Register (76 FR 15937), GIPSA requested applications for designation to provide official services... Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration Designation for the Aberdeen, SD; Decatur, IL; Hastings, NE; Fulton, IL; the State of Missouri, and the State of South Carolina Areas AGENCY:...

  15. Efficient implementation of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, with application to the Cormack-Jolly-Seber model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Barker, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Judicious choice of candidate generating distributions improves efficiency of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. In Bayesian applications, it is sometimes possible to identify an approximation to the target posterior distribution; this approximate posterior distribution is a good choice for candidate generation. These observations are applied to analysis of the Cormack-Jolly-Seber model and its extensions. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007.

  16. Efficient implementation of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, with application to the Cormack?Jolly?Seber model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Barker, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Judicious choice of candidate generating distributions improves efficiency of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. In Bayesian applications, it is sometimes possible to identify an approximation to the target posterior distribution; this approximate posterior distribution is a good choice for candidate generation. These observations are applied to analysis of the Cormack?Jolly?Seber model and its extensions.

  17. Estimation of Contextual Effects through Nonlinear Multilevel Latent Variable Modeling with a Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Ji Seung; Cai, Li

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to improve estimation efficiency in obtaining maximum marginal likelihood estimates of contextual effects in the framework of nonlinear multilevel latent variable model by adopting the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro algorithm (MH-RM). Results indicate that the MH-RM algorithm can produce estimates and standard…

  18. Metropolis–Hastings thermal state sampling for numerical simulations of Bose–Einstein condensates

    PubMed Central

    Grišins, Pjotrs; Mazets, Igor E.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of the Metropolis–Hastings algorithm to sampling of classical thermal states of one-dimensional Bose–Einstein quasicondensates in the classical fields approximation, both in untrapped and harmonically trapped case. The presented algorithm can be easily generalized to higher dimensions and arbitrary trap geometry. For truncated Wigner simulations the quantum noise can be added with conventional methods (half a quantum of energy in every mode). The advantage of the presented method over the usual analytical and stochastic ones lies in its ability to sample not only from canonical and grand canonical distributions, but also from the generalized Gibbs ensemble, which can help to shed new light on thermodynamics of integrable systems. PMID:25843966

  19. Dynamical behavior of fractional-order Hastings-Powell food chain model and its discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matouk, A. E.; Elsadany, A. A.; Ahmed, E.; Agiza, H. N.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the dynamical behavior of fractional-order Hastings-Powell food chain model is investigated and a new discretization method of the fractional-order system is introduced. A sufficient condition for existence and uniqueness of the solution of the proposed system is obtained. Local stability of the equilibrium points of the fractional-order system is studied. Furthermore, the necessary and sufficient conditions of stability of the discretized system are also studied. It is shown that the system's fractional parameter has effect on the stability of the discretized system which shows rich variety of dynamical behaviors such as Hopf bifurcation, an attractor crisis and chaotic attractors. Numerical simulations show the tea-cup chaotic attractor of the fractional-order system and the richer dynamical behavior of the corresponding discretized system.

  20. Evaluating plastic assembly processes for high reliability applications using HAST and Assembly Test Chips

    SciTech Connect

    Emerson, J.A.; Sweet, J.N.; Peterson, D.W.

    1994-05-01

    We demonstrate the use of HAST and Assembly Test Chips to evaluate the susceptability of epoxy molding compounds to moisture induced corrosion of Al conductors. We show that the procedure is sufficiently sensitive to discriminate between assembly processes used by different molding facilities. Our data show that the location in time of the ``knee`` in the failure distribution is dependent on material properties of the epoxy. Reducing the failure rate in the early or ``extrinsic`` region of the time-failure distribution is key to achieving high reliability. Wt examine the failure modes in the extrinsic region for test chips encapsulated with a number of high quality molding compounds in an attempt to better understand this region.

  1. A constrained Metropolis Hastings search for EMRIs in the Mock LISA Data Challenge 1B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gair, Jonathan R.; Porter, Edward; Babak, Stanislav; Barack, Leor

    2008-09-01

    We describe a search for the extreme-mass-ratio inspiral sources in the Round 1B Mock LISA Data Challenge data sets. The search algorithm is a Monte Carlo search based on the Metropolis Hastings algorithm, but also incorporates simulated, thermostated and time annealing, plus a harmonic identification stage designed to reduce the chance of the chain locking onto secondary maxima. In this paper, we focus on describing the algorithm that we have been developing. We give the results of the search of the Round 1B data, although parameter recovery has improved since that deadline. Finally, we describe several modifications to the search pipeline that we are currently investigating for incorporation in future searches.

  2. Time Lapse Gravity and Seismic Monitoring of CO2 Injection at the West Hastings Field, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. F.; Richards, T.; Klopping, F.; MacQueen, J.; Hosseini, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Time lapse or 4D gravity and seismic reflection surveys are being conducted at the West Hastings Field near Houston, Texas to monitor the progress of CO2 injection. This Department of Energy supported CO2 sequestration experiment is conducted in conjunction with a Denbury Onshore, LLC tertiary recovery project. The reservoir is at a depth of 1.8 km in the Oligocene Frio sands and has been produced since the 1930s. Goals are an accounting and mapping of the injected CO2 and to determine if migration occurs along intra-reservoir faults. An integrated interpretation of the geophysical surveys will be made together with well logs and engineering data. Gravity monitoring of water versus gas replacement has been very successful, but liquid phase CO2 monitoring is problematic due to the smaller density contrast with respect to oil and water. This reservoir has a small volume to depth ratio and hence only a small gravity difference signal is expected on the surface. New borehole gravity technology introduced by Micro-g-Lacoste can make gravity measurements at near reservoir depths with a much higher signal to noise ratio. This method has been successfully evaluated on a simulation of the Hastings project. Field operations have been conducted for repeated surface and borehole gravity surveys beginning in 2013. The surface survey of 95 stations covers an area of 3 by 5 km and 22 borehole gravity logs are run in the interval above the Frio formation. 4D seismic reflection surveys are being made at 6 month intervals on the surface and in 3 VSP wells. CO2 injection into the targeted portion of the reservoir only began in early 2015 and monitoring will continue into 2017. To date only the baseline reservoir conditions have been assessed. The overall success of the gravity monitoring will not be determined until 2017.

  3. Chaos control of Hastings-Powell model by combining chaotic motions.

    PubMed

    Danca, Marius-F; Chattopadhyay, Joydev

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a Parameter Switching (PS) algorithm as a new chaos control method for the Hastings-Powell (HP) system. The PS algorithm is a convergent scheme that switches the control parameter within a set of values while the controlled system is numerically integrated. The attractor obtained with the PS algorithm matches the attractor obtained by integrating the system with the parameter replaced by the averaged value of the switched parameter values. The switching rule can be applied periodically or randomly over a set of given values. In this way, every stable cycle of the HP system can be approximated if its underlying parameter value equalizes the average value of the switching values. Moreover, the PS algorithm can be viewed as a generalization of Parrondo's game, which is applied for the first time to the HP system, by showing that losing strategy can win: "losing + losing = winning." If "loosing" is replaced with "chaos" and, "winning" with "order" (as the opposite to "chaos"), then by switching the parameter value in the HP system within two values, which generate chaotic motions, the PS algorithm can approximate a stable cycle so that symbolically one can write "chaos + chaos = regular." Also, by considering a different parameter control, new complex dynamics of the HP model are revealed. PMID:27131485

  4. The Polya Tree Sampler: Towards Efficient and Automatic Independent Metropolis-Hastings Proposals

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Timothy E.; Monteiro, João V. D.; Jara, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple, efficient, and computationally cheap sampling method for exploring an un-normalized multivariate density on ℝd, such as a posterior density, called the Polya tree sampler. The algorithm constructs an independent proposal based on an approximation of the target density. The approximation is built from a set of (initial) support points – data that act as parameters for the approximation – and the predictive density of a finite multivariate Polya tree. In an initial “warming-up” phase, the support points are iteratively relocated to regions of higher support under the target distribution to minimize the distance between the target distribution and the Polya tree predictive distribution. In the “sampling” phase, samples from the final approximating mixture of finite Polya trees are used as candidates which are accepted with a standard Metropolis-Hastings acceptance probability. Several illustrations are presented, including comparisons of the proposed approach to Metropolis-within-Gibbs and delayed rejection adaptive Metropolis algorithm. PMID:22135487

  5. Chaos control of Hastings-Powell model by combining chaotic motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danca, Marius-F.; Chattopadhyay, Joydev

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a Parameter Switching (PS) algorithm as a new chaos control method for the Hastings-Powell (HP) system. The PS algorithm is a convergent scheme that switches the control parameter within a set of values while the controlled system is numerically integrated. The attractor obtained with the PS algorithm matches the attractor obtained by integrating the system with the parameter replaced by the averaged value of the switched parameter values. The switching rule can be applied periodically or randomly over a set of given values. In this way, every stable cycle of the HP system can be approximated if its underlying parameter value equalizes the average value of the switching values. Moreover, the PS algorithm can be viewed as a generalization of Parrondo's game, which is applied for the first time to the HP system, by showing that losing strategy can win: "losing + losing = winning." If "loosing" is replaced with "chaos" and, "winning" with "order" (as the opposite to "chaos"), then by switching the parameter value in the HP system within two values, which generate chaotic motions, the PS algorithm can approximate a stable cycle so that symbolically one can write "chaos + chaos = regular." Also, by considering a different parameter control, new complex dynamics of the HP model are revealed.

  6. Estimation of Contextual Effects through Nonlinear Multilevel Latent Variable Modeling with a Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm. CRESST Report 833

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Ji Seung; Cai, Li

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to improve estimation efficiency in obtaining full-information maximum likelihood (FIML) estimates of contextual effects in the framework of a nonlinear multilevel latent variable model by adopting the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro algorithm (MH-RM; Cai, 2008, 2010a, 2010b). Results indicate that the MH-RM…

  7. Scaling and multiscaling behavior of the perimeter of a diffusion-limited aggregation generated by the Hastings-Levitov method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, F.; Saberi, A. A.; Rouhani, S.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we analyze the scaling behavior of a diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) simulated by the Hastings-Levitov method. We obtain the fractal dimension of the clusters by direct analysis of the geometrical patterns, in good agreement with one obtained from an analytical approach. We compute the two-point density correlation function and we show that, in the large-size limit, it agrees with the obtained fractal dimension. These support the statistical agreement between the patterns and DLA clusters. We also investigate the scaling properties of various length scales and their fluctuations, related to the boundary of the cluster. We find that all of the length scales do not have a simple scaling with the same correction to scaling exponent. The fractal dimension of the perimeter is obtained equal to that of the cluster. The growth exponent is computed from the evolution of the interface width equal to β = 0.557(2). We also show that the perimeter of the DLA cluster has an asymptotic multiscaling behavior.

  8. Scaling and multiscaling behavior of the perimeter of a diffusion-limited aggregation generated by the Hastings-Levitov method.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, F; Saberi, A A; Rouhani, S

    2009-09-16

    In this paper, we analyze the scaling behavior of a diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) simulated by the Hastings-Levitov method. We obtain the fractal dimension of the clusters by direct analysis of the geometrical patterns, in good agreement with one obtained from an analytical approach. We compute the two-point density correlation function and we show that, in the large-size limit, it agrees with the obtained fractal dimension. These support the statistical agreement between the patterns and DLA clusters. We also investigate the scaling properties of various length scales and their fluctuations, related to the boundary of the cluster. We find that all of the length scales do not have a simple scaling with the same correction to scaling exponent. The fractal dimension of the perimeter is obtained equal to that of the cluster. The growth exponent is computed from the evolution of the interface width equal to β = 0.557(2). We also show that the perimeter of the DLA cluster has an asymptotic multiscaling behavior. PMID:21832341

  9. Recovery of the seabed following marine aggregate dredging on the Hastings Shingle Bank off the southeast coast of England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Keith; Boyd, Sian; Eggleton, Jacqueline; Limpenny, David; Rees, Hubert; Vanstaen, Koen

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dredging intensity on the physical and biological recovery times of the seabed following marine aggregate dredging. Two areas of seabed, previously subject to, respectively, relatively high and lower levels of dredging intensity, were identified on the Hastings Shingle Bank. Two reference areas were also selected for comparative purposes. All four sites were monitored annually over the period 2001-2004, using a combination of acoustic, video and grab sampling techniques. Since the site was last dredged in 1996, this was intended to provide a sequence of data 5-8 years after cessation of dredging. However, an unexpected resumption of dredging within the high intensity site, during 2002 and 2003, allowed an additional assessment of the immediate effects and aftermath of renewed dredging at the seabed. The early stages of recovery could then be assessed after dredging ceased in 2003. Results from both dredged sites provide a useful insight into the early and latter stages of physical and biological recovery. A comparison of recent and historic dredge track features provided evidence of track erosion. However, tracks were still visible 8 years after the cessation of dredging. Within the high dredging intensity site, recolonisation was relatively rapid after the cessation of dredging in 2003. Rather than indicating a full recovery, we suggest that this initial 'colonization community' may enter a transition phase before eventually reaching equilibrium. This hypothesis is supported by results from the low intensity site, where biological recovery was judged to have taken 7 years. Further monitoring is needed in order to test this. An alternative explanation is that the rapid recovery may be explained by the settlement of large numbers of Sabellaria spinulosa. As the resumption of dredging within the high intensity site limited our assessment of longer-term recovery it is not yet possible to assume that a 7-year

  10. Diffusion-weighted EPI- and HASTE-MRI and 18F-FDG-PET-CT early during chemoradiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schouten, Charlotte S.; de Bree, Remco; van der Putten, Lisa; Noij, Daniel P.; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Comans, Emile F.I.; Witte, Birgit I.; Doornaert, Patricia A.; Leemans, C. René

    2014-01-01

    Main problem Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) has potential to predict chemoradiotherapy (CRT) response in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and is generally performed using echo-planar imaging (EPI). However, EPI-DWI is susceptible to geometric distortions. Half-fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE)-DWI may be an alternative. This prospective pilot study evaluates the potential predictive value of EPI- and HASTE-DWI and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET-CT (18F-FDG-PET-CT) early during CRT for locoregional outcome in HNSCC. Methods Eight patients with advanced HNSCC (7 primary tumors and 25 nodal metastases) scheduled for CRT, underwent DW-MRI (using both EPI- and HASTE-DWI) and 18F-FDG-PET(-CT) pretreatment, early during treatment and three months after treatment. Median follow-up time was 38 months. Results No local recurrences were detected during follow-up. Median Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC)EPI-values in primary tumors increased from 77×10–5 mm2/s pretreatment, to 113×10–5 mm2/s during treatment (P=0.02), whereas ADCHASTE did not increase (74 and 74 mm2/s, respectively). Two regional recurrences were diagnosed. During treatment, ADCEPI tended to be higher for patients with regional control [(117.3±12.1)×10–5 mm2/s] than for patients with a recurrence [(98.0±4.2)×10–5 mm2/s]. This difference was not seen with ADCHASTE. No correlations between ΔADCEPI and ΔSUV (Standardized Uptake Value) were found in the primary tumor or nodal metastases. Conclusions HASTE-DWI seems to be inadequate in early CRT response prediction, compared to EPI-DWI which has potential to predict locoregional outcome. EPI-DWI and 18F-FDG-PET-CT potentially provide independent information in the early response to treatment, since no correlations were found between ΔADCEPI and ΔSUV. PMID:25202659

  11. Benefits of a new Metropolis-Hasting based algorithm, in non-linear regression for estimation of ex vivo antimalarial sensitivity in patients infected with two strains.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Rebecca; Mentré, France; Kaddouri, Halima; Le Bras, Jacques; Le Nagard, Hervé

    2014-12-01

    Malaria is one of the world׳s most widespread parasitic diseases. The parasitic protozoans of the genus Plasmodium have developed resistance to several antimalarial drugs. Some patients are therefore infected by two or more strains with different levels of antimalarial drug sensitivity. We previously developed a model to estimate the drug concentration (IC50) that inhibits 50% of the growth of the parasite isolated from a patient infected with one strain. We propose here a new Two-Slopes model for patients infected by two strains. This model involves four parameters: the proportion of each strain and their IC50, and the sigmoidicity parameter. To estimate the parameters of this model, we have developed a new algorithm called PGBO (Population Genetics-Based Optimizer). It is based on the Metropolis-Hasting algorithm and is implemented in the statistical software R. We performed a simulation study and defined three evaluation criteria to evaluate its properties and compare it with three other algorithms (Gauss-Newton, Levenberg-Marquardt, and a simulated annealing). We also evaluated it using in vitro data and three ex vivo datasets from the French Malaria Reference Center. Our evaluation criteria in the simulation show that PGBO gives good estimates of the parameters even if the concentration design is poor. Moreover, our algorithm is less sensitive than Gauss-Newton algorithms to initial values. Although parameter estimation is good, interpretation of the results can be difficult if the proportion of the second strain is close to 0 or 1. For these reasons, this approach cannot yet be implemented routinely. PMID:25450214

  12. Using satellite observations to improve model estimates of CO2 and CH4 flux: a Metropolis Hastings Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacBean, Natasha; Disney, Mathias; Lewis, Philip; Ineson, Phil

    2010-05-01

    profile as a whole. We present results from an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) designed to investigate the impact of management and climate change on peatland carbon fluxes, as well as how observations from satellites may be able to constrain modeled carbon fluxes. We use an adapted version of the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CASA) model (Potter et al., 1993) that includes a representation of methane dynamics (Potter, 1997). The model formulation is further modified to allow for assimilation of satellite observations of surface soil moisture and land surface temperature. The observations are used to update model estimates using a Metropolis Hastings Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach. We examine the effect of temporal frequency and precision of satellite observations with a view to establishing how, and at what level, such observations would make a significant improvement in model uncertainty. We compare this with the system characteristics of existing and future satellites. We believe this is the first attempt to assimilate surface soil moisture and land surface temperature into an ecosystem model that includes a full representation of CH4 flux. Bubier, J., and T. Moore (1994), An ecological perspective on methane emissions from northern wetlands, TREE, 9, 460-464. Charman, D. (2002), Peatlands and Environmental Change, JohnWiley and Sons, Ltd, England. Gorham, E. (1991), Northern peatlands: Role in the carbon cycle and probable responses to climatic warming, Ecological Applications, 1, 182-195. Lai, D. (2009), Methane dynamics in northern peatlands: A review, Pedosphere, 19, 409-421. Le Mer, J., and P. Roger (2001), Production, oxidation, emission and consumption of methane by soils: A review, European Journal of Soil Biology, 37, 25-50. Limpens, J., F. Berendse, J. Canadell, C. Freeman, J. Holden, N. Roulet, H. Rydin, and Potter, C. (1997), An ecosystem simulation model for methane production and emission from wetlands, Global Biogeochemical

  13. Avoid haste in defining human muscular Sarcocystosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We appreciate Dr. Italiano’s [1] interest in our article [2] and agree that our case definition, described in our methods as ‘intentionally specific,’ may have resulted in the exclusion of some travelers infected with Sarcocystis nesbitti. Nevertheless, we believe published data from outbreak invest...

  14. Cases in Bioethics from the Hastings Center Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Carol, Ed.; Veatch, Robert M.

    Case studies of ethical issues based on real events are followed by comments illustrating how people from various ethical traditions and frameworks and from different academic and professional disciplines analyze the issues and work toward a resolution of the conflict posed. The cases are intended to help the public and professional persons pursue…

  15. Making Haste Slowly: The Evolution of a Unified Qualifications Framework in Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffe, David

    2007-01-01

    The Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework is often claimed to be a success and an example to other countries. However, if other countries wish to learn from this example they should not only study the current framework; they should also examine the sequence of policy reforms, over a quarter of a century, through which it developed. The…

  16. The Ethics of Legislative Life. A Report by the Hastings Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings Center, Hastings-on-Hudson, NY.

    Results of a two-year research project (1982-84) on Legislative and Representative Ethics are presented in this report, which analyzes the basic principles of legislative ethics, discusses the special dilemmas and obligations of legislators, and offers conclusions about future steps that could be taken to enhance public discussion and to reinforce…

  17. Child malnutrition and the Millennium Development Goals: much haste but less speed?

    PubMed

    Oruamabo, Raphael S

    2015-02-01

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) provide a framework for measuring the progress of nations. Several of these goals relate to child malnutrition, which remains an important contributor to child morbidity and mortality, accounting for approximately 45% of child deaths globally. A high proportion of undernourished children still live in Africa and parts of Asia, and the uneven rate of reduction in the prevalence of various types of child malnutrition among different income groups worldwide is worrying. Attempts to reduce child malnutrition should therefore begin from the grassroots by improving primary healthcare services in developing countries with particular focus on basic requirements. Adequate nutrition should be provided from birth, through infancy, preschool and early childhood to adolescence. The overall strategy should be one of careful and meticulous planning involving all development sectors with an emphasis on a bottom-up approach within a stable and disciplined polity; the MDGs will be only be useful if they are seen not as narrow objectives with unidirectional interventions but as multifaceted and co-ordinated. The setting of deadlines, whether 2015 or 2035, should not be emphasised so as to avoid hasty decision making. The top priority should be the implementation of the essential social services of basic education, primary healthcare, nutrition, reproductive health care, water and sanitation in partnership with the developed economies. PMID:25613961

  18. On the Uses of the Humanities: Vision and Application. A Report by the Hastings Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings Center, Hastings-on-Hudson, NY.

    Designed to provide a general assessment of the rapidly growing applied humanities movement in the United States, this report sets forth issues found to be central to an assessment of current work in the applied humanities, presents a general survey of the nature of applied work in a variety of disciplines, and offers conclusions and observations…

  19. Haste Makes Waste but Condition Matters: Molt Rate–Feather Quality Trade-Off in a Sedentary Songbird

    PubMed Central

    Vágási, Csongor I.; Pap, Péter L.; Vincze, Orsolya; Benkő, Zoltán; Marton, Attila; Barta, Zoltán

    2012-01-01

    Background The trade-off between current and residual reproductive values is central to life history theory, although the possible mechanisms underlying this trade-off are largely unknown. The ‘molt constraint’ hypothesis suggests that molt and plumage functionality are compromised by the preceding breeding event, yet this candidate mechanism remains insufficiently explored. Methodology/Principal Findings The seasonal change in photoperiod was manipulated to accelerate the molt rate. This treatment simulates the case of naturally late-breeding birds. House sparrows Passer domesticus experiencing accelerated molt developed shorter flight feathers with more fault bars and body feathers with supposedly lower insulation capacity (i.e. shorter, smaller, with a higher barbule density and fewer plumulaceous barbs). However, the wing, tail and primary feather lengths were shorter in fast-molting birds if they had an inferior body condition, which has been largely overlooked in previous studies. The rachis width of flight feathers was not affected by the treatment, but it was still condition-dependent. Conclusions/Significance This study shows that sedentary birds might face evolutionary costs because of the molt rate–feather quality conflict. This is the first study to experimentally demonstrate that (1) molt rate affects several aspects of body feathers as well as flight feathers and (2) the costly effects of rapid molt are condition-specific. We conclude that molt rate and its association with feather quality might be a major mediator of life history trade-offs. Our findings also suggest a novel advantage of early breeding, i.e. the facilitation of slower molt and the condition-dependent regulation of feather growth. PMID:22808221

  20. Estimation of a Ramsay-Curve Item Response Theory Model by the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Scott; Cai, Li

    2014-01-01

    In Ramsay curve item response theory (RC-IRT) modeling, the shape of the latent trait distribution is estimated simultaneously with the item parameters. In its original implementation, RC-IRT is estimated via Bock and Aitkin's EM algorithm, which yields maximum marginal likelihood estimates. This method, however, does not produce the…

  1. When does haste make waste? Speed-accuracy tradeoff, skill level, and the tools of the trade.

    PubMed

    Beilock, Sian L; Bertenthal, Bennett I; Hoerger, Michael; Carr, Thomas H

    2008-12-01

    Novice and skilled golfers took a series of golf putts with a standard putter (Exp. 1) or a distorted funny putter (consisting of an s-shaped and arbitrarily weighted putter shaft; Exp. 2) under instructions to either (a) take as much time as needed to be accurate or to (b) putt as fast as possible while still being accurate. Planning and movement time were measured for each putt. In both experiments, novices produced the typical speed-accuracy trade-off. Going slower, in terms of both the planning and movement components of execution, improved performance. In contrast, skilled golfers benefited from reduced performance time when using the standard putter in Exp. 1 and, specifically, taking less time to plan improved performance. In Exp. 2, skilled golfers improved by going slower when using the funny putter, but only when it was unfamiliar. Thus, skilled performance benefits from speed instructions when wielding highly familiar tools (i.e., the standard putter) is harmed when using new tools (i.e., the funny putter), and benefits again by speed instructions as the new tool becomes familiar. Planning time absorbs these changes. PMID:19102617

  2. 76 FR 15936 - Opportunity for Designation in the Aberdeen, SD; Decatur, IL; Hastings, NE; Fulton, IL; the State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ...The designations of the official agencies listed below will end on September 30, 2011. We are asking persons or governmental agencies interested in providing official services in the areas presently served by these agencies to submit an application for designation. In addition, we are asking for comments on the quality of services provided by the following designated agencies: Aberdeen Grain......

  3. When Does Haste Make Waste? Speed-Accuracy Tradeoff, Skill Level, and the Tools of the Trade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beilock, Sian L.; Bertenthal, Bennett I.; Hoerger, Michael; Carr, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    Novice and skilled golfers took a series of golf putts with a standard putter (Exp. 1) or a distorted "funny putter" (consisting of an s-shaped and arbitrarily weighted putter shaft; Exp. 2) under instructions to either (a) take as much time as needed to be accurate or to (b) putt as fast as possible while still being accurate. Planning and…

  4. pHAST (pH-Driven Aptamer Switch for Thrombin) Catch-and-Release of Target Protein.

    PubMed

    McConnell, E M; Bolzon, R; Mezin, P; Frahm, G; Johnston, M; DeRosa, M C

    2016-06-15

    A pH-driven DNA nanomachine based on the human α-thrombin binding aptamer was designed for the specific catch-and-release of human α-thrombin at neutral and acidic pH, respectively. In neutral conditions, the thrombin aptamer component of the nanomachine is exposed and exists in the G-quadruplex conformation required to bind to the target protein. At slightly acidic pH, the polyadenine tail of the nanomachine becomes partially protonated and A+(anti)•G(syn) mispairing results in a conformational change, causing the target protein to be released. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used to monitor conformational switching over multiple pH cycles. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and fluorescence anisotropy were used to show pH dependent protein binding and release by the nanomachine. This approach could be applied generally to existing G-rich aptamers to develop novel biosensors, theranostics, and nanoswitches. PMID:27115292

  5. Estimation of Contextual Effects through Nonlinear Multilevel Latent Variable Modeling with a Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Ji Seung

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear multilevel latent variable modeling has been suggested as an alternative to traditional hierarchical linear modeling to more properly handle measurement error and sampling error issues in contextual effects modeling. However, a nonlinear multilevel latent variable model requires significant computational effort because the estimation…

  6. Structural, Mechanistic, and Antigenic Characterization of the Human Astrovirus Capsid

    PubMed Central

    York, Royce L.; Yousefi, Payam A.; Bogdanoff, Walter; Haile, Sara; Tripathi, Sarvind

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human astroviruses (HAstVs) are nonenveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses that are a leading cause of viral gastroenteritis. HAstV particles display T=3 icosahedral symmetry formed by 180 copies of the capsid protein (CP), which undergoes proteolytic maturation to generate infectious HAstV particles. Little is known about the molecular features that govern HAstV particle assembly, maturation, infectivity, and immunogenicity. Here we report the crystal structures of the two main structural domains of the HAstV CP: the core domain at 2.60-Å resolution and the spike domain at 0.95-Å resolution. Fitting of these structures into the previously determined 25-Å-resolution electron cryomicroscopy density maps of HAstV allowed us to characterize the molecular features on the surfaces of immature and mature T=3 HAstV particles. The highly electropositive inner surface of HAstV supports a model in which interaction of the HAstV CP core with viral RNA is a driving force in T=3 HAstV particle formation. Additionally, mapping of conserved residues onto the HAstV CP core and spike domains in the context of the immature and mature HAstV particles revealed dramatic changes to the exposure of conserved residues during virus maturation. Indeed, we show that antibodies raised against mature HAstV have reactivity to both the HAstV CP core and spike domains, revealing for the first time that the CP core domain is antigenic. Together, these data provide new molecular insights into HAstV that have practical applications for the development of vaccines and antiviral therapies. IMPORTANCE Astroviruses are a leading cause of viral diarrhea in young children, immunocompromised individuals, and the elderly. Despite the prevalence of astroviruses, little is known at the molecular level about how the astrovirus particle assembles and is converted into an infectious, mature virus. In this paper, we describe the high-resolution structures of the two main astrovirus

  7. A quasi-Monte Carlo Metropolis algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Art B.; Tribble, Seth D.

    2005-01-01

    This work presents a version of the Metropolis–Hastings algorithm using quasi-Monte Carlo inputs. We prove that the method yields consistent estimates in some problems with finite state spaces and completely uniformly distributed inputs. In some numerical examples, the proposed method is much more accurate than ordinary Metropolis–Hastings sampling. PMID:15956207

  8. 1. Photocopied October 1976, from F.B. Tower, Illistrations of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopied October 1976, from F.B. Tower, Illistrations of the Croton Aqueduct, New York: Wiley and Putnam, 1843. CROTON AQUEDUCT AT HASTINGS: ARCH PROVIDED ACCESS TO STONE QUARRY. PLATE XVII, PAGE 106. - Old Croton Aqueduct, Quarry Railroad Bridge, Aqueduct Lane at Williams Street, Hastings-on-Hudson, Westchester County, NY

  9. Negative Emotional Reactions to Challenging Behaviour and Staff Burnout: Two Replication Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, David; Horne, Sharon; Rose, John L.; Hastings, Richard P.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Hastings, R. P. ["American Journal on Mental Retardation" (2002) Vol. 107, pp. 455-467] hypothesized that staff negative emotional reactions to challenging behaviour might accumulate over time to affect staff well-being. Only one previous study (Mitchell, G.& Hastings, R. P. ["American Journal on Mental Retardation" (2001) Vol. 106,…

  10. Wisdom from the Factory Floor: For Best Results, Limit Initiatives, Build Capacity, and Monitor Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumas, Chad; Kautz, Craig

    2014-01-01

    In the Hastings Nebraska Public schools, two of the eight schools have been identified as national models of educational effectiveness. In seven of eight buildings, in just four years, student test scores have increased from around 60% proficiency to around 80% proficiency or better. At Hastings, central office leaders emphasize three key…

  11. Surveillance of Human Astrovirus Infection in Brazil: The First Report of MLB1 Astrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Maria da Penha Trindade Pinheiro; Carvalho Costa, Filipe Aníbal; Rocha, Mônica Simões; de Andrade, Juliana da Silva Ribeiro; Diniz, Fernanda Kreischer Bandeira; de Andrade, Thais Ramos; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Volotão, Eduardo de Mello

    2015-01-01

    Human astrovirus (HAstV) represents the third most common virus associated with acute diarrhea (AD). This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of HAstV infection in Brazilian children under 5 years of age with AD, investigate the presence of recently described HAstV strains, through extensive laboratory-based surveillance of enteric viral agents in three Brazilian coastal regions between 2005 and 2011. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the overall HAstV detection rate reached 7.1% (207/2.913) with percentage varying according to the geographic region: 3.9% (36/921) in the northeast, 7.9% in the south (71/903) and 9.2% in the southeast (100/1.089) (p < 0.001). HAstV were detected in cases of all age groups. Detection rates were slightly higher during the spring. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 320-bp ORF2 fragment revealed that HAstV-1 was the predominant genotype throughout the seven years of the study. The novel AstV-MLB1 was detected in two children with AD from a subset of 200 samples tested, demonstrating the circulation of this virus both the in northeastern and southeastern regions of Brazil. These results provide additional epidemiological and molecular data on HAstV circulation in three Brazilian coastal regions, highlighting its potential to cause infantile AD. PMID:26274322

  12. Human Astrovirus Coat Protein Inhibits Serum Complement Activation via C1, the First Component of the Classical Pathway▿

    PubMed Central

    Bonaparte, Rheba S.; Hair, Pamela S.; Banthia, Deepa; Marshall, Dawn M.; Cunnion, Kenji M.; Krishna, Neel K.

    2008-01-01

    Human astroviruses (HAstVs) belong to a family of nonenveloped, icosahedral RNA viruses that cause noninflammatory gastroenteritis, predominantly in infants. Eight HAstV serotypes have been identified, with a worldwide distribution. While the HAstVs represent a significant public health concern, very little is known about the pathogenesis of and host immune response to these viruses. Here we demonstrate that HAstV type 1 (HAstV-1) virions, specifically the viral coat protein (CP), suppress the complement system, a fundamental component of the innate immune response in vertebrates. HAstV-1 virions and purified CP both suppress hemolytic complement activity. Hemolytic assays utilizing sera depleted of individual complement factors as well as adding back purified factors demonstrated that HAstV CP suppresses classical pathway activation at the first component, C1. HAstV-1 CP bound the A chain of C1q and inhibited serum complement activation, resulting in decreased C4b, iC3b, and terminal C5b-9 formation. Inhibition of complement activation was also demonstrated for HAstV serotypes 2 to 4, suggesting that this phenomenon is a general feature of these human pathogens. Since complement is a major contributor to the initiation and amplification of inflammation, the observed CP-mediated inhibition of complement activity may contribute to the lack of inflammation associated with astrovirus-induced gastroenteritis. Although diverse mechanisms of inhibition of complement activation have been described for many enveloped animal viruses, this is the first report of a nonenveloped icosahedral virus CP inhibiting classical pathway activation at C1. PMID:17959658

  13. COPD and air travel: does hypoxia-altitude simulation testing predict in-flight respiratory symptoms?

    PubMed

    Edvardsen, Anne; Ryg, Morten; Akerø, Aina; Christensen, Carl Christian; Skjønsberg, Ole H

    2013-11-01

    The reduced pressure in an aircraft cabin may cause significant hypoxaemia and respiratory symptoms in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The current study evaluated whether there is a relationship between hypoxaemia obtained during hypoxia-altitude simulation testing (HAST), simulating an altitude of 2438 m, and the reporting of respiratory symptoms during air travel. 82 patients with moderate to very severe COPD answered an air travel questionnaire. Arterial oxygen tensions during HAST (PaO2HAST) in subjects with and without in-flight respiratory symptoms were compared. The same questionnaire was answered within 1 year after the HAST. Mean ± sd PaO2HAST was 6.3 ± 0.6 kPa and 62 (76%) of the patients had PaO2HAST <6.6 kPa. 38 (46%) patients had experienced respiratory symptoms during air travel. There was no difference in PaO2HAST in those with and those without in-flight respiratory symptoms (6.3 ± 0.7 kPa versus 6.3 ± 0.6 kPa, respectively; p=0.926). 54 (66%) patients travelled by air after the HAST, and patients equipped with supplemental oxygen (n = 23, 43%) reported less respiratory symptoms when flying with than those without such treatment (four (17%) versus 11 (48%) patients; p=0.039). In conclusion, no difference in PaO2HAST was found between COPD patients with and without respiratory symptoms during air travel. PMID:23258777

  14. 24. BUILDING NO. 266, GENERAL PURPOSE LABORATORY (ORIGINALLY MAGAZINE FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. BUILDING NO. 266, GENERAL PURPOSE LABORATORY (ORIGINALLY MAGAZINE FOR HE 'A' PUMP & CHANGE HOUSE), LOOKING HAST AT NORTHWEST SIDE OF BUILDING. - Picatinny Arsenal, 200 Area, Shell Component Loading, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  15. A Comparison of Estimation Methods for a Multi-unidimensional Graded Response IRT Model

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tzu-Chun; Sheng, Yanyan

    2016-01-01

    This study compared several parameter estimation methods for multi-unidimensional graded response models using their corresponding statistical software programs and packages. Specifically, we compared two marginal maximum likelihood (MML) approaches (Bock-Aitkin expectation-maximum algorithm, adaptive quadrature approach), four fully Bayesian algorithms (Gibbs sampling, Metropolis-Hastings, Hastings-within-Gibbs, blocked Metropolis), and the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro (MHRM) algorithm via the use of IRTPRO, BMIRT, and MATLAB. Simulation results suggested that, when the intertrait correlation was low, these estimation methods provided similar results. However, if the dimensions were moderately or highly correlated, Hastings-within-Gibbs had an overall better parameter recovery of item discrimination and intertrait correlation parameters. The performances of these estimation methods with different sample sizes and test lengths are also discussed. PMID:27375545

  16. Plastic encapsulated parts

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, T.

    1994-10-01

    Plastic semiconductor packages were characterized as possible alternatives for canned devices, which are susceptible to internal shorts caused by conductive particles. Highly accelerated stress testing (HAST) as well as electrical and mechanical testing were conducted on plastic technology devices.

  17. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Cal State Div. of Beaches ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Cal State Div. of Beaches & Parks Collection Sketch of 1857 Rephoto 1960 NORTHEAST CORNER ELEVATION - B. F. Hastings Bank Building, 128-132 J Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  18. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Cal. State Div. Beaches & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Cal. State Div. Beaches & Parks Collection Sketch of 1857 Rephoto 1960 NORTHEAST CORNER ELEVATION - B. F. Hastings Bank Building, 128-132 J Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  19. BLDG F101, FRONT ELEVATION Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG F101, FRONT ELEVATION - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Ammo Rework-Overhall Building Types, Eighteenth Street & Fence Road near Hastings Street intersection, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. BLDG F102, INTERIOR VIEW. Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG F102, INTERIOR VIEW. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Ammo Rework-Overhall Building Types, Eighteenth Street & Fence Road near Hastings Street intersection, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. BLDG F101, NORTH END AND REAR (EAST) SIDE. Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG F101, NORTH END AND REAR (EAST) SIDE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Ammo Rework-Overhall Building Types, Eighteenth Street & Fence Road near Hastings Street intersection, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. BLDG F101, FRONT ELEVATION W/POLE Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG F101, FRONT ELEVATION W/POLE - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Ammo Rework-Overhall Building Types, Eighteenth Street & Fence Road near Hastings Street intersection, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. BLDG F101, SOUTH END AND FRONT (WEST). F102 IN BACKGROUND. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG F101, SOUTH END AND FRONT (WEST). F102 IN BACKGROUND. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Ammo Rework-Overhall Building Types, Eighteenth Street & Fence Road near Hastings Street intersection, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. 16. Photocopy of postcard (from Ardella Fish Shanks) Frank Stumm, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of postcard (from Ardella Fish Shanks) Frank Stumm, photographer ca. 1908-16 SOUTH FRONT, HASTINGS HOUSE IN BACKGROUND - Riddell Fish House, 245 West K Street, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  5. Organ Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... polls available at the moment. The Hastings Center Bioethics Briefing Book From Birth to Death and Bench ... Journalists, Policymakers, and Educators Close Table of Contents Bioethics and Policy—A History Daniel Callahan Why Bioethics ...

  6. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey California State Library Collection Sacramento ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey California State Library Collection Sacramento Co. History Thompson & West Sketch of 1880 Rephoto 1960 NORTHEAST CORNER - B. F. Hastings Bank Building, 128-132 J Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  7. A Comparison of Estimation Methods for a Multi-unidimensional Graded Response IRT Model.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tzu-Chun; Sheng, Yanyan

    2016-01-01

    This study compared several parameter estimation methods for multi-unidimensional graded response models using their corresponding statistical software programs and packages. Specifically, we compared two marginal maximum likelihood (MML) approaches (Bock-Aitkin expectation-maximum algorithm, adaptive quadrature approach), four fully Bayesian algorithms (Gibbs sampling, Metropolis-Hastings, Hastings-within-Gibbs, blocked Metropolis), and the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro (MHRM) algorithm via the use of IRTPRO, BMIRT, and MATLAB. Simulation results suggested that, when the intertrait correlation was low, these estimation methods provided similar results. However, if the dimensions were moderately or highly correlated, Hastings-within-Gibbs had an overall better parameter recovery of item discrimination and intertrait correlation parameters. The performances of these estimation methods with different sample sizes and test lengths are also discussed. PMID:27375545

  8. 78 FR 38741 - Order Granting Limited Exemptions From Exchange Act Rule 10b-17 and Rules 101 and 102 of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ..., to Stuart M. Strauss, Esq., Clifford Chance US LLP (October 24, 2006); Letter from James A... Markets, to Domenick Pugliese, Esq., Paul, Hastings, Janofsky and Walker LLP (June 27, 2007). At least...

  9. PTB binds to the 3' untranslated region of the human astrovirus type 8: a possible role in viral replication.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Hernández, Wendy; Velez-Uriza, Dora; Valdés, Jesús; Vélez-Del Valle, Cristina; Salas-Benito, Juan; Martínez-Contreras, Rebeca; García-Espítia, Matilde; Salas-Benito, Mariana; Vega-Almeida, Tania; De Nova-Ocampo, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    The 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of human astroviruses (HAstV) consists of two hairpin structures (helix I and II) joined by a linker harboring a conserved PTB/hnRNP1 binding site. The identification and characterization of cellular proteins that interact with the 3'UTR of HAstV-8 virus will help to uncover cellular requirements for viral functions. To this end, mobility shift assays and UV cross-linking were performed with uninfected and HAstV-8-infected cell extracts and HAstV-8 3'UTR probes. Two RNA-protein complexes (CI and CII) were recruited into the 3'UTR. Complex CII formation was compromised with cold homologous RNA, and seven proteins of 35, 40, 45, 50, 52, 57/60 and 75 kDa were cross-linked to the 3'UTR. Supermobility shift assays indicated that PTB/hnRNP1 is part of this complex, and 3'UTR-crosslinked PTB/hnRNP1 was immunoprecipitated from HAstV-8 infected cell-membrane extracts. Also, immunofluorescence analyses revealed that PTB/hnRNP1 is distributed in the nucleus and cytoplasm of uninfected cells, but it is mainly localized perinuclearly in the cytoplasm of HAstV-8 infected cells. Furthermore, the minimal 3'UTR sequences recognized by recombinant PTB are those conforming helix I, and an intact PTB/hnRNP1-binding site. Finally, small interfering RNA-mediated PTB/hnRNP1 silencing reduced synthesis viral genome and virus yield in CaCo2 cells, suggesting that PTB/hnRNP1 is required for HAstV replication. In conclusion, PTB/hnRNP1 binds to the 3'UTR HAstV-8 and is required or participates in viral replication. PMID:25406089

  10. PTB Binds to the 3’ Untranslated Region of the Human Astrovirus Type 8: A Possible Role in Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Hernández, Wendy; Velez-Uriza, Dora; Valdés, Jesús; Vélez-Del Valle, Cristina; Salas-Benito, Juan; Martínez-Contreras, Rebeca; García-Espítia, Matilde; Salas-Benito, Mariana; Vega-Almeida, Tania; De Nova-Ocampo, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    The 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of human astroviruses (HAstV) consists of two hairpin structures (helix I and II) joined by a linker harboring a conserved PTB/hnRNP1 binding site. The identification and characterization of cellular proteins that interact with the 3′UTR of HAstV-8 virus will help to uncover cellular requirements for viral functions. To this end, mobility shift assays and UV cross-linking were performed with uninfected and HAstV-8-infected cell extracts and HAstV-8 3′UTR probes. Two RNA-protein complexes (CI and CII) were recruited into the 3′UTR. Complex CII formation was compromised with cold homologous RNA, and seven proteins of 35, 40, 45, 50, 52, 57/60 and 75 kDa were cross-linked to the 3′UTR. Supermobility shift assays indicated that PTB/hnRNP1 is part of this complex, and 3′UTR-crosslinked PTB/hnRNP1 was immunoprecipitated from HAstV-8 infected cell-membrane extracts. Also, immunofluorescence analyses revealed that PTB/hnRNP1 is distributed in the nucleus and cytoplasm of uninfected cells, but it is mainly localized perinuclearly in the cytoplasm of HAstV-8 infected cells. Furthermore, the minimal 3′UTR sequences recognized by recombinant PTB are those conforming helix I, and an intact PTB/hnRNP1-binding site. Finally, small interfering RNA-mediated PTB/hnRNP1 silencing reduced synthesis viral genome and virus yield in CaCo2 cells, suggesting that PTB/hnRNP1 is required for HAstV replication. In conclusion, PTB/hnRNP1 binds to the 3′UTR HAstV-8 and is required or participates in viral replication. PMID:25406089

  11. Human Astroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pintó, Rosa M.; Guix, Susana

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human astroviruses (HAtVs) are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses that were discovered in 1975. Astroviruses infecting other species, particularly mammalian and avian, were identified and classified into the genera Mamastrovirus and Avastrovirus. Through next-generation sequencing, many new astroviruses infecting different species, including humans, have been described, and the Astroviridae family shows a high diversity and zoonotic potential. Three divergent groups of HAstVs are recognized: the classic (MAstV 1), HAstV-MLB (MAstV 6), and HAstV-VA/HMO (MAstV 8 and MAstV 9) groups. Classic HAstVs contain 8 serotypes and account for 2 to 9% of all acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis in children worldwide. Infections are usually self-limiting but can also spread systemically and cause severe infections in immunocompromised patients. The other groups have also been identified in children with gastroenteritis, but extraintestinal pathologies have been suggested for them as well. Classic HAstVs may be grown in cells, allowing the study of their cell cycle, which is similar to that of caliciviruses. The continuous emergence of new astroviruses with a potential zoonotic transmission highlights the need to gain insights on their biology in order to prevent future health threats. This review focuses on the basic virology, pathogenesis, host response, epidemiology, diagnostic assays, and prevention strategies for HAstVs. PMID:25278582

  12. Stochastic Approximation Methods for Latent Regression Item Response Models. Research Report. ETS RR-09-09

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Davier, Matthias; Sinharay, Sandip

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an application of a stochastic approximation EM-algorithm using a Metropolis-Hastings sampler to estimate the parameters of an item response latent regression model. Latent regression models are extensions of item response theory (IRT) to a 2-level latent variable model in which covariates serve as predictors of the…

  13. 75 FR 58350 - Endangered Species; Permit No. 1578-01; and Permit No. 1595-04

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ...Notice is hereby given the following applicants have applied in due form for modifications to permits (Permit Nos. 1578 and 1595-03) to take shortnose sturgeon for purposes of scientific research:Maine Department of Marine Resources (MDMR) (Gail S. Wippelhauser, Principal Investigator), 21 State House Station, Augusta, ME, 04333 (Permit No. 1578); and Michael M. Hastings, University of Maine,......

  14. The Brave New World of the Interim Superintendency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigham, Gary D.

    2011-01-01

    Considering the vital role the superintendent plays in the overall functioning and well-being of any school district, the filling of the top leadership post with a permanent appointment never should be done in haste. The process of advertising, reviewing applications, conducting background checks, interviewing candidates, negotiating contracts,…

  15. Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Nonlinear Structural Equation Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sik-Yum; Zhu, Hong-Tu

    2002-01-01

    Developed an EM type algorithm for maximum likelihood estimation of a general nonlinear structural equation model in which the E-step is completed by a Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Illustrated the methodology with results from a simulation study and two real examples using data from previous studies. (SLD)

  16. Bayesian Analysis of Nonlinear Structural Equation Models with Nonignorable Missing Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sik-Yum

    2006-01-01

    A Bayesian approach is developed for analyzing nonlinear structural equation models with nonignorable missing data. The nonignorable missingness mechanism is specified by a logistic regression model. A hybrid algorithm that combines the Gibbs sampler and the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm is used to produce the joint Bayesian estimates of…

  17. Their Spirits Live within Us: Aboriginal Women in Downtown Eastside Vancouver Emerging into Visibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culhane, Dara

    2003-01-01

    The intersection of Main and Hastings streets--known locally as "Pain and Wastings"--marks the heart of Vancouver's inner-city neighborhood: the Downtown Eastside. Since 1997, when the City of Vancouver Health Department declared a public health emergency in response to reports that HIV infection rates among residents exceeded those anywhere else…

  18. The Psychometric Properties of the Difficult Behavior Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Hyun-Kyoung; Kozub, Francis M.

    2010-01-01

    The study was designed to estimate the psychometric properties of Hastings and Brown's (2002a) Difficult Behavior Self-efficacy Scale. Participants were two samples of physical educators teaching in Korea (n = 229) and the United States (U.S.; n = 139). An initial translation of the questionnaire to Korean and pilot study were conducted along with…

  19. The Emotional Reactions to Challenging Behavior Scale-Korean (ERCBS-K): Modification and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Hyun-Kyoung; Seo, Dong-Chul; Kozub, Francis M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the original version of Mitchell and Hastings's (1998) Emotional Reaction to Challenging Behavior Scale (ERCBS) and estimate validity and reliability of a revised version containing 29 items. The Emotional Reaction to Challenging Behavior Scale-Korean (ERCBS-K) was studied using 445 in-service physical…

  20. Andreas Vesalius--the work.

    PubMed

    Cobolet, Guy; Garrison, Dan; Vons, Jacqueline; Velut, Stéphane; Nutton, Vivian; Williams, David J

    2014-01-01

    This session focuses on the Fabrica (1543). Karger Publishers of Basel are producing a new English translation, by Daniel Garrison and Malcom Hast, to coincide with the quincentenary while Vivian Nutton's scholarly analysis of a newly discovered second edition indicates that the annotations are of Vesalius himself. PMID:25181777

  1. The Effect of an Integrative Parent Education Program on Quality of Life for Families of Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Caroline Jane

    2010-01-01

    Families of children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) exhibit decreases in cohesion and adaptability, increased social isolation (Higgins et al., 2005), higher levels of marital dissatisfaction (Hastings et al., 2005), and overall disruption to daily life (Bristol et al., 1988). Research has provided evidence of higher levels of stress,…

  2. Analyzing the Participatory Repertoire of a U.S. Educated EFL Teacher in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee-Johnson, Yin Lam

    2016-01-01

    The KSA has become a popular country for Americans to work as an EFL teacher in the recent years because of the payment and cultural experience (Hastings, 2012). Due to the wide social distance between the KSA and USA, the teachers had to adapt to the expectation and become legitimate participants (Lave and Wenger, 1991) in the local communities.…

  3. The Teaching of Ethics. Vol. 1-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1980

    The state of ethics teaching at the undergraduate and professional school levels is examined in these comprehensive monographs sponsored by the Institute of Society, Ethics and the Life Sciences/The Hastings Center. "The Teaching of Ethics in Higher Education (I)" encompasses: (1) the number and extent of courses in ethics, (2) the status and…

  4. Making Art Invisible: Visual Education and the Cultural Stagnation of Neo-Liberal Rationality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peers, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The popularity of visual literacy may have resulted, in part, from some school authorities rushing the process of determining school curriculum. This article argues that the haste is reflective of pressure placed on educational discourse to conform to neo-liberal reforms of the sector, and is not the result of a careful and complex debate within…

  5. Estimating a Noncompensatory IRT Model Using Metropolis within Gibbs Sampling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, Ben

    2011-01-01

    Relatively little research has been conducted with the noncompensatory class of multidimensional item response theory (MIRT) models. A Monte Carlo simulation study was conducted exploring the estimation of a two-parameter noncompensatory item response theory (IRT) model. The estimation method used was a Metropolis-Hastings within Gibbs algorithm…

  6. First North American record of the Palearctic Microplax albofasciata (Costa) (Hemiptera: Lygaeoidea: Oxycarenidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microplax albofasciata (Costa), a Palearctic (mainly Mediterranean) species of the small family Oxycarenidae, is reported from California as the first record for the New World. Adults of this little-known lygaeoid bug were found in 2012 and 2013 at the Hastings Natural History Reservation in norther...

  7. 77 FR 49440 - Membership of the Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... Defense. DATES: Effective Date: August 2, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michael L. Watson... Desimone Shari Durand Audrey Eckhart Webster Ewell John Hastings Paul Hulley John James, Jr. Clarence... Pontius Angela Rogers James Russell Dennis Savage Richard Sayre Steven Schleien Donna Seymour...

  8. MathBench Biology Modules: Web-Based Math for All Biology Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Karen C.; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Schneider, Katie; Thompson, Katerina V.; Shields, Patricia A.; Fagan, William F.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, biology has not been a heavily quantitative science, but this is changing rapidly (Ewing 2002; Gross 2000; Hastings and palmer 2003; Jungck 2005; Steen 2005). Quantitative approaches now constitute a key tool for modern biologists, yet undergraduate biology courses remain largely qualitative and descriptive. Although biology majors…

  9. 2. AERIAL VIEW SHOWING AQUEDUCT RIGHTOFWAY PASSING OVER RAILROAD LINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. AERIAL VIEW SHOWING AQUEDUCT RIGHT-OF-WAY PASSING OVER RAILROAD LINE FROM STONE QUARRY. TRACKS ARE GONE BUT RIGHT-OF-WAY IS STILL VISIBLE. - Old Croton Aqueduct, Quarry Railroad Bridge, Aqueduct Lane at Williams Street, Hastings-on-Hudson, Westchester County, NY

  10. Evolutionary outcomes should inform plant breeding and transgenic approaches to drought tolerance in crop species: the importance of xylem traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic-assisted breeding and transgenic approaches to crop improvement are presently targeting phenotypic traits that allegedly confer drought tolerance. A news feature published in Nature Biotechnology last year suggests that these efforts may not be proceeding with sufficient haste, considering t...

  11. VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE NORTH OF DWIGHT WAY. INTERSECTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE NORTH OF DWIGHT WAY. INTERSECTION OF HASTE STREET SEEN AT CENTER DISTANCE. SEEN FROM WEST SIDE OF PIEDMONT AVE. LOOKING NORTH. Photograph by Fredrica Drotos and Michael Kelly, July 8, 2006 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. Extended Mixed-Efects Item Response Models with the MH-RM Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalmers, R. Philip

    2015-01-01

    A mixed-effects item response theory (IRT) model is presented as a logical extension of the generalized linear mixed-effects modeling approach to formulating explanatory IRT models. Fixed and random coefficients in the extended model are estimated using a Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro (MH-RM) stochastic imputation algorithm to accommodate for…

  13. 75 FR 43818 - Amendment of VOR Federal Airways V-50, V-251, and V-313 in the Vicinity of Decatur, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of.... 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in 14...) Domestic VOR Federal Airways. * * * * * V-50 From Hastings, NE; Pawnee City, NE; St. Joseph, MO;...

  14. Stochastic Approximation Methods for Latent Regression Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Davier, Matthias; Sinharay, Sandip

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an application of a stochastic approximation expectation maximization (EM) algorithm using a Metropolis-Hastings (MH) sampler to estimate the parameters of an item response latent regression model. Latent regression item response models are extensions of item response theory (IRT) to a latent variable model with covariates…

  15. Watershed Research at the North Appalachian Experimental Watershed at Coshocton, Ohio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The North Appalachian Experimental Watershed (NAEW) at Coshocton, Ohio was established during the mid 1930s as one of the first watershed research locations in the US (other locations included Riesel, TX and Hastings, NE). The mission of the outdoor laboratory facility was to determine the effects ...

  16. The need to get smarter on smart grid projects: four Lessons

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-15

    Significant investments are being made in gadgets and technologies, sometimes without proper analysis of the costs and potential benefits, often without much thought on how the various components of the effort would interface with one another. As often happen when things are done in great haste, there have been setbacks in a number of these initiatives, three of which are highlighted in the article.

  17. The Experience of a Man with Severe Challenging Behaviour Following Resettlement from Hospital: A Single Case Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissell, Lianne; Phillips, Neil; Kroese, Biza Stenfert

    2005-01-01

    Carers' behaviour is thought to contribute to the development and maintenance of challenging behaviour in people with learning disabilities (Emerson et al. 1995; Hastings & Remington 1994). The present study sought to investigate the effectiveness of a behavioural intervention in the management of such problem behaviours by means of a long-term…

  18. [Construction and expression of six deletion mutants of human astrovirus C-terminal nsP1a/4 protein].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Niu, Ke; Zhao, Jian; Jin, Yi-ming; Sui, Ting-ting; Wang, Wen

    2013-09-01

    Human astrovirus (HAstV) is one of the leading causes of actue virual diarrhea in infants. HAstV-induced epithdlial cell apoptosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of HAstV infection. Our previous study indicated that HAstV non-structural protein nsPla C-terminal protein nsPla/4 was the major apoptosis functional protein and probably contained the main apoptosis domains. In order to screen for astrovirus encoded apoptotic protien, nsPla/4 and six turncated proteins, which possessed nsPla/4 protein different function domain ,were cloned into green fluorescent protein (GFP) vector pEG-FP-N3. After 24-72 h transfection, the fusion protein expression in BHK21 cells, was analysis by fluorescence microscope and Western blot. The results indicated seven fusion proteins were observed successfully in BHK21 cell after transfected for 24 h. Western blot analysis showed that the level of fusion protein expressed in BHK21 cells was increased significantly at 72h compared to 48h in transfected cells. The successful expression of deletion mutants of nsPla/4 protein was an important foundation to gain further insights into the function of apoptosis domains of nsPla/4 protein and it would also provide research platform to further confirm the molecule pathogenic mechanism of human astrovirus. PMID:24386845

  19. "Reading" Mixed Methods Research: Contexts for Criticism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freshwater, Dawn

    2007-01-01

    Health and social care researchers, in their haste to "belong" to academia, have adopted the system of mixed methodology research, overestimating its ability to reveal the truth and occasionally imprisoning their thought in one system. In this article, some of the assumptions underpinning mixed methodology research and its discourse are subjected…

  20. Elevation, looking SE. Concrete and steel bridge with exposed steel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation, looking SE. Concrete and steel bridge with exposed steel frame is the central of three bridges crossing Brush Street between east Baltimore and Piquette. The bridge links Old Lake Shore and Michigan Central Main Line on the western side to a New York Central siding on the eastern side - Railroad Overpass, East Milwaukee & Hastings Avenues, Detroit, MI

  1. Acceleration of degradation by highly accelerated stress test and air-included highly accelerated stress test in crystalline silicon photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Soh; Tanahashi, Tadanori; Doi, Takuya; Masuda, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    We examined the effects of hyper-hygrothermal stresses with or without air on the degradation of crystalline silicon (c-Si) photovoltaic (PV) modules, to shorten the required duration of a conventional hygrothermal-stress test [i.e., the “damp heat (DH) stress test”, which is conducted at 85 °C/85% relative humidity for 1,000 h]. Interestingly, the encapsulant within a PV module becomes discolored under the air-included hygrothermal conditions achieved using DH stress test equipment and an air-included highly accelerated stress test (air-HAST) apparatus, but not under the air-excluded hygrothermal conditions realized using a highly accelerated stress test (HAST) machine. In contrast, the reduction in the output power of the PV module is accelerated irrespective of air inclusion in hyper-hygrothermal test atmosphere. From these findings, we conclude that the required duration of the DH stress test will at least be significantly shortened using air-HAST, but not HAST.

  2. Comparing Three Estimation Methods for the Three-Parameter Logistic IRT Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamsal, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Different estimation procedures have been developed for the unidimensional three-parameter item response theory (IRT) model. These techniques include the marginal maximum likelihood estimation, the fully Bayesian estimation using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation techniques, and the Metropolis-Hastings Robbin-Monro estimation. With each…

  3. Initiation of human astrovirus type 1 infection was blocked by inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Upon initial contact with a virus, host cells activate a series of cellular signaling cascades that facilitate viral entry and viral propagation within the cell. Little is known about how the human astrovirus (HAstV) exploits signaling cascades to establish an infection in host cells. Recent studies showed that activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) is important for HAstV infection, though the involvement of other signaling cascades remains unclear. Methods A panel of kinase blockers was used to search for cellular signaling pathways important for HAstV1 infection. To determine their impact on the infectious process, we examined viral gene expression, RNA replication, and viral RNA and capsid protein release from host cells. Results Inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activation interfered with the infection, independent of their effect on ERK 1/2 activation. Activation of the PI3K signaling cascade occurred at an early phase of the infection, judging from the timeframe of Akt phosphorylation. PI3K inhibition at early times, but not at later times, blocked viral gene expression. However, inhibiting the downstream targets of PI3K activation, Akt and Rac1, did not block infection. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) activation was found to block a later phase of HAstV1 production. Conclusions Our results reveal a previously unknown, essential role of PI3K in the life cycle of HAstV1. PI3K participates in the early stage of infection, possibly during the viral entry process. Our results also reveal the role of PKA in viral production. PMID:23680019

  4. Molecular epidemiology of enteric viruses in patients with acute gastroenteritis in Aichi prefecture, Japan, 2008/09-2013/14.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Noriko; Kobayashi, Shinichi; Minagawa, Hiroko; Matsushita, Tadashi; Sugiura, Wataru; Iwatani, Yasumasa

    2016-07-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a critical infectious disease that affects infants and young children throughout the world, including Japan. This retrospective study was conducted from September 2008 to August 2014 (six seasons: 2008/09-2013/14) to investigate the incidence of enteric viruses responsible for 1,871 cases of acute gastroenteritis in Aichi prefecture, Japan. Of the 1,871 cases, 1,100 enteric viruses were detected in 978 samples, of which strains from norovirus (NoV) genogroup II (60.9%) were the most commonly detected, followed by strains of rotavirus A (RVA) (23.2%), adenovirus (AdV) type 41 (8.2%), sapovirus (SaV) (3.6%), human astrovirus (HAstV) (2.8%), and NoV genogroup I (1.3%). Sequencing of the NoV genogroup II (GII) strains revealed that GII.4 was the most common genotype, although four different GII.4 variants were also identified. The most common G-genotype of RVA was G1 (63.9%), followed by G3 (27.1%), G2 (4.7%) and G9 (4.3%). Three genogroups of SaV strains were found: GI (80.0%), GII (15.0%), and GV (5.0%). HAstV strains were genotyped as HAstV-1 (80.6%), HAstV-8 (16.1%), and HAstV-3 (3.2%). These results show that NoV GII was the leading cause of sporadic acute viral gastroenteritis, although a variety of enteric viruses were detected during the six-season surveillance period. PMID:26647761

  5. The psychology of autonomy.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    In May 2016, right around the time that this issue of the Hastings Center Report should be published, The Hastings Center is holding a conference in New York City titled "Bioethics Meets Moral Psychology." The goal of the conference is to consider the lessons that bioethicists should learn from the raft of literature now accumulating on how the mental processes of perception, emotion, and thinking affect things that bioethicists care about, from the education of health care professionals to the conflicts that arise in clinical care, the "culture wars" over bioethical policy issues, the status of different cultures' value systems, and the very understanding of the values that are foundational in moral thinking. The articles in this issue simply provide more evidence that bioethics is meeting moral psychology. PMID:27150409

  6. Animals, science, and ethics -- Preface; introduction: the troubled middle in medias res; future directions.

    PubMed

    Donnelley, Strachan; Nolan, Kathleen

    1990-01-01

    This is a report from The Hastings Center project, "The Ethics of Animal Experimentation and Research." As project members, we wanted to take a fresh look at the complex ethical issues that arise in the scientific use of animals in a non-adversarial and non-ideological forum. We were convinced that these issues required a genuinely interdisciplinary approach. This meant including laboratory and field scientific researchers; veterinarians; philosophers, lawyers, and scientists particularly interested in animal welfare issues; and physicians and philosophers with long-standing bioethical interests but who previously had not confronted the ethics of the human use of animals. This Special Supplement to the Hastings Center Report is the outcome of two years of deliberation. PMID:11650361

  7. Revisiting Additivity Violation of Quantum Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Motohisa

    2014-12-01

    We prove additivity violation of minimum output entropy of quantum channels by straightforward application of -net argument and Lévy's lemma. The additivity conjecture was disproved initially by Hastings. Later, a proof via asymptotic geometric analysis was presented by Aubrun, Szarek and Werner, which uses Dudley's bound on Gaussian process (or Dvoretzky's theorem with Schechtman's improvement). In this paper, we develop another proof along Dvoretzky's theorem in Milman's view, showing additivity violation in broader regimes than the existing proofs. Importantly,Dvoretzky's theorem works well with norms to give strong statements, but these techniques can be extended to functions which have norm-like structures-positive homogeneity and triangle inequality. Then, a connection between Hastings' method and ours is also discussed. In addition, we make some comments on relations between regularized minimum output entropy and classical capacity of quantum channels.

  8. Learning about Teaching.

    PubMed

    Kaebnick, Gregory E

    2014-09-01

    There are three broad themes in this issue of the Hastings Center Report. First, a special report published as a supplement to the issue addresses the medical and health policy issues faced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender patients. Inside the issue, the two articles take up questions about how caregivers may justify a refusal to provide a medical service that a patient has requested. The issue also contains a set of essays that have emerged from a collaborative effort by The Hastings Center and the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues to promote scholarly engagement with the practical problem of teaching caregivers, researchers, scientists, and others to address bioethical problems. What appears here is the first installment of a series that will appear in the pages of the Report well into the 2015 volume. PMID:25231650

  9. Maximum likelihood estimation of population growth rates based on the coalescent.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhner, M K; Yamato, J; Felsenstein, J

    1998-01-01

    We describe a method for co-estimating 4Nemu (four times the product of effective population size and neutral mutation rate) and population growth rate from sequence samples using Metropolis-Hastings sampling. Population growth (or decline) is assumed to be exponential. The estimates of growth rate are biased upwards, especially when 4Nemu is low; there is also a slight upwards bias in the estimate of 4Nemu itself due to correlation between the parameters. This bias cannot be attributed solely to Metropolis-Hastings sampling but appears to be an inherent property of the estimator and is expected to appear in any approach which estimates growth rate from genealogy structure. Sampling additional unlinked loci is much more effective in reducing the bias than increasing the number or length of sequences from the same locus. PMID:9584114

  10. Cruzan:A hostage to technology.

    PubMed

    Cranford, R E

    1990-01-01

    In its September/October issue, the Hastings Center Report published six brief essays with a short introduction by Courtney S. Campbell under the collective title of "Cruzan: clear and convincing?" These articles present a range of responses from participants, parents, constitutional scholars, and caregivers to the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Cruzan v. Director, Missouri Department of Health (June 25, 1990). Ronald E. Cranford is a neurologist and a consultant to the Cruzan family. PMID:2228595

  11. The Dawn of State Medicine in Britain

    PubMed Central

    McConaghey, R M S

    1967-01-01

    Dr R M S McConaghey traces the development of State control in the provision of medical services and also describes the rise in status of the general practitioner, from the early apothecary-surgeons. Mr Paul Vaughan describes the history of the British Medical Association and its development from the Provincial Medical and Surgical Association, founded by Sir Charles Hastings. He considers the relationship between the BMA and the Government, both in the past and present. PMID:5337476

  12. A method for estimating the age-depth relationship of Dome Fuji Ice Core using a sequential Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Shinya; Suzuki, Kazue; Kawamura, Kenji; Parrenin, Frederic; Higuchi, Tomoyuki

    2015-04-01

    A technique for estimating the age-depth relationship and its uncertainty in ice cores has been developed. The age-depth relationship is mainly determined by the accumulation of snow at the site of the ice core and the thinning process due to the horizontal stretching and vertical compression of an ice layer. However, both the accumulation process and the thinning process are not fully known. In order to appropriately estimate the age as a function of depth, it is crucial to incorporate observational information into a model describing the accumulation and thinning processes. In the proposed technique, the age as a function of depth is estimated from age markers and time series of δ18O data. The estimation is achieved using a method combining a sequential Monte Carlo method and the Markov chain Monte Carlo method as proposed by Andrieu et al. (2010). In this hybrid method, the posterior distributions for the parameters in the models for the accumulation and thinning processes are basically computed using a way of the standard Metropolis-Hastings method. Meanwhile, sampling from the posterior distribution for the age-depth relationship is achieved by using a sequential Monte Carlo approach at each iteration of the Metropolis-Hastings method. A sequential Monte Carlo method normally suffers from the degeneracy problem, especially in cases that the number of steps is large. However, when it is combined with the Metropolis-Hastings method, the degeneracy problem can be overcome by collecting a large number of samples obtained by many iterations of the Metropolis-Hastings method. We will demonstrate the result obtained by applying the proposed technique to the ice core data from Dome Fuji in Antarctica.

  13. Characterization of Human Astrovirus Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Ernesto; Muñoz-Yañez, Claudia; Sánchez-San Martín, Claudia; Aguirre-Crespo, Gabriela; Baños-Lara, M. del Rocio; Gutierrez, Michelle; Espinosa, Rafaela; Acevedo, Yunuén; Arias, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Human astroviruses (HAstV) are a frequent cause of gastroenteritis in young children and immunocompromised patients. To understand the early steps of HAstV infection in the highly permissive Caco-2 cell line, the binding and entry processes of the virus were characterized. The half-time of virus binding to the cell surface was about 10 min, while virus decapsidation took around 130 min. Drugs affecting clathrin-mediated endocytosis, endosome acidification, and actin filament polymerization, as well as those that reduce the presence of cholesterol in the cell membrane, decreased the infectivity of the virus. The infection was also reduced by silencing the expression of the clathrin heavy chain (CHC) by RNA interference or by overexpression of dominant-negative mutants of dynamin 2 and Eps15. Furthermore, the entry of HAstV apparently depends on the maturation of endosomes, since the infection was reduced by silencing the expression of Rab7, a small GTPase involved in the early- to late-endosome maturation. Altogether, our results suggest that HAstV enters Caco-2 cells using a clathrin-dependent pathway and reaches late endosomes to enter cells. Here, we have characterized the mechanism used by human astroviruses, important agents of gastroenteritis in children, to gain entry into their host cells. Using a combination of biochemical and genetic tools, we found that these viruses enter Caco-2 cells using a clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway, where they most likely need to travel to late endosomes to reach the cytoplasm and begin their replication cycle. PMID:24335315

  14. Next-Generation Sequencing for Diagnosis and Tailored Therapy: A Case Report of Astrovirus-Associated Progressive Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Frémond, M-L; Pérot, P; Muth, E; Cros, G; Dumarest, M; Mahlaoui, N; Seilhean, D; Desguerre, I; Hébert, C; Corre-Catelin, N; Neven, B; Lecuit, M; Blanche, S; Picard, C; Eloit, M

    2015-09-01

    A boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia experienced progressive global motor decline, cerebellar syndrome, and epilepsy. All standard polymerase chain reactions for neurotropic viruses were negative on cerebrospinal fluid and brain biopsy. Next-generation sequencing allowed fast identification of a new astrovirus strain (HAstV-VA1/HMO-C-PA), which led to tailor the patient's treatment, with encouraging clinical monitoring over 1 year. PMID:26407445

  15. Enhanced Research to Create More Jobs

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal, K.

    2004-03-01

    Mr. Doc Hastings, U.S. Congressman from the state of Washington is interviewed regarding various topics related to the nuclear energy picture in the US. Topics include the level of public support for nuclear energy, differences between the roles for state and federal governments, job creation, clean-up briefings, a Yucca Mountain status, a hydrogen-nuclear status, the role of nuclear energy in Kyoto protocol compliance, and the market for power plants.

  16. Deciphering the Diversities of Astroviruses and Noroviruses in Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluents by a High-Throughput Sequencing Method.

    PubMed

    Prevost, B; Lucas, F S; Ambert-Balay, K; Pothier, P; Moulin, L; Wurtzer, S

    2015-10-01

    Although clinical epidemiology lists human enteric viruses to be among the primary causes of acute gastroenteritis in the human population, their circulation in the environment remains poorly investigated. These viruses are excreted by the human population into sewers and may be released into rivers through the effluents of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In order to evaluate the viral diversity and loads in WWTP effluents of the Paris, France, urban area, which includes about 9 million inhabitants (approximately 15% of the French population), the seasonal occurrence of astroviruses and noroviruses in 100 WWTP effluent samples was investigated over 1 year. The coupling of these measurements with a high-throughput sequencing approach allowed the specific estimation of the diversity of human astroviruses (human astrovirus genotype 1 [HAstV-1], HAstV-2, HAstV-5, and HAstV-6), 7 genotypes of noroviruses (NoVs) of genogroup I (NoV GI.1 to NoV GI.6 and NoV GI.8), and 16 genotypes of NoVs of genogroup II (NoV GII.1 to NoV GII.7, NoV GII.9, NoV GII.12 to NoV GII.17, NoV GII.20, and NoV GII.21) in effluent samples. Comparison of the viral diversity in WWTP effluents to the viral diversity found by analysis of clinical data obtained throughout France underlined the consistency between the identified genotypes. However, some genotypes were locally present in effluents and were not found in the analysis of the clinical data. These findings could highlight an underestimation of the diversity of enteric viruses circulating in the human population. Consequently, analysis of WWTP effluents could allow the exploration of viral diversity not only in environmental waters but also in a human population linked to a sewerage network in order to better comprehend viral epidemiology and to forecast seasonal outbreaks. PMID:26253673

  17. Deciphering the Diversities of Astroviruses and Noroviruses in Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluents by a High-Throughput Sequencing Method

    PubMed Central

    Prevost, B.; Lucas, F. S.; Ambert-Balay, K.; Pothier, P.; Wurtzer, S.

    2015-01-01

    Although clinical epidemiology lists human enteric viruses to be among the primary causes of acute gastroenteritis in the human population, their circulation in the environment remains poorly investigated. These viruses are excreted by the human population into sewers and may be released into rivers through the effluents of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In order to evaluate the viral diversity and loads in WWTP effluents of the Paris, France, urban area, which includes about 9 million inhabitants (approximately 15% of the French population), the seasonal occurrence of astroviruses and noroviruses in 100 WWTP effluent samples was investigated over 1 year. The coupling of these measurements with a high-throughput sequencing approach allowed the specific estimation of the diversity of human astroviruses (human astrovirus genotype 1 [HAstV-1], HAstV-2, HAstV-5, and HAstV-6), 7 genotypes of noroviruses (NoVs) of genogroup I (NoV GI.1 to NoV GI.6 and NoV GI.8), and 16 genotypes of NoVs of genogroup II (NoV GII.1 to NoV GII.7, NoV GII.9, NoV GII.12 to NoV GII.17, NoV GII.20, and NoV GII.21) in effluent samples. Comparison of the viral diversity in WWTP effluents to the viral diversity found by analysis of clinical data obtained throughout France underlined the consistency between the identified genotypes. However, some genotypes were locally present in effluents and were not found in the analysis of the clinical data. These findings could highlight an underestimation of the diversity of enteric viruses circulating in the human population. Consequently, analysis of WWTP effluents could allow the exploration of viral diversity not only in environmental waters but also in a human population linked to a sewerage network in order to better comprehend viral epidemiology and to forecast seasonal outbreaks. PMID:26253673

  18. Resistant starch reduces colonic and urinary p-cresol in rats fed a tyrosine-supplemented diet, whereas konjac mannan does not.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bixiao; Morioka, Sahya; Nakagawa, Tomoyuki; Hayakawa, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    The effect of resistant starch (RS) and konjac mannan (KM) to maintain and improve the large intestinal environment was compared. Wistar SPF rats were fed the following diets for 4 weeks: negative control diet (C diet), tyrosine-supplemented positive control diet (T diet), and luminacoid supplemented diets containing either high-molecular konjac mannan A (KMAT diet), low-molecular konjac mannan B (KMBT diet), high-amylose cornstarch (HAST diet), or heat-moisture-treated starch (HMTST diet). The luminacoid-fed group had an increased content of short-chain fatty acids in the cecum. HAS caused a significant decrease in p-cresol content in the cecum, whereas KM did not. Urinary p-cresol was reduced in the HAST group compared with the T group, but not the KM fed groups. Deterioration in the large intestinal environment was only improved completely in the HAST and HMTST groups, suggesting that RS is considerably more effective than KM in maintaining the large intestinal environment. PMID:27296718

  19. Stability of large systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Harold

    2007-03-01

    We address a long-standing dilemma concerning stability of large systems. MacArthur (1955) and Hutchinson (1959) argued that more ``complex'' natural systems tended to be more stable than less complex systems based upon energy flow. May (1972) argued the opposite, using random matrix models; see Cohen and Newman (1984, 1985), Bai and Yin (1986). We show that in some sense both are right: under reasonable scaling assumptions on interaction strength, Lyapunov stability increases but structural stability decreases as complexity is increased (c.f. Harrison, 1979; Hastings, 1984). We apply this result to a variety of network systems. References: Bai, Z.D. & Yin, Y.Q. 1986. Probab. Th. Rel. Fields 73, 555. Cohen, J.E., & Newman, C.M. 1984. Annals Probab. 12, 283; 1985. Theoret. Biol. 113, 153. Harrison, G.W. 1979. Amer. Natur. 113, 659. Hastings, H.M. 1984. BioSystems 17, 171. Hastings, H.M., Juhasz, F., & Schreiber, M. 1992. .Proc. Royal Soc., Ser. B. 249, 223. Hutchinson, G.E. 1959. Amer. Natur. 93, 145, MacArthur, R. H. 1955. Ecology 35, 533, May, R.M. 1972. Nature 238, 413.

  20. Comparison of the kinetics of different Markov models for ligand binding under varying conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, Johannes W. R.; Habeck, Michael

    2015-03-07

    We recently derived a Markov model for macromolecular ligand binding dynamics from few physical assumptions and showed that its stationary distribution is the grand canonical ensemble [J. W. R. Martini, M. Habeck, and M. Schlather, J. Math. Chem. 52, 665 (2014)]. The transition probabilities of the proposed Markov process define a particular Glauber dynamics and have some similarity to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Here, we illustrate that this model is the stochastic analog of (pseudo) rate equations and the corresponding system of differential equations. Moreover, it can be viewed as a limiting case of general stochastic simulations of chemical kinetics. Thus, the model links stochastic and deterministic approaches as well as kinetics and equilibrium described by the grand canonical ensemble. We demonstrate that the family of transition matrices of our model, parameterized by temperature and ligand activity, generates ligand binding kinetics that respond to changes in these parameters in a qualitatively similar way as experimentally observed kinetics. In contrast, neither the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm nor the Glauber heat bath reflects changes in the external conditions correctly. Both converge rapidly to the stationary distribution, which is advantageous when the major interest is in the equilibrium state, but fail to describe the kinetics of ligand binding realistically. To simulate cellular processes that involve the reversible stochastic binding of multiple factors, our pseudo rate equation model should therefore be preferred to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and the Glauber heat bath, if the stationary distribution is not of only interest.

  1. Development of a multiplex PCR assay to detect gastroenteric pathogens in the feces of Mexican children.

    PubMed

    Tolentino-Ruiz, R; Montoya-Varela, D; García-Espitia, M; Salas-Benito, M; Gutiérrez-Escolano, A; Gómez-García, C; Figueroa-Arredondo, P; Salas-Benito, J; De Nova-Ocampo, M

    2012-10-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide; the etiology of AGE includes viruses, bacteria, and parasites. A multiplex PCR assay to simultaneously identify human Astrovirus (HAstV), Calicivirus (HuCVs), Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica), and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) in stool samples is described. A total of 103 samples were individually analyzed by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) and RT-PCR/PCR. HAstV and HuCVs were detected in four out of 103 samples (3.8 %) by RT-PCR, but ELISAs found only one sample as positive for HuCVs (2.5 %). E. histolytica was identified in two out of 19 samples (10.5 %) and EIEC in 13 out of 20 samples (70 %) by PCR, and all PCR products were sequenced to verify their identities. Our multiplex PCR results demonstrate the simultaneous amplification of different pathogens such as HAstV, EIEC, and E. histolytica in the same reaction, though the HuCVs signal was weak in every replicate. Regardless, this multiplex PCR protocol represents a novel tool for the identification of distinct pathogens and may provide support for the diagnosis of AGE in children. PMID:22711331

  2. Novel human astroviruses: Novel human diseases?

    PubMed

    Vu, Diem-Lan; Cordey, Samuel; Brito, Francisco; Kaiser, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    Astroviruses are small, non-enveloped, single-stranded positive RNA viruses that belong to the Astroviridae family. While classical human astroviruses (HAstV) are a well-recognized cause of acute non-bacterial diarrhea among young children worldwide, novel astroviruses, named HAstV-MLB and HAstV-VA/HMO, have been identified recently in humans by molecular assays. They are phylogenetically more related to animal astroviruses than to classical human astroviruses, thus suggesting cross-species transmission. Serological studies demonstrated a surprisingly high seroprevalence in certain populations and highlighted a high infection rate in the early years of life. Although their pathogenic role has not yet been clearly determined, novel astrovirus RNA sequences have been identified in different biological specimens of symptomatic patients, including the feces, plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, and brain biopsies. Thus, there is evidence that they could contribute not only to digestive tract infection, but also to unexpected clinical syndromes, notably encephalitis and meningitis. Severe infections affect mainly immunocompromised patients. These findings indicate that novel astroviruses should be considered in the differential diagnosis of immunocompromised patients with meningitis or encephalitis of unknown origin. PMID:27434149

  3. Comparison of the kinetics of different Markov models for ligand binding under varying conditions.

    PubMed

    Martini, Johannes W R; Habeck, Michael

    2015-03-01

    We recently derived a Markov model for macromolecular ligand binding dynamics from few physical assumptions and showed that its stationary distribution is the grand canonical ensemble [J. W. R. Martini, M. Habeck, and M. Schlather, J. Math. Chem. 52, 665 (2014)]. The transition probabilities of the proposed Markov process define a particular Glauber dynamics and have some similarity to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Here, we illustrate that this model is the stochastic analog of (pseudo) rate equations and the corresponding system of differential equations. Moreover, it can be viewed as a limiting case of general stochastic simulations of chemical kinetics. Thus, the model links stochastic and deterministic approaches as well as kinetics and equilibrium described by the grand canonical ensemble. We demonstrate that the family of transition matrices of our model, parameterized by temperature and ligand activity, generates ligand binding kinetics that respond to changes in these parameters in a qualitatively similar way as experimentally observed kinetics. In contrast, neither the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm nor the Glauber heat bath reflects changes in the external conditions correctly. Both converge rapidly to the stationary distribution, which is advantageous when the major interest is in the equilibrium state, but fail to describe the kinetics of ligand binding realistically. To simulate cellular processes that involve the reversible stochastic binding of multiple factors, our pseudo rate equation model should therefore be preferred to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and the Glauber heat bath, if the stationary distribution is not of only interest. PMID:25747058

  4. Comparison of the kinetics of different Markov models for ligand binding under varying conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Johannes W. R.; Habeck, Michael

    2015-03-01

    We recently derived a Markov model for macromolecular ligand binding dynamics from few physical assumptions and showed that its stationary distribution is the grand canonical ensemble [J. W. R. Martini, M. Habeck, and M. Schlather, J. Math. Chem. 52, 665 (2014)]. The transition probabilities of the proposed Markov process define a particular Glauber dynamics and have some similarity to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Here, we illustrate that this model is the stochastic analog of (pseudo) rate equations and the corresponding system of differential equations. Moreover, it can be viewed as a limiting case of general stochastic simulations of chemical kinetics. Thus, the model links stochastic and deterministic approaches as well as kinetics and equilibrium described by the grand canonical ensemble. We demonstrate that the family of transition matrices of our model, parameterized by temperature and ligand activity, generates ligand binding kinetics that respond to changes in these parameters in a qualitatively similar way as experimentally observed kinetics. In contrast, neither the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm nor the Glauber heat bath reflects changes in the external conditions correctly. Both converge rapidly to the stationary distribution, which is advantageous when the major interest is in the equilibrium state, but fail to describe the kinetics of ligand binding realistically. To simulate cellular processes that involve the reversible stochastic binding of multiple factors, our pseudo rate equation model should therefore be preferred to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and the Glauber heat bath, if the stationary distribution is not of only interest.

  5. The Anatomy and Phylogenetic Relationships of “Pelorosaurus“ becklesii (Neosauropoda, Macronaria) from the Early Cretaceous of England

    PubMed Central

    Upchurch, Paul; Mannion, Philip D.; Taylor, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The sauropod dinosaur “Pelorosaurus” becklesii was named in 1852 on the basis of an associated left humerus, ulna, radius and skin impression from the Early Cretaceous (Berriasian-Valanginian) Hastings Beds Group, near Hastings, East Sussex, southeast England, United Kingdom. The taxonomy and nomenclature of this specimen have a complex history, but most recent workers have agreed that “P.” becklesii represents a distinct somphospondylan (or at least a titanosauriform) and is potentially the earliest titanosaur body fossil from Europe or even globally. The Hastings specimen is distinct from the approximately contemporaneous Pelorosaurus conybeari from Tilgate Forest, West Sussex. “P.” becklesii can be diagnosed on the basis of five autapomorphies, such as: a prominent anteriorly directed process projecting from the anteromedial corner of the distal humerus; the proximal end of the radius is widest anteroposteriorly along its lateral margin; and the unique combination of a robust ulna and slender radius. The new generic name Haestasaurus is therefore erected for “P.” becklesii. Three revised and six new fore limb characters (e.g. the presence/absence of condyle-like projections on the posterodistal margin of the radius) are discussed and added to three cladistic data sets for Sauropoda. Phylogenetic analysis confirms that Haestasaurus becklesii is a macronarian, but different data sets place this species either as a non-titanosauriform macronarian, or within a derived clade of titanosaurs that includes Malawisaurus and Saltasauridae. This uncertainty is probably caused by several factors, including the incompleteness of the Haestasaurus holotype and rampant homoplasy in fore limb characters. Haestasaurus most probably represents a basal macronarian that independently acquired the robust ulna, enlarged olecranon, and other states that have previously been regarded as synapomorphies of clades within Titanosauria. There is growing evidence that basal

  6. Detection and Characterization of Waterborne Gastroenteritis Viruses in Urban Sewage and Sewage-Polluted River Waters in Caracas, Venezuela ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Díaz, J.; Querales, L.; Caraballo, L.; Vizzi, E.; Liprandi, F.; Takiff, H.; Betancourt, W. Q.

    2009-01-01

    The detection and molecular characterization of pathogenic human viruses in urban sewage have been used extensively to derive information on circulating viruses in given populations throughout the world. In this study, a similar approach was applied to provide an overview of the epidemiology of waterborne gastroenteritis viruses circulating in urban areas of Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela in South America. Dry season sampling was conducted in sewers and in a major river severely polluted with urban sewage discharges. Nested PCR was used for detection of human adenoviruses (HAds), while reverse transcription plus nested or seminested PCR was used for detection of enteroviruses (HuEVs), rotaviruses (HRVs), noroviruses (HuNoVs), and astroviruses (HAstVs). HRVs were fully characterized with genotype-specific primers for VP4 (genotype P), VP7 (genotype G), and the rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4). HuNoVs and HAstVs were characterized by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The detection rates of all viruses were ≥50%, and all sampling events were positive for at least one of the pathogenic viruses studied. The predominant HRV types found were G1, P[8], P[4], and NSP4A and -B. Genogroup II of HuNoVs and HAstV type 8 were frequently detected in sewage and sewage-polluted river waters. This study reveals relevant epidemiological data on the distribution and persistence of human pathogenic viruses in sewage-polluted waters and addresses the potential health risks associated with transmission of these viruses through water-related environmental routes. PMID:19028907

  7. Facies architecture and sequence stratigraphy of an early post-rift fluvial succession, Aptian Barbalha Formation, Araripe Basin, northeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Claiton M. S.; Goldberg, Karin; Bardola, Tatiana

    2015-06-01

    The Barbalha Formation (Aptian) records deposition in a fluvial and lacustrine environment accumulated in an early post-rift sag basin. Characterization of the facies architecture and sequence stratigraphic framework of the alluvial succession was carried out through detailed description and interpretation of outcrops and cored wells. The development of depositional sequences in this unit reflects variation in the accommodation-to-sediment supply (A/S) ratio. Two depositional sequences, showing an overall fining-upward trend, are preserved within the succession. The sequences are bounded by regional subaerial unconformities formed during negative A/S ratio, and may be subdivided in Low-accommodation Systems Tracts (LAST) (positive A/S ratio close to zero) and High accommodation Systems Tracts (HAST) (A/S ratio between 0.5 and 1). Sequence 1, with a minimum thickness of 100 m, is characterized by amalgamated, multi-storey, braided fluvial channel sand bodies, defining a LAST. These are interlayered with crevasse splay and floodplain deposits toward the top, passing to open lacustrine deposits, defining a HAST. Sequence 2, with minimum thickness ranging from 50 to 90 m, overlies the organic-rich lacustrine deposits. At the base, this sequence is composed of amalgamated, multistorey braided fluvial channel sand bodies (LAST), similar to Sequence 1, overlain by well-drained floodplain with fixed fluvial channel deposits, interpreted as an anastomosed fluvial system, which are in turn capped by lacustrine deposits, both grouped in a HAST. Paleocurrent data on fluvial deposits of sequences 1 and 2 show a consistent paleoflow to the SE. Sedimentological evidence indicates humid to sub-humid climatic conditions during deposition of sequences 1 and 2. Accumulation of fluvial sequences 1 and 2 was mainly controlled by tectonics. Variation in A/S ratios must be related to tectonic subsidence and uplift of the basin.

  8. Eigenvalue analysis of an irreversible random walk with skew detailed balance conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yuji; Hukushima, Koji

    2016-04-01

    An irreversible Markov-chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm with skew detailed balance conditions originally proposed by Turitsyn et al. is extended to general discrete systems on the basis of the Metropolis-Hastings scheme. To evaluate the efficiency of our proposed method, the relaxation dynamics of the slowest mode and the asymptotic variance are studied analytically in a random walk on one dimension. It is found that the performance in irreversible MCMC methods violating the detailed balance condition is improved by appropriately choosing parameters in the algorithm.

  9. Rapid recipe formulation for plasma etching of new materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Meghali; Zhang, Zizhuo; Ekerdt, John; Bonnecaze, Roger T.

    2016-03-01

    A fast and inexpensive scheme for etch rate prediction using flexible continuum models and Bayesian statistics is demonstrated. Bulk etch rates of MgO are predicted using a steady-state model with volume-averaged plasma parameters and classical Langmuir surface kinetics. Plasma particle and surface kinetics are modeled within a global plasma framework using single component Metropolis Hastings methods and limited data. The accuracy of these predictions is evaluated with synthetic and experimental etch rate data for magnesium oxide in an ICP-RIE system. This approach is compared and superior to factorial models generated from JMP, a software package frequently employed for recipe creation and optimization.

  10. Atrial fibrillation: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Hasun, Matthias; Gatterer, Eduard; Weidinger, Franz

    2014-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is by far the most frequent heart rhythm disorder and is associated with a significantly increased risk of stroke, heart failure and death. Despite improvements in prevention and treatment, the prognosis has not changed significantly. To use new and promising pharmacological and interventional concepts for thromboembolic prophylaxis and treatment of AF, as well as prevention of recurrence, patient compliance has to be improved, physicians have to be trained and experience hast to be gained. A consistently carried 'anticoagulation pass' might be a promising piece of the puzzle. PMID:25409952

  11. Eigenvalue analysis of an irreversible random walk with skew detailed balance conditions.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yuji; Hukushima, Koji

    2016-04-01

    An irreversible Markov-chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm with skew detailed balance conditions originally proposed by Turitsyn et al. is extended to general discrete systems on the basis of the Metropolis-Hastings scheme. To evaluate the efficiency of our proposed method, the relaxation dynamics of the slowest mode and the asymptotic variance are studied analytically in a random walk on one dimension. It is found that the performance in irreversible MCMC methods violating the detailed balance condition is improved by appropriately choosing parameters in the algorithm. PMID:27176439

  12. Norovirus Diversity in Diarrheic Children from an African-Descendant Settlement in Belém, Northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Aragão, Glicélia Cruz; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira; Kaiano, Jane Haruko Lima; de Lucena, Maria Silvia Sousa; Siqueira, Jones Anderson Monteiro; Fumian, Túlio Machado; Hernandez, Juliana das Mercês; de Oliveira, Consuelo Silva; Oliveira, Darleise de Souza; Araújo, Eliete da Cunha; Soares, Luana da Silva; Linhares, Alexandre Costa; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol

    2013-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV), sapovirus (SaV) and human astrovirus (HAstV) are viral pathogens that are associated with outbreaks and sporadic cases of gastroenteritis. However, little is known about the occurrence of these pathogens in relatively isolated communities, such as the remnants of African-descendant villages (“Quilombola”). The objective of this study was the frequency determination of these viruses in children under 10 years, with and without gastroenteritis, from a “Quilombola” Community, Northern Brazil. A total of 159 stool samples were obtained from April/2008 to July/2010 and tested by an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect NoV, SaV and HAstV, and further molecular characterization was performed. These viruses were detected only in the diarrheic group. NoV was the most frequent viral agent detected (19.7%-16/81), followed by SaV (2.5%-2/81) and HAstV (1.2%-1/81). Of the 16 NoV-positive samples, 14 were sequenced with primers targeting the B region of the polymerase (ORF1) and the D region of the capsid (ORF2). The results showed a broad genetic diversity of NoV, with 12 strains being classified as GII-4 (5–41.7%), GII-6 (3–25%), GII-7 (2–16.7%), GII-17 (1–8.3%) and GI-2 (1–8.3%), as based on the polymerase region; 12 samples were classified, based on the capsid region, as GII-4 (6–50%, being 3–2006b variant and 3–2010 variant), GII-6 (3–25%), GII-17 (2–16.7%) and GII-20 (1–8.3%). One NoV-strain showed dual genotype specificity, based on the polymerase and capsid region (GII-7/GII-20). This study provides, for the first time, epidemiological and molecular information on the circulation of NoV, SaV and HAstV in African-descendant communities in Northern Brazil and identifies NoV genotypes that were different from those detected previously in studies conducted in the urban area of Belém. It remains to be determined why a broader NoV diversity was observed in such a semi

  13. Eutrophication control and the fallacy of nitrogen removal

    SciTech Connect

    Sincero, A.P.

    1984-11-01

    There has been a great deal of controversy over the issue of nitrogen control from sewage treatment plants discharges to alleviate excessive algae growths in receiving bodies of water. Some of the controversy seems to have risen from a thorough misunderstanding of the microbiology involved in the utilization of nitrogen by microbes. In a haste to control eutrophication, some regulators have required the removal of nitrogen from the effluent of sewage treatment plants; e.g., the Patuxent Nitrogen Removal Policy of the State of Maryland.

  14. Padé approximations for Painlevé I and II transcendents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novokshenov, V. Yu.

    2009-06-01

    We use a version of the Fair-Luke algorithm to find the Padé approximate solutions of the Painlevé I and II equations. We find the distributions of poles for the well-known Ablowitz-Segur and Hastings-McLeod solutions of the Painlevé II equation. We show that the Boutroux tritronquée solution of the Painleé I equation has poles only in the critical sector of the complex plane. The algorithm allows checking other analytic properties of the Painlevé transcendents, such as the asymptotic behavior at infinity in the complex plane.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of a noisy quantum channel with memory.

    PubMed

    Akhalwaya, Ismail; Moodley, Mervlyn; Petruccione, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    The classical capacity of quantum channels is well understood for channels with uncorrelated noise. For the case of correlated noise, however, there are still open questions. We calculate the classical capacity of a forgetful channel constructed by Markov switching between two depolarizing channels. Techniques have previously been applied to approximate the output entropy of this channel and thus its capacity. In this paper, we use a Metropolis-Hastings Monte Carlo approach to numerically calculate the entropy. The algorithm is implemented in parallel and its performance is studied and optimized. The effects of memory on the capacity are explored and previous results are confirmed to higher precision. PMID:26565361

  16. Cruzan: On taking substituted judgment seriously.

    PubMed

    Baron, C

    1990-01-01

    In its September/October 1990 issue, the Hastings Center Report published six brief essays with a short introduction by Courtney S. Campbell under the collective title of "Cruzan: clear and convincing?" These articles present a range of responses from participants, parents, constitutional scholars, and caregivers to the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Cruzan v. Director, Missouri Department of Health (June 25, 1990). Legal scholar Charles Baron, though an advocate for patients' rights in general and the right to die in particular, argues that the Supreme Court rendered the right decision in Cruzan. PMID:2228593

  17. Driving forces behind integration: weigh your options.

    PubMed

    Friend, P M; Meighan, S

    1994-01-01

    Collaborative relationships between hospitals and physicians can take many forms. Before you choose your strategy, consider the benefits and drawbacks of each. Many of America's hospitals and physicians are rushing to integrate their services through a variety of collaborative options. Their haste has been encouraged by many factors. Before hospitals and physicians react to the driving forces around them, they should carefully consider the pros and cons of four types of collaborative options: 1. management service organizations, 2. physician-hospital organizations, 3. practice acquisition models, 4. equity models. PMID:10133599

  18. Norovirus diversity in diarrheic children from an African-descendant settlement in Belém, Northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Aragão, Glicélia Cruz; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira; Kaiano, Jane Haruko Lima; de Lucena, Maria Silvia Sousa; Siqueira, Jones Anderson Monteiro; Fumian, Túlio Machado; Hernandez, Juliana das Mercês; de Oliveira, Consuelo Silva; Oliveira, Darleise de Souza; Araújo, Eliete da Cunha; Soares, Luana da Silva; Linhares, Alexandre Costa; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol

    2013-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV), sapovirus (SaV) and human astrovirus (HAstV) are viral pathogens that are associated with outbreaks and sporadic cases of gastroenteritis. However, little is known about the occurrence of these pathogens in relatively isolated communities, such as the remnants of African-descendant villages ("Quilombola"). The objective of this study was the frequency determination of these viruses in children under 10 years, with and without gastroenteritis, from a "Quilombola" Community, Northern Brazil. A total of 159 stool samples were obtained from April/2008 to July/2010 and tested by an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect NoV, SaV and HAstV, and further molecular characterization was performed. These viruses were detected only in the diarrheic group. NoV was the most frequent viral agent detected (19.7%-16/81), followed by SaV (2.5%-2/81) and HAstV (1.2%-1/81). Of the 16 NoV-positive samples, 14 were sequenced with primers targeting the B region of the polymerase (ORF1) and the D region of the capsid (ORF2). The results showed a broad genetic diversity of NoV, with 12 strains being classified as GII-4 (5-41.7%), GII-6 (3-25%), GII-7 (2-16.7%), GII-17 (1-8.3%) and GI-2 (1-8.3%), as based on the polymerase region; 12 samples were classified, based on the capsid region, as GII-4 (6-50%, being 3-2006b variant and 3-2010 variant), GII-6 (3-25%), GII-17 (2-16.7%) and GII-20 (1-8.3%). One NoV-strain showed dual genotype specificity, based on the polymerase and capsid region (GII-7/GII-20). This study provides, for the first time, epidemiological and molecular information on the circulation of NoV, SaV and HAstV in African-descendant communities in Northern Brazil and identifies NoV genotypes that were different from those detected previously in studies conducted in the urban area of Belém. It remains to be determined why a broader NoV diversity was observed in such a semi-isolated community. PMID:23457593

  19. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Cellular Automaton Simulations for Target Waves in Excitable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Sheng; Deng, Min-Yi; Kong, Ling-Jiang; Liu, Mu-Ren; Tang, Guo-Ning

    2010-01-01

    Using the Greenberg-Hasting cellular automata model, we study the properties of target waves in excitable media under the no-flux boundary conditions. For the system has only one excited state, the computer simulation and analysis lead to the conclusions that, the number of refractory states does not influence the wave-front speed; the wave-front speed decreases as the excitation threshold increases and increases as the neighbor radius increases; the period of target waves is equal to the number of cell states; the excitation condition for target waves is that the wave-front speed must be bigger than half of the neighbor radius.

  20. Astrovirus MLB1 Is Not Associated with Diarrhea in a Cohort of Indian Children

    PubMed Central

    Holtz, Lori R.; Bauer, Irma K.; Rajendran, Priya; Kang, Gagandeep; Wang, David

    2011-01-01

    Astroviruses are a known cause of human diarrhea. Recently the highly divergent astrovirus MLB1 (MLB1) was identified in a stool sample from a patient with diarrhea. It has subsequently been detected in stool from individuals with and without diarrhea. To determine whether MLB1 is associated with diarrhea, we conducted a case control study of MLB1. In parallel, the prevalence of the classic human astroviruses (HAstVs) was also determined in the same case control cohort. 400 cases and 400 paired controls from a longitudinal birth cohort in Vellore, India were analyzed by RT-PCR. While HAstVs were associated with diarrhea (p = 0.029) in this cohort, MLB1 was not; 14 of the controls and 4 cases were positive for MLB1. Furthermore, MLB1 viral load did not differ significantly between the cases and controls. The role of MLB1 in human health still remains unknown and future studies are needed. PMID:22174853

  1. Modeling the Sinoatrial Node by Cellular Automata with Irregular Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowiec, Danuta

    The role of irregularity in intercellular connections is studied in the first natural human pacemaker called the sinoatrial node by modeling with the Greenberg-Hastings cellular automata. Facts from modern physiology about the sinoatrial node drive modeling. Heterogeneity between cell connections is reproduced by a rewiring procedure applied to a square lattice. The Greenberg-Hastings rule, representing the intrinsic cellular dynamics, is modified to imitate self-excitation of each pacemaker cell. Moreover, interactions with nearest neighbors are changed to heterogeneous ones by enhancing horizontal connections. Stationary states of the modeled system emerge as self-organized robust oscillatory states. Since the sinoatrial node role relies on a single cell cyclic activity, properties of single cells are studied. It appears that the strength and diversity of cellular oscillations depend directly on properties of intrinsic cellular dynamics. But these oscillations also depend on the underlying topology. Moderate nonuniformity of intercellular connections are found vital for proper function of the sinoatrial node, namely, for producing robust oscillatory states that are able to respond effectively to the autonomic system control.

  2. Effect of High Temperature Storage in Vacuum, Air, and Humid Conditions on Degradation of Gold/Aluminum Wire Bonds in PEMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Microcircuits encapsulated in three plastic package styles were stored in different environments at temperatures varying from 130 C to 225 C for up to 4,000 hours in some cases. To assess the effect of oxygen, the parts were aged at high temperatures in air and in vacuum chambers. The effect of humidity was evaluated during long-term highly accelerated temperature and humidity stress testing (HAST) at temperatures of 130 C and 150 C. High temperature storage testing of decapsulated microcircuits in air, vacuum, and HAST chambers was carried out to evaluate the role of molding compounds in the environmentally-induced degradation and failure of wire bonds (WB). This paper reports on accelerating factors of environment and molding compound on WB failures. It has been shown that all environments, including oxygen, moisture, and the presence of molding compounds reduce time-to-failures compared to unencapsulated devices in vacuum conditions. The mechanism of the environmental effect on KB degradation is discussed.

  3. AN AFFINE-INVARIANT SAMPLER FOR EXOPLANET FITTING AND DISCOVERY IN RADIAL VELOCITY DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Fengji; Hogg, David W.; Goodman, Jonathan; Weare, Jonathan; Schwab, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) proves to be powerful for Bayesian inference and in particular for exoplanet radial velocity fitting because MCMC provides more statistical information and makes better use of data than common approaches like chi-square fitting. However, the nonlinear density functions encountered in these problems can make MCMC time-consuming. In this paper, we apply an ensemble sampler respecting affine invariance to orbital parameter extraction from radial velocity data. This new sampler has only one free parameter, and does not require much tuning for good performance, which is important for automatization. The autocorrelation time of this sampler is approximately the same for all parameters and far smaller than Metropolis-Hastings, which means it requires many fewer function calls to produce the same number of independent samples. The affine-invariant sampler speeds up MCMC by hundreds of times compared with Metropolis-Hastings in the same computing situation. This novel sampler would be ideal for projects involving large data sets such as statistical investigations of planet distribution. The biggest obstacle to ensemble samplers is the existence of multiple local optima; we present a clustering technique to deal with local optima by clustering based on the likelihood of the walkers in the ensemble. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the sampler on real radial velocity data.

  4. Inscribed matter as an energy-efficient means of communication with an extraterrestrial civilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Christopher; Wright, Gregory

    2004-09-01

    It is well known that electromagnetic radiation-radio waves-can in principle be used to communicate over interstellar distances. By contrast, sending physical artefacts has seemed extravagantly wasteful of energy, and imagining human travel between the stars even more so. The key consideration in earlier work, however, was the perceived need for haste. If extraterrestrial civilizations existed within a few tens of light years, radio could be used for two-way communication on timescales comparable to human lifetimes (or at least the longevities of human institutions). Here we show that if haste is unimportant, sending messages inscribed on some material can be strikingly more energy efficient than communicating by electromagnetic waves. Because messages require protection from cosmic radiation and small messages could be difficult to find among the material clutter near a recipient, `inscribed matter' is most effective for long archival messages (as opposed to potentially short ``we exist'' announcements). The results suggest that our initial contact with extraterrestrial civilizations may be more likely to occur through physical artefacts-essentially messages in a bottle-than via electromagnetic communication.

  5. Fitting complex population models by combining particle filters with Markov chain Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Knape, Jonas; de Valpine, Perry

    2012-02-01

    We show how a recent framework combining Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) with particle filters (PFMCMC) may be used to estimate population state-space models. With the purpose of utilizing the strengths of each method, PFMCMC explores hidden states by particle filters, while process and observation parameters are estimated using an MCMC algorithm. PFMCMC is exemplified by analyzing time series data on a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) population in New South Wales, Australia, using MCMC over model parameters based on an adaptive Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. We fit three population models to these data; a density-dependent logistic diffusion model with environmental variance, an unregulated stochastic exponential growth model, and a random-walk model. Bayes factors and posterior model probabilities show that there is little support for density dependence and that the random-walk model is the most parsimonious model. The particle filter Metropolis-Hastings algorithm is a brute-force method that may be used to fit a range of complex population models. Implementation is straightforward and less involved than standard MCMC for many models, and marginal densities for model selection can be obtained with little additional effort. The cost is mainly computational, resulting in long running times that may be improved by parallelizing the algorithm. PMID:22624307

  6. Effect of oxygen pressure on glycogen synthesis by rat-liver slices

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Enrique; Vallejos, Rodolfo; Pfeifer, Ariana; Kahler, Cecilia

    1966-01-01

    1. Glycogen synthesized by rat-liver slices 0·5mm. thick incubated at 1atm. oxygen pressure in Hastings medium with glucose was localized in the cells of the periphery of the slice. Cells of the interior of this slice do not synthesize glycogen. 2. Inner cells of thin slices (about 0·3mm. thick) can synthesize glycogen when such slices are incubated under the same conditions, but oxygen pressures higher than 1atm. are required if inner cells of slices 0·5mm. or more thick are to be able to synthesize glycogen. 3. Localization of newly synthesized glycogen in rat-liver slices incubated in Hastings medium with glucose does not depend on glucose concentration. 4. Calculation of the minimum oxygen pressure required to synthesize glycogen gives values between 0·09 and 0·17atm. 5. The advantages of high oxygen pressures for the study of the synthesis of glycogen and other compounds that require ATP are discussed. ImagesFig. 2.Fig. 5. PMID:5938650

  7. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods: an introductory example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klauenberg, Katy; Elster, Clemens

    2016-02-01

    When the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) and methods from its supplements are not applicable, the Bayesian approach may be a valid and welcome alternative. Evaluating the posterior distribution, estimates or uncertainties involved in Bayesian inferences often requires numerical methods to avoid high-dimensional integrations. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling is such a method—powerful, flexible and widely applied. Here, a concise introduction is given, illustrated by a simple, typical example from metrology. The Metropolis-Hastings algorithm is the most basic and yet flexible MCMC method. Its underlying concepts are explained and the algorithm is given step by step. The few lines of software code required for its implementation invite interested readers to get started. Diagnostics to evaluate the performance and common algorithmic choices are illustrated to calibrate the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm for efficiency. Routine application of MCMC algorithms may be hindered currently by the difficulty to assess the convergence of MCMC output and thus to assure the validity of results. An example points to the importance of convergence and initiates discussion about advantages as well as areas of research. Available software tools are mentioned throughout.

  8. Improved resolution and a novel phylogeny for the Neotropical triplefin blennies (Teleostei: Tripterygiidae).

    PubMed

    Miller, Elizabeth Christina; Lin, Hsiu-Chin; Hastings, Philip A

    2016-03-01

    The triplefin blennies (Teleostei: Tripterygiidae) are a diverse group of small-bodied benthic fishes associated with rocky or coral reefs. The Neotropics contain four genera and 26 species, many of which have only been recently described. A recent molecular phylogeny (Lin and Hastings, 2013) contrasts with previous phylogenies based on morphology in recovering the four Neotropical genera as a single clade with respect to the Indo-Pacific genera; however, relationships within and among genera were poorly resolved. This study reports a novel topology based on an expanded seven-loci molecular dataset. Individual gene trees have poor resolution, but concatenated analyses show strong support for most nodes, likely due to emergent support from concatenation. Consistent with Lin and Hastings (2013), three of the Neotropical genera, Axoclinus, Enneanectes, and Crocodilichthys, form a well-supported clade, but relationships of the fourth (Lepidonectes) are not confidently resolved. The monophyly of Axoclinus is well supported, but Enneanectes is paraphyletic with the inclusion of Axoclinus and Crocodilichthys. Improved resolution allows for reinterpretation of the biogeography of the Neotropical Tripterygiidae. Broader taxon sampling is still necessary for resolving the relationships within Tripterygiidae globally. PMID:26718057

  9. Frontoparietal white matter integrity predicts haptic performance in chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Borstad, Alexandra L; Choi, Seongjin; Schmalbrock, Petra; Nichols-Larsen, Deborah S

    2016-01-01

    Frontoparietal white matter supports information transfer between brain areas involved in complex haptic tasks such as somatosensory discrimination. The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the relationship between microstructural integrity of frontoparietal network white matter and haptic performance in persons with chronic stroke and to compare frontoparietal network integrity in participants with stroke and age matched control participants. Nineteen individuals with stroke and 16 controls participated. Haptic performance was quantified using the Hand Active Sensation Test (HASTe), an 18-item match-to-sample test of weight and texture discrimination. Three tesla MRI was used to obtain diffusion-weighted and high-resolution anatomical images of the whole brain. Probabilistic tractography was used to define 10 frontoparietal tracts total; Four intrahemispheric tracts measured bilaterally 1) thalamus to primary somatosensory cortex (T-S1), 2) thalamus to primary motor cortex (T-M1), 3) primary to secondary somatosensory cortex (S1 to SII) and 4) primary somatosensory cortex to middle frontal gyrus (S1 to MFG) and, 2 interhemispheric tracts; S1-S1 and precuneus interhemispheric. A control tract outside the network, the cuneus interhemispheric tract, was also examined. The diffusion metrics fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD) were quantified for each tract. Diminished FA and elevated MD values are associated with poorer white matter integrity in chronic stroke. Nine of 10 tracts quantified in the frontoparietal network had diminished structural integrity poststroke compared to the controls. The precuneus interhemispheric tract was not significantly different between groups. Principle component analysis across all frontoparietal white matter tract MD values indicated a single factor explained 47% and 57% of the variance in tract mean diffusivity in stroke and control groups respectively. Age

  10. Frontoparietal white matter integrity predicts haptic performance in chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Borstad, Alexandra L.; Choi, Seongjin; Schmalbrock, Petra; Nichols-Larsen, Deborah S.

    2015-01-01

    Frontoparietal white matter supports information transfer between brain areas involved in complex haptic tasks such as somatosensory discrimination. The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the relationship between microstructural integrity of frontoparietal network white matter and haptic performance in persons with chronic stroke and to compare frontoparietal network integrity in participants with stroke and age matched control participants. Nineteen individuals with stroke and 16 controls participated. Haptic performance was quantified using the Hand Active Sensation Test (HASTe), an 18-item match-to-sample test of weight and texture discrimination. Three tesla MRI was used to obtain diffusion-weighted and high-resolution anatomical images of the whole brain. Probabilistic tractography was used to define 10 frontoparietal tracts total; Four intrahemispheric tracts measured bilaterally 1) thalamus to primary somatosensory cortex (T–S1), 2) thalamus to primary motor cortex (T–M1), 3) primary to secondary somatosensory cortex (S1 to SII) and 4) primary somatosensory cortex to middle frontal gyrus (S1 to MFG) and, 2 interhemispheric tracts; S1–S1 and precuneus interhemispheric. A control tract outside the network, the cuneus interhemispheric tract, was also examined. The diffusion metrics fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD) were quantified for each tract. Diminished FA and elevated MD values are associated with poorer white matter integrity in chronic stroke. Nine of 10 tracts quantified in the frontoparietal network had diminished structural integrity poststroke compared to the controls. The precuneus interhemispheric tract was not significantly different between groups. Principle component analysis across all frontoparietal white matter tract MD values indicated a single factor explained 47% and 57% of the variance in tract mean diffusivity in stroke and control groups respectively. Age

  11. Quantitative analysis of the breath-holding half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo technique in abdominal MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    A consecutive series of 50 patients (28 males and 22 females) who underwent hepatic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from August to December 2011 were enrolled in this study. The appropriate parameters for abdominal MRI scans were determined by comparing the images (TE = 90 and 128 msec) produced using the half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) technique at different signal acquisition times. The patients consisted of 15 normal patients, 25 patients with a hepatoma and 10 patients with a hemangioma. The TE in a single patient was set to either 90 msec or 128 msec. This was followed by measurements using the four normal rendering methods of the biliary tract system and the background signal intensity using the maximal signal intensity techniques in the liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, fat, muscles and hemangioma. The signal-to-noise and the contrast-to-noise ratios were obtained. The image quality was assessed subjectively, and the results were compared. The signal-to-noise and the contrast-to-noise ratios were significantly higher at TE = 128 msec than at TE = 90 when diseases of the liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, and fat and muscles, hepatocellular carcinomas and hemangiomas, and rendering the hepatobiliary tract system based on the maximum signal intensity technique were involved (p < 0.05). In addition, the presence of artifacts, the image clarity and the overall image quality were excellent at TE = 128 msec (p < 0.05). In abdominal MRI, the breath-hold half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) was found to be effective in illustrating the abdominal organs for TE = 128 msec. Overall, the image quality at TE = 128 msec was better than that at TE = 90 msec due to the improved signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios. Overall, the HASTE technique for abdominal MRI based on a high-magnetic field (3.0 T) at a TE of 128 msec can provide useful data.

  12. Improving fitness of elite handball players: small-sided games vs. high-intensity intermittent training.

    PubMed

    Iacono, Antonio Dello; Eliakim, Alon; Meckel, Yoav

    2015-03-01

    The present study was designed to compare the effects of high-intensity intermittent training (HIIT) and small-sided games (SSGs) training on fitness variables of elite handball players. Eighteen highly trained players (mean age ± SD: 25.6 ± 0.5 years) were assigned to either HIIT or SSGs group training protocols twice per week for 8 weeks. The HIIT consisted of 12-24 × 15 seconds of high-intensity runs interspersed by 15 seconds of recovery. The SSGs training consisted of 3 against 3 small-sided handball games. Both training methods were matched for exercise duration and recovery at each training session. Before and after 8-week training, the following fitness variables were assessed-speed: 10- and 20-m sprint time, agility: handball agility specific test (HAST), upper arm strength: 1 repetition maximum (1RM) bench press test, lower limb power: counter-movement jump tests with (CMJarm) and without (CMJ) arm movement, and aerobic fitness (yo-yo intermittent recovery test level 1 [YYIRTL1]). Significant improvement was found in the YYIRTL1 (23.3 and 26.3%, respectively), 10-m sprint (2.3 and 4.1%, respectively) and 20-m sprint (2.1 and 4%, respectively), HAST (1.1 and 2.2%, respectively), 1RM bench press (6.8 and 12.3%, respectively), CMJ (7.4 and 10.8%, respectively), and CMJarm (6.4 and 8.9%, respectively) following training in both groups (p ≤ 0.05 for all). There was a significantly greater improvement in 10- and 20-m sprint, HAST, 1RM, CMJ, and CMJarm following the SSGs training compared with the HIIT (p ≤ 0.05 for all). These results indicated that both HIIT and SSGs are effective training methods for fitness development among elite adult handball players. However, SSGs training may be considered as the preferred training regimen for improving handball-specific fitness variables during the in-season period. PMID:25226326

  13. Mid-Eocene alluvial-lacustrine succession at Gebel El-Goza El-Hamra (Shabrawet area, NE Eastern Desert, Egypt): Facies analysis, sequence stratigraphy and paleoclimatic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanas, H. A.; Sallam, E.; Zobaa, M. K.; Li, X.

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to provide the depositional facies, sequence stratigraphic and paleoclimatic characteristics of the Mid-Eocene (Bartonian) continental succession exposed at Gebel El-Goza El-Hamra (Shabrawet Area, NE Eastern Desert, Egypt). The studied succession consists of siliciclastic rocks followed upward by carbonate rocks. Detailed field observation and petrographic investigation indicate accumulation in floodplain-dominated alluvial and shallow lacustrine systems. The floodplain-dominated alluvial facies (45 m thick) is composed mainly of carbonate nodules-bearing, mottled mudrock with subordinate sandstone and conglomerate beds. The conglomerate and pebbly sandstone bodies interpreted as ephemeral braided channel deposits. The massive, laminated, planner cross-bedded, fine- to medium-grained sandstone bodies interlayered within mudstone reflect sheet flood deposits. The mudrocks associated with paleosols represent distal floodplain deposits. The shallow lacustrine facies (15 m thick) is made up of an alternation of marlstone, micritic limestone, dolostone and mudrock beds with charophytes and small gastropods. Both the alluvial and lacustrine facies show evidence of macro-and micro-pedogenic features. Pollen assemblages, stable δ18O and δ13C isotopes, and paleopedogenic features reflect prevalence of arid to semi-arid climatic conditions during the Bartonian. The sequence stratigraphic framework shows an overall fining-upward depositional sequence, consisting of Low- and High-accommodation Systems Tracts (LAST, HAST), and is bounded by two sequence boundaries (SB-1, SB-2). Conglomerate and pebbly sandstone deposits (braided channel and sheet flood deposits) of the lower part of the alluvial facies reflect a LAST. Mudrock and silty claystone facies (distal floodplain deposits) of the upper part of alluvial facies and its overlying lacustrine facies correspond to a HAST. The LAST, HAST and SB were formed during different accommodation-to-sediment supply (A

  14. DNA Microarray for Detection of Gastrointestinal Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Miguel A.; Soto-del Río, María de los Dolores; Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Chiu, Charles Y.; Greninger, Alexander L.; Contreras, Juan Francisco; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is a clinical illness of humans and other animals that is characterized by vomiting and diarrhea and caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. An increasing number of viral species have been associated with gastroenteritis or have been found in stool samples as new molecular tools have been developed. In this work, a DNA microarray capable in theory of parallel detection of more than 100 viral species was developed and tested. Initial validation was done with 10 different virus species, and an additional 5 species were validated using clinical samples. Detection limits of 1 × 103 virus particles of Human adenovirus C (HAdV), Human astrovirus (HAstV), and group A Rotavirus (RV-A) were established. Furthermore, when exogenous RNA was added, the limit for RV-A detection decreased by one log. In a small group of clinical samples from children with gastroenteritis (n = 76), the microarray detected at least one viral species in 92% of the samples. Single infection was identified in 63 samples (83%), and coinfection with more than one virus was identified in 7 samples (9%). The most abundant virus species were RV-A (58%), followed by Anellovirus (15.8%), HAstV (6.6%), HAdV (5.3%), Norwalk virus (6.6%), Human enterovirus (HEV) (9.2%), Human parechovirus (1.3%), Sapporo virus (1.3%), and Human bocavirus (1.3%). To further test the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray, the results were verified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of 5 gastrointestinal viruses. The RT-PCR assay detected a virus in 59 samples (78%). The microarray showed good performance for detection of RV-A, HAstV, and calicivirus, while the sensitivity for HAdV and HEV was low. Furthermore, some discrepancies in detection of mixed infections were observed and were addressed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the viruses involved. It was observed that differences in the amount of genetic material favored the detection of the most abundant

  15. Detection of spatially extended sources in high energy astrophysics with special application to lunar occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenke, Peter Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Occultation is a technique that enables image reconstruction and source identification with a non-imaging detector. Such an approach is well suited for a future survey mission in nuclear astrophysics. In particular, the Lunar Occultation Technique (LOT) utilizes the Moon as an occulting object and is the basis of a new gamma-ray survey mission concept, the Lunar OCcultation Observer (LOCO). Techniques utilizing the LOT to detect spatially extended emission, from the Galactic plane or Galactic Center region, have been developed. Given knowledge of detector position in lunar orbit, combined with lunar ephemeris and relevant coordinate transformations, occultation time series can be used to reconstruct skymaps of these extended Galactic emitters. Monte-Carlo Markov Chains (MCMC), incorporating the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm for parametric model testing, form the basis of the technique. Performance of the imaging methodology, and its application to nuclear astrophysics will be presented.

  16. field notes.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    For the last six months or so, some of us at The Hastings Center have been participating in a kind of short-term book group. Together we have been thinking about the contribution of moral psychology to bioethics. One of our questions is whether bioethics' understanding of moral values should draw on what moral psychology tells us about moral values. Bioethics tends to look to philosophy for guidance. Can it learn from insights in moral psychology into the biological, environmental, and cultural influences on morality? The question can be taken in many directions. One that I've wrestled with has to do with debates about genetic engineering, where a common concern is that genetic alteration of other organisms, and maybe also of humans, doesn't sit well with the kind of relationship that people want to have to nature. PMID:27150424

  17. Reproductive technology: in Britain, the debate after the Warnock Report.

    PubMed

    Gillon, Raanan

    1987-06-01

    Gillon contributes an article on Great Britain to the Hastings Center Report series on reproductive technologies outside the United States. In 1984 the Warnock Committee's report represented the first attempt by a national government to formulate a policy on reproductive issues such as artificial insemination, in vitro fertilization, surrogate mothers, and research on human embryos. Reaction to the Warnock report has focused on its recommendations to ban commercial surrogacy and to allow experimentation on embryos up to 14 days after fertilization. Legislation on surrogacy was passed in 1985, while bills banning embryo research failed in 1986. A 1986 government consultation paper called for discussion of other aspects of the Warnock report, including its recommendation that a statutory licensing authority to regulate reproductive technologies be established. Gillon predicts that no new legislation will be enacted under the present government. PMID:11644023

  18. Lessons not yet learned from the Fukushima disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klügel, Jens-Uwe

    2014-05-01

    The Fukushima nuclear catastrophe has led to a wide-spread international discussion on how seismic and tsunami hazards can be better predicted and adverse consequences be prevented.In some countries the event led to the complete phase-out of nuclear energy. The lessons drawn by different organisations including earth scientists, earthquake engineers,non-governmental and governmental organisations will be reviewed from an independent position. This review captures the following areas: 1) Hazard assessment 2) Engineering design and defense in depth concepts 3) Emergency preparedness It is shown that not all important lessons from the catastrophe have been drawn. Especially the need of an holistic approach towards hazard assessment and the implementation of defense in depth and diversity of design principles for critical infrastructures like nuclear power plants hast to be stronger emphasized to prevent similar disasters.

  19. Is there life after Roe v. Wade?

    PubMed

    Mahowald, M B

    1989-01-01

    Mahowald's article is one of three in this issue of the Hastings Center Report under the overall title of "Abortion: searching for common ground." The articles were occasioned by the impending U.S. Supreme Court decision in Webster v. Reproductive Health Services (decided 3 Jul 1989), which was widely regarded as the Court's reconsideration of Roe v. Wade (1973). The debate in the United States over abortion has become intransigent and polarized since Roe, and the HCR articles by Mahowald, M. Glendon, and N. Rhoden represent an effort to find areas of agreement between advocates on both sides of the abortion question. Mahowald identifies several points of convergence and proposes modifications to Roe that might better accommodate competing interests of woman, fetus, and society. PMID:2663777

  20. A compromise on abortion?

    PubMed

    Rhoden, N K

    1989-01-01

    Rhoden's article is one of three on "Abortion: searching for common ground" in this issue of the Hastings Center Report. Her article, together with those by M. Mahowald and M. Glendon, was prompted by the expectation that the impending U.S. Supreme Court decision in Webster v. Reproductive Health Services (3 July 1989) would overturn or restrict Roe v. Wade (1973). Rhoden, an advocate for the pro-choice position, asks whether a compromise leading to an acceptable regulatory policy is possible or desirable among those on opposite sides of the abortion issue. She identifies several reasons why the Roe decision is vulnerable to review, but argues that effective education about sexuality and comprehensive social support of women are better approaches to abortion than restrictive legislation. PMID:2663778

  1. Coping and positive perceptions in Irish mothers of children with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Greer, Felicity A; Grey, Ian M; McClean, Brian

    2006-09-01

    Thirty-six mothers of children aged between 5 and 8 years with intellectual disabilities completed five self-report questionnaires measuring variables related to behavioural and emotional difficulties, levels of care demand, family supports, coping and positive perceptions. The relationships among these variables were investigated using a working model proposed by Hastings and Taunt (2002). Child behavioural and emotional problems in the non-clinical range predicted low levels of care demand. Formal social support was an effective form of support for mothers; helpfulness of formal social support predicted mobilizing the family to acquire and accept help in the community; and mobilizing the family predicted levels of strength and family closeness. The majority of respondents rated agreement with statements that their child was: a source of happiness or fulfilment; a source of strength and family closeness; and a source of personal growth and maturity. The theoretical and clinical implications of these results are discussed. PMID:16916848

  2. Constraints on topological order in mott insulators.

    PubMed

    Zaletel, Michael P; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2015-02-20

    We point out certain symmetry induced constraints on topological order in Mott insulators (quantum magnets with an odd number of spin 1/2 moments per unit cell). We show, for example, that the double-semion topological order is incompatible with time reversal and translation symmetry in Mott insulators. This sharpens the Hastings-Oshikawa-Lieb-Schultz-Mattis theorem for 2D quantum magnets, which guarantees that a fully symmetric gapped Mott insulator must be topologically ordered, but is silent about which topological order is permitted. Our result applies to the kagome lattice quantum antiferromagnet, where recent numerical calculations of the entanglement entropy indicate a ground state compatible with either toric code or double-semion topological order. Our result rules out the latter possibility. PMID:25763971

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of field emission from a planar nanodiode

    SciTech Connect

    Torfason, Kristinn; Valfells, Agust; Manolescu, Andrei

    2015-03-15

    High resolution molecular dynamics simulations with full Coulomb interactions of electrons are used to investigate field emission in planar nanodiodes. The effects of space-charge and emitter radius are examined and compared to previous results concerning transition from Fowler-Nordheim to Child-Langmuir current [Y. Y. Lau, Y. Liu, and R. K. Parker, Phys. Plasmas 1, 2082 (1994) and Y. Feng and J. P. Verboncoeur, Phys. Plasmas 13, 073105 (2006)]. The Fowler-Nordheim law is used to determine the current density injected into the system and the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm to find a favourable point of emission on the emitter surface. A simple fluid like model is also developed and its results are in qualitative agreement with the simulations.

  4. MRI in the assessment of pregnancy related intrauterine bleeding: a valuable adjunct to ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Verswijvel, G; Grieten, M; Gyselaers, W; Van Holsbeke, C; Vandevenne, J; Horvath, M; Gelin, G; Palmers, Y

    2002-01-01

    MR imaging using ultrafast MR sequences is a useful method in assessing pregnancies at risk. This is especially the case for fetal imaging. However, reports of imaging of the placenta or the uterus are rare. We report the MR findings in 8 pregnant patients with vaginal blood loss in whom the obstetrical ultrasound was equivocal. MR imaging was performed with a 1.5 T magnet and consisted of T2- (HASTE), fat-suppressed gradient echo T1- and gradient echo T2-weighted images. Adequate anatomical visualisation of the uterus, the placentary tissue and the intrauterine bleeding irrespective of size and location of the latter, were obtained in all cases. PMID:12403387

  5. Intensity coding in two-dimensional excitable neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copelli, Mauro; Kinouchi, Osame

    2005-04-01

    In the light of recent experimental findings that gap junctions are essential for low level intensity detection in the sensory periphery, the Greenberg-Hastings cellular automaton is employed to model the response of a two-dimensional sensory network to external stimuli. We show that excitable elements (sensory neurons) that have a small dynamical range are shown to give rise to a collective large dynamical range. Therefore the network transfer (gain) function (which is Hill or Stevens law-like) is an emergent property generated from a pool of small dynamical range cells, providing a basis for a “neural psychophysics”. The growth of the dynamical range with the system size is approximately logarithmic, suggesting a functional role for electrical coupling. For a fixed number of neurons, the dynamical range displays a maximum as a function of the refractory period, which suggests experimental tests for the model. A biological application to ephaptic interactions in olfactory nerve fascicles is proposed.

  6. Light cone matrix product

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Matthew B

    2009-01-01

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {Delta} = 0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx} 22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  7. A Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo Based Method for Flaw Detection in Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, R E; Lee, C L; Nitao, J J; Hickling, T L; Hanley, W G

    2006-09-28

    A Bayesian inference methodology using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling procedure is presented for estimating the parameters of computational structural models. This methodology combines prior information, measured data, and forward models to produce a posterior distribution for the system parameters of structural models that is most consistent with all available data. The MCMC procedure is based upon a Metropolis-Hastings algorithm that is shown to function effectively with noisy data, incomplete data sets, and mismatched computational nodes/measurement points. A series of numerical test cases based upon a cantilever beam is presented. The results demonstrate that the algorithm is able to estimate model parameters utilizing experimental data for the nodal displacements resulting from specified forces.

  8. Modeling association among demographic parameters in analysis of open population capture?recapture data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Barker, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    We present a hierarchical extension of the Cormack?Jolly?Seber (CJS) model for open population capture?recapture data. In addition to recaptures of marked animals, we model first captures of animals and losses on capture. The parameter set includes capture probabilities, survival rates, and birth rates. The survival rates and birth rates are treated as a random sample from a bivariate distribution, thus the model explicitly incorporates correlation in these demographic rates. A key feature of the model is that the likelihood function, which includes a CJS model factor, is expressed entirely in terms of identifiable parameters; losses on capture can be factored out of the model. Since the computational complexity of classical likelihood methods is prohibitive, we use Markov chain Monte Carlo in a Bayesian analysis. We describe an efficient candidate-generation scheme for Metropolis?Hastings sampling of CJS models and extensions. The procedure is illustrated using mark-recapture data for the moth Gonodontis bidentata.

  9. Large-eddy simulation of flow around an airfoil on a structured mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaltenbach, Hans-Jakob; Choi, Haecheon

    1995-01-01

    The diversity of flow characteristics encountered in a flow over an airfoil near maximum lift taxes the presently available statistical turbulence models. This work describes our first attempt to apply the technique of large-eddy simulation to a flow of aeronautical interest. The challenge for this simulation comes from the high Reynolds number of the flow as well as the variety of flow regimes encountered, including a thin laminar boundary layer at the nose, transition, boundary layer growth under adverse pressure gradient, incipient separation near the trailing edge, and merging of two shear layers at the trailing edge. The flow configuration chosen is a NACA 4412 airfoil near maximum lift. The corresponding angle of attack was determined independently by Wadcock (1987) and Hastings & Williams (1984, 1987) to be close to 12 deg. The simulation matches the chord Reynolds number U(sub infinity)c/v = 1.64 x 10(exp 6) of Wadcock's experiment.

  10. Generalized Dynamic Factor Models for Mixed-Measurement Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Kai; Dunson, David B.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we propose generalized Bayesian dynamic factor models for jointly modeling mixed-measurement time series. The framework allows mixed-scale measurements associated with each time series, with different measurements having different distributions in the exponential family conditionally on time-varying latent factor(s). Efficient Bayesian computational algorithms are developed for posterior inference on both the latent factors and model parameters, based on a Metropolis Hastings algorithm with adaptive proposals. The algorithm relies on a Greedy Density Kernel Approximation (GDKA) and parameter expansion with latent factor normalization. We tested the framework and algorithms in simulated studies and applied them to the analysis of intertwined credit and recovery risk for Moody’s rated firms from 1982–2008, illustrating the importance of jointly modeling mixed-measurement time series. The article has supplemental materials available online. PMID:24791133

  11. Optimal timing for managed relocation of species faced with climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald Madden, Eve; Runge, Michael C.; Possingham, Hugh P.; Martin, Tara G.

    2011-01-01

    Managed relocation is a controversial climate-adaptation strategy to combat negative climate change impacts on biodiversity. While the scientific community debates the merits of managed relocation, species are already being moved to new areas predicted to be more suitable under climate change. To inform these moves, we construct a quantitative decision framework to evaluate the timing of relocation in the face of climate change. We find that the optimal timing depends on many factors, including the size of the population, the demographic costs of translocation and the expected carrying capacities over time in the source and destination habitats. In some settings, such as when a small population would benefit from time to grow before risking translocation losses, haste is ill advised. We also find that active adaptive management is valuable when the effect of climate change on source habitat is uncertain, and leads to delayed movement.

  12. 31. WEST TO PARTS AND TOOLS LOCATED DIRECTLY OPPOSITE FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. WEST TO PARTS AND TOOLS LOCATED DIRECTLY OPPOSITE FROM THE BLACKSMITH SHOP AREA IN THE NORTHEAST QUADRANT OF THE FACTORY. ON THE FLOOR AT THE LEFT SIDE IS A MANUAL PIPE THREADER FOR LARGE-DIAMETER PIPE (AS DROP PIPE IN WELLS FOR WATER SYSTEMS). BENEATH THE BENCH ARE UNMACHINED NEW OLD STOCK MAIN CASTINGS FOR ELI WINDMILLS, TOGETHER WITH A USED MAIN SHAFT/WHEEL HUB/CRANK PLATE ASSEMBLY WITH 1920S-1930S OIL RESERVOIR FROM ELI WINDMILL. THE CIRCULAR CASTING WITH CRESCENT-SHAPED PATTERNS IS A PORTION OF THE CAM MECHANISM FROM A 'WESTERN GEARED GEARLESS' WINDMILL MADE BY THE WESTERN LAND ROLLER CO., HASTINGS, NEB. TO THE RIGHT ON THE BENCH IS A GEARED TIRE BENDER USED TO GIVE CURVATURE TO WHEEL RIMS OF ELI WINDMILLS. IN THE BACKGROUND ARE ... - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  13. Tail decay for the distribution of the endpoint of a directed polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothner, Thomas; Liechty, Karl

    2013-05-01

    We obtain an asymptotic expansion for the tails of the random variable { T}=\\arg\\max_{u\\in{R}}(A_2(u)-u^2) where A_2 is the Airy2 process. Using the formula of Schehr (2012 J. Stat. Phys. 149 385) that connects the density function of { T} to the Hastings-McLeod solution to the second Painlevé equation, we prove that as t → ∞, {P}(|{ T}|>t)=C\\rme^{-\\frac{4}{3}\\varphi(t)}t^{-145/32}(1+O(t^{-3/4})) , where φ(t) = t3 - 2t3/2 + 3t3/4, and the constant C is given explicitly.

  14. Generalized Dynamic Factor Models for Mixed-Measurement Time Series.

    PubMed

    Cui, Kai; Dunson, David B

    2014-02-12

    In this article, we propose generalized Bayesian dynamic factor models for jointly modeling mixed-measurement time series. The framework allows mixed-scale measurements associated with each time series, with different measurements having different distributions in the exponential family conditionally on time-varying latent factor(s). Efficient Bayesian computational algorithms are developed for posterior inference on both the latent factors and model parameters, based on a Metropolis Hastings algorithm with adaptive proposals. The algorithm relies on a Greedy Density Kernel Approximation (GDKA) and parameter expansion with latent factor normalization. We tested the framework and algorithms in simulated studies and applied them to the analysis of intertwined credit and recovery risk for Moody's rated firms from 1982-2008, illustrating the importance of jointly modeling mixed-measurement time series. The article has supplemental materials available online. PMID:24791133

  15. Modeling interdependent animal movement in continuous time.

    PubMed

    Niu, Mu; Blackwell, Paul G; Skarin, Anna

    2016-06-01

    This article presents a new approach to modeling group animal movement in continuous time. The movement of a group of animals is modeled as a multivariate Ornstein Uhlenbeck diffusion process in a high-dimensional space. Each individual of the group is attracted to a leading point which is generally unobserved, and the movement of the leading point is also an Ornstein Uhlenbeck process attracted to an unknown attractor. The Ornstein Uhlenbeck bridge is applied to reconstruct the location of the leading point. All movement parameters are estimated using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling, specifically a Metropolis Hastings algorithm. We apply the method to a small group of simultaneously tracked reindeer, Rangifer tarandus tarandus, showing that the method detects dependency in movement between individuals. PMID:26812666

  16. Setting mental health priorities: problems and possibilities.

    PubMed

    Callahan, D

    1994-01-01

    A recent project at the Hastings Center examined the question of priority setting in the provision of mental health services. A central issue was whether those services should be prioritized independently of other health services. The answer to that question was no: they should have full parity. Even so, priority setting can be a complex venture. At the heart of any such effort will be the relationship between empirical evidence on treatment outcomes and efficacy and the political and ethical interests that legitimately bear on interpreting and using that evidence. An argument is made that a priority should be given those whose suffering and inability to function in ordinary life is most pronounced, even if the available treatment for them is comparatively less efficacious than for other conditions. PMID:7935242

  17. Small Commercial Program DOE Project: Impact evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bathgate, R.; Faust, S.

    1992-08-12

    In 1991, Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) implemented a Department of Energy grant to conduct a small commercial energy conservation project. The small commercial ``Mom, and Pop`` grocery stores within WEC`s service territory were selected as the target market for the project. Energy & Solid Waste Consultant`s (E&SWC) Impact Evaluation is documented here. The evaluation was based on data gathered from a variety of sources, including load profile metering, kWh submeters, elapsed time indicators, and billing histories. Five stores were selected to receive measures under this program: Waits River General Store, Joe`s Pond Store, Hastings Store, Walden General Store, and Adamant Cooperative. Specific measures installed in each store and description of each are included.

  18. Small Commercial Program DOE Project: Impact evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bathgate, R.; Faust, S. )

    1992-08-12

    In 1991, Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) implemented a Department of Energy grant to conduct a small commercial energy conservation project. The small commercial Mom, and Pop'' grocery stores within WEC's service territory were selected as the target market for the project. Energy Solid Waste Consultant's (E SWC) Impact Evaluation is documented here. The evaluation was based on data gathered from a variety of sources, including load profile metering, kWh submeters, elapsed time indicators, and billing histories. Five stores were selected to receive measures under this program: Waits River General Store, Joe's Pond Store, Hastings Store, Walden General Store, and Adamant Cooperative. Specific measures installed in each store and description of each are included.

  19. Quantitative K-Theory Related to Spin Chern Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loring, Terry A.

    2014-07-01

    We examine the various indices defined on pairs of almost commuting unitary matrices that can detect pairs that are far from commuting pairs. We do this in two symmetry classes, that of general unitary matrices and that of self-dual matrices, with an emphasis on quantitative results. We determine which values of the norm of the commutator guarantee that the indices are defined, where they are equal, and what quantitative results on the distance to a pair with a different index are possible. We validate a method of computing spin Chern numbers that was developed with Hastings and only conjectured to be correct. Specifically, the Pfaffian-Bott index can be computed by the ''log method'' for commutator norms up to a specific constant.

  20. Searching for massive black hole binaries in the first Mock LISA Data Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornish, Neil J.; Porter, Edward K.

    2007-10-01

    The Mock LISA Data Challenge is a worldwide effort to solve the LISA data analysis problem. We present here our results for the massive black hole binary (BBH) section of round 1. Our results cover challenge 1.2.1, where the coalescence of the binary is seen, and challenge 1.2.2, where the coalescence occurs after the simulated observational period. The data stream is composed of Gaussian instrumental noise plus an unknown BBH waveform. Our search algorithm is based on a variant of the Markov chain Monte Carlo method that uses Metropolis Hastings sampling and thermostated frequency annealing. We present results from the training data sets where we know the parameter values a priori and the blind data sets where we were informed of the parameter values after the challenge had finished. We demonstrate that our algorithm is able to rapidly locate the sources, accurately recover the source parameters and provide error estimates for the recovered parameters.

  1. An algorithm for the detection of extreme mass ratio inspirals in LISA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babak, Stanislav; Gair, Jonathan R.; Porter, Edward K.

    2009-07-01

    The gravitational wave signal from a compact object inspiralling into a massive black hole (MBH) is considered to be one of the most difficult sources to detect in the LISA data stream. Due to the large parameter space of possible signals and many orbital cycles spent in the sensitivity band of LISA, it has been estimated that ~1035 templates would be required to carry out a fully coherent search using a template grid, which is computationally impossible. Here we describe an algorithm based on a constrained Metropolis-Hastings stochastic search which allows us to find and accurately estimate parameters of isolated EMRI signals buried in Gaussian instrumental noise. We illustrate the effectiveness of the algorithm with results from searches of the Mock LISA Data Challenge round 1B data sets.

  2. Cosmic swarms: a search for supermassive black holes in the LISA data stream with a hybrid evolutionary algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gair, Jonathan R.; Porter, Edward K.

    2009-11-01

    We describe a hybrid evolutionary algorithm that can simultaneously search for multiple supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) inspirals in LISA data. The algorithm mixes evolutionary computation, Metropolis-Hastings methods and Nested Sampling. The inspiral of SMBHBs presents an interesting problem for gravitational wave data analysis since, due to the LISA response function, the sources have a bi-modal sky solution. We show here that it is possible not only to detect multiple SMBHBs in the data stream, but also to investigate simultaneously all the various modes of the global solution. In all cases, the algorithm returns parameter determinations within 5σ (as estimated from the Fisher matrix) of the true answer, for both the actual and antipodal sky solutions.

  3. Semiparametric Bayesian inference on skew-normal joint modeling of multivariate longitudinal and survival data.

    PubMed

    Tang, An-Min; Tang, Nian-Sheng

    2015-02-28

    We propose a semiparametric multivariate skew-normal joint model for multivariate longitudinal and multivariate survival data. One main feature of the posited model is that we relax the commonly used normality assumption for random effects and within-subject error by using a centered Dirichlet process prior to specify the random effects distribution and using a multivariate skew-normal distribution to specify the within-subject error distribution and model trajectory functions of longitudinal responses semiparametrically. A Bayesian approach is proposed to simultaneously obtain Bayesian estimates of unknown parameters, random effects and nonparametric functions by combining the Gibbs sampler and the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Particularly, a Bayesian local influence approach is developed to assess the effect of minor perturbations to within-subject measurement error and random effects. Several simulation studies and an example are presented to illustrate the proposed methodologies. PMID:25404574

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic streaming: absorption coefficient and acoustic field shape estimation.

    PubMed

    Madelin, Guillaume; Grucker, Daniel; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Thiaudiere, Eric

    2006-07-01

    In this study, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to visualize acoustic streaming in liquids. A single-shot spin echo sequence (HASTE) with a saturation band perpendicular to the acoustic beam permits the acquisition of an instantaneous image of the flow due to the application of ultrasound. An average acoustic streaming velocity can be estimated from the MR images, from which the ultrasonic absorption coefficient and the bulk viscosity of different glycerol-water mixtures can be deduced. In the same way, this MRI method could be used to assess the acoustic field and time-average power of ultrasonic transducers in water (or other liquids with known physical properties), after calibration of a geometrical parameter that is dependent on the experimental setup. PMID:16650447

  5. Bayesian Estimation of Latently-grouped Parameters in Undirected Graphical Models

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Page, David

    2014-01-01

    In large-scale applications of undirected graphical models, such as social networks and biological networks, similar patterns occur frequently and give rise to similar parameters. In this situation, it is beneficial to group the parameters for more efficient learning. We show that even when the grouping is unknown, we can infer these parameter groups during learning via a Bayesian approach. We impose a Dirichlet process prior on the parameters. Posterior inference usually involves calculating intractable terms, and we propose two approximation algorithms, namely a Metropolis-Hastings algorithm with auxiliary variables and a Gibbs sampling algorithm with “stripped” Beta approximation (Gibbs_SBA). Simulations show that both algorithms outperform conventional maximum likelihood estimation (MLE). Gibbs_SBA’s performance is close to Gibbs sampling with exact likelihood calculation. Models learned with Gibbs_SBA also generalize better than the models learned by MLE on real-world Senate voting data. PMID:25404848

  6. Understanding the agreements and controversies surrounding childhood psychopharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Parens, Erik; Johnston, Josephine

    2008-01-01

    The number of children in the US taking prescription drugs for emotional and behavioral disturbances is growing dramatically. This growth in the use of psychotropic drugs in pediatric populations has given rise to multiple controversies, ranging from concerns over off-label use and long-term safety to debates about the societal value and cultural meaning of pharmacological treatment of childhood behavioral and emotional disorders. This commentary summarizes the authors' eight main findings from the first of five workshops that seek to understand and produce descriptions of these controversies. The workshop series is convened by The Hastings Center, a bioethics research institute located in Garrison, New York, U.S.A. PMID:18261228

  7. A Bayesian Approach to Learning Scoring Systems.

    PubMed

    Ertekin, Şeyda; Rudin, Cynthia

    2015-12-01

    We present a Bayesian method for building scoring systems, which are linear models with coefficients that have very few significant digits. Usually the construction of scoring systems involve manual effort-humans invent the full scoring system without using data, or they choose how logistic regression coefficients should be scaled and rounded to produce a scoring system. These kinds of heuristics lead to suboptimal solutions. Our approach is different in that humans need only specify the prior over what the coefficients should look like, and the scoring system is learned from data. For this approach, we provide a Metropolis-Hastings sampler that tends to pull the coefficient values toward their "natural scale." Empirically, the proposed method achieves a high degree of interpretability of the models while maintaining competitive generalization performances. PMID:27441407

  8. Detection of "punctuated equilibrium" by bayesian estimation of speciation and extinction rates, ancestral character states, and rates of anagenetic and cladogenetic evolution on a molecular phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Bokma, Folmer

    2008-11-01

    Algorithms are presented to simultaneously estimate probabilities of speciation and extinction, rates of anagenetic and cladogenetic phenotypic evolution, as well as ancestral character states, from a complete ultrametric species-level phylogeny with dates assigned to all bifurcations and one or more phenotypes in three or more extant species, using Metropolis-Hastings Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling. The algorithms also estimate missing phenotypes of extant species and numbers of speciation events that occurred on all branches of the phylogeny. The algorithms are discussed and their performance is evaluated using simulated data. That evaluation shows that precise estimation of rates of evolution of one or a few phenotypes requires large phylogenies. Estimation accuracy improves with the number of species on the phylogeny. PMID:18752617

  9. Bayesian inference of subglacial topography using mass conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkerhoff, Douglas; Aschwanden, Andy; Truffer, Martin

    2016-02-01

    We develop a Bayesian model for estimating ice thickness given sparse observations coupled with estimates of surface mass balance, surface elevation change, and surface velocity. These fields are related through mass conservation. We use the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm to sample from the posterior probability distribution of ice thickness for three cases: a synthetic mountain glacier, Storglaciären, and Jakobshavn Isbræ. Use of continuity in interpolation improves thickness estimates where relative velocity and surface mass balance errors are small, a condition difficult to maintain in regions of slow flow and surface mass balance near zero. Estimates of thickness uncertainty depend sensitively on spatial correlation. When this structure is known, we suggest a thickness measurement spacing of one to two times the correlation length to take best advantage of continuity based interpolation techniques. To determine ideal measurement spacing, the structure of spatial correlation must be better quantified.

  10. A joint model for boundaries of multiple anatomical parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Grégoire; Kurtek, Sebastian; Srivastava, Anuj

    2011-03-01

    The use of joint shape analysis of multiple anatomical parts is a promising area of research with applications in medical diagnostics, growth evaluations, and disease characterizations. In this paper, we consider several features (shapes, orientations, scales, and locations) associated with anatomical parts and develop probability models that capture interactions between these features and across objects. The shape component is based on elastic shape analysis of continuous boundary curves. The proposed model is a second order model that considers principal coefficients in tangent spaces of joint manifolds as multivariate normal random variables. Additionally, it models interactions across objects using area-interaction processes. Using given observations of four anatomical parts: caudate, hippocampus, putamen and thalamus, on one side of the brain, we first estimate the model parameters and then generate random samples from them using the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. The plausibility of these random samples validates the proposed models.

  11. Reproductive technology: in the Netherlands, tolerance and debate.

    PubMed

    De Wachter, Maurice A M; De Wert, Guido MWR

    1987-06-01

    Two ethicists from the Netherlands' Institute for Bioethics file a report on their country in one of six Hastings Center Report articles on the status of reproductive technologies around the world. The situation in the Netherlands reflects the tolerant attitudes of the Dutch toward what are regarded as private matters. Artificial insemination, in vitro fertilization, and surrogate motherhood are available, and research on embryos is in the planning stages. Facilities offering reproductive services are regulated by the Minister of Health, with advice from the independent Health Council on Artificial Reproduction, the National Council for Public Health, and various insurance companies and professional medical organizations. Public policy debates center around such issues as the value of parenthood; involvement of third parties; secrecy about a child's genetic origins; privacy for semen, ovum, and embryo donors; access to services; and insurance coverage of treatment. PMID:11644022

  12. Meat and its place in the diet.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, H B

    1991-01-01

    Canadians are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of nutrition in their long-term health prospects. With this increased awareness, however, has come an abundance of misconceptions including the notion that meat is "bad" for you. In their haste to avoid saturated fat, physicians and the public alike have lost sight of the fact that lean meat in reasonable serving sizes poses no threat to health and is an extremely important source of many nutrients. The mistaken notion that only animal fats are saturated has resulted in a change in the source of fat but not the quantity. Health professionals must work together to educate the public about the many nutrient-dense, low-fat food choices available in a well-balanced diet. PMID:1768992

  13. Efficient estimation of decay parameters in acoustically coupled-spaces using slice sampling.

    PubMed

    Jasa, Tomislav; Xiang, Ning

    2009-09-01

    Room-acoustic energy decay analysis of acoustically coupled-spaces within the Bayesian framework has proven valuable for architectural acoustics applications. This paper describes an efficient algorithm termed slice sampling Monte Carlo (SSMC) for room-acoustic decay parameter estimation within the Bayesian framework. This work combines the SSMC algorithm and a fast search algorithm in order to efficiently determine decay parameters, their uncertainties, and inter-relationships with a minimum amount of required user tuning and interaction. The large variations in the posterior probability density functions over multidimensional parameter spaces imply that an adaptive exploration algorithm such as SSMC can have advantages over the exiting importance sampling Monte Carlo and Metropolis-Hastings Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithms. This paper discusses implementation of the SSMC algorithm, its initialization, and convergence using experimental data measured from acoustically coupled-spaces. PMID:19739741

  14. Light-cone matrix product

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, M. B.

    2009-09-15

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {delta}=0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx_equal}22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  15. Water-quality assessment of part of the Upper Mississippi River Basin Study Unit, Minnesota and Wisconsin- Nutrients, chlorophyll a, phytoplankton, and suspended sediment in streams, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kroening, Sharon E.; Lee, Kathy E.; Goldstein, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    Most sites had pronounced seasonal variations in dissolved nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen and dissolved ammonia nitrogen concentrations. At most sites, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen concentrations were greatest in the winter and spring and least during the summer and fall. In contrast, the greatest dissolved nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen concentrations in the Little Cobb River near Beauford, Minnesota; Minnesota River near Jordan, Minnesota; and Mississippi River at Hastings and Red Wing, Minnesota occurred during the spring and summer. These seasonal variations in dissolved nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen concentrations may be the result of nitrogen cycling in the soils, as well as crop uptake and hydrologic conditions. The greatest concentrations of dissolved ammonia nitrogen at all sites occurred in the winter and spring. The maximum contaminant level for nitrate of 10 milligrams per liter (mg/L) as nitrogen set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) for drinking water was exceeded in 20 percent of the

  16. Application of Thermo-Mechanical Measurements of Plastic Packages for Reliability Evaluation of PEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Ashok K.; Teverovsky, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Thermo-mechanical analysis (TMA) is typically employed for measurements of the glass transition temperature (Tg) and coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) in molding compounds used in plastic encapsulated microcircuits (PEMs). Application of TMA measurements directly to PEMs allows anomalies to be revealed in deformation of packages with temperature, and thus indicates possible reliability concerns related to thermo-mechanical integrity and stability of the devices. In this work, temperature dependencies of package deformation were measured in several types of PEMs that failed environmental stress testing including temperature cycling, highly accelerated stress testing (HAST) in humid environments, and bum-in (BI) testing. Comparison of thermo-mechanical characteristics of packages and molding compounds in the failed parts allowed for explanation of the observed failures. The results indicate that TMA of plastic packages might be used for quality evaluation of PEMs intended for high-reliability applications.

  17. Phase-Change Modelling in Severe Nuclear Accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pain, Christopher; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Xie, Zhihua; Percival, James; Gomes, Jefferson; Matar, Omar; Moatamedi, Moji; Tehrani, Ali; Jones, Alan; Smith, Paul

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes progress on a consistent approach for multi-phase flow modelling with phase-change. Although, the developed methods are general purpose the applications presented here cover core melt phenomena at the lower vessel head. These include corium pool formation, coolability and solidification. With respect to external cooling, comparison with the LIVE experiments (from Karlsruhe) is undertaken. Preliminary re-flooding simulation results are also presented. These include water injection into porous media (debris bed) and boiling. Numerical simulations follow IRSN's PEARL experimental programme on quenching/re-flooding. The authors wish to thank Prof. Timothy Haste of IRSN. Dr. D. Pavlidis is funded by EPSRC Consortium ``Computational Modelling for Advanced Nuclear Plants,'' Grant Number EP/I003010/1.

  18. Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gwyn P.; Revesz, Peter; Arp, Uwe

    2014-03-01

    Conference Chairs NameOrganization Gwyn Williams Jefferson Lab Peter ReveszCornell High Energy Synchrotron Source Uwe ArpSynchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility Programme Committee NameOrganization Alastair MacDowellAdvanced Light Source Tom ToellnerAdvanced Photon Source Amitava D RoyCenter for Advanced Microstructures and Devices Tom EllisCanadian Light Source Roberta SantarosaLaboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron Jerry (Jerome) HastingsLinac Coherent Light Source Steven HulbertNational Synchrotron Light Source Thomas A RabedeauStanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Mark BissenSynchrotron Radiation Center Gwyn WilliamsJefferson Lab Peter ReveszCornell High Energy Synchrotron Source Uwe ArpSynchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility

  19. Spain: from the decree to the proposal.

    PubMed

    Gracia, Diego

    1987-06-01

    This is one in a series of four country reports published together in the Hastings Center Report. Gracia, a bioethicist, compares health care policy before and after Franco's dictatorship. Under Franco, compulsory health insurance was enacted, and modern hospitals were built at the expense of primary services. Patient care was governed by the principle of beneficence "in its extreme and paternalistic sense." Medicine in the democratic post-Franco period has reflected changes in Spanish society as political freedom has led to an increased moral pluralism and the formation of public policy through debate and compromise. Gracia identifies three bioethical issues where changes in attitudes and policies have been the greatest: resource allocation, abortion, and organ transplantation. He concludes his report by briefly describing the role bioethics plays in public policy formation in Spain today. PMID:11644028

  20. Diversity in the enteric viruses detected in outbreaks of gastroenteritis from Mumbai, Western India.

    PubMed

    Chitambar, Shobha; Gopalkrishna, Varanasi; Chhabra, Preeti; Patil, Pooja; Verma, Harsha; Lahon, Anismrita; Arora, Ritu; Tatte, Vaishali; Ranshing, Sujata; Dhale, Ganesh; Kolhapure, Rajendra; Tikute, Sanjay; Kulkarni, Jagannath; Bhardwaj, Renu; Akarte, Sulbha; Pawar, Sashikant

    2012-03-01

    Faecal specimens collected from two outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis that occurred in southern Mumbai, India in March and October, 2006 were tested for seven different enteric viruses. Among the 218 specimens tested, 95 (43.6%) were positive, 73 (76.8%) for a single virus and 22 (23.2%) for multiple viruses. Single viral infections in both, March and October showed predominance of enterovirus (EV, 33.3% and 40%) and rotavirus A (RVA, 33.3% and 25%). The other viruses detected in these months were norovirus (NoV, 12.1% and 10%), rotavirus B (RVB, 12.1% and 10%), enteric adenovirus (AdV, 6.1% and 7.5%), Aichivirus (AiV, 3% and 7.5%) and human astrovirus (HAstV, 3% and 0%). Mixed viral infections were largely represented by two viruses (84.6% and 88.9%), a small proportion showed presence of three (7.7% and 11%) and four (7.7% and 0%) viruses in the two outbreaks. Genotyping of the viruses revealed predominance of RVA G2P[4], RVB G2 (Indian Bangladeshi lineage), NoV GII.4, AdV-40, HAstV-8 and AiV B types. VP1/2A junction region based genotyping showed presence of 11 different serotypes of EVs. Although no virus was detected in the tested water samples, examination of both water and sewage pipelines in gastroenteritis affected localities indicated leakages and possibility of contamination of drinking water with sewage water. Coexistence of multiple enteric viruses during the two outbreaks of gastroenteritis emphasizes the need to expand such investigations to other parts of India. PMID:22690171

  1. Diversity in the Enteric Viruses Detected in Outbreaks of Gastroenteritis from Mumbai, Western India

    PubMed Central

    Chitambar, Shobha; Gopalkrishna, Varanasi; Chhabra, Preeti; Patil, Pooja; Verma, Harsha; Lahon, Anismrita; Arora, Ritu; Tatte, Vaishali; Ranshing, Sujata; Dhale, Ganesh; Kolhapure, Rajendra; Tikute, Sanjay; Kulkarni, Jagannath; Bhardwaj, Renu; Akarte, Sulbha; Pawar, Sashikant

    2012-01-01

    Faecal specimens collected from two outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis that occurred in southern Mumbai, India in March and October, 2006 were tested for seven different enteric viruses. Among the 218 specimens tested, 95 (43.6%) were positive, 73 (76.8%) for a single virus and 22 (23.2%) for multiple viruses. Single viral infections in both, March and October showed predominance of enterovirus (EV, 33.3% and 40%) and rotavirus A (RVA, 33.3% and 25%). The other viruses detected in these months were norovirus (NoV, 12.1% and 10%), rotavirus B (RVB, 12.1% and 10%), enteric adenovirus (AdV, 6.1% and 7.5%), Aichivirus (AiV, 3% and 7.5%) and human astrovirus (HAstV, 3% and 0%). Mixed viral infections were largely represented by two viruses (84.6% and 88.9%), a small proportion showed presence of three (7.7% and 11%) and four (7.7% and 0%) viruses in the two outbreaks. Genotyping of the viruses revealed predominance of RVA G2P[4], RVB G2 (Indian Bangladeshi lineage), NoV GII.4, AdV-40, HAstV-8 and AiV B types. VP1/2A junction region based genotyping showed presence of 11 different serotypes of EVs. Although no virus was detected in the tested water samples, examination of both water and sewage pipelines in gastroenteritis affected localities indicated leakages and possibility of contamination of drinking water with sewage water. Coexistence of multiple enteric viruses during the two outbreaks of gastroenteritis emphasizes the need to expand such investigations to other parts of India. PMID:22690171

  2. MR Imaging of Pulmonary Nodules: Detection Rate and Accuracy of Size Estimation in Comparison to Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cieszanowski, Andrzej; Lisowska, Antonina; Dabrowska, Marta; Korczynski, Piotr; Zukowska, Malgorzata; Grudzinski, Ireneusz P.; Pacho, Ryszard; Rowinski, Olgierd; Krenke, Rafal

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to assess the sensitivity of various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences for the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules and to estimate the accuracy of MRI for the measurement of lesion size, as compared to computed tomography (CT). Methods Fifty patients with 113 pulmonary nodules diagnosed by CT underwent lung MRI and CT. MRI studies were performed on 1.5T scanner using the following sequences: T2-TSE, T2-SPIR, T2-STIR, T2-HASTE, T1-VIBE, and T1-out-of-phase. CT and MRI data were analyzed independently by two radiologists. Results The overall sensitivity of MRI for the detection of pulmonary nodules was 80.5% and according to nodule size: 57.1% for nodules ≤4mm, 75% for nodules >4-6mm, 87.5% for nodules >6-8mm and 100% for nodules >8mm. MRI sequences yielded following sensitivities: 69% (T1-VIBE), 54.9% (T2-SPIR), 48.7% (T2-TSE), 48.7% (T1-out-of-phase), 45.1% (T2-STIR), 25.7% (T2-HASTE), respectively. There was very strong agreement between the maximum diameter of pulmonary nodules measured by CT and MRI (mean difference -0.02 mm; 95% CI –1.6–1.57 mm; Bland-Altman analysis). Conclusions MRI yielded high sensitivity for the detection of pulmonary nodules and enabled accurate assessment of their diameter. Therefore it may be considered an alternative to CT for follow-up of some lung lesions. However, due to significant number of false positive diagnoses, it is not ready to replace CT as a tool for lung nodule detection. PMID:27258047

  3. Exponential Decay of Correlations Implies Area Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Horodecki, Michał

    2015-01-01

    We prove that a finite correlation length, i.e., exponential decay of correlations, implies an area law for the entanglement entropy of quantum states defined on a line. The entropy bound is exponential in the correlation length of the state, thus reproducing as a particular case Hastings's proof of an area law for groundstates of 1D gapped Hamiltonians. As a consequence, we show that 1D quantum states with exponential decay of correlations have an efficient classical approximate description as a matrix product state of polynomial bond dimension, thus giving an equivalence between injective matrix product states and states with a finite correlation length. The result can be seen as a rigorous justification, in one dimension, of the intuition that states with exponential decay of correlations, usually associated with non-critical phases of matter, are simple to describe. It also has implications for quantum computing: it shows that unless a pure state quantum computation involves states with long-range correlations, decaying at most algebraically with the distance, it can be efficiently simulated classically. The proof relies on several previous tools from quantum information theory—including entanglement distillation protocols achieving the hashing bound, properties of single-shot smooth entropies, and the quantum substate theorem—and also on some newly developed ones. In particular we derive a new bound on correlations established by local random measurements, and we give a generalization to the max-entropy of a result of Hastings concerning the saturation of mutual information in multiparticle systems. The proof can also be interpreted as providing a limitation on the phenomenon of data hiding in quantum states.

  4. Constraining Moment Deficit Rate on Crustal Faults from Geodetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, J.; Bradley, A. M.; Segall, P.

    2014-12-01

    Constraining moment deficit rates on crustal faults using geodetic data is currently an under-utilized but powerful method for estimating the potential seismic hazard presented by crustal faults. Two previous approaches to moment-bounding, bootstrapping and Metropolis-Hastings sampling, can both fail catastrophically when estimating the probability distribution of moment given data, p(Mo|d). Straightforward application of traditional Metropolis-Hastings sampling with uniform prior probabilities on slip leads to a mesh-dependent estimate of moment with a variance inversely related to the number of model elements. Moment thus estimated exhibits an "effective prior" on p(MO) that tends toward a delta function halfway between the bounds as the fault discretization becomes finer! Thus, it is incorrect to estimate the uncertainty in moment directly from the uncertainty in slip. Bootstrapping can produce optimistic bounds and give biased results. A third approach is functional moment bounding (FMB), which obtains bounds on moment by minimizing the data misfit over slip for all possible values of Mo and accepting only those values with a total misfit less than some threshold. We present a modified version of this method that creates a probability distribution function on Mo from the misfit and uses this pdf to obtain confidence bounds. We also present a fourth method that we term Probabilistic Moment Bounding (PMB) that we derive within a Bayesian framework and incorporate a smoothed slip prior. Both of these approaches produce conservative results and do not exhibit mesh dependence. We compare the results from FMB and PMB to those obtained from other methods and assess the results.

  5. The Lake Charles CCS Project

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Cathro

    2010-06-30

    The Lake Charles CCS Project is a large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) project which will demonstrate advanced technologies that capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. Specifically the Lake Charles CCS Project will accelerate commercialization of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage from industrial sources by leveraging synergy between a proposed petroleum coke to chemicals plant (the LCC Gasification Project) and the largest integrated anthropogenic CO{sub 2} capture, transport, and monitored sequestration program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region. The Lake Charles CCS Project will promote the expansion of EOR in Texas and Louisiana and supply greater energy security by expanding domestic energy supplies. The capture, compression, pipeline, injection, and monitoring infrastructure will continue to sequester CO{sub 2} for many years after the completion of the term of the DOE agreement. The objectives of this project are expected to be fulfilled by working through two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive project basis for a competitive Renewal Application process to proceed into Phase 2 - Design, Construction and Operations. Phase 1 includes the studies attached hereto that will establish: the engineering design basis for the capture, compression and transportation of CO{sub 2} from the LCC Gasification Project, and the criteria and specifications for a monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) plan at the Hastings oil field in Texas. The overall objective of Phase 2, provided a successful competitive down-selection, is to execute design, construction and operations of three capital projects: (1) the CO{sub 2} capture and compression equipment, (2) a Connector Pipeline from the LLC Gasification Project to the Green Pipeline owned by Denbury and an affiliate of Denbury, and (3) a comprehensive MVA system at the Hastings oil field.

  6. Detection and molecular characterization of diarrhea causing viruses in single and mixed infections in children: a comparative study between Bangladesh and Turkey.

    PubMed

    Mitui, Marcelo Takahiro; Bozdayi, Gulendam; Ahmed, Selim; Matsumoto, Takashi; Nishizono, Akira; Ahmed, Kamruddin

    2014-07-01

    The incidence and mortality caused by diarrhea differ among countries. The prevalence of different enteric viruses, their molecular characteristics, and infections with multiple viruses might affect the disease incidence and mortality caused by diarrhea. The objective of this study was to determine the distribution and molecular characteristics of enteric viruses in children with diarrhea in Turkey and Bangladesh. A total of 288 stool samples that were negative for group A rotavirus were collected from children aged <5 years with acute diarrhea who presented to hospitals in Turkey and Bangladesh. The samples were screened for human bocavirus (HBoV), astrovirus (HAstV), norovirus (NoV), and adenovirus (AdV). Phylogenetic analyses of the targeted virus genes were performed. In Turkey, viruses were detected in 87/150 samples (58%), which included 69 (79.3%) with single viruses and 18 (20.7%) with multiple viruses. AdV was the most common virus, followed by HBoV. In Bangladesh, viruses were detected in 123/138 samples (89.1%), which included 29 (23.6%) with single viruses and 94 (76.4%) with multiple viruses. NoV GII was the most common, followed by AdV. The dominant genotypes among the virus species were HBoV 2A, HAstV 1, NoV GI type 1, and AdV 40. For NoV GII, the Hunter variant of genotype 4 in Turkey and genotype 17 in Bangladesh were the most common among the sequenced strains. It was concluded that the distribution of the viruses associated with diarrhea in Turkish and Bangladeshi children was different. Enteric viruses and mixed infections were more prevalent in Bangladesh than in Turkey. PMID:24105741

  7. TU-F-BRF-06: 3D Pancreas MRI Segmentation Using Dictionary Learning and Manifold Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, S; Rapacchi, S; Hu, P; Sheng, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The recent advent of MRI guided radiotherapy machines has lent an exciting platform for soft tissue target localization during treatment. However, tools to efficiently utilize MRI images for such purpose have not been developed. Specifically, to efficiently quantify the organ motion, we develop an automated segmentation method using dictionary learning and manifold clustering (DLMC). Methods: Fast 3D HASTE and VIBE MR images of 2 healthy volunteers and 3 patients were acquired. A bounding box was defined to include pancreas and surrounding normal organs including the liver, duodenum and stomach. The first slice of the MRI was used for dictionary learning based on mean-shift clustering and K-SVD sparse representation. Subsequent images were iteratively reconstructed until the error is less than a preset threshold. The preliminarily segmentation was subject to the constraints of manifold clustering. The segmentation results were compared with the mean shift merging (MSM), level set (LS) and manual segmentation methods. Results: DLMC resulted in consistently higher accuracy and robustness than comparing methods. Using manual contours as the ground truth, the mean Dices indices for all subjects are 0.54, 0.56 and 0.67 for MSM, LS and DLMC, respectively based on the HASTE image. The mean Dices indices are 0.70, 0.77 and 0.79 for the three methods based on VIBE images. DLMC is clearly more robust on the patients with the diseased pancreas while LS and MSM tend to over-segment the pancreas. DLMC also achieved higher sensitivity (0.80) and specificity (0.99) combining both imaging techniques. LS achieved equivalent sensitivity on VIBE images but was more computationally inefficient. Conclusion: We showed that pancreas and surrounding normal organs can be reliably segmented based on fast MRI using DLMC. This method will facilitate both planning volume definition and imaging guidance during treatment.

  8. Asteroid orbital inversion using a virtual-observation Markov-chain Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muinonen, Karri; Granvik, Mikael; Oszkiewicz, Dagmara; Pieniluoma, Tuomo; Pentikäinen, Hanna

    2012-12-01

    A novel virtual-observation Markov-chain Monte Carlo method (MCMC) is presented for the asteroid orbital inverse problem posed by small to moderate numbers of astrometric observations. In the method, the orbital-element proposal probability density is chosen to mimic the convolution of the a posteriori density by itself: first, random errors are simulated for each observation, resulting in a set of virtual observations; second, least-squares orbital elements are derived for the virtual observations using the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method; third, repeating the procedure gives a difference between two sets of what can be called virtual least-squares elements; and, fourth, the difference obtained constitutes a symmetric proposal in a random-walk Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, avoiding the explicit computation of the proposal density. In practice, the proposals are based on a large number of pre-computed sets of orbital elements. Virtual-observation MCMC is thus based on the characterization of the phase-space volume of solutions before the actual MCMC sampling. Virtual-observation MCMC is compared to MCMC orbital ranging, a random-walk Metropolis-Hastings algorithm based on sampling with the help of Cartesian positions at two observation dates, in the case of the near-Earth asteroid (85640) 1998 OX4. In the present preliminary comparison, the methods yield similar results for a 9.1-day observational time interval extracted from the full current astrometry of the asteroid. In the future, both of the methods are to be applied to the astrometric observations of the Gaia mission.

  9. Structural inversion of the Tamworth Belt: Insights into the development of orogenic curvature in the southern New England Orogen, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G.; Robinson, J.; Glen, R.; Roberts, J.

    2016-05-01

    The middle to late Permian Hunter Bowen Event is credited with the development of orogenic curvature in the southern New England Orogen, yet contention surrounds the structural dynamics responsible for the development of this curvature. Debate is largely centred on the roles of orogen parallel strike-slip and orogen normal extension and contraction to explain the development of curvature. To evaluate the dynamic history of the Hunter Bowen Event, we present new kinematic reconstructions of the Tamworth Belt. The Tamworth Belt formed as a Carboniferous forearc basin and was subsequently inverted during the Hunter Bowen Event. Kinematic reconstructions of the Tamworth Belt are based on new maps and cross-sections built from a synthesis of best-available mapping, chronostratigraphic data and new interpretations of depth-converted seismic data. The following conclusions are made from our study: (i) the Hunter Bowen Event was dominantly driven by margin normal contraction (east-west shortening; present-day coordinates), and; (ii) variations in structural style along the strike of the Tamworth Belt can be explained by orthogonal vs. oblique inversion, which reflects the angular relationship between the principal shortening vector and continental-arc margin. Given these conclusions, we suggest that curvature around the controversial Manning Bend was influenced by the presence of primary curvature in the continental margin, and that the Hastings Block was translated along a sinistral strike-slip fault system that formed along this oblique (with respect to the regional east-west extension and convergence direction) part of the margin. Given the available temporal data, the translation of the Hastings Block took place in the Early Permian (Asselian) and therefore preceded the Hunter Bowen Event. Accordingly, we suggest that the Hunter Bowen Event was dominantly associated with enhancing curvature that was either primary in origin, or associated with fault block translation

  10. Evaluation of Data Retention and Imprint Characteristics of FRAMs Under Environmental Stresses for NASA Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Ashok K.; Teverovsky, Alexander; Dowdy, Terry W.; Hamilton, Brett

    2000-01-01

    A major reliability issue for all advanced nonvolatile memory (NVM) technology devices including FRAMs (Ferroelectric random access memories) is the data retention characteristics over extended period of time, under environmental stresses and exposure to total ionizing dose (TID) radiation effects. For this testing, 256 Kb FRAMs in 28-pin plastic DIPS, rated for industrial grade temperature range of -40 C to +85 C, were procured. These are two-transistor, two-capacitor (2T-2C) design FRAMs. In addition to data retention characteristics, the parts were also evaluated for imprint failures, which are defined as the failure of cells to change from a "preferred" state, where it has been for a significant period of time to an opposite state (e.g., from 1 to 0, or 0 to 1). These 256 K FRAMs were subjected to scanning acoustic microscopy (C-SAM); 1,000 temperature cycles from -65 C to +150 C; high temperature aging at 150 C, 175 C, and 200 C for 1,000 hours; highly accelerated stress test (HAST) for 500 hours; 1,000 hours of operational life test at 125 C; and total ionizing dose radiation testing. As a preconditioning, 10 K read/write cycles were performed on all devices. Interim electrical measurements were performed throughout this characterization, including special imprint testing and final electrical testing. Some failures were observed during high temperature aging test at 200 C, during HAST testing, and during 1,000 hours of operational life at 125 C. The parts passed 10 Krad exposure, but began showing power supply current increases during the dose increment from 10 Krad to 30 Krad, and at 40 Krad severe data retention and parametric failures were observed. Failures from various environmental group testing are currently being analyzed.

  11. Evaluation of Data Retention and Imprint Characteristics of FRAMs Under Environmental Stresses for NASA Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Asbok K.; Teverovsky, Alexander; Dowdy, Terry W.; Hamilton, Brett

    2002-01-01

    A major reliability issue for all advanced nonvolatile memory (NVM) technology devices including FRAMs is the data retention characteristics over extended period of time, under environmental stresses and exposure to total ionizing dose (TID) radiation effects. For this testing, 256 Kb FRAMs in 28-pin plastic DIPS, rated for industrial grade temperature range of -40 C to +85 C, were procured. These are two-transistor, two-capacitor (2T-2C) design FRAMs. In addition to data retention characteristics, the parts were also evaluated for imprint failures, which are defined as the failure of cells to change from a "preferred" state, where it has been for a significant period of time to an opposite state (e.g., from 1 to 0, or 0 to 1). These 256 K FRAMs were subjected to scanning acoustic microscopy (C-SAM); 1,000 temperature cycles from -65 C to +150 C; high temperature aging at 150 C, 175 C, and 200 C for 1,000 hours; highly accelerated stress test (HAST) for 500 hours; 1,000 hours of operational life test at 125 C; and total ionizing dose radiation testing. As a preconditioning, 10 K read/write cycles were performed on all devices. Interim electrical measurements were performed throughout this characterization, including special imprint testing and final electrical testing. Some failures were observed during high temperature aging test at 200 C, during HAST testing, and during 1,000 hours of operational life at 125 C. The parts passed 10 Krad exposure, but began showing power supply current increases during the dose increment from 10 Krad to 30 Krad, and at 40 Krad severe data retention and parametric failures were observed. Failures from various environmental group testing are currently being analyzed.

  12. Characterization and adhesion measurement of ceramic-coated nickel and titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruss, Kimberly Ann

    Chemically inert ceramic coatings are currently being investigated to extend the lifetime of metallic components operating in severe environments. As part of this effort, the characterization and adhesion measurement of zirconium nitride and silicon carbide coatings deposited on two nickel and one titanium alloys were conducted. Polycrystalline ZrN and amorphous Sisb{0.57}Csb{0.43} coatings were deposited by cathodic arc evaporation and by PACVD, respectively, on Incoloy 825 (Inc.), Hastelloy C22 (Hast.) and Titanium Grade 12 (Ti.) metal substrates. Analysis of the ZrN coatings by scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) revealed the presence of 1-8 mum diameter macroparticles composed of zirconium metal. Residual stress analyses were performed on the ZrN coatings via XRD using the sinsp2\\ Psi, method. Compressive stresses of 4.06 GPa, 3.88 GPa and 2.69 GPa were found in the ZrN coatings deposited on Inc., Hast. and Ti. substrates, respectively. Residual stresses in the Sisb{0.57}Csb{0.43} coatings were estimated from reports in the literature. Nanoindentation testing was employed to assess the Young's modulus and hardness of the coatings. The Young's modulus and hardness for the ZrN coatings were 458 GPa and 27.65 GPa, respectively, while the corresponding values for the Sisb{0.57}Csb{0.43} coatings were 212.15 GPa and 21.97 GPa. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was employed to measure the coating composition. The ZrN coatings were composed of 58.41% Zr and 41.59% N, measured in atomic concentration. The composition of the Sisb{0.57}Csb{0.43} coatings was 57.29 at.% Si and 42.18 at.% C. Studies of the interfacial chemistry via Auger electron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed chemically abrupt interfaces. In addition, there was good compositional uniformity throughout the thickness of both the ZrN and Sisb{0.57}Csb{0.43} coatings. Scratch tests were employed to assess the critical load for interfacial failure and

  13. Exotic ingredients in the mélange at Port Macquarie, southern New England Orogen, reveal a spicy history of crustal kneading along eastern Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckman, S.; Nutman, A.

    2013-12-01

    (sinistral) displacement of the Port Macquarie and Hastings Blocks and the dextral displacement of the Coffs Harbour Block associated with the Texas orocline, is apparent only, and due more in part to vertical displacements of an extensive, thin-skinned oceanic terranes that underlie the Tablelands Complex, rather than extensive lateral movements. Thus, there is no need to invoke large-scale ';oroclinal' folding or significant sinistral faulting to explain the repetition of Hastings and Port Macquarie blocks in the southern New England.

  14. Improving Bayesian analysis for LISA Pathfinder using an efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraioli, Luigi; Porter, Edward K.; Armano, Michele; Audley, Heather; Congedo, Giuseppe; Diepholz, Ingo; Gibert, Ferran; Hewitson, Martin; Hueller, Mauro; Karnesis, Nikolaos; Korsakova, Natalia; Nofrarias, Miquel; Plagnol, Eric; Vitale, Stefano

    2014-02-01

    We present a parameter estimation procedure based on a Bayesian framework by applying a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm to the calibration of the dynamical parameters of the LISA Pathfinder satellite. The method is based on the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and a two-stage annealing treatment in order to ensure an effective exploration of the parameter space at the beginning of the chain. We compare two versions of the algorithm with an application to a LISA Pathfinder data analysis problem. The two algorithms share the same heating strategy but with one moving in coordinate directions using proposals from a multivariate Gaussian distribution, while the other uses the natural logarithm of some parameters and proposes jumps in the eigen-space of the Fisher Information matrix. The algorithm proposing jumps in the eigen-space of the Fisher Information matrix demonstrates a higher acceptance rate and a slightly better convergence towards the equilibrium parameter distributions in the application to LISA Pathfinder data. For this experiment, we return parameter values that are all within ˜1 σ of the injected values. When we analyse the accuracy of our parameter estimation in terms of the effect they have on the force-per-unit of mass noise, we find that the induced errors are three orders of magnitude less than the expected experimental uncertainty in the power spectral density.

  15. A multivariate Poisson-lognormal regression model for prediction of crash counts by severity, using Bayesian methods.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianming; Kockelman, Kara M; Damien, Paul

    2008-05-01

    Numerous efforts have been devoted to investigating crash occurrence as related to roadway design features, environmental factors and traffic conditions. However, most of the research has relied on univariate count models; that is, traffic crash counts at different levels of severity are estimated separately, which may neglect shared information in unobserved error terms, reduce efficiency in parameter estimates, and lead to potential biases in sample databases. This paper offers a multivariate Poisson-lognormal (MVPLN) specification that simultaneously models crash counts by injury severity. The MVPLN specification allows for a more general correlation structure as well as overdispersion. This approach addresses several questions that are difficult to answer when estimating crash counts separately. Thanks to recent advances in crash modeling and Bayesian statistics, parameter estimation is done within the Bayesian paradigm, using a Gibbs Sampler and the Metropolis-Hastings (M-H) algorithms for crashes on Washington State rural two-lane highways. Estimation results from the MVPLN approach show statistically significant correlations between crash counts at different levels of injury severity. The non-zero diagonal elements suggest overdispersion in crash counts at all levels of severity. The results lend themselves to several recommendations for highway safety treatments and design policies. For example, wide lanes and shoulders are key for reducing crash frequencies, as are longer vertical curves. PMID:18460364

  16. A multi-thermogram-based Bayesian model for the determination of the thermal diffusivity of a material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, Alexandre; Fischer, Nicolas; Ebrard, Géraldine; Hay, Bruno; Harris, Peter; Wright, Louise; Rochais, Denis; Mattout, Jeremie

    2016-02-01

    The determination of thermal diffusivity is at the heart of modern materials characterisation. The evaluation of the associated uncertainty is difficult because the determination is performed in an indirect way, in the sense that the thermal diffusivity cannot be measured directly. The well-known GUM uncertainty framework does not provide a reliable evaluation of measurement uncertainty for such inverse problems, because in that framework the underlying measurement model is supposed to be a direct relationship between the measurand (the quantity intended to be measured) and the input quantities on which the measurand depends. This paper is concerned with the development of a Bayesian approach to evaluate the measurement uncertainty associated with thermal diffusivity. A Bayesian model is first developed for a single thermogram and is then extended to the case of several thermograms obtained under repeatability and reproducibility conditions. This multi-thermogram based model is able to take into consideration a large set of influencing quantities that occur during the measurements and yields a more reliable uncertainty evaluation than the one obtained from a single thermogram. Different aspects of the Bayesian model are discussed, including the sensitivity to the choice of the prior distribution, the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm used for the inference and the convergence of the Markov chains.

  17. Potent inhibition of the classical pathway of complement by a novel C1q-binding peptide derived from the human astrovirus coat protein.

    PubMed

    Gronemus, Jenny Q; Hair, Pamela S; Crawford, Katrina B; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Cunnion, Kenji M; Krishna, Neel K

    2010-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratories has demonstrated that purified, recombinant human astrovirus coat protein (HAstV CP) binds C1q and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) inhibiting activation of the classical and lectin pathways of complement, respectively. Analysis of the 787 amino acid CP molecule revealed that residues 79-139 share limited sequence homology with human neutrophil defensin-1 (HNP-1), a molecule previously demonstrated to bind C1q and MBL, inhibiting activation of the classical and lectin pathways of complement, respectively. A 30 amino acid peptide derived from this region of the CP molecule competitively inhibited the binding of wild-type CP to C1q. The parent peptide and various derivatives were subsequently assayed for C1q binding, inhibition of C1 and C4 activation as well as suppression of complement activation in hemolytic assays. The parent peptide and several derivatives inhibited complement activation in these functional assays to varying degrees. One peptide derivative in particular (E23A) displayed superior inhibition of complement activation in multiple assays of classical complement pathway activation. Further analysis revealed homology to a plant defensin allowing development of a proposed structural model for E23A. Based upon these findings, we hypothesize that further rationale optimization of E23A may result in a promising therapeutic inhibitor for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases in which dysregulated activation of the classical and lectin pathways of complement contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:20728940

  18. Alternative Test Methods for Electronic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Jeannette

    2004-01-01

    It is common practice within NASA to test electronic parts at the manufacturing lot level to demonstrate, statistically, that parts from the lot tested will not fail in service using generic application conditions. The test methods and the generic application conditions used have been developed over the years through cooperation between NASA, DoD, and industry in order to establish a common set of standard practices. These common practices, found in MIL-STD-883, MIL-STD-750, military part specifications, EEE-INST-002, and other guidelines are preferred because they are considered to be effective and repeatable and their results are usually straightforward to interpret. These practices can sometimes be unavailable to some NASA projects due to special application conditions that must be addressed, such as schedule constraints, cost constraints, logistical constraints, or advances in the technology that make the historical standards an inappropriate choice for establishing part performance and reliability. Alternate methods have begun to emerge and to be used by NASA programs to test parts individually or as part of a system, especially when standard lot tests cannot be applied. Four alternate screening methods will be discussed in this paper: Highly accelerated life test (HALT), forward voltage drop tests for evaluating wire-bond integrity, burn-in options during or after highly accelerated stress test (HAST), and board-level qualification.

  19. The artificial nutrition debate: still an issue... after all these years.

    PubMed

    Monturo, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    Debate over withdrawal or withholding of artificial nutrition appeared a distant discussion until the furor over the Schiavo case and a Papal Allocation reignited this ethical dilemma. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the bioethical opinion regarding artificial nutrition, as published in the Hastings Center Report from 1971 until 2007. A clinical and religious history of the evolution and use of artificial nutrition prefaces the review containing common themes and categories framed within a chronology of bioethical and legal events. Finally, an interpretative philosophical discussion is offered on the resurgence of the ethical dilemma concerning withdrawal or withholding of artificial nutrition. Through a combination of classic content analysis and grounded theory, 8 inductively derived categories emerged from a sample of 63 articles/letters with a primary focus on artificial nutrition, enteral nutrition or parenteral nutrition. These categories included illness/treatment trajectory, personhood, family, provider, cost, religion, legal, and ethics and morality. In more than 35 years, surprisingly little has changed with regard to withdrawal or withholding of artificial nutrition. As the Schiavo case revealed, despite a sense in bioethics of a firm consensus about handling the withdrawal of food and water, many are still searching for answers to this dilemma. PMID:19321894

  20. Measurement Scale of the SOLIS Vector Spectromagnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harrison P.; Harvey, John W.; Henney, Carl J.; Keller, Christoph U.; Malanushenko, Olena M.

    2004-01-01

    Longitudinal magnetograms obtained with thc SOLIS Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) during a cross-calibration period are compared with similar data from the NASA/NSO Spectromagnetograph (SPM) at the NSO/Kitt Peak Vacuum Telescope as well as with SOHO/MDI and GONG magnetogram. The VSM began observation at the University of Arizona agricultural test site and collaborative observations were obtained with both the VSM and SPM from 2003 Aug 05 through 2003 Sep 21 where the SPM was officially retired. The VSM replaces the SPM and continues the 3O-year NSO/Kitt Peak synoptic magnetogram record. Magnetograms are compared by equating histograms and, for selected examples, by pixel-by-pixel comparison of co-registered images. The VSM was not corrected for polarization crosstalk and was operated without hast guiding. Solar activity was at best moderate during this period. Over the range of observed fields, the VSM magnetograms show greatly improved sensitivity but are otherwise virtually identical with "raw" SPM magnetogram. GONG magnetograms are also closely comparable with the SPM while MDI flux values tend to be stronger by a factor of 1.2 - 1.4. Dependence of the results on seeing will be discussed. Partial funding for this work was provided through Solar and Heliospheric Research Supporting Research and Technology grants from NASA's Office of Space Sciences.

  1. Algorithmic and architectural optimizations for computationally efficient particle filtering.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Aswin C; Srivastava, Ankur; Chellappa, Rama

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we analyze the computational challenges in implementing particle filtering, especially to video sequences. Particle filtering is a technique used for filtering nonlinear dynamical systems driven by non-Gaussian noise processes. It has found widespread applications in detection, navigation, and tracking problems. Although, in general, particle filtering methods yield improved results, it is difficult to achieve real time performance. In this paper, we analyze the computational drawbacks of traditional particle filtering algorithms, and present a method for implementing the particle filter using the Independent Metropolis Hastings sampler, that is highly amenable to pipelined implementations and parallelization. We analyze the implementations of the proposed algorithm, and, in particular, concentrate on implementations that have minimum processing times. It is shown that the design parameters for the fastest implementation can be chosen by solving a set of convex programs. The proposed computational methodology was verified using a cluster of PCs for the application of visual tracking. We demonstrate a linear speed-up of the algorithm using the methodology proposed in the paper. PMID:18390378

  2. Hydrogen Safety Knowledge Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, Linda L.

    2011-01-31

    With hydrogen gaining acceptance as an energy carrier for fuel cell vehicles and stationary fuel cell applications, a new community of hydrogen users is emerging and continues to grow. With this growth has come the need to spread the word about safe practices for handling, storing, and using hydrogen. Like all energy forms, hydrogen can be used safely through proper procedures and engineering techniques. However, hydrogen involves a degree of risk that must be respected, and the importance of avoiding complacency or haste in the safe conduct and performance of projects involving hydrogen cannot be overstated. To encourage and promote the safe use of hydrogen, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed and continues to enhance two software tools in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program: the Hydrogen Safety Best Practices online manual (www.H2BestPractices.org) and the Hydrogen Incident Reporting and Lessons Learned database (www.H2Incidents.org).

  3. Bayesian model comparison of nonlinear structural equation models with missing continuous and ordinal categorical data.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sik-Yum; Song, Xin-Yuan

    2004-05-01

    Missing data are very common in behavioural and psychological research. In this paper, we develop a Bayesian approach in the context of a general nonlinear structural equation model with missing continuous and ordinal categorical data. In the development, the missing data are treated as latent quantities, and provision for the incompleteness of the data is made by a hybrid algorithm that combines the Gibbs sampler and the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. We show by means of a simulation study that the Bayesian estimates are accurate. A Bayesian model comparison procedure based on the Bayes factor and path sampling is proposed. The required observations from the posterior distribution for computing the Bayes factor are simulated by the hybrid algorithm in Bayesian estimation. Our simulation results indicate that the correct model is selected more frequently when the incomplete records are used in the analysis than when they are ignored. The methodology is further illustrated with a real data set from a study concerned with an AIDS preventative intervention for Filipina sex workers. PMID:15171804

  4. Virtual Goods Recommendations in Virtual Worlds

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Yu; Liao, Hsiu-Yu; Chen, Jyun-Hung; Liu, Duen-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Virtual worlds (VWs) are computer-simulated environments which allow users to create their own virtual character as an avatar. With the rapidly growing user volume in VWs, platform providers launch virtual goods in haste and stampede users to increase sales revenue. However, the rapidity of development incurs virtual unrelated items which will be difficult to remarket. It not only wastes virtual global companies' intelligence resources, but also makes it difficult for users to find suitable virtual goods fit for their virtual home in daily virtual life. In the VWs, users decorate their houses, visit others' homes, create families, host parties, and so forth. Users establish their social life circles through these activities. This research proposes a novel virtual goods recommendation method based on these social interactions. The contact strength and contact influence result from interactions with social neighbors and influence users' buying intention. Our research highlights the importance of social interactions in virtual goods recommendation. The experiment's data were retrieved from an online VW platform, and the results show that the proposed method, considering social interactions and social life circle, has better performance than existing recommendation methods. PMID:25834837

  5. Non-Intersecting Squared Bessel Paths at a Hard-Edge Tacnode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvaux, Steven

    2013-12-01

    The squared Bessel process is a 1-dimensional diffusion process related to the squared norm of a higher dimensional Brownian motion. We study a model of n non-intersecting squared Bessel paths, with all paths starting at the same point a > 0 at time t = 0 and ending at the same point b > 0 at time t = 1. Our interest lies in the critical regime ab = 1/4, for which the paths are tangent to the hard edge at the origin at a critical time . The critical behavior of the paths for n → ∞ is studied in a scaling limit with time t = t * + O( n -1/3) and temperature T = 1 + O( n -2/3). This leads to a critical correlation kernel that is defined via a new Riemann-Hilbert problem of size 4 × 4. The Riemann-Hilbert problem gives rise to a new Lax pair representation for the Hastings-McLeod solution to the inhomogeneous Painlevé II equation q''( x) = xq( x) + 2 q 3( x) - ν, where ν = α + 1/2 with α > -1 the parameter of the squared Bessel process. These results extend our recent work with Kuijlaars and Zhang (Comm Pure Appl Math 64:1305-1383, 2011) for the homogeneous case ν = 0.

  6. A non-enteric adenovirus A12 gastroenteritis outbreak in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Portes, Silvana Augusta Rodrigues; Volotão, Eduardo de Mello; Rocha, Monica Simões; Rebelo, Maria Cristina; Xavier, Maria da Penha Trindade Pinheiro; de Assis, Rosane Maria; Rose, Tatiana Lundgren; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe Anibal

    2016-01-01

    A gastroenteritis outbreak that occurred in 2013 in a low-income community in Rio de Janeiro was investigated for the presence of enteric viruses, including species A rotavirus (RVA), norovirus (NoV), astrovirus (HAstV), bocavirus (HBoV), aichivirus (AiV), and adenovirus (HAdV). Five of nine stool samples (83%) from patients were positive for HAdV, and no other enteric viruses were detected. Polymerase chain reaction products were sequenced and subjected to phylogenetic analysis, which revealed four strains and one strain of non-enteric HAdV-A12 and HAdV-F41, respectively. The HAdV-A12 nucleotide sequences shared 100% nucleotide similarity. Viral load was assessed using a TaqMan real-time PCR assay. Stool samples that were positive for HAdV-A12 had high viral loads (mean 1.9 X 107 DNA copies/g stool). All four patients with HAdV-A12 were < 25 months of age and had symptoms of fever and diarrhoea. Evaluation of enteric virus outbreaks allows the characterisation of novel or unique diarrhoea-associated viruses in regions where RVA vaccination is routinely performed. PMID:27223654

  7. New Kinematic Model in comparing with Langevin equation and Fokker Planck Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung; Wang, Zhijian; Gardner, Robin

    2010-03-01

    An analytic approximate solution of New Kinematic Model with the boundary conditions is developed for the incompressible packing condition in Pebble Bed Reactors. It is based on velocity description of the packing density in the hopper. The packing structure can be presented with a jamming phenomenon from flow types. The gravity-driven macroscopic motions are governed not only by the geometry and external boundary conditions of silos and hoppers, but by flow prosperities of granular materials, such as friction, viscosity and porosity. The analytical formulas for the quasi-linear diffusion and convection coefficients of the velocity profile are obtained. Since it was found that the New Kinematic Model is dependent upon the granular packing density distribution, we are motivated to study the Langevin equation with friction under the influence of the Gravitational field. We also discuss the relation with the Fokker Planck Equation using Detailed balance and Metropolis-Hastings Algorithm. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are shown to be a non-Maxwellian distribution function with the mean velocity of the field particles having an effective temperature.

  8. Exploring equivalence domain in nonlinear inverse problems using Covariance Matrix Adaption Evolution Strategy (CMAES) and random sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayver, Alexander V.; Kuvshinov, Alexey V.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a methodology to sample equivalence domain (ED) in nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE)-constrained inverse problems. For this purpose, we first applied state-of-the-art stochastic optimization algorithm called Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (CMAES) to identify low-misfit regions of the model space. These regions were then randomly sampled to create an ensemble of equivalent models and quantify uncertainty. CMAES is aimed at exploring model space globally and is robust on very ill-conditioned problems. We show that the number of iterations required to converge grows at a moderate rate with respect to number of unknowns and the algorithm is embarrassingly parallel. We formulated the problem by using the generalized Gaussian distribution. This enabled us to seamlessly use arbitrary norms for residual and regularization terms. We show that various regularization norms facilitate studying different classes of equivalent solutions. We further show how performance of the standard Metropolis-Hastings Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm can be substantially improved by using information CMAES provides. This methodology was tested by using individual and joint inversions of magneotelluric, controlled-source electromagnetic (EM) and global EM induction data.

  9. Potential effect of resonant scattering from multiple swimbladders on audition in juvenile fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Mardi C.

    2003-04-01

    The swimbladder, a gas-filled chamber in the abdominal cavity of most bony fishes, is a hydrostatic organ that enables fish to maintain neutral buoyancy; however, it also responds to acoustic pressure and radiates a secondary acoustic field that enhances detection capability of the inner ear. Recent experiments have indicated that resonant response of the swimbladder may control the auditory bandwidth in at least four species of fish [Hastings et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 2640 (2001)]. The auditory bandwidths of these fishes, however, do not change appreciably while they grow even though the resonance frequency of the swimbladder decreases with increasing body length. Results of an analysis inspired by Feiullade et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112, 2206 (2002)] show that the downward shift and broadening associated with resonance of the aggregate scattered field from multiple fish is perhaps sufficient enough to account for this discrepancy. Effects of resonant characteristics of a single swimbladder, fish length, and number of fish on the changes in the collective scattered field are presented. Thus the resonant scattered field created by relatively large schools of juvenile fish may enhance their auditory capability.

  10. A study on operation efficiency evaluation based on firm's financial index and benchmark selection: take China Unicom as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zu-guang; Tian, Zhan-jun; Liu, Hui; Huang, Rui; Zhu, Guo-hua

    2009-07-01

    Being the only listed telecom operators of A share market, China Unicom has always been attracted many institutional investors under the concept of 3G recent years,which itself is a great technical progress expectation.Do the institutional investors or the concept of technical progress have signficant effect on the improving of firm's operating efficiency?Though reviewing the documentary about operating efficiency we find that schoolars study this problem useing the regress analyzing based on traditional production function and data envelopment analysis(DEA) and financial index anayzing and marginal function and capital labor ratio coefficient etc. All the methods mainly based on macrodata. This paper we use the micro-data of company to evaluate the operating efficiency.Using factor analyzing based on financial index and comparing the factor score of three years from 2005 to 2007, we find that China Unicom's operating efficiency is under the averge level of benchmark corporates and has't improved under the concept of 3G from 2005 to 2007.In other words,institutional investor or the conception of technical progress expectation have faint effect on the changes of China Unicom's operating efficiency. Selecting benchmark corporates as post to evaluate the operating efficiency is a characteristic of this method ,which is basicallly sipmly and direct.This method is suit for the operation efficiency evaluation of agriculture listed companies because agriculture listed also face technical progress and marketing concept such as tax-free etc.

  11. Even an old technique is suitable in the molecular world of science: the everted sac preparation turns 60 years old.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kirk L

    2014-04-15

    An old proverb states "necessity is the mother of invention." This certainly holds true in science as one pursues research questions. Experimental techniques have evolved as scientists have asked more specific research questions. Indeed, techniques such as the Ussing chamber, the perfused renal tubule preparation, patch-clamp, polymerase chain reaction, and site-directed mutagenesis have been developed over the past 60 years. However, sometimes, simple techniques may be useful and still very informative, and this certainly applies to intestinal physiology. Indeed, Gerald Wiseman and Thomas Hastings Wilson described the intestinal everted sac preparation some 60 years ago. Since then, this technique has been used for numerous research purposes including determining ion, amino acid, water and solute transport across the intestinal epithelium; and drug metabolism, absorption, and interactions in pharmaceutical/pharmacological research and even in education. This article provides a historical review of the development of the in vitro intestinal preparation that led to the everted sac preparation and its use in science. PMID:24573083

  12. Additional Merits of Two-dimensional Single Thick-slice Magnetic Resonance Myelography in Spinal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Abhishek; Azad, Rajiv; Ahmad, Armeen; Arora, Pankaj; Gupta, Puneet

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To validate the additional merits of two-dimensional (2D) single thick-slice Magnetic Resonance Myelography (MRM) in spinal imaging. Materials and Methods: 2D single thick-slice MRM was performed using T2 half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequence in addition to routine Magnetic resonance (MR) sequences for spine in 220 patients. The images were evaluated for additional diagnostic information in spinal and extra-spinal regions. A three-point grading system was adopted depending upon the utility of MRM in contributing to the detection of spinal or extra-spinal findings. Grade 1 represented no contribution of MRM while grade 3 would indicate that it was essential to detection of findings. Results: Utility of MRM in spine was categorized as grade 3 in 10.9% cases (24/220), grade 2 in 21.8% (48/220) cases and grade 1 in 67.3% cases (148/220). Thus, the overall additional merit of MRM in spine was seen in 32.7% (72/220) of cases. Besides in 14.1% cases (31/220) extra-spinal pathologies were identified. Conclusion: 2D single thick-slice MRM could have additional merits in spinal imaging when used as an adjunct to routine MR sequences. PMID:23393640

  13. A simulation approach for change-points on phylogenetic trees.

    PubMed

    Persing, Adam; Jasra, Ajay; Beskos, Alexandros; Balding, David; De Iorio, Maria

    2015-01-01

    We observe n sequences at each of m sites and assume that they have evolved from an ancestral sequence that forms the root of a binary tree of known topology and branch lengths, but the sequence states at internal nodes are unknown. The topology of the tree and branch lengths are the same for all sites, but the parameters of the evolutionary model can vary over sites. We assume a piecewise constant model for these parameters, with an unknown number of change-points and hence a transdimensional parameter space over which we seek to perform Bayesian inference. We propose two novel ideas to deal with the computational challenges of such inference. Firstly, we approximate the model based on the time machine principle: the top nodes of the binary tree (near the root) are replaced by an approximation of the true distribution; as more nodes are removed from the top of the tree, the cost of computing the likelihood is reduced linearly in n. The approach introduces a bias, which we investigate empirically. Secondly, we develop a particle marginal Metropolis-Hastings (PMMH) algorithm, that employs a sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) sampler and can use the first idea. Our time-machine PMMH algorithm copes well with one of the bottle-necks of standard computational algorithms: the transdimensional nature of the posterior distribution. The algorithm is implemented on simulated and real data examples, and we empirically demonstrate its potential to outperform competing methods based on approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) techniques. PMID:25506749

  14. Flow and chloride transport in the tidal Hudson River, NY

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiss, Lawrence A.; Schaffranek, Raymond W.; de Vries, M. Peter

    1994-01-01

    A one-dimensional dynamic-flow model and a one-dimensional solute-transport model were used to evaluate the effects of hypothetical public-supply water withdrawals on saltwater intrusion in a 133-mile reach of the tidal Hudson River between Green Island dam, near Troy, N.Y., and Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y. Regression techniques were used in analyses of current and extreme historical conditions, and numerical models were used to investigate the effect of various water withdrawals. Of four withdrawal scenarios investigated, simulations of a 27-day period during which discharges at Green Island dam averaged 7,090 ft3/s indicate that increasing the present Chelsea pumping-station withdrawal rate of 100 Mgal/d (million gallons per day) to 300 Mgal/d would have the least effect on upstream saltwater movement. A 90-day simulation, during which discharges at Green Island dam averaged 25,200 ft3/s, indicates that withdrawals of 1,940 Mgal/d at Chelsea would not measurably increase chloride concentrations at Chelsea under normal tidal and meteorological conditions, but withdrawals of twice that rate (3,880 Mgal/d) could increase the chloride concentration at Chelsea to 250 mg/L.

  15. A consideration of the operation of automatic production machines

    PubMed Central

    HOSHI, Toshiro; SUGIMOTO, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    At worksites, various automatic production machines are in use to release workers from muscular labor or labor in the detrimental environment. On the other hand, a large number of industrial accidents have been caused by automatic production machines. In view of this, this paper considers the operation of automatic production machines from the viewpoint of accident prevention, and points out two types of machine operation − operation for which quick performance is required (operation that is not permitted to be delayed) − and operation for which composed performance is required (operation that is not permitted to be performed in haste). These operations are distinguished by operation buttons of suitable colors and shapes. This paper shows that these characteristics are evaluated as “asymmetric on the time-axis”. Here, in order for workers to accept the risk of automatic production machines, it is preconditioned in general that harm should be sufficiently small or avoidance of harm is easy. In this connection, this paper shows the possibility of facilitating the acceptance of the risk of automatic production machines by enhancing the asymmetric on the time-axis. PMID:25739898

  16. Land subsidence caused by withdrawal of oil and gas in the Gulf coastal plain - The Houston, Texas, case history

    SciTech Connect

    Holzer, T.L. )

    1990-09-01

    The extensive network of geodetic leveling lines in the Houston-Galveston, Texas, area, where at least 110 oil and gas fields have been developed, provides the most comprehensive opportunity in the Gulf Coast to search for the occurrence of land subsidence caused by withdrawal of oil and gas. Although the evaluation is complicated by regional subsidence caused by a decline of ground-water level in aquifers beneath the area, subsidence caused by oil and gas withdrawal can be examined by searching for local increases of subsidence at oil and gas fields crossed by leveling lines. Twenty-nine fields are crossed by lines with repeated leveling surveys. Subsidence profiles across these fields indicate local increases of subsidence at six fields-Alco-Mag, Chocolate Bayou, Goose Creek, Hastings, Mykawa, and South Houston. Although ground-water withdrawal is undoubtedly the most important factor contributing to the total subsidence at each field, oil and gas withdrawal may be partly responsible for the local increases. Except for Chocolate Bayou, the volume of petroleum production at each field was sufficient to account for the increase. The volume of petroleum production, however, in general is not a reliable index for predicting the local increase because land within many fields with significant production did not show local increases of subsidence. With the exception of the 1 m subsidence caused by petroleum withdrawal at Goose Creek (1917-1925), local increases of subsidence were less than 0.3 m.

  17. Modeling and simulation of cascading contingencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfeng

    This dissertation proposes a new approach to model and study cascading contingencies in large power systems. The most important contribution of the work involves the development and validation of a heuristic analytic model to assess the likelihood of cascading contingencies, and the development and validation of a uniform search strategy. We model the probability of cascading contingencies as a function of power flow and power flow changes. Utilizing logistic regression, the proposed model is calibrated using real industry data. This dissertation analyzes random search strategies for Monte Carlo simulations and proposes a new uniform search strategy based on the Metropolis-Hastings Algorithm. The proposed search strategy is capable of selecting the most significant cascading contingencies, and it is capable of constructing an unbiased estimator to provide a measure of system security. This dissertation makes it possible to reasonably quantify system security and justify security operations when economic concerns conflict with reliability concerns in the new competitive power market environment. It can also provide guidance to system operators about actions that may be taken to reduce the risk of major system blackouts. Various applications can be developed to take advantage of the quantitative security measures provided in this dissertation.

  18. Medical triage for WMD incidents incidents: an adaptation of daily triage.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Dave

    2008-05-01

    It's 2000 HRS on a Friday evening. You're assigned to an ALS engine company, and you're just settling down after a busy day when you're dispatched along with a BLS ambulance to a report of a sick person outside a local club where they're holding a concert. During your response, dispatch advises that they're receiving multiple calls on the incident and are dispatching a second BLS ambulance to the call. * As you turn the corner and approach the scene, you notice a haze in the air coming from an industrial site on the same side of the street and see approximately 200 people exiting the club in haste. Several dozen patrons line the street between the club and the subway station. They're coughing and crying, and several are vomiting. * The driver stops the engine in front of the subway entrance, which is located approximately 500 feet from the club and uphill and upwind from the haze. The scene is overwhelming, even to the captain, who turns to you-as the paramedic on the crew-and asks what you want done first. Your first thought is, Triage. But you know that triaging these patients is more complicated than your everyday two-car collision. PMID:18482652

  19. A theoretical approach to calibrate radiation portal monitor (RPM) systems.

    PubMed

    Nafee, Sherif S; Abbas, Mahmoud I

    2008-10-01

    Radiation portal monitor (RPM) systems are widely used at international border crossings, where they are applied to the task of detecting nuclear devices, special nuclear material, and radiation dispersal device materials that could appear at borders. The requirements and constraints on RPM systems deployed at high-volume border crossings are significantly different from those at weapons facilities or steel recycling plants, the former being required to rapidly detect localized sources of radiation with a very high detection probability and low false-alarm rate, while screening all of the traffic without impeding the flow of commerce [Chambers, W.H., Atwater, H.F., Fehlau, P.E., Hastings, R.D., Henry, C.N., Kunz, W.E., Sampson, T.E., Whittlesey, T.H., Worth, G.M., 1974. Portal Monitor for Diversion Safeguards. LA-5681, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM]. In the present work, compact analytical formulae are derived and used to calibrate two RPM systems with isotropic radiating sources: (i) polyvinyltoluene (PVT) or plastic and (ii) thallium-doped crystalline sodium iodide, NaI(Tl), gamma-ray detector materials. The calculated efficiencies are compared to measured values reported in the literatures, showing very good agreement. PMID:18486482

  20. Painlevé Representation of Tracy-Widom{_β} Distribution for {β} = 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumanov, Igor

    2016-03-01

    In Rumanov (J Math Phys 56:013508, 2015), we found explicit Lax pairs for the soft edge of beta ensembles with even integer values of {β}. Using this general result, the case {β = 6} is further considered here. This is the smallest even {β}, when the corresponding Lax pair and its relation to Painlevé II (PII) have not been known before, unlike cases {β = 2} and 4. It turns out that again everything can be expressed in terms of the Hastings-McLeod solution of PII. In particular, a second order nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) for the logarithmic derivative of Tracy-Widom distribution for {β = 6} involving the PII function in the coefficients is found, which allows one to compute asymptotics for the distribution function. The ODE is a consequence of a linear system of three ODEs for which the local singularity analysis yields series solutions with exponents in the set 4/3, 1/3 and -2/3.

  1. Effect of gaseous anaesthesia on blood carbon dioxide measurements

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, R. R.; Howie, G. F. A.

    1965-01-01

    The present study of the effect of two common anaesthetic gases on blood acid-base parameters shows that the micro-Astrup measurement of carbon dioxide tension is not invalidated by the presence of nitrous oxide. This result was anticipated from the theoretical aspect of this technique. The mean error involved in estimating plasma carbon dioxide content in the presence of nitrous oxide using the volumetric Van Slyke apparatus without absorption of carbon dioxide by sodium hydroxide can be of the order of 25%. No such effect was measurable in estimating carbon dioxide contents in the presence of halothane. The degree of respiratory alkalosis during anaesthesia reported in earlier papers (Walker, Morgan, Breckenridge, Watt, Ogilvie, and Douglas, 1963; Morgan, Ogilvie, and Walker, 1963) was greater than had been originally appreciated. A `false' increase in carbon dioxide content will also falsely increase buffer base or `base excess' as calculated from standard nomograms (Singer and Hastings, 1948; Davenport, 1958; Siggaard-Andersen, 1963). PMID:14304255

  2. The Full Monte Carlo: A Live Performance with Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiao-Li

    2014-06-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) is being applied increasingly often in modern Astrostatistics. It is indeed incredibly powerful, but also very dangerous. It is popular because of its apparent generality (from simple to highly complex problems) and simplicity (the availability of out-of-the-box recipes). It is dangerous because it always produces something but there is no surefire way to verify or even diagnosis that the “something” is remotely close to what the MCMC theory predicts or one hopes. Using very simple models (e.g., conditionally Gaussian), this talk starts with a tutorial of the two most popular MCMC algorithms, namely, the Gibbs Sampler and the Metropolis-Hasting Algorithm, and illustratestheir good, bad, and ugly implementations via live demonstration. The talk ends with a story of how a recent advance, the Ancillary-Sufficient Interweaving Strategy (ASIS) (Yu and Meng, 2011, http://www.stat.harvard.edu/Faculty_Content/meng/jcgs.2011-article.pdf)reduces the danger. It was discovered almost by accident during a Ph.D. student’s (Yaming Yu) struggle with fitting a Cox process model for detecting changes in source intensity of photon counts observed by the Chandra X-ray telescope from a (candidate) neutron/quark star.

  3. A MARKOV CHAIN MONTE CARLO ALGORITHM FOR ANALYSIS OF LOW SIGNAL-TO-NOISE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Jewell, J. B.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Huey, Greg; Gorski, K. M.; Eriksen, H. K.; Wandelt, B. D. E-mail: h.k.k.eriksen@astro.uio.no

    2009-05-20

    We present a new Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for cosmic microwave background (CMB) analysis in the low signal-to-noise regime. This method builds on and complements the previously described CMB Gibbs sampler, and effectively solves the low signal-to-noise inefficiency problem of the direct Gibbs sampler. The new algorithm is a simple Metropolis-Hastings sampler with a general proposal rule for the power spectrum, C {sub l}, followed by a particular deterministic rescaling operation of the sky signal, s. The acceptance probability for this joint move depends on the sky map only through the difference of {chi}{sup 2} between the original and proposed sky sample, which is close to unity in the low signal-to-noise regime. The algorithm is completed by alternating this move with a standard Gibbs move. Together, these two proposals constitute a computationally efficient algorithm for mapping out the full joint CMB posterior, both in the high and low signal-to-noise regimes.

  4. Chemical analyses of surface waters in Oklahoma, September - December, 1944

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1945-01-01

    Red River at Denison Dam, Texas Sport samples were collected at the remainder of the stations. The analyses of the spot samples were made largely in a laboratory provided by the Oklahoma A. & M. College, under the supervision of Dr. O.M. Smith, Head, Department of Chemistry; Dr. S.R. Wood, Associate Professor of Chemistry; and W.W. Hastings, U.S. Geological Survey. The daily samples were analyzed in the water resources laboratory of the Geological Survey at Austin, Texas. These data have been summarized in a report to the Oklahoma Planning and Resources Board prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, March 1, 1945. The streams of Oklahoma are classified into two major drainage basins: the Arkansas River and the Red River and their tributaries. The attached analyses are arranged in geographical order for their respective drainage basins, with records listed in downstream order for stations on the main stem first, followed by the analyses for the tributaries. When available, the mean daily discharge is given for the analyses.

  5. Learn-as-you-go acceleration of cosmological parameter estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanyan, Grigor; Easther, Richard; Price, Layne C.

    2015-09-01

    Cosmological analyses can be accelerated by approximating slow calculations using a training set, which is either precomputed or generated dynamically. However, this approach is only safe if the approximations are well understood and controlled. This paper surveys issues associated with the use of machine-learning based emulation strategies for accelerating cosmological parameter estimation. We describe a learn-as-you-go algorithm that is implemented in the Cosmo++ code and (1) trains the emulator while simultaneously estimating posterior probabilities; (2) identifies unreliable estimates, computing the exact numerical likelihoods if necessary; and (3) progressively learns and updates the error model as the calculation progresses. We explicitly describe and model the emulation error and show how this can be propagated into the posterior probabilities. We apply these techniques to the Planck likelihood and the calculation of ΛCDM posterior probabilities. The computation is significantly accelerated without a pre-defined training set and uncertainties in the posterior probabilities are subdominant to statistical fluctuations. We have obtained a speedup factor of 6.5 for Metropolis-Hastings and 3.5 for nested sampling. Finally, we discuss the general requirements for a credible error model and show how to update them on-the-fly.

  6. Altering risky decision-making: Influence of impulsivity on the neuromodulation of prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gordon L F; Lee, Tatia M C

    2016-08-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) subserves complex cognitive abilities, including risky decision-making; the modulation of this brain area is shown to alter the way people take risks. Yet, neuromodulation of the PFC in relation to risk-taking behavior remains relatively less well-studied. Moreover, the psychological variables that influence such neuromodulation remain poorly understood. To address these issues, 16 participants took part in 3 experimental sessions on separate days. They received: (i) left anodal-right cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS); (ii) left cathodal-right anodal stimulation; or (iii) sham stimulation while they completed two risk-taking tasks. They also measured on several cognitive-affective abilities and personality traits. It was revealed that left cathodal-right anodal stimulation led to significantly reduced risk-taking under a context of haste. The reduction of risk-taking (relative to sham) correlated with state and trait impulsivity, such that the effect was larger in more impulsive individuals. For these individuals, the tDCS effect size was considered to be large (generalized partial η(2) > .17). The effect of prefrontal-neuromodulation in reducing risk-taking was influenced by baseline impulsivity, reflecting a state-dependent effect of neuromodulation on the PFC. The results of this study carry important insights into the use of neuromodulation to alter higher cognition. PMID:26343527

  7. A non-enteric adenovirus A12 gastroenteritis outbreak in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Portes, Silvana Augusta Rodrigues; Volotão, Eduardo de Mello; Rocha, Monica Simões; Rebelo, Maria Cristina; Xavier, Maria da Penha Trindade Pinheiro; Assis, Rosane Maria de; Rose, Tatiana Lundgren; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe Anibal

    2016-05-24

    A gastroenteritis outbreak that occurred in 2013 in a low-income community in Rio de Janeiro was investigated for the presence of enteric viruses, including species A rotavirus (RVA), norovirus (NoV), astrovirus (HAstV), bocavirus (HBoV), aichivirus (AiV), and adenovirus (HAdV). Five of nine stool samples (83%) from patients were positive for HAdV, and no other enteric viruses were detected. Polymerase chain reaction products were sequenced and subjected to phylogenetic analysis, which revealed four strains and one strain of non-enteric HAdV-A12 and HAdV-F41, respectively. The HAdV-A12 nucleotide sequences shared 100% nucleotide similarity. Viral load was assessed using a TaqMan real-time PCR assay. Stool samples that were positive for HAdV-A12 had high viral loads (mean 1.9 X 107 DNA copies/g stool). All four patients with HAdV-A12 were < 25 months of age and had symptoms of fever and diarrhoea. Evaluation of enteric virus outbreaks allows the characterisation of novel or unique diarrhoea-associated viruses in regions where RVA vaccination is routinely performed. PMID:27223654

  8. Electric utility privatization: What we can learn from the British experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, L.S.

    1997-10-01

    The most famous privatization effort, that of the Thatcher government, put the concept on the front pages. It embraced privatization with zeal. The government raked in billions of pounds. Millions of new investors bought shares in dozens of companies. But the privatizations left a legacy of problems. One can learn from them. Privatizations shook up complacent enterprises, increasing their efficiency and decreasing the prices that customers paid (with the exception of water consumers). The efforts helped to revitalize London as a financial center, and launched enterprises that have now ventured forth from England`s green and pleasant land into the rest of the world. The UK also made sure that the British remained in control of all the new companies upon privatization. On the other side of the balance, the British government, on occasion, acted in haste, with meeting a politically imposed deadline more important than getting the structure right. It left a great deal of money on the table after each sale. It confused the appearance of competition with effective competition. It created a string of regulatory agencies that lacked the tools to effectively control the utilities absent the effective competition that was supposed to supplement light regulation. And the privatizations put a lot of people out of work in the regulated industries and the businesses that supplied them.

  9. GRID-BASED EXPLORATION OF COSMOLOGICAL PARAMETER SPACE WITH SNAKE

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelsen, K.; Næss, S. K.; Eriksen, H. K.

    2013-11-10

    We present a fully parallelized grid-based parameter estimation algorithm for investigating multidimensional likelihoods called Snake, and apply it to cosmological parameter estimation. The basic idea is to map out the likelihood grid-cell by grid-cell according to decreasing likelihood, and stop when a certain threshold has been reached. This approach improves vastly on the 'curse of dimensionality' problem plaguing standard grid-based parameter estimation simply by disregarding grid cells with negligible likelihood. The main advantages of this method compared to standard Metropolis-Hastings Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods include (1) trivial extraction of arbitrary conditional distributions; (2) direct access to Bayesian evidences; (3) better sampling of the tails of the distribution; and (4) nearly perfect parallelization scaling. The main disadvantage is, as in the case of brute-force grid-based evaluation, a dependency on the number of parameters, N{sub par}. One of the main goals of the present paper is to determine how large N{sub par} can be, while still maintaining reasonable computational efficiency; we find that N{sub par} = 12 is well within the capabilities of the method. The performance of the code is tested by comparing cosmological parameters estimated using Snake and the WMAP-7 data with those obtained using CosmoMC, the current standard code in the field. We find fully consistent results, with similar computational expenses, but shorter wall time due to the perfect parallelization scheme.

  10. Rape and the prevalence of hybrids in broadly sympatric species: a case study using albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Rohwer, Sievert; Harris, Rebecca B; Walsh, Hollie E

    2014-01-01

    Conspecific rape often increases male reproductive success. However, the haste and aggression of forced copulations suggests that males may sometimes rape heterospecific females, thus making rape a likely, but undocumented, source of hybrids between broadly sympatric species. We present evidence that heterospecific rape may be the source of hybrids between Black-footed and Laysan Albatrosses (Phoebastria nigripes, and P. immutabilis, respectively). Extensive field studies have shown that paired (but not unpaired) males of both of these albatross species use rape as a supplemental reproductive strategy. Between species differences in size, timing of laying, and aggressiveness suggest that Black-footed Albatrosses should be more successful than Laysan Albatrosses in heteropspecific rape attempts, and male Black-footed Albatrosses have been observed attempting to force copulations on female Laysan Albatrosses. Nuclear markers showed that the six hybrids we studied were F1s and mitochondrial markers showed that male Black-footed Albatrosses sired all six hybrids. Long-term gene exchange between these species has been from Black-footed Albatrosses into Laysan Albatrosses, suggesting that the siring asymmetry found in our hybrids has long persisted. If hybrids are sired in heterospecific rapes, they presumably would be raised and sexually imprinted on Laysan Albatrosses, and two unmated hybrids in a previous study courted only Laysan Albatrosses. PMID:24949232