Science.gov

Sample records for element functionally conserved

  1. "Reverse Genomics" Predicts Function of Human Conserved Noncoding Elements.

    PubMed

    Marcovitz, Amir; Jia, Robin; Bejerano, Gill

    2016-05-01

    Evolutionary changes in cis-regulatory elements are thought to play a key role in morphological and physiological diversity across animals. Many conserved noncoding elements (CNEs) function as cis-regulatory elements, controlling gene expression levels in different biological contexts. However, determining specific associations between CNEs and related phenotypes is a challenging task. Here, we present a computational "reverse genomics" approach that predicts the phenotypic functions of human CNEs. We identify thousands of human CNEs that were lost in at least two independent mammalian lineages (IL-CNEs), and match their evolutionary profiles against a diverse set of phenotypes recently annotated across multiple mammalian species. We identify 2,759 compelling associations between human CNEs and a diverse set of mammalian phenotypes. We discuss multiple CNEs, including a predicted ear element near BMP7, a pelvic CNE in FBN1, a brain morphology element in UBE4B, and an aquatic adaptation forelimb CNE near EGR2, and provide a full list of our predictions. As more genomes are sequenced and more traits are annotated across species, we expect our method to facilitate the interpretation of noncoding mutations in human disease and expedite the discovery of individual CNEs that play key roles in human evolution and development. PMID:26744417

  2. Genetic evidence for conserved non-coding element function across species–the ears have it

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Eric E.; Cox, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of genomic sequences from diverse vertebrate species has revealed numerous highly conserved regions that do not appear to encode proteins or functional RNAs. Often these “conserved non-coding elements,” or CNEs, can direct gene expression to specific tissues in transgenic models, demonstrating they have regulatory function. CNEs are frequently found near “developmental” genes, particularly transcription factors, implying that these elements have essential regulatory roles in development. However, actual examples demonstrating CNE regulatory functions across species have been few, and recent loss-of-function studies of several CNEs in mice have shown relatively minor effects. In this Perspectives article, we discuss new findings in “fancy” rats and Highland cattle demonstrating that function of a CNE near the Hmx1 gene is crucial for normal external ear development and when disrupted can mimic loss-of function Hmx1 coding mutations in mice and humans. These findings provide important support for conserved developmental roles of CNEs in divergent species, and reinforce the concept that CNEs should be examined systematically in the ongoing search for genetic causes of human developmental disorders in the era of genome-scale sequencing. PMID:24478720

  3. Functionally conserved cis-regulatory elements of COL18A1 identified through zebrafish transgenesis.

    PubMed

    Kague, Erika; Bessling, Seneca L; Lee, Josephine; Hu, Gui; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Fisher, Shannon

    2010-01-15

    Type XVIII collagen is a component of basement membranes, and expressed prominently in the eye, blood vessels, liver, and the central nervous system. Homozygous mutations in COL18A1 lead to Knobloch Syndrome, characterized by ocular defects and occipital encephalocele. However, relatively little has been described on the role of type XVIII collagen in development, and nothing is known about the regulation of its tissue-specific expression pattern. We have used zebrafish transgenesis to identify and characterize cis-regulatory sequences controlling expression of the human gene. Candidate enhancers were selected from non-coding sequence associated with COL18A1 based on sequence conservation among mammals. Although these displayed no overt conservation with orthologous zebrafish sequences, four regions nonetheless acted as tissue-specific transcriptional enhancers in the zebrafish embryo, and together recapitulated the major aspects of col18a1 expression. Additional post-hoc computational analysis on positive enhancer sequences revealed alignments between mammalian and teleost sequences, which we hypothesize predict the corresponding zebrafish enhancers; for one of these, we demonstrate functional overlap with the orthologous human enhancer sequence. Our results provide important insight into the biological function and regulation of COL18A1, and point to additional sequences that may contribute to complex diseases involving COL18A1. More generally, we show that combining functional data with targeted analyses for phylogenetic conservation can reveal conserved cis-regulatory elements in the large number of cases where computational alignment alone falls short. PMID:19895802

  4. Conservation of CD44 exon v3 functional elements in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Vela, Elena; Hilari, Josep M; Delclaux, María; Fernández-Bellon, Hugo; Isamat, Marcos

    2008-01-01

    Background The human CD44 gene contains 10 variable exons (v1 to v10) that can be alternatively spliced to generate hundreds of different CD44 protein isoforms. Human CD44 variable exon v3 inclusion in the final mRNA depends on a multisite bipartite splicing enhancer located within the exon itself, which we have recently described, and provides the protein domain responsible for growth factor binding to CD44. Findings We have analyzed the sequence of CD44v3 in 95 mammalian species to report high conservation levels for both its splicing regulatory elements (the 3' splice site and the exonic splicing enhancer), and the functional glycosaminglycan binding site coded by v3. We also report the functional expression of CD44v3 isoforms in peripheral blood cells of different mammalian taxa with both consensus and variant v3 sequences. Conclusion CD44v3 mammalian sequences maintain all functional splicing regulatory elements as well as the GAG binding site with the same relative positions and sequence identity previously described during alternative splicing of human CD44. The sequence within the GAG attachment site, which in turn contains the Y motif of the exonic splicing enhancer, is more conserved relative to the rest of exon. Amplification of CD44v3 sequence from mammalian species but not from birds, fish or reptiles, may lead to classify CD44v3 as an exclusive mammalian gene trait. PMID:18710510

  5. Evolutionary conservation of the functional modularity of primate and murine LINE-1 elements.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Bradley J; Barnerssoi, Miriam; Roy-Engel, Astrid M

    2011-01-01

    LINE-1 (L1) retroelements emerged in mammalian genomes over 80 million years ago with a few dominant subfamilies amplifying over discrete time periods that led to distinct human and mouse L1 lineages. We evaluated the functional conservation of L1 sequences by comparing retrotransposition rates of chimeric human-rodent L1 constructs to their parental L1 counterparts. Although amino acid conservation varies from ∼35% to 63% for the L1 ORF1p and ORF2p, most human and mouse L1 sequences can be functionally exchanged. Replacing either ORF1 or ORF2 to create chimeric human-mouse L1 elements did not adversely affect retrotransposition. The mouse ORF2p retains retrotransposition-competency to support both Alu and L1 mobilization when any of the domain sequences we evaluated were substituted with human counterparts. However, the substitution of portions of the mouse cys-domain into the human ORF2p reduces both L1 retrotransposition and Alu trans-mobilization by 200-1000 fold. The observed loss of ORF2p function is independent of the endonuclease or reverse transcriptase activities of ORF2p and RNA interaction required for reverse transcription. In addition, the loss of function is physically separate from the cysteine-rich motif sequence previously shown to be required for RNP formation. Our data suggest an additional role of the less characterized carboxy-terminus of the L1 ORF2 protein by demonstrating that this domain, in addition to mediating RNP interaction(s), provides an independent and required function for the retroelement amplification process. Our experiments show a functional modularity of most of the LINE sequences. However, divergent evolution of interactions within L1 has led to non-reciprocal incompatibilities between human and mouse ORF2 cys-domain sequences. PMID:21572950

  6. A functionally conserved Polycomb response element from mouse HoxD complex responds to heterochromatin factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasanthi, Dasari; Nagabhushan, A.; Matharu, Navneet Kaur; Mishra, Rakesh K.

    2013-10-01

    Anterior-posterior body axis in all bilaterians is determined by the Hox gene clusters that are activated in a spatio-temporal order. This expression pattern of Hox genes is established and maintained by regulatory mechanisms that involve higher order chromatin structure and Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) proteins. We identified earlier a Polycomb response element (PRE) in the mouse HoxD complex that is functionally conserved in flies. We analyzed the molecular and genetic interactions of mouse PRE using Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrate cell culture as the model systems. We demonstrate that the repressive activity of this PRE depends on PcG/trxG genes as well as the heterochromatin components. Our findings indicate that a wide range of factors interact with the HoxD PRE that can contribute to establishing the expression pattern of homeotic genes in the complex early during development and maintain that pattern at subsequent stages.

  7. Distinct Functional Constraints Partition Sequence Conservation in a cis-Regulatory Element

    PubMed Central

    Ruvinsky, Ilya

    2011-01-01

    Different functional constraints contribute to different evolutionary rates across genomes. To understand why some sequences evolve faster than others in a single cis-regulatory locus, we investigated function and evolutionary dynamics of the promoter of the Caenorhabditis elegans unc-47 gene. We found that this promoter consists of two distinct domains. The proximal promoter is conserved and is largely sufficient to direct appropriate spatial expression. The distal promoter displays little if any conservation between several closely related nematodes. Despite this divergence, sequences from all species confer robustness of expression, arguing that this function does not require substantial sequence conservation. We showed that even unrelated sequences have the ability to promote robust expression. A prominent feature shared by all of these robustness-promoting sequences is an AT-enriched nucleotide composition consistent with nucleosome depletion. Because general sequence composition can be maintained despite sequence turnover, our results explain how different functional constraints can lead to vastly disparate rates of sequence divergence within a promoter. PMID:21655084

  8. Conservation defines functional motifs in the squint/nodal-related 1 RNA dorsal localization element

    PubMed Central

    Gilligan, Patrick C.; Kumari, Pooja; Lim, Shimin; Cheong, Albert; Chang, Alex; Sampath, Karuna

    2011-01-01

    RNA localization is emerging as a general principle of sub-cellular protein localization and cellular organization. However, the sequence and structural requirements in many RNA localization elements remain poorly understood. Whereas transcription factor-binding sites in DNA can be recognized as short degenerate motifs, and consensus binding sites readily inferred, protein-binding sites in RNA often contain structural features, and can be difficult to infer. We previously showed that zebrafish squint/nodal-related 1 (sqt/ndr1) RNA localizes to the future dorsal side of the embryo. Interestingly, mammalian nodal RNA can also localize to dorsal when injected into zebrafish embryos, suggesting that the sequence motif(s) may be conserved, even though the fish and mammal UTRs cannot be aligned. To define potential sequence and structural features, we obtained ndr1 3′-UTR sequences from approximately 50 fishes that are closely, or distantly, related to zebrafish, for high-resolution phylogenetic footprinting. We identify conserved sequence and structural motifs within the zebrafish/carp family and catfish. We find that two novel motifs, a single-stranded AGCAC motif and a small stem-loop, are required for efficient sqt RNA localization. These findings show that comparative sequencing in the zebrafish/carp family is an efficient approach for identifying weak consensus binding sites for RNA regulatory proteins. PMID:21149265

  9. Conservation of Fold and Topology of Functional Elements in Thiamin Pyrophosphate Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, P.; Ciszak, E. M.

    2005-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-dependent enzymes are a highly divergent family of proteins binding both TPP and metal ions. They perform decarboxylation-hydroxyaldehydes. Prior -ketoacids and of a common - (O=)C-C(OH)- fragment of to knowledge of three-dimensional structures of these enzmes, the GDGY25-30NN sequence was used to identify these enzymes. Subsequently, a number of structural studies on those enzymes revealed multi-subunit organization and the features of the two duplicate cofactor binding sites. Analyzing the structures of 44 structurally known enzymes, we found that the common structure of these enzymes is reduced to 180-220 amino acid long fragments of two PP and two PYR domains that form the [PP:PYR]2 binding center of two cofactor molecules. The structures of PP and PYR are arranged in a similar fold-sheet with triplets of helices on both sides.Dconsisting of a six-stranded Residues surrounding the cofactors are not strictly conserved, but they provide the same interatomic contacts required for the catalytic functions that these enzymes perform while maintaining interactive structural integrity. These structural and functional amino acids are topological counterparts located in the same positions of the conserved fold of sets of PP and PYR domains. Additional parallels include short fragments of sequences that link these amino acids to the fold and function. This report on the structural commonalities amongst TPP dependent enzymes is thought to contribute new approaches to annotation that may assist in advancing the functional proteomics of TPP dependent enzymes, and trace their complexity within evolutionary context.

  10. Functional conservation of Pax6 regulatory elements in humans and mice demonstrated with a novel transgenic reporter mouse

    PubMed Central

    Tyas, David A; Simpson, T Ian; Carr, Catherine B; Kleinjan, Dirk A; van Heyningen, Veronica; Mason, John O; Price, David J

    2006-01-01

    Background The Pax6 transcription factor is expressed during development in the eyes and in specific CNS regions, where it is essential for normal cell proliferation and differentiation. Mice lacking one or both copies of the Pax6 gene model closely humans with loss-of-function mutations in the PAX6 locus. The sequence of the Pax6/PAX6 protein is identical in mice and humans and previous studies have shown structural conservation of the gene's regulatory regions. Results We generated a transgenic mouse expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and neomycin resistance under the control of the entire complement of human PAX6 regulatory elements using a modified yeast artificial chromosome (YAC). Expression of GFP was studied in embryos from 9.5 days on and was confined to cells known to express Pax6. GFP expression was sufficiently strong that expressing cells could be distinguished from non-expressing cells using flow cytometry. Conclusion This work demonstrates the functional conservation of the regulatory elements controlling Pax6/PAX6 expression in mice and humans. The transgene provides an excellent tool for studying the functions of different Pax6/PAX6 regulatory elements in controlling Pax6 expression in animals that are otherwise normal. It will allow the analysis and isolation of cells in which Pax6 is activated, irrespective of the status of the endogenous locus. PMID:16674807

  11. Functional conservation of cis-regulatory elements of heat-shock genes over long evolutionary distances.

    PubMed

    He, Zhengying; Eichel, Kelsie; Ruvinsky, Ilya

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional control of gene regulation is an intricate process that requires precise orchestration of a number of molecular components. Studying its evolution can serve as a useful model for understanding how complex molecular machines evolve. One way to investigate evolution of transcriptional regulation is to test the functions of cis-elements from one species in a distant relative. Previous results suggested that few, if any, tissue-specific promoters from Drosophila are faithfully expressed in C. elegans. Here we show that, in contrast, promoters of fly and human heat-shock genes are upregulated in C. elegans upon exposure to heat. Inducibility under conditions of heat shock may represent a relatively simple "on-off" response, whereas complex expression patterns require integration of multiple signals. Our results suggest that simpler aspects of regulatory logic may be retained over longer periods of evolutionary time, while more complex ones may be diverging more rapidly. PMID:21799932

  12. Functional conservation of a root hair cell-specific cis-element in angiosperms with different root hair distribution patterns.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Sang Ho; Choi, Sang-Bong; Won, Su-Kyung; Heo, Yoon-Kyung; Cho, Misuk; Park, Youn-Il; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2006-11-01

    Vascular plants develop distinctive root hair distribution patterns in the root epidermis, depending on the taxon. The three patterns, random (Type 1), asymmetrical cell division (Type 2), and positionally cued (Type 3), are controlled by different upstream fate-determining factors that mediate expression of root hair cell-specific genes for hair morphogenesis. Here, we address whether these root hair genes possess a common transcriptional regulatory module (cis-element) determining cell-type specificity despite differences in the final root hair pattern. We identified Arabidopsis thaliana expansinA7 (At EXPA7) orthologous (and paralogous) genes from diverse angiosperm species with different hair distribution patterns. The promoters of these genes contain conserved root hair-specific cis-elements (RHEs) that were functionally verified in the Type-3 Arabidopsis root. The promoter of At EXPA7 (Type-3 pattern) also showed hair cell-specific expression in the Type 2 rice (Oryza sativa) root. Root hair-specific genes other than EXPAs also carry functionally homologous RHEs in their promoters. The RHE core consensus was established by a multiple alignment of functionally characterized RHEs from different species and by high-resolution analysis of At EXPA7 RHE1. Our results suggest that this regulatory module of root hair-specific genes has been conserved across angiosperms despite the divergence of upstream fate-determining machinery. PMID:17098810

  13. Functional analysis of the Arabidopsis PLDZ2 promoter reveals an evolutionarily conserved low-Pi-responsive transcriptional enhancer element

    PubMed Central

    Oropeza-Aburto, Araceli; Cruz-Ramírez, Alfredo; Acevedo-Hernández, Gustavo J.; Pérez-Torres, Claudia-Anahí; Caballero-Pérez, Juan; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Plants have evolved a plethora of responses to cope with phosphate (Pi) deficiency, including the transcriptional activation of a large set of genes. Among Pi-responsive genes, the expression of the Arabidopsis phospholipase DZ2 (PLDZ2) is activated to participate in the degradation of phospholipids in roots in order to release Pi to support other cellular activities. A deletion analysis was performed to identify the regions determining the strength, tissue-specific expression, and Pi responsiveness of this regulatory region. This study also reports the identification and characterization of a transcriptional enhancer element that is present in the PLDZ2 promoter and able to confer Pi responsiveness to a minimal, inactive 35S promoter. This enhancer also shares the cytokinin and sucrose responsive properties observed for the intact PLDZ2 promoter. The EZ2 element contains two P1BS motifs, each of which is the DNA binding site of transcription factor PHR1. Mutation analysis showed that the P1BS motifs present in EZ2 are necessary but not sufficient for the enhancer function, revealing the importance of adjacent sequences. The structural organization of EZ2 is conserved in the orthologous genes of at least eight families of rosids, suggesting that architectural features such as the distance between the two P1BS motifs are also important for the regulatory properties of this enhancer element. PMID:22210906

  14. Profiling of conserved non-coding elements upstream of SHOX and functional characterisation of the SHOX cis-regulatory landscape

    PubMed Central

    Verdin, Hannah; Fernández-Miñán, Ana; Benito-Sanz, Sara; Janssens, Sandra; Callewaert, Bert; Waele, Kathleen De; Schepper, Jean De; François, Inge; Menten, Björn; Heath, Karen E.; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Baere, Elfride De

    2015-01-01

    Genetic defects such as copy number variations (CNVs) in non-coding regions containing conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) outside the transcription unit of their target gene, can underlie genetic disease. An example of this is the short stature homeobox (SHOX) gene, regulated by seven CNEs located downstream and upstream of SHOX, with proven enhancer capacity in chicken limbs. CNVs of the downstream CNEs have been reported in many idiopathic short stature (ISS) cases, however, only recently have a few CNVs of the upstream enhancers been identified. Here, we set out to provide insight into: (i) the cis-regulatory role of these upstream CNEs in human cells, (ii) the prevalence of upstream CNVs in ISS, and (iii) the chromatin architecture of the SHOX cis-regulatory landscape in chicken and human cells. Firstly, luciferase assays in human U2OS cells, and 4C-seq both in chicken limb buds and human U2OS cells, demonstrated cis-regulatory enhancer capacities of the upstream CNEs. Secondly, CNVs of these upstream CNEs were found in three of 501 ISS patients. Finally, our 4C-seq interaction map of the SHOX region reveals a cis-regulatory domain spanning more than 1 Mb and harbouring putative new cis-regulatory elements. PMID:26631348

  15. Genome-wide in Silico Identification of New Conserved and Functional Retinoic Acid Receptor Response Elements (Direct Repeats Separated by 5 bp)*

    PubMed Central

    Lalevée, Sébastien; Anno, Yannick N.; Chatagnon, Amandine; Samarut, Eric; Poch, Olivier; Laudet, Vincent; Benoit, Gerard; Lecompte, Odile; Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear retinoic acid receptors interact with specific retinoic acid (RA) response elements (RAREs) located in the promoters of target genes to orchestrate transcriptional networks involved in cell growth and differentiation. Here we describe a genome-wide in silico analysis of consensus DR5 RAREs based on the recurrent RGKTSA motifs. More than 15,000 DR5 RAREs were identified and analyzed for their localization and conservation in vertebrates. We selected 138 elements located ±10 kb from transcription start sites and gene ends and conserved across more than 6 species. We also validated the functionality of these RAREs by analyzing their ability to bind retinoic acid receptors (ChIP sequencing experiments) as well as the RA regulation of the corresponding genes (RNA sequencing and quantitative real time PCR experiments). Such a strategy provided a global set of high confidence RAREs expanding the known experimentally validated RAREs repertoire associated to a series of new genes involved in cell signaling, development, and tumor suppression. Finally, the present work provides a valuable knowledge base for the analysis of a wider range of RA-target genes in different species. PMID:21803772

  16. Genome-wide in silico identification of new conserved and functional retinoic acid receptor response elements (direct repeats separated by 5 bp).

    PubMed

    Lalevée, Sébastien; Anno, Yannick N; Chatagnon, Amandine; Samarut, Eric; Poch, Olivier; Laudet, Vincent; Benoit, Gerard; Lecompte, Odile; Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2011-09-23

    The nuclear retinoic acid receptors interact with specific retinoic acid (RA) response elements (RAREs) located in the promoters of target genes to orchestrate transcriptional networks involved in cell growth and differentiation. Here we describe a genome-wide in silico analysis of consensus DR5 RAREs based on the recurrent RGKTSA motifs. More than 15,000 DR5 RAREs were identified and analyzed for their localization and conservation in vertebrates. We selected 138 elements located ±10 kb from transcription start sites and gene ends and conserved across more than 6 species. We also validated the functionality of these RAREs by analyzing their ability to bind retinoic acid receptors (ChIP sequencing experiments) as well as the RA regulation of the corresponding genes (RNA sequencing and quantitative real time PCR experiments). Such a strategy provided a global set of high confidence RAREs expanding the known experimentally validated RAREs repertoire associated to a series of new genes involved in cell signaling, development, and tumor suppression. Finally, the present work provides a valuable knowledge base for the analysis of a wider range of RA-target genes in different species. PMID:21803772

  17. Evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements in vertebrate HOX gene clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, Simona; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Axel

    2003-12-31

    Due to their high degree of conservation, comparisons of DNA sequences among evolutionarily distantly-related genomes permit to identify functional regions in noncoding DNA. Hox genes are optimal candidate sequences for comparative genome analyses, because they are extremely conserved in vertebrates and occur in clusters. We aligned (Pipmaker) the nucleotide sequences of HoxA clusters of tilapia, pufferfish, striped bass, zebrafish, horn shark, human and mouse (over 500 million years of evolutionary distance). We identified several highly conserved intergenic sequences, likely to be important in gene regulation. Only a few of these putative regulatory elements have been previously described as being involved in the regulation of Hox genes, while several others are new elements that might have regulatory functions. The majority of these newly identified putative regulatory elements contain short fragments that are almost completely conserved and are identical to known binding sites for regulatory proteins (Transfac). The conserved intergenic regions located between the most rostrally expressed genes in the developing embryo are longer and better retained through evolution. We document that presumed regulatory sequences are retained differentially in either A or A clusters resulting from a genome duplication in the fish lineage. This observation supports both the hypothesis that the conserved elements are involved in gene regulation and the Duplication-Deletion-Complementation model.

  18. Implicit Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; Himansu, Ananda; Wang, Xiao-Yen

    1999-01-01

    Artificial numerical dissipation is in important issue in large Reynolds number computations. In such computations, the artificial dissipation inherent in traditional numerical schemes can overwhelm the physical dissipation and yield inaccurate results on meshes of practical size. In the present work, the space-time conservation element and solution element method is used to construct new and accurate implicit numerical schemes such that artificial numerical dissipation will not overwhelm physical dissipation. Specifically, these schemes have the property that numerical dissipation vanishes when the physical viscosity goes to zero. These new schemes therefore accurately model the physical dissipation even when it is extremely small. The new schemes presented are two highly accurate implicit solvers for a convection-diffusion equation. The two schemes become identical in the pure convection case, and in the pure diffusion case. The implicit schemes are applicable over the whole Reynolds number range, from purely diffusive equations to convection-dominated equations with very small viscosity. The stability and consistency of the schemes are analysed, and some numerical results are presented. It is shown that, in the inviscid case, the new schemes become explicit and their amplification factors are identical to those of the Leapfrog scheme. On the other hand, in the pure diffusion case, their principal amplification factor becomes the amplification factor of the Crank-Nicolson scheme.

  19. Missense mutations and evolutionary conservation of amino acids: evidence that many of the amino acids in factor IX function as "spacer" elements.

    PubMed Central

    Bottema, C D; Ketterling, R P; Ii, S; Yoon, H S; Phillips, J A; Sommer, S S

    1991-01-01

    We report 31 point mutations in the factor IX gene and explore the relationship between the level of evolutionary conservation of an amino acid and the probability of a mutation causing hemophilia B. From our total sample of 125 hemophiliacs and from those reported by others, we identify 95 independent missense mutations, 94 of which occur at amino acids that are evolutionarily conserved in the available mammalian factor IX sequences. The likelihood of a missense mutation causing hemophilia B depends on whether the residue is also conserved in the factor IX-related proteases: factor VII, factor X, and protein C. Most of the possible missense mutations in generically conserved residues (i.e., those conserved in factor IX and in all the related proteases) should cause disease. In contrast, missense mutations in factor IX-specific residues (i.e., those conserved in human, cow, dog, and mouse factor IX but not in the related proteases) are sixfold less likely to cause disease. Missense mutations at nonconserved residues are 33-fold less likely to cause disease. At least three models are compatible with these observations. A comparison of sequence alignments from four and nine species of factor IX and an examination of the missense mutations occurring at CpG residues suggest a model in which most residues fall on opposite ends of a spectrum. In about 40% of residues, virtually any missense mutation in a minority of the residues will cause disease, while virtually no missense mutations will cause disease in most of the remaining residues. Thus, many of the residues in factor IX are spacers; that is, the main chains are presumably necessary to keep other amino acid interactions in register, but the nature of the side chain is unimportant. PMID:1680287

  20. A 3-dimensional mass conserving element for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G.; Suri, M.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of finite element schemes has been used in the numerical approximation of compressible flows particularly in underwater acoustics. In many instances instabilities have been generated due to the lack of mass conservation. Two- and three-dimensional elements are developed which avoid these problems.

  1. New alloys to conserve critical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Based on availability of domestic reserves, chromium is one of the most critical elements within the U.S. metal industry. New alloys having reduced chromium contents which offer potential as substitutes for higher chromium containing alloys currently in use are being investigated. This paper focuses primarily on modified Type 304 stainless steels having one-third less chromium, but maintaining comparable oxidation and corrosion properties to that of type 304 stainless steel, the largest single use of chromium. Substitutes for chromium in these modified Type 304 stainless steel alloys include silicon and aluminum plus molybdenum.

  2. BLSSpeller: exhaustive comparative discovery of conserved cis-regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    De Witte, Dieter; Van de Velde, Jan; Decap, Dries; Van Bel, Michiel; Audenaert, Pieter; Demeester, Piet; Dhoedt, Bart; Vandepoele, Klaas; Fostier, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The accurate discovery and annotation of regulatory elements remains a challenging problem. The growing number of sequenced genomes creates new opportunities for comparative approaches to motif discovery. Putative binding sites are then considered to be functional if they are conserved in orthologous promoter sequences of multiple related species. Existing methods for comparative motif discovery usually rely on pregenerated multiple sequence alignments, which are difficult to obtain for more diverged species such as plants. As a consequence, misaligned regulatory elements often remain undetected. Results: We present a novel algorithm that supports both alignment-free and alignment-based motif discovery in the promoter sequences of related species. Putative motifs are exhaustively enumerated as words over the IUPAC alphabet and screened for conservation using the branch length score. Additionally, a confidence score is established in a genome-wide fashion. In order to take advantage of a cloud computing infrastructure, the MapReduce programming model is adopted. The method is applied to four monocotyledon plant species and it is shown that high-scoring motifs are significantly enriched for open chromatin regions in Oryza sativa and for transcription factor binding sites inferred through protein-binding microarrays in O.sativa and Zea mays. Furthermore, the method is shown to recover experimentally profiled ga2ox1-like KN1 binding sites in Z.mays. Availability and implementation: BLSSpeller was written in Java. Source code and manual are available at http://bioinformatics.intec.ugent.be/blsspeller Contact: Klaas.Vandepoele@psb.vib-ugent.be or jan.fostier@intec.ugent.be Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26254488

  3. Conserved Noncoding Elements in the Most Distant Genera of Cephalochordates: The Goldilocks Principle.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Kozmikova, Iryna; Ono, Hiroki; Nossa, Carlos W; Kozmik, Zbynek; Putnam, Nicholas H; Yu, Jr-Kai; Holland, Linda Z

    2016-01-01

    Cephalochordates, the sister group of vertebrates + tunicates, are evolving particularly slowly. Therefore, genome comparisons between two congeners of Branchiostoma revealed so many conserved noncoding elements (CNEs), that it was not clear how many are functional regulatory elements. To more effectively identify CNEs with potential regulatory functions, we compared noncoding sequences of genomes of the most phylogenetically distant cephalochordate genera, Asymmetron and Branchiostoma, which diverged approximately 120-160 million years ago. We found 113,070 noncoding elements conserved between the two species, amounting to 3.3% of the genome. The genomic distribution, target gene ontology, and enriched motifs of these CNEs all suggest that many of them are probably cis-regulatory elements. More than 90% of previously verified amphioxus regulatory elements were re-captured in this study. A search of the cephalochordate CNEs around 50 developmental genes in several vertebrate genomes revealed eight CNEs conserved between cephalochordates and vertebrates, indicating sequence conservation over >500 million years of divergence. The function of five CNEs was tested in reporter assays in zebrafish, and one was also tested in amphioxus. All five CNEs proved to be tissue-specific enhancers. Taken together, these findings indicate that even though Branchiostoma and Asymmetron are distantly related, as they are evolving slowly, comparisons between them are likely optimal for identifying most of their tissue-specific cis-regulatory elements laying the foundation for functional characterizations and a better understanding of the evolution of developmental regulation in cephalochordates. PMID:27412606

  4. Conserved Noncoding Elements in the Most Distant Genera of Cephalochordates: The Goldilocks Principle

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Kozmikova, Iryna; Ono, Hiroki; Nossa, Carlos W.; Kozmik, Zbynek; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Yu, Jr-Kai; Holland, Linda Z.

    2016-01-01

    Cephalochordates, the sister group of vertebrates + tunicates, are evolving particularly slowly. Therefore, genome comparisons between two congeners of Branchiostoma revealed so many conserved noncoding elements (CNEs), that it was not clear how many are functional regulatory elements. To more effectively identify CNEs with potential regulatory functions, we compared noncoding sequences of genomes of the most phylogenetically distant cephalochordate genera, Asymmetron and Branchiostoma, which diverged approximately 120–160 million years ago. We found 113,070 noncoding elements conserved between the two species, amounting to 3.3% of the genome. The genomic distribution, target gene ontology, and enriched motifs of these CNEs all suggest that many of them are probably cis-regulatory elements. More than 90% of previously verified amphioxus regulatory elements were re-captured in this study. A search of the cephalochordate CNEs around 50 developmental genes in several vertebrate genomes revealed eight CNEs conserved between cephalochordates and vertebrates, indicating sequence conservation over >500 million years of divergence. The function of five CNEs was tested in reporter assays in zebrafish, and one was also tested in amphioxus. All five CNEs proved to be tissue-specific enhancers. Taken together, these findings indicate that even though Branchiostoma and Asymmetron are distantly related, as they are evolving slowly, comparisons between them are likely optimal for identifying most of their tissue-specific cis-regulatory elements laying the foundation for functional characterizations and a better understanding of the evolution of developmental regulation in cephalochordates. PMID:27412606

  5. A Summary of the Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element (CESE) Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen J.

    2015-01-01

    The space-time Conservation Element and Solution Element (CESE) method for solving conservation laws is examined for its development motivation and design requirements. The characteristics of the resulting scheme are discussed. The discretization of the Euler equations is presented to show readers how to construct a scheme based on the CESE method. The differences and similarities between the CESE method and other traditional methods are discussed. The strengths and weaknesses of the method are also addressed.

  6. High-Resolution Genuinely Multidimensional Solution of Conservation Laws by the Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himansu, Ananda; Chang, Sin-Chung; Yu, Sheng-Tao; Wang, Xiao-Yen; Loh, Ching-Yuen; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    1999-01-01

    In this overview paper, we review the basic principles of the method of space-time conservation element and solution element for solving the conservation laws in one and two spatial dimensions. The present method is developed on the basis of local and global flux conservation in a space-time domain, in which space and time are treated in a unified manner. In contrast to the modern upwind schemes, the approach here does not use the Riemann solver and the reconstruction procedure as the building blocks. The drawbacks of the upwind approach, such as the difficulty of rationally extending the 1D scalar approach to systems of equations and particularly to multiple dimensions is here contrasted with the uniformity and ease of generalization of the Conservation Element and Solution Element (CE/SE) 1D scalar schemes to systems of equations and to multiple spatial dimensions. The assured compatibility with the simplest type of unstructured meshes, and the uniquely simple nonreflecting boundary conditions of the present method are also discussed. The present approach has yielded high-resolution shocks, rarefaction waves, acoustic waves, vortices, ZND detonation waves, and shock/acoustic waves/vortices interactions. Moreover, since no directional splitting is employed, numerical resolution of two-dimensional calculations is comparable to that of the one-dimensional calculations. Some sample applications displaying the strengths and broad applicability of the CE/SE method are reviewed.

  7. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 436 - Energy Program Conservation Elements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Energy Program Conservation Elements D Appendix D to Part.... 436, App. D Appendix D to Part 436—Energy Program Conservation Elements (a) In all successful energy conservation programs, certain key elements need to be present. The elements listed below must be...

  8. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 436 - Energy Program Conservation Elements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Energy Program Conservation Elements D Appendix D to Part.... 436, App. D Appendix D to Part 436—Energy Program Conservation Elements (a) In all successful energy conservation programs, certain key elements need to be present. The elements listed below must be...

  9. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 436 - Energy Program Conservation Elements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Energy Program Conservation Elements D Appendix D to Part.... 436, App. D Appendix D to Part 436—Energy Program Conservation Elements (a) In all successful energy conservation programs, certain key elements need to be present. The elements listed below must be...

  10. Evolution and Conservation of Plant NLR Functions

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Florence; Vernaldi, Saskia; Maekawa, Takaki

    2013-01-01

    In plants and animals, nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeats (NLR)-containing proteins play pivotal roles in innate immunity. Despite their similar biological functions and protein architecture, comparative genome-wide analyses of NLRs and genes encoding NLR-like proteins suggest that plant and animal NLRs have independently arisen in evolution. Furthermore, the demonstration of interfamily transfer of plant NLR functions from their original species to phylogenetically distant species implies evolutionary conservation of the underlying immune principle across plant taxonomy. In this review we discuss plant NLR evolution and summarize recent insights into plant NLR-signaling mechanisms, which might constitute evolutionarily conserved NLR-mediated immune mechanisms. PMID:24093022

  11. Functional conservation of Rel binding sites in drosophilid genomes

    PubMed Central

    Copley, Richard R.; Totrov, Maxim; Linnell, Jane; Field, Simon; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Udalova, Irina A.

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary constraints on gene regulatory elements are poorly understood: Little is known about how the strength of transcription factor binding correlates with DNA sequence conservation, and whether transcription factor binding sites can evolve rapidly while retaining their function. Here we use the model of the NFKB/Rel-dependent gene regulation in divergent Drosophila species to examine the hypothesis that the functional properties of authentic transcription factor binding sites are under stronger evolutionary constraints than the genomic background. Using molecular modeling we compare tertiary structures of the Drosophila Rel family proteins Dorsal, Dif, and Relish and demonstrate that their DNA-binding and protein dimerization domains undergo distinct rates of evolution. The accumulated amino acid changes, however, are unlikely to affect DNA sequence recognition and affinity. We employ our recently developed microarray-based experimental platform and principal coordinates statistical analysis to quantitatively and systematically profile DNA binding affinities of three Drosophila Rel proteins to 10,368 variants of the NFKB recognition sequences. We then correlate the evolutionary divergence of gene regulatory regions with differences in DNA binding affinities. Genome-wide analyses reveal a significant increase in the number of conserved Rel binding sites in promoters of developmental and immune genes. Significantly, the affinity of Rel proteins to these sites was higher than to less conserved sites and was maintained by the conservation of the DNA binding site sequence (static conservation) or in some cases despite significantly diverged sequences (dynamic conservation). We discuss how two types of conservation may contribute to the stabilization and optimization of a functional gene regulatory code in evolution. PMID:17785540

  12. A characteristic space-time conservation element and solution element method for conservation laws II. Multidimensional extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hua; Wen, Chih-Yung

    2016-01-01

    The characteristic space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) schemes proposed by Shen et al. (2015) [15] are straightforward extended to multidimensional schemes on 2D rectangular meshes which strictly follow the space-time conservation law. The schemes for solving both scalar conservation laws and compressible Euler equations with shock waves are developed. They are accurate and robust with CFL widely ranging from 0 to nearly 1. In Euler solvers, the frequently-used Harten, Lax and van Leer (HLL) Riemann solver, contact discontinuity restoring HLLC Riemann solver and Roe Riemann solver are employed to calculate the upwind fluxes as examples. When standard grid-aligned Riemann solvers are employed, the carbuncle phenomena are significantly suppressed when comparing with conventional upwind schemes. If rotated Riemann solvers are employed, nearly carbuncle-free results are obtained. Several well understood numerical examples are carried out to demonstrate that the 2D characteristic CE/SE schemes can simultaneously capture shocks and details of complex flow structures very well.

  13. Parallel, adaptive finite element methods for conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Devine, Karen D.; Flaherty, Joseph E.

    1994-01-01

    We construct parallel finite element methods for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in one and two dimensions. Spatial discretization is performed by a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method using a basis of piecewise Legendre polynomials. Temporal discretization utilizes a Runge-Kutta method. Dissipative fluxes and projection limiting prevent oscillations near solution discontinuities. A posteriori estimates of spatial errors are obtained by a p-refinement technique using superconvergence at Radau points. The resulting method is of high order and may be parallelized efficiently on MIMD computers. We compare results using different limiting schemes and demonstrate parallel efficiency through computations on an NCUBE/2 hypercube. We also present results using adaptive h- and p-refinement to reduce the computational cost of the method.

  14. Interstitial Functionalization in elemental Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Boris; Fohtung, Edwin

    Societies in the 21st century will face many challenges. Materials science and materials design will be essential to address and master some if not all of these challenges. Semiconductors are among the most important technological material classes. Properties such as electrical transport are strongly affected by defects and a central goal continues to be the reduction of defect densities as much as possible in these compounds. Here we present results of interstitial Fe doping in elemental Si using first-principles DFT calculations. The preliminary results show that Fe will only occupy octahedral interstitial sites. The analysis of the electronic structure shows that the compounds are ferromagnetic and that a bandgap opens as interstitial Fe concentrations decrease, with a possible intermittent semi-metallic phase. The formation energy for interstitial Fe is unfavorable, as expected, by ~1.5 eV but becomes favorable as the chemical potential of Fe increases. Therefore, we expect that biasing the system with an external electrical field will lead to the formation of these materials. Thus, our results show that interstitial defects can be beneficial for the design of functionalities that differ significantly from those of the host material.

  15. Functional metamirrors using bianisotropic elements.

    PubMed

    Asadchy, V S; Ra'di, Y; Vehmas, J; Tretyakov, S A

    2015-03-01

    Conventional mirrors obey the simple reflection law that a plane wave is reflected as a plane wave, at the same angle. To engineer spatial distributions of fields reflected from a mirror, one can either shape the reflector or position some phase-correcting elements on top of a mirror surface. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that full-power reflection with general control over the reflected wave phase is possible with a single-layer array of deeply subwavelength inclusions. These proposed artificial surfaces, metamirrors, provide various functions of shaped or nonuniform reflectors without utilizing any mirror. This can be achieved only if the forward and backward scattering of the inclusions in the array can be engineered independently, and we prove that it is possible using electrically and magnetically polarizable inclusions. The proposed subwavelength inclusions possess desired reflecting properties at the operational frequency band, while at other frequencies the array is practically transparent. The metamirror concept leads to a variety of applications over the entire electromagnetic spectrum, such as optically transparent focusing antennas for satellites, multifrequency reflector antennas for radio astronomy, low-profile conformal antennas for telecommunications, and nanoreflectarray antennas for integrated optics. PMID:25793826

  16. Functions over RDF Language Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schandl, Bernhard

    RDF data are usually accessed using one of two methods: either, graphs are rendered in forms perceivable by human users (e.g., in tabular or in graphical form), which are difficult to handle for large data sets. Alternatively, query languages like SPARQL provide means to express information needs in structured form; hence they are targeted towards developers and experts. Inspired by the concept of spreadsheet tools, where users can perform relatively complex calculations by splitting formulas and values across multiple cells, we have investigated mechanisms that allow us to access RDF graphs in a more intuitive and manageable, yet formally grounded manner. In this paper, we make three contributions towards this direction. First, we present RDFunctions, an algebra that consists of mappings between sets of RDF language elements (URIs, blank nodes, and literals) under consideration of the triples contained in a background graph. Second, we define a syntax for expressing RDFunctions, which can be edited, parsed and evaluated. Third, we discuss Tripcel, an implementation of RDFunctions using a spreadsheet metaphor. Using this tool, users can easily edit and execute function expressions and perform analysis tasks on the data stored in an RDF graph.

  17. Functional Metamirrors Using Bianisotropic Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadchy, V. S.; Ra'di, Y.; Vehmas, J.; Tretyakov, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional mirrors obey the simple reflection law that a plane wave is reflected as a plane wave, at the same angle. To engineer spatial distributions of fields reflected from a mirror, one can either shape the reflector or position some phase-correcting elements on top of a mirror surface. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that full-power reflection with general control over the reflected wave phase is possible with a single-layer array of deeply subwavelength inclusions. These proposed artificial surfaces, metamirrors, provide various functions of shaped or nonuniform reflectors without utilizing any mirror. This can be achieved only if the forward and backward scattering of the inclusions in the array can be engineered independently, and we prove that it is possible using electrically and magnetically polarizable inclusions. The proposed subwavelength inclusions possess desired reflecting properties at the operational frequency band, while at other frequencies the array is practically transparent. The metamirror concept leads to a variety of applications over the entire electromagnetic spectrum, such as optically transparent focusing antennas for satellites, multifrequency reflector antennas for radio astronomy, low-profile conformal antennas for telecommunications, and nanoreflectarray antennas for integrated optics.

  18. Finite element solution for energy conservation using a highly stable explicit integration algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Manhardt, P. D.

    1972-01-01

    Theoretical derivation of a finite element solution algorithm for the transient energy conservation equation in multidimensional, stationary multi-media continua with irregular solution domain closure is considered. The complete finite element matrix forms for arbitrarily irregular discretizations are established, using natural coordinate function representations. The algorithm is embodied into a user-oriented computer program (COMOC) which obtains transient temperature distributions at the node points of the finite element discretization using a highly stable explicit integration procedure with automatic error control features. The finite element algorithm is shown to posses convergence with discretization for a transient sample problem. The condensed form for the specific heat element matrix is shown to be preferable to the consistent form. Computed results for diverse problems illustrate the versatility of COMOC, and easily prepared output subroutines are shown to allow quick engineering assessment of solution behavior.

  19. Conserved elements in Pax6 intron 7 involved in (auto)regulation and alternative transcription.

    PubMed

    Kleinjan, Dirk A; Seawright, Anne; Childs, Andrew J; van Heyningen, Veronica

    2004-01-15

    Pax6 is a transcription factor with an essential role in eye, central nervous system, and pancreas development. Its expression pattern is restricted to these specific domains within the developing embryo. Here four conserved elements are identified in Pax6 intron 7, showing a high level of sequence conservation between human, mouse, pufferfish, and zebrafish. Three of these are shown to act as cis-regulatory elements, directing expression of a reporter gene to distinct subsets of the Pax6 expression domain. CE1 regulates gene expression in late eye development, CE2 drives expression in the diencephalon and in the developing heart tube where Pax6 is not normally expressed, while CE3 directs expression in rhombencephalon. CE2 is shown to be autoregulated in the diencephalon, responding to absence of Pax6. We identify a highly conserved Pax6 recognition site and demonstrate its ability to bind Pax6 specifically. CE1 is embedded in a CpG island, and we identify a novel Pax6 transcript which initiates from this region. Functional analysis of evolutionary conserved sequences pinpoints novel cis-acting elements that govern the regulation of the complex spatio-temporal and quantitative expression of Pax6. PMID:14732405

  20. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 436 - Energy Program Conservation Elements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Energy Program Conservation Elements D Appendix D to Part 436 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Pt. 436, App. D Appendix D to Part 436—Energy Program Conservation Elements (a) In all successful...

  1. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 436 - Energy Program Conservation Elements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Energy Program Conservation Elements D Appendix D to Part 436 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Pt. 436, App. D Appendix D to Part 436—Energy Program Conservation Elements (a) In all successful...

  2. CRISPR Screens to Discover Functional Noncoding Elements.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jason B; Sanjana, Neville E

    2016-09-01

    A major challenge in genomics is to identify functional elements in the noncoding genome. Recently, pooled clustered regularly interspersed palindromic repeat (CRISPR) mutagenesis screens of noncoding regions have emerged as a novel method for finding elements that impact gene expression and phenotype/disease-relevant biological processes. Here we review and compare different approaches for high-throughput dissection of noncoding elements. PMID:27423542

  3. Conservation of glp-1 regulation and function in nematodes.

    PubMed Central

    Rudel, D; Kimble, J

    2001-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans (Ce) glp-1 gene encodes a Notch-like receptor. We have cloned glp-1 from C. briggsae (Cb) and C. remanei (Cr), two Caenorhabditis species that have diverged from C. elegans by roughly 20-40 million years. By sequence analysis, we find that the Cb-GLP-1 and Cr-GLP-1 proteins have retained the same motif architecture as Ce-GLP-1, including number of domains. In addition, two regions (CC-linker and regions flanking the ANK repeats) are as highly conserved as regions previously recognized as essential for signaling (e.g., ANK repeats). Phylogenetic analysis of glp-1 sequences suggests a C. briggsae/C. remanei clade with C. elegans as a sister taxon. Using RNAi to test biological functions, we find that Ce-glp-1, Cb-glp-1, and Cr-glp-1 are all required for proliferation of germline stem cells and for specifying blastomere fates in the embryo. In addition, certain biological roles of Cb-glp-1, e.g., in the vulva, have diverged from those of Ce-glp-1 and Cr-glp-1, suggesting a change in either regulation or function of the Cb-glp-1 gene during evolution. Finally, the regulation of glp-1 mRNA, previously analyzed for Ce-glp-1, is conserved in Cb-glp-1, and we identify conserved 3' UTR sequences that may serve as regulatory elements. PMID:11156985

  4. Conserved Endonuclease Function of Hantavirus L Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Rothenberger, Sylvia; Torriani, Giulia; Johansson, Maria U; Kunz, Stefan; Engler, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are important emerging pathogens belonging to the Bunyaviridae family. Like other segmented negative strand RNA viruses, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) also known as L protein of hantaviruses lacks an intrinsic "capping activity". Hantaviruses therefore employ a "cap snatching" strategy acquiring short 5' RNA sequences bearing 5'cap structures by endonucleolytic cleavage from host cell transcripts. The viral endonuclease activity implicated in cap snatching of hantaviruses has been mapped to the N-terminal domain of the L protein. Using a combination of molecular modeling and structure-function analysis we confirm and extend these findings providing evidence for high conservation of the L endonuclease between Old and New World hantaviruses. Recombinant hantavirus L endonuclease showed catalytic activity and a defined cation preference shared by other viral endonucleases. Based on the previously reported remarkably high activity of hantavirus L endonuclease, we established a cell-based assay for the hantavirus endonuclase function. The robustness of the assay and its high-throughput compatible format makes it suitable for small molecule drug screens to identify novel inhibitors of hantavirus endonuclease. Based on the high degree of similarity to RdRp endonucleases, some candidate inhibitors may be broadly active against hantaviruses and other emerging human pathogenic Bunyaviruses. PMID:27144576

  5. Conserved Endonuclease Function of Hantavirus L Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberger, Sylvia; Torriani, Giulia; Johansson, Maria U.; Kunz, Stefan; Engler, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are important emerging pathogens belonging to the Bunyaviridae family. Like other segmented negative strand RNA viruses, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) also known as L protein of hantaviruses lacks an intrinsic “capping activity”. Hantaviruses therefore employ a “cap snatching” strategy acquiring short 5′ RNA sequences bearing 5′cap structures by endonucleolytic cleavage from host cell transcripts. The viral endonuclease activity implicated in cap snatching of hantaviruses has been mapped to the N-terminal domain of the L protein. Using a combination of molecular modeling and structure–function analysis we confirm and extend these findings providing evidence for high conservation of the L endonuclease between Old and New World hantaviruses. Recombinant hantavirus L endonuclease showed catalytic activity and a defined cation preference shared by other viral endonucleases. Based on the previously reported remarkably high activity of hantavirus L endonuclease, we established a cell-based assay for the hantavirus endonuclase function. The robustness of the assay and its high-throughput compatible format makes it suitable for small molecule drug screens to identify novel inhibitors of hantavirus endonuclease. Based on the high degree of similarity to RdRp endonucleases, some candidate inhibitors may be broadly active against hantaviruses and other emerging human pathogenic Bunyaviruses. PMID:27144576

  6. High Resolution Euler Solvers Based on the Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chow, Chuen-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung

    1996-01-01

    The I-D, quasi I-D and 2-D Euler solvers based on the method of space-time conservation element and solution element are used to simulate various flow phenomena including shock waves, Mach stem, contact surface, expansion waves, and their intersections and reflections. Seven test problems are solved to demonstrate the capability of this method for handling unsteady compressible flows in various configurations. Numerical results so obtained are compared with exact solutions and/or numerical solutions obtained by schemes based on other established computational techniques. Comparisons show that the present Euler solvers can generate highly accurate numerical solutions to complex flow problems in a straightforward manner without using any ad hoc techniques in the scheme.

  7. The Conservation/Solution Element (STE) Method for Linear Potential Flow Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adeyeye, John O.; Attia, Naguib F.; Jackson, Joy; Hunter, Timothy

    1996-01-01

    The potential equation is discretized on rectangular domains using the Conservation/Solution Element Method (STE) approach. Computational examples with a discussion of numerical experience gained are given.

  8. Finite element method for conserved phase fields: Stress-mediated diffusional phase transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaeem, Mohsen Asle; Mesarovic, Sinisa Dj.

    2010-12-01

    Phase-field models with conserved phase-field variables result in a 4th order evolution partial differential equation (PDE). When coupled with the usual 2nd order thermo-mechanics equations, such problems require special treatment. In the past, the finite element method (FEM) has been successfully applied to non-conserved phase fields, governed by a 2nd order PDE. For higher order equations, the convergence of the standard Galerkin FEM requires that the interpolation functions belong to a higher continuity class. We consider the Cahn-Hilliard phase-field model for diffusion-controlled solid state phase transformation in binary alloys, coupled with elasticity of the solid phases. A Galerkin finite element formulation is developed, with mixed-order interpolation: C 0 interpolation functions for displacements, and C 1 interpolation functions for the phase-field variable. To demonstrate convergence of the mixed interpolation scheme, we first study a one-dimensional problem - nucleation and growth of the intermediate phase in a thin-film diffusion couple with elasticity effects. Then, we study the effects of completeness of C 1 interpolation on parabolic problems in two space dimensions by considering the growth of the intermediate phase in a binary system. Quadratic convergence, expected for conforming elements, is achieved for both one- and two-dimensional systems.

  9. A new numerical framework for solving conservation laws: The method of space-time conservation element and solution element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; To, Wai-Ming

    1991-01-01

    A new numerical framework for solving conservation laws is being developed. It employs: (1) a nontraditional formulation of the conservation laws in which space and time are treated on the same footing, and (2) a nontraditional use of discrete variables such as numerical marching can be carried out by using a set of relations that represents both local and global flux conservation.

  10. Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; Himansu, Ananda; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Loh, Ching-Yuen; Wang, Xiao-Yen; Yu, Sheng-Tao

    1999-01-01

    The engineering research and design requirements of today pose great computer-simulation challenges to engineers and scientists who are called on to analyze phenomena in continuum mechanics. The future will bring even more daunting challenges, when increasingly complex phenomena must be analyzed with increased accuracy. Traditionally used numerical simulation methods have evolved to their present state by repeated incremental extensions to broaden their scope. They are reaching the limits of their applicability and will need to be radically revised, at the very least, to meet future simulation challenges. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, researchers have been developing a new numerical framework for solving conservation laws in continuum mechanics, namely, the Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method, or the CE/SE method. This method has been built from fundamentals and is not a modification of any previously existing method. It has been designed with generality, simplicity, robustness, and accuracy as cornerstones. The CE/SE method has thus far been applied in the fields of computational fluid dynamics, computational aeroacoustics, and computational electromagnetics. Computer programs based on the CE/SE method have been developed for calculating flows in one, two, and three spatial dimensions. Results have been obtained for numerous problems and phenomena, including various shock-tube problems, ZND detonation waves, an implosion and explosion problem, shocks over a forward-facing step, a blast wave discharging from a nozzle, various acoustic waves, and shock/acoustic-wave interactions. The method can clearly resolve shock/acoustic-wave interactions, wherein the difference of the magnitude between the acoustic wave and shock could be up to six orders. In two-dimensional flows, the reflected shock is as crisp as the leading shock. CE/SE schemes are currently being used for advanced applications to jet and fan noise prediction and to chemically

  11. Detecting conserved regulatory elements with the model genome of the Japanese puffer fish, Fugu rubripes.

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, S; Morrison, A; Gould, A; Gilthorpe, J; Chaudhuri, C; Rigby, P; Krumlauf, R; Brenner, S

    1995-01-01

    Comparative vertebrate genome sequencing offers a powerful method for detecting conserved regulatory sequences. We propose that the compact genome of the teleost Fugu rubripes is well suited for this purpose. The evolutionary distance of teleosts from other vertebrates offers the maximum stringency for such evolutionary comparisons. To illustrate the comparative genome approach for F. rubripes, we use sequence comparisons between mouse and Fugu Hoxb-4 noncoding regions to identify conserved sequence blocks. We have used two approaches to test the function of these conserved blocks. In the first, homologous sequences were deleted from a mouse enhancer, resulting in a tissue-specific loss of activity when assayed in transgenic mice. In the second approach, Fugu DNA sequences showing homology to mouse sequences were tested for enhancer activity in transgenic mice. This strategy identified a neural element that mediates a subset of Hoxb-4 expression that is conserved between mammals and teleosts. The comparison of noncoding vertebrate sequences with those of Fugu, coupled to a transgenic bioassay, represents a general approach suitable for many genome projects. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7878040

  12. One-Step Direct Aeroacoustic Simulation Using Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C. Y.; Leung, R. C. K.; Zhou, K.; Lam, G. C. Y.; Jiang, Z.

    2011-09-01

    One-step direct aeroacoustic simulation (DAS) has received attention from aerospace and mechanical high-pressure fluid-moving system manufacturers for quite some time. They aim to simulate the unsteady flow and acoustic field in the duct simultaneously in order to investigate the aeroacoustic generation mechanisms. Because of the large length and energy scale disparities between the acoustic far field and the aerodynamic near field, highly accurate and high-resolution simulation scheme is required. This involves the use of high order compact finite difference and time advancement schemes in simulation. However, in this situation, large buffer zones are always needed to suppress the spurious numerical waves emanating from computational boundaries. This further increases the computational resources to yield accurate results. On the other hand, for such problem as supersonic jet noise, the numerical scheme should be able to resolve both strong shock waves and weak acoustic waves simultaneously. Usually numerical aeroa-coustic scheme that is good for low Mach number flow is not able to give satisfactory simulation results for shock wave. Therefore, the aeroacoustic research community has been looking for a more efficient one-step DAS scheme that has the comparable accuracy to the finite-difference approach with smaller buffer regions, yet is able to give accurate solutions from subsonic to supersonic flows. The conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) scheme is one of the possible schemes satisfying the above requirements. This paper aims to report the development of a CE/SE scheme for one-step DAS and illustrate its robustness and effectiveness with two selected benchmark problems.

  13. Steady and Unsteady Nozzle Simulations Using the Conservation Element and Solution Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedlander, David Joshua; Wang, Xiao-Yen J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents results from computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of a three-stream plug nozzle. Time-accurate, Euler, quasi-1D and 2D-axisymmetric simulations were performed as part of an effort to provide a CFD-based approach to modeling nozzle dynamics. The CFD code used for the simulations is based on the space-time Conservation Element and Solution Element (CESE) method. Steady-state results were validated using the Wind-US code and a code utilizing the MacCormack method while the unsteady results were partially validated via an aeroacoustic benchmark problem. The CESE steady-state flow field solutions showed excellent agreement with solutions derived from the other methods and codes while preliminary unsteady results for the three-stream plug nozzle are also shown. Additionally, a study was performed to explore the sensitivity of gross thrust computations to the control surface definition. The results showed that most of the sensitivity while computing the gross thrust is attributed to the control surface stencil resolution and choice of stencil end points and not to the control surface definition itself.Finally, comparisons between the quasi-1D and 2D-axisymetric solutions were performed in order to gain insight on whether a quasi-1D solution can capture the steady and unsteady nozzle phenomena without the cost of a 2D-axisymmetric simulation. Initial results show that while the quasi-1D solutions are similar to the 2D-axisymmetric solutions, the inability of the quasi-1D simulations to predict two dimensional phenomena limits its accuracy.

  14. Defining functional DNA elements in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Kellis, Manolis; Wold, Barbara; Snyder, Michael P.; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Kundaje, Anshul; Marinov, Georgi K.; Ward, Lucas D.; Birney, Ewan; Crawford, Gregory E.; Dekker, Job; Dunham, Ian; Elnitski, Laura L.; Farnham, Peggy J.; Feingold, Elise A.; Gerstein, Mark; Giddings, Morgan C.; Gilbert, David M.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Green, Eric D.; Guigo, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim; Kent, Jim; Lieb, Jason D.; Myers, Richard M.; Pazin, Michael J.; Ren, Bing; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Weng, Zhiping; White, Kevin P.; Hardison, Ross C.

    2014-01-01

    With the completion of the human genome sequence, attention turned to identifying and annotating its functional DNA elements. As a complement to genetic and comparative genomics approaches, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements Project was launched to contribute maps of RNA transcripts, transcriptional regulator binding sites, and chromatin states in many cell types. The resulting genome-wide data reveal sites of biochemical activity with high positional resolution and cell type specificity that facilitate studies of gene regulation and interpretation of noncoding variants associated with human disease. However, the biochemically active regions cover a much larger fraction of the genome than do evolutionarily conserved regions, raising the question of whether nonconserved but biochemically active regions are truly functional. Here, we review the strengths and limitations of biochemical, evolutionary, and genetic approaches for defining functional DNA segments, potential sources for the observed differences in estimated genomic coverage, and the biological implications of these discrepancies. We also analyze the relationship between signal intensity, genomic coverage, and evolutionary conservation. Our results reinforce the principle that each approach provides complementary information and that we need to use combinations of all three to elucidate genome function in human biology and disease. PMID:24753594

  15. Systematic identification of conserved regulatory elements in upstream promoter regions of the cattle genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cross-species DNA sequence comparison is the primary approach to discover regulatory elements by identifying highly conserved sequences due to evolutionary constraints. Previously, we reported that a systematic approach, combining position-specific weight matrixes (JASPAR) and phylogenetic footprint...

  16. Effects of species combination on comparative analyses of conserved regulatory elements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cross-species DNA sequence comparison is the primary approach to discover regulatory elements by identifying highly conserved sequences due to evolutionary constraints. Previously, we reported that a systematic approach, combining position-specific weight matrixes (JASPAR) and phylogenetic footprint...

  17. Prediction of conserved regulatory elements in promoter regions of the cattle genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cross-species DNA sequence comparison is the primary approach to discover regulatory elements by identifying highly conserved sequences due to evolutionary constraints. Previously, we reported that a systematic approach, combining position-specific weight matrixes (JASPAR) and phylogenetic footprint...

  18. Genome-wide identification of conserved regulatory function in diverged sequences

    PubMed Central

    Taher, Leila; McGaughey, David M.; Maragh, Samantha; Aneas, Ivy; Bessling, Seneca L.; Miller, Webb; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; McCallion, Andrew S.; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Plasticity of gene regulatory encryption can permit DNA sequence divergence without loss of function. Functional information is preserved through conservation of the composition of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in a regulatory element. We have developed a method that can accurately identify pairs of functional noncoding orthologs at evolutionarily diverged loci by searching for conserved TFBS arrangements. With an estimated 5% false-positive rate (FPR) in approximately 3000 human and zebrafish syntenic loci, we detected approximately 300 pairs of diverged elements that are likely to share common ancestry and have similar regulatory activity. By analyzing a pool of experimentally validated human enhancers, we demonstrated that 7/8 (88%) of their predicted functional orthologs retained in vivo regulatory control. Moreover, in 5/7 (71%) of assayed enhancer pairs, we observed concordant expression patterns. We argue that TFBS composition is often necessary to retain and sufficient to predict regulatory function in the absence of overt sequence conservation, revealing an entire class of functionally conserved, evolutionarily diverged regulatory elements that we term “covert.” PMID:21628450

  19. Functionally conserved enhancers with divergent sequences in distant vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Song; Oksenberg, Nir; Takayama, Sachiko; Heo, Seok -Jin; Poliakov, Alexander; Ahituv, Nadav; Dubchak, Inna; Boffelli, Dario

    2015-10-30

    To examine the contributions of sequence and function conservation in the evolution of enhancers, we systematically identified enhancers whose sequences are not conserved among distant groups of vertebrate species, but have homologous function and are likely to be derived from a common ancestral sequence. In conclusion, our approach combined comparative genomics and epigenomics to identify potential enhancer sequences in the genomes of three groups of distantly related vertebrate species.

  20. Spectral/HP Element Method With Hierarchical Reconstruction for Solving Hyperbolic Conservation Laws

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhiliang; Lin, Guang

    2009-12-01

    Hierarchical reconstruction (HR) has been successfully applied to prevent oscillations in solutions computed by finite volume, discontinuous Galerkin, spectral volume schemes when solving hyperbolic conservation laws. In this paper, we demonstrate that HR can also be combined with spectral/hp element methods for solving hyperbolic conservation laws. We show that HR preserves the order of accuracy of spectral/hp element methods for smooth solutions and generate essentially non-oscillatory solution profiles for shock wave problems.

  1. Particle conservation in dynamical density functional theory.

    PubMed

    de Las Heras, Daniel; Brader, Joseph M; Fortini, Andrea; Schmidt, Matthias

    2016-06-22

    We present the exact adiabatic theory for the dynamics of the inhomogeneous density distribution of a classical fluid. Erroneous particle number fluctuations of dynamical density functional theory are absent, both for canonical and grand canonical initial conditions. We obtain the canonical free energy functional, which yields the adiabatic interparticle forces of overdamped Brownian motion. Using an exact and one of the most advanced approximate hard core free energy functionals, we obtain excellent agreement with simulations. The theory applies to finite systems in and out of equilibrium. PMID:27115673

  2. Particle conservation in dynamical density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de las Heras, Daniel; Brader, Joseph M.; Fortini, Andrea; Schmidt, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    We present the exact adiabatic theory for the dynamics of the inhomogeneous density distribution of a classical fluid. Erroneous particle number fluctuations of dynamical density functional theory are absent, both for canonical and grand canonical initial conditions. We obtain the canonical free energy functional, which yields the adiabatic interparticle forces of overdamped Brownian motion. Using an exact and one of the most advanced approximate hard core free energy functionals, we obtain excellent agreement with simulations. The theory applies to finite systems in and out of equilibrium.

  3. New alloys to conserve critical elements. [replacing chromium in steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Previous studies and surveys on availability of domestic reserves have shown that chromium is a most critical element within the U.S. metal industry. More precisely, the bulk of chromium is consumed in the production of stainless steels, specifically Type 304 stainless steel (304SS) which contains 18% Cr. The present paper deals with means of reducing chromium in commercial stainless steels by substituting more abundant or less expensive elements with the intent of maintaining the properties of 304SS. The discussion focuses on some of the oxidation and corrosion properties of new substitute stainless steels with only 12% Cr, which represents a potential saving of 33% of the chromium consumed in the production of 304SS. The alloying elements substituted for Cr in 304SS are selected according to their potential for protective oxide formation during high-temperature oxidation; these are Al, Si, Ti, Y, and misch metal which is 99.7% rare-earth metals containing 50 to 55% cerium. Other alloying elements to impart corrosion resistance are Mn, Mo, and V.

  4. Effective function annotation through catalytic residue conservation.

    PubMed

    George, Richard A; Spriggs, Ruth V; Bartlett, Gail J; Gutteridge, Alex; MacArthur, Malcolm W; Porter, Craig T; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Thornton, Janet M; Swindells, Mark B

    2005-08-30

    Because of the extreme impact of genome sequencing projects, protein sequences without accompanying experimental data now dominate public databases. Homology searches, by providing an opportunity to transfer functional information between related proteins, have become the de facto way to address this. Although a single, well annotated, close relationship will often facilitate sufficient annotation, this situation is not always the case, particularly if mutations are present in important functional residues. When only distant relationships are available, the transfer of function information is more tenuous, and the likelihood of encountering several well annotated proteins with different functions is increased. The consequence for a researcher is a range of candidate functions with little way of knowing which, if any, are correct. Here, we address the problem directly by introducing a computational approach to accurately identify and segregate related proteins into those with a functional similarity and those where function differs. This approach should find a wide range of applications, including the interpretation of genomics/proteomics data and the prioritization of targets for high-throughput structure determination. The method is generic, but here we concentrate on enzymes and apply high-quality catalytic site data. In addition to providing a series of comprehensive benchmarks to show the overall performance of our approach, we illustrate its utility with specific examples that include the correct identification of haptoglobin as a nonenzymatic relative of trypsin, discrimination of acid-d-amino acid ligases from a much larger ligase pool, and the successful annotation of BioH, a structural genomics target. PMID:16037208

  5. Fractality and entropic scaling in the chromosomal distribution of conserved noncoding elements in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Polychronopoulos, Dimitris; Athanasopoulou, Labrini; Almirantis, Yannis

    2016-06-15

    Conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) are defined using various degrees of sequence identity and thresholds of minimal length. Their conservation frequently exceeds the one observed for protein-coding sequences. We explored the chromosomal distribution of different classes of CNEs in the human genome. We employed two methodologies: the scaling of block entropy and box-counting, with the aim to assess fractal characteristics of different CNE datasets. Both approaches converged to the conclusion that well-developed fractality is characteristic of elements that are either extremely conserved between species or are of ancient origin, i.e. conserved between distant organisms across evolution. Given that CNEs are often clustered around genes, we verified by appropriate gene masking that fractal-like patterns emerge even when elements found in proximity or inside genes are excluded. An evolutionary scenario is proposed, involving genomic events that might account for fractal distribution of CNEs in the human genome as indicated through numerical simulations. PMID:26899868

  6. Local Function Conservation in Sequence and Structure Space

    PubMed Central

    Weinhold, Nils; Sander, Oliver; Domingues, Francisco S.; Lengauer, Thomas; Sommer, Ingolf

    2008-01-01

    We assess the variability of protein function in protein sequence and structure space. Various regions in this space exhibit considerable difference in the local conservation of molecular function. We analyze and capture local function conservation by means of logistic curves. Based on this analysis, we propose a method for predicting molecular function of a query protein with known structure but unknown function. The prediction method is rigorously assessed and compared with a previously published function predictor. Furthermore, we apply the method to 500 functionally unannotated PDB structures and discuss selected examples. The proposed approach provides a simple yet consistent statistical model for the complex relations between protein sequence, structure, and function. The GOdot method is available online (http://godot.bioinf.mpi-inf.mpg.de). PMID:18604264

  7. SMADs and FOXL2 synergistically regulate murine FSHbeta transcription via a conserved proximal promoter element.

    PubMed

    Tran, Stella; Lamba, Pankaj; Wang, Ying; Bernard, Daniel J

    2011-07-01

    Pituitary FSH regulates ovarian and testicular function. Activins stimulate FSHβ subunit (Fshb) gene transcription in gonadotrope cells, the rate-limiting step in mature FSH synthesis. Activin A-induced murine Fshb gene transcription in immortalized gonadotropes is dependent on homolog of Drosophila mothers against decapentaplegic (SMAD) proteins as well as the forkhead transcription factor FOXL2 (FOXL2). Here, we demonstrate that FOXL2 synergizes with SMAD2, SMAD3, and SMAD4 to stimulate murine Fshb promoter-reporter activity in heterologous cells. Moreover, SMAD3-induction of Fshb promoter activity or endogenous mRNA expression is dependent upon endogenous FOXL2 in homologous cells. FOXL2/SMAD synergy requires binding of both FOXL2 and SMAD3 or SMAD4 to DNA. Of three putative forkhead-binding elements identified in the murine Fshb promoter, only the most proximal is absolutely required for activin A induction of reporter activity in homologous cells. Additionally, mutations to the minimal SMAD-binding element adjacent to the proximal forkhead-binding element abrogate activin A or FOXL2/SMAD3 induction of reporter activity. In contrast, a mutation that impairs an adjacent PBX1/PREP1 (pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor 1-PBX/knotted-1 homeobox-1) binding site does not alter activin A-stimulated promoter activity in homologous cells. Collectively, these and previous data suggest a model in which activins stimulate formation of FOXL2-SMAD2/3/4 complexes, which bind to the proximal murine Fshb promoter to stimulate its transcription. Within these complexes, FOXL2 and SMAD3 or SMAD4 bind to adjacent cis-elements, with SMAD3 brokering the physical interaction with FOXL2. Because this composite response element is highly conserved, this suggests a general mechanism whereby activins may regulate and/or modulate Fshb transcription in mammals. PMID:21622537

  8. 49 CFR 236.526 - Roadway element not functioning properly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Roadway element not functioning properly. 236.526... element not functioning properly. When a roadway element except track circuit of automatic train stop... roadway element shall be caused manually to display its most restrictive aspect until such element...

  9. 49 CFR 236.526 - Roadway element not functioning properly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Roadway element not functioning properly. 236.526... element not functioning properly. When a roadway element except track circuit of automatic train stop... roadway element shall be caused manually to display its most restrictive aspect until such element...

  10. 49 CFR 236.526 - Roadway element not functioning properly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Roadway element not functioning properly. 236.526... element not functioning properly. When a roadway element except track circuit of automatic train stop... roadway element shall be caused manually to display its most restrictive aspect until such element...

  11. 49 CFR 236.526 - Roadway element not functioning properly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Roadway element not functioning properly. 236.526... element not functioning properly. When a roadway element except track circuit of automatic train stop... roadway element shall be caused manually to display its most restrictive aspect until such element...

  12. 49 CFR 236.526 - Roadway element not functioning properly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Roadway element not functioning properly. 236.526... element not functioning properly. When a roadway element except track circuit of automatic train stop... roadway element shall be caused manually to display its most restrictive aspect until such element...

  13. Functional equivalence of an evolutionarily conserved RNA binding module.

    PubMed

    Wells, Melissa L; Hicks, Stephanie N; Perera, Lalith; Blackshear, Perry J

    2015-10-01

    Members of the tristetraprolin (TTP) family of proteins participate in the regulation of mRNA turnover after initially binding to AU-rich elements in target mRNAs. Related proteins from most groups of eukaryotes contain a conserved tandem zinc finger (TZF) domain consisting of two closely spaced, similar CCCH zinc fingers that form the primary RNA binding domain. There is considerable sequence variation within the TZF domains from different family members within a single organism and from different organisms, raising questions about sequence-specific effects on RNA binding and decay promotion. We hypothesized that TZF domains from evolutionarily distant species are functionally interchangeable. The single family member expressed in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Zfs1, promotes the turnover of several dozen transcripts, some of which are involved in cell-cell interactions. Using knockin techniques, we replaced the TZF domain of S. pombe Zfs1 with the equivalent domains from human TTP and the single family member proteins expressed in the silkworm Bombyx mori, the pathogenic yeast Candida guilliermondii, and the plant Chromolaena odorata. We found that the TZF domains from these widely disparate species could completely substitute for the native S. pombe TZF domain, as determined by measurement of target transcript levels and the flocculation phenotype characteristic of Zfs1 deletion. Recombinant TZF domain peptides from several of these species bound to an AU-rich RNA oligonucleotide with comparably high affinity. We conclude that the TZF domains from TTP family members in these evolutionarily widely divergent species are functionally interchangeable in mRNA binding and decay. PMID:26292216

  14. Recurrent Modification of a Conserved Cis-Regulatory Element Underlies Fruit Fly Pigmentation Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, William A.; Salomone, Joseph R.; Tacy, David J.; Camino, Eric M.; Davis, Kristen A.; Rebeiz, Mark; Williams, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of morphological traits occurs through the collective action of networks of genes connected at the level of gene expression. As any node in a network may be a target of evolutionary change, the recurrent targeting of the same node would indicate that the path of evolution is biased for the relevant trait and network. Although examples of parallel evolution have implicated recurrent modification of the same gene and cis-regulatory element (CRE), little is known about the mutational and molecular paths of parallel CRE evolution. In Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies, the Bric-à-brac (Bab) transcription factors control the development of a suite of sexually dimorphic traits on the posterior abdomen. Female-specific Bab expression is regulated by the dimorphic element, a CRE that possesses direct inputs from body plan (ABD-B) and sex-determination (DSX) transcription factors. Here, we find that the recurrent evolutionary modification of this CRE underlies both intraspecific and interspecific variation in female pigmentation in the melanogaster species group. By reconstructing the sequence and regulatory activity of the ancestral Drosophila melanogaster dimorphic element, we demonstrate that a handful of mutations were sufficient to create independent CRE alleles with differing activities. Moreover, intraspecific and interspecific dimorphic element evolution proceeded with little to no alterations to the known body plan and sex-determination regulatory linkages. Collectively, our findings represent an example where the paths of evolution appear biased to a specific CRE, and drastic changes in function were accompanied by deep conservation of key regulatory linkages. PMID:24009528

  15. Conserved Structural Elements in the V3 Crown of HIV-1 gp120

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Burke, V; Totrov, M; Williams, C; Cardozo, T; Gorny, M; Zolla-Pazner, S; Kong, X

    2010-01-01

    Binding of the third variable region (V3) of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the cell-surface coreceptors CCR5 or CXCR4 during viral entry suggests that there are conserved structural elements in this sequence-variable region. These conserved elements could serve as epitopes to be targeted by a vaccine against HIV-1. Here we perform a systematic structural analysis of representative human anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies in complex with V3 peptides, revealing that the crown of V3 has four conserved structural elements: an arch, a band, a hydrophobic core and the peptide backbone. These are either unaffected by or are subject to minimal sequence variation. As these regions are targeted by cross-clade neutralizing human antibodies, they provide a blueprint for the design of vaccine immunogens that could elicit broadly cross-reactive protective antibodies.

  16. Application of the space-time conservation element and solution element method to shock-tube problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chow, Chuen-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung

    1994-01-01

    An Euler solver based on the method of space-time conservation element and solution element is in this paper to simulate shock-tube flows involving shock waves, contact discontinuities, expansion waves and their intersections. Seven test problems are considered to examine the capability of this method. The numerical results, when compared with exact solutions and/or numerical solutions by other methods, indicate that the present method can accurately resolve strong shock and contact discontinuities without using any ad hoc techniques which are used only at the neighborhood of a discontinuity.

  17. Application of the space-time conservation element and solution element method to two-dimensional advection-diffusion problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chow, Chuen-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung

    1995-01-01

    The existing 2-D alpha-mu scheme and alpha-epsilon scheme based on the method of space-time conservation element and solution element, which were constructed for solving the linear 2-D unsteady advection-diffusion equation and unsteady advection equation, respectively, are tested. Also, the alpha-epsilon scheme is modified to become the V-E scheme for solving the nonlinear 2-D inviscid Burgers equation. Numerical solutions of six test problems are presented in comparison with their exact solutions or numerical solutions obtained by traditional finite-difference or finite-element methods. It is demonstrated that the 2-D alpha-mu, alpha-epsilon, and nu-epsilon schemes can be used to obtain numerical results which are more accurate than those based on some of the traditional methods but without using any artificial tuning in the computation. Similar to the previous 1-D test problems, the high accuracy and simplicity features of the space-time conservation element and solution element method have been revealed again in the present 2-D test results.

  18. Similarity in Shape Dictates Signature Intrinsic Dynamics Despite No Functional Conservation in TIM Barrel Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Sandhya P.; Reuter, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The conservation of the intrinsic dynamics of proteins emerges as we attempt to understand the relationship between sequence, structure and functional conservation. We characterise the conservation of such dynamics in a case where the structure is conserved but function differs greatly. The triosephosphate isomerase barrel fold (TBF), renowned for its 8 β-strand-α-helix repeats that close to form a barrel, is one of the most diverse and abundant folds found in known protein structures. Proteins with this fold have diverse enzymatic functions spanning five of six Enzyme Commission classes, and we have picked five different superfamily candidates for our analysis using elastic network models. We find that the overall shape is a large determinant in the similarity of the intrinsic dynamics, regardless of function. In particular, the β-barrel core is highly rigid, while the α-helices that flank the β-strands have greater relative mobility, allowing for the many possibilities for placement of catalytic residues. We find that these elements correlate with each other via the loops that link them, as opposed to being directly correlated. We are also able to analyse the types of motions encoded by the normal mode vectors of the α-helices. We suggest that the global conservation of the intrinsic dynamics in the TBF contributes greatly to its success as an enzymatic scaffold both through evolution and enzyme design. PMID:27015412

  19. Sequence conservation and functional constraint on intergenic spacers in reduced genomes of the obligate symbiont Buchnera.

    PubMed

    Degnan, Patrick H; Ochman, Howard; Moran, Nancy A

    2011-09-01

    Analyses of genome reduction in obligate bacterial symbionts typically focus on the removal and retention of protein-coding regions, which are subject to ongoing inactivation and deletion. However, these same forces operate on intergenic spacers (IGSs) and affect their contents, maintenance, and rates of evolution. IGSs comprise both non-coding, non-functional regions, including decaying pseudogenes at varying stages of recognizability, as well as functional elements, such as genes for sRNAs and regulatory control elements. The genomes of Buchnera and other small genome symbionts display biased nucleotide compositions and high rates of sequence evolution and contain few recognizable regulatory elements. However, IGS lengths are highly correlated across divergent Buchnera genomes, suggesting the presence of functional elements. To identify functional regions within the IGSs, we sequenced two Buchnera genomes (from aphid species Uroleucon ambrosiae and Acyrthosiphon kondoi) and applied a phylogenetic footprinting approach to alignments of orthologous IGSs from a total of eight Buchnera genomes corresponding to six aphid species. Inclusion of these new genomes allowed comparative analyses at intermediate levels of divergence, enabling the detection of both conserved elements and previously unrecognized pseudogenes. Analyses of these genomes revealed that 232 of 336 IGS alignments over 50 nucleotides in length displayed substantial sequence conservation. Conserved alignment blocks within these IGSs encompassed 88 Shine-Dalgarno sequences, 55 transcriptional terminators, 5 Sigma-32 binding sites, and 12 novel small RNAs. Although pseudogene formation, and thus IGS formation, are ongoing processes in these genomes, a large proportion of intergenic spacers contain functional sequences. PMID:21912528

  20. Conservative site-specific and single-copy transgenesis in human LINE-1 elements.

    PubMed

    Vijaya Chandra, Shree Harsha; Makhija, Harshyaa; Peter, Sabrina; Myint Wai, Cho Mar; Li, Jinming; Zhu, Jindong; Ren, Zhonglu; D'Alcontres, Martina Stagno; Siau, Jia Wei; Chee, Sharon; Ghadessy, Farid John; Dröge, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Genome engineering of human cells plays an important role in biotechnology and molecular medicine. In particular, insertions of functional multi-transgene cassettes into suitable endogenous sequences will lead to novel applications. Although several tools have been exploited in this context, safety issues such as cytotoxicity, insertional mutagenesis and off-target cleavage together with limitations in cargo size/expression often compromise utility. Phage λ integrase (Int) is a transgenesis tool that mediates conservative site-specific integration of 48 kb DNA into a safe harbor site of the bacterial genome. Here, we show that an Int variant precisely recombines large episomes into a sequence, termedattH4X, found in 1000 human Long INterspersed Elements-1 (LINE-1). We demonstrate single-copy transgenesis throughattH4X-targeting in various cell lines including hESCs, with the flexibility of selecting clones according to transgene performance and downstream applications. This is exemplified with pluripotency reporter cassettes and constitutively expressed payloads that remain functional inLINE1-targeted hESCs and differentiated progenies. Furthermore,LINE-1targeting does not induce DNA damage-response or chromosomal aberrations, and neither global nor localized endogenous gene expression is substantially affected. Hence, this simple transgene addition tool should become particularly useful for applications that require engineering of the human genome with multi-transgenes. PMID:26673710

  1. Conservative site-specific and single-copy transgenesis in human LINE-1 elements

    PubMed Central

    Vijaya Chandra, Shree Harsha; Makhija, Harshyaa; Peter, Sabrina; Myint Wai, Cho Mar; Li, Jinming; Zhu, Jindong; Ren, Zhonglu; D'Alcontres, Martina Stagno; Siau, Jia Wei; Chee, Sharon; Ghadessy, Farid John; Dröge, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Genome engineering of human cells plays an important role in biotechnology and molecular medicine. In particular, insertions of functional multi-transgene cassettes into suitable endogenous sequences will lead to novel applications. Although several tools have been exploited in this context, safety issues such as cytotoxicity, insertional mutagenesis and off-target cleavage together with limitations in cargo size/expression often compromise utility. Phage λ integrase (Int) is a transgenesis tool that mediates conservative site-specific integration of 48 kb DNA into a safe harbor site of the bacterial genome. Here, we show that an Int variant precisely recombines large episomes into a sequence, termed attH4X, found in 1000 human Long INterspersed Elements-1 (LINE-1). We demonstrate single-copy transgenesis through attH4X-targeting in various cell lines including hESCs, with the flexibility of selecting clones according to transgene performance and downstream applications. This is exemplified with pluripotency reporter cassettes and constitutively expressed payloads that remain functional in LINE1-targeted hESCs and differentiated progenies. Furthermore, LINE-1 targeting does not induce DNA damage-response or chromosomal aberrations, and neither global nor localized endogenous gene expression is substantially affected. Hence, this simple transgene addition tool should become particularly useful for applications that require engineering of the human genome with multi-transgenes. PMID:26673710

  2. Identification of a Conserved Non-Protein-Coding Genomic Element that Plays an Essential Role in Alphabaculovirus Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kikhno, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Highly homologous sequences 154–157 bp in length grouped under the name of “conserved non-protein-coding element” (CNE) were revealed in all of the sequenced genomes of baculoviruses belonging to the genus Alphabaculovirus. A CNE alignment led to the detection of a set of highly conserved nucleotide clusters that occupy strictly conserved positions in the CNE sequence. The significant length of the CNE and conservation of both its length and cluster architecture were identified as a combination of characteristics that make this CNE different from known viral non-coding functional sequences. The essential role of the CNE in the Alphabaculovirus life cycle was demonstrated through the use of a CNE-knockout Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) bacmid. It was shown that the essential function of the CNE was not mediated by the presumed expression activities of the protein- and non-protein-coding genes that overlap the AcMNPV CNE. On the basis of the presented data, the AcMNPV CNE was categorized as a complex-structured, polyfunctional genomic element involved in an essential DNA transaction that is associated with an undefined function of the baculovirus genome. PMID:24740153

  3. Combinatorial Gene Regulatory Functions Underlie Ultraconserved Elements in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Warnefors, Maria; Hartmann, Britta; Thomsen, Stefan; Alonso, Claudio R

    2016-09-01

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) are discrete genomic elements conserved across large evolutionary distances. Although UCEs have been linked to multiple facets of mammalian gene regulation their extreme evolutionary conservation remains largely unexplained. Here, we apply a computational approach to investigate this question in Drosophila, exploring the molecular functions of more than 1,500 UCEs shared across the genomes of 12 Drosophila species. Our data indicate that Drosophila UCEs are hubs for gene regulatory functions and suggest that UCE sequence invariance originates from their combinatorial roles in gene control. We also note that the gene regulatory roles of intronic and intergenic UCEs (iUCEs) are distinct from those found in exonic UCEs (eUCEs). In iUCEs, transcription factor (TF) and epigenetic factor binding data strongly support iUCE roles in transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. In contrast, analyses of eUCEs indicate that they are two orders of magnitude more likely than the expected to simultaneously include protein-coding sequence, TF-binding sites, splice sites, and RNA editing sites but have reduced roles in transcriptional or epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, we use a Drosophila cell culture system and transgenic Drosophila embryos to validate the notion of UCE combinatorial regulatory roles using an eUCE within the Hox gene Ultrabithorax and show that its protein-coding region also contains alternative splicing regulatory information. Taken together our experiments indicate that UCEs emerge as a result of combinatorial gene regulatory roles and highlight common features in mammalian and insect UCEs implying that similar processes might underlie ultraconservation in diverse animal taxa. PMID:27247329

  4. Combinatorial Gene Regulatory Functions Underlie Ultraconserved Elements in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Warnefors, Maria; Hartmann, Britta; Thomsen, Stefan; Alonso, Claudio R.

    2016-01-01

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) are discrete genomic elements conserved across large evolutionary distances. Although UCEs have been linked to multiple facets of mammalian gene regulation their extreme evolutionary conservation remains largely unexplained. Here, we apply a computational approach to investigate this question in Drosophila, exploring the molecular functions of more than 1,500 UCEs shared across the genomes of 12 Drosophila species. Our data indicate that Drosophila UCEs are hubs for gene regulatory functions and suggest that UCE sequence invariance originates from their combinatorial roles in gene control. We also note that the gene regulatory roles of intronic and intergenic UCEs (iUCEs) are distinct from those found in exonic UCEs (eUCEs). In iUCEs, transcription factor (TF) and epigenetic factor binding data strongly support iUCE roles in transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. In contrast, analyses of eUCEs indicate that they are two orders of magnitude more likely than the expected to simultaneously include protein-coding sequence, TF-binding sites, splice sites, and RNA editing sites but have reduced roles in transcriptional or epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, we use a Drosophila cell culture system and transgenic Drosophila embryos to validate the notion of UCE combinatorial regulatory roles using an eUCE within the Hox gene Ultrabithorax and show that its protein-coding region also contains alternative splicing regulatory information. Taken together our experiments indicate that UCEs emerge as a result of combinatorial gene regulatory roles and highlight common features in mammalian and insect UCEs implying that similar processes might underlie ultraconservation in diverse animal taxa. PMID:27247329

  5. p53 genes function to restrain mobile elements.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Annika; Jones, Amanda E; D'Brot, Alejandro; Lu, Wan-Jin; Kurtz, Paula; Moran, John V; Rakheja, Dinesh; Chen, Kenneth S; Hammer, Robert E; Comerford, Sarah A; Amatruda, James F; Abrams, John M

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom, p53 genes govern stress response networks by specifying adaptive transcriptional responses. The human member of this gene family is mutated in most cancers, but precisely how p53 functions to mediate tumor suppression is not well understood. Using Drosophila and zebrafish models, we show that p53 restricts retrotransposon activity and genetically interacts with components of the piRNA (piwi-interacting RNA) pathway. Furthermore, transposon eruptions occurring in the p53(-) germline were incited by meiotic recombination, and transcripts produced from these mobile elements accumulated in the germ plasm. In gene complementation studies, normal human p53 alleles suppressed transposons, but mutant p53 alleles from cancer patients could not. Consistent with these observations, we also found patterns of unrestrained retrotransposons in p53-driven mouse and human cancers. Furthermore, p53 status correlated with repressive chromatin marks in the 5' sequence of a synthetic LINE-1 element. Together, these observations indicate that ancestral functions of p53 operate through conserved mechanisms to contain retrotransposons. Since human p53 mutants are disabled for this activity, our findings raise the possibility that p53 mitigates oncogenic disease in part by restricting transposon mobility. PMID:26701264

  6. p53 genes function to restrain mobile elements

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Annika; Jones, Amanda E.; D'Brot, Alejandro; Lu, Wan-Jin; Kurtz, Paula; Moran, John V.; Rakheja, Dinesh; Chen, Kenneth S.; Hammer, Robert E.; Comerford, Sarah A.; Amatruda, James F.; Abrams, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom, p53 genes govern stress response networks by specifying adaptive transcriptional responses. The human member of this gene family is mutated in most cancers, but precisely how p53 functions to mediate tumor suppression is not well understood. Using Drosophila and zebrafish models, we show that p53 restricts retrotransposon activity and genetically interacts with components of the piRNA (piwi-interacting RNA) pathway. Furthermore, transposon eruptions occurring in the p53− germline were incited by meiotic recombination, and transcripts produced from these mobile elements accumulated in the germ plasm. In gene complementation studies, normal human p53 alleles suppressed transposons, but mutant p53 alleles from cancer patients could not. Consistent with these observations, we also found patterns of unrestrained retrotransposons in p53-driven mouse and human cancers. Furthermore, p53 status correlated with repressive chromatin marks in the 5′ sequence of a synthetic LINE-1 element. Together, these observations indicate that ancestral functions of p53 operate through conserved mechanisms to contain retrotransposons. Since human p53 mutants are disabled for this activity, our findings raise the possibility that p53 mitigates oncogenic disease in part by restricting transposon mobility. PMID:26701264

  7. Functional Constraint Profiling of a Viral Protein Reveals Discordance of Evolutionary Conservation and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Nicholas C.; Olson, C. Anders; Du, Yushen; Le, Shuai; Tran, Kevin; Remenyi, Roland; Gong, Danyang; Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q.; Qi, Hangfei; Wu, Ting-Ting; Sun, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Viruses often encode proteins with multiple functions due to their compact genomes. Existing approaches to identify functional residues largely rely on sequence conservation analysis. Inferring functional residues from sequence conservation can produce false positives, in which the conserved residues are functionally silent, or false negatives, where functional residues are not identified since they are species-specific and therefore non-conserved. Furthermore, the tedious process of constructing and analyzing individual mutations limits the number of residues that can be examined in a single study. Here, we developed a systematic approach to identify the functional residues of a viral protein by coupling experimental fitness profiling with protein stability prediction using the influenza virus polymerase PA subunit as the target protein. We identified a significant number of functional residues that were influenza type-specific and were evolutionarily non-conserved among different influenza types. Our results indicate that type-specific functional residues are prevalent and may not otherwise be identified by sequence conservation analysis alone. More importantly, this technique can be adapted to any viral (and potentially non-viral) protein where structural information is available. PMID:26132554

  8. Functionally conserved effects of rapamycin exposure on zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sucularli, Ceren; Shehwana, Huma; Kuscu, Cem; Dungul, Dilay Ciglidag; Ozdag, Hilal; Konu, Ozlen

    2016-05-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a conserved serine/threonine kinase important in cell proliferation, growth and protein translation. Rapamycin, a well‑known anti‑cancer agent and immunosuppressant drug, inhibits mTOR activity in different taxa including zebrafish. In the present study, the effect of rapamycin exposure on the transcriptome of a zebrafish fibroblast cell line, ZF4, was investigated. Microarray analysis demonstrated that rapamycin treatment modulated a large set of genes with varying functions including protein synthesis, assembly of mitochondrial and proteasomal machinery, cell cycle, metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation in ZF4 cells. A mild however, coordinated reduction in the expression of proteasomal and mitochondrial ribosomal subunits was detected, while the expression of numerous ribosomal subunits increased. Meta‑analysis of heterogeneous mouse rapamycin microarray datasets enabled the comparison of zebrafish and mouse pathways modulated by rapamycin, using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and Gene Ontology pathway analysis. The analyses demonstrated a high degree of functional conservation between zebrafish and mice in response to rapamycin. In addition, rapamycin treatment resulted in a marked dose‑dependent reduction in body size and pigmentation in zebrafish embryos. The present study is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to evaluate the conservation of rapamycin‑modulated functional pathways between zebrafish and mice, in addition to the dose‑dependent growth curves of zebrafish embryos upon rapamycin exposure. PMID:27035657

  9. Functional and Structural Analysis of the Conserved EFhd2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Yancy Ferrer; Rodríguez Cruz, Eva N.; Vaquer, Ana del C.; Vega, Irving E.

    2013-01-01

    EFhd2 is a novel protein conserved from C. elegans to H. sapiens. This novel protein was originally identified in cells of the immune and central nervous systems. However, it is most abundant in the central nervous system, where it has been found associated with pathological forms of the microtubule-associated protein tau. The physiological or pathological roles of EFhd2 are poorly understood. In this study, a functional and structural analysis was carried to characterize the molecular requirements for EFhd2’s calcium binding activity. The results showed that mutations of a conserved aspartate on either EF-hand motif disrupted the calcium binding activity, indicating that these motifs work in pair as a functional calcium binding domain. Furthermore, characterization of an identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) that introduced a missense mutation indicates the importance of a conserved phenylalanine on EFhd2 calcium binding activity. Structural analysis revealed that EFhd2 is predominantly composed of alpha helix and random coil structures and that this novel protein is thermostable. EFhd2’s thermo stability depends on its N-terminus. In the absence of the N-terminus, calcium binding restored EFhd2’s thermal stability. Overall, these studies contribute to our understanding on EFhd2 functional and structural properties, and introduce it into the family of canonical EF-hand domain containing proteins. PMID:22973849

  10. Structure-aided prediction of mammalian transcription factor complexes in conserved non-coding elements.

    PubMed

    Guturu, Harendra; Doxey, Andrew C; Wenger, Aaron M; Bejerano, Gill

    2013-12-19

    Mapping the DNA-binding preferences of transcription factor (TF) complexes is critical for deciphering the functions of cis-regulatory elements. Here, we developed a computational method that compares co-occurring motif spacings in conserved versus unconserved regions of the human genome to detect evolutionarily constrained binding sites of rigid TF complexes. Structural data were used to estimate TF complex physical plausibility, explore overlapping motif arrangements seldom tackled by non-structure-aware methods, and generate and analyse three-dimensional models of the predicted complexes bound to DNA. Using this approach, we predicted 422 physically realistic TF complex motifs at 18% false discovery rate, the majority of which (326, 77%) contain some sequence overlap between binding sites. The set of mostly novel complexes is enriched in known composite motifs, predictive of binding site configurations in TF-TF-DNA crystal structures, and supported by ChIP-seq datasets. Structural modelling revealed three cooperativity mechanisms: direct protein-protein interactions, potentially indirect interactions and 'through-DNA' interactions. Indeed, 38% of the predicted complexes were found to contain four or more bases in which TF pairs appear to synergize through overlapping binding to the same DNA base pairs in opposite grooves or strands. Our TF complex and associated binding site predictions are available as a web resource at http://bejerano.stanford.edu/complex. PMID:24218641

  11. Conserved enhancer and silencer elements responsible for differential Adh transcription in Drosophila cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Ayer, S; Benyajati, C

    1990-01-01

    The distal promoter of Adh is differentially expressed in Drosophila tissue culture cell lines. After transfection with an exogenous Adh gene, there was a specific increase in distal alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) transcripts in ADH-expressing (ADH+) cells above the levels observed in transfected ADH-nonexpressing (ADH-) cells. We used deletion mutations and a comparative transient-expression assay to identify the cis-acting elements responsible for enhanced Adh distal transcription in ADH+ cells. DNA sequences controlling high levels of distal transcription were localized to a 15-base-pair (bp) region nearly 500 bp upstream of the distal RNA start site. In addition, a 61-bp negative cis-acting element was found upstream from and adjacent to the enhancer. When this silencer element was deleted, distal transcription increased only in the ADH+ cell line. These distant upstream elements must interact with the promoter elements, the Adf-1-binding site and the TATA box, as they only influenced transcription when at least one of these two positive distal promoter elements was present. Internal deletions targeted to the Adf-1-binding site or the TATA box reduced transcription in both cell types but did not affect the transcription initiation site. Distal transcription in transfected ADH- cells appears to be controlled primarily through these promoter elements and does not involve the upstream regulatory elements. Evolutionary conservation in distantly related Drosophila species suggests the importance of these upstream elements in correct developmental and tissue-specific expression of ADH. Images PMID:1694013

  12. Application of the Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method to One-Dimensional Advection-Diffusion Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chow, Chuen-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung

    1999-01-01

    Test problems are used to examine the performance of several one-dimensional numerical schemes based on the space-time conservation and solution element (CE/SE) method. Investigated in this paper are the CE/SE schemes constructed previously for solving the linear unsteady advection-diffusion equation and the schemes derived here for solving the nonlinear viscous and inviscid Burgers equations. In comparison with the numerical solutions obtained using several traditional finite-difference schemes with similar accuracy, the CE/SE solutions display much lower numerical dissipation and dispersion errors.

  13. Discovery of functional non-coding conserved regions in the α-synuclein gene locus

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Lori; Walter, Michael; Ting, Dennis; Schüle, Birgitt

    2014-01-01

    Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the Rep-1 microsatellite marker of the α-synuclein ( SNCA) gene have consistently been shown to be associated with Parkinson’s disease, but the functional relevance is unclear. Based on these findings we hypothesized that conserved cis-regulatory elements in the SNCA genomic region regulate expression of SNCA, and that SNPs in these regions could be functionally modulating the expression of SNCA, thus contributing to neuronal demise and predisposing to Parkinson’s disease. In a pair-wise comparison of a 206kb genomic region encompassing the SNCA gene, we revealed 34 evolutionary conserved DNA sequences between human and mouse. All elements were cloned into reporter vectors and assessed for expression modulation in dual luciferase reporter assays.  We found that 12 out of 34 elements exhibited either an enhancement or reduction of the expression of the reporter gene. Three elements upstream of the SNCA gene displayed an approximately 1.5 fold (p<0.009) increase in expression. Of the intronic regions, three showed a 1.5 fold increase and two others indicated a 2 and 2.5 fold increase in expression (p<0.002). Three elements downstream of the SNCA gene showed 1.5 fold and 2.5 fold increase (p<0.0009). One element downstream of SNCA had a reduced expression of the reporter gene of 0.35 fold (p<0.0009) of normal activity. Our results demonstrate that the SNCA gene contains cis-regulatory regions that might regulate the transcription and expression of SNCA. Further studies in disease-relevant tissue types will be important to understand the functional impact of regulatory regions and specific Parkinson’s disease-associated SNPs and its function in the disease process. PMID:25566351

  14. The Method of Space-time Conservation Element and Solution Element: Development of a New Implicit Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. C.; Wang, X. Y.; Chow, C. Y.; Himansu, A.

    1995-01-01

    The method of space-time conservation element and solution element is a nontraditional numerical method designed from a physicist's perspective, i.e., its development is based more on physics than numerics. It uses only the simplest approximation techniques and yet is capable of generating nearly perfect solutions for a 2-D shock reflection problem used by Helen Yee and others. In addition to providing an overall view of the new method, we introduce a new concept in the design of implicit schemes, and use it to construct a highly accurate solver for a convection-diffusion equation. It is shown that, in the inviscid case, this new scheme becomes explicit and its amplification factors are identical to those of the Leapfrog scheme. On the other hand, in the pure diffusion case, its principal amplification factor becomes the amplification factor of the Crank-Nicolson scheme.

  15. Functional characterization of the eukaryotic SECIS elements which direct selenocysteine insertion at UGA codons.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, M J; Banu, L; Harney, J W; Larsen, P R

    1993-01-01

    We investigated the requirements for selenocysteine insertion at single or multiple UGA codons in eukaryotic selenoproteins. Two functional SECIS elements were identified in the 3' untranslated region of the rat selenoprotein P mRNA, with predicted stem-loops and critical nucleotides similar to those in the SECIS elements in the type I iodothyronine 5' deiodinase (5'DI) and glutathione peroxidase selenoprotein mRNAs. Site-directed mutational analyses of three SECIS elements confirmed that conserved nucleotides in the loop and in unpaired regions of the stem are critical for activity. This indicates that multiple contact sites are required for SECIS function. Stop codon function at any of five out-of-context UGA codons in the 5'DI mRNA was suppressed by SECIS elements from the 5'DI or selenoprotein P genes linked downstream. Thus, the presence of SECIS elements in eukaryotic selenoprotein mRNAs permits complete flexibility in UGA codon position. Images PMID:8344267

  16. Interpolation functions in the immersed boundary and finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingshi; Zhang, Lucy T.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we review the existing interpolation functions and introduce a finite element interpolation function to be used in the immersed boundary and finite element methods. This straightforward finite element interpolation function for unstructured grids enables us to obtain a sharper interface that yields more accurate interfacial solutions. The solution accuracy is compared with the existing interpolation functions such as the discretized Dirac delta function and the reproducing kernel interpolation function. The finite element shape function is easy to implement and it naturally satisfies the reproducing condition. They are interpolated through only one element layer instead of smearing to several elements. A pressure jump is clearly captured at the fluid-solid interface. Two example problems are studied and results are compared with other numerical methods. A convergence test is thoroughly conducted for the independent fluid and solid meshes in a fluid-structure interaction system. The required mesh size ratio between the fluid and solid domains is obtained.

  17. Two evolutionarily conserved sequence elements for Peg3/Usp29 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Do; Yu, Sungryul; Choo, Jung Ha; Kim, Joomyeong

    2008-01-01

    Background Two evolutionarily Conserved Sequence Elements, CSE1 and CSE2 (YY1 binding sites), are found within the 3.8-kb CpG island surrounding the bidirectional promoter of two imprinted genes, Peg3 (Paternally expressed gene 3) and Usp29 (Ubiquitin-specific protease 29). This CpG island is a likely ICR (Imprinting Control Region) that controls transcription of the 500-kb genomic region of the Peg3 imprinted domain. Results The current study investigated the functional roles of CSE1 and CSE2 in the transcriptional control of the two genes, Peg3 and Usp29, using cell line-based promoter assays. The mutation of 6 YY1 binding sites (CSE2) reduced the transcriptional activity of the bidirectional promoter in the Peg3 direction in an orientation-dependent manner, suggesting an activator role for CSE2 (YY1 binding sites). However, the activity in the Usp29 direction was not detectable regardless of the presence/absence of YY1 binding sites. In contrast, mutation of CSE1 increased the transcriptional activity of the promoter in both the Peg3 and Usp29 directions, suggesting a potential repressor role for CSE1. The observed repression by CSE1 was also orientation-dependent. Serial mutational analyses further narrowed down two separate 6-bp-long regions within the 42-bp-long CSE1 which are individually responsible for the repression of Peg3 and Usp29. Conclusion CSE2 (YY1 binding sites) functions as an activator for Peg3 transcription, while CSE1 acts as a repressor for the transcription of both Peg3 and Usp29. PMID:19068137

  18. Characterization of a conserved extrachromosomal element isolated from the avian malarial parasite Plasmodium gallinaceum.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, J T; Aldritt, S M; Unnasch, T; Puijalon, O; Wirth, D F

    1989-01-01

    We have identified a conserved, repeated, and highly transcribed DNA element from the avian malarial parasite Plasmodium gallinaceum. The element produced multiple transcripts in both zygotes and asexual blood stages of this parasite. It was found to be highly conserved in all of five malarial species tested and hybridized at reduced stringency to other members of the phylum Apicomplexa, including the genera Babesia, Eimeria, Toxoplasma, and Theileria. The copy number of the element was about 15, and it had a circularly permuted restriction map with a repeat unit length of about 6.2 kilobases. It could be separated from the main genomic DNA by using sucrose gradients and agarose gels, and it migrated separately from the recognized Plasmodium chromosomes on pulse-field gels. In the accompanying paper (S. M. Aldritt, J. T. Joseph, and D. F. Wirth, Mol. Cell. Biol. 9:3614-3620, 1989), evidence is presented that element contains the mitochondrial genes for the protein cytochrome b and a fragment of the large rRNA. We postulate that this element is an episome in the mitochondria of the obligate parasites belonging to the phylum Apicomplexa. Images PMID:2779561

  19. A strongly conservative finite element method for the coupling of Stokes and Darcy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanschat, G.; Rivière, B.

    2010-08-01

    We consider a model of coupled free and porous media flow governed by Stokes and Darcy equations with the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman interface condition. This model is discretized using divergence-conforming finite elements for the velocities in the whole domain. Discontinuous Galerkin techniques and mixed methods are used in the Stokes and Darcy subdomains, respectively. This discretization is strongly conservative in Hdiv( Ω) and we show convergence. Numerical results validate our findings and indicate optimal convergence orders.

  20. A brief description of a new numerical framework for solving conservation laws: The method of space-time conservation element and solution element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; To, Wai-Ming

    1992-01-01

    A new numerical method for solving conservation laws is being developed. It differs substantially from the well established methods, i.e., finite difference, finite volume, finite element, and spectral methods, in both concept and methodology. It is much simpler than a typical high resolution method. No flux limiter or any technique related to characteristics is involved. No artificial viscosity or smoothing is introduced, and no moving mesh is used. Yet this method is capable of generating highly accurate shock tube solutions. The slight numerical overshoot and/or oscillations generated can be removed if a simple averaging formula initially used is replaced by a weighted formula. This modification has little effect on other parts of the solution. Because of its simplicity, generalization of this new method for multi-dimensional problems is straightforward.

  1. Almost-Killing conserved currents: A general mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Milton; Palenzuela, Carlos; Bona, Carles

    2014-01-01

    A new class of conserved currents, describing nongravitational energy-momentum density, is presented. The proposed currents do not require the existence of a (timelike) Killing vector, and are not restricted to spherically symmetric spacetimes (or similar ones, in which the Kodama vector can be defined). They are based instead on almost-Killing vectors, which could in principle be defined on generic spacetimes. We provide local arguments, based on energy density profiles in highly simplified (stationary, rigidly rotating) star models, which confirm the physical interest of these almost-Killing currents. A mass function is defined in this way for the spherical case, qualitatively different from the Hernández-Misner mass function. An elliptic equation determining the new mass function is derived for the Tolman-Bondi spherically symmetric dust metrics, including a simple solution for the Oppenheimer-Snyder collapse. The equations for the nonsymmetric case are shown to be of a mixed elliptic-hyperbolic nature.

  2. Does the evolutionary conservation of microsatellite loci imply function?

    SciTech Connect

    Shriver, M.D.; Deka, R.; Ferrell, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellites are highly polymorphic tandem arrays of short (1-6 bp) sequence motifs which have been found widely distributed in the genomes of all eukaryotes. We have analyzed allele frequency data on 16 microsatellite loci typed in the great apes (human, chimp, orangutan, and gorilla). The majority of these loci (13) were isolated from human genomic libraries; three were cloned from chimpanzee genomic DNA. Most of these loci are not only present in all apes species, but are polymorphic with comparable levels of heterozygosity and have alleles which overlap in size. The extent of divergence of allele frequencies among these four species were studies using the stepwise-weighted genetic distance (Dsw), which was previously shown to conform to linearity with evolutionary time since divergence for loci where mutations exist in a stepwise fashion. The phylogenetic tree of the great apes constructed from this distance matrix was consistent with the expected topology, with a high bootstrap confidence (82%) for the human/chimp clade. However, the allele frequency distributions of these species are 10 times more similar to each other than expected when they were calibrated with a conservative estimate of the time since separation of humans and the apes. These results are in agreement with sequence-based surveys of microsatellites which have demonstrated that they are highly (90%) conserved over short periods of evolutionary time (< 10 million years) and moderately (30%) conserved over long periods of evolutionary time (> 60-80 million years). This evolutionary conservation has prompted some authors to speculate that there are functional constraints on microsatellite loci. In contrast, the presence of directional bias of mutations with constraints and/or selection against aberrant sized alleles can explain these results.

  3. Highly conserved elements discovered in vertebrates are present in non-syntenic loci of tunicates, act as enhancers and can be transcribed during development

    PubMed Central

    Sanges, Remo; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Gueroult-Bellone, Marion; Roure, Agnes; Ferg, Marco; Meola, Nicola; Amore, Gabriele; Basu, Swaraj; Brown, Euan R.; De Simone, Marco; Petrera, Francesca; Licastro, Danilo; Strähle, Uwe; Banfi, Sandro; Lemaire, Patrick; Birney, Ewan; Müller, Ferenc; Stupka, Elia

    2013-01-01

    Co-option of cis-regulatory modules has been suggested as a mechanism for the evolution of expression sites during development. However, the extent and mechanisms involved in mobilization of cis-regulatory modules remains elusive. To trace the history of non-coding elements, which may represent candidate ancestral cis-regulatory modules affirmed during chordate evolution, we have searched for conserved elements in tunicate and vertebrate (Olfactores) genomes. We identified, for the first time, 183 non-coding sequences that are highly conserved between the two groups. Our results show that all but one element are conserved in non-syntenic regions between vertebrate and tunicate genomes, while being syntenic among vertebrates. Nevertheless, in all the groups, they are significantly associated with transcription factors showing specific functions fundamental to animal development, such as multicellular organism development and sequence-specific DNA binding. The majority of these regions map onto ultraconserved elements and we demonstrate that they can act as functional enhancers within the organism of origin, as well as in cross-transgenesis experiments, and that they are transcribed in extant species of Olfactores. We refer to the elements as ‘Olfactores conserved non-coding elements’. PMID:23393190

  4. The putative role of some conserved water molecules in the structure and function of human transthyretin.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Avik; Dasgupta, Subrata; Mukhopadhyay, Bishnu P; Sekar, Kanagaraj

    2015-11-01

    Human transthyretin (hTTR) is a multifunctional protein that is involved in several neurodegenerative diseases. Besides the transportation of thyroxin and vitamin A, it is also involved in the proteolysis of apolipoprotein A1 and Aβ peptide. Extensive analyses of 32 high-resolution X-ray and neutron diffraction structures of hTTR followed by molecular-dynamics simulation studies using a set of 15 selected structures affirmed the presence of 44 conserved water molecules in its dimeric structure. They are found to play several important roles in the structure and function of the protein. Eight water molecules stabilize the dimeric structure through an extensive hydrogen-bonding network. The absence of some of these water molecules in highly acidic conditions (pH ≤ 4.0) severely affects the interfacial hydrogen-bond network, which may destabilize the native tetrameric structure, leading to its dissociation. Three pairs of conserved water molecules contribute to maintaining the geometry of the ligand-binding cavities. Some other water molecules control the orientation and dynamics of different structural elements of hTTR. This systematic study of the location, absence, networking and interactions of the conserved water molecules may shed some light on various structural and functional aspects of the protein. The present study may also provide some rational clues about the conserved water-mediated architecture and stability of hTTR. PMID:26527142

  5. Hedgehog signaling pathway function conserved in Tribolium segmentation.

    PubMed

    Farzana, Laila; Brown, Susan J

    2008-04-01

    In Drosophila, maintenance of parasegmental boundaries and formation of segmental grooves depend on interactions between segment polarity genes. Wingless and Engrailed appear to have similar roles in both short and long germ segmentation, but relatively little is known about the extent to which Hedgehog signaling is conserved. In a companion study to the Tribolium genome project, we analyzed the expression and function of hedgehog, smoothened, patched, and cubitus interruptus orthologs during segmentation in Tribolium. Their expression was largely conserved between Drosophila and Tribolium. Parental RNAi analysis of positive regulators of the pathway (Tc-hh, Tc-smo, or Tc-ci) resulted in small spherical cuticles with little or no evidence of segmental grooves. Segmental Engrailed expression in these embryos was initiated but not maintained. Wingless-independent Engrailed expression in the CNS was maintained and became highly compacted during germ band retraction, providing evidence that derivatives from every segment were present in these small spherical embryos. On the other hand, RNAi analysis of a negative regulator (Tc-ptc) resulted in embryos with ectopic segmental grooves visible during germband elongation but not discernible in the first instar larval cuticles. These transient grooves formed adjacent to Engrailed expressing cells that encircled wider than normal wg domains in the Tc-ptc RNAi embryos. These results suggest that the en-wg-hh gene circuit is functionally conserved in the maintenance of segmental boundaries during germ band retraction and groove formation in Tribolium and that the segment polarity genes form a robust genetic regulatory module in the segmentation of this short germ insect. PMID:18392879

  6. Conservation patterns in different functional sequence categoriesof divergent Drosophila species

    SciTech Connect

    Papatsenko, Dmitri; Kislyuk, Andrey; Levine, Michael; Dubchak, Inna

    2005-10-01

    We have explored the distributions of fully conservedungapped blocks in genome-wide pairwise alignments of recently completedspecies of Drosophila: D.yakuba, D.ananassae, D.pseudoobscura, D.virilisand D.mojavensis. Based on these distributions we have found that nearlyevery functional sequence category possesses its own distinctiveconservation pattern, sometimes independent of the overall sequenceconservation level. In the coding and regulatory regions, the ungappedblocks were longer than in introns, UTRs and non-functional sequences. Atthe same time, the blocks in the coding regions carried 3N+2 signaturecharacteristic to synonymic substitutions in the 3rd codon positions.Larger block sizes in transcription regulatory regions can be explainedby the presence of conserved arrays of binding sites for transcriptionfactors. We also have shown that the longest ungapped blocks, or'ultraconserved' sequences, are associated with specific gene groups,including those encoding ion channels and components of the cytoskeleton.We discussed how restrained conservation patterns may help in mappingfunctional sequence categories and improving genomeannotation.

  7. Functional conservation of an ancestral Pellino protein in helminth species.

    PubMed

    Cluxton, Christopher D; Caffrey, Brian E; Kinsella, Gemma K; Moynagh, Paul N; Fares, Mario A; Fallon, Padraic G

    2015-01-01

    The immune system of H. sapiens has innate signaling pathways that arose in ancestral species. This is exemplified by the discovery of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway using free-living model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster. The TLR pathway is ubiquitous and controls sensitivity to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in eukaryotes. There is, however, a marked absence of this pathway from the plathyhelminthes, with the exception of the Pellino protein family, which is present in a number of species from this phylum. Helminth Pellino proteins are conserved having high similarity, both at the sequence and predicted structural protein level, with that of human Pellino proteins. Pellino from a model helminth, Schistosoma mansoni Pellino (SmPellino), was shown to bind and poly-ubiquitinate human IRAK-1, displaying E3 ligase activity consistent with its human counterparts. When transfected into human cells SmPellino is functional, interacting with signaling proteins and modulating mammalian signaling pathways. Strict conservation of a protein family in species lacking its niche signalling pathway is rare and provides a platform to examine the ancestral functions of Pellino proteins that may translate into novel mechanisms of immune regulation in humans. PMID:26120048

  8. Conservation of Planar Polarity Pathway Function Across the Animal Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Hale, Rosalind; Strutt, David

    2015-01-01

    Planar polarity is a well-studied phenomenon resulting in the directional coordination of cells in the plane of a tissue. In invertebrates and vertebrates, planar polarity is established and maintained by the largely independent core and Fat/Dachsous/Four-jointed (Ft-Ds-Fj) pathways. Loss of function of these pathways can result in a wide range of developmental or cellular defects, including failure of gastrulation and problems with placement and function of cilia. This review discusses the conservation of these pathways across the animal kingdom. The lack of vital core pathway components in basal metazoans suggests that the core planar polarity pathway evolved shortly after, but not necessarily alongside, the emergence of multicellularity. PMID:26360326

  9. PHYLOGENOMICS - GUIDED VALIDATION OF FUNCTION FOR CONSERVED UNKNOWN GENES

    SciTech Connect

    V, DE CRECY-LAGARD; D, HANSON A

    2012-01-03

    Identifying functions for all gene products in all sequenced organisms is a central challenge of the post-genomic era. However, at least 30-50% of the proteins encoded by any given genome are of unknown function, or wrongly or vaguely annotated. Many of these 'unknown' proteins are common to prokaryotes and plants. We accordingly set out to predict and experimentally test the functions of such proteins. Our approach to functional prediction is integrative, coupling the extensive post-genomic resources available for plants with comparative genomics based on hundreds of microbial genomes, and functional genomic datasets from model microorganisms. The early phase is computer-assisted; later phases incorporate intellectual input from expert plant and microbial biochemists. The approach thus bridges the gap between automated homology-based annotations and the classical gene discovery efforts of experimentalists, and is much more powerful than purely computational approaches to identifying gene-function associations. Among Arabidopsis genes, we focused on those (2,325 in total) that (i) are unique or belong to families with no more than three members, (ii) are conserved between plants and prokaryotes, and (iii) have unknown or poorly known functions. Computer-assisted selection of promising targets for deeper analysis was based on homology .. independent characteristics associated in the SEED database with the prokaryotic members of each family, specifically gene clustering and phyletic spread, as well as availability of functional genomics data, and publications that could link candidate families to general metabolic areas, or to specific functions. In-depth comparative genomic analysis was then performed for about 500 top candidate families, which connected ~55 of them to general areas of metabolism and led to specific functional predictions for a subset of ~25 more. Twenty predicted functions were experimentally tested in at least one prokaryotic organism via reverse

  10. Allele Frequencies of Variants in Ultra Conserved Elements Identify Selective Pressure on Transcription Factor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Silla, Toomas; Kepp, Katrin; Tai, E. Shyong; Goh, Liang; Davila, Sonia; Ivkovic, Tina Catela; Calin, George A.; Voorhoeve, P. Mathijs

    2014-01-01

    Ultra-conserved genes or elements (UCGs/UCEs) in the human genome are extreme examples of conservation. We characterized natural variations in 2884 UCEs and UCGs in two distinct populations; Singaporean Chinese (n = 280) and Italian (n = 501) by using a pooled sample, targeted capture, sequencing approach. We identify, with high confidence, in these regions the abundance of rare SNVs (MAF<0.5%) of which 75% is not present in dbSNP137. UCEs association studies for complex human traits can use this information to model expected background variation and thus necessary power for association studies. By combining our data with 1000 Genome Project data, we show in three independent datasets that prevalent UCE variants (MAF>5%) are more often found in relatively less-conserved nucleotides within UCEs, compared to rare variants. Moreover, prevalent variants are less likely to overlap transcription factor binding site. Using SNPfold we found no significant influence of RNA secondary structure on UCE conservation. All together, these results suggest UCEs are not under selective pressure as a stretch of DNA but are under differential evolutionary pressure on the single nucleotide level. PMID:25369454

  11. A conservative multi-tracer transport scheme for spectral-element spherical grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erath, Christoph; Nair, Ramachandran D.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric models used for practical climate simulation must be capable handling the transport of hundreds of tracers. For computational efficiency conservative multi-tracer semi-Lagrangian type transport schemes are appropriate. Global models based on high-order Galerkin approach employ highly non-uniform spectral-element grids, and semi-Lagrangian transport is a challenge on those grids. A conservative semi-Lagrangian scheme (SPELT - SPectral-Element Lagrangian Transport) employing a multi-moment compact reconstruction procedure is developed for non-uniform quadrilateral grids. The scheme is based on a characteristic semi-Lagrangian method that avoids complex and expensive upstream area computations. The SPELT scheme has been implemented in the High-Order Method Modeling Environment (HOMME), which is based on a cubed-sphere grid with spectral-element spatial discretization. Additionally, we show the (strong) scalability and multi-tracer efficiency using several benchmark tests. The SPELT solution can be made monotonic (positivity preserving) by combining the flux-corrected transport algorithm, which is demonstrated on a uniform resolution grid. In particular, SPELT can be efficiently used for non-uniform grids and provides accurate and stable results for high-resolution meshes.

  12. Reprint of: A conservative multi-tracer transport scheme for spectral-element spherical grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erath, Christoph; Nair, Ramachandran D.

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric models used for practical climate simulation must be capable handling the transport of hundreds of tracers. For computational efficiency conservative multi-tracer semi-Lagrangian type transport schemes are appropriate. Global models based on high-order Galerkin approach employ highly non-uniform spectral-element grids, and semi-Lagrangian transport is a challenge on those grids. A conservative semi-Lagrangian scheme (SPELT - SPectral-Element Lagrangian Transport) employing a multi-moment compact reconstruction procedure is developed for non-uniform quadrilateral grids. The scheme is based on a characteristic semi-Lagrangian method that avoids complex and expensive upstream area computations. The SPELT scheme has been implemented in the High-Order Method Modeling Environment (HOMME), which is based on a cubed-sphere grid with spectral-element spatial discretization. Additionally, we show the (strong) scalability and multi-tracer efficiency using several benchmark tests. The SPELT solution can be made monotonic (positivity preserving) by combining the flux-corrected transport algorithm, which is demonstrated on a uniform resolution grid. In particular, SPELT can be efficiently used for non-uniform grids and provides accurate and stable results for high-resolution meshes.

  13. Applications of the Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element (CE/SE) Method to Computational Aeroacoustic Benchmark Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Himansu, Ananda; Chang, Sin-Chung; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2000-01-01

    The Internal Propagation problems, Fan Noise problem, and Turbomachinery Noise problems are solved using the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. The problems in internal propagation problems address the propagation of sound waves through a nozzle. Both the nonlinear and linear quasi 1D Euler equations are solved. Numerical solutions are presented and compared with the analytical solution. The fan noise problem concerns the effect of the sweep angle on the acoustic field generated by the interaction of a convected gust with a cascade of 3D flat plates. A parallel version of the 3D CE/SE Euler solver is developed and employed to obtain numerical solutions for a family of swept flat plates. Numerical solutions for sweep angles of 0, 5, 10, and 15 deg are presented. The turbomachinery problems describe the interaction of a 2D vortical gust with a cascade of flat-plate airfoils with/without a downstream moving grid. The 2D nonlinear Euler Equations are solved and the converged numerical solutions are presented and compared with the corresponding analytical solution. All the comparisons demonstrate that the CE/SE method is capable of solving aeroacoustic problems with/without shock waves in a simple and efficient manner. Furthermore, the simple non-reflecting boundary condition used in the CE/SE method which is not based on the characteristic theory works very well in 1D, 2D and 3D problems.

  14. Application of the Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method to One-Dimensional Convection-Diffusion Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; Wang, Xiao-Yen; To, Wai-Ming

    2000-01-01

    In the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method, the independent marching variables used comprise not only the mesh value of the physical dependent variables but also, in contrast to it typical numerical method, the Mesh values of the spatial derivatives of the physical variables The use of the extra marching variables results from the need to construct the two-level explicit and nondissipative schemes which are at the core of the CE/SE development. It also results from the need to minimize the stencil while maintaining accuracy. In this paper using the 1D(sub (alpha)-mu) scheme as an example, the effect of this added complication on consistency, accuracy and operation count is assessed. As part of this effort, an equivalent yet more efficient form of the alpha-mu scheme in which the independent marching variables are the local fluxes tied to each mesh point is introduced. Also, the intriguing relations that exist among the alpha-mu. Leapfrog, and DuFort-Frankel schemes are further explored. In addition, the redundance of the Leapfrog, DUFort-Frankel, and Lax scheme and the remedy for this redundance are discussed. This paper is concluded with the construction and evaluation of a CE/SE solver for the inviscid Burger equation.

  15. Applications of the Method of Space-Time Conservation Element and the Solution Element to Unsteady Chemically Reactive Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    2001-01-01

    This document reports the conclusion and findings of our research activities for this grant. The goal of the project is the development and application of the method of Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element, or the CE/SE method, to simulate chemically reacting flows. The product of this project will be a high-fidelity, time-accurate flow solver analyzing unsteady flow fields advanced propulsion concepts, including the low-emission turbojet engine combustion and flow fields of the Pulse Detonation Engines (PDE). Based on the documents and computer software of the CE/SE method that we have received from the CE/SE working group at NASA Lewis, we have focused our research effort on addressing outstanding technical issues related to the extension of the CE/SE method for unsteady, chemically reactive flows. In particular, we have made progresses in the following three aspects: (1) Derivation of the governing equations for reacting flows; (2) Numerical treatments of stiff source terms; and (3) Detailed simulations of ZND detonation waves.

  16. Elements and modulation of functional dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Alan C

    2014-10-01

    The existing structure-function paradigm of drug discovery has been evolving toward the essential incorporation of dynamics data. This new functional dynamics paradigm emphasizes conformational entropy as a driving force of protein function and intermolecular recognition. Conformational dynamics (a proxy of conformational entropy) impacts the degree of protein (dis)order and the constitution of the conformational ensemble, the mechanisms of allostery and drug resistance, and the free energy of ligand binding. Specific protein and ligand conformations facilitate favorable, reciprocal interactions. The number of protein and ligand conformers that exhibit favorable binding interactions will vary from system to system. All binding scenarios can modulate protein dynamics by various levels of enthalpic and entropic contribution, with significant influence on the functional dynamics of the system. Analysis and consideration of resulting changes of activity, signaling, catalysis, and subsequent phenotypic outcome are powerful motivations in the drug design process. PMID:24913411

  17. A locally conservative non-negative finite element formulation for anisotropic advective-diffusive-reactive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudunuru, M. K.; Shabouei, M.; Nakshatrala, K.

    2015-12-01

    Advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) equations appear in various areas of life sciences, hydrogeological systems, and contaminant transport. Obtaining stable and accurate numerical solutions can be challenging as the underlying equations are coupled, nonlinear, and non-self-adjoint. Currently, there is neither a robust computational framework available nor a reliable commercial package known that can handle various complex situations. Herein, the objective of this poster presentation is to present a novel locally conservative non-negative finite element formulation that preserves the underlying physical and mathematical properties of a general linear transient anisotropic ADR equation. In continuous setting, governing equations for ADR systems possess various important properties. In general, all these properties are not inherited during finite difference, finite volume, and finite element discretizations. The objective of this poster presentation is two fold: First, we analyze whether the existing numerical formulations (such as SUPG and GLS) and commercial packages provide physically meaningful values for the concentration of the chemical species for various realistic benchmark problems. Furthermore, we also quantify the errors incurred in satisfying the local and global species balance for two popular chemical kinetics schemes: CDIMA (chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid) and BZ (Belousov--Zhabotinsky). Based on these numerical simulations, we show that SUPG and GLS produce unphysical values for concentration of chemical species due to the violation of the non-negative constraint, contain spurious node-to-node oscillations, and have large errors in local and global species balance. Second, we proposed a novel finite element formulation to overcome the above difficulties. The proposed locally conservative non-negative computational framework based on low-order least-squares finite elements is able to preserve these underlying physical and mathematical properties

  18. The Human Postsynaptic Density Shares Conserved Elements with Proteomes of Unicellular Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Emes, Richard David; Grant, Seth G. N.

    2011-01-01

    The animal nervous system processes information from the environment and mediates learning and memory using molecular signaling pathways in the postsynaptic terminal of synapses. Postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors assemble to form multiprotein complexes that drive signal transduction pathways to downstream cell biological processes. Studies of mouse and Drosophila postsynaptic proteins have identified key roles in synaptic physiology and behavior for a wide range of proteins including receptors, scaffolds, enzymes, structural, translational, and transcriptional regulators. Comparative proteomic and genomic studies identified components of the postsynaptic proteome conserved in eukaryotes and early metazoans. We extend these studies, and examine the conservation of genes and domains found in the human postsynaptic density with those across the three superkingdoms, archaeal, bacteria, and eukaryota. A conserved set of proteins essential for basic cellular functions were conserved across the three superkingdoms, whereas synaptic structural and many signaling molecules were specific to the eukaryote lineage. Genes involved with metabolism and environmental signaling in Escherichia coli including the chemotactic and ArcAB Two-Component signal transduction systems shared homologous genes in the mammalian postsynaptic proteome. These data suggest conservation between prokaryotes and mammalian synapses of signaling mechanisms from receptors to transcriptional responses, a process essential to learning and memory in vertebrates. A number of human postsynaptic proteins with homologs in prokaryotes are mutated in human genetic diseases with nervous system pathology. These data also indicate that structural and signaling proteins characteristic of postsynaptic complexes arose in the eukaryotic lineage and rapidly expanded following the emergence of the metazoa, and provide an insight into the early evolution of synaptic mechanisms and conserved mechanisms of learning and

  19. Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of seven Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing the teacher and student with informational reading on various topics in conservation. The bulletins have these titles: Plants as Makers of Soil, Water Pollution Control, The Ground Water Table, Conservation--To Keep This Earth Habitable, Our Threatened Air Supply,…

  20. Conservation of lipid functions in cytochrome bc complexes.

    PubMed

    Hasan, S Saif; Yamashita, Eiki; Ryan, Christopher M; Whitelegge, Julian P; Cramer, William A

    2011-11-18

    Lipid binding sites and properties are compared in two sub-families of hetero-oligomeric membrane protein complexes known to have similar functions in order to gain further understanding of the role of lipid in the function, dynamics, and assembly of these complexes. Using the crystal structure information for both complexes, we compared the lipid binding properties of the cytochrome b(6)f and bc(1) complexes that function in photosynthetic and respiratory membrane energy transduction. Comparison of lipid and detergent binding sites in the b(6)f complex with those in bc(1) shows significant conservation of lipid positions. Seven lipid binding sites in the cyanobacterial b(6)f complex overlap three natural sites in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algal complex and four sites in the yeast mitochondrial bc(1) complex. The specific identity of lipids is different in b(6)f and bc(1) complexes: b(6)f contains sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, and digalactosyldiacylglycerol, whereas cardiolipin, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidic acid are present in the yeast bc(1) complex. The lipidic chlorophyll a and β-carotene (β-car) in cyanobacterial b(6)f, as well as eicosane in C. reinhardtii, are unique to the b(6)f complex. Inferences of lipid binding sites and functions were supported by sequence, interatomic distance, and B-factor information on interacting lipid groups and coordinating amino acid residues. The lipid functions inferred in the b(6)f complex are as follows: (i) substitution of a transmembrane helix by a lipid and chlorin ring, (ii) lipid and β-car connection of peripheral and core domains, (iii) stabilization of the iron-sulfur protein transmembrane helix, (iv) n-side charge and polarity compensation, and (v) β-car-mediated super-complex with the photosystem I complex. PMID:21978667

  1. Investigating Evolutionary Conservation of Dendritic Cell Subset Identity and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Bertho, Nicolas; Hosmalin, Anne; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Dalod, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) were initially defined as mononuclear phagocytes with a dendritic morphology and an exquisite efficiency for naïve T-cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of specific cell surface molecules and later shown to excel in distinct functions and to develop under the instruction of different transcription factors or cytokines. Very few cell surface molecules are expressed in a specific manner on any immune cell type. Hence, to identify cell types, the sole use of a small number of cell surface markers in classical flow cytometry can be deceiving. Moreover, the markers currently used to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets vary depending on the tissue and animal species studied and even between laboratories. This has led to confusion in the definition of DC subset identity and in their attribution of specific functions. There is a strong need to identify a rigorous and consensus way to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets, with precise guidelines potentially applicable throughout tissues and species. We will discuss the advantages, drawbacks, and complementarities of different methodologies: cell surface phenotyping, ontogeny, functional characterization, and molecular profiling. We will advocate that gene expression profiling is a very rigorous, largely unbiased and accessible method to define the identity of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which strengthens and refines surface phenotyping. It is uniquely powerful to yield new, experimentally testable, hypotheses on the ontogeny or functions of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, their molecular regulation, and their evolutionary conservation. We propose defining cell populations based on a combination of cell surface phenotyping, expression analysis of hallmark genes, and robust functional assays, in order to reach a consensus and integrate faster the huge but scattered knowledge accumulated by different laboratories on different cell types, organs, and

  2. Functional conservation of atonal and Math1 in the CNS and PNS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Arie, N.; Hassan, B. A.; Bermingham, N. A.; Malicki, D. M.; Armstrong, D.; Matzuk, M.; Bellen, H. J.; Zoghbi, H. Y.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the extent to which atonal and its mouse homolog Math1 exhibit functional conservation, we inserted (beta)-galactosidase (lacZ) into the Math1 locus and analyzed its expression, evaluated consequences of loss of Math1 function, and expressed Math1 in atonal mutant flies. lacZ under the control of Math1 regulatory elements duplicated the previously known expression pattern of Math1 in the CNS (i.e., the neural tube, dorsal spinal cord, brainstem, and cerebellar external granule neurons) but also revealed new sites of expression: PNS mechanoreceptors (inner ear hair cells and Merkel cells) and articular chondrocytes. Expressing Math1 induced ectopic chordotonal organs (CHOs) in wild-type flies and partially rescued CHO loss in atonal mutant embryos. These data demonstrate that both the mouse and fly homologs encode lineage identity information and, more interestingly, that some of the cells dependent on this information serve similar mechanoreceptor functions.

  3. [Nutritional content, functional properties and conservation of edible flowers. Review].

    PubMed

    Lara-Cortés, Estrella; Osorio-Díaz, Perla; Jiménez-Aparicio, Antonio; Bautista-Bañios, Silvia

    2013-09-01

    The floriphagia that is the consumption of flowers as a food, is an old practice not widespread among consumers until some decades ago. Edible flowers contribute to increasing the appearance of food. They can provide biologically active substances including vitamin A, C, riboflavins, niacin, minerals such as calcium, phosphorous, iron and potassium that are eventually beneficial to consumers' health. This review includes some examples of edible flowers including roses, violets and nasturtium among others, uses and applications, sensorial characteristics and nutritional values that lead them to be considered as functional food: An important factor that affects the quality of edible flowers is the form in which they are preserved since it may affect their sensorial and nutritional characteristics. However, not all flowers can be eaten as food since there are some of them that can be toxic or even mortal. Finally, although the consumption of flowers is an ancient practice, there is little regulation in this regard. Of the review on edible flowers, it is concluded that there are still numerous aspects about them to evaluate such as nutritional and functional characteristics, conservation and regulation with the aim to extend its consumption. PMID:25362819

  4. Transposable elements in fish functional genomics: technical challenges and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Parinov, Serguei; Emelyanov, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    The recent introduction of several transposable elements in zebrafish opens new frontiers for genetic manipulation in this important vertebrate model. This review discusses transposable elements as mutagenesis tools for fish functional genomics. We review various mutagenesis strategies that were previously applied in other genetic models, such as Drosophila, Arabidopsis, and mouse, that may be beneficial if applied in fish. We also discuss the forthcoming challenges of high-throughput functional genomics in fish. PMID:18047698

  5. Use of a Drosophila Genome-Wide Conserved Sequence Database to Identify Functionally Related cis-Regulatory Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Thomas; Yavatkar, Amarendra S; Kuzin, Alexander; Kundu, Mukta; Tyson, Leonard J; Ross, Jermaine; Lin, Tzu-Yang; Lee, Chi-Hon; Awasaki, Takeshi; Lee, Tzumin; Odenwald, Ward F

    2012-01-01

    Background: Phylogenetic footprinting has revealed that cis-regulatory enhancers consist of conserved DNA sequence clusters (CSCs). Currently, there is no systematic approach for enhancer discovery and analysis that takes full-advantage of the sequence information within enhancer CSCs. Results: We have generated a Drosophila genome-wide database of conserved DNA consisting of >100,000 CSCs derived from EvoPrints spanning over 90% of the genome. cis-Decoder database search and alignment algorithms enable the discovery of functionally related enhancers. The program first identifies conserved repeat elements within an input enhancer and then searches the database for CSCs that score highly against the input CSC. Scoring is based on shared repeats as well as uniquely shared matches, and includes measures of the balance of shared elements, a diagnostic that has proven to be useful in predicting cis-regulatory function. To demonstrate the utility of these tools, a temporally-restricted CNS neuroblast enhancer was used to identify other functionally related enhancers and analyze their structural organization. Conclusions: cis-Decoder reveals that co-regulating enhancers consist of combinations of overlapping shared sequence elements, providing insights into the mode of integration of multiple regulating transcription factors. The database and accompanying algorithms should prove useful in the discovery and analysis of enhancers involved in any developmental process. Developmental Dynamics 241:169–189, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Key findings A genome-wide catalog of Drosophila conserved DNA sequence clusters. cis-Decoder discovers functionally related enhancers. Functionally related enhancers share balanced sequence element copy numbers. Many enhancers function during multiple phases of development. PMID:22174086

  6. Altered Response Hierarchy and Increased T-Cell Breadth upon HIV-1 Conserved Element DNA Vaccination in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Viraj; Valentin, Antonio; Rosati, Margherita; Alicea, Candido; Singh, Ashish K.; Jalah, Rashmi; Broderick, Kate E.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Le Gall, Sylvie; Mothe, Beatriz; Brander, Christian; Rolland, Morgane; Mullins, James I.; Pavlakis, George N.; Felber, Barbara K.

    2014-01-01

    HIV sequence diversity and potential decoy epitopes are hurdles in the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. A DNA vaccine candidate comprising of highly conserved p24gag elements (CE) induced robust immunity in all 10 vaccinated macaques, whereas full-length gag DNA vaccination elicited responses to these conserved elements in only 5 of 11 animals, targeting fewer CE per animal. Importantly, boosting CE-primed macaques with DNA expressing full-length p55gag increased both magnitude of CE responses and breadth of Gag immunity, demonstrating alteration of the hierarchy of epitope recognition in the presence of pre-existing CE-specific responses. Inclusion of a conserved element immunogen provides a novel and effective strategy to broaden responses against highly diverse pathogens by avoiding decoy epitopes, while focusing responses to critical viral elements for which few escape pathways exist. PMID:24465991

  7. Altered response hierarchy and increased T-cell breadth upon HIV-1 conserved element DNA vaccination in macaques.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Viraj; Valentin, Antonio; Rosati, Margherita; Alicea, Candido; Singh, Ashish K; Jalah, Rashmi; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Le Gall, Sylvie; Mothe, Beatriz; Brander, Christian; Rolland, Morgane; Mullins, James I; Pavlakis, George N; Felber, Barbara K

    2014-01-01

    HIV sequence diversity and potential decoy epitopes are hurdles in the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. A DNA vaccine candidate comprising of highly conserved p24(gag) elements (CE) induced robust immunity in all 10 vaccinated macaques, whereas full-length gag DNA vaccination elicited responses to these conserved elements in only 5 of 11 animals, targeting fewer CE per animal. Importantly, boosting CE-primed macaques with DNA expressing full-length p55(gag) increased both magnitude of CE responses and breadth of Gag immunity, demonstrating alteration of the hierarchy of epitope recognition in the presence of pre-existing CE-specific responses. Inclusion of a conserved element immunogen provides a novel and effective strategy to broaden responses against highly diverse pathogens by avoiding decoy epitopes, while focusing responses to critical viral elements for which few escape pathways exist. PMID:24465991

  8. Function of a Conserved Checkpoint Recruitment Domain in ATRIP Proteins▿

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Heather L.; Ehrhardt, Mark R.; Mordes, Daniel A.; Glick, Gloria G.; Chazin, Walter J.; Cortez, David

    2007-01-01

    The ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) kinase is essential to maintain genomic integrity. ATR is recruited to DNA lesions in part through its association with ATR-interacting protein (ATRIP), which in turn interacts with the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA (replication protein A). In this study, a conserved checkpoint protein recruitment domain (CRD) in ATRIP orthologs was identified by biochemical mapping of the RPA binding site in combination with nuclear magnetic resonance, mutagenesis, and computational modeling. Mutations in the CRD of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATRIP ortholog Ddc2 disrupt the Ddc2-RPA interaction, prevent proper localization of Ddc2 to DNA breaks, sensitize yeast to DNA-damaging agents, and partially compromise checkpoint signaling. These data demonstrate that the CRD is critical for localization and optimal DNA damage responses. However, the stimulation of ATR kinase activity by binding of topoisomerase binding protein 1 (TopBP1) to ATRIP-ATR can occur independently of the interaction of ATRIP with RPA. Our results support the idea of a multistep model for ATR activation that requires separable localization and activation functions of ATRIP. PMID:17339343

  9. Class IIa Histone Deacetylases Are Conserved Regulators of Circadian Function*

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Paul C. M.; O'Neill, John S.; Dobrzycki, Tomasz; Calvert, Shaun; Lord, Emma C.; McIntosh, Rebecca L. L.; Elliott, Christopher J. H.; Sweeney, Sean T.; Hastings, Michael H.; Chawla, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate the activity of many transcription factors to influence liver gluconeogenesis and the development of specialized cells, including muscle, neurons, and lymphocytes. Here, we describe a conserved role for class IIa HDACs in sustaining robust circadian behavioral rhythms in Drosophila and cellular rhythms in mammalian cells. In mouse fibroblasts, overexpression of HDAC5 severely disrupts transcriptional rhythms of core clock genes. HDAC5 overexpression decreases BMAL1 acetylation on Lys-537 and pharmacological inhibition of class IIa HDACs increases BMAL1 acetylation. Furthermore, we observe cyclical nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC5 in mouse fibroblasts that is characteristically circadian. Mutation of the Drosophila homolog HDAC4 impairs locomotor activity rhythms of flies and decreases period mRNA levels. RNAi-mediated knockdown of HDAC4 in Drosophila clock cells also dampens circadian function. Given that the localization of class IIa HDACs is signal-regulated and influenced by Ca2+ and cAMP signals, our findings offer a mechanism by which extracellular stimuli that generate these signals can feed into the molecular clock machinery. PMID:25271152

  10. Conserved intron elements repress splicing of a neuron-specific c-src exon in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, R C; Black, D L

    1995-01-01

    The neuron-specific N1 exon of the mouse c-src transcript is normally skipped in nonneuronal cells. In this study, we examined the sequence requirements for the exclusion of this exon in nonneuronal HeLa cell nuclear extracts. We found that the repression of the N1 exon is mediated by specific intron sequences that flank the N1 exon. Mutagenesis experiments identified conserved CUCUCU elements within these intron regions that are required for the repression of N1 splicing. The addition of an RNA competitor containing the upstream regulatory sequence to the HeLa extract induced splicing of the intron downstream of N1, indicating that the competitor sequence binds to splicing repressor proteins. The similarities between this mechanism for src splicing repression and the repression of other regulated exons point to a common role of exon-spanning interactions in splicing repression. PMID:7565790

  11. Mammalian mitochondrial D-loop region structural analysis: identification of new conserved sequences and their functional and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Sbisà, E; Tanzariello, F; Reyes, A; Pesole, G; Saccone, C

    1997-12-31

    This paper reports the first comprehensive analysis of Displacement loop (D-loop) region sequences from ten different mammalian orders. It represents a systematic evolutionary study at the molecular level on regulatory homologous regions in organisms belonging to a well defined class, mammalia, which radiated about 150 million years ago (Mya). We have aligned and analyzed 26 complete D-loop region sequences available in the literature and the fat dormouse sequence, recently determined in our laboratory. The novelty of our alignment consists of the extensive manual revision of the preliminary output obtained by computer program to optimize sequence similarity, particularly for the two peripheral domains displaying heterogeneity in length and the presence of repeated sequences. The multialignment is available at the WWW site: http://www.ba.cnr.it/dloop.html. Our comparative study has allowed us to identify new conserved sequence blocks present in all the species under consideration and events of insertion/deletion which have important implications in both functional and evolutionary aspects. In particular we have detected two blocks, about 60 bp long, extended termination associated sequences (ETAS1 and ETAS2) conserved in all the organisms considered. Evaluation against experimental work suggests a possible functional role of ETAS1 and ETAS2 in the regulation of replication and transcription and targeted experimental approaches. The analyses on conserved sequence blocks (CSBs) clearly indicate that CSB1 is the only very essential element, common to all mammalian mt genomes, while CSB2 and CSB3 could be involved in different though related functions, probably species specific, and thus more linked to nuclear mitochondrial coevolutionary processes. Our hypothesis on the different functional implications of the conserved elements, CSBs and TASs, reported so far as main regulatory signals, would explain the different conservation of these elements in evolution. Moreover

  12. A higher-order conservation element solution element method for solving hyperbolic differential equations on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyeu, David

    This dissertation presents an extension of the Conservation Element Solution Element (CESE) method from second- to higher-order accuracy. The new method retains the favorable characteristics of the original second-order CESE scheme, including (i) the use of the space-time integral equation for conservation laws, (ii) a compact mesh stencil, (iii) the scheme will remain stable up to a CFL number of unity, (iv) a fully explicit, time-marching integration scheme, (v) true multidimensionality without using directional splitting, and (vi) the ability to handle two- and three-dimensional geometries by using unstructured meshes. This algorithm has been thoroughly tested in one, two and three spatial dimensions and has been shown to obtain the desired order of accuracy for solving both linear and non-linear hyperbolic partial differential equations. The scheme has also shown its ability to accurately resolve discontinuities in the solutions. Higher order unstructured methods such as the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method and the Spectral Volume (SV) methods have been developed for one-, two- and three-dimensional application. Although these schemes have seen extensive development and use, certain drawbacks of these methods have been well documented. For example, the explicit versions of these two methods have very stringent stability criteria. This stability criteria requires that the time step be reduced as the order of the solver increases, for a given simulation on a given mesh. The research presented in this dissertation builds upon the work of Chang, who developed a fourth-order CESE scheme to solve a scalar one-dimensional hyperbolic partial differential equation. The completed research has resulted in two key deliverables. The first is a detailed derivation of a high-order CESE methods on unstructured meshes for solving the conservation laws in two- and three-dimensional spaces. The second is the code implementation of these numerical methods in a computer code. For

  13. Algebraic evaluation of matrix elements in the Laguerre function basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, A. E.; Caprio, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    The Laguerre functions constitute one of the fundamental basis sets for calculations in atomic and molecular electron-structure theory, with applications in hadronic and nuclear theory as well. While similar in form to the Coulomb bound-state eigenfunctions (from the Schrödinger eigenproblem) or the Coulomb-Sturmian functions (from a related Sturm-Liouville problem), the Laguerre functions, unlike these former functions, constitute a complete, discrete, orthonormal set for square-integrable functions in three dimensions. We construct the SU(1, 1) × SO(3) dynamical algebra for the Laguerre functions and apply the ideas of factorization (or supersymmetric quantum mechanics) to derive shift operators for these functions. We use the resulting algebraic framework to derive analytic expressions for matrix elements of several basic radial operators (involving powers of the radial coordinate and radial derivative) in the Laguerre function basis. We illustrate how matrix elements for more general spherical tensor operators in three dimensional space, such as the gradient, may then be constructed from these radial matrix elements.

  14. Conserved and Diverged Functions of the Calcineurin-Activated Prz1 Transcription Factor in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Chatfield-Reed, Kate; Vachon, Lianne; Kwon, Eun-Joo Gina; Chua, Gordon

    2016-04-01

    Gene regulation in response to intracellular calcium is mediated by the calcineurin-activated transcription factor Prz1 in the fission yeastSchizosaccharomyces pombe Genome-wide studies of theCrz1and CrzA fungal orthologs have uncovered numerous target genes involved in conserved and species-specific cellular processes. In contrast, very few target genes of Prz1 have been published. This article identifies an extensive list of genes using transcriptome and ChIP-chip analyses under inducing conditions of Prz1, including CaCl2and tunicamycin treatment, as well as a∆pmr1genetic background. We identified 165 upregulated putative target genes of Prz1 in which the majority contained a calcium-dependent response element in their promoters, similar to that of theSaccharomyces cerevisiaeorthologCrz1 These genes were functionally enriched forCrz1-conserved processes such as cell-wall biosynthesis. Overexpression ofprz1(+)increased resistance to the cell-wall degradation enzyme zymolyase, likely from upregulation of theO-mannosyltransferase encoding geneomh1(+) Loss ofomh1(+)abrogates this phenotype. We uncovered a novel inhibitory role in flocculation for Prz1. Loss ofprz1(+)resulted in constitutive flocculation and upregulation of genes encoding the flocculins Gsf2 and Pfl3, as well as the transcription factor Cbf12. The constitutive flocculation of the∆prz1strain was abrogated by the loss ofgsf2(+)orcbf12(+) This study reveals that Prz1 functions as a positive and negative transcriptional regulator of genes involved in cell-wall biosynthesis and flocculation, respectively. Moreover, comparison of target genes betweenCrz1/CrzA and Prz1 indicate some conservation in DNA-binding specificity, but also substantial rewiring of the calcineurin-mediated transcriptional regulatory network. PMID:26896331

  15. Conserved and Diverged Functions of the Calcineurin-Activated Prz1 Transcription Factor in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Chatfield-Reed, Kate; Vachon, Lianne; Kwon, Eun-Joo Gina; Chua, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation in response to intracellular calcium is mediated by the calcineurin-activated transcription factor Prz1 in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Genome-wide studies of the Crz1 and CrzA fungal orthologs have uncovered numerous target genes involved in conserved and species-specific cellular processes. In contrast, very few target genes of Prz1 have been published. This article identifies an extensive list of genes using transcriptome and ChIP-chip analyses under inducing conditions of Prz1, including CaCl2 and tunicamycin treatment, as well as a ∆pmr1 genetic background. We identified 165 upregulated putative target genes of Prz1 in which the majority contained a calcium-dependent response element in their promoters, similar to that of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog Crz1. These genes were functionally enriched for Crz1-conserved processes such as cell-wall biosynthesis. Overexpression of prz1+ increased resistance to the cell-wall degradation enzyme zymolyase, likely from upregulation of the O-mannosyltransferase encoding gene omh1+. Loss of omh1+ abrogates this phenotype. We uncovered a novel inhibitory role in flocculation for Prz1. Loss of prz1+ resulted in constitutive flocculation and upregulation of genes encoding the flocculins Gsf2 and Pfl3, as well as the transcription factor Cbf12. The constitutive flocculation of the ∆prz1 strain was abrogated by the loss of gsf2+ or cbf12+. This study reveals that Prz1 functions as a positive and negative transcriptional regulator of genes involved in cell-wall biosynthesis and flocculation, respectively. Moreover, comparison of target genes between Crz1/CrzA and Prz1 indicate some conservation in DNA-binding specificity, but also substantial rewiring of the calcineurin-mediated transcriptional regulatory network. PMID:26896331

  16. Functional Nanofibers and Colloidal Gels: Key Elements to Enhance Functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Nancy Amanda

    Nanomaterials bridge the gap between bulk materials and molecular structures and are known for their unique material properties and highly functional nature which make them attractive for a variety of potential applications, from energy storage and pollution sensors to agricultural and biomedical products. These potential applications, coupled with advances in nanotechnology, have generated considerable interest in nanostructure research. The work presented in this dissertation focuses on two such nanostructures, electrospun nanofibers and nanodiamond particles, with an overarching goal of tailoring the material behavior for a desired outcome. Our first research theme focuses on realizing the full potential of chitosan electrospinning by understanding the mechanism that enables fiber formation through cyclodextrin complexation as a function of solution properties, solvent types, and cyclodextrin content. We demonstrate that cyclodextrin addition not only enables chitosan fiber formation, but also extends the composition and solvent window for nanofiber synthesis while introducing a variety of mat topologies, including three-dimensional, self-supporting mats. These fiber formation improvements cannot be fully explained by conventional electrospinning parameters, but instead seem to be related to the molecular interactions between chitosan and cyclodextrin. Our second research theme entails the modification of highly water soluble, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofibers dissolution properties via atomic layer deposition (ALD) post treatments. In this work, we demonstrate that applying different thicknesses of aluminum oxide nano-coatings can improve the stability of PVA nanofibers in high humidity conditions and significantly decrease the solubility of electrospun PVA mats in water, from seconds to multiple weeks. Controlling mat dissolution allows for the unique opportunity to modulate small molecule, such as drug, release from nanofibers without altering the core

  17. A conserved MCM single-stranded DNA binding element is essential for replication initiation

    PubMed Central

    Froelich, Clifford A; Kang, Sukhyun; Epling, Leslie B; Bell, Stephen P; Enemark, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    The ring-shaped MCM helicase is essential to all phases of DNA replication. The complex loads at replication origins as an inactive double-hexamer encircling duplex DNA. Helicase activation converts this species to two active single hexamers that encircle single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The molecular details of MCM DNA interactions during these events are unknown. We determined the crystal structure of the Pyrococcus furiosus MCM N-terminal domain hexamer bound to ssDNA and define a conserved MCM-ssDNA binding motif (MSSB). Intriguingly, ssDNA binds the MCM ring interior perpendicular to the central channel with defined polarity. In eukaryotes, the MSSB is conserved in several Mcm2-7 subunits, and MSSB mutant combinations in S. cerevisiae Mcm2-7 are not viable. Mutant Mcm2-7 complexes assemble and are recruited to replication origins, but are defective in helicase loading and activation. Our findings identify an important MCM-ssDNA interaction and suggest it functions during helicase activation to select the strand for translocation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01993.001 PMID:24692448

  18. Epigenetic conservation at gene regulatory elements revealed by non-methylated DNA profiling in seven vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Long, Hannah K; Sims, David; Heger, Andreas; Blackledge, Neil P; Kutter, Claudia; Wright, Megan L; Grützner, Frank; Odom, Duncan T; Patient, Roger; Ponting, Chris P; Klose, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Two-thirds of gene promoters in mammals are associated with regions of non-methylated DNA, called CpG islands (CGIs), which counteract the repressive effects of DNA methylation on chromatin. In cold-blooded vertebrates, computational CGI predictions often reside away from gene promoters, suggesting a major divergence in gene promoter architecture across vertebrates. By experimentally identifying non-methylated DNA in the genomes of seven diverse vertebrates, we instead reveal that non-methylated islands (NMIs) of DNA are a central feature of vertebrate gene promoters. Furthermore, NMIs are present at orthologous genes across vast evolutionary distances, revealing a surprising level of conservation in this epigenetic feature. By profiling NMIs in different tissues and developmental stages we uncover a unifying set of features that are central to the function of NMIs in vertebrates. Together these findings demonstrate an ancient logic for NMI usage at gene promoters and reveal an unprecedented level of epigenetic conservation across vertebrate evolution. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00348.001. PMID:23467541

  19. Abscisic acid-induced gene expression in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha is mediated by evolutionarily conserved promoter elements.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Totan K; Kaneko, Midori; Akter, Khaleda; Murai, Shuhei; Komatsu, Kenji; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Kohchi, Takayuki; Takezawa, Daisuke

    2016-04-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a phytohormone widely distributed among members of the land plant lineage (Embryophyta), regulating dormancy, stomata closure and tolerance to environmental stresses. In angiosperms (Magnoliophyta), ABA-induced gene expression is mediated by promoter elements such as the G-box-like ACGT-core motifs recognized by bZIP transcription factors. In contrast, the mode of regulation by ABA of gene expression in liverworts (Marchantiophyta), representing one of the earliest diverging land plant groups, has not been elucidated. In this study, we used promoters of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha dehydrin and the wheat Em genes fused to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene to investigate ABA-induced gene expression in liverworts. Transient assays of cultured cells of Marchantia indicated that ACGT-core motifs proximal to the transcription initiation site play a role in the ABA-induced gene expression. The RY sequence recognized by B3 transcriptional regulators was also shown to be responsible for the ABA-induced gene expression. In transgenic Marchantia plants, ABA treatment elicited an increase in GUS expression in young gemmalings, which was abolished by simultaneous disruption of the ACGT-core and RY elements. ABA-induced GUS expression was less obvious in mature thalli than in young gemmalings, associated with reductions in sensitivity to exogenous ABA during gametophyte growth. In contrast, lunularic acid, which had been suggested to function as an ABA-like substance, had no effect on GUS expression. The results demonstrate the presence of ABA-specific response mechanisms mediated by conserved cis-regulatory elements in liverworts, implying that the mechanisms had been acquired in the common ancestors of embryophytes. PMID:26456006

  20. Telomerase RNA stem terminus element affects template boundary element function, telomere sequence, and shelterin binding

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Christopher J.; Zakian, Virginia A.

    2015-01-01

    The stem terminus element (STE), which was discovered 13 y ago in human telomerase RNA, is required for telomerase activity, yet its mode of action is unknown. We report that the Schizosaccharomyces pombe telomerase RNA, TER1 (telomerase RNA 1), also contains a STE, which is essential for telomere maintenance. Cells expressing a partial loss-of-function TER1 STE allele maintained short stable telomeres by a recombination-independent mechanism. Remarkably, the mutant telomere sequence was different from that of wild-type cells. Generation of the altered sequence is explained by reverse transcription into the template boundary element, demonstrating that the STE helps maintain template boundary element function. The altered telomeres bound less Pot1 (protection of telomeres 1) and Taz1 (telomere-associated in Schizosaccharomyces pombe 1) in vivo. Thus, the S. pombe STE, although distant from the template, ensures proper telomere sequence, which in turn promotes proper assembly of the shelterin complex. PMID:26305931

  1. A novel mosaic protein containing LDL receptor elements is highly conserved in humans and chickens.

    PubMed

    Mörwald, S; Yamazaki, H; Bujo, H; Kusunoki, J; Kanaki, T; Seimiya, K; Morisaki, N; Nimpf, J; Schneider, W J; Saito, Y

    1997-05-01

    Certain receptors belonging to the LDL receptor (LDLR) gene family appear to constitute a newly identified branch whose members are expressed in brain, in addition to other tissues. In support of this concept, we have now discovered the expression and delineated the molecular structures of a representative of this emerging branch from two such diverse species as human and chicken. This membrane receptor, called LR11 and thus far only known to exist in the rabbit, is a complex seven-domain mosaic protein containing, among other structural elements, a cluster of 11 LDLR ligand-binding repeats and a domain with homology to VPS10, a yeast receptor for vacuolar protein sorting. Cytoplasmic signature sequences define the receptor as competent for endocytosis. The most striking properties of LR11s are their (1) high degree of structural conservation (>80% identity among mammals and birds), with 100% identity in the membrane-spanning and cytoplasmic domains of rabbit and human; (2) lack of regulation by cholesterol and estrogen; and (3) expression in brain. The features of LR11 suggest important roles in intercellular and intracellular ligand transport processes, some of which it may share with other brain-specific LDLR family members. PMID:9157966

  2. SHOX gene and conserved noncoding element deletions/duplications in Colombian patients with idiopathic short stature

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Gloria Tatiana Vinasco; Jaimes, Giovanna Carola; Barrios, Mauricio Coll; Cespedes, Camila; Velasco, Harvy Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    SHOX gene mutations or haploinsufficiency cause a wide range of phenotypes such as Leri Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD), Turner syndrome, and disproportionate short stature (DSS). However, this gene has also been found to be mutated in cases of idiopathic short stature (ISS) with a 3–15% frequency. In this study, the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique was employed to determine the frequency of SHOX gene mutations and their conserved noncoding elements (CNE) in Colombian patients with ISS. Patients were referred from different centers around the county. From a sample of 62 patients, 8.1% deletions and insertions in the intragenic regions and in the CNE were found. This result is similar to others published in other countries. Moreover, an isolated case of CNE 9 duplication and a new intron 6b deletion in another patient, associated with ISS, are described. This is one of the first studies of a Latin American population in which deletions/duplications of the SHOX gene and its CNE are examined in patients with ISS. PMID:24689071

  3. A regulon conserved in monocot and dicot plants defines a functional module in antifungal plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Humphry, Matt; Bednarek, Paweł; Kemmerling, Birgit; Koh, Serry; Stein, Mónica; Göbel, Ulrike; Stüber, Kurt; Piślewska-Bednarek, Mariola; Loraine, Ann; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Somerville, Shauna; Panstruga, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    At least two components that modulate plant resistance against the fungal powdery mildew disease are ancient and have been conserved since the time of the monocot–dicot split (≈200 Mya). These components are the seven transmembrane domain containing MLO/MLO2 protein and the syntaxin ROR2/PEN1, which act antagonistically and have been identified in the monocot barley (Hordeum vulgare) and the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively. Additionally, syntaxin-interacting N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor adaptor protein receptor proteins (VAMP721/722 and SNAP33/34) as well as a myrosinase (PEN2) and an ABC transporter (PEN3) contribute to antifungal resistance in both barley and/or Arabidopsis. Here, we show that these genetically defined defense components share a similar set of coexpressed genes in the two plant species, comprising a statistically significant overrepresentation of gene products involved in regulation of transcription, posttranslational modification, and signaling. Most of the coexpressed Arabidopsis genes possess a common cis-regulatory element that may dictate their coordinated expression. We exploited gene coexpression to uncover numerous components in Arabidopsis involved in antifungal defense. Together, our data provide evidence for an evolutionarily conserved regulon composed of core components and clade/species-specific innovations that functions as a module in plant innate immunity. PMID:21098265

  4. Separation of the PROX1 gene from upstream conserved elements in a complex inversion/translocation patient with hypoplastic left heart.

    PubMed

    Gill, Harinder K; Parsons, Sian R; Spalluto, Cosma; Davies, Angela F; Knorz, Victoria J; Burlinson, Clare E G; Ng, Bee Ling; Carter, Nigel P; Ogilvie, Caroline Mackie; Wilson, David I; Roberts, Roland G

    2009-11-01

    Hypoplastic left heart (HLH) occurs in at least 1 in 10 000 live births but may be more common in utero. Its causes are poorly understood but a number of affected cases are associated with chromosomal abnormalities. We set out to localize the breakpoints in a patient with sporadic HLH and a de novo translocation. Initial studies showed that the apparently simple 1q41;3q27.1 translocation was actually combined with a 4-Mb inversion, also de novo, of material within 1q41. We therefore localized all four breakpoints and found that no known transcription units were disrupted. However we present a case, based on functional considerations, synteny and position of highly conserved non-coding sequence elements, and the heterozygous Prox1(+/-) mouse phenotype (ventricular hypoplasia), for the involvement of dysregulation of the PROX1 gene in the aetiology of HLH in this case. Accordingly, we show that the spatial expression pattern of PROX1 in the developing human heart is consistent with a role in cardiac development. We suggest that dysregulation of PROX1 gene expression due to separation from its conserved upstream elements is likely to have caused the heart defects observed in this patient, and that PROX1 should be considered as a potential candidate gene for other cases of HLH. The relevance of another breakpoint separating the cardiac gene ESRRG from a conserved downstream element is also discussed. PMID:19471316

  5. Understanding the function of conserved variations in the catalytic loops of fungal glycoside hydrolase family 12.

    PubMed

    Damásio, André R L; Rubio, Marcelo V; Oliveira, Leandro C; Segato, Fernando; Dias, Bruno A; Citadini, Ana P; Paixão, Douglas A; Squina, Fabio M

    2014-08-01

    Enzymes that cleave the xyloglucan backbone at unbranched glucose residues have been identified in GH families 5, 7, 12, 16, 44, and 74. Fungi produce enzymes that populate 20 of 22 families that are considered critical for plant biomass deconstruction. We searched for GH12-encoding genes in 27 Eurotiomycetes genomes. After analyzing 50 GH12-related sequences, the conserved variations of the amino acid sequences were examined. Compared to the endoglucanases, the endo-xyloglucanase-associated YSG deletion at the negative subsites of the catalytic cleft with a SST insertion at the reducing end of the substrate-binding crevice is highly conserved. In addition, a highly conserved alanine residue was identified in all xyloglucan-specific enzymes, and this residue is substituted by arginine in more promiscuous glucanases. To understand the basis for the xyloglucan specificity displayed by certain GH12 enzymes, two fungal GH12 endoglucanases were chosen for mutagenesis and functional studies: an endo-xyloglucanase from Aspergillus clavatus (AclaXegA) and an endoglucanase from A. terreus (AtEglD). Comprehensive molecular docking studies and biochemical analyses were performed, revealing that mutations at the entrance of the catalytic cleft in AtEglD result in a wider binding cleft and the alteration of the substrate-cleavage pattern, implying that a trio of residues coordinates the interactions and binding to linear glycans. The loop insertion at the crevice-reducing end of AclaXegA is critical for catalytic efficiency to hydrolyze xyloglucan. The understanding of the structural elements governing endo-xyloglucanase activity on linear and branched glucans will facilitate future enzyme modifications with potential applications in industrial biotechnology. PMID:24578305

  6. Cellular interactions during tracheary elements formation and function.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Delphine; Pesquet, Edouard

    2015-02-01

    The survival of higher plant species on land depends on the development and function of an efficient vascular system distributing water and minerals absorbed by roots to all aerial organs. This conduction and distribution of plant sap relies on specialized cells named tracheary elements (TEs). In contrast to many other cell types in plants, TEs are functionalized by cell death that hollows the cell protoplast to make way for the sap. To maintain a stable conducting function during plant development, recovery from vascular damages as well as to adapt to environmental changes, TEs are completely dependent on direct cellular interactions with neighboring xylem parenchyma cells (XPs). PMID:25545993

  7. Element orbitals for Kohn-Sham density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lin; Ying, Lexing

    2012-05-08

    We present a method to discretize the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian matrix in the pseudopotential framework by a small set of basis functions automatically contracted from a uniform basis set such as planewaves. Each basis function is localized around an element, which is a small part of the global domain containing multiple atoms. We demonstrate that the resulting basis set achieves meV accuracy for 3D densely packed systems with a small number of basis functions per atom. The procedure is applicable to insulating and metallic systems.

  8. Quadratic Interaction Functional for General Systems of Conservation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Stefano; Modena, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    For the Glimm scheme approximation to the solution of the system of conservation laws in one space dimension with initial data u 0 with small total variation, we prove a quadratic (w.r.t. Tot. Var. ( u 0)) interaction estimate, which has been used in the literature for stability and convergence results. No assumptions on the structure of the flux f are made (apart from smoothness), and this estimate is the natural extension of the Glimm type interaction estimate for genuinely nonlinear systems. More precisely, we obtain the following results: a new analysis of the interaction estimates of simple waves;

  9. Functional overlap between conserved and diverged KH domains in Saccharomyces cerevisiae SCP160

    PubMed Central

    Brykailo, Melissa A.; Corbett, Anita H.; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.

    2007-01-01

    The K homology (KH) domain is a remarkably versatile and highly conserved RNA-binding motif. Classical KH domains include a characteristic pattern of hydrophobic residues, a Gly-X-X-Gly (GXXG) segment, and a variable loop. KH domains typically occur in clusters, with some retaining their GXXG sequence (conserved), while others do not (diverged). As a first step towards addressing whether GXXG is essential for KH-domain function, we explored the roles of conserved and diverged KH domains in Scp160p, a multiple-KH-domain-containing protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We specifically wanted to know (1) whether diverged KH domains were essential for Scp160p function, and (2) whether diverged KH domains could functionally replace conserved KH domains. To address these questions, we deleted and/or interchanged conserved and diverged KH domains of Scp160p and expressed the mutated alleles in yeast. Our results demonstrated that the answer to each question was yes. Both conserved and diverged KH domains are essential for Scp160p function, and diverged KH domains can function in place of conserved KH domains. These findings challenge the prevailing notions about the requisite features of a KH domain and raise the possibility that there may be more functional KH domains in the proteome than previously appreciated. PMID:17264125

  10. HIV-1 p24(gag) derived conserved element DNA vaccine increases the breadth of immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Viraj; Rosati, Margherita; Valentin, Antonio; Ganneru, Brunda; Singh, Ashish K; Yan, Jian; Rolland, Morgane; Alicea, Candido; Beach, Rachel Kelly; Zhang, Gen-Mu; Le Gall, Sylvie; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Heckerman, David; Mothe, Beatriz; Brander, Christian; Weiner, David B; Mullins, James I; Pavlakis, George N; Felber, Barbara K

    2013-01-01

    Viral diversity is considered a major impediment to the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. Despite this diversity, certain protein segments are nearly invariant across the known HIV-1 Group M sequences. We developed immunogens based on the highly conserved elements from the p24(gag) region according to two principles: the immunogen must (i) include strictly conserved elements of the virus that cannot mutate readily, and (ii) exclude both HIV regions capable of mutating without limiting virus viability, and also immunodominant epitopes located in variable regions. We engineered two HIV-1 p24(gag) DNA immunogens that express 7 highly Conserved Elements (CE) of 12-24 amino acids in length and differ by only 1 amino acid in each CE ('toggle site'), together covering >99% of the HIV-1 Group M sequences. Altering intracellular trafficking of the immunogens changed protein localization, stability, and also the nature of elicited immune responses. Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with p55(gag) DNA induced poor, CD4(+) mediated cellular responses, to only 2 of the 7 CE; in contrast, vaccination with p24CE DNA induced cross-clade reactive, robust T cell responses to 4 of the 7 CE. The responses were multifunctional and composed of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells with mature cytotoxic phenotype. These findings provide a method to increase immune response to universally conserved Gag epitopes, using the p24CE immunogen. p24CE DNA vaccination induced humoral immune responses similar in magnitude to those induced by p55(gag), which recognize the virus encoded p24(gag) protein. The inclusion of DNA immunogens composed of conserved elements is a promising vaccine strategy to induce broader immunity by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells to additional regions of Gag compared to vaccination with p55(gag) DNA, achieving maximal cross-clade reactive cellular and humoral responses. PMID:23555935

  11. Prediction of functional sites in proteins using conserved functional group analysis.

    PubMed

    Innis, C Axel; Anand, A Prem; Sowdhamini, R

    2004-04-01

    A detailed knowledge of a protein's functional site is an absolute prerequisite for understanding its mode of action at the molecular level. However, the rapid pace at which sequence and structural information is being accumulated for proteins greatly exceeds our ability to determine their biochemical roles experimentally. As a result, computational methods are required which allow for the efficient processing of the evolutionary information contained in this wealth of data, in particular that related to the nature and location of functionally important sites and residues. The method presented here, referred to as conserved functional group (CFG) analysis, relies on a simplified representation of the chemical groups found in amino acid side-chains to identify functional sites from a single protein structure and a number of its sequence homologues. We show that CFG analysis can fully or partially predict the location of functional sites in approximately 96% of the 470 cases tested and that, unlike other methods available, it is able to tolerate wide variations in sequence identity. In addition, we discuss its potential in a structural genomics context, where automation, scalability and efficiency are critical, and an increasing number of protein structures are determined with no prior knowledge of function. This is exemplified by our analysis of the hypothetical protein Ydde_Ecoli, whose structure was recently solved by members of the North East Structural Genomics consortium. Although the proposed active site for this protein needs to be validated experimentally, this example illustrates the scope of CFG analysis as a general tool for the identification of residues likely to play an important role in a protein's biochemical function. Thus, our method offers a convenient solution to rapidly and automatically process the vast amounts of data that are beginning to emerge from structural genomics projects. PMID:15033369

  12. Approximate formula for the escape function for nearly conservative scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanovitskij, E. G.

    2002-02-01

    The escape function u(μ) (i.e., the boundary solution of the Milne problem for a semi-infinite atmosphere) is considered. It is presented in the form u(μ) = u0 (μ ) + √ {1 - λ}u1(μ) + (1-λ)u2(μ) + ldots, where λ is the single-scattering albedo. A rather accurate approximate formula for a the function u0 (μ) is obtained for not highly elongated phase function. An approximate expression for the function u2 (μ) is also derived, it is exact in the case of the most simple anisotropic scattering.

  13. MELK-a conserved kinase: functions, signaling, cancer, and controversy.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Ranjit; Mohyeldin, Ahmed; Thiel, Jordyn; Kornblum, Harley I; Beullens, Monique; Nakano, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase initially found to be expressed in a wide range of early embryonic cellular stages, and as a result has been implicated in embryogenesis and cell cycle control. Recent evidence has identified a broader spectrum of tissue expression pattern for this kinase than previously appreciated. MELK is expressed in several human cancers and stem cell populations. Unique spatial and temporal patterns of expression within these tissues suggest that MELK plays a prominent role in cell cycle control, cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell migration, cell renewal, embryogenesis, oncogenesis, and cancer treatment resistance and recurrence. These findings have important implications for our understanding of development, disease, and cancer therapeutics. Furthermore understanding MELK signaling may elucidate an added dimension of stem cell control. PMID:25852826

  14. Identification of Weakly Conserved Regulatory Elements in Upstream Promoter Regions of Mammals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several methods have been proposed that identify sequences conserved due to evolutionary constraints by cross-species genome comparison. However, aside from the most prominently conserved transcription factor binding sites (TFBS), there is a general lack of cross reference between in silico predicti...

  15. Sex Differences in the Association of Cerebral Hemispheric Specialization of Spatial Function with Conservation Task Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Affleck, Glenn; Joyce, Patricia

    1979-01-01

    The association of locus of cerebral hemispheric specialization of spatial function with identity and equivalence conservation judgments was tested in a group of four- to six-year-old right-handed children (N=31). (Author/MP)

  16. Residue Substitutions Near the Redox Center of Bacillus subtilis Spx Affect RNA Polymerase Interaction, Redox Control, and Spx-DNA Contact at a Conserved cis-Acting Element

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ann A.; Walthers, Don

    2013-01-01

    Spx, a member of the ArsC protein family, is a regulatory factor that interacts with RNA polymerase (RNAP). It is highly conserved in Gram-positive bacteria and controls transcription on a genome-wide scale in response to oxidative stress. The structural requirements for RNAP interaction and promoter DNA recognition by Spx were examined through mutational analysis. Residues near the CxxC redox disulfide center of Spx functioned in RNAP α subunit interaction and in promoter DNA binding. R60E and C10A mutants were shown previously to confer defects in transcriptional activation, but both were able to interact with RNAP. R92, which is conserved in ArsC-family proteins, is likely involved in redox control of Spx, as the C10A mutation, which blocks disulfide formation, was epistatic to the R92A mutation. The R91A mutation reduced transcriptional activation and repression, suggesting a defect in RNAP interaction, which was confirmed by interaction assays using an epitope-tagged mutant protein. Protein-DNA cross-linking detected contact between RNAP-bound Spx and the AGCA element at −44 that is conserved in Spx-controlled genes. This interaction caused repositioning of the RNAP σA subunit from a −35-like element upstream of the trxB (thioredoxin reductase) promoter to positions −36 and −11 of the core promoter. The study shows that RNAP-bound Spx contacts a conserved upstream promoter sequence element when bound to RNAP. PMID:23813734

  17. Conserved cysteine residues in the pore region are obligatory for human TRPM2 channel function

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Zhu-Zhong; Mao, Hong-Ju; Jiang, Lin-Hua

    2006-01-01

    TRPM2 proteins belong to the melastatin-related transient receptor potential or TRPM subfamily and form Ca2+-permeable cationic channels activated by intracellular adenosine diphosphoribose (ADPR). The TRPM2 channel subunit, like all its close relatives, is structurally homologous to the well-characterized voltage-gated potassium channel subunits, each containing six transmembrane segments and a putative pore loop between the fifth and sixth segments. Nevertheless, the structural elements determining the TRPM2 channel functions are still not well understood. In this study, we investigated the functional role of two conserved cysteine residues (at positions 996 and 1008) in the putative pore region of the human TRPM2 by site-directed mutagenesis combined with electrophysiological and biochemical approaches. Expression of wild type hTRPM2 channels in HEK293 cells resulted in robust ADPR-evoked currents. Substitution of cysteine with alanine or serine generated mutant channels that failed to be activated by ADPR. Furthermore, experiments by Western blotting, immunocytochemistry, biotin labelling, and co-immunoprecipitation techniques showed no obvious changes in protein expression, trafficking or membrane localisation, and the ability of interacting with neighbouring subunits that is required for channel assembly. Co-expression of wild type and mutant subunits significantly reduced the ADPR-evoked currents; for combination of wild type and C996S mutant subunits, the reduction was approximately 95%, indicating that incorporation of one or more non-functional C996S subunits leads to the loss of channel function. These results taken together suggest that the cysteine residues in the pore region are obligatory for TRPM2 channel function. PMID:16822940

  18. A posteriori subcell limiting of the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbser, Michael; Zanotti, Olindo; Loubère, Raphaël; Diot, Steven

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to propose a novel a posteriori finite volume subcell limiter technique for the Discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for nonlinear systems of hyperbolic conservation laws in multiple space dimensions that works well for arbitrary high order of accuracy in space and time and that does not destroy the natural subcell resolution properties of the DG method. High order time discretization is achieved via a one-step ADER approach that uses a local space-time discontinuous Galerkin predictor method to evolve the data locally in time within each cell. Our new limiting strategy is based on the so-called MOOD paradigm, which a posteriori verifies the validity of a discrete candidate solution against physical and numerical detection criteria after each time step. Here, we employ a relaxed discrete maximum principle in the sense of piecewise polynomials and the positivity of the numerical solution as detection criteria. Within the DG scheme on the main grid, the discrete solution is represented by piecewise polynomials of degree N. For those troubled cells that need limiting, our new limiter approach recomputes the discrete solution by scattering the DG polynomials at the previous time step onto a set of Ns=2N+1 finite volume subcells per space dimension. A robust but accurate ADER-WENO finite volume scheme then updates the subcell averages of the conservative variables within the detected troubled cells. The recomputed subcell averages are subsequently gathered back into high order cell-centered DG polynomials on the main grid via a subgrid reconstruction operator. The choice of Ns=2N+1 subcells is optimal since it allows to match the maximum admissible time step of the finite volume scheme on the subgrid with the maximum admissible time step of the DG scheme on the main grid, minimizing at the same time also the local truncation error of the subcell finite volume scheme. It furthermore provides an excellent subcell resolution of

  19. An Evolutionary Conserved Epigenetic Mark of Polycomb Response Elements Implemented by Trx/MLL/COMPASS.

    PubMed

    Rickels, Ryan; Hu, Deqing; Collings, Clayton K; Woodfin, Ashley R; Piunti, Andrea; Mohan, Man; Herz, Hans-Martin; Kvon, Evgeny; Shilatifard, Ali

    2016-07-21

    Polycomb response elements (PREs) are specific DNA sequences that stably maintain the developmental pattern of gene expression. Drosophila PREs are well characterized, whereas the existence of PREs in mammals remains debated. Accumulating evidence supports a model in which CpG islands recruit Polycomb group (PcG) complexes; however, which subset of CGIs is selected to serve as PREs is unclear. Trithorax (Trx) positively regulates gene expression in Drosophila and co-occupies PREs to antagonize Polycomb-dependent silencing. Here we demonstrate that Trx-dependent H3K4 dimethylation (H3K4me2) marks Drosophila PREs and maintains the developmental expression pattern of nearby genes. Similarly, the mammalian Trx homolog, MLL1, deposits H3K4me2 at CpG-dense regions that could serve as PREs. In the absence of MLL1 and H3K4me2, H3K27me3 levels, a mark of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), increase at these loci. By inhibiting PRC2-dependent H3K27me3 in the absence of MLL1, we can rescue expression of these loci, demonstrating a functional balance between MLL1 and PRC2 activities at these sites. Thus, our study provides rules for identifying cell-type-specific functional mammalian PREs within the human genome. PMID:27447986

  20. Combining Comparison Functions and Finite Element Approximations in CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.; Baumeister, Joseph F.

    1995-01-01

    In a variety of potential flow applications, the modal element method has been shown to significantly reduce the numerical grid, employ a more precise grid termination boundary condition, and give theoretical insight to the flow physics. The method employs eigenfunctions to replace the numerical grid over significant portions of the flow field. Generally, a numerical grid is employed around obstacles with complex geometry while eigenfunctions are applied to regions in the flow field where the boundary conditions can easily be satisfied. To handle a wider class of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) problems, the present paper extends the modal element to include function approximations which do not satisfy the governing differential equation. To accomplish this task, a double modal series approximation and weighted residual constraints are developed to force the comparison functions to satisfy the governing differential equation and to interface properly with the finite element solution. As an example, the method is applied to the problem of potential flow in a channel with two-dimensional cylindrical like obstacles. The calculated flow fields are in excellent agreement with exact analytical solutions.

  1. The splicing regulatory element, UGCAUG, is phylogenetically and spatially conserved in introns that flank tissue-specific alternative exons

    PubMed Central

    Minovitsky, Simon; Gee, Sherry L.; Schokrpur, Shiruyeh; Dubchak, Inna; Conboy, John G.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have identified UGCAUG as an intron splicing enhancer that is frequently located adjacent to tissue-specific alternative exons in the human genome. Here, we show that UGCAUG is phylogenetically and spatially conserved in introns that flank brain-enriched alternative exons from fish to man. Analysis of sequence from the mouse, rat, dog, chicken and pufferfish genomes revealed a strongly statistically significant association of UGCAUG with the proximal intron region downstream of brain-enriched alternative exons. The number, position and sequence context of intronic UGCAUG elements were highly conserved among mammals and in chicken, but more divergent in fish. Control datasets, including constitutive exons and non-tissue-specific alternative exons, exhibited a much lower incidence of closely linked UGCAUG elements. We propose that the high sequence specificity of the UGCAUG element, and its unique association with tissue-specific alternative exons, mark it as a critical component of splicing switch mechanism(s) designed to activate a limited repertoire of splicing events in cell type-specific patterns. We further speculate that highly conserved UGCAUG-binding protein(s) related to the recently described Fox-1 splicing factor play a critical role in mediating this specificity. PMID:15691898

  2. Conservation and Innovation of APOBEC3A Restriction Functions during Primate Evolution.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Richard N; Gable, Jacob T; Wittkopp, Cristina J; Emerman, Michael; Malik, Harmit S

    2016-08-01

    LINE-1 (long interspersed element-1) retroelements are the only active autonomous endogenous retroelements in human genomes. Their retrotransposition activity has created close to 50% of the current human genome. Due to the apparent costs of this proliferation, host genomes have evolved multiple mechanisms to curb LINE-1 retrotransposition. Here, we investigate the evolution and function of the LINE-1 restriction factor APOBEC3A, a member of the APOBEC3 cytidine deaminase gene family. We find that APOBEC3A genes have evolved rapidly under diversifying selection in primates, suggesting changes in APOBEC3A have been recurrently selected in a host-pathogen "arms race." Nonetheless, in contrast to previous reports, we find that the LINE-1 restriction activity of APOBEC3A proteins has been strictly conserved throughout simian primate evolution in spite of its pervasive diversifying selection. Based on these results, we conclude that LINE-1s have not driven the rapid evolution of APOBEC3A in primates. In contrast to this conserved LINE-1 restriction, we find that a subset of primate APOBEC3A genes have enhanced antiviral restriction. We trace this gain of antiviral restriction in APOBEC3A to the common ancestor of a subset of Old World monkeys. Thus, APOBEC3A has not only maintained its LINE-1 restriction ability, but also evolved a gain of antiviral specificity against other pathogens. Our findings suggest that while APOBEC3A has evolved to restrict additional pathogens, only those adaptive amino acid changes that leave LINE-1 restriction unperturbed have been tolerated. PMID:27189538

  3. High conservation of a 5' element required for RNA editing of a C target in chloroplast psbE transcripts.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Michael L; Hanson, Maureen R

    2008-09-01

    C-to-U editing modifies 30-40 distinct nucleotides within higher-plant chloroplast transcripts. Many C targets are located at the same position in homologous genes from different plants; these either could have emerged independently or could share a common origin. The 5' sequence GCCGUU, required for editing of C214 in tobacco psbE in vitro, is one of the few identified editing cis-elements. We investigated psbE sequences from many plant species to determine in what lineage(s) editing of psbE C214 emerged and whether the cis-element identified in tobacco is conserved in plants with a C214. The GCCGUU sequence is present at a high frequency in plants that carry a C214 in psbE. However, Sciadopitys verticillata (Pinophyta) edits C214 despite the presence of nucleotide differences compared to the conserved cis-element. The C214 site in psbE genes is represented in members of four branches of spermatophytes but not in gnetophytes, resulting in the parsimonious prediction that editing of psbE C214 was present in the ancestor of spermatophytes. Extracts from chloroplasts from a species that has a difference in the motif and lacks the C target are incapable of editing tobacco psbE C214 substrates, implying that the critical trans-acting protein factors were not retained without a C target. Because noncoding sequences are less constrained than coding regions, we analyzed sequences 5' to two C editing targets located within coding regions to search for possible editing-related conserved elements. Putative editing cis-elements were uncovered in the 5' UTRs near editing sites psbL C2 and ndhD C2. PMID:18696032

  4. A Conserved C-terminal Element in the Yeast Doa10 and Human MARCH6 Ubiquitin Ligases Required for Selective Substrate Degradation.

    PubMed

    Zattas, Dimitrios; Berk, Jason M; Kreft, Stefan G; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Specific proteins are modified by ubiquitin at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are degraded by the proteasome, a process referred to as ER-associated protein degradation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two principal ER-associated protein degradation ubiquitin ligases (E3s) reside in the ER membrane, Doa10 and Hrd1. The membrane-embedded Doa10 functions in the degradation of substrates in the ER membrane, nuclear envelope, cytoplasm, and nucleoplasm. How most E3 ligases, including Doa10, recognize their protein substrates remains poorly understood. Here we describe a previously unappreciated but highly conserved C-terminal element (CTE) in Doa10; this cytosolically disposed 16-residue motif follows the final transmembrane helix. A conserved CTE asparagine residue is required for ubiquitylation and degradation of a subset of Doa10 substrates. Such selectivity suggests that the Doa10 CTE is involved in substrate discrimination and not general ligase function. Functional conservation of the CTE was investigated in the human ortholog of Doa10, MARCH6 (TEB4), by analyzing MARCH6 autoregulation of its own degradation. Mutation of the conserved Asn residue (N890A) in the MARCH6 CTE stabilized the normally short lived enzyme to the same degree as a catalytically inactivating mutation (C9A). We also report the localization of endogenous MARCH6 to the ER using epitope tagging of the genomic MARCH6 locus by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-mediated genome editing. These localization and CTE analyses support the inference that MARCH6 and Doa10 are functionally similar. Moreover, our results with the yeast enzyme suggest that the CTE is involved in the recognition and/or ubiquitylation of specific protein substrates. PMID:27068744

  5. Elements of a function analytic approach to probability.

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanem, Roger Georges; Red-Horse, John Robert

    2008-02-01

    We first provide a detailed motivation for using probability theory as a mathematical context in which to analyze engineering and scientific systems that possess uncertainties. We then present introductory notes on the function analytic approach to probabilistic analysis, emphasizing the connections to various classical deterministic mathematical analysis elements. Lastly, we describe how to use the approach as a means to augment deterministic analysis methods in a particular Hilbert space context, and thus enable a rigorous framework for commingling deterministic and probabilistic analysis tools in an application setting.

  6. Enhancer turnover and conserved regulatory function in vertebrate evolution

    PubMed Central

    Domené, Sabina; Bumaschny, Viviana F.; de Souza, Flávio S. J.; Franchini, Lucía F.; Nasif, Sofía; Low, Malcolm J.; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in regulatory regions including enhancers are an important source of variation and innovation during evolution. Enhancers can evolve by changes in the sequence, arrangement and repertoire of transcription factor binding sites, but whole enhancers can also be lost or gained in certain lineages in a process of turnover. The proopiomelanocortin gene (Pomc), which encodes a prohormone, is expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus of all jawed vertebrates. We have previously described that hypothalamic Pomc expression in mammals is controlled by two enhancers—nPE1 and nPE2—that are derived from transposable elements and that presumably replaced the ancestral neuronal Pomc regulatory regions. Here, we show that nPE1 and nPE2, even though they are mammalian novelties with no homologous counterpart in other vertebrates, nevertheless can drive gene expression specifically to POMC neurons in the hypothalamus of larval and adult transgenic zebrafish. This indicates that when neuronal Pomc enhancers originated de novo during early mammalian evolution, the newly created cis- and trans-codes were similar to the ancestral ones. We also identify the neuronal regulatory region of zebrafish pomca and confirm that it is not homologous to the mammalian enhancers. Our work sheds light on the process of gene regulatory evolution by showing how a locus can undergo enhancer turnover and nevertheless maintain the ancestral transcriptional output. PMID:24218639

  7. Identification and functional analysis of essential, conserved, housekeeping and duplicated genes.

    PubMed

    Arun, P V Parvati Sai; Miryala, Sravan Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Subhayan; Thiyyagura, Kranthi; Bawa, Payal; Bhattacharjee, Madhuchhanda; Yellaboina, Sailu

    2016-05-01

    Gene conservation, duplication and constitutive expression are intricately linked and strong predictors of essentiality. Here, we introduce metrics based on diversity indices to measure gene conservation, duplication and constitutive expression and validate them by measuring their performance in prediction of essential genes. Conservation and duplication were measured using the diversity indices on the bit score profile of Escherichia coli K12 orthologues, across the genomes, and paralogues, within the genome respectively. Constitutive expression was measured using expression diversity of E. coli K12 genes across different conditions. In addition, we developed a systematic method for enrichment analysis of gene-sets in a given ranked list of genes. The method was used to identify genome-wide functions of essential, conserved, constitutively expressed and duplicated genes. Furthermore, we also ranked various operons, complexes and pathways according to their essentiality, conservation, constitutive expression and duplication. PMID:27129600

  8. From Elements to Metabolism: Linking Organismal Stoichiometry to Ecosystem Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. J.; Nifong, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    Metabolism is an integrative metric of ecosystem function and energetics, synthesizing the relative contributions of multiple inputs, processes, and interactions. Stoichiometry is a framework based on elemental ratios for understanding how organisms interact within ecosystems. Linking the two has the potential to yield fresh insight about how ecosystems utilize elements and energy. We sought to quantify the link between the stoichiometry of ecosystem metabolism, specifically the C:N:P ratios of integrated autotrophic assimilation, and the stoichiometric tissue ratios observed in the dominant autotrophs. Using high frequency in situ nutrient sensors we estimated the assimilatory fluxes of C, N, and P in multiple spring-fed rivers of varying autotrophic species composition. We measured autotroph cover in each spring river, collected composite vegetation samples, and evaluated tissue stoichiometry; as expected, we observed large differences in C:N and N:P between algal and vascular plant taxa. We observed associations between measured tissue stoichiometry and elemental ratios at the ecosystem scale, suggesting that aggregated assimilatory fluxes may be useful for partitioning primary production and linking organismal nutrient content to the stoichiometry of ecosystem metabolism.

  9. The method of space-time and conservation element and solution element: A new approach for solving the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung

    1995-01-01

    A new numerical framework for solving conservation laws is being developed. This new framework differs substantially in both concept and methodology from the well-established methods, i.e., finite difference, finite volume, finite element, and spectral methods. It is conceptually simple and designed to overcome several key limitations of the above traditional methods. A two-level scheme for solving the convection-diffusion equation is constructed and used to illuminate the major differences between the present method and those previously mentioned. This explicit scheme, referred to as the a-mu scheme, has two independent marching variables.

  10. Functional studies on the ATM intronic splicing processing element

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowska, Marzena A.; Stuani, Cristiana; Parvizpur, Alireza; Baralle, Francisco E.; Pagani, Franco

    2005-01-01

    In disease-associated genes, the understanding of the functional significance of deep intronic nucleotide variants may represent a difficult challenge. We have previously reported a new disease-causing mechanism that involves an intronic splicing processing element (ISPE) in ATM, composed of adjacent consensus 5′ and 3′ splice sites. A GTAA deletion within ISPE maintains potential adjacent splice sites, disrupts a non-canonical U1 snRNP interaction and activates an aberrant exon. In this paper, we demonstrate that binding of U1 snRNA through complementarity within a ∼40 nt window downstream of the ISPE prevents aberrant splicing. By selective mutagenesis at the adjacent consensus ISPE splice sites, we show that this effect is not due to a resplicing process occurring at the ISPE. Functional comparison of the ATM mouse counterpart and evaluation of the pre-mRNA splicing intermediates derived from affected cell lines and hybrid minigene assays indicate that U1 snRNP binding at the ISPE interferes with the cryptic acceptor site. Activation of this site results in a stringent 5′–3′ order of intron sequence removal around the cryptic exon. Artificial U1 snRNA loading by complementarity to heterologous exonic sequences represents a potential therapeutic method to prevent the usage of an aberrant CFTR cryptic exon. Our results suggest that ISPE-like intronic elements binding U1 snRNPs may regulate correct intron processing. PMID:16030351

  11. Hierarchical partitioning of metazoan protein conservation profiles provides new functional insights.

    PubMed

    Witztum, Jonathan; Persi, Erez; Horn, David; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Chor, Benny

    2014-01-01

    The availability of many complete, annotated proteomes enables the systematic study of the relationships between protein conservation and functionality. We explore this question based solely on the presence or absence of protein homologues (a.k.a. conservation profiles). We study 18 metazoans, from two distinct points of view: the human's and the fly's. Using the GOrilla gene ontology (GO) analysis tool, we explore functional enrichment of the "universal proteins", those with homologues in all 17 other species, and of the "non-universal proteins". A large number of GO terms are strongly enriched in both human and fly universal proteins. Most of these functions are known to be essential. A smaller number of GO terms, exhibiting markedly different properties, are enriched in both human and fly non-universal proteins. We further explore the non-universal proteins, whose conservation profiles are consistent with the "tree of life" (TOL consistent), as well as the TOL inconsistent proteins. Finally, we applied Quantum Clustering to the conservation profiles of the TOL consistent proteins. Each cluster is strongly associated with one or a small number of specific monophyletic clades in the tree of life. The proteins in many of these clusters exhibit strong functional enrichment associated with the "life style" of the related clades. Most previous approaches for studying function and conservation are "bottom up", studying protein families one by one, and separately assessing the conservation of each. By way of contrast, our approach is "top down". We globally partition the set of all proteins hierarchically, as described above, and then identify protein families enriched within different subdivisions. While supporting previous findings, our approach also provides a tool for discovering novel relations between protein conservation profiles, functionality, and evolutionary history as represented by the tree of life. PMID:24594619

  12. A conserved cysteine motif essential for ceramide kinase function.

    PubMed

    Lidome, Emilie; Graf, Christine; Jaritz, Markus; Schanzer, Andrea; Rovina, Philipp; Nikolay, Rainer; Bornancin, Frédéric

    2008-10-01

    Ceramide kinase (CerK) is a sphingolipid metabolizing enzyme very sensitive to oxidation; however, the determinants are unknown. We show here that the thiol-modifying agent N-ethyl-maleimide abrogates CerK activity in vitro and in a cell based assay, implying that important cysteine residues are accessible in purified as well as endogenous CerK. We replaced every 22 residues in human CerK, by an alanine, and measured activity in the resulting mutant proteins. This led to identification of a cluster of cysteines, C(347)XXXC(351)XXC(354), essential for CerK function. These findings are discussed based on homology modeling of the catalytic domain of CerK. PMID:18662741

  13. Applications of step-selection functions in ecology and conservation.

    PubMed

    Thurfjell, Henrik; Ciuti, Simone; Boyce, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in positioning technology facilitates the collection of massive amounts of sequential spatial data on animals. This has led to new opportunities and challenges when investigating animal movement behaviour and habitat selection. Tools like Step Selection Functions (SSFs) are relatively new powerful models for studying resource selection by animals moving through the landscape. SSFs compare environmental attributes of observed steps (the linear segment between two consecutive observations of position) with alternative random steps taken from the same starting point. SSFs have been used to study habitat selection, human-wildlife interactions, movement corridors, and dispersal behaviours in animals. SSFs also have the potential to depict resource selection at multiple spatial and temporal scales. There are several aspects of SSFs where consensus has not yet been reached such as how to analyse the data, when to consider habitat covariates along linear paths between observations rather than at their endpoints, how many random steps should be considered to measure availability, and how to account for individual variation. In this review we aim to address all these issues, as well as to highlight weak features of this modelling approach that should be developed by further research. Finally, we suggest that SSFs could be integrated with state-space models to classify behavioural states when estimating SSFs. PMID:25520815

  14. A geometrically-conservative, synchronized, flux-corrected remap for arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian computations with nodal finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ortega, A.; Scovazzi, G.

    2011-07-01

    This article describes a conservative synchronized remap algorithm applicable to arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian computations with nodal finite elements. In the proposed approach, ideas derived from flux-corrected transport (FCT) methods are extended to conservative remap. Unique to the proposed method is the direct incorporation of the geometric conservation law (GCL) in the resulting numerical scheme. It is shown here that the geometric conservation law allows the method to inherit the positivity preserving and local extrema diminishing (LED) properties typical of FCT schemes. The proposed framework is extended to the systems of equations that typically arise in meteorological and compressible flow computations. The proposed algorithm remaps the vector fields associated with these problems by means of a synchronized strategy. The present paper also complements and extends the work of the second author on nodal-based methods for shock hydrodynamics, delivering a fully integrated suite of Lagrangian/remap algorithms for computations of compressible materials under extreme load conditions. Extensive testing in one, two, and three dimensions shows that the method is robust and accurate under typical computational scenarios.

  15. Basis Functions With Divergence Constraints For The Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinciuc, Christopher Michael

    Maxwell's equations are a system of partial differential equations of vector fields. Imposing the constitutive relations for material properties yields equations for the curl and divergence of the electric and magnetic fields. The curl and divergence equations must be solved simultaneously, which is not the same as solving three separate scalar problems in each component of the vector field. This thesis describes a new method for solving partial differential equations of vector fields using the finite element method. New basis functions are used to solve the curl equation while allowing the divergence to be set as a constraint. The basis functions are defined on a mesh of bricks and the method is applicable for geometries that conform to a Cartesian coordinate system. The basis functions are a combination of cubic Hermite splines and second order Lagrange interpolation polynomials. The method yields a linearly independent set of constraints for the divergence, which is modelled to second order accuracy within each brick. Mesh refinement is accomplished by dividing selected bricks into 2 x 2 x 2 smaller bricks of equal size. The change in the node pattern at an interface where mesh refinement occurs necessitates a modified implementation of the divergence constraints as well as additional constraints for hanging nodes. The mesh can be refined to an arbitrary number of levels. The basis functions can exactly model the discontinuity in the normal component of the field at a planar interface. The method is modified to solve problems with singularities at material boundaries that form 90° edges and corners. The primary test problem of the new basis functions is to obtain the resonant frequencies and fields of three-dimensional cavities. The new basis functions can resolve physical solutions and non-physical, spurious modes. The eigenvalues obtained with the new method are in good agreement with exact solutions and experimental values in cases where they exist. There is

  16. Functional Analysis of Semi-conserved Transit Peptide Motifs and Mechanistic Implications in Precursor Targeting and Recognition.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, Kristen; Subramanian, Chitra; Chotewutmontri, Prakitchai; Reddick, L Evan; Wright, Sarah; Zhang, Huixia; Moncrief, Lily; Bruce, Barry D

    2016-09-01

    Over 95% of plastid proteins are nuclear-encoded as their precursors containing an N-terminal extension known as the transit peptide (TP). Although highly variable, TPs direct the precursors through a conserved, posttranslational mechanism involving translocons in the outer (TOC) and inner envelope (TOC). The organelle import specificity is mediated by one or more components of the Toc complex. However, the high TP diversity creates a paradox on how the sequences can be specifically recognized. An emerging model of TP design is that they contain multiple loosely conserved motifs that are recognized at different steps in the targeting and transport process. Bioinformatics has demonstrated that many TPs contain semi-conserved physicochemical motifs, termed FGLK. In order to characterize FGLK motifs in TP recognition and import, we have analyzed two well-studied TPs from the precursor of RuBisCO small subunit (SStp) and ferredoxin (Fdtp). Both SStp and Fdtp contain two FGLK motifs. Analysis of large set mutations (∼85) in these two motifs using in vitro, in organello, and in vivo approaches support a model in which the FGLK domains mediate interaction with TOC34 and possibly other TOC components. In vivo import analysis suggests that multiple FGLK motifs are functionally redundant. Furthermore, we discuss how FGLK motifs are required for efficient precursor protein import and how these elements may permit a convergent function of this highly variable class of targeting sequences. PMID:27378725

  17. A Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method for Solving the Two- and Three-Dimensional Unsteady Euler Equations Using Quadrilateral and Hexahedral Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zeng-Chan; Yu, S. T. John; Chang, Sin-Chung; Jorgenson, Philip (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we report a version of the Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element (CE/SE) Method in which the 2D and 3D unsteady Euler equations are simulated using structured or unstructured quadrilateral and hexahedral meshes, respectively. In the present method, mesh values of flow variables and their spatial derivatives are treated as independent unknowns to be solved for. At each mesh point, the value of a flow variable is obtained by imposing a flux conservation condition. On the other hand, the spatial derivatives are evaluated using a finite-difference/weighted-average procedure. Note that the present extension retains many key advantages of the original CE/SE method which uses triangular and tetrahedral meshes, respectively, for its 2D and 3D applications. These advantages include efficient parallel computing ease of implementing non-reflecting boundary conditions, high-fidelity resolution of shocks and waves, and a genuinely multidimensional formulation without using a dimensional-splitting approach. In particular, because Riemann solvers, the cornerstones of the Godunov-type upwind schemes, are not needed to capture shocks, the computational logic of the present method is considerably simpler. To demonstrate the capability of the present method, numerical results are presented for several benchmark problems including oblique shock reflection, supersonic flow over a wedge, and a 3D detonation flow.

  18. Identity elements for the aminoacylation of metazoan mitochondrial tRNAArg have been widely conserved throughout evolution and ensure the fidelity of the AGR codon reassignment

    PubMed Central

    Igloi, Gabor L; Leisinger, Anne-Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Eumetazoan mitochondrial tRNAs possess structures (identity elements) that require the specific recognition by their cognate nuclear-encoded aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. The AGA (arginine) codon of the standard genetic code has been reassigned to serine/glycine/termination in eumetazoan organelles and is translated in some organisms by a mitochondrially encoded tRNASerUCU. One mechanism to prevent mistranslation of the AGA codon as arginine would require a set of tRNA identity elements distinct from those possessed by the cytoplasmic tRNAArg in which the major identity elements permit the arginylation of all 5 encoded isoacceptors. We have performed comparative in vitro aminoacylation using an insect mitochondrial arginyl-tRNA synthetase and tRNAArgUCG structural variants. The established identity elements are sufficient to maintain the fidelity of tRNASerUCU reassignment. tRNAs having a UCU anticodon cannot be arginylated but can be converted to arginine acceptance by identity element transplantation. We have examined the evolutionary distribution and functionality of these tRNA elements within metazoan taxa. We conclude that the identity elements that have evolved for the recognition of mitochondrial tRNAArgUCG by the nuclear encoded mitochondrial arginyl-tRNA synthetases of eumetazoans have been extensively, but not universally conserved, throughout this clade. They ensure that the AGR codon reassignment in eumetazoan mitochondria is not compromised by misaminoacylation. In contrast, in other metazoans, such as Porifera, whose mitochondrial translation is dictated by the universal genetic code, recognition of the 2 encoded tRNAArgUCG/UCU isoacceptors is achieved through structural features that resemble those employed by the yeast cytoplasmic system. PMID:25603118

  19. Defining conservation priorities for freshwater fishes according to taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strecker, Angela; Olden, Julian D.; Whittier, Joanna B.; Paukert, Craig P.

    2011-01-01

    To date, the predominant use of systematic conservation planning has been to evaluate and conserve areas of high terrestrial biodiversity. Although studies in freshwater ecosystems have received recent attention, research has rarely considered the potential trade-offs between protecting different dimensions of biodiversity and the ecological processes that maintain diversity. We provide the first systematic prioritization for freshwaters (focusing on the highly threatened and globally distinct fish fauna of the Lower Colorado River Basin, USA) simultaneously considering scenarios of: taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity; contemporary threats to biodiversity (including interactions with nonnative species); and future climate change and human population growth. There was 75% congruence between areas of highest conservation priority for different aspects of biodiversity, suggesting that conservation efforts can concurrently achieve strong complementarity among all types of diversity. However, sizable fractions of the landscape were incongruent across conservation priorities for different diversity scenarios, underscoring the importance of considering multiple dimensions of biodiversity and highlighting catchments that contribute disproportionately to taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity in the region. Regions of projected human population growth were not concordant with conservation priorities; however, higher human population abundance will likely have indirect effects on native biodiversity by increasing demand for water. This will come in direct conflict with projected reductions in precipitation and warmer temperatures, which have substantial overlap with regions of high contemporary diversity. Native and endemic fishes in arid ecosystems are critically endangered by both current and future threats, but our results highlight the use of systematic conservation planning for the optimal allocation of limited resources that incorporates

  20. Defining conservation priorities for freshwater fishes according to taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strecker, A.L.; Olden, J.D.; Whittier, Joanna B.; Paukert, C.P.

    2011-01-01

    To date, the predominant use of systematic conservation planning has been to evaluate and conserve areas of high terrestrial biodiversity. Although studies in freshwater ecosystems have received recent attention, research has rarely considered the potential tradeoffs between protecting different dimensions of biodiversity and the ecological processes that maintain diversity. We provide the first systematic prioritization for freshwaters (focusing on the highly threatened and globally distinct fish fauna of the Lower Colorado River Basin, USA) simultaneously considering scenarios of: taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity;contemporary threats to biodiversity (including interactions with nonnative species);and future climate change and human population growth. There was 75% congruence between areas of highest conservation priority for different aspects of biodiversity, suggesting that conservation efforts can concurrently achieve strong complementarity among all types of diversity. However, sizable fractions of the landscape were incongruent across conservation priorities for different diversity scenarios, underscoring the importance of considering multiple dimensions of biodiversity and highlighting catchments that contribute disproportionately to taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity in the region. Regions of projected human population growth were not concordant with conservation priorities;however, higher human population abundance will likely have indirect effects on native biodiversity by increasing demand for water. This will come in direct conflict with projected reductions in precipitation and warmer temperatures, which have substantial overlap with regions of high contemporary diversity. Native and endemic fishes in arid ecosystems are critically endangered by both current and future threats, but our results highlight the use of systematic conservation planning for the optimal allocation of limited resources that incorporates multiple

  1. Conserved Noncoding Elements Follow Power-Law-Like Distributions in Several Genomes as a Result of Genome Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Polychronopoulos, Dimitris; Sellis, Diamantis; Almirantis, Yannis

    2014-01-01

    Conserved, ultraconserved and other classes of constrained elements (collectively referred as CNEs here), identified by comparative genomics in a wide variety of genomes, are non-randomly distributed across chromosomes. These elements are defined using various degrees of conservation between organisms and several thresholds of minimal length. We here investigate the chromosomal distribution of CNEs by studying the statistical properties of distances between consecutive CNEs. We find widespread power-law-like distributions, i.e. linearity in double logarithmic scale, in the inter-CNE distances, a feature which is connected with fractality and self-similarity. Given that CNEs are often found to be spatially associated with genes, especially with those that regulate developmental processes, we verify by appropriate gene masking that a power-law-like pattern emerges irrespectively of whether elements found close or inside genes are excluded or not. An evolutionary model is put forward for the understanding of these findings that includes segmental or whole genome duplication events and eliminations (loss) of most of the duplicated CNEs. Simulations reproduce the main features of the observed size distributions. Power-law-like patterns in the genomic distributions of CNEs are in accordance with current knowledge about their evolutionary history in several genomes. PMID:24787386

  2. Trace element geochemistry of soils and plants in Kenyan conservation areas and implications for wildlife nutrition.

    PubMed

    Maskall, J; Thornton, I

    1991-06-01

    Trace element concentrations in soils, plants and animals in National Parks and Wildlife Reserves in Kenya are assessed using geochemical mapping techniques. Soil trace element concentrations are shown to be related to soil parent material and possibly to pedological and hydrological factors. At Lake Nakuru National Park, plant trace element concentrations vary with plant species and the geochemical conditions that influence uptake are discussed. Impala at Lake Nakuru National Park and black rhino at Solio Wildlife Reserve are shown to have a lower blood copper status than animals from other areas. The trace element status of wildlife is assessed also with respect to critical concentrations used for domestic ruminants. It is suggested that at Lake Nakuru National Park, the low soil copper content and high molybdenum content of some plants contributes to the low copper status of impala and may also influence the nutrition of other species. PMID:24202842

  3. Multilevel Selection Theory and the Evolutionary Functions of Transposable Elements

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Tyler D.P.; Doolittle, W. Ford

    2015-01-01

    One of several issues at play in the renewed debate over “junk DNA” is the organizational level at which genomic features might be seen as selected, and thus to exhibit function, as etiologically defined. The intuition frequently expressed by molecular geneticists that junk DNA is functional because it serves to “speed evolution” or as an “evolutionary repository” could be recast as a claim about selection between species (or clades) rather than within them, but this is not often done. Here, we review general arguments for the importance of selection at levels above that of organisms in evolution, and develop them further for a common genomic feature: the carriage of transposable elements (TEs). In many species, not least our own, TEs comprise a large fraction of all nuclear DNA, and whether they individually or collectively contribute to fitness—or are instead junk— is a subject of ongoing contestation. Even if TEs generally owe their origin to selfish selection at the lowest level (that of genomes), their prevalence in extant organisms and the prevalence of extant organisms bearing them must also respond to selection within species (on organismal fitness) and between species (on rates of speciation and extinction). At an even higher level, the persistence of clades may be affected (positively or negatively) by TE carriage. If indeed TEs speed evolution, it is at these higher levels of selection that such a function might best be attributed to them as a class. PMID:26253318

  4. vanG Element Insertions within a Conserved Chromosomal Site Conferring Vancomycin Resistance to Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus anginosus

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Velusamy; Metcalf, Benjamin J.; Knipe, Kristen M.; Ouattara, Mahamoudou; McGee, Lesley; Shewmaker, Patricia L.; Glennen, Anita; Nichols, Megin; Harris, Carol; Brimmage, Mary; Ostrowsky, Belinda; Park, Connie J.; Schrag, Stephanie J.; Frace, Michael A.; Sammons, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Three vancomycin-resistant streptococcal strains carrying vanG elements (two invasive Streptococcus agalactiae isolates [GBS-NY and GBS-NM, both serotype II and multilocus sequence type 22] and one Streptococcus anginosus [Sa]) were examined. The 45,585-bp elements found within Sa and GBS-NY were nearly identical (together designated vanG-1) and shared near-identity over an ~15-kb overlap with a previously described vanG element from Enterococcus faecalis. Unexpectedly, vanG-1 shared much less homology with the 49,321-bp vanG-2 element from GBS-NM, with widely different levels (50% to 99%) of sequence identity shared among 44 related open reading frames. Immediately adjacent to both vanG-1 and vanG-2 were 44,670-bp and 44,680-bp integrative conjugative element (ICE)-like sequences, designated ICE-r, that were nearly identical in the two group B streptococcal (GBS) strains. The dual vanG and ICE-r elements from both GBS strains were inserted at the same position, between bases 1328 and 1329, within the identical RNA methyltransferase (rumA) genes. A GenBank search revealed that although most GBS strains contained insertions within this specific site, only sequence type 22 (ST22) GBS strains contained highly related ICE-r derivatives. The vanG-1 element in Sa was also inserted within this position corresponding to its rumA homolog adjacent to an ICE-r derivative. vanG-1 insertions were previously reported within the same relative position in the E. faecalis rumA homolog. An ICE-r sequence perfectly conserved with respect to its counterpart in GBS-NY was apparent within the same site of the rumA homolog of a Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis strain. Additionally, homologous vanG-like elements within the conserved rumA target site were evident in Roseburia intestinalis. PMID:25053786

  5. Computation of Schenberg response function by using finite element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frajuca, C.; Bortoli, F. S.; Magalhaes, N. S.

    2016-05-01

    Schenberg is a detector of gravitational waves resonant mass type, with a central frequency of operation of 3200 Hz. Transducers located on the surface of the resonating sphere, according to a distribution half-dodecahedron, are used to monitor a strain amplitude. The development of mechanical impedance matchers that act by increasing the coupling of the transducers with the sphere is a major challenge because of the high frequency and small in size. The objective of this work is to study the Schenberg response function obtained by finite element modeling (FEM). Finnaly, the result is compared with the result of the simplified model for mass spring type system modeling verifying if that is suitable for the determination of sensitivity detector, as the conclusion the both modeling give the same results.

  6. Numerical solution of transonic full stream function equations in conservation form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.

    1979-01-01

    The stream function equation in conservation form is solved iteratively based on the artificial compressibility method. The density is not a unique function of the mass flux. In order to avoid the ambiguity near the sonic line, the density is updated in terms of the velocity, which is obtained through a simple integration of a first order equation step by step in the flow field. Iteration algorithms and finite difference approximations are discussed and numerical results of both conservative and nonconservative calculations are presented.

  7. Function-based classification of carbohydrate-active enzymes by recognition of short, conserved peptide motifs.

    PubMed

    Busk, Peter Kamp; Lange, Lene

    2013-06-01

    Functional prediction of carbohydrate-active enzymes is difficult due to low sequence identity. However, similar enzymes often share a few short motifs, e.g., around the active site, even when the overall sequences are very different. To exploit this notion for functional prediction of carbohydrate-active enzymes, we developed a simple algorithm, peptide pattern recognition (PPR), that can divide proteins into groups of sequences that share a set of short conserved sequences. When this method was used on 118 glycoside hydrolase 5 proteins with 9% average pairwise identity and representing four characterized enzymatic functions, 97% of the proteins were sorted into groups correlating with their enzymatic activity. Furthermore, we analyzed 8,138 glycoside hydrolase 13 proteins including 204 experimentally characterized enzymes with 28 different functions. There was a 91% correlation between group and enzyme activity. These results indicate that the function of carbohydrate-active enzymes can be predicted with high precision by finding short, conserved motifs in their sequences. The glycoside hydrolase 61 family is important for fungal biomass conversion, but only a few proteins of this family have been functionally characterized. Interestingly, PPR divided 743 glycoside hydrolase 61 proteins into 16 subfamilies useful for targeted investigation of the function of these proteins and pinpointed three conserved motifs with putative importance for enzyme activity. Furthermore, the conserved sequences were useful for cloning of new, subfamily-specific glycoside hydrolase 61 proteins from 14 fungi. In conclusion, identification of conserved sequence motifs is a new approach to sequence analysis that can predict carbohydrate-active enzyme functions with high precision. PMID:23524681

  8. Hoxb-2 transcriptional activation in rhombomeres 3 and 5 requires an evolutionarily conserved cis-acting element in addition to the Krox-20 binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Vesque, C; Maconochie, M; Nonchev, S; Ariza-McNaughton, L; Kuroiwa, A; Charnay, P; Krumlauf, R

    1996-01-01

    Segmentation is a key feature of the development of the vertebrate hindbrain where it involves the generation of repetitive morphological units termed rhombomeres (r). Hox genes are likely to play an essential role in the specification of segmental identity and we have been investigating their regulation. We show here that the mouse and chicken Hoxb-2 genes are dependent for their expression in r3 and r5 on homologous enhancer elements and on binding to this enhancer of the r3/r5-specific transcriptional activator Krox-20. Among the three Krox-20 binding sites of the mouse Hoxb-2 enhancer, only the high-affinity site is absolutely necessary for activity. In contrast, we have identified an additional cis-acting element, Box1, essential for r3/r5 enhancer activity. It is conserved both in sequence and in position respective to the high-affinity Krox-20 binding site within the mouse and chicken enhancers. Furthermore, a short 44 bp sequence spanning the Box1 and Krox-20 sites can act as an r3/r5 enhancer when oligomerized. Box1 may therefore constitute a recognition sequence for another factor cooperating with Krox-20. Taken together, these data demonstrate the conservation of Hox gene regulation and of Krox-20 function during vertebrate evolution. Images PMID:8895582

  9. Identification of conserved regulatory elements in upstream promoter regions of mammals at relaxed thresholds by comparative genomics - a case study using PEPCK

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Comparative genomics is the primary method to discover regulatory elements by identifying conserved sequences due to evolutionary constraints by cross-species genome comparison. Except for the most conserved and prominent transcription factor binding sites (TFBS), there is a general lack ...

  10. Alu element-containing RNAs maintain nucleolar structure and function.

    PubMed

    Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Pankert, Teresa; Seiler, Jeanette; Németh, Attila; Voit, Renate; Grummt, Ingrid; Rippe, Karsten

    2015-11-12

    Non-coding RNAs play a key role in organizing the nucleus into functional subcompartments. By combining fluorescence microscopy and RNA deep-sequencing-based analysis, we found that RNA polymerase II transcripts originating from intronic Alu elements (aluRNAs) were enriched in the nucleolus. Antisense-oligo-mediated depletion of aluRNAs or drug-induced inhibition of RNA polymerase II activity disrupted nucleolar structure and impaired RNA polymerase I-dependent transcription of rRNA genes. In contrast, overexpression of a prototypic aluRNA sequence increased both nucleolus size and levels of pre-rRNA, suggesting a functional link between aluRNA, nucleolus integrity and pre-rRNA synthesis. Furthermore, we show that aluRNAs interact with nucleolin and target ectopic genomic loci to the nucleolus. Our study suggests an aluRNA-based mechanism that links RNA polymerase I and II activities and modulates nucleolar structure and rRNA production. PMID:26464461

  11. SLiMPrints: conservation-based discovery of functional motif fingerprints in intrinsically disordered protein regions

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Norman E.; Cowan, Joanne L.; Shields, Denis C.; Gibson, Toby J.; Coldwell, Mark J.; Edwards, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Large portions of higher eukaryotic proteomes are intrinsically disordered, and abundant evidence suggests that these unstructured regions of proteins are rich in regulatory interaction interfaces. A major class of disordered interaction interfaces are the compact and degenerate modules known as short linear motifs (SLiMs). As a result of the difficulties associated with the experimental identification and validation of SLiMs, our understanding of these modules is limited, advocating the use of computational methods to focus experimental discovery. This article evaluates the use of evolutionary conservation as a discriminatory technique for motif discovery. A statistical framework is introduced to assess the significance of relatively conserved residues, quantifying the likelihood a residue will have a particular level of conservation given the conservation of the surrounding residues. The framework is expanded to assess the significance of groupings of conserved residues, a metric that forms the basis of SLiMPrints (short linear motif fingerprints), a de novo motif discovery tool. SLiMPrints identifies relatively overconstrained proximal groupings of residues within intrinsically disordered regions, indicative of putatively functional motifs. Finally, the human proteome is analysed to create a set of highly conserved putative motif instances, including a novel site on translation initiation factor eIF2A that may regulate translation through binding of eIF4E. PMID:22977176

  12. Stability of Periodic Solutionsof Conservation Laws with Viscosity:Analysis of the Evans Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, M.; Zumbrun, K.

    We establish instability of periodic traveling waves arising in conservation laws featuring phase transition. The analysis uses the Evans function framework introduced by R.A. Gardner in the periodic case. The main new tool is a periodic generalization of the stability index introduced by Gardner and Zumbrun in the traveling front or pulse case.

  13. Functional conservation analysis and expression modes of grape anthocyanin synthesis genes responsive to low temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Jia, Haifeng; Wu, Weimin; Wang, Xicheng; Fang, Jinggui; Wang, Chen

    2015-12-10

    In grape cultivation, low temperature generally increases the expression of genes involved in synthesis of anthocyanin. In this study, multi-type structural analysis of the proteins encoded by five anthocyanin biosynthesis genes VvF3H, VvPAL, VvCHS3, VvCHS2 and VvLDOX, in addition to nine of their homologous genes revealed that proteins in grapevine shared a high similarity with that in kiwi, red orange and some other species in which the biosynthesis of anthocyanin significantly influenced by low temperature as proved by previous studies. Low temperature regulatory elements were also found in the promoter region of the grapevine genes VvCHS2, VvPAL and VvF3H. These findings indicate that the functions of anthocyanin biosynthesis genes in grapevine are conservative and might be sensitive to low temperature. In order to identify the specific expression patterns of the five anthocyanin biosynthesis genes and the changes of polyphenols, anthocyanins and flavonoids under low temperature stress. The transcription analysis of the five genes and the content of polyphenols, anthocyanins and flavonoids in grape skins were examined, by using Vitis vinifera L. cv. 'Yongyou 1' and 'Juxing' berries as experimental material and treated at 4°C and 25°C for 24h, 48 h, 72 h and 96 h. The results showed that low temperature greatly enhanced the expression of the five anthocyanin biosynthesis genes. Low temperature greatly slowed down the decomposition of polyphenol, anthocyanin, and flavonoid in grape skins. Our study also found that cv. 'Juxing' responded more sensitively to low temperature than cv. 'Yongyou 1'. All the findings would provide a basis for further study on the mechanism of anthocyanin biosynthesis under environmental stress. PMID:26253159

  14. Comparative functional genomics revealed conservation and diversification of three enhancers of the isl1 gene for motor and sensory neuron-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Osamu; Okada, Yohei; Ando, Hideki; Guedj, Mickael; Higashijima, Shin-Ichi; Shimazaki, Takuya; Chino, Naoichi; Okano, Hideyuki; Okamoto, Hitoshi

    2005-02-15

    Islet-1 (Isl1) is a member of the Isl1 family of LIM-homeodomain transcription factors (LIM-HD) that is expressed in a defined subset of motor and sensory neurons during vertebrate embryogenesis. To investigate how this specific expression of isl1 is regulated, we searched for enhancers of the isl1 gene that are conserved in vertebrate evolution. Initially, two enhancer elements, CREST1 and CREST2, were identified downstream of the isl1 locus in the genomes of fugu, chick, mouse, and human by BLAST searching for highly similar elements to those originally identified as motor and sensory neuron-specific enhancers in the zebrafish genome. The combined action of these elements is sufficient for completely recapitulating the subtype-specific expression of the isl1 gene in motor neurons of the mouse spinal cord. Furthermore, by direct comparison of the upstream flanking regions of the zebrafish and human isl1 genes, we identified another highly conserved noncoding element, CREST3, and subsequently C3R, a similar element to CREST3 with two CDP CR1 recognition motifs, in the upstream regions of all other isl1 family members. In mouse and human, CRESTs are located as far as more than 300 kb away from the isl1 locus, while they are much closer to the isl1 locus in zebrafish. Although all of zebrafish CREST2, CREST3, and C3R activate gene expression in the sensory neurons of zebrafish, CREST2 of mouse and human does not have the sequence necessary for sensory neuron-specific expression. Our results revealed both a remarkable conservation of the regulatory elements regulating subtype-specific gene expression in motor and sensory neurons and the dynamic process of reorganization of these elements whereby each element increases the level of cell-type specificity by losing redundant functions with the other elements during vertebrate evolution. PMID:15680372

  15. A stable high-order Spectral Difference method for hyperbolic conservation laws on triangular elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, Aravind; May, Georg; Schöberl, Joachim

    2012-03-01

    Numerical schemes using piecewise polynomial approximation are very popular for high order discretization of conservation laws. While the most widely used numerical scheme under this paradigm appears to be the Discontinuous Galerkin method, the Spectral Difference scheme has often been found attractive as well, because of its simplicity of formulation and implementation. However, recently it has been shown that the scheme is not linearly stable on triangles. In this paper we present an alternate formulation of the scheme, featuring a new flux interpolation technique using Raviart-Thomas spaces, which proves stable under a similar linear analysis in which the standard scheme failed. We demonstrate viability of the concept by showing linear stability both in the semi-discrete sense and for time stepping schemes of the SSP Runge-Kutta type. Furthermore, we present convergence studies, as well as case studies in compressible flow simulation using the Euler equations.

  16. Conserving the functional and phylogenetic trees of life of European tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Thuiller, Wilfried; Maiorano, Luigi; Mazel, Florent; Guilhaumon, François; Ficetola, Gentile Francesco; Lavergne, Sébastien; Renaud, Julien; Roquet, Cristina; Mouillot, David

    2015-02-19

    Protected areas (PAs) are pivotal tools for biodiversity conservation on the Earth. Europe has had an extensive protection system since Natura 2000 areas were created in parallel with traditional parks and reserves. However, the extent to which this system covers not only taxonomic diversity but also other biodiversity facets, such as evolutionary history and functional diversity, has never been evaluated. Using high-resolution distribution data of all European tetrapods together with dated molecular phylogenies and detailed trait information, we first tested whether the existing European protection system effectively covers all species and in particular, those with the highest evolutionary or functional distinctiveness. We then tested the ability of PAs to protect the entire tetrapod phylogenetic and functional trees of life by mapping species' target achievements along the internal branches of these two trees. We found that the current system is adequately representative in terms of the evolutionary history of amphibians while it fails for the rest. However, the most functionally distinct species were better represented than they would be under random conservation efforts. These results imply better protection of the tetrapod functional tree of life, which could help to ensure long-term functioning of the ecosystem, potentially at the expense of conserving evolutionary history. PMID:25561666

  17. Conserving the functional and phylogenetic trees of life of European tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    Thuiller, Wilfried; Maiorano, Luigi; Mazel, Florent; Guilhaumon, François; Ficetola, Gentile Francesco; Lavergne, Sébastien; Renaud, Julien; Roquet, Cristina; Mouillot, David

    2015-01-01

    Protected areas (PAs) are pivotal tools for biodiversity conservation on the Earth. Europe has had an extensive protection system since Natura 2000 areas were created in parallel with traditional parks and reserves. However, the extent to which this system covers not only taxonomic diversity but also other biodiversity facets, such as evolutionary history and functional diversity, has never been evaluated. Using high-resolution distribution data of all European tetrapods together with dated molecular phylogenies and detailed trait information, we first tested whether the existing European protection system effectively covers all species and in particular, those with the highest evolutionary or functional distinctiveness. We then tested the ability of PAs to protect the entire tetrapod phylogenetic and functional trees of life by mapping species' target achievements along the internal branches of these two trees. We found that the current system is adequately representative in terms of the evolutionary history of amphibians while it fails for the rest. However, the most functionally distinct species were better represented than they would be under random conservation efforts. These results imply better protection of the tetrapod functional tree of life, which could help to ensure long-term functioning of the ecosystem, potentially at the expense of conserving evolutionary history. PMID:25561666

  18. LINE-1 retrotransposons: from 'parasite' sequences to functional elements.

    PubMed

    Paço, Ana; Adega, Filomena; Chaves, Raquel

    2015-02-01

    Long interspersed nuclear elements-1 (LINE-1) are the most abundant and active retrotransposons in the mammalian genomes. Traditionally, the occurrence of LINE-1 sequences in the genome of mammals has been explained by the selfish DNA hypothesis. Nevertheless, recently, it has also been argued that these sequences could play important roles in these genomes, as in the regulation of gene expression, genome modelling and X-chromosome inactivation. The non-random chromosomal distribution is a striking feature of these retroelements that somehow reflects its functionality. In the present study, we have isolated and analysed a fraction of the open reading frame 2 (ORF2) LINE-1 sequence from three rodent species, Cricetus cricetus, Peromyscus eremicus and Praomys tullbergi. Physical mapping of the isolated sequences revealed an interspersed longitudinal AT pattern of distribution along all the chromosomes of the complement in the three genomes. A detailed analysis shows that these sequences are preferentially located in the euchromatic regions, although some signals could be detected in the heterochromatin. In addition, a coincidence between the location of imprinted gene regions (as Xist and Tsix gene regions) and the LINE-1 retroelements was also observed. According to these results, we propose an involvement of LINE-1 sequences in different genomic events as gene imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation and evolution of repetitive sequences located at the heterochromatic regions (e.g. satellite DNA sequences) of the rodents' genomes analysed. PMID:25106509

  19. The Most Deeply Conserved Noncoding Sequences in Plants Serve Similar Functions to Those in Vertebrates Despite Large Differences in Evolutionary Rates[W

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Diane; Freeling, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In vertebrates, conserved noncoding elements (CNEs) are functionally constrained sequences that can show striking conservation over >400 million years of evolutionary distance and frequently are located megabases away from target developmental genes. Conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) in plants are much shorter, and it has been difficult to detect conservation among distantly related genomes. In this article, we show not only that CNS sequences can be detected throughout the eudicot clade of flowering plants, but also that a subset of 37 CNSs can be found in all flowering plants (diverging ∼170 million years ago). These CNSs are functionally similar to vertebrate CNEs, being highly associated with transcription factor and development genes and enriched in transcription factor binding sites. Some of the most highly conserved sequences occur in genes encoding RNA binding proteins, particularly the RNA splicing–associated SR genes. Differences in sequence conservation between plants and animals are likely to reflect differences in the biology of the organisms, with plants being much more able to tolerate genomic deletions and whole-genome duplication events due, in part, to their far greater fecundity compared with vertebrates. PMID:24681619

  20. The Splicing Factor U2AF Small Subunit Is Functionally Conserved between Fission Yeast and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Christopher J.; Wise, Jo Ann

    2004-01-01

    The small subunit of U2AF, which functions in 3′ splice site recognition, is more highly conserved than its heterodimeric partner yet is less thoroughly investigated. Remarkably, we find that the small subunit of Schizosaccharomyces pombe U2AF (U2AFSM) can be replaced in vivo by its human counterpart, demonstrating that the conservation extends to function. Precursor mRNAs accumulate in S. pombe following U2AFSM depletion in a time frame consistent with a role in splicing. A comprehensive mutational analysis reveals that all three conserved domains are required for viability. Notably, however, a tryptophan in the pseudo-RNA recognition motif implicated in a key contact with the large subunit by crystallographic data is dispensable whereas amino acids implicated in RNA recognition are critical. Mutagenesis of the two zinc-binding domains demonstrates that they are neither equivalent nor redundant. Finally, two- and three-hybrid analyses indicate that mutations with effects on large-subunit interactions are rare whereas virtually all alleles tested diminished RNA binding by the heterodimer. In addition to demonstrating extraordinary conservation of U2AF small-subunit function, these results provide new insights into the roles of individual domains and residues. PMID:15121844

  1. Expression and functional role of a transcribed noncoding RNA with an ultraconserved element in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Braconi, Chiara; Valeri, Nicola; Kogure, Takayuki; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Huang, Nianyuan; Nuovo, Gerard J; Terracciano, Luigi; Croce, Carlo M; Patel, Tushar

    2011-01-11

    Although expression of non-protein-coding RNA (ncRNA) can be altered in human cancers, their functional relevance is unknown. Ultraconserved regions are noncoding genomic segments that are 100% conserved across humans, mice, and rats. Conservation of gene sequences across species may indicate an essential functional role, and therefore we evaluated the expression of ultraconserved RNAs (ucRNA) in hepatocellular cancer (HCC). The global expression of ucRNAs was analyzed with a custom microarray. Expression was verified in cell lines by real-time PCR or in tissues by in situ hybridization using tissue microarrays. Cellular ucRNA expression was modulated with siRNAs, and the effects on global gene expression and growth of human and murine HCC cells were evaluated. Fifty-six ucRNAs were aberrantly expressed in HepG2 cells compared with nonmalignant hepatocytes. Among these ucRNAs, the greatest change was noted for ultraconserved element 338 (uc.338), which was dramatically increased in human HCC compared with noncancerous adjacent tissues. Although uc.338 is partially located within the poly(rC) binding protein 2 (PCBP2) gene, the transcribed ncRNA encoding uc.338 is expressed independently of PCBP2 and was cloned as a 590-bp RNA gene, termed TUC338. Functional gene annotation analysis indicated predominant effects on genes involved in cell growth. These effects were experimentally demonstrated in both human and murine cells. siRNA to TUC338 decreased both anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent growth of HCC cells. These studies identify a critical role for TUC338 in regulation of transformed cell growth and of transcribed ultraconserved ncRNA as a unique class of genes involved in the pathobiology of HCC. PMID:21187392

  2. Expression and functional role of a transcribed noncoding RNA with an ultraconserved element in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Braconi, Chiara; Valeri, Nicola; Kogure, Takayuki; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Huang, Nianyuan; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Terracciano, Luigi; Croce, Carlo M.; Patel, Tushar

    2011-01-01

    Although expression of non–protein-coding RNA (ncRNA) can be altered in human cancers, their functional relevance is unknown. Ultraconserved regions are noncoding genomic segments that are 100% conserved across humans, mice, and rats. Conservation of gene sequences across species may indicate an essential functional role, and therefore we evaluated the expression of ultraconserved RNAs (ucRNA) in hepatocellular cancer (HCC). The global expression of ucRNAs was analyzed with a custom microarray. Expression was verified in cell lines by real-time PCR or in tissues by in situ hybridization using tissue microarrays. Cellular ucRNA expression was modulated with siRNAs, and the effects on global gene expression and growth of human and murine HCC cells were evaluated. Fifty-six ucRNAs were aberrantly expressed in HepG2 cells compared with nonmalignant hepatocytes. Among these ucRNAs, the greatest change was noted for ultraconserved element 338 (uc.338), which was dramatically increased in human HCC compared with noncancerous adjacent tissues. Although uc.338 is partially located within the poly(rC) binding protein 2 (PCBP2) gene, the transcribed ncRNA encoding uc.338 is expressed independently of PCBP2 and was cloned as a 590-bp RNA gene, termed TUC338. Functional gene annotation analysis indicated predominant effects on genes involved in cell growth. These effects were experimentally demonstrated in both human and murine cells. siRNA to TUC338 decreased both anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent growth of HCC cells. These studies identify a critical role for TUC338 in regulation of transformed cell growth and of transcribed ultraconserved ncRNA as a unique class of genes involved in the pathobiology of HCC. PMID:21187392

  3. Evaluation of IRX Genes and Conserved Noncoding Elements in a Region on 5p13.3 Linked to Families with Familial Idiopathic Scoliosis and Kyphosis

    PubMed Central

    Justice, Cristina M.; Bishop, Kevin; Carrington, Blake; Mullikin, Jim C.; Swindle, Kandice; Marosy, Beth; Sood, Raman; Miller, Nancy H.; Wilson, Alexander F.

    2016-01-01

    Because of genetic heterogeneity present in idiopathic scoliosis, we previously defined clinical subsets (a priori) from a sample of families with idiopathic scoliosis to find genes involved with spinal curvature. Previous genome-wide linkage analysis of seven families with at least two individuals with kyphoscoliosis found linkage (P-value = 0.002) in a 3.5-Mb region on 5p13.3 containing only three known genes, IRX1, IRX2, and IRX4. In this study, the exons of IRX1, IRX2, and IRX4, the conserved noncoding elements in the region, and the exons of a nonprotein coding RNA, LOC285577, were sequenced. No functional sequence variants were identified. An intrafamilial test of association found several associated noncoding single nucleotide variants. The strongest association was with rs12517904 (P = 0.00004), located 6.5 kb downstream from IRX1. In one family, the genotypes of nine variants differed from the reference allele in all individuals with kyphoscoliosis, and two of three individuals with scoliosis, but did not differ from the reference allele in all other genotyped individuals. One of these variants, rs117273909, was located in a conserved noncoding region that functions as an enhancer in mice. To test whether the variant allele at rs117273909 had an effect on enhancer activity, zebrafish transgenesis was performed with overlapping fragments of 198 and 687 bp containing either the wild type or the variant allele. Our data suggests that this region acts as a regulatory element; however, its size and target gene(s) need to be identified to determine its role in idiopathic scoliosis. PMID:27172222

  4. Evaluation of IRX Genes and Conserved Noncoding Elements in a Region on 5p13.3 Linked to Families with Familial Idiopathic Scoliosis and Kyphosis.

    PubMed

    Justice, Cristina M; Bishop, Kevin; Carrington, Blake; Mullikin, Jim C; Swindle, Kandice; Marosy, Beth; Sood, Raman; Miller, Nancy H; Wilson, Alexander F

    2016-01-01

    Because of genetic heterogeneity present in idiopathic scoliosis, we previously defined clinical subsets (a priori) from a sample of families with idiopathic scoliosis to find genes involved with spinal curvature. Previous genome-wide linkage analysis of seven families with at least two individuals with kyphoscoliosis found linkage (P-value = 0.002) in a 3.5-Mb region on 5p13.3 containing only three known genes, IRX1, IRX2, and IRX4 In this study, the exons of IRX1, IRX2, and IRX4, the conserved noncoding elements in the region, and the exons of a nonprotein coding RNA, LOC285577, were sequenced. No functional sequence variants were identified. An intrafamilial test of association found several associated noncoding single nucleotide variants. The strongest association was with rs12517904 (P = 0.00004), located 6.5 kb downstream from IRX1 In one family, the genotypes of nine variants differed from the reference allele in all individuals with kyphoscoliosis, and two of three individuals with scoliosis, but did not differ from the reference allele in all other genotyped individuals. One of these variants, rs117273909, was located in a conserved noncoding region that functions as an enhancer in mice. To test whether the variant allele at rs117273909 had an effect on enhancer activity, zebrafish transgenesis was performed with overlapping fragments of 198 and 687 bp containing either the wild type or the variant allele. Our data suggests that this region acts as a regulatory element; however, its size and target gene(s) need to be identified to determine its role in idiopathic scoliosis. PMID:27172222

  5. Structural and biophysical characterization of Staphylococcus aureus SaMazF shows conservation of functional dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zorzini, Valentina; Buts, Lieven; Sleutel, Mike; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Talavera, Ariel; Haesaerts, Sarah; De Greve, Henri; Cheung, Ambrose; van Nuland, Nico A J; Loris, Remy

    2014-06-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus genome contains three toxin-antitoxin modules, including one mazEF module, SamazEF. Using an on-column separation protocol we are able to obtain large amounts of wild-type SaMazF toxin. The protein is well-folded and highly resistant against thermal unfolding but aggregates at elevated temperatures. Crystallographic and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) solution studies show a well-defined dimer. Differences in structure and dynamics between the X-ray and NMR structural ensembles are found in three loop regions, two of which undergo motions that are of functional relevance. The same segments also show functionally relevant dynamics in the distantly related CcdB family despite divergence of function. NMR chemical shift mapping and analysis of residue conservation in the MazF family suggests a conserved mode for the inhibition of MazF by MazE. PMID:24748664

  6. Structural and biophysical characterization of Staphylococcus aureus SaMazF shows conservation of functional dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zorzini, Valentina; Buts, Lieven; Sleutel, Mike; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Talavera, Ariel; Haesaerts, Sarah; Greve, Henri De; Cheung, Ambrose; van Nuland, Nico A. J.; Loris, Remy

    2014-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus genome contains three toxin–antitoxin modules, including one mazEF module, SamazEF. Using an on-column separation protocol we are able to obtain large amounts of wild-type SaMazF toxin. The protein is well-folded and highly resistant against thermal unfolding but aggregates at elevated temperatures. Crystallographic and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) solution studies show a well-defined dimer. Differences in structure and dynamics between the X-ray and NMR structural ensembles are found in three loop regions, two of which undergo motions that are of functional relevance. The same segments also show functionally relevant dynamics in the distantly related CcdB family despite divergence of function. NMR chemical shift mapping and analysis of residue conservation in the MazF family suggests a conserved mode for the inhibition of MazF by MazE. PMID:24748664

  7. Systems biology approach reveals possible evolutionarily conserved moonlighting functions for enolase.

    PubMed

    Paludo, Gabriela Prado; Lorenzatto, Karina Rodrigues; Bonatto, Diego; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2015-10-01

    Glycolytic enzymes, such as enolase, have been described as multifunctional complex proteins that also display non-glycolytic activities, termed moonlighting functions. Although enolase multifunctionality has been described for several organisms, the conservation of enolase alternative functions through different phyla has not been explored with more details. A useful strategy to investigate moonlighting functions is the use of systems biology tools, which allow the prediction of protein functions/interactions by graph design and analysis. In this work, available information from protein-protein interaction (PPI) databases were used to design enolase PPI networks for four eukaryotic organisms, namely Homo sapiens, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, covering a wide spectrum of this domain of life. PPI networks with number of nodes ranging from 140 to 411 and up to 15,855 connections were generated, and modularity and centrality analyses, and functional enrichment were performed for all of them. The performed analyses showed that enolase is a central node within the networks, and that, in addition to its canonical interactions with proteins related to glycolysis and energetic metabolism, it is also part of protein clusters related to different biological processes, like transcription, development, and apoptosis, among others. Some of these non-glycolytic clusters, are partially conserved between networks, in terms of overall sharing of orthologs, overall cluster structure, and/or at the levels of key regulatory proteins within clusters. Overall, our results provided evidences of enolase multifunctionality and evolutionary conservation of enolase PPIs at all these levels. PMID:25978602

  8. Intracisternal A-particle genes in Mus musculus: A conserved family of retrovirus-like elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kuff, E.L.; Smith, L.A.; Lueders, K.K.

    1981-03-01

    The structural organization of intracisternal A-particle genes has been studied, using isolates from a mouse gene library in lambda phage Charon 4A. The predominant gene form among the isolates was 7.3 kilobases (kb) in length. R-loops between the 7-kb (35S) A-particle genomic ribonucleic acid and several of these genes were colinear, with no visible evidence of intervening deoxyribonucleic acid sequences. Restriction endonuclease fragments encompassing the 5' and 3' regions of one 7.3b gene were separately subcloned into pBR322. Heteroduplexes between the two subclones revealed an approximately 300-base pair segment of terminally redundant sequences. The cloned 3' fragment hybridized with restriction fragments from the 5' end of several other A-particle genes, demonstrating the presence of common (though not necessarily identical) terminally repeated sequences. The relative abundance of restriction site variants was highly conserved in 12 laboratory strains of Mus musculus, in embryonic and adult tissues of a single inbred strain, and in the SC-1 cell line of feral mouse origin, but appeared to differ in a feral Japanese substrain, Mus musculus molossinus. Some evidence suggests that subsets of A-particle genes may have similar flanking sequences. The results are discussed in terms of the evolution of this multigene family.

  9. Quantitative and Functional Characterization of the Hyper-Conserved Protein of Prochlorococcus and Marine Synechococcus

    PubMed Central

    Zorz, Jackie K.; Joy, Andrew P.; Barnett, David A.; Johnson, Milo S.; Zhaxybayeva, Olga; Cockshutt, Amanda M.

    2014-01-01

    A large fraction of any bacterial genome consists of hypothetical protein-coding open reading frames (ORFs). While most of these ORFs are present only in one or a few sequenced genomes, a few are conserved, often across large phylogenetic distances. Such conservation provides clues to likely uncharacterized cellular functions that need to be elucidated. Marine cyanobacteria from the Prochlorococcus/marine Synechococcus clade are dominant bacteria in oceanic waters and are significant contributors to global primary production. A Hyper Conserved Protein (PSHCP) of unknown function is 100% conserved at the amino acid level in genomes of Prochlorococcus/marine Synechococcus, but lacks homologs outside of this clade. In this study we investigated Prochlorococcus marinus strains MED4 and MIT 9313 and Synechococcus sp. strain WH 8102 for the transcription of the PSHCP gene using RT-Q-PCR, for the presence of the protein product through quantitative immunoblotting, and for the protein's binding partners in a pull down assay. Significant transcription of the gene was detected in all strains. The PSHCP protein content varied between 8±1 fmol and 26±9 fmol per ug total protein, depending on the strain. The 50 S ribosomal protein L2, the Photosystem I protein PsaD and the Ycf48-like protein were found associated with the PSHCP protein in all strains and not appreciably or at all in control experiments. We hypothesize that PSHCP is a protein associated with the ribosome, and is possibly involved in photosystem assembly. PMID:25360678

  10. Detecting the limits of regulatory element conservation anddivergence estimation using pairwise and multiple alignments

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, Daniel A.; Moses, Alan M.; Iyer, Venky N.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2006-08-14

    Background: Molecular evolutionary studies of noncodingsequences rely on multiple alignments. Yet how multiple alignmentaccuracy varies across sequence types, tree topologies, divergences andtools, and further how this variation impacts specific inferences,remains unclear. Results: Here we develop a molecular evolutionsimulation platform, CisEvolver, with models of background noncoding andtranscription factor binding site evolution, and use simulated alignmentsto systematically examine multiple alignment accuracy and its impact ontwo key molecular evolutionary inferences: transcription factor bindingsite conservation and divergence estimation. We find that the accuracy ofmultiple alignments is determined almost exclusively by the pairwisedivergence distance of the two most diverged species and that additionalspecies have a negligible influence on alignment accuracy. Conservedtranscription factor binding sites align better than surroundingnoncoding DNA yet are often found to be misaligned at relatively shortdivergence distances, such that studies of binding site gain and losscould easily be confounded by alignment error. Divergence estimates frommultiple alignments tend to be overestimated at short divergencedistances but reach a tool specific divergence at which they cease toincrease, leading to underestimation at long divergences. Our moststriking finding was that overall alignment accuracy, binding sitealignment accuracy and divergence estimation accuracy vary greatly acrossbranches in a tree and are most accurate for terminal branches connectingsister taxa and least accurate for internal branches connectingsub-alignments. Conclusions: Our results suggest that variation inalignment accuracy can lead to errors in molecular evolutionaryinferences that could be construed as biological variation. Thesefindings have implications for which species to choose for analyses, whatkind of errors would be expected for a given set of species and howmultiple alignment tools and

  11. Divergent and Conserved Elements Comprise the Chemoreceptive Repertoire of the Nonblood-Feeding Mosquito Toxorhynchites amboinensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaofan; Rinker, David C.; Pitts, Ronald Jason; Rokas, Antonis; Zwiebel, Laurence J.

    2014-01-01

    Many mosquito species serve as vectors of diseases such as malaria and yellow fever, wherein pathogen transmission is tightly associated with the reproductive requirement of taking vertebrate blood meals. Toxorhynchites is one of only three known mosquito genera that does not host-seek and initiates egg development in the absence of a blood-derived protein bolus. These remarkable differences make Toxorhynchites an attractive comparative reference for understanding mosquito chemosensation as it pertains to host-seeking. We performed deep transcriptome profiling of adult female Toxorhynchites amboinensis bodies, antennae and maxillary palps, and identified 25,084 protein-coding “genes” in the de novo assembly. Phylogenomic analysis of 4,266 single-copy “genes” from T. amboinensis, Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae, and Culex quinquefasciatus robustly supported Ae. aegypti as the closest relative of T. amboinensis, with the two species diverged approximately 40 Ma. We identified a large number of T. amboinensis chemosensory “genes,” the majority of which have orthologs in other mosquitoes. Finally, cross-species expression analyses indicated that patterns of chemoreceptor transcript abundance were very similar for chemoreceptors that are conserved between T. amboinensis and Ae. aegypti, whereas T. amboinensis appeared deficient in the variety of expressed, lineage-specific chemoreceptors. Our transcriptome assembly of T. amboinensis represents the first comprehensive genomic resource for a nonblood-feeding mosquito and establishes a foundation for future comparative studies of blood-feeding and nonblood-feeding mosquitoes. We hypothesize that chemosensory genes that display discrete patterns of evolution and abundance between T. amboinensis and blood-feeding mosquitoes are likely to play critical roles in host-seeking and hence the vectorial capacity. PMID:25326137

  12. Nicotinic receptors in non-human primates: analysis of genetic and functional conservation with humans

    PubMed Central

    Shorey-Kendrick, Lyndsey E.; Ford, Matthew M.; Allen, Daicia C.; Kuryatov, Alexander; Lindstrom, Jon; Wilhelm, Larry; Grant, Kathleen A.; Spindel, Eliot R.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are highly conserved between humans and non-human primates. Conservation exists at the level of genomic structure, protein structure and epigenetics. Overall homology of nAChRs at the protein level is 98% in macaques versus 89% in mice, which is highly relevant for evaluating subtype-specific ligands that have different affinities in humans versus rodents. In addition to conservation at the protein level, there is high conservation of genomic structure in terms of intron and exon size and placement of CpG sites that play a key role in epigenetic regulation. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) shows that while the majority of SNPs are not conserved between humans and macaques, some functional polymorphisms are. Most significantly, cynomolgus monkeys express a similar α5 nAChR Asp398Asn polymorphism to the human α5 Asp398Asn polymorphism that has been linked to greater nicotine addiction and smoking related disease. Monkeys can be trained to readily self-administer nicotine, and in an initial study we have demonstrated that cynomolgus monkeys bearing the α5 D398N polymorphism show a reduced behavioral sensitivity to oral nicotine and tend to consume it in a different pattern when compared to wild-type monkeys. Thus the combination of highly homologous nAChR, higher cortical functions and capacity for complex training makes non-human primates a unique model to study in vivo functions of nicotinic receptors. In particular, primate studies on nicotine addiction and evaluation of therapies to prevent or overcome nicotine addiction are likely to be highly predictive of treatment outcomes in humans. PMID:25661700

  13. Concentrations of Elements in Hellbender Blood and Fish Fillets from the Missouri Department of Conservation Monitoring Programs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Mike J.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the results of contaminant monitoring surveys conducted annually by the Missouri Department of Conservation to examine the levels of selected elemental contaminants in hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis) blood and fish. Catfish (Ictalurus furcatus, Ictalurus punctatus, Pylodictis olivaris), redhorse (Moxostoma anisorum, Moxostoma erythrurum), bass (Micropterus salmoides, Micropterus punctulatus, Micropterus Lacepede, Ambloplites rupestris), walleye (Sander vitreus), and sunfish (Lepomis megalotis) were collected from 17 sites as part of the Department's General Contaminant Monitoring Program. Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and other sunfish (Lepomis megalotis, Lepomis cyanellus) were collected from 18 sites as part of the Department's Resource Assessment and Monitoring Program. Blood from hellbenders was collected from seven sites as part of the Department's Hellbender Monitoring Program.

  14. Proton stopping using a full conserving dielectric function in plasmas at any degeneracy

    SciTech Connect

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D.

    2010-10-15

    In this work, we present a dielectric function including the three conservation laws (density, momentum and energy) when we take into account electron-electron collisions in a plasma at any degeneracy. This full conserving dielectric function (FCDF) reproduces the random phase approximation (RPA) and Mermin ones, which confirms this outcome. The FCDF is applied to the determination of the proton stopping power. Differences among diverse dielectric functions in the proton stopping calculation are minimal if the plasma electron collision frequency is not high enough. These discrepancies can rise up to 2% between RPA values and the FCDF ones, and to 8% between the Mermin ones and FCDF ones. The similarity between RPA and FCDF results is not surprising, as all conservation laws are also considered in RPA dielectric function. Even for plasmas with low collision frequencies, those discrepancies follow the same behavior as for plasmas with higher frequencies. Then, discrepancies do not depend on the plasma degeneracy but essentially do on the value of the plasma collision frequency.

  15. Conservation of the primary structure, organization, and function of the human and mouse beta-globin locus-activating regions.

    PubMed Central

    Moon, A M; Ley, T J

    1990-01-01

    DNA sequences located in a region 6-18 kilobases (kb) upstream from the human epsilon-globin gene are known as the locus-activating region (LAR) or dominant control region. This region is thought to play a key role in chromatin organization of the beta-like globin gene cluster during erythroid development. The beta-globin LAR activates linked globin genes in transiently or stably transfected erythroleukemia cells and in erythroid cells of transgenic mice. Since the human beta-globin LAR is functional in mice, we reasoned that critical LAR sequence elements might be conserved between mice and humans. We therefore cloned murine genomic sequences homologous to one portion of the human LAR (site II, positions -11,054 to -10,322 with respect to the human epsilon gene). We found that this murine DNA fragment (mouse LAR site II) and sequences homologous to human LAR sites I and III are located upstream from the mouse beta-like globin gene cluster and determined that their locations relative to the cluster are similar to that of their human counterparts. The homologous site II sequences are 70% identical between mice and humans over a stretch of approximately 800 base pairs. Multiple core sequences with greater than 80% identity were present within this region. Transient and stable transfection assays of K562 erythroleukemia cells demonstrated that both human and mouse LAR elements contain enhancer activity and confer hemin inducibility on a linked human gamma-globin promoter. These results suggest that primary structural elements--and the spatial organization of these elements--are important for function of the beta-globin LAR. Images PMID:2217202

  16. FSHB promoter polymorphism within evolutionary conserved element is associated with serum FSH level in men

    PubMed Central

    Grigorova, Marina; Punab, Margus; Ausmees, Kristo; Laan, Maris

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND No polymorphisms affecting serum FSH levels have been described in the human FSHB gene. We have identified a potential regulatory single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs10835638; G/T) 211 bp upstream from the FSHB mRNA transcription start-site, located within a highly conserved region among placental mammals. We aimed to determine the correlation of carrier status of rs10835638 alternative alleles with serum FSH level in men, and testicular and hormonal parameters. METHODS A quantitative genetic association study using a cohort of healthy men (n = 554; age 19.2 ± 1.7 years) visiting the Centre of Andrology, Tartu University Hospital, Estonia. RESULTS Rs10835638 (allele frequencies: G 87.6%, T 12.4%) was significantly associated with serum FSH level (analysis of variance: F = 13.0, P = 0.0016, df = 1; regression testing for a linear trend: P = 0.0003). Subjects with the GG genotype exhibited higher FSH levels (3.37 ± 1.79 IU/l, n = 423) compared with heterozygotes (2.84 ± 1.54 IU/l, n = 125) (P = 0.0005), the group of T-allele carriers (GT+TT, 2.78 ± 1.51 IU/l, n = 131) (P = 0.0005) and TT-homozygotes (2.02 ± 0.81 IU/L, n = 6) (P = 0.031). Rs10835638 was also associated with significant (P < 0.05) reduction in free testosterone index and testes volume, but increased semen volume, sex hormone-binding globulin, serum testosterone and estradiol. LH and inhibin-B levels did not differ significantly between groups. CONCLUSIONS The identification of a regulatory SNP in FSHB promoter paves the way to study the effect of constitutively low FSH on male health and fertility. As FSH contributes to follicular development and sex steroid production in women, the role of this FSHB variant in female reproductive success is still to be addressed. PMID:18567894

  17. The five elements process: designing optimal landscapes to meet bird conservation objectives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Will, T.C.; Ruth, J.M.; Rosenberg, K.V.; Krueper, D.; Hahn, D.; Fitzgerald, J.; Dettmers, R.; Beardmore, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    In February 2004 at Port Aransas, Texas, Partners in Flight (PIF) and representatives from the other NABCI bird initiative met to discuss the process of stepping down PIF continental population objectives (Rich et al. 2004) to regional and local scales. Participants also discussed rolling up local population estimates and targets to assess the feasibility of the landscape changes necessary to meet continental objectives. Since the process of stepping-down/rolling-up population objectives shifts focus from identifying priority species to formulating quantitative estimates of how much habitat was needed, where, and by when the Port Aransas group called the stepping-down/rolling-up process a??stepping forward.a?? Participants agreed that stepping forward objectives was the beginning of an inevitably iterative dialog necessary to evaluate the assumptions of PIF population estimates and objectives as well as the methods used to monitor local implementation. To facilitate the translation of continental population objectives into biologically sound, measurable regional and local population-based habitat targets the Port Aransas group recommended a process no commonly referred to as the Five Elements Processa?|

  18. A Recent Adaptive Transposable Element Insertion Near Highly Conserved Developmental Loci in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    González, Josefa; Macpherson, J. Michael; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2009-01-01

    A recent genomewide screen identified 13 transposable elements that are likely to have been adaptive during or after the spread of Drosophila melanogaster out of Africa. One of these insertions, Bari-Juvenile hormone epoxy hydrolase (Bari-Jheh), was associated with the selective sweep of its flanking neutral variation and with reduction of expression of one of its neighboring genes: Jheh3. Here, we provide further evidence that Bari-Jheh insertion is adaptive. We delimit the extent of the selective sweep and show that Bari-Jheh is the only mutation linked to the sweep. Bari-Jheh also lowers the expression of its other flanking gene, Jheh2. Subtle consequences of Bari-Jheh insertion on life-history traits are consistent with the effects of reduced expression of the Jheh genes. Finally, we analyze molecular evolution of Jheh genes in both the long- and the short-term and conclude that Bari-Jheh appears to be a very rare adaptive event in the history of these genes. We discuss the implications of these findings for the detection and understanding of adaptation. PMID:19458110

  19. CPhos: a program to calculate and visualize evolutionarily conserved functional phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Boyang; Pisitkun, Trairak; Hoffert, Jason D; Knepper, Mark A; Saeed, Fahad

    2012-11-01

    Profiling using high-throughput MS has discovered an overwhelming number of novel protein phosphorylation sites ("phosphosites"). However, the functional relevance of these sites is not always clear. In light of recent studies on the evolutionary mechanism of phosphorylation, we have developed CPhos, a Java program that can assess the conservation of phosphosites among species using an information theory-based approach. The degree of conservation established using CPhos can be used to assess the functional significance of phosphosites. CPhos has a user friendly graphical user interface and is available both as a web service and as a standalone Java application to assist phosphoproteomic researchers in analyzing and prioritizing lists of phosphosites for further experimental validation. CPhos can be accessed or downloaded at http://helixweb.nih.gov/CPhos/. PMID:23001821

  20. A kinetic equation with kinetic entropy functions for scalar conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perthame, Benoit; Tadmor, Eitan

    1990-01-01

    A nonlinear kinetic equation is constructed and proved to be well-adapted to describe general multidimensional scalar conservation laws. In particular, it is proved to be well-posed uniformly in epsilon - the microscopic scale. It is also shown that the proposed kinetic equation is equipped with a family of kinetic entropy functions - analogous to Boltzmann's microscopic H-function, such that they recover Krushkov-type entropy inequality on the macroscopic scale. Finally, it is proved by both - BV compactness arguments in the one-dimensional case, that the local density of kinetic particles admits a continuum limit, as it converges strongly with epsilon below 0 to the unique entropy solution of the corresponding conservation law.

  1. Prioritizing conservation effort through the use of biological soil crusts as ecosystem function indicators in an arid region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, M.A.; Miller, M.E.; Belnap, J.; Sisk, T.D.; Johnson, N.C.

    2008-01-01

    Conservation prioritization usually focuses on conservation of rare species or biodiversity, rather than ecological processes. This is partially due to a lack of informative indicators of ecosystem function. Biological soil crusts (BSCs) trap and retain soil and water resources in arid ecosystems and function as major carbon and nitrogen fixers; thus, they may be informative indicators of ecosystem function. We created spatial models of multiple indicators of the diversity and function of BSCs (species richness, evenness, functional diversity, functional redundancy, number of rare species, number of habitat specialists, nitrogen and carbon fixation indices, soil stabilization, and surface roughening) for the 800,000-ha Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument (Utah, U.S.A.). We then combined the indicators into a single BSC function map and a single BSC biodiversity map (2 alternative types of conservation value) with an unweighted averaging procedure and a weighted procedure derived from validations performance. We also modeled potential degradation with data from a rangeland assessment survey. To determine which areas on the landscape were the highest conservation priorities, we overlaid the function- and diversity-based conservation-value layers on the potential degradation layer. Different methods for ascribing conservation-value and conservation-priority layers all yielded strikingly similar results (r = 0.89-0.99), which suggests that in this case biodiversity and function can be conserved simultaneously. We believe BSCs can be used as indicators of ecosystem function in concert with other indicators (such as plant-community properties) and that such information can be used to prioritize conservation effort in drylands. ?? 2008 Society for Conservation Biology.

  2. Conservation of CFTR codon frequency through primates suggests synonymous mutations could have a functional effect.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Lucilla; Iriarte, Andrés; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando; Marín, Mónica

    2015-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited chronic disease that affects the lungs and digestive system, with a prevalence of about 1:3000 people. Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in CFTR gene, which lead to a defective function of the chloride channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Up-to-date, more than 1900 mutations have been reported in CFTR. However for an important proportion of them, their functional effects and the relation to disease are still not understood. Many of these mutations are silent (or synonymous), namely they do not alter the encoded amino acid. These synonymous mutations have been considered as neutral to protein function. However, more recent evidence in bacterial and human proteins has put this concept under revision. With the aim of understanding possible functional effects of synonymous mutations in CFTR, we analyzed human and primates CFTR codon usage and divergence patterns. We report the presence of regions enriched in rare and frequent codons. This spatial pattern of codon preferences is conserved in primates, but this cannot be explained by sequence conservation alone. In sum, the results presented herein suggest a functional implication of these regions of the gene that may be maintained by purifying selection acting to preserve a particular codon usage pattern along the sequence. Overall these results support the idea that several synonymous mutations in CFTR may have functional importance, and could be involved in the disease. PMID:25839760

  3. Conserving approximations for response functions of the Fermi gas in a random potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiš, Václav; Kolorenč, Jindřich

    2016-07-01

    One- and two-electron Green functions are simultaneously needed to determine the response functions of the electron gas in a random potential. Reliable approximations must retain consistency between the two types of Green functions expressed via Ward identities so that their output is compliant with macroscopic symmetries and conservation laws. Such a consistency is not directly guaranteed when summing nonlocal corrections to the local (dynamical) mean field. We analyze the reasons for this failure and show how the full Ward identity can generically be implemented in the diagrammatic approach to the vertex functions without breaking the analytic properties of the self-energy. We use the low-energy asymptotics of the conserving two-particle vertex determining the singular part of response and correlation functions to derive an exact representation of the diffusion constant in terms of Green functions of the perturbation theory. We then calculate explicitly the leading vertex corrections to the mean-field diffusion constant due to maximally-crossed diagrams.

  4. Functional analysis of conserved residues in the putative "finger" domain of telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Bosoy, D; Lue, N F

    2001-12-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase (RT) responsible for the maintenance of one strand of telomere terminal repeats. The catalytic protein subunit of telomerase, known generically as telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), exhibits significant homology to RTs encoded by retroviruses and retroelements. The polymerization mechanisms of telomerase may therefore be similar to those of the "conventional" RTs. In this study, we explored the extent of mechanistic conservation by analyzing mutations of conserved residues within the putative "finger" domain of TERT. Previous analysis has implicated this domain of retroviral RTs in nucleotide and RNA binding and in processivity control. Our results demonstrate that residues conserved between TERT and human immunodeficiency virus-1 RT are more likely than TERT-specific residues to be required for enzyme activity. In addition, residues presumed to make direct contact with either the RNA or nucleotide substrate appear to be functionally more important. Furthermore, distinct biochemical defects can be observed for alterations in the putative RNA- and nucleotide-binding TERT residues in a manner that can be rationalized by their postulated mechanisms of action. This study thus supports a high degree of mechanistic conservation between telomerase and retroviral RTs and underscores the roles of distinct aspects of telomerase biochemistry in telomere length maintenance. PMID:11581271

  5. New developments in the method of space-time conservation element and solution element: Applications to the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung

    1993-01-01

    A new numerical framework for solving conservation laws is being developed. This new approach differs substantially in both concept and methodology from the well-established methods--i.e., finite difference, finite volume, finite element, and spectral methods. It is conceptually simple and designed to avoid several key limitations to the above traditional methods. An explicit model scheme for solving a simple 1-D unsteady convection-diffusion equation is constructed and used to illuminate major differences between the current method and those mentioned above. Unexpectedly, its amplification factors for the pure convection and pure diffusion cases are identical to those of the Leapfrog and the DuFort-Frankel schemes, respectively. Also, this explicit scheme and its Navier-Stokes extension have the unusual property that their stabilities are limited only by the CFL condition. Moreover, despite the fact that it does not use any flux-limiter or slope-limiter, the Navier-Stokes solver is capable of generating highly accurate shock tube solutions with shock discontinuities being resolved within one mesh interval. An accurate Euler solver also is constructed through another extension. It has many unusual properties, e.g., numerical diffusion at all mesh points can be controlled by a set of local parameters.

  6. The roles of evolutionarily conserved functional modules in cilia-related trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Ching-Hwa; Leroux, Michel R.

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are present across most eukaryotic phyla and have diverse sensory and motility roles in animal physiology, cell signalling and development. Their biogenesis and maintenance depend on vesicular and intraciliary (intraflagellar) trafficking pathways that share conserved structural and functional modules. The functional units of the interconnected pathways, which include proteins involved in membrane coating as well as small GTPases and their accessory factors, were first experimentally associated with canonical vesicular trafficking. These components are, however, ancient, having been co-opted by the ancestral eukaryote to establish the ciliary organelle, and their study can inform us about ciliary biology in higher organisms. PMID:24296415

  7. Structural and functional analysis of hypothetical and conserved proteins of Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Enany, Shymaa

    2014-01-01

    The progress in biological technologies has led to rapid accumulation of microbial genomic sequences with a vast number of uncharacterized genes. Proteins encoded by these genes are usually uncharacterized, hypothetical, and/or conserved. In Clostridium tetani (C. tetani), these proteins constitute up to 50% of the expressed proteins. In this regard, understanding the functions and the structures of these proteins is crucially important, particularly in C. tetani, which is a medically important pathogen. Here, we used a variety of bioinformatics tools and databases to analyze 10 hypothetical and conserved proteins in C. tetani. We were able to provide a detailed overview of the functional contributions of some of these proteins in several cellular functions, including (1) evolving antibiotic resistance, (2) interaction with enzymes pathways, and (3) involvement in drug transportation. Among these candidates, we postulated the involvement of one of these hypothetical proteins in the pathogenic activity of tetanus. The structural and functional prediction of these proteins should serve in uncovering and better understanding the function of C. tetani cells to ultimately discover new possible drug targets. PMID:24802661

  8. Functional Advantages of Conserved Intrinsic Disorder in RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varadi, Mihaly; Zsolyomi, Fruzsina; Guharoy, Mainak; Tompa, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Proteins form large macromolecular assemblies with RNA that govern essential molecular processes. RNA-binding proteins have often been associated with conformational flexibility, yet the extent and functional implications of their intrinsic disorder have never been fully assessed. Here, through large-scale analysis of comprehensive protein sequence and structure datasets we demonstrate the prevalence of intrinsic structural disorder in RNA-binding proteins and domains. We addressed their functionality through a quantitative description of the evolutionary conservation of disordered segments involved in binding, and investigated the structural implications of flexibility in terms of conformational stability and interface formation. We conclude that the functional role of intrinsically disordered protein segments in RNA-binding is two-fold: first, these regions establish extended, conserved electrostatic interfaces with RNAs via induced fit. Second, conformational flexibility enables them to target different RNA partners, providing multi-functionality, while also ensuring specificity. These findings emphasize the functional importance of intrinsically disordered regions in RNA-binding proteins. PMID:26439842

  9. Correlation functions of main-chain polymer nematics constrained by tensorial and vectorial conservation laws.

    PubMed

    Svenšek, Daniel; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-09-21

    We present and analyze correlation functions of a main-chain polymer nematic in a continuum worm-like chain description for two types of constraints formalized by the tensorial and vectorial conservation laws, both originating in the microscopic chain integrity, i.e., the connectivity of the polymer chains. In particular, our aim is to identify the features of the correlation functions that are most susceptible to the differences between the two constraints. Besides the density and director autocorrelations in both the tensorial and vectorial cases, we calculate also the density-director correlation functions, the latter being a direct signature of the presence of a specific constraint. Its amplitude is connected to the strength of the constraint and is zero if none of the constraints are present, i.e., for a standard non-polymeric nematic. Generally, the correlation functions with the constraints differ substantially from the correlation functions in the non-polymeric case, if the constraints are strong which in practice requires long chains. Moreover, for the tensorial conservation law to be well distinguishable from the vectorial one, the chain persistence length should be much smaller than the total length of the chain, so that hairpins (chain backfolding) are numerous and the polar order is small. PMID:26395733

  10. Correlation functions of main-chain polymer nematics constrained by tensorial and vectorial conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenšek, Daniel; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-09-01

    We present and analyze correlation functions of a main-chain polymer nematic in a continuum worm-like chain description for two types of constraints formalized by the tensorial and vectorial conservation laws, both originating in the microscopic chain integrity, i.e., the connectivity of the polymer chains. In particular, our aim is to identify the features of the correlation functions that are most susceptible to the differences between the two constraints. Besides the density and director autocorrelations in both the tensorial and vectorial cases, we calculate also the density-director correlation functions, the latter being a direct signature of the presence of a specific constraint. Its amplitude is connected to the strength of the constraint and is zero if none of the constraints are present, i.e., for a standard non-polymeric nematic. Generally, the correlation functions with the constraints differ substantially from the correlation functions in the non-polymeric case, if the constraints are strong which in practice requires long chains. Moreover, for the tensorial conservation law to be well distinguishable from the vectorial one, the chain persistence length should be much smaller than the total length of the chain, so that hairpins (chain backfolding) are numerous and the polar order is small.

  11. Functional phosphorylation sites in cardiac myofilament proteins are evolutionarily conserved in skeletal myofilament proteins.

    PubMed

    Gross, Sean M; Lehman, Steven L

    2016-06-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating cardiac contractile function, but phosphorylation is not thought to play a regulatory role in skeletal muscle. To examine how myofilament phosphorylation arose in the human heart, we analyzed the amino acid sequences of 25 cardiac phosphorylation sites in animals ranging from fruit flies to humans. These analyses indicated that of the 25 human phosphorylation sites examined, 11 have been conserved across vertebrates and four have been sporadically present in vertebrates. Furthermore, all 11 of the cardiac sites found across vertebrates were present in skeletal muscle isoforms, along with three sites that were sporadically present. Based on the conservation of amino acid sequences between cardiac and skeletal contractile proteins, we tested for phosphorylation in mammalian skeletal muscle using several biochemical techniques and found evidence that multiple myofilament proteins were phosphorylated. Several of these phosphorylation sites were validated using mass spectrometry, including one site that is present in slow- and fast-twitch troponin I (TnI), but was lost in cardiac TnI. Thus, several myofilament phosphorylation sites present in the human heart likely arose in invertebrate muscle, have been evolutionarily conserved in skeletal muscle, and potentially have functional effects in both skeletal and cardiac muscle. PMID:26993364

  12. Evolutionary conservation of physical and functional interactions between phospholipase D and actin.

    PubMed

    Kusner, David J; Barton, James A; Qin, Chunbo; Wang, Xuemin; Iyer, Shankar S

    2003-04-15

    Phospholipase D (PLD) enzymes from bacteria to mammals exhibit a highly conserved core structure and catalytic mechanism, but whether protein-protein interactions exhibit similar commonality is unknown. Our objective was to determine whether the physical and functional interactions of mammalian PLDs with actin are evolutionarily conserved among bacterial and plant PLDs. Highly purified bacterial and plant PLDs cosedimented with mammalian skeletal muscle alpha-actin, indicating direct interaction with F-actin. The binding of bacterial PLD to G-actin exhibited two affinity states, with dissociation constants of 1.13 pM and 0.58 microM. The effects of actin on the activities of bacterial and plant PLDs were polymerization dependent; monomeric G-actin inhibited PLD activity, whereas polymerized F-actin augmented PLD activity. Actin modulation of bacterial and plant PLDs demonstrated kinetic characteristics, efficacies, and potencies similar to those of human PLD1. Thus, physical and functional interactions between PLD and actin in PLD family members from bacteria to mammals are highly conserved throughout evolution. PMID:12667487

  13. Conservative surgery for low rectal carcinoma after high-dose radiation. Functional and oncologic results.

    PubMed Central

    Rouanet, P; Fabre, J M; Dubois, J B; Dravet, F; Saint Aubert, B; Pradel, J; Ychou, M; Solassol, C; Pujol, H

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Using a prospective, nonrandomized study, the authors evaluated the morbidity and functional and oncologic results of conservative surgery for cancer of the lower third of the rectum after high-dose radiation. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Colo-anal anastomosis has made sphincter conservation for low rectal carcinoma technically feasible. The limits to conservative surgery currently are oncologic rather than technical. Adjuvant radiotherapy has proven its benefit in terms of regional control, with a dose relationship. METHODS: Since June 1990, 27 patients with distal rectal adenocarcinoma were treated by preoperative radiotherapy (40 + 20 Gy delivered with three fields) and curative surgery. The mean distance from the anal verge was 47 mm (27-57 mm), and none of the tumors were fixed (15 T2, 12 T3). RESULTS: Mortality and morbidity were not increased by high-dose preoperative radiation. Twenty-one patients underwent conservative surgery (78%-17 total proctectomies and colo-anal anastomoses, 4 trans-anal resections). After colo-anal anastomosis, all patients with colonic pouch had good results; two patients had moderate results and one patient had poor results after straight colo-anal anastomosis. With a mean follow-up of 24 months, the authors noted 1 postoperative death, 2 disease-linked deaths, 1 controlled regional recurrence, 2 evolutive patients with pulmonary metastases, and 21 disease-free patients. CONCLUSIONS: These first results confirm the possibility of conservative surgery for low rectal carcinoma after high-dose radiation. A prospective, randomized trial could be induced to determine the real role of the 20 Gy boost on the sphincter-saving decision. PMID:7826163

  14. Identifying Elements Critical for Functional and Sustainable Professional Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Gail; Manokore, Viola

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we examined data collected as part of a 5-year project designed to foster reform-based urban science teaching through teachers' communities of inquiry. Drawing upon a distributed leadership framework, we analyzed teacher "talk" during professional learning community (PLC) meetings. This analysis yielded five elements: teacher…

  15. Nmf9 Encodes a Highly Conserved Protein Important to Neurological Function in Mice and Flies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuxiao; Ross, Kevin D.; Seidner, Glen A.; Gorman, Michael R.; Poon, Tiffany H.; Wang, Xiaobo; Keithley, Elizabeth M.; Lee, Patricia N.; Martindale, Mark Q.; Joiner, William J.; Hamilton, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Many protein-coding genes identified by genome sequencing remain without functional annotation or biological context. Here we define a novel protein-coding gene, Nmf9, based on a forward genetic screen for neurological function. ENU-induced and genome-edited null mutations in mice produce deficits in vestibular function, fear learning and circadian behavior, which correlated with Nmf9 expression in inner ear, amygdala, and suprachiasmatic nuclei. Homologous genes from unicellular organisms and invertebrate animals predict interactions with small GTPases, but the corresponding domains are absent in mammalian Nmf9. Intriguingly, homozygotes for null mutations in the Drosophila homolog, CG45058, show profound locomotor defects and premature death, while heterozygotes show striking effects on sleep and activity phenotypes. These results link a novel gene orthology group to discrete neurological functions, and show conserved requirement across wide phylogenetic distance and domain level structural changes. PMID:26131556

  16. Sorting out relationships among the grouse and ptarmigan using intron, mitochondrial, and ultra-conserved element sequences.

    PubMed

    Persons, Nicholas W; Hosner, Peter A; Meiklejohn, Kelly A; Braun, Edward L; Kimball, Rebecca T

    2016-05-01

    The Holarctic phasianid clade of the grouse and ptarmigan has received substantial attention in areas such as evolution of mating systems, display behavior, and population ecology related to their conservation and management as wild game species. There are multiple molecular phylogenetic studies that focus on grouse and ptarmigan. In spite of this, there is little consensus regarding historical relationships, particularly among genera, which has led to unstable and partial taxonomic revisions. We estimated the phylogeny of all currently recognized species using a combination of novel data from seven nuclear loci (largely intron sequences) and published data from one additional autosomal locus, two W-linked loci, and four mitochondrial regions. To explore relationships among genera and assess paraphyly of one genus more rigorously, we then added over 3000 ultra-conserved element (UCE) loci (over 1.7million bp) gathered using Illumina sequencing. The UCE topology agreed with that of the combined nuclear intron and previously published sequence data with 100% bootstrap support for all relationships. These data strongly support previous studies separating Bonasa from Tetrastes and Dendragapus from Falcipennis. However, the placement of Lagopus differed from previous studies, and we found no support for Falcipennis monophyly. Biogeographic analysis suggests that the ancestors of grouse and ptarmigan were distributed in the New World and subsequently underwent at least four dispersal events between the Old and New Worlds. Divergence time estimates from maternally-inherited and autosomal markers show stark differences across this clade, with divergence time estimates from maternally-inherited markers being nearly half that of the autosomal markers at some nodes, and nearly twice that at other nodes. PMID:26879712

  17. Evolution of TNF-induced apoptosis reveals 550 My of functional conservation.

    PubMed

    Quistad, Steven D; Stotland, Aleksandr; Barott, Katie L; Smurthwaite, Cameron A; Hilton, Brett Jameson; Grasis, Juris A; Wolkowicz, Roland; Rohwer, Forest L

    2014-07-01

    The Precambrian explosion led to the rapid appearance of most major animal phyla alive today. It has been argued that the complexity of life has steadily increased since that event. Here we challenge this hypothesis through the characterization of apoptosis in reef-building corals, representatives of some of the earliest animals. Bioinformatic analysis reveals that all of the major components of the death receptor pathway are present in coral with high-predicted structural conservation with Homo sapiens. The TNF receptor-ligand superfamilies (TNFRSF/TNFSF) are central mediators of the death receptor pathway, and the predicted proteome of Acropora digitifera contains more putative coral TNFRSF members than any organism described thus far, including humans. This high abundance of TNFRSF members, as well as the predicted structural conservation of other death receptor signaling proteins, led us to wonder what would happen if corals were exposed to a member of the human TNFSF (HuTNFα). HuTNFα was found to bind directly to coral cells, increase caspase activity, cause apoptotic blebbing and cell death, and finally induce coral bleaching. Next, immortalized human T cells (Jurkats) expressing a functional death receptor pathway (WT) and a corresponding Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD) KO cell line were exposed to a coral TNFSF member (AdTNF1) identified and purified here. AdTNF1 treatment resulted in significantly higher cell death (P < 0.0001) in WT Jurkats compared with the corresponding FADD KO, demonstrating that coral AdTNF1 activates the H. sapiens death receptor pathway. Taken together, these data show remarkable conservation of the TNF-induced apoptotic response representing 550 My of functional conservation. PMID:24927546

  18. Comparative Analysis of the Conserved Functions of Arabidopsis DRL1 and Yeast KTI12

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Sang Eun; Cho, Kiu-Hyung; Hwang, Ji-Young; Abdel-Fattah, Wael; Hammermeister, Alexander; Schaffrath, Raffael; Bowman, John L.; Kim, Gyung-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Patterning of the polar axis during the early leaf developmental stage is established by cell-to-cell communication between the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and the leaf primordia. In a previous study, we showed that the DRL1 gene, which encodes a homolog of the Elongator-associated protein KTI12 of yeast, acts as a positive regulator of adaxial leaf patterning and shoot meristem activity. To determine the evolutionally conserved functions of DRL1, we performed a comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of DRL1 and its yeast homolog, KTI12, and found that while overall homology was low, well-conserved domains were presented. DRL1 contained two conserved plant-specific domains. Expression of the DRL1 gene in a yeast KTI12-deficient yeast mutant suppressed the growth retardation phenotype, but did not rescue the caffeine sensitivity, indicating that the role of Arabidopsis Elongator-associated protein is partially conserved with yeast KTI12, but may have changed between yeast and plants in response to caffeine during the course of evolution. In addition, elevated expression of DRL1 gene triggered zymocin sensitivity, while overexpression of KTI12 maintained zymocin resistance, indicating that the function of Arabidopsis DRL1 may not overlap with yeast KTI12 with regards to toxin sensitivity. In this study, expression analysis showed that class-I KNOX genes were downregulated in the shoot apex, and that YAB and KAN were upregulated in leaves of the Arabidopsis drl1-101 mutant. Our results provide insight into the communication network between the SAM and leaf primordia required for the establishment of leaf polarity by mediating histone acetylation or through other mechanisms. PMID:25518926

  19. Role of conserved cis-regulatory elements in the post-transcriptional regulation of the human MECP2 gene involved in autism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The MECP2 gene codes for methyl CpG binding protein 2 which regulates activities of other genes in the early development of the brain. Mutations in this gene have been associated with Rett syndrome, a form of autism. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of evolutionarily conserved cis-elements in regulating the post-transcriptional expression of the MECP2 gene and to explore their possible correlations with a mutation that is known to cause mental retardation. Results A bioinformatics approach was used to map evolutionarily conserved cis-regulatory elements in the transcribed regions of the human MECP2 gene and its mammalian orthologs. Cis-regulatory motifs including G-quadruplexes, microRNA target sites, and AU-rich elements have gained significant importance because of their role in key biological processes and as therapeutic targets. We discovered in the 5′-UTR (untranslated region) of MECP2 mRNA a highly conserved G-quadruplex which overlapped a known deletion in Rett syndrome patients with decreased levels of MeCP2 protein. We believe that this 5′-UTR G-quadruplex could be involved in regulating MECP2 translation. We mapped additional evolutionarily conserved G-quadruplexes, microRNA target sites, and AU-rich elements in the key sections of both untranslated regions. Our studies suggest the regulation of translation, mRNA turnover, and development-related alternative MECP2 polyadenylation, putatively involving interactions of conserved cis-regulatory elements with their respective trans factors and complex interactions among the trans factors themselves. We discovered highly conserved G-quadruplex motifs that were more prevalent near alternative splice sites as compared to the constitutive sites of the MECP2 gene. We also identified a pair of overlapping G-quadruplexes at an alternative 5′ splice site that could potentially regulate alternative splicing in a negative as well as a positive way in the MECP2 pre

  20. Evidence of a conserved functional role for DNA methylation in termites.

    PubMed

    Glastad, K M; Hunt, B G; Goodisman, M A D

    2013-04-01

    Many organisms are capable of developing distinct phenotypes from the same genotype. This developmental plasticity is particularly prevalent in insects, which can produce alternate adaptive forms in response to distinct environmental cues. The ability to develop divergent phenotypes from the same genotype often relies on epigenetic information, which affects gene function and is transmitted through cell divisions. One of the most important epigenetic marks, DNA methylation, has been lost in several insect lineages, yet its taxonomic distribution and functional conservation remain uninvestigated in many taxa. In the present study, we demonstrate that the signature of high levels of DNA methylation exists in the expressed genes of two termites, Reticulitermes flavipes and Coptotermes formosanus. Further, we show that DNA methylation is preferentially targeted to genes with ubiquitous expression among morphs. Functional associations of DNA methylation are also similar to those observed in other invertebrate taxa with functional DNA methylation systems. Finally, we demonstrate an association between DNA methylation and the long-term evolutionary conservation of genes. Overall, our findings strongly suggest DNA methylation is present at particularly high levels in termites and may play similar roles to those found in other insects. PMID:23278917

  1. Functional inactivation of the conserved Sem1p in yeast by intrabodies.

    PubMed

    Reinman, Mirka; Jäntti, Jussi; Alfthan, Kaija; Keränen, Sirkka; Söderlund, Hans; Takkinen, Kristiina

    2003-09-01

    Intrabody technology was applied to characterize the function and intracellular localization of a highly conserved Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sem1 protein. DSS1, the mammalian homologue of Sem1p, is functionally conserved between yeast and mammalian cells, and in mammalian cells physically interacts with the strong tumour supressor BRCA2. Yeast and the generated intrabodies are thus expected to offer a useful system for studies on Sem1p/DSS1 function. Sem1p-specific antibody isolated from a phage display library was expressed intracellularily and targeted to either the cytosol or the nucleus of yeast cells. Analysis of the applicability of different antibody fragments as intrabodies showed that the Fab intrabody was expressed most efficiently. Expression of nuclear-targeted anti-Sem1p Fab intrabodies inhibited the growth of the sigma1278b yeast strain in a manner similar to deletion of the SEM1 gene. This indicates that the Fab intrabodies interact in vivo with Sem1p and result in inactivation of Sem1p. Localization of the Fab intrabody with or without the nuclear localization signal to the nucleus in Sem1p-dependent manner suggests that Sem1p mediates the nuclear transport of the intrabody without any targeting signal. Our results suggest that Sem1p function in yeast cells is in part manifested in the nucleus. PMID:12961755

  2. Functionally conservative substitutions at cardiac troponin I S43/45.

    PubMed

    Lang, Sarah E; Stevenson, Tamara K; Xu, Dongyang; O'Connell, Ryan; Westfall, Margaret V

    2016-07-01

    A phospho-null Ala substitution at protein kinase C (PKC)-targeted cardiac troponin I (cTnI) S43/45 reduces myocyte and cardiac contractile function. The goal of the current study was to test whether cTnIS43/45N is an alternative, functionally conservative substitution in cardiac myocytes. Partial and more extensive endogenous cTnI replacement was similar at 2 and 4 days after gene transfer, respectively, for epitope-tagged cTnI and cTnIS43/45N. This replacement did not significantly change thin filament stoichiometry. In functional studies, there were no significant changes in the amplitude and/or rates of contractile shortening and re-lengthening after this partial (2 days) and extensive (4 days) replacement with cTnIS43/45N. The cTnIS43/45N substitution also was not associated with adaptive changes in the myocyte Ca(2+) transient or in phosphorylation of the protein kinase A and C-targeted cTnIS23/24 site. These results provide evidence that cTnIS43/45N is a functionally conservative substitution, and may be appropriate for use as a phospho-null in rodent models designed for studies on PKC modulation of cardiac performance. PMID:26869200

  3. Modern money theory and ecological tax reform: A functional finance approach to energy conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Scott L. B.

    This dissertation contributes to heterodox economics by developing a theoretical and policy-relevant link that will promote the conservation of energy while driving the value of the domestic currency. The analysis relies upon the theoretical foundation of modern money theory and functional finance, which states that "taxes-drive-money" where the value of a sovereign nation's currency is imputed through the acceptance by the sovereign nation of the currency in payment of taxation. This theoretical perspective lends itself to various public policy prescriptions, such as government employment policies or the employer of last resort (ELR), which has been discussed at length elsewhere (Wray 1998; Tcherneva 2007, Forstater 2003). This research contributes to this overall program by arguing that the basis for taxation under modern money theory allows public policy makers various alternatives regarding the make-up of the tax system in place. In particular, following functional finance, taxes do not have the sole purpose of paying for government spending, but rather drive the value of the currency and may be designed to perform other functions as well, such as penalizing socially undesirable behavior. The focus in this dissertation is on the amelioration of pollution and increasing energy conservation. The research question for this dissertation is this: what federally implemented tax would best serve the multiple criteria of 1) driving the value of the currency, 2) promoting energy conservation and 3) ameliorating income and wealth disparities inherent in a monetary production economy? This dissertation provides a suggestion for such a tax that would be part of a much larger overall policy program based upon the tenets of modern money theory and functional finance. Additionally, this research seeks to provide an important theoretical contribution to the emerging Post Keynesian and ecological economics dialog.

  4. New Developments in the Method of Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element-Applications to Two-Dimensional Time-Marching Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1994-01-01

    A new numerical discretization method for solving conservation laws is being developed. This new approach differs substantially in both concept and methodology from the well-established methods, i.e., finite difference, finite volume, finite element, and spectral methods. It is motivated by several important physical/numerical considerations and designed to avoid several key limitations of the above traditional methods. As a result of the above considerations, a set of key principles for the design of numerical schemes was put forth in a previous report. These principles were used to construct several numerical schemes that model a 1-D time-dependent convection-diffusion equation. These schemes were then extended to solve the time-dependent Euler and Navier-Stokes equations of a perfect gas. It was shown that the above schemes compared favorably with the traditional schemes in simplicity, generality, and accuracy. In this report, the 2-D versions of the above schemes, except the Navier-Stokes solver, are constructed using the same set of design principles. Their constructions are simplified greatly by the use of a nontraditional space-time mesh. Its use results in the simplest stencil possible, i.e., a tetrahedron in a 3-D space-time with a vertex at the upper time level and other three at the lower time level. Because of the similarity in their design, each of the present 2-D solvers virtually shares with its 1-D counterpart the same fundamental characteristics. Moreover, it is shown that the present Euler solver is capable of generating highly accurate solutions for a famous 2-D shock reflection problem. Specifically, both the incident and the reflected shocks can be resolved by a single data point without the presence of numerical oscillations near the discontinuity.

  5. AthaMap web tools for database-assisted identification of combinatorial cis-regulatory elements and the display of highly conserved transcription factor binding sites in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Nils Ole; Galuschka, Claudia; Schindler, Martin; Bülow, Lorenz; Hehl, Reinhard

    2005-07-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of cis-regulatory elements for the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. AthaMap contains more than 7.4 x 10(6) putative binding sites for 36 transcription factors (TFs) from 16 different TF families. A newly implemented functionality allows the display of subsets of higher conserved transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). Furthermore, a web tool was developed that permits a user-defined search for co-localizing cis-regulatory elements. The user can specify individually the level of conservation for each TFBS and a spacer range between them. This web tool was employed for the identification of co-localizing sites of known interacting TFs and TFs containing two DNA-binding domains. More than 1.8 x 10(5) combinatorial elements were annotated in the AthaMap database. These elements can also be used to identify more complex co-localizing elements consisting of up to four TFBSs. The AthaMap database and the connected web tools are a valuable resource for the analysis and the prediction of gene expression regulation at http://www.athamap.de. PMID:15980498

  6. Malaria Parasite Survival Depends on Conserved Binding Peptides' Critical Biological Functions.

    PubMed

    Patarroyo, Manuel E; Arevalo-Pinzon, Gabriela; Reyes, Cesar; Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2016-01-01

    Biochemical, structural and single amino acid level analysis of 49 Plasmodium falciparum protein regions (13 sporozoite and 36 merozoite proteins) has highlighted the functional role of each conserved high activity binding peptide (cHABP) in cell host-microbe interaction, involving biological functions such as gliding motility, traversal activity, binding invasion, reproduction, nutrient ion transport and the development of severe malaria. Each protein's key function in the malaria parasite's asexual lifecycle (pre-erythrocyte and erythro-cyte) is described in terms of cHABPs; their sequences were located in elegant work published by other groups regarding critical binding regions implicated in malarial parasite invasion. Such cHABPs represent the starting point for developing a logical and rational methodology for selecting an appropriate mixture of modified cHABPs to be used in a completely effective, synthetic antimalarial vaccine. Such methodology could be used for developing vaccines against diseases scourging humanity. PMID:26317369

  7. Antigen-specific T cells fully conserve antitumour function following cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Galeano Niño, Jorge L; Kwan, Rain Yq; Weninger, Wolfgang; Biro, Maté

    2016-04-01

    Immunotherapies based on the autologous adoptive transfer of ex vivo-manipulated T cells are rapidly evolving for the treatment of both metastatic and primary malignancies. However, extended ex vivo culturing reduces the functionality of isolated T cells. Cryopreservation of rapidly expanded T cells for subsequent use throughout an immunotherapeutic regimen is a highly desirable recourse, thus far encumbered by a lack of studies investigating its effects on effector T-cell functionality. Here we directly compare murine tumour-reactive CD8(+) T cells cryopreserved during ex vivo expansion to freshly isolated populations. We show that cryopreservation fully conserves the differentiation potential of effector T cells, secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, cytotoxic function and does not impair the three-dimensional scanning motility of T cells or their capacity to infiltrate and reject tumours. PMID:26754453

  8. Antigen-specific T cells fully conserve antitumour function following cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Galeano Niño, Jorge L; Kwan, Rain YQ; Weninger, Wolfgang; Biro, Maté

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapies based on the autologous adoptive transfer of ex vivo-manipulated T cells are rapidly evolving for the treatment of both metastatic and primary malignancies. However, extended ex vivo culturing reduces the functionality of isolated T cells. Cryopreservation of rapidly expanded T cells for subsequent use throughout an immunotherapeutic regimen is a highly desirable recourse, thus far encumbered by a lack of studies investigating its effects on effector T-cell functionality. Here we directly compare murine tumour-reactive CD8+ T cells cryopreserved during ex vivo expansion to freshly isolated populations. We show that cryopreservation fully conserves the differentiation potential of effector T cells, secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, cytotoxic function and does not impair the three-dimensional scanning motility of T cells or their capacity to infiltrate and reject tumours. PMID:26754453

  9. Identification of human proteins functionally conserved with the yeast putative adaptors ADA2 and GCN5.

    PubMed Central

    Candau, R; Moore, P A; Wang, L; Barlev, N; Ying, C Y; Rosen, C A; Berger, S L

    1996-01-01

    Transcriptional adaptor proteins are required for full function of higher eukaryotic acidic activators in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that this pathway of activation is evolutionarily conserved. Consistent with this view, we have identified possible human homologs of yeast ADA2 (yADA2) and yeast GCN5 (yGCN5), components of a putative adaptor complex. While there is overall sequence similarity between the yeast and human proteins, perhaps more significant is conservation of key sequence features with other known adaptors. We show several functional similarities between the human and yeast adaptors. First, as shown for yADA2 and yGCN5, human ADA2 (hADA2) and human GCN5 (hGCN5) interacted in vivo in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Moreover, hGCN5 interacted with yADA2 in this assay, suggesting that the human proteins form similar complexes. Second, both yADA2 and hADA2 contain cryptic activation domains. Third, hGCN5 and yGCN5 had similar stabilizing effects on yADA2 in vivo. Furthermore, the region of yADA2 that interacted with yGCN5 mapped to the amino terminus of yADA2, which is highly conserved in hADA2. Most striking, is the behavior of the human proteins in human cells. First, GAL4-hADA2 activated transcription in HeLa cells, and second, either hADA2 or hGCN5 augmented GAL4-VP16 activation. These data indicated that the human proteins correspond to functional homologs of the yeast adaptors, suggesting that these cofactors play a key role in transcriptional activation. PMID:8552087

  10. A Conserved Cysteine Motif Is Critical for Rice Ceramide Kinase Activity and Function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhe; Fang, Ce; Li, Jian; Su, Jian-Bin; Greenberg, Jean T.; Wang, Hong-Bin; Yao, Nan

    2011-01-01

    Background Ceramide kinase (CERK) is a key regulator of cell survival in dicotyledonous plants and animals. Much less is known about the roles of CERK and ceramides in mediating cellular processes in monocot plants. Here, we report the characterization of a ceramide kinase, OsCERK, from rice (Oryza sativa spp. Japonica cv. Nipponbare) and investigate the effects of ceramides on rice cell viability. Principal Findings OsCERK can complement the Arabidopsis CERK mutant acd5. Recombinant OsCERK has ceramide kinase activity with Michaelis-Menten kinetics and optimal activity at 7.0 pH and 40°C. Mg2+ activates OsCERK in a concentration-dependent manner. Importantly, a CXXXCXXC motif, conserved in all ceramide kinases and important for the activity of the human enzyme, is critical for OsCERK enzyme activity and in planta function. In a rice protoplast system, inhibition of CERK leads to cell death and the ratio of added ceramide and ceramide-1-phosphate, CERK's substrate and product, respectively, influences cell survival. Ceramide-induced rice cell death has apoptotic features and is an active process that requires both de novo protein synthesis and phosphorylation, respectively. Finally, mitochondria membrane potential loss previously associated with ceramide-induced cell death in Arabidopsis was also found in rice, but it occurred with different timing. Conclusions OsCERK is a bona fide ceramide kinase with a functionally and evolutionarily conserved Cys-rich motif that plays an important role in modulating cell fate in plants. The vital function of the conserved motif in both human and rice CERKs suggests that the biochemical mechanism of CERKs is similar in animals and plants. Furthermore, ceramides induce cell death with similar features in monocot and dicot plants. PMID:21483860