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Sample records for elemental boron powder

  1. Neutron detectors comprising boron powder

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Morris, Christopher; Bacon, Jeffrey Darnell; Makela, Mark F; Spaulding, Randy Jay

    2013-05-21

    High-efficiency neutron detector substrate assemblies comprising a first conductive substrate, wherein a first side of the substrate is in direct contact with a first layer of a powder material comprising .sup.10boron, .sup.10boron carbide or combinations thereof, and wherein a conductive material is in proximity to the first layer of powder material; and processes of making said neutron detector substrate assemblies.

  2. Characterization of electrodeposited elemental boron

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ashish; Anthonysamy, S. Ananthasivan, K.; Ranganathan, R.; Mittal, Vinit; Narasimhan, S.V.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2008-07-15

    Elemental boron was produced through electrowinning from potassium fluoroborate dissolved in a mixture of molten potassium fluoride and potassium chloride. The characteristics of the electrodeposited boron (raw boron) as well as the water and acid-leached product (processed boron) were studied. The chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size of the boron powders were investigated. The morphology of the deposits was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The chemical state of the matrix, as well as the impurity phases present in them, was established using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In order to interpret and understand the results obtained, a thermodynamic analysis was carried out. The gas-phase corrosion in the head space as well as the chemistry behind the leaching process were interpreted using this analysis. The ease of oxidation of these powders in air was investigated using differential thermal analysis (DTA) coupled with thermogravimetry (TG). From the results obtained in this study it was established that elemental boron powder with a purity of 95-99% could be produced using a high temperature molten salt electrowinning process. The major impurities were found to be oxygen, carbon, iron and nickel.

  3. CVD boron on calcium chromate powder

    SciTech Connect

    Coonen, R.M.

    1984-09-01

    This study was an experimental effort to improve the compositional homogeneity of a pyrotechnic mixture of boron and calcium chromate (CaCrO/sub 4/). Boron was deposited onto calcium chromate powders at 350/sup 0/C from a diborane and hydrogen gas mixture at a pressure of 40 torr by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). The B:CaCrO/sub 4/ ratio of the coated powders was analyzed by inductively-coupled plasma spectroscopy and the distribution of the two phases was observed by electron microprobe analysis. The pyrotechnic activity was determined by differential thermal analysis. In addition to varying the composition of the mixture, an attempt was made to vary the boron distribution by coating both sized and unsized CaCrO/sub 4/ powders. Boron was deposited for 2 h onto sized CaCrO/sub 4/ powder, which resulted in a higher weight percentage of boron in comparison to the unsized powder. CVD coated CaCrO/sub 4/ powders began their pyrotechnic activity at an auto ignition temperature that was lower than the auto ignition temperature observed for mechanically blended mixtures. The coating of sized CaCrO/sub 4/ powder improved the uniformity of boron deposition of CaCrO/sub 4/, but it also decreased the pyrotechnic activity.

  4. X-ray diffraction investigation of ultrafine boron nitride powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gurov, S.V.; Chukalin, V.I.; Rezchikova, T.V.; Torbov, V.J.; Troitskii, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an x-ray diffraction analysis of ultrafine boron nitride powders of different mean particle sizes. Diffraction spectra of the ultrafine boron nitride powders were obtained using a DRON-1 apparatus. The experimental facts are indicative of a turbostratic character of deformation of the hexagonal lattice of ultrafinely divided boron nitride.

  5. Determination of phase stability of elemental boron.

    PubMed

    White, Mary Anne; Cerqueira, Anthony B; Whitman, Catherine A; Johnson, Michel B; Ogitsu, Tadashi

    2015-03-16

    Boron is an important element, used in applications from superhard materials to superconductors. Boron exists in several forms (allotropes) and, surprisingly, it was not known which form (α or β) is stable at ambient conditions. Through experiment, we quantify the relative stability of α-boron and β-boron as a function of temperature. The ground-state energies of α-boron and β-boron are nearly identical. For all temperatures up to 2000 K, the complicated β-boron structure is more stable than the simpler α-boron structure at ambient pressure. Below 1000 K, β-boron is entropically stabilized with respect to α-boron owing to its partially occupied sites, whereas at higher temperatures β-boron is enthalpically stabilized with respect to α-boron. We show that α-boron only becomes stable on application of pressure. PMID:25619645

  6. Neutron detectors comprising ultra-thin layers of boron powder

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehul; Morris, Christopher

    2013-07-23

    High-efficiency neutron detector substrate assemblies comprising a first conductive substrate, wherein a first side of the substrate is in direct contact with a first layer of a powder material having a thickness of from about 50 nm to about 250 nm and comprising .sup.10boron, .sup.10boron carbide or combinations thereof, and wherein a conductive material is in proximity to the first layer of powder material; and processes of making said neutron detector substrate assemblies.

  7. Certain features of the preparation of boron powders in x-ray diffraction investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Tsagareishvili, G.V.; Avlokhashvili, D.A.; Bairamashvili, I.A.; Dolidze, T.V.; Gabuniya, D.L.; Nakashidze, T.G.; Oganezov, K.A.; Tabutsidze, M.L.

    1985-05-01

    It is known that elemental boron is characterized by an increased reaction capacity toward oxygen. Boron powders oxidize especially intensely. Under real conditions, boron powders always contain a certain quantity of oxide phase (primarily in the form of B2O3), the quantity of which depends on their degree of dispersion, the method of production, and the storage conditions. In long exposure to air, as the result of its high hygroscopicity, boric anhydride reacts with particles of moisture, as the result of which orthoboric acid is formed. The mass absorption coefficient of x-rays by elemental boron is significantly lower than by its compounds (anhydride and acid). The presence on the surface of particles of boric anhydride and products of its hydration, the total quantity of which in the powder is large, cannot affect the result of x-ray diffraction investigations of the powders. In this work an investigation is made of the possibility of weakening this influence by preliminary treatment of the powders.

  8. New Ground-State Crystal Structure of Elemental Boron.

    PubMed

    An, Qi; Reddy, K Madhav; Xie, Kelvin Y; Hemker, Kevin J; Goddard, William A

    2016-08-19

    Elemental boron exhibits many polymorphs in nature based mostly on an icosahedral shell motif, involving stabilization of 13 strong multicenter intraicosahedral bonds. It is commonly accepted that the most thermodynamic stable structure of elemental boron at atmospheric pressure is the β rhombohedral boron (β-B). Surprisingly, using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we found that pure boron powder contains grains of two different types, the previously identified β-B containing a number of randomly spaced twins and what appears to be a fully transformed twinlike structure. This fully transformed structure, denoted here as τ-B, is based on the Cmcm orthorhombic space group. Quantum mechanics predicts that the newly identified τ-B structure is 13.8  meV/B more stable than β-B. The τ-B structure allows 6% more charge transfer from B_{57} units to nearby B_{12} units, making the net charge 6% closer to the ideal expected from Wade's rules. Thus, we predict the τ-B structure to be the ground state structure for elemental boron at atmospheric pressure. PMID:27588864

  9. New Ground-State Crystal Structure of Elemental Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Qi; Reddy, K. Madhav; Xie, Kelvin Y.; Hemker, Kevin J.; Goddard, William A.

    2016-08-01

    Elemental boron exhibits many polymorphs in nature based mostly on an icosahedral shell motif, involving stabilization of 13 strong multicenter intraicosahedral bonds. It is commonly accepted that the most thermodynamic stable structure of elemental boron at atmospheric pressure is the β rhombohedral boron (β -B ). Surprisingly, using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we found that pure boron powder contains grains of two different types, the previously identified β -B containing a number of randomly spaced twins and what appears to be a fully transformed twinlike structure. This fully transformed structure, denoted here as τ -B , is based on the C m c m orthorhombic space group. Quantum mechanics predicts that the newly identified τ -B structure is 13.8 meV /B more stable than β -B . The τ -B structure allows 6% more charge transfer from B57 units to nearby B12 units, making the net charge 6% closer to the ideal expected from Wade's rules. Thus, we predict the τ -B structure to be the ground state structure for elemental boron at atmospheric pressure.

  10. Electroextraction of boron from boron carbide scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ashish; Anthonysamy, S.; Ghosh, C.; Ravindran, T.R.; Divakar, R.; Mohandas, E.

    2013-10-15

    Studies were carried out to extract elemental boron from boron carbide scrap. The physicochemical nature of boron obtained through this process was examined by characterizing its chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size. The microstructural characteristics of the extracted boron powder were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopic examination of boron powder was also carried out to determine its crystalline form. Oxygen and carbon were found to be the major impurities in boron. Boron powder of purity ∼ 92 wt. % could be produced by the electroextraction process developed in this study. Optimized method could be used for the recovery of enriched boron ({sup 10}B > 20 at. %) from boron carbide scrap generated during the production of boron carbide. - Highlights: • Recovery of {sup 10}B from nuclear grade boron carbide scrap • Development of process flow sheet • Physicochemical characterization of electroextracted boron • Microscopic examination of electroextracted boron.

  11. Characterisation of graphite using boron as a marker element

    SciTech Connect

    Kamble, Granthali S.; Pandey, Shailaja; Thakur, Neha; Kumar, Sanjukta A.; Venkatesh, K.; Kumar, Sangita D.; Kameswaran, R.; Reddy, A. V. R.

    2013-06-12

    Graphite has many industrial applications. Two of the most important applications are as electrodes in industries and as moderator in nuclear industry. Determination of the Boron Equivalent of the impurity elements in graphite is the most important parameter for certifying the grade of graphite electrode [1]. The use of a suitable method with low limits of determination of boron is therefore necessary. A method has been standardised in Analytical Chemistry Division, BARC for determining trace amounts of boron in graphite electrodes. It involves controlled dissolution of graphite sample powder and measurement of boron by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) using matrix matched standards. The method detection limit is 1 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The method Relative Standard Deviation was 5%. The method was verified by spike recovery experiments. Recoveries were found to be within 100{+-}2% in the concentration range of 1 to 100 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The developed method has been adopted for the compositional characterization of several graphite electrode samples.

  12. Double helix boron-10 powder thermal neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Morris, Christopher L.; Bacon, Jeffrey D.

    2015-06-02

    A double-helix Boron-10 powder detector having intrinsic thermal neutron detection efficiency comparable to 36'' long, 2-in diameter, 2-bar Helium-3 detectors, and which can be used to replace such detectors for use in portal monitoring, is described. An embodiment of the detector includes a metallic plate coated with Boron-10 powder for generating alpha and Lithium-7 particles responsive to neutrons impinging thereon supported by insulators affixed to at least two opposing edges; a grounded first wire wound in a helical manner around two opposing insulators; and a second wire having a smaller diameter than that of the first wire, wound in a helical manner around the same insulators and spaced apart from the first wire, the second wire being positively biased. A gas, disposed within a gas-tight container enclosing the plate, insulators and wires, and capable of stopping alpha and Lithium-7 particles and generating electrons produces a signal on the second wire which is detected and subsequently related to the number of neutrons impinging on the plate.

  13. Boron

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron is an essential micronutrient element required for plant growth. Boron deficiency is wide-spread in crop plants throughout the world especially in coarse-textured soils in humid areas. Boron toxicity can also occur, especially in arid regions under irrigation. Plants respond directly to the...

  14. Shockwave Processing of Composite Boron and Titanium Nitride Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beason, Matthew T.; Gunduz, I. Emre; Mukasyan, Alexander S.; Son, Steven F.

    2015-06-01

    Shockwave processing of powders has been shown to initiate reactions between condensed phase reactants. It has been observed that these reactions can occur at very short timescales, resulting in chemical reactions occurring at a high pressure state. These reactions have the potential to produce metastable phases. Kinetic limitations prevent gaseous reactants from being used in this type of synthesis reaction. To overcome this limitation, a solid source of gaseous reactants must be used. An example of this type of reaction is the nitrogen exchange reaction (e.g. B + TiN, B + Si3N4 etc.). In these reactions nitrogen is ``carried'' by a material that can be then reduced by the second reactant. This work explores the possibility of using nitrogen exchange reactions to synthesize the cubic phase of boron nitride (c-BN) through shockwave processing of ball milled mixtures of boron and titanium nitride. The heating from the passage of the shock wave (pore collapse, plastic work, etc.) combined with thermochemical energy from the reaction may provide a means to synthesize c-BN. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, under Award Number(s) DE-NA0002377. National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG), 32 CFR 168a.

  15. Geometrical frustration in an element solid: (beta)-rhombohedral boron

    SciTech Connect

    Ogitsu, T; Gygi, F; Reed, J; Udagawa, M; Motome, Y; Schwegler, E; Galli, G

    2009-05-19

    Although a comprehensive understanding of the basic properties of most elemental solids has been achieved, there are still fundamental, open questions regarding simple substances, e.g. boron. Based on an Ising model that describes the intrinsic defect states in elemental boron, we show that this system is the only known element to exhibit geometrical frustration in its solid form. Interestingly, we find that the peculiar transport properties of boron that have been reported over the past forty years originate from the presence of geometrical frustration.

  16. Properties of MgB2 wires made by internal magnesium diffusion into different boron powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, P.; Hušek, I.; Rosova, A.; Kulich, M.; Melišek, T.; Kopera, L.; Brunner, B.

    2015-09-01

    Different boron powders were used for MgB2 wires manufactured by internal magnesium diffusion. The structure of the MgB2 core, critical temperature and critical currents of Cu/Ti sheathed wires differing only in boron powder were analyzed and compared. It was found that the particle size and purity of boron powders influence the creation of the MgB2 phase and, consequently, also considerably influence its superconducting properties. The highest critical current density in the low external field was measured for wire with a boron purity of 98.5% produced by Pavezyum. It was used also for stabilized multi-core MgB2 wire with high engineering current densities in low magnetic fields at 20 K, which may be attractive for some low field applications, e.g. high-power wind generators.

  17. Boron-modified Ni3Al intermetallic compound formed by spark plasma sintering of mechanically activated Ni and Al powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, L. I.; Ogneva, T. S.; Mul, D. O.; Esikov, M. A.; Larichkin, A. Yu; Malikov, V. N.

    2016-04-01

    A Ni3Al intermetallic compound was obtained by spark plasma sintering of mechanically activated Ni and Al powders in atomic ratio 3:1 respectively. Samples with boron addition of 0.1 and 0.2% (wt.) and samples without boron were obtained. The maximum value of the relative density (~99 %) has been obtained for the material by sintering of mechanically activated mixture powders modified with 0.1% of boron. No differences have been found between the structure of boron-modified Ni3Al and Ni3Al without boron addition. The maximum level of bending strength (2200 MPa) has been achieved for Ni3Al with 0.1% (wt.) of boron. This value is almost 3 times the bending strength of the sample of Ni3Al sintered without boron addition.

  18. Process for synthesizing compounds from elemental powders and product

    DOEpatents

    Rabin, Barry H.; Wright, Richard N.

    1993-01-01

    A process for synthesizing intermetallic compounds from elemental powders. The elemental powders are initially combined in a ratio which approximates the stoichiometric composition of the intermetallic compound. The mixed powders are then formed into a compact which is heat treated at a controlled rate of heating such that an exothermic reaction between the elements is initiated. The heat treatment may be performed under controlled conditions ranging from a vacuum (pressureless sintering) to compression (hot pressing) to produce a desired densification of the intermetallic compound. In a preferred form of the invention, elemental powders of Fe and Al are combined to form aluminide compounds of Fe.sub.3 Al and FeAl.

  19. Boron-Doped Strontium-Stabilized Bismuth Cobalt Oxide Thermoelectric Nanocrystalline Ceramic Powders Synthesized via Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koçyiğit, Serhat; Aytimur, Arda; Çınar, Emre; Uslu, İbrahim; Akdemir, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Boron-doped strontium-stabilized bismuth cobalt oxide thermoelectric nanocrystalline ceramic powders were produced by using a polymeric precursor technique. The powders were characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and physical properties measurement system (PPMS) techniques. The XRD results showed that these patterns have a two-phase mixture. The phases are face-centered cubic (fcc) and body-centered cubic (bcc). Values of the crystallite size, dislocation density, and microstrain were calculated by using the Scherrer equation. The lattice parameters were calculated for fcc and bcc phases. The SEM results showed that needle-like grains are formed in boron-undoped composite materials, but the needle-like grains changed to the plate-like grains with the addition of boron. The distribution of the nanofiber diameters was calculated and the average diameter of the boron-doped sample is smaller than the boron-undoped one. PPMS values showed that the electrical resistivity values decreased, but the thermal conductivity values, the Seebeck coefficients, and figure of merit ( ZT) increased with increasing temperature for the two samples.

  20. Silicon carbide sintered body manufactured from silicon carbide powder containing boron, silicon and carbonaceous additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Hidehiko

    1987-01-01

    A silicon carbide powder of a 5-micron grain size is mixed with 0.15 to 0.60 wt% mixture of a boron compound, i.e., boric acid, boron carbide (B4C), silicon boride (SiB4 or SiB6), aluminum boride, etc., and an aluminum compound, i.e., aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum hydroxide, aluminum carbide, etc., or aluminum boride (AlB2) alone, in such a proportion that the boron/aluminum atomic ratio in the sintered body becomes 0.05 to 0.25 wt% and 0.05 to 0.40 wt%, respectively, together with a carbonaceous additive to supply enough carbon to convert oxygen accompanying raw materials and additives into carbon monoxide.

  1. Liquid Phase Sintering of Boron-Containing Powder Metallurgy Steel with Chromium and Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Wei; Fan, Yu-Chi; Huang, Her-Yueh; Cai, Wen-Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Liquid phase sintering is an effective method to improve the densification of powder metallurgy materials. Boron is an excellent alloying element for liquid phase sintering of Fe-based materials. However, the roles of chromium and carbon, and particularly that of the former, on liquid phase sintering are still undetermined. This study demonstrated the effects of chromium and carbon on the microstructure, elemental distribution, boride structure, liquid formation, and densification of Fe-B-Cr and Fe-B-Cr-C steels during liquid phase sintering. The results showed that steels with 0.5 wt pct C densify faster than those without 0.5 wt pct C. Moreover, although only one liquid phase forms in Fe-B-Cr steel, adding 0.5 wt pct C reduces the formation temperature of the liquid phase by about 50 K (°C) and facilitates the formation of an additional liquid, resulting in better densification at 1473 K (1200 °C). In both Fe-B-Cr and Fe-B-Cr-C steels, increasing the chromium content from 1.5 to 3 wt pct raises the temperature of liquid formation by about 10 K (°C). Thermodynamic simulations and experimental results demonstrated that carbon atoms dissolved in austenite facilitate the eutectic reaction and reduce the formation temperature of the liquid phase. In contrast, both chromium and molybdenum atoms dissolved in austenite delay the eutectic reaction. Furthermore, the 3Cr-0.5Mo additive in the Fe-0.4B steel does not change the typical boride structure of M2B. With the addition of 0.5 wt pct C, the crystal structure is completely transformed from M2B boride to M3(B,C) boro-carbide.

  2. EPR observation of first point defects in cubic boron nitride crystalline powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nistor, S. V.; Stefan, M.; Schoemaker, D.; Dinca, G.

    2000-05-01

    An X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of nominally pure, diamond-like cubic boron nitride (c-BN) crystalline powders, has led to the first identification of a spectrum attributed to two related paramagnetic species. The composite EPR spectrum can be observed only in dark brown colored powders known to contain excess of boron. It consists of two superimposed lorentzian components, called D1 and D2, centered at g1=2.0063 and g2=2.0084, with peak-to-peak linewidths of 3.3 and 17.9 mT, respectively. The temperature dependence of the integrated intensities, their linewidths and intensity ratio D2/D1 allows one to conclude that the narrow line D1 originates from EPR transitions inside a S=1/2 ground doublet and the broad line D2 from transitions inside the excited levels of another center. Evidence suggests that both centers are boron related paramagnetic species.

  3. Process for synthesizing compounds from elemental powders and product

    DOEpatents

    Rabin, B.H.; Wright, R.N.

    1993-12-14

    A process for synthesizing intermetallic compounds from elemental powders is described. The elemental powders are initially combined in a ratio which approximates the stoichiometric composition of the intermetallic compound. The mixed powders are then formed into a compact which is heat treated at a controlled rate of heating such that an exothermic reaction between the elements is initiated. The heat treatment may be performed under controlled conditions ranging from a vacuum (pressureless sintering) to compression (hot pressing) to produce a desired densification of the intermetallic compound. In a preferred form of the invention, elemental powders of Fe and Al are combined to form aluminide compounds of Fe[sub 3] Al and FeAl. 25 figures.

  4. Boron

    MedlinePlus

    Boron is a mineral that is found in food and the environment. People take boron supplements as medicine. Boron is used for building ... to affect the way the body handles other minerals such as magnesium and phosphorus. It also seems ...

  5. Fabrication and characterization of hexagonal boron nitride powder by spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Xiaoliang Wang Sheng; Yang Hua; Duan Xinglong; Dong Xuebin

    2008-09-15

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) powder was fabricated prepared by the spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology. The effects of nitrided temperature on the phases, morphology and particle size distribution of hBN powder, were investigated. The synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), Fourier transformed infrared spectrum, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum and photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. UV-vis spectrum revealed that the product had one obvious band gap (4.7 eV) and PL spectrum showed that it had a visible emission at 457 nm ({lambda}{sub ex}=230 nm). FESEM image indicated that the particle size of the synthesized hBN was mainly in the range of 0.5-1.5 {mu}m in diameter, and 50-150 nm in thickness. The high-energy ball-milling process following 900 deg. C calcining process was very helpful to obtain fully crystallized hBN at lower temperature. - Graphical abstract: hBN powder was fabricated prepared by spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology. The results indicated that spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology assisted with high-energy ball-milling process following calcined process was a hopeful way to manufacture hBN powder with high crystallinity in industrial scale.

  6. Synthesis of nano-sized amorphous boron powders through active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jilin; Gu, Yunle; Li, Zili; Wang, Weimin; Fu, Zhengyi

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: Nano-sized amorphous boron powders were synthesized by active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) method. The effects of endothermic reaction rate, the possible chemical reaction mechanism and active dilution model for synthesis of the product were also discussed. Highlights: ► Nano-sized amorphous boron powders were synthesized by active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis method. ► The morphology, particle size and purity of the samples could be effectively controlled via changing the endothermic rate. ► The diluter KBH{sub 4} played an important role in active dilution synthesis of amorphous nano-sized boron powders. ► The active dilution method could be further popularized and become a common approach to prepare various inorganic materials. - Abstract: Nano-sized amorphous boron powders were synthesized by active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) method at temperatures ranging from 700 °C to 850 °C in a SHS furnace using Mg, B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and KBH{sub 4} as raw materials. Samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Laser particle size analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission TEM (HRTEM). The boron powders demonstrated an average particle size of 50 nm with a purity of 95.64 wt.%. The diluter KBH{sub 4} played an important role in the active dilution synthesis of amorphous nano-sized boron powders. The effects of endothermic reaction rate, the possible chemical reaction mechanism and active dilution model for synthesis of the product were also discussed.

  7. Microstructure and superconducting properties of nanocarbon-doped internal Mg diffusion-processed MgB2 wires fabricated using different boron powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Da; Wang, Dongliang; Li, Chen; Yuan, Pusheng; Zhang, Xianping; Yao, Chao; Dong, Chiheng; Huang, He; Ma, Yanwei; Oguro, Hidetoshi; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    MgB2/Nb/Monel monofilament wires were fabricated using four different boron powders by an internal Mg diffusion (IMD) process. The microstructure, morphology and the critical current density (J c) of the used boron powders and the formative MgB2 layers were analyzed and compared. It was found that the purity and particle size of the boron powder influence the superconducting properties of MgB2 wires; further that the optimized heat-treatment condition also depends on the quality of the boron powder. The highest J c was obtained in the MgB2 layer made using amorphous boron (AB) powder, although a certain amount of voids existed in the superconducting layer. The IMD-processed MgB2 layer fabricated using high-purity boron (HB) powder had also a high J c compared with the powder-in-tube (PIT) process and a few unreacted boron particles remained in it. MgB2 wire fabricated using low-purity boron (LB) powder had a high cost-performance ratio compared with the others, which is expected to allow the fabrication of large-scale and low-cost superconducting wires for practical application. However, the enhancement of the J c was not found in the MgB2 layer manufactured using the ball-milled LB (MLB) powder as expected due to the increased percentage of impurity.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of hexagonal boron nitride powder by spray drying and calcining nitriding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaoliang; Wang, Sheng; Yang, Hua; Duan, Xinglong; Dong, Xuebin

    2008-09-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) powder was fabricated prepared by the spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology. The effects of nitrided temperature on the phases, morphology and particle size distribution of hBN powder, were investigated. The synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), Fourier transformed infrared spectrum, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum and photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. UV-vis spectrum revealed that the product had one obvious band gap (4.7 eV) and PL spectrum showed that it had a visible emission at 457 nm ( λex=230 nm). FESEM image indicated that the particle size of the synthesized hBN was mainly in the range of 0.5-1.5 μm in diameter, and 50-150 nm in thickness. The high-energy ball-milling process following 900 °C calcining process was very helpful to obtain fully crystallized hBN at lower temperature.

  9. Spark Plasma Sintering of Aluminum-Magnesium-Matrix Composites with Boron Carbide and Tungsten Nano-powder Inclusions: Modeling and Experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvilis, E. S.; Khasanov, O. L.; Gulbin, V. N.; Petyukevich, M. S.; Khasanov, A. O.; Olevsky, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    Spark-plasma sintering (SPS) is used to fabricate fully-dense metal-matrix (Al/Mg) composites containing hard ceramic (boron carbide) and refractory metal (tungsten) inclusions. The study objectives include the modeling (and its experimental verification) of the process of the consolidation of the composites consisted of aluminum-magnesium alloy AMg6 (65 wt.%), B4C powder (15 wt.%), and W nano-powder (20 wt.%), as well as the optimization of the composite content and of the SPS conditions to achieve higher density. Discrete element modeling of the composite particles packing based on the particle size distribution functions of real powders is utilized for the determination of the powder compositions rendering maximum mixture packing densities. Two models: a power-law creep model of the high temperature deformation of powder materials, and an empirical logarithmic pressure-temperature-relative density relationship are successfully applied for the description of the densification of the aluminum-magnesium metal matrix powder composite subjected to spark-plasma sintering. The elastoplastic properties of the sintered composite samples are assessed by nanoindentation.

  10. Two-dimensional finite elements model for boron management in agroforestry sites.

    PubMed

    Tayfur, Gokmen; Tanji, Kenneth K; Baba, Alper

    2010-01-01

    Agroforesty systems, which are recommended as a management option to lower the shallow groundwater level and to reuse saline subsurface drainage waters from the tile-drained croplands in the drainage-impacted areas of Jan Joaquin Valley of California, have resulted in excessive boron buildup in the soil root zone. To assess the efficacy of the long-term impacts of soil boron buildup in agroforesty systems, a mathematical model was developed to simulate non-conservative boron transport. The developed dynamic two-dimensional finite element model simulates water flow and boron transport in saturated-unsaturated soil system, including boron sorption and boron uptake by root-water extraction processes. The simulation of two different observed field data sets by the developed model is satisfactory, with mean absolute error of 1.5 mg/L and relative error of 6.5%. Application of the model to three different soils shows that boron adsorption is higher in silt loam soil than that in sandy loam and clay loam soils. This result agrees with the laboratory experimental observations. The results of the sensitivity analysis indicate that boron uptake by root-water extraction process influences the boron concentration distribution along the root zone. Also, absorption coefficient and maximum adsorptive capacity of a soil for boron are found to be sensitive parameters. PMID:19184495

  11. Discrete element analysis of powder processing: Fill and compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Consuelo Margarita

    The production of various ceramic components is often achieved by processing powder into the desired shape and dimensions. The process includes filling a die with powder, which then is compacted. Even today, most parameters are adjusted by trial-and-error. The quality of the product is associated with its density homogeneity. This is a function of powder properties, die geometry, filling method and compacting cycle. The goal of the present work is to understand the parameters that affect dimension and quality of the compacted part. A discrete element model is proved suitable to simulate the powders' behavior during fill and compaction. This model suggests that application of accepted radius ratio rules for die filling have an effect opposite to that intended, because fines catalyze bridge formation instead of filling voids. Our results provide strong support that compaction is clearly localized before and during the I-II transition prior to propagating in a wave-like fashion throughout the rest of the compact. The changes in local density associated to the Stage I-II transition on the compaction curves signifies a change in the direction of the transmitted pressure through the uppermost layer, from dispersed to joined. Cyclic compaction allows for the periodic release of stress that homogenizes the granular matter immediately in front of the wave, producing a locally uniform propagation of pressure during succeeding cycles. The model is proven a valuable tool in predicting improvements in die design.

  12. Boron doping of diamond powder by enhanced diffusion and forced diffusion: Diffusion concentrations, mechanical, chemical and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golshani, Fariborz

    Diamond, with its unique mechanical properties, is an excellent material for a wide range of applications. However, there exist some problems. One such problem is integration of diamond of diamond into tool's (usually tungsten-carbide) lattice matrix for the purpose of increasing its performance. The presence of cobalt in the matrix, which acts as a poison for diamond, causes graphitization and degradation of diamond. In addition, diamond graphitizes at sintering temperatures (1770 K). The results of this work suggest that boron has produced a protective layer for diamond, thus reducing the effects of annealing at high temperatures. Boron has been introduced into single crystal high pressure, high temperature diamond powder by enhanced diffusion and forced diffusion techniques. Enhanced diffusion resulted in higher concentrations of boron in diamond powder. Total boron concentrations of 500 to 600 ppm, and 10sp{20} cmsp{-3} at a depth of 0.5 micrometer, have been achieved. Hardness tests performed on doped samples reveal that diamond did not lose its strength due to diffusion at elevated temperatures. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis did not show any change in the "quality" of diamond due to doping. Oxidation experiments performed on doped and undoped samples revealed that the samples with the highest boron concentrations had superior performance and resistance to oxidation. Final weight loss in these samples was much less than in undoped samples and samples with low boron concentrations. Scanning electron microscopy of these samples showed that degradation due to oxidation of heavily doped diamond samples was significantly less than other samples.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of aluminum nitride/boron nitride nanocomposites by carbothermal reduction and nitridation of aluminum borate powders.

    PubMed

    Kusunose, Takafumi; Sakayanagi, Nobuaki; Sekino, Tohru; Ando, Yoichi

    2008-11-01

    In order to fabricate aluminum nitride/boron nitride (AIN/BN) nanocomposites by pressureless sintering, the present study investigated the synthesis of AIN-BN nanocomposite powders by carbothermal reduction and nitridation of aluminum borate powders. Homogeneous mixtures of alumina (Al2O3), boric acid (H3BO3), and carbon powder were used to synthesize AIN/BN nanocomposite powders containing 10 and 20 vol% BN. Aluminum borate was produced by reacting Al2O3 and B2O3 above 800 degrees C, and AIN and turbostratic BN (t-BN) were produced by reacting aluminum borate with carbon powder and nitrogen gas at 1500 degrees C. Carbothermal reduction followed by nitridation yielded an AIN/BN nanocomposite powder composed of nanosized AIN and t-BN. By pressureless sintering nanocomposite AIN/BN powders containing 5 wt% Y22O3, AIN/BN nanocomposites were obtained without compromising the high thermal conductivity and high hardness. PMID:19198315

  14. High-purity, fine-particle boron nitride powder synthesis at -75 to 750C. Report of investigations/1986

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyoncu, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Nonoxide ceramics with improved high-temperature properties could substitute for high-temperature alloys and reduce the Nation's dependence on imports of Cr, Co, Ni, and Mn. To meet the objective, the Bureau of Mines conducted research to synthesize ultrafine reactive boron nitride (BN) powders. BN powders were prepared at temperatures ranging from -75 degrees to 750 degrees C. Low-temperature reactions (-75 to 200/sup 0/C) between boron halides and N compounds led to formation of elemento-organic compounds that were thermally decomposed to ultrafine (approximately 100- to 150-A particle size) reactive BN powders. BN powders were also prepared through the reaction of a low-melting inorganic B compound (boric acid, borax) with an organic N compound (carbimide and thiocarbimide) in N/sub 2/ and/or ammonia (NH/sub 3/) atmospheres at temperatures between 500 and 750/sup 0/C. The report is based upon work done under an agreement between the University of Alabama and the Bureau of Mines.

  15. Slip Casting of α-Sialon/AlN/BN Powder Carbothermally Prepared by Boron-rich Slag-based Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun-bin, Wu; Xiang-xin, Xue; Tao, Jiang; Qing, Zhang

    2011-10-01

    With boron-rich slag, silica fume, bauxite chalmette and carbon black as starting materials, α-Sialon/AlN/BN powder was prepared by carbothermal reduction-nitridation. The powder was attrition milled to submicron size and suspended in water. The effects of yttrium oxide as a sintering aid, pH, and addition of deflocculant on the suspensions were study. Optimum slip casting properties, i.e. lowest viscosity values, the highest absolute zeta potential values, the smallest floc size and sediment volume were found at pH 10 for the powder. The suspensions were used to slip cast discs which were sintered in a nitrogen atmosphere at 1700°C for 2h. The strength was about 230MPa, the toughness 3.6 MPa·m1/2 and the hardness about 13.8GPa.

  16. Boron reclamation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.M.

    1980-07-01

    A process to recover high purity /sup 10/B enriched crystalline boron powder from a polymeric matrix was developed on a laboratory basis and ultimately scaled up to production capacity. The process is based on controlled pyrolysis of boron-filled scrap followed by an acid leach and dry sieving operation to return the powder to the required purity and particle size specifications. Typically, the recovery rate of the crystalline powder is in excess of 98.5 percent, and some of the remaining boron is recovered in the form of boric acid. The minimum purity requirement of the recovered product is 98.6 percent total boron.

  17. Trace element chemistry of coal bed natural gas produced water in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Richard E. Jackson; K.J. Reddy

    2007-09-15

    Coal bed natural gas (CBNG) produced water is usually disposed into nearby constructed disposal ponds. Geochemistry of produced water, particularly trace elements interacting with a semiarid environment, is not clearly understood. The objective of this study was to collect produced water samples at outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds and monitor pH, iron (Fe), aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), boron (B), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), cadmium (Cd), and barium (Ba). Outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds were sampled from five different watersheds including Cheyenne River (CHR), Belle Fourche River (BFR), Little Powder River (LPR), Powder River (PR), and Tongue River (TR) within the Powder River Basin (PRB), Wyoming from 2003 to 2005. Paired tests were conducted between CBNG outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds for each watershed. Results suggest that produced water from CBNG outfalls is chemically different from the produced water from corresponding disposal ponds. Most trace metal concentrations in the produced water increased from outfall to disposal pond except for Ba. In disposal ponds, Ba, As, and B concentrations increased from 2003 to 2005. Geochemical modeling predicted precipitation and dissolution reactions as controlling processes for Al, Cu, and Ba concentrations in CBNG produced water. Adsorption and desorption reactions appear to control As, Mo, and B concentrations in CBNG water in disposal ponds. Overall, results of this study will be important to determine beneficial uses (e.g., irrigation, livestock/wildlife water, and aquatic life) for CBNG produced water in the PRB, Wyoming. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Process for microwave sintering boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Morrow, Marvin S.

    1993-01-01

    A method of microwave sintering boron carbide comprises leaching boron carbide powder with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to form a leached boron carbide powder. The leached boron carbide powder is coated with a glassy carbon precursor to form a coated boron carbide powder. The coated boron carbide powder is consolidated in an enclosure of boron nitride particles coated with a layer of glassy carbon within a container for microwave heating to form an enclosed coated boron carbide powder. The enclosed coated boron carbide powder is sintered within the container for microwave heating with microwave energy.

  19. Process for microwave sintering boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

    1993-10-12

    A method of microwave sintering boron carbide comprises leaching boron carbide powder with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to form a leached boron carbide powder. The leached boron carbide powder is coated with a glassy carbon precursor to form a coated boron carbide powder. The coated boron carbide powder is consolidated in an enclosure of boron nitride particles coated with a layer of glassy carbon within a container for microwave heating to form an enclosed coated boron carbide powder. The enclosed coated boron carbide powder is sintered within the container for microwave heating with microwave energy.

  20. [The element determination of six samples of petal powders by using XRF spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Mei, Yan; Ma, Mi-Xia; Nie, Zuo-Ren

    2012-07-01

    Elements and contents in three kinds of petal powders of white and red rose, carnation, and butterfly orchis were determined by using XRF technic, and the data for every group were compared and analysed. The results indicated that all powders contain no toxic elements determined but have lots of normal elements and trace elements, such as Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn, Ni, Si, Sr, and Rb. The same sort of powder had approximately equivalent elements but their contents are different, and the element content of the white sort. was higher than the red one. PMID:23016365

  1. Novel nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating for boron powders by direct pyrolysis of coronene without solvent.

    PubMed

    Ye, ShuJun; Song, MingHui; Kumakura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-30

    A 3 nm coronene coating and a 4 nm amorphous carbon coating with a uniform shell-core encapsulation structure for nanosized boron (B) powders are formed by a simple process in which coronene is directly mixed with boron particles without a solvent and heated at 520 °C for 1 h or at 630 °C for 3 h in a vacuum-sealed silica tube. Coronene has a melting point lower than its decomposition temperature, which enables liquid coronene to cover B particles by liquid diffusion and penetration without the need for a solvent. The diffusion and penetration of coronene can extend to the boundaries of particles and to inside the agglomerated nanoparticles to form a complete shell-core encapsulated structure. As the temperature is increased, thermal decomposition of coronene on the B particles results in the formation of a uniform amorphous carbon coating layer. This novel and simple nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating method can possibly be applied to many other powders; thus, it has potential applications in many fields at low cost. PMID:25556855

  2. Bonding in elemental boron: a view from electronic structure calculations using maximally localized Wannier functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogitsu, Tadashi; Gygi, Francois; Reed, John; Schwegler, Eric; Galli, Giulia

    2007-03-01

    Boron exhibits the most complex structure of all elemental solids, with more than 300 atoms per unit cell arranged in interconnecting icosahedra, and some crystallographic positions occupied with a probability of less than one. The precise determination of the ground state geometry of boron---the so-called β-boron structure--has been elusive and its electronic and bonding properties have been difficult to rationalize. Using lattice model Monte Carlo optimization techniques and ab-initio simulations, we have shown that a defective, quasi-ordered β solid is the most stable structure at zero as well as finite T. In the absence of partially occupied sites (POS), the perfect β-boron crystal is unstable; the presence of POS lower its internal energy below that of an ordered α-phase, not mere an entropic effect. We present a picture of the intricate and unique bonding in boron based on maximally localized Wannier (MLWF) functions, which indicates that the presence of POS provides a subtle, yet essential spatial balance between electron deficient and fully saturated bonds. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy at the University of California/ LLNL under contract no. W-7405-Eng-48.

  3. Is boron a prebiotic element? A mini-review of the essentiality of boron for the appearance of life on earth.

    PubMed

    Scorei, Romulus

    2012-02-01

    Boron is probably a prebiotic element with special importance in the so-called "sugars world". Boron is not present on Earth in its elemental form. It is found only in compounds, e.g., borax, boric acid, kernite, ulexite, colemanite and other borates. Volcanic spring waters sometimes contain boron-based acids (e.g., boric, metaboric, tetraboric and pyroboric acid). Borates influence the formation of ribofuranose from formaldehyde that feeds the "prebiotic metabolic cycle". The importance of boron in the living world is strongly related to its implications in the prebiotic origins of genetic material; consequently, we believe that throughout the evolution of life, the primary role of boron has been to provide thermal and chemical stability in hostile environments. The complexation of boric acid and borates with organic cis-diols remains the most probable chemical mechanism for the role of this element in the evolution of the living world. Because borates can stabilize ribose and form borate ester nucleotides, boron may have provided an essential contribution to the "pre-RNA world". PMID:22528885

  4. Is Boron a Prebiotic Element? A Mini-review of the Essentiality of Boron for the Appearance of Life on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scorei, Romulus

    2012-02-01

    Boron is probably a prebiotic element with special importance in the so-called "sugars world". Boron is not present on Earth in its elemental form. It is found only in compounds, e.g., borax, boric acid, kernite, ulexite, colemanite and other borates. Volcanic spring waters sometimes contain boron-based acids (e.g., boric, metaboric, tetraboric and pyroboric acid). Borates influence the formation of ribofuranose from formaldehyde that feeds the "prebiotic metabolic cycle". The importance of boron in the living world is strongly related to its implications in the prebiotic origins of genetic material; consequently, we believe that throughout the evolution of life, the primary role of boron has been to provide thermal and chemical stability in hostile environments. The complexation of boric acid and borates with organic cis-diols remains the most probable chemical mechanism for the role of this element in the evolution of the living world. Because borates can stabilize ribose and form borate ester nucleotides, boron may have provided an essential contribution to the "pre-RNA world".

  5. The use of elemental powder mixes in laser-based additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Rodney Michael

    This study examines the use and functionality of laser depositing alloys from mixes of elemental metallic powders. Through the use of laser-based additive manufacturing (LAM), near net-shaped 3-Dimensional metallic parts can be produced in a layer-by-layer fashion. It is customary for pre-alloyed powders to be used in this process. However, mixes of elemental powders can be used to produce alloys that are formed during the deposition process. This alternative technique requires that the elemental powders adequately mix during deposition for a homogeneous deposit to be produced. Cost savings and versatility are among several of the advantages to using elemental powder mixes in LAM. Representative alloys of 316 and 430 Stainless Steel (SS) and Ti-6Al-4V were produced with elemental powder mixes during this research. These deposits were then compared to deposits of the same material manufactured with pre-alloyed powder. Comparison between the two types of samples included; EDS analysis to examine chemical homogeneity, metallography techniques to compare microstructures, and finally hardness testing to observe mechanical properties. The enthalpy of mixing is also discussed as this can impact the resulting homogeneity of deposits produced with mixes of elemental powders. Some differences were observed between the two types of deposits for 430 SS and Ti-6Al-4V. Results indicate that deposits fabricated with mixes of elemental powders can be produced to an equivalent quality of pre-alloyed powder deposits for 316 SS. This research also proposes potential alloys that could be considered for use in an elemental powder mixing technique.

  6. Preparation of metal diboride powders

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, J.; Bamberger, C.E.

    Finely-divided titanium diboride or zirconium diboride powders are formed by reacting gaseous boron trichloride with a material selected from the group of consisting of titanium powder, zirconium powder, titanium dichloride powder, titanium trichloride powder, and gaseous titanium trichloride.

  7. Preparation of titanium diboride powder

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, Jorulf; Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1985-01-01

    Finely-divided titanium diboride or zirconium diboride powders are formed by reacting gaseous boron trichloride with a material selected from the group consisting of titanium powder, zirconium powder, titanium dichloride powder, titanium trichloride powder, and gaseous titanium trichloride.

  8. Determination of boron isotope ratios and rare earth elements by ETC-ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Richner, P.; Wanner, B.

    1994-12-31

    Matrix modifiers play an important role in ETV-ICP-MS as they do in GF-AAS. In ETV-ICP-MS matrix modifiers, which are used as carriers for the analyte from the furnace to the ICP, enhance both sensitivity and reproducibility. Furthermore, matrix modifiers can be used to bring the element investigated into a specific compound with certain properties. The graphite furnace plays the role of a chemical reactor. In GF-AAS volatile elements are transformed into refractory compounds in order to prevent loss during the ashing stage of the temperature program. In ETV-ICP-MS, refractory elements can be transformed into volatile compounds with the help of matrix modifiers. Both B and the REE`s are known to form refractory compounds such as carbides and oxides which make them difficult to analyze by GF-AAS. However, halides of both B and the REE`s have boiling points below 2000{degrees}C. If these compounds are formed within the furnace the analyte elements can then be effectively transported into the ICP where they will be consequentially atomized and ionized. The technique will be applied to the determination of boron isotope ratios in a tracer study of the boron metabolism in vegetables, using NH4F as a matrix modifier, and the determination of REE`s in geological samples, with CHF{sub 3} as matrix modifier.

  9. Discrete element modeling of powder consolidation and the formation of titanium-matrix composites from powder-fiber monotapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, Kenneth James

    A three year research effort is completed with the development of the Discrete Element Consolidation Analyzer (DECA) for process modeling the formation of titanium composites from powder-fiber monotapes. The primary goal of the DECA process model is to provide a statistically realistic analysis of the various physical processes necessary to achieve higher quality composites from the powder-fiber technique. Over the course of this effort, research and code development was conducted in three distinct stages. The first stage focused on the simulation of initial geometry of the powder and fibers as well as the evolution of tape configuration during the pre-consolidation processing steps. The second stage developed the mechanics of the discrete element powder consolidation and the material characterization methods necessary to model the viscoplastic response of the powder to transient thermal and mechanical boundary conditions. The final stage incorporated the presence of fibers to evaluate the interaction mechanics and possible fibers damage resulting from discrete powder-fiber contacts. As a conclusion to the research, DECA model predictions of density versus time for various consolidation profiles are directly compared to actual consolidation test results and a DECA prescribed process profile is used to fabricate a 6sp{''} × 6sp{''} composite panel of Ti-6242/SCS-6. In completing this research, the discrete element modeling technique has proven to be a powerful tool for the analysis and simulation of metal powder consolidation as well as the consolidation of metal matrix composites. The DECA code orchestrates the use of particle kinetics, some simple aspects of gas dynamics, elasticity, plasticity, creep and various innovative material characterization methods to produce a seamless analysis for powder metallurgy processing of composites. Through the application of the DECA capability, many aspects of the processing stages have been elucidated for further

  10. Preparation of nanocrystalline TiN coated cubic boron nitride powders by a sol-gel process.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee S; Umer, M Adeel; Ryu, Ho J; Hong, Soon H

    2011-01-01

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles coated with 20 wt% nanocrystalline TiN were prepared by coating the surface of cBN particles with TiO2, followed by nitridation with NH3 gas at 900 degrees C. Coating of TiO2 on cBN powders was accomplished by a sol-gel process from a solution of titanium (IV) isopropoxide and anhydrous ethanol. An amorphous TiO(x) layer of 50 nm thickness was homogenously formed on the surface of the cBN particles by the sol-gel process. The amorphous layer was then crystallized to an anatase TiO2 phase through calcination in air at 400 degrees C. The crystallized TiO2 layer was 50 nm in thickness, and the size of TiO2 particles comprising the layer was nearly 10 nm. The TiO2 on cBN surfaces was completely converted into nanocrystalline TiN of uniform particles 20 nm in size on cBN particles by nitridation under flowing NH3 gas. PMID:21446456

  11. Air toxics in coal: Distribution and abundance of selected trace elements in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, S.S.; Stanton, R.W.

    1994-12-31

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments identified 12 potentially toxic elements, called ``air toxics,`` that may be released during the combustion of coal. The elements identified in the amendments are As, Be, Cd, Cr, Co, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and U (radionuclides). In this study, the distribution and concentration of these elements were examined, on a whole-coal basis, in samples from two cores of the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed (Paleocene, Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation), in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The distribution of these elements in the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed is also compared to the distribution of the same elements in a correlative coal bed, the Anderson-Dietz 1 coal bed in the Powder River Basin of Montana.

  12. Bifunctional air electrodes containing elemental iron powder charging additive

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chia-tsun; Demczyk, Brian G.; Gongaware, Paul R.

    1982-01-01

    A bifunctional air electrode for use in electrochemical energy cells is made, comprising a hydrophilic layer and a hydrophobic layer, where the hydrophilic layer essentially comprises a hydrophilic composite which includes: (i) carbon; (ii) elemental iron particles having a particle size of between about 25 microns and about 700 microns diameter; (iii) an oxygen evolution material; (iv) a nonwetting agent; and (v) a catalyst, where at least one current collector is formed into said composite.

  13. The use of amorphous boron powder enhances mechanical alloying in soft magnetic FeNbB alloy: A magnetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipus, J. J.; Blázquez, J. S.; Franco, V.; Conde, A.

    2013-05-01

    Saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy have been studied during mechanical alloying of Fe75Nb10B15 alloys prepared using crystalline and commercial amorphous boron. The evolution of saturation magnetization indicates a more efficient dissolution of boron into the matrix using amorphous boron, particularly for short milling times. The magnetization of the crystalline phase increases as boron is incorporated into this phase. Two milling time regimes can be used to describe the evolution of magnetic anisotropy: a first regime governed by microstrains and a second one mainly governed by crystal size and amorphous fraction.

  14. The use of amorphous boron powder enhances mechanical alloying in soft magnetic FeNbB alloy: A magnetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Ipus, J. J.; Blazquez, J. S.; Franco, V.; Conde, A.

    2013-05-07

    Saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy have been studied during mechanical alloying of Fe{sub 75}Nb{sub 10}B{sub 15} alloys prepared using crystalline and commercial amorphous boron. The evolution of saturation magnetization indicates a more efficient dissolution of boron into the matrix using amorphous boron, particularly for short milling times. The magnetization of the crystalline phase increases as boron is incorporated into this phase. Two milling time regimes can be used to describe the evolution of magnetic anisotropy: a first regime governed by microstrains and a second one mainly governed by crystal size and amorphous fraction.

  15. Boron nitrides synthesized directly from the elements at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, M.; Yoo, C.S.; Akella, J.; Cynn, H.

    1996-11-01

    We use angle-resolved synchrotron x-ray diffraction, laser sample heating, and diamond-anvil cells to follow in-situ chemical reactions directly between elemental boron and nitrogen. The structures of the solid reaction products vary with pressure. Below 10 GPa, hexagonal BN is the product; cubic or wurzite BN form at higher pressures. Under nitrogen-rich conditions, another hexagonal allotrope occurs which seems to be a new highly transparent, low density h`-BN. No direct reactions occur at ambient temperature even at pressures as high as 50 GPa, implying that a large activation barrier limits the kinetics of these exothermic processes. Laser heating overcomes the large kinetic activation barrier and initiates spontaneous, self-sustaining exothermic reactions even at moderate pressures.

  16. Finite element model of iron powder compaction at above room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Ariffin, A. K.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the finite element modelling of iron powder compaction process at above ambient temperature. The deformation behaviour of powder mass at elevated temperature was assumed to be rate independent thermo-elastoplastic material where the material constitutive laws were derived based on a continuum mechanics approach by considering a large displacement based finite element formulation. The temperature dependent material parameters were established through experimentation. Two constitutive relations namely Mohr-Coulomb and Elliptical Cap yield models were used to represent the deformation behaviour of the powder mass during the compaction process. These yield models were tested, however an Elliptical Cap model was shown to be the most appropriate to represent the compaction process. The staggered-incremental-iterative solution strategy was established to solve the non-linearity in the systems of equations. Some numerical simulation results were validated through experimentation, where a good agreement was observed.

  17. Fabrication of boron articles

    DOEpatents

    Benton, Samuel T.

    1976-01-01

    This invention is directed to the fabrication of boron articles by a powder metallurgical method wherein the articles are of a density close to the theoretical density of boron and are essentially crackfree. The method comprises the steps of admixing 1 to 10 weight percent carbon powder with amorphous boron powder, cold pressing the mixture and then hot pressing the cold pressed compact into the desired article. The addition of the carbon to the mixture provides a pressing aid for inhibiting the cracking of the hot pressed article and is of a concentration less than that which would cause the articles to possess significant concentrations of boron carbide.

  18. Microwave sintering of boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Blake, R.D.; Katz, J.D.; Petrovic, J.J.; Sheinberg, H.

    1988-06-10

    A method for forming boron carbide into a particular shape and densifying the green boron carbide shape. Boron carbide in powder form is pressed into a green shape and then sintered, using a microwave oven, to obtain a dense boron carbide body. Densities of greater than 95% of theoretical density have been obtained. 1 tab.

  19. Glacial-interglacial Changes in Ocean Carbon Chemistry constrained by Boron Isotopes, Trace Elements, and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, J. W. B.; Adkins, J. F.; Foreman, A. D.; Charles, C.

    2014-12-01

    Deep ocean carbon storage and release is commonly invoked to explain glacial-interglacial CO2 cycles, but records of the carbonate chemistry of the glacial ocean have, until recently, been scarce. Here we present new boron isotope (δ11B) and trace metal data from benthic foraminifera from a suite of 15 cores from the South Atlantic from depths ranging from 1500 to 4000 m. These records show distinct changes in the water column depth structure of these tracers between the last glacial maximum (LGM) and late Holocene. Comparison of these paired trace element and isotope ratios reveals new insights to the shared and individual controls on tracers including Li/Ca, Sr/Ca, U/Ca, Mg/Li and δ11B. We further examine these data using a recently developed tracer fields modelling approach (Lund et al. 2011). This has previously been applied to δ18O data to investigate changes in circulation at the LGM. Here we extend this method to non-conservative isotopic and trace elemental tracers, allowing us to constrain the roles of circulation, the biological pump of organic carbon and CaCO3, and carbonate compensation, in setting deep ocean carbon storage at the LGM. Lund, D. C., J. F. Adkins, and R. Ferrari (2011), Abyssal Atlantic circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum: Constraining the ratio between transport and vertical mixing, Paleoceanography, 26, PA1213, doi:10.1029/2010PA001938.

  20. Elastic and Piezoelectric Properties of Boron Nitride Nanotube Composites. Part II; Finite Element Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. Alicia; Hardie, Robert; Yamakov, Vesselin; Park, Cheol

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the second part of a two-part series where the first part presents a molecular dynamics model of a single Boron Nitride Nanotube (BNNT) and this paper scales up to multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix. This paper presents finite element (FE) models to investigate the effective elastic and piezoelectric properties of (BNNT) nanocomposites. The nanocomposites studied in this paper are thin films of polymer matrix with aligned co-planar BNNTs. The FE modelling approach provides a computationally efficient way to gain an understanding of the material properties. We examine several FE models to identify the most suitable models and investigate the effective properties with respect to the BNNT volume fraction and the number of nanotube walls. The FE models are constructed to represent aligned and randomly distributed BNNTs in a matrix of resin using 2D and 3D hollow and 3D filled cylinders. The homogenisation approach is employed to determine the overall elastic and piezoelectric constants for a range of volume fractions. These models are compared with an analytical model based on Mori-Tanaka formulation suitable for finite length cylindrical inclusions. The model applies to primarily single-wall BNNTs but is also extended to multi-wall BNNTs, for which preliminary results will be presented. Results from the Part 1 of this series can help to establish a constitutive relationship for input into the finite element model to enable the modeling of multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix.

  1. Finite Element Modeling and Analysis of Powder Stream in Low Pressure Cold Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Tarun; Walia, Ravinderjit Singh; Sharma, Prince; Sidhu, Tejinder Singh

    2016-07-01

    Low pressure cold gas dynamic spray (LPCGDS) is a coating process that utilize low pressure gas (5-10 bars instead of 25-30 bars) and the radial injection of powder instead of axial injection with the particle range (1-50 μm). In the LPCGDS process, pressurized compressed gas is accelerated to the critical velocity, which depends on length of the divergent section of nozzle, the propellant gas and particle characteristics, and the diameters ratio of the inlet and outer diameters. This paper presents finite element modeling (FEM) of powder stream in supersonic nozzle wherein adiabatic gas flow and expansion of gas occurs in uniform manner and the same is used to evaluate the resultant temperature and velocity contours during coating process. FEM analyses were performed using commercial finite volume package, ANSYS CFD FLUENT. The results are helpful to predict the characteristics of powder stream at the exit of the supersonic nozzle.

  2. Finite Element Modeling and Analysis of Powder Stream in Low Pressure Cold Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Tarun; Walia, Ravinderjit Singh; Sharma, Prince; Sidhu, Tejinder Singh

    2016-05-01

    Low pressure cold gas dynamic spray (LPCGDS) is a coating process that utilize low pressure gas (5-10 bars instead of 25-30 bars) and the radial injection of powder instead of axial injection with the particle range (1-50 μm). In the LPCGDS process, pressurized compressed gas is accelerated to the critical velocity, which depends on length of the divergent section of nozzle, the propellant gas and particle characteristics, and the diameters ratio of the inlet and outer diameters. This paper presents finite element modeling (FEM) of powder stream in supersonic nozzle wherein adiabatic gas flow and expansion of gas occurs in uniform manner and the same is used to evaluate the resultant temperature and velocity contours during coating process. FEM analyses were performed using commercial finite volume package, ANSYS CFD FLUENT. The results are helpful to predict the characteristics of powder stream at the exit of the supersonic nozzle.

  3. Method of manufacturing iron aluminide by thermomechanical processing of elemental powders

    SciTech Connect

    Deevi, S.C.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.; Sikka, V.K.; Hajaligol, M.R.

    2000-03-07

    A powder metallurgical process is dislosed for preparing iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 20 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as {<=}1% Cr, {>=}05% Zr or ZrO{sub 2} stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element, {<=}2% Ti, {<=}2% Mo, {<=}1% Zr, {<=}1% C, {<=}0.1% B, {<=}30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {<=}1 % rare earth metal, {<=}1% oxygen, and/or {<=}3% Cu. The process includes forming a mixture of aluminum powder and iron powder, shaping the mixture into an article such as by cold rolling the mixture into a sheet, and sintering the article at a temperature sufficient to react the iron and aluminum powders and form iron aluminide. The sintering can be followed by hot or cold rolling to reduce porosity created during the sintering step and optional annealing steps in a vacuum or inert atmosphere.

  4. Simulation of Powder Layer Deposition in Additive Manufacturing Processes Using the Discrete Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Herbold, E. B.; Walton, O.; Homel, M. A.

    2015-10-26

    This document serves as a final report to a small effort where several improvements were added to a LLNL code GEODYN-­L to develop Discrete Element Method (DEM) algorithms coupled to Lagrangian Finite Element (FE) solvers to investigate powder-­bed formation problems for additive manufacturing. The results from these simulations will be assessed for inclusion as the initial conditions for Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) simulations performed with ALE3D. The algorithms were written and performed on parallel computing platforms at LLNL. The total funding level was 3-­4 weeks of an FTE split amongst two staff scientists and one post-­doc. The DEM simulations emulated, as much as was feasible, the physical process of depositing a new layer of powder over a bed of existing powder. The DEM simulations utilized truncated size distributions spanning realistic size ranges with a size distribution profile consistent with realistic sample set. A minimum simulation sample size on the order of 40-­particles square by 10-­particles deep was utilized in these scoping studies in order to evaluate the potential effects of size segregation variation with distance displaced in front of a screed blade. A reasonable method for evaluating the problem was developed and validated. Several simulations were performed to show the viability of the approach. Future investigations will focus on running various simulations investigating powder particle sizing and screen geometries.

  5. Method of manufacturing iron aluminide by thermomechanical processing of elemental powders

    DOEpatents

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton; Sikka, Vinod K.; Hajaligol, Mohammed R.

    2000-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 20 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1 % rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a mixture of aluminum powder and iron powder, shaping the mixture into an article such as by cold rolling the mixture into a sheet, and sintering the article at a temperature sufficient to react the iron and aluminum powders and form iron aluminide. The sintering can be followed by hot or cold rolling to reduce porosity created during the sintering step and optional annealing steps in a vacuum or inert atmosphere.

  6. Elemental boron-doped p(+)-SiGe layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy for infrared detector applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. L.; George, T.; Jones, E. W.; Ksendzov, A.; Huberman, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    SiGe/Si heterojunction internal photoemission (HIP) detectors have been fabricated utilizing molecular beam epitaxy of p(+)-SiGe layers on p(-)-Si substrates. Elemental boron from a high-temperature effusion cell was used as the dopant source during MBE growth, and high doping concentrations have been achieved. Strong infrared absorption, mainly by free-carrier absorption, was observed for the degenerately doped SiGe layers. The use of elemental boron as the dopant source allows a low MBE growth temperature, resulting in improved crystalline quality and smooth surface morphology of the Si(0.7)Ge(0.3) layers. Nearly ideal thermionic emission dark current characteristics have been obtained. Photoresponse of the HIP detectors in the long-wavelength infrared regime has been demonstrated.

  7. Homoepitaxial Boron Doped Diamond Anvils as Heating Elements in a Diamond Anvil Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jeffrey; Samudrala, Gopi; Smith, Spencer; Tsoi, Georgiy; Vohra, Yogesh; Weir, Samuel

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in designer-diamond technology have allowed for the use of electrically and thermally conducting homoepitaxially-grown layers of boron-doped diamond (grown at 1200 °C with a 2% mixture of CH4 in H, resulting in extremely high doping levels ~ 1020/cm3) to be used as heating elements in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). These diamonds allow for precise control of the temperature inside of the diamond anvil itself, particularly when coupled with a cryostat. Furthermore, the unmatched thermally conducting nature of diamond ensures that no significant lateral gradient in temperature occurs across the culet area. Since a thermocouple can easily be attached anywhere on the diamond surface, we can also measure diamond temperatures directly. With two such heaters, one can raise sample temperatures uniformly, or with any desired gradient along the pressure axis while preserving optical access. In our continuing set of benchmark experiments, we use two newly created matching heater anvils with 500 μm culets to analyze the various fluorescence emission lines of ruby microspheres, which show more complicated behavior than traditional ruby chips. We also report on the temperature dependence of the high-pressure Raman modes of paracetamol (C8H9NO2) up to 20 GPa.

  8. Boron: a frustrated element. Physical properties at ambient conditions and under pressure from ab-initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogitsu, Tadashi; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    2004-03-01

    Boron is the only low-Z element in the periodic table whose atomic ground state structure has not yet been fully determined. For example, it is yet unclear whether perfectly pure elemental Boron is stable in an ordered crystalline form and the number of atoms in the unit cell (varying from 315 to about 325) is still the subject of debate. Using ab-initio calculations and supercells with 1260-1280 atoms, we have studied the physical properties of Boron at ambient conditions and under pressure (P). Results about the ionic and electronic structure will be presented, in particular the role of interstitial atoms and the presence of localized states right above the Fermi level will be discussed in detail. The computed equation of state under pressure is in agreement with recent experimental data. At about 120 GPa we observe amorphization, consistent with the results of Ref. [1] at l00 GPa. Amorphization occurs by random deformation of icosahedral units which remain intact; it is accompanied by a delocalization of states near the Fermi level yielding a poorly conducting system. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy at the University of California/ LLNL under contract no. W-7405-Eng-48. [1] Sanz et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 245501 (2002)

  9. Rapid Synthesis of a Near-β Titanium Alloy by Blended Elemental Powder Metallurgy (BEPM) with Induction Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Mingtu; Gabbitas, Brian

    2015-10-01

    A near-β Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al alloy was produced by blended elemental powder metallurgy combining warm compaction and induction sintering. Two Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al powder compacts with different oxygen content were manufactured by mixing PREP and HDH Ti powders with Cr and AlV master alloy powders, respectively. The effect of isothermal holding time, at a sintering temperature of 1573 K (1300 °C), on pore characteristics and compositional homogeneity was investigated in this study. Pore coarsening by Ostwald ripening occurred with an increase in the isothermal holding time and Kirkendall voids were produced by a reaction between Ti and Cr. After an isothermal holding time of 10 minutes, the two sintered powder compacts had a homogeneous composition. Ti/AlV and Ti/Cr diffusion couples were used to predict the distribution of alloying elements, and the binary Ti-V, Ti-Al, and Ti-Cr interdiffusion coefficients were consistent with the distribution of alloying elements after isothermal holding. The mechanical properties of sintered powder compacts, prepared using PREP Ti powder as the raw powder, were optimized by sintered density and pore size.

  10. Effect of α-Si3N4 Addition on Sintering of α-Sialon Powder via Carbonthermal Reduction Nitridation of Boron-rich Slag-based Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junbin; Jiang, Tao; Xue, Xiangxin

    2011-10-01

    With boron-rich slag, silica fume, bauxite chalmette, carbon black and α-Si3N4 as starting materials, α-Sialon powders were prepared by carbothermal reduction-nitridation(CRN). Different contents of α-Si3N4 addition were added to investigate the α-Sialon formation as a function of α-Si3N4 addition from boron rich slag based mixture fired at 1480 °C for 8 h under N2 flowing of 0.4 L/min. Phase assembly, microstructure of reaction products were determined by X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscope. The results showed that the main phases of the samples were a-Sialon, h-BN, AlN and small quantity of SiC. With the increasing amount of the α-Si3N4 addition, the h-BN content remained in a constant and AlN content was running down steadily, while the α-Sialon content increased gradually. The aspect ratio and the amount of elongated α-Sialon grains could be tailored by using different amounts of the α-Si3N4 addition.

  11. Process for making boron nitride using sodium cyanide and boron

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1990-02-06

    This a very simple process for making boron nitride by mixing sodium cyanide and boron phosphate and heating the mixture in an inert atmosphere until a reaction takes place. The product is a white powder of boron nitride that can be used in applications that require compounds that are stable at high temperatures and that exhibit high electrical resistance.

  12. Process for making boron nitride using sodium cyanide and boron

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1990-01-01

    This a very simple process for making boron nitride by mixing sodium cyanide and boron phosphate and heating the mixture in an inert atmosphere until a reaction takes place. The product is a white powder of boron nitride that can be used in applications that require compounds that are stable at high temperatures and that exhibit high electrical resistance.

  13. Applications of pulsed neutron powder diffraction to actinide elements. [Pu-Al

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, A.C.; Richardson, J.W.; Mueller, M.H.; Lander, G.H.; Goldstone, J.A.; Williams, A.; Kwei, G.H.; Von Dreele, R.B.; Faber, J. Jr.; Hitterman, R.L.

    1987-11-01

    We have been using the technique of pulsed neutron powder diffraction to study several problems in the physics and chemistry of the actinide elements. In these elements one often encounters very complex structures resulting from polymorphic transformations presumably induced by the presence of 5f-electrons. For example, at least five distinct structures of plutonium metal are found between room temperature and its melting point of 640/sup 0/C, and two of the structures are monoclinc. The determination of the crystal structure of beta-uranium (tetragonal, 30 atoms per unit cell) which has finnaly been shown to be centrosymmetric, after decades of uncertainty is discussed. Some preliminary results on the structure of alpha-plutonium (which confirm Zachariasen's original determination of the monoclinic structure) are presented. Pu-Al alloys were also studied. 12 refs., 18 figs.

  14. Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative Sulfenylation of Indoles and Related Electron-Rich Heteroarenes with Aryl Boronic Acids and Elemental Sulfur.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianxiao; Li, Chunsheng; Yang, Shaorong; An, Yanni; Wu, Wanqing; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2016-09-01

    An efficient and convenient palladium-catalyzed C-H bond oxidative sulfenylation of indoles and related electron-rich heteroarenes with aryl boronic acids and elemental sulfur has been described. This procedure provides a useful and direct approach for the assembly of a wide range of structurally diverse 3-sulfenylheteroarenes with moderate to excellent yields from simple and readily available starting materials. Moreover, this synthetic protocol is suitable for N-protected and unprotected indoles. Notably, the construction of two C-S bonds in one step was also achieved in this transformation. PMID:27500941

  15. Average bond energies between boron and elements of the fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh groups of the periodic table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altshuller, Aubrey P

    1955-01-01

    The average bond energies D(gm)(B-Z) for boron-containing molecules have been calculated by the Pauling geometric-mean equation. These calculated bond energies are compared with the average bond energies D(exp)(B-Z) obtained from experimental data. The higher values of D(exp)(B-Z) in comparison with D(gm)(B-Z) when Z is an element in the fifth, sixth, or seventh periodic group may be attributed to resonance stabilization or double-bond character.

  16. Boron-substituted 1,3-dienes and heterodienes as key elements in multicomponent processes

    PubMed Central

    Eberlin, Ludovic; Tripoteau, Fabien; Carreaux, François

    2014-01-01

    Summary In the last few years, multicomponent reactions involving boron substituted 1,3-dienes have emerged as important tools in synthetic organic chemistry. The most significant recent results and developments obtained in this area are reported in this review. PMID:24605143

  17. Synthesis of Ti-Ta alloys with dual structure by incomplete diffusion between elemental powders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Li, Kaiyang; Wu, Hong; Song, Min; Wang, Wen; Li, Nianfeng; Tang, Huiping

    2015-11-01

    In this work, powder metallurgical (PM) Ti-Ta alloys were sintered using blended elemental powders. A dual structure, consisting of Ti-rich and Ta-rich zones, was formed due to the insufficient diffusion between Ti and Ta powders. The microstructure, mechanical properties and in vitro biological properties of the alloys were studied. Results indicated that the alloys have inhomogenous microstructures and compositions, but the grain structures were continuous from the Ti-rich zone to the Ta-rich zone. The Ta-rich zone exhibited a much finer grain size than the Ti-rich zone. The alloys had a high relative density in the range of 95-98%, with the porosity increasing with the content of Ta due to the increased difficulty in sintering and the formation of Kirkendall pores. The alloys had a good combination of low elastic modulus and high tensile strength. The strength of alloys was almost doubled compared to that of the ingot metallurgy alloys with the same compositions. The low elastic modulus was due to the residual pores and the alloying effect of Ta, while the high tensile strength resulted from the strengthening effects of solid solution, fine grain size and α phase. The alloys had a high biocompatibility due to the addition of Ta, and were suitable for the attachment of cells due to the surface porosity. It was also indicated that PM Ti-(20-30)Ta alloys are promising for biomedical applications after the evaluations of both the mechanical and the biological properties. PMID:26275506

  18. Fabrication of NiAl intermetallic from dense elemental powder blends via solid state reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Farber, L.; Gotman, I.; Gutmanas, E.Y.

    1997-12-31

    Dense NiAl intermetallic was synthesized from very fine elemental powders via solid state reactions. Homogeneous blends of micron size Ni and Al powders were consolidated to full density and heat treated in a 425--800 C temperature range. During heat treatment, formation of various intermediate intermetallics phases: NiAl{sub 3}, Ni{sub 2}Al{sub 3}, Ni{sub 3}Al and NiAl was observed. The sequence and kinetics of these phase formations at different temperatures were studied employing X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). A model for a description of synthesis reaction kinetics in Ni-Al blends was developed. Based on the obtained results, the synthesis of NiAl was performed in two stages: reactions in 425--550 C range with consumption of Al, followed by a reaction at up to 800 C. It allowed uncontrolled SHS (self propagating high temperature synthesis, resulting in the occurrence of liquid phases and in formation of reaction products in a very fast/explosive manner) to be avoided. The synthesis temperatures are considerably lower than those used currently in processing of NiAl.

  19. Application of powder metallurgy techniques to produce improved bearing elements for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moracz, D. J.; Shipley, R. J.; Moxson, V. S.; Killman, R. J.; Munson, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective was to apply powder metallurgy techniques for the production of improved bearing elements, specifically balls and races, for advanced cryogenic turbopump bearings. The materials and fabrication techniques evaluated were judged on the basis of their ability to improve fatigue life, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) propellant bearings over the currently used 440C. An extensive list of candidate bearing alloys in five different categories was considered: tool/die steels, through hardened stainless steels, cobalt-base alloys, and gear steels. Testing of alloys for final consideration included hardness, rolling contact fatigue, cross cylinder wear, elevated temperature wear, room and cryogenic fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking, and five-ball (rolling-sliding element) testing. Results of the program indicated two alloys that showed promise for improved bearing elements. These alloys were MRC-2001 and X-405. 57mm bearings were fabricated from the MRC-2001 alloy for further actual hardware rig testing by NASA-MSFC.

  20. A Novel Powder Metallurgy Processing Approach to Prepare Fine-Grained Cu-Al-Ni Shape-Memory Alloy Strips from Elemental Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajpai, S. K.; Dube, R. K.; Chatterjee, P.; Sangal, S.

    2012-07-01

    The current work describes the experimental results related to the successful preparation of fine-grained, Cu-Al-Ni, high-temperature shape-memory alloy (SMA) strips from elemental Cu, Al, and Ni powders via a novel powder metallurgy (P/M) processing approach. This route consists of short time period ball milling of elemental powder mixture, preform preparation from milled powder, sintering of preforms, hot-densification rolling of unsheathed sintered powder preforms under protective atmosphere, and postconsolidation homogenization treatment of the hot-rolled strips. It has been shown that it is possible to prepare chemically homogeneous Cu-Al-Ni SMA strips consisting of equiaxed grains of average size approximately 6 μm via the current processing approach. It also has been shown that fine-grained microstructure in the finished Cu-Al-Ni SMA strips resulted from the pinning effect of nanosized alumina particles present on the grain boundaries. The finished SMA strips were almost fully martensitic in nature, consisting of a mixture of β1^' } - and γ1^' } -type martensites. The Cu-Al-Ni SMA strips had 677 MPa average fracture strength, coupled with 13 pct average fracture strain. The fractured surfaces of the specimens exhibited primarily dimpled ductile type of fracture, together with some transgranular mode of fracture. The Cu-Al-Ni strips exhibited an almost 100 pct one-way shape recovery after bending followed by unconstrained heating at 1, 2, and 4 pct applied deformation prestrain. The two-way shape-memory strain was found approximately 0.35 pct after 15 training cycles at 4 pct applied training prestrain.

  1. Development of improved analytical procedures for boron purification: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, J.D.; Fossey, J.L.; Hinds, S.C.; Lantz, L.L.; Smith, R.E.

    1988-06-01

    Three new analytical methods for boron powder certification were developed and evaluated during this project. First, the boric acid content of the powder was determined by an acid-base titration method. Second, the moisture content of boron samples was measured with a moisture evolution analyzer. Third, boron powder samples were acid digested in a microwave oven. 11 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  2. Carbon doping of precursor boron powder for control of normal resistance of MgB2 bulks for specific use in fault current limiter applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, J.; Jarvis, A. L. L.

    2014-05-01

    Magnesium Diboride (MgB2) bulk superconductor has been manufactured in order to study the enhancement of the normal resistivity for application to superconducting fault current limiters (SFCLs). SFCLs have proven to be a viable means for limiting surge currents by dissipating fault energy as the superconductor quenches. As the current limiting behaviour is determined by the normal resistivity (ρn), research has been conducted to evaluate an effective means to increase ρn for bulk superconducting MgB2, which is intrinsically much lower than for high temperature superconductors. Intragranular carbon doping has been confirmed as a means to increase ρn, and was implemented by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on the boron precursor powder by ethylene gas at 600 °C for durations up to 6 hours in a tubular furnace apparatus. In situ manufacturing of MgB2 bulk was performed using the reactive liquid magnesium infiltration technique. Overall, carbon doping provided a factor of 11.00 increase in the residual resistivity, ρ0, which provides the initial limiting action to fault currents, for an accompanying decrease in the critical temperature, Tc, of 2 K.

  3. Rapid Quantitative Analyses of Elements on Herb Medicine and Food Powder Using TEA CO2 Laser-Induced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khumaeni, Ali; Ramli, Muliadi; Idris, Nasrullah; Lee, Yong Inn; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lie, Tjung Jie; Deguchi, Yoji; Niki, Hideaki; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2009-03-01

    A novel technique for rapid quantitative analyses of elements on herb medicine and food powder has successfully been developed. In this technique, the powder samples were plugged in a small hole (2 mm in diameter and 3 mm in depth) and covered by a metal mesh. The Transversely Excited Atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser (1500 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on the powder sample surfaces passing through the metal mesh at atmospheric pressure of nitrogen surrounding gas. It is hypothesized that the small hole functions to confine the powder particles and suppresses the blowing-off, while the metal mesh works as the source of electrons to initiate the strong gas breakdown plasma. The confined powder particles are subsequently ablated by the laser irradiation and the ablated particles move into the strong gas breakdown plasma region to be atomized and excited. Using this method, a quantitative analysis of the milk powder sample containing different concentrations of Ca was successfully demonstrated, resulting in a good linear calibration curve with high precision.

  4. Finite element modelling of process-integrated powder coating by radial axial rolling of rings

    SciTech Connect

    Frischkorn, J.; Kebriaei, R.; Reese, S.; Moll, H.; Theisen, W.; Husmann, T.; Meier, H.

    2011-05-04

    The process-integrated powder coating by radial axial rolling of rings represents a new hybrid production technique applied in the manufacturing of large ring-shaped work pieces with functional layers. It is thought to break some limitations that come along with the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) which is used nowadays to apply the powdery layer material onto the rolled substrate ring. Within the new process the compaction of the layer material is integrated into the ring rolling and HIP becomes dispensable. Following this approach the rolling of such compound rings brings up some new challenges. The volume of a solid ring stays nearly constant during the rolling. This behaviour can be exploited to determine the infeed of the rollers needed to reach the desired ring shape. Since volume consistency cannot be guaranteed for the rolling of a compound ring the choice of appropriate infeed of the rollers is still an open question. This paper deals with the finite element (FE) simulation of this new process. First, the material model that is used to describe the compaction of the layer material is shortly reviewed. The main focus of the paper is then put on a parameterized FE ring rolling model that incorporates a control system in order to stabilize the process. Also the differences in the behaviour during the rolling stage between a compound and a solid ring will be discussed by means of simulation results.

  5. Fabrication of zero power reactor fuel elements containing /sup 233/U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ powder

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, R G; Parrott, J R; Krichinsky, A M; Box, W D; Martin, C W; Whitson, W R

    1982-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory, under contract with Argonne National Laboratory, completed the fabrication of 1743 fuel elements for use in their Zero Power Reactor. The contract also included recovery of 20 kg of /sup 233/U from rejected elements. This report describes the steps associated with conversion of purified uranyl nitrate (as solution) to U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ powder (suitable for fuel) and subsequent charging, sealing, decontamination, and testing of the fuel elements (packets) preparatory to shipment. The nuclear safety, radiation exposures, and quality assurance aspects of the program are discussed.

  6. Structures, stability, mechanical and electronic properties of α-boron and α∗-boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chaoyu; Zhong, J. X.

    2013-04-01

    The structures, stability, mechanical and electronic properties of α-boron and a promising metastable boron phase (α*-boron) have been studied by first-principles calculations. α-boron and α*-boron consist of equivalent icosahedra B12 clusters in different connecting configurations of "3S-6D-3S" and "2S-6D-4S", respectively. The total energy calculations show that α*-boron is less stable than α-boron but more favorable than the well-known β-boron and γ-boron at zero pressure. Both α-boron and α*-boron are confirmed dynamically and mechanically stable. The mechanical and electronic properties of α-boron and α*-boron indicate that they are potential superhard semiconducting phases of element boron.

  7. [Determination of trace elements in sika bone powder by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with microwave digestion].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Yong; Han, Jin-Tu; Wang, Hui; Wang, Zhi-Wen

    2006-05-01

    Contents of trace elements in sika bone powder were determined with microwave digestion and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limits (3sigma, n = 11) are in the range of 0. 000 6-1. 498 ng x mL(-1) with relative standard deviations of 1.7%-6.8%. The recoveries are between 91% and 109%. The analytical results of national certified reference demonstrated the applicability of the proposed method. PMID:16883876

  8. Boron-Based Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Ban, Hyun Seung; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    The use of the element boron, which is not generally observed in a living body, possesses a high potential for the discovery of new biological activity in pharmaceutical drug design. In this account, we describe our recent developments in boron-based drug design, including boronic acid containing protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, and tubulin polymerization inhibitors, and ortho-carborane-containing proteasome activators, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 inhibitors, and topoisomerase inhibitors. Furthermore, we applied a closo-dodecaborate as a water-soluble moiety as well as a boron-10 source for the design of boron carriers in boron neutron capture therapy, such as boronated porphyrins and boron lipids for a liposomal boron delivery system. PMID:25800654

  9. [Determination of the content of eight metal elements in enteral nutritional powder (VIVONEX) by microwave digestion-AAS].

    PubMed

    Ding, Rui; Zhou, Chang-Ming; Ji, Hong; Yu, Li; Li, Zhi-Gang; Peng, Tao; Wang, Lin

    2011-11-01

    Enteral nutritional powder (VIVONEX) is mainly used to provide nourishment for critical patients and those patients who have just undergone surgical operation. Microelements included in it exert significant influence on the patients' physical functioning. In the present paper, Enteral nutritional powder was digested with HNO3 by microwave digestion. After that, the content of eight metal elements in it, K, Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn, was determined by FAAS. With the good linear correlations of standard curves (r = 0.999 2-0.999 8), the recovery (n = 6) ranging from 97% to 103%, and the RSD (n = 6) from 0.46% to 1.12%, the method can be applied to simultaneous determination of several metal elements in enteral nutritional powder, and offers advantages of low detection limit, high sensitivity, speediness and accuracy. The determination of metal elements in samples by this method gives satisfactory results. Hence, the method helps to guarantee quality control of this kind of medicine, and supplies statistical evidence for the safety of clinical drug use. PMID:22242533

  10. Fabrication of boron sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

    1995-02-28

    A process is disclosed for fabricating high density boron sputtering targets with sufficient mechanical strength to function reliably at typical magnetron sputtering power densities and at normal process parameters. The process involves the fabrication of a high density boron monolithe by hot isostatically compacting high purity (99.9%) boron powder, machining the boron monolithe into the final dimensions, and brazing the finished boron piece to a matching boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) piece, by placing aluminum foil there between and applying pressure and heat in a vacuum. An alternative is the application of aluminum metallization to the back of the boron monolithe by vacuum deposition. Also, a titanium based vacuum braze alloy can be used in place of the aluminum foil. 7 figs.

  11. Fabrication of boron sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; McKernan, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    A process for fabricating high density boron sputtering targets with sufficient mechanical strength to function reliably at typical magnetron sputtering power densities and at normal process parameters. The process involves the fabrication of a high density boron monolithe by hot isostatically compacting high purity (99.9%) boron powder, machining the boron monolithe into the final dimensions, and brazing the finished boron piece to a matching boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) piece, by placing aluminum foil there between and applying pressure and heat in a vacuum. An alternative is the application of aluminum metallization to the back of the boron monolithe by vacuum deposition. Also, a titanium based vacuum braze alloy can be used in place of the aluminum foil.

  12. Boron-lithium relationships in rhyolites and associated thermal waters of young silicic calderas, with comments on incompatible element behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, D.M. ); Sturchio, N.C. )

    1992-10-01

    This study had three goals: (1) to study B distribution in a rhyolitic volcanic sequence already extensively investigated for other elements; (2) to interpret the joint behavior of B and Li during the interaction of such rocks with subsurface waters; and (3) to assess the manner in which water affects the behavior of incompatible elements such as B and Gd. New B, Gd, and Sm analyses have been made on a suite of Yellowstone rhyolites, including fresh and partially devitrified glassy obsidian from surface exposures of several flows, a drill-core of increasing degrees of alteration in the Biscuit Basin Flow, and two drill-cores from other flows. Within the Biscuit Basin Flow, the Sm and Gd concentrations remain rather constant and behave conservatively, independent of alteration. Boron decreases from about 10 to 3 ppm with progressive alteration, and Li increases from about 40 ppm by a factor of 2-3 in the most altered rocks. Obsidians from the Valles and Long Valley calderas show greater Li loss during alteration. All the rhyolitic rocks lose B during aqueous alteration; the waters acquire both B and Li, but proportionately much more B. Natural waters of all kinds, including those from the three calderas, show six orders of magnitude range in aqueous B and Li, with a high degree of linear correlation and an average ratio B/Li essentially constant at 4.0. The linearity mainly expresses processes of dilution and concentration: reactions specific to B or Li engender waters with deviating B/Li.

  13. Mechanical behaviour of pressed and sintered titanium alloys obtained from prealloyed and blended elemental powders.

    PubMed

    Bolzoni, L; Esteban, P G; Ruiz-Navas, E M; Gordo, E

    2012-10-01

    The applicability of irregular prealloyed Ti-6Al-4V powder for the fabrication of titanium products by pressing and sintering and its employment as a master alloy to obtain the Ti-3Al-2.5V alloy was studied. To this end, the starting powders were characterised by dilatometry, differential thermal analysis and XRD. Green samples were obtained by cold uniaxial pressing, and the evolution of the microstructure over the sintering temperature range 900-1400°C was studied. The variation of the final density and mechanical properties with the sintering temperature was considered. Based on the study carried out, it can be stated that more reliable powders are needed to open the titanium market to new applications. A relative density of 95% and diverse microstructural features and mechanical properties equivalent to those of biomedical devices can be obtained by the pressing and sintering route. PMID:22963744

  14. Boron addition to alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Coad, B. C.

    1985-08-20

    A process for addition of boron to an alloy which involves forming a melt of the alloy and a reactive metal, selected from the group consisting of aluminum, titanium, zirconium and mixtures thereof to the melt, maintaining the resulting reactive mixture in the molten state and reacting the boric oxide with the reactive metal to convert at least a portion of the boric oxide to boron which dissolves in the resulting melt, and to convert at least portion of the reactive metal to the reactive metal oxide, which oxide remains with the resulting melt, and pouring the resulting melt into a gas stream to form a first atomized powder which is subsequently remelted with further addition of boric oxide, re-atomized, and thus reprocessed to convert essentially all the reactive metal to metal oxide to produce a powdered alloy containing specified amounts of boron.

  15. Experimental evidence of orbital order in α-B12 and γ-B28 polymorphs of elemental boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Swastik; van Smaalen, Sander; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; Prathapa, Siriyara Jagannatha; Noohinejad, Leila; Bykova, Elena; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2013-07-01

    The electron density of the α form of boron has been obtained by multipole refinement against high-resolution, single-crystal x-ray diffraction data measured on a high-quality single crystal at a temperature of 100 K. Topological properties of this density have been used to show that all chemical bonds between B12 clusters in α-B12 are formed due to one orbital on each boron atom that is oriented perpendicular to the surface of the cluster. It is shown that the same orbital order on B12 clusters persists in both α-B12 and γ-B28 polymorphs and in several dodecaboranes, despite the fact that in every case the B12 clusters participate in entirely different kinds of exocluster bonds. It is likely that the same orbital order of B12 clusters can explain bonding in other boron polymorphs and boron-rich solids.

  16. Major to ultra trace element bulk rock analysis of nanoparticulate pressed powder pellets by LA-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Daniel; Pettke, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    An efficient, clean procedure for bulk rock major to trace element analysis by 193 nm Excimer LA-ICP-MS analysis of nanoparticulate pressed powder pellets (PPPs) employing a binder is presented. Sample powders are milled in water suspension in a planetary ball mill, reducing average grain size by about one order of magnitude compared to common dry milling protocols. Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) is employed as a binder, improving the mechanical strength of the PPP and the ablation behaviour, because MCC absorbs 193 nm laser light well. Use of MCC binder allows for producing cohesive pellets of materials that cannot be pelletized in their pure forms, such as quartz powder. Rigorous blank quantification was performed on synthetic quartz treated like rock samples, demonstrating that procedural blanks are irrelevant except for a few elements at the 10 ng g‑1 concentration level. The LA-ICP-MS PPP analytical procedure was optimised and evaluated using six different SRM powders (JP-1, UB-N, BCR-2, GSP-2, OKUM, and MUH-1). Calibration based on external standardization using SRM 610, SRM 612, BCR-2G, and GSD-1G glasses allows for evaluation of possible matrix effects during LA-ICP-MS analysis. The data accuracy of the PPP LA-ICP-MS analytical procedure compares well to that achieved for liquid ICP-MS and LA-ICP-MS glass analysis, except for element concentrations below ˜30 ng g‑1, where liquid ICP-MS offers more precise data and in part lower limits of detection. Uncertainties on the external reproducibility of LA-ICP-MS PPP element concentrations are of the order of 0.5 to 2 % (1σ standard deviation) for concentrations exceeding ˜1 μg g‑1. For lower element concentrations these uncertainties increase to 5-10% or higher when analyte-depending limits of detection (LOD) are approached, and LODs do not significantly differ from glass analysis. Sample homogeneity is demonstrated by the high analytical precision, except for very few elements where grain size

  17. Laser-ablation ICP-MS as a tool for whole rock trace element analyses on fused powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, G.; Rooney, T. O.

    2013-12-01

    Here we present an accurate and precise technique for routine trace element analysis of geologic materials by laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). We focus on rock powders previously prepared for X-ray fluorescence by fusion in a Li2B4O7 flux, and subsequently quenched in a Pt mold to form a glass disk. Our method allows for the analysis up to 30 trace elements by LA-ICP-MS using a Photon-Machines Analyte G2 193 nm excimer laser coupled to a Thermo-Fisher Scientific ICAP Q quadrupole ICP-MS. Analyses are run as scans on the surface of the disks. Laser ablation conditions for which trace element fractionation effects are minimal have been empirically determined to be ~ 4 J m-2 fluence, at 10 Hz , and 10 μm s-1 scan speed, using a 110 μm laser beam size. Ablated material is carried into the ICP-MS by a He carrier at a rate of 0.75 L min-1. Following pre-ablation to remove surface particles, samples are ablated for 200 s, of which 140 s are used for data acquisition. At the end of each scan, a gas blank is collected for 30 s. Dwell times for each element vary between 15 and 60 μs, depending on abundance and instrument sensitivity, allowing 120 readings of each element during the data acquisition time window. To correct for variations in the total volume of material extracted by the laser, three internal standards are used, Ca, Fe and Zr. These elements are routinely analyzed by X-ray fluorescence by the Geoanalytical laboratory at Michigan State University with precision and accuracy of <5%. The availability of several internal standards allows for better correction of possible persisting laser ablation fractionation effects; for a particular trace element, we correct using the internal standard that best reproduces its ablation behavior. Our calibration is based on a combination of fused powders of US Geological Survey and Geological Survey of Japan rock standards, NIST SRM 612 glass, and US Geological Survey natural and

  18. Boron-lithium relationships in rhyolites and associated thermal waters of young silicic calderas, with comments on incompatible element behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Denis M.; Sturchio, Neil C.

    1992-10-01

    This study had three goals: (1) to study B distribution in a rhyolitic volcanic sequence already extensively investigated for other elements; (2) to interpret the joint behaviour of B and Li during the interaction of such rocks with subsurface waters; (3) to assess the manner in which water affects the behaviour of incompatible elements such as B and Gd. New B, Gd, and Sm analyses have been made on a suite of Yellowstone rhyolites, including fresh and partially devitrified glassy obsidian from surface exposures of several flows, drill-core of increasing degrees of alteration in the Biscuit Basin Flow, and two drill-cores from other flows. Within the Biscuit Basin Flow, the Sm and Gd concentrations remain rather constant (9-12 and 8-10 ppm, respectively) and behave conservatively, independent of alteration. Boron decreases from about 10 to 3 ppm with progressive alteration, and Li increases from about 40 ppm by a factor of 2-3 in the most altered rocks. Thermal waters reflect leaching from the fresh rocks, but contain much less Li than B ( B/Li ≈ 3 compared with 0.8 in fresh obsidian). Retention of Li was favoured by abundant illitic alteration. Obsidians from the Valles and Long Valley calderas show greater Li loss during alteration. All the rhyolitic rocks lose B during aqueous alteration; the waters acquire both B and Li, but proportionately much more B. Natural waters of all kinds, including those from the three calderas, show six orders of magnitude range in aqueous B and Li, with a high degree of linear correlation and an average ratio B/Li essentially constant at 4.0. The linearity mainly expresses processes of dilution and concentration: reactions specific to B or Li engender waters with deviating B/Li. The patterns of Sm-Gd-B-Li variation in rocks exemplify two kinds of behaviour. In petrological processes with no hydrous phase (lunar rocks, mantle, fresh seafloor basalt, the lower continental crust), these elements are incompatible and behave similarly

  19. [Ultra-Fine Pressed Powder Pellet Sample Preparation XRF Determination of Multi-Elements and Carbon Dioxide in Carbonate].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-li; An, Shu-qing; Xu, Tie-min; Liu, Yi-bo; Zhang, Li-juan; Zeng, Jiang-ping; Wang, Na

    2015-06-01

    The main analysis error of pressed powder pellet of carbonate comes from particle-size effect and mineral effect. So in the article in order to eliminate the particle-size effect, the ultrafine pressed powder pellet sample preparation is used to the determination of multi-elements and carbon-dioxide in carbonate. To prepare the ultrafine powder the FRITSCH planetary Micro Mill machine and tungsten carbide media is utilized. To conquer the conglomeration during the process of grinding, the wet grinding is preferred. The surface morphology of the pellet is more smooth and neat, the Compton scatter effect is reduced with the decrease in particle size. The intensity of the spectral line is varied with the change of the particle size, generally the intensity of the spectral line is increased with the decrease in the particle size. But when the particle size of more than one component of the material is decreased, the intensity of the spectral line may increase for S, Si, Mg, or decrease for Ca, Al, Ti, K, which depend on the respective mass absorption coefficient . The change of the composition of the phase with milling is also researched. The incident depth of respective element is given from theoretical calculation. When the sample is grounded to the particle size of less than the penetration depth of all the analyte, the effect of the particle size on the intensity of the spectral line is much reduced. In the experiment, when grounded the sample to less than 8 μm(d95), the particle-size effect is much eliminated, with the correction method of theoretical α coefficient and the empirical coefficient, 14 major, minor and trace element in the carbonate can be determined accurately. And the precision of the method is much improved with RSD < 2%, except Na2O. Carbon is ultra-light element, the fluorescence yield is low and the interference is serious. With the manual multi-layer crystal PX4, coarse collimator, empirical correction, X-ray spectrometer can be used to

  20. Magnetron sputtered boron films

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1998-01-01

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for producing hardened surfaces, surfacing machine tools, etc. and for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z optical components, such as mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  1. Magnetron sputtered boron films

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1998-06-16

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for producing hardened surfaces, surfacing machine tools, etc. and for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z optical components, such as mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence. 8 figs.

  2. Boron Clusters Come of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Russell N.

    2004-01-01

    Boron is the only element other than carbon that can build molecules of unlimited size by covalently boding to itself, a property known as catenation. In contrast to the chains and rings favored by carbon, boron arguably adopts a cluster motif that is reflected in the various forms of the pure element and in the huge area of polyhedral borane…

  3. METHOD OF PREPARING POLONIUM-BORON SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Birden, J.H.

    1959-08-01

    An improved technique is described for preparation of a polonium-boron neutron source. A selected amount of Po-210 is vaporized into a thin walled nickel container, then the desired amcunt of boron powder is added. After sealing the container, it is heated quickly by induction heating to vaporize the Po-210 and deposit it in the still cool boron powder. The unit is then quickly cooled to prevent revaporization of the Po-210 from the boron. The build-up of neutron emission may be followed by means of a neutron counter in order to terminate the heating at the optimum level of neutron yield.

  4. Process of Making Boron-Fiber Reinforced Composite Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Johnston, Norman J. (Inventor); Marchello, Joseph M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method for producing a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composition from powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and a linear array of boron fibers. The boron fibers are applied onto the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and then are processed within a processing component having an impregnation bar assembly. After passing through variable-dimension forming nip-rollers, the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with the boron fibers become a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite tape. A driving mechanism pulls the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with boron fibers through the processing line of the apparatus and a take-up spool collects the formed hybrid boron-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite tape.

  5. Determination of trace elements in high purity alumina powder by helium enhanced direct current glow discharge mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sehoon; Kim, Sunhye; Hinrichs, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Trace impurities in high purity alumina powder were determined by fast flow direct current glow discharge mass spectrometry (GD-MS). The non-conductive samples were prepared with high purity graphite powder and used as a sample binder and as a secondary cathode. To improve the sensitivity of the GD-MS analysis, helium was introduced as an additional glow discharge gas to argon plasma. The quantification results of the GD-MS measurement were calculated by external calibration with matrix matched certified reference materials. The GD-MS results for the determination of Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Ga in the alumina samples agreed well with the certified values of a reference material and the results of chemical analysis using wet sample digestion with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The GD-MS analysis is a rapid analysis technique to determine trace elements in non-conductive alumina to below mg·kg- 1 levels.

  6. Boron doping a semiconductor particle

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, G.D.; Reynolds, J.S.; Brown, L.K.

    1998-06-09

    A method of boron doping a semiconductor particle using boric acid to obtain a p-type doped particle. Either silicon spheres or silicon powder is mixed with a diluted solution of boric acid having a predetermined concentration. The spheres are dried, with the boron film then being driven into the sphere. A melt procedure mixes the driven boron uniformly throughout the sphere. In the case of silicon powder, the powder is metered out into piles and melted/fused with an optical furnace. Both processes obtain a p-type doped silicon sphere with desired resistivity. Boric acid is not a restricted chemical, is inexpensive, and does not pose any special shipping, handling, or disposal requirements. 2 figs.

  7. Boron doping a semiconductor particle

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Gary Don; Reynolds, Jeffrey Scott; Brown, Louanne Kay

    1998-06-09

    A method (10,30) of boron doping a semiconductor particle using boric acid to obtain a p-type doped particle. Either silicon spheres or silicon powder is mixed with a diluted solution of boric acid having a predetermined concentration. The spheres are dried (16), with the boron film then being driven (18) into the sphere. A melt procedure mixes the driven boron uniformly throughout the sphere. In the case of silicon powder, the powder is metered out (38) into piles and melted/fused (40) with an optical furnace. Both processes obtain a p-type doped silicon sphere with desired resistivity. Boric acid is not a restricted chemical, is inexpensive, and does not pose any special shipping, handling, or disposal requirements.

  8. Application of powder metallurgy technique to produce improved bearing elements for cryogenic aerospace engine turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moxson, V. S.; Moracz, D. J.; Bhat, B. N.; Dolan, F. J.; Thom, R.

    1987-01-01

    Traditionally, vacuum melted 440C stainless steel is used for high performance bearings for aerospace cryogenic systems where corrosion due to condensation is a major concern. For the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), however, 440C performance in the high-pressure turbopumps has been marginal. A basic assumption of this study was that powder metallurgy, rather than cast/wrought, processing would provide the finest, most homogeneous bearing alloy structure. Preliminary testing of P/M alloys (hardness, corrosion resistance, wear resistance, fatigue resistance, and fracture toughness) was used to 'de-select' alloys which did perform as well as baseline 440C. Five out of eleven candidate materials (14-4/6V, X-405, MRC-2001, T-440V, and D-5) based on preliminary screening were selected for the actual rolling-sliding five-ball testing. The results of this test were compared with high-performance vacuum-melted M50 bearing steel. The results of the testing indicated outstanding performance of two P/M alloys, X-405 and MRC-2001, which eventually will be further evaluated by full-scale bearing testing.

  9. A study of galactic cosmic ray propagation models based on the isotopic composition of the elements lithium, beryllium and boron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, G. F.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Greiner, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    A good test for a cosmic ray propagation model is its ability to predict the abundances of the light secondary nuclei lithium, beryllium, and boron. By using measured isotopic abundances of lithium, beryllium, and boron, Garcia-Munoz et al. (1979) were able to place limits on three important parameters of a leaky box propagation model. The considered parameters include the source spectral parameter, the leakage mean free path, and the characteristic adiabatic energy loss due to solar modulation. The present investigation is concerned with a critical evaluation of the information which can be deduced about these parameters from isotopic composition alone, taking into account the effects of uncertainties in the spallation cross section data.

  10. Boron carbide whiskers produced by vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Boron carbide whiskers have an excellent combination of properties for use as a reinforcement material. They are produced by vaporizing boron carbide powder and condensing the vapors on a substrate. Certain catalysts promote the growth rate and size of the whiskers.

  11. Boron incorporation into mullite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesser, K. J.; Beran, A.; Voll, D.; Schneider, H.

    2008-03-01

    Boron-doped mullites were synthesized using aluminium nitrate-nonahydrate, tetraethoxysilane and boric acid in a sol gel process with subsequent annealing at 950 and 1300 °C for five hours. Two different bulk compositions with constant Al2O3 contents (60 and 70 mol%, respectively) and varying SiO2 plus B2O3 contents were investigated. X-ray powder diffraction analyses yielded a linear decrease of the lattice parameters with increasing bulk B2O3 content, which was interpreted as to be due to boron incorporation. Related to the increasing boron content, corresponding infrared spectra revealed a slight and continuous shift for most of the absorption bands. These data show that mullite is able to incorporate large amounts of boron into its structure (up to about 20 mol% B2O3 depending on the bulk composition of the starting materials). Infrared analyses suggest that boron is incorporated into the mullite structure in form of planar three-fold coordinated BO3 groups.

  12. NEW ADVANCES IN BORON SOIL CHEMISTRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron is an essential micronutrient element required for plant growth. Boron deficiency is wide-spread in crop plants throughout the world especially in coarse-textured soils in humid areas. Boron toxicity can also occur, especially in arid regions under irrigation. Plants respond directly to the...

  13. Electrochemical sensor for dopamine based on imprinted silica matrix-poly(aniline boronic acid) hybrid as recognition element.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Zhang, Ning; Sun, Qingqing; Bai, Zhanming; Zheng, Jianbin

    2016-10-01

    A novel imprinted silica matrix-poly(aniline boronic acid) hybrid for electrochemical detection of dopamine (DA) was developed. Boronic acid functionalized conducting polymer was electrochemically prepared on Au electrode. The number of covalent binding sites toward DA templates was controlled by potential cycles. A precursory sol solution of ammonium fluorosilicate (as cross-linking monomer) containing DA was spin-coated on the polymer modified electrode. Under NH3 atmosphere, the hydroxyl ions were generated in the solution and catalyzed the hydrolysis of fluorosilicate to form silica matrix. After this aqueous sol-gel process, an inorganic framework around the DA template was formed and the imprinted hybrid for DA was also produced. As revealed by scanning electron microscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry characterization, DA was embedded in the imprinted hybrid successfully. The affinity and selectivity of the imprinted hybrid were also characterized by cyclic voltammetry. The imprinted hybrid showed higher affinity for DA than that for epinephrine, and little or no affinity for ascorbic acid and uric acid due to the combined effects of covalent interaction, cavities matching and electrostatic repulsion. The imprinted hybrid sensor exhibited a quick response (within 5min) to DA in the concentration range from 0.05 to 500μmolL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.018μmolL(-1). The prepared sensor was also applied to detect DA in real samples with a satisfactory result. PMID:27474321

  14. Polyethylene/Boron Composites for Radiation Shielding Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Courtney; Grulke, Eric; Burgett, Eric; Hertel, Nolan

    2008-01-21

    Multifunctional composites made with boron are absorbers of low energy nuetrons, and could be used for structural shielding materials. Polyethylene/boron carbide composites were fabricated using conventional polymer processing techniques, and were evaluated for mechanical and radiation shielding properties. Addition of neat boron carbide (powder and nanoparticles) to an injection molding grade HPDE showed superior mechanical properties compared to neat HDPE. Radiation shielding measurements of a 2 wt% boron carbide composite were improved over those of the neat polyethylene.

  15. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Beaver, R.J.; Leitten, C.F. Jr.

    1962-04-17

    A boron-10 containing reactor control element wherein the boron-10 is dispersed in a matrix material is describeri. The concentration of boron-10 in the matrix varies transversely across the element from a minimum at the surface to a maximum at the center of the element, prior to exposure to neutrons. (AEC)

  16. Effect of isothermal forging on microstructure and fatigue behavior of blended elemental Ti-6Al-4V powder compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, I.; Eylon, D.; Toaz, M. W.; Froes, F. H.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of isothermal hot forging (IHF) on microstructure, pore closure, and tensile and fatigue properties of Ti-6A1-4V blended elemental cold pressed and sintered powder compacts was investigated. Two types of sponge fines were used: (a) high chloride produced by the Hunter sodium reduction process (HP) and (b) low chloride produced by the electrolytic process (EP). The as-sintered HP compacts were 99 pct dense while the EP compacts were only 92 pct dense. All sintered preforms were isothermally hot forged below the beta transus temperature and reached almost full density. The microstructure of the HP forged compacts consisted of fine equiaxed alpha, while the EP forged compacts exhibited a coarse lenticular alpha structure after 30 pct reduction and a partially recrystallized structure after 68 pct reduction. It was found that EP compacts forged to a 30 pct reduction exhibited a low fatigue limit of 172 MPa (25 ksi), since the lenticular alpha morphology and the residual porosity resulted in premature fatigue crack initiation. On the other hand, a higher fatigue strength of 485 MPa (70 ksi) was obtained for EP compacts forged to a 78 pct reduction due to the mixed equiaxed/lenticular alpha morphology as well as removal of stress concentration features such as interparticle pore interfaces.

  17. Cosmic-ray elemental abundances from 1 to 10 GeV per amu for boron through nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwyer, Robert; Meyer, Peter

    1987-01-01

    The relative abundances of cosmic-ray nuclei in the charge range boron through nickel over the energy range 1-10 GeV per amu were measured with a balloon-borne detector. The instrument consists of a scintillation and Cerenkov counter telescope with a multiwire proportional chamber hodoscope and has been flown in four high-altitude balloon flights. Good charge resolution (sigma = 0.2 charge units at iron) and high statistical accuracy have been achieved. These data are used to derive the energy dependence of the leakage path length using the leaky box model of propagation and confinement in the galaxy. This energy dependence is found to be best fit by lambda = E(tot) exp -n, where n = 0.49 + or - 0.06 over 1-10 GeV per amu. Relative abundances at the source are consistent with an energy-independent composition.

  18. Detection of rare earth elements in Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal ash using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Phuoc

    2015-10-01

    We reported our preliminary results on the use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to analyze the rare earth elements contained in ash samples from Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal (PRB-coal). We have identified many elements in the lanthanide series (cerium, europium, holmium, lanthanum, lutetium, praseodymium, promethium, samarium, terbium, ytterbium) and some elements in the actinide series (actinium, thorium, uranium, plutonium, berkelium, californium) in the ash samples. In addition, various metals were also seen to present in the ash samples

  19. Is Boron Nutritionally Relevant?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence from numerous laboratories using a variety of experimental models, including humans, shows that boron is a bioactive beneficial element. Much evidence has come from studies that did not require nutritional or environmental stressors or fastidious methods in diet preparation or environmental...

  20. Boron, bromine, and other trace elements as clues to the fate of chlorine in mid-ocean ridge vent fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, M.E.; Seyfried, W.E. Jr. )

    1990-08-01

    Fluids from mid-ocean ridge hot springs typically have Cl concentrations which depart significantly from seawater values. These variations may be due in part to phase separation processes and/or precipitation and dissolution of chloride-bearing minerals. Both of these processes likely produce systematic and recognizable variations in the distributions of trace elements which should be evident in vent fluid chemistries. To better understand how supercritical phase separation can affect trace element distributions, we conducted an experiment involving a Na-Ca-K-Cl fluid containing trace quantities of Sr, Ba, B, Li, and Br, which was allowed to separate into vapor and brine phases at 425, 440, and 450{degree}C by systematically adjusting pressure. All of the measured trace elements were concentrated into the brine phase relative to the vapor phase. The relative order of partitioning into the brine was Ba > Sr > Ca > K > Na,Cl > Li > Br > B.

  1. Process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Holt, J.B.; Kingman, D.D.; Bianchini, G.M.

    1992-04-28

    Disclosed is a process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride comprising the steps of: [A] preparing an intimate mixture of powdered boron oxide, a powdered metal selected from the group consisting of magnesium or aluminum, and a powdered metal azide; [B] igniting the mixture and bringing it to a temperature at which self-sustaining combustion occurs; [C] shocking the mixture at the end of the combustion thereof with a high pressure wave, thereby forming as a reaction product, wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride and occluded metal oxide; and, optionally [D] removing the occluded metal oxide from the reaction product. Also disclosed are reaction products made by the process described.

  2. Process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Holt, J. Birch; Kingman, deceased, Donald D.; Bianchini, Gregory M.

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride comprising the steps of: [A] preparing an intimate mixture of powdered boron oxide, a powdered metal selected from the group consisting of magnesium or aluminum, and a powdered metal azide; [B] igniting the mixture and bringing it to a temperature at which self-sustaining combustion occurs; [C] shocking the mixture at the end of the combustion thereof with a high pressure wave, thereby forming as a reaction product, wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride and occluded metal oxide; and, optionally [D] removing the occluded metal oxide from the reaction product. Also disclosed are reaction products made by the process described.

  3. Boron deposition from fused salts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.L.

    1980-08-01

    A partial evaluation of the feasibility of a process to electrodeposit pure coherent coatings of elemental boron from molten fluorides has been performed. The deposit produced was powdery and acicular, unless the fluoride melt was purified to have very low oxygen concentration. When the oxygen activity was reduced in the melt by addition of crystalline elemental boron, dense, amorphous boron deposit was produced. The boron deposits produced had cracks but were otherwise pure and dense and ranged up to 0.35 mm thick. Information derived during this project suggests that similar deposits might be obtained crack-free up to 1.00 mm thick by process modifications and improvements.

  4. Boron nutrition and mobility, and its relation to the elemental composition of greenhouse grown root crops I. rutabaga

    SciTech Connect

    Shelp, B.J.; Shattuck, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    The nutrition and mobility of B, and its relation to the elemental composition of two cultivars of rutabaga (Brassica napus ssp. rapifera cv. Laurentian and Wilhelmsberger) plants were investigated in greenhouse experiments. Laurentian exhibited a greater response than Wilhelmsberger to continuing B deficiency as indicated by the severity in the roots of brown heart, of external roughness and elongation and of the decrease in B concentration. Signs of B deficiency were not found when the B contents of the root and young leaves were 27 and 56 ..mu..g and g/sup -1/ DM respectively. Root B levels of 14 and 17-20 ..mu..g f/sup -1/ gave moderate and slight internal signs of brown discoloration. Foliar applications of B partially restored the B concentrations of the roots; however, the mechanisms of movement was unclear. The Mg, Mn and Zn contents of roots were the only elements that consistently increased and accumulated under B deficiency. The relative element composition of the root compared to the mature leaves is consistent with the root being supplied predominantly with nutrients by the phloem.

  5. Toxic effects of boron on mallard reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, G.J.; Anders, V.P.

    1989-01-01

    Boron, a naturally occurring trace element generally considered environmentally innocuous, was documented to severely impair mallard reproduction. Boron is leached from irrigated agricultural soils and transported in drainage water that contaminates wetlands. Until now, only the selenium accumulated in aquatic food chains has been documented to pose a toxic hazard to wildlife in drainage water wetlands. Management of drainage water-contaminated environments must now also consider the adverse effects of boron, as well as the possible interactions of drainage water contaminants.

  6. Method and device to synthesize boron nitride nanotubes and related nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-07-19

    Methods and apparatus for producing chemical nanostructures having multiple elements, such as boron and nitride, e.g. boron nitride nanotubes, are disclosed. The method comprises creating a plasma jet, or plume, such as by an arc discharge. The plasma plume is elongated and has a temperature gradient along its length. It extends along its length into a port connector area having ports for introduction of feed materials. The feed materials include the multiple elements, which are introduced separately as fluids or powders at multiple ports along the length of the plasma plume, said ports entering the plasma plume at different temperatures. The method further comprises modifying a temperature at a distal portion of or immediately downstream of said plasma plume; and collecting said chemical nanostructures after said modifying.

  7. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flumerfelt, Joel Fredrick

    In recent years, the aluminum powder industry has expanded into non-aerospace applications. However, the alumina and aluminum hydroxide in the surface oxide film on aluminum powder require high cost powder processing routes. A driving force for this research is to broaden the knowledge base about aluminum powder metallurgy to provide ideas for fabricating low cost aluminum powder components. The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization commercial inert gas atomization and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). The commercial atomization methods are bench marks of current aluminum powder technology. The GARS process is a laboratory scale inert gas atomization facility. A benefit of using pure aluminum powders is an unambiguous interpretation of the results without considering the effects of alloy elements. A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a

  8. Density separation of boron particles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.M.

    1980-04-01

    A density distribution much broader than expected was observed in lots of natural boron powder supplied by two different sources. The material in both lots was found to have a rhombohedral crystal structure, and the only other parameters which seemed to account for such a distribution were impurities within the crystal structure and varying isotopic ratios. A separation technique was established to isolate boron particles in narrow densty ranges. The isolated fractions were subsequently analyzed for B/sup 10/ and total boron content in an effort to determine whether selective isotopic enrichment and nonhomogeneous impurity distribution were the causes for the broad density distribution of the boron powders. It was found that although the B/sup 10/ content remained nearly constant around 18%, the total boron content varied from 37.5 to 98.7%. One of the lots also was found to contain an apparently high level of alpha rhombohedral boron which broadened the density distribution considerably. During this work, a capability for removing boron particles containing gross amounts of impurities and, thereby, improving the overall purity of the remaining material was developed. In addition, the separation technique used in this study apparently isolated particles with alpha and beta rhombohedral crystal structures, although the only supporting evidence is density data.

  9. Micro- and nanosized boron carbide: synthesis, structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrievski, Rostislav A.

    2012-06-01

    Methods of synthesis of powder particles, fibres (wires), tubes, films, coatings and bulk materials based on micro- and nanocrystalline and amorphous boron carbide are considered. Specific features of the electronic structure, material structure and physicochemical and mechanical properties of boron carbide and boron carbide-based composites are discussed. Their existing and potential applications are highlighted. The little studied aspects of the research area in question are specified. The bibliography includes 105 references.

  10. Solution-processed highly efficient Cu2ZnSnSe4 thin film solar cells by dissolution of elemental Cu, Zn, Sn, and Se powders.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanchun; Wang, Gang; Zhao, Wangen; Tian, Qingwen; Huang, Lijian; Pan, Daocheng

    2015-01-14

    Solution deposition approaches play an important role in reducing the manufacturing cost of Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) thin film solar cells. Here, we present a novel precursor-based solution approach to fabricate highly efficient CZTSe solar cells. In this approach, low-cost elemental Cu, Zn, Sn, and Se powders were simultaneously dissolved in the solution of thioglycolic acid and ethanolamine, forming a homogeneous CZTSe precursor solution to deposit CZTSe nanocrystal thin films. Based on high-quality CZTSe absorber layer, pure selenide CZTSe solar cell with a photoelectric conversion efficiency of 8.02% has been achieved without antireflection coating. PMID:25494493

  11. Initial boronization of PBX-M using ablation of solid boronized probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Hirooka, Y.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Khandagle, M. . Inst. of Plasma and Fusion Research); Timberlake, J.; Bell, R.; England, A.; Isler, R.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Takahashi, H.; Tighe, W.; von Goeler, S.; Post-Zwicker, A.P. ); Jones, S. )

    1993-05-01

    The initial boronization of PBX-M was performed using the sequential ablation of two types of solid target probes. Probe-1 in a mushroom shape consisted of a 10.7% boronized 2-D C-C composite containing 3.6 g of boron in a B[sub 4]C binder. Probe-2 in a rectangular shape consisted of an 86% boronized graphite felt composite containing 19.5 g of 40 [mu] boron particles. After boronization with Probe-1, the loop voltage during 1 MW neutral beam heated plasmas decreased 27% and volt-sec consumption decreased 20%. Strong peripheral spectral lines from low-Z elements decreased by factors of about 5. The central oxygen density decreased 15--20%. The total radiated power during neutral beam injection decreased by 43%. Probe-2 boronization exhibited improved operating conditions similar to Probe-1, but for some parameters, a smaller percentage change occurred due to the residual boron from the previous boronization using Probe-1. The ablation rates of both probes were consistent with front face temperatures at or slightly above the boron melting point. These results confirm the effectiveness of the solid target boronization (STB) technique as a real-time impurity control method for replenishing boron depositions without the use of hazardous borane compounds.

  12. Initial boronization of PBX-M using ablation of solid boronized probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Hirooka, Y.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Khandagle, M.; Timberlake, J.; Bell, R.; England, A.; Isler, R.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Takahashi, H.; Tighe, W.; von Goeler, S.; Post-Zwicker, A.P.; Jones, S.

    1993-05-01

    The initial boronization of PBX-M was performed using the sequential ablation of two types of solid target probes. Probe-1 in a mushroom shape consisted of a 10.7% boronized 2-D C-C composite containing 3.6 g of boron in a B{sub 4}C binder. Probe-2 in a rectangular shape consisted of an 86% boronized graphite felt composite containing 19.5 g of 40 {mu} boron particles. After boronization with Probe-1, the loop voltage during 1 MW neutral beam heated plasmas decreased 27% and volt-sec consumption decreased 20%. Strong peripheral spectral lines from low-Z elements decreased by factors of about 5. The central oxygen density decreased 15--20%. The total radiated power during neutral beam injection decreased by 43%. Probe-2 boronization exhibited improved operating conditions similar to Probe-1, but for some parameters, a smaller percentage change occurred due to the residual boron from the previous boronization using Probe-1. The ablation rates of both probes were consistent with front face temperatures at or slightly above the boron melting point. These results confirm the effectiveness of the solid target boronization (STB) technique as a real-time impurity control method for replenishing boron depositions without the use of hazardous borane compounds.

  13. Dilatometric Analysis and Microstructural Investigation of the Sintering Mechanisms of Blended Elemental Ti-6Al-4V Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngmoo; Lee, Junho; Lee, Bin; Ryu, Ho Jin; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2016-09-01

    The densification behavior of mixed Ti and Al/V master alloy powders for Ti-6Al-4V was investigated by a series of dilatometry tests to measure the shrinkage of the samples with the sintering temperature. The corresponding microstructural changes were examined under various sintering conditions with optical microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses. From these results, the consolidation of the mixed powders was divided into two domains: (i) sintering densification and solute homogenization of Ti and Al/V master alloy particles below 1293 K (1020 °C), and (ii) densification of Ti alloy phases above 1293 K (1020 °C). In the lower temperature region, the inter-diffusion between Ti and Al/V master alloy particles dominated the sintering of the mixed powders because the chemical gradient between two types of particles outweighed the surface energy reduction. Following chemical homogenization, the densification induced the shrinkage of the Ti alloy phases to reduce their surface energies. These tendencies are also supported by the density and grain size variations of the sintered specimens with temperature. The apparent activation energies of the sintering and grain growth for Ti alloy particles are 85.91 ± 6.93 and 37.33 kJ/mol, respectively, similar to or slightly lower than those of pure Ti particles. The difference was attributed to the slower self-diffusion of Ti resulting from the alloying of Al and V into in the Ti matrix.

  14. Dilatometric Analysis and Microstructural Investigation of the Sintering Mechanisms of Blended Elemental Ti-6Al-4V Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngmoo; Lee, Junho; Lee, Bin; Ryu, Ho Jin; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2016-06-01

    The densification behavior of mixed Ti and Al/V master alloy powders for Ti-6Al-4V was investigated by a series of dilatometry tests to measure the shrinkage of the samples with the sintering temperature. The corresponding microstructural changes were examined under various sintering conditions with optical microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses. From these results, the consolidation of the mixed powders was divided into two domains: (i) sintering densification and solute homogenization of Ti and Al/V master alloy particles below 1293 K (1020 °C), and (ii) densification of Ti alloy phases above 1293 K (1020 °C). In the lower temperature region, the inter-diffusion between Ti and Al/V master alloy particles dominated the sintering of the mixed powders because the chemical gradient between two types of particles outweighed the surface energy reduction. Following chemical homogenization, the densification induced the shrinkage of the Ti alloy phases to reduce their surface energies. These tendencies are also supported by the density and grain size variations of the sintered specimens with temperature. The apparent activation energies of the sintering and grain growth for Ti alloy particles are 85.91 ± 6.93 and 37.33 kJ/mol, respectively, similar to or slightly lower than those of pure Ti particles. The difference was attributed to the slower self-diffusion of Ti resulting from the alloying of Al and V into in the Ti matrix.

  15. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  16. Dietary boron: possible roles in human and animal physiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron is a bioactive element of low molecular weight. Since discovery of the first boron biomolecule, boromycin, in 1967, several other similar biomolecules are now well-characterized. Most recently described was a bacterial cell-to-cell communication signal that requires boron, autoinducer-II. Boro...

  17. The Effect of Boronizing on Metallic Alloys for Automotive Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Roumiana S.; Suwattananont, Naruemon; Samardzic, Veljko

    2008-06-01

    In this study the wear resistance, corrosion resistance, and oxidation resistance of boronized metallic alloys were investigated. Thermochemical treatment was performed by powder pack boronizing process at temperature 850-950 °C for 4 h. Saw-tooth morphology and smooth interface microstructures were observed with an optical microscope; microhardness was measured across the coating depth. The phases present in the boron coatings depend on the substrate material. High-temperature oxidation resistance was investigated and it was found that boron coating on ferrous alloys can resist temperatures up to 800 °C. The corrosion resistance of the boronized samples was improved and the corrosion rate was calculated for boronized and plain specimens. Wear testing was conducted by following the procedures of ASTM G99, ASTM D2526, and ASTM D4060. The obtained experimental results revealed that boronizing significantly improves the wear-resistance, corrosion-resistance, and oxidation resistance of metallic alloys.

  18. Mineral resource of the month: boron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crangle, Robert D., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The article offers information on the mineral, boron. Boron compounds, particularly borates, have more commercial applications than its elemental relative which is a metalloid. Making up the 90% of the borates that are used worldwide are colemanite, kernite, tincal, and ulexite. The main borate deposits are located in the Mojave Desert of the U.S., the Tethyan belt in southern Asia, and the Andean belt of South America. Underground and surface mining are being used in gathering boron compounds. INSETS: Fun facts;Boron production and consumption.

  19. Producing carbon stripper foils containing boron

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, J. O. Jr.

    2012-12-19

    Parameters being actively tested by the accelerator community for the purpose of extending carbon stripper foil lifetimes in fast ion beams include methods of deposition, parting agents, mounting techniques, support (fork) materials, and inclusion of alloying elements, particularly boron. Specialized production apparatus is required for either sequential deposition or co-deposition of boron in carbon foils. A dual-use vacuum evaporator for arc evaporation of carbon and electron-beam evaporation of boron and other materials has been built for such development. Production of both carbon and boron foils has begun and improvements are in progress.

  20. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry for quantitative elemental analysis of powdered samples by radiofrequency pulsed glow discharge time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Toral, Aitor; Fernandez, Beatriz; Malherbe, Julien; Claverie, Fanny; Molloy, John L; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2013-10-15

    In recent years particular effort is being devoted to the development of pulsed glow discharges (PGDs) for mass spectrometry because this powering operation mode could offer important ionization analytical advantages. However, the capabilities of radiofrequency (RF) PGD coupled to a time of flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS) for accurate isotope ratio measurements have not been demonstrated yet. This work is focused on investigating different time positions along the pulse profile for the accurate measurement of isotope ratios. As a result, a method has been developed for the direct and simultaneous multielement determination of trace elements in powdered geological samples by RF-PGD-ToFMS in combination with isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) as an absolute measurement method directly traceable to the International System of Units. Optimized operating conditions were 70 W of applied radiofrequency power, 250 Pa of pressure, 2 ms of pulse width and 4 ms of pulse period, being argon the plasma gas used. To homogeneously distribute the added isotopically-enriched standards, lithium borate fusion of powdered solid samples was used as sample preparation approach. In this way, Cu, Zn, Ba and Pb were successfully determined by RF-PGD-ToF(IDMS) in two NIST Standard Reference Materials (SRM 2586 and SRM 2780) representing two different matrices of geological interest (soil and rock samples). Cu, Zn, Ba and Pb concentrations determined by RF-PGD-ToF(IDMS) were well in agreement with the certified values at 95% confidence interval and precisions below 12% relative standard deviation were observed for three independent analyses. Elemental concentrations investigated were in the range of 81-5770 mg/kg, demonstrating the potential of RF-PGD-ToF(IDMS) for a sensitive, accurate and robust analysis of powdered samples. PMID:24054645

  1. Direct current sputtering of boron from boron/boron mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, J.R.; Manos, D.; Nartowitz, E.

    1994-12-13

    A method for coating a substrate with boron by sputtering includes lowering the electrical resistance of a boron-containing rod to allow electrical conduction in the rod; placing the boron-containing rod inside a vacuum chamber containing substrate material to be coated; applying an electrical potential between the boron target material and the vacuum chamber; countering a current avalanche that commences when the conduction heating rate exceeds the cooling rate, and until a steady equilibrium heating current is reached; and, coating the substrate material with boron by sputtering from the boron-containing rod. 2 figures.

  2. Synthesis of aluminium nitride/boron nitride composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, T.D. . Polymer Science Program and Dept. of Chemistry); Gonsalves, K.E. . Polymer Science Program and Dept. of Chemistry Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT . Dept. of Chemistry); Strutt, P.R. . Dept. of Metallurgy)

    1993-04-01

    Aluminum nitride/boron nitride composite was synthesized by using boric acid, urea, and aluminum chloride (or aluminum lactate) as the starting compounds. The starting materials were dissolved in water and mixed homogeneously. Ammonolysis of this aqueous solution resulted in the formation of a precomposite gel, which converted into the aluminum nitride/boron nitride composite on further heat treatment. Characterization of both the precomposite and the composite powders included powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of the composite revealed that the aluminum nitride phase had a hexagonal structure, and the boron nitride phase a turbostratic structure.

  3. Infiltration processing of boron carbide-, boron-, and boride-reactive metal cermets

    DOEpatents

    Halverson, Danny C.; Landingham, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    A chemical pretreatment method is used to produce boron carbide-, boron-, and boride-reactive metal composites by an infiltration process. The boron carbide or other starting constituents, in powder form, are immersed in various alcohols, or other chemical agents, to change the surface chemistry of the starting constituents. The chemically treated starting constituents are consolidated into a porous ceramic precursor which is then infiltrated by molten aluminum or other metal by heating to wetting conditions. Chemical treatment of the starting constituents allows infiltration to full density. The infiltrated precursor is further heat treated to produce a tailorable microstructure. The process at low cost produces composites with improved characteristics, including increased toughness, strength.

  4. Boron-copper neutron absorbing material and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Wiencek, Thomas C.; Domagala, Robert F.; Thresh, Henry

    1991-01-01

    A composite, copper clad neutron absorbing material is comprised of copper powder and boron powder enriched with boron 10. The boron 10 content can reach over 30 percent by volume, permitting a very high level of neutron absorption. The copper clad product is also capable of being reduced to a thickness of 0.05 to 0.06 inches and curved to a radius of 2 to 3 inches, and can resist temperatures of 900.degree. C. A method of preparing the material includes the steps of compacting a boron-copper powder mixture and placing it in a copper cladding, restraining the clad assembly in a steel frame while it is hot rolled at 900.degree. C. with cross rolling, and removing the steel frame and further rolling the clad assembly at 650.degree. C. An additional sheet of copper can be soldered onto the clad assembly so that the finished sheet can be cold formed into curved shapes.

  5. In situ elaboration of a binary Ti-26Nb alloy by selective laser melting of elemental titanium and niobium mixed powders.

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Joguet, D; Robin, G; Peltier, L; Laheurte, P

    2016-05-01

    Ti-Nb alloys are excellent candidates for biomedical applications such as implantology and joint replacement because of their very low elastic modulus, their excellent biocompatibility and their high strength. A low elastic modulus, close to that of the cortical bone minimizes the stress shielding effect that appears subsequent to the insertion of an implant. The objective of this study is to investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties of a Ti-Nb alloy elaborated by selective laser melting on powder bed of a mixture of Ti and Nb elemental powders (26 at.%). The influence of operating parameters on porosity of manufactured samples and on efficacy of dissolving Nb particles in Ti was studied. The results obtained by optical microscopy, SEM analysis and X-ray microtomography show that the laser energy has a significant effect on the compactness and homogeneity of the manufactured parts. Homogeneous and compact samples were obtained for high energy levels. Microstructure of these samples has been further characterized. Their mechanical properties were assessed by ultrasonic measures and the Young's modulus found is close to that of classically elaborated Ti-26 Nbingot. PMID:26952492

  6. Daily boron intake from the American diet.

    PubMed

    Rainey, C J; Nyquist, L A; Christensen, R E; Strong, P L; Culver, B D; Coughlin, J R

    1999-03-01

    Interest in boron as a naturally occurring trace element nutrient from the food supply is increasing. Mounting evidence suggests that boron is essential to human beings. This study explores the major food and beverage contributors of boron and estimates of daily boron intake from the American diet. Previous estimates in the literature of dietary boron consumption are based on limited foods and population segments. In this study we provide a more comprehensive assessment of boron consumption by the US population. A boron nutrient database of 1,944 individual foods was developed. These foods represent 95.3% by weight of all foods consumed in the US Department of Agriculture 1989-1991 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals (1989-1991 CSFII). The Boron Nutrient Database (version 1.0) was then linked to the 3-day food records of 11,009 respondents to the 1989-1991 CSFII to generate the average daily boron intake for each person. The weighted 5th percentile, median, mean, and 95th percentile boron intakes, respectively, are 0.43, 1.02, 1.17 and 2.42 mg/day for men; 0.33, 0.83, 0.96 and 1.94 mg/day for women; and 0.40, 0.86, 1.01 and 2.18 mg/day for pregnant women. For vegetarian adults, these intakes are 0.46, 1.30, 1.47 and 2.74 mg/day for men and 0.33, 1.00, 1.29 and 4.18 mg/day for women. The top 2 boron contributors, coffee and milk, are low in boron, yet they make up 12% of the total boron intake by virtue of the volume consumed. Among the top 50 boron contributors, peanut butter, wine, raisins, peanuts, and other nuts are high in boron. As more data become available on daily boron requirements, the results of this study may be used to assess whether Americans' daily intake of boron is adequate. PMID:10076586

  7. Synthesis of nanoscale magnesium diboride powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnemore, D. K.; Marzik, J. V.

    2015-12-01

    A procedure has been developed for the preparation of small grained magnesium diboride (MgB2) powder by reacting nanometer size boron powder in a magnesium vapor. Plasma synthesized boron powder that had particle sizes ranging from 20 to 300nm was mixed with millimeter size chunks of Mg by rolling stoichiometric amounts of the powders in a sealed cylindrical container under nitrogen gas. This mixture then was placed in a niobium reaction vessel, evacuated, and sealed by e-beam welding. The vessel was typically heated to approximately 830°C for several hours. The resulting MgB2 particles have a grain size in the 200 nm to 800 nm range. Agglomerates of loosely bound particles could be broken up by light grinding in a mortar and pestle. At 830°C, many particles are composed of several grains grown together so that the average particle size is about twice the average grain size. Experiments were conducted primarily with undoped boron powder, but carbon-doped boron powder showed very similar results.

  8. Synthesis of nanoscale magnesium diboride powder

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Finnemore, D. K.; Marzik, J. V.

    2015-12-18

    A procedure has been developed for the preparation of small grained magnesium diboride (MgB2) powder by reacting nanometer size boron powder in a magnesium vapor. Plasma synthesized boron powder that had particle sizes ranging from 20 to 300nm was mixed with millimeter size chunks of Mg by rolling stoichiometric amounts of the powders in a sealed cylindrical container under nitrogen gas. This mixture then was placed in a niobium reaction vessel, evacuated, and sealed by e-beam welding. The vessel was typically heated to approximately 830°C for several hours. The resulting MgB2 particles have a grain size in the 200 nmmore » to 800 nm range. Agglomerates of loosely bound particles could be broken up by light grinding in a mortar and pestle. At 830°C, many particles are composed of several grains grown together so that the average particle size is about twice the average grain size. Furthermore, experiments were conducted primarily with undoped boron powder, but carbon-doped boron powder showed very similar results.« less

  9. Synthesis of nanoscale magnesium diboride powder

    SciTech Connect

    Finnemore, D. K.; Marzik, J. V.

    2015-12-18

    A procedure has been developed for the preparation of small grained magnesium diboride (MgB2) powder by reacting nanometer size boron powder in a magnesium vapor. Plasma synthesized boron powder that had particle sizes ranging from 20 to 300nm was mixed with millimeter size chunks of Mg by rolling stoichiometric amounts of the powders in a sealed cylindrical container under nitrogen gas. This mixture then was placed in a niobium reaction vessel, evacuated, and sealed by e-beam welding. The vessel was typically heated to approximately 830°C for several hours. The resulting MgB2 particles have a grain size in the 200 nm to 800 nm range. Agglomerates of loosely bound particles could be broken up by light grinding in a mortar and pestle. At 830°C, many particles are composed of several grains grown together so that the average particle size is about twice the average grain size. Furthermore, experiments were conducted primarily with undoped boron powder, but carbon-doped boron powder showed very similar results.

  10. Solution-Processed Cu2ZnSn(S,Se) 4 Thin-Film Solar Cells Using Elemental Cu, Zn, Sn, S, and Se Powders as Source.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Pei, Yingli; Zhou, Zhengji; Zhou, Wenhui; Kou, Dongxing; Wu, Sixin

    2015-12-01

    Solution-processed approach for the deposition of Cu2ZnSn (S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) absorbing layer offers a route for fabricating thin film solar cell that is appealing because of simplified and low-cost manufacturing, large-area coverage, and better compatibility with flexible substrates. In this work, we present a simple solution-based approach for simultaneously dissolving the low-cost elemental Cu, Zn, Sn, S, and Se powder, forming a homogeneous CZTSSe precursor solution in a short time. Dense and compact kesterite CZTSSe thin film with high crystallinity and uniform composition was obtained by selenizing the low-temperature annealed spin-coated precursor film. Standard CZTSSe thin film solar cell based on the selenized CZTSSe thin film was fabricated and an efficiency of 6.4 % was achieved. PMID:26293494

  11. Solution-Processed Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 Thin-Film Solar Cells Using Elemental Cu, Zn, Sn, S, and Se Powders as Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Pei, Yingli; Zhou, Zhengji; Zhou, Wenhui; Kou, Dongxing; Wu, Sixin

    2015-08-01

    Solution-processed approach for the deposition of Cu2ZnSn (S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) absorbing layer offers a route for fabricating thin film solar cell that is appealing because of simplified and low-cost manufacturing, large-area coverage, and better compatibility with flexible substrates. In this work, we present a simple solution-based approach for simultaneously dissolving the low-cost elemental Cu, Zn, Sn, S, and Se powder, forming a homogeneous CZTSSe precursor solution in a short time. Dense and compact kesterite CZTSSe thin film with high crystallinity and uniform composition was obtained by selenizing the low-temperature annealed spin-coated precursor film. Standard CZTSSe thin film solar cell based on the selenized CZTSSe thin film was fabricated and an efficiency of 6.4 % was achieved.

  12. Combustion synthesis of novel boron carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harini, R. Saai; Manikandan, E.; Anthonysamy, S.; Chandramouli, V.; Eswaramoorthy, D.

    2013-02-01

    The solid-state boron carbide is one of the hardest materials known, ranking third behind diamond and cubic boron nitride. Boron carbide (BxCx) enriched in the 10B isotope is used as a control rod material in the nuclear industry due to its high neutron absorption cross section and other favorable physico-chemical properties. Conventional methods of preparation of boron carbide are energy intensive processes accompanied by huge loss of boron. Attempts were made at IGCAR Kalpakkam to develop energy efficient and cost effective methods to prepare boron carbide. The products of the gel combustion and microwave synthesis experiments were characterized for phase purity by XRD. The carbide formation was ascertained using finger-print spectroscopy of FTIR. Samples of pyrolized/microwave heated powder were characterized for surface morphology using SEM. The present work shows the recent advances in understanding of structural and chemical variations in boron carbide and their influence on morphology, optical and vibrational property results discussed in details.

  13. Fluid sources and metallogenesis in the Blackbird Co-Cu-Au-Bi-Y-REE district, Idaho, U.S.A.: Insights from major-element and boron isotopic compositions of tourmaline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trumbull, R.B.; Slack, J.F.; Krienitz, M.-S.; Belkin, H.E.; Wiedenbeck, M.

    2011-01-01

    Tourmaline is a widespread mineral in the Mesoproterozoic Blackbird Co-Cu-Au-Bi-Y-REE district, Idaho, where it occurs in both mineralized zones and wallrocks. We report here major-element and B-isotope compositions of tourmaline from stratabound sulfide deposits and their metasedimentary wallrocks, from mineralized and barren pipes of tourmaline breccia, from late barren quartz veins, and from Mesoproterozoic granite. The tourmalines are aluminous, intermediate in the schorl-dravite series, with Fe/(Fe + Mg) values of 0.30 to 0.85, and 10 to 50% X-site vacancies. Compositional zoning is prominent only in tourmaline from breccias and quartz veins; crystal rims are enriched in Mg, Ca and Ti, and depleted in Fe and Al relative to cores. The chemical composition of tourmaline does not correlate with the presence or absence of mineralization. The ??11B values fall into two groups. Isotopically light tourmaline (-21.7 to-7.6%o) occurs in unmineralized samples from wallrocks, late quartz veins and Mesoproterozoic granite, whereas heavy tourmaline (-6.9 to +3.2%o) is spatially associated with mineralization (stratabound and breccia-hosted), and is also found in barren breccia. At an inferred temperature of 300??C, boron in the hydrothermal fluid associated with mineralization had ??11B values of-3 to +7%o. The high end of this range indicates a marine source of the boron. A likely scenario involves leaching of boron principally from marine carbonate beds or B-bearing evaporites in Mesoproterozoic strata of the region. The ??11B values of the isotopically light tourmaline in the sulfide deposits are attributed to recrystallization during Cretaceous metamorphism, superimposed on a light boron component derived from footwall siliciclastic sediments (e.g., marine clays) during Mesoproterozoic mineralization, and possibly a minor component of light boron from a magmatic-hydrothermal fluid. The metal association of Bi-Be-Y-REE in the Blackbird ores suggests some magmatic input

  14. Magnetron sputtered boron films and Ti/B multilayer structures

    SciTech Connect

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1991-03-11

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor 5 deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z mirrors which enhance reflectivity 10 from grazing to normal incidence.

  15. Magnetron sputtered boron films and Ti/B multilayer structures

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1995-02-14

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence. 6 figs.

  16. Magnetron sputtered boron films and TI/B multilayer structures

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  17. Magnetron sputtered boron films and Ti/B multilayer structures

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  18. Magnetron sputtered boron films and TI/B multilayer structures

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1993-04-20

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  19. Boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin; Park, Cheol

    2012-06-06

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  20. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  1. Boron chemicals in diagnosis and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bhaskar C; Thapa, Pritam; Karki, Radha; Schinke, Caroline; Das, Sasmita; Kambhampati, Suman; Banerjee, Sushanta K; Van Veldhuizen, Peter; Verma, Amit; Weiss, Louis M; Evans, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the field of boron chemistry have expanded the application of boron from material use to medicine. Boron-based drugs represent a new class of molecules that possess several biomedical applications including use as imaging agents for both optical and nuclear imaging as well as therapeutic agents with anticancer, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal and other disease-specific activities. For example, bortezomib (Velcade®), the only drug in clinical use with boron as an active element, was approved in 2003 as a proteasome inhibitor for the treatment of multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Several other boron-based compounds are in various phases of clinical trials, which illustrates the promise of this approach for medicinal chemists working in the area of boron chemistry. It is expected that in the near future, several boron-containing drugs should become available in the market with better efficacy and potency than existing drugs. This article discusses the current status of the development of boron-based compounds as diagnostic and therapeutic agents in humans. PMID:23617429

  2. Quantitative analysis of trace elements in environmental powders with laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry using non-sample-corresponding reference materials for signal evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Gerald; Limbeck, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is an attractive alternative to traditional procedures for the analysis of environmental samples (i.e., conventional liquid measurement after sample digestion). However, for accurate quantification, certified reference materials (CRM) are necessary which match the composition of the sample and include all elements of interest at the required concentration levels. The limited availability of appropriate CRMs hampers therefore substantial application. In this work, an LA-ICP-MS procedure allowing for accurate determination of trace element contents in powdered environmental samples is presented. For LA-ICP-MS analysis, the samples are mixed with an internal standard (silver oxide) and a binder (sodium tetra borate) and subsequently pressed to pellets. Quantification is accomplished using a calibration function determined using CRMs with varying matrix composition and analyte content, pre-treated and measured in the same way as the samples. With this approach, matrix-induced ablation differences resulting from varying physical/chemical properties of the individual CRMs could be compensated. Furthermore, ICP-related matrix-effects could be minimized using collision/reaction cell technology. Applicability of the procedure has been demonstrated by assessment of Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn in four different environmental CRMs (NIST SRM1648a (urban particulate matter), NIST SRM2709 (San Joaquin Soil), BCR144 (sewage sludge), and BCR723 (road dust)). Signal evaluation was performed by alternative use of three CRMs for calculation of the calibration function whereas the remaining fourth CRM acted as unknown sample, resulting in a good agreement between measured and certified values for all elements and reference materials.

  3. Ceramic powder compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Mahoney, F.M.

    1995-12-31

    With the objective of developing a predictive model for ceramic powder compaction we have investigated methods for characterizing density gradients in ceramic powder compacts, reviewed and compared existing compaction models, conducted compaction experiments on a spray dried alumina powder, and conducted mechanical tests and compaction experiments on model granular materials. Die filling and particle packing, and the behavior of individual granules play an important role in determining compaction behavior and should be incorporated into realistic compaction models. These results support the use of discrete element modeling techniques and statistical mechanics principals to develop a comprehensive model for compaction, something that should be achievable with computers with parallel processing capabilities.

  4. Coal Quality and Major, Minor, and Trace Elements in the Powder River, Green River, and Williston Basins, Wyoming and North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stricker, Gary D.; Flores, Romeo M.; Trippi, Michael H.; Ellis, Margaret S.; Olson, Carol M.; Sullivan, Jonah E.; Takahashi, Kenneth I.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Wyoming Reservoir Management Group (RMG) of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and nineteen independent coalbed methane (CBM) gas operators in the Powder River and Green River Basins in Wyoming and the Williston Basin in North Dakota, collected 963 coal samples from 37 core holes (fig. 1; table 1) between 1999 and 2005. The drilling and coring program was in response to the rapid development of CBM, particularly in the Powder River Basin (PRB), and the needs of the RMG BLM for new and more reliable data for CBM resource estimates and reservoir characterization. The USGS and BLM entered into agreements with the gas operators to drill and core Fort Union coal beds, thus supplying core samples for the USGS to analyze and provide the RMG with rapid, real-time results of total gas desorbed, coal quality, and high pressure methane adsorption isotherm data (Stricker and others, 2006). The USGS determined the ultimate composition of all coal core samples; for selected samples analyses also included proximate analysis, calorific value, equilibrium moisture, apparent specific gravity, and forms of sulfur. Analytical procedures followed those of the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM; 1998). In addition, samples from three wells (129 samples) were analyzed for major, minor, and trace element contents. Ultimate and proximate compositions, calorific value, and forms of sulfur are fundamental parameters in evaluating the economic value of a coal. Determining trace element concentrations, along with total sulfur and ash yield, is also essential to assess the environmental effects of coal use, as is the suitability of the coal for cleaning, gasification, liquefaction, and other treatments. Determination of coal quality in the deeper part (depths greater than 1,000 to 1,200 ft) of the PRB (Rohrbacher and others, 2006; Luppens and others, 2006) is especially important, because these coals are targeted for future

  5. Imaging of boron in tissue at the cellular level for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Arlinghaus, H F; Spaar, M T; Switzer, R C; Kabalka, G W

    1997-08-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme, and other tumors involving the brain, are undergoing experimental treatment with a promising new technique: boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). BNCT relies on the capture of thermal neutrons by boron deposited biochemically in the tumor and the subsequent fission of the boron into energetic lithium ions and alpha particles. An important requirement for improved BNCT is the development of more selective boron delivery mechanisms. The ability to image the boron concentration in tissue sections and even inside individual cells would be an important aid in the development of these delivery mechanisms. We have compared both sputter-initiated resonance ionization microprobe (SIRIMP), which combines resonance ionization with a high-energy pulsed focused sputter ion beam and mass spectrometric detection of ions, with laser atomization resonance ionization microprobe (LARIMP), which uses a laser pulse instead of an ion pulse for the atomization process, to determine their characteristics in locating and quantifying boron concentrations as a function of position in tissues obtained from a rat which had been infused with a BNCT drug. The data show that the SIRIMP/LARIMP techniques are well suited for quantitative and ultrasensitive imaging of boron trace element concentrations in biological tissue sections. The LARIMP mode could be used to quickly determine the spatial boron concentration with intercellular resolution over large areas down to the low nanograms-per-gram level, while the SIRIMP mode could be used to determine the spatial boron concentration and its variability in intracellular areas. PMID:9271061

  6. Superconductivity in two-dimensional boron allotropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yinchang; Zeng, Shuming; Ni, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We use ab initio evolutionary algorithm and first-principles calculations to investigate structural, electronic, vibrational, and superconducting properties of two-dimensional (2 D ) boron allotropes. Remarkably, we show that conventional BCS superconductivity in the stable 2 D boron structures is ubiquitous with the critical temperature Tc above the liquid hydrogen temperature for certain configurations. Due to the electronic states of the Fermi surface originating from both σ and π electrons, the superconductivity of the 2 D structures arises from multiple phonon modes. Our results support that 2 D boron structure may be a pure single-element material with the highest Tc on conditions without high pressure and external strain.

  7. Methods of forming boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J; Crandall, David L

    2015-03-03

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boron nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.

  8. Metal-ceramics based on nanostructured boron carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antadze, M.; Chedia, R.; Tsagareishvili, O.; Mikeladze, A.; Gacheciladze, A.; Margiev, B.; Gabunia, D.; Tsuladze, T.; Khantadze, D.

    2012-11-01

    Boron carbide has unique physicochemical and mechanical properties such as: high modulus of elasticity, high value of a strength-to-density ratio, heightened wear-resistance in unfriendly environment, etc., however dense product of boron carbide is not widely used in the area of engineering due to low impact strength, brittleness and low thermal conductivity of this material. Recent efforts of the scientists working in this area are focused on creating the so-called hetero-modulus metal-ceramic composite materials comprised of high-modulus ceramic and a metallic phase as an elastic binder. Creation of effective boron carbide based hetero-modulus materials is possible when a) boron carbide has a high degree of dispersion; b) metallic binder has a high adhesion ability and low reactivity toward boron carbide. The technology developed for producing boron carbide based metal-ceramic materials provides pyrolysis (900-1100 °C) of the precursors comprised of amorphous boron, carbon-chain polymers and appropriate metal salts. Each particle of the obtained powder contains both - nanostructured components of boron carbide and of a binding metallic phase. The fabricated metal-ceramic product has heightened parameters of impact strength and thermal conductivity in parallel with the retained unique properties of boron carbide.

  9. Synthesis, crystal growth and structure of Mg containing {beta}-rhombohedral boron: MgB{sub 17.4}

    SciTech Connect

    Adasch, Volker; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Vojteer, Natascha; Hillebrecht, Harald . E-mail: harald.hillebrecht@ac.uni-freiburg.de

    2006-09-15

    For the first time, single crystals of Mg containing {beta}-rhombohedral boron MgB{sub 17.4} were synthesised from the elements in a Mg/Cu melt at 1600deg. C. The crystal structure determined by the refinement of single crystal data (space group R-3m, a=10.991(2)A, c=24.161(4)A, 890 reflections, 123 variables, R{sub 1}(F)=0.049, wR{sub 2}(I)=0.122) improves and modifies the former structure model derived from earlier investigations on powder samples. Mg is located on four different positions with partial occupation. While the occupation of the sites D (53.3%), E (91%) and F (7.2%) is already known from other boron-rich borides related to {beta}-rhombohedral boron, the occupation of the fourth position (18h, 6.7%) is observed for the first time. Two boron positions show partial occupation. The summation reveals the composition MgB{sub 17.4} and Mg{sub 5.85}B{sub 101.9}, respectively, confirmed by WDX measurements. The single crystals of MgB{sub 17.4} show the highest Mg content ever found. Preliminary measurements indicate no superconductivity.

  10. Properties of vacuum-evaporated boron films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feakes, F.

    1973-01-01

    The work on the properties of thin boron films made by vacuum evaporation of elemental boron using an electron beam as the energy source is reported. The program aimed at characterizing the properties of vacuum evaporated films. The work was directed toward those variables considered to be important in affecting the tensile strength of the boron films. In general, the thickness of the films was less than 0.002 in. The temperature of the substrate on which the boron was condensed was found to be most important. Three distinctly different forms of boron deposit were produced. Although the transition temperature was not sharply defined, at substrate temperatures of less than approximately 600 deg C the boron deposits were amorphous to X-ray. If the substrate were highly polished, the deposits were black and mirror-like. For substrates with coefficients of thermal expansion close to that of boron, the deposits were then continuous and uncracked. The studies suggest that the potential continues to exist for film-type composites to have both high strength and high modulus.

  11. High resolution imaging of boron carbide microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, I.D.R.; Aselage, T.; Van Deusen, S.B.

    1985-08-01

    Two samples of boron carbide have been examined using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A hot-pressed B/sub 13/C/sub 2/ sample shows a high density of variable width twins normal to (10*1). Subtle shifts or offsets of lattice fringes along the twin plane and normal to approx.(10*5) were also observed. A B/sub 4/C powder showed little evidence of stacking disorder in crystalline regions.

  12. High resolution imaging of boron carbide microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, I.D.R.; Aselage, T.; Van Deusen, S.B.

    1986-04-15

    Two samples of boron carbide have been examined using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A hot-pressed B/sub 13/C/sub 2/ sample shows a high density of variable width twins normal to (10*1). Subtle shifts or offsets of lattice fringes along the twin plane and normal to approx.(10*5) were also observed. A B/sub 4/C powder showed little evidence of stacking disorder in crystalline regions.

  13. A reduction boronation route to nanocrystalline titanium diboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Luyang; Gu, Yunle; Shi, Liang; Yang, Zeheng; Ma, Jianhua; Qian, Yitai

    2004-04-01

    Nanocrystalline titanium diboride (TiB 2) has been prepared through a reduction-boronation route by using Ti powders and BBr 3 as titanium and boron sources, and metallic sodium as reductant at 400 °C. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) pattern can be indexed as hexagonal TiB 2 with the lattice constants of a=3.028 and c=3.223 Å. Transmission electron microscopy images show particle morphology with average size of 15 nm. Selected area electron diffraction patterns confirm the preparation of the hexagonal TiB 2.

  14. Comparison of performance of partial prestressed beam-column subassemblages made of reactive powder concrete and normal concrete materials using finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurjannah, S. A.; Budiono, B.; Imran, I.; Sugiri, S.

    2016-04-01

    Research on concrete material continues in several countries and had produced a concrete type of Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC) which has a better compressive strength, tensile strength, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, and durability than normal concrete (NC) namely Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC). Researches on structures using RPC material showed that the RPC structures had a better performance than the NC structures in resisting gravity and lateral cyclic loads. In this study, an experiment was conducted to apply combination of constant axial and lateral cyclic loads to a prototype of RPC interior partial prestressed beam-column subassemblage (prototype of BCS-RPC) with a value of Partial Prestressed Ratio (PPR) of 31.72% on the beam. The test results were compared with finite element model of beam-column subassemblage made of RPC by PPR of 31.72% (BCS-RPC-31.72). Furthermore, there was BCS-RPC modeling with PPR of 21.39% (BCS-RPC-21.39) and beam-column subassemblages made of NC materials modeling with a value of PPR at 21.09% (BCS-NC-21.09) and 32.02% (BCS-NC-32.02). The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of the BCS-RPC models compared to the performance of the BCS-NC models with PPR values below and above 25%, which is the maximum limit of permitted PPR. The results showed that all models of BCS-RPC had a better performance than all models of BCS-NC and the BCS-RPC model with PPR above 25% still behaved ductile and was able to dissipate energy well.

  15. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    DOEpatents

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  16. Rapid mass-spectrometric determination of boron isotopic distribution in boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Rein, J E; Abernathey, R M

    1972-07-01

    Boron isotopic ratios are measured in boron carbide by thermionic ionization mass spectrometry with no prior chemical separation. A powder blend of boron carbide and sodium hydroxide is prepared, a small portion is transferred to a tantalum filament, the filament is heated to produce sodium borate, and the filament is transferred to the mass spectrometer where the(11)B/(10)B ratio is measured, using the Na(2)BO(2)(+) ion. Variables investigated for their effect on preferential volatilization of (10)B include the sodium hydroxide-boron carbide ratio and the temperature and duration of filament heating. A series of boron carbide pellets containing natural boron, of the type proposed for the control rods of the Fast Flux Test Facility reactor, were analysed with an apparently unbiased result of 4.0560 for the (11)B/(10)B ratio (standard deviation 0.0087). The pellets contained over 3% metal impurities typically found in this material. Time of analysis is 45 min per sample, with one analyst. PMID:18961131

  17. Dietary boron in the typical diet: possible essential roles in human and animal physiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron is a bioactive element of low molecular weight. Since discovery of the first boron biomolecule, boromycin, in 1967, several other similar biomolecules are now well-characterized. Most recently described was a bacterial cell-to-cell communication signal that requires boron, autoinducer-II. Boro...

  18. Growing evidence for human health benefits of boron

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growing evidence from numerous laboratories using a variety of experimental models shows that boron is a bioactive beneficial, perhaps essential, element for humans. Reported beneficial actions of boron include arthritis alleviation or risk reduction; bone growth and maintenance; central nervous sys...

  19. Synthesis of Atomically Thin Boron Films on Copper Foils.

    PubMed

    Tai, Guoan; Hu, Tingsong; Zhou, Yungang; Wang, Xufeng; Kong, Jizhou; Zeng, Tian; You, Yuncheng; Wang, Qin

    2015-12-14

    Two-dimensional boron materials have recently attracted extensive theoretical interest because of their exceptional structural complexity and remarkable physical and chemical properties. However, such 2D boron monolayers have still not been synthesized. In this report, the synthesis of atomically thin 2D γ-boron films on copper foils is achieved by chemical vapor deposition using a mixture of pure boron and boron oxide powders as the boron source and hydrogen gas as the carrier gas. Strikingly, the optical band gap of the boron film was measured to be around 2.25 eV, which is close to the value (2.07 eV) determined by first-principles calculations, suggesting that the γ-B28 monolayer is a fascinating direct band gap semiconductor. Furthermore, a strong photoluminescence emission band was observed at approximately 626 nm, which is again due to the direct band gap. This study could pave the way for applications of two-dimensional boron materials in electronic and photonic devices. PMID:26510179

  20. Microwave-assisted wet digestion with H2O2 at high temperature and pressure using single reaction chamber for elemental determination in milk powder by ICP-OES and ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Muller, Edson I; Souza, Juliana P; Muller, Cristiano C; Muller, Aline L H; Mello, Paola A; Bizzi, Cezar A

    2016-08-15

    In this work a green digestion method which only used H2O2 as an oxidant and high temperature and pressure in the single reaction chamber system (SRC-UltraWave™) was applied for subsequent elemental determination by inductively coupled plasma-based techniques. Milk powder was chosen to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of the proposed method. Samples masses up to 500mg were efficiently digested, and the determination of Ca, Fe, K, Mg and Na was performed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), while trace elements (B, Ba, Cd, Cu, Mn, Mo, Pb, Sr and Zn) were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Residual carbon (RC) lower than 918mgL(-1) of C was obtained for digests which contributed to minimizing interferences in determination by ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Accuracy was evaluated using certified reference materials NIST 1549 (non-fat milk powder certified reference material) and NIST 8435 (whole milk powder reference material). The results obtained by the proposed method were in agreement with the certified reference values (t-test, 95% confidence level). In addition, no significant difference was observed between results obtained by the proposed method and conventional wet digestion using concentrated HNO3. As digestion was performed without using any kind of acid, the characteristics of final digests were in agreement with green chemistry principles when compared to digests obtained using conventional wet digestion method with concentrated HNO3. Additionally, H2O2 digests were more suitable for subsequent analysis by ICP-based techniques due to of water being the main product of organic matrix oxidation. The proposed method was suitable for quality control of major components and trace elements present in milk powder in consonance with green sample preparation. PMID:27260458

  1. Microstructures of rapidly solidified powder and extruded rod of Ni{sub 3}Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, J.; Schulson, E.M.

    1996-07-01

    Rapidly solidified powders and extruded rods of Ni{sub 3}Ge with and without 0.06 at. % boron were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The powders were generally spherical and exhibited both dendritic and lamellar structures. The increase in lattice parameter per atom fraction of boron, {var_epsilon}, was estimated to be 0.33. Extrusion of the powders produced fine grains of about 2 {micro}m in diameter. The extruded materials were partially recrystallized and showed a minor preference for [111] orientation. Annealing at 950 C resulted in a fully recrystallized structure and a nearly random orientation. The addition of 0.06 at. % boron had no observable effect on the morphology, microstructure, and texture. Precipitates of borides were observed in the annealed boron-doped alloy, suggesting that the solubility of boron in Ni{sup 3}Ge may be below about 0.06 at. %.

  2. Optical investigations of noncrystalline semiconductors. [considering silicon and boron films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, N. A.; Feldman, C.; Moorjani, K.

    1973-01-01

    Three areas of investigation into the properties of amorphous silicon and boron are reported: (1) optical properties of elemental amorphous semiconductors; (2) Mossbauer studies of disordered systems; and (3) theoretical aspects of disordered semiconductors.

  3. NEW ADVANCES IN BORON SOIL CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Boron is an essential plant micronutrient for which the range between deficiency and toxicity is narrower than for any other nutrient element. Plants respond directly to the amount of B in soil solution and only indirectly to the amount of B adsorbed on soil particle surfaces. ...

  4. NEW ADVANCES IN BORON SOIL CHEMISTRY - Paper

    EPA Science Inventory

    Boron is an essential plant micronutrient for which the range between deficiency and toxicity is narrower than for any other nutrient element. Plants respond directly to the amount of B in soil solution and only indirectly to the amount of B adsorbed on soil particle surfaces. ...

  5. Boron Substitution in Disordered Graphene-like Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeperkoetter, Joe; Gillespie, Andrew; Wexler, Carlos; Pfeifer, Peter; Materials Research Institute-Missouri S&T Collaboration; Paul Rulis Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine both the elemental composition of boron doped carbons as well as gain insight into the arrangement of atoms in the material. The hypothesized arrangement of atoms is a direct substitution of boron for carbon into a graphene like sheet, maintaining the hexagonal honeycomb lattice of sp2 sigma bonds. Such a boron atom would have an electronic configuration of 1s2(sp2)3 . With a graphitic carbon atom, the pz orbitals are maintained and participate in mobile pi bonds with neighboring carbon atoms, as understood in the aromatic model. Boron, however, would require a charge donation to fill its pz orbital. Thus, three possible models are proposed for the out of plane electron density: (1) the orbital remains unoccupied and the boron is a free radical, (2) charge is donated from a neighboring atom and the boron atom is ionic, (3) the delocalization of charge in the aromatic system results in a partial charge transfer with an effective charge somewhere between neutral and anionic. Our results suggest that boron is not in an anionic state, and, by doing a quantitative and simultaneous analysis from multiple elemental spectra, we conclude that no more than 2 wt% of boron is being substitutionally doped into the system.

  6. The structure of boron in boron fibres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, J.; Krawitz, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    The structure of noncrystalline, chemically vapour-deposited boron fibres was investigated by computer modelling the experimentally obtained X-ray diffraction patterns. The diffraction patterns from the models were computed using the Debye scattering equation. The modelling was done utilizing the minimum nearest-neighbour distance, the density of the model, and the broadening and relative intensity of the various peaks as boundary conditions. The results suggest that the fibres consist of a continuous network of randomly oriented regions of local atomic order, about 2 nm in diameter, containing boron atoms arranged in icosahedra. Approximately half of these regions have a tetragonal structure and the remaining half a distorted rhombohedral structure. The model also indicates the presence of many partial icosahedra and loose atoms not associated with any icosahedra. The partial icosahedra and loose atoms indicated in the present model are in agreement with the relaxing sub-units which have been suggested to explain the anelastic behavior of fibre boron and the loosely bound boron atoms which have been postulated to explain the strengthening mechanism in boron fibres during thermal treatment.

  7. Three-dimensional boron particle loaded thermal neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam M.; Graff, Robert T.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Reinhardt, Catherine; Voss, Lars F.; Cheung, Chin Li; Heineck, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    Three-dimensional boron particle loaded thermal neutron detectors utilize neutron sensitive conversion materials in the form of nano-powders and micro-sized particles, as opposed to thin films, suspensions, paraffin, etc. More specifically, methods to infiltrate, intersperse and embed the neutron nano-powders to form two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional charge sensitive platforms are specified. The use of nano-powders enables conformal contact with the entire charge-collecting structure regardless of its shape or configuration.

  8. Boron: elementary challenge for experimenters and theoreticians.

    PubMed

    Albert, Barbara; Hillebrecht, Harald

    2009-01-01

    Many of the fundamental questions regarding the solid-state chemistry of boron are still unsolved, more than 200 years after its discovery. Recently, theoretical work on the existence and stability of known and new modifications of the element combined with high-pressure and high-temperature experiments have revealed new aspects. A lot has also happened over the last few years in the field of reactions between boron and main group elements. Binary compounds such as B(6)O, MgB(2), LiB(1-x), Na(3)B(20), and CaB(6) have caused much excitement, but the electron-precise, colorless boride carbides Li(2)B(12)C(2), LiB(13)C(2), and MgB(12)C(2) as well as the graphite analogue BeB(2)C(2) also deserve special attention. Physical properties such as hardness, superconductivity, neutron scattering length, and thermoelectricity have also made boron-rich compounds attractive to materials research and for applications. The greatest challenges to boron chemistry, however, are still the synthesis of monophasic products in macroscopic quantities and in the form of single crystals, the unequivocal identification and determination of crystal structures, and a thorough understanding of their electronic situation. Linked polyhedra are the dominating structural elements of the boron-rich compounds of the main group elements. In many cases, their structures can be derived from those that have been assigned to modifications of the element. Again, even these require a critical revision and discussion. PMID:19830749

  9. Method for fabricating boron carbide articles

    DOEpatents

    Ardary, Zane L.; Reynolds, Carl D.

    1980-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the fabrication of boron carbide articles having length-to-diameter or width ratios greater than 2 to 1. The process of the present invention is practiced by the steps comprising hot pressing boron carbide powder into article segments or portions in which the segments have a length-to-diameter or width ratio less than 1.5, aligning a plurality of the initially hot-pressed segments in a hot-pressing die with the end surfaces of the segments placed in intimate contact with one another, and then hot pressing the aligned segments into an article of the desired configuration. The resulting article exhibits essentially uniform density throughout the structure with the bonds between the segments being equivalent in hardness, strength, and density to the remainder of the article.

  10. Boron and strontium isotope ratios and major/trace elements concentrations in tea leaves at four major tea growing gardens in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Ta; You, Chen-Feng; Aggarwal, Suresh Kumar; Chung, Chuan-Hsiung; Chao, Hung-Chun; Liu, Hou-Chun

    2016-06-01

    Isotopic compositions of B and Sr in rocks and sediments can be used as tracers for plant provincial sources. This study aims to test whether tea leaf origin can be discriminated using (10)B/(11)B and Sr isotopic composition data, along with concentrations of major/trace elements, in tea specimens collected from major plantation gardens in Taiwan. The tea leaves were digested by microwave and analyzed by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). The data showed significant variations in (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios (from 0.70482 to 0.71462), which reflect changes in soil, groundwater or irrigation conditions. The most radiogenic tea leaves were found at the Taitung garden and the least radiogenic ones were from the Hualien garden. The δ (11)B was found to change appreciably (δ (11)B = 0.38-23.73 ‰) which could be due to fertilizers. The maximum δ (11)B was also observed in tea samples from the Hualien garden. Principal component analysis combining (87)Sr/(86)Sr, δ (11)B and major/trace elements results successfully discriminated different sources of major tea gardens in Taiwan, except the Hualien gardens, and this may be due to rather complicated local geological settings. PMID:26254888

  11. Growth and characterization of boron doped graphene by Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition Technique (HFCVD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, A.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Salar Elahi, A.

    2016-03-01

    Large-area boron doped graphene was synthesized on Cu foil (as a catalyst) by Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (HFCVD) using boron oxide powder and ethanol vapor. To investigate the effect of different boron percentages, grow time and the growth mechanism of boron-doped graphene, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman scattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were applied. Also in this experiment, the I-V characteristic carried out for study of electrical property of graphene with keithley 2361 system. Nucleation of graphene domains with an average domain size of ~20 μm was observed when the growth time is 9 min that has full covered on the Cu surface. The Raman spectroscopy show that the frequency of the 2D band down-shifts with B doping, consistent with the increase of the in-plane lattice constant, and a weakening of the B-C in-plane bond strength relative to that of C-C bond. Also the shifts of the G-band frequencies can be interpreted in terms of the size of the C-C ring and the changes in the electronic structure of graphene in the presence of boron atoms. The study of electrical property shows that by increasing the grow time the conductance increases which this result in agree with SEM images and graphene grain boundary. Also by increasing the boron percentage in gas mixer the conductance decreases since doping graphene with boron creates a band-gap in graphene band structure. The XPS results of B doped graphene confirm the existence of boron in doped graphene, which indicates the boron atoms doped in the graphene lattice are mainly in the form of BC3. The results showed that boron-doped graphene can be successfully synthesized using boron oxide powder and ethanol vapor via a HFCVD method and also chemical boron doping can be change the electrical conductivity of the graphene.

  12. Preparation and dielectric properties of B-doped SiC powders by combustion synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Su Xiaolei Zhou Wancheng; Li Zhimin; Luo Fa; Du Hongliang; Zhu Dongmei

    2009-04-02

    The SiC(B) solid solution powders were synthesized via combustion reaction of Si/C system in Ar atmosphere, using boron powder as the dopant and polytetrafluoroethylene as the chemical activator, which were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and Raman spectra. Results show that the prepared powders are C-enriched SiC with C antisites and sp{sup 2} carbon defects in which the sp{sup 2} carbon is transformed to the sp{sup 3} carbon due to boron doping. The electric permittivities of the prepared powders were determined in the frequency range of 8.2-12.4 GHz. The dielectric real part {epsilon}' and dielectric loss tan {delta} of undoped powder have maximum values ({epsilon}' = 5.5-5.3, tan {delta} = 0.23-0.20), and decrease with increasing boron content. The mechanism of dielectric loss by doping has been discussed.

  13. Chemical disposition of boron in animals and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Moseman, R F

    1994-01-01

    Elemental boron was isolated in 1808. It typically occurs in nature as borates hydrated with varying amounts of water. Important compounds are boric acid and borax. Boron compounds are also used in the production of metals, enamels, and glasses. In trace amounts, boron is essential for the growth of many plants, and is found in animal and human tissues at low concentrations. Poisoning in humans has been reported as the result of accidental ingestion or use of large amounts in the treatment of burns. Boron as boric acid is fairly rapidly absorbed and excreted from the body via urine. The half-life of boric acid in humans is on the order of 1 day. Boron does not appear to accumulate in soft tissues of animals, but does accumulate in bone. Normal levels of boron in soft tissues, urine, and blood generally range from less than 0.05 ppm to no more than 10 ppm. In poisoning incidents, the amount of boric acid in brain and liver tissue has been reported to be as high as 2000 ppm. Recent studies at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences have indicated that boron may contribute to reduced fertility in male rodents fed 9000 ppm of boric acid in feed. Within a few days, boron levels in blood and most soft tissues quickly reached a plateau of about 15 ppm. Boron in bone did not appear to plateau, reaching 47 ppm after 7 days on the diet. Cessation of exposure to dietary boron resulted in a rapid drop in bone boron.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889870

  14. High-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of gadolinium studied using a boron-doped heater anvil

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Montgomery, J. M.; Samudrala, G. K.; Velisavljevic, N.; Vohra, Y. K.

    2016-04-07

    A boron-doped designer heater anvil is used in conjunction with powder x-ray diffraction to collect structural information on a sample of quasi-hydrostatically loaded gadolinium metal up to pressures above 8GPa and 600K. The heater anvil consists of a natural diamond anvil that has been surface modified with a homoepitaxially grown chemical-vapor-deposited layer of conducting boron-doped diamond, and is used as a DC heating element. Internally insulating both diamond anvils with sapphire support seats allows for heating and cooling of the high-pressure area on the order of a few tens of seconds. This device is then used to scan the phasemore » diagram of the sample by oscillating the temperature while continuously increasing the externally applied pressure and collecting in situ time-resolved powder diffraction images. In the pressure-temperature range covered in this experiment, the gadolinium sample is observed in its hcp, αSm, and dhcp phases. Under this temperature cycling, the hcp → αSm transition proceeds in discontinuous steps at points along the expected phase boundary. From these measurements (representing only one hour of synchrotron x-ray collection time), a single-experiment equation of state and phase diagram of each phase of gadolinium is presented for the range of 0–10GPa and 300–650K« less

  15. High-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of gadolinium studied using a boron-doped heater anvil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, J. M.; Samudrala, G. K.; Velisavljevic, N.; Vohra, Y. K.

    2016-04-01

    A boron-doped designer heater anvil is used in conjunction with powder x-ray diffraction to collect structural information on a sample of quasi-hydrostatically loaded gadolinium metal up to pressures above 8 GPa and 600 K. The heater anvil consists of a natural diamond anvil that has been surface modified with a homoepitaxially grown chemical-vapor-deposited layer of conducting boron-doped diamond, and is used as a DC heating element. Internally insulating both diamond anvils with sapphire support seats allows for heating and cooling of the high-pressure area on the order of a few tens of seconds. This device is then used to scan the phase diagram of the sample by oscillating the temperature while continuously increasing the externally applied pressure and collecting in situ time-resolved powder diffraction images. In the pressure-temperature range covered in this experiment, the gadolinium sample is observed in its hcp, αSm, and dhcp phases. Under this temperature cycling, the hcp → αSm transition proceeds in discontinuous steps at points along the expected phase boundary. From these measurements (representing only one hour of synchrotron x-ray collection time), a single-experiment equation of state and phase diagram of each phase of gadolinium is presented for the range of 0-10 GPa and 300-650 K.

  16. Abundance and distribution of boron in the Hauzenberg (Bavaria) granite complex

    SciTech Connect

    Sauerer, A.; Troll, G. )

    1990-01-01

    Hercynian S-type granites from the Hauzenberg igneous complex show a range of boron concentration from 1 to 12 ppm. The whole-rock boron data are not significantly correlated with concentrations of other trace elements (Zr, Rb, Ba, Sr, Ni, V, Co, Cu, Zn, F); neither is boron correlated with the major elements (except with sodium) or with the differentiation index (DI). The boron budget in the rock-forming minerals (plagioclase, alkali feldspar, quartz, biotite, muscovite) of the tourmaline-free granites reveals that the highest concentrations of boron occur in muscovite, whereas the greatest amount of boron is incorporated in plagioclase (57-69%) due to its high modal amount. Boron in plagioclase increases with the extent of of sericitization (obtained by X-ray diffractometry). Muscovite in a pegmatite contains more than 50% of the total boron. The areal distribution of boron within the complex is neither uniform nor random; an increase of boron concentrations from granodioritic to granitic rocks is indicated, whereas the late differentiates are depleted in boron.

  17. Method for exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A new method is disclosed for the exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride into mono- and few-layered nanosheets (or nanoplatelets, nanomesh, nanoribbons). The method does not necessarily require high temperature or vacuum, but uses commercially available h-BN powders (or those derived from these materials, bulk crystals) and only requires wet chemical processing. The method is facile, cost efficient, and scalable. The resultant exfoliated h-BN is dispersible in an organic solvent or water thus amenable for solution processing for unique microelectronic or composite applications.

  18. Magnesium doping of boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Legg, Robert; Jordan, Kevin

    2015-06-16

    A method to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes incorporating magnesium diboride in their structure. In a first embodiment, magnesium wire is introduced into a reaction feed bundle during a BNNT fabrication process. In a second embodiment, magnesium in powder form is mixed into a nitrogen gas flow during the BNNT fabrication process. MgB.sub.2 yarn may be used for superconducting applications and, in that capacity, has considerably less susceptibility to stress and has considerably better thermal conductivity than these conventional materials when compared to both conventional low and high temperature superconducting materials.

  19. Method for removing oxide contamination from titanium diboride powder

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, J.; Bamberger, C.E.

    A method for removing oxide contamination from titanium diboride powder involves the direct chemical treatment of TiB/sub 2/ powders with a gaseous boron halide, such as BCl/sub 3/, at temperatures in the range of 500 to 800/sup 0/C. The BCl/sub 3/ reacts with the oxides to form volatile species which are removed by the BCl/sub 3/ exit stream.

  20. Method for removing oxide contamination from titanium diboride powder

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, Jorulf; Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1984-01-01

    A method for removing oxide contamination from titanium diboride powder involves the direct chemical treatment of TiB.sub.2 powders with a gaseous boron halide, such as BCl.sub.3, at temperatures in the range of 500.degree.-800.degree. C. The BCl.sub.3 reacts with the oxides to form volatile species which are removed by the BCl.sub.3 exit stream.

  1. Innovative method for boron extraction from iron ore containing boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guang; Wang, Jing-song; Yu, Xin-yun; Shen, Ying-feng; Zuo, Hai-bin; Xue, Qing-guo

    2016-03-01

    A novel process for boron enrichment and extraction from ludwigite based on iron nugget technology was proposed. The key steps of this novel process, which include boron and iron separation, crystallization of boron-rich slag, and elucidation of the boron extraction behavior of boron-rich slag by acid leaching, were performed at the laboratory. The results indicated that 95.7% of the total boron could be enriched into the slag phase, thereby forming a boron-rich slag during the iron and slag melting separation process. Suanite and kotoite were observed to be the boron-containing crystalline phases, and the boron extraction properties of the boron-rich slag depended on the amounts and grain sizes of these minerals. When the boron-rich slag was slowly cooled to 1100°C, the slag crystallized well and the efficiency of extraction of boron (EEB) of the slag was the highest observed in the present study. The boron extraction property of the slow-cooled boron-rich slag obtained in this study was much better than that of szaibelyite ore under the conditions of 80% of theoretical sulfuric acid amount, leaching time of 30 min, leaching temperature of 40°C, and liquid-to-solid ratio of 8 mL/g.

  2. Face powder poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Face powder poisoning occurs when someone swallows or breathes in this substance. This article is for information ... The ingredients in face powder that can be harmful are: Baking soda Talcum powder Many other types of powder

  3. Metal powder reactions in ball milling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arias, A.

    1976-01-01

    On milling chromium powder in three metal chlorides and either chromium or nickel powders in ten organic liquids representative of nine different functional groups, the powders always reacted with the liquids and became contaminated with elements from them. The milled powders had specific surface areas ranging from 0.14 to 37 sq m/g, and the total contamination with elements from the milling liquid ranged from 0.01 to 56 wt%. In most milling runs, compounds resulting from substitution, addition, or elimination reactions formed in or from the milling liquid, and in most runs with organic liquids H2, CH4, and CO2 were generated.

  4. Boron in sillimanite.

    PubMed

    Grew, E S; Hinthorne, J R

    1983-08-01

    Sillimanite in six granulite-facies, kornerupine-bearing rocks contains 0.035 to 0.43 percent B(2)O(3) and 0.02 to 0.23 percent MgO (by weight). Substitution of boron for silicon and magnesium for aluminum is coupled such that the ratio of magnesium to boron is about 0.5. Sillimanite incorporates more than 0.1 percent B(2)O(3) only at high temperatures in a boron-rich environment at very low partial pressures of water. In the amphibolite facies, the sillimanite boron contents are too low to appreciably affect the stability relations of sillimanite with kyanite and andalusite. PMID:17830955

  5. Direct current sputtering of boron from boron/coron mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, John R.; Manos, Dennis; Nartowitz, Ed

    1994-01-01

    A method for coating a substrate with boron by sputtering includes lowering the electrical resistance of a boron-containing rod to allow electrical conduction in the rod; placing the boron-containing rod inside a vacuum chamber containing substrate material to be coated; applying an electrical potential between the boron target material and the vacuum chamber; countering a current avalanche that commences when the conduction heating rate exceeds the cooling rate, and until a steady equilibrium heating current is reached; and, coating the substrate material with boron by sputtering from the boron-containing rod.

  6. Boron nitride composites

    DOEpatents

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  7. Structure, Mechanics and Synthesis of Nanoscale Carbon and Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, Steven G.

    formation of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In Chapter 6, we look at various methods of producing BNNTs from boron droplets, and introduce a new method involving injection of boron powder into an induction furnace. In Chapter 7 we consider another useful process, where ammonia is reacted with boron vapor generated in situ, either through the reaction of boron with metal oxides or through the decomposition of metal borides.

  8. Physiological roles and transport mechanisms of boron: perspectives from plants.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Mayuki; Fujiwara, Toru

    2008-07-01

    Boron, an orphan of the periodic table of the elements, is unique not only in its chemical properties but also in its roles in biology. Its requirement in plants was described more than 80 years ago. Understandings of the molecular basis of the requirement and transport have been advanced greatly in the last decade. This article reviews recent findings of boron function and transport in plants and discusses possible implication to other organisms including humans. PMID:17965876

  9. Explosively driven low-density foams and powders

    DOEpatents

    Viecelli, James A.; Wood, Lowell L.; Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Nuckolls, John H.; Pagoria, Phillip F.

    2010-05-04

    Hollow RX-08HD cylindrical charges were loaded with boron and PTFE, in the form of low-bulk density powders or powders dispersed in a rigid foam matrix. Each charge was initiated by a Comp B booster at one end, producing a detonation wave propagating down the length of the cylinder, crushing the foam or bulk powder and collapsing the void spaces. The PdV work done in crushing the material heated it to high temperatures, expelling it in a high velocity fluid jet. In the case of boron particles supported in foam, framing camera photos, temperature measurements, and aluminum witness plates suggest that the boron was completely vaporized by the crush wave and that the boron vapor turbulently mixed with and burned in the surrounding air. In the case of PTFE powder, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of residues recovered from fragments of a granite target slab suggest that heating was sufficient to dissociate the PTFE to carbon vapor and molecular fluorine which reacted with the quartz and aluminum silicates in the granite to form aluminum oxide and mineral fluoride compounds.

  10. Ceramic Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In developing its product line of specialty ceramic powders and related products for government and industrial customers, including companies in the oil, automotive, electronics and nuclear industries, Advanced Refractory Technologies sought technical assistance from NERAC, Inc. in specific areas of ceramic materials and silicon technology, and for assistance in identifying possible applications of these materials in government programs and in the automotive and electronics industry. NERAC conducted a computerized search of several data bases and provided extensive information in the subject areas requested. NERAC's assistance resulted in transfer of technologies that helped ART staff develop a unique method for manufacture of ceramic materials to precise customer specifications.

  11. Energetic powder

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Betty S.; Danen, Wayne C.

    2003-12-23

    Fluoroalkylsilane-coated metal particles. The particles have a central metal core, a buffer layer surrounding the core, and a fluoroalkylsilane layer attached to the buffer layer. The particles may be prepared by combining a chemically reactive fluoroalkylsilane compound with an oxide coated metal particle having a hydroxylated surface. The resulting fluoroalkylsilane layer that coats the particles provides them with excellent resistance to aging. The particles can be blended with oxidant particles to form energetic powder that releases chemical energy when the buffer layer is physically disrupted so that the reductant metal core can react with the oxidant.

  12. Boron and strontium isotopic characterization of coal combustion residuals: validation of new environmental tracers.

    PubMed

    Ruhl, Laura S; Dwyer, Gary S; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Hower, James C; Vengosh, Avner

    2014-12-16

    In the U.S., coal fired power plants produce over 136 million tons of coal combustion residuals (CCRs) annually. CCRs are enriched in toxic elements, and their leachates can have significant impacts on water quality. Here we report the boron and strontium isotopic ratios of leaching experiments on CCRs from a variety of coal sources (Appalachian, Illinois, and Powder River Basins). CCR leachates had a mostly negative δ(11)B, ranging from -17.6 to +6.3‰, and (87)Sr/(86)Sr ranging from 0.70975 to 0.71251. Additionally, we utilized these isotopic ratios for tracing CCR contaminants in different environments: (1) the 2008 Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) coal ash spill affected waters; (2) CCR effluents from power plants in Tennessee and North Carolina; (3) lakes and rivers affected by CCR effluents in North Carolina; and (4) porewater extracted from sediments in lakes affected by CCRs. The boron isotopes measured in these environments had a distinctive negative δ(11)B signature relative to background waters. In contrast (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios in CCRs were not always exclusively different from background, limiting their use as a CCR tracer. This investigation demonstrates the validity of the combined geochemical and isotopic approach as a unique and practical identification method for delineating and evaluating the environmental impact of CCRs. PMID:25417938

  13. Ionicities of Boron-Boron Bonds in B12 Icosahedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Julong; Wu, Erdong; Wang, Huitian; Liu, Riping; Tian, Yongjun

    2005-01-01

    First-principles calculations are used to investigate ionicities of boron-boron bonds in B12 icosahedra. It is observed that the geometrical symmetry breaking of B12 icosahedra results in the spatial asymmetry of charge density on each boron-boron bond, and further in the ionicity of B12 icosahedra. The results calculated by a new ionicity scale, a population ionicity scale, indicate that the maximum ionicity among those boron-boron bonds is larger than that of boron-nitrogen bonds in the III-V compound cubic BN. It is of great importance that such an ionicity concept can be extended to boron-rich solids and identical atom clusters.

  14. Novel rare earth boron-rich solids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fuxiang; Leithe-Jasper, Andreas; Xu, Jun; Mori, Takao; Matsui, Yoshio, Tanaka, Takaho; Okada, Shigeru

    2001-06-01

    A new series of boron-rich solids ReB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N (Re: Y, Ho, Er, Tm, Lu) was synthesized by traditional solid-state reaction. The crystal structure of the representative compound YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N was solved by direct method from powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) data and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. The unit cell of the new structure is rhombohedral with space group R-3m (No. 166), lattice constant a = b = 5.623(0) {angstrom} and c = 44.785(3) {angstrom} with six formula units in one unit cell. The atoms of boron in the solids, like most of the boron-rich solids, exist with icosahedral and octahedral clusters, and the whole crystal shows a layered structure. The interconnected nine layers of icosahedron and three layers of octahedron in a unit cell build the whole framework of the new phase and rare earth metal atoms reside in voids of the octahedron layers. The neighboring icosahedral layers link through C-B-C chains besides the direct bonding of B-B. Both experimental and structural analysis indicated that the nitrogen atoms in the new phase can be replaced with carbon.

  15. Effect of annealing on the structure and properties of hot-pressed boron carbide base cermets

    SciTech Connect

    Koval'chenko, M.S.; Laptev, A.V.; Zhidov, A.B.

    1986-02-01

    This paper studies the effect of annealing conditions on the structure and some physicomechanical properties of boron carbidealuminum cermets produced by hot pressing under high pressures. The paper also explores the possibility of regulating the properties of such cermets by heat treatment. Cermets were produced using boron carbide powders of particle sizes up to 100 ..mu..m. As metallic binders, PA-3 aluminum powder and powders of aluminum alloys with improving wetting and adhesional interaction were employed. The microstructures of specimens were studied under an MIM-8 optical microscope. X-ray phase analysis was carried out in a URS-501M diffractometer in Cu K-alpha radiation. The authors found that to obtain boron carbidealuminum materials of maximum strength, it is necessary to perform their liquid-phase pressing under high pressures and dispense with subsequent annealing.

  16. Accumulation and loss of arsenic and boron, alone and in combination, in mallard ducks

    SciTech Connect

    Pendleton, G.W.; Whitworth, M.R.; Olsen, G.H.

    1995-08-01

    Arsenic and boron are common in the environment, and wildlife can be exposed to toxic concentrations through both natural and human-influenced processes. The authors exposed adult male mallard ducks to dietary concentrations of 300 ppm arsenic as sodium arsenate, 1,600 ppm boron as boric acid, or both and estimated the tissue accumulation and loss rates when the ducks were returned to uncontaminated food. Both elements were accumulated rapidly; equilibrium levels were reached for arsenic in 10 to 30 d and for boron in 2 to 15 d. Accumulation of each element was slowed by the presence of the other in the diet. Boron was eliminated by mallards very rapidly, with few detectable residues {ge}1 d after removal of boron from the diet; arsenic was also rapidly lost with half-lives of 1 to 3 d (half-lives were not constant throughout the loss period). Arsenic loss rate was not affected by the presence of boron. Arsenic accumulated to the highest level in liver tissue, with blood and brain levels lower; concentrations in the liver and blood were proportional but affected by the presence of boron. Boron concentrations were highest in the blood, followed by the brain and liver; concentrations in the liver and blood were proportional but affected by the presence of boron. Boron concentrations were highest in the blood, followed by the brain and liver; concentrations in the blood and liver were proportional.

  17. Boron-carbide-aluminum and boron-carbide-reactive metal cermets

    DOEpatents

    Halverson, Danny C.; Pyzik, Aleksander J.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    1986-01-01

    Hard, tough, lightweight boron-carbide-reactive metal composites, particularly boron-carbide-aluminum composites, are produced. These composites have compositions with a plurality of phases. A method is provided, including the steps of wetting and reacting the starting materials, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected. Starting compositions, reaction temperatures, reaction times, and reaction atmospheres are parameters for controlling the process and resulting compositions. The ceramic phases are homogeneously distributed in the metal phases and adhesive forces at ceramic-metal interfaces are maximized. An initial consolidation step is used to achieve fully dense composites. Microstructures of boron-carbide-aluminum cermets have been produced with modulus of rupture exceeding 110 ksi and fracture toughness exceeding 12 ksi.sqroot.in. These composites and methods can be used to form a variety of structural elements.

  18. Boron nitride housing cools transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Boron nitride ceramic heat sink cools transistors in r-f transmitter and receiver circuits. Heat dissipated by the transistor is conducted by the boron nitride housing to the metal chassis on which it is mounted.

  19. Boronated liposome development and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, M.F.

    1995-11-01

    The boronated liposome development and evaluation effort consists of two separate tasks. The first is the development of new boron compounds and the synthesis of known boron species with BNCT potential. These compounds are then encapsulated within liposomes for the second task, biodistribution testing in tumor-bearing mice, which examines the potential for the liposomes and their contents to concentrate boron in cancerous tissues.

  20. Toxicity of boron to the duckweed, Spirodella polyrrhiza.

    PubMed

    Davis, Shanna M; Drake, Kevin D; Maier, Kurt J

    2002-08-01

    Boron is an essential nutrient for plants and the potential exists for efficient removal of this element by wetland treatment systems due to accumulation by plants. To evaluate the efficacy of using Spirodella polyrrhiza to treat boron-contaminated wastewater or to be a suitable species for removing other nutrients from boron-containing wastewater the toxicity of this micronutrient was determined using standard methods. Frond production is apparently a more sensitive endpoint than either growth rate or the presence of abnormal fronds. Frond production in S. polyrrhiza was significantly reduced at 3.55 mg B/l. Significant reductions in growth rate and the percentage of abnormal (chlorotic, necrotic, and dead) fronds were observed at 18.9 and 22.4 mg B/l, respectively. The EC50 for frond production, frond growth rate, and abnormal fronds were 14.3, 11.7, and 17.7 mg B/l, respectively. S. polyrrhiza did not remove significant amounts of boron from the treatment solutions under the conditions and concentrations existing in this study. The inability of S. polyrrhiza to remove even small amounts of boron from the test solutions indicates this species is not suitable for treating boron-containing wastewater, even those with low boron concentrations. PMID:12143936

  1. Method for separating boron isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.

    1978-01-01

    A method of separating boron isotopes .sup.10 B and .sup.11 B by laser-induced selective excitation and photodissociation of BCl.sub.3 molecules containing a particular boron isotope. The photodissociation products react with an appropriate chemical scavenger and the reaction products may readily be separated from undissociated BCl.sub.3, thus effecting the desired separation of the boron isotopes.

  2. Mineral of the month: boron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyday, Phyllis A.

    2005-01-01

    What does boron have to do with baseball, apple pie, motherhood and Chevrolet? Boron minerals and chemicals are used in the tanning of leather baseballs and gloves; in micro-fertilizer to grow apples and in the glass and enamels of bakewares to cook apple pie; in boron detergents for soaking baby clothes and diapers; and in fiberglass parts for the Chevrolet Corvette.

  3. High density crystalline boron prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoenig, C. L.

    1990-06-01

    Boron powder is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid boron monolith with a bulk density at least 2.22 g/cc and up to greater than 2.34 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1800 C and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.34 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  4. High density crystalline boron prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, Clarence L.

    1993-01-01

    Boron powder is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid boron monolith with a bulk density at least 2.22 g/cc and up to or greater than 2.34 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1800.degree. C. and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.34 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  5. High density crystalline boron prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, C.L.

    1993-08-31

    Boron powder is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid boron monolith with a bulk density at least 2.22 g/cc and up to or greater than 2.34 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1,800 C and 30 PSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.34 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  6. In Vivo Boron Uptake Determination for Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Binello, Emanuela; Shortkroff, Sonya; Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    1999-06-06

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) has been proposed as a new application of the boron neutron capture reaction for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In BNCS, a boron compound is injected into the joint space, where it is taken up by the synovium. The joint is then irradiated with neutrons of a desired energy range, inducing the boron neutron capture reaction in boron-loaded cells. Boron uptake by the synovium is an important parameter in the assessment of the potential of BNCS and in the determination of whether to proceed to animal irradiations for the testing of therapeutic efficacy. We present results from an investigation of boron uptake in vivo by the synovium.

  7. Boron uptake, localization, and speciation in marine brown algae.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric P; Wu, Youxian; Carrano, Carl J

    2016-02-01

    In contrast to the generally boron-poor terrestrial environment, the concentration of boron in the marine environment is relatively high (0.4 mM) and while there has been extensive interest in its use as a surrogate of pH in paleoclimate studies in the context of climate change-related questions, the relatively depth independent, and the generally non-nutrient-like concentration profile of this element have led to boron being neglected as a potentially biologically relevant element in the ocean. Among the marine plant-like organisms the brown algae (Phaeophyta) are one of only five lineages of photosynthetic eukaryotes to have evolved complex multicellularity. Many of unusual and often unique features of brown algae are attributable to this singular evolutionary history. These adaptations are a reflection of the marine coastal environment which brown algae dominate in terms of biomass. Consequently, brown algae are of fundamental importance to oceanic ecology, geochemistry, and coastal industry. Our results indicate that boron is taken up by a facilitated diffusion mechanism against a considerable concentration gradient. Furthermore, in both Ectocarpus and Macrocystis some boron is most likely bound to cell wall constituent alginate and the photoassimilate mannitol located in sieve cells. Herein, we describe boron uptake, speciation, localization and possible biological function in two species of brown algae, Macrocystis pyrifera and Ectocarpus siliculosus. PMID:26679972

  8. Minerals Yearbook 1989: Boron

    SciTech Connect

    Lyday, P.A.

    1990-08-01

    U.S. production and sales of boron minerals and chemicals decreased during the year. Domestically, glass fiber insulation was the largest use for borates, followed by sales to distributors, textile-grade glass fibers, and borosilicate glasses. California was the only domestic source of boron minerals. The United States continued to provide essentially all of its own supply while maintaining a strong position as a source of sodium borate products and boric acid exported to foreign markets. Supplementary U.S. imports of Turkish calcium borate and calcium-sodium borate ores, borax, and boric acid, primarily for various glass uses, continued.

  9. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, Richard K.; Bystroff, Roman I.; Miller, Dale E.

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  10. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, R.K.; Bystroff, R.I.; Miller, D.E.

    1986-08-27

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  11. Powder treatment process

    DOEpatents

    Weyand, J.D.

    1988-02-09

    Disclosed are: (1) a process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the slurry containing a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, while reducing the tendency for oxidation of the constituent by including as a liquid constituent of the slurry an organic liquid; (2) a process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the powder having been pretreated to reduce content of a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, the pretreating comprising heating the powder to react the constituent; and (3) a process comprising reacting ceramic powder, grinding the reacted powder, slurrying the ground powder, spray drying the slurried powder, and blending the dried powder with metal powder. 2 figs.

  12. Powder treatment process

    DOEpatents

    Weyand, John D.

    1988-01-01

    (1) A process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the slurry containing a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, while reducing the tendency for oxidation of the constituent by including as a liquid constituent of the slurry an organic liquid; (2) a process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the powder having been pretreated to reduce content of a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, the pretreating comprising heating the powder to react the constituent; and (3) a process comprising reacting ceramic powder, grinding the reacted powder, slurrying the ground powder, spray drying the slurried powder, and blending the dried powder with metal powder.

  13. The loss of boron in ultra-shallow boron implanted Si under heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelicon, P.; El Bouanani, M.; Prasad, G. V. R.; Razpet, A.; Simcic, J.; Guo, B. N.; Birt, D.; Duggan, J. L.; McDaniel, F. D.

    2006-08-01

    Heavy ion impact has been known to cause a loss of light elements from the near-surface region of the irradiated sample. One of the possible approaches to a better understanding of the processes responsible for the release of specific elements is to irradiate shallow-implanted samples, which exhibit a well-known depth distribution of the implanted species. In this work, the samples studied were produced by implantation of Si wafers with 11 B at implantation energies of 250 and 500 eV and fluence of 1.0x10(15) atoms/cm 2 . Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis was applied to monitor the remnant boron fluence in the sample. Irradiation of the samples by a 14.2 (MeVF4+)-F-19 beam resulted in a slow decrease of boron remnant fluence with initial loss rates of the order of 0.05 B atom per impact ion. Under irradiation with 12 (MeVS3+)-S-32 ions, the remnant boron fluence in Si decreased exponentially with a much faster loss rate of boron and became constant after a certain heavy ion irradiation dose. A simple model, which assumes a finite desorption range and corresponding depletion of the near-surface region, was used to describe the observations. The depletion depths under the given irradiation conditions were calculated from the measured data.

  14. Enhanced-wetting, boron-based liquid-metal ion source and method

    DOEpatents

    Bozack, M.J.; Swanson, L.W.; Bell, A.E.; Clark, W.M. Jr.; Utlaut, M.W.; Storms, E.K.

    1999-02-16

    A binary, boron-based alloy as a source for field-emission-type, ion-beam generating devices, wherein boron predominates in the alloy, preferably with a presence of about 60 atomic percent is disclosed. The other constituent in the alloy is selected from the group of elements consisting of nickel, palladium and platinum. Predominance of boron in these alloys, during operation, promotes combining of boron with trace impurities of carbon in the alloys to form B{sub 4}C and thus to promote wetting of an associated carbon support substrate. 1 fig.

  15. Enhanced-wetting, boron-based liquid-metal ion source and method

    DOEpatents

    Bozack, Michael J.; Swanson, Lynwood W.; Bell, Anthony E.; Clark Jr., William M.; Utlaut, Mark W.; Storms, Edmund K.

    1999-01-01

    A binary, boron-based alloy as a source for field-emission-type, ion-beam generating devices, wherein boron predominates in the alloy, preferably with a presence of about 60 atomic percent. The other constituent in the alloy is selected from the group of elements consisting of nickel, palladium and platinum. Predominance of boron in these alloys, during operation, promotes combining of boron with trace impurities of carbon in the alloys to form B.sub.4 C and thus to promote wetting of an associated carbon support substrate.

  16. Multi-component boron coatings on low carbon steel AISI 1018

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwattananont, Naruemon

    Boronizing and metalizing are thermo-chemical surface hardening treatments in which boron and metal atoms diffuse into the metal substrate forming metallic boride layers, providing complex properties of B-Me-Fe system. To study multi-component boron coatings on low carbon steel AISI 1018, the simultaneous powder pack method of boronizing and metalizing was selected to perform the coatings. One B-Fe system and eight boron-metal (B-Me-Fe) systems from transition metals group IVB (Ti, Zr, HO, group VB (Nb, Ta), and group VIB (Cr, Mo, W) were studied. The system specimens were thereto-chemically treated at 950°C for 4 hours in a crucible containing powder mixture of boron source, transition metal powder, and activator. After the heat treatment process, the multi-component boron coatings were characterized by using optical microscope, microhardness tester, TGA, XRD, and Synchrotron microdiffraction. The coating morphology was observed and the coating thickness was measured as well as the microhardness across the depth of coating. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was evaluated by the continuous weighting method. The high temperature oxidation was also detected by isothermal method at a temperature range of 400-800°C for 24 hours. The Rietveld refinement method was used to examine the quantitative phase analysis, crystalline size, microstrain and lattice parameters of the multi-component boron coatings. The results have shown that adding transition metals into the B-Fe system caused the formation of solid solution of transition-metal borides. The distortion of crystal lattice parameters generated microstrain in the boride phase. The Synchrotron microdiffraction confirmed the presence of about 5-10 microns of transition-metal boride phase at the surface. Moreover, the additional transition metal can provide better corrosion and high temperature oxidation resistance to the B-Fe system, preventing the deboronizing and stabilizing the boride phases.

  17. Boron and Compounds

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Boron and Compounds ; CASRN 7440 - 42 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  18. Boron site preference in ternary Ta and Nb boron silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Atta U.; Nunes, Carlos A.; Coelho, Gilberto C.; Suzuki, Paulo A.; Grytsiv, Andriy; Bourree, Francoise; Rogl, Peter F.

    2012-06-15

    X-ray single crystal (XSC) and neutron powder diffraction data (NPD) were used to elucidate boron site preference for five ternary phases. Ta{sub 3}Si{sub 1-x}B{sub x} (x=0.112(4)) crystallizes with the Ti{sub 3}P-type (space group P4{sub 2}/n) with B-atoms sharing the 8g site with Si atoms. Ta{sub 5}Si{sub 3-x} (x=0.03(1); Cr{sub 5}B{sub 3}- type) crystallizes with space group I4/mcm, exhibiting a small amount of vacancies on the 4a site. Both, Ta{sub 5}(Si{sub 1-x}B{sub x}){sub 3}, x=0.568(3), and Nb{sub 5}(Si{sub 1-x}B{sub x}){sub 3}, x=0.59(2), are part of solid solutions of M{sub 5}Si{sub 3} with Cr{sub 5}B{sub 3}-type into the ternary M-Si-B systems (M=Nb or Ta) with B replacing Si on the 8h site. The D8{sub 8}-phase in the Nb-Si-B system crystallizes with the Ti{sub 5}Ga{sub 4}-type revealing the formula Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub 1-x} (x=0.292(3)) with B partially filling the voids in the 2b site of the Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3} parent type. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structures of a series of compounds have been solved from X-ray single crystal diffractometry revealing details on the boron incorporation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of a series of compounds have been solved by X-ray single crystal diffractometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ta{sub 3}(Si{sub 1-x}B{sub x}) (x=0.112) crystallizes with the Ti{sub 3}P-type, B and Si atoms randomly share the 8g site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub 1-x} (x=0.292; Ti{sub 5}Ga{sub 4}-type) was solved from NPD.

  19. The Effect of Time, Temperature and Composition on Boron Carbide Synthesis by Sol-gel Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadian, A. M.; Bigdeloo, J. A.

    2008-02-01

    To minimize free carbon residue in the boron carbide (B4C) powder, a modified sol-gel process is performed where the starting materials as boric acid and citric acid compositions are adjusted. Because of boron loss in the form of B2O2(g) during the reduction reaction of the stoichiometric starting composition, the final B4C powders contain carbon residues. Thus, an excess H3BO3 is used in the reaction to compensate the loss and to obtain stoichiometric powders. Parameters of production have been determined using x-ray diffraction analysis and particle size analyses. The synthesized B4C powder using an excess boric acid composition shows no trace of carbon.

  20. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  1. Asymmetric twins in rhombohedral boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Takeshi Guan, Pengfei; Madhav Reddy, K.; Hirata, Akihiko; Guo, Junjie; Chen, Mingwei

    2014-01-13

    Superhard materials consisting of light elements have recently received considerable attention because of their ultrahigh specific strength for a wide range of applications as structural and functional materials. However, the failure mechanisms of these materials subjected to high stresses and dynamic loading remain to be poorly known. We report asymmetric twins in a complex compound, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C), characterized by spherical-aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. The atomic structure of boron-rich icosahedra at rhombohedral vertices and cross-linked carbon-rich atomic chains can be clearly visualized, which reveals unusual asymmetric twins with detectable strains along the twin interfaces. This study offers atomic insights into the structure of twins in a complex material and has important implications in understanding the planar defect-related failure of superhard materials under high stresses and shock loading.

  2. Effects on environment and agriculture of geothermal wastewater and boron pollution in great Menderes basin.

    PubMed

    Koç, Cengiz

    2007-02-01

    Boron toxicity is an important disorder that can be limit plant growth on soils of arid and semi arid environments through the world. High concentrations of Boron may occur naturally in the soil or in groundwater, or be added to the soil from mining, fertilizers, or irrigation water. Off all the potential resources, irrigation water is the most important contributor to high levels of soil boron, boron is often found in high concentrations in association with saline soil and saline well water. Although of considerable agronomic importance, our understanding of Boron toxicity is rather fragment and limited. In this study, Boron content of Great Menderes River and Basin was researched. Great Menderes Basin is one of the consequence basins having agricultural potential, aspect of water and soil resources in Turkey. Great Menderes River, water resource of the basin was to be polluted by geothermal wastewater and thermal springs including Boron element. Great Menderes Basin has abundant geothermal water resources which contain high amounts of Boron and these ground water are brought to surface and used for various purposes such as power generation, heating or thermal spring and than discharged to Great Menderes River. In order to prevent Boron pollution and hence unproductively in soils, it is necessary not to discharged water with Boron to irrigation water. According to results, it was obtained that Boron content of River was as high in particular Upper Basin where there was a ground thermal water reservoir. Boron has been accumulated more than plant requirement in this area irrigated by this water. Boron content of River was relatively low in rainy months and irrigation season while it was high in dry season. Boron concentration in the River was to decrease from upstream to downstream. If it is no taken measure presently, about 130,000 ha irrigation areas which was constructed irrigation scheme in the Great Menderes basin will expose the Boron pollution and salinity

  3. Understanding boron through size-selected clusters: structure, chemical bonding, and fluxionality.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Alina P; Popov, Ivan A; Piazza, Zachary A; Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Boldyrev, Alexander I

    2014-04-15

    Boron is an interesting element with unusual polymorphism. While three-dimensional (3D) structural motifs are prevalent in bulk boron, atomic boron clusters are found to have planar or quasi-planar structures, stabilized by localized two-center-two-electron (2c-2e) σ bonds on the periphery and delocalized multicenter-two-electron (nc-2e) bonds in both σ and π frameworks. Electron delocalization is a result of boron's electron deficiency and leads to fluxional behavior, which has been observed in B13(+) and B19(-). A unique capability of the in-plane rotation of the inner atoms against the periphery of the cluster in a chosen direction by employing circularly polarized infrared radiation has been suggested. Such fluxional behaviors in boron clusters are interesting and have been proposed as molecular Wankel motors. The concepts of aromaticity and antiaromaticity have been extended beyond organic chemistry to planar boron clusters. The validity of these concepts in understanding the electronic structures of boron clusters is evident in the striking similarities of the π-systems of planar boron clusters to those of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, naphthalene, coronene, anthracene, or phenanthrene. Chemical bonding models developed for boron clusters not only allowed the rationalization of the stability of boron clusters but also lead to the design of novel metal-centered boron wheels with a record-setting planar coordination number of 10. The unprecedented highly coordinated borometallic molecular wheels provide insights into the interactions between transition metals and boron and expand the frontier of boron chemistry. Another interesting feature discovered through cluster studies is boron transmutation. Even though it is well-known that B(-), formed by adding one electron to boron, is isoelectronic to carbon, cluster studies have considerably expanded the possibilities of new structures and new materials using the B(-)/C analogy. It is

  4. Boron isotopic compositions of some boron minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oi, Takao; Nomura, Masao; Musashi, Masaaki; Ossaka, Tomoko; Okamoto, Makoto; Kakihana, Hidetake

    1989-12-01

    Boron minerals that have different structural formulae but are supposed to have the same geologic origin have been collected and analyzed for the 11B /10B isotopic ratio. It has been reconfirmed that minerals of marine origin have higher 11B /10B ratios than those of nonmarine origin. It has been found that the sequence of decreasing 11B /10B values among the minerals with the same geologic origin is; borax, tincal, kernite (Na borates) > ulexite ( Na/Ca borate) > colemanite, iyoite, meyerhofferite (Ca borates). This sequence is explainable on the basis of the difference in crystal structure among the minerals. That is, minerals with higher BO 3/BO 4 ratios, (the ratio of the number of the BO 3 triangle units to the number of the BO 4 tetrahedron units in the structural formula of a mineral) have higher 11B /10B ratios.

  5. Novel hollow powder porous structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sypeck, D.J.; Parrish, P.A.; Wadley, H.N.G.

    1998-12-31

    Recent finite element calculations indicate that structures constructed from partially compacted hollow spheres exhibit a greater stiffness and strength than many other cellular structures at comparable density. It has been observed that gas atomization of metallic powders often leads to entrapment of the flow field gas. The resulting hollow powders are an unwanted by-product in the sense that they lead to porosity and future sites of defect in solid parts. Here a method is developed to separate the hollow powders according to their size, shape and density. They are then consolidated to a porous structure. Examples of this are given for both a titanium alloy and a nickel-base superalloy. The compressive mechanical properties are measured and compared to those of other porous structures.

  6. PROCESS OF FORMING POWDERED MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Glatter, J.; Schaner, B.E.

    1961-07-14

    A process of forming high-density compacts of a powdered ceramic material is described by agglomerating the powdered ceramic material with a heat- decompossble binder, adding a heat-decompossble lubricant to the agglomerated material, placing a quantity of the material into a die cavity, pressing the material to form a compact, pretreating the compacts in a nonoxidizing atmosphere to remove the binder and lubricant, and sintering the compacts. When this process is used for making nuclear reactor fuel elements, the ceramic material is an oxide powder of a fissionsble material and after forming, the compacts are placed in a cladding tube which is closed at its ends by vapor tight end caps, so that the sintered compacts are held in close contact with each other and with the interior wall of the cladding tube.

  7. The role of various boron precursor on superconducting properties of MgB2/Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, S.; Kılıçarslan, E.; Kılıç, A.; Gencer, A.

    2014-09-01

    The superconducting properties of Fe sheathed MgB2 wire has been studied as a function of precursor B powder particle size. The in situ processed MgB2 samples were prepared by means of conventional solid state reaction method with magnesium powder (99.8%, 325 mesh) and three different types of amorphous boron powders (purity; 98.8%, >95% and 91.9%) from two sources, Pavezyum (Turkish supplier) and Sigma Aldrich. The particle sizes of Turkish boron precursor powder were selected between 300 and 800 nm. The structural and magnetic properties of the prepared samples were investigated by means of the X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and ac susceptibility measurements. The XRD patterns showed that the diffraction peaks for our samples belong to the main phase of the MgB2 diffraction patterns. The highest critical temperature, Tc = 38.4 K was measured for the MgB2 sample which was fabricated by using the 98.8% B. The critical current density of this sample was extracted from the magnetization measurements and Jc = 5.4 × 105 A cm-2 at 5 K and B = 2 T. We found that the sample made by using the 98.8% boron showed almost 2 times higher Jc than that of obtained from 91.9% B powder.

  8. Experimental realization of two-dimensional boron sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Baojie; Zhang, Jin; Zhong, Qing; Li, Wenbin; Li, Shuai; Li, Hui; Cheng, Peng; Meng, Sheng; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui

    2016-06-01

    A variety of two-dimensional materials have been reported in recent years, yet single-element systems such as graphene and black phosphorus have remained rare. Boron analogues have been predicted, as boron atoms possess a short covalent radius and the flexibility to adopt sp2 hybridization, features that favour the formation of two-dimensional allotropes, and one example of such a borophene material has been reported recently. Here, we present a parallel experimental work showing that two-dimensional boron sheets can be grown epitaxially on a Ag(111) substrate. Two types of boron sheet, a β12 sheet and a χ3 sheet, both exhibiting a triangular lattice but with different arrangements of periodic holes, are observed by scanning tunnelling microscopy. Density functional theory simulations agree well with experiments, and indicate that both sheets are planar without obvious vertical undulations. The boron sheets are quite inert to oxidization and interact only weakly with their substrate. We envisage that such boron sheets may find applications in electronic devices in the future.

  9. Experimental realization of two-dimensional boron sheets.

    PubMed

    Feng, Baojie; Zhang, Jin; Zhong, Qing; Li, Wenbin; Li, Shuai; Li, Hui; Cheng, Peng; Meng, Sheng; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui

    2016-06-01

    A variety of two-dimensional materials have been reported in recent years, yet single-element systems such as graphene and black phosphorus have remained rare. Boron analogues have been predicted, as boron atoms possess a short covalent radius and the flexibility to adopt sp(2) hybridization, features that favour the formation of two-dimensional allotropes, and one example of such a borophene material has been reported recently. Here, we present a parallel experimental work showing that two-dimensional boron sheets can be grown epitaxially on a Ag(111) substrate. Two types of boron sheet, a β12 sheet and a χ3 sheet, both exhibiting a triangular lattice but with different arrangements of periodic holes, are observed by scanning tunnelling microscopy. Density functional theory simulations agree well with experiments, and indicate that both sheets are planar without obvious vertical undulations. The boron sheets are quite inert to oxidization and interact only weakly with their substrate. We envisage that such boron sheets may find applications in electronic devices in the future. PMID:27219700

  10. Ferrocenyl-substituted Schiff base complexes of boron: Synthesis, structural, physico-chemical and biochemical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Sunita; Singh, R. V.

    2011-01-01

    Biological important complexes of boron(III) derived from 1-acetylferrocenehydrazinecarboxamide (L 1H), 1-acetylferrocenehydrazinecarbothioamide (L 2H) and 1-acetylferrocene carbodithioic acid (L 3H) have been prepared and investigated using a combination of microanalytical analysis, melting point, electronic, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectral studies, cyclic voltammetry and X-ray powder diffraction studies. Boron isopropoxide interacts with the ligands in 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 molar ratios (boron:ligand) resulting in the formation of coloured products. On the basis of conductance and spectral evidences, tetrahedral structures for boron(III) complexes have been assigned. The ligands are coordinated to the boron(III) via the azomethine nitrogen atom and the thiolic sulfur atom/enolic oxygen atom. On the basis of X-ray powder diffraction study one of the representative boron complex was found to have orthorhombic lattice, having lattice parameters: a = 9.9700, b = 15.0000 and c = 7.0000. Both the ligands and their complexes have been screened for their biological activity on several pathogenic fungi and bacteria and were found to possess appreciable fungicidal and bactericidal properties. Plant growth regulating activity of one of the ligand and its complexes has also been recorded on gram plant, and results have been discussed.

  11. [Boron in dental hard tissues studied by 11B(p,alpha)8Be nuclear reaction].

    PubMed

    Torrisi, L; Rapisarda, E; Cicero, G

    1989-09-01

    Boron's low atomic number and low concentration make its measurement in hard dental tissues difficult. Using nuclear reaction, the 11B(p,alpha)8Be*, enamel, dentine and radicular cement of 18 dental elements, ten healthy and eight decayed teeth, both permanent and deciduous were studied. The highest Boron concentrations were found in the two most superficial microns of the vestibular enamel in non-decayed incisors, particularly deciduous ones. Premolar and molar teeth showed lower Boron concentrations than frontal ones, decayed teeth revealed hardly any Boron. In confirmation of the prevailing exogenous contribution of this karyostatic trace element, on average, Boron concentrations were 2.5 times as high as dentine and 10 times as high as cement. PMID:2811808

  12. Large-scale fabrication of boron nitride nanotubes with high purity via solid-state reaction method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An effective solid-state reaction method is reported for synthesizing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in large scale and with high purity by annealing amorphous boron powder and ferric chloride (FeCl3) catalyst in ammonia atmosphere at elevated temperatures. FeCl3 that has rarely been utilized before is introduced not only as a catalyst but also as an efficient transforming agent which converts boron powder into boron chloride (BCl3) vapor in situ. The nanotubes are bamboo in shape and have an average diameter of about 90 nm. The effect of synthetic temperatures on nanotube morphology and yield is investigated. The photoluminescence (PL) measurement shows emission bands of the nanotubes at 354, 423, 467, and 666 nm. A combined growth mechanism of vapor–liquid-solid (VLS) and solid–liquid-solid (SLS) model is proposed for the formation of the BNNTs. PMID:25313303

  13. Boron since Asbury Park: The first International boron Conference September 18-19, 1959

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starks, R. J.; Buford, J. T.; Grayson, Paul E.

    1986-04-01

    During the late 1950's a Department of Defense agency decided the potential for the production of a very high temperature electronic device using single crystal boron justified an extended study of the chemistry and metallurgy of the element applying techniques then being used on silicon. These studies led to the first International Conference. The response to that conference led to a continuing series of conferences, all held in Europe until now. This paper discusses work on the production of high purity single crystals, and their evaluation. These studies led to the use of this high purity boron to produce arsenides and phosphides and their evaluation. A whole new area of study was made possible by this effort in that high purity isotope of boron are now available for use in all these evaluations. Isotopic boron has proven to be of use in electronics, medical applications and of course in nuclear physics. The nuclear applications are for high purity compounds including oxides, carbides and nitrides. Examples of all these are discussed in the body of the paper.

  14. Understanding Boron through Size-Selected Clusters: Structure, Chemical Bonding, and Fluxionality

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeeva, Alina P.; Popov, Ivan A.; Piazza, Zachary A.; Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Wang, Lai S.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2014-04-15

    Conspectus Boron is an interesting element with unusual polymorphism. While three-dimensional (3D) structural motifs are prevalent in bulk boron, atomic boron clusters are found to have planar or quasi-planar structures, stabilized by localized two-center–two-electron (2c–2e) σ bonds on the periphery and delocalized multicenter–two-electron (nc–2e) bonds in both σ and π frameworks. Electron delocalization is a result of boron’s electron deficiency and leads to fluxional behavior, which has been observed in B13+ and B19–. A unique capability of the in-plane rotation of the inner atoms against the periphery of the cluster in a chosen direction by employing circularly polarized infrared radiation has been suggested. Such fluxional behaviors in boron clusters are interesting and have been proposed as molecular Wankel motors. The concepts of aromaticity and antiaromaticity have been extended beyond organic chemistry to planar boron clusters. The validity of these concepts in understanding the electronic structures of boron clusters is evident in the striking similarities of the π-systems of planar boron clusters to those of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, naphthalene, coronene, anthracene, or phenanthrene. Chemical bonding models developed for boron clusters not only allowed the rationalization of the stability of boron clusters but also lead to the design of novel metal-centered boron wheels with a record-setting planar coordination number of 10. The unprecedented highly coordinated borometallic molecular wheels provide insights into the interactions between transition metals and boron and expand the frontier of boron chemistry. Another interesting feature discovered through cluster studies is boron transmutation. Even though it is well-known that B–, formed by adding one electron to boron, is isoelectronic to carbon, cluster studies have considerably expanded the possibilities of new structures and new materials using the B

  15. Determination of main and minor components of silicon based materials by a combustion with elemental fluorine. Separation of gaseous fluorination products by carrier gas distillation and gas mass spectrometry

    PubMed

    Russe; Kipphardt; Broekaert

    2000-08-15

    For the determination of main and minor components in silicon-based ceramic powders, a decomposition by a combustion with elemental fluorine and separation of the volatile fluorination products by a carrier-gas distillation with a subsequent detection by quadrupole mass spectrometry is described. The necessity and success of the separation step is demonstrated for the determination of boron as a minor constituent in SiC, where the spectral interferences of silicon on the boron signals are decreased considerably. The method developed is shown to be directly applicable to determination of silicon in Si3N4, SiC, and SiO2. The determination of nitrogen in Si3N4 requires additional effort, to separate nitrogen from the excess of fluorine. For the determination of boron, a complete mobilization of BF3 is assured by the presence of an adequate amount of GeF4. Analysis results obtained with different types of calibration show a precision of 30 microg for boron at the milligram-per-gram level and a precision between 0.5 and 2% (m/m) for the main components, silicon and nitrogen. Within these standard deviations, the results agree well with the values expected from the stoichiometry, with the results for silicon and boron obtained by wet chemical decomposition and slurry techniques in combination with ICP-OES and with the results for nitrogen obtained by carrier gas heat extraction. PMID:10959976

  16. Growth of cubic boron nitride on diamond particles by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, H.; Yarbrough, W. A.

    1991-06-01

    The nucleation and growth of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) onto diamond powder using solid NaBH4 in low pressure gas mixtures of NH3 and H2 by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition has been studied. Boron nitride was deposited on submicron diamond seed crystals scattered on (100) silicon single crystal wafers and evidence was found for the formation of the cubic phase. Diamond powder surfaces appear to preferentially nucleate c-BN. In addition, it was found that the ratio of c-BN to turbostratic structure boron nitride (t-BN) deposited increases with decreasing NH3 concentration in H2. It is suggested that this may be due to an increased etching rate for t-BN by atomic hydrogen whose partial pressure may vary with NH3 concentration.

  17. Chemical and photoluminescence analyses of new carbon-based boron oxynitride phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei-Ning; Kaihatsu, Yutaka; Iskandar, Ferry; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2009-11-15

    Analyses of newly developed carbon-based boron oxynitride phosphors using an electron energy-loss spectrometer and a spectroflurophotometer were carried out. The results showed that the prepared phosphor powder has covalently bonded boron, nitrogen, and oxygen atoms with a soft carbon framework. Photoluminescence characterization revealed that the resultant phosphor has a direct bandgap transition with defect broadened band edges, resulting in a high quantum efficiency, because the atomic distances of the phosphor are smaller than those of conventional carbon-based boron nitride compounds, which have an indirect bandgap transition and a low quantum efficiency. The atomic distances of the phosphor are smaller owing to the presence of oxygen atoms, which have a higher electron affinity and a smaller covalent bond radius compared with boron, carbon and nitrogen.

  18. Preliminary study of neutron absorption by concrete with boron carbide addition

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Yusof Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Zali, Nurazila Mat; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Yazid, Hafizal; Ariffin, Fatin Nabilah Tajul; Ahmad, Sahrim; Hamid, Roszilah; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz

    2014-02-12

    Concrete has become a conventional material in construction of nuclear reactor due to its properties like safety and low cost. Boron carbide was added as additives in the concrete construction as it has a good neutron absorption property. The sample preparation for concrete was produced with different weight percent of boron carbide powder content. The neutron absorption rate of these samples was determined by using a fast neutron source of Americium-241/Be (Am-Be 241) and detection with a portable backscattering neutron detector. Concrete with 20 wt % of boron carbide shows the lowest count of neutron transmitted and this indicates the most neutrons have been absorbed by the concrete. Higher boron carbide content may affect the concrete strength and other properties.

  19. Preliminary study of neutron absorption by concrete with boron carbide addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Yusof; Ariffin, Fatin Nabilah Tajul; Hamid, Roszilah; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Zali, Nurazila Mat; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Yazid, Hafizal; Ahmad, Sahrim; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz

    2014-02-01

    Concrete has become a conventional material in construction of nuclear reactor due to its properties like safety and low cost. Boron carbide was added as additives in the concrete construction as it has a good neutron absorption property. The sample preparation for concrete was produced with different weight percent of boron carbide powder content. The neutron absorption rate of these samples was determined by using a fast neutron source of Americium-241/Be (Am-Be 241) and detection with a portable backscattering neutron detector. Concrete with 20 wt % of boron carbide shows the lowest count of neutron transmitted and this indicates the most neutrons have been absorbed by the concrete. Higher boron carbide content may affect the concrete strength and other properties.

  20. Effect of production conditions on the corrosion resistance of lanthanum hexaboride powders and parts made from them

    SciTech Connect

    Paderno, Y.B.; Dudnik, E.M.; Masyuk, T.V.; Tkasch, A.V.; Zaitseva, A.Z.

    1985-10-01

    The authors studied the effect of chemical and thermal treatments of an industrial LaB6 powder on the corrosion resistance of the powder itself and parts pressed hot from it. To start, two batches of an industrial lanthanum hexaboride powder were used; and any boron oxide present removed by washing the powders with warm distilled water. To free the powders of lanthanum borates and lanthanum oxide, the powders were treated with a hydrochloric acid solution. The authors determine that this hydrochloric acid cleaning method is an effective means of ridding an industrial lanthanum hexaboride powder of impurities. It is also shown that acid treatment of industrial LaB6 powders substantially improves the corrosion resistance of parts made from them by powder metallurgy techniques. Also, a mechanism of rupture of hotpressed and sintered lanthanum hexaboride parts is proposed.

  1. Boron isotopic compositions of some boron minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Oi, Takao; Musashi, Masaaki; Ossaka, Tomoko; Kakihana, Hidetake ); Nomura, Masao; Okamoto, Makoto )

    1989-12-01

    Boron minerals that have different structural formulae but are supposed to have the same geologic origin have been collected and analyzed for the {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B isotopic ratio. It has been reconfirmed that minerals of marine origin have higher {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B ratios than those of nonmarine origin. It has been found that the sequence of decreasing {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B values among the minerals with the same geologic origin is; borax, tincal, kernite (Na borates) > ulexite (Na/Ca borate) > colemanite, iyoite, meyerhofferite (Ca borates). This sequence is explainable on the basis of the difference in crystal structure among the minerals. That is, minerals with high BO{sub 3}/BO{sub 4} ratios, (the ratio of the number of the BO{sub 3} triangle units to the number of the BO{sub 4} tetrahedron units in the structural formula of a mineral) have higher {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B ratios.

  2. Method of fabricating boron containing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1999-01-01

    Hard coatings are fabricated from boron nitride, cubic boron nitride, and multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron is formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron and cubic boron nitride, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be discrete or of a blended or graded composition.

  3. Method of fabricating boron containing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1999-04-27

    Hard coatings are fabricated from boron nitride, cubic boron nitride, and multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron is formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron and cubic boron nitride, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be discrete or of a blended or graded composition. 3 figs.

  4. BORON SYNTHESIS IN TYPE Ic SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Ko; Kajino, Toshitaka; Yoshida, Takashi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the {nu}-process in an energetic Type Ic supernova (SN Ic) and the resultant productions of the light elements including boron and its stable isotopes. SN Ic is a very unique boron source because it can produce boron not only through spallation reactions as discussed in Nakamura and Shigeyama but also the {nu}-process. The {nu}-process is considered to occur in core-collapse supernovae and previous studies were limited to SNe II. Although the progenitor star of an SN Ic does not posses an He envelope so that {sup 7}Li production via the {nu}-process is unlikely, {sup 11}B can be produced in the C-rich layers. We demonstrate a hydrodynamic simulation of a SN Ic explosion and estimate the amounts of the light elements produced via the {nu}-process for the first time, and also the subsequent spallation reactions between the outermost layers of the compact SN Ic progenitor and the ambient medium. We find that the {nu}-process in the current SN Ic model produces a significant amount of {sup 11}B, which is diluted by {sup 10}B from spallation reactions to get closer to B isotopic ratios observed in meteorites. We also confirm that high-temperature {mu} and {tau} neutrinos and their anti-neutrinos, reasonably suggested from the compact structure of SN Ic progenitors, enhance the light-element production through the neutral current reactions, which may imply an important role of SNe Ic in the Galactic chemical evolution.

  5. Plasma Synthesized Doped Boron Nanopowder for MgB2 Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    James V. Marzik

    2012-03-26

    Under this program, a process to synthesize nano-sized doped boron powder by a plasma synthesis process was developed and scaled up from 20 gram batches at program start to over 200 grams by program end. Over 75 batches of boron nanopowder were made by RF plasma synthesis. Particle sizes were typically in the 20-200 nm range. The powder was synthesized by the reductive pyrolysis of BCl{sub 3} in hydrogen in an RF plasma. A wide range of process parameters were investigated including plasma power, torch geometry, gas flow rates, and process pressure. The powder-in-tube technique was used to make monofilament and multifilament superconducting wires. MgB{sub 2} wire made with Specialty Materials plasma synthesized boron nanopowder exhibited superconducting properties that significantly exceeded the program goals. Superconducting critical currents, J{sub c}, in excess of 10{sup 5} A cm{sup -2} at magnetic fields of 8 tesla were reproducibly achieved. The upper critical magnetic field in wires fabricated with program boron powder were H{sub c2}(0) = 37 tesla, demonstrating the potential of these materials for high field magnet applications. T{sub c} in carbon-doped MgB{sub 2} powder showed a systematic decrease with increasing carbon precursor gas flows, indicating the plasma synthesis process can give precise control over dopant concentrations. Synthesis rates increased by a factor of 400% over the course of the program, demonstrating the scalability of the powder synthesis process. The plasma synthesis equipment at Specialty Materials has successfully and reproducibly made high quality boron nanopowder for MgB{sub 2} superconductors. Research and development from this program enabled Specialty Materials to successfully scale up the powder synthesis process by a factor of ten and to double the size of its powder pilot plant. Thus far the program has been a technical success. It is anticipated that continued systematic development of plasma processing parameters, dopant

  6. Atomization methods for forming magnet powders

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, C.H.; Branagan, D.J.; Hyde, T.A.

    2000-02-08

    The invention encompasses methods of utilizing atomization, methods for forming magnet powders, methods for forming magnets, and methods for forming bonded magnets. The invention further encompasses methods for simulating atomization conditions. In one aspect, the invention includes an atomization method for forming a magnet powder comprising: (a) forming a melt comprising R{sub 2.1}Q{sub 13.9}B{sub 1}, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; (b) atomizing the melt to form generally spherical alloy powder granules having an internal structure comprising at least one of a substantially amorphous phase or a substantially nanocrystalline phase; and (c) heat treating the alloy powder to increase an energy product of the alloy powder; after the heat treatment, the alloy powder comprising an energy product of at least 10 MGOe. In another aspect, the invention includes a magnet comprising R, Q, B, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; the magnet comprising an internal structure comprising R{sub 2.1}Q{sub 13.9}B{sub 1}.

  7. Atomization methods for forming magnet powders

    DOEpatents

    Sellers, Charles H.; Branagan, Daniel J.; Hyde, Timothy A.

    2000-01-01

    The invention encompasses methods of utilizing atomization, methods for forming magnet powders, methods for forming magnets, and methods for forming bonded magnets. The invention further encompasses methods for simulating atomization conditions. In one aspect, the invention includes an atomization method for forming a magnet powder comprising: a) forming a melt comprising R.sub.2.1 Q.sub.13.9 B.sub.1, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; b) atomizing the melt to form generally spherical alloy powder granules having an internal structure comprising at least one of a substantially amorphous phase or a substantially nanocrystalline phase; and c) heat treating the alloy powder to increase an energy product of the alloy powder; after the heat treatment, the alloy powder comprising an energy product of at least 10 MGOe. In another aspect, the invention includes a magnet comprising R, Q, B, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; the magnet comprising an internal structure comprising R.sub.2.1 Q.sub.13.9 B.sub.1.

  8. Boron carbide-aluminum cermets

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, D.C.

    1986-09-03

    We have developed boron carbide-aluminum cermets by means of thermodynamic, kinetic, and processing studies. Our research indicates that boron carbide-aluminum cermets offer ''tailorable'' microstructures with designable properties through process control. This new class of cermets has the potential to become a very important material with wide industrial applications.

  9. Enantioselective oxidative boron Heck reactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, A-L

    2016-06-28

    This review highlights the use of the oxidative boron Heck reaction in enantioselective Heck-type couplings. The enantioselective oxidative boron Heck reaction overcomes several limitations of the traditional Pd(0)-catalysed Heck coupling and has subsequently allowed for intermolecular couplings of challenging systems such as cyclic enones, acyclic alkenes, and even site selectively on remote alkenes. PMID:26529247

  10. Isotopic composition of cosmic-ray boron and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krombel, K. E.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    New measurements of the cosmic-ray boron and nitrogen isotopes at earth and of the elemental abundances of boron, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are presented. A region of mutually allowed values for the cosmic-ray nitrogen source ratios is determined, and the cosmic-ray escape mean free path is determined as a function of energy using a leaky box model for cosmic-ray propagation in the Galaxy. Relative to O-16, a N-15 source abundance consistent with solar system composition and a N-14 source abundance which is a factor of about three underabundant relative to the solar value are found.

  11. Effects of Powder Size and Initial Arrangement on Cold Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanwongwan, Wiwat; Manonukul, Anchalee; Carmai, Julaluk

    In the past, the most common assumption in every explicit modelling of individual powders for compaction is that powders have only one single size which are arranged uniformly. However, all powders used in practice have a distribution of particle size and random initial arrangement. In this work, a systematic theoretical study of the effects of initial powder arrangement and distribution of size has been investigated using numerical analysis tool. Various types of elements have been considered first. Considering the accuracy and the effort required, the two-dimensional plane strain element has been employed for the rest of the investigation. The initial arrangement of powder and the distribution of powder size were considered separately. The results show that the initial arrangement has significant influence on the macroscopic behaviour while the powder size has little influence. Both factors have noticeable influence on the microscopic behaviour.

  12. Face powder poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002700.htm Face powder poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Face powder poisoning occurs when someone swallows or breathes ...

  13. Composite powder particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Donald S. (Inventor); MacDowell, Louis G. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A liquid coating composition including a coating vehicle and composite powder particles disposed within the coating vehicle. Each composite powder particle may include a magnesium component, a zinc component, and an indium component.

  14. Precision powder feeder

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, M. Eric; Schmale, David T.; Oliver, Michael S.

    2001-07-10

    A new class of precision powder feeders is disclosed. These feeders provide a precision flow of a wide range of powdered materials, while remaining robust against jamming or damage. These feeders can be precisely controlled by feedback mechanisms.

  15. Boron arsenide thin film solar cell development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, J.L.; Van Doren, T.P.

    1980-09-01

    Pyrolytic decomposition of diborane and arsine has been used in attempts to grow polycrystalline BAs films. This method, however, produced only amorphous films for deposition temperatures below 920/sup 0/C and polycrystalline boron subarsenide (B/sub 12/As/sub 2/) flms for deposition temperatures above this value. The amorphous films have been determined to have a significant arsenic content but the actual stoichiometry was not obtained. The films were adherent on single crystal sapphire (0001), (111) silicon, (0001) SiC, and polycrystalline SiC but were found not to be adherent to substrates of fused quartz, tungsten, and molybdenum. It was also found that all films deposited above 650/sup 0/C were p-type while those deposited below 600/sup 0/C were usually n-type. Polycrystalline BAs and B/sub 12/As/sub 2/ was produced by reaction of the elements in a closed tube. The amorphous films showed an indirect or non-direct optical bandgap from 1.0 to 1.7 eV with the most probable values between 1.2 to 1.4 eV. The crystalline BAs powder shows a bandgap near 1.0 eV. Photoconductance time constants have been measured for films deposited on (0001) sapphire and (0001) SiC. Attempts at doping the amorphous films were generally unsuccessful. A polycrystalline powder sample was successfully doped with sulfur. Attempts were made to produce a Schottky barrier diode by evaporating Al dots onto an amorphous film on graphite without a post-evaporation anneal. An MIS structure was also attempted by baking an amorphous film in air at 280/sup 0/C before evaporation of aluminum. Although nonlinear characteristics were obtained, none of the devices showed any photovoltaic response. A p-type amorphous film was deposited on an n-type silicon substrate to form a p-n heterojunction. This device did exhibit a photovoltaic response but it is believed that the photogeneration was occurring primarily in the silicon substrate.

  16. High density hexagonal boron nitride prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Hoenig, C.L.

    1990-12-31

    Boron nitride powder with less than or equal to the oxygen content of starting powder (down to 0.5% or less) is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce hexagonal boron nitride with a bulk density greater than 2.0 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a cansister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1800{degrees}C and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.21 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  17. High density hexagonal boron nitride prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, Clarence L.

    1992-01-01

    Boron nitride powder with less than or equal to the oxygen content of starting powder (down to 0.5% or less) is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce hexagonal boron nitride with a bulk density greater than 2.0 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1800.degree. C. and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.21 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  18. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  19. Boron containing multilayer coatings and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1997-01-01

    Hard coatings are fabricated from multilayer boron/boron carbide, boron carbide/cubic boron nitride, and boron/boron nitride/boron carbide, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron and boron carbide used in forming the multilayers are formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/boron carbide, and boron carbide/cubic boron nitride is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron, cubic boron nitride or boron carbide, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be of a discrete or a blended or graded composition.

  20. Facile synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and improved electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongjun; Luo, Lijie; Zhou, Longchang; Mo, Libin; Tong, Zhangfa

    2010-02-01

    A layer of catalyst film on substrate is usually required during the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth of one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials. In this work, however, a novel approach for synthesizing high-purity bamboo-like boron nitride (BN) nanotubes directly on commercial stainless steel foils was demonstrated. Synthesis was realized by heating boron and zinc oxide (ZnO) powders at 1200 degrees C under a mixture gas flow of nitrogen and hydrogen. The stainless steel foils played an additional role of catalyst besides the substrate during the VLS growth of the nanotubes. In addition, the electrical conductivity of the BN nanotubes was efficiently improved in a simple way by coating with Au and Pd nanoparticles. The decorated BN nanotubes may find potential applications in catalysts, sensors and nanoelectronics. PMID:20352730

  1. T Strip Properties Fabricated by Powder Rolling Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jae-Keun; Lee, Chae-Hun; Kim, Jeoung-Han; Yeom, Jong-Taek; Park, Nho-Kwang

    In the present study, the characteristics of the Ti powders fabricated by Hydride-Dehydride (HDH) were analyzed in terms of particle shape, size and size distribution. Ti powders were subjected to roll compaction and their microstructure and green densities were evaluated in terms of particle size, powder morphology, roll gap and rolling speed. Effects of blending elements having different powder sizes on densification properties were analyzed. The strip thickness was proportional to the roll gap up to 0.9 mm and the density of titanium strip was decreased with the increase in roll gap. As the roll speed increased, the strip density and thickness were decreased by using -200 mesh Ti powder. However, the effect of rolling speed for -400 mesh Ti powder was not greater than that of -200 mesh powder. The highest density by 93% was achieved by using -400 mesh Ti powder at 0.1 mm roll gap, however edge cracks and alligator cracks were occurred.

  2. Boron Abundances in A and B-type Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, David L.

    1997-01-01

    Boron abundances in A- and B-type stars may be a successful way to track evolutionary effects in these hot stars. The light elements - Li, Be, and B - are tracers of exposure to temperatures more moderate than those in which the H-burning CN-cycle operates. Thus, any exposure of surface stellar layers to deeper layers will affect these light element abundances. Li and Be are used in this role in investigations of evolutionary processes in cool stars, but are not observable in hotter stars. An investigation of boron, however, is possible through the B II 1362 A resonance line. We have gathered high resolution spectra from the IUE database of A- and B-type stars near 10 solar mass for which nitrogen abundances have been determined. The B II 1362 A line is blended throughout; the temperature range of this program, requiring spectrum syntheses to recover the boron abundances. For no star could we synthesize the 1362 A region using the meteoritic/solar boron abundance of log e (B) = 2.88; a lower boron abundance was necessary which may reflect evolutionary effects (e.g., mass loss or mixing near the main-sequence), the natal composition of the star forming regions, or a systematic error in the analyses (e.g., non-LTE effects). Regardless of the initial boron abundance, and despite the possibility of non-LTE effects, it seems clear that boron is severely depleted in some stars. It may be that the nitrogen and boron abundances are anticorrelated, as would be expected from mixing between the H-burning and outer stellar layers. If, as we suspect, a residue of boron is present in the A-type supergiants, we may exclude a scenario in which mixing occurs continuously between the surface and the deep layers operating the CN-cycle. Further exploitation of the B II 1362 A line as an indicator of the evolutionary status of A- and B-type stars will require a larger stellar sample to be observed with higher signal-to-noise as attainable with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  3. Development of a boron-copper neutron absorber composite

    SciTech Connect

    Wiencek, T.C.; Thresh, H.R.; Summers, J.R.

    1991-05-01

    This report describes the fabrication of a new boron-copper neutron absorbing material that was developed to meet the upgrading needs of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory. To increase the intensity of the neutron beams from the IPNS, the target uranium was changed from depleted uranium to uranium enriched to 77.5% {sup 235}U. To keep the multiplication factor, k{sub eff} (number of fissions in one generation/number of fissions in preceding generation) at a safe level, a new neutron absorber material was needed. The previous materials, boral and cadmium, could not meet the new requirements and a search of the literature showed that no currently available material was acceptable. With previous powder metallurgy used as a base, the composite was fabricated with 43 vol. % {sup 10}B (81% enriched {sup 10}B) and the balance copper and voids. The powder metallurgy techniques was followed by hot-rolling the composite to a sheet. The material composed of boron particles dispersed in a pure copper matrix and clad with pure copper on both sides, exhibits the following properties: Loadings up to 43 vol. % boron, with the balance copper and voids. A loading of 0.5 {times} 10{sup 22}{sup 10}B atoms/cm{sup 2} in sections as thin as 0.067 in. (1.7 mm), with copper cladding as thin as 0.010 in. (0.25 mm). Formability to radii as small as 2.1 in. (53.3 mm). No observed reaction between boron and the copper matrix and cladding at temperatures up to 900{degrees}C for times as long as 7 h. Retains structural integrity at 900{degrees}C.

  4. Magnetron sputtered boron films for increasing hardness of a metal surface

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    2003-05-27

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for producing hardened surfaces, surfacing machine tools, etc. and for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z optical components, such as mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  5. Calculation of residual principal stresses in CVD boron on carbon filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of boron on a carbon substrate (B/C) is developed. The model includes an expansion of the boron after deposition due to atomic rearrangement and includes creep of the boron and carbon. Curves are presented to show how the principal residual stresses and the filament elongation vary as the parameters defining deposition strain and creep are varied. The calculated results are compared with experimental axial residual stress and elongation measurements made on B/C filaments. This comparison requires that for good agreement between calculated and experimental results, the deposited boron must continue to expand after deposition, and that the build-up of residual stresses is limited by significant boron and carbon creep rates.

  6. Calculation of residual principal stresses in CVD boron on carbon filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model of the chemical vapor deposition of boron on a carbon substrate (B/C) is developed. The model includes an expansion of the boron after deposition due to atomic rearrangement and includes creep of the boron and carbon. Curves are presented showing the variation of the principal residual stresses and the filament elongation with the parameters defining deposition strain and creep. The calculated results are compared with experimental axial residual stress and elongation measurements made on B/C filaments. For good agreement between calculated and experimental results, the deposited boron must continue to expand after deposition, and the build up of residual stresses must be limited by significant boron and carbon creep rates.

  7. Synthesis of high purity nitride powders. (Latest citations from Engineered Materials abstracts). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the synthesis and preparation of high purity nitride powders. Citations discuss the preparation of powders using chemical vapor deposition, carbothermic reactions, plasmochemical reactions, pyrolysis, sol gel processes, and self-propagating high-temperature synthesis. Citations concern boron nitrides, carbonitrides, aluminum nitrides, silicon nitrides, and titanium nitrides. (Contains a minimum of 246 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Synthesis of high purity nitride powders. (Latest citations from Engineered Materials abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the synthesis and preparation of high purity nitride powders. Citations discuss the preparation of powders using chemical vapor deposition, carbothermic reactions, plasmochemical reactions, pyrolysis, sol gel processes, and self-propagating high-temperature synthesis. Citations concern boron nitrides, carbonitrides, aluminum nitrides, silicon nitrides, and titanium nitrides.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  9. Atomically controlled substitutional boron-doping of graphene nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Shigeki; Saito, Shohei; Osumi, Shinichiro; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro; Foster, Adam S.; Spijker, Peter; Meyer, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Boron is a unique element in terms of electron deficiency and Lewis acidity. Incorporation of boron atoms into an aromatic carbon framework offers a wide variety of functionality. However, the intrinsic instability of organoboron compounds against moisture and oxygen has delayed the development. Here, we present boron-doped graphene nanoribbons (B-GNRs) of widths of N=7, 14 and 21 by on-surface chemical reactions with an employed organoboron precursor. The location of the boron dopant is well defined in the centre of the B-GNR, corresponding to 4.8 atom%, as programmed. The chemical reactivity of B-GNRs is probed by the adsorption of nitric oxide (NO), which is most effectively trapped by the boron sites, demonstrating the Lewis acid character. Structural properties and the chemical nature of the NO-reacted B-GNR are determined by a combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy, high-resolution atomic force microscopy with a CO tip, and density functional and classical computations. PMID:26302943

  10. Stabilization of Small Boron Cage by Transition Metal Encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijun; Lv, Jian; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of chemically stable fullerene-like structures formed by elements other than carbon has been long-standing desired. On this aspect significant efforts have centered around boron, only one electron deficient compared with carbon. However, during the past decade a large number of experimental and theoretical studies have established that small boron clusters are either planar/quasi-planar or forming double-ring tubular structures. Until recently, two all-boron fullerenes have been independently discovered: B38 proposed by our structure searching calculations and B40 observed in a joint experimental and theoretical study. Here we extend our work to the even smaller boron clusters and propose an effective routine to stabilize them by transition metal encapsulation. By combining swarm-intelligence structure searching and first-principles calculations, we have systematically investigated the energy landscapes of transition-metal-doped MB24 clusters (M = Ti, Zr, Hf, Cr, Mo, W, Fe, Ru and Os). Two stable symmetric endohedral boron cages, MoB24 and WB24 are identified. The stability of them can be rationalized in terms of their unique 18-electron closed-shell electronic structures. Funded by Recruitment Program of Global Experts of China and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation.

  11. Atomically controlled substitutional boron-doping of graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Shigeki; Saito, Shohei; Osumi, Shinichiro; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro; Foster, Adam S.; Spijker, Peter; Meyer, Ernst

    2015-08-01

    Boron is a unique element in terms of electron deficiency and Lewis acidity. Incorporation of boron atoms into an aromatic carbon framework offers a wide variety of functionality. However, the intrinsic instability of organoboron compounds against moisture and oxygen has delayed the development. Here, we present boron-doped graphene nanoribbons (B-GNRs) of widths of N=7, 14 and 21 by on-surface chemical reactions with an employed organoboron precursor. The location of the boron dopant is well defined in the centre of the B-GNR, corresponding to 4.8 atom%, as programmed. The chemical reactivity of B-GNRs is probed by the adsorption of nitric oxide (NO), which is most effectively trapped by the boron sites, demonstrating the Lewis acid character. Structural properties and the chemical nature of the NO-reacted B-GNR are determined by a combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy, high-resolution atomic force microscopy with a CO tip, and density functional and classical computations.

  12. METHOD OF COATING SURFACES WITH BORON

    DOEpatents

    Martin, G.R.

    1949-10-11

    A method of forming a thin coating of boron on metallic, glass, or other surfaces is described. The method comprises heating the article to be coated to a temperature of about 550 d C in an evacuated chamber and passing trimethyl boron, triethyl boron, or tripropyl boron in the vapor phase and under reduced pressure into contact with the heated surface causing boron to be deposited in a thin film.

  13. Boron-carbide-aluminum and boron-carbide-reactive metal cermets. [B/sub 4/C-Al

    DOEpatents

    Halverson, D.C.; Pyzik, A.J.; Aksay, I.A.

    1985-05-06

    Hard, tough, lighweight boron-carbide-reactive metal composites, particularly boron-carbide-aluminum composites, are produced. These composites have compositions with a plurality of phases. A method is provided, including the steps of wetting and reacting the starting materials, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected. Starting compositions, reaction temperatures, reaction times, and reaction atmospheres are parameters for controlling the process and resulting compositions. The ceramic phases are homogeneously distributed in the metal phases and adhesive forces at ceramic-metal interfaces are maximized. An initial consolidated step is used to achieve fully dense composites. Microstructures of boron-carbide-aluminum cermets have been produced with modules of rupture exceeding 110 ksi and fracture toughness exceeding 12 ksi..sqrt..in. These composites and methods can be used to form a variety of structural elements.

  14. Cosmis Lithium-Beryllium-Boron Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vangioni-Flam, E.; Cassé, M.

    Light element nucleosynthesis is an important chapter of nuclear astrophysics. Specifically, the rare and fragile light nuclei Lithium, Beryllium and Boron (LiBeB) are not generated in the normal course of stellar nucleosynthesis (except Lithium-7) and are, in fact, destroyed in stellar interiors. This characteristic is reflected in the low abundance of these simple species. Up to recently, the most plausible interpretation was that galactic cosmic rays (GCR) interact with interstellar CNO to form LiBeB. Other origins have been also identified, primordial and stellar (Lithium-7) and supernova neutrino spallation (Lithium-7 and Boron-11). In contrast, Beryllium-9, Boron-10 and Lithium-6 are pure spallative products. This last isotope presents a special interest since the Lithium-7/Lithium-6 ratio has been measured in a few halo stars offering a new constraint on the early galactic evolution. However, in the nineties, new observations prompted astrophysicists to reassess the question. Optical measurements of the beryllium and boron abundances in halo stars have been achieved by the 10 meters KECK telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope. These observations indicate a quasi linear correlation between Be and B vs Fe, at least at low metallicity, unexpected on the basis of GCR scenario, predicting a quadratic relationship. As a consequence, the origin and the evolution of the LiBeB nuclei has been revisited. This linearity implies the acceleration of C and O nuclei freshly synthesized and their fragmentation on the the interstellar Hydrogen and Helium. Wolf-Rayet stars and supernovae via the shock waves induced, are the best candidates to the acceleration of their own material enriched into C and O; so LiBeB is produced independently of the Interstellar Medium chemical composition. Moreover, neutrinos emitted by the newly born neutron stars interacting with the C layer of the supernova could produce specifically Lithium-7 and Boron-11. This process is supported by the

  15. Boron nanowires for flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jifa; Cai, Jinming; Hui, Chao; Zhang, Chendong; Bao, Lihong; Gao, Min; Shen, Chengmin; Gao, Hongjun

    2008-09-01

    Flexible boron nanowires have been synthesized via thermoreduction in boron-oxygen compounds with magnesium. These as-prepared nanowires, which are structurally uniform and single crystalline, represent good semiconductor at high temperature. Tensile stress measurements demonstrate excellent mechanical property of boron nanowires as well as resistance to mechanical fracture even under a strain of 3%. Importantly, simultaneous electrical measurement reveals that the corresponding electrical conductance is very robust and remains constant under mechanical strain. Our results can be briefly explained by Mott's variable range hopping model.

  16. Boron modified molybdenum silicide and products

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, M.K.; Akinc, M.

    1999-02-02

    A boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is disclosed having the composition comprising about 80 to about 90 weight % Mo, about 10 to about 20 weight % Si, and about 0.1 to about 2 weight % B and a multiphase microstructure including Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} phase as at least one microstructural component effective to impart good high temperature creep resistance. The boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is fabricated into such products as electrical components, such as resistors and interconnects, that exhibit oxidation resistance to withstand high temperatures in service in air as a result of electrical power dissipation, electrical resistance heating elements that can withstand high temperatures in service in air and other oxygen-bearing atmospheres and can span greater distances than MoSi{sub 2} heating elements due to improved creep resistance, and high temperature structural members and other fabricated components that can withstand high temperatures in service in air or other oxygen-bearing atmospheres while retaining creep resistance associated with Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} for structural integrity. 7 figs.

  17. Boron modified molybdenum silicide and products

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Mitchell K.; Akinc, Mufit

    1999-02-02

    A boron-modified molybdenum silicide material having the composition comprising about 80 to about 90 weight % Mo, about 10 to about 20 weight % Si, and about 0.1 to about 2 weight % B and a multiphase microstructure including Mo.sub.5 Si.sub.3 phase as at least one microstructural component effective to impart good high temperature creep resistance. The boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is fabricated into such products as electrical components, such as resistors and interconnects, that exhibit oxidation resistance to withstand high temperatures in service in air as a result of electrical power dissipation, electrical resistance heating elements that can withstand high temperatures in service in air and other oxygen-bearing atmospheres and can span greater distances than MoSi.sub.2 heating elements due to improved creep resistance, and high temperature structural members and other fabricated components that can withstand high temperatures in service in air or other oxygen-bearing atmospheres while retaining creep resistance associated with Mo.sub.5 Si.sub.3 for structural integrity.

  18. Outside the pH box: Boron isotopes in synthetic calcite precipitated under varying solution chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, J. R.; Uchikawa, J.; Penman, D. E.; Hoenisch, B.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Boron isotopic measurements (δ11B) in marine carbonates are a powerful tool for reconstructing past ocean carbon chemistry and the carbon cycle. Boron systematics in marine carbonates are rooted in the equilibrium dissociation of dissolved boron in seawater, but existing evidence from biogenic carbonates (corals, planktic and benthic foraminifers) suggests somewhat variable controls on boron concentration and δ11B. Synthetic precipitation experiments provide an opportunity to study boron systematics without biological interference, and recent studies (e.g., Uchikawa et al., 2015, GCA v150, 171-191) suggest that boron incorporation (measured as B/Ca ratios) into synthetic carbonates varies both with the elemental composition of experimental seawater and precipitation rate. Here we extend the geochemical characterization of synthetic calcite by investigating the influences of changing solution chemistry (pH, [Ca2+], [DIC] and [B]) and precipitation rate on their boron isotopic composition. Our results will be evaluated in the context of carbonate precipitation rates, modes of boron incorporation, and changing seawater chemistry through geologic time.

  19. Boron and Iron in AV 304: A B-dwarf in the SMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, A. M.; Venn, K. A.; Lambert, D. L.; Lemke, M.

    2001-11-01

    An upper limit in the boron abundance in AV 304 is determined as a test of cosmic ray spallation as the production of boron. Boron is determined from the B III resonance line at 2066 A from HST STIS data. AV 304 does not show signs of mixing or mass loss, which can destroy the fragile boron atom. The abundance othe boron seed nucleus, oxygen, is also well known in this star, and O is approximately the same from location to location in the SMC. Thus, the boron abundance from AV 304 should be representative of the abundance in ththe entire galaxy. We find an upper limit of 12+log(B/H)=1.7. This boron upper limit is lower than the oxygen depletion relative to the solar neighborhood by 0.3 dex. This is unlike the Galactic studies that suggest that boron scales linearly with oxygen. Additionally, the numerous Fe-group elements in the UV spectrum allows for a detailed Fe-group abundance determination. We find 12+log(Fe/H)=0.7+/-0.1, primarily from Fe III lines. The abundance is in excellent agreement with determinations from Fe I and Fe II lines in A-K supergiants in the SMC, and supports that O and Fe have the same underabundance in the SMC. We appreciate support for this project from NASA GO-08661, and Clare Boothe Luce research funds.

  20. Concentrations of arsenic, antimony, and boron in steam and steam condensate at The Geysers, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, C.L.; Ficklin, W.H.; Thompson, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Studies at The Geysers Geothermal Field, California indicate that under some circumstances elements that are transported in the vapor phase can become enriched in the liquid phase. Waters from two condensate traps (steam traps) on steam lines at The Geysers are enriched with arsenic, antimony, and boron compared to the concentrations of these elements in coexisting steam. Concentrations of boron in condensate-trap waters were as high as 160 mg/L, arsenic as high as 35 mg/L, and antimony as high as 200 ??g/L. Enrichment of arsenic, antimony, and boron is at least partially controlled by the partitioning of these elements into the liquid phase, according to their vapor-liquid distribution coefficients, after they are transported in steam. Several of the elements that are most soluble in steam, including arsenic and antimony, are part of the trace-element suite that characterizes precious-metal epithermal ore deposits. ?? 1987.

  1. Nothing Boring About Boron

    PubMed Central

    Pizzorno, Lara

    2015-01-01

    The trace mineral boron is a micronutrient with diverse and vitally important roles in metabolism that render it necessary for plant, animal, and human health, and as recent research suggests, possibly for the evolution of life on Earth. As the current article shows, boron has been proven to be an important trace mineral because it (1) is essential for the growth and maintenance of bone; (2) greatly improves wound healing; (3) beneficially impacts the body’s use of estrogen, testosterone, and vitamin D; (4) boosts magnesium absorption; (5) reduces levels of inflammatory biomarkers, such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α); (6) raises levels of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase; (7) protects against pesticide-induced oxidative stress and heavy-metal toxicity; (8) improves the brains electrical activity, cognitive performance, and short-term memory for elders; (9) influences the formation and activity of key biomolecules, such as S-adenosyl methionine (SAM-e) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+); (10) has demonstrated preventive and therapeutic effects in a number of cancers, such as prostate, cervical, and lung cancers, and multiple and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma; and (11) may help ameliorate the adverse effects of traditional chemotherapeutic agents. In none of the numerous studies conducted to date, however, do boron’s beneficial effects appear at intakes > 3 mg/d. No estimated average requirements (EARs) or dietary reference intakes (DRIs) have been set for boron—only an upper intake level (UL) of 20 mg/d for individuals aged ≥ 18 y. The absence of studies showing harm in conjunction with the substantial number of articles showing benefits support the consideration of boron supplementation of 3 mg/d for any individual who is consuming a diet lacking in fruits and vegetables or who is at risk for or has osteopenia; osteoporosis

  2. A new and effective approach to boron removal by using novel boron-specific fungi isolated from boron mining wastewater.

    PubMed

    Taştan, Burcu Ertit; Çakir, Dilara Nur; Dönmez, Gönül

    2016-01-01

    Boron-resistant fungi were isolated from the wastewater of a boron mine in Turkey. Boron removal efficiencies of Penicillium crustosum and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were detected in different media compositions. Minimal Salt Medium (MSM) and two different waste media containing molasses (WM-1) or whey + molasses (WM-2) were tested to make this process cost effective when scaled up. Both isolates achieved high boron removal yields at the highest boron concentrations tested in MSM and WM-1. The maximum boron removal yield by P. crustosum was 45.68% at 33.95 mg l(-1) initial boron concentration in MSM, and was 38.97% at 42.76 mg l(-1) boron for R. mucilaginosa, which seemed to offer an economically feasible method of removing boron from the effluents. PMID:26877036

  3. Polymer quenched prealloyed metal powder

    DOEpatents

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Fleischhauer, Grier; German, Randall M.

    2001-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3 % Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  4. Regulation of iron transport related genes by boron in the marine bacterium Marinobacter algicola DG893.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ariel; Trimble, Lyndsay; Hobusch, Ashtian R; Schroeder, Kristine J; Amin, Shady A; Hartnett, Andrej D; Barker, Ryan A; Crumbliss, Alvin L; Carrano, Carl J

    2013-08-01

    While there has been extensive interest in the use of boron isotope ratios as a surrogate of pH in paleoclimate studies in the context of climate change-related questions, the high (0.4 mM) concentration and the depth-independent (conservative or non-nutrient-like) concentration profile of this element have led to boron being neglected as a potentially biologically relevant element in the modern ocean. Here we report that boron affects the expression of a number of protein and genes in the "algal-associated" Gram-negative marine bacterium Marinobacter algicola DG893. Most intriguingly, a number of these proteins and genes are related to iron uptake. In a recent separate publication we have shown that boron regulates one such iron transport related protein, i.e. the periplasmic iron binding protein FbpA via a direct interaction of the metalloid with this protein. Here we show that a number of other iron uptake related genes are also affected by boron but in the opposite way i.e. they are up-regulated. We propose that the differential effect of boron on FbpA expression relative to other iron transport related genes is a result of an interaction between boron and the global iron regulatory protein Fur. PMID:23775459

  5. Powder modification under influence of heat, electric field and particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begrambekov, L.; Grunin, A.; Zakharov, A.

    2015-07-01

    Influence of heat, electric field and particle irradiation of powders of boron and tungsten are presented and discussed in the paper. It is shown that the particles of both powders are emitted from their surface when electric field applied normally to the powder surface exceeds some minimal magnitude. Simultaneous influence of electric field and irradiation by hydrogen- and argon plasma ions or by hydrogen atoms activates particle emission at the temperatures <1300 K. Hydrogen- and argon plasma ion irradiation in the temperature range 1300-1800 K stimulates a succession of powder modifications with the increase of powder temperature and power of ion irradiation. Driving forces and processes of powder modifications were found to be electric field forces, irradiation enhanced diffusion, interatomic forces, surface tension, sputtering by ion irradiation and ion induced stresses in the newly formed uniform layers.

  6. The shocking development of lithium (and boron) in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dearborn, David S. P.; Schramm, David N.; Steigman, Gary; Truran, James

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that significant amounts of Li-7 and B-11 are produced in Type 2 supernovae. The synthesis of these rare elements occurs as the supernova shock traverses the base of the hydrogen envelope burning He-3 to masses 7 and 11 via alpha capture. The yields in this process are sufficient to account for the difference in lithium abundance observed between Pop 2 and Pop 1 stars. Since lithium (and boron) would, in this manner, be created in the same stars that produce the bulk of the heavy elements, the lithium abundance even in old Pop 1 stars would be high (as observed). The B-11 production may remedy the long-standing problem of the traditional spallation scenario to account for the observed isotopic ratio of boron. Observational consequences of this mechanism are discussed, including the evolution of lithium and boron isotope ratios in the Galaxy and the possible use of the boron yields to constrain the number of blue progenitor Type 2 supernovae.

  7. Effect of boron on tensile properties of B2 BeAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crimp, M.; Vedula, K.

    1986-01-01

    Small additions of boron were shown to improve the room temperature ductility of the intermetallic compound Ni3Al. Boron is believed to segregate to the gain boundaries and strengthen them, allowing the inheret ductility of the grains to be achieved. The present study was undertaken to see if boron has a similar effect on the low temperature tensile properties of the equiatomic intermetallic compound FeAl. A binary alloy without boron is compared with an alloy containing 0.78 at % B (0.2 wt %) B, by tensile testing over the temperature range of 300 K to 640 K. Both alloys were processed by powder metallurgy. Results showed that 0.78 at % B addition to FeAl does indeed change the room temperature fracture mode from intergranular to transgranular, suggesting a strengthening of grain boundaries. The alloy containing boron is, however, still brittle at room temperature. A slight decrease in the ductile to brittle transition temperature is, nevertheless, observed. In addition a significant increase in strength of the alloy is observed with boron addition.

  8. Surface analysis of VPS-W coatings boronized by an ICRF discharge in HT-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhongshi; Wang, Wanjing; Li, Qiang; Wu, Jing; Okuno, Kenji; Oya, Yasuhisa; Luo, Guang-Nan

    2011-10-01

    To understand the surface compositions and the hydrogen isotope behavior in boronized Vacuum plasma spraying (VPS)-W, the boron coating has been achieved by means of Ion Cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF) boronization using carborane (C 2B 10H 12) powder as the precursor material in HT-7. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) were used to observe the morphology of the VPS-W and boronized W surfaces. The X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) of W-4f, O-1s, C-1s and B-1s on the VPS-W sample before and after boronization and after plasma exposure have been measured. The B-B and B-C bonds were observed after boronization treatment for VPS-W. Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS) experiments were also carried out to investigate the thermal desorption behavior of D implanted into the samples. After HT-7 plasma exposure, the desorption spectrum had a low temperature peak associated with trapping in intrinsic defects in polycrystalline W and a high temperature peak associated with B-O-D and B-C-D bonds.

  9. Enhancement of oxidation resistance via a self-healing boron carbide coating on diamond particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Youhong; Meng, Qingnan; Qian, Ming; Liu, Baochang; Gao, Ke; Ma, Yinlong; Wen, Mao; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-02-01

    A boron carbide coating was applied to diamond particles by heating the particles in a powder mixture consisting of H3BO3, B and Mg. The composition, bond state and coverage fraction of the boron carbide coating on the diamond particles were investigated. The boron carbide coating prefers to grow on the diamond (100) surface than on the diamond (111) surface. A stoichiometric B4C coating completely covered the diamond particle after maintaining the raw mixture at 1200 °C for 2 h. The contribution of the boron carbide coating to the oxidation resistance enhancement of the diamond particles was investigated. During annealing of the coated diamond in air, the priory formed B2O3, which exhibits a self-healing property, as an oxygen barrier layer, which protected the diamond from oxidation. The formation temperature of B2O3 is dependent on the amorphous boron carbide content. The coating on the diamond provided effective protection of the diamond against oxidation by heating in air at 1000 °C for 1 h. Furthermore, the presence of the boron carbide coating also contributed to the maintenance of the static compressive strength during the annealing of diamond in air.

  10. Enhancement of oxidation resistance via a self-healing boron carbide coating on diamond particles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Youhong; Meng, Qingnan; Qian, Ming; Liu, Baochang; Gao, Ke; Ma, Yinlong; Wen, Mao; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-01-01

    A boron carbide coating was applied to diamond particles by heating the particles in a powder mixture consisting of H3BO3, B and Mg. The composition, bond state and coverage fraction of the boron carbide coating on the diamond particles were investigated. The boron carbide coating prefers to grow on the diamond (100) surface than on the diamond (111) surface. A stoichiometric B4C coating completely covered the diamond particle after maintaining the raw mixture at 1200 °C for 2 h. The contribution of the boron carbide coating to the oxidation resistance enhancement of the diamond particles was investigated. During annealing of the coated diamond in air, the priory formed B2O3, which exhibits a self-healing property, as an oxygen barrier layer, which protected the diamond from oxidation. The formation temperature of B2O3 is dependent on the amorphous boron carbide content. The coating on the diamond provided effective protection of the diamond against oxidation by heating in air at 1000 °C for 1 h. Furthermore, the presence of the boron carbide coating also contributed to the maintenance of the static compressive strength during the annealing of diamond in air. PMID:26831205

  11. Enhancement of oxidation resistance via a self-healing boron carbide coating on diamond particles

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Youhong; Meng, Qingnan; Qian, Ming; Liu, Baochang; Gao, Ke; Ma, Yinlong; Wen, Mao; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-01-01

    A boron carbide coating was applied to diamond particles by heating the particles in a powder mixture consisting of H3BO3, B and Mg. The composition, bond state and coverage fraction of the boron carbide coating on the diamond particles were investigated. The boron carbide coating prefers to grow on the diamond (100) surface than on the diamond (111) surface. A stoichiometric B4C coating completely covered the diamond particle after maintaining the raw mixture at 1200 °C for 2 h. The contribution of the boron carbide coating to the oxidation resistance enhancement of the diamond particles was investigated. During annealing of the coated diamond in air, the priory formed B2O3, which exhibits a self-healing property, as an oxygen barrier layer, which protected the diamond from oxidation. The formation temperature of B2O3 is dependent on the amorphous boron carbide content. The coating on the diamond provided effective protection of the diamond against oxidation by heating in air at 1000 °C for 1 h. Furthermore, the presence of the boron carbide coating also contributed to the maintenance of the static compressive strength during the annealing of diamond in air. PMID:26831205

  12. Method for preparing metal powder, device for preparing metal powder, method for processing spent nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jong-Hee

    2011-11-29

    A method for producing metal powder is provided the comprising supplying a molten bath containing a reducing agent, contacting a metal oxide with the molten bath for a time and at a temperature sufficient to reduce the metal in the metal oxide to elemental metal and produce free oxygen; and isolating the elemental metal from the molten bath.

  13. Incorporation of Integral Fuel Burnable Absorbers Boron and Gadolinium into Zirconium-Alloy Fuel Clad Material

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, K.; Renk, T.J.; Lahoda, E.J.; Corradini, M.L

    2004-12-14

    Long-lived fuels require the use of higher enrichments of 235U or other fissile materials. Such high levels of fissile material lead to excessive fuel activity at the beginning of life. To counteract this excessive activity, integral fuel burnable absorbers (IFBA) are added to some rods in the fuel assembly. The two commonly used IFBA elements are gadolinium, which is added as gadolinium-oxide to the UO2 powder, and boron, which is applied as a zirconium-diboride coating on the UO2 pellets using plasma spraying or chemical vapor deposition techniques. The incorporation of IFBA into the fuel has to be performed in a nuclear-regulated facility that is physically separated from the main plant. These operations tend to be very costly because of their small volume and can add from 20 to 30% to the manufacturing cost of the fuel. Other manufacturing issues that impact cost and performance are maintaining the correct levels of dosing, the reduction in fuel melting point due to gadolinium-oxide additions, and parasitic neutron absorption at fuel's end-of-life. The goal of the proposed research is to develop an alternative approach that involves incorporation of boron or gadolinium into the outer surface of the fuel cladding material rather than as an additive to the fuel pellets. This paradigm shift will allow for the introduction of the IFBA in a non-nuclear regulated environment and will obviate the necessity of additional handling and processing of the fuel pellets. This could represent significant cost savings and potentially lead to greater reproducibility and control of the burnable fuel in the early stages of the reactor operation. The surface alloying is being performed using the IBEST (Ion Beam Surface Treatment) process developed at Sandia National Laboratories. IBEST involves the delivery of energetic ion beam pulses onto the surface of a material, near-surface melting, and rapid solidification. The non-equilibrium nature of such processing allows for surface

  14. Boron nitride nanowires synthesis via a simple chemical vapor deposition at 1200 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Pervaiz; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Khan, Ziaul Raza

    2015-04-24

    A very simple chemical vapor deposition technique is used to synthesize high quality boron nitride nanowires at 1200 °C within a short growth duration of 30 min. FESEM micrograph shows that the as-synthesized boron nitride nanowires have a clear wire like morphology with diameter in the range of ∼20 to 150 nm. HR-TEM confirmed the wire-like structure of boron nitride nanowires, whereas XPS and Raman spectroscopy are used to find out the elemental composition and phase of the synthesized material. The synthesized boron nitride nanowires have potential applications as a sensing element in solid state neutron detector, neutron capture therapy and microelectronic devices with uniform electronic properties.

  15. Boron nitride nanowires synthesis via a simple chemical vapor deposition at 1200 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Pervaiz; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Khan, Ziaul Raza

    2015-04-01

    A very simple chemical vapor deposition technique is used to synthesize high quality boron nitride nanowires at 1200 ˚C within a short growth duration of 30 min. FESEM micrograph shows that the as-synthesized boron nitride nanowires have a clear wire like morphology with diameter in the range of ˜20 to 150 nm. HR-TEM confirmed the wire-like structure of boron nitride nanowires, whereas XPS and Raman spectroscopy are used to find out the elemental composition and phase of the synthesized material. The synthesized boron nitride nanowires have potential applications as a sensing element in solid state neutron detector, neutron capture therapy and microelectronic devices with uniform electronic properties.

  16. Boron diffusion in silicon devices

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Kim, Dong Seop; Nakayashiki, Kenta; Rounsaville, Brian

    2010-09-07

    Disclosed are various embodiments that include a process, an arrangement, and an apparatus for boron diffusion in a wafer. In one representative embodiment, a process is provided in which a boric oxide solution is applied to a surface of the wafer. Thereafter, the wafer is subjected to a fast heat ramp-up associated with a first heating cycle that results in a release of an amount of boron for diffusion into the wafer.

  17. Reducing Boron Toxicity by Microbial Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.; Phelps, T.J.

    2002-01-01

    While electricity is a clean source of energy, methods of electricity-production, such as the use of coal-fired power plants, often result in significant environmental damage. Coal-fired electrical power plants produce air pollution, while contaminating ground water and soils by build-up of boron, which enters surrounding areas through leachate. Increasingly high levels of boron in soils eventually overcome boron tolerance levels in plants and trees, resulting in toxicity. Formation of insoluble boron precipitates, mediated by mineral-precipitating bacteria, may sequester boron into more stable forms that are less available and toxic to vegetation. Results have provided evidence of microbially-facilitated sequestration of boron into insoluble mineral precipitates. Analyses of water samples taken from ponds with high boron concentrations showed that algae present contained 3-5 times more boron than contained in the water in the samples. Boron sequestration may also be facilitated by the incorporation of boron within algal cells. Experiments examining boron sequestration by algae are in progress. In bacterial experiments with added ferric citrate, the reduction of iron by the bacteria resulted in an ironcarbonate precipitate containing boron. An apparent color change showing the reduction of amorphous iron, as well as the precipitation of boron with iron, was more favorable at higher pH. Analysis of precipitates by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy revealed mineralogical composition and biologicallymediated accumulation of boron precipitates in test-tube experiments.

  18. The influence of metal Mg on micro-morphology and crystallinity of spherical hexagonal boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ning Liu, Huan; Kan, Hongmin; Wang, Xiaoyang; Long, Haibo; Zhou, Yonghui

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The action mechanism of Mg to the synthesis of spherical BN was explored. • The influence of Mg content on the crystallinity of h-BN powders was studied. • Even if not added any template, the spherical h-BN could be prepared. - Abstract: This search used the boric acid and borax as a source of boron, urea as a nitrogen source, Mg as metal catalyst, and thus prepared different micro-morphology and crystallinity hexagonal boron nitride powders under a flowing ammonia atmosphere at a nitriding temperature of 750 °C. The effect of Mg content on the crystallinity and micro-morphology of hexagonal boron nitride powders was studied, and the Mg action mechanism was explored. Without the added surfactant, the graphitization index (GI) was 6.87, and the diameter of the spherical h-BN was bigger. When the added Mg were 0.1 g, 0.3 g, 0.5 g and 0.7 g, the (GI) decreased to 6.04, 5.67, 4.62 and 4.84, respectively. When the Mg content was higher (0.9 g), GI value increased rapidly, and the crystallinity became bad. When the Mg content was 0.5 g, the dispersion of h-BN powders was at its optimum and refinement apparently, and the crystallinity at its highest.

  19. Multiple feed powder splitter

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K.; Less, Richard M.

    2001-01-01

    A device for providing uniform powder flow to the nozzles when creating solid structures using a solid fabrication system such as the directed light fabrication (DLF) process. In the DLF process, gas entrained powders are passed through the focal point of a moving high-power laser light which fuses the particles in the powder to a surface being built up in layers. The invention is a device providing uniform flow of gas entrained powders to the nozzles of the DLF system. The device comprises a series of modular splitters which are slidably interconnected and contain an integral flow control mechanism. The device can take the gas entrained powder from between one to four hoppers and split the flow into eight tubular lines which feed the powder delivery nozzles of the DLF system.

  20. Granulation of fine powder

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Ching-Fong

    2016-08-09

    A mixture of fine powder including thorium oxide was converted to granulated powder by forming a first-green-body and heat treating the first-green-body at a high temperature to strengthen the first-green-body followed by granulation by crushing or milling the heat-treated first-green-body. The granulated powder was achieved by screening through a combination of sieves to achieve the desired granule size distribution. The granulated powder relies on the thermal bonding to maintain its shape and structure. The granulated powder contains no organic binder and can be stored in a radioactive or other extreme environment. The granulated powder was pressed and sintered to form a dense compact with a higher density and more uniform pore size distribution.

  1. Multiple feed powder splitter

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K.; Less, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    A device for providing uniform powder flow to the nozzles when creating solid structures using a solid fabrication system such as the directed light fabrication (DLF) process. In the DLF process, gas entrained powders are passed through the focal point of a moving high-power laser light which fuses the particles in the powder to a surface being built up in layers. The invention is a device providing uniform flow of gas entrained powders to the nozzles of the DLF system. The device comprises a series of modular splitters which are slidably interconnected and contain an integral flow control mechanism. The device can take the gas entrained powder from between one to four hoppers and split the flow into eight tubular lines which feed the powder delivery nozzles of the DLF system.

  2. Structural analysis of Li-intercalated hexagonal boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Sumiyoshi, A.; Hyodo, H.; Kimura, K.

    2012-03-15

    A structural investigation of Li-intercalated hexagonal boron nitride (Li-h-BNIC) was performed by synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The host BN framework of Li-h-BNIC was expanded by Li-intercalation. The intralayer B-N bond length was increased by 2.48(1)% and the interlayer distance was expanded by 12.86(1)%. No superlattice structure of intercalated Li was observed. - Graphical abstract: XRD pattern fitting of the sample and schematic view of host h-BN lattice. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Li-intercalated h-BN was investigated by synchrotron radiation powder XRD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lattice parameter of host h-BN lattice was increased by intercalation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase ratio of B-N bond length was considerably larger than those of Li GICs.

  3. Targeted and non-targeted boron complex formation followed by electrospray Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry: a novel approach for identifying boron esters with natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Andras; Lucio, Marianna; Harir, Mourad; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The formation of boron esters was investigated in peat-soluble humified materials with a detailed molecular-level description of boron-organic interactions. Thousands of individually baseline separated signals were obtained from the analysis of natural organic matter of peat samples, using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. This technique offers unsurpassed isotope-specific mass resolution that can lead to precise molecular formula assignments by means of mathematical data analysis and visualisation techniques, such as mass defect (Kendrick) or elemental ratio (van Krevelen) plots. The analysis of potential boron binding structures within the sample of natural organic matter was described based on prior results. Herein, we describe an algorithm that can be used to effectively distinguish and filter complexes through data obtained from boron-enriched systems with highly intricate mass spectra, such as natural organic matter. PMID:21719921

  4. Cow dung powder poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sherfudeen, Khaja Mohideen; Kaliannan, Senthil Kumar; Dammalapati, Pavan Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Cow dung, which has germicidal property, was used in ancient days to clean living premises in South India. Nowadays, people are using commercially available synthetic cow dung powder. It is locally known as "saani powder" in Tamil Nadu. It is freely available in homes and is sometimes accidentally consumed by children. It is available in two colors - yellow and green. Cow dung powder poisoning is common in districts of Tamil Nadu such as Coimbatore, Tirupur, and Erode. We report two cases of yellow cow dung powder poisoning from our hospital. PMID:26730123

  5. Coprecipitation and isotopic fractionation of boron in modern biogenic carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Vengosh, A. Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem ); Chivas, A.R.; McCulloch, M.T. ); Kolodny, Y.; Starinsky, A. )

    1991-10-01

    The abundances and isotopic composition of boron in modern, biogenic calcareous skeletons from the Gulf of Elat, Israel, the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and in deep-sea sediments have been examined by negative thermal-ionization mass spectrometry. The selected species (Foraminifera, Pteropoda, corals, Gastropoda, and Pelecypoda) yield large variations in boron concentration that range from 1 ppm in gastropod shells to 80 ppm in corals. The variations of {delta}{sup 11}B may be controlled by isotopic exchange of boron species in which {sup 10}B is preferentially partitioned into the tetrahedral species, and coprecipitation of different proportions of trigonal and tetrahedral species in the calcium carbonates. The B content and {delta}{sup 11}B values of deep-sea sediments, Foraminifera tests, and corals are used to estimate the global oceanic sink of elemental boron by calcium carbonate deposition. As a result of enrichment of B in corals, a substantially higher biogenic sink of 6.4 {plus minus} 0.9 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr is calculated for carbonates. This is only slightly lower than the sink for desorbable B in marine sediments (10 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr) and approximately half that of altered oceanic crust (14 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr). Thus, carbonates are an important sink for B in the oceans being {approximately}20% of the total sinks. The preferential incorporation of {sup 10}B into calcium carbonate results in oceanic {sup 11}B-enrichment, estimated as 1.2 {plus minus} 0.3 {times} 10{sup 12} per mil {center dot} g/yr. The boron-isotope composition of authigenic, well-preserved carbonate skeletons may provide a useful tool to record secular boron-isotope variations in seawater at various times in the geological record.

  6. Static and Dynamic Behavior of High Modulus Hybrid Boron/Glass/Aluminum Fiber Metal Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Po-Ching

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation presents the investigation of a newly developed hybrid fiber metal laminates (FMLs) which contains commingled boron fibers, glass fibers, and 2024-T3 aluminum sheets. Two types of hybrid boron/glass/aluminum FMLs are developed. The first, type I hybrid FMLs, contained a layer of boron fiber prepreg in between two layers of S2-glass fiber prepreg, sandwiched by two aluminum alloy 2024-T3 sheets. The second, type II hybrid FMLs, contained three layer of commingled hybrid boron/glass fiber prepreg layers, sandwiched by two aluminum alloy 2024-T3 sheets. The mechanical behavior and deformation characteristics including blunt notch strength, bearing strength and fatigue behavior of these two types of hybrid boron/glass/aluminum FMLs were investigated. Compared to traditional S2-glass fiber reinforced aluminum laminates (GLARE), the newly developed hybrid boron/glass/aluminum fiber metal laminates possess high modulus, high yielding stress, and good blunt notch properties. From the bearing test result, the hybrid boron/glass/aluminum fiber metal laminates showed outstanding bearing strength. The high fiber volume fraction of boron fibers in type II laminates lead to a higher bearing strength compared to both type I laminates and traditional GLARE. Both types of hybrid FMLs have improved fatigue crack initiation lives and excellent fatigue crack propagation resistance compared to traditional GLARE. The incorporation of the boron fibers improved the Young's modulus of the composite layer in FMLs, which in turn, improved the fatigue crack initiation life and crack propagation rates of the aluminum sheets. Moreover, a finite element model was established to predict and verify the properties of hybrid boron/glass/aluminum FMLs. The simulated results showed good agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-05

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of ternary mixtures consisting of: Ni powder, Cu powder, and Al powder, Ni powder, Cr powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, W powder and Al powder; Ni powder, V powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, Mo powder, and Al powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  8. Consolidation of cubic and hexagonal boron nitride composites

    SciTech Connect

    Du Frane, W. L.; Cervantes, O.; Ellsworth, G. F.; Kuntz, J. D.

    2015-12-08

    When we Consolidate cubic boron nitride (cBN) it typically requires either a matrix of metal bearing materials that are undesirable for certain applications, or very high pressures within the cBN phase stability field that are prohibitive to manufacturing size and cost. We present new methodology for consolidating high stiffness cBN composites within a hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) matrix (15–25 vol%) with the aid of a binder phase (0–6 vol%) at moderate pressures (0.5–1.0 GPa) and temperatures (900–1300 °C). The composites are demonstrated to be highly tailorable with a range of compositions and resulting physical/mechanical properties. Ultrasonic measurements indicate that in some cases these composites have elastic mechanical properties that exceed those of the highest strength steel alloys. Moreover, two methods were identified to prevent phase transformation of the metastable cBN phase into hBN during consolidation: 1. removal of hydrocarbons, and 2. increased cBN particle size. Lithium tetraborate worked better as a binder than boron oxide, aiding consolidation without enhancing cBN to hBN phase transformation kinetics. These powder mixtures consolidated within error of their full theoretical mass densities at 1 GPa, and had only slightly lower densities at 0.5 GPa. This shows potential for consolidation of these composites into larger parts, in a variety of shapes, at even lower pressures using more conventional manufacturing methods, such as hot-pressing.

  9. The Coefficients of Thermal Expansion of Boron Arsenide (B12As2) Between 25 C and 850 C

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteley, Clinton E.; Kirkham, Melanie J; Edgar, J H

    2013-01-01

    The semiconductor boron arsenide has a high 10B density, a wide bandgap, and a high melting temperature, all of which make it an interesting candidate for high-temperature electronic devices and radiation detectors. The present investigation was undertaken to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion for boron arsenide. B12As2 powder was synthesized from boron and arsenic heated in a sealed quartz ampoule at 1100 C for 72 hrs with excess boron. Using high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) between 25 C and 850 C, the average lattice coefficients of thermal expansion were measured perpendicular and parallel to the <111> axis in the rhombohedral setting (equivalent to the a and c axes in the hexagonal setting): 4.9x10-6 K-1 and 5.3x10-6 K-1, respectively. The average unit cell volumetric coefficient of thermal expansion was determined to be 1.5x10-5 K-1.

  10. Application of sodium carbonate-zinc oxide decomposition mixture on ICP-AES determination of boron in tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Lihareva, N; Kosturkova, P; Vakarelska, T

    2000-05-01

    Boron in tourmaline, a high refractory mineral with a high boron content (approximately 3%), can be determined after aqueous leaching of a sodium carbonate-zinc oxide melt. Boron is separated effectively from the major elements of matrix, such as silicon, calcium and magnesium and especially from iron, the main spectral interfering element. Measurements were performed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. A determination limit of 4 microg/g could be achieved when 200 mg of sample are analyzed with a precision of 5.2% RSD. This method could be applied to the determination of fluorine in the same solution. PMID:11227440

  11. Boron-10 ABUNCL Prototype Initial Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-12-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results of initial testing of an Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) design built by General Electric Reuter-Stokes. Several configurations of the ABUNCL models, which use 10B-lined proportional counters in place of 3He proportional counters for the neutron detection elements, were previously reported. The ABUNCL tested is of a different design than previously modeled. Initial experimental testing of the as-delivered passive ABUNCL was performed, and modeling will be conducted. Testing of the system reconfigured for active testing will be performed in the near future, followed by testing with nuclear fuel.

  12. The boron connection: Roots (routes), grounds, horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdetsis, Aristides D.

    2012-12-01

    Isoelectronic and isolobal silicon-based analogues to boranes and borane complexes are considered and studied. The framework and the implementation of such isoelectronic and isolobal analogies initially between silicon clusters (cluster dianions) and isovalent boranes, known under the scoptical and synoptical name "boron connection" is critically analyzed and reviewed in considerable depth and breadth, paying special attention to its conceptual simplicity, origin, and originality. It is illustrated that such a concept can be extended to several borane complexes producing analogous silicon based (nano)structures. This is achieved by considering and evaluating several vertical, horizontal and diagonal relationships on the periodical table rooted on Si. It is shown that this type of simple and transparent relationships can lead to far reaching extensions and generalizations of the "boron connection" to encompass structural and electronic relationships between additional simple and mixed clusters based in addition to Si on other group 14 elements. Such clusters include, among others, simple Gen2- and Snn2- dianions and mixed Si-Bi, Ge-Bi and Sn-Bi clusters. Special emphasis is placed on molecular and material engineering and functionalization, in analogy to similar functionalization of borane based molecules and materials. It is illustrated that this enlarged and expanded project is very promising and could be very successful for the design of a practically unlimited number of new group-14-based complexes as well as the rationalization and fictionalization of newly synthesized materials.

  13. Polynitroethyl- and fluorodinitroethyl substituted boron esters.

    PubMed

    Klapötke, Thomas M; Krumm, Burkhard; Moll, Richard

    2013-09-01

    The reaction of boron oxide with various nitro-substituted ethanols (2-nitroethanol, 2-fluoro-2,2-dinitroethanol, 2,2,2-trinitroethanol) furnished the corresponding nitroethyl borates B(OCH2CH2NO2)3 (1), B(OCH2CF(NO2)2)3 (2), and B(OCH2C(NO2)3)3 (3). Fluorination of the anion [(NO2)2CCH2OH](-) (4) resulted in 2-fluoro-2,2-dinitroethanol (5), a precursor for 2, and was thoroughly characterized. An interesting condensation was observed with the anion 4 to form the unusual dianion [(NO2)2CCH2C(NO2)2](2-) (6). All compounds were fully characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy (IR, Raman), mass spectrometry and elemental analysis. The chemical, physical and energetic properties of 1-3 and 5 are reported, as well as quantum chemical calculations at the CBS-4M level of theory to predict the enthalpies and energies of formation. X-ray diffraction studies were performed, and the crystal structures for compounds 1-6 were determined and discussed thoroughly. The boron esters 1-3 are of interest as possible candidates for smoke-free, green colorants in pyrotechnic applications, and in case of 2 and 3 also as promising high energy oxidizers. PMID:23893716

  14. Boronated porhyrins and methods for their use

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Shelnutt, John A.; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention covers boronated porphyrins containing multiple carborane cages which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies such as boron neutron capture therapy and photodynamic therapy.

  15. Boronated porhyrins and methods for their use

    DOEpatents

    Miura, M.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention covers boronated porphyrins containing multiple carborane cages which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies such as boron neutron capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. 3 figs.

  16. Synthesis and Utility of Dihydropyridine Boronic Esters.

    PubMed

    Panda, Santanu; Coffin, Aaron; Nguyen, Q Nhu; Tantillo, Dean J; Ready, Joseph M

    2016-02-01

    When activated by an acylating agent, pyridine boronic esters react with organometallic reagents to form a dihydropyridine boronic ester. This intermediate allows access to a number of valuable substituted pyridine, dihydropyridine, and piperidine products. PMID:26694785

  17. Boron in Pariette Wetland Sediments, Aquatic Vegetation & Benthic Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudeva, P.; Jones, C. P.; Powelson, D.; Jacobson, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Pariette Wetlands are comprised of 20 ponds located in Utah's Uintah Basin. Boron concentration in the Pariette Wetlands have been observed to exceed the total maximum daily limit of 750 µg L-1. Considering water flow in and out of the wetlands, boron is accumulating within the wetlands where it is sorbed to sediments and bioconcentrated by wetland plant and macro invertebrates. Since boron is an avian teratogen, an estimate of boron ingestion exposure is warranted. Samples from 3 of the 23 Pariette Wetland ponds with one pond near the inlet, one near the outlet, and one in the middle were collected. Five sampling points were designated along a 100 m transect of each pond. At each sampling point duplicate (or triplicate) samples of water, sediments, benthic organisms and wetland vegetation were collected. The sediments were collected with a KB-corer and divided at depths of 0-2 cm, 2-7 cm, and 7+ cm from the sediment surface. Sample splits were sent to the USU Bug lab for identification of invertebrate species. Whenever this transect was not intercepting vegetation, 2-3 additional sample sites were identified at the pond within stands of representative vegetation where bird nests are located. The plant parts used for boron analyses will include seeds, shoot and roots of vascular plants, as well as algae or duckweeds skimmed from the surface. Samples were processed within 2 days of collection. Water samples filtered through a 0.45 μ membrane filter were analyzed for DOC, pH and ECe. The dried and washed vegetation samples were ground and stored. The benthic organisms and macro invertebrates were netted at the water surface. The dried samples were weighed, ground and stored. Samples were weighed, oven dried and reweighed. For plant and macro-invertebrate samples, a nitric and hydrogen peroxide digestion procedure is used to dissolve environmentally available elements. The Hot Water extraction and DTPA-Sorbitol extraction were compared to estimate wetland plant

  18. Beryllium and Boron abundances in population II stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The scientific focus of this program was to undertake UV spectroscopic abundance analyses of extremely metal poor stars with attention to determining abundances of light elements such as beryllium and boron. The abundances are likely to reflect primordial abundances within the early galaxy and help to constrain models for early galactic nucleosynthesis. The general metal abundances of these stars are also important for understanding stellar evolution.

  19. Phosphors containing boron and metals of Group IIIA and IIIB

    DOEpatents

    Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani; Comanzo, Holly Ann; Manivannan, Venkatesan

    2006-10-31

    A phosphor comprises: (a) at least a first metal selected from the group consisting of yttrium and elements of lanthanide series other than europium; (b) at least a second metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, indium, and scandium; (c) boron; and (d) europium. The phosphor is used in light source that comprises a UV radiation source to convert UV radiation to visible light.

  20. Diffusion of boron in alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Zhang, S; He, X.

    1995-04-01

    By means of particle tracking autoradiography (PTA), the diffusion coefficients of boron between 900 and 1,200 C were measured in 04MnNbB steel, 25MnTiB steel, Ni-B, Fe-30%Ni-B and Fe-3%Si-B alloys, and the frequency factor D{sub 0} and activation energy Q were obtained respectively. The experiment results indicated that there was an obvious difference between the present result and the result obtained by Busby (in 1953). It was found that the boron diffusivity in {gamma}-Fe increased as Ni was added. The diffusivity of boron in Fe-3%Si-B alloy with b.c.c. structure was much slower than one obtained by Busby in {alpha}-Fe (1954), which, however, was much faster than the results obtained in {gamma}-Fe (with f.c.c. structure). Based on the present data of boron diffusion coefficients, the mechanism of segregation of boron to grain boundaries is discussed.

  1. The boron trifluoride nitromethane adduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ownby, P. Darrell

    2004-02-01

    The separation of the boron isotopes using boron trifluoride·organic-donor, Lewis acid·base adducts is an essential first step in preparing 10B enriched and depleted crystalline solids so vital to nuclear studies and reactor applications such as enriched MgB 2, boron carbide, ZrB 2, HfB 2, aluminum boron alloys, and depleted silicon circuits for radiation hardening and neutron diffraction crystal structure studies. The appearance of this new adduct with such superior properties demands attention in the continuing search for more effective and efficient means of separation. An evaluation of the boron trifluoride nitromethane adduct, its thermodynamic and physical properties related to large-scale isotopic separation is presented. Its remarkably high separation factor was confirmed to be higher than the expected theoretical value. However, the reportedly high acid/donor ratio was proven to be an order of magnitude lower. On-going research is determining the crystal structure of deuterated and 11B enriched 11BF 3·CD 3NO 2 by X-ray and neutron diffraction.

  2. Methods for boron delivery to mammalian tissue

    DOEpatents

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Feaks, Debra A.; Shelly, Kenneth J.

    2003-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy can be used to destroy tumors. This treatment modality is enhanced by delivering compounds to the tumor site where the compounds have high concentrations of boron, the boron compounds being encapsulated in the bilayer of a liposome or in the bilayer as well as the internal space of the liposomes. Preferred compounds, include carborane units with multiple boron atoms within the carborane cage structure. Liposomes with increased tumor specificity may also be used.

  3. The Structure, Stability, and Properties of a One-Dimensional α-Boron Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kah, Cherno; Tandy, Paul; Yu, Ming; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.; Condensed Matter Theory Group Team

    2013-03-01

    Boron is an electron deficient element exhibiting a complex and versatile chemistry. In this work we have performed a preliminary study on the structural stability and electronic properties of one-dimensional α - boronstructuresbasedontheSCED - LCAOmoleculardynamicsscheme (MD) [PRB 74, 15540 (2006)]. The one-dimensional α-boron structures were generated by constructing icosahedra B12 clusters, referred as α-boron balls, and arranging them in one-dimension. Such structures were stabilized through the simulated annealing based on the SCED-LCAO MD. We found that: (1) the α-boron ball is compressed in comparison to its bulk counterpart (α-phase) (2) the distance between `` α-boron balls'' is shorter in the center of the chain than that at the two ends and decreases as the length of the chain increases; (3) the HOMO-LUMO gap is very small (~1 meV) in the finite chains, but it opens up when the chain length becomes infinite. The optimized lattice constant of the infinite α-boron chain was found to be 2.998 Å and its energy gap is found to be 0.74 e. The stability and properties of ring-shaped one-dimensional α-boron structures will also be discussed. The first author acknowledges McSweeny Fellowship for supporting his research in this work.

  4. Effect of pretreatment and additives on boron release during pyrolysis and gasification of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Yuuki Mochizuki; Katsuyasu Sugawara; Yukio Enda

    2009-09-15

    Boron is one of the most toxic and highly volatile elements present in coal. As part of a series of studies carried out on coal cleaning to prevent environmental problems and to promote efficient coal utilization processes, the removal of boron by leaching with water and acetic acid has been investigated. The effects of the addition of ash components, that is, SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and CaO on the control of boron release during pyrolysis and gasification were investigated. Here, 20-70% of boron in coal was removed by leaching the coal with water and acetic acid. Boron leached by water and acetic acid was related to the volatiles released from coal in pyrolysis below 1173 K. The addition of ash components such as SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was found to be effective in suppressing the release of boron during pyrolysis at temperatures below and above 1173 K, respectively. The addition of CaO to coal was effective in suppressing the release of boron during gasification at 1173 K. 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Mineral resource of the month: boron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyday, Phyllis A.

    2005-01-01

    What does boron have to do with baseball, apple pie, motherhood and Chevrolet? Boron minerals and chemicals are used in the tanning of leather baseballs and gloves; in micro-fertilizer to grow apples and in the glass and enamels of bakewares to cook apple pie; in boron detergents for soaking baby clothes and diapers; and in fiberglass parts for the Chevrolet Corvette.

  6. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    MIYATAKE, Shin-Ichi; KAWABATA, Shinji; HIRAMATSU, Ryo; KUROIWA, Toshihiko; SUZUKI, Minoru; KONDO, Natsuko; ONO, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting. PMID:27250576

  7. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kawabata, Shinji; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kondo, Natsuko; Ono, Koji

    2016-07-15

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting. PMID:27250576

  8. Design and fabrication of a boron reinforced intertank skirt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henshaw, J.; Roy, P. A.; Pylypetz, P.

    1974-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to evaluate the structural efficiency of a boron reinforced shell, where the medium of reinforcement consists of hollow aluminum extrusions infiltrated with boron epoxy. Studies were completed for the design of a one-half scale minimum weight shell using boron reinforced stringers and boron reinforced rings. Parametric and iterative studies were completed for the design of minimum weight stringers, rings, shells without rings and shells with rings. Computer studies were completed for the final evaluation of a minimum weight shell using highly buckled minimum gage skin. The detail design is described of a practical minimum weight test shell which demonstrates a weight savings of 30% as compared to an all aluminum longitudinal stiffened shell. Sub-element tests were conducted on representative segments of the compression surface at maximum stress and also on segments of the load transfer joint. A 10 foot long, 77 inch diameter shell was fabricated from the design and delivered for further testing.

  9. Titanium-boron mixtures as variable heat sources

    SciTech Connect

    Begeal, D.R. ); Munger, A.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The reaction between titanium and boron to form titanium diboride is one of the hottest pyrotechnic reactions in common usage and offers the advantage of being a solid state gasless reaction. Based on the work of Hart, a heat source with a variable output has been developed that utilizes this pyrotechnic. The device was designed to deliver the heat across a 0.26 inch inner diameter hemispherical bulkhead of a material and thickness that can be specified by the user. For evaluation purposes, the bulkhead was 0.036 inches thick stainless steel. The maximum temperature on the tip of the bulkhead was 950{degree}C for the pure reactants and 680{degree}C for blends diluted with 30 weight percent of alumina. Further, the temperature was uniform within {plus minus}20{degree}C across a 2 millimeter diameter on the tip of the bulkhead, and the temperature rise characteristics were repeatable. Ignition of the titanium/boron heat powder was accomplished by first igniting an adjacent charge of titanium subhydride/potassium perchlorate with a one ohm bridge wire. The header was constructed of inconel, a glass ceramic insulator, and hastelloy pins. The ignition and subsequent burn of the titanium/boron was nearly instantaneous, thus the thermal output was dependent only on the heat transfer properties of the materials and geometry involved. Therefore, the user can tailor the blend dilution and the bulkhead characteristics to provide a large range of precise heat outputs. Typical uses of this heat source include timely ignition of other materials, or heating confined gas to perform useful mechanical work. Achievement of the precise heat output required special attention to the purity of the titanium and boron and to the blending process. These aspects, as well as those described above will be described. 6 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; Paul D. Jablonski

    2010-11-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  11. Sintering titanium powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Alman, David E.

    2005-09-01

    Recently, there has been renewed interest in low-cost titanium. Near-net-shape powder metallurgy offers the potential of manufacturing titanium articles without costly and difficult forming and machining operations; hence, processing methods such as conventional press-and-sinter, powder forging and powder injection molding are of interest. The sintering behavior of a variety of commercial and experimental titanium powders was studied. Commercial powders were acquired that were produced different routes: (i) sponge fines from the primary titanium processing; (ii) via the hydride-dehydride process; and (iii) gas atomization. The influence of vacuum sintering time (0.5 to 32 hrs) and temperature (1200, 1275 or 1350°C) on the microstructure (porosity present) of cold pressed powders was studied. The results are discussed in terms of the difference in powder characteristics, with the aim of identify the characteristics required for full density via press-and-sinter processing. Near-net-shape tensile bars were consolidated via cold pressed and sintered. After sintering, a sub-set of the tensile bars was hot-isostatic pressed (HIPed). The microstructure and properties of the bars were compared in the sintered and HIPed conditions.

  12. Synthesis and structures of iron nanoparticles coated with boron nitride nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Narita, Ichihito; Oku, Takeo; Tokoro, Hisato; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2006-06-01

    Iron (Fe) nanoparticles coated with boron nitride (BN) nanomaterials were synthesized by using Fe(4)N and B powders as raw materials. The Fe(4)N was reduced to alpha-Fe during annealing at 1000 degrees C for several hours with flowing 100 sccm N(2) gas. The reaction was predicted by Ellingham diagram. The atomic structure and magnetic properties were investigated by high-resolution electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer system. PMID:16585048

  13. Features of the crystalline structure and thermal stability of the Wurtzite modification of boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Kurdyumov, A.V.; Oleinik, G.S.; Ostrovskaya, N.F.; Pilyankevich, A.N.; Savvakin, G.I.

    1985-06-01

    The authors propose a comparative investigation of the graphitelike modification (BNg) of wurzite boron nitride (BNw) and also a study of the rules of structure formation of polycrystalline materials during hot pressing of powders of BNw at high pressures. They conclude that their data indicates the possibility of obtaining highly dispersed polycrystalline materials consisting of a mixture of dense modifications of BN from BNw syntesized under conditions of dynamic compression rates of loading and heating.

  14. Drinking water health advisory for boron

    SciTech Connect

    Cantilli, R.

    1991-04-01

    The Health Advisory Program, sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Water, has issued its report on the element boron: included are the compounds boric acid and borax(sodium tetraborate). It provides information on the health effects, analytical methodology, and treatment technology that would be useful in dealing with the contamination of drinking water. Health Advisories (HAs) describe nonregulatory concentrations of drinking water contaminants at which adverse health effects would not be anticipated to occur over specific exposure durations. HAs serve as informal technical guidance to assist Federal, State, and local officials responsible for protecting public health when emergency spills or contamination situations occur. They are not legally enforceable Federal Standards and are subject to change as new information becomes available.

  15. BP: synthesis and properties of boron phosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Katherine; Lee, Kathleen; Kovnir, Kirill

    2016-07-01

    Cubic boron phosphide, BP, is notorious for its difficult synthesis, thus preventing it from being a widely used material in spite of having numerous favorable technological properties. In the current work, three different methods of synthesis are developed and compared: from the high temperature reaction of elements, Sn flux assisted synthesis, and a solid state metathesis reaction. Structural and optical properties of the products synthesized from the three methods were thoroughly characterized. Solid state metathesis is shown to be the cleanest and most efficient method in terms of reaction temperature and time. Synthesis by Sn flux resulted in a novel Sn-doped BP compound. Undoped BP samples exhibit an optical bandgap of ∼2.2 eV while Sn-doped BP exhibits a significantly smaller bandgap of 1.74 eV. All synthesized samples show high stability in concentrated hydrochloric acid, saturated sodium hydroxide solutions, and fresh aqua regia.

  16. Boron removal by the duckweed Lemna gibba: a potential method for the remediation of boron-polluted waters.

    PubMed

    Del-Campo Marín, Claudia M; Oron, Gideon

    2007-12-01

    Boron (B) is often found in polluted and desalinated waters. Despite its potentially environmental damaging effects, efficient treatments are lacking. The duckweed Lemna gibba has been shown to remove toxic elements from water; however, its applicability to B removal is unknown. In this study, L. gibba was examined for its tolerance to B in water and its B removal efficiency. Duckweed plants were grown in outdoor 12-day batch experiments in nutrient solution containing 0.3-10 mg B L(-1). Plant biomass production was not affected by B over the tested concentrations during the 12-day cultivation period. Boron removal and the bioconcentration factor of B in L. gibba were highest at initial B concentrations below 2 mg L(-1), and decreased as the initial B concentration increased. Boron content in the plants at the end of the experiment ranged between 930 and 1900 mg kg(-1) dry weight, and was comparable to that of wetland plants reported to be good B accumulators. Boron removal by L. gibba may therefore be a suitable option for the treatment of water containing B concentrations below 2 mg L(-1). PMID:17643472

  17. Thermal conductivity of boron carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbide is necessary to evaluate its potential for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. Measurements have been conducted of the thermal diffusivity of hot-pressed boron carbide BxC samples as a function of composition (x in the range from 4 to 9), temperature (300-1700 K), and temperature cycling. These data, in concert with density and specific-heat data, yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results are discussed in terms of a structural model that has been previously advanced to explain the electronic transport data. Some novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are briefly discussed.

  18. Metal interactions with boron clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the structural and bonding features of metallaboranes and metallacarboranes; transition-metal derivatives of nido-boranes and some related species; interactions of metal groups with the octahydrotriborate (1-) anion, B/sub 3/H/sub 8/; metallaboron cage compounds of the main group metals; closo-carborane-metal complexes containing metal-carbon and metal-boron omega-bonds; electrochemistry of metallaboron cage compounds; and boron clusters with transition metal-hydrogen bonds.

  19. Two-dimensional boron: Lightest catalyst for hydrogen and oxygen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, Showkat H.; Chakraborty, Sudip; Jha, Prakash C.; Wärnâ, John; Soni, Himadri; Jha, Prafulla K.; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-08-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) have been envisaged on a two-dimensional (2D) boron sheet through electronic structure calculations based on a density functional theory framework. To date, boron sheets are the lightest 2D material and, therefore, exploring the catalytic activity of such a monolayer system would be quite intuitive both from fundamental and application perspectives. We have functionalized the boron sheet (BS) with different elemental dopants like carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, sulphur, and lithium and determined the adsorption energy for each case while hydrogen and oxygen are on top of the doping site of the boron sheet. The free energy calculated from the individual adsorption energy for each functionalized BS subsequently guides us to predict which case of functionalization serves better for the HER or the OER.

  20. Boron under Pressure: Phase Diagram and Novel High-Pressure Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oganov, Artem R.

    Boron has a unique chemistry, responsible for remarkable complexities even in the pure element. I review some of the history of the discovery of this element, and recent surprises found in boron under pressure. I discuss the recent discovery of a new high-pressure phase, ?-B28, consisting of icosahedral B12 clusters and B2 pairs in a NaCl-type arrangement: (B2)δ+(B12)δ-, and displaying a significant charge transfer δ ~ 0.48. Boron is the only light element, for which the phase diagram has become clear only in the last couple of years, and this phase diagram is discussed here among other recent findings.

  1. Highly Strained Heterocycles Constructed from Boron-Boron Multiple Bonds and Heavy Chalcogens.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Holger; Constantinidis, Philipp; Dellermann, Theresa; Ewing, William C; Fischer, Ingo; Hess, Merlin; Knight, Fergus R; Rempel, Anna; Schneider, Christoph; Ullrich, Stefan; Vargas, Alfredo; Woollins, J Derek

    2016-04-25

    The reactions of a diborene with elemental selenium or tellurium are shown to afford a diboraselenirane or diboratellurirane, respectively. These reactions are reminiscent of the sequestration of subvalent oxygen and nitrogen in the formation of oxiranes and aziridines; however, such reactivity is not known between alkenes and the heavy chalcogens. Although carbon is too electronegative to affect the reduction of elements with lower relative electronegativity, the highly reducing nature of the B-B double bond enables reactions with Se(0) and Te(0) . The capacity of multiple bonds between boron atoms to donate electron density is highlighted in reactions where diborynes behave as nucleophiles, attacking one of the two Te atoms of diaryltellurides, forming salts consisting of diboratellurenium cations and aryltelluride anions. PMID:27027522

  2. Chemoselective Boronic Ester Synthesis by Controlled Speciation**

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, James W B; Seath, Ciaran P; Watson, Allan J B

    2014-01-01

    Control of boronic acid solution speciation is presented as a new strategy for the chemoselective synthesis of boronic esters. Manipulation of the solution equilibria within a cross-coupling milieu enables the formal homologation of aryl and alkenyl boronic acid pinacol esters. The generation of a new, reactive boronic ester in the presence of an active palladium catalyst also facilitates streamlined iterative catalytic C=C bond formation and provides a method for the controlled oligomerization of sp2-hybridized boronic esters. PMID:25267096

  3. Boron analysis and boron imaging in biological materials for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT).

    PubMed

    Wittig, Andrea; Michel, Jean; Moss, Raymond L; Stecher-Rasmussen, Finn; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Bendel, Peter; Mauri, Pier Luigi; Altieri, Saverio; Hilger, Ralf; Salvadori, Piero A; Menichetti, Luca; Zamenhof, Robert; Sauerwein, Wolfgang A G

    2008-10-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is based on the ability of the stable isotope 10B to capture neutrons, which leads to a nuclear reaction producing an alpha- and a 7Li-particle, both having a high biological effectiveness and a very short range in tissue, being limited to approximately one cell diameter. This opens the possibility for a highly selective cancer therapy. BNCT strongly depends on the selective uptake of 10B in tumor cells and on its distribution inside the cells. The chemical properties of boron and the need to discriminate different isotopes make the investigation of the concentration and distribution of 10B a challenging task. The most advanced techniques to measure and image boron are described, both invasive and non-invasive. The most promising approach for further investigation will be the complementary use of the different techniques to obtain the information that is mandatory for the future of this innovative treatment modality. PMID:18439836

  4. Effects of sulfur, zinc, iron, copper, manganese, and boron applications on sunflower yield and plant nutrient concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, B.R.; Zubriski, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfur, zinc, iron, copper, manganese, and boron application did not affect the seed yield or oil percentage of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) on both dryland and irrigated soils in North Dakota in 1981. Field averages indicated significant Zn, Mn, and B uptake by sunflower at the 12-leaf stage as a result of fertilization with these elements. Increased Zn uptake was also observed in the uppermost mature leaf at anthesis from zinc fertilization. Although sunflower yield from boron fertilization was not significantly different from the check, a trend was observed in which boron fertilization seemed to decrease sunflower yield. Sunflower yields from the boron treatment were the lowest out of seven treatments in three out of four fields. Also, sunflower yield from the boron treatment was significantly lower than both iron and sulfur treatments when all fields were combined.

  5. Gelcasting superalloy powders

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    Gelcasting is a process for forming inorganic powders into complex shapes. It was originally developed for ceramic powders. A slurry of powder and a monomer solution is poured in to mold and polymerized in-situ to form gelled parts. Typically, only 2-4 wt % Polymer is used. The process has both aqueous and nonaqueous versions. Gelcasting is a generic process and has been used to produce ceramic parts from over a dozen different ceramic compositions ranging from alumina-based refractories to high-performance silicon nitride. Recently, gelcasting has been applied to forming superalloy powders into complex shapes. This application has posed several challenges not previously encountered in ceramics. In particular, problems were caused by the larger particle size and the higher density of the particles. Additional problems were encountered with binder removal. How these problems were overcome will be described.

  6. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospiskova, Kristyna; Safarik, Ivo

    2015-04-01

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (-20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties.

  7. POWDER COAT APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses an investigation of critical factors that affect the use of powder coatings on the environment, cost, quality, and production. The investigation involved a small business representative working with the National Defense Center for Environmental Excellence (ND...

  8. Pyrotechnic filled molding powder

    DOEpatents

    Hartzel, Lawrence W.; Kettling, George E.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to thermosetting molding compounds and more particularly to a pyrotechnic filled thermosetting compound comprising a blend of unfilled diallyl phthalate molding powder and a pyrotechnic mixture.

  9. Talcum powder poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... powder As a filler in street drugs, like heroin Other products may also contain talc. ... have developed serious lung damage and cancer. Injecting heroin that contains talc into a vein may lead ...

  10. Assessment of processing routes and strength of a 3-phase molybdenum boron silicide (Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}-Mo{sub 3}Si)

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Heatherly, L.; Kramer, M.J.

    1998-03-03

    High temperature components such as furnace elements are often fabricated from MoSi{sub 2}. Molybdenum boron silicides consisting of Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, Mo{sub 3}Si, and Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} are an interesting alternative to MoSi{sub 2}. At present, the mechanical properties of these new Mo-Si-B intermetallics have not been fully explored. One reason for this is simply the unavailability of sufficiently large parts with a sound microstructure. The goal of this work was therefore to explore the processing of these materials by several different routes such as powder and ingot metallurgy, and examine the resulting microstructures. In addition, some post-processing (hot isostatic forging, extrusion) was carried out. The flexure strength of the differently processed materials was characterized and interpreted in terms of their microstructures.

  11. Process for recovering boron trifluoride from an impure gaseous boron trifluoride residue

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, F.E.; Schroeder, K.H.; Wagner, W.J.

    1990-07-24

    This patent describes a method for removing sulfur dioxide from a boron trifluoride stream. It comprises: condensing a gaseous boron trifluoride stream; distilling the condensed boron trifluoride stream to yield pure boron trifluoride and a liquid boron trifluoride residue wherein the liquid boron trifluoride residue comprises by weight: about 40 to about 95% boron trifluoride, about 5 to about 30% sulfur dioxide, about 0 to 19% sulfur trioxide, about 0 to about 0.2% silicon fluoride, about 0 to about 1.0% arsenic fluoride, and about 0 to about 0.1% antimony fluoride; vaporizing the liquid boron trifluoride residue; feeding the gaseous boron trifluoride residue into a mixture of boric and sulfuric acids; and removing the unabsorbed sulfur dioxide from the acid mixture.

  12. Analytical boron diffusivity model in silicon for thermal diffusion from boron silicate glass film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurachi, Ikuo; Yoshioka, Kentaro

    2015-09-01

    An analytical boron diffusivity model in silicon for thermal diffusion from a boron silicate glass (BSG) film has been proposed in terms of enhanced diffusion due to boron-silicon interstitial pair formation. The silicon interstitial generation is considered to be a result of the silicon kick-out mechanism by the diffused boron at the surface. The additional silicon interstitial generation in the bulk silicon is considered to be the dissociation of the diffused pairs. The former one causes the surface boron concentration dependent diffusion. The latter one causes the local boron concentration dependent diffusion. The calculated boron profiles based on the diffusivity model are confirmed to agree with the actual diffusion profiles measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) for a wide range of the BSG boron concentration. This analytical diffusivity model is a helpful tool for p+ boron diffusion process optimization of n-type solar cell manufacturing.

  13. Intracellular boron localization and uptake in cell cultures using imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (ion microscopy) for neutron capture therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Bennett, B D; Zha, X; Gay, I; Morrison, G H

    1992-01-01

    Quantitative ion microscopy of freeze-fractured, freeze-dried cultured cells is a technique for single cell and subcellular elemental analysis. This review describes the technique and its usefulness in determining the uptake and subcellular distribution of the boron from boron neutron capture therapy drugs. PMID:1511239

  14. Powder Diffraction: By Decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, William I. F.

    This introductory chapter reviews the first 100 years of powder diffraction, decade by decade, from the earliest X-ray powder diffraction measurements of the crystal structure of graphite through to the diversity and complexity of twenty-first century powder diffraction. Carbon features as an illustrative example throughout the discussion of these ten decades from graphite and the disorder of carbon black through to lonsdaleite, the elusive hexagonal polymorph of diamond, and C60, the most symmetrical of molecules. Electronics and computing have played a leading role in the development of powder diffraction, particularly over the past 60 years, and the Moore's Law decade-by-decade rise in computing power is clear in the increasing complexity of powder diffraction experiments and material systems that can be studied. The chapter concludes with a final discussion of decades - the four decades of length-scale from the ångstrom to the micron that not only represent the domain of powder diffraction but are also the distances that will dominate twenty-first century science and technology.

  15. Magnetic and Thermoelectric Properties of Boron-Rich Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takao

    Boron forms various compounds with metal atoms occupying voids in the boron framework. As a synthesis method it has been found that the addition of small amounts of third elements like carbon, nitrogen, and silicon can result in the formation of novel and varied rare earth boron cluster structures. A wide variation of 1D, 2D, and 3D magnetic behavior with unexpectedly strong magnetic interactions has been discovered in rare earth boron icosahedra compounds which are magnetically dilute, f-electron insulators. As an intriguing phenomenon, the B12 icosahedra cluster, which is a building block of the structure, has been indicated to function as a novel mediator of magnetic interaction. These phenomena are borides. Attractive high temperature thermoelectric properties are also emerging in borides. Attractive high temperature thermoelectric properties are also emerging in this group of compounds, which is striking due to the great potential of utilizing waste heat. Recent developments on the long awaited n-type counterpart to boron carbide, the homologous series of RE-B-C(N) compounds, REB17CN, REB22C2N, and REB28.5C4, will be presented together with those of p-type REB44Si2. General new ways to improve the thermoelectric properties are also discussed. For example, seeding with highly electrically conductive metallic borides like REB4 and REB6 is found to be a way to significantly increase the thermoelectric figure of merit. Electric resistivity significantly decreases while Seebeck coefficients and thermal conductivity are not sizably affected.

  16. Boron isotopic fractionation related to boron sorption on humic acid and the structure of surface complexes formed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarchand, Emmanuel; Schott, Jacques; Gaillardet, Jérôme

    2005-07-01

    Boron isotopic fractionation during adsorption onto Ca-flocculated Aldrich humic acid (HA) has been investigated experimentally as a function of solution pH at 25°C and I = 0.15 M. Boron aqueous concentration and isotopic composition were determined by Cs 2BO 2+ Positive Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry analysis, while the structure of B surface complexes on HA was characterized using 11B Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR). Significant B sorption on HA was observed at 6 < pH < 12 with a maximum value of Kd, the partition coefficient between adsorbed and aqueous boron, equal to 40 at pH = 9.5-10. Combined 11B MAS NMR analysis and FITEQL modeling of B sorption on HA showed that this element forms tetrahedrally coordinated five- or six-membered ring chelates, most likely 1,2-diol and 1,3-diol complexes at alkaline pH (8 < pH < 11) and dicarboxylic complexes at near neutral conditions (6 < pH < 9). Results of this study demonstrate for the first time that boron sorption on HA induces a strong pH-dependent isotope fractionation—with 11B depleted at the surface of HA—that reaches a maximum at 5 < pH < 9 (α = 0.975, Δ = -25‰) and decreases sharply at pH >9. The measured isotope fractionation cannot be modeled assuming that the isotopic composition of the sorbed borate species is identical to that of B(OH) 4- species in the parent solution. It is shown that the extent of isotopic fractionation depends not only on B aqueous speciation but also on the distribution and structure of the borate surface complexes formed. In agreement with energetic constrains, calculation of the isotope fractionation factors between aqueous boric acid and boron surface complexes suggests that the formation of the strained six-membered ring 1,3-diol complex yields a much higher fractionation (α BL P1-III = 0.954-0.960, Δ = -41/-47‰) than that of the very stable five-membered ring 1,2-diol (α BL P2-III = 0.983, Δ = -18‰). The results of this study open

  17. Method of separating boron isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Thorne, J.M.; Cluff, C.L.

    1981-01-23

    A method of boron isotope enrichment involving the isotope preferential photolysis of (2-chloroethenyl)-dichloroborane as the feed material. The photolysis can readily by achieved with CO/sub 2/ laser radiation and using fluences significantly below those required to dissociate BCl/sub 3/.

  18. Method of separating boron isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Reed J.; Thorne, James M.; Cluff, Coran L.; Hayes, John K.

    1984-01-01

    A method of boron isotope enrichment involving the isotope preferential photolysis of (2-chloroethenyl)dichloroborane as the feed material. The photolysis can readily be achieved with CO.sub.2 laser radiation and using fluences significantly below those required to dissociate BCl.sub.3.

  19. Boron trifluoride coatings for plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubacki, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Tough, durable coatings of boron triflouride can be deposited on plastic optical components to protect them from destructive effects of abrasion, scratching, and environment. Coating material can be applied simultaneously with organic polymers, using plasma glow-discharge methods, or it can be used as base material for other coatings to increase adhesion.

  20. Structure of boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Buranova, Yu. S. Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Blank, V. D.

    2015-01-15

    The crystallographic structure of boron nitride nanotubes has been investigated. Various defects that may arise during nanotube synthesis are revealed by electron microscopy. Nanotubes with different numbers of walls and different diameters are modeled by molecular dynamics methods. Structural features of single-wall nanotubes are demonstrated. The causes of certain defects in multiwall nanotubes are indicated.

  1. An Exploration of Neutron Detection in Semiconducting Boron Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Nina

    The 3He supply problem in the U.S. has necessitated the search for alternatives for neutron detection. The neutron detection efficiency is a function of density, atomic composition, neutron absorption cross section, and thickness of the neutron capture material. The isotope 10B is one of only a handful of isotopes with a high neutron absorption cross section---3840 barns for thermal neutrons. So a boron carbide semiconductor represents a viable alternative to 3He. This dissertation provides an evaluation of the performance of semiconducting boron carbide neutron detectors grown by plasma enhance chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) in order to determine the advantages and drawbacks of these devices for neutron detection. Improved handling of the PECVD system has resulted in an extremely stable plasma, enabling deposition of thick films of semiconducting boron carbide. A variety of material and semiconducting characterization tools have been used to investigate the structure and electronic properties of boron carbide thin films, including X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, infrared/Raman spectroscopy, current-voltage measurements and capacitance-voltage measurements. Elemental concentrations in the boron carbide films have been obtained from Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil detection analysis. Solid state neutron detection devices have been fabricated in the form of heterostructured p-n diodes, p-type boron carbide/n-type Si. Operating conditions, including applied bias voltage, and time constants, have been optimized for maximum detection efficiency and correlated to the semiconducting properties investigated in separate electronic measurements. Accurate measurements of the neutron detection efficiency and the response of the detector to a wide range of neutron wavelengths have been performed at a well calibrated, tightly collimated, "white" cold neutron beam source using time-of-flight neutron detection technique

  2. Functionally graded boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.; McClellan, K.J.; Kise, C.D.; Hoover, R.C.; Scarborough, W.K.

    1998-12-31

    Lightweight body armor is important for the protection of US soldiers in the field. Here, fabrication techniques were developed for producing graded porosity B{sub 4}C, and for producing aluminum-B{sub 4}C and epoxy-B{sub 4}C functionally graded materials. The key fabrication aspect was obtaining the graded porosity B{sub 4}C. The feasibility of producing graded porosity B{sub 4}C using a grading of carbon densification aid produced from a gradient of furfuryl alcohol carbon precursor was demonstrated. This approach is quite promising, but it was not optimized in the present investigation. Graded porosity B{sub 4}C materials were produced by a layering approach using different size distributions of B{sub 4}C powders in the green state, and then densifying the layered assembly by hot pressing at 1,900 C. The hardness of uninfiltrated graded B{sub 4}C, aluminum infiltrated B{sub 4}C, and epoxy infiltrated B{sub 4}C was observed to be similar.

  3. Method for classifying ceramic powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takabe, K.

    1983-01-01

    Under the invented method, powder A of particles of less than 10 microns, and carrier powder B, whose average particle diameter is more than five times that of powder A, are premixed so that the powder is less than 40 wt.% of the total mixture, before classifying.

  4. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-19

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  5. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goval, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-06-07

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  6. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-07-29

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  7. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-14

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  8. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-05-10

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  9. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-26

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  10. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-28

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  11. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-01-25

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  12. Silicon and boron differ in their localization and loading in bone☆

    PubMed Central

    Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Pedro, Liliana D.; Watson, Abigail; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon and boron share many similarities, both chemically and biochemically, including having similar effects on bone, although their mechanisms of action are not known. Here we compared the loading of silicon and boron into bone, their localization and how they are influenced by age (growth & development), to obtain further clues as to the biological effects of these elements and, especially, to see if they behave the same or not. Bone samples were obtained from two different studies where female Sprague Dawley rats had been maintained on a normal maintenance diet for up to 43 weeks. Total bone elemental levels were determined by ICP-OES following microwave assisted acid digestion. Silicon and boron levels in the decalcified bones (i.e. the collagen fraction) were also investigated. Silicon and boron showed marked differences in loading and in their localization in bone. Highest silicon and lowest boron concentrations were found in the under-mineralized bone of younger rats and lowest silicon and highest boron concentrations were found in the fully mineralized bone of the adult rat. Overall, however total bone silicon content increased with age, as did boron content, the latter mirroring the increase in calcium (mineral) content of bone. However, whereas silicon showed equal distribution in the collagen and mineral fractions of bone, boron was exclusively localized in the mineral fraction. These findings confirm the reported association between silicon and collagen, especially at the early stages of bone mineralization, and show that boron is associated with the bone mineral but not connective tissues. These data suggest that silicon and boron have different biological roles and that one is unlikely, therefore, to substitute for the other, or at least boron would not substitute for Si in the connective tissues. Finally, we noted that silicon levels in the mineral fraction varied greatly between the two studies, suggesting that one or more nutritional factor

  13. Efficient FEM simulation of static and free vibration behavior of single walled boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannopoulos, Georgios I.; Kontoni, Denise-Penelope N.; Georgantzinos, Stylianos K.

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes the static and free vibration behavior of single walled boron nitride nanotubes using a structural mechanics based finite element method. First, depending on the type of nanotube under investigation, its three dimensional nanostructure is developed according to the well-known corresponding positions of boron and nitride atoms as well as boron nitride bonds. Then, appropriate point masses are assigned to the atomic positions of the developed space frame. Next, these point masses are suitably interconnected with two-noded, linear, spring-like, finite elements. In order to simulate effectively the interactions observed between boron and nitride atoms within the nanotube, appropriate potential energy functions are introduced for these finite elements. In this manner, various atomistic models for both armchair and zigzag nanotubes with different aspect ratios are numerically analyzed and their effective elastic modulus as well as their natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes are obtained. Regarding the free vibration analysis, the computed results reveal bending, breathing and axial modes of vibration depending on the nanotube size and chirality as well as the applied boundary support conditions. The longitudinal stiffness of the boron nitride nanotubes is found also sensitive to their geometric characteristics.

  14. Determination of structural changes and phase transformations in boron carbide by static and dynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Varun

    Recent transmission electron microscopy results demonstrate that the failure of B4C is commensurate with the segregation of boron icosahedra embedded in amorphous carbon in 2--3 nm wide amorphous bands along the (113) lattice direction, in good agreement with our recent theoretical results. Boron carbide is generally composed of multiple polytypes of B4C which have the same primitive lattice parameters but differ from each other by the location of the boron and carbon atoms in the unit cells. The unit cells are formed by a 12-atom B12-nCn icosahedron and a 3-atom (C3-nBn) chain. Our theoretical results indicate that one polytype, B12(C3), whose formation is responsible for the failure of the entire material. This anomalous and poorly understood glass-like behavior in boron carbide has been the subject of research since its discovery over 70 years ago. The characterization of disorder in hot pressed and powder boron carbide samples is therefore of primary interest. The research work has focused on characterization techniques which can be used at a micrometric sampling size so that individual powder grains of the material can be utilized. Specifically, micro-Raman and electrical conductivity measurements can be used with micrometric gap cells to understand the disorder in B4C. The results also demonstrate that it is possible to induce transformations in boron carbide using electric fields that are comparable with those obtained under shock and nanoindentation. Our calculations present a hypothesis which can provide a solution to prevent the premature failure of B4C. A route to achieve suppression of the B12(CCC) polytype without significantly affecting the elastic constants is via low concentration Silicon (Si) doping of B4C. Suppression of B12(CCC) by Si doping has implications towards development of boron carbide armor with improved properties for protection against high velocity threats. In order to achieve this, nanostructures (nanowires, nanorods, etc.) of Si

  15. Chemistry of trace elements in coalbed methane product water.

    PubMed

    McBeth, Ian; Reddy, Katta J; Skinner, Quentin D

    2003-02-01

    Extraction of methane (natural gas) from coal deposits is facilitated by pumping of aquifer water. Coalbed methane (CBM) product water, produced from pumping ground water, is discharged into associated unlined holding ponds. The objective of this study was to examine the chemistry of trace elements in CBM product water at discharge points and in associated holding ponds across the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Product water samples from discharge points and associated holding ponds were collected from the Cheyenne River (CHR), Belle Fourche River (BFR), and Little Powder River (LPR) watersheds during the summers of 1999 and 2000. Samples were analyzed for pH, Al (aluminum), As (arsenic), B (boron), Ba (barium), Cr (chromium), Cu (copper), F (fluoride), Fe (iron), Mn (manganese), Mo (molybdenum), Se (selenium), and Zn (zinc). Chemistry of trace element concentrations were modeled with the MINTEQA2 geochemical equilibrium model. Results of this study show that pH of product water for three watersheds increased in holding ponds. For example the pH of CBM product water increased from 7.21 to 8.26 for LPR watershed. Among three watersheds, the CBM product water exhibited relatively less change in trace element concentrations in CHR watershed holding ponds. Concentration of dissolved Al, Fe, As, Se, and F in product water increased in BFR watershed holding ponds. For example, concentration of dissolved Fe increased from 113 to 135 microg/L. Boron, Cu, and Zn concentrations of product water did not change in BFR watershed holding ponds. However, concentration of dissolved Ba, Mn, and Cr in product water decreased in BFR watershed holding ponds. For instance, Ba and Cr concentrations decreased from 445 to 386 microg/L and from 43.6 to 25.1 microg/L, respectively. In the LPR watershed, Al, Fe, As, Se, and F concentrations of product water increased substantially in holding ponds. For example, Fe concentration increased from 192 to 312 microg/L. However, concentration of

  16. Beryllium and boron in metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primas, Francesca

    2010-04-01

    Knowledge of lithium, beryllium, and boron abundances in stars of the Galactic halo and disk plays a major role in our understanding of Big Bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic-ray physics, and stellar interiors. 9Be and 10B are believed to originate entirely from spallation reactions in the interstellar medium (ISM) between α-particles and protons and heavy nuclei like carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen (CNO), whereas 11B may have an extra production channel via neutrino-spallation. Beryllium and boron are both observationally challenging, with their main resonant doublets falling respectively at 313 nm and at 250 nm. The advent of 8-10m class telescopes equipped with highly sensitive (in the near-UV/blue) spectrographs has opened up a new era of Be abundance studies. Here, I will review and discuss the most interesting results of recent observational campaigns in terms of formation and evolution of these two light elements.

  17. Chronic boron exposure and human semen parameters.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Wendie A; Xun, Lin; Jia, Juan; Kennedy, Nola; Elashoff, David A; Ping, Liu

    2010-04-01

    Boron found as borates in soil, food, and water has important industrial and medical applications. A panel reviewing NTP reproductive toxicants identified boric acid as high priority for occupational studies to determine safe versus adverse reproductive effects. To address this, we collected boron exposure/dose measures in workplace inhalable dust, dietary food/fluids, blood, semen, and urine from boron workers and two comparison worker groups (n=192) over three months and determined correlations between boron and semen parameters (total sperm count, sperm concentration, motility, morphology, DNA breakage, apoptosis and aneuploidy). Blood boron averaged 499.2 ppb for boron workers, 96.1 and 47.9 ppb for workers from high and low environmental boron areas (p<0.0001). Boron concentrated in seminal fluid. No significant correlations were found between blood or urine boron and adverse semen parameters. Exposures did not reach those causing adverse effects published in animal toxicology work but exceeded those previously published for boron occupational groups. PMID:19962437

  18. Ferromagnetism and semiconducting of boron nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    More recently, motivated by extensively technical applications of carbon nanostructures, there is a growing interest in exploring novel non-carbon nanostructures. As the nearest neighbor of carbon in the periodic table, boron has exceptional properties of low volatility and high melting point and is stronger than steel, harder than corundum, and lighter than aluminum. Boron nanostructures thus are expected to have broad applications in various circumstances. In this contribution, we have performed a systematical study of the stability and electronic and magnetic properties of boron nanowires using the spin-polarized density functional calculations. Our calculations have revealed that there are six stable configurations of boron nanowires obtained by growing along different base vectors from the unit cell of the bulk α-rhombohedral boron (α-B) and β-rhombohedral boron (β-B). Well known, the boron bulk is usually metallic without magnetism. However, theoretical results about the magnetic and electronic properties showed that, whether for the α-B-based or the β-B-based nanowires, their magnetism is dependent on the growing direction. When the boron nanowires grow along the base vector [001], they exhibit ferromagnetism and have the magnetic moments of 1.98 and 2.62 μB, respectively, for the α-c [001] and β-c [001] directions. Electronically, when the boron nanowire grows along the α-c [001] direction, it shows semiconducting and has the direct bandgap of 0.19 eV. These results showed that boron nanowires possess the unique direction dependence of the magnetic and semiconducting behaviors, which are distinctly different from that of the bulk boron. Therefore, these theoretical findings would bring boron nanowires to have many promising applications that are novel for the boron bulk. PMID:23244063

  19. Microstructure and shape memory characteristics of gas-atomized TiNi powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon-Wook; Jeon, Kyeong-Su; Yun, Young-Mok; Nam, Tae-Hyun

    2010-05-01

    For the fabrication of bulk near-net-shape shape memory alloys and porous metallic biomaterials, consolidation of TiNi alloy powders is more useful than that of elemental powders of Ti and Ni. In the present study, TiNi shape memory alloy powders were prepared by inert gas atomization, and martensitic transformation temperatures and microstructures of those powders were investigated as a function of powder size. The size distribution of the powders was measured by conventional sieving, and sieved powders with the specific size range of 0-200 μm were chosen for this examination. XRD analysis showed that the B2-B19' martensitic transformation occurred in powders smaller than 200 μm. In DSC curves of the as-atomized Ti50Ni50 powders as a function of powder size, only one clear peak was found on each cooling and heating curve. The martensitic transformation start temperature (Ms) of the 0-20 μm powders was 21.9 °C. The Ms increased with increasing powder size, and the difference in Ms between 0 and 20 μm powders and 150-200 μm powders is only 1 °C. The typical microstructure of the rapidly solidified TiNi powders showed cellular/dendrite morphology and exhibited a small volume fraction of Ti2Ni phase, which is located in interdendritic/intercellular regions.

  20. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Ellis, Timothy W.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Ting, Jason; Terpstra, Robert; Bowman, Robert C.; Witham, Charles K.; Fultz, Brent T.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2000-06-13

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  1. Boron in the extreme Pop II star HD 140283

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edvardsson, Bengt

    1997-07-01

    Using the HST and ground-based observations we have determined abundances of boron and beryllium in the extreme Pop II dwarf HD140283. These are very useful since different scenarios for the origins of Be and B in the Early Galaxy suggest different abundance ratios between the two elements. From the 2497 Angstrom B I line the boron abundance was found to be log epsilon{B} {=12 + log{N{B}/N{H}}} =0.34 +/- 0.20 {Edvardsson et al. 1994, A&A 290, 176}. Our abundance ratio N{B}/N{Be} 17 and similar results for other stars indicate that these elements were formed by cosmic ray spallation in the Early Galaxy. Other suggested mechanisms include inhomogeneous Big Bang nucleosynthesis, supernova boron production or photoerosion in active galactic nuclei. These mechanisms would give other abundance ratios. We now want to confirm these results by observing the 2089 Angstrom B I line. The line is expected to give an independent check of the boron abundances as well as an opportunity to examine the suitability of the line for future investigations of the ratio between the isotopes 11B/10B in Pop II stars. This isotopic ratio has never been measured in Pop II objects and provides further important information concerning the mechanism of 11B production and the conditions in the Early Galaxy. For comparison, the solar system {meteoritic} 11B/10B suggests that about 40% of the 11B in Pop I objects is not formed by ISM spallation, but probably in Supernovae of Type II.

  2. The effect of boron doping on the Hall-Petch slope of FeAl (40 at. % Al)

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, L.M.; Liu, C.T. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports on the iron aluminide, FeAl, which has good oxidation resistance, low density, and low material cost. However, this aluminide shows limited ductility when tested in air at ambient temperatures. This embrittlement involves the reaction of the moisture in air with the aluminide and the generation of hydrogen at crack tips. By testing in dry oxygen, the environmental effect can be eliminated, but an intergranular fracture mode is still seen. This suggests that the grain boundaries of FeAl are intrinsically weak. It has been shown in both air and oxygen tests of FeAl that microapplying with boron suppresses intergranular fracture and subsequently increases ductility. For Ni{sub 3}Al, in which boron also suppresses intergranular fracture, two explanations of the beneficial effect of boron have been proposed. One claims that boron increases the cohesive strength of the grain boundaries. The other claims that boron enhances slip transfer at the grain boundaries. The primary experimental evidence for increased slip transfer was based on the observation that for powder-extruded (PE) Ni{sub 3}Al, the Hall-Petch slope, k{sub y}, was lowered by the addition of boron. The Hall-Petch equation, which relates yield stress, {sigma}{sub y} = {sigma}{sub o} + k{sub y}d{sup {minus} -.5}, where the intercept stress, {sigma}{sub o}, and the Hall-Petch slope, K{sub y}, are material constants.

  3. Alkylamine-functionalized hexagonal boron nitride nanoplatelets as a novel material for the reduction of friction and wear.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sangita; Sharma, Om P; Khatri, Om P

    2016-08-17

    Hexagonal boron nitride nanoplatelets (h-BNNPs), which are structurally analogous to graphene, were prepared via the ultrasound-assisted exfoliation of h-BN powder using N-methyl pyrrolidone as the solvent. The alkylamines with variable alkyl chains and electron-rich nitrogen atoms were grafted onto the boron sites of the h-BNNPs based on Lewis acid-base chemistry. The grafting of the alkylamines onto the h-BNNPs was confirmed using FTIR, XPS, TGA and (13)C SSNMR analyses. The crystalline and structural features of the alkylamine-functionalized h-BNNPs were studied using XRD and HRTEM analyses. The TGA and FTIR results revealed a higher grafting of octadecylamine (ODA) on the h-BNNPs compared to trioctylamine (TOA). The cohesive interaction between the alkyl chains grafted onto the h-BNNPs and the hydrocarbon chains of mineral lube base oil facilitates the dispersion of the alkylamine-functionalized h-BNNPs. The TOA-grafted h-BNNPs (h-BNNPs-TOA) exhibited long-term dispersion stability compared to the ODA-grafted h-BNNPs and this was attributed to a higher degree of van der Waals interactions between the octyl chains of the TOA molecules grafted onto the h-BNNPs and the hydrocarbon chains of the mineral lube base oil. The tribo-performance of the h-BNNPs-TOA as an additive to mineral lube base oil was evaluated in terms of the coefficient of friction and wear using ball-on-disc contact geometry. A minute dosing (0.02 mg mL(-1)) of h-BNNPs-TOA significantly improved the lubrication characteristics of the mineral lube base oil and showed a 35 and 25% reduction of friction and wear, respectively. The presence of boron and nitrogen on the worn scar of an aluminium disc, as deduced from elemental mapping, confirmed the formation of a tribo-chemical thin film of h-BN lamellae on the contact interfaces, which not only reduced the friction but also protected the contact interfaces against undesirable wear events. PMID:27484045

  4. Synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes by boron ink annealing.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu Hua; Chen, Ying; Glushenkov, Alexey M

    2010-03-12

    Ball-milling and annealing is one effective method for the mass production of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). We report that the method has been modified to a boron (B) ink annealing method. In this new process, the nanosize ball-milled B particles are mixed with metal nitrate in ethanol to form an ink-like solution, and then the ink is annealed in nitrogen-containing gas to form nanotubes. The new method greatly enhances the yield of BNNTs, giving a higher density of nanotubes. These improvements are caused by the addition of metal nitrate and ethanol, both of which can strongly boost the nitriding reaction, as revealed by thermogravimetric analysis. The size and structure of BNNTs can be controlled by varying the annealing conditions. This high-yield production of BNNTs in large quantities enables the large-scale application of BNNTs. PMID:20154372

  5. FUEL ELEMENTS FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Blainey, A.; Lloyd, H.

    1961-07-11

    A method of sheathing a tubular fuel element for a nuclear reactor is described. A low melting metal core member is centered in a die, a layer of a powdered sheathing substance is placed on the bottom of the die, the tubular fuel element is inserted in the die, the space between the tubular fuel element and the die walls and core member is filled with the same powdered sheathing substance, a layer of the same substance is placed over the fissile material, and the charge within the die is subjected to pressure in the direction of the axis of the fuel element at the sintering temperature of the protective substance.

  6. Synthesis of vinyl boronates from aldehydes by a practical boron-Wittig reaction.

    PubMed

    Coombs, John R; Zhang, Liang; Morken, James P

    2015-04-01

    A highly stereoselective boron-Wittig reaction between stable and readily accessible 1,1-bis(pinacolboronates) and aldehydes furnishes a variety of synthetically useful di- and trisubstituted vinyl boronate esters. PMID:25799147

  7. Two-dimensional boron based nanomaterials: electronic, vibrational, Raman, and STM signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massote, Daniel V. P.; Liang, Liangbo; Kharche, Neerav; Meunier, Vincent

    Because boron has only three electrons on its outer shell, planar mono-elemental boron nanostructures are expected to be much more challenging to assemble than their carbon counterparts. Several studies proposed schemes in which boron is stabilized to form flat semiconducting sheets consisting of a hexagonal lattice of boron atoms with partial hexagon filling (PRL 99 115501, ACSNano 6 7443-7453) . Other structures were proposed based on results from an evolutionary algorithm (PRL 112 085502). These structures are metallic and one even features a distorted Dirac cone near the Fermi level. Experimental evidence for 2D boron is still lacking but the recently proposed molecular synthesis of a flat all-boron molecule is a promising route to achieve this goal (Nat.Comms. 5 3113). Our research aims at providing a first-principles based description of these materials' properties to help in their identification. DFT is used to calculate phonon dispersion and associated Raman scattering spectra. We report some marked discrepancy between our findings and results from the recent literature and address the deviation using two methods for phonon dispersion. We also simulated STM images at various bias potentials to reveal the electronic symmetry of each material.

  8. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000°F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

  9. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-03-01

    The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000°F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

  10. Prediction of boron carbon nitrogen phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Sanxi; Zhang, Hantao; Widom, Michael

    We studied the phase diagram of boron, carbon and nitrogen, including the boron-carbon and boron-nitrogen binaries and the boron-carbon-nitrogen ternary. Based on the idea of electron counting and using a technique of mixing similar primitive cells, we constructed many ''electron precise'' structures. First principles calculation is performed on these structures, with either zero or high pressures. For the BN binary, our calculation confirms that a rhmobohedral phase can be stablized at high pressure, consistent with some experimental results. For the BCN ternary, a new ground state structure is discovered and an Ising-like phase transition is suggested. Moreover, we modeled BCN ternary phase diagram and show continuous solubility from boron carbide to the boron subnitride phase.

  11. Method for preparing boron-carbide articles

    DOEpatents

    Benton, S.T.; Masters, D.R.

    1975-10-21

    The invention is directed to the preparation of boron carbide articles of various configurations. A stoichiometric mixture of particulate boron and carbon is confined in a suitable mold, heated to a temperature in the range of about 1250 to 1500$sup 0$C for effecting a solid state diffusion reaction between the boron and carbon for forming the boron carbide (B$sub 4$C), and thereafter the resulting boron-carbide particles are hot-pressed at a temperature in the range of about 1800 to 2200$sup 0$C and a pressure in the range of about 1000 to 4000 psi for densifying and sintering the boron carbide into the desired article.

  12. Jaguar Procedures for Detonation Behavior of Explosives Containing Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiel, L. I.; Baker, E. L.; Capellos, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Jaguar product library was expanded to include boron and boron containing products by analysis of Available Hugoniot and static volumetric data to obtain constants of the Murnaghan relationships for the components. Experimental melting points were also utilized to obtain the constants of the volumetric relationships for liquid boron and boron oxide. Detonation velocities for HMX—boron mixtures calculated with these relationships using Jaguar are in closer agreement with literature values at high initial densities for inert (unreacted) boron than with the completely reacted metal. These results indicate that the boron does not react near the detonation front or that boron mixtures exhibit eigenvalue detonation behavior (as shown by some aluminized explosives), with higher detonation velocities at the initial points. Analyses of calorimetric measurements for RDX—boron mixtures indicate that at high boron contents the formation of side products, including boron nitride and boron carbide, inhibits the detonation properties of the formulation.

  13. Resonant x-ray reflectivity study of partial decomposed boron nitride thin films using Indus-1 synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, Maheswar Lodha, Gyanendra S.

    2014-04-24

    We determined the microstructural parameters and chemical composition profile of partial decomposed boron nitride thin films using x-ray reflectivity near the respective absorption edges. The elemental specificity and optical contrast variation properties of the resonant effect are utilized to combine chemical analysis with physical microstructure of thin films from x-ray scattered intensities. We demonstrated these aspects through calculations and experiments in the soft x-ray region near the boron K-absorption edge.

  14. Boron and Coumaphos Residues in Hive Materials Following Treatments for the Control of Aethina tumida Murray.

    PubMed

    Valdovinos-Flores, Cesar; Gaspar-Ramírez, Octavio; Heras-Ramírez, María Elena; Lara-Álvarez, Carlos; Dorantes-Ugalde, José Antonio; Saldaña-Loza, Luz María

    2016-01-01

    In the search of alternatives for controlling Aethina tumida Murray, we recently proposed the BAA trap which uses boric acid and an attractant which mimics the process of fermentation caused by Kodamaea ohmeri in the hive. This yeast is excreted in the feces of A. tumida causing the fermentation of pollen and honey of infested hives and releasing compounds that function as aggregation pheromones to A. tumida. Since the boron is the toxic element in boric acid, the aim of this article is to assess the amount of boron residues in honey and beeswax from hives treated with the BAA trap. For this aim, the amount of bioaccumulated boron in products of untreated hives was first determined and then compared with the amount of boron of products from hives treated with the BAA trap in two distinct climatic and soil conditions. The study was conducted in the cities of Padilla, Tamaulipas, and Valladolid, Yucatan (Mexico) from August 2014 to March 2015. The quantity of boron in honey was significantly less in Yucatan than in Tamaulipas; this agrees with the boron deficiency among Luvisol and Leptosol soils found in Yucatan compared to the Vertisol soil found in Tamaulipas. In fact, the honey from Yucatan has lower boron levels than those reported in the literature. The BAA treatment was applied for four months, results show that the BAA trap does not have any residual effect in either honey or wax; i.e., there is no significant difference in boron content before and after treatment. On the other hand, the organophosphate pesticide coumaphos was found in 100% of wax samples and in 64% of honey samples collected from Yucatan. The concentration of coumaphos in honey ranges from 0.005 to 0.040 mg/kg, which are below Maximum Residue Limit (MRL) allowed in the European Union (0.1 mg/kg) but 7.14% of samples exceeded the MRL allowed in Canada (0.02 mg/kg). PMID:27092938

  15. A Modified Oxidative Refinement Process for Removing Boron from Molten Silicon Under Enhanced Electromagnetic Force.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Kyu; Lee, Jin-Seok; Jang, Bo-Yun; Kim, Joon-Soo; Ahn, Young-Soo; Kang, Gi-Hwan; Cho, Churl-Hee

    2015-11-01

    The removal of boron is one of the main challenges in the purification of metallurgical grade silicon destined for low-cost photovoltaic applications. However, boron is very difficult to remove in its elemental form due to its large segregation coefficient in silicon and its low vapor pressure. The removal of boron by slag treatment is today regarded as a highly promising method, but its refining efficiency is relatively low. Also, the reduction of boron by plasma treatment exhibits a high refining efficiency, but the processing cost is high due to the large amount of electricity consumed by the process. In this regard, the use of an oxidizing reactive gas in the refinement process offers some advantages both in terms of low energy consumption and promising refinement rates. Boron can be extracted in various gaseous forms as B(x)O(y) and/or B(x)H(z)O(y) phases, but the vapor pressure of B(x)H(z)O(y) is much greater than that of the other specie at a temperature of 1700 K. The present study reports a modified oxidative refining method designed to enhance the vaporization of boron as B(x)H(z)O(y) by blowing gaseous water onto the silicon melt in a segmented crucible to enhance the electromagnetic force, whereby the processing cost can be dramatically reduced due to the use of a reusable quartz crucible in a graphite crucible. An initial boron content of 13 ppm in the metallurgical grade silicon was significantly decreased to 0.3 ppm by the employment of 1.7SLM Ar + 100 ml/h H2O. Also, a mechanism capable of reducing boron based on thermodynamic considerations is proposed. PMID:26726550

  16. Boron and Coumaphos Residues in Hive Materials Following Treatments for the Control of Aethina tumida Murray

    PubMed Central

    Valdovinos-Flores, Cesar; Gaspar-Ramírez, Octavio; Heras–Ramírez, María Elena; Dorantes-Ugalde, José Antonio; Saldaña-Loza, Luz María

    2016-01-01

    In the search of alternatives for controlling Aethina tumida Murray, we recently proposed the BAA trap which uses boric acid and an attractant which mimics the process of fermentation caused by Kodamaea ohmeri in the hive. This yeast is excreted in the feces of A. tumida causing the fermentation of pollen and honey of infested hives and releasing compounds that function as aggregation pheromones to A. tumida. Since the boron is the toxic element in boric acid, the aim of this article is to assess the amount of boron residues in honey and beeswax from hives treated with the BAA trap. For this aim, the amount of bioaccumulated boron in products of untreated hives was first determined and then compared with the amount of boron of products from hives treated with the BAA trap in two distinct climatic and soil conditions. The study was conducted in the cities of Padilla, Tamaulipas, and Valladolid, Yucatan (Mexico) from August 2014 to March 2015. The quantity of boron in honey was significantly less in Yucatan than in Tamaulipas; this agrees with the boron deficiency among Luvisol and Leptosol soils found in Yucatan compared to the Vertisol soil found in Tamaulipas. In fact, the honey from Yucatan has lower boron levels than those reported in the literature. The BAA treatment was applied for four months, results show that the BAA trap does not have any residual effect in either honey or wax; i.e., there is no significant difference in boron content before and after treatment. On the other hand, the organophosphate pesticide coumaphos was found in 100% of wax samples and in 64% of honey samples collected from Yucatan. The concentration of coumaphos in honey ranges from 0.005 to 0.040 mg/kg, which are below Maximum Residue Limit (MRL) allowed in the European Union (0.1 mg/kg) but 7.14% of samples exceeded the MRL allowed in Canada (0.02 mg/kg). PMID:27092938

  17. Boron Carboxylate Catalysis of Homoallylboration

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Boron tris(trifluoroacetate) is identified as the first effective catalyst for the homoallyl- and homocrotylboration of aldehydes by cyclopropylcarbinylboronates. NMR spectroscopic studies and theoretical calculations of key intermediates and transition states both suggest that a ligand-exchange mechanism, akin to our previously reported PhBCl2-promoted homoallylations, is operative. Our experimental and theoretical results also suggest that the catalytic activity of boron tris(trifluoroacetate) might originate from more facile catalytic turnover of the trifluoroacetate ligands (in agreement with DFT calculations) or from a lower propensity for formation of off-pathway reservoir intermediates (as observed by 1H NMR). This work shows that carboxylates are viable catalytic ligands for homoallyl- and homocrotylations of carbonyl compounds and opens the door to the development of catalytic asymmetric versions of this transformation. PMID:24754566

  18. Boron clusters in luminescent materials.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sanjoy; Thilagar, Pakkirisamy

    2016-01-21

    In recent times, luminescent materials with tunable emission properties have found applications in almost all aspects of modern material sciences. Any discussion on the recent developments in luminescent materials would be incomplete if one does not account for the versatile photophysical features of boron containing compounds. Apart from triarylboranes and tetra-coordinate borate dyes, luminescent materials consisting of boron clusters have also found immense interest in recent times. Recent studies have unveiled the opportunities hidden within boranes, carboranes and metalloboranes, etc. as active constituents of luminescent materials. From simple illustrations of luminescence, to advanced applications in LASERs, OLEDs and bioimaging, etc., the unique features of such compounds and their promising versatility have already been established. In this review, recent revelations about the excellent photophysical properties of such materials are discussed. PMID:26574714

  19. Boron-10 ABUNCL Active Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-07-09

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results from testing of the active mode of the General Electric Reuter-Stokes Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) at Los Alamos National Laboratory using sources and fuel pins.

  20. CVD-produced boron filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wawner, F. E.; Debolt, H. E.; Suplinskas, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A technique for producing boron filaments with an average tensile strength of 6.89 GPa has been developed which involves longitudinal splitting of the filament and core (substrate) removal by etching. Splitting is accomplished by a pinch wheel device which continuously splits filaments in lengths of 3.0 m by applying a force to the side of the filament to create a crack which is then propagated along the axis by a gentle sliding action. To facilitate the splitting, a single 10 mil tungsten substrate is used instead of the usual 0.5 mil substrate. A solution of hot 30% hydrogen peroxide is used to remove the core without attacking the boron. An alternative technique is to alter the residual stress by heavily etching the filament. Average strengths in the 4.83-5.52 GPa range have been obtained by etching an 8 mil filament to 4 mil.

  1. Effects of ball milling and sintering on alumina and alumina-boron compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Thomas

    Alumina has a wide variety of applications, but the processing of alumina based materials can be costly. Mechanically milling alumina has been shown to enhance the sintering properties while decreasing the sintering temperature. Additions of boron have also proven to increase sintering properties of alumina. These two processes, mechanical milling and boron additions, will be combined to test the sintering properties and determine if they are improved upon even further compared to the individual processes. Multiple samples of pure alumina, 0.2 weight percent boron, and 1.0 weight percent boron are batched and processed in a ball mill for different time intervals. These samples are then characterized to observe the structure and properties of the samples after milling but before sintering. Pellets are dry pressed from the milled powders, sintered at 1200°C for one to 10 hours, and characterized to determine the impact of processing. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) was used on each sample to determine crystallite size and lattice parameters at different stages throughout the experiment. XRD was also used to identify any samples with an aluminum borate phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the powder and pellet morphology and to measure bulk chemical composition. Samples were sputter coated with an Au-Pd coating observed in the SEM to characterize the topography as a function of variables such as milling time, boron composition, and sintering time. Additionally, porosity and change in diameter were measured to track the sintering process. Milling sample for longer periods of time would be unnecessary due to the crystallite size leveling off between 10 and 12 hours of milling time. Samples of alumina with 0.2 weight percent boron prove to have very little effect on the sintering properties. At 1.0 weight percent boron, there are changes in diffraction patterns and topography after being sintered for one hour. The porosities of all of the sintered

  2. Alkyl-chain-grafted hexagonal boron nitride nanoplatelets as oil-dispersible additives for friction and wear reduction.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sangita; Sharma, Om P; Gusain, Rashi; Mungse, Harshal P; Kukrety, Aruna; Kumar, Niranjan; Sugimura, Hiroyuki; Khatri, Om P

    2015-02-18

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), an isoelectric analogous to graphene multilayer, can easily shear at the contact interfaces and exhibits excellent mechanical strength, higher thermal stability, and resistance toward oxidation, which makes it a promising material for potential lubricant applications. However, the poor dispersibility of h-BN in lube base oil has been a major obstacle. Herein, h-BN powder was exfoliated into h-BN nanoplatelets (h-BNNPs), and then long alkyl chains were chemically grafted, targeting the basal plane defect and edge sites of h-BNNPs. The chemical and structural features of octadecyltriethoxysilane-functionalized h-BNNPs (h-BNNPs-ODTES) were studied by FTIR, XPS, XRD, HRTEM, and TGA analyses. The h-BNNPs-ODTES exhibit long-term dispersion stability in synthetic polyol ester lube base oil because of van der Waals interaction between the octadecyl chains of h-BNNPs-ODTES and alkyl functionalities of polyol ester. Micro- and macrotribology results showed that h-BNNPs-ODTES, as an additive to synthetic polyol ester, significantly reduced both the friction and wear of steel disks. Elemental mapping of the worn area explicitly demonstrates the transfer of h-BNNPs-ODTES on the contact interfaces. Furthermore, insight into the lubrication mechanism for reduction in both friction and wear is deduced based on the experimental results. PMID:25625695

  3. Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Of Boron Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes synthesis, properties, and applications of boron nitride. Especially in thin-film form. Boron nitride films useful as masks in x-ray lithography; as layers for passivation of high-speed microelectronic circuits; insulating films; hard, wear-resistant, protective films for optical components; lubricants; and radiation detectors. Present status of single-crystal growth of boron nitride indicates promising candidate for use in high-temperature semiconductor electronics.

  4. Making Microscopic Cubes Of Boron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulkner, Joseph M.

    1993-01-01

    Production of finely divided cubes of boron involves vacuum-deposition technology and requires making of template. Template supports pattern of checkered squares 25 micrometers on side, which are etched 25 micrometers into template material. Template coasted uniformly with paralyene or some similar vacuum coating with low coefficient of adhesion. Intended application to solid rocket fuels, explosives, and pyrotechnics; process used for other applications, from manufacture of pharmaceuticals to processing of nuclear materials.

  5. Boronization in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, G.L.; Burrell, K.H.; DeBoo, J.C.; Greenfield, C.M.; Groebner, R.J.; Hodapp, T.; Kellman, A.G.; Lee, R.; Lippman, S.I.; Phillips, J.; Taylor, T.S.; West, W.P.; Winter, J.; Moyer, R.; Watkins, J.

    1992-05-01

    A thin boron film has been applied to the DIII-D tokamak plasma facing surfaces to reduce impurity influx, particularly oxygen and carbon. A direct result of this surface modification was the observation of a regime of very high energy confinement, VH-mode, with confinement times from 1.5 to 2 times greater than predicted by H-mode scaling relation for the same set of parameters. VH-mode discharges are characterized by low ohmic target densities, low edge neutral pressure, and reduced cycling. These conditions have reduced the collisionality, {nu}*, in the edge region producing a higher edge pressure gradient and a significant bootstrap current, up to 30% of the total current. We will describe the edge plasma properties after boronization including reductions in recycling inferred from measurements of {tau}{sup p}*. In particular we will discuss the edge plasma conditions necessary for access to VH-mode including the boronization process and properties of the deposited film.

  6. Magnetoresistance in Boron Carbide junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Ellen; Sokolov, A.; Baruth, A.; Robertson, B. W.; Adenwalla, S.

    2007-03-01

    The properties of thin insulator layers are crucial to the performance of magnetic tunnel junctions. Commercial requirements are a device with a high tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) with low cost and high stability. At present the vast majority of barriers are made from amorphous Al2O3 and crystalline MgO. The TMR value depends not only on the spin-dependent electronic structure of the electrodes, but on the metal-insulator interface. Oxide-type barriers may suffer from local vacancies and other type of defects, resulting in oxygen diffusion, making the TMR value unstable with time. We present TMR results obtained on a non-oxide barrier, boron carbide (B10C2) for applications in magnetic tunnel junctions. This low Z inorganic material can be grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) without pinholes in the ultra thin film regime. PECVD grown boron carbide is an excellent dielectric with resistivities in the range of 10^7 ohm-cm, with a band gap that can be adjusted from 0.7 eV to 1.9 eV by altering the boron to carbon ratio and to band gap values well above 2.7 eV by adding phosphorus. This creates a unique opportunity for experimental study of a broad spectrum of phenomena, related to the dielectric properties of the barrier.

  7. Consolidation of TiB{sub 2} powders produced by plasma synthesis of cheap raw materials

    SciTech Connect

    Watt, G.L.; Bhaduri, S.B.; Radhakrishnan, R.

    1995-12-31

    TiB{sub 2} powders were produced in a non-transferred arc thermal plasma reactor. The starting raw materials were rutile and boron oxide, which reacted in the plasma chamber using methane to form TiB{sub 2}. As received powders were treated to remove any adherent oxide. The powders were consolidated using two different approaches. In the first case the powders were CIPed at 30 ksi, sintered at 1825{center_dot}C, followed by HIPing at 1825{center_dot}C and 28 ksi. In the other approach, the samples were CIPed followed by direct HIPing. The as compacted samples were characterized for microstructure and mechanical properties. The results will be reported in this paper.

  8. Consolidation of cubic and hexagonal boron nitride composites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Du Frane, W. L.; Cervantes, O.; Ellsworth, G. F.; Kuntz, J. D.

    2015-12-08

    When we Consolidate cubic boron nitride (cBN) it typically requires either a matrix of metal bearing materials that are undesirable for certain applications, or very high pressures within the cBN phase stability field that are prohibitive to manufacturing size and cost. We present new methodology for consolidating high stiffness cBN composites within a hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) matrix (15–25 vol%) with the aid of a binder phase (0–6 vol%) at moderate pressures (0.5–1.0 GPa) and temperatures (900–1300 °C). The composites are demonstrated to be highly tailorable with a range of compositions and resulting physical/mechanical properties. Ultrasonic measurements indicate that inmore » some cases these composites have elastic mechanical properties that exceed those of the highest strength steel alloys. Moreover, two methods were identified to prevent phase transformation of the metastable cBN phase into hBN during consolidation: 1. removal of hydrocarbons, and 2. increased cBN particle size. Lithium tetraborate worked better as a binder than boron oxide, aiding consolidation without enhancing cBN to hBN phase transformation kinetics. These powder mixtures consolidated within error of their full theoretical mass densities at 1 GPa, and had only slightly lower densities at 0.5 GPa. This shows potential for consolidation of these composites into larger parts, in a variety of shapes, at even lower pressures using more conventional manufacturing methods, such as hot-pressing.« less

  9. Rheological profile of boron nitride–ethylene glycol nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Żyła, Gaweł; Witek, Adam; Gizowska, Magdalena

    2015-01-07

    The paper presents the complete rheological profile of boron nitride (BN)–ethylene glycol (EG) nanofluids. Nanofluids have been produced by two-step method on the basis of commercially available powder of plate-like grains of nanometrical thickness. Viscoelastic structure has been determined in oscillatory measurements at a constant frequency and temperature. Viscosity and flow curves for these materials have been measured. Studies have shown that the Carreau model can be used for the modeling of dynamic viscosity curves of the material. The samples were tested for the presence of thixotropy. The dependence of viscosity on temperature was also examined. The effect of temperature on the dynamic viscosity of BN-EG nanofluids can be modelled with the use of Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann expression.

  10. Demystifying Mystery Powders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotar, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Describes science activities which use simple chemical tests to distinguish between materials and to determine some of their properties. Explains the water, iodine, heat, acid, baking soda, acid/base indicator, glucose, and sugar tests. Includes activities to enhance chemical testing and a list of suggested powders for use. (RT)

  11. Novelty shop 'itching powder'.

    PubMed

    Albert, M R

    1998-08-01

    To evaluate causes of itch, commercial 'itching powders' were sought for evaluation. Only one product, produced in Germany and consisting of ground rose hips, is currently sold in novelty shops in the Boston area. These plant fibres appear to provoke itch and prickle sensations by non-allergic mechanical stimulation, similar to the action of wool fibres. PMID:9737050

  12. Boron containing multilayer coatings and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1997-09-23

    Hard coatings are fabricated from multilayer boron/boron carbide, boron carbide/cubic boron nitride, and boron/boron nitride/boron carbide, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron and boron carbide used in forming the multilayers are formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/boron carbide, and boron carbide/cubic boron nitride is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron, cubic boron nitride or boron carbide, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be of a discrete or a blended or graded composition. 6 figs.

  13. Boron isotopic constraints on the source of Hawaiian shield lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura, Eizo

    2005-07-01

    Boron isotopic compositions of lavas from three representative Hawaiian shield volcanoes (Kilauea, Mauna Loa, and Koolau) were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The boron isotopic composition of each sample was analyzed twice, once with and once without acid leaching to evaluate the effect of posteruptive boron contamination. Our acid-leaching procedure dissolved glass, olivine, secondary zeolite, and adsorbed boron; this dissolved boron was completely removed from the residue, which was comprised of plagioclase, pyroxenes, and newly formed amorphous silica. We confirmed that an appropriate acid-leaching process can eliminate adsorbed and incorporated boron contamination from all submarine samples without modifying the original 11B/ 10B ratio. On the other hand, when the sample was weathered, i.e., the olivine had an iddingsite rim, 11B/ 10B of the acid-resistant minerals are also modified, thus it is impossible to get the preeruptive 11B/ 10B value from the weathered samples. Through this elimination and evaluation procedure of posteruptive contamination, preeruptive δ 11B values for the shield lavas are -4.5 to -5.4‰ for Koolau ( N = 8), -3.6 to -4.6‰ for Kilauea ( N = 11), and -3.0 to -3.8‰ for Mauna Loa ( N = 6). Historical Kilauea lavas show a systematic temporal trend for B content and Nb/B coupled with other radiogenic isotopic ratios and trace element ratios, at constant δ 11B, indicating little or no assimilation of crustal materials in these lavas. Uncorrelated B content and δ 11B in Koolau and Mauna Loa lavas may also indicate little or no effect of crustal assimilation in these lavas. The source of KEA-component (identical to the so-called Kea end member in Hawaiian lavas) of the Hawaiian source mantle, represented by Kilauea, should be derived from lower part of subducted oceanic crust or refractory peridotite in the recycled subducted slab. The systematic trend from Kilauea to Koolau—decreasing δ 11B coupled with decreasing

  14. Work function measurement of lanthanum-boron compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, D. L.; Storms, E. K.

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between emission properties and sample composition is studied for lanthanum-boron compounds. Specifically, the La-B system is considered between 1400 and 2100 K and between LaB(4.24) and LaB(29.2) to determine the phase relationship, chemical activity of the compounds, vapor composition, and vaporization rate. The results indicate that: (1) a blue-colored phase near LaB(9) exists between a purple-colored LaB(6) and elemental boron, (2) vaporization is sufficiently more rapid than diffusion so that great compositional differences exist between the surface and the interior, (3) an activation energy lowers the boron vaporization rate from LaB(6), and (4) a steady-state surface composition between LaB(6.04) and LaB(6.07) exists for freely vaporizing materials as a function of interior composition, purity, and temperature. It is noted that the ultimate life of a thermionic diode is governed by electrode vaporization rate whereas efficiency is governed by the electrode work function.

  15. Matrix Effects on Boron Containing Materials due to Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Staci R.; Akpovo, Charlemagne A.; Martinez, Jorge; Ford, Alan; Herbert, Kenley; Johnson, Lewis

    2014-03-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a spectroscopic technique that is used for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of materials in the liquid, solid, or gas phase. LIBS can also be used for the detection of isotopic shifts in atomic and diatomic species via Laser-Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectroscopy (LAMIS). However, any additional elements that are entrained into the plasma other than the element of interest, can affect the extent of ablation and quality of spectra and hence, potentially obscure or aid in the relative abundance assessment for a given element. To address the importance of matrix effects, the isotopic analysis of boron obtained from boron oxide (BO) emission originating from different boron-containing compounds, such as boron nitride (BN), boric acid (H3BO3) , and borax (Na2B4O710H2O), via LIBS has been performed here. Each of these materials has different physical properties and elemental composition in order to illustrate possible challenges for the LAMIS method. A calibration-free model similar to that for the original LAMIS work is used to determine properties of the plasma as the matrix is changed. DTRA

  16. Source of Boron in Curcuma for Burn Symptoms at Leaf Margins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was initiated to investigate the source of boron (B) accumulated in margins of leaves of Curcuma ‘Chiangmai University Pride (‘CMU Pride’). Nutrient elements were analyzed from different rhizome locations before potting, and from whole rhizomes and different leaf locations at harvest af...

  17. Boron coating on boron nitride coated nuclear fuels by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmazuçar, Hasan H.; Gündüz, Güngör

    2000-12-01

    Uranium dioxide-only and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide (5% and 10%) ceramic nuclear fuel pellets which were already coated with boron nitride were coated with thin boron layer by chemical vapor deposition to increase the burn-up efficiency of the fuel during reactor operation. Coating was accomplished from the reaction of boron trichloride with hydrogen at 1250 K in a tube furnace, and then sintering at 1400 and 1525 K. The deposited boron was identified by infrared spectrum. The morphology of the coating was studied by using scanning electron microscope. The plate, grainy and string (fiber)-like boron structures were observed.

  18. Investigation of the structure and properties of boron-containing coatings obtained by electron-beam treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Krivezhenko, Dina S. Drobyaz, Ekaterina A. Bataev, Ivan A. Chuchkova, Lyubov V.

    2015-10-27

    An investigation of surface-hardened materials obtained by cladding with an electron beam injected into the air atmosphere was carried out. Structural investigations of coatings revealed that an increase in boron carbide concentration in a saturating mixture contributed to a rise of a volume fraction of iron borides in coatings. The maximum hardened depth reached 2 mm. Hardened layers were characterized by the formation of heterogeneous structure which consisted of iron borides and titanium carbides distributed uniformly in the eutectic matrix. Areas of titanium boride conglomerations were detected. It was found that an increase in the boron carbide content led to an enhancement in hardness of the investigated materials. Friction testing against loosely fixed abrasive particles showed that electron-beam cladding of powder mixtures containing boron carbides, titanium, and iron in air atmosphere allowed enhancing a resistance of materials hardened in two times.

  19. Effect of initial composition on boron carbide production by SHS process followed by acid leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkan, Murat; Sonmez, M. Seref; Derin, Bora; Yücel, Onuralp

    2012-11-01

    In this study, iron-free boron carbide powders (B4C) were produced from the milled SHS (self-propagating high temperature synthesis) products followed by leaching in an aqueous hydrochloric acid (HCl) media. The SHS mixtures were composed of boron oxide (B2O3), carbon black and magnesium. Thermochemical simulations were performed to estimate the effect of initial composition on the SHS process. In the SHS experiments, it was found that the formations of boron carbide and magnesium borates were directly related with B2O3 and carbon black contents in the initial SHS mixture. The aqueous HCl leaching of the SHS products did not only eliminate the unwanted byproducts (i.e. MgO, Mg3B2O6 and Mg2B2O5) but also enhanced substantially the pore structure of the particles. Even though the leached SHS particles (d0.5 = 7.96 μm) were much coarser than that of the commercial powder (d0.5 = 1.73 μm), the surface area of the leached product (15.56 m2/g) was found to be larger than that of commercial one (4.92 m2/g).

  20. Method to blend separator powders

    DOEpatents

    Guidotti, Ronald A.; Andazola, Arthur H.; Reinhardt, Frederick W.

    2007-12-04

    A method for making a blended powder mixture, whereby two or more powders are mixed in a container with a liquid selected from nitrogen or short-chain alcohols, where at least one of the powders has an angle of repose greater than approximately 50 degrees. The method is useful in preparing blended powders of Li halides and MgO for use in the preparation of thermal battery separators.

  1. Method for synthesizing powder materials

    DOEpatents

    Buss, R.J.; Ho, P.

    1988-01-21

    A method for synthesizing ultrafine powder materials, for example, ceramic and metal powders, comprises admitting gaseous reactants from which the powder material is to be formed into a vacuum reaction chamber maintained at a pressure less than atmospheric and at a temperature less than about 400/degree/K (127/degree/C). The gaseous reactants are directed through a glow discharge provided in the vacuum reaction chamber to form the ultrafine powder material. 1 fig.

  2. Boron: do we know the ground state structure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogitsu, Tadashi

    2006-03-01

    Boron is only the fifth element in the periodic table, having a simple electronic configuration, yet, it is known to form one of the most complicated crystal structures, β-rhombohedral structure. Up to date, the best estimate on the number of atoms in its hexagonal unit cell is 320.1, not even an integer number. The key concept to understand its complexity is covalency and electron deficiency: It does not have enough valence electrons to form a simple covalent crystal, like carbon or silicon. Instead it forms a complicated packing of icosahedrons. The structural model of β-boron was developed in the 1960s based on X-ray experiment. Although this model structure captures the most of the structural characteristics of β-boron, it has a crucial pitfall; the number of atoms per cell estimated by X-ray experiment does not agree with the number of atoms estimated by the pycnometric density. In 1988, Slack et al. discovered four more POS, by which the discrepancy in the number of atoms is reconciled [J. of Solid State Chem. 76, 52 (1988)]. There still remains an unanswered question; how are these POS atoms configured? Is it completely random? Or there is some kind of order as it has been suggested in Slack’s paper? A major challenge here is the astronomical number of possible configurations, roughly 150 million even for the irreducible cell. We tackle this problem using ab-initio simulated annealing coupled with a Lattice Model Monte Carlo simulated annealing. Our results reveal that the stable structure, indeed, has a certain type of correlation in its POS configuration. More detail on the structural property and its impact on electronic property of β-boron will be discussed at the presentation. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy at the University of California/ LLNL under contract no. W-7405-Eng-48.

  3. The Influence of Surface-Active Agent on the Micro-Morphology and Crystallinity of Spherical Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Liu, Huan; Kan, Hongmin; Wang, Xiaoyang; Long, Haibo; Zhou, Yonghui

    2015-08-01

    This search used the low-cost boric acid and borax as a source of boron, urea as a nitrogen source, surface-active agent Dodecyl benzenesulfonic acid (SDBS) as a dispersant, and thus prepared different micro-morphology and crystallinity hexagonal boron nitride powders under a flowing ammonia atmosphere at a nitriding temperature of 900 °C. The effect of the surface-active agent (SDBS) content on the crystallinity and micro-morphology of hexagonal boron nitride powders was studied, and the corresponding relationship between micro-morphology and crystallinity was explored. The results showed that under a certain synthetic process (900 °C for 3 h), the surfactant content had affected the crystallinity and micro-morphology of h-BN powders. Without the added surfactant, the graphitization index (GI) was 3.61, and micro-morphology of h-BN powders. was spherical, the distribution of ball diameters was uneven, and there was also significant particle agglomeration, with some particles even exhibiting adhesion, sintering necks, and high sphericity and diameter. When the added SDBS percentages were 2%, 4% and 6%, the graphitization index (GI) decreased to 2.98, 2.58 and 2.41 respectively: the corresponding crystallinity improved significantly. When the surfactant SDBS content was higher (10%), the diameter distribution of the h-BN powders was even, but there was evidence of agglomeration of particles and particle adhesion. The crystallinity decreased when the GI value was increased to 4. When the surfactant SDBS content was 6%, the dispersion of h-BN powders was at its optimum, and the particle size distribution was at its most uniform. Meanwhile the GI value was at its lowest, and the crystallinity at its highest. PMID:26369229

  4. Conditioning of Boron-Containing Low and Intermediate Level Liquid Radioactive Waste - 12041

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbunova, Olga A.; Kamaeva, Tatiana S.

    2012-07-01

    Improved cementation of low and intermediate level radioactive waste (ILW and LLW) aided by vortex electromagnetic treatment as well as silica addition was investigated. Positive effects including accelerated curing of boron-containing cement waste forms, improve end product quality, decreased product volume and reduced secondary LRW volume from equipment decontamination were established. These results established the possibility of boron-containing LRW cementation without the use of neutralizing alkaline additives that greatly increase the volume of the final product intended for long-term storage (burial). Physical (electromagnetic) treatment in a vortex mixer can change the state of LRW versus chemical treatment. By treating the liquid phase of cement solution only, instead of the whole solution, and using fine powder and nano-particles of ferric oxides instead of separable ferromagnetic cores for the activating agents the positive effect are obtained. VET for 1 to 3 minutes yields boron-containing LRW cemented products of satisfactory quality. Silica addition at 10 % by weight will accelerate curing and solidification and to decrease radionuclide leaching rates from boron-containing cement products. (authors)

  5. Structural investigations of adsorbed films of Methyl Halides on Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprung, Michael; Freitag, Andrea; Hanson, Jonathan; Larese, John

    2000-03-01

    The Methyl Halides are a group of molecules whose properties of thin adsorbed films on Graphite have been well characterized. Boron Nitride forms a hexagonal structure with a slightly larger (about 2% ) unit cell than Graphite. The study of thin films of Methyl Halides (CH_3R, R=Cl, Br and I) on Boron Nitride is motivated by the hope to gain a better understanding of adsorbate-substrate interaction. High resolution adsorption isotherms and x-ray powder diffraction have been used to investigate the monolayer structures of CH_3R adsorbed on Boron Nitride. The experiments were carried out at the Beamline X7B of the NSLS. The gases were dosed onto the sample with an automated gas handling system, and a Mar345 image plate detector was used to collect the data. The measurements were performed in a temperature range between 50 and 175 K. All three adsorbates form a solid monolayer structure on Boron Nitride at low temperature. The structure of Methyl Chloride and Methyl Bromide is very similar to the high-density structure of CH_3Cl on Graphite. This is surprising for CH_3Br because it forms a different structure on Graphite. Methyl Iodide forms similar structures on both substrates.

  6. The mean grain size determination of boron carbide (B{sub 4}C)-aluminium (Al) and boron carbide (B{sub 4}C)-nickel (Ni) composites by ultrasonic velocity technique

    SciTech Connect

    Unal, Ridvan . E-mail: runal@aku.edu.tr; Sarpuen, Ismail H.; Yalim, H. Ali; Erol, Ayhan; Ozdemir, Tuba; Tuncel, Sabri

    2006-04-15

    In this study, the mean grain size of ceramic-metal composites, made from boron carbide (B{sub 4}C)-aluminium (Al)-nickel (Ni) powders, has been determined with ultrasonic velocity technique by using a 2 MHz transducer. An ultrasonic velocity-grain size master graph was plotted using a 4 MHz ultrasonic transducer. The results were compared to the mean grain size obtained from SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) images.

  7. Vacuum powder injector and method of impregnating fiber with powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Working, Dennis C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus uniformly impregnate stranded material with dry powder such as low solubility, high melt flow polymer powder to produce, for example, composite prepregs. The stranded material is expanded in an impregnation chamber by an influx of air so that the powder, which may enter through the same inlet as the air, penetrates to the center of the stranded material. The stranded material then is contracted for holding the powder therein. The stranded material and powder may be pulled through the impregnation chamber in the same direction by vacuum. Larger particles of powder which do not fully penetrate the stranded material may be combed into the stranded material and powder which does not impregnate the stranded material may be collected and reused.

  8. Reducing metal alloy powder costs for use in powder bed fusion additive manufacturing: Improving the economics for production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Fransisco

    AM. Alternative powders can be made by blending or re-spheroidizing HDH and CPTi powders. Machine modifications were performed to allow the testing and manufacturing with these low cost alternative powders. A comparison was made between alternative powders and gas atomized powders. Powders were compared in terms of morphology and at the microstructural level. Flowability of different powder blends was also measured. Finally, a comparison of parts fabricated from the multiple powder blends and gas atomized powder was made. It has been demonstrated that powder blending can produce fully dense parts in the Arcam system by utilizing the double melt technique or HIPing the built pars. The double melt technique increased the density of the sample part and modified the microstructure into finer martensitic grains. The HIP process can make a part fully dense regardless of what percentage of HDH powder blending is used. The HIP process yielded the same microstructure, regardless of the grain structure it started with. This research allows for the reduction of costs using titanium powders in the EBM system, but can also be implemented with more costly elements and alloys using other metal AM technologies. This includes niobium, tantalum, and nickel-based superalloys for use in various industries.

  9. Investigations on the system boron-carbon silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieffer, R.; Gugel, E.; Leimer, G.; Ettmayer, P.

    1983-01-01

    The above elements form with each other binary compounds which are very interesting from the point of view of their structure and their chemistry and which are important for technology. The present investigation is concerned with the three-component system and the behavior of the binary compounds occurring in it. Investigations employing various techniques, such as X-ray, chemical analysis, microscopy and fusion experiments showed that no ternary phase exists within the boundary of the ternary system. There is no compound with a higher abrasion capacity than boron carbide. The probable phase field divisions at two isothermic intersections and the fusion isotherms are indicated.

  10. New techniques for producing thin boron films

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    A review will be presented of methods for producing thin boron films using an electron gun. Previous papers have had the problem of spattering of the boron source during the evaporation. Methods for reducing this problem will also be presented. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Boron Carbides As Thermo-electric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles

    1988-01-01

    Report reviews recent theoretical and experimental research on thermoelectric materials. Recent work with narrow-band semiconductors demonstrated possibility of relatively high thermoelectric energy-conversion efficiencies in materials withstanding high temperatures needed to attain such efficiencies. Among promising semiconductors are boron-rich borides, especially boron carbides.

  12. Porphyrins for boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Gabel, Detlef

    1990-01-01

    Novel compounds for treatment of brain tumors in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy are disclosed. A method for preparing the compounds as well as pharmaceutical compositions containing said compounds are also disclosed. The compounds are water soluble, non-toxic and non-labile boronated porphyrins which show significant uptake and retention in tumors.

  13. Ultratough single crystal boron-doped diamond

    DOEpatents

    Hemley, Russell J [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Mao, Ho-Kwang [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Yan, Chih-Shiue [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Liang, Qi [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC

    2015-05-05

    The invention relates to a single crystal boron doped CVD diamond that has a toughness of at least about 22 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention further relates to a method of manufacturing single crystal boron doped CVD diamond. The growth rate of the diamond can be from about 20-100 .mu.m/h.

  14. Processing polymeric powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throne, James L.

    1989-01-01

    The concept of uniformly and continuously depositing and sinter-fusing nominal 0.1 to 40 microns dimensioned electrostatically charged polymer powder particles onto essentially uniformly spread 5 to 20 micron grounded continuous fiber tow to produce a respoolable thermoplastic composite two-preg was formulated at NASA Langley. The process was reduced to practice under a NASA grant at the University of Akron this spring. The production of tow-preg is called phase 1. The production of ultrafine polymer powders from 5 to 10 percent (wt) polymer solids in solvent is considered. This is phase 0 and is discussed. The production of unitape from multi tow-pregs was also considered. This is phase 2 and is also discussed. And another approach to phase 1, also proposed last summer, was scoped. This is phase 1A and is also discussed.

  15. Advanced powder processing

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, M.A.

    1997-04-01

    Gelcasting is an advanced powder forming process. It is most commonly used to form ceramic or metal powders into complex, near-net shapes. Turbine rotors, gears, nozzles, and crucibles have been successfully gelcast in silicon nitride, alumina, nickel-based superalloy, and several steels. Gelcasting can also be used to make blanks that can be green machined to near-net shape and then high fired. Green machining has been successfully applied to both ceramic and metal gelcast blanks. Recently, the authors have used gelcasting to make tooling for metal casting applications. Most of the work has centered on H13 tool steel. They have demonstrated an ability to gelcast and sinter H13 to near net shape for metal casting tooling. Also, blanks of H13 have been cast, green machined into complex shape, and fired. Issues associated with forming, binder burnout, and sintering are addressed.

  16. Design synthesis of a boron/epoxy reinforced metal shear web.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    An advanced composite shear web design concept has been developed for the Space Shuttle Orbiter main engine thrust beam structure. Various web concepts were synthesized by a computer-aided adaptive random search procedure. A practical concept is identified having a titanium-clad, boron/epoxy plate with vertical boron/epoxy reinforced stiffeners. Baseline composite and titanium shear resistant designs are compared; the composite concept is 28% lighter than the titanium web. Element test results show the metal cladding effectively reinforces critical composite load transfer and fastener hole areas making the composite web concept practical for other shear structure applications.-

  17. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, J. E.; Bhakhri, V.; Hao, R.; Prior, T. J.; Scheler, T.; Gregoryanz, E.; Chhowalla, M.; Giulani, F.

    2015-01-01

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping.

  18. Boron-isotope geochemistry. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Spivack, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of the major aspects of the boron-isotope geochemical cycle was carried out. Particular emphasis was directed at developing a reproducible, high-precision method for the determination of boron isotope ratios in geologic materials and determining the processes that influence the boron-isotope composition of seawater. A method for the determination of the isotopic composition of boron by thermal ionization mass spectrometry of Cs/sub 2/B/sub 4/O/sub 7/ is described. Samples analyzed for boron content and isotopic composition included: seawater, unaltered mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB), altered MORB (dredge and core samples), serpentinized periodotites, marine sediments, marine sedimentary pore waters, hydrothermally altered sediments, oceanic hydrothermal solutions, rainwater, river water and suspended sediments, island arc volcanics and a soil profile.

  19. Boron Enrichment in Martian Clay

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

  20. Boron enrichment in martian clay.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, James D; Hallis, Lydia J; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

  1. Full-scale simulation of seawater reverse osmosis desalination processes for boron removal: Effect of membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Park, Pyung-Kyu; Lee, Sangho; Cho, Jae-Seok; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study is to further develop previously reported mechanistic predictive model that simulates boron removal in full-scale seawater reverse osmosis (RO) desalination processes to take into account the effect of membrane fouling. Decrease of boron removal and reduction in water production rate by membrane fouling due to enhanced concentration polarization were simulated as a decrease in solute mass transfer coefficient in boundary layer on membrane surface. Various design and operating options under fouling condition were examined including single- versus double-pass configurations, different number of RO elements per vessel, use of RO membranes with enhanced boron rejection, and pH adjustment. These options were quantitatively compared by normalizing the performance of the system in terms of E(min), the minimum energy costs per product water. Simulation results suggested that most viable options to enhance boron rejection among those tested in this study include: i) minimizing fouling, ii) exchanging the existing SWRO elements to boron-specific ones, and iii) increasing pH in the second pass. The model developed in this study is expected to help design and optimization of the RO processes to achieve the target boron removal at target water recovery under realistic conditions where membrane fouling occurs during operation. PMID:22578430

  2. Microstructural stability and thermomechanical processing of boron modified beta titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherukuri, Balakrishna

    alloys. Micro-voids were observed at the ends of the TiB needles at high temperature, slow strain rates as a result of decohesion at the TiB/matrix interfaces. At low temperatures and faster strain rates micro voids were also formed due to fracture of TiB needles. Finite element analysis on void formation in TiB containing alloys were in agreement with experimental observations. Microhardness and tensile testing of as-cast + forged and aged Beta21S and Ti5553 alloys with and without boron did not show any significant differences in mechanical properties. The primary benefits of boron modified alloys are in as-cast condition.

  3. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath

    1998-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  4. Trace Elements Affect Methanogenic Activity and Diversity in Enrichments from Subsurface Coal Bed Produced Water

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Burcu; Perry, Verlin Ryan; Sheth, Mili; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Chin, Kuk-Jeong; Nüsslein, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Microbial methane from coal beds accounts for a significant and growing percentage of natural gas worldwide. Our knowledge of physical and geochemical factors regulating methanogenesis is still in its infancy. We hypothesized that in these closed systems, trace elements (as micronutrients) are a limiting factor for methanogenic growth and activity. Trace elements are essential components of enzymes or cofactors of metabolic pathways associated with methanogenesis. This study examined the effects of eight trace elements (iron, nickel, cobalt, molybdenum, zinc, manganese, boron, and copper) on methane production, on mcrA transcript levels, and on methanogenic community structure in enrichment cultures obtained from coal bed methane (CBM) well produced water samples from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Methane production was shown to be limited both by a lack of additional trace elements as well as by the addition of an overly concentrated trace element mixture. Addition of trace elements at concentrations optimized for standard media enhanced methane production by 37%. After 7 days of incubation, the levels of mcrA transcripts in enrichment cultures with trace element amendment were much higher than in cultures without amendment. Transcript levels of mcrA correlated positively with elevated rates of methane production in supplemented enrichments (R2 = 0.95). Metabolically active methanogens, identified by clone sequences of mcrA mRNA retrieved from enrichment cultures, were closely related to Methanobacterium subterraneum and Methanobacterium formicicum. Enrichment cultures were dominated by M. subterraneum and had slightly higher predicted methanogenic richness, but less diversity than enrichment cultures without amendments. These results suggest that varying concentrations of trace elements in produced water from different subsurface coal wells may cause changing levels of CBM production and alter the composition of the active methanogenic community. PMID

  5. Boron-containing compositions, and lubricants and fuels containing same

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, F.W.; Pialet, J.W.; Barrer, D.E.; Schroech, C.W.

    1988-05-03

    A method of preparing boron-containing compositions is described which comprises reacting at least one hydroxy-substituted ester, amide or imide with a boron compound. Such boron-containing compositions are useful in lubricating oils and provide the lubricating oils with anti-wear and/or friction-reducing properties. The boron-containing compositions also are useful in fuel compositions.

  6. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  7. Boron nitride hollow nanospheres: Synthesis, formation mechanism and dielectric property

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, B.; Tang, X.H.; Huang, X.X.; Xia, L.; Zhang, X.D.; Wang, C.J.; Wen, G.W.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • BN hollow nanospheres are fabricated in large scale via a new CVD method. • Morphology and structure are elucidated by complementary analytical techniques. • Formation mechanism is proposed based on experimental observations. • Dielectric properties are investigated in the X-band microwave frequencies. • BN hollow nanospheres show lower dielectric loss than regular BN powders. - Abstract: Boron nitride (BN) hollow nanospheres have been successfully fabricated by pyrolyzing vapors decomposed from ammonia borane (NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}) at 1300 °C. The final products have been extensively characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The BN hollow nanospheres were ranging from 100 to 300 nm in diameter and around 30–100 nm in thickness. The internal structure of the products was found dependent on the reaction temperatures. A possible formation mechanism of the BN hollow nanospheres was proposed on the basis of the experimental observations. Dielectric measurements in the X-band microwave frequencies (8–12 GHz) showed that the dielectric loss of the paraffin filled by the BN hollow nanospheres was lower than that filled by regular BN powders, which indicated that the BN hollow nanospheres could be potentially used as low-density fillers for microwave radomes.

  8. Characterization and modes of occurrence of elements in feed coal and coal combustion products from a power plant utilizing low-sulfur coal from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brownfield, Michael E.; Cathcart, James D.; Affolter, Ronald H.; Brownfield, Isabelle K.; Rice, Cynthia A.; O'Connor, Joseph T.; Zielinski, Robert A.; Bullock, John H., Jr.; Hower, James C.; Meeker, Gregory P.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research are collaborating with an Indiana utility company to determine the physical and chemical properties of feed coal and coal combustion products from a coal-fired power plant. The Indiana power plant utilizes a low-sulfur (0.23 to 0.47 weight percent S) and lowash (4.9 to 6.3 weight percent ash) subbituminous coal from the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone in the Tongue River Member of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation, Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Based on scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction analyses of feed coal samples, two mineral suites were identified: (1) a primary or detrital suite consisting of quartz (including beta-form grains), biotite, feldspar, and minor zircon; and (2) a secondary authigenic mineral suite containing alumino-phosphates (crandallite and gorceixite), kaolinite, carbonates (calcite and dolomite), quartz, anatase, barite, and pyrite. The primary mineral suite is interpreted, in part, to be of volcanic origin, whereas the authigenic mineral suite is interpreted, in part, to be the result of the alteration of the volcanic minerals. The mineral suites have contributed to the higher amounts of barium, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, strontium, and titanium in the Powder River Basin feed coals in comparison to eastern coals. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that (1) fly ash is mostly aluminate glass, perovskite, lime, gehlenite, quartz, and phosphates with minor amounts of periclase, anhydrite, hematite, and spinel group minerals; and (2) bottom ash is predominantly quartz, plagioclase (albite and anorthite), pyroxene (augite and fassaite), rhodonite, and akermanite, and spinel group minerals. Microprobe and scanning electron microscope analyses of fly ash samples revealed quartz, zircon, and monazite, euhedral laths of corundum with merrillite, hematite, dendritic spinels/ferrites, wollastonite, and periclase. The abundant calcium and

  9. Direct elementary reactions of boron and nitrogen at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Akella, J.; Cynn, H.; Nicol, M.

    1997-07-01

    Highly exothermic direct reactions between elements boron and nitrogen at high pressures and temperatures yield technologically important forms of hexagonal and cubic boron nitride (BN). The crystal structures of the reaction products vary with pressure. Below 10 GPa, hexagonal BN is the product; cubic or wurzite BN form at higher pressures. Under nitrogen-rich conditions, another hexagonal allotrope occurs; this seems to be a highly transparent, low density h{sup {prime}}-BN. No direct reactions occur at ambient temperature even at pressures as high as 50 GPa, implying that a large activation barrier limits the kinetics of these exothermic processes. Direct reactions between boron and oxygen are also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Boron based two-dimensional crystals: theoretical design, realization proposal and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xian-Bin; Xie, Sheng-Yi; Zheng, Hui; Tian, Wei Quan; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-11-01

    The successful realization of free-standing graphene and the various applications of its exotic properties have spurred tremendous research interest for two-dimensional (2D) layered materials. Besides graphene, many other 2D materials have been successfully produced by experiment, such as silicene, monolayer MoS2, few-layer black phosphorus and so on. As a neighbor of carbon in the periodic table, element boron is interesting and many researchers have contributed their efforts to realize boron related 2D structures. These structures may be significant both in fundamental science and future technical applications in nanoelectronics and nanodevices. In this review, we summarize the recent developments of 2D boron based materials. The theoretical design, possible experimental realization strategies and their potential technical applications are presented and discussed. Also, the current challenges and prospects of this area are discussed.

  11. Synthesis, characterization and fluorescence properties of boron difluoride pyridyl-β-diketonate derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dun-Jia; Kang, Yan-Fang; Xu, Ben-Po; Zheng, Jing; Wei, Xian-Hong

    2013-03-01

    Five pyridyl-β-diketones were synthesized by Claisen condensation of ethyl nicotinate with various aryl methyl ketones in benzene in the presence of sodium amide as the base, and then reacted with boron trifluoride diethyl etherate in dichloromethane to afford some new boron difluoride pyridyl-β-diketonate derivatives. The compounds obtained were characterized using FTIR, 1H NMR, elemental analysis and mass spectrometry. Their optical properties were studied in DMF by UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results showed that these boron complexes exhibited intense fluorescence in the blue-green region (420-490 nm) under UV radiation with a relatively high quantum yield. Especially, compounds 4b and 5b displayed much higher quantum yield as compared to compounds 1b, 2b and 3b.

  12. Boron based two-dimensional crystals: theoretical design, realization proposal and applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Bin; Xie, Sheng-Yi; Zheng, Hui; Tian, Wei Quan; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-12-01

    The successful realization of free-standing graphene and the various applications of its exotic properties have spurred tremendous research interest for two-dimensional (2D) layered materials. Besides graphene, many other 2D materials have been successfully produced by experiment, such as silicene, monolayer MoS2, few-layer black phosphorus and so on. As a neighbor of carbon in the periodic table, element boron is interesting and many researchers have contributed their efforts to realize boron related 2D structures. These structures may be significant both in fundamental science and future technical applications in nanoelectronics and nanodevices. In this review, we summarize the recent developments of 2D boron based materials. The theoretical design, possible experimental realization strategies and their potential technical applications are presented and discussed. Also, the current challenges and prospects of this area are discussed. PMID:26523799

  13. Three dimensional aromaticity, elemental boron and stuffed fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Jemmis, E.D.

    1994-12-31

    An intriguing aspect of fullerenes is the large empty space within. It has been possible to use this space as a molecular container encapsulating neutral atoms and metal ions. A few atoms do not fill the available space. To stuff fullerenes a systematic chemical binding of atoms or molecules to the endohedral surface is needed.

  14. Autoionizing states of atomic boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argenti, Luca; Moccia, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    We present a B -spline K -matrix method for three-active-electron atoms in the presence of a polarizable core, with which it is possible to compute multichannel single-ionization scattering states with good accuracy. We illustrate the capabilities of the method by computing the parameters of several autoionizing states of the boron atom, with S2e, 2,o2P and D2e symmetry, up to at least the 2 p2(1S) excitation threshold of the B ii parent ion, as well as selected portions of the photoionization cross section from the ground state. Our results exhibit remarkable gauge consistency, they significantly extend the existing sparse record of data for the boron atom, and they are in good agreement with the few experimental and theoretical data available in the literature. These results open the way to extend to three-active-electron systems the spectral analysis of correlated wave packets in terms of accurate scattering states that has already been demonstrated for two-electron atoms in Argenti and Lindroth [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 053002 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.053002].

  15. Powder metallurgy bearings for advanced rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleck, J. N.; Killman, B. J.; Munson, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    Traditional ingot metallurgy was pushed to the limit for many demanding applications including antifriction bearings. New systems require corrosion resistance, better fatigue resistance, and higher toughness. With conventional processing, increasing the alloying level to achieve corrosion resistance results in a decrease in other properties such as toughness. Advanced powder metallurgy affords a viable solution to this problem. During powder manufacture, the individual particle solidifies very rapidly; as a consequence, the primary carbides are very small and uniformly distributed. When properly consolidated, this uniform structure is preserved while generating a fully dense product. Element tests including rolling contact fatigue, hot hardness, wear, fracture toughness, and corrosion resistance are underway on eleven candidate P/M bearing alloys and results are compared with those for wrought 440C steel, the current SSME bearing material. Several materials which offer the promise of a significant improvement in performance were identified.

  16. Current data regarding the structure-toxicity relationship of boron-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Farfán-García, E D; Castillo-Mendieta, N T; Ciprés-Flores, F J; Padilla-Martínez, I I; Trujillo-Ferrara, J G; Soriano-Ursúa, M A

    2016-09-01

    Boron is ubiquitous in nature, being an essential element of diverse cells. As a result, humans have had contact with boron containing compounds (BCCs) for a long time. During the 20th century, BCCs were developed as antiseptics, antibiotics, cosmetics and insecticides. Boric acid was freely used in the nosocomial environment as an antiseptic and sedative salt, leading to the death of patients and an important discovery about its critical toxicology for humans. Since then the many toxicological studies done in relation to BCCs have helped to establish the proper limits of their use. During the last 15 years, there has been a boom of research on the design and use of new, potent and efficient boron containing drugs, finding that the addition of boron to some known drugs increases their affinity and selectivity. This mini-review summarizes two aspects of BCCs: toxicological data found with experimental models, and the scarce but increasing data about the structure-activity relationship for toxicity and therapeutic use. As is the case with boron-free compounds, the biological activity of BCCs is related to their chemical structure. We discuss the use of new technology to discover potent and efficient BCCs for medicinal therapy by avoiding toxic effects. PMID:27329537

  17. Analysis of atomic scale chemical environments of boron in coal by 11B solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Takafumi; Kashiwakura, Shunsuke; Kanehashi, Koji; Hayashi, Shunichi; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2011-02-01

    Atomic scale chemical environments of boron in coal has been studied by solid state NMR spectroscopy including magic angle spinning (MAS), satellite transition magic angle spinning (STMAS), and cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS). The (11)B NMR spectra can be briefly classified according to the degree of coalification. On the (11)B NMR spectra of lignite, bituminous, and sub-bituminous coals (carbon content of 70-90mass%), three sites assigned to four-coordinate boron ([4])B with small quadrupolar coupling constants (≤0.9 MHz) are observed. Two of the ([4])B sites in downfield are considered organoboron complexes with aromatic ligands, while the other in the most upper field is considered inorganic tetragonal boron (BO(4)). By contrast, on the (11)B NMR spectra of blind coal (carbon content >90mass%), the ([4])B which substitutes tetrahedral silicon of Illite is observed as a representative species. It has been considered that the organoboron is decomposed and released from the parent phase with the advance of coal maturation, and then the released boron reacts with the inorganic phase to substitute an element of inorganic minerals. Otherwise boron contained originally in inorganic minerals might remain preserved even under the high temperature condition that is generated during coalification. PMID:21175186

  18. The interaction of boron with goethite: experiments and CD-MUSIC modeling.

    PubMed

    Goli, Esmaiel; Rahnemaie, Rasoul; Hiemstra, Tjisse; Malakouti, Mohammad Jafar

    2011-03-01

    Boron (B) is an essential element for plants and animals growth that interacts with mineral surfaces regulating its bioavailability and mobility in soils, sediments, and natural ecosystems. The interaction with mineral surfaces is quite important because of a narrow range between boron deficiency and toxicity limits. In this study, the interaction of boric acid with goethite (α-FeOOH) was measured in NaNO(3) background solution as a function of pH, ionic strength, goethite and boron concentration representing as adsorption edges and isotherms. Boron adsorption edges showed a bell-shaped pattern with maximum adsorption around pH 8.50, whereas adsorption isotherms were rather linear. The adsorption data were successfully described with the CD-MUSIC model in combination with the Extended Stern (ES) model. The charge distribution (CD) of inner-sphere boron surface complexes was calculated from the geometry optimized with molecular orbital calculations applying density functional theory (MO/DFT). The CD modeling suggested dominant binding of boric acid as a trigonal inner-sphere complex with minor contributions of a tetrahedral inner-sphere complex (at high pH) and a trigonal outer-sphere complex (at low pH). The interpretation with the CD model is consistent with the spectroscopic observations. PMID:21185584

  19. Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Z.W.; Maya, L.; Brown, G.M.; Sloop, F.V.Jr

    2003-05-12

    Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon response were obtained, and although the light output was found to be much poorer than from samples in which boron was dissolved, the higher boron concentrations enabled essentially 100% neutron absorption in only a few millimeters' thickness of rubber.

  20. Method of synthesizing cubic system boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Yuzu, S.; Sumiya, H.; Degawa, J.

    1987-10-13

    A method is described for synthetically growing cubic system boron nitride crystals by using boron nitride sources, solvents for dissolving the boron nitride sources, and seed crystals under conditions of ultra-high pressure and high temperature for maintaining the cubic system boron nitride stable. The method comprises the following steps: preparing a synthesizing vessel having at least two chambers, arrayed in order in the synthesizing vessel so as to be heated according to a temperature gradient; placing the solvents having different eutectic temperatures in each chamber with respect to the boron nitride sources according to the temperature gradient; placing the boron nitride source in contact with a portion of each of the solvents heated at a relatively higher temperature and placing at least a seed crystal in a portion of each of the solvents heated at a relatively lower temperature; and growing at least one cubic system boron nitride crystal in each of the solvents in the chambers by heating the synthesizing vessel for establishing the temperature gradient while maintaining conditions of ultra-high pressure and high temperature.

  1. Synthesis of Cubic Boron Nitride Nanoparticles from Boron Oxide, Melamine and NH3 by Non-Transferred Ar-N2 Thermal Plasma.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eun Ha; Kim, Tae-Hee; Choi, Sooseok; Park, Dong-Wha

    2015-11-01

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) which is has extremely high hardness and thermal conductivity comparable to the diamond was synthesized in nanoparticle form by using non-transferred thermal plasma. The input power of arc plasma was fixed at 13.5 kW and the operating pressure was also fixed at atmospheric pressure. Boron oxide (B2O3) and melamine (C3H6N6) were used as raw materials for the sources of boron and nitrogen. Ammonia gas (NH3) was additionally injected to plasma jet as reactive gas providing additional nitrogen. Decomposed B2O3 and C3H6N6 enhance reactivity for synthesizing c-BN with exothermic reactions between carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. Products were collected from the inner wall of reactor. In X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope measurements, the collected powder was confirmed as c-BN nanoparticles which have crystalline size smaller than 150 nm. PMID:26726544

  2. Microstructural characterization, visualization, and simulation of titanium-boron materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, Scott I.

    Additions of boron in modified titanium alloys and Ti-B composites result in the in situ formation during high temperature processing of TiB reinforcement phases that improve the mechanical properties and wear resistance of unreinforced titanium alloys, while still utilizing the high strength-to-weight ratio and excellent corrosion resistance of titanium. Several boron-modified titanium alloys and Ti-B composites in a Ti-6Al-4V matrix have been investigated to determine the effect of processing parameters on the TiB reinforcement phases and resultant microstructures and mechanical properties. Using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, conventional characterization techniques, and newly developed methodologies for three-dimensional visualization, the microstructures of these Ti-B materials have been studied. Observations included a similar anisotropic whisker morphology with roughly hexagonal cross-sections among all TiB phases; alignment of all TiB phases with extrusion, with the extent of alignment affected by thermomechanical processing parameters; brittle fracture behavior of TiB whiskers, with fracture down the length of whiskers not aligned in the tensile direction and across the width of whiskers aligned in the tensile direction; and discoveries of the anisotropic morphologies of the coarse primary TiB phase and the sub-micron precipitated TiB phase. It has been observed that extruded boron-modified alloys with compositions in the hypoeutectic regime of the quaternary system of titanium, alloying elements aluminum and vanadium, and boron, containing a unimodal size distribution of eutectic TiB whiskers, significantly improve the strength and stiffness compared to unreinforced Ti-6Al-4V alloy while also demonstrating tensile elongation to failure within the fracture-critical limits required for aerospace structural applications. Materials design methodologies have been developed using Ti-B materials, and they show promise for predicting the

  3. LARC powder prepreg system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1990-01-01

    Thermoplastic prepregs of LARC-TPI have been produced in a fluidized bed unit on spread continuous fiber tows. The powders are melted on the fibers by radiant heating to adhere the polymer to the fiber. This process produces tow prepreg uniformly without imposing severe stress on the fibers or requiring long high temperature residence times for the polymer. Unit design theory and operating correlations have been developed to provide the basis for scale up to commercial operation. Special features of the operation are the pneumatic tow spreader, fluidized bed and resin feed systems.

  4. Combustion of Na 2B 4O 7 + Mg + C to synthesis B 4C powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guojian, Jiang; Jiayue, Xu; Hanrui, Zhuang; Wenlan, Li

    2009-09-01

    Boron carbide powder was fabricated by combustion synthesis (CS) method directly from mixed powders of borax (Na 2B 4O 7), magnesium (Mg) and carbon. The adiabatic temperature of the combustion reaction of Na 2B 4O 7 + 6 Mg + C was calculated. The control of the reactions was achieved by selecting reactant composition, relative density of powder compact and gas pressure in CS reactor. The effects of these different influential factors on the composition and morphologies of combustion products were investigated. The results show that, it is advantageous for more Mg/Na 2B 4O 7 than stoichiometric ratio in Na 2B 4O 7 + Mg + C system and high atmosphere pressure in the CS reactor to increase the conversion degree of reactants to end product. The final product with the minimal impurities' content could be fabricated at appropriate relative density of powder compact. At last, boron carbide without impurities could be obtained after the acid enrichment and distilled water washing.

  5. Synergistic methods for the production of high-strength and low-cost boron carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, Charles Schenck

    2011-12-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a non-oxide ceramic in the same class of nonmetallic hard materials as silicon carbide and diamond. The high hardness, high elastic modulus and low density of B4C make it a nearly ideal material for personnel and vehicular armor. B4C plates formed via hot-pressing are currently issued to U.S. soldiers and have exhibited excellent performance; however, hot-pressed articles contain inherent processing defects and are limited to simple geometries such as low-curvature plates. Recent advances in the pressureless sintering of B4C have produced theoretically-dense and complex-shape articles that also exhibit superior ballistic performance. However, the cost of this material is currently high due to the powder shape, size, and size distribution that are required, which limits the economic feasibility of producing such a product. Additionally, the low fracture toughness of pure boron carbide may have resulted in historically lower transition velocities (the projectile velocity range at which armor begins to fail) than competing silicon carbide ceramics in high-velocity long-rod tungsten penetrator tests. Lower fracture toughness also limits multi-hit protection capability. Consequently, these requirements motivated research into methods for improving the densification and fracture toughness of inexpensive boron carbide composites that could result in the development of a superior armor material that would also be cost-competitive with other high-performance ceramics. The primary objective of this research was to study the effect of titanium and carbon additives on the sintering and mechanical properties of inexpensive B4C powders. The boron carbide powder examined in this study was a sub-micron (0.6 mum median particle size) boron carbide powder produced by H.C. Starck GmbH via a jet milling process. A carbon source in the form of phenolic resin, and titanium additives in the form of 32 nm and 0.9 mum TiO2 powders were selected. Parametric studies of

  6. X-ray diffraction study of boron produced by pyrolysis of boron tribromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, David

    The goal of this research was to determine the composition of boron deposits produced by pyrolysis of boron tribromide, and to use the results to (a) determine the experimental conditions (reaction temperature, etc.) necessary to produce alpha-rhombohedral boron and (b) guide the development/refinement of the pyrolysis experiments such that large, high purity crystals of alpha-rhombohedral boron can be produced with consistency. Developing a method for producing large, high purity alpha-rhombohedral boron crystals is of interest because such crystals could potentially be used to achieve an alpha-rhombohedral boron based neutron detector design (a solid-state detector) that could serve as an alternative to existing neutron detector technologies. The supply of neutron detectors in the United States has been hampered for a number of years due to the current shortage of helium-3 (a gas used in many existing neutron detector technologies); the development of alternative neutron detector technology such as an alpha-rhombohedral boron based detector would help provide a more sustainable supply of neutron detectors in this country. In addition, the prospect/concept of an alpha-rhombohedral boron based neutron detector is attractive because it offers the possibility of achieving a design that is smaller, longer life, less power consuming, and potentially more sensitive than existing neutron detectors. The main difficulty associated with creating an alpha-rhombohedral boron based neutron detector is that producing large, high purity crystals of alpha-rhombohedral boron is extremely challenging. Past researchers have successfully made alpha-rhombohedral boron via a number of methods, but no one has developed a method for consistently producing large, high purity crystals. Alpha-rhombohedral boron is difficult to make because it is only stable at temperatures below around 1100-1200 °C, its formation is very sensitive to impurities, and the conditions necessary for its

  7. JAGUAR Procedures for Detonation Behavior of Explosives Containing Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiel, Leonard; Baker, Ernest; Capellos, Christos

    2009-06-01

    The JAGUAR product library was expanded to include boron and boron containing products. Relationships of the Murnaghan form for molar volumes and derived properties were implemented in JAGUAR. Available Hugoniot and static volumertic data were analyzed to obtain constants of the Murnaghan relationship for solid boron, boron oxide, boron nitride, boron carbide, and boric acid. Experimental melting points were also utilized with optimization procedures to obtain the constants of the volumetric relationships for liquid boron and boron oxide. Detonation velocities for HMX - boron mixtures calculated with these relationships using JAGUAR are in closer agreement with literature values at high initial densities for inert (unreacted) boron than with the completely reacted metal. These results indicate that boron mixtures may exhibit eigenvalue detonation behavior, as observed by aluminized combined effects explosives, with higher detonation velocities than would be achieved by a classical Chapman-Jouguet detonation. Analyses of calorimetric measurements for RDX - boron mixtures indicate that at high boron contents the formation of side products, including boron nitride and boron carbide, inhibits the energy output obtained from the detonation of the formulation.

  8. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  9. Crystallization of Beryllium-Boron Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F; Wall, M A; Nieh, T G

    2002-02-14

    Prior studies of evaporation and sputter deposition show that the grain size of pure beryllium can be dramatically refined through the incorporation of metal impurities. Recently, the addition of boron at a concentration greater than 11% is shown to serve as a glassy phase former in sputter deposited beryllium. Presently, thermally induced crystallization of the beryllium-boron metallic glass is reported. The samples are characterized during an in-situ anneal treatment with bright field imaging and electron diffraction using transmission electron microscopy. A nanocrystalline structure evolves from the annealed amorphous phase and the crystallization temperature is affected by the boron concentration.

  10. Boron-10 Lined Proportional Counter Wall Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Siciliano, Edward R.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2012-05-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report provides information about how variations in proportional counter radius and gas pressure in a typical coincident counter design might affect the observed signal from boron-lined tubes. A discussion comparing tubes to parallel plate counters is also included.

  11. Boron Nitride Nanoribbons: Synthesis and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, Ashley; Erikson, Kris; Sinitskii, Alex; Rousseas, Michael; Alem, Nasim; Tour, James; Zettl, Alex

    2012-02-01

    Boron Nitride Nanoribbons (BNNR) have been theorized to have many interesting electrical and magnetic properties and edge states, but these characteristics have not been experimentally verified due to challenges in synthesis and purification. We have produced BNNRs by longitudinally splitting boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) using potassium vapor as an intercalant. Due to the strong interactions between boron nitride sheets, separation of nanoribbons from their parent tubes is challenging. We have used various solvent systems to assist with separation of the ribbons with the goal of probing their properties.

  12. Boronated dipeptide borotrimethylglycylphenylalanine as a potential boron carrier in boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Takagaki, M; Powell, W; Sood, A; Spielvogel, B F; Hosmane, N S; Kirihata, M; Ono, K; Masunaga, S I; Kinashi, Y; Miyatake, S I; Hashimoto, N

    2001-07-01

    Takagaki, M., Ono, K., Masunaga, S-I., Kinashi, Y., Oda, Y., Miyatake, S-I., Hashimoto, N., Powell, W., Sood, A. and Spielvogel, B. F. Boronated Dipeptide Borotrimethylglycylphenylalanine as a Potential Boron Carrier in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors. Radiat. Res. 156, 118-122 (2001).A boronated dipeptide, borotrimethylglycylphenylalanine (BGPA), was synthesized as a possible boron carrier for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant brain tumors. In vitro, at equal concentrations of (10)B in the extracellular medium, BGPA had the same effect in BNCT as p-boronophenylalanine (BPA). Boron analysis was carried out using prompt gamma-ray spectrometry and track-etch autoradiography. The tumor:blood and tumor:normal brain (10)B concentration ratios were 8.9 +/- 2.1 and 3.0 +/- 1.2, respectively, in rats bearing intracranial C6 gliosarcomas using alpha-particle track autoradiography. The IC(50), i.e. the dose capable of inhibiting the growth of C6 gliosarcoma cells by 50% after 3 days of incubation, was 5.9 x 10(-3) M BGPA, which is similar to that of 6.4 x 10(-3) M for BPA. The amide bond of BGPA is free from enzymatic attack, since it is protected from hydrolysis by the presence of a boron atom at the alpha-carbon position of glycine. These results suggest promise for the use of this agent for BNCT of malignant brain tumors. Further preclinical studies of BGPA are warranted, since BGPA has advantages over both BPA and BSH. PMID:11418080

  13. Boron

    SciTech Connect

    Cozen, L.F. )

    1991-05-01

    This paper reports that borate minerals and refined borates are used extensively for the manufacture of vitreous materials such as insulation and textile fiberglasses, borosilicate glass, and porcelain enamels and frits. In North America, these applications are estimated to account for over 54% of the borate consumption. Other substantial uses are in soaps and detergents, metallurgy, fire retardants, industrial biocides, agriculture, and various miscellaneous applications. Reported domestic borate consumption in 1990 was estimated by the U.S. Bureau of Mines to be 320 000 metric tons B{sub 2}O{sub 3} versus 354 000 metric tons B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in 1989. Consumption is projected to remain essentially static in 1991. Imports were estimated by the Bureau to be 50 000 metric tons B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in 1990. Exports of boric acid and refined borates were approximately 650 000 metric tons of product, a 15 000 metric ton increase from the 1989 level. This increase partially offsets the drop in the 1990 consumption level.

  14. Boron

    MedlinePlus

    ... as an aid for building muscles and increasing testosterone levels, and for improving thinking skills and muscle ... seem to improve body mass, muscle mass, or testosterone levels in male bodybuilders.Improving thinking and coordination ...

  15. Polymer powder prepregging: Scoping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throne, James L.

    1988-01-01

    Early on, it was found that NEAT LARC-TPI thermoplastic polyimide powder behaved elastoplastically at pressures to 20 ksi and temperatures to 260 degrees celcius (below MP). At high resin assay, resin powder could be continuously cold-flowed around individual carbon fibers in a metal rolling mill. At low resin assay (2:1, C:TPI), fiber breakage was prohibitive. Thus, although processing of TPI below MP would be quite unique, it appears that the polymer must be melted and flowed to produce low resin assay prepreg. Fiber tow was spread to 75 mm using a venturi slot tunnel. This allowed intimate powder/fiber interaction. Two techniques were examined for getting room temperature powder onto the room temperature fiber surface. Electrostatic powder coating allows the charged powder to cling tenaciously to the fiber, even while heated with a hot air gun to above its melt temperature. A variant of the wet slurry coating process was also explored. The carbon fibers are first wetted with water. Then dry powder is sprinkled onto the wet tow and doctor-rolled between the fibers. The wet structure is then taken onto a heated roll, with hot air guns drying and sinter-melting the powder onto the fiber surfaces. In both cases SEM shows individual fibers coated with powder particles that have melted in place and flowed along the fiber surface via surface tension.

  16. Systematic study of the electronic structure and optical properties of icosahedral boron and boron compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong

    1997-11-01

    A systematic study of the electronic structures, total energies and optical properties of B12-based boron and boron-rich compounds and boron oxide compounds has been conducted by the first-principles orthogonalized linear combination of atomic orbitals method. The materials involved are: α-r-B12, B12As2,/ B12P2,/ B11C(CBC)/ (or/ B4C),/ B13C2,/ B12O2,/ (B10Si2)Si2,/ (B10Si2)Si2-I, B2O3-I and B2O3-II. The band structures show that α-r-B12,/ B12As2,/ B12P2,/ B11C(CBC),/ B12O2,/ (B10Si2)Si2, and (B10Si2)Si2-I are semiconductors with band gaps ranging from 1.29 eV to 3.04 eV while B13C2 is a metal with an intrinsic hole at the top of the valence band below a semiconductor-like gap. The study also shows that B2O3-I and B2O3-II are wide gap insulators with calculated LDA gaps of 6.20 eV and 8.85 eV separately. The calculated density of states are resolved into atomic and orbital partial components and the valence-charge distributions are also studied. The natural bonding characteristics in these crystals are illuminated by evaluating the Mulliken effective charges on each atom and overlap populations between pairs of atoms. It is shown that inter-icosahedral bonding is much stronger than the intra-icosahedral bonding in the B12- based crystals. The chain elements in B12As2,/ B12P2,/ (B10Si2)Si2 and (B10Si2)Si2-I donate electrons to the icosahedra, while B11C(CBC),/ B13C2 and B12O2 gain a slight amount of charge in forming strong covalent bonds. For boron oxide compounds, B2O3-II is found to be more ionic than B2O3-I. It is also concluded that the sp2 planar bonding in B2O3-I is stronger than the sp3 tetrahedral bonding in B2O3-II. The bulk moduli of α-r-B12,/ B12As2,/ B12P2,/ B11C(CBC),/ B13C2 and B12O2 are estimated by means of total energy calculation as a function of crystal volume, and are to be considered as upper limits. We have also calculated the interband optical conductivities and the complex dielectric functions. Static dielectric constants for icosahedral

  17. Boron-neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, A. M.; Moschini, G.; Valkovic, Vlado; Zafiropoulos, D.

    1995-03-01

    The final goal of any radiotherapy project is to expose the tumor as the target to a lethal dose of ionizing radiation, sparing thereby the surrounding healthy tissues to a maximum extent. Precise treatment is nevertheless essential for cure, since the danger exists that the tumor might re-establish itself if every cancer cell is not destroyed. The conventional therapy treatments existing to date, e.g., surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, have been successful in curing some kinds of cancers, but still there are many exceptions. In the following, the progress of a promising therapy tool, called the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), which has made its dynamic evolution in recent years, is briefly described. The approach towards clinical trials with BNCT is described in detail.

  18. Structural stability and electronic properties of β-tetragonal boron: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Hayami, Wataru

    2015-01-15

    It is known that elemental boron has five polymorphs: α- and β-rhombohedral, α- and β-tetragonal, and the high-pressure γ phase. β-tetragonal (β-t) boron was first discovered in 1960, but there have been only a few studies since then. We have thoroughly investigated, using first-principles calculations, the atomic and electronic structures of β-t boron, the details of which were not known previously. The difficulty of calculation arises from the fact that β-t boron has a large unit cell that contains between 184 and 196 atoms, with 12 partially-occupied interstitial sites. This makes the number of configurations of interstitial atoms too great to calculate them all. By introducing assumptions based on symmetry and preliminary calculations, the number of configurations to calculate can be greatly reduced. It was eventually found that β-t boron has the lowest total energy, with 192 atoms (8 interstitial atoms) in an orthorhombic lattice. The total energy per atom was between those of α- and β-rhombohedral boron. Another tetragonal structure with 192 atoms was found to have a very close energy. The valence bands were fully filled and the gaps were about 1.16 to 1.54 eV, making it comparable to that of β-rhombohedral boron. - Graphical abstract: Electronic density distribution for the lowest-energy configuration (N=192) viewed from the 〈1 0 0〉 direction. Left: isosurface (yellow) at d=0.09 electrons/a.u.{sup 3} Right: isosurface (orange) at d=0.12 electrons/a.u.{sup 3}. - Highlights: • β-tetragonal boron was thoroughly investigated using first-principles calculations. • The lowest energy structure contains 192 atoms in an orthorhombic lattice. • Another tetragonal structure with 192 atoms has a very close energy. • The total energy per atom is between those of α- and β-rhombohedral boron. • The band gap of the lowest energy structure is about 1.16 to 1.54 eV.

  19. Boron strengthening in FeAl

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, I.; Li, X.; Xiao, H.; Klein, O.; Nelson, C.; Carleton, R.L.; George, E.P.

    1998-11-01

    The effect of boron on the strength of B2-structured FeAl is considered as a function of composition, grain size and temperature. Boron does not affect the concentrations of antisite atoms or vacancies present, with the former increasing and the latter decreasing with increasing deviation from the stoichiometric composition. When vacancies are absent, the strength increase per at. % B per unit lattice strain, {Delta}{sigma}/({Delta}c x {epsilon}) increases with increasing aluminum concentration, but when vacancies are present (>45 at. % Al), {Delta}{sigma}/({Delta}c x {epsilon}) decreases again. Boron increases grain size strengthening in FeAl. B strengthening is roughly independent of temperature up to the yield strength peak but above the point, when diffusion-assisted deformation occurs, boron strengthening increases dramatically.

  20. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rajen B.; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J.; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs. PMID:27460526