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Sample records for elemental ions released

  1. Composite oxygen ion transport element

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Jack C.; Besecker, Charles J.; Chen, Hancun; Robinson, Earil T.

    2007-06-12

    A composite oxygen ion transport element that has a layered structure formed by a dense layer to transport oxygen ions and electrons and a porous support layer to provide mechanical support. The dense layer can be formed of a mixture of a mixed conductor, an ionic conductor, and a metal. The porous support layer can be fabricated from an oxide dispersion strengthened metal, a metal-reinforced intermetallic alloy, a boron-doped Mo.sub.5Si.sub.3-based intermetallic alloy or combinations thereof. The support layer can be provided with a network of non-interconnected pores and each of said pores communicates between opposite surfaces of said support layer. Such a support layer can be advantageously employed to reduce diffusion resistance in any type of element, including those using a different material makeup than that outlined above.

  2. FORTE antenna element and release mechanism design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohweller, David J.; Butler, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    The Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite being built by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has as its most prominent feature a large deployable (11 m by 5 m) log periodic antenna to monitor emissions from electrical storms on the Earth. This paper describes the antenna and the design for the long elements and explains the dynamics of their deployment and the damping system employed. It also describes the unique paraffin-actuated reusable tie-down and release mechanism employed in the system.

  3. FORTE antenna element and release mechanism design

    SciTech Connect

    Rohweller, D.J.; Butler, T.Af.

    1995-02-01

    The Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite being built by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has as its most prominent feature a large deployable (11 m by 5 m) log periodic antenna to monitor emissions from electrical storms on the Earth. This paper describes the antenna and the design for the long elements and explains the dynamics of their deployment and the damping system employed. It also describes the unique paraffin-actuated reusable tie-down and release mechanism employed in the system.

  4. Ion processing element with composite media

    DOEpatents

    Mann, Nick R.; Tranter, Troy J.; Todd, Terry A.; Sebesta, Ferdinand

    2009-03-24

    An ion processing element employing composite media disposed in a porous substrate, for facilitating removal of selected chemical species from a fluid stream. The ion processing element includes a porous fibrous glass substrate impregnated by composite media having one or more active components supported by a matrix material of polyacrylonitrile. The active components are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream passing through the ion processing element. Due to the porosity and large surface area of both the composite medium and the substrate in which it is disposed, a high degree of contact is achieved between the active component and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the porosity of the matrix material and the substrate facilitates use of the ion processing element in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a high volume flows.

  5. Ion processing element with composite media

    DOEpatents

    Mann, Nick R.; Tranter, Troy J.; Todd, Terry A.; Sebesta, Ferdinand

    2003-02-04

    An ion processing element employing composite media disposed in a porous substrate, for facilitating removal of selected chemical species from a fluid stream. The ion processing element includes a porous fibrous glass substrate impregnated by composite media having one or more active components supported by a matrix material of polyacrylonitrile. The active components are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream passing through the ion processing element. Due to the porosity and large surface area of both the composite medium and the substrate in which it is disposed, a high degree of contact is achieved between the active component and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the porosity of the matrix material and the substrate facilitates use of the ion processing element in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a high volume flows.

  6. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J.

    2012-11-06

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  7. Synthesis and release of trace elements from hollow and porous hydroxyapatite spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wei; Grandfield, Kathryn; Schwenke, Almut; Engqvist, Håkan

    2011-07-01

    It is known that organic species regulate fabrication of hierarchical biological forms via solution methods. However, in this study, we observed that the presence of inorganic ions plays an important role in the formation and regulation of biological spherical hydroxyapatite formation. We present a mineralization method to prepare ion-doped hydroxyapatite spheres with a hierarchical structure that is free of organic surfactants and biological additives. Porous and hollow strontium-doped hydroxyapatite spheres were synthesized via controlling the concentration of strontium ions in a calcium and phosphate buffer solution. Similarly, fluoride and silicon-doped hydroxyapatite spheres were synthesized. While spherical particle formation was attainable at low and high temperature for Sr-doped hydroxyapatite, it was only possible at high temperature in the F/Si-doped system. The presence of inorganic ions not only plays an important role in the formation and regulation of biological spherical hydroxyapatite, but also could introduce pharmaceutical effects as a result of trace element release. Such ion release results showed a sustained release with pH responsive behavior, and significantly influenced the hydroxyapatite re-precipitation. These ion-doped hydroxyapatite spheres with hollow and porous structure could have promising applications as bone/tooth materials, drug delivery systems, and chromatography supports.

  8. Release of metal ions from orthodontic appliances: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mikulewicz, Marcin; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Woźniak, Barbara; Downarowicz, Patrycja

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we report the results of an in vitro experiment on the release of metal ions from orthodontic appliances composed of alloys containing iron, chromium, nickel, silicon, and molybdenum into artificial saliva. The concentrations of magnesium, aluminum, silicon, phosphorus, sulfur, potassium, calcium, titanium, vanadium, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper, zinc, nickel, and chromium were significantly higher in artificial saliva in which metal brackets, bands, and wires used in orthodontics were incubated. In relation to the maximum acceptable concentrations of metal ions in drinking water and to recommended daily doses, two elements of concern were nickel (573 vs. 15 μg/l in the controls) and chromium (101 vs. 8 μg/l in the controls). Three ion release coefficients were defined: α, a dimensionless multiplication factor; β, the difference in concentrations (in micrograms per liter); and γ, the ion release coefficient (in percent). The elevated levels of metals in saliva are thought to occur by corrosion of the chemical elements in the alloys or welding materials. The concentrations of some groups of dissolved elements appear to be interrelated. PMID:22011837

  9. Helium-ion-induced release of hydrogen from graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The ion-induced release of hydrogen from AXF-5Q graphite was studied for 350-eV helium ions. The hydrogen was implanted into the graphite with a low energy (approx.200 eV) and to a high fluence. This achieved a thin (approx.10-nm), saturated near-surface region. The release of hydrogen was measured as a function of helium fluence. A model that includes ion-induced detrapping, retrapping, and surface recombination was used to analyze the experimental data. A value of (1.65 +- 0.2) x 10/sup -16/ cm/sup 2/ was obtained from the detrapping cross section, and a value of (0.5 to 4) x 10/sup -14/ cm/sup 4//atoms was obtained for the recombination coefficient. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Micro faraday-element array detector for ion mobility spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Gresham, Christopher A.; Rodacy, Phillip J.; Denton, M. Bonner; Sperline, Roger

    2004-10-26

    An ion mobility spectrometer includes a drift tube having a collecting surface covering a collecting area at one end of the tube. The surface comprises a plurality of closely spaced conductive elements on a non-conductive substrate, each conductive element being electrically insulated from each other element. A plurality of capacitive transimpedance amplifiers (CTIA) adjacent the collecting surface are electrically connected to the plurality of elements, so charge from an ion striking an element is transferred to the capacitor of the connected CTIA. A controller counts the charge on the capacitors over a period of time.

  11. Zoledronate and Ion-releasing Resins Impair Dentin Collagen Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, A.; Seseogullari-Dirihan, R.; Feitosa, V.P.; Tay, F.R.; Watson, T.F.; Pashley, D.H.; Sauro, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed the amounts of solubilized telopeptides cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) and C-terminal crosslinked telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) derived from matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins (CTPs) subsequent to application of a filler-free (Res.A) or an ion-releasing resin (Res.B) to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-demineralized dentin with or without zoledronate-containing primer (Zol-primer) pre-treatment. The chemical modification induced following treatments and artificial saliva (AS) storage was also analyzed through attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Totally EDTA-demineralized specimens were infiltrated with Res.A or Res.B with or without Zol-primer pre-treatment, light-cured, and immersed in AS for up to 4 wk. ICTP release was reduced following infiltration with Res.B and further reduced when Res.B was used with Zol-primer; remarkable phosphate mineral uptake was attained after AS storage. CTX release was increased in Res.A- and Res.B-treated dentin. However, when Zol-primer was used with Res.A, the CTX release fell significantly compared to the other tested resin-infiltration methods. In conclusion, zoledronate offers an additional inhibitory effect to the ion-releasing resins in MMP-mediated collagen degradation. However, Zol-primer induces a modest reduction in CTX release only when used with resin-based systems containing no ion-releasing fillers. PMID:25074494

  12. Zoledronate and ion-releasing resins impair dentin collagen degradation.

    PubMed

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, A; Seseogullari-Dirihan, R; Feitosa, V P; Tay, F R; Watson, T F; Pashley, D H; Sauro, S

    2014-10-01

    This study analyzed the amounts of solubilized telopeptides cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) and C-terminal crosslinked telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) derived from matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins (CTPs) subsequent to application of a filler-free (Res.A) or an ion-releasing resin (Res.B) to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-demineralized dentin with or without zoledronate-containing primer (Zol-primer) pre-treatment. The chemical modification induced following treatments and artificial saliva (AS) storage was also analyzed through attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Totally EDTA-demineralized specimens were infiltrated with Res.A or Res.B with or without Zol-primer pre-treatment, light-cured, and immersed in AS for up to 4 wk. ICTP release was reduced following infiltration with Res.B and further reduced when Res.B was used with Zol-primer; remarkable phosphate mineral uptake was attained after AS storage. CTX release was increased in Res.A- and Res.B-treated dentin. However, when Zol-primer was used with Res.A, the CTX release fell significantly compared to the other tested resin-infiltration methods. In conclusion, zoledronate offers an additional inhibitory effect to the ion-releasing resins in MMP-mediated collagen degradation. However, Zol-primer induces a modest reduction in CTX release only when used with resin-based systems containing no ion-releasing fillers. PMID:25074494

  13. Multitude of ion channels in the regulation of transmitter release.

    PubMed Central

    Rahamimoff, R; Butkevich, A; Duridanova, D; Ahdut, R; Harari, E; Kachalsky, S G

    1999-01-01

    The presynaptic nerve terminal is of key importance in communication in the nervous system. Its primary role is to release transmitter quanta on the arrival of an appropriate stimulus. The structural basis of these transmitter quanta are the synaptic vesicles that fuse with the surface membrane of the nerve terminal, to release their content of neurotransmitter molecules and other vesicular components. We subdivide the control of quantal release into two major classes: the processes that take place before the fusion of the synaptic vesicle with the surface membrane (the pre-fusion control) and the processes that occur after the fusion of the vesicle (the post-fusion control). The pre-fusion control is the main determinant of transmitter release. It is achieved by a wide variety of cellular components, among them the ion channels. There are reports of several hundred different ion channel molecules at the surface membrane of the nerve terminal, that for convenience can be grouped into eight major categories. They are the voltage-dependent calcium channels, the potassium channels, the calcium-gated potassium channels, the sodium channels, the chloride channels, the non-selective channels, the ligand gated channels and the stretch-activated channels. There are several categories of intracellular channels in the mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and the synaptic vesicles. We speculate that the vesicle channels may be of an importance in the post-fusion control of transmitter release. PMID:10212476

  14. In vitro prominent bone regeneration by release zinc ion from Zn-modified implant

    SciTech Connect

    Yusa, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Osamu; Fukuda, Masayuki; Koyota, Souichi; Koizumi, Yukio; Sugiyama, Toshihiro

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} We isolated the Zn{sup 2+} ions (eluted Zn{sup 2+} ion; EZ) from zinc-incorporated titanium implant. {yields} The EZ promoted the cell viability in hBMCs. {yields} The EZ stimulated preosteoblast and osteoblast marker gene expression in hBMCs. {yields} The hBMCs supplemented with EZ showed typically cell morphology when osteoblast maturing. {yields} It is revealed that the EZ also stimulates the calcium deposition of hBMCs. -- Abstract: Zinc is one of the trace elements which induce the proliferation and the differentiation of the osteoblast. In the previous study, we found that zinc ions (Zn{sup 2+} ion)-releasing titanium implants had excellent bone fixation using a rabbit femurs model. In this study, we isolated the Zn{sup 2+} ions (eluted Zn{sup 2+} ion; EZ) released from the implant surface, and evaluated the effect of EZ on the osteogenesis of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells (hBMCs). In the result, it was found that the EZ stimulated cell viability, osteoblast marker gene (type I collagen, osteocalcin (OC), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone sialoprotein (BSP)) expressions and calcium deposition in hBMCs.

  15. Elemental microanalysis in ecophysiology using ion microbeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybyłowicz, W. J.; Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, J.; Migula, P.; Turnau, K.; Nakonieczny, M.; Augustyniak, M.; Głowacka, E.

    2004-06-01

    A few recent applications of elemental microanalysis based on proton beam in ecophysiology and ecotoxicology are shown. They are related to biofiltering capabilities of mycorrhiza (symbiosis between fungi and plant roots) and to plant-insect herbivore interactions. The reported results were obtained at iThemba LABS, South Africa. PIXE and BS techniques were simultaneously used. True elemental maps were generated using a VMS version and PC version of GeoPIXE (GeoPIXE I and II). Further analysis was performed using PIXE and BS spectra extracted from list-mode data and corresponding to specific organs of an insect or a plant.

  16. Fluoride and aluminum release from restorative materials using ion chromatography

    PubMed Central

    OKTE, Zeynep; BAYRAK, Sule; FIDANCI, Ulvi Reha; SEL, Tevhide

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the amounts of fluoride and aluminum released from different restorative materials stored in artificial saliva and double-distilled water. Material and Methods Cylindrical specimens (10 x 1 mm) were prepared from 4 different restorative materials (Kavitan Plus, Vitremer, Dyract Extra, and Surefil). For each material, 20 specimens were prepared, 10 of which were stored in 5 mL artificial saliva and 10 of which were stored in 5 mL of double-distilled water. Concentrations of fluoride and aluminum in the solutions were measured using ion chromatography. Measurements were taken daily for one week and then weekly for two additional weeks. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range tests (p<0.05). Results The highest amounts of both fluoride and aluminum were released by the resin-modified glass ionomer cement Vitremer in double-distilled water (p<0.05). All materials released significantly more fluoride in double-distilled water than in artificial saliva (p<0.05). In artificial saliva, none of the materials were observed to release aluminum. Conclusion It was concluded that storage media and method of analysis should be taken into account when the fluoride and aluminum release from dental materials is assessed. PMID:22437674

  17. Experimental composite guidance conduits for peripheral nerve repair: an evaluation of ion release.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X F; Coughlan, A; O'Shea, H; Towler, M R; Kehoe, S; Boyd, D

    2012-08-01

    Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) - Pluronic F127 - glass composites have demonstrated excellent potential, from the perspective of controlled mechanical properties and cytocompatibility, for peripheral nerve regeneration. In addition to controlling the mechanical properties and cytotoxicity for such composite devices, the glass component may mediate specific responses upon implantation via degradation in the physiological environment and release of constituent elements. However, research focused on quantifying the release levels of such therapeutic ions from these experimental medical devices has been limited. To redress the balance, this paper explores the ion release profiles for Si(4+), Ca(2+), Na(+), Zn(2+), and Ce(4+) from experimental composite nerve guidance conduits (CNGC) comprising PLGA (at 12.5, and 20 wt.%), F127 (at 0, 2.5 and 5 wt.%) and various loadings of Si-Ca-Na-Zn-Ce glass (at 20 and 40 wt.%) for incubation periods of up to 28 days. The concentration of each ion, at various time points, was determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (Perkin Elmer Optima 3000). It was observed that the Si(4+), Na(+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+) release from CNGCs in this study ranged from 0.22 to 6.477 ppm, 2.307 to 3.277 ppm, 40 to 119 ppm, and 45 to 51 ppm, respectively. The Ce(4+) concentrations were under the minimum detection limits for the ICP instrument utilized. The results indicate that the ion release levels may be appropriate to mediate therapeutic effects with respect to peripheral nerve regeneration. The data generated in this paper provides requisite evidence to optimize composition for pre-clinical evaluation of the experimental composite. PMID:24364973

  18. The effect of platform switching on the levels of metal ion release from different implant–abutment couples

    PubMed Central

    Alrabeah, Ghada O; Knowles, Jonathan C; Petridis, Haralampos

    2016-01-01

    The improved peri-implant bone response demonstrated by platform switching may be the result of reduced amounts of metal ions released to the surrounding tissues. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of metal ions released from platform-matched and platform-switched implant–abutment couples as a result of accelerated corrosion. Thirty-six titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) and cobalt–chrome alloy abutments were coupled with titanium cylinders forming either platform-switched or platform-matched groups (n=6). In addition, 18 unconnected samples served as controls. The specimens were subjected to accelerated corrosion by static immersion in 1% lactic acid for 1 week. The amount of metal ions ion of each test tube was measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and energy dispersive spectroscopy X-ray analyses were performed pre- and post-immersion to assess corrosion at the interface. The platform-matched groups demonstrated higher ion release for vanadium, aluminium, cobalt, chrome, and molybdenum compared with the platform-switched groups (P<0.05). Titanium was the highest element to be released regardless of abutment size or connection (P<0.05). SEM images showed pitting corrosion prominent on the outer borders of the implant and abutment platform surfaces. In conclusion, implant–abutment couples underwent an active corrosion process resulting in metal ions release into the surrounding environment. The highest amount of metal ions released was recorded for the platform-matched groups, suggesting that platform-switching concept has a positive effect in reducing the levels of metal ion release from the implant–abutment couples. PMID:27357323

  19. The effect of platform switching on the levels of metal ion release from different implant-abutment couples.

    PubMed

    Alrabeah, Ghada O; Knowles, Jonathan C; Petridis, Haralampos

    2016-01-01

    The improved peri-implant bone response demonstrated by platform switching may be the result of reduced amounts of metal ions released to the surrounding tissues. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of metal ions released from platform-matched and platform-switched implant-abutment couples as a result of accelerated corrosion. Thirty-six titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) and cobalt-chrome alloy abutments were coupled with titanium cylinders forming either platform-switched or platform-matched groups (n=6). In addition, 18 unconnected samples served as controls. The specimens were subjected to accelerated corrosion by static immersion in 1% lactic acid for 1 week. The amount of metal ions ion of each test tube was measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and energy dispersive spectroscopy X-ray analyses were performed pre- and post-immersion to assess corrosion at the interface. The platform-matched groups demonstrated higher ion release for vanadium, aluminium, cobalt, chrome, and molybdenum compared with the platform-switched groups (P<0.05). Titanium was the highest element to be released regardless of abutment size or connection (P<0.05). SEM images showed pitting corrosion prominent on the outer borders of the implant and abutment platform surfaces. In conclusion, implant-abutment couples underwent an active corrosion process resulting in metal ions release into the surrounding environment. The highest amount of metal ions released was recorded for the platform-matched groups, suggesting that platform-switching concept has a positive effect in reducing the levels of metal ion release from the implant-abutment couples. PMID:27357323

  20. In vitro cytotoxicity of metallic ions released from dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Milheiro, Ana; Nozaki, Kosuke; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Muris, Joris; Miura, Hiroyuki; Feilzer, Albert J

    2016-05-01

    The cytotoxicity of a dental alloy depends on, but is not limited to, the extent of its corrosion behavior. Individual ions may have effects on cell viability that are different from metals interacting within the alloy structure. We aimed to investigate the cytotoxicity of individual metal ions in concentrations similar to those reported to be released from Pd-based dental alloys on mouse fibroblast cells. Metal salts were used to prepare seven solutions (concentration range 100 ppm-1 ppb) of the transition metals, such as Ni(II), Pd(II), Cu(II), and Ag(I), and the metals, such as Ga(III), In(III), and Sn(II). Cytotoxicity on mouse fibroblasts L929 was evaluated using the MTT assay. Ni, Cu, and Ag are cytotoxic at 10 ppm, Pd and Ga at 100 ppm. Sn and In were not able to induce cytotoxicity at the tested concentrations. Transition metals were able to induce cytotoxic effects in concentrations similar to those reported to be released from Pd-based dental alloys. Ni, Cu, and Ag were the most cytotoxic followed by Pd and Ga; Sn and In were not cytotoxic. Cytotoxic reactions might be considered in the etiopathogenesis of clinically observed local adverse reactions. PMID:25549610

  1. Energy Release, Acceleration, and Escape of Solar Energetic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nolfo, G. A.; Ireland, J.; Ryan, J. M.; Young, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Solar flares are prodigious producers of energetic particles, and thus a rich laboratory for studying particle acceleration. The acceleration occurs through the release of magnetic energy, a significant fraction of which can go into the acceleration of particles. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) certainly produce shocks that both accelerate particles and provide a mechanism for escape into the interplanetary medium (IP). What is less well understood is whether accelerated particles produced from the flare reconnection process escape, and if so, how these same particles are related to solar energetic particles (SEPs) detected in-situ. Energetic electron SEPs have been shown to be correlated with Type III radio bursts, hard X-ray emission, and EUV jets, making a very strong case for the connection between acceleration at the flare and escape along open magnetic field lines. Because there has not been a clear signature of ion escape, as is the case with the Type III radio emission for electrons, sorting out the avenues of escape for accelerated flare ions and the possible origin of the impulsive SEPs continues to be a major challenge. The key to building a clear picture of particle escape relies on the ability to map signatures of escape such as EUV jets at the Sun and to follow the progression of these escape signatures as they evolve in time. Furthermore, nuclear γ-ray emissions provide critical context relating ion acceleration to that of escape. With the advent observations from Fermi as well as RHESSI and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the challenge of ion escape from the Sun can now be addressed. We present a preliminary study of the relationship of EUV jets with nuclear γ-ray emission and Type III radio observations and discuss the implications for possible magnetic topologies that allow for ion escape from deep inside the corona to the interplanetary medium.

  2. Cyclic silylated onium ions of group 15 elements.

    PubMed

    Reissmann, Matti; Schäfer, André; Panisch, Robin; Schmidtmann, Marc; Bolte, Michael; Müller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Five- and six-membered cyclic silylated onium ions of group 15 elements I were synthesized by intramolecular cyclization of transient silylium ions II. Silylium ions II were prepared by the hydride transfer reaction from silanes III using trityl cation as hydride acceptor. It was found that smaller ring systems could not be obtained by this approach. In these cases tritylphosphonium ions IV were isolated instead. Cations I and IV were isolated in the form of their tetrakispentafluorphenyl borates and characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and, in two cases, by X-ray diffraction analysis. Cyclic onium ions I showed no reactivity similar to that of isoelectronic intramolecular borane/phosphane frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs). The results of DFT computations at the M05-2X level suggest that the strength of the newly formed Si-E linkage is the major reason for inertness of I[B(C6F5)4] versus molecular hydrogen. PMID:25664605

  3. Trace element siting in iron sulfides from coal determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, R.G. Jr. ); Muir, I.J.; Fyfe, W.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Intact samples of coal have been analyzed by SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry) ion imaging and ion probe techniques for determination of the distribution of trace elements in pyrite and marcasite and in the associated clay minerals. Ion mapping of site-specific concentrations of trace elements is important as one considers the environmental consequences of not only the combustion of coal, but also the disposal of coal-washing plant refuse and the placement of mine spoils during reclamation. Iron sulfides and clays are both involved in the oxidation-hydration reactions that result in the formation of acid waters and the release of trace elements into the ecosystem. Iron sulfides from selected Ohio coals contain site-specific concentrations of Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, As, and Pb. Clay minerals found within and marginal to the sulfides contain V, Cr, and also As and Co. The distribution of trace elements in the sulfides and associated clays clearly is related to microenvironments that existed during the formation of successive parts of the sulfide grains. The sulfide-clay relationships determine the extent to which the sulfides break down in oxidation-hydration reactions.

  4. Molecular ion battery: a rechargeable system without using any elemental ions as a charge carrier

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Masaru; Sano, Hikaru; Ando, Hisanori; Kiyobayashi, Tetsu

    2015-01-01

    Is it possible to exceed the lithium redox potential in electrochemical systems? It seems impossible to exceed the lithium potential because the redox potential of the elemental lithium is the lowest among all the elements, which contributes to the high voltage characteristics of the widely used lithium ion battery. However, it should be possible when we use a molecule-based ion which is not reduced even at the lithium potential in principle. Here we propose a new model system using a molecular electrolyte salt with polymer-based active materials in order to verify whether a molecular ion species serves as a charge carrier. Although the potential of the negative-electrode is not yet lower than that of lithium at present, this study reveals that a molecular ion can work as a charge carrier in a battery and the system is certainly a molecular ion-based “rocking chair” type battery. PMID:26043147

  5. Molecular ion battery: a rechargeable system without using any elemental ions as a charge carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Masaru; Sano, Hikaru; Ando, Hisanori; Kiyobayashi, Tetsu

    2015-06-01

    Is it possible to exceed the lithium redox potential in electrochemical systems? It seems impossible to exceed the lithium potential because the redox potential of the elemental lithium is the lowest among all the elements, which contributes to the high voltage characteristics of the widely used lithium ion battery. However, it should be possible when we use a molecule-based ion which is not reduced even at the lithium potential in principle. Here we propose a new model system using a molecular electrolyte salt with polymer-based active materials in order to verify whether a molecular ion species serves as a charge carrier. Although the potential of the negative-electrode is not yet lower than that of lithium at present, this study reveals that a molecular ion can work as a charge carrier in a battery and the system is certainly a molecular ion-based “rocking chair” type battery.

  6. An evaluation of trace element release associated with acid mine drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Patrick J.; Yelton, Jennifer L.

    1988-12-01

    The determination of trace element release from geologic materials, such as oil shale and coal overburden, is important for proper solid waste management planning. The objective of this study was to determine a correlation between trace element residency and concentration to trace element release using the following methods: (1) sequential selective dissolution for determining trace element residencies, (2) toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), and (3) humidity cell weathering study simulating maximum trace element release. Two eastern oil shales were used, a New albany shale that contains 4.6 percent pyrite, and a Chattanooga shale that contains 1.5 percent pyrite. Each shale was analyzed for elemental concentrations by soluble, adsorbed, organic, carbonate, and sulfide phases. All leachates were analyzed to determine total trace element concentrations. The results of the selective dissolution studies show that each trace element has a unique distribution between the various phases. Thus, it is possible to predict trace element release based on trace element residency. The TCLP results show that this method is suitable for assessing soluble trace element release but does not realistically assess potential hazards. The results of the humidity cell studies do demonstrate a more reasonable method for predicting trace element release and potential water quality hazards. The humidity cell methods, however, require months to obtain the required data with a large number of analytical measurements. When the selective dissolution data are compared to the trace element concentrations in the TCLP and humidity cell leachates, it is shown that leachate concentrations are predicted by the selective dissolution data. Therefore, selective dissolution may represent a rapid method to assess trace element release associated with acid mine drainage.

  7. Angiogenesis in calcium phosphate scaffolds by inorganic copper ion release.

    PubMed

    Barralet, Jake; Gbureck, Uwe; Habibovic, Pamela; Vorndran, Elke; Gerard, Catherine; Doillon, Charles J

    2009-07-01

    Angiogenesis in a tissue-engineered device may be induced by incorporating growth factors (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]), genetically modified cells, and=or vascular cells. It represents an important process during the formation and repair of tissue and is essential for nourishment and supply of reparative and immunological cells. Inorganic angiogenic factors, such as copper ions, are therefore of interest in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering due to their low cost, higher stability, and potentially greater safety compared with recombinant proteins or genetic engineering approaches. The purpose of this study was to compare tissue responses to 3D printed macroporous bioceramic scaffolds implanted in mice that had been loaded with either VEGF or copper sulfate. These factors were spatially localized at the end of a single macropore some 7 mm from the surface of the scaffold. Controls without angiogenic factors exhibited only poor tissue growth within the blocks; in contrast, low doses of copper sulfate led to the formation of microvessels oriented along the macropore axis. Further, wound tissue ingrowth was particularly sensitive to the quantity of copper sulfate and was enhanced at specific concentrations or in combination with VEGF. The potential to accelerate and guide angiogenesis and wound healing by copper ion release without the expense of inductive protein(s) is highly attractive in the area of tissue-engineered bone and offers significant future potential in the field of regenerative biomaterials. PMID:19182977

  8. Rocket having barium release system to create ion clouds in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Stokes, C. S.; Smith, E. W.; Murphy, W. J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A chemical system for releasing a good yield of free barium atoms and barium ions to create ion clouds in the upper atmosphere and interplanetary space for the study of the geophysical properties of the medium is presented.

  9. Multi-element logic gates for trapped-ion qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, T. R.; Gaebler, J. P.; Lin, Y.; Wan, Y.; Bowler, R.; Leibfried, D.; Wineland, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Precision control over hybrid physical systems at the quantum level is important for the realization of many quantum-based technologies. In the field of quantum information processing (QIP) and quantum networking, various proposals discuss the possibility of hybrid architectures where specific tasks are delegated to the most suitable subsystem. For example, in quantum networks, it may be advantageous to transfer information from a subsystem that has good memory properties to another subsystem that is more efficient at transporting information between nodes in the network. For trapped ions, a hybrid system formed of different species introduces extra degrees of freedom that can be exploited to expand and refine the control of the system. Ions of different elements have previously been used in QIP experiments for sympathetic cooling, creation of entanglement through dissipation, and quantum non-demolition measurement of one species with another. Here we demonstrate an entangling quantum gate between ions of different elements which can serve as an important building block of QIP, quantum networking, precision spectroscopy, metrology, and quantum simulation. A geometric phase gate between a 9Be+ ion and a 25Mg+ ion is realized through an effective spin-spin interaction generated by state-dependent forces induced with laser beams. Combined with single-qubit gates and same-species entangling gates, this mixed-element entangling gate provides a complete set of gates over such a hybrid system for universal QIP. Using a sequence of such gates, we demonstrate a CNOT (controlled-NOT) gate and a SWAP gate. We further demonstrate the robustness of these gates against thermal excitation and show improved detection in quantum logic spectroscopy. We also observe a strong violation of a CHSH (Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt)-type Bell inequality on entangled states composed of different ion species.

  10. Multi-element logic gates for trapped-ion qubits.

    PubMed

    Tan, T R; Gaebler, J P; Lin, Y; Wan, Y; Bowler, R; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2015-12-17

    Precision control over hybrid physical systems at the quantum level is important for the realization of many quantum-based technologies. In the field of quantum information processing (QIP) and quantum networking, various proposals discuss the possibility of hybrid architectures where specific tasks are delegated to the most suitable subsystem. For example, in quantum networks, it may be advantageous to transfer information from a subsystem that has good memory properties to another subsystem that is more efficient at transporting information between nodes in the network. For trapped ions, a hybrid system formed of different species introduces extra degrees of freedom that can be exploited to expand and refine the control of the system. Ions of different elements have previously been used in QIP experiments for sympathetic cooling, creation of entanglement through dissipation, and quantum non-demolition measurement of one species with another. Here we demonstrate an entangling quantum gate between ions of different elements which can serve as an important building block of QIP, quantum networking, precision spectroscopy, metrology, and quantum simulation. A geometric phase gate between a (9)Be(+) ion and a (25)Mg(+) ion is realized through an effective spin-spin interaction generated by state-dependent forces induced with laser beams. Combined with single-qubit gates and same-species entangling gates, this mixed-element entangling gate provides a complete set of gates over such a hybrid system for universal QIP. Using a sequence of such gates, we demonstrate a CNOT (controlled-NOT) gate and a SWAP gate. We further demonstrate the robustness of these gates against thermal excitation and show improved detection in quantum logic spectroscopy. We also observe a strong violation of a CHSH (Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt)-type Bell inequality on entangled states composed of different ion species. PMID:26672553

  11. Stopping of energetic light ions in elemental matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, J. F.

    1999-02-01

    The formalism for calculating the stopping of energetic light ions (H, He, and Li) at energies above 1 MeV/u, has advanced to the point that stopping powers may now be calculated with an accuracy of a few percent for all elemental materials. Although the subject has been of interest for a century, only recently have the final required corrections been understood and evaluated. The theory of energetic ion stopping is reviewed with emphasis on those aspects that pertain to the calculation of accurate stopping powers.

  12. Electrodialytic separation of alkali-element ions with the aid of ion-exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Gurskii, V.S.; Moskvin, L.N.

    1988-03-20

    Electrodialytic separation of ions bearing charges of the same sign with the aid of ion-exchange membranes has been examined in the literature in relation to the so-called ideal membranes, which do not exhibit selectivity with respect to one ion type in ion exchange. It has been shown that separation on such membranes is effective only for counterions differing in size of charge. A matter of greater importance from the practical standpoint is the possibility of using electrodialysis for separating ions bearing like charges and having similar properties, including ionic forms of isotopes of the same element. In this paper they report a comparative study of ion separation, with reference to the Cs-Na pair, by electrodialysis through various types of cation-exchange membranes. Changes of the solution concentration in the cathode compartment were monitored by measurement of /sup 22/Na and /sup 137/Cs activities.

  13. Influence of Finite Element Software on Energy Release Rates Computed Using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Goetze, Dirk; Ransom, Jonathon (Technical Monitor)

    2006-01-01

    Strain energy release rates were computed along straight delamination fronts of Double Cantilever Beam, End-Notched Flexure and Single Leg Bending specimens using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT). Th e results were based on finite element analyses using ABAQUS# and ANSYS# and were calculated from the finite element results using the same post-processing routine to assure a consistent procedure. Mixed-mode strain energy release rates obtained from post-processing finite elem ent results were in good agreement for all element types used and all specimens modeled. Compared to previous studies, the models made of s olid twenty-node hexahedral elements and solid eight-node incompatible mode elements yielded excellent results. For both codes, models made of standard brick elements and elements with reduced integration did not correctly capture the distribution of the energy release rate acr oss the width of the specimens for the models chosen. The results suggested that element types with similar formulation yield matching results independent of the finite element software used. For comparison, m ixed-mode strain energy release rates were also calculated within ABAQUS#/Standard using the VCCT for ABAQUS# add on. For all specimens mod eled, mixed-mode strain energy release rates obtained from ABAQUS# finite element results using post-processing were almost identical to re sults calculated using the VCCT for ABAQUS# add on.

  14. Impact of Elevated CO2 on Trace Element Release from Aquifer Sediments of the San Joaquin Valley, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, P. M.; Nico, P. S.; Davis, J. A.; Spycher, N.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a promising technique for mitigating climate change by storing large volumes of carbon dioxide in deep saline aquifers. In California, the thick marine sediments of the Central and Salinas Valleys have been identified as prime targets for future CO2 storage. However, the potential impacts on water quality of overlying drinking-water aquifers must be studied before CCS can be implemented. In this study, we compare trace element release from San Joaquin Valley aquifer sediments with a wide range of textural and redox properties. Kinetic batch experiments were performed with artificial groundwater continuously equilibrated under CO2-saturated (at 1 atm) and background CO2 (0.002-0.006 atm) conditions, resulting in a shift of nearly 3 pH units. In addition, the reversibility of trace element release was studied by sequentially lowering the CO2 from 1.0 atm to 0.5 atm to background concentrations (0.002-0.006 atm) for CO2-saturated systems in order to mimic the dissipation of a CO2 plume in the aquifer. During exposure to high CO2, a number of elements displayed enhanced release compared to background CO2 experiments (Ca, Mg, Li, Si, B, As, Sr, Ni, Fe, Mn, V, Ti, and Co) with concentrations of As, Fe, and Mn exceeding EPA maximum contaminant levels in some cases. On the other hand, Mo and U showed suppressed release. Most intriguing, many of the elements showing enhanced release displayed at least some degree of irreversibility when CO2 concentrations were decreased to background levels. In fact, in some cases (i.e., for V), an element showed further release when CO2 concentrations were decreased. These results suggest that there may be longer-term effects on groundwater quality that persist even after the CO2 plume has dissipated. Several different mechanisms of trace element release including ion exchange, desorption, and carbonate mineral dissolution are explored. Preliminary modeling results suggest that carbonate mineral

  15. Controls on Fe(II)-Activated Trace Element Release from Goethite and Hematite

    SciTech Connect

    Frierdich, Andrew J.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2012-03-26

    Electron transfer and atom exchange (ETAE) between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxides induces surface growth and dissolution that affects trace element fate and transport. We have recently demonstrated Ni(II) cycling through goethite and hematite (adsorbed Ni incorporates into the mineral structure and preincorporated Ni releases to solution) during Fe(II)-Fe(III) ETAE. However, the chemical parameters affecting net trace element release remain unknown. Here, we examine the chemical controls on Ni(II) and Zn(II) release from Ni- and Zn-substituted goethite and hematite during reaction with Fe(II). Release follows a rate law consistent with surface reaction limited mineral dissolution and suggests that release occurs near sites of Fe(III) reductive dissolution during Fe(II)-Fe(III) ETAE. Metal substituent type affects reactivity; Zn release is more pronounced from hematite than goethite, whereas the opposite trend occurs for Ni. Buildup of Ni or Zn in solution inhibits further release but this resumes upon fluid exchange, suggesting that sustained release is possible under flow conditions. Mineral and aqueous Fe(II) concentrations as well as pH strongly affect sorbed Fe(II) concentrations, which directly control the reaction rates and final metal concentrations. Our results demonstrate that structurally incorporated trace elements are mobilized from iron oxides into fluids without abiotic or microbial net iron reduction. Such release may affect micronutrient availability, contaminant transport, and the distribution of redox-inactive trace elements in natural and engineered systems.

  16. Release of soluble elements from biochars derived from various biomass feedstocks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hailu; Che, Xiaodong; Ding, Zhuhong; Hu, Xin; Creamer, Anne Elise; Chen, Hao; Gao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Biochar as soil amendment can increase soil carbon (C) sequestration and mineral nutrients; however, some of its soluble elements may also be unintentionally released during the application. In this work, eight types of biochars were derived from herbaceous, woody, and waste (tailing, manure, sludge) biomass feedstocks through slow pyrolysis at 600 °C in N2. The elemental composition, specific surface area, morphology, crystalline phases, thermal stability, surface functional groups, and pH of the point of zero charge of the biochars were determined using various methods. These properties varied significantly among the tested biochars, suggesting that feedstock type played an important role in controlling their properties. Laboratory release and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure extraction experiments were conducted to evaluate the potential release of nutritious and toxic element from biochars. Results showed that all the biochars released nutritious elements and thus, may be beneficial to plants when amended in soils. In general, biochars produced from herbaceous and woody biomass feedstocks showed low risks of releasing toxic elements. Biochar derived from sludge, however, might present ecotoxicological challenges for its environmental applications due to the release of toxic elements, such as heavy metals. PMID:26408115

  17. A parallel finite element simulator for ion transport through three-dimensional ion channel systems.

    PubMed

    Tu, Bin; Chen, Minxin; Xie, Yan; Zhang, Linbo; Eisenberg, Bob; Lu, Benzhuo

    2013-09-15

    A parallel finite element simulator, ichannel, is developed for ion transport through three-dimensional ion channel systems that consist of protein and membrane. The coordinates of heavy atoms of the protein are taken from the Protein Data Bank and the membrane is represented as a slab. The simulator contains two components: a parallel adaptive finite element solver for a set of Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations that describe the electrodiffusion process of ion transport, and a mesh generation tool chain for ion channel systems, which is an essential component for the finite element computations. The finite element method has advantages in modeling irregular geometries and complex boundary conditions. We have built a tool chain to get the surface and volume mesh for ion channel systems, which consists of a set of mesh generation tools. The adaptive finite element solver in our simulator is implemented using the parallel adaptive finite element package Parallel Hierarchical Grid (PHG) developed by one of the authors, which provides the capability of doing large scale parallel computations with high parallel efficiency and the flexibility of choosing high order elements to achieve high order accuracy. The simulator is applied to a real transmembrane protein, the gramicidin A (gA) channel protein, to calculate the electrostatic potential, ion concentrations and I - V curve, with which both primitive and transformed PNP equations are studied and their numerical performances are compared. To further validate the method, we also apply the simulator to two other ion channel systems, the voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC) and α-Hemolysin (α-HL). The simulation results agree well with Brownian dynamics (BD) simulation results and experimental results. Moreover, because ionic finite size effects can be included in PNP model now, we also perform simulations using a size-modified PNP (SMPNP) model on VDAC and α-HL. It is shown that the size effects in SMPNP can

  18. Reactive-element effect studied using ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.E.; Grabowski, K.S.

    1988-11-01

    Implantation of reactive elements into metals that form chromia layers upon exposure to high temperature oxidizing environments has a very large effect on the growth rate of the oxide and adhesion of the oxide to the base alloy. We have investigated the effect of Y ion implantation on the high temperature oxidation of Fe-24Cr using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and electron microscopy. Analytical tools have been applied to determine the spatial distribution of Y, the microstructure of the oxide, and contribution of oxygen transport to the oxidation process. Results are compared with similar experiments in Fe-Cr alloys with Y additions and with results of cation and anion tracer diffusion experiments. 51 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. An experimental study on major element release from the sediments in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanwei; Yang, Shouye

    2015-06-01

    With the enhanced warming and acidification of global ocean, whether and to what extent the naturally-weathered fluvial sediment into the sea can release elements and thus influence the geochemical process and ecosystem of global ocean remain to be resolved. In this contribution, an experimental study was carried out to examine the release rates of major elements (Ca, K, Mg and Al) from the surface sediments in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) Estuary under the pH values of 4.0, 6.0 and 7.0. The two studied sediments consist primarily of quartz, plagioclase, calcite and clay minerals, with the BET (Brunauer, Emmett and Teller) surface areas of 61.7 m2 g-1 and 23.1 m2 g-1. Major elements of Ca, K, Mg and Al show different release rates under different solution pH values. With the decreasing solution pH, the release rates of Ca and K increase obviously, while the release rates of Mg and Al increase with the initial solution pH varying from 6.0 to 7.0. The different release rates of these elements are closely related to the original mineral composition of the sediments and the reaction kinetics. Based on the experimental observation, quartz and clay minerals that have low dissolution rates may dominate the major element release to the aqueous phase. This study reveals that the enhancing ocean acidification could cause considerable release of major elements from natural terrigenous sediments into the ambient marine environment, which has to be considered carefully in the future study on global change.

  20. Potentially toxic element release by fenton oxidation of sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J P; Asaadi, M; Clarke, B; Ouki, S

    2006-01-01

    The presence, in sewage sludge, of excess levels of the potentially toxic elements (PTE) copper, zinc, chromium, cadmium, nickel, lead and mercury, could impact on our ability to recycle these residues in the future. Far stricter limits on the levels of PTEs are likely in proposed legislation. A method involving the dosing of Fenton's reagent, a mixture of ferrous iron and hydrogen peroxide, under acidic conditions was evaluated for its potential to reduce metal levels. The [Fe]:[H2O2] (w/w) ratio was found to give a good indication of the percentage copper and zinc elution obtainable. Sites with no iron dosing as part of wastewater treatment required extra iron to be added in order to initiate the Fenton's reaction. A significant reduction, in excess of 70%, of the copper and zinc was eluted from both raw primary and activated sludge solid fractions. Cadmium and nickel could be reduced to below detection limits but elution of mercury, lead and chromium was less than 40%. The iron catalyst concentration was found to be a crucial parameter. This process has the potential to reduce the heavy metal content of the sludge and allow the recycling of sludge to continue in a sustainable manner. PMID:17087386

  1. Large areas elemental mapping by ion beam analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. F.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Curado, J. F.; Allegro, P.; Moro, M. V.; Campos, P. H. O. V.; Santos, S. B.; Kajiya, E. A. M.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.

    2015-07-01

    The external beam line of the Laboratory for Material Analysis with Ion Beams (LAMFI) is a versatile setup for multi-technique analysis. X-ray detectors for Particle Induced X-rays Emission (PIXE) measurements, a Gamma-ray detector for Particle Induced Gamma- ray Emission (PIGE), and a particle detector for scattering analysis, such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), were already installed. In this work, we present some results, using a large (60-cm range) XYZ computer controlled sample positioning system, completely developed and build in our laboratory. The XYZ stage was installed at the external beam line and its high spacial resolution (better than 5 μm over the full range) enables positioning the sample with high accuracy and high reproducibility. The combination of a sub-millimeter beam with the large range XYZ robotic stage is being used to produce elemental maps of large areas in samples like paintings, ceramics, stones, fossils, and all sort of samples. Due to its particular characteristics, this is a unique device in the sense of multi-technique analysis of large areas. With the continuous development of the external beam line at LAMFI, coupled to the robotic XYZ stage, it is becoming a robust and reliable option for regular analysis of trace elements (Z > 5) competing with the traditional in-vacuum ion-beam-analysis with the advantage of automatic rastering.

  2. Effect of liposome-albumin coatings on ferric ion retention and release from chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Chandy, T; Sharma, C P

    1996-01-01

    Ferric chloride was embedded in a chitosan matrix to develop a prolonged-release form. The in vitro release profiles of ferric ions from chitosan beads were monitored in 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer, pH 7.4, using a UV spectrophotometer. The amount of drug release was much higher initially, followed by a constant slow release profile for a prolonged period. The initial burst release was substantially modified with liposome and albumin coatings. From scanning electron microscope studies, it appears that the ferric ions diffuse out slowly to the dissolution medium through the micropores of the chitosan matrix. Further, the liposome forms a phospholipid membrane layer in the pores of chitosan beads and encapsulates the ferric ions within their vesicles and controls the release profile. The chitosan beads loaded with ferric ions substantially inhibited the polyurethane-associated calcification, in an in vitro model system. The released ferric ions, appeared to alter the protein-surface binding and improved the biocompatibility of the matrix. The results propose the possibility of modifying the polymer matrix to obtain a desired controlled release of the drug for a prolonged period. PMID:8962949

  3. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with laser ablation metal ions release detection in the human mouth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueerova, Hana; Dostalova, Tatjana; Prochazkova, J.

    2002-06-01

    Presence of more dental alloys in oral cavity often causes pathological symptoms. Due to various and multi-faced symptomatology, they tend to be a source of significant problems not only for the patient but also for the dentist. Metal ions released from alloys can cause subjective and objective symptoms in mouth. The aim of this study was detection of metal elements presence in saliva. There were 4 groups of examined persons: with intact teeth (15 individuals) with metallic restorations, pathological currents 5-30 (mu) A, multi-faced subjective symptomatology and uncharacteristic objective diagnosis (32 patients), with metallic restorations and no subjective symptoms (14 persons) and with metallic restorations, without pathological currents and with problems related to galvanism (13 patients). Presence of 14 metal elements was checked by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with laser ablation. Nd:YAG laser detector was used. There were significant differences in content of silver, gold and mercury between persons with intact teeth and other three groups. There were no differences found between subjects with and without galvanic currents, and presence of subjective and objective symptoms.

  4. Radioactive Fission Product Release from Defective Light Water Reactor Fuel Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Konyashov, Vadim V.; Krasnov, Alexander M.

    2002-04-15

    Results are provided of the experimental investigation of radioactive fission product (RFP) release, i.e., krypton, xenon, and iodine radionuclides from fuel elements with initial defects during long-term (3 to 5 yr) irradiation under low linear power (5 to 12 kW/m) and during special experiments in the VK-50 vessel-type boiling water reactor.The calculation model for the RFP release from the fuel-to-cladding gap of the defective fuel element into coolant was developed. It takes into account the convective transport in the fuel-to-cladding gap and RFP sorption on the internal cladding surface and is in good agreement with the available experimental data. An approximate analytical solution of the transport equation is given. The calculation dependencies of the RFP release coefficients on the main parameters such as defect size, fuel-to-cladding gap, temperature of the internal cladding surface, and radioactive decay constant were analyzed.It is shown that the change of the RFP release from the fuel elements with the initial defects during long-term irradiation is, mainly, caused by fuel swelling followed by reduction of the fuel-to-cladding gap and the fuel temperature. The calculation model for the RFP release from defective fuel elements applicable to light water reactors (LWRs) was developed. It takes into account the change of the defective fuel element parameters during long-term irradiation. The calculation error according to the program does not exceed 30% over all the linear power change range of the LWR fuel elements (from 5 to 26 kW/m)

  5. Fragmentation of water by ion impact: Kinetic energy release spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Rajput, Jyoti; Safvan, C. P.

    2011-11-15

    The fragmentation of isolated water molecules on collision with 450-keV Ar{sup 9+} has been studied using time-of-flight mass spectrometry employing multihit detection. The kinetic energy release spectrum for the dissociation of [H{sub 2}O]{sup 2+ White-Star} into (H{sup White-Star },H{sup +},O{sup +}) fragments has been measured where H{sup White-Star} is a neutral Rydberg hydrogen atom. Ab initio calculations are carried out for the lowest states of [H{sub 2}O]{sup q+} with q=2 and 3 to help interpret the kinetic energy release spectra.

  6. On-demand release of corrosion-inhibiting ions from amorphous Al-Co-Ce alloys.

    PubMed

    Jakab, M A; Scully, J R

    2005-09-01

    Controlled release technologies are often used to supply chemicals or drugs at given rates. Release often occurs on contact with solution. However, some applications, such as corrosion protection, require containment of the active species in a reservoir and their slow release when needed. Conductive polymers have been used as reservoirs for corrosion inhibitors whose triggered release occurs by galvanic reduction or ion exchange. This work shows one of the first examples of pH-controlled release of corrosion-inhibiting ions from an amorphous metallic coating where the pH change that triggers release is a consequence of the onset of corrosion. This corrosion-inhibition strategy provides further corrosion protection beyond the traditional roles of barrier and sacrificial cathodic protection using a metal coating. For instance, zinc galvanizing provides sacrificial cathodic protection and acts as a barrier, but does not supply inhibitor ions. In the coating described here, protection of an underlying structural alloy exposed at coating defects is demonstrated by inhibitor ion release in addition to barrier function and sacrificial cathodic protection. PMID:16086020

  7. Cytotoxicity of Metal Ions Released from Nitinol Alloys on Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, W.; Munroe, N.; Tek, V.; Gill, P. K. S.; Tang, Y.; McGoron, A. J.

    2011-07-01

    Most implantable medical devices are expected to function in the body over an extended period of time. Therefore, immersion tests under simulated conditions can be useful for assessing the amount of metal ions released in situ. In this investigation, dissolved ions from as-received binary and ternary Nitinol alloys in cell culture media were periodically measured under static and dynamic conditions. Endothelial cells were grown in aliquots of culture media obtained and the effect of dissolved ions on cell proliferation and viability of endothelial cells (HUVEC) was studied by cytotoxicity assays. The concentration of metal ions in the media was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  8. An invitro analysis of elemental release and cytotoxicity of recast nickel-chromium dental casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Nagam Raja; Abraham, Anandapandian Ponsekar; Murugesan, Krishnan; Matsa, Vasanthakumar

    2011-06-01

    Recasting of the casting alloys affects the composition and elemental release which may have cytotoxic effect different from the pure alloy in the surrounding tissues. An Invitro study was conducted to investigate the elemental release and their cytotoxic effects from commercially available Ni-Cr dental casting alloys, commonly used for fabricating fixed partial dentures. Three Ni-Cr alloys [Wiron 99(A), Ceramet (B), and Hi Nickel CB (C)] were tested. Alloy specimens (disks 3 × 5 mm) were casted and grouped as follows: Group I (A(1)/B(1)/C(1)): 100% pure alloy; Group II (A(2)/B(2)/C(2)): 50% new with 50% recast; and Group III (A(3)/B(3)/C(3)): 100% recast. Disks of each alloy type from each group were transferred to Dulbecco's modified eagle medium and left for 3 days at 37°C in an atmosphere of 5% CO(2). Ni, Cr, Co, Cu and Mo elemental release from metal alloys into culture medium was investigated using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Cytotoxicity was tested using mouse fibroblast cells and MTT Assay. Controls consisted of 6 wells containing cells with no alloy specimens. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance followed by t-test. The total amount of elements released in parts per billion for various casting groups were Group I, A(1)-6.572, B(1)-6.732, C(1)-8.407; Group II, A(2)-22.046, B(2)-26.450, C(2)-29.189; Group III, A(3)-84.554, B(3)-88.359, C(3)-92.264. More amounts of elements were released in Hi Nickel CB than Ceramet and Wiron 99 in all the three test groups. Percentage of viable cells from MTT analysis were Group I, A(1)-62.342, B(1)-61.322 C(1)-60.593, Group II, A(2)-58.699, B(2)-56.494, C(2)-52.688, Group III, A(3)-53.101, B(3)-52.195, C(3)-47.586. The viable cells present in the culture media were more in Wiron 99 than Ceramet and Hi Nickel CB. Elemental release increased with amount of recast alloy. Amongst the three alloys tested Hi Nickel CB had significantly higher elements released compared to Ceramet and Wiron 99

  9. Release Fractions from Multi-Element Spent Fuel Casks Resulting from HEDD Attack

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, R. E.

    2006-07-01

    This paper provides a simple model for estimating the release of respirable aerosols resulting from an attack on a spent fuel cask using a high energy density device (HEDD). Two primary experiments have provided data on potential releases from spent fuel casks under HEDD attack. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted the first in the early 1980's and the second was sponsored by Gessellshaft fur Anlagen- and Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) in Germany and conducted in France in 1994. Both used surrogate spent fuel assemblies in real casks. The SNL experiments used un-pressurized fuel pin assemblies in a single element cask while the GRS tests used pressurized fuel pin assemblies in a 9-element cask. Data from the two test programs is reasonably consistent, given the differences in the experiments, but the use of the test data for prediction of releases resulting from HEDD attack requires a method for accounting for the effects of pin pressurization release and the ratio of pin plenum gas release to cask free volume (VR). To account for the effects of VR and to link the two data sources, a simple model has been developed that uses both the SNL data and the GRS data as well as recent test data on aerosols produced in experiments with single pellets subjected to HEDD effects conducted under the aegis of the International Consortium's Working Group on Sabotage of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC). (authors)

  10. Graphite corrosion and hydrogen release from HTR fuel elements in Q-brine

    SciTech Connect

    Fachinger, J.; Zhang, Z.X.; Brodda, B.G.

    1995-12-31

    Industrial reprocessing for High Temperature Reactors (HTR) fuel elements has never been installed in Germany. The spent fuel elements are being considered for final disposal in a rock salt repository in the deep geologic underground. Safety analysis requires the assumption of an accidental water ingress into the repository, resulting in the formation of a concentrated salt solution with the typical composition of a quinary brine. After corrosive penetration of the container walls, the brine may finally contact the fuel elements directly and mobilize radionuclides. Duve et al. investigated the leaching of the fission products and actinides from HTR fuel elements in Q-brine. The mobilization of {sup 14}C by graphite corrosion is one of the last data bases required as a source term for the release estimation of radionuclides in the final safety analysis. The evaluation of the hydrogen release was prescribed by the licensing board, because an excessive gas pressure may affect the overall integrity of the geological barrier. {sup 14}C occurs as dissolved organic and inorganic compounds in the brine. The leaching rate or organic {sup 14}C decreases from about 80 Bq to 1 Bq. The amount of organic {sup 14}C decreases from about 80 Bq to 1 Bq during leaching. The release of inorganic {sup 14}C ceases within 4 months. About 100 ppm of the total {sup 14}C inventory was released during leaching. Gaseous {sup 14}C has never been detected. The gas formation is based on the radiolytic degradation of water, with a formation rate of 0.04 to 0.11 ml/d. Gas chromatographic analysis of the gas proved that hydrogen is the main component of the released gas. Tritium and {sup 85}Kr were detected as traces with radio gas chromatography.

  11. Sustained insulin release with biodegradation of chitosan gel beads prepared by copper ions.

    PubMed

    Kofuji, Kyoko; Murata, Yoshifumi; Kawashima, Susumu

    2005-10-13

    Chitosan (CS) gel beads were prepared with chelated copper (II) ions as a vehicle for the delivery of peptide and protein drugs. Insulin, which is a model of peptide and protein drugs, was scarcely released from the CS gel beads in vitro, presumably due to the nature of interactions occurring between insulin, CS and the copper (II) ions. The efficacy of insulin released from the CS gel beads was confirmed by implantation into diabetic mice. A consistent reduction in blood glucose level was observed in vivo due to insulin release as the CS gel beads were degraded. Control over insulin release was achieved by altering the properties of the CS. Thus, CS gel beads are promising as a biocompatible and biodegradable vehicle by which peptide and protein drugs can be delivered. PMID:16139972

  12. Release of elements to natural water from sediments of Lake Roosevelt, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulson, Anthony J.; Cox, Stephen E.

    2007-01-01

    Reservoir sediments from Lake Roosevelt (WA, USA) that were contaminated with smelter waste discharged into the Columbia River (BC, Canada) were examined using three measures of elemental release reflecting varying degrees of physical mixing and time scales. Aqueous concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in the interstitial water of reservoir sediments, in the gently stirred overlying waters of incubated sediment cores, and in supernatants of aggressively tumbled slurries of reservoir sediments generally were higher than the concentrations from a reference site. When compared to chronic water-quality criteria, all three measures of release suggest that slag-contaminated sediments near the U.S.-Canadian border are potentially toxic as a result of Cu release and Pb release in two of the three measures. All three measures of Cd release suggest potential toxicity for one site farther down the reservoir, probably contaminated as a result of transport and adsorption of Cd from smelter liquid waste. Releases of Zn and As did not appear to be potentially toxic. Carbonate geochemistry indirectly affects the potential toxicity by increasing water hardness.

  13. PIXE and micro-PIXE studies of ion release around endosseous implants in animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeni, G. P.; Jaksic, M.; Moschini, G.; Passi, P.; Piattelli, A.; Rossi, P.; Rudello, V.; Tauro, L.

    1996-04-01

    The so-called "osseointegration" of oral and orthopedic implants means that newly-formed bone embeds the alloplastic implant materials allowing long-term clinical success. Commercially pure smooth titanium, rough titanium (sand blasted or plasma spray coated), hydroxylapatite and other coatings present different patterns, especially in the early healing phase after surgery. PIXE and micro-PIXE analysis are to be considered effective techniques to measure ion diffusion at the implant-bone interface, and to evaluate the possible diffusion of metal into the organism. Investigations were carried out in rabbits, both with PIXE and micro-PIXE, to evaluate a possible release of titanium from implants into the tissues and to measure other elements at the bone-implant border. Preliminary results suggest that a minor diffusion of titanium exists, even if probably without any significant clinical disturbance. Indeed, there is some evidence of initial titanium accumulation in some organs after six months. A possible deposition of calcium and phosphorus on the metal might indicate a good biological behavior of titanium.

  14. Niobium Uptake and Release by Bacterial Ferric Ion Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanbo; Harvey, Ian; Campopiano, Dominic; Sadler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Ferric ion binding proteins (Fbps) transport FeIII across the periplasm and are vital for the virulence of many Gram negative bacteria. Iron(III) is tightly bound in a hinged binding cleft with octahedral coordination geometry involving binding to protein side chains (including tyrosinate residues) together with a synergistic anion such as phosphate. Niobium compounds are of interest for their potential biological activity, which has been little explored. We have studied the binding of cyclopentadienyl and nitrilotriacetato NbV complexes to the Fbp from Neisseria gonorrhoeae by UV-vis spectroscopy, chromatography, ICP-OES, mass spectrometry, and Nb K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These data suggest that NbV binds strongly to Fbp and that a dinuclear NbV centre can be readily accommodated in the interdomain binding cleft. The possibility of designing niobium-based antibiotics which block iron uptake by pathogenic bacteria is discussed. PMID:20445753

  15. Effect of calcium ions on the gelling and drug release characteristics of xanthan matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Sasa; Pavli, Matej; Kristl, Julijana

    2008-06-01

    Xanthan is a well-known biopolymer. It is an anionic polysaccharide, whose primary structure depends on the bacterial strain and fermentation conditions. Xanthan was extensively studied in combination with galactomannans, and over 90 patents cover the technology of this preparation. Our aim was to investigate the relation between the physical properties of a xanthan matrix in the absence or presence of calcium ions and its influence on the release of pentoxifylline. The release of pentoxifylline from xanthan tablets in purified water was shown to be very slow and governed by the process of polymer relaxation. The presence of calcium ions significantly increased the drug release, changing the release mechanism into a more diffusion controlled one. Xanthan matrices showed substantially faster and more extensive swelling in water than in the presence of Ca2+ ions. Surprisingly, negative correlation between drug release and degree of swelling was obtained for xanthan: the higher the swelling, the slower the drug release. Higher ionic strength led to lower erosion of xanthan tablets, and the gel layers formed were more rigid and of firmer texture, as shown by rheological experiments and textural profiling. The results indicate that the presence of Ca2+ ions in the solution or in matrices does not cause crosslinking of xanthan polymers, but causes charge screening of ionized groups on the trisaccharide side chains of xanthan, leading to lower inter-molecular repulsion and changing water arrangement. The understanding of the parameters influencing drug release leads to the conclusion that xanthan is suitable for controlled release formulations, especially with the incorporation of certain small counterions. PMID:18248802

  16. Elemental mercury releases attributed to antiques--New York, 2000-2006.

    PubMed

    2007-06-15

    Metallic (i.e., elemental) mercury, a heavy, silvery odorless liquid, is in common household products such as thermostats and thermometers. Lesser-known household sources of elemental mercury include certain antique or vintage items such as clocks, barometers, mirrors, and lamps. Over time, the mercury in these items can leak, particularly as seals age or when the items are damaged, dropped, or moved improperly. Vacuuming a mercury spill or vaporization from spill-contaminated surfaces such as carpets, floors, furniture, mops, or brooms can increase levels of mercury in the air, especially in enclosed spaces. Environmental sampling conducted after releases of elemental mercury have indicated substantial air concentrations that were associated with increases in blood and urine mercury levels among exposed persons. In 1990, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) created the Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) system, a multistate health department surveillance system designed to help reduce morbidity and mortality associated with hazardous substance events. This report describes antique-related mercury releases reported to HSEES, all of which occurred in New York state during 2000-2006. Although none of these spills resulted in symptoms or acute health effects, they required remediation to prevent future mercury exposure. The findings underscore the need for caution when handling antiques containing elemental mercury and the need for proper remediation of spills. PMID:17568369

  17. The release of trace elements in the process of coal coking.

    PubMed

    Konieczyński, Jan; Zajusz-Zubek, Elwira; Jabłońska, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    In order to assess the penetration of individual trace elements into the air through their release in the coal coking process, it is necessary to determine the loss of these elements by comparing their contents in the charge coal and in coke obtained. The present research covered four coke oven batteries differing in age, technology, and technical equipment. By using mercury analyzer MA-2 and the method of ICP MS As, Be, Cd, Co, Hg, Mn, Ni, Se, Sr, Tl, V, and Zn were determined in samples of charge coal and yielded coke. Basing on the analyses results, the release coefficients of selected elements were determined. Their values ranged from 0.5 to 94%. High volatility of cadmium, mercury, and thallium was confirmed. The tests have shown that although the results refer to the selected case studies, it may be concluded that the air purity is affected by controlled emission occurring when coke oven batteries are fired by crude coke oven gas. Fugitive emission of the trace elements investigated, occurring due to coke oven leaks and openings, is small and, is not a real threat to the environment except mercury. PMID:22666104

  18. The Release of Trace Elements in the Process of Coal Coking

    PubMed Central

    Konieczyński, Jan; Zajusz-Zubek, Elwira; Jabłońska, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    In order to assess the penetration of individual trace elements into the air through their release in the coal coking process, it is necessary to determine the loss of these elements by comparing their contents in the charge coal and in coke obtained. The present research covered four coke oven batteries differing in age, technology, and technical equipment. By using mercury analyzer MA-2 and the method of ICP MS As, Be, Cd, Co, Hg, Mn, Ni, Se, Sr, Tl, V, and Zn were determined in samples of charge coal and yielded coke. Basing on the analyses results, the release coefficients of selected elements were determined. Their values ranged from 0.5 to 94%. High volatility of cadmium, mercury, and thallium was confirmed. The tests have shown that although the results refer to the selected case studies, it may be concluded that the air purity is affected by controlled emission occurring when coke oven batteries are fired by crude coke oven gas. Fugitive emission of the trace elements investigated, occurring due to coke oven leaks and openings, is small and, is not a real threat to the environment except mercury. PMID:22666104

  19. Antimicrobial Activity of Silver Ions Released from Zeolites Immobilized on Cellulose Nanofiber Mats.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Katrina A; Cho, Hong Je; Yeung, Hiu Fai; Fan, Wei; Schiffman, Jessica D

    2016-02-10

    In this study, we exploit the high silver ion exchange capability of Linde Type A (LTA) zeolites and present, for the first time, electrospun nanofiber mats decorated with in-house synthesized silver (Ag(+)) ion exchanged zeolites that function as molecular delivery vehicles. LTA-Large zeolites with a particle size of 6.0 μm were grown on the surface of the cellulose nanofiber mats, whereas LTA-Small zeolites (0.2 μm) and three-dimensionally ordered mesoporous-imprinted (LTA-Meso) zeolites (0.5 μm) were attached to the surface of the cellulose nanofiber mats postsynthesis. After the three zeolite/nanofiber mat assemblies were ion-exchanged with Ag(+) ions, their ion release profiles and ability to inactivate Escherichia coli (E. coli) K12 were evaluated as a function of time. LTA-Large zeolites immobilized on the nanofiber mats displayed more than an 11 times greater E. coli K12 inactivation than the Ag-LTA-Large zeolites that were not immobilized on the nanofiber mats. This study demonstrates that by decorating nanometer to micrometer scale Ag(+) ion-exchanged zeolites on the surface of high porosity, hydrophilic cellulose nanofiber mats, we can achieve a tunable release of Ag(+) ions that inactivate bacteria faster and are more practical to use in applications over powder zeolites. PMID:26788882

  20. Effects of Ion-Releasing Tooth-Coating Material on Demineralization of Bovine Tooth Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Koji; Kambara, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    We compared the effect of a novel ion-releasing tooth-coating material that contained S-PRG (surface-reaction type prereacted glass-ionomer) filler to that of non-S-PRG filler and nail varnish on the demineralization of bovine enamel subsurface lesions. The demineralization process of bovine enamel was examined using quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) and electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) measurement. Ion concentrations in demineralizing solution were measured using inductively coupled plasma atomic (ICP) emission spectrometry and an ion electrode. The nail varnish group and the non-S-PRG filler group showed linear demineralization. Although the nail varnish group and the non-S-PRG filler group showed linear demineralization, the S-PRG filler group did not. Further, plane-scanning by EPMA analysis in the S-PRG filler group showed no changes in Ca ion distribution, and F ions showed peak levels on the surface of enamel specimens. Most ions in the demineralizing solution were present at higher concentrations in the S-PRG filler group than in the other two groups. In conclusion, only the S-PRG filler-containing tooth-coating material released ions and inhibited demineralization around the coating. PMID:24578706

  1. Electron Beam Distruption due to Ion Release from Targets - Comparison Between Computer Calculations and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Thomas P.; Davis, Harold A.; Vermare, Christophe; Moir, David C.; Olson, Russell T.; Monty Wood, W.

    2001-10-01

    Experiments have been performed on the first axis of the DARHT electron beam accelerator to study the effects on the beam of ion emission from surfaces struck by electrons (see preceding abstract). Calculations using the two- and three-dimensional Lsp particle-in-cell code were performed to compare with experimental results. Two-dimensional calculations, which allow the release of ions when the impacted surface temperature increases by 300 deg C, accurately replicate the experimental results showing beam blow-up downstream of the surface just after ion emission. Three-dimensional calculations show the onset of a hose instability after beam blow up in agreement with observations. A comparison of calculations to identify the dominant ion species with direct ion measurements will be presented.

  2. Does Ion Release Differ Between Hip Resurfacing and Metal-on-metal THA?

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Antonio; Cadossi, Matteo; Baldini, Nicola; Giannini, Sandro

    2008-01-01

    Modern metal-on-metal hip resurfacing was introduced as a bone-preserving method of joint reconstruction for young and active patients; however, the large diameter of the bearing surfaces is of concern for potential increased metal ion release. We hypothesized there were no differences in serum concentrations of chromium, cobalt, and molybdenum between patients who had metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (Group A; average head diameter, 48 mm; median followup, 24 months) and patients who had 28-mm metal-on-metal THA (Group B; median followup, 25 months). Serum concentrations also were compared with concentrations in healthy subjects. We identified no differences in ion levels between Groups A and B. A distinction was made according to gender. Women showed a higher chromium release in Group A whereas men had a higher cobalt release in Group B. Values obtained from Group A were higher than those of the control subjects. Our data suggest metal-on-metal bearings for THA should not be rejected because of concern regarding potential increased metal ion release; however, patients with elevated ion levels, even without loosening or toxicity, could be at higher risk and should be followed up periodically. Level of Evidence: Level III, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18196364

  3. Ion release and pH of a new endodontic cement, MTA and Portland cement

    PubMed Central

    Amini Ghazvini, Sara; Abdo Tabrizi, Maryam; Kobarfard, Farzad; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza; Asgary, Saeed

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This in vitro study measured and compared pH and phosphate and calcium ions release of a new endodontic material (CEM cement), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and Portland cement (PC) using UV-visible technique, atomic absorption spectrophotometry methods, and pH meter, respectively. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Each material was placed in a plastic tube (n=10) and immersed in a glass flask containing deionized water. Half of the samples were tested for determining pH and released ions after 1h, 3h, 24h, 48h, 7d and 28d. Remaining samples (n=5), were evaluated after 28d. Data was analyzed using one way ANOVA and Tukey tests. RESULTS: Results indicated that all materials were highly alkaline and released calcium and low concentration of phosphate ions in all the time intervals. CEM cement released considerably higher concentration of phosphate during the first hour (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: This novel endodontic cement promoted alkaline pH in a similar manner to MTA and released calcium and phosphate. These conditions can stimulate the calcification process and explain the basic physico-chemical mechanisms of hard tissue regeneration of CEM cement. PMID:23940490

  4. Controlling ion release from bioactive glass foam scaffolds with antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Jones, Julian R; Ehrenfried, Lisa M; Saravanapavan, Priya; Hench, Larry L

    2006-11-01

    Bioactive glass scaffolds have been produced, which meet many of the criteria for an ideal scaffold for bone tissue engineering applications, by foaming sol-gel derived bioactive glasses. The scaffolds have a hierarchical pore structure that is very similar to that of cancellous bone. The degradation products of bioactive glasses have been found to stimulate the genes in osteoblasts. This effect has been found to be dose dependent. The addition of silver ions to bioactive glasses has also been investigated to produce glasses with bactericidal properties. This paper discusses how changes in the hierarchical pore structure affect the dissolution of the glass and therefore its bioactivity and rate of ion delivery and demonstrates that silver containing bioactive glass foam scaffolds can be synthesised. It was found that the rate of release of Si and Ca ions was more rapid for pore structures with a larger modal pore diameter, although the effect of tailoring the textural porosity on the rate of ion release was more pronounced. Bioactive glass scaffolds, containing 2 mol% silver, released silver ions at a rate that was similar to that which has previously been found to be bactericidal but not high enough to be cytotoxic to bone cells. PMID:17122909

  5. pH-dependent release of trace elements including platinum group elements (PGEs) from gasoline and diesel catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucha, Veronika; Mihaljevic, Martin; Ettler, Vojtech; Strnad, Ladislav

    2014-05-01

    The release of trace metals and platinum group elements (PGEs) from automobile exhaust catalysts represents a remarkable source of higly dispersed environmental contamination. Especially, PGEs have shown increasing research interest due to their possible bioaccessibility. In our research, we focused on leaching behaviour of trace metals from gasoline and diesel automobile catalysts. While catalysts for gasoline engines contain a mixture of Pt-Pd-Rh or Pd-Rh, catalysts for diesel engines are composed only of Pt. We used dust from two crushed gasoline and two crushed diesel catalysts (new and aged). The dust of gasoline catalysts contains significant concentrations of Pt (700 mg.kg-1), Pd (11 000 mg.kg-1) and Rh (700 mg.kg-1). And the dust of diesel catalysts are composed of Pt (3 900 mg.kg-1) and they contains negligible amounts of Pd dan Rh (< 0.5 mg.kg-1, < 0.1 mg.kg-1, respectively). To evaluate leaching of trace metals from dust we used pH-stat leaching test according to the European standard CEN/TS 14997. The concentrations of cations: PGEs (Pt, Pd a Rh), K, Na, Ca, Mg, Al, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, La and Ce were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), and anions: F-, Cl-, SO42- and NO3- by high-performance liquid chromatography. Although the dusts from catalysts were relatively stable to acid/base influence, the leaching of trace metals from catalysts showed a dependence on pH. Generally, the highest concentrations were released under acidic conditions. The leaching of PGEs was higher for Pt in diesel catalysts and for Pd and Rh in gasoline catalysts. The highest concentrations of Zn and Pb were observed in old catalysts. The rare earth metals were released more from gasoline catalysts. Catalysts particles represent health risk especially with respect to their PGEs contents.

  6. Metal ion-induced toxic histamine release from human basophils and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Schedle, A; Samorapoompichit, P; Füreder, W; Rausch-Fan, X H; Franz, A; Sperr, W R; Sperr, W; Slavicek, R; Simak, S; Klepetko, W; Ellinger, A; Ghannadan, M; Baghestanian, M; Valent, P

    1998-03-15

    Recent data suggest that distinct metal ions can be released from dental alloys or other biomaterials, and may cause toxic effects on various cells. In this study, the effects of 14 metal ions on histamine release from human blood basophils (n = 4), isolated tissue mast cells (lung n = 8, uterus n = 2, skin n = 1, gingiva n = 1), the basophil cell line KU-812, and the mast cell line HMC-1 were analyzed. Of the 14 metal ions, Ag+ (0.33 mM) and Hg2+ (0.33 mM) were found to induce release of histamine in blood basophils, KU-812, mast cells, and HMC-1. The effects of Ag+ and Hg2+ were dose dependent and were observed within 60 min of incubation. In primary mast cells and basophils, AU3+ (0.33 mM) also induced histamine release, whereas no effects of Au3+ on HMC-1 or KU-812 cells were seen. The other metal ions showed no effects on primary or immortal cells within 60 min. However, Pt4+ (0.33 mM) induced histamine liberation in HMC-1 and lung mast cells after 12 h. The Ag+- and Hg2+-induced rapid release of histamine from HMC-1 was associated with ultrastructural signs of necrosis, but not apoptosis. In contrast, prolonged exposure to Pt4+ (0.33 mM, 14 h) induced apoptotic cell death in HMC-1 cells, as assessed by electron microscopy and DNA analysis. Together, certain metal ions induce distinct cytopathogenic effects in mast cells and basophils. Whereas Ag+, Hg2+, and Au3+ cause direct toxicity, Pt4 causes cell death through induction of apoptosis. Whether such effects contribute to local adverse reactions to metal-containing biomaterials in vivo remains to be determined. PMID:9492216

  7. Dynamic analysis of elemental mercury released from thermal decomposition of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Shaoqing Guo; Jianli Yang; Zhenyu Liu

    2009-09-15

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic and ubiquitous trace element in coal. Monitoring its release behavior during coal processing is a challenging problem. This paper presents a method that is capable of online measurement of the dynamic release behavior of elemental Hg (Hg{sup 0}) from thermal decomposition of coal. The method couples a temperature-programmed decomposition unit with an atomic fluorescence spectrometry detector (TPD-AFS). The AFS signal can be converted to Hg content for quantitative analysis through calibration. The main advantage of the TPD-AFS system is that it can provide either real-time or accumulated data. It was confirmed that the amount of Hg{sup 0} determined by this method agreed well with that by the Ontario-Hydro method, and the results are reproducible with a high accuracy. The method can be used to characterize the release behavior of Hg in coals upon heating and may be used to identify the forms of occurrence of Hg in coals. 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Intracellular accumulation of indium ions released from nanoparticles induces oxidative stress, proinflammatory response and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Tabei, Yosuke; Sonoda, Akinari; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Makita, Yoji; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Horie, Masanori

    2016-02-01

    Due to the widespread use of indium tin oxide (ITO), it is important to investigate its effect on human health. In this study, we evaluated the cellular effects of ITO nanoparticles (NPs), indium chloride (InCl3) and tin chloride (SnCl3) using human lung epithelial A549 cells. Transmission electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry were employed to study cellular ITO NP uptake. Interestingly, greater uptake of ITO NPs was observed, as compared with soluble salts. ITO NP species released could be divided into two types: 'indium release ITO' or 'tin release ITO'. We incubated A549 cells with indium release ITO, tin release ITO, InCl3 or SnCl2 and investigated oxidative stress, proinflammatory response, cytotoxicity and DNA damage. We found that intracellular reactive oxygen species were increased in cells incubated with indium release ITO, but not tin release ITO, InCl3 or SnCl2. Messenger RNA and protein levels of the inflammatory marker, interleukin-8, also increased following exposure to indium release ITO. Furthermore, the alkaline comet assay revealed that intracellular accumulation of indium ions induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that the accumulation of ionic indium, but not ionic tin, from ITO NPs in the intracellular matrix has extensive cellular effects. PMID:26378248

  9. Antibacterial activity and ion release of bonding agent containing amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Weir, Michael D.; Cheng, Lei; Lin, Nancy; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Chow, Laurence C.; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Recurrent caries at the margins is a primary reason for restoration failure. The objectives of this study were to develop bonding agent with the double benefits of antibacterial and remineralizing capabilities, to investigate the effects of NACP filler level and solution pH on Ca and P ion release from adhesive, and to examine the antibacterial and dentin bond properties. Methods Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and a quaternary ammonium monomer (dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate, DMADDM) were synthesized. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) primer and adhesive served as control. DMADDM was incorporated into primer and adhesive at 5% by mass. NACP was incorporated into adhesive at filler mass fractions of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model was used to test the antibacterial bonding agents. Calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion releases from the cured adhesive samples were measured vs. filler level and solution pH of 7, 5.5 and 4. Results Adding 5% DMADDM and 10–40% NACP into bonding agent, and water-aging for 28 days, did not affect dentin bond strength, compared to SBMP control at 1 day (p > 0.1). Adding DMADDM into bonding agent substantially decreased the biofilm metabolic activity and lactic acid production. Total microorganisms, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci were greatly reduced for bonding agents containing DMADDM. Increasing NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive increased the Ca and P ion release by an order of magnitude. Decreasing solution pH from 7 to 4 increased the ion release from adhesive by 6–10 folds. Significance Bonding agents containing antibacterial DMADDM and remineralizer NACP were formulated to have Ca and P ion release, which increased with NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive. NACP adhesive was “smart” and dramatically increased the ion release at cariogenic pH 4, when these ions would be most-needed to inhibit caries. Therefore, bonding agent

  10. Finite Element Analysis of Silicon Thin Films on Soft Substrates as Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Joseph

    2011-12-01

    The wide-scale use of green technologies such as electric vehicles has been slowed due to insufficient means of storing enough portable energy. Therefore it is critical that efficient storage mediums be developed in order to transform abundant renewable energy into an on-demand source of power. Lithium (Li) ion batteries are seeing a stream of improvements as they are introduced into many consumer electronics, electric vehicles and aircraft, and medical devices. Li-ion batteries are well suited for portable applications because of their high energy-to-weight ratios, high energy densities, and reasonable life cycles. Current research into Li-ion batteries is focused on enhancing its energy density, and by changing the electrode materials, greater energy capacities can be realized. Silicon (Si) is a very attractive option because it has the highest known theoretical charge capacity. Current Si anodes, however, suffer from early capacity fading caused by pulverization from the stresses induced by large volumetric changes that occur during charging and discharging. An innovative system aimed at resolving this issue is being developed. This system incorporates a thin Si film bonded to an elastomeric substrate which is intended to provide the desired stress relief. Non-linear finite element simulations have shown that a significant amount of deformation can be accommodated until a critical threshold of Li concentration is reached; beyond which buckling is induced and a wavy structure appears. When compared to a similar system using rigid substrates where no buckling occurs, the stress is reduced by an order of magnitude, significantly prolonging the life of the Si anode. Thus the stress can be released at high Li-ion diffusion induced strains by buckling the Si thin film. Several aspects of this anode system have been analyzed including studying the effects of charge rate and thin film plasticity, and the results are compared with preliminary empirical measurements to

  11. Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Energy: Summaries of Program Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Kaganovich, I; Seidl, P A; Briggs, R J; Faltens, A; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Logan, B G

    2011-02-28

    The goal of the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program is to apply high-current accelerator technology to IFE power production. Ion beams of mass {approx}100 amu and kinetic energy {>=} 1 GeV provide efficient energy coupling into matter, and HIF enjoys R&D-supported favorable attributes of: (1) the driver, projected to be robust and efficient; see 'Heavy Ion Accelerator Drivers.'; (2) the targets, which span a continuum from full direct to full indirect drive (and perhaps fast ignition), and have metal exteriors that enable injection at {approx}10 Hz; see 'IFE Target Designs'; (3) the near-classical ion energy deposition in the targets; see 'Beam-Plasma Interactions'; (4) the magnetic final lens, robust against damage; see 'Final Optics-Heavy Ion Beams'; and (5) the fusion chamber, which may use neutronically-thick liquids; see 'Liquid-Wall Chambers.' Most studies of HIF power plants have assumed indirect drive and thick liquid wall protection, but other options are possible.

  12. Release of toxic Gd3+ ions to tumour cells by vitamin B12 bioconjugates.

    PubMed

    Siega, Patrizia; Wuerges, Jochen; Arena, Francesca; Gianolio, Eliana; Fedosov, Sergey N; Dreos, Renata; Geremia, Silvano; Aime, Silvio; Randaccio, Lucio

    2009-08-10

    Two probes consisting of vitamin B(12) (CNCbl) conjugated to Gd chelates by esterification of the ribose 5'-OH moiety, Gd-DTPA-CNCbl (1; DTPA = diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N'',N''-pentaacetic acid) and Gd-TTHA-CNCbl (2; TTHA = triethylenetetramine-N,N,N',N'',N''',N'''-hexaacetic acid), have been synthesised and characterised. The crystal structure of a dimeric form of 1, obtained by crystallisation with an excess of GdCl(3), has been determined. The kinetics of binding to and dissociation from transcobalamin II show that 1 and 2 maintain high-affinity binding to the vitamin B(12) transport protein. Complex 2 is very stable with respect to Gd(3+) release owing to the saturated co-ordination of the Gd(3+) ion by four amino and five carboxylate groups. Hydrolysis of the ester functionality occurs on the time scale of several hours. The lack of saturation and the possible involvement of the ester functionality in co-ordination result in lower stability of 1 towards hydrolysis and in a considerable release of Gd(3+) in vitro. Gd(3+) ions released from 1 are avidly taken up by the K562 tumour cells to an extent corresponding to approximately 10(10) Gd(3+) per cell. The internalisation of toxic Gd(3+) ions causes a marked decrease in cell viability as assessed by Trypan blue and WST-1 tests. On the contrary, the experiments with the more stable 2 did not show any significant cell internalisation of Gd(3+) ions and any influence on cell viability. The results point to new avenues of in situ generation of cytotoxic pathways based on the release of toxic Gd(3+) ions by vitamin B(12) bioconjugates. PMID:19562781

  13. The effect of humic acids on the element release from high level waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Van Iseghem, P.

    1997-12-31

    Eu and Am doped glasses were interacted with synthetic interstitial clay water (SiC) and corresponding reference leachant, humic acids free interstitial solution (IS) to investigate the influence of humic acids on the leaching behavior of the waste glass. Static leach tests were carried out at 40 C and 90 C. The release of the lanthanide Eu and the actinide Am from the glass was obviously enhanced by the presence of humic acids. The leaching of transition elements, Fe and Ti strongly depends on the humic acids concentration. The leaching of glass matrix components, Al and B was also influenced by the concentrations of humic acids. However, humic acids have little effect on the leaching of glass matrix element Si.

  14. Using support vector machines to improve elemental ion identification in macromolecular crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Morshed, Nader; Echols, Nathaniel; Adams, Paul D.

    2015-05-01

    A method to automatically identify possible elemental ions in X-ray crystal structures has been extended to use support vector machine (SVM) classifiers trained on selected structures in the PDB, with significantly improved sensitivity over manually encoded heuristics. In the process of macromolecular model building, crystallographers must examine electron density for isolated atoms and differentiate sites containing structured solvent molecules from those containing elemental ions. This task requires specific knowledge of metal-binding chemistry and scattering properties and is prone to error. A method has previously been described to identify ions based on manually chosen criteria for a number of elements. Here, the use of support vector machines (SVMs) to automatically classify isolated atoms as either solvent or one of various ions is described. Two data sets of protein crystal structures, one containing manually curated structures deposited with anomalous diffraction data and another with automatically filtered, high-resolution structures, were constructed. On the manually curated data set, an SVM classifier was able to distinguish calcium from manganese, zinc, iron and nickel, as well as all five of these ions from water molecules, with a high degree of accuracy. Additionally, SVMs trained on the automatically curated set of high-resolution structures were able to successfully classify most common elemental ions in an independent validation test set. This method is readily extensible to other elemental ions and can also be used in conjunction with previous methods based on a priori expectations of the chemical environment and X-ray scattering.

  15. INDUCTIVELY COUPLED ARGON PLASMA AS AN ION SOURCE FOR MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETERMINATION OF TRACE ELEMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solution aerosols are injected into an inductively coupled argon plasma (ICP) to generate a relatively high number density of positive ions derived from elemental constituents. A small fraction of these ions is extracted through a sampling orifice into a differentially pumped vac...

  16. FINAL REPORT. F-ELEMENT ION CHELATION IN HIGHLY BASIC MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large body of data has been collected over the last fifty years on the chemical behaviorof f-element ions. The ions undergo rapid hydrolysis reactions in neutral or basic aqueoussolutions that produce poorly understood oxide-hydroxide species; therefore, most of thefundament...

  17. Nanoscale surface structuring during ion bombardment of elemental semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzenberg, Eitan

    2013-01-01

    Nano-patterning of surfaces with uniform ion bombardment yields a rich phase-space of topographic patterns. Particle irradiation can cause surface ultra-smoothing or self-organized nanoscale pattern formation in surface topography. Topographic pattern formation has previously been attributed to the effects of the removal of target atoms by sputter erosion. In this thesis, the surface morphology evolution of Si(100) and Ge(100) during low energy ion bombardment of Ar+ and Kr+ ions, respectively, is studied. Our facilities for studies of surface processes at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) allow in-situ characterization of surface morphology evolution during ion bombardment using grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS). This technique is used to measure in reciprocal space the kinetics of formation or decay of correlated nanostructures on the surface, effectively measuring the height-height correlations. A linear model is used to characterize the early time kinetic behavior during ion bombardment as a function of ion beam incidence angle. The curvature coefficients predicted by the widely used erosive model of Bradley and Harper are quantitatively negligible and of the wrong sign when compared to the observed effect in both Si and Ge. A mass-redistribution model explains the observed ultra-smoothing at low angles, exhibits an instability at higher angles, and predicts the observed 45° critical angle separating these two regimes in Si. The Ge surface evolution during Kr+ irradiation is qualitatively similar to that observed for Ar+ irradiation of Si at the same ion energy. However, the critical angle for Ge cannot be quantitatively reproduced by the simple mass redistribution model. Crater function theory, as developed by Norris et al., incorporates both mass redistributive and erosive effects, and predicts constraining relationships between curvature coefficients. These constraints are compared to experimental data of both Si and Ge

  18. The Gypsy Database (GyDB) of mobile genetic elements: release 2.0.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Carlos; Futami, Ricardo; Covelli, Laura; Domínguez-Escribá, Laura; Viu, Jose M; Tamarit, Daniel; Aguilar-Rodríguez, Jose; Vicente-Ripolles, Miguel; Fuster, Gonzalo; Bernet, Guillermo P; Maumus, Florian; Munoz-Pomer, Alfonso; Sempere, Jose M; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andres

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the second release of the Gypsy Database of Mobile Genetic Elements (GyDB 2.0): a research project devoted to the evolutionary dynamics of viruses and transposable elements based on their phylogenetic classification (per lineage and protein domain). The Gypsy Database (GyDB) is a long-term project that is continuously progressing, and that owing to the high molecular diversity of mobile elements requires to be completed in several stages. GyDB 2.0 has been powered with a wiki to allow other researchers participate in the project. The current database stage and scope are long terminal repeats (LTR) retroelements and relatives. GyDB 2.0 is an update based on the analysis of Ty3/Gypsy, Retroviridae, Ty1/Copia and Bel/Pao LTR retroelements and the Caulimoviridae pararetroviruses of plants. Among other features, in terms of the aforementioned topics, this update adds: (i) a variety of descriptions and reviews distributed in multiple web pages; (ii) protein-based phylogenies, where phylogenetic levels are assigned to distinct classified elements; (iii) a collection of multiple alignments, lineage-specific hidden Markov models and consensus sequences, called GyDB collection; (iv) updated RefSeq databases and BLAST and HMM servers to facilitate sequence characterization of new LTR retroelement and caulimovirus queries; and (v) a bibliographic server. GyDB 2.0 is available at http://gydb.org. PMID:21036865

  19. The Gypsy Database (GyDB) of mobile genetic elements: release 2.0

    PubMed Central

    Llorens, Carlos; Futami, Ricardo; Covelli, Laura; Domínguez-Escribá, Laura; Viu, Jose M.; Tamarit, Daniel; Aguilar-Rodríguez, Jose; Vicente-Ripolles, Miguel; Fuster, Gonzalo; Bernet, Guillermo P.; Maumus, Florian; Munoz-Pomer, Alfonso; Sempere, Jose M.; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andres

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the second release of the Gypsy Database of Mobile Genetic Elements (GyDB 2.0): a research project devoted to the evolutionary dynamics of viruses and transposable elements based on their phylogenetic classification (per lineage and protein domain). The Gypsy Database (GyDB) is a long-term project that is continuously progressing, and that owing to the high molecular diversity of mobile elements requires to be completed in several stages. GyDB 2.0 has been powered with a wiki to allow other researchers participate in the project. The current database stage and scope are long terminal repeats (LTR) retroelements and relatives. GyDB 2.0 is an update based on the analysis of Ty3/Gypsy, Retroviridae, Ty1/Copia and Bel/Pao LTR retroelements and the Caulimoviridae pararetroviruses of plants. Among other features, in terms of the aforementioned topics, this update adds: (i) a variety of descriptions and reviews distributed in multiple web pages; (ii) protein-based phylogenies, where phylogenetic levels are assigned to distinct classified elements; (iii) a collection of multiple alignments, lineage-specific hidden Markov models and consensus sequences, called GyDB collection; (iv) updated RefSeq databases and BLAST and HMM servers to facilitate sequence characterization of new LTR retroelement and caulimovirus queries; and (v) a bibliographic server. GyDB 2.0 is available at http://gydb.org. PMID:21036865

  20. Computation of strain energy release rates for skin-stiffener debonds modeled with plate elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. T.; Raju, I. S.; Davila, C. G.; Sleight, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    An efficient method for predicting the strength of debonded composite skin-stiffener configurations is presented. This method, which is based on fracture mechanics, models the skin and the stiffener with two-dimensional (2D) plate elements instead of three-dimensional (3D) solid elements. The skin and stiffener flange nodes are tied together by two modeling techniques. In one technique, the corresponding flange and skin nodes are required to have identical translational and rotational degrees-of-freedom. In the other technique, the corresponding flange and skin nodes are only required to have identical translational degrees-of-freedom. Strain energy release rate formulas are proposed for both modeling techniques. These formulas are used for skin-stiffener debond cases with and without cylindrical bending deformations. The cylindrical bending results are compared with plane-strain finite element results. Excellent agreement between the two sets of results is obtained when the second technique is used. Thus, from these limited studies, a preferable modeling technique for skin-stiffener debond analysis using plate elements is established.

  1. Effect of simulated rainfall and weathering on release of preservative elements from CCA treated wood.

    PubMed

    Lebow, Stan; Williams, R Sam; Lebow, Patricia

    2003-09-15

    The release of arsenic from wood pressure-treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) can be decreased by application of wood finishes, but little is known about the types of finishes that are best suited for this purpose. This study evaluated the effects of finish water repellent content and ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the release of arsenic, copper, and chromium from CCA-treated wood exposed to simulated rainfall. Deck boards treated with CCA were either left unfinished or dipped in a finish prepared with 1%, 3%, or 5% water repellent. All specimens were exposed to leaching from simulated rainfall, and a subset of specimens was also exposed to UV radiation. The rainfall was collected and analyzed for total elemental arsenic, copper, and chromium. The water repellent significantly decreased the amounts of these elements in the runoff, but for the short duration of this study there was no difference among the three water repellent concentrations. It is possible that water repellent content would have a greater effect over a longer exposure period. Exposure to UV radiation caused a significant increase in leaching from both finished and unfinished specimens. This effect may be a result of increased surface area during weathering as well as loss of fibers caused by UV-induced surface erosion. PMID:14524438

  2. Ion release from, and fluoride recharge of a composite with a fluoride-containing bioactive glass

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Harry B.; Gwinner, Fernanda; Mitchell, John C.; Ferracane, Jack L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Materials that are capable of releasing ions such as calcium and fluoride, that are necessary for remineralization of dentin and enamel, have been the topic of intensive research for many years. The source of calcium has most often been some form of calcium phosphate, and that for fluoride has been one of several metal fluoride or hexafluorophosphate salts. Fluoride-containing bioactive glass (BAG) prepared by the sol-gel method acts as a single source of both calcium and fluoride ions in aqueous solutions. The objective of this investigation was to determine if BAG, when added to a composite formulation, can be used as a single source for calcium and fluoride ion release over an extended time period, and to determine if the BAG-containing composite can be recharged upon exposure to a solution of 5,000 ppm fluoride. Methods BAG 61 (61% Si; 31% Ca; 4% P; 3% F; 1% B) and BAG 81 (81% Si; 11% Ca; 4% P; 3% F; 1% B) were synthesized by the sol gel method. The composite used was composed of 50/50 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA, 0.8% EDMAB, 0.4% CQ, and 0.05% BHT, combined with a mixture of BAG (15%) and strontium glass (85%) to a total filler load of 72% by weight. Disks were prepared, allowed to age for 24 h, abraded, then placed into DI water. Calcium and fluoride release was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy and fluoride ion selective electrode methods, respectively, after 2, 22, and 222 h. The composite samples were then soaked for 5 min in an aqueous 5,000 ppm fluoride solution, after which calcium and fluoride release was again measured at 2, 22, and 222 h time points. Results Prior to fluoride recharge, release of fluoride ions was similar for the BAG 61 and BAG 81 composites after 2 h, and also similar after 22 h. At the four subsequent time points, one prior to, and three following fluoride recharge, the BAG 81 composite released significantly more fluoride ions (p<0.05). Both composites were recharged by exposure to 5,000 ppm fluoride, although the BAG 81

  3. Injection of metallic elements into an electron-beam ion trap using a Knudsen cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, C.; Nagata, K.; Nakamura, N.; Ohtani, S.; Takahashi, S.; Tobiyama, T.; Tona, M.; Watanabe, H.; Yoshiyasu, N.; Sakurai, M.; Kavanagh, A. P.; Currell, F. J.

    2006-06-15

    A method of injecting metallic elements into an electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) is described. The method is advantageous over the conventional coaxial and pulsed injection methods in two ways: (a) complicated switching of injection and extraction beams can be avoided when extracting beams of highly charged ions from the EBIT and (b) a beam of stable intensity can be achieved. This method may be applicable to any metallic elements or metallic compounds that have vapor pressures of {approx}0.1 Pa at a temperature lower than 1900 deg. C. We have employed this method for the extraction of highly charged ions of Bi, Er, Fe, and Ho.

  4. Bone Cell–materials Interactions and Ni Ion Release of Anodized Equiatomic NiTi Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Sheldon A.; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Davies, Neal M.; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2011-01-01

    Laser processed NiTi alloy was anodized for different durations in H2SO4 electrolyte with varying pH to create biocompatible surfaces with low Ni ion release as well as bioactive surfaces to enhance biocompatibility and bone cell-materials interactions. The anodized surfaces were assessed for their in vitro cell-materials interactions using human fetal osteoblast (hFOB) cells for 3, 7 and 11 days, and Ni ion release up to 8 weeks in simulated body fluids. The results were correlated with surface morphologies of anodized surfaces characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The results show that the anodization creates a surface with nano/micro roughness depending on anodization conditions. The hydrophilicity of NiTi surface was found to improve after anodization due to lower contact angles in cell media, which dropped from 32° to < 5°. The improved wettability of anodized surfaces is further corroborated by their high surface energy comparable to that of cp Ti. Relatively high surface energy, especially polar component, and nano/micro surface features of anodized surfaces significantly increased the number of living cells and their adherence and growth on these surfaces. Finally, a significant drop in Ni ion release from 268 ± 11 to 136 ± 15 ppb was observed for NiTi surfaces after anodization. This work indicates that anodization of NiTi alloy has a positive influence on the surface energy and surface morphology, which in turn improve bone cell-materials interactions and reduce Ni ion release in vitro. PMID:21232641

  5. Speciation of hazardous elements released from glass-works fly ash into soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udatný, M.; Mihaljevič, M.; Kochergina, Y.; Šebek, O.

    2012-04-01

    Keywords: Načetín, fly ash, lead, zinc, antimony, barium, soils, hazardous elements, contamination, BCR sequential extraction The release of hazardous elements from anomalous geomaterials represents risk for the environment. In our research, we focused on exogenic alteration of fly ash (FA) originating from glass-works in Svetla nad Sazavou (Czech Republic). This factory produces glass with high amounts of PbO. Fly ash from electrostatic filter contains elevated concentrations of Pb (800 ppm), Zn (13 500 ppm), Sb (31 500 ppm) and Ba (67 000 ppm). In present history, small amount of FA may be emitted from factory and can settle in the surrounding environment (soil). To assess possible risk for the environment we placed samples (0.5 g) of the FA in small nylon bags into soils with different vegetation cover (spruce, beech and unforested area) situated near village Načetín in the Krušné hory Mts. (Ore Mts.), northwest Czech Republic. This locality was selected as a representative example of contaminated place; it neighbours industrial cities and thermal power plants and this area was severally polluted in the past (several decades till early 1990s) mainly by sulphur compounds. The individual sites have the same geological background, climatic conditions and also the same pollution input levels. The distances between sites are about 500 meters. Bags with samples of the FA was placed into individual soil horizons (litter (A0), A, B and C horizons for spruce; litter (A0), A, B and C horizons for beech and A, B and C horizons for unforested area). The pH of all horizons did not exceed value 4.6 and the lowest pH values were observed in upper horizons. Samples of the FA were exposed in soils for a period of one year (October 2010 - October 2011), and then were removed together with samples of soils, which immediately surrounded the bags with the FA. Concentrations of studied elements in the FA and concentrations of these elements in the soil samples (initial and

  6. F-ELEMENT ION CHELATION IN HIGHLY BASIC MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is faced with the formidable task of developing techniques for the safe and cost effective remediation of 1.5 x 10 x 7ft 3 of high level waste (HLW) stored in the DOE complex. Only a small fraction of the waste contains radioactive elements, bu...

  7. [Leaching experiments on the release of trace elements from tailings of Chashan antimony mine, Guangxi, China].

    PubMed

    Cai, Yong-bing; Li, Ling; Wei, Xiao-fei; Zhang, Guo-ping; Li, Hai-xia; Fu, Zhi-ping

    2012-08-01

    The leaching of trace elements from tailings of an antimony mine in Guangxi Autonomous Region, China, was investigated through column leaching under wet-dry cycling and complete immersion conditions. Simulated acid rain (pH 4.0-4.4) and river water (pH 8.0) were used as the leaching solution. No matter the simulated acid rain or river water was used, the leachate always showed a slightly alkaline pH between 7.2 and 8.0, suggesting an acid neutralization capacity of the tailing. Compared to As and Pb, Sb was leached out to a much higher extent in this circumstance. Furthermore, Sb release was largely enhanced in wet-dry cycle compared to the complete immersion condition. In contrast, As was leached more readily in the complete immersion condition, and the longer the tailings were immersed in water, the higher the As concentration in the leachate. The leachate on day 5 and day 10 showed 1-2 times higher As concentration as compared with the leachate on day 1 and day 2. The leaching of Mn and Zn by simulated acid rain was much stronger than that by river water, and the release of Mn and Zn was more significantly affected by pH than by O2 (i.e., the difference between the wet-dry cycle and complete immersion condition). Sr showed a high release rate that was not affected by leaching solution or air-exposure condition. Basically, Pb showed a very low leaching potential. In general, an alkaline circumstance combined with wet-dry cycle forms the favorable condition for the release of Sb in the tailings. PMID:23213913

  8. Assessment of trace element impacts on agricultural use of water from the Dan River following the Eden coal ash release.

    PubMed

    Hesterberg, Dean; Polizzotto, Matthew L; Crozier, Carl; Austin, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    Catastrophic events require rapid, scientifically sound decision making to mitigate impacts on human welfare and the environment. The objective of this study was to analyze potential impacts of coal ash-derived trace elements on agriculture following a 35,000-tonne release of coal ash into the Dan River at the Duke Energy Steam Station in Eden, North Carolina. We performed scenario calculations to assess the potential for excessive trace element loading to soils via irrigation and flooding with Dan River water, uptake of trace elements by crops, and livestock consumption of trace elements via drinking water. Concentrations of 13 trace elements measured in Dan River water samples within 4 km of the release site declined sharply after the release and were equivalent within 5 d to measurements taken upriver. Mass-balance calculations based on estimates of soil trace-element concentrations and the nominal river water concentrations indicated that irrigation or flooding with 25 cm of Dan River water would increase soil concentrations of all trace elements by less than 0.5%. Calculations of potential increases of trace elements in corn grain and silage, fescue, and tobacco leaves suggested that As, Cr, Se, Sr, and V were elements of most concern. Concentrations of trace elements measured in river water following the ash release never exceeded adopted standards for livestock drinking water. Based on our analyses, we present guidelines for safe usage of Dan River water to diminish negative impacts of trace elements on soils and crop production. In general, the approach we describe here may serve as a basis for rapid assessment of environmental and agricultural risks associated with any similar types of releases that arise in the future. PMID:26033746

  9. Enhancement of RIE: etched Diffractive Optical Elements surfaces by using Ion Beam Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J.; Bischoff, Ch.; Rädel, U.; Grau, M.; Wallrabe, U.; Völklein, F.

    2015-09-01

    Shaping of laser light intensities by using Diffractive Optical Elements allows the adaption of the incident light to its application. Fused silica is used where for example UV-light or high temperatures are mandatory. For high diffraction efficiency the quality of the etched surface areas is important. The investigation of different process parameters for Ion Beam and Reactive Ion Etching reveals that only Ion Beam Etching provides surfaces with optical quality. Measurements of the influence of the surface quality on the diffraction efficiencies prove that the surfaces generated by Reactive Ion Etching are not suitable. Due to the high selectivity of the process Reactive Ion Etching is nevertheless a reasonable choice for the fabrication of Diffractive Optical Elements. To improve the quality of the etched surfaces a post processing with Ion Beam Etching is developed. Simulations in MATLAB display that the angle dependent removal of the surface during the Ion Beam Etching causes a smoothing of the surface roughness. The positive influence of a post processing on the diffraction efficiency is outlined by measurements. The ion beam post processing leads to an increase of the etching depth. For the fabrication of high efficient Diffractive Optical Elements this has to be taken into account. The relation is investigated and transferred to the fabrication of four-level gratings. Diffraction efficiencies up to 78 % instead of the ideal 81 % underline the practicability of the developed post processing.

  10. Therapeutic ion-releasing bioactive glass ionomer cements with improved mechanical strength and radiopacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Maximilian; Gentleman, Eileen; Shahid, Saroash; Hill, Robert; Brauer, Delia

    2015-10-01

    Bioactive glasses (BG) are used to regenerate bone, as they degrade and release therapeutic ions. Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are used in dentistry, can be delivered by injection and set in situ by a reaction between an acid-degradable glass and a polymeric acid. Our aim was to combine the advantages of BG and GIC, and we investigated the use of alkali-free BG (SiO2-CaO-CaF2-MgO) with 0 to 50% of calcium replaced by strontium, as the beneficial effects of strontium on bone formation are well documented. When mixing BG and poly(vinyl phosphonic-co-acrylic acid), ions were released fast (up to 90% within 15 minutes at pH 1), which resulted in GIC setting, as followed by infrared spectroscopy. GIC mixed well and set to hard cements (compressive strength up to 35 MPa), staying hard when in contact with aqueous solution. This is in contrast to GIC prepared with poly(acrylic acid), which were shown previously to become soft in contact with water. Strontium release from GIC increased linearly with strontium for calcium substitution, allowing for tailoring of strontium release depending on clinical requirements. Furthermore, strontium substitution increased GIC radiopacity. GIC passed ISO10993 cytotoxicity test, making them promising candidates for use as injectable bone cements.

  11. Effect of ion irradiation on the properties multi-element plasma coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, E. N.; Syzdykova, A. S.; Guchenko, S. A.; Yurov, V. M.; Gyngazova, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    The paper presents the results of the study of ion irradiation on the properties of multi-element plasma coatings. The coatings were bombarded by argon ions using heavy current ion source with a hollow cathode. After ion irradiation, the structure and physical properties of the coatings change, however, the nature of the changes is different for different coatings. To predict the behavior of the coating exposed to irradiation is virtually impossible. Therefore, structural studies and investigation of physical properties of the coatings to determine their functional characteristics are to be conducted.

  12. Real-time monitoring of inhibitory effects on glutamate-induced neurotransmitter release using a potassium ion image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akiteru; Sakurai, Takashi; Hattori, Toshiaki; Okumura, Koichi; Ishida, Makoto; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2015-02-01

    To directly image the release of neurotransmitters from neurons, we combined a substance-selective layer with a 128 × 128-pixel ion image sensor based on CMOS technology. Using the substance-specific image sensors, we studied the dynamics of potassium ion ( K+) release from neurons and examined the effect of ouabain on K+ release. K+ transients were significantly inhibited by ouabain. The K+ image sensor used in this study demonstrated the dynamic analysis of ligand-operated signal release and the pharmacological assessment of secretagogues without requiring cell labeling.

  13. Using support vector machines to improve elemental ion identification in macromolecular crystal structures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morshed, Nader; Echols, Nathaniel; Adams, Paul D.

    2015-04-25

    In the process of macromolecular model building, crystallographers must examine electron density for isolated atoms and differentiate sites containing structured solvent molecules from those containing elemental ions. This task requires specific knowledge of metal-binding chemistry and scattering properties and is prone to error. A method has previously been described to identify ions based on manually chosen criteria for a number of elements. Here, the use of support vector machines (SVMs) to automatically classify isolated atoms as either solvent or one of various ions is described. Two data sets of protein crystal structures, one containing manually curated structures deposited with anomalousmore » diffraction data and another with automatically filtered, high-resolution structures, were constructed. On the manually curated data set, an SVM classifier was able to distinguish calcium from manganese, zinc, iron and nickel, as well as all five of these ions from water molecules, with a high degree of accuracy. Additionally, SVMs trained on the automatically curated set of high-resolution structures were able to successfully classify most common elemental ions in an independent validation test set. This method is readily extensible to other elemental ions and can also be used in conjunction with previous methods based on a priori expectations of the chemical environment and X-ray scattering.« less

  14. Using support vector machines to improve elemental ion identification in macromolecular crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Morshed, Nader; Echols, Nathaniel; Adams, Paul D.

    2015-04-25

    In the process of macromolecular model building, crystallographers must examine electron density for isolated atoms and differentiate sites containing structured solvent molecules from those containing elemental ions. This task requires specific knowledge of metal-binding chemistry and scattering properties and is prone to error. A method has previously been described to identify ions based on manually chosen criteria for a number of elements. Here, the use of support vector machines (SVMs) to automatically classify isolated atoms as either solvent or one of various ions is described. Two data sets of protein crystal structures, one containing manually curated structures deposited with anomalous diffraction data and another with automatically filtered, high-resolution structures, were constructed. On the manually curated data set, an SVM classifier was able to distinguish calcium from manganese, zinc, iron and nickel, as well as all five of these ions from water molecules, with a high degree of accuracy. Additionally, SVMs trained on the automatically curated set of high-resolution structures were able to successfully classify most common elemental ions in an independent validation test set. This method is readily extensible to other elemental ions and can also be used in conjunction with previous methods based on a priori expectations of the chemical environment and X-ray scattering.

  15. Using support vector machines to improve elemental ion identification in macromolecular crystal structures

    PubMed Central

    Morshed, Nader; Echols, Nathaniel; Adams, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    In the process of macromolecular model building, crystallographers must examine electron density for isolated atoms and differentiate sites containing structured solvent molecules from those containing elemental ions. This task requires specific knowledge of metal-binding chemistry and scattering properties and is prone to error. A method has previously been described to identify ions based on manually chosen criteria for a number of elements. Here, the use of support vector machines (SVMs) to automatically classify isolated atoms as either solvent or one of various ions is described. Two data sets of protein crystal structures, one containing manually curated structures deposited with anomalous diffraction data and another with automatically filtered, high-resolution structures, were constructed. On the manually curated data set, an SVM classifier was able to distinguish calcium from manganese, zinc, iron and nickel, as well as all five of these ions from water molecules, with a high degree of accuracy. Additionally, SVMs trained on the automatically curated set of high-resolution structures were able to successfully classify most common elemental ions in an independent validation test set. This method is readily extensible to other elemental ions and can also be used in conjunction with previous methods based on a priori expectations of the chemical environment and X-ray scattering. PMID:25945580

  16. Ions Release and pH of Calcium Hydroxide-, Chlorhexidine- and Bioactive Glass-Based Endodontic Medicaments.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Freire, Laila Gonzales; Carvalho, Alexandre Pinheiro Lima de; Duarte, Marco Antonio Húngaro; Bauer, José; Gavini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated pH and release of calcium, sodium and phosphate ions from different medications in human dentin. Fifty premolars were prepared and randomly divided into groups: (CHX) - 2% chlorhexidine gel; (CHX + CH) - CHX + calcium hydroxide PA; (CH) - CH + propylene glycol 600; (NPBG) - experimental niobium phosphate bioactive glass + distilled water; (BG) - bioactive glass (Bio-Gran) + distilled water. The specimens were immersed in deionized water and the pH variations were measured. The quantification of ions in the solutions was made by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES) at 10 min, 24 h, 7, 14, 21 and 30 days. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey`s test, with a significance level of 5%. CH had the highest level of calcium ions release at 30 days, while CHX and BG released more sodium ions. BG, NPBG and CHX released a higher amount of phosphate ions. The pH of CH was significantly higher compared with the other groups. CH favored the greatest increase of pH and calcium ions release. The bioactive glasses released more sodium and phosphate ions and presented an alkaline pH immediately and after 30 days. PMID:27224568

  17. Effect of denture cleansers on metal ion release and surface roughness of denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Davi, Letícia Resende; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz; Lovato-Silva, Cláudia Helena; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Chemical disinfectants are usually associated with mechanical methods to remove stains and reduce biofilm formation. This study evaluated the effect of disinfectants on release of metal ions and surface roughness of commercially pure titanium, metal alloys, and heat-polymerized acrylic resin, simulating 180 immersion trials. Disk-shaped specimens were fabricated with commercially pure titanium (Tritan), nickel-chromium-molybdenum-titanium (Vi-Star), nickel-chromium (Fit Cast-SB Plus), and nickel-chromium-beryllium (Fit Cast-V) alloys. Each cast disk was invested in the flasks, incorporating the metal disk to the heat-polymerized acrylic resin. The specimens (n=5) were immersed in these solutions: sodium hypochlorite 0.05%, Periogard, Cepacol, Corega Tabs, Medical Interporous, and Polident. Deionized water was used as a control. The quantitative analysis of metal ion release was performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ELAN DRC II). A surface analyzer (Surftest SJ-201P) was used to measure the surface roughness (µm). Data were recorded before and after the immersions and evaluated by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The nickel release proved most significant with the Vi-Star and Fit Cast-V alloys after immersion in Medical Interporous. There was a significant difference in surface roughness of the resin (p=0.011) after immersion. Cepacol caused significantly higher resin roughness. The immersion products had no influence on metal roughness (p=0.388). It could be concluded that the tested alloys can be considered safe for removable denture fabrication, but disinfectant solutions as Cepacol and Medical Interporous tablet for daily denture immersion should be used with caution because it caused greater resin surface roughness and greater ion release, respectively. PMID:23207854

  18. BET bromodomain inhibition releases the Mediator complex from select cis-regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Anand S.; Roe, Jae-Seok; Mok, Beverly A.; Hohmann, Anja F.; Shi, Junwei; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) protein BRD4 can physically interact with the Mediator complex, but the relevance of this association to the therapeutic effects of BET inhibitors in cancer is unclear. Here, we show that BET inhibition causes a rapid release of Mediator from a subset of cis-regulatory elements in the genome of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. These sites of Mediator eviction were highly correlated with transcriptional suppression of neighboring genes, which are enriched for targets of the transcription factor MYB and for functions related to leukemogenesis. An shRNA screen of Mediator in AML cells identified the MED12, MED13, MED23, and MED24 subunits as performing a similar regulatory function to BRD4 in this context, including a shared role in sustaining a block in myeloid maturation. These findings suggest that the interaction between BRD4 and Mediator has functional importance for gene-specific transcriptional activation and for AML maintenance. PMID:27068464

  19. Metal ion release: also a concern for ceramic-on-ceramic couplings?

    PubMed

    Beraudi, Alina; Stea, Susanna; De Pasquale, Dalila; Bordini, Barbara; Catalani, Simona; Apostoli, Pietro; Toni, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    BIOLOX delta is the newest ceramic composite material of the BIOLOX family and its use in hip devices represents a good alternative to Metal-on-Metal or Metal-on-Polyethylene coupling. Some Metal-on-Metal hip devices have shown chromium and cobalt release, which promoted toxic effects. Furthermore, the ceramic composite contains trivalent chromium, even if strongly bound to the alumina lattice. The present study is aimed at detecting any 'in vivo' release of chromium ions from BIOLOX delta bearings in the blood, erythrocytes and urine of patients. Twenty patients implanted with total hip arthroplasty (THA) with BIOLOX delta-BIOLOX delta couplings and 21 subjects with no implanted prostheses were studied. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry equipped with dynamic reaction cell was used for analysis. In the THA group the Cr ions values were; in blood mean 0.21 µg/l (±0.09), in serum 0.21 µg/l (±0.12), in normalized erythrocytes 0.13 µg/l (±0.09), in normalized urine 0.12 µg/g creatinine (±0.13). In the control group the Cr ions values were; in blood mean 0.22 µg/l (st dev 0.14), in serum 0.17 µg/l (±0.08), in normalized erythrocytes 0.13 µg/l (±0.11), in normalized urine 0.07 µg/g creatinine (±0.08). The Lab reference values were 0.1-5.0 µg/l for blood, 0.1-0.5 µg/l for serum, 0.14-4.58 µg/l for normalised erythrocytes and 0.05-2.2 µg/l for urine. All samples in both groups resulted in chromium levels within the normal reference range and the safety of BIOLOX delta ceramics, in terms of chromium ions release, has been demonstrated. PMID:24817392

  20. A zinc-sensing receptor triggers the release of intracellular Ca2+ and regulates ion transport

    PubMed Central

    Hershfinkel, Michal; Moran, Arie; Grossman, Nili; Sekler, Israel

    2001-01-01

    Changes in extracellular zinc concentration participate in modulating fundamental cellular processes such as proliferation, secretion, and ion transport in a mechanism that is not well understood. Here, we show that a micromolar concentration of extracellular zinc triggers a massive release of calcium from thapsigargin-sensitive intracellular pools in the colonocytic cell line HT29. Calcium release was blocked by a phospholipase-C inhibitor, indicating that formation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate is required for zinc-dependent calcium release. Zinc influx was not observed, indicating that extracellular zinc triggered the release. The Cai2+ release was zinc specific and could not be triggered by other heavy metals. Furthermore, zinc failed to activate the Ca2+-sensing receptor heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells. The zinc-induced Cai2+ rise stimulated the activity of the Na+/H+ exchanger in HT29 cells. Our results indicate that a previously uncharacterized extracellular, G protein-coupled, Zn2+-sensing receptor is functional in colonocytes. Because Cai2+ rise is known to regulate key cellular and signal-transduction processes, the zinc-sensing receptor may provide the missing link between extracellular zinc concentration changes and the regulation of cellular processes. PMID:11573009

  1. Enhanced Ag(+) Ion Release from Aqueous Nanosilver Suspensions by Absorption of Ambient CO2.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Kakeru; Sotiriou, Georgios A; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2015-05-19

    Nanosilver with closely controlled average particle diameter (7-30 nm) immobilized on nanosilica is prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption, and transmission electron microscopy. The presence of Ag2O on the as-prepared nanosilver surface is confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy and quantified by thermogravimetric analysis and mass spectrometry. The release of Ag(+) ions in deionized water is monitored electrochemically and traced quantitatively to the dissolution of a preexisting Ag2O monolayer on the nanosilver surface. During this dissolution, the pH of the host solution rapidly increases, suppressing dissolution of the remaining metallic Ag. When, however, a nanosilver suspension is exposed to a CO2-containing atmosphere, like ambient air during its storage or usage, then CO2 is absorbed by the host solution decreasing its pH and contributing to metallic Ag dissolution and further leaching of Ag(+) ions. So the release of Ag(+) ions from the above closely sized nanosilver solutions in the absence and presence of CO2 as well as under synthetic air containing 200-1800 ppm of CO2 is investigated along with the solution pH and related to the antibacterial activity of nanosilver. PMID:25923906

  2. Multi-spacecraft Observations of Heavy Ion Dropouts: Physical Processes, Fractionation Rates, and Release Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weberg, M. J.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2014-12-01

    Heavy ion dropouts in the solar wind are thought to originate from large, closed coronal loops. The distinctive, mass-dependent fractionation patterns of the dropouts requires that their source loops are relatively quiet and stable long enough (on the order of a day) to undergo gravitational settling. Therefore by studying the composition of heavy ion dropouts we are able to peer into the solar corona and glean information about the fine balance of physical processes. Additionally, the occurrence rates and magnetic profiles of dropouts suggest specific forms of magnetic reconnection are responsible for the release of the otherwise trapped plasma into the solar wind. In this study we identify and compare dropouts observed by two different satellites, ACE and Ulysses, which together provide over 20 years of continuous observations at a variety of heliographic latitudes and radii. The resulting partial global view (or 3D view) enables us to identify coronal source regions and release mechanisms of heavy ion dropouts. We also discuss a physical model of gravitational settling which can be used to reconcile fractionation rates with the rate at which plasma must be escaping via reconnection. Our conclusions and results may contribute towards the ongoing refinement and validation of theories which predict the origin of "slow type" solar wind.

  3. Ion energy distribution near a plasma meniscus with beam extraction for multi element focused ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Jose V.; Paul, Samit; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2010-05-15

    An earlier study of the axial ion energy distribution in the extraction region (plasma meniscus) of a compact microwave plasma ion source showed that the axial ion energy spread near the meniscus is small ({approx}5 eV) and comparable to that of a liquid metal ion source, making it a promising candidate for focused ion beam (FIB) applications [J. V. Mathew and S. Bhattacharjee, J. Appl. Phys. 105, 96101 (2009)]. In the present work we have investigated the radial ion energy distribution (IED) under the influence of beam extraction. Initially a single Einzel lens system has been used for beam extraction with potentials up to -6 kV for obtaining parallel beams. In situ measurements of IED with extraction voltages upto -5 kV indicates that beam extraction has a weak influence on the energy spread ({+-}0.5 eV) which is of significance from the point of view of FIB applications. It is found that by reducing the geometrical acceptance angle at the ion energy analyzer probe, close to unidirectional distribution can be obtained with a spread that is smaller by at least 1 eV.

  4. Experimental study of trace element release during ultrahigh-pressure serpentinite dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spandler, Carl; Pettke, Thomas; Hermann, Joerg

    2014-04-01

    Subduction of serpentinite is envisaged to play a key role in volatile and element recycling at convergent plate margins, but there is currently little known about the composition of the fluid phase(s) released by devolatilisation of deeply subducted serpentinite. We have performed a series of ultrahigh pressure experiments to examine the phase relations and fluid compositions produced by reaction of a natural serpentinite under sub-arc conditions. We employ a novel technique of forming synthetic fluid inclusions in olivine at run conditions to preserve samples of experimental fluids for subsequent analysis. Our experiments confirm that the breakdown of antigorite and chlorite are the most important fluid-producing reactions from serpentinite at sub-arc depths. For our low CaO/Al2O3 peridotitic composition at 3.5 to 4.0 GPa we find that clinopyroxene reacts out below 750 °C and chlorite breaks down progressively between 700 and 800 °C to form garnet harzburgite. Raman analysis of synthetic fluid inclusions indicates that all experiments contained a single aqueous fluid phase, which - together with a lack of textural or mineralogical evidence for hydrous melting - indicates that the water-saturated solidus for our starting composition is above 900 °C at 4.0 GPa. Element concentrations in the fluid for three experiments were determined in situ via laser ablation ICP-MS of individual fluid inclusions. In general, the fluids are enriched in trace elements compared to the bulk starting material, but particularly so for Li, B, LILE, LREE, and U. Chlorite dehydration fluids have high Li/B, LREE/HREE and Ce/Y due to retention of some B in olivine, and retention of Y and HREE in garnet. Our results indicate that fluids produced by serpentinite dehydration at sub-arc depths may carry some of the slab-derived trace elements required for arc magmatism, and may fractionate key trace element ratios in the dehydrated residues, which in turn may ultimately contribute to the

  5. Variations in elemental composition of several MEV/nucleon ions observed in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, R. E.; Vonrosenvinge, T. T.; Reames, D. V.

    1985-01-01

    Six years of accumulated ISEE-3 and IMP-8 data to study variations in elemental relative abundances among the different populations of energetic ions seen in interplanetary space are surveyed. Evidence suggesting that heavy ion enrichments may be organized by a rigidity scaling factor A/Z over the range H to Fe is presented. Data to support the hypothesis that shock-associated particles are probably accelerated from ambient energetic fluxes are shown.

  6. Nanofabrication of Optical Elements for SXR and EUV Applications: Ion Beam Lithography as a New Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, J.; Krupp, N.; Wilhein, T.; Irsen, S.

    2011-09-01

    Diffractive optical elements are important components for applications in soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation. At present, the standard fabrication method for such optics is based on electron beam lithography followed by nanostructuring. This requires a series of complex processes including exposure, reactive ion-etching, and electro-plating. We report on experiments showing the single-step fabrication of such elements using ion beam lithography. Both transmission and reflection gratings were fabricated and successfully implemented as spectrometers at laboratory soft x-ray sources. Additionally, first steps toward zone plate fabrication are described.

  7. Synergistic cytotoxic effects of ions released by zinc-aluminum bronze and the metallic salts on osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Claudia A; Morales, María L; Mirífico, María V; Fernández Lorenzo de Mele, Mónica A

    2013-07-01

    The use of copper-based alloys for fixed dental crowns and bridges is increasingly widespread in several countries. The aim of this work is to study the dissolution of a zinc-aluminum-bronze and the cytotoxic effects of the ions released on UMR-106 osteoblastic cell line. Two sources of ions were used: (1) ions released by the metal alloy immersed in the cell culture and (2) salts of the metal ions. Conventional electrochemical techniques, atomic absorption spectroscopy [to obtain the average concentration of ions (AC) in solution], and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy analysis were used to study the corrosion process. Corrosion tests revealed a strong influence of the composition of the electrolyte medium and the immersion time on the electrochemical response. The cytotoxicity was evaluated with (a) individual ions, (b) combinations of two ions, and (c) the mixture of all the ions released by a metal disc of the alloy. Importantly, synergistic cytotoxic effects were found when Al-Zn ion combinations were used at concentration levels lower than the cytotoxic threshold values of the individual ions. Cytotoxic effects in cells in the vicinity of the metal disc were also found. These results were interpreted considering synergistic effects and a diffusion controlled mechanism that yields to concentration levels, in the metal surroundings, several times higher than the measured AC value. PMID:23596152

  8. Influence of Surface Coating on Metal Ion Release: Evaluation in Patients With Metal Allergy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Peter; Weik, Thomas; Roider, Gabriele; Summer, Burkhard; Thomsen, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Nickel, chromium, and cobalt in stainless steel and Cobalt-chrome-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys may induce allergy. The objectives of this study were to evaluate surface coating regarding ion release, patch test reactivity, and arthroplasty performance. Materials and methods included patch test in 31 patients with metal allergy and 30 patients with no allergy to stainless steel and CoCrMo disks that are uncoated or coated by titanium nitride/zirconium nitride (TiN/ZrN). Assessment include atomic absorption spectrometry of released nickel, cobalt, and chromium from the disks after exposure to distilled water, artificial sweat and culture medium. Results showed that both coatings reduced the nickel and chromium release from stainless steel and CoCrMo disks and mostly the cobalt release from the disks (maximally 11.755 µg/cm(2)/5 d to 1.624 by Ti-N and to 0.442 by ZrN). Six of the 31 patients with metal allergy reacted to uncoated disks, but none reacted to the coated disks. The current authors report on exemplary patients with metal allergy who had symptom relief by revision with surface-coated arthroplasty. The authors concluded that the surface coating may prevent cutaneous and peri-implant allergic reactions. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):S24-S30.]. PMID:27219723

  9. Electrosynthesis and analytical characterization of PMMA coatings on titanium substrates as barriers against ion release.

    PubMed

    De Giglio, E; Cometa, S; Sabbatini, L; Zambonin, P G; Spoto, G

    2005-02-01

    The performance of polyacrylic coatings as barrier films against corrosion of titanium-based orthopaedic implants was investigated. In particular, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was electrosynthesized on titanium substrates by electro-reductive processes from aqueous monomer solutions. The obtained PMMA coatings were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of an annealing treatment on the morphology of coatings with respect to uniformity and porosity of films was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) technique was used for ion concentration measurements in ion release tests performed on TiAlV sheets modified with PMMA coatings (annealed and unannealed). Results indicated that the annealing process produces coatings with considerable anticorrosion performances. PMID:15657712

  10. Fluorescence effect of ion-implanted sapphire doped with Ag/Cu/Fe elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-jian; Wang, Yu-hua; Zhang, Xiao-jian; Dai, Hou-mei; Ji, Ling-ling; Wang, Ru-wu; Wang, Deng-jing; Lu, Jian-duo; Zheng, Li-rong

    2015-11-01

    The fluorescence effect and microstructure of the nanocomposite samples prepared by ion implantation have been studied in the subsurface area. Based on the UV-vis and VUV data, the luminescence properties of implanted samples have been presented and discussed. The research indicates that the surface plasma resonance has an impact on the fluorescence effect notably. In addition, the fluorescence performance of the substrates implanted with ions is related to the outermost electron number of the injection element. And SRIM is used to analyze the energy loss in the process of ion implantation.

  11. The load and release characteristics on a strong cationic ion-exchange fiber: kinetics, thermodynamics, and influences

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Gao, Yanan; Wang, Xinyu; Liu, Hongzhuo; Che, Xin; Xu, Lu; Yang, Yang; Wang, Qifang; Wang, Yan; Li, Sanming

    2014-01-01

    Ion-exchange fibers were different from conventional ion-exchange resins in their non-cross-linked structure. The exchange was located on the surface of the framework, and the transport resistance reduced significantly, which might mean that the exchange is controlled by an ionic reaction instead of diffusion. Therefore, this work aimed to investigate the load and release characteristics of five model drugs with the strong cationic ion-exchange fiber ZB-1. Drugs were loaded using a batch process and released in United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) dissolution apparatus 2. Opposing exchange kinetics, suitable for the special structure of the fiber, were developed for describing the exchange process with the help of thermodynamics, which illustrated that the load was controlled by an ionic reaction. The molecular weight was the most important factor to influence the drug load and release rate. Strong alkalinity and rings in the molecular structures made the affinity between the drug and fiber strong, while logP did not cause any profound differences. The drug–fiber complexes exhibited sustained release. Different kinds and concentrations of counter ions or different amounts of drug–fiber complexes in the release medium affected the release behavior, while the pH value was independent of it. The groundwork for in-depth exploration and further application of ion-exchange fibers has been laid. PMID:25114504

  12. Element synthesis calculations for stellar explosions: robust uncertainties, sensitivities, and radioactive ion beam measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael S.; Hix, W. Raphael; Parete-Koon, Suzanne; Dessieux, Luc; Ma, Zhanwen; Starrfield, Sumner; Bardayan, Daniel W.; Guidry, Michael W.; Smith, Donald L.; Blackmon, Jeffery C.; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2004-12-01

    We utilize multiple-zone, post-processing element synthesis calculations to determine the impact of recent ORNL radioactive ion beam measurements on predictions of novae and X-ray burst simulations. We also assess the correlations between all relevant reaction rates and all synthesized isotopes, and translate nuclear reaction rate uncertainties into abundance prediction uncertainties, via a unique Monte Carlo technique.

  13. DETERMINATION OF ELEMENTAL COMPOSITIONS FROM MASS PEAK PROFILES OF THE MOLECULAR ION (M) AND THE M + 1 AND M + 2 IONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative abundances of M + 1 and M + 2 ions help to identify the elemental composition of the molecular ion (M). But scan speed, snesitiity, and resolution limitations of mass spectrometers have impeded determination of these abundances. Mass peak profiling from selected ion ...

  14. Electron Beam Distruption due to Ion Release from Targets - Experimental Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermare, Christophe; Davis, Harold A.; Hughes, Thomas P.; Moir, David C.; Olson, Russell; Wood, W. Monty

    2001-10-01

    A major concern for the new generation radiography facilities like DARHT and AIRIX is that ions or ionized neutrals released from solid surfaces by beam impact can be accelerated and trapped by the beam potential. This time-dependent positive-charge distribution, inside the beam channel, can disrupt the beam. Possible release mechanisms include electron induced desorption of neutrals or ions, thermal desorption due to beam-target heating, and melting or vaporization of the solid target. To study this, we have performed experiments on the DARHT first axis (1.7 kA, 20. MeV, 60 ns). Here, the beam, focused to a range of diameters, is transmitted through a thin target made of various materials. The time evolution of the beam radial profile is measured downstream of the target. For low current density, the downstream-beam radial profile is time invariant as expected. At higher current density, the downstream beam radial profile is clearly disrupted during the pulse including a large transverse instability.

  15. Simulation studies of acceleration of heavy ions and their elemental compositions; IFSR--755

    SciTech Connect

    Toida, Mieko; Ohsawa, Yukiharu

    1996-07-01

    By using a one-dimensional, electromagnetic particle simulation code with full ion and electron dynamics, we have studied the acceleration of heavy ions by a nonlinear magnetosonic wave in a multi-ion-species plasma. First, we describe the mechanism of heavy ion acceleration by magnetosonic waves. We then investigate this by particle simulations. The simulation plasma contains four ion species: H, He, O, and Fe. The number density of He is taken to be 10% of that of H, and those of O and Fe are much lower. Simulations confirm that, as in a single-ion-species plasma, some of the hydrogens can be accelerated by the longitudinal electric field formed in the wave. Furthermore, they show that magnetosonic waves can accelerate all the particles of all the heavy species (He, O, and Fe) by a different mechanism, i.e., by the transverse electric field. The maximum speeds of the heavy species are about the same, of the order of the wave propagation speed. These are in good agreement with theoretical prediction. These results indicate that, if high-energy ions are produced in the solar corona through these mechanisms, the elemental compositions of these heavy ions can be similar to that of the background plasma, i.e., the corona.

  16. Exposure of Cleft Lip and Palate Patients to Toxic Elements Released during Orthodontic Treatment in the Study of Non-Invasive Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Mikulewicz, Marcin; Kachniarz, Krzysztof; Chojnacka, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The Objective The aim of the study was evaluation of metal ions (nickel and chromium) released from orthodontic appliances in cleft lip and palate patients and the usefulness of non-invasive matrices (saliva and hair). Materials and Methods The material studied consisted of 100 individuals, including 59 females and 41 males of 5 to 16 years of age, which were divided into 3 groups: experimental–patients with cleft lip and palate (36 individuals, the average treatment time 5.74 years); control group–patients without cleft lip and palate, during orthodontic treatment (32 individuals, the average treatment time 1.78 years) and the control group patients without cleft lip and palate, without any orthodontic appliances (32 individuals). Samples (saliva, hair) were collected and subjects underwent a survey by questionnaire. Multi-elemental analyses of the composition of non-invasive matrices was conducted in an accredited laboratory by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry technique ICP-OES. The results were reported as mean contents of particular elements (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Si) in hair and in saliva. Results The concentration of Cr, Ni, Fe and Cu ions in saliva of cleft lip and palate patients were several times higher as compared with not treated orthodontically control groups and higher than in the group with orthodontic appliances. Among the assessed matrices, hair of cleft lip and palate patients seem to be not a meaningful biomarker. Conclusion It was found that orthodontic appliances used in long-term treatment of cleft lip and palate patients do not release toxic levels of Cr and Ni ions. PMID:26544176

  17. Hydrocolloid-based nutraceutical delivery systems: Effect of counter-ions on the encapsulation and release.

    PubMed

    Polowsky, Patrick J; Janaswamy, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Nutraceuticals provide health benefits, especially for the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Their incorporation in food supplements, functional foods and medicinal foods is a major technological challenge due to lower water solubility, instability during processing and storage conditions. Carriers that can effectively overcome these predicaments and protect them during product development, consumption and delivery are in high demand. Toward this end, our research approach is to entrap nutraceuticals in the ordered networks of hydrocolloids. We have examined the effect cations in regulating the encapsulated amounts and release characteristics. Iota-carrageenan and eugenol have been chosen as models of hydrocolloid and nutraceutical, respectively, in the presence of Na and Ca ions. The results suggest that carrageenan maintains its network organization even after encapsulating the eugenol molecules. Increased eugenol amounts are found in the Na carrageenan complex compared to the Ca complex, and the release rate is faster from the former but it is more controlled from the latter. These differences highlight the vital role of cations on the encapsulation efficiency and release profiles of hydrocolloid-based nutraceutical carriers. The outcome offers an elegant opportunity for developing novel and value-added food systems employing low-in-cost, nontoxic and heavily consumed food grade hydrocolloids. PMID:25419030

  18. Hydrocolloid-based nutraceutical delivery systems: Effect of counter-ions on the encapsulation and release

    PubMed Central

    Polowsky, Patrick J.; Janaswamy, Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Nutraceuticals provide health benefits, especially for the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Their incorporation in food supplements, functional foods and medicinal foods is a major technological challenge due to lower water solubility, instability during processing and storage conditions. Carriers that can effectively overcome these predicaments and protect them during product development, consumption and delivery are in high demand. Toward this end, our research approach is to entrap nutraceuticals in the ordered networks of hydrocolloids. We have examined the effect cations in regulating the encapsulated amounts and release characteristics. Iota-carrageenan and eugenol have been chosen as models of hydrocolloid and nutraceutical, respectively, in the presence of Na and Ca ions. The results suggest that carrageenan maintains its network organization even after encapsulating the eugenol molecules. Increased eugenol amounts are found in the Na carrageenan complex compared to the Ca complex, and the release rate is faster from the former but it is more controlled from the latter. These differences highlight the vital role of cations on the encapsulation efficiency and release profiles of hydrocolloid-based nutraceutical carriers. The outcome offers an elegant opportunity for developing novel and value-added food systems employing low-in-cost, nontoxic and heavily consumed food grade hydrocolloids. PMID:25419030

  19. Fabrication of porous zeolite/chitosan monoliths and their applications for drug release and metal ions adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongli; Yan, Weiwei; Sun, Zhiming; Pan, Cheng; Mi, Xue; Zhao, Gang; Gao, Jianping

    2015-03-01

    Ordered porous zeolite/chitosan (Zel/Chi) monoliths were prepared by a unidirectional freeze-drying method, and their properties and structures were characterized by various instrumental methods. The metal ion adsorption and the drug release performance of the porous Zel/Chi monoliths were also studied. The release rate of cefalexin from drug-loaded Zel/Chi monoliths depended on the composition and porous structure of the monoliths. The metal ion adsorption capacity of the Zel/Chi monoliths was related to the concentration of the metal ions, the adsorption time and the Zel/Chi ratio. An experimentally maximum adsorption of 89 mg/g was achieved for Cu(2+) ions. The Zel/Chi monoliths with adsorbed Cu(2+) ions effectively catalyzed the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol and had good recyclability. They were easily recovered by simply removing them from the reaction system and rinsing them with water. PMID:25498685

  20. Influence of drug distribution and solubility on release from geopolymer pellets--a finite element method study.

    PubMed

    Jämstorp, Erik; Strømme, Maria; Bredenberg, Susanne

    2012-05-01

    This study investigates the influence of drug solubility and distribution on its release from inert geopolymer pellets of three different sizes (1.5 × 1.5, 3 × 6, and 6 × 6 mm), having the same geopolymer composition and containing highly potent opioid fentanyl, sumatriptan, theophylline, or saccharin. Scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen sorption, drug solubility, permeation, and release experiments were performed, and estimates of the drug diffusion coefficients and solubilities in the geopolymer matrix were derived with the aid of finite element method (FEM). FEM was further employed to investigate the effect of a nonuniform drug distribution on the drug release profile. When inspecting the release profiles for each drug, it was observed that their solubilities in the geopolymer matrix imposed a much greater influence on the drug release rate than their diffusion coefficients. Concentrating the initial drug load in FEM into nonuniformly distributed drug regions inside the matrix created drug release profiles that more closely resembled experimental data than an FEM-simulated uniform drug distribution did. The presented FEM simulations and visualization of drug release from geopolymers under varying initial and dynamic conditions should open up for more systematic studies of additional factors that influence the drug release profile from porous delivery vehicles. PMID:22308066

  1. Ion-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon collisions: kinetic energy releases for specific fragmentation channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitsma, G.; Zettergren, H.; Boschman, L.; Bodewits, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2013-12-01

    We report on 30 keV He2 + collisions with naphthalene (C10H8) molecules, which leads to very extensive fragmentation. To unravel such complex fragmentation patterns, we designed and constructed an experimental setup, which allows for the determination of the full momentum vector by measuring charged collision products in coincidence in a recoil ion momentum spectrometer type of detection scheme. The determination of fragment kinetic energies is found to be considerably more accurate than for the case of mere coincidence time-of-flight spectrometers. In fission reactions involving two cationic fragments, typically kinetic energy releases of 2-3 eV are observed. The results are interpreted by means of density functional theory calculations of the reverse barriers. It is concluded that naphthalene fragmentation by collisions with keV ions clearly is much more violent than the corresponding photofragmentation with energetic photons. The ion-induced naphthalene fragmentation provides a feedstock of various small hydrocarbonic species of different charge states and kinetic energy, which could influence several molecule formation processes in the cold interstellar medium and facilitates growth of small hydrocarbon species on pre-existing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  2. f-Element Ion Chelation in Highly Basic Media - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, R.T.

    2000-12-12

    A large body of data has been collected over the last fifty years on the chemical behavior of f-element ions. The ions undergo rapid hydrolysis reactions in neutral or basic aqueous solutions that produce poorly understood oxide-hydroxide species; therefore, most of the fundamental f-element solution chemistry has allowed synthetic and separations chemists to rationally design advanced organic chelating ligands useful for highly selective partitioning and separation of f-element ions from complex acidic solution matrices. These ligands and new examples under development allow for the safe use and treatment of solutions containing highly radioactive species. This DOE/EMSP project was undertaken to address the following fundamental objectives: (1) study the chemical speciation of Sr and lanthanide (Ln) ions in basic aqueous media containing classical counter anions found in waste matrices; (2) prepare pyridine N-oxide phosphonates and phosphonic acids that might act as selective chelator s for Ln ions in model basic pH waste streams; (3) study the binding of the new chelators toward Ln ions and (4) examine the utility of the chelators as decontamination and dissolution agents under basic solution conditions. The project has been successful in attacking selected aspects of the very difficult problems associated with basic pH solution f-element waste chemistry. In particular, the project has (1) shed additional light on the initial stages of Ln ion sol-gel-precipitate formulation under basic solution conditions; (2) generated new families of pyridine phosphonic acid chelators; (3) characterized the function of the chelators and (4) examined their utility as oxide-hydroxide dissolution agents. These findings have contributed significantly to an improved understanding of the behavior of Ln ions in basic media containing anions found in typical waste sludges as well as to the development of sludge dissolution agents. The new chelating reagents are easily made and could be

  3. Metal ion-assisted self-assembly of complexes for controlled and sustained release of minocycline for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiling; Wang, Zhicheng; Nong, Jia; Nix, Camilla A.; Ji, Hai-Feng; Zhong, Yinghui

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the development of novel drug delivery complexes self-assembled by divalent metal ion-assisted coacervation for controlled and sustained release of a hydrophilic small drug molecule minocycline (MH). MH is a multifaceted agent that has demonstrated therapeutic effects in infection, inflammation, tumor, as well as cardiovascular, renal, and neurological disorders due to its anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, and cytoprotective properties. However, the inability to translate the high doses used in experimental animals to tolerable doses in human patients limits its clinical application. Localized delivery can potentially expose the diseased tissue to high concentrations of MH that systemic delivery cannot achieve, while minimizing the side effects from systemic exposure. The strong metal ion binding-assisted interaction enabled high drug entrapment and loading efficiency, and stable long term release for more than 71 days. Released MH demonstrated potent anti-biofilm, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective activities. Furthermore, MH release from the complexes is pH-sensitive as the chelation between minocycline and metal ions decreases with pH, allowing ‘smart’ drug release in response to the severity of pathology-induced tissue acidosis. This novel metal ion binding-mediated drug delivery mechanism can potentially be applied to other drugs that have high binding affinity for metal ions and may lead to the development of new delivery systems for a variety of drugs. PMID:25599696

  4. The release properties of silver ions from Ag-nHA/TiO2/PA66 antimicrobial composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xia; Li, Jidong; Wang, Li; Huang, Di; Zuo, Yi; Li, Yubao

    2010-08-01

    Implant-associated bacterial infection can jeopardize the clinical success of implants and result in loss of supporting bone. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel porous scaffold with long-term antibacterial activity for bone repair or regeneration. Porous nano-hydroxyapatite/titania/polyamide66 scaffolds containing different amounts of silver ions (Ag-nHA/TiO(2)/PA66) were prepared by a phase inversion technique. The release of silver ions from the porous scaffolds in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in the F12 cell culture medium was evaluated via atomic absorption spectrometry. The results showed that the release of Ag(+) was time and concentration dependent, increasing with the immersion time and the silver content in the scaffolds. On the other hand, the release property of Ag(+) was also influenced by the immersion medium. The cumulative Ag(+) release in the F12 medium with time increase parabolically, different from the linear increase or the zero-order release kinetics in the SBF medium. Compared to the slight fluctuation of the Ag(+) release rate in SBF during the whole immersion period, the initial fast release rate and the later sustained release rate of Ag(+) in the F12 medium could be more helpful for preventing implant-associated infection. Since the Ag-nHA/TiO(2) particles were embedded in the PA66 matrix, the long-term-sustained release should be related both to the relaxation of PA macromolecular chains due to the penetration of water and to the slow release of the substituted Ag(+) ions in the HA lattice. The sustained Ag(+) release with time indicates that the composite scaffold is suitable for a long-term antimicrobial application during the scaffold-assisted bone repair or regeneration. PMID:20683127

  5. Sensing Nature's Electric Fields: Ion Channels as Active Elements of Linear Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2003-05-01

    Given the parameters of familiar cellular elements — voltage-sensitive ion channels, carriers, pumps, phospholipid insulators, and electrolytic conductors — is it possible to construct an amplifier whose sensitivity matches the 5 nV/cm threshold found in behavioral experiments on elasmobranch fish? Or, in addition to clever circuitry that uses commonly known elements and principles, do we need something else to understand this sensitivity? The resolution of this question is important not only for studies in sensory biophysics seeking to reveal underlying mechanisms and molecular structures. More generally, it deepens our appreciation of the stochastic nature of inter- and intra-cellular control circuits. Here I analyze a simplified circuit involving negative differential resistance of voltage-sensitive ion channels. The analysis establishes an off-equilibrium criterion for amplification, shows that ion channels are the dominant noise sources, and, by minimizing channel noise within the given constraints, demonstrates that generic voltage-sensitive ion channels are likely candidates for the active elements of the linear cellular amplifiers. Finally, I highlight a number of unsolved issues.

  6. Fabricating high-density magnetic storage elements by low-dose ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Neb, R.; Sebastian, T.; Pirro, P.; Hillebrands, B.; Pofahl, S.; Schaefer, R.; Reuscher, B.

    2012-09-10

    We fabricate magnetic storage elements by irradiating an antiferromagnetically coupled ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic/ferromagnetic trilayer by a low-dose ion beam. The irradiated areas become ferromagnetically coupled and are capable of storing information if their size is small enough. We employ Fe/Cr/Fe trilayers and a 30 keV focused Ga{sup +}-ion beam to demonstrate the working principle for a storage array with a bit density of 7 Gbit/in.{sup 2}. Micromagnetic simulations suggest that bit densities of at least two magnitudes of order larger should be possible.

  7. Strain-energy-release rate analysis of the end-notched flexure specimen using the finite-element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.; Raju, I. S.; Obrien, T. K.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite-element analysis of the end-notched flexure specimen was performed using 8-node isoparametric, parabolic elements to evaluate compliance and mode II strain energy release rates, G sub II. The G sub II values were computed using two different techniques: the virtural crack-closure technique (VCCT) and the rate of change of compliance with crack length (compliance derivative method). The analysis was performed for various crack-length-to-semi-span (a/L) ratios ranging from 0.2 to 0.9. Three material systems representing a wide range of material properties were analyzed. The compliance and strain energy release rates of the specimen calculated with the present finite-element analysis agree very well with beam theory equations including transverse shear. The G sub II values calculated using the compliance derivative method compared extremely well with those calculated using the VCCT. The G sub II values obtained by the compliance derivative method using the top or bottom beam deflections agreed closely with each other. The strain energy release rates from a plane-stress analysis were higher than the plane-strain values by only a small percentage, indicating that either assumption may be used in the analysis. The G sub II values for one material system calculated from the finite-element analysis agreed with one solution in the literature and disagreed with the other solution in the literature.

  8. Nonlinear ion-acoustic waves in a degenerate plasma with nuclei of heavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hossen, M. A. Mamun, A. A.

    2015-10-15

    The ion-acoustic (IA) solitary waves propagating in a fully relativistic degenerate dense plasma (containing relativistic degenerate electron and ion fluids, and immobile nuclei of heavy elements) have been theoretically investigated. The relativistic hydrodynamic model is used to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) equation by the reductive perturbation method. The stationary solitary wave solution of this K-dV equation is obtained to characterize the basic features of the IA solitary structures that are found to exist in such a degenerate plasma. It is found that the effects of electron dynamics, relativistic degeneracy of the plasma fluids, stationary nuclei of heavy elements, etc., significantly modify the basic properties of the IA solitary structures. The implications of this results in astrophysical compact objects like white dwarfs are briefly discussed.

  9. Nonlinear ion-acoustic waves in a degenerate plasma with nuclei of heavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, M. A.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    The ion-acoustic (IA) solitary waves propagating in a fully relativistic degenerate dense plasma (containing relativistic degenerate electron and ion fluids, and immobile nuclei of heavy elements) have been theoretically investigated. The relativistic hydrodynamic model is used to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) equation by the reductive perturbation method. The stationary solitary wave solution of this K-dV equation is obtained to characterize the basic features of the IA solitary structures that are found to exist in such a degenerate plasma. It is found that the effects of electron dynamics, relativistic degeneracy of the plasma fluids, stationary nuclei of heavy elements, etc., significantly modify the basic properties of the IA solitary structures. The implications of this results in astrophysical compact objects like white dwarfs are briefly discussed.

  10. Effect of hydroxyapatite thickness on metal ion release from Ti6Al4V substrates.

    PubMed

    Sousa, S R; Barbosa, M A

    1996-02-01

    The electrochemical dissolution behaviour of Ti6Al4V alloy coated with hydroxyapatite (HA) by plasma spraying was studied in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) and compared with that of polished and grit-blasted passivated surfaces. Two different nominal thicknesses of HA (50 and 200 micro m) were used. Taking a polished passivated surface as reference, grit blasting of the substrate increased the electrical charge used in the oxidation of Ti6Al4V alloy at constant potential, as a result of increased surface area. However, only HA coatings with a thickness of 200 micro m were capable of reducing the charge to values lower than those measured for polished surfaces. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has also shown that only 200 micro m thick coatings are effective in reducing the oxidation rate of the substrate. Furthermore, in potentiostatic experiments the 50 micro m thick coating detached from the substrate, which did not occur with the 200 micro m thick coating. However, after 6 months immersion in HBSS, detachment occurred in some regions of both coatings. No titanium, aluminium or vanadium were detected in solution by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy. These data indicate that HA is an effective barrier to metal ion release, even for the thinner coatings, due to formation of metal phosphates or to incorporation of metal ions in the HA structure. PMID:8938233

  11. Slow release of ions from internalized silver nanoparticles modifies the epidermal growth factor signaling response.

    PubMed

    Comfort, Kristen K; Maurer, Elizabeth I; Hussain, Saber M

    2014-11-01

    Due to their distinctive physiochemical properties, including a robust antibacterial activity and plasmonic capability, hundreds of consumer and medical products contain colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). However, even at sub-toxic dosages, AgNPs are able to disrupt cell functionality, through a yet unknown mechanism. Moreover, internalized AgNPs have the potential to prolong this disruption, even after the removal of excess particles. In the present study, we evaluated the impact, mechanism of action, and continual effects of 50 nm AgNP exposure on epidermal growth factor (EGF) signal transduction within a human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cell line. After AgNP expose, EGF signaling was initially obstructed due to the dissolution of particles into silver ions. However, at longer durations, the internalized AgNPs increased EGF signaling activity. This latter behavior correlated to sustained HaCaT stress, believed to be maintained through the continual dissolution of internalized AgNPs. This study raises concerns that even after exposure ceases, the retained nanomaterials are capable of acting as a slow-release mechanism for metallic ions; continually stressing and modifying normal cellular functionality. PMID:25260222

  12. The Antimicrobial Properties of Silver Nanoparticles in Bacillus subtilis Are Mediated by Released Ag+ Ions

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Lin, Kuen-Song; Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Chiang, Chao-Lung; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2015-01-01

    The superior antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are well-documented, but the exact mechanisms underlying Ag-NP microbial toxicity remain the subject of intense debate. Here, we show that Ag-NP concentrations as low as 10 ppm exert significant toxicity against Bacillus subtilis, a beneficial bacterium ubiquitous in the soil. Growth arrest and chromosomal DNA degradation were observed, and flow cytometric quantification of propidium iodide (PI) staining also revealed that Ag-NP concentrations of 25 ppm and above increased membrane permeability. RedoxSensor content analysis and Phag-GFP expression analysis further indicated that reductase activity and cytosolic protein expression decreased in B. subtilis cells treated with 10–50 ppm of Ag NPs. We conducted X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analyses to directly clarify the valence and fine structure of Ag atoms in B. subtilis cells placed in contact with Ag NPs. The results confirmed the Ag species in Ag NP-treated B. subtilis cells as Ag2O, indicating that Ag-NP toxicity is likely mediated by released Ag+ ions from Ag NPs, which penetrate bacterial cells and are subsequently oxidized intracellularly to Ag2O. These findings provide conclusive evidence for the role of Ag+ ions in Ag-NP microbial toxicity, and suggest that the impact of inappropriately disposed Ag NPs to soil and water ecosystems may warrant further investigation. PMID:26669836

  13. Mass analysis of neutral particles and ions released during electrical breakdowns on spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R. F.

    1985-01-01

    Charged-particle fluxes from breakdown events were studied. Methods to measure mass spectra and total emitted flux of neutral particles were developed. The design and construction of the specialized mass spectrometer was completed. Electrical breakdowns were initiated by a movable blunt contact touching the insulating surface. The contact discharge apparatus was used for final development of two different high-speed recording systems and for measurements of the composition of the materials given off by the discharge. It was shown that intense instantaneous fluxes of neutral particles were released from the sites of electrical breakdown events. A laser micropulse mass analyzer showed that visible discoloration at breakdown sites were correllated with the presence of iron on the polymer side of the film, presumably caused by punch-through to the Inconel backing. Kapton samples irradiated by an oxygen ion beam were tested. The irradiated samples were free of surface hydrocarbon contamination but otherwise behaved in the same way as the Kapton samples tested earlier. Only the two samples exposed to oxygen ion bombardment were relatively clean. This indicates an additional variable that should be considered when testing spacecraft materials in the laboratory.

  14. EVALUATION OF TRACE ELEMENT RELEASE FROM FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an investigation of four trace elements: lead, beryllium, mercury, and fluorine. The chemical fate of minor and trace elements is important in assessing the environmental impact of the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) process and, for certain elements, i...

  15. Special diffractive elements for optical trapping fabricated on optical fiber tips using the focused ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues Ribeiro, R. S.; Guerreiro, A.; Viegas, J.; Jorge, P. A. S.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, spiral phase lenses and Fresnel zone lenses for beam tailoring, fabricated on the tip of optical fibers, are reported. The spiral phase lenses allow tailoring the fundamental guided mode, a Gaussian beam, into a Laguerre - Gaussian profile without using additional optical elements. Whereas, the Fresnel lenses are used as focusing systems. The lenses are fabricated using Focused Ion Beam milling, enabling high resolution in the manufacturing process. The output optical intensity profiles matching the numerical simulations are presented and analyzed.

  16. The Release of Elements from the Base Metal Alloys in a Protein Containing Biologic Environments and Artificial Saliva – An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Manoj; Prasad, D Krishna; Kanathila, Hema

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It has been reported that protein containing solutions can accelerate the release of elements from the base metal alloys. Aim This study aims to determine whether the solution in which an alloy is submerged and the exposure time have any effect on the amount of release of elements from the Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloys. Material and Methods A total of 126 specimens were made from the Ni-Cr alloy and 42 specimens were made from Co-Cr alloy in the form of 5mm diameter discs, 2mm in thickness. Dissolution experiments were carried out in Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and artificial saliva for a period of seven weeks and atomic absorption spectrophotometer was used for elemental analysis. Statistical Analysis T-test was done to correlate the difference of elemental release from both BSA and artificial saliva. ANOVA test was done to compare the release at different time intervals and to compare the release of elements at different time intervals within a particular solution. TUKEY HSD test was done for comparison between the elements in a particular solution. Results The results showed that the elemental release was seen in both the solutions with a significant increase of release in BSA. The release of elements from the Ni-Cr alloy showed the predominant release of Cr. Conclusion The protein containing solution showed maximum release of elements from Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloys. The elements that released from the alloys never reached their threshold for toxic effects. Hence these alloys can be safely used in fabrication of metal restorations without any ill effects. PMID:26894170

  17. Evaluation of calcium ion, hydroxyl ion release and pH levels in various calcium hydroxide based intracanal medicaments: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Fulzele, Punit; Baliga, Sudhindra; Thosar, Nilima; Pradhan, Debaprya

    2011-01-01

    Aims: Evaluation of calcium ion and hydroxyl ion release and pH levels in various calcium hydroxide based intracanal medicaments. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate calcium and hydroxyl ion release and pH levels of calcium hydroxide based products, namely, RC Cal, Metapex, calcium hydroxide with distilled water, along with the new gutta-percha points with calcium hydroxide. Materials and Methods: The materials were inserted in polyethylene tubes and immersed in deionized water. The pH variation, Ca++ and OH- release were monitored periodically for 1 week. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was carried out using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc tests with PASW Statistics version 18 software to compare the statistical difference. Results: After 1 week, calcium hydroxide with distilled water and RC Cal raised the pH to 12.7 and 11.8, respectively, while a small change was observed for Metapex, calcium hydroxide gutta-percha points. The calcium released after 1 week was 15.36 mg/dL from RC Cal, followed by 13.04, 1.296, 3.064 mg/dL from calcium hydroxide with sterile water, Metapex and calcium hydroxide gutta-percha points, respectively. Conclusions: Calcium hydroxide with sterile water and RC Cal pastes liberate significantly more calcium and hydroxyl ions and raise the pH higher than Metapex and calcium hydroxidegutta-percha points. PMID:22346155

  18. Nanometer scale elemental analysis in the helium ion microscope using time of flight spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Klingner, N; Heller, R; Hlawacek, G; von Borany, J; Notte, J; Huang, J; Facsko, S

    2016-03-01

    Time of flight backscattering spectrometry (ToF-BS) was successfully implemented in a helium ion microscope (HIM). Its integration introduces the ability to perform laterally resolved elemental analysis as well as elemental depth profiling on the nm scale. A lateral resolution of ≤54nm and a time resolution of Δt≤17ns(Δt/t≤5.4%) are achieved. By using the energy of the backscattered particles for contrast generation, we introduce a new imaging method to the HIM allowing direct elemental mapping as well as local spectrometry. In addition laterally resolved time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) can be performed with the same setup. Time of flight is implemented by pulsing the primary ion beam. This is achieved in a cost effective and minimal invasive way that does not influence the high resolution capabilities of the microscope when operating in standard secondary electron (SE) imaging mode. This technique can thus be easily adapted to existing devices. The particular implementation of ToF-BS and ToF-SIMS techniques are described, results are presented and advantages, difficulties and limitations of this new techniques are discussed. PMID:26725148

  19. Unimolecular reactions of halogeno phenylarsenium ions: Kinetic energy release during the elimination of halogen hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhoff, Dirk; Grützmacher, Hans-Friedrich; Grützmacher, Hansjörg

    2006-03-01

    The four dihalogeno phenylarsanes C6H5AsF2, 1, C6H5AsCl2, 2, C6H5AsBr2, 3, and C6H5AsI2, 4, produce in the 70 eV-EI mass spectra by loss of a halogen atom abundant halogeno phenylarseniun ions C6H5As+-X, 1a+-4a+. The further fragmentation reactions of ions 1a+-4a+ are elimination of a molecule halogen hydride HX and/or loss of a halogen atom X. The preferred route of fragmentation depends clearly on the strength of the As-X bond. The metastable fluoro ion 1a+ and chloro ion 2a+, respectively, fragment only by loss of HF and HCl, the metastable bromo derivative 3a+ exhibits losses of HBr and Br of about equal intensity, and the metastable iodo ion 4a+ fragments only by loss of an I atom. The loss of HX is associated with a large kinetic energy release (KER) which yield a dish-topped peak in the MIKE spectrum of 1a+ ( = 845 meV) and 2a+ ( = 550 meV) and a broad round-topped peak on the MIKE spectrum of 3a+ ( = 369 meV). Theoretical calculations (UBHLYP/6-311 + G(2d,p)/-/UBHLYP/6-31 + G(d)) confirm that the elimination of HX requires an enthalpy of activation [Delta]H#, and that in the case of 3a+ this [Delta]H# and the reaction enthalpy for loss of Br are of similar size. The [Delta]H# of HX elimination is also responsible for the reverse enthalpy of activation and the KER during this process. The observed amounts to 78% (1a+), 55% (2a+), and 40% (3a+) of the calculated value of . Thus, the KER as well as the distribution of the KER (KERD) and the competition between elimination of HX and loss of X are very specific for the halogen ligand at the As atom. Metastable (4-fluorophenyl) arsenium ions 1b+, F-C6H4As+-H, and (4-chlorophenyl) arsenium ions 2b+, Cl-C6H4As+-H+, eliminate HF or HCl with virtually identical KERD as metastable 1a+ or 2a+, C6H5As+-Cl, proving an identical transition state for both isomers. Accordingly, 1b+ and 2b+ rearrange to 1a+ and 2a+ prior to HCl elimination. Such a rearrangement by a reductive elimination/oxidative insertion of

  20. Development and Evaluation of Sustained Release Tablet of Betahistine Hydrochloride Using Ion Exchange Resin Tulsion T344

    PubMed Central

    Wagh, Vijay D.; Pawar, Nilesh

    2012-01-01

    An attempt was made to sustain the release of Betahistine hydrochloride by complexation technique using strong cation-exchange resin, Tulsion T344. The drug loading onto ion-exchange resin was optimized for mixing time, activation, effect of pH, swelling time, ratio of drug : resin, and temperature. The resinate was evaluated for micromeritic properties and characterized using XRPD and IR. For resinate sustained release tablets were formulated using hydoxypropyl methylcellulose K100M. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, thickness, friability, drug content, weight variation, and in vitro drug release. Tablets thus formulated (Batch T-3) provided sustained release of drug over a period of 12 h. The release of Betahistine HCl from resinate controls the diffusion of drug molecules through the polymeric material into aqueous medium. Results showed that Betahistine HCl was formulated into a sustained dosage form as an alternative to the conventional tablet. PMID:22779010

  1. Development and evaluation of sustained release tablet of betahistine hydrochloride using ion exchange resin tulsion t344.

    PubMed

    Wagh, Vijay D; Pawar, Nilesh

    2012-01-01

    An attempt was made to sustain the release of Betahistine hydrochloride by complexation technique using strong cation-exchange resin, Tulsion T344. The drug loading onto ion-exchange resin was optimized for mixing time, activation, effect of pH, swelling time, ratio of drug : resin, and temperature. The resinate was evaluated for micromeritic properties and characterized using XRPD and IR. For resinate sustained release tablets were formulated using hydoxypropyl methylcellulose K100M. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, thickness, friability, drug content, weight variation, and in vitro drug release. Tablets thus formulated (Batch T-3) provided sustained release of drug over a period of 12 h. The release of Betahistine HCl from resinate controls the diffusion of drug molecules through the polymeric material into aqueous medium. Results showed that Betahistine HCl was formulated into a sustained dosage form as an alternative to the conventional tablet. PMID:22779010

  2. Garnet/high-silica rhyolite trace element partition coefficients measured by ion microprobe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.; Bacon, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Garnet/liquid trace element partition coefficients have been measured in situ by ion microprobe in a rhyolite from Monache Mountain, California. Partition coefficients are reported for La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Dy, Er, Yb, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Sr, Y, and Zr. The in situ analyses avoid the problem of contamination of the garnet phase by trace element-rich accessory minerals encountered in traditional bulk phenocryst/matrix partitioning studies. The partitioning pattern for the rare earth elements (REEs, excluding Eu) is smooth and rises steeply from the light to the heavy REEs with no sharp kinks or changes in slope, unlike patterns for garnet /silicic liquid REE partitioning determined by bulk methods. This difference suggests that the previous determinations by bulk methods are in error, having suffered from contamination of the phenocryst separates. ?? 1992.

  3. Microbial acidification and pH effects on trace element release from sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Shabnam; Richards, Brian K; Steenhuis, Tammo S; McBride, Murray B; Baveye, Philippe; Dousset, Sylvie

    2004-11-01

    Leaching of sludge-borne trace elements has been observed in experimental and field studies. The role of microbial processes in the mobilization of trace elements from wastewater sludge is poorly defined. Our objectives were to determine trace element mobilization from sludge subjected to treatments representing microbial acidification, direct chemical acidification and no acidification, and to determine the readsorption potential of mobilized elements using calcareous sand. Triplicate columns (10-cm diameter) for incubation and leaching of sludge had a top layer of digested dewatered sludge (either untreated, acidified with H2SO4, or limed with CaCO3; all mixed with glass beads to prevent ponding) and a lower glass bead support bed. Glass beads in the sludge layer, support layer or both were replaced by calcareous sand in four treatments used for testing the readsorption potential of mobilized elements. Eight sequential 8-day incubation and leaching cycles were operated, each consisting of 7.6 d of incubation at 28 degrees C followed by 8 h of leaching with synthetic acid rain applied at 0.25 cm/h. Leachates were analyzed for trace elements, nitrate and pH, and sludge layer microbial respiration was measured. The largest trace element, nitrate and S losses occurred in treatments with the greatest pH depression and greatest microbial respiration rates. Cumulative leaching losses from both microbial acidification and direct acidification treatments were > 90% of Zn and 64-80% of Cu and Ni. Preventing acidification with sludge layer lime or sand restricted leaching for all trace elements except Mo. Results suggested that the primary microbial role in the rapid leaching of trace elements was acidification, with results from direct acidification being nearly identical to microbial acidification. Microbial activity in the presence of materials that prevented acidification mobilized far lower concentrations of trace elements, with the exception of Mo. Trace elements

  4. Stabilized finite element methods to simulate the conductances of ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Bin; Xie, Yan; Zhang, Linbo; Lu, Benzhuo

    2015-03-01

    We have previously developed a finite element simulator, ichannel, to simulate ion transport through three-dimensional ion channel systems via solving the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations (PNP) and Size-modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations (SMPNP), and succeeded in simulating some ion channel systems. However, the iterative solution between the coupled Poisson equation and the Nernst-Planck equations has difficulty converging for some large systems. One reason we found is that the NP equations are advection-dominated diffusion equations, which causes troubles in the usual FE solution. The stabilized schemes have been applied to compute fluids flow in various research fields. However, they have not been studied in the simulation of ion transport through three-dimensional models based on experimentally determined ion channel structures. In this paper, two stabilized techniques, the SUPG and the Pseudo Residual-Free Bubble function (PRFB) are introduced to enhance the numerical robustness and convergence performance of the finite element algorithm in ichannel. The conductances of the voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC) and the anthrax toxin protective antigen pore (PA) are simulated to validate the stabilization techniques. Those two stabilized schemes give reasonable results for the two proteins, with decent agreement with both experimental data and Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations. For a variety of numerical tests, it is found that the simulator effectively avoids previous numerical instability after introducing the stabilization methods. Comparison based on our test data set between the two stabilized schemes indicates both SUPG and PRFB have similar performance (the latter is slightly more accurate and stable), while SUPG is relatively more convenient to implement.

  5. Antibacterial Behavior of Additively Manufactured Porous Titanium with Nanotubular Surfaces Releasing Silver Ions.

    PubMed

    Amin Yavari, S; Loozen, L; Paganelli, F L; Bakhshandeh, S; Lietaert, K; Groot, J A; Fluit, A C; Boel, C H E; Alblas, J; Vogely, H C; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2016-07-13

    Additive manufacturing (3D printing) has enabled fabrication of geometrically complex and fully interconnected porous biomaterials with huge surface areas that could be used for biofunctionalization to achieve multifunctional biomaterials. Covering the huge surface area of such porous titanium with nanotubes has been already shown to result in improved bone regeneration performance and implant fixation. In this study, we loaded TiO2 nanotubes with silver antimicrobial agents to equip them with an additional biofunctionality, i.e., antimicrobial behavior. An optimized anodizing protocol was used to create nanotubes on the entire surface area of direct metal printed porous titanium scaffolds. The nanotubes were then loaded by soaking them in three different concentrations (i.e., 0.02, 0.1, and 0.5 M) of AgNO3 solution. The antimicrobial behavior and cell viability of the developed biomaterials were assessed. As far as the early time points (i.e., up to 1 day) are concerned, the biomaterials were found to be extremely effective in preventing biofilm formation and decreasing the number of planktonic bacteria particularly for the middle and high concentrations of silver ions. Interestingly, nanotubes not loaded with antimicrobial agents also showed significantly smaller numbers of adherent bacteria at day 1, which may be attributed to the bactericidal effect of high aspect ratio nanotopographies. The specimens with the highest concentrations of antimicrobial agents adversely affected cell viability at day 1, but this effect is expected to decrease or disappear in the following days as the rate of release of silver ions was observed to markedly decrease within the next few days. The antimicrobial effects of the biomaterials, particularly the ones with the middle and high concentrations of antimicrobial agents, continued until 2 weeks. The potency of the developed biomaterials in decreasing the number of planktonic bacteria and hindering the formation of biofilms make

  6. Time study of trace elements and major ions during two cloud events at the Mt. Brocken

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plessow, K.; Acker, K.; Heinrichs, H.; Möller, D.

    Cloud water investigations have been performed at the highest elevation of Central Germany in 1997. Results of extensive trace element measurements are presented. Besides conductivity, pH, liquid water content and major ions the data set includes 49 minor and trace elements. Estimation of crustal enrichment factors (EFs) provides an indication of the anthropogenic contributions to the cloud water concentrations. The variation of cloud composition with time has been illustrated for two selected events with different air mass origins. The chemical composition of the cloud condensation nuclei on which the droplets grow mainly determines the cloud water chemistry. For a cloud event in June 1997 the concentrations of the crustally derived elements Si, Al, Fe, Ti, Ce, La and Nd follow each other closely. The fact that SO 42-, NO 3- and NH 4+ are only moderately correlated with the particular pollutants with high enrichment factors such as Cd, Sb, Pb, Zn, Cu, As, Bi, Sn, Mo, Ni, Tl and V indicates that their source regions are more widespread. During an event in October 1997 the time trends for most minor and trace elements follow rather closely those for the major ions NH 4+, SO 42- and NO 3-. Back trajectories show that the transport from continental and marine European sources was the likely cause of the sample concentrations. EFs of trace elements in cloud water samples during the June and October event show a strong correlation with those obtained for urban particulate matter. Although both events are influenced by air masses of different origin, there is a good agreement between the EF signatures.

  7. A New Radio Frequency Plasma Oxygen Primary Ion Source on Nano Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Improved Lateral Resolution and Detection of Electropositive Elements at Single Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, Julien; Penen, Florent; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Frank, Julia; Hause, Gerd; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Gontier, Etienne; Horréard, François; Hillion, François; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2016-07-19

    An important application field of secondary ion mass spectrometry at the nanometer scale (NanoSIMS) is the detection of chemical elements and, in particular, metals at the subcellular level in biological samples. The detection of many trace metals requires an oxygen primary ion source to allow the generation of positive secondary ions with high yield in the NanoSIMS. The duoplasmatron oxygen source is commonly used in this ion microprobe but cannot achieve the same quality of images as the cesium primary ion source used to produce negative secondary ions (C(-), CN(-), S(-), P(-)) due to a larger primary ion beam size. In this paper, a new type of an oxygen ion source using a rf plasma is fitted and characterized on a NanoSIMS50L. The performances of this primary ion source in terms of current density and achievable lateral resolution have been characterized and compared to the conventional duoplasmatron and cesium sources. The new rf plasma oxygen source offered a net improvement in terms of primary beam current density compared to the commonly used duoplasmatron source, which resulted in higher ultimate lateral resolutions down to 37 nm and which provided a 5-45 times higher apparent sensitivity for electropositive elements. Other advantages include a better long-term stability and reduced maintenance. This new rf plasma oxygen primary ion source has been applied to the localization of essential macroelements and trace metals at basal levels in two biological models, cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:27291826

  8. Ion microprobe elemental analyses of impact features on interplanetary dust experiment sensor surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Jerry L.; Wortman, Jim J.; Griffis, Dieter P.; Simon, Charles G.

    1991-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact features on several of the electro-active dust sensors utilized in the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) were subjected to elemental analysis using an ion microprobe. The negatively biased dust sensor surfaces acted as ion traps for cations produced in the plasma plumes of impacting particles. Impactor residue surrounds most impact features to two or three feature diameters. After etching away a layer of carbonaceous/silicaceous surface contamination, low mass resolution elemental survey scans are used to tentatively identify the presence of impactor debris. High mass resolution two-dimensional elemental maps and three dimensional depth profiling of the feature and surrounding area show the distribution and relative composition of the debris. The location of these sensors on the six primary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) sides provides a unique opportunity to further define the debris environment. Researchers applied the same techniques to impact and contaminant features on a set of ultra-pure, highly polished single crystal germanium wafer witness plates that were mounted on row 12 and exposed to the environment during the entire mission.

  9. Ion selectivity of porcine skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channels is unaffected by the Arg615 to Cys615 mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Shomer, N H; Mickelson, J R; Louis, C F

    1994-01-01

    The Arg615 to Cys615 mutation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channel of malignant hyperthermia susceptible (MHS) pigs results in a decreased sensitivity of the channel to inhibitory Ca2+ concentrations. To investigate whether this mutation also affects the ion selectivity filter of the channel, the monovalent cation conductances and ion permeability ratios of single Ca2+ release channels incorporated into planar lipid bilayers were compared. Monovalent cation conductances in symmetrical solutions were: Li+, 183 pS +/- 3 (n = 21); Na+, 474 pS +/- 6 (n = 29); K+, 771 pS +/- 7 (n = 29); Rb+, 502 pS +/- 10 (n = 22); and Cs+, 527 pS +/- 5 (n = 16). The single-channel conductances of MHS and normal Ca2+ release channel were not significantly different for any of the monovalent cations tested. Permeability ratios measured under biionic conditions had the permeability sequence Ca2+ >> Li+ > Na+ > K+ > or Rb+ > Cs+, with no significant difference noted between MHS and normal channels. This systematic examination of the conduction properties of the pig skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel indicated a higher Ca2+ selectivity (PCa2+:Pk+ approximately 15.5) than the sixfold Ca2+ selectivity previously reported for rabbit skeletal (Smith et al., 1988) or sheep cardiac muscle (Tinker et al., 1992) Ca2+ release channels. These results also indicate that although Ca2+ regulation of Ca2+ release channel activity is altered, the Arg615 to Cys615 mutation of the porcine Ca2+ release channel does not affect the conductance or ion selectivity properties of the channel. PMID:7948678

  10. Synthesis of large FeSe superconductor crystals via ion release/introduction and property characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongna, Yuan; Yulong, Huang; Shunli, Ni; Huaxue, Zhou; Yiyuan, Mao; Wei, Hu; Jie, Yuan; Kui, Jin; Guangming, Zhang; Xiaoli, Dong; Fang, Zhou

    2016-07-01

    Large superconducting FeSe crystals of (001) orientation have been prepared via a hydrothermal ion release/introduction route for the first time. The hydrothermally derived FeSe crystals are up to 10 mm×5 mm×0.3 mm in dimension. The pure tetragonal FeSe phase has been confirmed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and the composition determined by both inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The superconducting transition of the FeSe samples has been characterized by magnetic and transport measurements. The zero-temperature upper critical field H c2 is calculated to be 13.2–16.7 T from a two-band model. The normal-state cooperative paramagnetism is found to be predominated by strong spin frustrations below the characteristic temperature T sn, where the Ising spin nematicity has been discerned in the FeSe superconductor crystals as reported elsewhere. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11574370, 11274358, and 11190020), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB921700), and the Strategic Priority Research Program (B) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07020100).

  11. Finite element simulation of the gating mechanism of mechanosensitive ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavi, Navid; Qin, Qinghua; Martinac, Boris

    2013-08-01

    In order to eliminate limitations of existing experimental or computational methods (such as patch-clamp technique or molecular dynamic analysis) a finite element (FE) model for multi length-scale and time-scale investigation on the gating mechanism of mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels has been established. Gating force value (from typical patch clamping values) needed to activate Prokaryotic MS ion channels was applied as tensional force to the FE model of the lipid bilayer. Making use of the FE results, we have discussed the effects of the geometrical and the material properties of the Escherichia coli MscL mechanosensitive ion channel opening in relation to the membrane's Young's modulus (which will vary depending on the cell type or cholesterol density in an artificial membrane surrounding the MscL ion channel). The FE model has shown that when the cell membrane stiffens the required channel activation force increases considerably. This is in agreement with experimental results taken from the literature. In addition, the present study quantifies the relationship between the membrane stress distribution around a `hole' for modeling purposes and the stress concentration in the place transmembrane proteins attached to the hole by applying an appropriate mesh refinement as well as well defining contact condition in these areas.

  12. The Potential Impacts on Aquatic Ecosystems from the Release of Trace Elements in Geothermal Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.

    2000-03-14

    Geothermal energy will likely constitute an increasing percentage of our nation's future energy ''mix,'' both for electrical and nonelectrical uses. Associated with the exploitation of geothermal resources is the handling and disposal of fluids which contain a wide variety of potentially toxic trace elements. We present analyses of 14 trace elements found in hydrothermal fluids from various geothermal reservoirs in the western United States. The concentrations of these elements vary over orders of magnitude between reservoirs. Potential impacts are conservatively assessed on the basis of (1) toxicity to freshwater biota, and (2) bioaccumulation in food fish to the point where consumption might be hazardous to human health. Trace element concentrations generally range from benign levels to levels which might prove toxic to freshwater biota and contaminate food fisheries. We stress the need for site-specific analyses and careful handling of geothermal fluids in order to minimize potential impacts.

  13. In Situ Response of Nanostructured Hybrid Fluoridated Restorative Composites on Enamel Demineralization, Surface Roughness and Ion Release.

    PubMed

    Melo, Mary A S; Codes, Bruna M; Passos, Vanara F; Lima, Juliana P M; Rodrigues, Lidiany K A

    2014-12-01

    Recurrent caries at the tooth-restoration margins is the main reason for composite failure. Fluoride-releasing nanohybrid composite resin may reduce the recurrent caries rates. A fluoride-releasing resin (FCR) and non-fluoride-releasing resin (CR) were tested using an in situ model. Demineralization (ΔS), ion release and surface roughness of composite specimens were determined. The F concentration in the group FCR was higher than the CR group. ΔS (Mean ± SD) was 2579 ± 1582 and 1705 ± 1292, respectively, for FCR and CR. Surfaces roughness was altered by biofilm accumulation. The hybrid fluorated restorative composites containing nanoparticles have a slight anticaries action without alteration of surface smoothness of the material. PMID:26466443

  14. Large-ion lithophile elements delivered by saline fluids to the sub-arc mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Mibe, Kenji; Bureau, Hélène; Reguer, Solenn; Mocuta, Cristian; Kubsky, Stefan; Thiaudière, Dominique; Ono, Shigeaki; Kogiso, Tetsu

    2014-12-01

    Geochemical signatures of arc basalts can be explained by addition of aqueous fluids, melts, and/or supercritical fluids from the subducting slab to the sub-arc mantle. Partitioning of large-ion lithophile elements between aqueous fluids and melts is crucial as these two liquid phases are present in the sub-arc pressure-temperature conditions. Using a micro-focused synchrotron X-ray beam, in situ X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra were obtained from aqueous fluids and haplogranite or jadeite melts at 0.3 to 1.3 GPa and 730°C to 830°C under varied concentrations of (Na, K)Cl (0 to 25 wt.%). Partition coefficients between the aqueous fluids and melts were calculated for Pb, Rb, and Sr ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]). There was a positive correlation between [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] values and pressure, as well as [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] values and salinity. As compared to the saline fluids with 25 wt.% (Na, K)Cl, the Cl-free aqueous fluids can only dissolve one tenth (Pb, Rb) to one fifth (Sr) of the amount of large-ion lithophile elements when they coexist with the melts. In the systems with 13 to 25 wt.% (Na, K)Cl, [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] values were greater than unity, which is indicative of the capacity of such highly saline fluids to effectively transfer Pb and Rb. Enrichment of large-ion lithophile elements such as Pb and Rb in arc basalts relative to mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORB) has been attributed to mantle source fertilization by aqueous fluids from dehydrating oceanic plates. Such aqueous fluids are likely to contain Cl, although the amount remains to be quantified.

  15. Functionalized Mesoporous Silica via an Aminosilane Surfactant Ion Exchange Reaction: Controlled Scaffold Design and Nitric Oxide Release

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide-releasing mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were prepared using an aminosilane-template surfactant ion exchange reaction. Initially, bare silica particles were synthesized under basic conditions in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). These particles were functionalized with nitric oxide (NO) donor precursors (i.e., secondary amines) via the addition of aminosilane directly to the particle sol and a commensurate ion exchange reaction between the cationic aminosilanes and CTAB. N-Diazeniumdiolate NO donors were formed at the secondary amines to yield NO-releasing MSNs. Tuning of the ion exchange-based MSN modification approach allowed for the preparation of monodisperse particles ranging from 30 to 1100 nm. Regardless of size, the MSNs stored appreciable levels of NO (0.4–1.5 μmol mg–1) with tunable NO release durations (1–33 h) dependent on the aminosilane modification. Independent control of NO release properties and particle size was achieved, demonstrating the flexibility of this novel MSN synthesis over conventional co-condensation and surface grafting strategies. PMID:26717238

  16. Hornblende-melt trace-element partitioning measured by ion microprobe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.

    1994-01-01

    Trace-element abundances were measured in situ by ion microprobe in five samples of hornblende and melt ranging from basaltic andesite to high-silica rhyolite. Except for one sample, for which quench overgrowth or disequilibrium is suspected, the abundance ratios show systematic inter-element and inter-sample variations, and probably approach true partition coefficients. Apparent partition coefficients are reported for La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Dy, Er, Yb, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Sr, Y and Zr. Rare-earth elements (REE) and Y form smooth convex-upward partitioning patterns that rise to higher D-values and become increasingly convex in more evolved samples. Apparent partition coefficients for REE, Y, Ti, V and Cr can be parameterized as functions of the distribution of Ca between hornblende and melt, giving expressions to predict hornblende-melt trace-element partitioning values. These expressions are used to show that heavy REE-enriched hornblende/whole-rock REE abundance patterns in granitoids may result from partial re-equilibration of hornblende and late-stage residual liquids rather than from anomalous partitioning values. ?? 1994.

  17. Neutron interrogation to identify chemical elements with an ion-tube neutron source (INS)

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, R.A.; Dougan, A.D.; Rowland, M.R.; Wang, T.F.

    1994-04-07

    A non-destructive analysis technique using a portable, electric ion-tube neutron source (INS) and gamma ray detector has been used to identify the key constituent elements in a number of sealed munitions, and from the elemental makeup, infer the types of agent within each. The high energy (14 MeV) and pulsed character of the neutron flux from an INS provide a method of measuring, quantitatively, the oxygen, carbon, and fluorine content of materials in closed containers, as well as the other constituents that can be measured with low-energy neutron probes. The broad range of elements that can be quantitatively measured with INS-based instruments provides a capability of verifying common munition fills; it provides the greatest specificity of any portable neutron-based technique for determining the full matrix of chemical elements in completely unrestricted sample scenarios. The specific capability of quantifying the carbon and oxygen content of materials should lead to a fast screening technique which, can discriminate very quickly between high-explosive and chemical agent-filled containers.

  18. Strain energy release rate determination of stress intensity factors by finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, R. M., Jr.; Pipes, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    The stiffness derivative finite element technique is used to determine the Mode I stress intensity factors for three-crack configurations. The geometries examined include the double edge notch, single edge notch, and the center crack. The results indicate that when the specified guidelines of the Stiffness Derivative Method are used, a high degree of accuracy can be achieved with an optimized, relatively coarse finite element mesh composed of standard, four-node, plane strain, quadrilateral elements. The numerically generated solutions, when compared with analytical ones, yield results within 0.001 percent of each other for the double edge crack, 0.858 percent for the single edge crack, and 2.021 percent for the center crack.

  19. Early time evolution of negative ion clouds and electron density depletions produced during electron attachment chemical release experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scales, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Ganguli, G.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations are used to study the early time evolution of electron depletions and negative ion clouds produced during electron attachment chemical releases in the ionosphere. The simulation model considers the evolution in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field and a three-species plasma that contains electrons, positive ions, and also heavy negative ions that result as a by-product of the electron attachment reaction. The early time evolution (less than the negative ion cyclotron period) of the system shows that a negative charge surplus initially develops outside of the depletion boundary as the heavy negative ions move across the boundary. The electrons are initially restricted from moving into the depletion due to the magnetic field. An inhomogenous electric field develops across the boundary layer due to this charge separation. A highly sheared electron flow velocity develops in the depletion boundary due to E x B and Delta-N x B drifts that result from electron density gradients and this inhomogenous electric field. Structure eventually develops in the depletion boundary layer due to low-frequency electrostatic waves that have growth times shorter than the negative ion cyclotron period. It is proposed that these waves are most likely produced by the electron-ion hybrid instability that results from sufficiently large shears in the electron flow velocity.

  20. DEVOLATILIZATION KINETICS AND ELEMENTAL RELEASE IN THE PYROLYSIS OF PULVERIZED COAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the evolution of volatile matter and trace elements from pulverized coal during pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere, using batch and laminar flow furnace reactors. Five coals were used, ranging in rank from lignite to anthracite. Data on transi...

  1. In situ cross-linking of sodium alginate with calcium and aluminum ions to sustain the release of theophylline from polymeric matrices.

    PubMed

    Nokhodchi, Ali; Tailor, Anish

    2004-12-01

    Small matrices of calcium alginate or aluminium alginate have been investigated as possible controlled release systems for drugs. The objective of the present study was to sustain the release of theophylline from alginate matrices using different concentrations of aluminium chloride and calcium chloride in presence and absence of HPMC. Tablets containing differing concentrations of aluminium and calcium chloride were produced and the release rate of theophylline was tested using the basket dissolution apparatus over 8 h. Increasing amounts of aluminium chloride from 0.0001 to 0.00068 moles decreased the release of theophylline from 95.1 +/- 0.27 to 29.5 +/- 1.5, indicating a significant effect of aluminium ions on a reduction in the release rate of theophylline from sodium alginate matrices. In the case of matrices containing different concentrations of calcium ions, as the concentration of calcium chloride increased, the release rate increased to an optimum then declined after this. This was due to insufficient calcium ions being available to cross-link with the sodium alginate to form an insoluble gel. The effect of aluminium ions, as this is a trivalent ion compared to calcium, which is a divalent ion, aluminium ions are able to decrease the release rate with a smaller concentration compared to calcium ions. The results also showed that the presence of HPMC caused a reduction in release rate of theophylline from alginate matrices containing calcium chloride. Whereas, in the case of alginate matrices containing aluminium chloride the release rate of theophylline increased in presence of HPMC. For comparing the dissolution data, dissolution efficiency (DE) was used. The values of DE are consistent with the dissolution data. The results show that within a formulation series, DE values generally decrease when the cation concentration increases and this criterion can be used to describe the effect of calcium and aluminium ions on the release behaviour of theophylline

  2. H-isotope retention and thermal/ion-induced release in boronized films

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, D.S. ); Doyle, B.L.; Wampler, W.R.; Hays, A.K. )

    1990-01-01

    Over the past decade, it has been clearly demonstrated that the composition of the very near surface ({approximately}100nm) of plasma-interactive components plays a determinant role in most processes which occur in the plasma-edge of Tokamaks. Two very successful techniques to effect control of the plasma-wall interaction are (1) in-situ deposition of amorphous carbon or boron-carbon films and (2) the use of He/C conditioning discharges or He glow discharge cleaning to modify the near surface of bulk graphite components. We have deposited boronized layers into Si using plasma-assisted CVD and sputter deposition. The PCVD deposition conditions were as close as possible to those used in TFTR, and some films deposited in TFTR have also been studied. Using these two deposition techniques, B{sub x}CH{sub y} films have been produced with x varying from 1/2 -- 4, and y from {approximately}1 (sputtered) to {approximately}3 (PCVD). Most films also contained significant amounts of 0. Thermal and ion-induced release of H-isotopes from BC films is qualitatively similar to that measured for graphite. Implanted H saturates in these films at a H/host atom ratio of 0.7 which is considerably higher than that of graphite({approximately}0.4). As-deposited PCVD films are already saturated with H, while sputtered films are not. Sputtered BC films therefore possess an inherent H-pumping capability which could prove to be extremely beneficial to TFTR. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of metallic biomaterials: reaction rate and ion release imaging modes.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, J L; Smith, S M; Lautenschlager, E P

    1993-11-01

    The Scanning Electrochemical Microscope (SECM) is a nonoptical scanning microscopic instrument capable of imaging highly localized electrical currents associated with charge transfer reactions on metallic biomaterials surfaces. The SECM operates as an aqueous electrochemical cell under bipotentiostatic control with a microelectrode and sample independently biased as working electrodes. Microelectrode current and position is recorded as it is scanned very near a metallurgically polished planar sample surface. To date, the SECM has imaged metallic biomaterials surfaces in oxygen reaction rate imaging (ORRI) and ion release and deposition imaging (IRDI) modes. In ORRI, sample and microelectrode are biased at sufficiently negative potentials to reduce absorbed oxygen. As the microelectrode scans areas of active oxygen reduction, localized diffusion fields with decreased oxygen solution concentrations are encountered and resultant decrements in microelectrode current are observed. In IRDI mode the sample is positively biased and the microelectrode is negatively biased. The microelectrode detects anodic dissolution products with highest currents being observed over the most active areas. Performance of the SECM has been evaluated on Ni minigrids, gamma-1 Hg-Ag dental amalgam crystals, and sintered beads of Co-Cr-Mo alloy which represent significantly different geometries and corrosion processes to help demonstrate the potential of this instrument. The SECM is a valuable tool for imaging microelectrochemical processes on the surfaces of metallurgically polished metallic biomaterials samples and a wide variety of other surfaces of biological interest where charge transfer reactions occur. The SECM allows selective biasing of metallic biomaterials surfaces and Faradaic reactions can be selectively imaged while the surface is in the active, passive, or transpassive state. PMID:8262998

  4. X-Rays of Heavy Elements for Nanotechnological Applications:. W and Pb Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2013-03-01

    Heavy elements can absorb or emit hard X-rays and hence are commonly implemented in various high energy nanotechnological applications. The absorptin or emission occurs mainly through the 1s-2p (Kα) transitions, and the process can be used as the source for production of radiation or electron in the applications. For enhanced productions of electrons and photons in the nanobiomedical applications, investigations have focused on the K-shell ionization of the atom or ion. This is because of the well-known rise in photoionization at the K-shell ionization threshold. However, experimental investigations to find any evidence of this rise has not been successful. We have developed a new method called Resonant Theranostics for biomedical applications, where we show that the energy for the rise is related to 1s-np, particularly to 1s-2p transitions which appear as resonances in the photoionization for heavy elements. The energy for the 1s-2p transitions varies some with the ionic state of the element and gives a narrow band resonant energy for the element. The strength of the process depends on the oscillator strength of the transitions. This report will demonstrate these through illustrations of the resonant energy range and strengths of photoabsorption due to K-alpha transitions using some elements, such as tungsten (W, Z=74) and lead (Pb, Z=82). An X-ray photon can ionize a high-Z element by ejection of a K-shell electron. This will create a hole or vacancy which, through the Auger process, will be filled out by an upper shell electron with emission of a photon. Such process at the resonant energy can lead to Koster-Kronig cascade giving out a number of photons and electrons as the element goes through various ionic states and can be modeled using the oscillator strengths. Such emissions are highly desirable in radiation therapy application. Present illustrations will include electric dipole allowed transitions for nine ionic states, from hydrogen to fluorine like ions

  5. Mechanical characterization of several ion-implanted alloys: nanoindentation testing, wear testing and finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourcier, R. J.; Follstaedt, D. M.; Dugger, M. T.; Myers, S. M.

    1991-07-01

    The influence of ion implantation on the mechanical properties of metal alloys has been examined using a variety of experimental and numerical techniques. Ultralow load indentation testing and finite element modeling has been used for the aluminum/oxygen to extract fundamental mechanical properties. Aluminum implanted with 20 at.% O exhibits extraordinary strength, as high as 3300 MPa. The degree of strengthening expected for this Al(O) alloy on the basis of the observed microstructure of fine (1.5-3.5 nm) oxide precipitates was estimated using several micromechanical models, and the results agree with our experimental findings. Pin-on-disk tribological characterization of aluminum implanted with 10 at.% oxygen revealed that the ion-beam treatment reduced the average friction coefficient from greater than 1.0 (for pure Al) to approximately 0.25 (for Al(O)). Large-amplitude stick-slip oscillations, which occur within the first two cycles for pure aluminum, were postponed to 30-50 cycles for the ion-implanted material. Two stainless steels which have been amorphized by implantation, 304 implanted with C and 440C implanted with Ti + C, show measurable hardening with implantation, of the order of 40 and 15%, respectively. In addition, nanoindentation within pin-on-disk wear tracks on 440C reveals that the mechanical state of the extensively deformed implanted layer is apparently unchanged from its initial state.

  6. Evaluation of calcium ion release and change in pH on combining calcium hydroxide with different vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Charu; Shetty, Neeta

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Intracanal medicaments have traditionally been used in endodontics to disinfect root canals between appointments. Calcium hydroxide is widely used as an intracanal medicament for disinfection and to promote periapical healing. It is stable for long periods, harmless to the body, and bactericidal in a limited area. The efficacy of calcium hydroxide as a disinfectant is dependent on the availability of the hydroxyl ions in the solution that depends on the vehicle in which the calcium hydroxide is carried. In general, three types of vehicles are used: Aqueous, viscous or oily. Some in vitro studies have shown that the type of vehicle has a direct relationship with the concentration and the velocity of ionic liberation as well as with the antibacterial action when the paste is carried into a contaminated area. Aim of the Study: To evaluate the calcium ion release and measure the change in pH of the environment that occurred when calcium hydroxide was combined with different vehicles (distilled water, propylene glycol, calcium hydroxide containing gutta-percha points and chitosan) over different time periods. Materials and Methods: Forty single rooted mandibular first premolar teeth were decoronated for this study. Working length was established and the root canals were enlarged and irrigation accomplished with 2 ml of NaOCl solution after every file. The teeth were then randomly divided into four groups. The canals were then packed with different preparations of calcium hydroxide using the following vehicles-distilled water, propylene glycol, gutta-percha points and chitosan. Calcium ion release in different groups was analyzed using an ultraviolet spectrophotometer at 220 nm. The change in pH of was determined using a pH meter. Results were statistically evaluated using one-way ANOVA test. Result: For calcium ion release, Group 2 showed cumulative drug release of 81.97% at the end of 15 days, whereas Group 1, 3 and 4 showed a release of 99.53, 17.98, 74

  7. The Double Solid Reactant Method for modeling the release of trace elements from dissolving solid phases: I. Outline and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accornero, Marina; Marini, Luigi

    2008-10-01

    A Double Solid Reactant Method was elaborated from a suggestion of Marini (Geological sequestration of carbon dioxide: Thermodynamics, kinetics, and reaction path modeling. Developments in Geochemistry, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2007) to simulate the release of trace elements during the progressive dissolution of solid phases. The method is based on the definition, for each dissolving solid, of both an entity whose thermodynamic and kinetic properties are known (either a pure mineral or a solid mixture) and a special reactant, that is, a material of known stoichiometry and unknown thermodynamic and kinetic properties. The special reactant is utilised to take into account the concentrations of trace elements in the dissolving solid phase. In this communication, the influence of several trace elements on the Δ G f o, Δ G r o and log K of the minerals considered by Lelli et al. (Environ Geol, 2007) and Accornero and Marini (Geobasi, 2007a; Proceedings of IMWA symposium, Cagliari, 27 31 May 2007b) was evaluated assuming ideal mixing in the solid state. These effects were found to be negligible for albite and the leucite latitic glass, limited for muscovites and chlorites, and slightly more important for apatites. These influences become progressively higher with increasing concentration of trace elements in these minerals. Based on these deviations in thermodynamic parameters, special reactants should not include oxide components with molar fractions higher than 0.003.

  8. Solar Ion Processing of Major Element Surface Compositions of Mature Mare Soils: Insights from Combined XPS and Analytical TEM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C.; Keller, L. P.; Baragiola, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind ions are capable of altering the sur-face chemistry of the lunar regolith by a number of mechanisms including preferential sputtering, radiation-enhanced diffusion and sputter erosion of space weathered surfaces containing pre-existing compositional profiles. We have previously reported in-situ ion irradiation experiments supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and analytical TEM that show how solar ions potentially drive Fe and Ti reduction at the monolayer scale as well as the 10-100 nm depth scale in lunar soils [1]. Here we report experimental data on the effect of ion irradiation on the major element surface composition in a mature mare soil.

  9. Galvanic Corrosion of and Ion Release from Various Orthodontic Brackets and Wires in a Fluoride-containing Mouthwash

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasbi, Soodeh; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Masudrad, Mahdis

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. This study compared the galvanic corrosion of orthodontic wires and brackets from various manufacturers following exposure to a fluoride mouthwash. Materials and methods. This study was conducted on 24 lower central incisor 0.022" Roth brackets of four different commercially available brands (Dentaurum, American Orthodontics, ORJ, Shinye). These brackets along with stainless steel (SS) or nickel-titanium (NiTi) orthodontic wires (0.016", round) were immersed in Oral-B mouthwash containing 0.05% sodium fluoride for 28 days. The electric potential (EP) difference of each bracket-wire couple was measured with a Saturated Calomel Reference Electrode (Ag/AgCl saturated with KCl) via a voltmeter. The ions released in the electrolyte weremeasured with an atomic absorption spectrometer. All the specimens were assessed under a stereomicroscope and specimens with corrosion were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Results. The copper ions released from specimens with NiTi wire were greater than those of samples containing SS wire. ORJ brackets released more Cu ions than other samples. The Ni ions released from Shinye brackets were significantly more than those of other specimens (P < 0.05). Corrosion rate of brackets coupled with NiTi wires was higher than that of brackets coupled with SS wires. Light and electron microscopic observations showed greater corrosion of ORJ brackets. Conclusion. In fluoride mouthwash, Shinye and ORJ brackets exhibited greater corrosion than Dentaurum and American Orthodontics brackets. Stainless steel brackets used with NiTi wires showed greater corrosion and thus caution is recommended when using them. PMID:26697148

  10. Galvanic Corrosion of and Ion Release from Various Orthodontic Brackets and Wires in a Fluoride-containing Mouthwash.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbi, Soodeh; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Masudrad, Mahdis

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. This study compared the galvanic corrosion of orthodontic wires and brackets from various manufacturers following exposure to a fluoride mouthwash. Materials and methods. This study was conducted on 24 lower central incisor 0.022" Roth brackets of four different commercially available brands (Dentaurum, American Orthodontics, ORJ, Shinye). These brackets along with stainless steel (SS) or nickel-titanium (NiTi) orthodontic wires (0.016", round) were immersed in Oral-B mouthwash containing 0.05% sodium fluoride for 28 days. The electric potential (EP) difference of each bracket-wire couple was measured with a Saturated Calomel Reference Electrode (Ag/AgCl saturated with KCl) via a voltmeter. The ions released in the electrolyte weremeasured with an atomic absorption spectrometer. All the specimens were assessed under a stereomicroscope and specimens with corrosion were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Results. The copper ions released from specimens with NiTi wire were greater than those of samples containing SS wire. ORJ brackets released more Cu ions than other samples. The Ni ions released from Shinye brackets were significantly more than those of other specimens (P < 0.05). Corrosion rate of brackets coupled with NiTi wires was higher than that of brackets coupled with SS wires. Light and electron microscopic observations showed greater corrosion of ORJ brackets. Conclusion. In fluoride mouthwash, Shinye and ORJ brackets exhibited greater corrosion than Dentaurum and American Orthodontics brackets. Stainless steel brackets used with NiTi wires showed greater corrosion and thus caution is recommended when using them. PMID:26697148

  11. Laser-based directed release of array elements for efficient collection into targeted microwells.

    PubMed

    Dobes, Nicholas C; Dhopeshwarkar, Rahul; Henley, W Hampton; Ramsey, J Michael; Sims, Christopher E; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2013-02-21

    A cell separation strategy capable of the systematic isolation and collection of moderate to large numbers (25-400) of single cells into a targeted microwell is demonstrated. An array of microfabricated, releasable, transparent micron-scale pedestals termed pallets and an array of microwells in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) were mated to enable selective release and retrieval of individual cells. Cells cultured on a pallet array mounted on a custom designed stage permitted the array to be positioned independently of the microwell locations. Individual pallets containing cells were detached in a targeted fashion using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The location of the laser focal point was optimized to transfer individual pallets to designated microwells. In a large-scale sort (n = 401), the accuracy, defined as placing a pallet in the intended well, was 94% and the collection efficiency was 100%. Multiple pallets were observed in only 4% of the targeted wells. In cell sorting experiments, the technique provided a yield and purity of target cells identified by their fluorescence signature of 91% and 93%, respectively. Cell viability based on single-cell cloning efficiency at 72 h post collection was 77%. PMID:23223411

  12. Trace element release from estuarine sediments of South Mosquito Lagoon near Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, M. P.; Ghuman, G. S.; Emeh, C. O.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical partitioning of four trace metals in estuarine sediments collected from eight sites in South Mosquito Lagoon near Kennedy Space Center, in terms of four different categories was accomplished using four different extraction techniques. The concentrations of the four trace metals, Zn, Mn, Cd, and Cu, released in interstitial water extract, 1 N ammonium acetate extract, conc. HCl extract and fusion extract of sediments as well as their concentrations in water samples collected from the same location were determined using flame atomic absorption technique. From the analytical results the percentages of total amount of each metal distributed among four different categories, interstitial water phase, acetate extractable, acid extractable and detrital crystalline material, were determined. Our results suggest that analytical partitioning of trace metals in estuarine sediments may be used to study the mechanism of incorporation of trace metals with sediments from natural waters. A correlation between the seasonal variation in the concentration of acetate extractable trace metals in the sediment and similar variation in their concentration in water was observed. A mechanism for the release of trace metals from estuarine sediments to natural water is also suggested.

  13. Laser-Based Directed Release of Array Elements for Efficient Collection into Targeted Microwells

    PubMed Central

    Dobes, Nicholas C.; Dhopeshwarkar, Rahul; Henley, W. Hampton; Ramsey, J. Michael; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    A cell separation strategy capable of the systematic isolation and collection of moderate to large numbers (25–400) of single cells into a targeted microwell is demonstrated. An array of microfabricated, releasable, transparent micron-scale pedestals termed pallets and an array of microwells in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) were mated to enable selective release and retrieval of individual cells. Cells cultured on a pallet array mounted on a custom designed stage permitted the array to be positioned independently of the microwell locations. Individual pallets containing cells were detached in a targeted fashion using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The location of the laser focal point was optimized to transfer individual pallets to designated microwells. In a large-scale sort (n = 401), the accuracy, defined as placing a pallet in the intended well, was 94% and the collection efficiency was 100%. Multiple pallets were observed in only 4% of the targeted wells. In cell sorting experiments, the technique provided a yield and purity of target cells identified by their fluorescence signature of 91% and 93%, respectively. Cell viability based on single-cell cloning efficiency at 72 h post collection was 77%. PMID:23223411

  14. Effect of different cleansers on the weight and ion release of removable partial denture: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    FELIPUCCI, Daniela N.B.; DAVI, Letícia R.; PARANHOS, Helena F.O.; BEZZON, Osvaldo L.; SILVA, Rodrigo F.; BARBOSA JUNIOR, Fernando; PAGNANO, Valéria O.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Removable partial dentures (RPD) require different hygiene care, and association of brushing and chemical cleansing is the most recommended to control biofilm formation. However, the effect of cleansers has not been evaluated in RPD metallic components. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of different denture cleansers on the weight and ion release of RPD. Material and Methods Five specimens (12x3 mm metallic disc positioned in a 38x18x4 mm mould filled with resin), 7 cleanser agents [Periogard (PE), Cepacol (CE), Corega Tabs (CT), Medical Interporous (MI), Polident (PO), 0.05% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and distilled water (DW) (control)] and 2 cobalt-chromium alloys [DeguDent (DD), and VeraPDI (VPDI)] were used for each experimental situation. One hundred and eighty immersions were performed and the weight was analyzed with a high precision analytic balance. Data were recorded before and after the immersions. The ion release was analyzed using mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD post hoc test at 5% significance level. Results Statistical analysis showed that CT and MI had higher values of weight loss with higher change in VPDI alloy compared to DD. The solutions that caused more ion release were NaOCl and MI. Conclusions It may be concluded that 0.05% NaOCl and Medical Interporous tablets are not suitable as auxiliary chemical solutions for RPD care. PMID:21986653

  15. Application of alpha spectrometry to the discovery of new elements by heavy-ion-beam bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1983-05-01

    Starting with polonium in 1898, ..cap alpha..-spectrometry has played a decisive role in the discovery of new, heavy elements. For even-even nuclei, ..cap alpha..-spectra have proved simple to interpret and exhibit systematic trends that allow extrapolation to unknown isotopes. The early discovery of the natural ..cap alpha..-decay series led to the very powerful method of genetically linking the decay of new elements to the well-established ..cap alpha..-emission of daughter and granddaughter nuclei. This technique has been used for all recent discoveries of new elements including Z = 109. Up to mendelevium (Z = 101), thin samples suitable for ..cap alpha..-spectrometry were prepared by chemical methods. With the advent of heavy-ion accelerators new sample preparation methods emerged. These were based on the large momentum transfer associated with heavy-ion reactions, which produced energetic target recoils that, when ejected from the target, could be thermalized in He gas. Subsequent electrical deposition or a He-jet technique yielded samples that were not only thin enough for ..cap alpha..-spectroscopy, but also for ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-recoil experiments. Many variations of these methods have been developed and are discussed. For the synthesis of element 106 an aerosol-based recoil transport technique was devised. In the most recent experiments, ..cap alpha..-spectrometry has been coupled with the magnetic analysis of the recoils. The time from production to analysis of an isotope has thereby been reduced to 10/sup -6/ s; while it was 10/sup -1/ to 10/sup 0/ s for He-jets and 10/sup 1/ to 10/sup 3/ s for rapid chemical separations. Experiments are now in progress to synthesize super heavy elements (SHE) and to analyze them with these latest techniques. Again, ..cap alpha..-spectrometry will play a major role since the expected signature for the decay of a SHE is a sequence of ..cap alpha..-decays followed by spontaneous fission.

  16. Release of nickel and chromium ions in the saliva of patients with fixed orthodontic appliance: An in-vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Anoop; Tikku, Tripti; Khanna, Rohit; Maurya, Rana Pratap; Verma, Geeta; Murthy, R. C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Various components of fixed orthodontic appliances are continuously interacting with saliva and other fluids in the mouth releasing various metal ions including nickel and chromium that can cause damaging effects if their concentration exceeds above the toxic dose. Aim: To determine and compare the level of nickel and chromium in the saliva of patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment at different time periods. Materials and Methods: The sample of saliva of 13 patients was taken at different time periods that is: Group 1 (before appliance placement), Group II, III, and IV (after 1-week, 1-month, and 3 months of appliance placement respectively). The fixed appliance comprised of brackets, bands, buccal tubes, lingual sheath, transpalatal arch and wires composed of Ni-Ti and stainless steel. The level of ions was determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectro-photometry. The data thus obtained were statistically analyzed using SPSS Statistical Analysis Software (Version 15.0). Results: Level of nickel and chromium in saliva was highest in Group II and lowest in Groups I for both the ions. On comparison among different Groups, it was statistically significant for all the groups (<0.001) except between Group III and Group IV. Conclusion: The release of nickel and chromium was maximum at 1-week and then the level gradually declined. These values were well below the toxic dose of these ions. The results should be viewed with caution in subjects with Ni hypersensitivity. PMID:26668455

  17. Novel, silver-ion-releasing nanofibrous scaffolds exhibit excellent antibacterial efficacy without the use of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mohiti-Asli, Mahsa; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2014-05-01

    Nanofibers, with their morphological similarities to the extracellular matrix of skin, hold great potential for skin tissue engineering. Over the last decade, silver nanoparticles have been extensively investigated in wound-healing applications for their ability to provide antimicrobial benefits to nanofibrous scaffolds. However, the use of silver nanoparticles has raised concerns as these particles can penetrate into the stratum corneum of skin, or even diffuse into the cellular plasma membrane. We present and evaluate a new silver ion release polymeric coating that we have found can be applied to biocompatible, biodegradable poly(l-lactic acid) nanofibrous scaffolds. Using this compound, custom antimicrobial silver-ion-releasing nanofibers were created. The presence of a uniform, continuous silver coating on the nanofibrous scaffolds was verified by XPS analysis. The antimicrobial efficacy of the antimicrobial scaffolds against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria was determined via industry-standard AATCC protocols. Cytotoxicity analyses of the antimicrobial scaffolds toward human epidermal keratinocytes and human dermal fibroblasts were performed via quantitative analyses of cell viability and proliferation. Our results indicated that the custom antimicrobial scaffolds exhibited excellent antimicrobial properties while also maintaining human skin cell viability and proliferation for silver ion concentrations below 62.5μgml(-1) within the coating solution. This is the first study to show that silver ions can be effectively delivered with nanofibrous scaffolds without the use of silver nanoparticles. PMID:24365706

  18. Manufacturing and characterization of a ceramic microcombustor with integrated oxygen storage and release element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaji, Z.; Sturesson, P.; Klintberg, L.; Hjort, K.; Thornell, G.

    2015-10-01

    A microscale ceramic high-temperature combustor with a built-in temperature sensor and source of oxygen has been designed, manufactured and characterized. The successful in situ electroplating and oxidation of copper, and the use of copper oxide as the source of oxygen were demonstrated. It was shown that residual stresses from electroplating, copper oxidation and oxide decomposition did not cause much deformation of the substrate but influenced mainly the integrity and adhesion of the metal films. The process had influence on the electrical resistances, however. Calibration of the temperature sensor and correlation with IR thermography up to 1000 °C revealed a nearly linear sensor behavior. Demonstration of combustion in a vacuum chamber proved that no combustion had occurred before release of oxygen from the metal oxide resource.

  19. Environmental risk of particulate and soluble platinum group elements released from gasoline and diesel engine catalytic converters.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, M; Palacios, M A; Gómez, M M; Morrison, G; Rauch, S; McLeod, C; Ma, R; Caroli, S; Alimonti, A; Petrucci, F; Bocca, B; Schramel, P; Zischka, M; Pettersson, C; Wass, U; Luna, M; Saenz, J C; Santamaría, J

    2002-09-16

    A comparison of platinum-group element (PGE) emission between gasoline and diesel engine catalytic converters is reported within this work. Whole raw exhaust fumes from four catalysts of three different types were examined during their useful lifetime, from fresh to 80,000 km. Two were gasoline engine catalysts (Pt-Pd-Rh and Pd-Rh), while the other two were diesel engine catalysts (Pt). Samples were collected following the 91441 EUDC driving cycle for light-duty vehicle testing, and the sample collection device used allowed differentiation between the particulate and soluble fractions, the latter being the most relevant from an environmental point of view. Analyses were performed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) (quadrupole and high resolution), and special attention was paid to the control of spectral interference, especially in the case of Pd and Rh. The results obtained show that, for fresh catalysts, the release of particulate PGE through car exhaust fumes does not follow any particular trend, with a wide range (one-two orders of magnitude) for the content of noble metals emitted. The samples collected from 30,000-80,000 km present a more homogeneous PGE release for all catalysts studied. A decrease of approximately one order of magnitude is observed with respect to the release from fresh catalysts, except in the case of the diesel engine catalyst, for which PGE emission continued to be higher than in the case of gasoline engines. The fraction of soluble PGE was found to represent less than 10% of the total amount released from fresh catalysts. For aged catalysts, the figures are significantly higher, especially for Pd and Rh. Particulate PGE can be considered as virtually biologically inert, while soluble PGE forms can represent an environmental risk due to their bioavailability, which leads them to accumulate in the environment. PMID:12398337

  20. Elemental ratios and the uptake and release of nutrients by phytoplankton and bacteria in three lakes of the Canadian shield.

    PubMed

    Elser, J J; Chrzanowski, T H; Sterner, R W; Schampel, J H; Foster, D K

    1995-03-01

    The dynamics of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P), elemental ratios, and dark uptake/release of N and P in bacterial and phytoplankton size fractions were studied during summer 1992 in three lakes of contrasting food web structure and trophic status (L240, L110, L227). We wished to determine if phytoplankton and bacteria differed in their elemental characteristics and to evaluate whether the functional role of bacteria in nutrient cycling (i.e., as sink or source) depended on bacterial elemental characteristics. Bacterial contributions to total suspended particulate material and to fluxes of nutrients in the dark were substantial and varied for different elements. This indicated that some techniques for assaying phytoplankton physiological condition are compromised by bacterial contributions. C/N ratios were generally less variable than C/P and N/P ratios. Both elemental ratios and biomass-normalized N and P flux indicated that phytoplankton growth in each lake was predominantly P-limited, although in L227 these data reflect the dominance of N-fixing cyanobacteria, and N was likely limiting early in the sampling season. In L227, phytoplankton N/P ratio and biomass-normalized N flux were negatively correlated, indicating that flux data were likely a reasonable measure of the N status of the phytoplankton. However, for L227 phytoplankton, P-flux per unit biomass was a hyperbolic function of N/P, suggesting that the dominant L227 cyanobacteria have a limited uptake and storage capacity and that P-flux per unit biomass may not be a good gauge of the P-limitation status of phytoplankton in this situation. Examination of N-flux data in the bacterial size fraction relative to the N/P ratio of the bacteria revealed a threshold N/P ratio (∼22:1 N/P, by atoms), below which, bacteria took up and sequestered added N, and above which, N was released. Thus, the functional role of bacteria in N cycling in these ecosystems depended on their N/P stoichiometry. PMID

  1. Iron sulfide attenuates the methanogenic toxicity of elemental copper and zinc oxide nanoparticles and their soluble metal ion analogs.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-04-01

    Elemental copper (Cu(0)) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) toxicity to methanogens has been attributed to the release of soluble metal ions. Iron sulfide (FeS) partially controls the soluble concentration of heavy metals and their toxicity in aquatic environments. Heavy metals displace the Fe from FeS forming poorly soluble metal sulfides in the FeS matrix. Therefore, FeS may be expected to attenuate the NP toxicity. This work assessed FeS as an attenuator of the methanogenic toxicity of Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble salt analogs. The toxicity attenuation capacity of fine (25-75μm) and coarse (500 to 1200μm) preparations of FeS (FeS-f and FeS-c respectively) was tested in the presence of highly inhibitory concentrations of CuCl2, ZnCl2 Cu(0) and ZnO NPs. FeS-f attenuated methanogenic toxicity better than FeS-c. The results revealed that 2.5× less FeS-f than FeS-c was required to recover the methanogenic activity to 50% (activity normalized to uninhibited controls). The results also indicated that a molar FeS-f/Cu(0) NP, FeS-f/ZnO NP, FeS-f/ZnCl2, and FeS-f/CuCl2 ratio of 2.14, 2.14, 4.28, and 8.56 respectively, was necessary to recover the methanogenic activity to >75%. Displacement experiments demonstrated that CuCl2 and ZnCl2 partially displaced Fe from FeS. As a whole, the results indicate that not all the sulfide in FeS was readily available to react with the soluble Cu and Zn ions which may explain the need for a large stoichiometric excess of FeS to highly attenuate Cu and Zn toxicity. Overall, this study provides evidence that FeS attenuates the toxicity caused by Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble ion analogs to methanogens. PMID:26803736

  2. Ion microprobe elemental analyses of impact features on interplanetary dust experiment sensor surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Charles G.; Hunter, Jerry L.; Wortman, Jim J.; Griffis, Dieter P.

    1992-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact features from very small particles (less than 3 microns in diameter) on several of the electro-active dust sensors used in the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) were subjected to elemental analysis using an ion microscope. The same analytical techniques were applied to impact and containment features on a set of ultra-pure, highly polished single crystal germanium wafer witness plates that were mounted on tray B12. Very little unambiguously identifiable impactor debris was found in the central craters or shatter zones of small impacts in this crystalline surface. The surface contamination, ubiquitous on the surface of the Long Duration Exposure Facility, has greatly complicated data collection and interpretation from microparticle impacts on all surfaces.

  3. Mathematical modeling and remote monitoring of ion-exchange separation of transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Tselishchev, I.V.; Elesin, A.A.

    1988-07-01

    A mathematical model and calculational algorithms for the elution curves for ion-exchange separation of transplutonium elements (TPE) and the limits of optimal fractionation of the substances being separated, based on indicators of the process (yield, purification), are presented. The calculational programs are part of the programming provision of a small informational-calculational system based on the microcomputer Elektronika DZ-28, intended for remote monitoring of TPE separation. The elaborated programs can be implemented in the preliminary choice of necessary conditions of the TPE separation process, and also during and after the separation process for comparison of calculated results with the results of continuous, on-line remote monitoring and with the results of laboratory sample analysis. The possible application of the programs has been checked in the instance of the separation of curium and americium, and einsteinium and californium, the results of which are in satisfactory agreement with the results of remote and laboratory-analytical monitoring.

  4. Inhibition of trace element release during Fe(II)-activated recrystallization of Al-, Cr-, and Sn-substituted goethite and hematite

    SciTech Connect

    Frierdich, Andrew J.; Scherer, M.; Bachman, Jonathan E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Rapponotti, Brett W.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2012-09-18

    Aqueous Fe(II) reacts with Fe(III) oxides by coupled electron transfer and atom exchange (ETAE) resulting in mineral recrystallization, contaminant reduction, and trace element cycling. Previous studies of Fe(II)-Fe(III) ETAE have explored the reactivity of either pure iron oxide phases or those containing small quantities of soluble trace elements. Naturally occurring iron oxides, however, contain substantial quantities of insoluble impurities (e.g., Al) which are known to affect the chemical properties of such minerals. Here we explore the effect of Al(III), Cr(III), and Sn(IV) substitution on trace element release from Ni(II)-substituted goethite and Zn(II)-substituted hematite during reaction with aqueous Fe(II). Fe(II)-activated trace element release is substantially inhibited from both minerals when an insoluble element is co-substituted into the structure, and the total amount of release decreases exponentially with increasing co substituent. The limited changes in surface composition that occur following reaction with Fe(II) indicate that Al, Cr, and Sn do not exsolve from the structure and that Ni and Zn released to solution originate primarily from the bulk rather than the particle exterior (upper ~3 nm). Incorporation of Al into goethite substantially decreases the amount of iron atom exchange with aqueous Fe(II) and, consequently, the amount of Ni release from the structure. This implies that trace element release inhibition caused by substituting insoluble elements results from a decrease in the amount of mineral recrystallization. These results suggest that naturally occurring iron oxides containing insoluble elements are less susceptible to Fe(II)-activated recrystallization and exhibit a greater retention of trace elements and contaminants than pure mineral phases.

  5. Inhibition of trace element release during Fe(II)-activated recrystallization of Al-, Cr-, and Sn-substituted goethite and hematite.

    PubMed

    Frierdich, Andrew J; Scherer, Michelle M; Bachman, Jonathan E; Engelhard, Mark H; Rapponotti, Brett W; Catalano, Jeffrey G

    2012-09-18

    Aqueous Fe(II) reacts with Fe(III) oxides by coupled electron transfer and atom exchange (ETAE) resulting in mineral recrystallization, contaminant reduction, and trace element cycling. Previous studies of Fe(II)-Fe(III) ETAE have explored the reactivity of either pure iron oxide phases or those containing small quantities of soluble trace elements. Naturally occurring iron oxides, however, contain substantial quantities of insoluble impurities (e.g., Al) which are known to affect the chemical properties of such minerals. Here we explore the effect of Al(III), Cr(III), and Sn(IV) substitution (1-8 mol %) on trace element release from Ni(II)-substituted goethite and Zn(II)-substituted hematite during reaction with aqueous Fe(II). Fe(II)-activated trace element release is substantially inhibited from both minerals when an insoluble element is cosubstituted into the structure, and the total amount of release decreases exponentially with increasing cosubstituent. The limited changes in surface composition that occur following reaction with Fe(II) indicate that Al, Cr, and Sn do not exsolve from the structure and that Ni and Zn released to solution originate primarily from the bulk rather than the particle exterior (upper ~3 nm). Incorporation of Al into goethite substantially decreases the amount of iron atom exchange with aqueous Fe(II) and, consequently, the amount of Ni release from the structure. This implies that trace element release inhibition caused by substituting insoluble elements results from a decrease in the amount of mineral recrystallization. These results suggest that naturally occurring iron oxides containing insoluble elements are less susceptible to Fe(II)-activated recrystallization and exhibit a greater retention of trace elements and contaminants than pure mineral phases. PMID:22924460

  6. Oral sustained-release suspension based on a novel taste-masked and mucoadhesive carrier-ion-exchange fiber.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Liu, Tiaotiao; Li, Heran; Shi, Tianyu; Xu, Jie; Liu, Hongzhuo; Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Qifang; Xu, Lu; Wang, Yan; Li, Sanming

    2014-09-10

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of ion-exchange fiber ZB-1 as a novel carrier in oral taste-masked mucoadhesive sustained-release suspensions. Propranolol (PPN) hydrochloride was selected as a model drug with good water solubility, short half life and bitter taste. The PPN-fiber complexes (PF) were prepared by a batch process and coated with Eudragit(®) RS100. Gamma scintigraphy was performed on fasted volunteers revealed about 30% ZB-1 and more than 50% coated ZB-1 were still remaining in the stomach at 6h. In vitro results showed the releases of PF and coated PPN-fiber complexes (C-PF) were sustained. The release, drug content and particle size of C-PF were influenced by coat to core ratio, concentration of coating material and rotation rate. The suspension was stable after standing for 30 days in 0.5% Carbopol(®) with no release rate and taste changed. The administration of C-PF suspension to rats resulted a significant different (P<0.05) improvement of the plasma drug level and prolongation of the release. However, because of the burst effect, the Cmax values of PF suspension didn't differ from drug solution (P>0.05). Furthermore, a linear relationship between in vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption was observed. PMID:24882038

  7. Generation of intense and cold beam of Pt-Ag bi-element cluster ions having single-composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasumatsu, H.

    2011-07-01

    An intense beam of bi-element Pt-Ag cluster ions with a single atomic-composition has been gained toward development of new-functional materials of the clusters fixed on a solid surface. Mass production of the bi-element cluster ions has been achieved by operating dual magnetron-sputtering devices independently in a gas aggregation cell, and the ions having a single composition are filtered out by passing through a quadrupole mass filter. The kinetic energies of the cluster ions have been reduced by collision with cold helium in order for low-energy cluster-impact deposition of the clusters on the surface. The cooling process was examined further by means of molecular-dynamics simulation.

  8. Mineralogy and the release of trace elements from slag from the Hegeler Zinc smelter, Illinois (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatak, N.M.; Seal, R.R., II

    2010-01-01

    Slag from the former Hegeler Zn-smelting facility in Illinois (USA) is mainly composed of spinifex Ca-rich plagioclase, fine-grained dendritic or coarse-grained subhedral to anhedral clinopyroxenes, euhedral to subhedral spinels, spherical blebs of Fe sulfides, silicate glass, and less commonly fayalitic olivine. Mullite and quartz were also identified in one sample as representing remnants of the furnace lining. Secondary phases such as goethite, hematite and gypsum are significant in some samples and reflect surficial weathering of the dump piles or represent byproducts of roasting. A relatively rare Zn-rich material contains anhedral willemite, subhedral gahnite, massive zincite, hardystonite and a Zn sulfate (brianyoungite), among other phases, and likely represents the molten content of the smelting furnace before Zn extraction. The bulk major-element chemistry of most slag samples is dominated by SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3 and CaO. The bulk composition of the slag suggests a high viscosity of the melt and the mineralogy suggests a high silica content of the melt. Bulk slag trace-element chemistry shows that the dominant metal is Zn with >28.4 wt.% in the Zn-rich material and between 212 and 14,900 mg/kg in the other slags. The concentrations of other trace elements reach the following: 45 mg/kg As, 1170 mg/kg Ba, 191 mg/kg Cd, 242 mg/kg Co, 103 mg/kg Cr, 6360 mg/kg Cu, 107 mg/kg Ni, and 711 mg/kg Pb. Zinc, as the dominant metal in the slags, is likely the most environmentally significant metal in these samples; Cd, Cu, and Pb are also of concern and their concentrations exceed US Environmental Protection Agency preliminary remediation goals for residential soils. Spinel was found to be the dominant concentrator of Zn for samples containing significant Zn (>1 wt.%); the silicate glass also contained relatively high concentrations of Zn compared to other phases. Zinc partitioned into the silicates and oxides in these samples is generally more resistant to weathering

  9. Template copolymerization to control site structure around metal ions: Applications towards sensing and gas storage and release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell-Koch, Jeremy T.

    The development of functional materials for sensing and gas storage and release is useful in a number of chemical and biological applications. Investigating function of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP), often used for these purposes, has relied on circumstantial evidence because direct examination of immobilized sites is not possible. Described in this dissertation is the design, synthesis, characterization and function studies of materials synthesized by template copolymerization methods. Metal ions exhibit unique spectroscopic properties and their utilization makes site examination more feasible. Ligand binding modulates these properties such that the event can be measured by spectroscopy. The metal ion's secondary coordination environment can also be tuned to increase or decrease function of the material. In Chapter Two the utilization of template copolymerization to immobilize a europium-containing compound for the detection of volatile organic compounds is described. Luminescence of the immobilized complex is quenched in the presence of volatile organic compounds (VOC). The quenching effect is dependent on concentration of VOC and the nature of polymeric host. Chapters Three and Four describe the development of materials for the photolytic release of nitric oxide (NO). In Chapter Three, a novel manipulation of the immobilized complex is employed to produce binding sites that contain ligands covalently embedded into the host in a position to bind the metal ion upon NO release in order to block rebinding. Incompatible binding affinities of the iron-containing templates made it impossible to study NO photo-release from this material. Second-row transition metals are more compatible with NO binding, and Chapter Four describes a ruthenium salen-containing polymer that releases NO in response to light. Additionally, transfer of NO to a metalloporphyrin and myoglobin has been achieved. This is the first report of photolytic heterogeneous NO transfer by a material

  10. Mechanical behavior of representative volume elements of lithium-ion battery modules under various loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wei-Jen; Ali, Mohammed Yusuf; Pan, Jwo

    2014-02-01

    Mechanical behavior of lithium-ion battery modules is investigated by conducting tensile tests of the module components, constrained compression tests of dry module representative volume element (RVE) specimens, and a constrained punch test of a small-scale dry module specimen. The results of tensile tests of the module components are used to characterize the tensile behavior of module specimens. The results in-plane constrained compression tests of module RVE specimens indicate that the load carrying capacity is characterized by the buckling of the module components and the final densification of the module components, and the nominal stress-strain curves appear to be independent of the specimen height. The results of different compressive nominal stress-strain curves in the in-plane and out-of-plane directions indicate the module RVE specimens are anisotropic. The results of a buckling analysis of the module RVE specimens under in-plane constrained compression are in agreement with the experimental results. The module RVE specimen is dominated by the buckling of the aluminum heat dissipater sheet under in-plane constrained compression. Finally, the results of a constrained punch test of a module specimen are in agreement with those of the corresponding finite element analyses based on a macroscopic homogenized foam material model.

  11. Impact of rice cultivar and organ on elemental composition of phytoliths and the release of bio-available silicon

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zimin; Song, Zhaoliang; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The continental bio-cycling of silicon (Si) plays a key role in global Si cycle and as such partly controls global carbon (C) budget through nutrition of marine and terrestrial biota, accumulation of phytolith-occluded organic carbon (PhytOC) and weathering of silicate minerals. Despite the key role of elemental composition of phytoliths on their solubility in soils, the impact of plant cultivar and organ on the elemental composition of phytoliths in Si high-accumulator plants, such as rice (Oryza sativa) is not yet fully understood. Here we show that rice cultivar significantly impacts the elemental composition of phytoliths (Si, Al, Fe, and C) in different organs of the shoot system (grains, sheath, leaf and stem). The amount of occluded OC within phytoliths is affected by contents of Si, Al, and Fe in plants, while independent of the element composition of phytoliths. Our data document, for different cultivars, higher bio-available Si release from phytoliths of leaves and sheaths, which are characterized by higher enrichment with Al and Fe (i.e., lower Si/Al and Si/Fe ratios), compared to grains and stems. We indicate that phytolith solubility in soils may be controlled by rice cultivar and type of organs. Our results highlight that the role of the morphology, the hydration rate and the chemical composition in the solubility of phytoliths and the kinetic release of Si in soil solution needs to be studied further. This is central to a better understanding of the impact of soil amendment with different plant organs and cultivars on soil OC stock and on the delivery of dissolved Si as we show that sheath and leaf rice organs are both characterized by higher content of OC occluded in phytolith and higher phytolith solubility compared to grains and stems. Our study shows the importance of studying the impact of the agro-management on the evolution of sinks and sources of Si and C in soils used for Si-high accumulator plants. PMID:25346741

  12. Impact of rice cultivar and organ on elemental composition of phytoliths and the release of bio-available silicon.

    PubMed

    Li, Zimin; Song, Zhaoliang; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The continental bio-cycling of silicon (Si) plays a key role in global Si cycle and as such partly controls global carbon (C) budget through nutrition of marine and terrestrial biota, accumulation of phytolith-occluded organic carbon (PhytOC) and weathering of silicate minerals. Despite the key role of elemental composition of phytoliths on their solubility in soils, the impact of plant cultivar and organ on the elemental composition of phytoliths in Si high-accumulator plants, such as rice (Oryza sativa) is not yet fully understood. Here we show that rice cultivar significantly impacts the elemental composition of phytoliths (Si, Al, Fe, and C) in different organs of the shoot system (grains, sheath, leaf and stem). The amount of occluded OC within phytoliths is affected by contents of Si, Al, and Fe in plants, while independent of the element composition of phytoliths. Our data document, for different cultivars, higher bio-available Si release from phytoliths of leaves and sheaths, which are characterized by higher enrichment with Al and Fe (i.e., lower Si/Al and Si/Fe ratios), compared to grains and stems. We indicate that phytolith solubility in soils may be controlled by rice cultivar and type of organs. Our results highlight that the role of the morphology, the hydration rate and the chemical composition in the solubility of phytoliths and the kinetic release of Si in soil solution needs to be studied further. This is central to a better understanding of the impact of soil amendment with different plant organs and cultivars on soil OC stock and on the delivery of dissolved Si as we show that sheath and leaf rice organs are both characterized by higher content of OC occluded in phytolith and higher phytolith solubility compared to grains and stems. Our study shows the importance of studying the impact of the agro-management on the evolution of sinks and sources of Si and C in soils used for Si-high accumulator plants. PMID:25346741

  13. Determination of trace element mineral/liquid partition coefficients in melilite and diopside by ion and electron microprobe techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehner, S. M.; Laughlin, J. R.; Grossman, L.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1989-01-01

    The applicability of ion microprobe (IMP) for quantitative analysis of minor elements (Sr, Y, Zr, La, Sm, and Yb) in the major phases present in natural Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) was investigated by comparing IMP results with those of an electron microprobe (EMP). Results on three trace-element-doped glasses indicated that it is not possible to obtain precise quantitative analysis by using IMP if there are large differences in SiO2 content between the standards used to derive the ion yields and the unknowns.

  14. Surface properties and ion release from fluoride-containing bioactive glasses promote osteoblast differentiation and mineralization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gentleman, E; Stevens, M M; Hill, R G; Brauer, D S

    2013-03-01

    Bioactive glasses (BG) are suitable for bone regeneration applications as they bond with bone and can be tailored to release therapeutic ions. Fluoride, which is widely recognized to prevent dental caries, is efficacious in promoting bone formation and preventing osteoporosis-related fractures when administered at appropriate doses. To take advantage of these properties, we created BG incorporating increasing levels of fluoride whilst holding their silicate structure constant, and tested their effects on human osteoblasts in vitro. Our results demonstrate that, whilst cell proliferation was highest on low-fluoride-containing BG, markers for differentiation and mineralization were highest on BG with the highest fluoride contents, a likely effect of a combination of surface effects and ion release. Furthermore, osteoblasts exposed to the dissolution products of fluoride-containing BG or early doses of sodium fluoride showed increased alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker for bone mineralization, suggesting that fluoride can direct osteoblast differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that BG that can release therapeutic levels of fluoride may find use in a range of bone regeneration applications. PMID:23128161

  15. Avidin-biotin capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles as an ion-responsive release system to determine lead(II).

    PubMed

    Song, Weiling; Li, Jingyu; Li, Qing; Ding, Wenyao; Yang, Xiaoyan

    2015-02-15

    We have developed DNAzyme-functionalized silica nanoparticles for the rapid, sensitive, and selective detection of lead ion (Pb(2+)). The specific binding between avidin and biotinylated DNAzymes was used to cap the pore of dye-trapped silica nanoparticles. In the presence of Pb(2+), DNAzymes were catalytically cleaved to uncap the pore, releasing the dye cargo with detectable enhancements of fluorescence signal. This method enables rapid (15 min) and sensitive (limit of detection=8.0 nM) detection. Moreover, the Pb(2+)-responsive behavior shows high selectivity with other metal ions. The superior properties of the as-designed DNAzyme-functionalized silica nanoparticles can be attributed to the large loading capacity and highly ordered pore structure of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as well as the catalytical cleaving of DNAzymes with Pb(2+). The recoveries obtained by standard Pb(II) addition to real samples-tap water, commercial mineral water, and lake water-were all from 98 to 101%. Our design serves as a new prototype for metal-ion sensing systems, and it also has promising potential for detection of various targets in stimulus-release systems. PMID:25447495

  16. A Study on Removal of Rare Earth Elements from U.S. Coal Byproducts by Ion Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozelle, Peter L.; Khadilkar, Aditi B.; Pulati, Nuerxida; Soundarrajan, Nari; Klima, Mark S.; Mosser, Morgan M.; Miller, Charles E.; Pisupati, Sarma V.

    2016-03-01

    Rare earth elements are known to occur in low concentrations in U.S. coals and coal byproducts. These low concentrations may make rare earth element recovery from these materials unattractive, using only physical separation techniques. However, given the significant production of rare earths through ion exchange extraction in China, two U.S. coal byproducts were examined for ion extraction, using ammonium sulfate, an ionic liquid, and a deep eutectic solvent as lixiviants. Extraction of rare earth elements in each case produced high recoveries of rare earth elements to the solution. This suggests that in at least the cases of the materials examined, U.S. coal byproducts may be technically suitable as REE ores. More work is required to establish economic suitability.

  17. Kinetic-energy release in the dissociative capture-ionization of CO molecules by 97-MeV Ar14+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, R. L.; Sampoll, G.; Horvat, V.; Heber, O.

    1996-02-01

    The dissociation of COQ+ molecular ions (Q=4 to 9) produced in multiply ionizing collisions accompanied by the transfer of an electron to the projectile has been studied using time-of-flight techniques. Analysis of the coincident-ion-pair flight-time-difference distributions yielded average values of the kinetic-energy releases for the various dissociation reactions. These values were found to be as much as a factor of 2 greater than the kinetic-energy releases expected for dissociation along Coulombic potential curves. The average kinetic-energy release observed for a given ion pair with charges q1 and q2 are nearly equal to the point-charge Coulomb potential energies for an ion pair with charges q1+1 and q2+1, suggesting that the parent molecular ion is formed with two electrons, on average, in highly excited states that do not contribute to the screening of the nuclei.

  18. Nitric acid passivation of Ti6Al4V reduces thickness of surface oxide layer and increases trace element release.

    PubMed

    Callen, B W; Lowenberg, B F; Lugowski, S; Sodhi, R N; Davies, J E

    1995-03-01

    Passivation of Ti6Al4V and cpTi implants using methods based on the ASTM-F86 nitric acid protocol are used with the intention of reducing their surface reactivity, and consequently the corrosion potential, in the highly corrosive biologic milieu. The ASTM-F86 passivation protocol was originally developed for surgical implants made of stainless steel and chrome cobalt alloy. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to examine the effect of nitric acid passivation on the surface oxide layer of mill-annealed Ti6Al4V and cpTi, we have found that such treatment actually reduced the oxide thickness on the alloy while having no significant effect on the pure metal. These results correlated with observations obtained using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GFAAS) to detect trace element release from solid, mill-annealed, Ti6Al4V and cpTi into serum-containing culture medium. We detected significantly greater levels of Ti, Al, and V in the presence of passivated compared to nonpassivated Ti6Al4V. In contrast, nitric acid passivation did not influence Ti release from mill-annealed cpTi. These results, derived from two mill-annealed Ti-based metals, would indicate that re-examination of ASTM-F86-based passivation protocols with respect to Ti6Al4V should be considered in view of the widespread use of this alloy for biomedical devices. PMID:7615579

  19. Specific release of membrane-bound annexin II and cortical cytoskeletal elements by sequestration of membrane cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Harder, T; Kellner, R; Parton, R G; Gruenberg, J

    1997-01-01

    Annexin II is an abundant protein which is present in the cytosol and on the cytoplasmic face of plasma membrane and early endosomes. It is generally believed that this association occurs via Ca(2+)-dependent binding to lipids, a mechanism typical for the annexin protein family. Although previous studies have shown that annexin II is involved in early endosome dynamics and organization, the precise biological role of the protein is unknown. In this study, we found that approximately 50% of the total cellular annexin was associated with membranes in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. This binding was extremely tight, since it resisted high salt and, to some extent, high pH treatments. We found, however, that membrane-associated annexin II could be quantitatively released by low concentrations of the cholesterol-sequestering agents filipin and digitonin. Both treatments released an identical and limited set of proteins but had no effects on other membrane-associated proteins. Among the released proteins, we identified, in addition to annexin II itself, the cortical cytoskeletal proteins alpha-actinin, ezrin and moesin, and membrane-associated actin. Our biochemical and immunological observations indicate that these proteins are part of a complex containing annexin II and that stability of the complex is sensitive to cholesterol sequestering agents. Since annexin II is tightly membrane-associated in a cholesterol-dependent manner, and since it seems to interact physically with elements of the cortical actin cytoskeleton, we propose that the protein serves as interface between membranes containing high amounts of cholesterol and the actin cytoskeleton. Images PMID:9188103

  20. Localization of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in the lysosomal acidic compartment of cultured neurons and its impact on viability: potential role of ion release.

    PubMed

    Corazzari, Ingrid; Gilardino, Alessandra; Dalmazzo, Simona; Fubini, Bice; Lovisolo, Davide

    2013-03-01

    CdSe Quantum Dots (QDs) are increasingly being employed in both industrial applications and biological imaging, thanks to their numerous advantages over conventional organic and proteic fluorescent markers. On the other hand a growing concern has emerged that toxic elements from the QDs core would render the nanoparticles harmful to cell cultures, animals and humans. The interaction between QDs and neuronal cells in particular needs to be carefully evaluated, since nanoparticles could access the nervous system by several pathways, including the olfactory epithelium, even if no data are presently available about QDs. The pH of the environment to which the nanoparticles are exposed may play a crucial role in the stability of QDs coating. For this reason we investigated the release of metal ions from CdSe/ZnS QDs in artificial media reproducing the cytosolic and lysosomal cellular compartments characterized respectively by a neutral and an acidic pH. In the latter significant amounts of both Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) were released. We provide evidence that these QDs are internalized in the GT1-7 neuronal cell line and located in the lysosomal compartment. These findings can be related to a slight but significant reduction in cell survival and proliferation. PMID:23274769

  1. Gellan gum microspheres crosslinked with trivalent ion: effect of polymer and crosslinker concentrations on drug release and mucoadhesive properties.

    PubMed

    Boni, Fernanda Isadora; Prezotti, Fabíola Garavello; Cury, Beatriz Stringhetti Ferreira

    2016-08-01

    Gellan gum microspheres were obtained by ionotropic gelation technique, using the trivalent ion Al(3+). The percentage of entrapment efficiency ranged from 48.76 to 87.52% and 2(2) randomized full factorial design demonstrated that both the increase of polymer concentration and the decrease of crosslinker concentration presented a positive effect in the amount of encapsulated drug. Microspheres size and circularity ranged from 700.17 to 938.32 μm and from 0.641 to 0.796 μm, respectively. The increase of polymer concentration (1-2%) and crosslinker concentration (3-5%) led to the enlargement of particle size and circularity. However, the association of increased crosslinker concentration and reduced polymer content made the particles more irregular. In vitro and ex vivo tests evidenced the high mucoadhesiveness of microspheres. The high liquid uptake ability of the microspheres was demonstrated and the pH variation did not affect this parameter. Drug release was pH dependent, with low release rates in acid pH (42.40% and 44.93%) and a burst effect in phosphate buffer pH (7.4). The Weibull model had the best correlation with the drug release data, demonstrating that the release process was driven by a complex mechanism involving the erosion and swelling of the matrix or by non-Fickian diffusion. PMID:26616390

  2. Evaluation of effect of galvanic corrosion between nickel-chromium metal and titanium on ion release and cell toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung-Yun

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate cell toxicity due to ion release caused by galvanic corrosion as a result of contact between base metal and titanium. MATERIALS AND METHODS It was hypothesized that Nickel (Ni)-Chromium (Cr) alloys with different compositions possess different corrosion resistances when contacted with titanium abutment, and therefore in this study, specimens (10×10×1.5 mm) were fabricated using commercial pure titanium and 3 different types of Ni-Cr alloys (T3, Tilite, Bella bond plus) commonly used for metal ceramic restorations. The specimens were divided into 6 groups according to the composition of Ni-Cr alloy and contact with titanium. The experimental groups were in direct contact with titanium and the control groups were not. After the samples were immersed in the culture medium - Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium[DMEM] for 48 hours, the released metal ions were detected using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) and analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney test (P<.05). Mouse L-929 fibroblast cells were used for cell toxicity evaluation. The cell toxicity of specimens was measured by the 3-{4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl}-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test. Results of MTT assay were statistically analyzed by the two-way ANOVA test (P<.05). Post-hoc multiple comparisons were conducted using Tukey's tests. RESULTS The amount of metal ions released by galvanic corrosion due to contact between the base metal alloy and titanium was increased in all of the specimens. In the cytotoxicity test, the two-way ANOVA showed a significant effect of the alloy type and galvanic corrosion for cytotoxicity (P<.001). The relative cell growth rate (RGR) was decreased further on the groups in contact with titanium (P<.05). CONCLUSION The release of metal ions was increased by galvanic corrosion due to contact between base metal and titanium, and it can cause adverse effects on the tissue around the implant by inducing

  3. Quantum ricochets: surface capture, release and energy loss of fast ions hitting a polar surface at grazing incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, A. A.; Sunjic, M.; Benedek, G.; Echenique, P. M.

    2014-06-01

    A diffraction mechanism is proposed for the capture, multiple bouncing and final escape of a fast ion (keV) impinging on the surface of a polarizable material at grazing incidence. Capture and escape are effected by elastic quantum diffraction consisting of the exchange of a parallel surface wave vector G = 2π/a between the ion parallel momentum and the surface periodic potential of period a. Diffraction-assisted capture becomes possible for glancing angles Φ smaller than a critical value given by Φ c2 ≈ 2λ/a-|V im|/E, where E is the kinetic energy of the ion, λ = h/Mv its de Broglie wavelength and V im its average electronic image potential at the distance from the surface where diffraction takes place. For Φ < Φ c, the ion can fall into a selected capture state in the quasi-continuous spectrum of its image potential and execute one or several ricochets before being released by the time reversed diffraction process. The capture, ricochet and escape are accompanied by a large, periodic energy loss of several tens of eV in the forward motion caused by the coherent emission of a giant number of quanta ħω of Fuchs-Kliewer surface phonons characteristic of the polar material. An analytical calculation of the energy loss spectrum, based on the proposed diffraction process and using a model ion-phonon coupling developed earlier (Lucas et al 2013 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 25 355009), is presented, which fully explains the experimental spectrum of Villette et al (2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 3137) for Ne+ ions ricocheting on a LiF(001) surface.

  4. Nickel Ion Release from Three Types of Nickel-titanium-based Orthodontic Archwires in the As-received State and After Oral Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Ramazanzadeh, Barat Ali; Ahrari, Farzaneh; Sabzevari, Berahman; Habibi, Samaneh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. This study aimed to investigate release of nickel ion from three types of nickel-titanium-based wires in the as-received state and after immersion in a simulated oral environment. Materials and methods. Forty specimens from each of the single-strand NiTi (Rematitan "Lite"), multi-strand NiTi (SPEED Supercable) and Copper NiTi (Damon Copper NiTi) were selected. Twenty specimens from each type were used in the as-received state and the others were kept in deflected state at 37ºC for 2 months followed by autoclave sterilization. The as-received and recycled wire specimens were immersed in glass bottles containing 1.8 mL of artificial saliva for 28 days and the amount of nickel ion released into the electrolyte was determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results. The single-strand NiTi released the highest quantity of nickel ion in the as-received state and the multi-strand NiTi showed the highest ion release after oral simulation. The quantity of nickelion released from Damon Copper NiTi was the lowest in both conditions. Oral simulation followed by sterilization did not have a significant influence on nickel ion release from multi-strand NiTi and Damon Copper NiTi wires, but single-strand NiTi released statistically lower quantities of nickel ion after oral simulation. Conclusion. The multi-strand nature of Supercable did not enhance the potential of corrosion after immersion in the simulated oral environment. In vitro use of nickel-titanium-based archwires followed by sterilization did not significantly increase the amount of nickel ion released from these wires. PMID:25093049

  5. Utilizing environmental friendly iron as a substitution element in spinel structured cathode materials for safer high energy lithium-ion batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, Enyuan; Bak, Seong -Min; Liu, Yijin; Liu, Jue; Yu, Xiqian; Zhou, Yong -Ning; Zhou, Jigang; Khalifah, Peter; Ariyoshi, Kingo; Nam, Kyung -Wan; et al

    2015-12-03

    Suppressing oxygen release from lithium ion battery cathodes during heating is a critical issue for the improvement of the battery safety characteristics because oxygen can exothermically react with the flammable electrolyte and cause thermal runaway. Previous studies have shown that oxygen release can be reduced by the migration of transition metal cations from octahedral sites to tetrahedral sites during heating. Such site-preferred migration is determined by the electronic structure of cations. In addition, taking advantage of the unique electronic structure of the environmental friendly Fe, this is selected as substitution element in a high energy density material LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 to improvemore » the thermal stability. The optimized LiNi0.33Mn1.33Fe0.33O4 material shows significantly improved thermal stability compared with the unsubstituted one, demonstrated by no observed oxygen release at temperatures as high as 500°C. Due to the electrochemical contribution of Fe, the high energy density feature of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 is well preserved.« less

  6. Utilizing environmental friendly iron as a substitution element in spinel structured cathode materials for safer high energy lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Enyuan; Bak, Seong -Min; Liu, Yijin; Liu, Jue; Yu, Xiqian; Zhou, Yong -Ning; Zhou, Jigang; Khalifah, Peter; Ariyoshi, Kingo; Nam, Kyung -Wan; Yang, Xiao -Qing

    2015-12-03

    Suppressing oxygen release from lithium ion battery cathodes during heating is a critical issue for the improvement of the battery safety characteristics because oxygen can exothermically react with the flammable electrolyte and cause thermal runaway. Previous studies have shown that oxygen release can be reduced by the migration of transition metal cations from octahedral sites to tetrahedral sites during heating. Such site-preferred migration is determined by the electronic structure of cations. In addition, taking advantage of the unique electronic structure of the environmental friendly Fe, this is selected as substitution element in a high energy density material LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 to improve the thermal stability. The optimized LiNi0.33Mn1.33Fe0.33O4 material shows significantly improved thermal stability compared with the unsubstituted one, demonstrated by no observed oxygen release at temperatures as high as 500°C. Due to the electrochemical contribution of Fe, the high energy density feature of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 is well preserved.

  7. Objective assessment of an ionic footbath (IonCleanse): testing its ability to remove potentially toxic elements from the body.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Deborah A; Cooley, Kieran; Einarson, Thomas R; Seely, Dugald

    2012-01-01

    Ionic footbaths are often used in holistic health centres and spas to aid in detoxification; however, claims that these machines eliminate toxins from the body have not been rigorously evaluated. In this proof-of-principle study, we sought to measure the release of potentially toxic elements from ionic footbaths into distilled and tap water with and without feet. Water samples were collected and analyzed following 30-minute ionic footbath sessions without feet using both distilled (n = 1) and tap water (n = 6) and following four ionic footbaths using tap water (once/week for 4 weeks) in six healthy participants. Urine collection samples were analyzed at four points during the study. Hair samples were analyzed for element concentrations at baseline and study conclusion. Contrary to claims made for the machine, there does not appear to be any specific induction of toxic element release through the feet when running the machine according to specifications. PMID:22174728

  8. Prospects for laser spectroscopy, ion chemistry and mobility measurements of superheavy elements in buffer-gas traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backe, H.; Lauth, W.; Block, M.; Laatiaoui, M.

    2015-12-01

    Laser spectroscopic methods are reviewed which are of potential interest for the investigation of atomic and ionic level structures of superheavy elements. The latter are defined here as the trans-fermium elements with Z > 100 for which no experimental atomic or ionic level structure information is known so far, and which cannot be bred in high flux nuclear power reactors via successive neutron capture. The principles of suitable laser spectroscopic methods are described, and illustrated by examples of real experiments. The addressed methods include single-ion spectroscopy in Paul traps, laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIF), radiation-detected optical pumping (RADOP), radioactive decay-detected resonance ionization spectroscopy (RADRIS), and ion-guide-detected resonance ionization spectroscopy (IGRIS). With the exception of the first all take advantage of a storage of the ions or atoms in so-called buffer-gas traps. The developed experimental methods can, in principle, also be employed for studying ion-chemical reactions with gas admixtures like O2 as well as for performing ion mobility measurements. Both provide complementary information on the electronic structure of superheavy ions. First attempts on this road of research are reviewed as well.

  9. A Stabilized Finite Element Method for Modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck Equations to Determine Ion Flow Through a Nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Jehanzeb Hameed; Comer, Jeffrey; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Olson, Luke N.

    2013-01-01

    The conventional Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations do not account for the finite size of ions explicitly. This leads to solutions featuring unrealistically high ionic concentrations in the regions subject to external potentials, in particular, near highly charged surfaces. A modified form of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations accounts for steric effects and results in solutions with finite ion concentrations. Here, we evaluate numerical methods for solving the modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations by modeling electric field-driven transport of ions through a nanopore. We describe a novel, robust finite element solver that combines the applications of the Newton's method to the nonlinear Galerkin form of the equations, augmented with stabilization terms to appropriately handle the drift-diffusion processes. To make direct comparison with particle-based simulations possible, our method is specifically designed to produce solutions under periodic boundary conditions and to conserve the number of ions in the solution domain. We test our finite element solver on a set of challenging numerical experiments that include calculations of the ion distribution in a volume confined between two charged plates, calculations of the ionic current though a nanopore subject to an external electric field, and modeling the effect of a DNA molecule on the ion concentration and nanopore current. PMID:24363784

  10. Increase in the power of lasing on atomic and ion transitions in chemical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Klimkin, V M; Sokovikov, V G

    2007-02-28

    A method for increasing the power of pulsed lasing on atomic and ion transitions in chemical elements obtained by the conversion of the UV radiation of excimer lasers in cells with metal vapours is studied. A part of UV radiation transmitted through a cell with metal vapour is used for pumping a dye solution in such a way that the cell converter with metal vapour represents a master oscillator, while the dye cell represents an amplifier. The study is performed by the example of amplification of weak spectral components of radiation from a XeCl* laser converted in mercury and barium vapours. In the amplifying stage the longitudinal pumping of the dye is used and a scheme for suppressing self-excitation is employed. It is found by selecting dyes that the alcohol solution of uranin is nearly optimal for amplification of the 546.1-nm laser line of mercury, while the best results in amplification of the 533-nm and 648.2-nm laser lines of barium were obtained by using alcohol solutions of rhodamine 6G and oxazine 17, respectively. The power of the 546.1-nm mercury line was increased by an order of magnitude, while the power of the 533-nm and 648.2-nm lines of barium - almost by a factor of twenty-five. (lasers)

  11. Metal Oxide Nanosensors Using Polymeric Membranes, Enzymes and Antibody Receptors as Ion and Molecular Recognition Elements

    PubMed Central

    Willander, Magnus; Khun, Kimleang; Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain

    2014-01-01

    The concept of recognition and biofunctionality has attracted increasing interest in the fields of chemistry and material sciences. Advances in the field of nanotechnology for the synthesis of desired metal oxide nanostructures have provided a solid platform for the integration of nanoelectronic devices. These nanoelectronics-based devices have the ability to recognize molecular species of living organisms, and they have created the possibility for advanced chemical sensing functionalities with low limits of detection in the nanomolar range. In this review, various metal oxides, such as ZnO-, CuO-, and NiO-based nanosensors, are described using different methods (receptors) of functionalization for molecular and ion recognition. These functionalized metal oxide surfaces with a specific receptor involve either a complex formation between the receptor and the analyte or an electrostatic interaction during the chemical sensing of analytes. Metal oxide nanostructures are considered revolutionary nanomaterials that have a specific surface for the immobilization of biomolecules with much needed orientation, good conformation and enhanced biological activity which further improve the sensing properties of nanosensors. Metal oxide nanostructures are associated with certain unique optical, electrical and molecular characteristics in addition to unique functionalities and surface charge features which shows attractive platforms for interfacing biorecognition elements with effective transducing properties for signal amplification. There is a great opportunity in the near future for metal oxide nanostructure-based miniaturization and the development of engineering sensor devices. PMID:24841244

  12. Trace Elements and Common Ions in Southeastern Idaho Snow: Regional Air Pollutant Tracers for Source Area Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Michael Lehman; Einerson, Jeffrey James; Schuster, Paul; Susong, David D.

    2002-09-01

    Snow samples were collected in southeastern Idaho over two winters to assess trace elements and common ions concentrations in air pollutant fallout across the region. The objectives were to: 1) develop sampling and analysis techniques that would produce accurate measurements of a broad suite of elements and ions in snow, 2) identify the major elements in regional fallout and their spatial and temporal trends, 3) determine if there are unique combinations of elements that are characteristic to the major source areas in the region (source profiles), and 4) use pattern recognition and multivariate statistical techniques (principal component analysis and classical least squares regression) to investigate source apportionment of the fallout to the major source areas. In the winter of 2000-2001, 250 snow samples were collected across the region over a 4-month period and analyzed in triplicate using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and ion chromatography (IC). Thirty-nine (39) trace elements and 9 common ions were positively identified in most samples. The data were analyzed using pattern recognition tools in the software, Pirouette® (Infometrix, Inc.). These results showed a large crustal component (Al, Zn, Mn, Ba, and rare earth elements), an overwhelming contribution from phosphate processing facilities located outside Pocatello in the southern portion of the ESRP, some changes in concentrations over time, and no obvious source area profiles (unique chemical signatures) other than at Pocatello. Concentrations near a major U.S. Department of Energy industrial complex on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) were lower than those observed at major downwind communities. In the winter of 2001-2002, we tried a new sampling design (and collected 135 additional samples) in an attempt to estimate pure emission profiles from the major source areas in the region and used classical least squares regression (CLS) to source

  13. Amendment of biochar reduces the release of toxic elements under dynamic redox conditions in a contaminated floodplain soil.

    PubMed

    Rinklebe, Jörg; Shaheen, Sabry M; Frohne, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Biochar (BC) can be used to remediate soils contaminated with potential toxic elements (PTEs). However, the efficiency of BC to immobilize PTEs in highly contaminated floodplain soils under dynamic redox conditions has not been studied up to date. Thus, we have (i) quantified the impact of pre-definite redox conditions on the release dynamics of dissolved aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn) in a highly contaminated soil (CS) (non-treated) and in the same soil treated with 10 g kg(-1) biochar based material (CS+BC), and (ii) assessed the efficacy of the material to reduce the concentrations of PTEs in soil solution under dynamic redox conditions using an automated biogeochemical microcosm apparatus. The impact of redox potential (EH), pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and sulfate (SO4(2-)) on dynamics of PTEs was also determined. The EH was lowered to +68 mV and afterwards increased stepwise to +535 mV. Significant negative correlation between EH and pH in CS and CS+BC was detected. The systematic increase of EH along with decrease of pH favors the mobilization of PTEs in CS and CS+BC. The material addition seems to have little effect on redox processes because pattern of EH/pH and release dynamics of PTEs was basically similar in CS and CS+BC. However, concentrations of dissolved PTEs were considerably lower in CS+BC than in CS which demonstrates that BC is able to decrease concentrations of dissolved PTEs even under dynamic redox conditions. PMID:25900116

  14. On the differences in element abundances of energetic ions from corotating events and from large solar events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Barbier, L. M.

    1991-01-01

    The abundances of energetic ions accelerated from high-speed solar wind streams by shock waves formed at corotating interaction regions (CIRs) where high-speed streams overtake the lower-speed solar wind are examined. The observed element abundances appear to represent those of the high-speed solar wind, unmodified by the shock acceleration. These abundances, relative to those in the solar photosphere, are organized by the first ionization potential (FIP) of the ions in a way that is different from the FIP effect commonly used to describe differences between abundances in the solar photosphere and those in the solar corona, solar energetic particles (SEPs), and the low-speed solar wind. In contrast, the FIP effect of the ion abundances in the CIR events is characterized by a smaller amplitude of the differences between high-FIP and low-FIP ions and by elevated abundances of He, C, and S.

  15. A facility to study the particles released by ion sputtering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, E.; di Lellis, A. M.; Vannaroni, G.; Orsini, S.; Mangano, V.; Milillo, A.; Massetti, S.; Mura, A.; Vertolli, N.

    2007-08-01

    Research on the planetary surface erosion and planetary evolution could be enriched with the detection of the escaping material, in terms of energy and direction, caused by ions sputtering. A complete study of emitted neutral distribution from which infers the processes occurring on the impacted surface requires dedicated instrumentation, tailored on the peculiarity on the low energy profile of the sputtered signal. We propose a comprehensive facility at INAF/IFSI in Rome intended to provide the opportunity to investigate the interaction of selectable ion beam with planetary analogues through the detection of sputtered neutral atoms. The laboratory is equipped with a high volume UHV chamber, ion selectable sources in the range 0 to 10 keV, a set of 3D sample/sensor orientation motion actuation motors down to 1/100 deg resolution. The laboratory will support a set of neutral sensor heads sets derived from the Emitted for Low Energetic Neutral Atoms (ELENA) instrument under development for the ESA BepiColombo Mercury mission able to detect neutral atoms (few eV-up to 5 keV).

  16. MinION Analysis and Reference Consortium: Phase 1 data release and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, David A.; Zalunin, Vadim; Urban, John M.; Piazza, Paolo; Bowden, Rory J.; Paten, Benedict; Mwaigwisya, Solomon; Batty, Elizabeth M.; Simpson, Jared T.; Snutch, Terrance P.

    2015-01-01

    The advent of a miniaturized DNA sequencing device with a high-throughput contextual sequencing capability embodies the next generation of large scale sequencing tools. The MinION™ Access Programme (MAP) was initiated by Oxford Nanopore Technologies™ in April 2014, giving public access to their USB-attached miniature sequencing device. The MinION Analysis and Reference Consortium (MARC) was formed by a subset of MAP participants, with the aim of evaluating and providing standard protocols and reference data to the community. Envisaged as a multi-phased project, this study provides the global community with the Phase 1 data from MARC, where the reproducibility of the performance of the MinION was evaluated at multiple sites. Five laboratories on two continents generated data using a control strain of Escherichia coli K-12, preparing and sequencing samples according to a revised ONT protocol. Here, we provide the details of the protocol used, along with a preliminary analysis of the characteristics of typical runs including the consistency, rate, volume and quality of data produced. Further analysis of the Phase 1 data presented here, and additional experiments in Phase 2 of E. coli from MARC are already underway to identify ways to improve and enhance MinION performance. PMID:26834992

  17. MinION Analysis and Reference Consortium: Phase 1 data release and analysis.

    PubMed

    Ip, Camilla L C; Loose, Matthew; Tyson, John R; de Cesare, Mariateresa; Brown, Bonnie L; Jain, Miten; Leggett, Richard M; Eccles, David A; Zalunin, Vadim; Urban, John M; Piazza, Paolo; Bowden, Rory J; Paten, Benedict; Mwaigwisya, Solomon; Batty, Elizabeth M; Simpson, Jared T; Snutch, Terrance P; Birney, Ewan; Buck, David; Goodwin, Sara; Jansen, Hans J; O'Grady, Justin; Olsen, Hugh E

    2015-01-01

    The advent of a miniaturized DNA sequencing device with a high-throughput contextual sequencing capability embodies the next generation of large scale sequencing tools. The MinION™ Access Programme (MAP) was initiated by Oxford Nanopore Technologies™ in April 2014, giving public access to their USB-attached miniature sequencing device. The MinION Analysis and Reference Consortium (MARC) was formed by a subset of MAP participants, with the aim of evaluating and providing standard protocols and reference data to the community. Envisaged as a multi-phased project, this study provides the global community with the Phase 1 data from MARC, where the reproducibility of the performance of the MinION was evaluated at multiple sites. Five laboratories on two continents generated data using a control strain of Escherichia coli K-12, preparing and sequencing samples according to a revised ONT protocol. Here, we provide the details of the protocol used, along with a preliminary analysis of the characteristics of typical runs including the consistency, rate, volume and quality of data produced. Further analysis of the Phase 1 data presented here, and additional experiments in Phase 2 of E. coli from MARC are already underway to identify ways to improve and enhance MinION performance. PMID:26834992

  18. Copper ion-mediated liposomal encapsulation of mitoxantrone: the role of anions in drug loading, retention and release.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunlei; Cui, Jingxia; Li, Yingui; Wang, Caixia; Li, Yanhui; Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Li; Guo, Wenmin; Wang, Jinxu; Zhang, Hongwu; Hao, Yanli; Wang, Yongli

    2008-08-01

    Besides pH gradient, other transmembrane gradients such as metal ion gradient could be also employed to load drugs into liposomes. In pH gradient method, anions have an important role since they could form specific aggregates with drugs, and then affect drug release kinetics from vesicles. To explore the role of anions in metal ion gradient method, copper ion-mediated mitoxantrone (MIT) loading was investigated systematically. When empty liposomes exhibiting a transmembrane copper ion gradient (300 mM) were mixed with MIT in a molar ratio of 0.2:1, after 5 min incubation at 60 degrees C, >95% MIT could be loaded into vesicles and the encapsulation was stable, regardless of the kinds of anions and initial intraliposomal pH values. The encapsulation ratio decreased with increased MIT/lipid molar ratio. But even when the molar ratio increased to 0.4, >90% encapsulation could still be achieved. In the presence of nigericin and ammonium, the drug loading profiles were affected to different degree with respect to both drug loading rate and encapsulation ratio. Relative to CuSO(4)-containing systems, CuCl(2) mediated MIT loading was unstable. Both nigericin and ammonium could alter the absorption spectra of liposomal MITs loaded with CuSO(4) gradient. In vitro release studies were performed in glucose/histidine buffer and in 50% human plasma using a dialysis method. In both of release media, CuCl(2)-containing vesicles displayed rapid release kinetics in comparison with CuSO(4) systems; and during the experiment period, MIT was lost from the vesicles continuously. When the formulations were injected into BDF1 mice at a dose of 4 mg/kg, all the liposomal formulations exhibited enhanced blood circulation time, with half-life values of 6.8-7.2h, significantly compared to the rapid clearance of free-MIT. In L1210 ascitic model, CuCl(2) formulation was more therapeutically active than CuSO(4) formulation. At a dose of 6 mg/kg, the treatment with CuCl(2) formulation resulted in

  19. Quantifying element incorporation in multispecies biofilms using nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry image analysis.

    PubMed

    Renslow, Ryan S; Lindemann, Stephen R; Cole, Jessica K; Zhu, Zihua; Anderton, Christopher R

    2016-06-01

    Elucidating nutrient exchange in microbial communities is an important step in understanding the relationships between microbial systems and global biogeochemical cycles, but these communities are complex and the interspecies interactions that occur within them are not well understood. Phototrophic consortia are useful and relevant experimental systems to investigate such interactions as they are not only prevalent in the environment, but some are cultivable in vitro and amenable to controlled scientific experimentation. Nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) is a powerful, high spatial resolution tool capable of visualizing the metabolic activities of single cells within a biofilm, but quantitative analysis of the resulting data has typically been a manual process, resulting in a task that is both laborious and susceptible to human error. Here, the authors describe the creation and application of a semiautomated image-processing pipeline that can analyze NanoSIMS-generated data, applied to phototrophic biofilms as an example. The tool employs an image analysis process, which includes both elemental and morphological segmentation, producing a final segmented image that allows for discrimination between autotrophic and heterotrophic biomass, the detection of individual cyanobacterial filaments and heterotrophic cells, the quantification of isotopic incorporation of individual heterotrophic cells, and calculation of relevant population statistics. The authors demonstrate the functionality of the tool by using it to analyze the uptake of (15)N provided as either nitrate or ammonium through the unicyanobacterial consortium UCC-O and imaged via NanoSIMS. The authors found that the degree of (15)N incorporation by individual cells was highly variable when labeled with (15)NH4 (+), but much more even when biofilms were labeled with (15)NO3 (-). In the (15)NH4 (+)-amended biofilms, the heterotrophic distribution of (15)N incorporation was highly skewed, with

  20. The effects on bone cells of metal ions released from orthopaedic implants. A review

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Valerio; Pagani, Davide; Melato, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Summary The increasing use of orthopedic implants and, in particular, of hip and knee joint replacements for young and active patients, has stimulated interest and concern regarding the chronic, long-term effects of the materials used. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the adverse biologic reactions to metal particles released from orthopaedic implants in vivo and in vitro. More specifically, the purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the current literature about the adverse effects of metal particles on bone cells and peri-implant bone. PMID:23858309

  1. Preliminary evaluation of therapeutic ion release from Sr-doped zinc-silicate glass ceramics.

    PubMed

    Looney, Mark; O'Shea, Helen; Boyd, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive and degradable porous bioceramics play an important role in many clinical situations. Porosity is essential to the performance of a material that is proposed to be used as an implantable osseous scaffold. Scaffolds provide a three dimensional support and template to osseous integration and vascularization. Combining the porosity of a scaffold with the ability of the scaffold material to deliver therapeutic ions to the site of implantation goes some way towards developing an ideal bone graft. A series of strontium-doped zinc silicate (Ca-Sr-Na-Zn-Si) glass ceramics scaffoldswere developed, whose porosity was measured to be between 93% and 96%, which is advantageous in terms of osseous integration and vascularization. The levels of Zn(2+) and Sr(2+) detected as a result of degradation of the crystalline phases were found to be 1.4-600 parts per million (ppm) and 0-583 ppm, respectively. The levels detected correlate well with the levels of Sr(2+) and Zn(2+)ions typically associated with clinical benefits, including antibacterial efficacy, osteoblastic differentiation and impaired osteoclastic resorption. PMID:21926151

  2. Clinoenstatite coatings have high bonding strength, bioactive ion release, and osteoimmunomodulatory effects that enhance in vivo osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengtie; Chen, Zetao; Wu, Qianju; Yi, Deliang; Friis, Thor; Zheng, Xuebin; Chang, Jiang; Jiang, Xinquan; Xiao, Yin

    2015-12-01

    A number of coating materials have been developed over past two decades seeking to improve the osseointegration of orthopedic metal implants. Despite the many candidate materials trialed, their low rate of translation into clinical applications suggests there is room for improving the current strategies for their development. We therefore propose that the ideal coating material(s) should possess the following three properties: (i) high bonding strength, (ii) release of functional ions, and (iii) favourable osteoimmunomodulatory effects. To test this proposal, we developed clinoenstatite (CLT, MgSiO3), which as a coating material has high bonding strength, cytocompability and immunomodulatory effects that are favourable for in vivo osteogenesis. The bonding strength of CLT coatings was 50.1 ± 3.2 MPa, more than twice that of hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings, at 23.5 ± 3.5 MPa. CLT coatings released Mg and Si ions, and compared to HA coatings, induced an immunomodulation more conducive for osseointegration, demonstrated by downregurelation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, enhancement of osteogenesis, and inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. In vivo studies demonstrated that CLT coatings improved osseointegration with host bone, as shown by the enhanced biomechanical strength and increased de novo bone formation, when compared with HA coatings. These results support the notion that coating materials with the proposed properties can induce an in vivo environment better suited for osseointegration. These properties could, therefore, be fundamental when developing high-performance coating materials. PMID:26318815

  3. Mass analysis of neutral particles and ions released during electrical breakdowns on spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R. F.

    1983-01-01

    A specialized spectrometer was designed and developed to measure the mass and velocity distributions of neutral particles (molecules and molecular clusters) released from metal-backed Teflon and Kapton films. Promising results were obtained with an insulation breakdown initiation system based on a moveable contact touching the insulated surfaces. A variable energy, high voltage pulse is applied to the contact. The resulting surface damage sites can be made similar in size and shape to those produced by a high voltage electron beam system operating at similar discharge energies. The point discharge apparatus was used for final development of several high speed recording systems and for measurements of the composition of the materials given off by the discharge. Results with this apparatus show evolution of large amounts of fluorocarbon fragments from discharge through Teflon FEP, while discharges through Kapton produce mainly very light hydrocarbon fragments at masses below about 80 a.m.u.

  4. Voltage-activated ion channels and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release shape Ca2+ signaling in Merkel cells

    PubMed Central

    Piskorowski, Rebecca; Haeberle, Henry; Panditrao, Mayuri V.; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling and neurotransmission modulate touch-evoked responses in Merkel cell–neurite complexes. To identify mechanisms governing these processes, we analyzed voltage-activated ion channels and Ca2+ signaling in purified Merkel cells. Merkel cells in the intact skin were specifically labeled by antibodies against voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (CaV2.1) and voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channels. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed small Ca2+ currents, which produced Ca2+ transients that were amplified sevenfold by Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. Merkel cells' voltage-activated K+ currents were carried predominantly by BKCa channels with inactivating and noninactivating components. Thus, Merkel cells, like hair cells, have functionally diverse BKCa channels. Finally, blocking K+ channels increased response magnitude and dramatically shortened Ca2+ transients evoked by mechanical stimulation. Together, these results demonstrate that Ca2+ signaling in Merkel cells is governed by the interplay of plasma membrane Ca2+ channels, store release and K+ channels, and they identify specific signaling mechanisms that may control touch sensitivity. PMID:18415122

  5. The salt and lipid composition of model cheeses modifies in-mouth flavour release and perception related to the free sodium ion content.

    PubMed

    Boisard, Lauriane; Andriot, Isabelle; Martin, Christophe; Septier, Chantal; Boissard, Vanessa; Salles, Christian; Guichard, Elisabeth

    2014-02-15

    Reducing salt and lipid levels in foodstuffs without any effect on acceptability is a major challenge, particularly because of their interactions with other ingredients. This study used a multimodal approach to understand the effects of changes to the composition of model cheeses (20/28, 24/24, 28/20 lipid/protein ratios, 0% and 1% added NaCl) on sodium ion mobility ((23)Na NMR), in-mouth sodium release and flavour perception. An increase in the salt content decreased cheese firmness and perceived hardness, and increased sodium ion mobility, in vivo sodium release and both saltiness and aroma perception. With the same amount of salt, a lower lipid/protein ratio increased the firmness of the cheeses, perceived hardness, and decreased sodium ion mobility, in vivo sodium release, saltiness and aroma perception. These findings suggest on one hand that it could be possible to increase saltiness perception by varying cheese composition, thus inducing differences in sodium ion mobility and in free sodium ion concentration, leading to differences in in-mouth sodium release and saltiness perception, and on the other hand that the reformulation of foods in line with health guidelines needs to take account of both salt content and the lipid/protein ratio. PMID:24128499

  6. The Effect of Annealing at 1500 C on Migration and Release of Ion Implanted Silver in CVD Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    HJ MacLean; RG Ballinger; LE Kolaya; SA Simonson; N Lewis; M Hanson

    2004-10-07

    The transport of silver in CVD {beta}-SiC has been studied using ion implantation. Silver ions were implanted in {beta}-SiC using the ATLAS accelerator facility at the Argonne National Laboratory. Ion beams with energies of 93 and 161 MeV were used to achieve deposition with peak concentrations at depths of approximately 9 and 13 {micro}m, respectively. As-implanted samples were then annealed at 1500 C for 210 or 480 hours. XPS, SEM, TEM, STEM, and optical methods were used to analyze the material before and after annealing. Silver concentration profiles were determined using XPS before and after annealing. STEM and SEM equipped with quantitative chemical analysis capability were used to more fully characterize the location and morphology of the silver before and after annealing. The results show that, within the uncertainty of measurement techniques, there is no silver migration, via either inter- or intragrannular paths, for the times and temperature studied. Additionally, the silver was observed to phase separate within the SiC after annealing. The irradiation damage from the implantation process resulted in a three-layer morphology in the as-implanted condition: (1) a layer of unaltered SiC, followed by (2) a layer of crystallized SiC, followed by (3) an amorphized layer which contained essentially all of the implanted silver. After annealing the layer structure changed. Layer 1 was unaltered. The grains in layer 2 recrystallized to form an epitaxial (columnar) layer. Layer 3 recrystallized to form a fine grain equiaxed layer. The results of this work do not support the long held assumption that silver release from CVD SiC, used for gas-reactor coated particle fuel, is dominated by grain boundary diffusion.

  7. Guidelines for Designing Surface Ion Traps Using the Boundary Element Method.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seokjun; Lee, Minjae; Cheon, Hongjin; Kim, Taehyun; Cho, Dong-Il Dan

    2016-01-01

    Ion traps can provide both physical implementation of quantum information processing and direct observation of quantum systems. Recently, surface ion traps have been developed using microfabrication technologies and are considered to be a promising platform for scalable quantum devices. This paper presents detailed guidelines for designing the electrodes of surface ion traps. First, we define and explain the key specifications including trap depth, q-parameter, secular frequency, and ion height. Then, we present a numerical-simulation-based design procedure, which involves determining the basic assumptions, determining the shape and size of the chip, designing the dimensions of the radio frequency (RF) electrode, and analyzing the direct current (DC) control voltages. As an example of this design procedure, we present a case study with tutorial-like explanations. The proposed design procedure can provide a practical guideline for designing the electrodes of surface ion traps. PMID:27136559

  8. Guidelines for Designing Surface Ion Traps Using the Boundary Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seokjun; Lee, Minjae; Cheon, Hongjin; Kim, Taehyun; Cho, Dong-il “Dan”

    2016-01-01

    Ion traps can provide both physical implementation of quantum information processing and direct observation of quantum systems. Recently, surface ion traps have been developed using microfabrication technologies and are considered to be a promising platform for scalable quantum devices. This paper presents detailed guidelines for designing the electrodes of surface ion traps. First, we define and explain the key specifications including trap depth, q-parameter, secular frequency, and ion height. Then, we present a numerical-simulation-based design procedure, which involves determining the basic assumptions, determining the shape and size of the chip, designing the dimensions of the radio frequency (RF) electrode, and analyzing the direct current (DC) control voltages. As an example of this design procedure, we present a case study with tutorial-like explanations. The proposed design procedure can provide a practical guideline for designing the electrodes of surface ion traps. PMID:27136559

  9. Stanford-USGS shrimp-RG ion microprobe: A new approach to determining the distribution of trace elements in coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolker, A.; Wooden, J.L.; Persing, H.M.; Zielinski, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    The distribution of Cr and other trace metals of environmental interest in a range of widely used U.S. coals was investigated using the Stanford-USGS SHRIMP-RG ion microprobe . Using the oxygen ion source, concentrations of Cr (11 to 176 ppm), V (23 to 248 ppm), Mn (2 to 149 ppm), Ni (2 to 30 ppm), and 13 other elements were determined in illite/smectite, a group of clay minerals commonly present in coal. The results confirm previous indirect or semi-quantitative determinations indicating illite/smectite to be an important host of these metals. Calibration was achieved using doped aluminosilicate-glass synthetic standards and glasses prepared from USGS rock standards. Grains for analysis were identified optically, and confirmed by 1) precursory electron microprobe analysis and wavelength-dispersive compositional mapping, and 2) SHRIMP-RG major element data obtained concurrently with trace element results. Follow-up investigations will focus on the distribution of As and other elements that are more effectively ionized with the cesium primary beam currently being tested.

  10. Effect of temperature on the release and remobilization of ecotoxic elements in AMD colloidal precipitates: the example of the Libiola copper mine, Liguria, (Italy).

    PubMed

    Consani, S; Carbone, C; Salviulo, G; Zorzi, F; Dinelli, E; Botter, R; Nodari, L; Badocco, D; Lucchetti, G

    2016-07-01

    Due to their characteristics, colloidal particles are able to control the dispersion of many organic and inorganic pollutants in soils and streams. Colloidal precipitates generated by acid mine drainage (AMD) process are usually amorphous or nanocrystalline materials, and their stability plays a crucial role in controlling the fate of metals released by sulphide oxydation. This paper describes a study of elements release (Fe, Al, Mn, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, S, Zn) due to desorption or destabilization of three different colloidal precipitates, two ochreous and a greenish-blue precipitate, sampled at the Libiola mine site (northwest Italy). The samples were heated at high temperature in order to verify this treatment as inertization process. At room temperature, the most easily extracted element was S (with released percentages from 8.39 to 29.17 %), but considerable amounts of Cu, Zn and Mn (up to 16.6, 610.6 and 595.6 mg/kg, respectively) were also observed in the leachates for greenish-blue precipitates. The highest release of elements (S > Cu, Zn, Mn, Cd > Co, Ni > Al, Fe, Cr), with minor differences depending on the mineralogical composition of the samples, was observed for heat-treated samples obtained through moderate heating and mainly formed by anhydrous phases. Samples treated at high temperature had the lowest release, with only Cu showing a significant concentration in the leachate of greenish-blue precipitates. The results showed that dissolution/desorption is limited from ochreous natural colloidal precipitates occurring at the Libiola mine site but also that high amounts of some metals can be remobilized from greenish-blue precipitates. The destabilization of all percipitates through dehydratation-dehydroxylation can further remobilize important amounts of ecotoxic elements. Heat treatment at high temperature could be a definitive, although expensive, way to fix heavy metals in the solid fraction, preventing their dispersion in the surrounding

  11. Enhanced flow injection leaching of rocks by focused microwave heating with in-line monitoring of released elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Silva, Milithza; Kyser, Kurt; Beauchemin, Diane

    2007-02-19

    A focused microwave digestion system was used to heat a mini-column of sample of crushed rock (hematite) during its successive leaching by repeated 250-microL injections of water, HNO(3) 1%, 10% and 30% (v/v). The mini-column was connected to the nebulizer of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry instrument, which allowed a continuous monitoring of the progressive release of elements by a given leaching reagent. Quantitation of the accessible fraction of Mg, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, Sb and Pb was done by calibration using 250-microL injections of standard solutions prepared in the leaching reagent matrices. Total digestion of the sample residue was also done to verify mass balance. With the exception of Mg, V and Co, where the same total amount was released with or without microwave heating, an increased release resulted from focused microwave heating, by up to an order of magnitude. Furthermore, mass balance was verified for more elements using microwave heating, presumably because of a lower relative proportion of spectroscopic interference as a result of an increased release of analytes. Using microwave energy in general resulted in the dissolution of additional phases, as evidenced by significantly different (208)Pb/(206)Pb ratios as well as the increased release of elements with milder reagents. In fact, in the case of Pb, leaching with 30% HNO(3) was no longer necessary as all the Pb was released in the first three leaching reagents. Microwave heating could therefore be used advantageously in on-line leaching for exploration geochemistry and environmental monitoring. PMID:17386636

  12. Multi-Element Preconcentration/Separation of Some Metal Ions in Environmental Samples by Using Co-precipitation.

    PubMed

    Soylak, Mustafa; Aydin, Ayse; Kizil, Nebiye

    2016-01-01

    A preconcentration/separation system for cadmium(II), nickel(II), copper(II), lead(II), iron(II), cobalt(II), and manganese(II) ions has been established prior to their atomic absorption spectrometric determinations. The procedure is based on the co-precipitation of these ions by the aid of a praseodymium hydroxide (Pr(OH)3) precipitate. The precipitate was dissolved in 0.5 mL of concentrated HNO3, and made up to 10.0 mL with water. The analytes were determined by a flame atomic absorption spectrometer. The effects of analytical parameters including pH, amounts of praseodymium as carrier element, sample volume, etc. on the recoveries of heavy metals were investigated. The effects of matrix ions were also examined. The limits of detection for analyte ions were found in the range between 0.7-5.2 μg/L. The validation of this present procedure was verified by the analysis of certified reference materials, TMDA-54.4 (fortified water) and NIST 1570a (spinach leaves). The proposed co-precipitation procedure was applied for the determination of cadmium(II), nickel(II), copper(II), lead(II), iron(II), cobalt(II), and manganese(II) ions in various environmental water samples. PMID:27053469

  13. Polyglycerol-Based Copper Chelators for the Transport and Release of Copper Ions in Biological Environments.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Ralf; Fehse, Susanne; Pant, Kritee; Nowag, Sabrina; Stephan, Holger; Haag, Rainer; Tzschucke, Carl Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Here, the synthesis and characterization of three improved nanosystems is presented based on amino functionalized hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG; M(w) = 16.8 kDa) as potential copper(II) chelators. The ligands, N-methyl-N-picolylglycine amide, 2,6-pyridine dicarboxylic acid monoamide, and cyclam tetraacetic acid (TETA) monoamide, are covalently attached to the polymer with amide bonds. In this paper, the Cu(II) loading capacity, the stability of the Cu(II)-loaded carriers at different pHs, with competing ligands and in human serum, as well as the transport of Cu(II) in biological systems are investigated. For the first time, a different cytotoxicity of functionalized polymer nanoparticles with and without Cu(II) is observed. The cyclam-based carrier combines the highest loading capacity (29 Cu ions/nanoparticle), best stability with respect to pH and EDTA (45% remaining Cu after 24 h), lowest cytotoxicity (IC50 > 100 × 10(-6) M (unloaded), 1500 × 10(-6) M Cu(II); Cu:carrier 29:1), and the highest stability in human serum. PMID:26644323

  14. Geochemical and mineralogical controls on trace element release from the Penn Mine base-metal slag dump, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, M.B.; Bird, D.K.; Einaudi, M.T.; Alpers, C.N.

    2001-01-01

    phase precipitation. Close agreement between model results and measured concentrations of Al, Ba, Cu, Fe, SiO2, and SO4 in the slag dump pore waters suggests that the dissolved concentrations of these elements are controlled by solubility equilibrium with secondary phases. Differences between predicted and measured Cd and Pb concentrations imply that field weathering rates of glass and sulfides are approximately two orders of magnitude lower than laboratory rates. Overprediction of Pb release may also reflect other attenuation processes in the natural system, such as sorption or coprecipitation. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Corrosion, ion release and Mott–Schottky probe of chromium oxide coatings in saline solution with potential for orthopaedic implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogwu, A. A.; Oje, A. M.; Kavanagh, J.

    2016-04-01

    We report our investigation on chromium oxide thin film coatings that show a negligible ion release during electrochemical corrosion testing in saline solution. The chemical constituents of the films prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering were identified to be predominantly Cr2O3 based on Raman spectroscopy anti-symmetric stretching vibration modes for CrIII–O and other peaks and an FTIR spectroscopy E u vibrational mode at 409 cm‑1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, multiplet fitting for 2P 3/2 and 2P 1/2 states also confirmed the predominantly Cr2O3 stoichiometry in the films. The prepared chromium oxide coatings showed superior pitting corrosion resistance compared to the native chromium oxide films on bare uncoated stainless steel when tested under open circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarisation and cyclic voltammetry in saline solution. The chromium ion released into solution during the corrosion testing of stainless steel substrates coated with chromium oxide coatings was found to be negligibly small based on atomic absorption spectroscopy measurements. Our Mott–Schottky analysis investigation showed that the negligibly small ion release from the chromium oxide coated steel substrates is most likely due to a much lower defect density on the surface of the deposited coatings compared to the native oxide layer on the uncoated steel substrates. This opens up the opportunity for using chromium oxide surface coatings in hip, knee and other orthopaedic implants where possible metal ion release in vivo still poses a great challenge.

  16. Atmospheric trace element and major ion concentrations over the eastern Mediterranean Sea: Identification of anthropogenic source regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güllü, Gülen; Doğan, Güray; Tuncel, Gürdal

    Concentrations of elements and ions measured in aerosol samples collected from March 1992 to the end of December 1993 were investigated to identify source regions affecting chemical composition of aerosols in the eastern Mediterranean atmosphere. Collected samples were analyzed for approximately 40 elements and ions using a combination of atomic absorption spectrometry, instrumental neutron activation analysis, ion chromatography and colorimetry. Statistical techniques, such as enrichment factors and a non-parametric bootstrapped potential source contribution function, were applied on the data set to determine main source types and source regions of anthropogenic particles in the eastern Mediterranean basin. Source regions of two previously defined anthropogenic components, namely a long-range transported component and a local pollution component, were identified. The main source areas for pollutants reaching the eastern Mediterranean basin were determined as southern and western parts of Turkey, central and eastern regions of Ukraine, east of Belarus, Greece, Georgia, Romania, coastal areas along France and Spain and coastal areas around the Black Sea, Russia. More distant source regions in the South of UK and Sweden, the central part of Algeria, the northeastern part of Turkey, Russia, Germany, Hungary, Czech Republic, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and coastal areas of Egypt, Israel and Italy do affect aerosol composition in the eastern Mediterranean, but transport from these regions cannot account for the highest 20% of the measured pollutant concentrations.

  17. Evaluation of Nickel and Chromium Ion Release During Fixed Orthodontic Treatment Using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer: An In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Rabindra S; Khanna, Bharti; Pasha, Azam; Vinay, K; Narayan, Anjali; Chaitra, K

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fixed orthodontic appliances with the use of stainless steel brackets and archwires made of nitinol have a corrosive potential in the oral environment. Nickel and chromium ions released from these appliances act as allergens apart from being cytotoxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic in smaller quantities in the range of nanograms. This study was done to evaluate the release of nickel and chromium ions from orthodontic appliances in the oral cavity using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). Materials and Methods: Saliva samples from 30 orthodontic patients undergoing treatment with 0.022″ MBT mechanotherapy were collected prior to commencement of treatment, after initial aligning wires and after 10-12 months of treatment. Salivary nickel and chromium ion concentration was measured in parts per billion (ppb) using ICP-MS. Results: Mean, standard deviation and range were computed for the concentrations of ions obtained. Results analyzed using ANOVA indicated a statistically significant increase of 10.35 ppb in nickel ion concentration and 33.53 ppb in chromium ion concentration after initial alignment. The ionic concentration at the end of 10-12 months of treatment showed a statistically significant increase in of 17.92 ppb for chromium and a statistically insignificant decrease in nickel ion concentration by 1.58 ppb. Pearson’s correlation coefficient showed a positive correlation for an increase in nickel concentration after aligning, but not at the end of 10-12 months. A positive correlation was seen for an increase in chromium ion concentration at both time intervals. Conclusion: Nickel and chromium ion concentration in saliva even though below the recommended daily allowance should not be ignored in light of the new knowledge regarding effects of these ions at the molecular level and the allergic potential. Careful and detailed medical history of allergy is essential. Nickel free alternatives should form an essential part of an

  18. Some Rare Earth Elements Analysis by Microwave Plasma Torch Coupled with the Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiaohong; Jiang, Tao; Qi, Wenhao; Zuo, Jun; Yang, Meiling; Fei, Qiang; Xiao, Saijin; Yu, Aimin; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive mass spectrometric analysis method based on the microwave plasma technique is developed for the fast detection of trace rare earth elements (REEs) in aqueous solution. The plasma was produced from a microwave plasma torch (MPT) under atmospheric pressure and was used as ambient ion source of a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ). Water samples were directly pneumatically nebulized to flow into the plasma through the central tube of MPT. For some REEs, the generated composite ions were detected in both positive and negative ion modes and further characterized in tandem mass spectrometry. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) was at the level 0.1 ng/mL using MS2 procedure in negative mode. A single REE analysis can be completed within 2~3 minutes with the relative standard deviation ranging between 2.4% and 21.2% (six repeated measurements) for the 5 experimental runs. Moreover, the recovery rates of these REEs are between the range of 97.6%–122.1%. Two real samples have also been analyzed, including well and orange juice. These experimental data demonstrated that this method is a useful tool for the field analysis of REEs in water and can be used as an alternative supplement of ICP-MS. PMID:26421013

  19. Some Rare Earth Elements Analysis by Microwave Plasma Torch Coupled with the Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaohong; Jiang, Tao; Qi, Wenhao; Zuo, Jun; Yang, Meiling; Fei, Qiang; Xiao, Saijin; Yu, Aimin; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive mass spectrometric analysis method based on the microwave plasma technique is developed for the fast detection of trace rare earth elements (REEs) in aqueous solution. The plasma was produced from a microwave plasma torch (MPT) under atmospheric pressure and was used as ambient ion source of a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ). Water samples were directly pneumatically nebulized to flow into the plasma through the central tube of MPT. For some REEs, the generated composite ions were detected in both positive and negative ion modes and further characterized in tandem mass spectrometry. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) was at the level 0.1 ng/mL using MS(2) procedure in negative mode. A single REE analysis can be completed within 2~3 minutes with the relative standard deviation ranging between 2.4% and 21.2% (six repeated measurements) for the 5 experimental runs. Moreover, the recovery rates of these REEs are between the range of 97.6%-122.1%. Two real samples have also been analyzed, including well and orange juice. These experimental data demonstrated that this method is a useful tool for the field analysis of REEs in water and can be used as an alternative supplement of ICP-MS. PMID:26421013

  20. Hydrophobic ion pairing of a minocycline/Ca(2+)/AOT complex for preparation of drug-loaded PLGA nanoparticles with improved sustained release.

    PubMed

    Holmkvist, Alexander Dontsios; Friberg, Annika; Nilsson, Ulf J; Schouenborg, Jens

    2016-02-29

    Polymeric nanoparticles is an established and efficient means to achieve controlled release of drugs. Incorporation of minocycline, an antibiotic with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties, into biodegradable nanoparticles may therefore provide an efficient means to combat foreign body reactions to implanted electrodes in the brain. However, minocycline is commonly associated with poor encapsulation efficiencies and/or fast release rates due to its high solubility in water. Moreover, minocycline is unstable under conditions of low and high pH, heat and exposure to light, which exacerbate the challenges of encapsulation. In this work drug loaded PLGA nanoparticles were prepared by a modified emulsification-solvent-diffusion technique and characterized for size, drug encapsulation and in vitro drug release. A novel hydrophobic ion pair complex of minocycline, Ca(2+) ions and the anionic surfactant AOT was developed to protect minocycline from degradation and prolong its release. The optimized formulation resulted in particle sizes around 220 nm with an entrapment efficiency of 43% and showed drug release over 30 days in artificial cerebrospinal fluid. The present results constitute a substantial increase in release time compared to what has hitherto been achieved for minocycline and indicate that such particles might provide useful for sustained drug delivery in the CNS. PMID:26773599

  1. Acoustic signals generated in piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate elements by direct bombardment with xenon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyachi, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Kuraza, G.; Fujii, M.; Nagashima, A.; Hasebe, N.; Kobayashi, M. N.; Kobayashi, S.; Miyajima, M.; Mori, K.; Okudaira, O.; Yamashita, N.; Shibata, H.; Murakami, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Okada, N.

    2006-12-01

    Acoustic signals were observed with a lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) element that was directly irradiated with a 368 MeV/n xenon beam. Using an array comprising PZT elements, the energy loss in the PZT was studied. These elements are sensitive to an energy deposit of 100 nJ. A series of values of output voltage vs. integrated thickness of PZT was represented along a line similar to the ionization loss calculated by the Bethe-Bloch formula. The induced voltage was attributed to several processes—ionization, thermal, elastic, and piezoelectric processes. This study describes the possible applications of the PZT element as an active medium for calorimeters and a monitor for hypervelocity impact of space dust.

  2. AUTOMATED ELEMENTAL COMPOSITION DETERMINATION AND CORRELATION OF PRECURSOR WITH PRODUCT IONS BASED ON ORTHOGONAL ACCELERATION, TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS SPECTRA

    EPA Science Inventory

    For more than a decade in our laboratory, elemental compositions of ions in mass spectra havebeen routinely determined by measuring exact masses and relative isotopic abundances of ions in isotopicclusters using a GC coupled to a double focusing mass spectrometer.1 HPLC interfac...

  3. Metal ion-assisted drug-loading model for novel delivery system of cisplatin solid lipid nanoparticles with improving loading efficiency and sustained release.

    PubMed

    Yang, Caiqin; Lv, Jie; Lv, Tao; Pan, Yahui; Han, Yazhu; Zhao, Sha; Wang, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Metal ion-assisted drug loading model, in which metal ion was used to modify the microstructure of lipid layer, has been developed to improve drug loading efficiency of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs). The microstructure and properties of metal ion-assisted cisplatin-loading SLNs were investigated by infra-red spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and zetasizer. The reactions of hydrogenated soybean lecithin with Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Mn(2+ )and Mg(2+ )have been detected; the mechanism for higher drug encapsulation efficiency (EE) has been investigated. In metal ion introduction SLNs, the compact degree of the lipid molecules was increased due to the electrostatic interaction between metal ions and phospholipid acyl and choline polarity groups, which result in increasing of drug EE. Meanwhile, these electrostatic interactions slowed the releasing rate of encapsulated drug. The study of cytotoxic activity in vitro indicated that the cell cytotoxicity of metal ions introduction SLNs depended on both cell uptake of SLNs and drug releasing from SLNs. PMID:27113257

  4. NUMEN Project @ LNS : Heavy ions double charge exchange reactions towards the 0νββ nuclear matrix element determination

    SciTech Connect

    Agodi, C. Calabretta, L.; Calanna, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Colonna, M.; Cuttone, G.; Finocchiaro, P.; Pandola, L.; Rifuggiato, D.; Tudisco, S.; Cappuzzello, F.; Greco, V.; Bonanno, D. L.; Bongiovanni, D. G.; Longhitano, F.; Branchina, V.; Foti, A.; Lo Presti, D.; Lanzalone, G.; and others

    2015-10-28

    In the NUMEN Project it is proposed an innovative technique to access the nuclear matrix elements entering in the expression of the life-time of the neutrinoless double beta decay, using relevant cross sections of double charge exchange reactions. A key aspect is the use of MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, for the detection of the ejectiles, and of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) K800 Superconducting Cyclotron (CS), for the acceleration of the required high resolution and low emittance heavy-ion beams.

  5. NUMEN Project @ LNS : Heavy ions double charge exchange reactions towards the 0νββ nuclear matrix element determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agodi, C.; Cappuzzello, F.; Bonanno, D. L.; Bongiovanni, D. G.; Branchina, V.; Calabretta, L.; Calanna, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Colonna, M.; Cuttone, G.; Foti, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Greco, V.; Lanzalone, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Longhitano, F.; Muoio, A.; Pandola, L.; Rifuggiato, D.; Tudisco, S.

    2015-10-01

    In the NUMEN Project it is proposed an innovative technique to access the nuclear matrix elements entering in the expression of the life-time of the neutrinoless double beta decay, using relevant cross sections of double charge exchange reactions. A key aspect is the use of MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, for the detection of the ejectiles, and of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) K800 Superconducting Cyclotron (CS), for the acceleration of the required high resolution and low emittance heavy-ion beams.

  6. Angle-resolved intensity and energy distributions of positive and negative hydrogen ions released from tungsten surface by molecular hydrogen ion impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, S.; Tanaka, N.; Sasao, M.; Kisaki, M.; Tsumori, K.; Nishiura, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Kenmotsu, T.; Wada, M.; Yamaoka, H.

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen ion reflection properties have been investigated following the injection of H+, H2+ and H3+ ions onto a polycrystalline W surface. Angle- and energy-resolved intensity distributions of both scattered H+ and H- ions are measured by a magnetic momentum analyzer. We have detected atomic hydrogen ions reflected from the surface, while molecular hydrogen ions are unobserved within our detection limit. The reflected hydrogen ion energy is approximately less than one-third of the incident beam energy for H3+ ion injection and less than a half of that for H2+ ion injection. Other reflection properties are very similar to those of monoatomic H+ ion injection. Experimental results are compared to the classical trajectory simulations using the ACAT code based on the binary collision approximation.

  7. Behavior of transplutonium elements on ion-exchange materials in mixed aqueous-organic solutions of mineral acids

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirov, G.S.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-03-01

    Systematic studies are reported on the behavior of transplutonium elements (TPE) on cation-exchange and anion-exchange materials in mixed aqueous-organic solutions of mineral acids (HClO/sub 4/, HCl, HNO/sub 3/, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/) as affected by solution composition, nature of acid, and nature of organic solvent. With all these acids, replacing most of the water by alcohol increases the TPE uptake on the ion exchangers, and the effect occurs for the cation exchangers at lower contents of the organic component. Optimum conditions have been identified for concentrating and separating TPE from numerous elements. The most effective system consists of anion exchanger with HNO/sub 3/ and alcohol.

  8. Effects of alloying elements on the formation of < c >-component loops in Zr alloy Excel under heavy ion irradiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Idrees, Yasir; Francis, Elisabeth M.; Yao, Zhongwen; Korinek, Andreas; Kirk, Marquis A.; Sattari, Mohammad; Preuss, Michael; Daymond, M. R.

    2015-05-14

    We report here the microstructural changes occurring in the zirconium alloy Excel (Zr-3.5 wt% Sn-0.8Nb-0.8Mo-0.2Fe) during heavy ion irradiation. In situ irradiation experiments were conducted at reactor operating temperatures on two Zr Excel alloy microstructures with different states of alloying elements, with the states achieved by different solution heat treatments. In the first case, the alloying elements were mostly concentrated in the beta (beta) phase, whereas, in the second case, large Zr-3(Mo,Nb,Fe)(4) secondary phase precipitates (SPPs) were grown in the alpha (alpha) phase by long term aging. The heavy ion induced damage and resultant compositional changes were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM)-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping. Significant differences were seen in microstructural evolution between the two different microstructures that were irradiated under similar conditions. Nucleation and growth of < c >-component loops and their dependence on the alloying elements are a major focus of the current investigation. It was observed that the < c >-component loops nucleate readily at 100, 300, and 400 degrees C after a threshold incubation dose (TID), which varies with irradiation temperature and the state of alloying elements. It was found that the TID for the formation of < c >-component loops increases with decrease in irradiation temperature. Alloying elements that are present in the form of SPPs increase the TID compared to when they are in the beta phase solid solution. Dose and temperature dependence of loop size and density are presented. Radiation induced redistribution and clustering of alloying elements (Sn, Mo, and Fe) have been observed and related to the formation of < c >-component loops. It has been shown that at the higher temperature tests, irradiation induced dissolution of precipitates occurs whereas irradiation induced

  9. Reduction of copper ions release by a novel ecofriendly electropolymerized nanolayer obtained from a natural compound (carvacrol).

    PubMed

    Bertuola, M; Grillo, C A; Fernández Lorenzo de Mele, M

    2016-08-01

    The release of copper ions by copper-containing devices, equipments and facilities represents a potential risk for biological systems. Different inhibitory treatments (CuIT) that use organic compounds have been proposed to reduce this environmental hazard but many of them are not in accordance with new regulations. The development of an ecofriendly CuIT based on the use of carvacrol, a natural phenolic compound present in essential oils, is reported here. The effects of carvacrol adsorption (adCarv) and its electropolymerization (polyCarv) were examined. Electropolymerization was attained after cycling the copper electrode in the 0.3-1.0V potential range. Electrochemical techniques complemented by ATR-FTIR, XPS, SEM and AFM surface analyses were used to evaluate the composition and characteristics of the layers. Results demonstrated that adCarv includes cetonic structures while polyCarv additionally contains ether bonds. AFM and SEM observations showed the presence of round nanoglobules, larger for adCarv (close to 50nm diameter). Cytotoxicity of adCarv and polyCarv layers on copper was also evaluated. The comparative analysis of both treatments revealed that polyCarv nanolayer is highly protective while the adCarv layer is weakly protective and reduction in cell viability was found. It was concluded that CuIT that leads to polyCarv nanolayer is very effective and ecofriendly. PMID:27132073

  10. Release of deuterium from irradiation damage in Fe-9Cr-2W ferritic alloy irradiated with deuterium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Kudo, F.

    2014-09-01

    The release profile of deuterium from an Fe-9Cr-2W ferritic alloy irradiated with low-energy deuterium ions was studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that one sharp TDS peak appeared at a temperature around 410 K depending on the heating rate that ranged from 1.5 to 20 K/min. The TDS peak height increased with increasing fluence from 2 × 1019 to 2 × 1021 D+/m2 with no shift of the peak temperature. A close correlation between these TDS peaks and the disappearance of dislocation loops formed by the irradiation was observed. The effects of tiny bubbles on TDS were small. These results suggest that most of the deuterium was trapped by dislocation loops, which affected the thermal stability of dislocation loops in the alloy. The dependence of TDS peak temperature on the heating rate yielded an activation energy of 0.63 ± 0.02 eV for deuterium de-trapping from dislocation loops. The retention properties of the total amount of deuterium exhibited a tendency of saturation at values on the order of 1020 D+/m2, which corresponded to a saturation tendency of the loop density.

  11. Water-soluble ions and trace elements in surface snow and their potential source regions across northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Pu, Wei; Zhang, Xueying; Ren, Yong; Huang, Jianping

    2015-08-01

    We collected 92 snow samples from 13 sites across northeastern China from January 7 to February 15, 2014. The surface snow samples were analyzed for the major water-soluble ions (SO42-, NO3-, F-, Cl-, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, and NH4+) and trace element (Al, As, Mn, V, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn, Fe, Cr, and Ni). The results indicated that the higher concentrations of NO3- and SO42- and the trace elements Zn, Pb, Cd, Ni, and Cu were likely attributable to enhanced local industrial emissions in East Asia especially in China. In addition, snow samples characterized by higher enrichment factors of trace elements (Cu, Cd, As, Zn, Pb) were indicative of an anthropogenic source. Emissions from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning were likely important contributors to the chemical elements in seasonal snow with long-range transport. On the other hand, the large attribution of K+ appeared in the higher latitude demonstrated that biomass burning was a dominated factor of the chemical species in seasonal snow in the higher latitude of China than that in the lower latitude. Finally, an interannual comparison with the 2010 China snow survey also confirmed the source attributions of chemical speciation in seasonal snow in these regions.

  12. The architecture of cartilage: Elemental maps and scanning transmission ion microscopy/tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinert, Tilo; Reibetanz, Uta; Schwertner, Michael; Vogt, Jürgen; Butz, Tilman; Sakellariou, Arthur

    2002-04-01

    Articular cartilage is not just a jelly-like cover of the bone within the joints but a highly sophisticated architecture of hydrated macromolecules, collagen fibrils and cartilage cells. Influences on the physiological balance due to age-related or pathological changes can lead to malfunction and subsequently to degradation of the cartilage. Many activities in cartilage research are dealing with the architecture of joint cartilage but have limited access to elemental distributions. Nuclear microscopy is able to yield spatially resolved elemental concentrations, provides density information and can visualise the arrangement of the collagen fibres. The distribution of the cartilage matrix can be deduced from the elemental and density maps. The findings showed a varying content of collagen and proteoglycan between zones of different cell maturation. Zones of higher collagen content are characterised by aligned collagen fibres that can form tubular structures. Recently we focused on STIM tomography to investigate the three dimensional arrangement of the collagen structures.

  13. Trace element content and magnetic properties of commercial HOPG samples studied by ion beam microscopy and SQUID magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Spemann, D. Esquinazi, P. Setzer, A.; Böhlmann, W.

    2014-10-15

    In this study, the impurity concentration and magnetic response of nine highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples with different grades and from different providers were determined using ion beam microscopy and SQUID magnetometry. Apart from sideface contaminations in the as-received state, bulk contamination of the samples in most cases consists of disk-shaped micron-sized particles made of Ti and V with an additional Fe contamination around the grain perimeter. The saturation magnetization typically increases with Fe concentration, however, there is no simple correlation between Fe content and magnetic moment. The saturation magnetization of one, respectively six, out of nine samples clearly exceeds the maximum contribution from pure Fe or Fe{sub 3}C. For most samples the temperature dependence of the remanence decreases linearly with T – a dependence found previously for defect-induced magnetism (DIM) in HOPG. We conclude that apart from magnetic impurities, additional contribution to the ferromagnetic magnetization exists in pristine HOPG in agreement with previous studies. A comparative study between the results of ion beam microscopy and the commonly used EDX analysis shows clearly that EDX is not a reliable method for quantitative trace elemental analysis in graphite, clarifying weaknesses and discrepancies in the element concentrations given in the recent literature.

  14. Study of heavy-ion induced fission for heavy-element synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, K.; Ikezoe, H.; Hofmann, S.; Heßberger, F. P.; Ackermann, D.; Antalic, S.; Aritomo, Y.; Comas, V. F.; Düllman, Ch. E.; Gorshkov, A.; Graeger, R.; Heinz, S.; Heredia, J. A.; Hirose, K.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Kojouharov, I.; Lommel, B.; Makii, H.; Mann, R.; Mitsuoka, S.; Nagame, Y.; Nishinaka, I.; Ohtsuki, T.; Popeko, A. G.; Saro, S.; Schädel, M.; Türler, A.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Yakushev, A.; Yeremin, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    Fission fragment mass distributions were measured in heavy-ion induced fissions using 238U target nucleus. The measured mass distributions changed drastically with incident energy. The results are explained by a change of the ratio between fusion and qasifission with nuclear orientation. A calculation based on a fluctuation dissipation model reproduced the mass distributions and their incident energy dependence. Fusion probability was determined in the analysis, and the values were consistent with those determined from the evaporation residue cross sections.

  15. Combined element magnet production for the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Mulhall, S.; Foelsche, H.; Ganetis, G.

    1995-05-01

    The production of 432 combined element magnets for RHIC is well underway. These magnets consist of a superconducting corrector, a quadrupole, and a sextupole combined into an integrated cold mass which is inserted into a cryostat. Production experiences as well as test results are reported.

  16. Heavy-Ion Fusion Mechanism and Predictions of Super-Heavy Elements Production

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Yasuhisa; Shen Caiwan; Boilley, David

    2009-08-26

    Fusion process is shown to firstly form largely deformed mono-nucleus and then to undergo diffusion in two-dimensions with the radial and mass-asymmetry degrees of freedom. Examples of prediction of residue cross sections are given for the elements with Z = 117 and 118.

  17. A finite element simulation on transient large deformation and mass diffusion in electrodes for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yonghao; Jiang, Hanqing

    2013-10-01

    Lithium-ion batteries have attracted great deal of attention recently. Silicon is one of the most promising anode materials for high-performance lithium-ion batteries, due to its highest theoretical specific capacity. However, the short lifetime confined by mechanical failure in the silicon anode is now considered to be the biggest challenge in desired applications. High stress induced by the huge volume change due to lithium insertion/extraction is the main reason underlying this problem. Some theoretical models have been developed to address this issue. In order to properly implement these models, we develop a finite element based numerical method using a commercial software package, ABAQUS, as a platform at the continuum level to study fully coupled large deformation and mass diffusion problem. Using this method, large deformation, elasticity-plasticity of the electrodes, various spatial and temporal conditions, arbitrary geometry and dimension could be fulfilled. The interaction between anode and other components of the lithium ion batteries can also be studied as an integrated system. Several specific examples are presented to demonstrate the capability of this numerical platform.

  18. The screened hydrogenic model: Analytic formulae for matrix elements of radiative and collisional rates in complex ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upcraft, L. M.

    2010-09-01

    There is an ongoing need for numerically efficient algorithms that are capable of calculating the radiative and collisional rates of arbitrarily complex ions that are present in hot plasmas to a level of accuracy that surpasses that available in many existing approximations. Hydrogen-like solutions for determining these rates in more general ions by use of an effective (and generally non-integer) atomic number frequently give poor results and are of limited validity. This paper illustrates that results accurate to of order 20% can be obtained for matrix elements of both rates for arbitrarily complex ions by use of hydrogenic wavefunctions that use different effective atomic numbers for the initial and final sub-shells. Not only does this allow for the realistic modelling of inner shell transitions, it naturally allows for the physical effect of orbital relaxation. It is shown that the integral of the generalised oscillator strength used by the Plane-wave Born approximation has an analytic solution that can be reduced to a form suitable for efficient numerical integration over an arbitrary electron distribution. Extensive use of the computer algebra package Mathematica ® has generated a unique formula for each transition and the results have been transformed to efficient fortran 90 code for all transitions between non-relativistic sub-shells with principal quantum numbers n ≤ 10. In the case of the collisional matrix elements these are typically two to three orders of magnitude faster to calculate than by direct numerical evaluation. The fortran code is available upon request from the author.

  19. A novel multi-element coprecipitation technique for separation and enrichment of metal ions in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Funda Armagan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2007-08-15

    A multi-element preconcentration-separation technique for heavy metal ions in environmental samples has been established. The procedure is based on coprecipitation of gold(III), bismuth(III), cobalt(II), chromium(III), iron(III), manganese(II), nickel(II), lead(II), thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) ions by the aid of Cu(II)-9-phenyl-3-fluorone precipitate. The Cu(II)-9-phenyl-3-fluorone precipitate was dissolved by the addition 1.0 mL of concentrated HNO(3) and then the solution was completed to 5 mL with distilled water. Iron, lead, cobalt, chromium, manganese and nickel levels in the final solution were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometer, while gold, bismuth, uranium and thorium were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. The optimal conditions are pH 7, amounts of 9-phenyl-3-fluorone: 5mg and amounts of Cu(II): 1mg. The effects of concomitant ions as matrix were also examined. The preconcentration factor was 30. Gold(III), bismuth(III), chromium(III), iron(III), lead(II) and thorium(IV) were quantitatively recovered from the real samples. The detection limits for the analyte elements based on 3 sigma (n=15) were in the range of 0.05-12.9 microg L(-1). The validation of the presented procedure was checked by the analysis of two certified reference materials (Montana I Soil (NIST-SRM 2710) and Lake Sediment (IAEA-SL-1)). The procedure was successfully applied to some environmental samples including water and sediments. PMID:19071860

  20. Determination of Zinc(II) Ions Released into Artificial Digestive Juices from Culinary-Medicinal Button Mushroom, Agaricus bisporus (Agaricomycetidae), Biomass of In Vitro Cultures Using an Anodic Stripping Voltammetry Method.

    PubMed

    Kala, Katarzyna; Muszynska, Bozena; Zajac, Magdalena; Krezalek, Remigiusz; Opoka, Wlodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is one of those microelements that are essential for the proper functioning of the human body and must be supplemented in our food at a daily dose of 15 mg. It is well known that mushrooms accumulate elements; thus, in order to determine the extent of accumulation and the level of zinc released from mushrooms, in vitro cultures of Agaricus bisporus were established. The cultures were run on a modified Oddoux medium (a control culture) as well as on the same medium with the addition of zinc hydroaspartate (100 and 200 mg/L) and zinc sulfate (87.23 and 174.47 mg/L). These compounds were chosen to help estimate which form, organic or inorganic, results in a better assimilation of zinc(II) ions by biomass. As the next step, the level of zinc(II) ions released from the lyophilized biomass of in vitro cultures to the digestive juices, under thermal conditions of the human body (37°C), was determined. For this purpose, artificial digestive juices, imitating the composition of human digestive juices, were used. For determination of zinc(II) ions in the digestive tract, an anodic stripping voltammetry method was employed. The amount of zinc released into artificial saliva over 1 minute varied from 0.15 mg/100 g d.w. in the control culture to 2.35 mg/100 g d.w. in the biomass in the medium to which 200 mg/L zinc hydroaspartate had been added. Values were higher in gastric juice and depended on incubation time (2.66 to 30.63 mg/100 g d.w.). In intestinal juice, the highest value of the released zinc grew to 24.20 mg/100 g d.w. (biomass of A. bisporus in vitro cultures in medium with the addition of 200 mg/L zinc hydroaspartate). Total average amount of zinc released into artificial digestive juices was the highest (56.26 mg/100 g d.w.) from A. bisporus biomass of in vitro cultures in the medium to which 200 mg/L zinc hydroaspartate had been added. PMID:27279537

  1. Rational design on controlled release ion-exchange polymeric microspheres and polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticles for the delivery of water-soluble drugs through a multidisciplinary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongqiang

    Sulfopropyl dextran sulfate (SP-DS) microspheres and polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticles (PLN) for the delivery of water-soluble anticancer drugs and P-glycoprotein inhibitors were developed by our group recently and demonstrated effectiveness in local chemotherapy. To optimize the delivery performance of these particulate systems, particularly PLN, an integrated multidisciplinary approach was developed, based on an in-depth understanding of drug-excipient interactions, internal structure, drug loading and release mechanisms, and application of advanced modeling/optimization techniques. An artificial neural networks (ANN) simulator capable of formulation optimization and drug release prediction was developed. In vitro drug release kinetics of SP-DS microspheres, with various drug loading and in different release media, were predicted by ANN. The effects of independent variables on drug release were evaluated. Good modeling performance suggested that ANN is a useful tool to predict drug release from ion-exchange microspheres. To further improve the performance of PLN, drug-polymer-lipid interactions were characterized theoretically and experimentally using verapamil hydrochloride (VRP) as a model drug and dextran sulfate sodium (DS) as a counter-ion polymer. VRP-DS complexation followed a stoichiometric rule and solid-state transformation of VRP were observed. Dodecanoic acid (DA) was identified as the lead lipid carrier material. Based upon the optimized drug-polymer-lipid interactions, PLN with high drug loading capacity (36%, w/w) and sustained release without initial burst release were achieved. VRP remained amorphous and was molecularly dispersed within PLN. H-bonding contributed to the miscibility between the VRP-DS complex and DA. Drug release from PLN was mainly controlled by diffusion and ion-exchange processes. Drug loading capacity and particle size of PLN depend on the formulation factors of the weight ratio of drug to lipid and concentrations of

  2. The evolution of complex type B Allende inclusion - an ion microprobe trace element study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, G. J.; Crozaz, G.; Lundberg, L. L.

    1989-09-01

    Results are presented of a detailed trace-element and isotopic analyses of the constituent phases in each of the major textural parts (mantle, core, and islands) of a Type B refractory inclusion, the USNM 5241 inclusion from Allende, first described by El Goresy et al. (1985). The REE data on 5241 were found to be largely consistent with a model in which the mantle and the core of 5241 formed sequentially out of a single melt by fractional crystallization. The numerical models of REE evolution in the 5241 melt, especially that of Eu, require that a significant mass of spinel-free island material was assimilated into the evolving melt during the last half of the solidification history of 5241. The trace element results obtained thus strongly support the interpretation of El Goresy et al. (1985) that the spinel-free islands in the 5241 are trapped xenoliths.

  3. The evolution of complex type B Allende inclusion - An ion microprobe trace element study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macpherson, Glenn J.; Crozaz, Ghislaine; Lundberg, Laura L.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented of a detailed trace-element and isotopic analyses of the constituent phases in each of the major textural parts (mantle, core, and islands) of a Type B refractory inclusion, the USNM 5241 inclusion from Allende, first described by El Goresy et al. (1985). The REE data on 5241 were found to be largely consistent with a model in which the mantle and the core of 5241 formed sequentially out of a single melt by fractional crystallization. The numerical models of REE evolution in the 5241 melt, especially that of Eu, require that a significant mass of spinel-free island material was assimilated into the evolving melt during the last half of the solidification history of 5241. The trace element results pbtained thus strongly support the interpretation of El Goresy et al. (1985) that the spinel-free islands in the 5241 are trapped xenoliths.

  4. Atomic Data for Neutron-capture Elements I. Photoionization and Recombination Properties of Low-charge Selenium Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, N. C.; Witthoeft, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We present multi-configuration Breit-Pauli AUTOSTRUCTURE calculations of distorted-wave photoionization (PI) cross sections. and total and partial final-state resolved radiative recombination (RR) and dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for the first six ions of the trans-iron element Se. These calculations were motivated by the recent detection of Se emission lines in a large number of planetary nebulae. Se is a potentially useful tracer of neutron-capture nucleosynthesis. but accurate determinations of its abundance in photoionized nebulae have been hindered by the lack of atomic data governing its ionization balance. Our calculations were carried out in intermediate coupling with semi re1ativistic radial wavefunctions. PI and recombination data were determined for levels within the ground configuration of each ion, and experimental PI cross-section measurements were used to benchmark our results. For DR, we allowed (Delta)n = 0 core excitations, which are important at photoionized plasma temperatures. We find that DR is the dominant recombination process for each of these Se ions at temperatures representative of photoionized nebulae (approx.10(exp 4) K). In order to estimate the uncertainties of these data, we compared results from three different configuration-interaction expansions for each ion, and also tested the sensitivity of the results to the radial scaling factors in the structure calculations. We find that the internal uncertainties are typically 30-50% for the direct PI cross sections and approx.10% for the computed RR rate coefficients, while those for low-temperature DR can be considerably larger (from 15-30% up to two orders of magnitude) due to the unknown energies of near-threshold autoionization resonances. These data are available at the CDS, and fitting coefficients to the total RR and DR rate coefficients are presented. The results are suitable for incorporation into photoionization codes used to numerically simulate

  5. Conductive carbon filled polymeric electrodes: novel ion optical elements for time-of-flight mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Appel, Matthew F; van der Veer, Wytze E; Benter, Thorsten

    2002-10-01

    A new technique employing conductive polymeric electrodes for the generation of linear electric fields is proposed and validated. A hollow cylinder comprised of DuPont's Vespel SP-22, a polymer loaded with conductive carbon particles, is used to enhance the performance of a hybrid reflectron compared to a conventional dual stage gridless reflectron composed of discrete metal ring electrodes. Both devices have comparable physical dimensions and nearly identical ion optical properties. Instrumental resolution measurements are used to validate this novel design. PMID:12387322

  6. Kinetic simulation of complex decomposition as a tool for the ion chromatographic determination of elemental speciation of less inert metal ions.

    PubMed

    Winter, Christian; Seubert, Andreas

    2016-01-15

    Species decomposition is an often occurring artefact during the chromatographic determination of elemental speciation. The decomposition follows a simple path to lower coordinated compounds. Therefore a simulation is developed for those decomposition reactions. The simulation separates the isochronal processes of the separation itself and the ongoing reaction and delivers thermodynamic and kinetic information about the species present in the original sample. This shifts the boundaries of separation based elemental speciation to less inert metal ions which are typically not analyzable by this approach. The less inert gallium monooxalato complex [GaOx](+) is used as example for testing the simulation software as this complex decomposes only to Ga(3+) and both species are retained on cation exchange columns. We extracted thermodynamic and kinetic information from flow rate experiments by the analysis of the peak areas in the chromatogram. The results show that some of our assumptions such as the irreversibility under the applied chromatographic conditions are not ultimately true, but good accordance of simulation and measured data was achieved. PMID:26709021

  7. Concentration-dependent cytotoxicity of copper ions on mouse fibroblasts in vitro: effects of copper ion release from TCu380A vs TCu220C intra-uterine devices.

    PubMed

    Cao, Bianmei; Zheng, Yudong; Xi, Tingfei; Zhang, Chuanchuan; Song, Wenhui; Burugapalli, Krishna; Yang, Huai; Ma, Yanxuan

    2012-08-01

    Sustained release of copper (Cu) ions from Cu-containing intrauterine devices (CuIUD) is quite efficient for contraception. However, the tissue surrounding the CuIUD is exposed to toxic Cu ion levels. The objective for this study was to quantify the concentration dependent cytotoxic effects of Cu ions and correlate the toxicity due to Cu ion burst release for two popular T-shaped IUDs - TCu380A and TCu220C on L929 mouse fibroblasts. Fibroblasts were cultured in 98 well tissue culture plates and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol- 2-yl)-2,5-diphehyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to determine their viability and proliferation as a function of time. For cell seeding numbers ranging from 10,000 to 100,000, a maximum culture time of 48 h was identified for fibroblasts without significant reduction in cell proliferation due to contact inhibition. Thus, for Cu cytotoxicity assays, a cell seeding density of 50,000 and a maximum culture time of 48 h in 96 well plates were used. 24 h after cell seeding, culture media were replaced with Cu ion containing media solutions of different concentrations, including 24 and 72 h extracts from TCuIUDs and incubated for a further 24 h. Cell viability decreased with increasing Cu ion concentration, with 30 % and 100 % reduction for 40 μg/ml and 100 μg/ml respectively at 24 h. The cytotoxic effects were further evaluated using light microscopy, apoptosis and cell cycle analysis assays. Fibroblasts became rounded and eventually detached from TCP surface due to Cu ion toxicity. A linear increase in apoptotic cell population with increasing Cu ion concentration was observed in the tested range of 0 to 50 μg/ml. Cell cycle analysis indicated the arrest of cell division for the tested 25 to 50 μg/ml Cu ion treatments. Among the TCuIUDs, TCu220C having 265 mm(2) Cu surface area released 9.08 ± 0.16 and 26.02 ± 0.25 μg/ml, while TCu380A having 400 mm(2) released 96.7 ± 0.11 and 159.3 ± 0.15 μg/ml respectively following 24 and 72 h

  8. Chemical characterization of high-temperature arc gasification slag with a focus on element release in the environment.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Justin G; Oehmig, Wesley N; Blaisi, Nawaf I; Townsend, Timothy G

    2014-07-15

    High-temperature arc gasification (HTAG) has been proposed as a viable technology for the generation of energy and the production of saleable byproducts from municipal solid waste (MSW). Total concentrations of elements in HTAG slag were assessed and indicated a high partitioning of trace elements (Pb, Cd, and As) into the flue gas, an issue of concern when assessing the air pollution control residues (APCR) status as a hazardous waste. Hazardous waste leaching tests [such as the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP)] were performed and confirmed that the slag did not meet U.S. criteria for a hazardous waste. Leaching was assessed using batch and column tests; the results revealed that Sb and Al were elevated in respect to risk-based regulatory thresholds. Slag samples were carbonated to simulate weathering effects, and although leachable concentrations of Al did decrease by an order of magnitude, Sb concentrations were found to increase. Low total concentrations of certain trace elements (As, Cd, and Pb), with respect to MSW incineration bottom ashes support the potential for reuse of HTAG slag; however, leaching of elements (Pb, Al, and Sb) in batch and column tests indicate that proper engineering controls would need to be taken to ensure protection of water supplies in a reuse application. PMID:24912855

  9. Surface Modification of NiTi Alloy via Cathodic Plasma Electrolytic Deposition and its Effect on Ni Ion Release and Osteoblast Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ying; Cai, Kaiyong; Yang, Weihu; Liu, Peng

    2013-07-01

    To reduce Ni ion release and improve biocompatibility of NiTi alloy, the cathodic plasma electrolytic deposition (CPED) technique was used to fabricate ceramic coating onto a NiTi alloy surface. The formation of a coating with a rough and micro-textured surface was confirmed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, respectively. An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry test showed that the formed coating significantly reduced the release of Ni ions from the NiTi alloy in simulated body fluid. The influence of CPED treated NiTi substrates on the biological behaviors of osteoblasts, including cell adhesion, cell viability, and osteogenic differentiation function (alkaline phosphatase), was investigated in vitro. Immunofluorescence staining of nuclei revealed that the CPED treated NiTi alloy was favorable for cell growth. Osteoblasts on CPED modified NiTi alloy showed greater cell viability than those for the native NiTi substrate after 4 and 7 days cultures. More importantly, osteoblasts cultured onto a modified NiTi sample displayed significantly higher differentiation levels of alkaline phosphatase. The results suggested that surface functionalization of NiTi alloy with ceramic coating via the CPED technique was beneficial for cell proliferation and differentiation. The approach presented here is useful for NiTi implants to enhance bone osseointegration and reduce Ni ion release in vitro.

  10. 3,3'-Dihydroxyisorenieratene prevents UV-induced formation of reactive oxygen species and the release of protein-bound zinc ions in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lutter, Kaya; De Spirt, Silke; Kock, Sebastian; Kröncke, Klaus-Dietrich; Martin, Hans-Dieter; Wagener, Tanja; Stahl, Wilhelm

    2010-02-01

    3,3'-Dihydroxyisorenieratene (DHIR) is a structurally unusual carotenoid exhibiting bifunctional antioxidant properties. It is synthesized by Brevibacterium linens, used in dairy industry for the production of red smear cheeses. The compound protects cellular structures against photo-oxidative damage and inhibits the UV-dependent formation of thymidine dimers. Here we show that DHIR prevents a UV-induced intracellular release of zinc ions from proteins in human dermal fibroblasts. The effect is correlated with a decreased formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. In contrast, zinc release from cellular proteins induced by hyperthermia is not affected by pretreatment of cells with the antioxidant DHIR. It is suggested that the intracellular zinc release upon UV irradiation is due to oxidative modifications of the zinc ligands in proteins (e.g. cysteine) and that protection by DHIR is due to intracellular scavenging of reactive oxygen species generated in photo-oxidation. PMID:19862772

  11. Three-dimensional thermal finite element modeling of lithium-ion battery in thermal abuse application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guifang; Long, Bo; Cheng, Bo; Zhou, Shiqiong; Xu, Peng; Cao, Binggang

    In order to better understand the thermal abuse behavior of high capacities and large power lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicle application, a three-dimensional thermal model has been developed for analyzing the temperature distribution under abuse conditions. The model takes into account the effects of heat generation, internal conduction and convection, and external heat dissipation to predict the temperature distribution in a battery. Three-dimensional model also considers the geometrical features to simulate oven test, which are significant in larger cells for electric vehicle application. The model predictions are compared to oven test results for VLP 50/62/100S-Fe (3.2 V/55 Ah) LiFePO 4/graphite cells and shown to be in great agreement.

  12. Metal ion release and surface composition of the Cu 18Ni 20Zn nickel silver during 30 days immersion in artificial sweat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošev, Ingrid; Kosec, Tadeja

    2007-11-01

    In order to study nickel ion release associated with nickel allergy, Cu-18Ni-20Zn nickel-silver alloy was immersed in artificial sweat and Ringer physiological solution for 30 days. Dissolution of metal ions was measured as a function of time, and the characteristics of the solid surface layer formed after 30 days were studied by SEM/EDS and XPS. The dissolution of nickel prevails over dissolution of copper and zinc. Nickel release in artificial sweat is approximately 10 times higher than in Ringer physiological solution and in both solutions the nickel release exceeds 0.5 μg cm -2 week -1, the threshold above which the allergy is triggered. Evidence of selective nickel dissolution is reported. The composition of the surface layer formed in artificial sweat and in Ringer physiological solution differs in the content of nickel and chlorine. In artificial sweat, the major constituents of the surface layer are dominantly oxides, Cu 2O and ZnO, with traces of chlorine. In Ringer physiological solution, the composition of the surface layer changes to a mixture of oxides, chlorides and/or oxychlorides. Two components peaks were detected in the Cl 2p 3/2 peak; however, it was not possible to distinguish the exact nature of the chloride compound formed. The mechanism of nickel release is discussed as a function of the composition of the solution.

  13. Redox-inactive metal ions modulate the reactivity and oxygen release of mononuclear non-haem iron(III)–peroxo complexes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bang, Suhee; Lee, Yong -Min; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung -Bin; Nishida, Yusuke; Seo, Mi Sook; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-09-14

    Redox-inactive metal ions that function as Lewis acids play pivotal roles in modulating the reactivity of oxygen-containing metal complexes and metalloenzymes, such as the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II and its small-molecule mimics. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of non-haem iron(III)–peroxo complexes that bind redox-inactive metal ions, (TMC)FeIII–(μ,η2:η2-O2)–Mn+ (Mn+ = Sr2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Lu3+, Y3+ and Sc3+; TMC, 1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane). We demonstrate that the Ca2+ and Sr2+ complexes showed similar electrochemical properties and reactivities in one-electron oxidation or reduction reactions. However, the properties and reactivities of complexes formed with stronger Lewis acidities were found to be markedly different. Inmore » conclusion, complexes that contain Ca2+ or Sr2+ ions were oxidized by an electron acceptor to release O2, whereas the release of O2 did not occur for complexes that bind stronger Lewis acids. Furthermore, we discuss these results in the light of the functional role of the Ca2+ ion in the oxidation of water to dioxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex.« less

  14. Gold ions bio-released from metallic gold particles reduce inflammation and apoptosis and increase the regenerative responses in focal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Agnete; Kolind, Kristian; Pedersen, Dan Sonne; Doering, Peter; Pedersen, Mie Ostergaard; Danscher, Gorm; Penkowa, Milena; Stoltenberg, Meredin

    2008-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury results in loss of neurons caused as much by the resulting neuroinflammation as by the injury. Gold salts are known to be immunosuppressive, but their use are limited by nephrotoxicity. However, as we have proven that implants of pure metallic gold release gold ions which do not spread in the body, but are taken up by cells near the implant, we hypothesize that metallic gold could reduce local neuroinflammation in a safe way. Bio-liberation, or dissolucytosis, of gold ions from metallic gold surfaces requires the presence of disolycytes i.e. macrophages and the process is limited by their number and activity. We injected 20-45 mum gold particles into the neocortex of mice before generating a cryo-injury. Comparing gold-treated and untreated cryolesions, the release of gold reduced microgliosis and neuronal apoptosis accompanied by a transient astrogliosis and an increased neural stem cell response. We conclude that bio-liberated gold ions possess pronounced anti-inflammatory and neuron-protective capacities in the brain and suggest that metallic gold has clinical potentials. Intra-cerebral application of metallic gold as a pharmaceutical source of gold ions represents a completely new medical concept that bypasses the blood-brain-barrier and allows direct drug delivery to inflamed brain tissue. PMID:18542984

  15. Selected ion flow tube, SIFT, studies of the reactions of H3O+, NO+ and O2+ with compounds released by Pseudomonas and related bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianshu; Smith, David; Spanel, Patrik

    2004-04-01

    A selected ion flow tube, SIFT, study has been carried out of the reactions of H3O+, NO+ and O2+ with some volatile organic compounds that are released by bacteria. The major intention is to prepare the way for an extensive study of the emissions from Pseudomonas bacteria in vitro using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, with a view to detecting the presence of these bacteria in vivo. This requires an extensive SIFT-MS database of the rate coefficients and product ion distributions for the reactions of the above precursor ions with those molecular species that are released by or implicated in the growth of bacteria. A partial list of these molecular species is given. The available SIFT-MS database already includes the kinetic data for the reactions of several of these compounds and the present study supplements this to include 2-methyl-1-butanol and 2-heptanol, 3-methyl-1-butyl acetate, 4-methyl-1,3-pentadiene, and dimethyl trisulphide and dimethyl tetrasulphide. The kinetic data obtained in the present study are compared with those obtained previously for classes of similar compounds.

  16. Secondary fusion reactions in the bombardment of light-element targets with low-energy heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gikal, B. N.; Teterev, Yu. G.; Shchegolev, V. Yu.; Zdorovets, M. V.; Ivanov, I. A.; Koloberdin, M. V.; Aleksandrenko, V. V.

    2014-07-01

    Neutron emission was observed experimentally at the DC-60 cyclotron at the Institute of Nuclear Physics (Astana, Kazakhstan). The neutron yields were measured in the bombardment of light-element (Be, C, Al, Al2O3, and LiF) targets with heavy ions (Ar, Kr, and Xe) with energies below the Coulomb barrier. The angular distributions of neutrons from the targets were also measured. It was found that the observed neutrons were produced in secondary nuclear reactions between the resting target nuclei and recoil nuclei that acquire energy in the process of elastic scattering. The experimental results were compared with calculations based on the abovementioned secondary-reaction mechanism. The calculations allow one to estimate the yields of secondary reactions to within a coefficient of 2.

  17. In vivo response of heme-oxygenase-1 to metal ions released from metal-on-metal hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Beraudi, Alina; Bianconi, Eva; Catalani, Simona; Canaider, Silvia; De Pasquale, Dalila; Apostoli, Pietro; Bordini, Barbara; Stea, Susanna; Toni, Aldo; Facchin, Federica

    2016-07-01

    Metal ion release and accumulation is considered to be a factor responsible for the high failure rates of metal-on-metal (MoM) hip implants. Numerous studies have associated the presence of these ions, besides other factors, including a hypoxia‑like response and changes in pH due to metal corrosion leading to the induction of the oxidative stress response. The aim of the present study was to verify whether, in patients with a MoM hip prosthesis, mRNA and protein expression of HMOX‑1 was modulated by the presence of metal ions and whether patients without prostheses exhibit a different expression pattern of this enzyme. The study was conducted on 22 matched pairs of patients with and without prostheses, for a total of 44 samples. Ion dosage was determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry equipped with dynamic cell reaction. HMOX‑1 gene expression was quantified by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and HMOX‑1 protein expression was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results demonstrated that although there were significant differences in the metallic ion concentrations amongst the two groups of patients, there was no correlation between circulating levels of cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr), and HMOX‑1 gene and protein expression. Additionally, there was no significant difference in the protein expression levels of HMOX‑1 between the two groups. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that circulating Co and Cr ions released by articular prosthetics do not induce an increase in HMOX‑1 mRNA and protein expression at least 3.5 years after the implant insertion. The present study suggests that involvement of HMOX‑1 may be excluded from future studies and suggests that other antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and reductase should be investigated. PMID:27176599

  18. Major-ion, nutrient, and trace-element concentrations in the Steamboat Creek basin, Oregon, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rinella, Frank A.

    1998-01-01

    Bottom-sediment concentrations of antimony, arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, zinc, and organic carbon were largest in City Creek. In City Creek and Horse Heaven Creek, concentrations for 11 constituents--antimony, arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, manganese (Horse Heaven Creek only), mercury, selenium, silver, zinc, and organic carbon (City Creek only)--exceeded concentrations considered to be enriched in streams of the nearby Willamette River Basin, whereas in Steamboat Creek only two trace elements--antimony and nickel--exceeded Willamette River enriched concentrations. Bottom-sediment concentrations for six of these constituents in City Creek and Horse Heaven Creek--arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc--also exceeded interim Canadian threshold effect level (TEL) concentrations established for the protection of aquatic life, whereas only four constituents between Singe Creek and Steamboat Creek--arsenic, chromium, copper (Singe Creek only), and nickel--exceeded the TEL concentrations.

  19. Effect of acetabular cup design on metal ion release in two designs of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Cadossi, Matteo; Tedesco, Giuseppe; Savarino, Lucia; Baldini, Nicola; Mazzotti, Antonio; Greco, Michelina; Giannini, Sandro

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this observational prospective cohort study was to evaluate the serum concentrations of cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), and nickel (Ni) at a 2-year follow-up in patients operated on with a novel design of hip resurfacing: Romax resurfacing system (RRS). RRS is characterized by the presence of an acetabular notch which theoretically provides a wider range of motion and a reduced incidence of groin pain. The presence of radiolucencies and functional outcome, assessed using the Harris hip score (HHS) and the University of California Activity scale (UCLA), were secondary endpoints. Moreover, these results were compared with those obtained in our previous study from a similar cohort of patients implanted using the Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR) system. At a 2-year follow-up, the serum levels of Co in patients operated on using the RRS were five times higher (p = 0.0002) than those found before surgery (Co, means: 1.04 and 0.20 ng/mL, respectively); similarly, Cr levels were 13 times higher (p < 0.0001) at a 2-year follow-up than before surgery (Cr, means: 1.69 and 0.13 ng/mL, respectively). Ni concentrations (0.42 and 0.78 ng/mL) were not significantly different (p = 0.16), even if they increased 86% after surgery. In the RRS patients, an inverse correlation was found between Co and Cr concentrations and length of follow-up (Co: r = -0.64, p = 0.0096; Cr: r= -0.45, p = 0.08). The serum levels of Co and Cr were not significantly different between RRS (Co: 1.04 ng/mL and Cr: 1.69 ng/mL) and BHR (Co: 1.39 ng/mL and Cr: 2.30 ng/mL) patients at 2 years (p = 0.95 and 0.26 for Co and Cr, respectively). Our results showed that RRS patients achieved an excellent clinical outcome with limited metal ion release. PMID:24962936

  20. Effect of magnetic element ions on collective pinning behaviour in Bi-2223 quadrilateral bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, M. I.

    2007-10-01

    Frequency and ac field dependence of Bi1.6Pb0.4Sr2(Ca1-xMx)2Cu3Oδ quadrilateral bars with x ⩽ 0.02 and M = Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd and Ni, prepared by the conventional reaction method have been measured in the range of low field/frequency ac susceptibility and BSCCO superconducting temperature. The ac loss peak shifts to higher temperature and its summit shows nonlinear change with increasing frequency. Introduction of magnetic ions as defects is found to increase the intergranular critical current Jcm and the flux pinning of Bi(Pb)-2223 system. Application of the power law critical state model suggested that pinning behaviour of specimen could be viewed as hysteretic bulk pinning and/or flux creep. On the other hand, Jcm dependence activation energy is found to obey Ea ∝ J-μ relation, characteristic of the vortex glass/collective creep. Hence, collective pinning behaviour of specimens is discussed in view of the intergranular pinning mechanism.

  1. A pH-sensitive histidine residue as control element for ligand release from HLA-DR molecules.

    PubMed

    Rötzschke, Olaf; Lau, Julie M; Hofstätter, Maria; Falk, Kirsten; Strominger, Jack L

    2002-12-24

    Class II MHC molecules undergo conformational changes on shifts of the pH. As a consequence, low-affinity peptides tightly bound at pH 7.0 can be released at pH 5.0. The imidazole group of histidine is the only amino acid side chain affected within this range. At pH 5.0 the group is positively charged, polar, and hydrophilic, whereas at pH 7.4 it is neutral, apolar, and hydrophobic. In this study, we used soluble forms of HLA-DR and substituted conserved histidine residues with tyrosine, an isosteric analogue to the uncharged form of histidine. The goal of this substitution was to identify crucial His residues by an increase in pH stability of the ligand complex. HLA-DM-mediated release experiments revealed that substitution of His-33 in the alpha(1) domain of the HLA-DR molecule almost doubled the half-life of HLA-DR1class II-associated invariant-chain peptide complexes. The divergence in the off-rate of WT and H33Y mutated complex was strictly pH-dependent and correlated with the theoretical titration curve of the imidazole group. For both HLA-DR1 and HLA-DR4 molecules the mutation resulted in a shift of class II-associated invariant-chain peptide release curves by up to 0.5 pH units. His-33alpha1 is present in all HLA-DR and H-2E molecules. It connects the alpha(1) and alpha(2) domains in its noncharged form by hydrophobic interactions with residue Val-136alpha2. It is located in close proximity to the putative interface with HLA-DM and may function as a pH-sensitive "button," which is closed at pH 7.0 but opens below pH 6.0 to allow conformational transitions necessary for ligand exchange. PMID:12471156

  2. A pH-sensitive histidine residue as control element for ligand release from HLA-DR molecules

    PubMed Central

    Rötzschke, Olaf; Lau, Julie M.; Hofstätter, Maria; Falk, Kirsten; Strominger, Jack L.

    2002-01-01

    Class II MHC molecules undergo conformational changes on shifts of the pH. As a consequence, low-affinity peptides tightly bound at pH 7.0 can be released at pH 5.0. The imidazole group of histidine is the only amino acid side chain affected within this range. At pH 5.0 the group is positively charged, polar, and hydrophilic, whereas at pH 7.4 it is neutral, apolar, and hydrophobic. In this study, we used soluble forms of HLA-DR and substituted conserved histidine residues with tyrosine, an isosteric analogue to the uncharged form of histidine. The goal of this substitution was to identify crucial His residues by an increase in pH stability of the ligand complex. HLA-DM-mediated release experiments revealed that substitution of His-33 in the α1 domain of the HLA-DR molecule almost doubled the half-life of HLA-DR1/class II-associated invariant-chain peptide complexes. The divergence in the off-rate of WT and H33Y mutated complex was strictly pH-dependent and correlated with the theoretical titration curve of the imidazole group. For both HLA-DR1 and HLA–DR4 molecules the mutation resulted in a shift of class II-associated invariant-chain peptide release curves by up to 0.5 pH units. His-33α1 is present in all HLA-DR and H-2E molecules. It connects the α1 and α2 domains in its noncharged form by hydrophobic interactions with residue Val-136α2. It is located in close proximity to the putative interface with HLA-DM and may function as a pH-sensitive “button,” which is closed at pH 7.0 but opens below pH 6.0 to allow conformational transitions necessary for ligand exchange. PMID:12471156

  3. Carbon-Based Solid-State Calcium Ion-Selective Microelectrode and Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy: A Quantitative Study of pH-Dependent Release of Calcium Ions from Bioactive Glass.

    PubMed

    Ummadi, Jyothir Ganesh; Downs, Corey J; Joshi, Vrushali S; Ferracane, Jack L; Koley, Dipankar

    2016-03-15

    Solid-state ion-selective electrodes are used as scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) probes because of their inherent fast response time and ease of miniaturization. In this study, we report the development of a solid-state, low-poly(vinyl chloride), carbon-based calcium ion-selective microelectrode (Ca(2+)-ISME), 25 μm in diameter, capable of performing an amperometric approach curve and serving as a potentiometric sensor. The Ca(2+)-ISME has a broad linear response range of 5 μM to 200 mM with a near Nernstian slope of 28 mV/log[a(Ca(2+))]. The calculated detection limit for Ca(2+)-ISME is 1 μM. The selectivity coefficients of this Ca(2+)-ISME are log K(Ca(2+),A) = -5.88, -5.54, and -6.31 for Mg(2+), Na(+), and K(+), respectively. We used this new type of Ca(2+)-ISME as an SECM probe to quantitatively map the chemical microenvironment produced by a model substrate, bioactive glass (BAG). In acidic conditions (pH 4.5), BAG was found to increase the calcium ion concentration from 0.7 mM ([Ca(2+)] in artificial saliva) to 1.4 mM at 20 μm above the surface. In addition, a solid-state dual SECM pH probe was used to correlate the release of calcium ions with the change in local pH. Three-dimensional pH and calcium ion distribution mapping were also obtained by using these solid-state probes. The quantitative mapping of pH and Ca(2+) above the BAG elucidates the effectiveness of BAG in neutralizing and releasing calcium ions in acidic conditions. PMID:26861499

  4. Effect of pH on the release of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resins collected from operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Data are presented on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small-scale waste--form specimens collected during solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station were leach-tested and subjected to compressive strength testing in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1). Samples of untreated resin waste collected from each solidification vessel before the solidification process were analyzed for concentrations of radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to determine the quantities of these chemicals in the waste-form specimens. The chelating agents included oxalic, citric, and picolinic acids. In order to determine the effect of leachant chemical composition and pH on the stability and leachability of the waste forms, waste-form specimens were leached in various leachants. Results of this study indicate that differences in pH do not affect releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms, but that differences in leachant chemistry and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. Also, this study indicates that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents are similar for waste- form specimens that decomposed and those that retained their general physical form. 36 refs., 60 figs., 28 tabs.

  5. Effect of preparation route on the degradation behavior and ion releasability of siloxane-poly(lactic acid)-vaterite hybrid nonwoven fabrics for guided bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Takashi; Nakamura, Jin; Ota, Yoshio; Obata, Akiko; Kasuga, Toshihiro; Ban, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    Two types of nonwoven fabric, consisting of siloxane-doped vaterite (SiV) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA), for guided bone regeneration (GBR) were prepared by an electrospinning. One of the fabrics, SiV-PLA(M), was derived from PLA mixed with the solution of SiV dispersed in chloroform. Another one, SiV-PLA(K), was derived from a composite prepared by kneading SiV and PLA while heating at 200°C. The SiV-PLA(K) fabric shows higher degradability in dilute NaOH aq. than the SiV-PLA(M) fabric. To improve the cellular compatibility of the fabric, the fibers were coated with hydroxyapatite (HA) by soaking in simulated body fluid. The HA-coated SiV-PLA(K) fabric showed the release of silicate ions; the amount was reduced by 1/5 to 1/8 compared with that of the HA-coated SiV-PLA(M) fabric, and the excessive release was controlled. The preparation route of kneading at 200°C led to formation of a fabric with degradation behavior and ion releasability effective for bone regeneration. PMID:21415554

  6. Release of halide ions from the buried active site of the haloalkane dehalogenase LinB revealed by stopped-flow fluorescence analysis and free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Hladilkova, Jana; Prokop, Zbynek; Chaloupkova, Radka; Damborsky, Jiri; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2013-11-21

    Release of halide ions is an essential step of the catalytic cycle of haloalkane dehalogenases. Here we describe experimentally and computationally the process of release of a halide anion from the buried active site of the haloalkane dehalogenase LinB. Using stopped-flow fluorescence analysis and umbrella sampling free energy calculations, we show that the anion binding is ion-specific and follows the ordering I(-) > Br(-) > Cl(-). We also address the issue of the protonation state of the catalytic His272 residue and its effect on the process of halide release. While deprotonation of His272 increases binding of anions in the access tunnel, we show that the anionic ordering does not change with the switch of the protonation state. We also demonstrate that a sodium cation could relatively easily enter the active site, provided the His272 residue is singly protonated, and replace thus the missing proton. In contrast, Na(+) is strongly repelled from the active site containing the doubly protonated His272 residue. Our study contributes toward understanding of the reaction mechanism of haloalkane dehalogenase enzyme family. Determination of the protonation state of the catalytic histidine throughout the catalytic cycle remains a challenge for future studies. PMID:24151979

  7. Use of leaching tests to quantify trace element release from waste to energy bottom ash amended pavements.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Justin G; Townsend, Timothy G; Ferraro, Christopher C

    2015-12-30

    A series of roadway tests strips were paved on-site at a landfill in Florida, U.S. Waste to energy (WTE) bottom ash was used as a partial course aggregate replacement in a hot mix asphalt (HMA) and a Portland cement concrete (PCC) pavement, along with control HMA and PCC sections. This allowed for a comparison of the relative degree of leaching between both materials (HMA and PCC) as well as between the ash-amended and control pavements. Batch and monolithic tank leaching tests were conducted on the pavements. Testing of the PCC samples demonstrated that Mo and Al were elevated above regulatory thresholds for both the control and ash amended samples. Further leach testing demonstrated that the release of Mo was likely from the PCC and not a result of the inclusion of the BA into pavement. Batch leach testing of ash-amended HMA samples revealed Sb as a constituent of potential concern. The results of the monolith leaching test displayed leaching of Sb within the same order of magnitude as the regulatory threshold. Calculation of the leachability index (LI) for Sb found that it would have limited mobility when incorporated in the HMA matrix. PMID:26340550

  8. DNA-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles as an ion-responsive release system to determine the presence of mercury in aqueous solutions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunfei; Yuan, Quan; Chen, Tao; Chen, Yan

    2013-01-01

    We have developed DNA-functionalized silica nanoparticles for the rapid, sensitive, and selective detection of mercuric ion (Hg2+) in aqueous solution. Two DNA strands were designed to cap the pore of dye-trapped silica nanoparticles. In the presence of ppb level Hg2+, the two DNA strands are dehybridized to uncap the pore, releasing the dye cargo with detectable enhancements of fluorescence signal. This method enables rapid (less than 20min) and sensitive (LOD 4ppb) detection, and it was also able to discriminate Hg2+ from twelve other environmentally relevant metal ions. The superior properties of the as-designed DNA-functionalized silica nanoparticles can be attributed to the large loading capacity and highly ordered pore structure of mesoporous silica nanoparticles, as well as the selective binding of thymine-rich DNA with Hg2+ . Our design serves as a new prototype for metal-ion sensing systems and it also has promising potential for detection of various targets in stimulus-release systems. PMID:22240146

  9. Molecular Sidebands of Refractory Elements for ISOL

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, Andreas; Spejewski, Eugene H.; Carter, H Kennon; Mervin, Brenden T.; Jost, Cara; Stracener, Daniel W; Lapi, Suzanne; Bray, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    The formation of molecular sidebands of refractory elements, such as V, Re, Zr, Mo, Tc, is discussed. The focus is on in situ sideband formation and its advantage for the release process. An atomic 48V beam has been produced in a two step process, forming the oxide in situ, transporting it through the target-ion source as a chloride and destroying the chlorine sideband in the ion source. The sideband formation of Re, Zr, Mo, Tc is discussed.

  10. It's elemental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Periodic Table of the elements will now have to be updated. An international team of researchers has added element 110 to the Earth's armory of elements. Though short-lived—of the order of microseconds, element 110 bottoms out the list as the heaviest known element on the planet. Scientists at the Heavy Ion Research Center in Darmstadt, Germany, made the 110-proton element by colliding a lead isotope with nickel atoms. The element, which is yet to be named, has an atomic mass of 269.

  11. Metal release from coffee machines and electric kettles.

    PubMed

    Müller, Frederic D; Hackethal, Christin; Schmidt, Roman; Kappenstein, Oliver; Pfaff, Karla; Luch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The release of elemental ions from 8 coffee machines and 11 electric kettles into food simulants was investigated. Three different types of coffee machines were tested: portafilter espresso machines, pod machines and capsule machines. All machines were tested subsequently on 3 days before and on 3 days after decalcification. Decalcification of the machines was performed with agents according to procedures as specified in the respective manufacturer's manuals. The electric kettles showed only a low release of the elements analysed. For the coffee machines decreasing concentrations of elements were found from the first to the last sample taken in the course of 1 day. Metal release on consecutive days showed a decreasing trend as well. After decalcification a large increase in the amounts of elements released was encountered. In addition, the different machine types investigated clearly differed in their extent of element release. By far the highest leaching, both quantitatively and qualitatively, was found for the portafilter machines. With these products releases of Pb, Ni, Mn, Cr and Zn were in the range and beyond the release limits as proposed by the Council of Europe. Therefore, a careful rinsing routine, especially after decalcification, is recommended for these machines. The comparably lower extent of release of one particular portafilter machine demonstrates that metal release at levels above the threshold that triggers health concerns are technically avoidable. PMID:26436214

  12. BLT-EC (Breach, Leach Transport, and Equilibrium Chemistry), a finite-element model for assessing the release of radionuclides from low-level waste disposal units: Background, theory, and model description

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, R.J.; Sullivan, T.M.; Simonson, S.A.; Suen, C.J.

    1995-08-01

    Performance assessment models typically account for the processes of sorption and dissolution-precipitation by using an empirical distribution coefficient, commonly referred to as K{sub d} that combines the effects of all chemical reactions between solid and aqueous phases. In recent years, however, there has been an increasing awareness that performance assessments based solely on empirically based K{sub d} models may be incomplete, particularly for applications involving radionuclides having sorption and solubility properties that are sensitive to variations in the in-situ chemical environment. To accommodate variations in the in-situ chemical environment, and to assess its impact on radionuclide mobility, it is necessary to model radionuclide release, transport, and chemical processes in a coupled fashion. This modeling has been done and incorporated into the two-dimensional, finite-element, computer code BLT-EC (Breach, Leach, Transport, Equilibrium Chemistry). BLT-EC is capable of predicting container degradation, waste-form leaching, and advective-dispersive, multispecies, solute transport. BLT-EC accounts for retardation directly by modeling the chemical processes of complexation, sorption, dissolution-precipitation, ion-exchange, and oxidation-reduction reactions. In this report we: (1) present a detailed description of the various physical and chemical processes that control the release and migration of radionuclides from shallow land LLW disposal facilities; (2) formulate the mathematical models that represent these processes; (3) outline how these models are incorporated and implemented in BLT-EC; and (4) demonstrate the application of BLT-EC on a set of example problems.

  13. A Jump-from-Cavity Pyrophosphate Ion Release Assisted by a Key Lysine Residue in T7 RNA Polymerase Transcription Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Da, Lin-Tai; E, Chao; Duan, Baogen; Zhang, Chuanbiao; Zhou, Xin; Yu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Pyrophosphate ion (PPi) release during transcription elongation is a signature step in each nucleotide addition cycle. The kinetics and energetics of the process as well as how it proceeds with substantial conformational changes of the polymerase complex determine the mechano-chemical coupling mechanism of the transcription elongation. Here we investigated detailed dynamics of the PPi release process in a single-subunit RNA polymerase (RNAP) from bacteriophage T7, implementing all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We obtained a jump-from-cavity kinetic model of the PPi release utilizing extensive nanosecond MD simulations. We found that the PPi release in T7 RNAP is initiated by the PPi dissociation from two catalytic aspartic acids, followed by a comparatively slow jump-from-cavity activation process. Combining with a number of microsecond long MD simulations, we also found that the activation process is hindered by charged residue associations as well as by local steric and hydrogen bond interactions. On the other hand, the activation is greatly assisted by a highly flexible lysine residue Lys472 that swings its side chain to pull PPi out. The mechanism can apply in general to single subunit RNA and DNA polymerases with similar molecular structures and conserved key residues. Remarkably, the flexible lysine or arginine residue appears to be a universal module that assists the PPi release even in multi-subunit RNAPs with charge facilitated hopping mechanisms. We also noticed that the PPi release is not tightly coupled to opening motions of an O-helix on the fingers domain of T7 RNAP according to the microsecond MD simulations. Our study thus supports the Brownian ratchet scenario of the mechano-chemical coupling in the transcription elongation of the single-subunit polymerase. PMID:26599007

  14. A Jump-from-Cavity Pyrophosphate Ion Release Assisted by a Key Lysine Residue in T7 RNA Polymerase Transcription Elongation.

    PubMed

    Da, Lin-Tai; E, Chao; Duan, Baogen; Zhang, Chuanbiao; Zhou, Xin; Yu, Jin

    2015-11-01

    Pyrophosphate ion (PPi) release during transcription elongation is a signature step in each nucleotide addition cycle. The kinetics and energetics of the process as well as how it proceeds with substantial conformational changes of the polymerase complex determine the mechano-chemical coupling mechanism of the transcription elongation. Here we investigated detailed dynamics of the PPi release process in a single-subunit RNA polymerase (RNAP) from bacteriophage T7, implementing all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We obtained a jump-from-cavity kinetic model of the PPi release utilizing extensive nanosecond MD simulations. We found that the PPi release in T7 RNAP is initiated by the PPi dissociation from two catalytic aspartic acids, followed by a comparatively slow jump-from-cavity activation process. Combining with a number of microsecond long MD simulations, we also found that the activation process is hindered by charged residue associations as well as by local steric and hydrogen bond interactions. On the other hand, the activation is greatly assisted by a highly flexible lysine residue Lys472 that swings its side chain to pull PPi out. The mechanism can apply in general to single subunit RNA and DNA polymerases with similar molecular structures and conserved key residues. Remarkably, the flexible lysine or arginine residue appears to be a universal module that assists the PPi release even in multi-subunit RNAPs with charge facilitated hopping mechanisms. We also noticed that the PPi release is not tightly coupled to opening motions of an O-helix on the fingers domain of T7 RNAP according to the microsecond MD simulations. Our study thus supports the Brownian ratchet scenario of the mechano-chemical coupling in the transcription elongation of the single-subunit polymerase. PMID:26599007

  15. High-resolution high-sensitivity elemental imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry: from traditional 2D and 3D imaging to correlative microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, T.; Philipp, P.; Audinot, J.-N.; Dowsett, D.; Eswara, S.

    2015-10-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) constitutes an extremely sensitive technique for imaging surfaces in 2D and 3D. Apart from its excellent sensitivity and high lateral resolution (50 nm on state-of-the-art SIMS instruments), advantages of SIMS include high dynamic range and the ability to differentiate between isotopes. This paper first reviews the underlying principles of SIMS as well as the performance and applications of 2D and 3D SIMS elemental imaging. The prospects for further improving the capabilities of SIMS imaging are discussed. The lateral resolution in SIMS imaging when using the microprobe mode is limited by (i) the ion probe size, which is dependent on the brightness of the primary ion source, the quality of the optics of the primary ion column and the electric fields in the near sample region used to extract secondary ions; (ii) the sensitivity of the analysis as a reasonable secondary ion signal, which must be detected from very tiny voxel sizes and thus from a very limited number of sputtered atoms; and (iii) the physical dimensions of the collision cascade determining the origin of the sputtered ions with respect to the impact site of the incident primary ion probe. One interesting prospect is the use of SIMS-based correlative microscopy. In this approach SIMS is combined with various high-resolution microscopy techniques, so that elemental/chemical information at the highest sensitivity can be obtained with SIMS, while excellent spatial resolution is provided by overlaying the SIMS images with high-resolution images obtained by these microscopy techniques. Examples of this approach are given by presenting in situ combinations of SIMS with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), helium ion microscopy (HIM) and scanning probe microscopy (SPM).

  16. High-resolution high-sensitivity elemental imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry: from traditional 2D and 3D imaging to correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, T; Philipp, P; Audinot, J-N; Dowsett, D; Eswara, S

    2015-10-30

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) constitutes an extremely sensitive technique for imaging surfaces in 2D and 3D. Apart from its excellent sensitivity and high lateral resolution (50 nm on state-of-the-art SIMS instruments), advantages of SIMS include high dynamic range and the ability to differentiate between isotopes. This paper first reviews the underlying principles of SIMS as well as the performance and applications of 2D and 3D SIMS elemental imaging. The prospects for further improving the capabilities of SIMS imaging are discussed. The lateral resolution in SIMS imaging when using the microprobe mode is limited by (i) the ion probe size, which is dependent on the brightness of the primary ion source, the quality of the optics of the primary ion column and the electric fields in the near sample region used to extract secondary ions; (ii) the sensitivity of the analysis as a reasonable secondary ion signal, which must be detected from very tiny voxel sizes and thus from a very limited number of sputtered atoms; and (iii) the physical dimensions of the collision cascade determining the origin of the sputtered ions with respect to the impact site of the incident primary ion probe. One interesting prospect is the use of SIMS-based correlative microscopy. In this approach SIMS is combined with various high-resolution microscopy techniques, so that elemental/chemical information at the highest sensitivity can be obtained with SIMS, while excellent spatial resolution is provided by overlaying the SIMS images with high-resolution images obtained by these microscopy techniques. Examples of this approach are given by presenting in situ combinations of SIMS with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), helium ion microscopy (HIM) and scanning probe microscopy (SPM). PMID:26436905

  17. Finite element modelling of the common carotid artery in the elderly with physiological intimal thickening using layer-specific stress-released geometries and nonlinear elastic properties.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili Monir, Hamed; Yamada, Hiroshi; Sakata, Noriyuki

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the mechanical effects of tissue responses, such as remodelling, in the arteries of the elderly, it is important to evaluate stress in the intimal layer. In this study, we investigated a novel technique to evaluate the effect of layer-specific characteristics on stress in the arterial wall in an elderly subject. We used finite element analysis of a segment of carotid artery with intimal thickening, incorporating stress-released geometries and the stress-strain relationships for three separate wall layers. We correlated the stress-strain relationships and local curvatures of the layers with the stress on the arterial wall under physiological loading. The simulation results show that both the stress-strain relationship and the local curvature of the innermost stress-released layer influence the circumferential stress and its radial gradient. This indicates that intimal stress is influenced significantly by location-dependent intimal remodelling. However, further investigation is needed before conclusive inferences can be drawn. PMID:26710676

  18. The pH-dependent release of platinum group elements (PGEs) from gasoline and diesel fuel catalysts: Implication for weathering in soils.

    PubMed

    Suchá, Veronika; Mihaljevič, Martin; Ettler, Vojtěch; Strnad, Ladislav

    2016-04-15

    Powdered samples of new and old gasoline catalysts (Pt, Pd, Rh) and new and old diesel (Pt) catalysts were subjected to a pH-static leaching procedure (pH 2-9) coupled with thermodynamic modeling using PHREEQC-3 to verify the release and mobility of PGEs (platinum group elements). PGEs were released under acidic conditions, mostly exhibiting L-shaped leaching patterns: diesel old: 5.47, 0.005, 0.02; diesel new: 68.5, 0.23, 0.11; gasoline old: 0.1, 11.8, 4.79; gasoline new 2.6, 25.2, 35.9 in mg kg(-1) for Pt, Pd and Rh, respectively. Only the new diesel catalyst had a strikingly different leaching pattern with elevated concentrations at pH 4, probably influenced by the dissolution of the catalyst carrier and washcoat. The pH-static experiment coupled with thermodynamic modeling was found to be an effective instrument for understanding the leaching behavior of PGEs under various environmental conditions, and indicated that charged Pt and Rh species may be adsorbed on the negatively charged surface of kaolinite or Mn oxides in the soil system, whereas uncharged Pd and Rh species may remain mobile in soil solutions. PMID:26874614

  19. Assessment by self-organizing maps of element release from sediments in contact with acidified seawater in laboratory leaching test conditions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, I; Martín-Torre, M C; Galán, B; Viguri, J R

    2015-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is gaining interest as a significant global option to reduce emissions of CO2. CCS development requires an assessment of the potential risks associated with CO2 leakages from storage sites. Laboratory leaching tests have proved to be a useful tool to study the potential mobilization of metals from contaminated sediment in a decreased-pH environment that mimics such a leakage event. This work employs a self-organizing map (SOM) tool to interpret and analyze the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn from equilibrium, column, and pH-dependent leaching tests. In these tests, acidified seawater is used for simulating different CO2 leakage scenarios. Classification was carried out detailing the mobilization of contaminants for environments of varying pH, liquid-to-solid ratio, and type of contact of the laboratory leaching tests. Component planes in the SOMs allow visualization of the results and the determination of the worst case of element release. The pH-dependent leaching test with initial addition of either base or acid was found to mobilize the highest concentrations of metals. PMID:26563235

  20. Dual drug load and release behavior on ion-exchange fiber: influencing factors and prediction method for precise control of the loading amount.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Gao, Yanan; Liu, Tiaotiao; Wang, Xinyu; Liu, Hongzhuo; Li, Sanming

    2015-01-01

    Ion-exchange fiber undergoes a stoichiometric exchange reaction and has large exchange capability, which makes it a promising candidate as a multiple drug carrier. Because combinatorial effects can act synergistically, additively or antagonistically depending on the ratio of the agents being combined, the objective of this study was to learn the dual drug loading of ion-exchange fiber and develop a mathematical method for precisely control of the loading amount. Atenolol and Gatifloxacin, with different loading behaviors into strong cationic ion-exchange fiber ZB-1, were used to build a representative of dual loading. Not suitable pH value of drug solutions could make simultaneous loading fail, while the change of drug solution volume hardly affected the equilibrium. Ion-exchange groups occupied by the drug which owned lower affinity to fiber could be grabbed by the higher affinity drug, indicating the existence of competition between drugs. Thermodynamic model was introduced to guide the loading prediction and a favorable relevance had been shown between determined and predicted data. The release behaviors of each drug from dual drug-fiber complex were similar to those from single drug-fiber complexes. PMID:24841046

  1. Redox-inactive metal ions modulate the reactivity and oxygen release of mononuclear non-haem iron(III)–peroxo complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Suhee; Lee, Yong -Min; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung -Bin; Nishida, Yusuke; Seo, Mi Sook; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-09-14

    Redox-inactive metal ions that function as Lewis acids play pivotal roles in modulating the reactivity of oxygen-containing metal complexes and metalloenzymes, such as the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II and its small-molecule mimics. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of non-haem iron(III)–peroxo complexes that bind redox-inactive metal ions, (TMC)FeIII–(μ,η22-O2)–Mn+ (Mn+ = Sr2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Lu3+, Y3+ and Sc3+; TMC, 1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane). We demonstrate that the Ca2+ and Sr2+ complexes showed similar electrochemical properties and reactivities in one-electron oxidation or reduction reactions. However, the properties and reactivities of complexes formed with stronger Lewis acidities were found to be markedly different. In conclusion, complexes that contain Ca2+ or Sr2+ ions were oxidized by an electron acceptor to release O2, whereas the release of O2 did not occur for complexes that bind stronger Lewis acids. Furthermore, we discuss these results in the light of the functional role of the Ca2+ ion in the oxidation of water to dioxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex.

  2. Characterization of trace elements and ions in PM 10 and PM 2.5 emitted from animal confinement buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xufei; Wang, Xinlei; Zhang, Yuanhui; Lee, Jongmin; Su, Jingwei; Gates, Richard S.

    2011-12-01

    Chemical characterization of PM emanating from animal confinement buildings can provide essential information for receptor modeling-based PM source apportionment as well as health effects assessment. In this study, PM 10 and PM 2.5 samples were collected from twelve swine (farrowing, gestation, weaning, and finishing) and six poultry (layer hen and tom turkey) confinement buildings in the U.S. Midwest and their inorganic composition, in terms of trace elements and ions, was investigated. A total of 23 species were identified and quantified, including Al, B, Ba, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, S, Si, Sr, Ti, Zn, Cl -, NO 3-, SO 42- and NH 4+. The total mass fraction of identified species was typically less than 16%. NH 4+ was detected in low contents (<1% wt.) in collected PM samples, suggesting that the majority of NH 3-N emissions were in gas form and the formation of NH 4+-containing secondary aerosols is insignificant in animal confinement buildings. Several multivariate analysis tools prevalent in ecology research were implemented for examining variability in PM inorganic compositions. Results showed that PM inorganic composition varied significantly with animal building type. Seasons had no significant effect on PM 10 and a significant but weak effect on PM 2.5 inorganic compositions. Compared to PM 10 samples, PM 2.5 samples from different types of animal confinement buildings were more similar in inorganic composition.

  3. Separation of berkelium (IV) from trivalent transplutonium elements on ion-exchangers in solutions of phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.; Tikhomirova, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    The dependences of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf and Es behavior on anion- and cation-exchangers in solutions of 0.1-8.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ on acid concentration and oxidant content in solution (KBrO/sub 3/) or in resin (PbO/sub 2/) have been studied. Significant differences in distribution coefficients of Bk and other transplutonium elements (TPE) have been found that can be explained by Bk oxidation to the tetravalent state. A simple and effective method of Bk (IV) separation from trivalent TPE has been developed. The method was applied to the isolation of isotopes Bk-249 and Bk-250; the purification factor of Bk (IV) from other TPE is 10/sup 4/-10/sub 6/ per cycle. The possibility of Bk separation from bromate and phosphate ions by its sorption on a cation-exchanger from diluted H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ solutions with subsequent desorption by the mineral acid has been shown. 20 references, 8 figures.

  4. Selective extraction and release using (EDTA-Ni)-layered double hydroxide coupled with catalytic oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine for sensitive detection of copper ion.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sheng; Chang, Yuepeng; Chia, Guo Hui; Lee, Hian Kee

    2015-07-23

    Copper is an important heavy metal in various biological processes. Many methods have been developed for detecting of copper ions (Cu(2+)) in aqueous samples. However, an easy, cheap, selective and sensitive method is still desired. In this study, a selective extraction-release-catalysis approach has been developed for sensitive detection of copper ion. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) chelated with nickel ion (Ni(2+)) were intercalated in a layered double hydroxide via a co-precipitation reaction. The product was subsequently applied as sorbent in dispersive solid-phase extraction for the enrichment of Cu(2+) at pH 6. Since Cu(2+) has a stronger complex formation constant with EDTA, Ni(2+) exchanged with Cu(2+) selectively. The resulting sorbent containing Cu(2+) was transferred to catalyze the 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine oxidation reaction, since Cu(2+) could be released by the sorbent effectively and has high catalytic ability for the reaction. Blue light emitted from the oxidation product was measured by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry for the determination of Cu(2+). The extraction temperature, extraction time, and catalysis time were optimized. The results showed that this method provided a low limit of detection of 10nM, a wide linear range (0.05-100μM) and good linearity (r(2)=0.9977). The optimized conditions were applied to environmental water samples. Using Cu(2+) as an example, this work provided a new and interesting approach for the convenient and efficient detection of metal cations in aqueous samples. PMID:26231895

  5. Electrical-thermal-structural finite element simulation and experimental study of a plasma ion source for the production of radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzolaro, M.; Meneghetti, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Vivian, G.

    2016-03-01

    The production target and the ion source constitute the core of the selective production of exotic species (SPES) facility. In this complex experimental apparatus for the production of radioactive ion beams, a 40 MeV, 200 μA proton beam directly impinges a uranium carbide target, generating approximately 1013 fissions per second. The transfer line enables the unstable isotopes generated by the 238U fissions in the target to reach the ion source, where they can be ionized and finally accelerated to the subsequent areas of the facility. In this work, the plasma ion source currently adopted for the SPES facility is analyzed in detail by means of electrical, thermal, and structural numerical models. Next, theoretical results are compared with the electric potential difference, temperature, and displacement measurements. Experimental tests with stable ion beams are also presented and discussed.

  6. Electrical-thermal-structural finite element simulation and experimental study of a plasma ion source for the production of radioactive ion beams.

    PubMed

    Manzolaro, M; Meneghetti, G; Andrighetto, A; Vivian, G

    2016-03-01

    The production target and the ion source constitute the core of the selective production of exotic species (SPES) facility. In this complex experimental apparatus for the production of radioactive ion beams, a 40 MeV, 200 μA proton beam directly impinges a uranium carbide target, generating approximately 10(13) fissions per second. The transfer line enables the unstable isotopes generated by the (238)U fissions in the target to reach the ion source, where they can be ionized and finally accelerated to the subsequent areas of the facility. In this work, the plasma ion source currently adopted for the SPES facility is analyzed in detail by means of electrical, thermal, and structural numerical models. Next, theoretical results are compared with the electric potential difference, temperature, and displacement measurements. Experimental tests with stable ion beams are also presented and discussed. PMID:27036768

  7. Kinetic-energy release in N{sub 2} fragmentation by charge-changing collisions of 2-MeV C{sup +} ions

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Yamada, T.; Tsuchida, H.; Itoh, A.; Nakai, Y.

    2010-11-15

    Collision-induced fragmentation of N{sub 2} was investigated for 2-MeV C{sup +} ions under charge-changing conditions of C{sup +{yields}}C{sup q+} (q=0,2,3). Coincidence measurement of fragment ions was performed by means of a momentum three-dimensional imaging technique at scattering angles of {theta}=0 and 1.0 mrad. Kinetic-energy release (KER) obtained for a fragmentation channel of N{sub 2}{sup 2+{yields}}N{sup +}+N{sup +} was found to differ significantly in electron loss and capture collisions. In two-electron-loss collisions (C{sup +{yields}}C{sup 3+}), KER spectra were essentially identical for {theta}=0 and 1.0 mrad. It is concluded that the energy level of dissociating excited states of N{sub 2}{sup 2+} may be saturated when the interaction strength, defined as (q/vb), exceeds 0.65, where q and v are the charge and the velocity, respectively, of an incident ion, and b is the impact parameter.

  8. Quantitation of fluoride ion released sarin in red blood cell samples by gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry using isotope dilution and large-volume injection.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, E M; McGuire, J M; Evans, R A; Edwards, J L; Hulet, S W; Benton, B J; Forster, J S; Burnett, D C; Muse, W T; Matson, K; Crouse, C L; Mioduszewski, R J; Thomson, S A

    2004-01-01

    A new method for measuring fluoride ion released isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (sarin, GB) in the red blood cell fraction was developed that utilizes an autoinjector, a large-volume injector port (LVI), positive ion ammonia chemical ionization detection in the SIM mode, and a deuterated stable isotope internal standard. This method was applied to red blood cell (RBC) and plasma ethyl acetate extracts from spiked human and animal whole blood samples and from whole blood of minipigs, guinea pigs, and rats exposed by whole-body sarin inhalation. Evidence of nerve agent exposure was detected in plasma and red blood cells at low levels of exposure. The linear method range of quantitation was 10-1000 pg on-column with a detection limit of approximately 2-pg on-column. In the course of method development, several conditions were optimized for the LVI, including type of injector insert, injection volume, initial temperature, pressure, and flow rate. RBC fractions had advantages over the plasma with respect to assessing nerve agent exposure using the fluoride ion method especially in samples with low serum butyrylcholinesterase activity. PMID:15239856

  9. A new method for the determination of the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose based on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Alinat, Elodie; Delaunay, Nathalie; Archer, Xavier; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Gareil, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    A new method was proposed to determine the nitrogen content of nitrocelluloses (NCs). It is based on the finding of a linear relationship between the nitrogen content and the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis. Capillary electrophoresis was used to monitor the concentration of nitrite and nitrate ions. The influences of hydrolysis time and molar mass of NC on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions were investigated, and new insights into the understanding of the alkaline denitration mechanism of NCs, underlying this analytical strategy is provided. The method was then tested successfully with various explosive and non-explosive NC-containing samples such as various daily products and smokeless gunpowders. Inherently to its principle exploiting a concentration ratio, this method shows very good repeatability in the determination of nitrogen content in real samples with relative standard deviation (n = 3) inferior to 1.5%, and also provides very significant advantages with respect to sample extraction, analysis time (1h for alkaline hydrolysis, 3 min for electrophoretic separation), which was about 5 times shorter than for the classical Devarda's method, currently used in industry, and safety conditions (no need for preliminary drying NC samples, mild hydrolysis conditions with 1M sodium hydroxide for 1h at 60 °C). PMID:25562808

  10. Ion microprobe studies of trace elements in Apollo 14 volcanic glass beads - Comparisons to Apollo 14 mare basalts and petrogenesis of picritic magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Simon, S. B.; Shimizu, N.; Yurimoto, H.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from trace element analysis, by ion microprobe techniques, of individual glass beads representing seven compositionally distinct types of picritic glass beads from the Apollo 14 landing site. The picritic glass beads at the A-14 exhibited a wide range of primary magma compositions and a lack of petrogenetic linkage (via crystal fractionation) to crystalline basalts. The wide range of major and trace element characteristics of the picritic glass beads is consistent with derivation from mineralogically distinct sources which consist of varying proportions of olivine + orthopyroxene +/- clonopyroxene +/- ilmenite +/- plagioclase +/- KREEP component.

  11. Determination of inorganic ions and trace elements in total suspended particles at three urban zones in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area and one rural site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, R.; Belmont, R.; Padilla, H.; Torres, Ma. del C.; Baez, A. P.

    2009-10-01

    Inorganic ions and trace metals in total suspended particles were measured during the period 2006-2007 at four sites; three urban sites in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and one nearby rural site in the state of Morelos. SO 42-, NO 3-, Cl - and NH 4+ ions were analyzed by ion chromatography; Na +, K +, Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy, and Al, Cd, Cr, Mn, Pb and V by an atomic absorption spectrometer with a graphite furnace attachment. The results indicated that SO 42- was the most abundant ion. All trace elements except Mn and V showed statistically significant differences between sampling sites. Pearson's correlation applied to all data showed a high correlation among SO 42-, NO 3- and NH 4+, indicating a common anthropogenic origin. In addition, the correlation observed between Ca 2+ and Al indicated a crustal origin, as supported by the enrichment factors. Over the total sampling period, significant differences in particles and trace metals were found between sites and meteorological seasons. To gain a better insight into the origin of trace metals and major inorganic ions, a Principal Component Analysis was applied to the results for six trace metal and eight inorganic ions.

  12. Isolation and separation of transplutonium elements from other actinides on ion exchange resins from aqueous and aqueous ethanol solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-11-01

    The behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, and other actinides, as well as Zr, on an anion exchange resin and a cation exchange resin in aqueous and aqueous alcohol solutions of sulfuric acid was investigated as a function of the concentration of various components of the solution. It was found that the presence of alcohol in sulfuric acid solutions leads to an increase in the distribution coefficients both on cation exchange resins and on anion exchange resins. The possibility of using ion exchange resins for the concentration and separation of transplutonium elements from U, Np, Pu, Zr, and other elements that form strong complexes with sulfate ions in a wide range of sulfuric acid concentrations was demonstrated.

  13. Coumarin-modified microporous-mesoporous Zn-MOF-74 showing ultra-high uptake capacity and photo-switched storage/release of U(VI) ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Wang, Lin Lin; Gong, Le Le; Feng, Xue Feng; Luo, Ming Biao; Luo, Feng

    2016-07-01

    Driven by an energy crisis but consequently puzzled by various environmental problems, uranium, as the basic material of nuclear energy, is now receiving extensive attentions. In contrast to numerous sorbents applied in this field, metal-organic framework (MOFs), as a renovated material platform, has only recently been developed. How to improve the adsorption capacity of MOF materials towards U(VI) ions, as well as taking advantage of the nature of these MOFs to design photo-switched behaviour for photo-triggered storage/release of U(VI) ions are at present urgent problems and great challenges to be solved. Herein, we show a simple and facile method to target the goal. Through coordination-based post-synthetic strategy, microporous- mesoporous Zn-MOF-74 was easily functionalized by grafting coumarin on coordinatively unsaturated Zn(II) centers, yielding a series of coumarin-modified Zn-MOF-74 materials. The obtained samples displayed ultra-high adsorption capacity for U(VI) ions from water at pH value of 4 with maximum adsorption capacities as high as 360mg/g (the record value in MOFs) and a remarkable photo-switched capability of 50mg/g at pH value of 4. To the best of knowledge, and in contrast to the well-known photo-switched behaviour towards CO2, dye (propidium iodide), as well as fluorescence observed in MOFs, this is the first study that shows a photo-switched behaviour towards radioactive U(VI) ions in aqueous solution. PMID:26954473

  14. Reactive transport modeling to quantify trace element release into fresh groundwater in case of CO2 leak from deep geological storage.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lions, J.; Jakymiw, C.; Devau, N.; Barsotti, V.; Humez, P.

    2014-12-01

    Geological storage of CO2 in deep saline aquifers is one of the options considered for the mitigation of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. A deep geological CO2 storage is not expected to leak but potential impacts on groundwater have to be studied. A better understanding on how it could affect groundwater quality, aquifer minerals and trace elements is necessary to characterize a future storage site. Moreover, monitoring and remediation solutions have to be evaluated before storage operations. As part of the ANR project CIPRES, we present here reactive transport works. In a 3D model using ToughReact v.2, we perform different CO2 leakage scenarios in a confined aquifer, considering CO2 gas leakage. The model is based on the Albian aquifer, a strategic water resource. It takes into account groundwater and rock chemistry of the Albian green sand layer (Quartz, Glauconite, Kaolinite) at 700 m deep. The geochemical model was elaborated from experimental data. The aquifer consists in a mesh, divided roughly in 20000 cells making a 60 m thick and a 500 m large layer. Furthermore, cells are subdivided near the leakage point to consider local phenomena (secondary precipitation, sorption/desorption...). The chemical model takes into account kinetics for mineral dissolution, ion exchange and surface complexation. We highlight the importance of sorption processes on trace element transport (As, Zn and Ni) in fresh groundwater. Moreover, we distinguish different geochemical behavior (CO2 plume shape, secondary precipitation, desorption...) according to different horizontal flow rates influenced by the hydrodynamics (regional gradient). Understanding how geochemical processes and regional flows influence water chemistry, allows to ascertain measurement monitoring and verification plan and remediation works in case of leak considering a given location.

  15. Thermal-electric coupled-field finite element modeling and experimental testing of high-temperature ion sources for the production of radioactive ion beams.

    PubMed

    Manzolaro, M; Meneghetti, G; Andrighetto, A; Vivian, G; D'Agostini, F

    2016-02-01

    In isotope separation on line facilities the target system and the related ion source are two of the most critical components. In the context of the selective production of exotic species (SPES) project, a 40 MeV 200 μA proton beam directly impinges a uranium carbide target, generating approximately 10(13) fissions per second. The radioactive isotopes produced in this way are then directed to the ion source, where they can be ionized and finally accelerated to the subsequent areas of the facility. In this work both the surface ion source and the plasma ion source adopted for the SPES facility are presented and studied by means of numerical thermal-electric models. Then, numerical results are compared with temperature and electric potential difference measurements, and finally the main advantages of the proposed simulation approach are discussed. PMID:26932055

  16. Thermal-electric coupled-field finite element modeling and experimental testing of high-temperature ion sources for the production of radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzolaro, M.; Meneghetti, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Vivian, G.; D'Agostini, F.

    2016-02-01

    In isotope separation on line facilities the target system and the related ion source are two of the most critical components. In the context of the selective production of exotic species (SPES) project, a 40 MeV 200 μA proton beam directly impinges a uranium carbide target, generating approximately 1013 fissions per second. The radioactive isotopes produced in this way are then directed to the ion source, where they can be ionized and finally accelerated to the subsequent areas of the facility. In this work both the surface ion source and the plasma ion source adopted for the SPES facility are presented and studied by means of numerical thermal-electric models. Then, numerical results are compared with temperature and electric potential difference measurements, and finally the main advantages of the proposed simulation approach are discussed.

  17. Trace element incorporation into quartz: A combined study by ICP-MS, electron spin resonance, cathodoluminescence, capillary ion analysis, and gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götze, Jens; Plötze, Michael; Graupner, Torsten; Hallbauer, Dieter Klaus; Bray, Colin J.

    2004-09-01

    Pegmatite quartz from different occurrences in Norway and Namibia was investigated by a combination of ICP-MS, Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), Capillary Ion Analysis (CIA) and Gas Chromatography (GC) to quantify trace elements in very low concentrations and to determine their position in the quartz structure. The studied quartz samples show similar geochemical characteristics with low contents of most trace elements. Remarkable are the elevated concentrations of Al (36-636 ppm), Ti (1.6-25.2 ppm), Ge (1.0-7.1 ppm), Na (5.2 to >50 ppm), K (1.6 to >100 ppm) and Li (2.1-165.6 ppm). These elements are preferentially incorporated into the quartz lattice on substitutional (Al, Ti, Ge) and interstitial (Li, Na, K) positions. Li + was found to be the main charge compensating ion for Al, Ge and Ti, whereas some ppm of Na and K may also be hosted by fluid inclusions. Ti may be incorporated as substitutional ion for Si or bound on mineral microinclusions (rutile). The results of the ESR measurements show that there may be a redistribution of alkali ions during irradiation. The diamagnetic [AlO 4/M +] 0 center transforms into the paramagnetic [AlO 4] 0 center, whilst the compensating ions diffuse away and may be captured by the diamagnetic precursor centers of [GeO 4] 0 and [TiO 4] 0 to form paramagnetic centers ([TiO 4/Li +] 0, [GeO 4/Li +] 0). In general, fluid inclusions in pegmatite quartz can be classified as H 2O-CO 2-NaCl type inclusions with water as the predominant volatile. Among the main elements hosted by fluid inclusions in quartz are Na, K, NH 4, Ca, Mg and the anionic complexes Cl -, NO 3-, HCO 3- and SO 42-. Gas analysis of trapped fluids shows volatile components in the following order of abundance: H 2O > CO 2 > N 2(+) ≥ CH 4 > COS > C 2 and C 3 hydrocarbons. Additionally, traces of Co, Ni, Zn, Pb, and Cu were detected by CIA in fluid inclusions of some samples. There are indications that the REE and Rb are also bound in fluid inclusions, however, the

  18. Principal Locations of Major-Ion, Trace-Element, Nitrate, and Escherichia coli Loading to Emigration Creek, Salt Lake County, Utah, October 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimball, Briant A.; Runkel, Robert L.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Housing development and recreational activity in Emigration Canyon have increased substantially since 1980, perhaps causing an observed decrease in water quality of this northern Utah stream located near Salt Lake City. To identify reaches of the stream that contribute to water-quality degradation, a tracer-injection and synoptic-sampling study was done to quantify mass loading of major ions, trace elements, nitrate, and Escherichia coli (E. coli) to the stream. The resulting mass-loading profiles for major ions and trace elements indicate both geologic and anthropogenic inputs to the stream, principally from tributary and spring inflows to the stream at Brigham Fork, Burr Fork, Wagner Spring, Emigration Tunnel Spring, Blacksmith Hollow, and Killyon Canyon. The pattern of nitrate loading does not correspond to the major-ion and trace-element loading patterns. Nitrate levels in the stream did not exceed water-quality standards at the time of synoptic sampling. The majority of nitrate mass loading can be considered related to anthropogenic input, based on the field settings and trends in stable isotope ratios of nitrogen. The pattern of E. coli loading does not correspond to the major-ion, trace-element, or nitrate loading patterns. The majority of E. coli loading was related to anthropogenic sources based on field setting, but a considerable part of the loading also comes from possible animal sources in Killyon Canyon, in Perkins Flat, and in Rotary Park. In this late summer sampling, E. coli concentrations only exceeded water-quality standards in limited sections of the study reach. The mass-loading approach used in this study provides a means to design future studies and to evaluate the loading on a catchment scale.

  19. Rare earth element measurements and mapping of minerals in the Allende CAI, 7R19-1, by NanoSIMS ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Motoo; Messenger, Scott

    2016-04-01

    We have established analytical procedures for quantitative rare earth element (REE) measurements by NanoSIMS 50L ion microprobe with 2-10 μm spatial resolution. Measurements are performed by multidetection using energy filtering under several static magnetic field settings. Relative sensitivity factors and REE oxide/REE element secondary ion ratios that we determined for the NanoSIMS match values previously determined for other ion microprobes. REE measurements of 100 ppm REE glass standards yielded reproducibility and accuracy of 0.5-2.5% and 5-15%, respectively. REE measurements of minerals of an Allende type-A CAI, 7R19-1, were performed using three different methods: spot analysis, line profile, and imaging. These data are in excellent agreement with previous REE measurements of this inclusion by IMS-3f ion microprobe. The higher spatial resolution NanoSIMS measurements provide additional insight into the formation process of this CAI and offer a promising new tool for analysis of fine-grained and complexly zoned materials.

  20. Re-evaluation of interferences of doubly charged ions of heavy rare earth elements on Sr isotopic analysis using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue-Heng; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Xie, Lie-Wen; Chu, Zhu-Yin; Yang, Jin-Hui

    2014-07-01

    We re-evaluate the interference of doubly charged heavy rare earth elements during Sr isotopic analysis using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). A series of mixed solutions of standard reference material SRM 987, rare earth elements, and Sr separated from rock reference materials are measured to assess the influence of isobaric interferences on the MC-ICP-MS analysis of Sr isotopes. After sample dissolution, conventional cation-exchange chromatography is employed for Sr purification of rock reference materials prior to MC-ICP-MS measurement. It has been demonstrated that if the natural abundances of Er and Yb are used to correct for doubly charged ion interferences on Sr, an overcorrection results. In contrast, the use of measured doubly charged ion ratios results in an accurate and precise correction of isobaric interference. This finding is confirmed by analytical results for several certified reference materials from mafic (basaltic) to felsic (granitic) silicate rocks. It is noteworthy that, because Er is more prone to doubly charged ion formation, it dominates over Yb doubly charged ions as an interference source.

  1. Multireference - Møller-Plesset Perturbation Theory Results on Levels and Transition Rates in Al-like Ions of Iron Group Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Santana, J A; Ishikawa, Y; Tr�abert, E

    2009-02-26

    Ground configuration and low-lying levels of Al-like ions contribute to a variety of laboratory and solar spectra, but the available information in databases are neither complete not necessarily correct. We have performed multireference Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory calculations that approach spectroscopic accuracy in order to check the information that databases hold on the 40 lowest levels of Al-Like ions of iron group elements (K through Ge), and to provide input for the interpretation of concurrent experiments. Our results indicate problems of the database holdings on the levels of the lowest quartet levels in the lighter elements of the range studied. The results of our calculations of the decay rates of five long-lived levels (3s{sup 2}3p {sup 2}p{sup o}{sub 3/2}, 3s3p{sup 2} {sup 4}P{sup o} J and 3s3p3d {sup 4}F{sup o}{sub 9/2}) are compared with lifetime data from beam-foil, electron beam ion trap and heavy-ion storage ring experiments.

  2. Ion-exchange complex of famotidine: sustained release and taste masking approach of stable liquid dosage form.

    PubMed

    Aman, Reham Mokhtar; Meshali, Mahasen Mohamed; Abdelghani, Galal Mahmoud

    2014-12-01

    A stable controlled release resinate-complex for the highly bitter taste famotidine (FAM) was developed to allow once-daily administration and improve patient compliance especially in pediatric and geriatric medicine. The drug-resinate complexes were prepared in different drug to resin (Amberlite IRP-69) ratios by weight (1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:4, 1:5 and 1:6). The optimized drug-resinate complex resulted from 1:6 drug to resin ratio experienced maximum drug loading and sustained release property. Hence, it was subjected to physicochemical characterizations by differential scanning colorimetry (DSC), x-ray diffractometry (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The optimized complex was further dispensed in the prepared syrup and the suspension was subjected to accelerated stability study, as mentioned in the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines. Furthermore, the gustatory properties of the complex were evaluated on humans. The syrup complied successfully with ICH guidelines and sufficiently alleviated the bitterness of famotidine. PMID:25639307

  3. Mineralogical and geochemical controls on the release of trace elements from slag produced by base- and precious-metal smelting at abandoned mine sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatak, N.M.; Seal, R.R., II; Hammarstrom, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Slag collected from smelter sites associated with historic base-metal mines contains elevated concentrations of trace elements such as Cu, Zn and Pb. Weathering of slag piles, many of which were deposited along stream banks, potentially may release these trace elements into the environment. Slags were sampled from the Ely and Elizabeth mines in the Vermont copper belt, from the copper Basin mining district at Ducktown, Tennessee and from the Clayton silver mine in the Bayhorse mining district, Idaho, in the USA. Primary phases in the slags include: olivine-group minerals, glass, spinels, sulfide minerals and native metals for Vermont samples; glass, sulfide minerals and native metals for the Ducktown sample; and olivine-group minerals, clinopyroxenes, spinels, sulfide minerals, native metals and other unidentified metallic compounds for Clayton slag. Olivine-group minerals and pyroxenes are dominantly fayalitic and hedenbergitic in composition, respectively and contain up to 1.25 wt.% ZnO. Spinel minerals range between magnetite and hercynite in composition and contain Zn (up to 2.07 wt.% ZnO), Ti (up to 4.25 wt.% TiO2) and Cr (up to 1.39 wt.% Cr2O3). Cobalt, Ni, Cu, As, Ag, Sb and Pb occur in the glass phase, sulfides, metallic phases and unidentified metallic compounds. Bulk slag trace-element chemistry shows that the metals of the Vermont and Tennessee slags are dominated by Cu (1900-13,500 mg/kg) and Zn (2310-10,200 mg/kg), whereas the Clayton slag is dominated by Pb (63,000 mg/kg), Zn (19,700 mg/kg), Cu (7550 mg/kg), As (555 mg/kg), Sn (363 mg/kg) and Ag (200 mg/kg). Laboratory-based leach tests indicate metals can be released under simulated natural conditions. Leachates from most slags were found to contain elevated concentrations of Cu and Zn (up to 1800 and 470 ??g/l, respectively), well in excess of the acute toxicity guidelines for aquatic life. For the Idaho slag, the concentration of Pb in the leachate (11,000 ??g/l) is also in excess of the acute

  4. Major ions, nutrients, and trace elements in the Mississippi River near Thebes, Illinois, July through September 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Howard E.; Antweiler, Ronald C.; Brinton, Terry I.; Roth, David A.; Moody, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Extensive flooding in the upper Mississippi River Basin during summer 1993 had a significant effect on the water quality of the Mississippi River. To evaluate the change in temporal distribution and transport of dissolved constituents in the Mississippi River, six water samples were collected by a discharge-weighted method from July through September 1993 near Thebes, Illinois. Sampling at this location provided water-quality information from the upper Mississippi, the Missouri, and the Illinois River Basins. Dissolved major constituents that were analyzed in each of the samples included bicarbonate, calcium (Ca), carbonate (CO3), chloride (C1), dissolved organic carbon, magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), silica (SiO2) , sodium (Na), and sulfate (SO4). Dissolved nutrients included ammonium ion (NH4), nitrate (NO3), nitrite (NO2), and orthophosphate (PO4). Dissolved trace elements included aluminum (A1), arsenic (As), barium (Ba), boron (B), beryllium (Be), bromide (Br), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), cobalt, (Co), copper (Cu), fluoride (F), iron (Fe), lead, lithium (Li), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), strontium (Sr), thallium, uranium (U), vanadium (V), and zinc (Zn). Other physical properties of water that were measured included specific conductance, pH and suspended-sediment concentration (particle size, less than 63 micrometers). Results of this study indicated that large quantifies of dissolved constituents were transported through the river system. Generally, pH, alkalinity, and specific conductance and the concentrations of B, Br, Ca, C1, Cr, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Na, SO4, Sr, U, and V increased as water discharge decreased, while concentrations of F, Hg, and suspended sediment sharply decreased as water discharge decreased after the crest of the flood. Concentrations of other constituents, such as A1, As, Ba, Be, Co, Cu, Ni, NO3, NO2, NH4, PO 4, and SiO2, varied with time as discharge decreased after the crest of the flood. For most

  5. Differentiation of Spores of Bacillus Subtilis Grown in Different Media by Elemental Characterization using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cliff, John B.; Jarman, Kristin H.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Golledge, Stephen; Gaspar, Dan J.; Wunschel, David S.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2005-11-01

    We demonstrate the use of time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to infer the medium in which Bacillus subtilis spores were grown based on elemental signatures of the spores. Triplicate culture replicates grown in each of four different media were analyzed to obtain ToF-SIMS signatures comprised of 16 elemental intensities. The signatures were analyzed using ANOVA and principal components analysis (PCA). Confusion matrices constructed using nearest neighbor classification of the PCA scores confirmed the predictive utility of ToF-SIMS elemental signatures in identifying sporulation media. Application of this method will be of use in microbial forensics, and may also prove useful in the areas of food microbiology and astrobiology.

  6. An ion microprobe study of the intra-crystalline behavior of REE and selected trace elements in pyroxene from mare basalts with different cooling and crystallization histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Simon, S. B.; Shimizu, N.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of crystallization interaction on the trace element zoning characteristics of pyroxenes are analyzed using electron and ion microprobe techniques. Four pigeonite basalts with similar isochemical composition, but different cooling rates and crystallization histories are studied. Pyroxene quadrilaterals displaying crystallization trends are presented. The crystal chemical rationalization of REE zoning, pattern shapes, and abundances are examined. The data reveal that the trace element zoning characteristics in pyroxene and the partitioning of trace elements between pyroxene and the melt are related to the interaction between the efficiency of the crystallization process, the kinetics at the crystal-melt interface, the kinetics of plagioclase nucleation and the characteristics of the crystal chemical substitutions in the pyroxene and the associated crystallizing phase.

  7. Separation and preconcentration of the rare-earth elements and yttrium from geological materials by ion-exchange and sequential acid elution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Lichte, F.E.; Riddle, G.O.; Beech, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    The abundance of rare-earth elements (REE) and yttrium in geological materials is generally low, and most samples contain elements that interfere in the determination of the REE and Y, so a separation and/or preconcentration step is often necessary. This is often achieved by ion-exchange chromatography with either nitric or hydrochloric acid. It is advantageous, however, to use both acids sequentially. The final solution thus obtained contains only the REE and Y, with minor amounts of Al, Ba, Ca, Sc, Sr and Ti. Elements that potentially interfere, such as Be, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Th, U, V and Zr, are virtually eliminated. Inductively-coupled argon plasma atomic-emission spectroscopy can then be used for a final precise and accurate measurement. The method can also be used with other instrumental methods of analysis. ?? 1986.

  8. Simultaneous depth-profiling of electrical and elemental properties of ion-implanted arsenic in silicon by combining secondary-ion mass spectrometry with resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, N. S.; Wong, C. S.; McNally, P. J.

    2016-07-01

    A method is proposed to extract the electrical data for surface doping profiles of semiconductors in unison with the chemical profile acquired by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)—a method we call SIMSAR (secondary-ion mass spectrometry and resistivity). The SIMSAR approach utilizes the inherent sputtering process of SIMS, combined with sequential four-point van der Pauw resistivity measurements, to surmise the active doping profile as a function of depth. The technique is demonstrated for the case of ion-implanted arsenic doping profiles in silicon. Complications of the method are identified, explained, and corrections for these are given. While several techniques already exist for chemical dopant profiling and numerous for electrical profiling, since there is no technique which can measure both electrical and chemical profiles in parallel, SIMSAR has significant promise as an extension of the conventional dynamic SIMS technique, particularly for applications in the semiconductor industry.

  9. Aminated polyethersulfone-silver nanoparticles (AgNPs-APES) composite membranes with controlled silver ion release for antibacterial and water treatment applications.

    PubMed

    Haider, M Salman; Shao, Godlisten N; Imran, S M; Park, Sung Soo; Abbas, Nadir; Tahir, M Suleman; Hussain, Manwar; Bae, Wookeun; Kim, Hee Taik

    2016-05-01

    The present study reports the antibacterial disinfection properties of a series of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) immobilized membranes. Initially, polyethersulfone (PES) was functionalized through the introduction of amino groups to form aminated polyethersulfone (NH2-PES, APES). AgNPs were then coordinately immobilized on the surface of the APES composite membrane to form AgNPs-APES. The properties of the obtained membrane were examined by FT-IR, XPS, XRD, TGA, ICP-OES and SEM-EDAX analyses. These structural characterizations revealed that AgNPs ranging from 5 to 40nm were immobilized on the surface of the polymer membrane. Antibacterial tests of the samples showed that the AgNPs-APES exhibited higher activity than the AgNPs-PES un-functionalized membrane. Generally, the AgNPs-APES 1cm×3cm strip revealed a four times longer life than the un-functionalized AgNPs polymer membranes. The evaluation of the Ag(+) leaching properties of the obtained samples indicated that approximately 30% of the AgNPs could be retained, even after 12days of operation. Further analysis indicated that silver ion release can be sustained for approximately 25days. The present study provides a systematic and novel approach to synthesize water treatment membranes with controlled and improved silver (Ag(+)) release to enhance the lifetime of the membranes. PMID:26952479

  10. Solving the Neutrino Mass Mystery using Double Beta Decay. An Examination of the Feasibility of Xennoon Purification and Ion Capture and Release using an Electrostatic Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Outschoorn, Verena M

    2003-09-05

    Double beta decay has long been recognized as a useful avenue for the study of electron neutrinos, especially the neutrino mass and its fundamental nature (Majorana or Dirac). Recent neutrino oscillation experiments have provided compelling evidence that the neutrino has mass. The detection of the neutrinoless mode of double beta decay would finally set a lower limit on the mass of the electron neutrino, as well as prove that the neutrino is a Majorana particle (with opposite spin, it is its own anti-particle). The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) project attempts to detect neutrinoless double beta decay using {sup 136}Xe that decays by this process to {sup 136}Ba{sup 2} + e{sup -} + e{sup -}. Perhaps one of the most significant characteristics of this project is the reduction of the background through the identification of the Barium ions for each individual event using laser fluorescence techniques. This project also proposes to collect scintillation light in addition to the ionization electrons in order to further improve energy resolution. Current work at SLAC includes the development of a purification system for xenon, as well as tests for the capture and release of single ions using an electrostatic probe.

  11. Tests on the extracted current density of negative hydrogen ions from a single element of the matrix source

    SciTech Connect

    Lishev, St.; Yordanov, D. Shivarova, A.

    2015-04-08

    Concepts for the extraction of volume-produced negative hydrogen ions from a rf matrix source (a matrix of small-radius discharges with a planar-coil inductive driving) are presented and discussed based on experimental results for the current densities of the extracted ions and the co-extracted electrons. The experiment has been carried out in a single discharge of the source: a rf discharge with a radius of 2.25 cm inductively driven by a 3.5-turn planar coil. The length of the discharge tube, the area of the reference electrode inserted in the discharge volume, the discharge modes, the magnetic filter and its position along the discharge length, the position of the permanent magnets for the separation of the co-extracted electrons from the extracted ions in the extraction device and the bias applied to its first electrode are considered as factors influencing the extracted currents of negative ions.

  12. Ion Microprobe Analyses of Rare Earth Elements in an Extremely Ultrarefractory Nodule from the Efremovka CV3 Chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, K.; Hiyagon, H.; Takahata, N.; Sano, Y.; Ushikubo, T.; Kimura, M.; Hashimoto, A.

    2008-03-01

    REE abundance patterns of an extremely ultrarefractory nodule "Himiko" and its host inclusion "EFG-1" obtained using NanoSIMS and ims-6f ion microprobes, respectively, are presented and their formation conditions are discussed.

  13. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry of ion beam sputtered neutrals for element- and isotope-selective analysis of plutonium in micro-particles.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, N; Kratz, J-V; Trautmann, N; Passler, G

    2009-11-01

    Micro-particles containing actinides are of interest for risk assessments of contaminated areas, nuclear forensic analyses, and IAEA as well as Euratom safeguards programs. For their analysis, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been established as the state-of-the-art standard technique. In the case of actinide mixtures within the particles, however, SIMS suffers from isobaric interferences (e.g., (238)U/(238)Pu, (241)Am/(241)Pu). This can be eliminated by applying resonance ionization mass spectrometry which is based on stepwise resonant excitation and ionization of atoms with laser light, followed by mass spectrometric detection of the produced ions, combining high elemental selectivity with the analysis of isotopic compositions. This paper describes the instrumental modifications for coupling a commercial time-of-flight (TOF)-SIMS apparatus with three-step resonant post-ionization of the sputtered neutrals using a high-repetition-rate (kHz) Nd:YAG laser pumped tunable titanium:sapphire laser system. Spatially resolved ion images obtained from actinide-containing particles in TOF-SIMS mode demonstrate the capability for isotopic and spatial resolution. Results from three-step resonant post-ionization of bulk Gd and Pu samples successfully demonstrate the high elemental selectivity of this process. PMID:19557397

  14. Structure of a prokaryotic sodium channel pore reveals essential gating elements and an outer ion binding site common to eukaryotic channels

    PubMed Central

    Shaya, David; Findeisen, Felix; Abderemane-Ali, Fayal; Arrigoni, Cristina; Wong, Stephanie; Nurva, Shailika Reddy; Loussouarn, Gildas; Minor, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) are central elements of cellular excitation. Notwithstanding advances from recent bacterial NaV (BacNaV) structures, key questions about gating and ion selectivity remain. Here, we present a closed conformation of NaVAe1p, a pore-only BacNaV derived from NaVAe1, a BacNaV from the arsenite oxidizer Alkalilimnicola ehrlichei found in Mono Lake, California, that provides insight into both fundamental properties. The structure reveals a pore domain in which the pore-lining S6 helix connects to a helical cytoplasmic tail. Electrophysiological studies of full-length BacNaVs show that two elements defined by the NaVAe1p structure, an S6 activation gate position and the cytoplasmic tail ‘neck’, are central to BacNaV gating. The structure also reveals the selectivity filter ion entry site, termed the ‘outer ion’ site. Comparison with mammalian voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV) selectivity filters, together with functional studies shows that this site forms a previously unknown determinant of CaV high affinity calcium binding. Our findings underscore commonalities between BacNaVs and eukaryotic voltage-gated channels and provide a framework for understanding gating and ion permeation in this superfamily. PMID:24120938

  15. Cross Sections for K-shell X-ray Production by Hydrogen and Helium Ions in Elements from Beryllium to Uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapicki, G.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental cross sections for K-shell x-ray production by hydrogen and helium ions (Z1=1,2) in target atoms from beryllium to uranium (Z2=4-92 ) are tabulated as compiled (7418 cross sections) from the literature (161 references were found) with the search for the data terminated in January 1988. These cross sections are compared with predictions of the first Born approximation and ECPSSR theory for inner-shell ionization. The ECPSSR accounts for the energy loss (E) and Coulomb deflection (C) of the projectile ion as well as for the perturbed stationary state (PSS) and relativistic (R) nature of the target's inner-shell electron. While the first Born approximation generally overestimates the data by orders of magnitude, the ECPSSR theory is confirmed to be, on the average, in agreement with the experiment to within 10%-20%. For light and heavy target atoms, however, systematic and opposite deviations are found in the low projectile-velocity regime. These deviations are associated with the influence of multiple outer-shell ionizations on the fluorescence yields of light elements, particularly in ionization by helium ions, and with the inaccuracy of the ECPSSR theory in the reproduction of relativistic calculations for ionization of heavy elements. The remaining discrepancies at moderate projectile velocities are prima facie attributed to inadequacies of a screened hydrogenic description for the K-shell electron.

  16. Effects of crystallographic plane and co-deposited element on the growth of ion-sputter induced Si nano-cone arrays: a mechanism study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng-Chi; Qiu, Ying; Hao, Hong-Chen; Lu, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Self-organized Si nano-cone arrays induced by Ar+ ion sputtering on different Si crystallographic planes with different co-deposited alien atoms are investigated. The Si planes are (100), (110), and (111) ones, and the alien elements are Ta, Mo, Fe, and C, respectively. It is found that the growth of Si nano-cone arrays is insensitive to the initial crystallographic plane, but depends strongly on the co-deposited element. For the same Ar+ ion dose and sample temperature, the smaller the activation energy between the co-deposited element and Si is, the larger the average cone height and base diameter are. It is found that the preferential sputtering does not play an important role in the nano-cone formation. A model based on the concepts of classical surface-curvature-dependent sputtering yield and the formation of stationary silicide is proposed, which explains the observed results. The results of microstructural and compositional analysis support the proposed model.

  17. Elementally specific electron-positron annihilation radiation emitted from ion cores of group-V impurity-vacancy complexes in germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, N. Yu.; Emtsev, V. V.

    2007-12-01

    High-momentum component (HMC) of the electron-positron annihilation has been detected by the angular correlation of annihilation radiation (ACAR) technique in order to obtain elementally specific information about the ion cores of the donor-vacancy complexes (DV) formed by irradiation with 60Co γ-rays at Tirr.≈280 K in oxygen-lean n-Ge doped with group-V donors (D=As, Sb, and Bi). The probability of annihilation of positrons with the core electrons of DV complexes reconstructed from ACAR spectra increases in passing from AsV to SbV and BiV complexes. This increase correlates with the shift of the D atom from its regular position towards the vacancy site predicted by the results of spin-density functional modeling study. The data obtained suggest inward relaxation of the ion cores of DV complexes (including the one directed inward towards the vacancy).

  18. Features of radiation damage of Ni-Ti alloy under exposure to heavy ions of gaseous elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poltavtseva, V. P.; Kislitsin, S. B.; Satpayev, D. A.; Mylnikova, T. S.; Chernyavskii, A. V.

    2015-04-01

    The consistent patterns of changes in structural and phase state, hardening and temperature ranges of martensitic transformations in Ni-Ti alloy with the shape memory effect after implantation of heavy ions 16O3+, 40Ar8+ and 84Kr15+ under comparable parameters have been experimentally studied. It is found that under the impact of 84Kr15+ ions, a two-layer surface structure with radiation-hardened second layer is formed, radiation-stimulated phase transformation B19'→B2 occurs in the near-surface layer and out-range area, and the martensitic transformation temperature increases toward higher values after implantation of 40Ar8+ and 84Kr15+ ions.

  19. Ion irradiation induced element-enriched and depleted nanostructures in Zr-Al-Cu-Ni metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H. C.; Liu, R. D.; Yan, L. E-mail: zhouxingtai@sinap.ac.cn; Zhou, X. T. E-mail: zhouxingtai@sinap.ac.cn; Cao, G. Q.; Wang, G.

    2015-07-21

    The microstructural evolution of a Zr-Al-Cu-Ni metallic glass induced by irradiation with Ar ions was investigated. Under ion irradiation, the Cu- and Ni-enriched nanostructures (diameter of 30–50 nm) consisted of crystalline and amorphous structures were formed. Further, Cu- and Ni-depleted nanostructures with diameters of 5–20 nm were also observed. The formation of these nanostructures can be ascribed to the migration of Cu and Ni atoms in the irradiated metallic glass.

  20. Heavy-ion double charge exchange reactions: A tool toward 0 νββ nuclear matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Agodi, C.; Bondì, M.; Carbone, D.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.

    2015-11-01

    The knowledge of the nuclear matrix elements for the neutrinoless double beta decay is fundamental for neutrino physics. In this paper, an innovative technique to extract information on the nuclear matrix elements by measuring the cross section of a double charge exchange nuclear reaction is proposed. The basic point is that the initial- and final-state wave functions in the two processes are the same and the transition operators are similar. The double charge exchange cross sections can be factorized in a nuclear structure term containing the matrix elements and a nuclear reaction factor. First pioneering experimental results for the 40Ca(18O,18Ne)40Ar reaction at 270 MeV incident energy show that such cross section factorization reasonably holds for the crucial 0+ → 0+ transition to 40Args, at least at very forward angles.

  1. Solution structure and metal-ion binding of the P4 element from bacterial RNase P RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, M; Tinoco, I

    2000-01-01

    We determined the solution structure of two 27-nt RNA hairpins and their complexes with cobalt(III)-hexammine (Co(NH3)3+(6)) by NMR spectroscopy. The RNA hairpins used in this study are the P4 region from Escherichia coli RNase P RNA and a C-to-U mutant that confers altered divalent metal-ion specificity (Ca2+ replaces Mg2+) for catalytic activity of this ribozyme. Co(NH3)3+(6) is a useful spectroscopic probe for Mg(H2O)2+(6)-binding sites because both complexes have octahedral symmetry and have similar radii. The thermodynamics of binding to both RNA hairpins was studied using chemical shift changes upon titration with Mg2+, Ca2+, and Co(NH3)3+(6). We found that the equilibrium binding constants for each of the metal ions was essentially unchanged when the P4 model RNA hairpin was mutated, although the NMR structures show that the RNA hairpins adopt different conformations. In the C-to-U mutant a C.G base pair is replaced by U.G, and the conserved bulged uridine in the P4 wild-type stem shifts in the 3' direction by 1 nt. Intermolecular NOE cross-peaks between Co(NH3)3+(6) and RNA protons were used to locate the site of Co(NH3)3+(6) binding to both RNA hairpins. The metal ion binds in the major groove near a bulge loop, but is shifted 5' by more than 1 bp in the mutant. The change of the metal-ion binding site provides a possible explanation for changes in catalytic activity of the mutant RNase P in the presence of Ca2+. PMID:10999599

  2. Analysis of trace elements and ions in ambient fine particulate matter at three elementary schools in Ohio.

    PubMed

    John, Kuruvilla; Karnae, Saritha; Crist, Kevin; Kim, Myoungwoo; Kulkarni, Amol

    2007-04-01

    The results from a chemical characterization study of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) measured at three elementary schools in Central and Southeast Ohio is presented here. PM2.5 aerosol samples were collected from outdoor monitors and indoor samplers at each monitoring location during the period of February 1, 1999, through August 31, 2000. The locations included a rural elementary school in Athens, OH, and two urban schools within Columbus, OH. The trace metal and ionic concentrations in the collected samples were analyzed using an X-ray fluorescence spectrophotometer and ion chromatography unit, respectively. Sulfate ion was found to be the largest component present in the samples at all three of the sites. Other abundant components included nitrate, chloride, ammonium, and sodium ions, as well as calcium, silicon, and iron. The average PM2.5 concentrations showed similar temporal variations among the three sites within the study region. PM2.5 and its major component, sulfate ion, showed strong seasonal variations with maximum concentrations observed during the summer at all three of the sites. The indoor environment was found to be more contaminated during the spring months (March through May) at New Albany (a suburb of Columbus, OH) and East Athens (rural Ohio area). Potential source contribution function analysis showed that particulate matter levels at the monitoring sites were affected by transport from adjoining urban areas and industrial complexes located along the Ohio River Valley. A preliminary outdoor source apportionment using the principal component analysis (PCA) technique was performed. The results from the PCA suggest that the study region was primarily impacted by industrial, fossil fuel combustion, and geological sources. The 2002 emissions inventory data for PM2.5 compiled by Ohio Environmental Protection Agency also showed impacts of similar source types, and this was used to validate the PCA analysis. PMID:17458459

  3. Visualization of local electrochemical activity and local nickel ion release on laser-welded NiTi/steel joints using combined alternating current mode and stripping mode SECM.

    PubMed

    Ruhlig, D; Gugel, H; Schulte, A; Theisen, W; Schuhmann, W

    2008-12-01

    Smoothly polished cross-sections of laser-fabricated welds between NiTi shape memory alloy and stainless steel (SS) microwires of approximately the same diameter and, for comparison, between identical stainless steel or NiTi wires have been subjected to local chemical activity and nickel release measurements using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). In the alternating current mode (AC-SECM), the measurements detected clear differences in the local interfacial chemical activity of the passivated weld and the base metals only for the heterogeneous joints of the type NiTi-SS. In this case the local electrochemical acvtivity was lower above the weld material. Subjecting cross-sections of NiTi-SS to stripping mode SECM (SM-SECM), higher Ni(2+) concentrations were measured above the regions of the parental NiTi wire, which correlates well with the results from AC-SECM imaging which showed this region as being less passivated. An energy-dispersive elemental analysis of the specimen in a scanning electron microscope revealed the coexistence of Ti and Cr in the weld mass. Possibly, a joint action of these two metals in terms of protective oxide formation is better for passivation of the weld region than the individual action of one or the other element for passivating the original wires. Better passivation of course led to decreased electrochemical activity of the weld surface. Apparently, AC- and SM-mode SECM imaging were sufficiently sensitive to detect and visualize the impact of the changed surface passivation upon laser welding. PMID:19082072

  4. Effects of trace elements on the crystal field parameters of Nd ions at the surface of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains

    SciTech Connect

    Toga, Yuta; Suzuki, Tsuneaki; Sakuma, Akimasa

    2015-06-14

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the positional dependence of trace elements such as O and Cu on the crystal field parameter A{sub 2}{sup 0}, proportional to the magnetic anisotropy constant K{sub u} of Nd ions placed at the surface of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains. The results suggest the possibility that the A{sub 2}{sup 0} parameter of Nd ions at the (001) surface of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains exhibits a negative value when the O or Cu atom is located near the surface, closer than its equilibrium position. At the (110) surface, however, O atoms located at the equilibrium position provide a negative A{sub 2}{sup 0}, while for Cu additions A{sub 2}{sup 0} remains positive regardless of Cu's position. Thus, Cu atoms are expected to maintain a positive local K{sub u} of surface Nd ions more frequently than O atoms when they approach the grain surfaces in the Nd-Fe-B grains.

  5. Heavy-ion Fractionation in the Impulsive Solar Energetic Particle Event of 2002 August 20: Elements, Isotopes, and Inferred Charge States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    2010-08-01

    Measurements of heavy-ion elemental and isotopic composition in the energy range ~12-60 MeV nucleon-1 are reported from the Advanced Composition Explorer/Solar Isotope Spectrometer (ACE/SIS) instrument for the solar energetic particle (SEP) event of 2002 August 20. We investigate fractionation in this particularly intense impulsive event by examining the enhancements of elemental and isotopic abundance ratios relative to corresponding values in the solar wind. The elemental enhancement pattern is similar to those in other impulsive events detected by ACE/SIS and in compilations of average impulsive-event composition. For individual elements, the abundance of a heavy isotope (mass M 2) is enhanced relative to that of a lighter isotope (M 1) by a factor ~(M 1/M 2)α with α ~= -15. Previous studies have reported elemental abundance enhancements organized as a power law in Q/M, the ratio of estimated ionic charge to mass in the material being fractionated. We consider the possibility that a fractionation law of this form could be responsible for the isotopic fractionation as a power law in the mass ratio and then explore the implications it would have for the ionic charge states in the source material. Assuming that carbon is fully stripped (Q C = 6), we infer mean values of the ionic charge during the fractionation process, QZ , for a variety of elements with atomic numbers 7 <= Z <= 28. We find that Q Fe ~= 21-22, comparable to the highest observed values that have been reported at lower energies in impulsive SEP events from direct measurements near 1 AU. The inferred charge states as a function of Z are characterized by several step increases in the number of attached electrons, Z - QZ . We discuss how this step structure, together with the known masses of the elements, might account for a variety of features in the observed pattern of elemental abundance enhancements. We also briefly consider alternative fractionation laws and the relationship between the charge

  6. HEAVY-ION FRACTIONATION IN THE IMPULSIVE SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENT OF 2002 AUGUST 20: ELEMENTS, ISOTOPES, AND INFERRED CHARGE STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    2010-08-20

    Measurements of heavy-ion elemental and isotopic composition in the energy range {approx}12-60 MeV nucleon{sup -1} are reported from the Advanced Composition Explorer/Solar Isotope Spectrometer (ACE/SIS) instrument for the solar energetic particle (SEP) event of 2002 August 20. We investigate fractionation in this particularly intense impulsive event by examining the enhancements of elemental and isotopic abundance ratios relative to corresponding values in the solar wind. The elemental enhancement pattern is similar to those in other impulsive events detected by ACE/SIS and in compilations of average impulsive-event composition. For individual elements, the abundance of a heavy isotope (mass M {sub 2}) is enhanced relative to that of a lighter isotope (M{sub 1}) by a factor {approx}(M {sub 1}/M {sub 2}){sup {alpha}} with {alpha} {approx_equal} -15. Previous studies have reported elemental abundance enhancements organized as a power law in Q/M, the ratio of estimated ionic charge to mass in the material being fractionated. We consider the possibility that a fractionation law of this form could be responsible for the isotopic fractionation as a power law in the mass ratio and then explore the implications it would have for the ionic charge states in the source material. Assuming that carbon is fully stripped (Q{sub C} = 6), we infer mean values of the ionic charge during the fractionation process, Q{sub Z} , for a variety of elements with atomic numbers 7 {<=} Z {<=} 28. We find that Q{sub Fe} {approx_equal} 21-22, comparable to the highest observed values that have been reported at lower energies in impulsive SEP events from direct measurements near 1 AU. The inferred charge states as a function of Z are characterized by several step increases in the number of attached electrons, Z - Q{sub Z} . We discuss how this step structure, together with the known masses of the elements, might account for a variety of features in the observed pattern of elemental abundance

  7. Elemental mapping of Neuromelanin organelles of human Substantia Nigra: correlative ultrastructural and chemical analysis by analytical transmission electron microscopy and nano-secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Biesemeier, Antje; Eibl, Oliver; Eswara, Santhana; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Wirtz, Tom; Pezzoli, Gianni; Zucca, Fabio A; Zecca, Luigi; Schraermeyer, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    Neuromelanin (NM) is a compound which highly accumulates mainly in catecholamine neurons of the substantia nigra (SN), and is contained in organelles (NM-containing organelles) with lipid bodies and proteins. These neurons selectively degenerate in Parkinson's disease and NM can play either a protective or toxic role. NM-containing organelles of SN were investigated by Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) and Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS) within human tissue sections with respect to ultrastructure and elemental composition. Within the NM-containing organelle, the single NM granules and lipid bodies had sizes of about 200-600 nm. Energy-Dispersive X-ray microanalysis spectra of the NM granules and lipid bodies were acquired with 100 nm beam diameter in AEM, NanoSIMS yielded elemental maps with a lateral resolution of about 150 nm. AEM yielded the quantitative elemental composition of NM granules and bound metals, e.g., iron with a mole fraction of about 0.15 atomic percent. Chemical analyses by AEM and NanoSIMS were consistent at the subcellular level so that nanoSIMS measurements have been quantitated. In NM granules of SN from healthy subjects, a significant amount of S, Fe, and Cu was found. In lipid bodies an amount of P consistent with the presence of phospholipids was measured. The improved detection limits of nanoSIMS offer new possibilities for chemical mapping, high-sensitivity trace element detection, and reduced acquisition times. Variations between individual NM granules can now be investigated effectively and quantitatively by NanoSIMS mapping Cu and Fe. This should yield new insight into the changes in chemical composition of NM pigments during healthy aging and disease. Neuromelanin-containing organelles of dopamine neurons in normal human substantia nigra were investigated by analytical electron mircoscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (NanoSIMS) yielding the ultrastructure and elemental composition. In neuromelanin

  8. Stable Chlorine Isotopes and Elemental Chlorine by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Ion Chromatography; Martian Meteorites, Carbonaceous Chondrites and Standard Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C.-Y.; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2011-01-01

    Recently significantly large mass fractionation of stable chlorine isotopes has been reported for terrestrial and lunar samples [1,2]. In addition, in view of possible early solar system processes [3] and also potential perchlorate-related fluid/microbial activities on the Martian surface [4,5], a large chlorine isotopic fractionation might be expected for some types of planetary materials. Due to analytical difficulties of isotopic and elemental analyses, however, current chlorine analyses for planetary materials are controversial among different laboratories, particularly between IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1,6,7] for isotopic analyses, as well as between those doing pyrohydrolysis and other groups [i.e. 6,8]. Additional careful investigations of Cl isotope and elemental abundances are required to confirm real chlorine isotope and elemental variations for planetary materials. We have developed a TIMS technique combined with HF-leaching/ion chromatography at NASA JSC that is applicable to analysis of small amounts of meteoritic and planetary materials. We present here results for several standard rocks and meteorites, including Martian meteorites.

  9. Detection of fuel release in a nuclear accident: a method for preconcentration and isolation of reactor-borne (239)Np using ion-specific extraction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Brett L; Shozugawa, Katsumi; Steinhauser, Georg

    2015-09-01

    Although actinides are the most informative elements with respect to the nature of a nuclear accident, plutonium analysis is complicated by the background created by fallout from atmospheric nuclear explosions. Therefore, we propose (239)Np, a short-lived actinide that emits several γ rays, as a preferred proxy. The aim of this study was to screen ion specific extraction chromatography resins (RE-, TEVA-, UTEVA-, TRU-, and Actinide-Resin) for the highest possible recovery and separation of trace amounts of (239)Np from samples with large activities of fission products such as radiocesium, radioiodine, and, most importantly, radiotellurium, the latter of which causes spectral interference in gamma spectrometry through overlapping peaks with (239)Np. The investigated environmental media for these separations were aqueous solutions simulating rainwater and soil. Spiked samples containing (239)Np and the aforementioned volatile radionuclides were separated through extraction chromatographic columns to ascertain the most effective means of separating (239)Np from other fission products for detection by gamma spectroscopy. We propose a method for nuclear accident preparedness based on the use of Eichrom's RE-Resin. The proposed method was found most effective for isolating (239)Np from interfering radionuclides in both aqueous solution and soil using 8 M HNO3 as the loading solution and H2O as the eluent. The RE-Resin outperforms the more commonly used TEVA-Resin because the TEVA-Resin showed a higher affinity for interfering radiotellurium and radioiodine. PMID:26255661

  10. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Elk City NTMS Quadrangle, Idaho/Montana, including concentrations of forty-five additional elements

    SciTech Connect

    Broxton, D.E.; Beyth, M.

    1980-07-01

    Totals of 1580 water and 1720 sediment samples were collected from 1754 locations in the quadrangle. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters in Appendix I-A and for sediments in Appendix I-B. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included in Appendix I-B. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 parts per billion (ppB) uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting (DNC). A supplemental report containing the multielement analyses of water samples will be open filed in the near future. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, selenium, scandium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, zinc, and zirconium. Basic statistics for 40 of these elements are presented. All sediments were analyzed for uranium by delayed-neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron-activation analysis for 30 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 12 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million.

  11. Source Regions of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field and Variability in Heavy-Ion Elemental Composition in Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tylka, Allan J.; Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Keong Ng, Chee; Wang, Yi-Ming; Dietrich, William F.

    2014-05-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are those in which ions are accelerated to their observed energies by interactions with a shock driven by a fast coronal mass-ejection (CME). Previous studies have shown that much of the observed event-to-event variability can be understood in terms of shock speed and evolution in the shock-normal angle. But an equally important factor, particularly for the elemental composition, is the origin of the suprathermal seed particles upon which the shock acts. To tackle this issue, we (1) use observed solar-wind speed, magnetograms, and the PFSS model to map the Sun-L1 interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) line back to its source region on the Sun at the time of the SEP observations; and (2) then look for correlation between SEP composition (as measured by Wind and ACE at ~2-30 MeV/nucleon) and characteristics of the identified IMF-source regions. The study is based on 24 SEP events, identified as a statistically-significant increase in ~20 MeV protons and occurring in 1998 and 2003-2006, when the rate of newly-emergent solar magnetic flux and CMEs was lower than in solar-maximum years and the field-line tracing is therefore more likely to be successful. We find that the gradual SEP Fe/O is correlated with the field strength at the IMF-source, with the largest enhancements occurring when the footpoint field is strong, due to the nearby presence of an active region. In these cases, other elemental ratios show a strong charge-to-mass (q/M) ordering, at least on average, similar to but less pronounced than that found in impulsive events. These results lead us to suggest that magnetic reconnection in footpoint regions near active regions bias the heavy-ion composition of suprathermal seed ions by processes qualitatively similar to those that produce larger heavy-ion enhancements in impulsive SEP events.

  12. Source Regions of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field and Variability in Heavy-Ion Elemental Composition in Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tylka, A. J.; Ko, Y.; Ng, C. K.; Wang, Y.; Dietrich, W. F.

    2013-12-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are those in which ions are accelerated to their observed energies by interactions with a shock driven by a fast coronal mass-ejection (CME). Previous studies have shown that much of the observed event-to-event variability can be understood in terms of shock speed and evolution in the shock-normal angle. But an equally important factor, particularly for the elemental composition, is the origin of the suprathermal seed particles upon which the shock acts. To tackle this issue, we (1) use observed solar-wind speed, magnetograms, and the PFSS model to map the Sun-L1 interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) line back to its source region on the Sun at the time of the SEP observations; and (2) then look for correlation between SEP composition (as measured by Wind and ACE at ~2-30 MeV/nucleon) and characteristics of the identified IMF-source regions. The study is based on 24 SEP events, identified as a statistically-significant increase in ~20 MeV protons and occurring in 1998 and 2003-2006, when the rate of newly-emergent solar magnetic flux and CMEs was lower than in solar-maximum years and the field-line tracing is therefore more likely to be successful. We find that the gradual SEP Fe/O is correlated with the field strength at the IMF-source, with the largest enhancements occurring when the footpoint field is strong, due to the nearby presence of an active region. In these cases, other elemental ratios show a strong charge-to-mass (q/M) ordering, at least on average, similar to that found in impulsive events. These results lead us to suggest that magnetic reconnection in footpoint regions near active regions bias the heavy-ion composition of suprathermal seed ions by processes qualitatively similar to those that produce larger heavy-ion enhancements in impulsive SEP events. To address potential technical concerns about our analysis, we also discuss efforts to exclude impulsive SEP events from our event sample.

  13. Source Regions of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field and Variability in Heavy-ion Elemental Composition in Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Tylka, Allan J.; Ng, Chee K.; Wang, Yi-Ming; Dietrich, William F.

    2013-10-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are those in which ions are accelerated to their observed energies by interactions with a shock driven by a fast coronal mass ejection (CME). Previous studies have shown that much of the observed event-to-event variability can be understood in terms of shock speed and evolution in the shock-normal angle. However, an equally important factor, particularly for the elemental composition, is the origin of the suprathermal seed particles upon which the shock acts. To tackle this issue, we (1) use observed solar-wind speed, magnetograms, and the potential-field source-surface model to map the Sun-L1 interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) line back to its source region on the Sun at the time of the SEP observations and (2) then look for a correlation between SEP composition (as measured by Wind and Advanced Composition Explorer at ~2-30 MeV nucleon-1) and characteristics of the identified IMF source regions. The study is based on 24 SEP events, identified as a statistically significant increase in ~20 MeV protons and occurring in 1998 and 2003-2006, when the rate of newly emergent solar magnetic flux and CMEs was lower than in solar-maximum years, and the field-line tracing is therefore more likely to be successful. We find that the gradual SEP Fe/O is correlated with the field strength at the IMF source, with the largest enhancements occurring when the footpoint field is strong due to the nearby presence of an active region (AR). In these cases, other elemental ratios show a strong charge-to-mass (q/M) ordering (at least on average), similar to that found in impulsive events. Such results lead us to suggest that magnetic reconnection in footpoint regions near ARs bias the heavy-ion composition of suprathermal seed ions by processes qualitatively similar to those that produce larger heavy-ion enhancements in impulsive SEP events. To address potential technical concerns about our analysis, we also discuss efforts to exclude

  14. SOURCE REGIONS OF THE INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELD AND VARIABILITY IN HEAVY-ION ELEMENTAL COMPOSITION IN GRADUAL SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Wang, Yi-Ming; Tylka, Allan J.; Ng, Chee K.; Dietrich, William F.

    2013-10-20

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are those in which ions are accelerated to their observed energies by interactions with a shock driven by a fast coronal mass ejection (CME). Previous studies have shown that much of the observed event-to-event variability can be understood in terms of shock speed and evolution in the shock-normal angle. However, an equally important factor, particularly for the elemental composition, is the origin of the suprathermal seed particles upon which the shock acts. To tackle this issue, we (1) use observed solar-wind speed, magnetograms, and the potential-field source-surface model to map the Sun-L1 interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) line back to its source region on the Sun at the time of the SEP observations and (2) then look for a correlation between SEP composition (as measured by Wind and Advanced Composition Explorer at ∼2-30 MeV nucleon{sup –1}) and characteristics of the identified IMF source regions. The study is based on 24 SEP events, identified as a statistically significant increase in ∼20 MeV protons and occurring in 1998 and 2003-2006, when the rate of newly emergent solar magnetic flux and CMEs was lower than in solar-maximum years, and the field-line tracing is therefore more likely to be successful. We find that the gradual SEP Fe/O is correlated with the field strength at the IMF source, with the largest enhancements occurring when the footpoint field is strong due to the nearby presence of an active region (AR). In these cases, other elemental ratios show a strong charge-to-mass (q/M) ordering (at least on average), similar to that found in impulsive events. Such results lead us to suggest that magnetic reconnection in footpoint regions near ARs bias the heavy-ion composition of suprathermal seed ions by processes qualitatively similar to those that produce larger heavy-ion enhancements in impulsive SEP events. To address potential technical concerns about our analysis, we also discuss efforts to

  15. Source Regions of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field and Variability in Heavy-Ion Elemental Composition in Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Tylka, Allan J.; Ng, Chee K.; Wang, Yi-Ming; Dietrich, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are those in which ions are accelerated to their observed energies by interactions with a shock driven by a fast coronal mass-ejection (CME). Previous studies have shown that much of the observed event-to-event variability can be understood in terms of shock speed and evolution in the shock-normal angle. But an equally important factor, particularly for the elemental composition, is the origin of the suprathermal seed particles upon which the shock acts. To tackle this issue, we (1) use observed solar-wind speed, magnetograms, and the PFSS model to map the Sun-L1 interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) line back to its source region on the Sun at the time of the SEP observations; and (2) then look for correlation between SEP composition (as measured by Wind and ACE at approx. 2-30 MeV/nucleon) and characteristics of the identified IMF-source regions. The study is based on 24 SEP events, identified as a statistically-significant increase in approx. 20 MeV protons and occurring in 1998 and 2003-2006, when the rate of newly-emergent solar magnetic flux and CMEs was lower than in solar-maximum years and the field-line tracing is therefore more likely to be successful. We find that the gradual SEP Fe/O is correlated with the field strength at the IMF-source, with the largest enhancements occurring when the footpoint field is strong, due to the nearby presence of an active region. In these cases, other elemental ratios show a strong charge-to-mass (q/M) ordering, at least on average, similar to that found in impulsive events. These results lead us to suggest that magnetic reconnection in footpoint regions near active regions bias the heavy-ion composition of suprathermal seed ions by processes qualitatively similar to those that produce larger heavy-ion enhancements in impulsive SEP events. To address potential technical concerns about our analysis, we also discuss efforts to exclude impulsive SEP events from our event sample.

  16. Controlled Release of Biologically Active Silver from Nanosilver Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyu; Sonshine, David A.; Shervani, Saira; Hurt, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Major pathways in the antibacterial activity and eukaryotic toxicity of nano-silver involve the silver cation and its soluble complexes, which are well established thiol toxicants. Through these pathways, nano-silver behaves in analogy to a drug delivery system, in which the particle contains a concentrated inventory of an active species, the ion, which is transported to and released near biological target sites. Although the importance of silver ion in the biological response to nano-silver is widely recognized, the drug delivery paradigm has not been well developed for this system, and there is significant potential to improve nano-silver technologies through controlled release formulations. This article applies elements of the drug delivery paradigm to nano-silver dissolution and presents a systematic study of chemical concepts for controlled release. After presenting thermodynamic calculations of silver species partitioning in biological media, the rates of oxidative silver dissolution are measured for nanoparticles and macroscopic foils and used to derive unified area-based release kinetics. A variety of competing chemical approaches are demonstrated for controlling the ion release rate over four orders of magnitude. Release can be systematically slowed by thiol and citrate ligand binding, formation of sulfidic coatings, or the scavenging of peroxy-intermediates. Release can be accelerated by pre-oxidation or particle size reduction, while polymer coatings with complexation sites alter the release profile by storing and release inventories of surface-bound silver. Finally, the ability to tune biological activity is demonstrated through bacterial inhibition zone assay carried out on selected formulations of controlled release nano-silver. PMID:20968290

  17. Phytotoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles and the released Zn(II) ion to corn (Zea mays L.) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) during germination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruichang; Zhang, Haibo; Tu, Chen; Hu, Xuefeng; Li, Lianzhen; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Toxicity of engineered nanoparticles on organisms is of concern worldwide due to their extensive use and unique properties. The impacts of ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on seed germination and root elongation of corn (Zea mays L.) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) were investigated in this study. The role of seed coats of corn in the mitigation toxicity of nanoparticles was also evaluated. ZnO NPs (1,000 mg L(-1)) reduced root length of corn and cucumber by 17 % (p < 0.05) and 51 % (p < 0.05), respectively, but exhibited no effects on germination. In comparison with Zn(2+), toxicity of ZnO NPs on the root elongation of corn could be attributed to the nanoparticulate ZnO, while released Zn ion from ZnO could solely contribute to the inhibition of root elongation of cucumber. Zn uptake in corn exposed to ZnO NPs during germination was much higher than that in corn exposed to Zn(2+), whereas Zn uptake in cucumber was significantly correlated with soluble Zn in suspension. It could be inferred that Zn was taken up by corn and cucumber mainly in the form of ZnO NPs and soluble Zn, respectively. Transmission electron microscope confirmed the uptake of ZnO NPs into root of corn. Although isolation of the seed coats might not be the principal factor that achieved avoidance from toxicity on germination, seed coats of corn were found to mitigate the toxicity of ZnO NPs on root elongation and prevent approximately half of the Zn from entering into root and endosperm. PMID:25794580

  18. Characterization of flux-grown Trace-element-doped titanite using the high-mass-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP-RG)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazdab, F.K.

    2009-01-01

    Crystals of titanite can be readily grown under ambient pressure from a mixture of CaO, TiO2 and SiO2 in the presence of molten sodium tetraborate. The crystals produced are euhedral and prismatic, lustrous and transparent, and up to 5 mm in length. Titanite obtained by this method contains approximately 4300 ppm Na and 220 ppm B contributed from the flux. In addition to dopant-free material, titanite containing trace alkali and alkaline earth metals (K, Sr, Ba), transition metals (Sc, Cr, Ni, Y, Zr, Nb, Hf and Ta), rare-earth elements (REE), actinides (Th, U) and p-block elements (F, S, Cl, Ge, Sn and Pb) have been prepared using the same procedure. Back-scattered electron (BSE) imaging accompanied by ion-microprobe (SHRIMP-RG) analysis confirms significant incorporation of selected trace-elements at structural sites. Regardless of some zonation, the large size of the crystals and broad regions of chemical homogeneity make these crystals useful as experimental starting material, and as matrix-matched trace-element standards for a variety of microbeam analytical techniques where amorphous titanite glass, heterogeneous natural titanite or a non-titanite standard may be less than satisfactory. Trace-element-doped synthetic crystals can also provide a convenient proxy for a better understanding of trace-element incorporation in natural titanite. Comparisons with igneous, authigenic and high-temperature metasomatic titanite are examined. The use of high-mass-resolution SIMS also demonstrates the analytical challenges inherent to any in situ mass-spectrometry-based analysis of titanite, owing to the production of difficult-to-resolve molecular interferences. These interferences are dominated by Ca-Ca, Ca-Ti and Ti-Ti dimers that are significant in the mass range of 80-100, affecting all isotopes of Sr and Zr, as well as 89Y and 93Nb. Methods do exist for the evaluation of interferences by these dimers and of polyatomic interferences on the LREE.

  19. Rb, Sr and strontium isotopic composition, K/Ar age and large ion lithophile trace element abundances in rocks and glasses from the Wanapitei Lake impact structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winzer, S. R.; Lum, R. K. L.; Schuhmann, S.

    1976-01-01

    Shock metamorphosed rocks and shock-produced melt glasses from the Wanapitei Lake impact structure have been examined petrographically and by electron microprobe. Eleven clasts exhibiting varying degrees of shock metamorphism and eight impact-produced glasses have been analyzed for Rb, Sr and Sr isotopic composition. Five clasts and one glass have also been analyzed for large ion lithophile (LIL) trace element abundances including Li, Rb, Sr, and Ba and the REE's. The impact event forming the Wanapitei Lake structure occurred 37 m.y. ago based on K/Ar dating of glass and glassy whole-rock samples. Rb/Sr isotopic dating failed to provide a meaningful whole-rock or internal isochron. The isotopic composition of the glasses can be explained by impact-produced mixing and melting of metasediments.

  20. NUMEN Project @ LNS : Heavy Ions Double Charge Exchange as a tool towards the 0νββ Nuclear Matrix Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agodi, C.; Cappuzzello, F.; Bonanno, D. L.; Bongiovanni, D. G.; Branchina, V.; Calabrese, S.; Calabretta, L.; Calanna, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Colonna, M.; Foti, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Greco, V.; Lanzalone, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Longhitano, F.; Muoio, A.; Pandola, L.; Rifuggiato, D.; Tudisco, S.

    2016-06-01

    The NUMEN Project, proposed at INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) in Catania, has the aim to access the nuclear matrix elements, entering the expression of the life time of double beta decay, by relevant cross sections of double charge exchange reactions. The basic point, on which it is based this innovative technique, is the coincidence of the initial and final state wave-functions in the two classes of processes and the similarity of the transition operators. A key aspect of the Project is the use of MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, for the detection of the ejectiles, and of the INFN LNS K800 Superconducting Cyclotron (CS), for the acceleration of the required high resolution and low emittance heavy-ion beams.

  1. Role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptor and stretch-activated ion channels in nitric oxide release from endothelial cells of the aorta and heart in rats.

    PubMed

    Torres-Narváez, Juan Carlos; Mondragón, Leonardo Del Valle; Varela López, Elvira; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Díaz Juárez, Julieta Anabell; Suárez, Jorge; Hernández, Gustavo Pastelín

    2012-09-01

    Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide (NO) release in endothelial cells. Stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor respond to mechanical stimulus and are permeable to Na(+), Ca(2+) and K(+). The influence of SACs and the TRPV1 receptor on NO release on the heart and on the vascular reactivity of the thoracic aorta (TA) was studied. Experiments were performed in isolated perfused heart, cultured endothelial cells and TA rings from Wistar rats. Capsaicin (10 μM, 30 μM) was used as a NO release stimulator, capsazepine (6 μM, 10 μM) was used as a capsaicin antagonist and gadolinium (3 μM, 5 μM) was used as an inhibitor of SACs. NO was measured by the Kelm and Tenorio methods. Left ventricular pressure was recorded and coronary vascular resistance was calculated. Capsaicin increased NO release in the heart by 58% (395±8 pmol/mL to 627±23 pmol/mL). Capsazepine and gadolinium inhibited NO release by 74% and 82%, respectively. This tendency was similar in all experimental models. Capsaicin attenuated the effects of norepinephrine (10 M to 7 M) on TA and had no effect in the presence of N (ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Therefore, the authors conclude that SACs and the TRPV1 receptor are both present in the coronary endothelium and that both participate in Ca(2+)-dependent NO release. PMID:23620694

  2. Role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptor and stretch-activated ion channels in nitric oxide release from endothelial cells of the aorta and heart in rats

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Narváez, Juan Carlos; Mondragón, Leonardo del Valle; Varela López, Elvira; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Díaz Juárez, Julieta Anabell; Suárez, Jorge; Hernández, Gustavo Pastelín

    2012-01-01

    Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide (NO) release in endothelial cells. Stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor respond to mechanical stimulus and are permeable to Na+, Ca2+ and K+. The influence of SACs and the TRPV1 receptor on NO release on the heart and on the vascular reactivity of the thoracic aorta (TA) was studied. Experiments were performed in isolated perfused heart, cultured endothelial cells and TA rings from Wistar rats. Capsaicin (10 μM, 30 μM) was used as a NO release stimulator, capsazepine (6 μM, 10 μM) was used as a capsaicin antagonist and gadolinium (3 μM, 5 μM) was used as an inhibitor of SACs. NO was measured by the Kelm and Tenorio methods. Left ventricular pressure was recorded and coronary vascular resistance was calculated. Capsaicin increased NO release in the heart by 58% (395±8 pmol/mL to 627±23 pmol/mL). Capsazepine and gadolinium inhibited NO release by 74% and 82%, respectively. This tendency was similar in all experimental models. Capsaicin attenuated the effects of norepinephrine (10 M to 7 M) on TA and had no effect in the presence of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Therefore, the authors conclude that SACs and the TRPV1 receptor are both present in the coronary endothelium and that both participate in Ca2+-dependent NO release. PMID:23620694

  3. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Extracting Spectra of N-Glycans Directly from Incubation Mixtures Following Glycan Release: Application to Glycans from Engineered Glycoforms of Intact, Folded HIV gp120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, David J.; Sobott, Frank; Crispin, Max; Wrobel, Antoni; Bonomelli, Camille; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Scarff, Charlotte A.; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Scrivens, James H.

    2011-03-01

    The analysis of glycosylation from native biological sources is often frustrated by the low abundances of available material. Here, ion mobility combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry have been used to extract the spectra of N-glycans released with PNGase F from a serial titration of recombinantly expressed envelope glycoprotein, gp120, from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Analysis was also performed on gp120 expressed in the α-mannosidase inhibitor, and in a matched mammalian cell line deficient in GlcNAc transferase I. Without ion mobility separation, ESI spectra frequently contained no observable ions from the glycans whereas ions from other compounds such as detergents and residual buffer salts were abundant. After ion mobility separation on a Waters T-wave ion mobility mass spectrometer, the N-glycans fell into a unique region of the ion mobility/ m/z plot allowing their profiles to be extracted with good signal:noise ratios. This method allowed N-glycan profiles to be extracted from crude incubation mixtures with no clean-up even in the presence of surfactants such as NP40. Furthermore, this technique allowed clear profiles to be obtained from sub-microgram amounts of glycoprotein. Glycan profiles were similar to those generated by MALDI-TOF MS although they were more susceptible to double charging and fragmentation. Structural analysis could be accomplished by MS/MS experiments in either positive or negative ion mode but negative ion mode gave the most informative spectra and provided a reliable approach to the analysis of glycans from small amounts of glycoprotein.

  4. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Dubois NTMS Quadrangle, Idaho/Montana, including concentrations of forty-five additional elements

    SciTech Connect

    LaDelfe, C.M.

    1980-08-01

    Totals of 1024 water samples and 1600 sediment samples were collected from 1669 locations in the Dubois quadrangle. Water samples were taken at streams, springs, and wells; sediment samples were collected from streams and springs. All field and analytical data are presented for waters in Appendix I-A and for sediments in I-B. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than the upper detection limit of uranium were reanalyzed by delayed neutron counting. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium rubidium, samarium, scandium, selenium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, zinc and zirconium. All sediments were analyzed for uranium by delayed-neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron-activation analysis for 30 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 12 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million.

  5. CdSe@ZnS nanocomposites prepared by a mechanochemical route: No release of Cd{sup 2+} ions and negligible in vitro cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Baláž, Peter; Sayagués, Maria Jesús; Baláž, Matej; Zorkovská, Anna; Hronec, Pavol; Kováč, Jaroslav; Kováč, Jaroslav; Dutková, Erika; Mojžišová, Gabriela; and others

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CdSe@ZnS nanocomposites were produced by milling. • Negligible cadmium leakage was observed. • No toxicity against living cells was documented. • The material is suitable for biological imaging. - Abstract: CdSe@ZnS nanocomposites have been prepared by a two-step solid state mechanochemical synthesis. CdSe prepared from Cd and Se elements in the first step was mixed with zinc acetate and sodium sulphide in the second step of milling to prepare a CdSe@ZnS nanocomposite. In the third step, the obtained nanocomposite was coated with L-cysteine to prepare a biocompatible system. The crystallite size of the new type of nanocomposite was 20–35 nm for cubic CdSe and 3–8 nm for hexagonal ZnS as calculated from XRD, TEM and SEM data. The synthesised samples show good crystallinity and have been tested for dissolution and cytotoxicity. The dissolution of cadmium from CdSe@ZnS was less than 0.05 μg mL{sup −1}, whereas a value of 0.8 μg mL{sup −1} was measured for CdSe alone. The binding of ZnS with CdSe in the nanocomposite practically eliminated the release of cadmium into solution. As a consequence, a very low cytotoxic activity has been evidenced for CdSe@ZnS. The nanocomposites coated with L-cysteine have a great potential as fluorescent labels in biomedical engineering.

  6. Application of flowing stream techniques to water analysis Part III. Metal ions: alkaline and alkaline-earth metals, elemental and harmful transition metals, and multielemental analysis.

    PubMed

    Miró, Manuel; Estela, José Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor

    2004-05-28

    In the earlier parts of this series of reviews [1,2], the most relevant flowing stream techniques (namely, segmented flow analysis, continuous flow analysis, flow injection (FI) analysis, sequential injection (SI) analysis, multicommuted flow injection analysis and multisyringe flow injection analysis) applied to the determination of several core inorganic parameters for water quality assessment, such as nutrients and anionic species including nitrogen, sulfur and halogen compounds, were described. In the present paper, flow techniques are presented as powerful analytical tools for the environmental monitoring of metal ions (alkaline and alkaline-earth metals, and elemental and harmful transition metals) as well as to perform both multielemental and speciation analysis in water samples. The potentials of flow techniques for automated sample treatment involving on-line analyte separation and/or pre-concentration are also discussed in the body of the text, and demonstrated for each individual ion with a variety of strategies successfully applied to trace analysis. In this context, the coupling of flow methodologies with atomic spectrometric techniques such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) or hydride-generation (HG)/cold-vapor (CV) approaches, launching the so-called hyphenated techniques, is specially worth mentioning. PMID:18969420

  7. Fourier-spectral element approximation of the ion-electron Braginskii system with application to tokamak edge plasma in divertor configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minjeaud, Sebastian; Pasquetti, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Due to the extreme conditions required to produce energy by nuclear fusion in tokamaks, simulating the plasma behavior is an important but challenging task. We focus on the edge part of the plasma, where fluid approaches are probably the best suited, and our approach relies on the Braginskii ion-electron model. Assuming that the electric field is electrostatic, this yields a set of 10 strongly coupled and non-linear conservation equations that exhibit multiscale and anisotropy features. The computational domain is a torus of complex geometrical section, that corresponds to the divertor configuration, i.e. with an "X-point" in the magnetic surfaces. To capture the complex physics that is involved, high order methods are used: The time-discretization is based on a Strang splitting, that combines implicit and explicit high order Runge-Kutta schemes, and the space discretization makes use of the spectral element method in the poloidal plane together with Fourier expansions in the toroidal direction. The paper thoroughly describes the algorithms that have been developed, provides some numerical validations of the key algorithms and exhibits the results of preliminary numerical experiments. In particular, we point out that the highest frequency of the system is intermediate between the ion and electron cyclotron frequencies.

  8. The effect of water vapor on the release of fission gas from the fuel elements of high temperature, gas-cooled reactors: A preliminary assessment of experiments HRB-17, HFR-B1, HFR-K6 and KORA

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    The effect of water vapor on the release of fission gas from the fuel elements of high temperature, gas-cooled reactors has been measured in different laboratories under both irradiation and post irradiation conditions. The data from experiments HRB-17, HFR-B1, HFR-K6, and in the KORA facility are compared to assess their consistency and complimentarily. The experiments are consistent under comparable experimental conditions and reveal two general mechanisms involving exposed fuel kernels embedded in carbonaceous materials. One is manifest as a strong dependence of fission gas release on the partial pressure of water vapor below 1 kPa and the other, as a weak dependence above 1 kPa.

  9. Combined elemental analysis of ancient glass beads by means of ion beam, portable XRF, and EPMA techniques.

    PubMed

    Sokaras, D; Karydas, A G; Oikonomou, A; Zacharias, N; Beltsios, K; Kantarelou, V

    2009-12-01

    Ion beam analysis (IBA)- and X-ray fluorescence (XRF)-based techniques have been well adopted in cultural-heritage-related analytical studies covering a wide range of diagnostic role, i.e., from screening purposes up to full quantitative characterization. In this work, a systematic research was carried out towards the identification and evaluation of the advantages and the limitations of laboratory-based (IBA, electron probe microanalyzer) and portable (milli-XRF and micro-XRF) techniques. The study focused on the analysis of an Archaic glass bead collection recently excavated from the city of Thebes (mainland, Greece), in order to suggest an optimized and synergistic analytical methodology for similar studies and to assess the reliability of the quantification procedure of analyses conducted in particular by portable XRF spectrometers. All the employed analytical techniques and methodologies proved efficient to provide in a consistent way characterization of the glass bead composition, with analytical range and sensitivity depending on the particular technique. The obtained compositional data suggest a solid basis for the understanding of the main technological features related to the raw major and minor materials utilized for the manufacture of the Thebian ancient glass bead collection. PMID:19821114

  10. Exploration of multi-fold symmetry element-loaded superconducting radio frequency structure for reliable acceleration of low- & medium-beta ion species

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shichun; Geng, Rongli

    2015-09-01

    Reliable acceleration of low- to medium-beta proton or heavy ion species is needed for future high-current superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerators. Due to the high-Q nature of an SRF resonator, it is sensitive to many factors such as electron loading (from either the accelerated beam or from parasitic field emitted electrons), mechanical vibration, and liquid helium bath pressure fluctuation etc. To increase the stability against those factors, a mechanically strong and stable RF structure is desirable. Guided by this consideration, multi-fold symmetry element-loaded SRF structures (MFSEL), cylindrical tanks with multiple (n>=3) rod-shaped radial elements, are being explored. The top goal of its optimization is to improve mechanical stability. A natural consequence of this structure is a lowered ratio of the peak surface electromagnetic field to the acceleration gradient as compared to the traditional spoke cavity. A disadvantage of this new structure is an increased size for a fixed resonant frequency and optimal beta. This paper describes the optimization of the electro-magnetic (EM) design and preliminary mechanical analysis for such structures.

  11. Occurrence and fate of some trace elements during pyrolysis of Yima coal, China

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yiwei; Liu, Guijian; Wang, Lei; Kang, Yu; Yang, Jianli

    2008-11-15

    Modes of occurrence and transformation behaviors of selected trace elements during coal pyrolysis were studied. The element content in coal and chars was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The elemental occurrence in raw coal was analyzed through a sequential extraction procedure and determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic absorption spectroscopy (ICP-AAS). The trace elements in Yima coal are separated into five fractions: water soluble, ion exchangeable, carbonate, organic material, and residue. All the elements studied mainly exist in the residue fraction. With regard to heavy-metal elements studied, the residue fraction takes about 50-80% and the organic fraction takes about 15-40%; other chemical forms occurred at a very low level. Only Mn and Ni showed a sizable distribution of water-soluble, ion-exchangeable, and carbonate fraction. During coal pyrolysis, part of the element became released from the coal body and some other parts became enriched in chars. All the elements showed a increasing release ratio with the temperature ascending; at the same pyrolysis temperature, the release ratio of heavy-metal elements is higher than that of the rare earth elements (REEs). At 900{degree}C, the volatilizable fraction of the coal body is nearly depleted, the pyrolysis almost came to an end and the release intensity was approaching zero. All the elements showed a enrichment in chars and the enrichment ratioincreases with the temperature ascending. The modes of occurrence of the element is a key role affecting the transformation during pyrolysis. With regard to REEs, there is a negative correlation between the elements left in chars and the residue fraction in raw coal, indicatingthat the element content left in chars for REEs is a result of the element distribution in the residue fraction in raw coal. 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Ashton NTMS quadrangle, Idaho/Montana/Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, S.S. Jr; Sandoval, W.F.; Gallimore, D.L.; Hansel, J.M.; Hensley, W.K.; Pirtle, J.; Macdonell, C.J.

    1980-08-01

    This report contains data collected during a geochemical survey for uranium in the Ashton National Topographic Map Series quadrangle of eastern Idaho, southwestern Montana, and northwestern Wyoming by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) as part of the nationwide Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). The LASL is responsible for conducting the HSSR primarily in the Rocky Mountain states of New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana and in Alaska. Totals of 1141 water and 1500 sediment samples were collected from 1539 locations in the quadrangle by a commercial contractor. Water samples were collected at streams, springs, wells, ponds, and marshes; sediment samples were obtained from streams, springs, and ponds. Histograms and statistical data for uranium concentrations in water and sediment samples and thorium concentrations in sediment samples are given. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting (DNC). Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, scandium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, and zinc. All sediments were analyzed for uranium by DNC. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 9 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million.

  13. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Lewistown NTMS Quadrangle, Montana, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    Totals of 758 water and 1170 sediment samples were collected from 1649 locations in the Levistown quadrangle. Water samples were collected at streams, springs, wells, ponds, and marshes; sediment samples were obtained from streams, springs, and ponds. Histograms and statistical data for uranium concentrations in water and sediment samples and thorium concentrations in sediment samples are given. All samples were collected at the nominal reconnaissance density of one sample location per 10 km/sup 2/. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments. Uranium to thorium (U/Th) ratios for sediment samples are included. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB U were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting. Sediments were analyzed for U and Th as well as Al, Sb, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Ce, Cs, Cl, Cr, Co, Cu, Dy, Eu, Au, Hf, Fe, La, Pb, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Ni, Nb, K, Rb, Sa, Sc, Ag, Na, Sr, Ta, Tb, Sn, Ti, W, V, Yb, and Zn. All sediments were analyzed for U by delayed neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 9 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results are reported as parts per million. Descriptions of procedures used for analysis of water and sediments samples as well as analytical precisions and detection limits are given.

  14. Detection of mercury ions using silver telluride nanoparticles as a substrate and recognition element through surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chia-Wei; Lin, Zong-Hong; Roy, Prathik; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we unveil a new sensing strategy for sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) using Ag2Te nanoparticles (NPs) as a substrate and recognition element and rhodamine 6G (R6G) as a reporter. Ag2Te NPs prepared from tellurium dioxide and silver nitrate and hydrazine in aqueous solution containing sodium dodecyl sulfate at 90°C with an average size of 26.8 ± 4.1 nm (100 counts) have strong SERS activity. The Ag2Te substrate provides strong SERS signals of R6G with an enhancement factor of 3.6 × 105 at 1360 cm−1, which is comparable to Ag NPs. After interaction of Ag2Te NPs with Hg2+, some HgTe NPs are formed, leading to decreases in the SERS signal of R6G, mainly because HgTe NPs relative to Ag2Te NPs have weaker SERS activity. Under optimum conditions, this SERS approach using Ag2Te as substrates is selective for the detection of Hg2+, with a limit of detection of 3 nM and linearity over 10–150 nM. The practicality of this approach has been validated for the determination of the concentrations of spiked Hg2+ in a pond water sample. PMID:24790948

  15. U-Th-Pb ion microprobe analysis of monazite from the Paleoproterozoic Karrat rare earth element (REE) deposit, western Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, A.; Grove, M.; Bird, D. K.

    2012-12-01

    The Karrat rare earth element (REE) deposit is located at 72°N on the Niaqornakavsak peninsula of Qeqertarssuq Island on the western coast of Greenland. Metasomatic alteration of an amphibolite host rock by carbonatite derived fluids resulted in REE mineralization in the Karrat Isfjord area. REE in the mineralization are primarily found in bastnasite, allanite, and monazite. In-situ analysis of monazite was conducted on samples obtained from three sites of mineralization: (1) the primary deposit at Niaqornakavsak consisting of a single distinct ~30m thick unit; (2) at Umiamako Nuna 7 km to the east of Niaqornakavsak where the majority of REE mineralization occurs within the first 20m of the surface; and (3) a 6m thick REE-rich vein 100m below the surface at Umiamako Nuna. Formation ages for monazite at Niaqornakavsak, Umiamako Nuna (surface), and Umiamako Nuna (vein) have been calculated using 207Pb/206Pb, 206Pb/238U, and 208Pb/232Th isotope ratios. Multiple isotope ratios were examined to determine the ideal method of monazite analysis based on the inherent issues of low U content of monazite, difficulties measuring 204Pb, common Pb corrections, and peak interferences resulting from high concentrations of REE. 208Pb/232Th analysis resulted in the best precision and smallest spread of values. Energy filtering was applied to 208Pb/232Th analyses in an effort to reduce interferences at several peaks. Although all three isotope ratio analyses result in a Paleoproterozoic age similar to the timing of convergence of the North Atlantic craton, Rae craton, and Aasiat domain as well as the emplacement of the Prøven Igneous Complex in Greenland (1.95-1.80Ga), the values range between 1.7-1.9Ga depending on the isotope ratio.

  16. Freshwater Inflows to San Francisco Bay and Estuary, California From Ion Microprobe Analysis of Trace Elements in Estuarine Bivalve Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takesue, R. K.; Bacon, C. R.; Brown, C. L.; Schwartz, C. L.; Wooden, J. L.

    2002-12-01

    In San Francisco Bay and Estuary, salinity and trace metal distribution are closely linked to freshwater inflow from the Sacramento-San Joaquin (S-SJ) Rivers. Because the magnitude and timing of precipitation and snow melt influence river flow, records of salinity and trace metal variations in SF Bay-Estuary may provide information about regional climate variability. Some trace elements are incorporated into growth-banded calcium carbonate bivalve shells in proportion to ambient water concentration, or with a dependence on environmental conditions such as temperature, salinity, or biological productivity. The work presented here will explore whether such geochemical tracers and proxy relationships exist in modern SF Bay and Estuary bivalve shells, with an ultimate goal of using these relationships to reconstruct past regional climatological and local environmental conditions. A fast-growing euryhaline clam Potamocorbula amurensis was chosen for modern calibration studies because its physiology and ecology are well characterized, including tissue trace metal concentrations. High resolution trace metal records in P. amurensis shells may complement ongoing monthly monitoring efforts by providing information about short-term (weekly) changes in estuarine trace metal distributions, or by providing information about distributions before monitoring began. P. amurensis shells were collected near the confluence of the S-SJ Rivers (0-12 psu) and in northern SF Bay (up to 26 psu) following flood (1995) and drought (1991) years. B, Mg, S, V, Cr, Mn, Sr, and Ba concentrations were measured in situ across growth bands in shell cross sections by secondary ionization mass spectrometry (Stanford-USGSSHRIMP-RG). [M]/Cashell profiles were compared to records of calculated Delta outflow (an estimate of net S-SJ River discharge), salinity, and temperature. S-SJ waters entering SF Bay and Estuary are naturally enriched in V. All V/Cashell profiles showed peaks corresponding to winter

  17. Role of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, α Subunit and cAMP-Response Element Binding Protein 1 in Synergistic Release of Interleukin 8 by Prostaglandin E2 and Nickel in Lung Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Fabisiak, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have linked exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution with acute respiratory infection and chronic respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. We have previously shown that soluble nickel (Ni), a common component of PM, alters the release of CXC chemokines from cultured human lung fibroblasts (HLF) in response to microbial stimuli via a pathway dependent on disrupted prostaglandin (PG)E2 signaling. The current study sought to identify the molecular events underlying Ni-induced alterations in PGE2 signaling and its effects on IL-8 production. PGE2 synergistically enhances Ni-induced IL-8 release from HLF in a concentration-dependent manner. The effects of PGE2 were mimicked by butaprost and PGE1-alcohol and inhibited with antagonists AH6809 and L-161,982, indicating PGE2 signals via PGE2 receptors 2 and 4. PGE2 and forskolin stimulated cAMP, but it was only in the presence of Ni-induced hypoxia-inducible factor 1, α subunit (HIF1A) that these agents stimulated IL-8 release. The Ni-induced HIF1A DNA binding was enhanced by PGE2 and mediated, in part, by activation of p38 MAPK. Negation of cAMP-response element binding protein 1 or HIF1A using short interfering RNA blocked the synergistic interactions between Ni and PGE2. The results of the current study provide novel information on the ability of atmospheric hypoxia-mimetic metals to disrupt the release of immune-modulating chemokines by HLF in response to PGE2. Moreover, in the presence of HIF1A, cAMP-mediated signaling pathways may be altered to exacerbate inflammatory-like processes in lung tissue, imparting a susceptibility of PM-exposed populations to adverse respiratory health effects. PMID:23526216

  18. Oxidative mobilization of cerium and uranium and enhanced release of "immobile" high field strength elements from igneous rocks in the presence of the biogenic siderophore desferrioxamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Dennis; Kopf, Sebastian; Bau, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Polyvalent trace elements such as the high field strength elements (HFSE) are commonly considered rather immobile during low-temperature water-rock interaction. Hence, they have become diagnostic tools that are widely applied in geochemical studies. We present results of batch leaching experiments focused on the mobilization of certain HFSE (Y, Zr, Hf, Th, U and rare earth elements) from mafic, intermediate and felsic igneous rocks in the presence and absence, respectively, of the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB). Our data show that DFOB strongly enhances the mobility of these trace elements during low-temperature water-rock interaction. The presence of DFOB produces two distinct features in the Rare Earths and Yttrium (REY) patterns of leaching solutions, regardless of the mineralogical and chemical composition or the texture of the rock type studied. Bulk rock-normalized REY patterns of leaching solutions with DFOB show (i) a very distinct positive Ce anomaly and (ii) depletion of La and other light REY relative to the middle REY, with a concave downward pattern between La and Sm. These features are not observed in experiments with hydrochloric acid, acetic acid or deionized water. In DFOB-bearing leaching solutions Ce and U are decoupled from and selectively enriched relative to light REY and Th, respectively, due to oxidation to Ce(IV) and U(VI). Oxidation of Ce3+ and U4+ is promoted by the significantly higher stability of the Ce(IV) and U(VI) DFOB complexes as compared to the Ce(III) and U(IV) DFOB complexes. This is similar to the relationship between the Ce(IV)- and Ce(III)-pentacarbonate complexes that cause positive Ce anomalies in alkaline lakes. However, while formation of Ce(IV) carbonate complexes is confined to alkaline environments, Ce(IV) DFOB complexes may produce positive Ce anomalies even in mildly acidic and near-neutral natural waters. Siderophore-promoted dissolution processes also significantly enhance mobility of other 'immobile' HFSE

  19. Effect of weathering on abundance and release of potentially toxic elements in soils developed on Lower Cambrian black shales, P. R. China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changxun; Peng, Bo; Peltola, Pasi; Tang, Xiaoyan; Xie, Shurong

    2012-06-01

    This paper examines the geochemical features of 8 soil profiles developed on metalliferous black shales distributed in the central parts of the South China black shale horizon. The concentrations of 21 trace elements and 8 major elements were determined using ICP-MS and XRF, respectively, and weathering intensity (W) was calculated according to a new technique recently proposed in the literature. The data showed that the black shale soils inherited a heterogeneous geochemical character from their parent materials. A partial least square regression model and EF(bedrock) (enrichment factor normalized to underlying bedrock) indicated that W was not a major control in the redistribution of trace metals. Barium, Sn, Cu, V, and U tended to be leached in the upper soil horizons and trapped by Al and Fe oxides, whereas Sb, Cd, and Mo with negative EF values across the whole profiles may have been leached out during the first stage of pedogenesis (mainly weathering of black shale). Compared with the Chinese average soils, the soils were strongly enriched in the potentially toxic metals Mo, Cd, Sb, Sn, U, V, Cu, and Ba, among which the 5 first listed were enriched to the highest degrees. Elevated concentrations of these toxic metals can have a long-term negative effect on human health, in particular, the soils in mining areas dominated by strongly acidic conditions. As a whole, the black shale soils have much in common with acid sulfate soils. Therefore, black shale soils together with acid sulfate soils deserve more attention in the context of metal exposure and human health. PMID:21674160

  20. Mechanical testing and macro-mechanical finite element simulation of the deformation, fracture, and short circuit initiation of cylindrical Lithium ion battery cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, Lars; Fehrenbach, Clemens

    2012-09-01

    A quasi-static mechanical abuse test program on cylindrical Lithium ion battery cells has been performed at a state of charge (SoC) of 0%. The investigated load cases involved radial crushing, local lateral indentation and global three-point bending of the cell. During the tests, the punch load, the punch displacement, the cell voltage and the temperature development of the cell have been monitored using an infrared camera and temperature sensors. After the test, the cells have been analysed using computer tomography. It is indicated that macroscopic jelly roll fracture on a global scale initiates the internal short circuits, revealed by a sudden decrease of the global mechanical load due to the rupture, followed by a drop of the measured voltage and immediate increase in cell temperature. A macro-mechanical finite element crash simulation model has been established for the cell housing and the jelly roll. The classical stress-based criterion after Mohr and Coulomb (MC) has been applied to predict fracture and the initiation of an internal short circuit of the jelly roll. The MC criterion correctly represents the punch displacement to fracture, where the predicted fracture locations correspond to the observed locations of the internal short circuits of the cells.

  1. M-shell x-ray production by 0.8-4.0-MeV 4He+ ions in ten elements from hafnium to thorium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajek, M.; Kobzev, A. P.; Sandrik, R.; Skrypnik, A. V.; Ilkhamov, R. A.; Khusmurodov, S. H.; Lapicki, G.

    1990-11-01

    M-shell x-ray production cross sections are reported for 72Hf, 73Ta, 74W, 75Re, 76Os, 77Ir, 78Pt, 79Au, 83Bi, and 90Th bombarded by 4He ions of energy 0.8-4.0 MeV. The measured cross sections are compared with the predictions of the semiclassical and first-order Born approximations and the calculations of the perturbed-stationary-state (PSS) theory that accounts for energy-loss (E), Coulomb deflection (C), and relativistic (R) effects (ECPSSR). The ECPSSR theory gives the best overall description of the measured data, although systematical discrepancies are found in the low-velocity region. Apart from deficiency of the available M-shell Coster-Kronig factors and fluorescence yields near or above Z2=74, where strong M4-M5N6,7 Coster-Kronig transitions become energetically forbidden, the increasing underestimation of the data by the ECPSSR theory with decreasing projectile velocities is genuine. In fact, we have found previously [Pajek et al., Phys. Rev. A 42, 261 (1990)] the same discrepancy for identical target elements bombarded by protons at comparably low velocities.

  2. Design and performance of a combined secondary ion mass spectrometry-scanning probe microscopy instrument for high sensitivity and high-resolution elemental three-dimensional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, Tom; Fleming, Yves; Gerard, Mathieu; Gysin, Urs; Glatzel, Thilo; Meyer, Ernst; Wegmann, Urs; Maier, Urs; Odriozola, Aitziber Herrero; Uehli, Daniel

    2012-06-15

    State-of-the-art secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) instruments allow producing 3D chemical mappings with excellent sensitivity and spatial resolution. Several important artifacts however arise from the fact that SIMS 3D mapping does not take into account the surface topography of the sample. In order to correct these artifacts, we have integrated a specially developed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) system into a commercial Cameca NanoSIMS 50 instrument. This new SPM module, which was designed as a DN200CF flange-mounted bolt-on accessory, includes a new high-precision sample stage, a scanner with a range of 100 {mu}m in x and y direction, and a dedicated SPM head which can be operated in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy modes. Topographical information gained from AFM measurements taken before, during, and after SIMS analysis as well as the SIMS data are automatically compiled into an accurate 3D reconstruction using the software program 'SARINA,' which was developed for this first combined SIMS-SPM instrument. The achievable lateral resolutions are 6 nm in the SPM mode and 45 nm in the SIMS mode. Elemental 3D images obtained with our integrated SIMS-SPM instrument on Al/Cu and polystyrene/poly(methyl methacrylate) samples demonstrate the advantages of the combined SIMS-SPM approach.

  3. Skin tissue engineering for the infected wound site: biodegradable PLA nanofibers and a novel approach for silver ion release evaluated in a 3D coculture system of keratinocytes and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mohiti-Asli, Mahsa; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2014-10-01

    Wound infection presents a challenging and growing problem. With the increased prevalence and growth of multidrug-resistant bacteria, there is a mounting need to reduce and eliminate wound infections using methodologies that limit the ability of bacteria to evolve into further drug-resistant strains. A well-known strategy for combating bacterial infection and preventing wound sepsis is through the delivery of silver ions to the wound site. High surface area silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) allowing extensive silver ion release have therefore been explored in different wound dressings and/or skin substitutes. However, it has been recently shown that AgNPs can penetrate into the stratum corneum of skin or diffuse into the cellular plasma membrane, and may interfere with a variety of cellular mechanisms. The goal of this study was to introduce and evaluate a new type of high surface area metallic silver in the form of highly porous silver microparticles (AgMPs). Polylactic acid (PLA) nanofibers were successfully loaded with either highly porous AgMPs or AgNPs and the antimicrobial efficacy and cytotoxicity of the two silver-based wound dressings were assessed and compared. To better mimic the physiological environment in vivo where both human cells and bacteria are present, a novel coculture system combining human epidermal keratinocytes and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria was designed to simultaneously evaluate human skin cell cytotoxicity with antimicrobial efficacy in a three-dimensional environment. We found that highly porous AgMPs could be successfully incorporated in nanofibrous wound dressings, and exhibited comparable antimicrobial efficacy and cytotoxicity to AgNPs. Further, PLA nanofibers containing highly porous AgMPs exhibited steady silver ion release, at a greater rate of release, than nanofibers containing AgNPs. The replacement of AgNPs with the newly introduced AgMPs overcomes concerns regarding the use of nanoparticles and holds great promise as skin

  4. Skin Tissue Engineering for the Infected Wound Site: Biodegradable PLA Nanofibers and a Novel Approach for Silver Ion Release Evaluated in a 3D Coculture System of Keratinocytes and Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Mohiti-Asli, Mahsa; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    2014-01-01

    Wound infection presents a challenging and growing problem. With the increased prevalence and growth of multidrug-resistant bacteria, there is a mounting need to reduce and eliminate wound infections using methodologies that limit the ability of bacteria to evolve into further drug-resistant strains. A well-known strategy for combating bacterial infection and preventing wound sepsis is through the delivery of silver ions to the wound site. High surface area silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) allowing extensive silver ion release have therefore been explored in different wound dressings and/or skin substitutes. However, it has been recently shown that AgNPs can penetrate into the stratum corneum of skin or diffuse into the cellular plasma membrane, and may interfere with a variety of cellular mechanisms. The goal of this study was to introduce and evaluate a new type of high surface area metallic silver in the form of highly porous silver microparticles (AgMPs). Polylactic acid (PLA) nanofibers were successfully loaded with either highly porous AgMPs or AgNPs and the antimicrobial efficacy and cytotoxicity of the two silver-based wound dressings were assessed and compared. To better mimic the physiological environment in vivo where both human cells and bacteria are present, a novel coculture system combining human epidermal keratinocytes and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria was designed to simultaneously evaluate human skin cell cytotoxicity with antimicrobial efficacy in a three-dimensional environment. We found that highly porous AgMPs could be successfully incorporated in nanofibrous wound dressings, and exhibited comparable antimicrobial efficacy and cytotoxicity to AgNPs. Further, PLA nanofibers containing highly porous AgMPs exhibited steady silver ion release, at a greater rate of release, than nanofibers containing AgNPs. The replacement of AgNPs with the newly introduced AgMPs overcomes concerns regarding the use of nanoparticles and holds great promise as skin

  5. Two-dimensional microchemical observation of mast cell biogenic amine release as monitored by a 128 × 128 array-type charge-coupled device ion image sensor.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Toshiaki; Tamamura, Youichiro; Tokunaga, Kenta; Sakurai, Takashi; Kato, Ryo; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2014-05-01

    Available array-type, chemical-sensing image sensors generally only provide on/off responses to the sensed chemical and produce qualitative information. Therefore, there is a need for an array sensor design that can detect chemical concentration changes to produce quantitative, event-sensitive information. In this study, a 128 × 128 array-type image sensor was modified and applied to imaging of biogenic amines released from stimulated rat mast cells, providing recordable responses of the time course of their release and diffusion. The imaging tool was manufactured by an integrated circuit process, including complementary metal oxide semiconductor and charge-coupled device technology. It was fitted with an amine-sensitive membrane prepared from plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) including a hydrophobic anion, which allowed the sensor to detect amines, such as histamine and serotonin, in Tyrode's solution. As mast cells were larger in diameter than the pixel hollows, some pixels monitored amines released from single cells. The image from the array responses yielded sequential snapshots at a practical frame speed that followed amine concentration changes over time, after mast cell amine release was synchronized by chemical stimulation. This sensor was shown to be sensitive to amine release at very low stimulus concentrations and was able to detect localized spots of high amine release. The entire time course of the amine release was recorded, including maximum concentration at 4-6 s and signal disappearance at 30 s after stimulation. With further development, this sensor will increase opportunities to study a variety of biological systems, including neuronal chemical processes. PMID:24731060

  6. Metal DiCarbides as Intermediate Species in thermal Ion Formation Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew G. Watrous; James E. Delmore

    2009-09-01

    The lanthanide elements (lanthanum to lutetium) adsorbed onto resin beads have been studied as thermal ionization sources. Temperatures at which these ion sources gave maximum intensities were measured for each of these elements. The temperature trends track the trends in the dissociation energies of the corresponding metal dicarbide compounds. The metal dicarbide functions as a carrier to take the lanthanide element to higher temperatures than otherwise attainable. This results in the release of the atomic species at a higher temperature where the ionization probability is significantly increased. This breaking of molecular bonds releasing the atoms at these elevated temperatures is hypothesized as the reason for high ionization efficiencies.

  7. Element- and charge-state-resolved ion energies in the cathodic arc plasma from composite AlCr cathodes in argon, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Robert; Polcik, Peter; Anders, André

    2015-01-01

    The energy distribution functions of ions in the cathodic arc plasma using composite AlCr cathodes were measured as a function of the background gas pressure in the range 0.5 to 3.5 Pa for different cathode compositions and gas atmospheres. The most abundant aluminium ions were Al+ regardless of the background gas species, whereas Cr2+ ions were dominating in Ar and N2 and Cr+ in O2 atmospheres. The energy distributions of the aluminium and chromium ions typically consisted of a high-energy fraction due to acceleration in the expanding plasma plume from the cathode spot and thermalised ions that were subjected to collisions in the plasma cloud. The fraction of the latter increased with increasing background gas pressure. Atomic nitrogen and oxygen ions showed similar energy distributions as the aluminium and chromium ions, whereas the argon and molecular nitrogen and oxygen ions were formed at greater distance from the cathode spot and thus less subject to accelerating gradients. In addition to the positively charged metal and gas ions, negatively charged oxygen and oxygen-containing ions were observed in O2 atmosphere. The obtained results are intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the ion energies and charge states in the arc plasma of AlCr composite cathodes in different gas atmospheres as such plasmas are frequently used to deposit thin films and coatings. PMID:26120236

  8. Barium release system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Stokes, C. S.; Smith, E. W.; Murphy, W. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A chemical system is described for releasing a good yield of free barium neutral atoms and barium ions in the upper atmosphere and interplanetary space for the study of the geophysical properties of the medium. The barium is released in the vapor phase so that it can be ionized by solar radiation and also be excited to emit resonance radiation in the visible range. The ionized luminous cloud of barium becomes a visible indication of magnetic and electrical characteristics in space and allows determination of these properties over relatively large areas at a given time.

  9. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    RHIC and LHC injector chains for the heaviest ion species used to date. The RHIC pulsed sputter source (PSC) and Tandem electrostatic accelerator are being replaced by an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and short linac [08Ale1]. With EBIS beams of any element can be prepared for RHIC including uranium and spin-polarized 3He. At CERN an ECR ion source is used, followed by an RFQ and Linac. The ions are then accumulated, electron cooled, and accelerated in LEIR. After transfer to and acceleration in the PS, ion beams are injected into the SPS.

  10. Negative ion generator

    DOEpatents

    Stinnett, R.W.

    1984-05-08

    A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions. 8 figs.

  11. Negative ion generator

    DOEpatents

    Stinnett, Regan W.

    1984-01-01

    A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions.

  12. Concentration-triggered fission product release from zirconia: consequences for nuclear safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentils, A.; Thomé, L.; Jagielski, J.; Garrido, F.

    2002-02-01

    Crystalline oxide ceramics, more particularly zirconia and spinel, are promising matrices for plutonium and minor actinide transmutation. An important issue concerning these materials is the investigation of their ability to confine radiotoxic elements resulting from the fission of actinides. This letter reports the study of the release, upon annealing or irradiation at high temperature, of one of the most toxic fission product (Cs) in zirconia. The foreign species are introduced by ion implantation and the release is studied by Rutherford backscattering experiments. The results emphasize the decisive influence of the fission product concentration on the release properties. The Cs mobility in zirconia is strongly increased when the impurity concentration exceeds a threshold of the order of a few atomic per cent. Irradiation with medium-energy heavy ions is shown to enhance Cs outdiffusion with respect to annealing at the same temperature.

  13. Complexing of metal ions by humic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, N.D.; Zhang, Y.; Jones, M.N.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction of metal ions with humic substances is being studied using two different techniques. UV-scanning ultracentrifugation is being used to determine molecular weights and to investigate changes in aggregation brought about by metal ion complexation. The relationship between cation charge and conformation of the humic ligands is also being investigated. The complexation of actinide elements (U, Np, Pu, Am) by humic substances from soils contaminated by both natural processes and by low-level effluent releases is also being studied. Gel permeation chromatography has been used to show both that different fractions of humic substances vary greatly in their effectiveness as ligands and that different actinide elements associate with different fractions. These studies have also shown that uranium desorption is kinetically controlled by humic substances.

  14. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOEpatents

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  15. Toxicological risk assessment of elemental gold following oral exposure to sheets and nanoparticles - A review.

    PubMed

    Hadrup, Niels; Sharma, Anoop K; Poulsen, Morten; Nielsen, Elsa

    2015-07-01

    Elemental gold is used as a food coloring agent and in dental fillings. In addition, gold nanoparticles are gaining increasing attention due to their potential use as inert carriers for medical purposes. Although elemental gold is considered to be inert, there is evidence to suggest the release of gold ions from its surface. Elemental gold, or the released ions, is, to some extent, absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract. Gold is distributed to organs such as the liver, heart, kidneys and lungs. The main excretion route of absorbed gold is through urine. Data on the oral toxicity of elemental gold is limited. The acute toxicity of elemental gold seems to be low, as rats were unaffected by a single dose of 2000mg nanoparticles/kg of body weight. Information on repeated dose toxicity is very limited. Skin rashes have been reported in humans following the ingestion of liquors containing gold. In addition, gold released from dental restorations has been reported to increase the risk of developing gold hypersensitivity. Regarding genotoxicity, in vitro studies indicate that gold nanoparticles induce DNA damage in mammalian cells. In vivo, gold nanoparticles induce genotoxic effects in Drosophila melanogaster; however, genotoxicity studies in mammals are lacking. Overall, based on the literature and taking low human exposure into account, elemental gold via the oral route is not considered to pose a health concern to humans in general. PMID:25929617

  16. Effect of inflammatory conditions and H2O2 on bare and coated Ti-6Al-4V surfaces: Corrosion behavior, metal ion release and Ca-P formation under long-term immersion in DMEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhn, Sarah; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2015-12-01

    The surface oxide film and calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) formation on Ti-6Al-4V during long-term immersion in biological environments play a decisive role for the biocompatibility of the implant. Hence, the aim of the study was to evaluate the corrosion resistance, metal ion release and Ca-P formation in DMEM under physiological conditions at pH values of 7.4 and in comparison under simulated inflammatory conditions with pH 5 and in presence of H2O2. Furthermore, the influence of the immersion conditions was investigated on different surface treatments: on bare Ti-6Al-4V, after anodization, and for TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) and hydroxyapatite (HA)-incorporated TiO2-NP coatings. In the absence of H2O2, the impedance response indicated a stable thin oxide film and Ca-P formation after 28 days or 56 days depending on the coating, while under inflammatory conditions the Ca-P formation on the surface is time-delayed and dissolution of the anodized oxide layer as well as selective etching of the β-phase and phase boundaries in case of the bare alloy occur. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), however, indicates a good general corrosion behavior in all cases. The quantities of Ti, Al and V released from the bare and coated Ti-6Al-4V alloy markedly increased with decreasing pH (pH ≤ 5). Although the rapid increase of metal release was observed for all samples at pH 5, the quantities were significantly higher for the bare and anodized alloy than after coating with TiO2-NP or HA.

  17. Rare earth element selenochemistry of immiscible liquids and zircon at Apollo 14 - An ion probe study of evolved rocks on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Crozaz, Ghislaine

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of trace-element analyses of three lunar zircons. The major-element and REE compositions were determined using electron microprobes, and a correction was made for zircon for Zr-Si-O molecular interferences in the La to Pr mass region. The three zircons were found to exhibit similar REE abundances and patterns. Results of the analyses confirm earlier studies (Hess et al., 1975; Watson, 1976; Neal and Taylor, 1989) on the partitioning behavior of trace elements in immiscible liquid-liquid pairs. The results also support the postulated importance of silicate liquid immiscibility in the differentiation of the upper mantle and crust of the moon.

  18. Separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from trivalent transplutonium and rare-earth elements on ion exchangers in solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1988-05-01

    The behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Ce, Eu, and Pr on anion exchangers and cation exchangers mixed with PbO/sub 2/ in solutions of sulfuric acid has been investigated. A significant difference between the distribution coefficients of Bk and Ce, on the one hand, and the remaining transplutonium elements and rare-earth elements, on the other hand, which has been attributed to the oxidation of the first two elements to the tetravalent state, has been discovered. Methods for the preconcentration and separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from the other transplutonium and rare-earth element son anion exchangers in 0.01-0.25 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions and on cation exchangers in 0.75-1.0 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions have been proposed.

  19. Determination of selected elements in whole coal and in coal ash from the eight argonne premium coal samples by atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry, and ion-selective electrode

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doughten, M.W.; Gillison, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Methods for the determination of 24 elements in whole coal and coal ash by inductively coupled argon plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, flame, graphite furnace, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, and by ion-selective electrode are described. Coal ashes were analyzed in triplicate to determine the precision of the methods. Results of the analyses of NBS Standard Reference Materials 1633, 1633a, 1632a, and 1635 are reported. Accuracy of the methods is determined by comparison of the analysis of standard reference materials to their certified values as well as other values in the literature.

  20. Toggle release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Thomas Joseph (Inventor); Yang, Robert Alexander (Inventor); Brown, Christopher William (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The invention relates to a pyrotechnic actuated release mechanism which is mechanically two fault tolerant for effecting release. It is particularly well suited for releasably connecting structures to be used in the space environment or in other aerospace applications. The device comprises a fastener plate and fastener body, each attachable to either one of a pair of structures to be joined. The fastener plate and the body are fastenable by a toggle supported at one end on the fastener plate and mounted for universal pivotal movement thereon. At its other end, which is received in a central opening in the fastener body and adapted for limited pivotal movement therein, the toggle is restrained by three retractable latching pins. Each pin is individually retractable by combustion of a pyrotechnic charge. While retraction of all three pins releases the toggle, the fastener is mechanically two fault tolerant since the failure of any single or pair of the latch pins to retract results in an asymmetrical loading on the toggle and its pivotal movement to effect a release. An annular bolt is mounted on the fastener plate as a support for the socket mounting of the toggle whereby its selective axial movement provides a means for pre-loading the toggle.

  1. Probing the magnetosphere using chemical releases from the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of the chemical release experiments from NASA's Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) program. Preliminary results are given for the CRRES investigations of (1) stimulated electron and ion precipitation, (2) ion transport in the magnetotail, (3) critical ionization velocity, (4) field line tracing and parallel acceleration, (5) diamagnetic cavity formation and collapse, and (6) plasma instabilities. The chemical vapor properties from a thermite release mechanism are also briefly described.

  2. Propensity-matched patient-level comparison of the TAXUS Liberté and TAXUS element (ION) paclitaxel-eluting stents.

    PubMed

    Kereiakes, Dean J; Cannon, Louis A; Ormiston, John A; Turco, Mark A; Mann, Tift; Mishkel, Gregory J; McGarry, Thomas; Wang, Hong; Underwood, Paul; Dawkins, Keith D

    2011-09-15

    Stent design, metal alloy composition, and strut thickness may influence late lumen loss and clinical outcomes after bare metal stent deployment; however, their impact on outcomes after drug-eluting stent deployment is unknown. Although the TAXUS Liberté and ION paclitaxel-eluting stents use similar polymer and drug, the ION stent incorporates a novel thin-strut platinum chromium metal alloy and cell design. We therefore compared patient-level data from 2,298 subjects enrolled into the TAXUS ATLAS (TAXUS Liberté) and PERSEUS (ION) clinical trials. Propensity-score (1:1) matching was performed to adjust for covariate imbalance between stent types. Twelve-month major adverse cardiac events were less frequent after use of the ION compared to the TAXUS Liberté (12.7% vs 8.3%, p <0.001, unadjusted; 12.0% vs 7.5%, p = 0.007, propensity matched) largely because of decreased non-Q-wave myocardial infarction (MI; 2.9% vs 1.4%, p = 0.01, unadjusted; 3.2% vs 0.9%, p = 0.004, propensity matched). The MI difference was predominantly periprocedural and in patients treated with a single stent. In conclusion, this exploratory post hoc analysis demonstrated that the ION was associated with fewer adverse clinical events than the TAXUS Liberté because of decreased non-Q-wave MI. Stent platform-related variables may influence clinical outcomes after drug-eluting stent use despite similar polymer and drug elution. Differences in adjunctive pharmacotherapy and/or stenting technique may also be contributory. PMID:21803319

  3. Endothelial responses of magnesium and other alloying elements in magnesium-based stent materials

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable tailored magnesium (Mg) alloys are some of the most promising scaffolds for cardiovascular stents. During the course of degradation after implantation, all the alloying elements in the scaffold will be released to the surrounding vascular tissues. However, fundamental questions regarding the toxicity of alloying elements towards vascular cells, the maximum amount of each element that could be used in alloy design, or how each of the alloying elements affects vascular cellular activity and gene expression, are still not fully answered. This work systematically addressed these questions by revealing how application of different alloying elements commonly used in Mg stent materials influences several indices of human endothelial cell health, i.e., viability, proliferations, cytoskeletal reorganizations, migration, and the gene expression profile. The overall cell viability and proliferation showed a decreasing trend with increasing concentrations of the ions, and the half maximal effective concentrations (EC50) for each element were determined. When applied at a low concentration of around 10 mM, Mg had no adverse effects but improved cell proliferation and migration instead. Mg ions also altered endothelial gene expression significantly in a dose dependent manner. Most of the changed genes are related to angiogenesis and the cell adhesion signaling pathways. Findings from this work provide useful information on maximum safe doses of these ions for endothelial cells, endothelial responses towards these metal ions, and some guidance for future Mg stent design. PMID:25363018

  4. HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

    1959-01-01

    A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

  5. Elemental characterization of commercial mate tea leaves (Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil.) before and after hot water infusion using ion beam techniques.

    PubMed

    Giulian, Raquel; Santos, Carla Eliete Iochims dos; Shubeita, Samir de Moraes; Silva, Luiza Manfredi da; Dias, Johnny Ferraz; Yoneama, Maria Lúcia

    2007-02-01

    Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil. is used to prepare a traditional tealike beverage widely appreciated in Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, and southern Brazil. In these countries, the tea is popularly known as mate or chimarrão. The aim of this work is to characterize the elemental composition of commercial Ilex paraguariensis and determine the portion of each element present in the leaves that is eluted in the water during the infusion process and consequently ingested by the drinker. Using the particle-induced X-ray emission technique, we verified the presence of Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Rb at different concentrations, which accounts for about 3.4% of the total mass. The results show a loss of about 90% of K and Cl, 50% of Mg and P, and 20% of Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Rb by the leaves after the infusion. The volume of water used in the infusion affects only the concentration of elements such as Cl, P, K, and Mg until the first 600 mL of water, where a steep decrease in the concentration of these elements was observed in brewed leaves. Furthermore, higher water temperatures (typical temperatures used in infusions, between 80 and 100 degrees C) favor the extraction of K and Cl into the infusion, while the concentration of other elements remains practically constant as a function of temperature. PMID:17263469

  6. Ion optics of RHIC electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Okamura, M.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Tan, Y.; Kuznetsov, G.

    2012-02-15

    RHIC electron beam ion source has been commissioned to operate as a versatile ion source on RHIC injection facility supplying ion species from He to Au for Booster. Except for light gaseous elements RHIC EBIS employs ion injection from several external primary ion sources. With electrostatic optics fast switching from one ion species to another can be done on a pulse to pulse mode. The design of an ion optical structure and the results of simulations for different ion species are presented. In the choice of optical elements special attention was paid to spherical aberrations for high-current space charge dominated ion beams. The combination of a gridded lens and a magnet lens in LEBT provides flexibility of optical control for a wide range of ion species to satisfy acceptance parameters of RFQ. The results of ion transmission measurements are presented.

  7. High temperature ion source for an on-line isotope separator

    DOEpatents

    Mlekodaj, Ronald L.

    1979-01-01

    A reduced size ion source for on-line use with a cyclotron heavy-ion beam is provided. A sixfold reduction in source volume while operating with similar input power levels results in a 2000.degree. C. operating temperature. A combined target/window normally provides the reaction products for ionization while isolating the ion source plasma from the cyclotron beam line vacuum. A graphite felt catcher stops the recoiling reaction products and releases them into the plasma through diffusion and evaporation. Other target arrangements are also possible. A twenty-four hour lifetime of unattended operation is achieved, and a wider range of elements can be studied than was heretofore possible.

  8. Separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from trivalent transplutonium and rare earth elements on ion exchange resins in solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-11-01

    Th behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Ce, Eu, and Pr on an anion exchange resin and a cation exchange resin in a mixture with PbO/sub 2/ was investigated in sulfuric acid solutions. A substantial difference was detected in the distribution coefficients of Bk and Ce, on the one hand, and the remaining transplutonium and rare earth elements, on the other, associated with oxidation of the first two elements to the tetravalent state. Methods are proposed for the concentration and separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from the other transplutonium and rare earth elements on an anion exchange resin in solution of 0.01-0.25 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and a cation exchange resin in 0.75-1.0 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/.

  9. Toggle release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Thomas J. (Inventor); Yang, Robert A. (Inventor); Brown, Christopher W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A pyrotechnic actuated structural release device 10 which is mechanically two fault tolerant for release. The device 10 comprises a fastener plate 11 and fastener body 12, each attachable to a different one of a pair of structures to be joined. The fastener plate 11 and body 12 are fastenable by a toggle 13 supported at one end on the fastener plate and mounted for universal pivotal movement thereon. At its other end which is received in a central opening in the fastener body 12 and adapted for limited pivotal movement therein the toggle 13 is restrained by three retractable latching pins 61 symmetrically disposed in equiangular spacing about the axis of the toggle 13 and positionable in latching engagement with an end fitting on the toggle. Each pin 61 is individually retractable by combustion of a pyrotechnic charge 77, the expanding gases of which are applied to a pressure receiving face 67 on the latch pin 61 to effect its retraction from the toggle. While retraction of all three pins 62 releases the toggle, the fastener is mechanically two fault tolerant since the failure of any single one or pair of the latch pins to retract results in an asymmetrical loading on the toggle and its pivotal movement to effect a release. An annular bolt 18 is mounted on the fastener plate 11 as a support for the socket mounting 30, 37 of the toggle whereby its selective axial movement provides a means for preloading the toggle.

  10. Areal distribution of selected trace elements, salinity, and major ions in shallow ground water, Tulare Basin, Southern San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fujii, Roger; Swain, W.C.

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of salinity and selected trace elements in shallow ground water in the Tulare Basin, California, was assessed to evaluate potential problems related to disposal in evaporation ponds of irrigation drain water containing elevated concentrations of selenium and other trace elements. The constituents of primary concern were selenium, arsenic, and salinity; uranium, boron, and molybdenum also were evaluated. Samples from 117 shallow wells were analyzed, and the results for samples from 110 of the wells were interpreted in relation to surficial geology, sediment depositional environment, soil characteristics, and hydrologic processes to determine the geochemical and hydrologic factors affecting the distribution of these constituents in ground water. In general, shallow ground water in areas where concentrations of salinity and most trace elements are elevated is influenced primarily by sediments derived from marine sedimentary rocks originating in the Coast Range, San Emigdio Mountains, and Tehachapi Mountains, and probably by unusual exposures of similar marine formations in the Sierra Nevada. Ground water in areas where concentrations of salinity and trace elements are significantly lower generally is influenced by igneous and metamorphic rocks exposed in the Sierra Nevada. In addition to sources of sediments, evaporation of shallow ground water, as indicated by isotopic enrichment of oxygen-18 and deuterium, increases salinity and concentrations of conservative trace elements such as selenium (under oxidizing conditions) and boron. Redox conditions affect the oxidation state of all trace elements of concern, except boron, and were found to be a major influence on trace-element solubility. Under oxidized conditions, selenate predominates and behaves conservatively, and arsenate predominates and is affected by sorption reactions that can limit arsenic solubility. Under reduced conditions, selenium is reduced to insoluble elemental selenium and arsenite

  11. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bell, W.A. Jr.; Love, L.O.; Prater, W.K.

    1958-01-28

    An ion source is presented capable of producing ions of elements which vaporize only at exceedingly high temperatures, i.e.,--1500 degrees to 3000 deg C. The ion source utilizes beams of electrons focused into a first chamber housing the material to be ionized to heat the material and thereby cause it to vaporize. An adjacent second chamber receives the vaporized material through an interconnecting passage, and ionization of the vaporized material occurs in this chamber. The ionization action is produced by an arc discharge sustained between a second clectron emitting filament and the walls of the chamber which are at different potentials. The resultant ionized material egresses from a passageway in the second chamber. Using this device, materials which in the past could not be processed in mass spectometers may be satisfactorily ionized for such applications.

  12. Calcium release from experimental dental materials.

    PubMed

    Okulus, Zuzanna; Buchwald, Tomasz; Voelkel, Adam

    2016-11-01

    The calcium release from calcium phosphate-containing experimental dental restorative materials was examined. The possible correlation of ion release with initial calcium content, solubility and degree of curing (degree of conversion) of examined materials was also investigated. Calcium release was measured with the use of an ion-selective electrode in an aqueous solution. Solubility was established by the weighing method. Raman spectroscopy was applied for the determination of the degree of conversion, while initial calcium content was examined with the use of energy-dispersive spectroscopy. For examined materials, the amount of calcium released was found to be positively correlated with solubility and initial calcium content. It was also found that the degree of conversion does not affect the ability of these experimental composites to release calcium ions. PMID:27524015

  13. ION-BY-ION COOLING EFFICIENCIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gnat, Orly; Ferland, Gary J.

    2012-03-01

    We present ion-by-ion cooling efficiencies for low-density gas. We use Cloudy (version 10.00) to estimate the cooling efficiencies for each ion of the first 30 elements (H-Zn) individually. We present results for gas temperatures between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 8} K, assuming low densities and optically thin conditions. When nonequilibrium ionization plays a significant role the ionization states deviate from those that obtain in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), and the local cooling efficiency at any given temperature depends on specific nonequilibrium ion fractions. The results presented here allow for an efficient estimate of the total cooling efficiency for any ionic composition. We also list the elemental cooling efficiencies assuming CIE conditions. These can be used to construct CIE cooling efficiencies for non-solar abundance ratios or to estimate the cooling due to elements not included in any nonequilibrium computation. All the computational results are listed in convenient online tables.

  14. - - and M-Shell X-Ray Production Cross-Sections for Beryllium, Aluminum, and Argon Ions Incident upon Selected Elements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Jack Lewis, Jr.

    Incident 0.5 to 2.5 MeV charged particle beams were used to ion- ize the inner-shells of selected targets and study their subsequent emission of characteristic x -rays. ('9)(,4)Be('+) ions were used to examine K-shell x-ray production from thin F, Na, Al, Si, P, Cl, and K targets, L-shell x-ray production from thin Cu, Zn, Ge, Br, Zr, and Ag targets, and M-shell x-ray production from thin Pr, Nd, Eu, Dy, Ho, Hf, W, Au, Pb, and Bi targets. L -shell x-ray production cross sections were also measured for ('27)(,13)Al('+) ions incident upon Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Zr, and Pd targets. M-shell x-ray production cross sections were measured for ('27)(,13)Al('+) and ('40)(,18)Ar('+) ions incident upon Pr, Nd, Gd, Dy, Lu, Hf, Au, Pb, Bi, and U targets. These measurements were performed using the 2.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at North Texas State University. The x-rays were detected with a Si(Li) detector whose efficiency was determined by fitting a theoretical photon absorption curve to experimentally meas- ured values. The x-ray yields were normalized to the simultaneously measured Rutherford backscattered (RBS) yields which resulted in an x-ray production cross section per incident ion. The RBS spec- trum was obtained using a standard surface barrier detector calibrated for to account for the "pulse height defect.". The experimental results are compared to the predictions of both the first Born and ECPSSR theories; each of which is composed of two parts, the direct ionization (DI) of the target electron to the con- tinuum and the capture (EC) of the target electron to the projectile. The first Born describes DI by the Plane-Wave-Born-Approximation (PWBA) and EC by the Oppenheimer-Brinkman-Kramers treatment of Nikolaev (OBKN). ECPSSR expands upon the first Born by using perturbed (PSS) and relativistic (R) target electron wave functions in addition to considering the energy loss (E) of the projectile in the target and its deviation from a straight line trajectory (Coulomb

  15. The effects of reactive-element, ion-implantation-induced amorphous layers on the oxidation of Co-12Cr and Ni-12Cr alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.

    1998-08-01

    Nickel-chromium (Ni-12Cr, wt.%) and cobalt-chromium (Co-12Cr, wt.%) alloys were ion implanted with 150 keV yttrium to fluences that ranged between 2 {times} 10{sup 16} and 1 {times} 0{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}. The influence of the implantation on the microstructure of the alloy was determined. The effect of the highest dose implantation on the alloys` oxidation response at 1,000 C, 48 hr was measured. Both alloys contained an amorphous surface phase as a result of this fluence and one of the effects of oxidation was to recrystallize the amorphized alloy in the first few minutes of oxidation. The lower doses of 2 {times} 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} were sufficient to cause amorphization of both the Ni-12Cr and the Co-12Cr. The implantation reduced the isothermal mass gain by a factor of 25% for the Ni-12Cr, but had a negligible effect on the Co-12Cr alloy. Short-term oxidation of experiments at 600 C showed via transmission electron microscopy that, in the absence of the yttrium implant, the Ni-12Cr alloy forms NiO in the first minute of oxidation and the Co-12Cr alloy forms CoO and CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The implanted Ni-12Cr, on the other hand (1 {times} 10{sup 17} Y{sup +}/cm{sup 2}), forms recrystallized Ni-Cr, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and NiO in the near-surface region, while the implanted Co-12Cr alloy forms CoO, CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and a recrystallized intermetallic alloy from the amorphized region.

  16. Toxic Elements in Soil and Groundwater: Short-Time Study on Electrokinetic Removal of Arsenic in the Presence of other Ions

    PubMed Central

    Leszczynska, Danuta; Ahmad, Hafiz

    2006-01-01

    The electrokinetic technique is an emerging technology presently tested in situ to remove dissolved heavy metals from contaminated groundwater. There is a growing interest for using this system to cleanse clayey soil contaminated by toxic metallic ions. Currently, there are very few available non-destructive treatment methods that could be successfully applied in situ on low permeable type of soil matrix. The main objective of presented study was to validate and possibly enhance the overall efficiency of decontamination by the electrokinetic technique of the low permeable soil polluted by the arsenic in combination with chromium and copper ions. The chosen mixture of ions was imitating leak of pesticide well known as chromate copper arsenate (CCA). The chosen technique is showing a big promise to be used in the future as a portable, easy to install and run on sites with spills or leaks hard to reach otherwise; such as in the dense populated and urbanized areas. Laboratory electrokinetic experiments were designed to understand and possibly manipulate main mechanisms involved during forced migration of ions. All tests were conducted on artificially contaminated kaolinite (low permeable clay soil). Electrokinetic migration was inducted by the low voltage dc current applied through soil column. Series of experiments were designed to assess the efficiency of arsenic-chromium-copper remediation by applying (1) only dc current; and (2) by altering the soil environment. Obtained results showed that arsenic could be successfully removed from the soil in one day (25 hours) span. It was significant time reduction, very important during emergency response. Mass recovered at the end of each test depended on initial condition of soil and type of flushing solution. The best results were obtained, when soil was flushed with either NaOH or NaOCl (total removal efficiency 74.4% and 78.1%, respectively). Direct analysis of remained arsenic in soil after these tests confirmed

  17. Toxic elements in soil and groundwater: short-time study on electrokinetic removal of arsenic in the presence of other ions.

    PubMed

    Leszczynska, Danuta; Ahmad, Hafiz

    2006-06-01

    The electrokinetic technique is an emerging technology presently tested in situ to remove dissolved heavy metals from contaminated groundwater. There is a growing interest for using this system to cleanse clayey soil contaminated by toxic metallic ions. Currently, there are very few available non-destructive treatment methods that could be successfully applied in situ on low permeable type of soil matrix. The main objective of presented study was to validate and possibly enhance the overall efficiency of decontamination by the electrokinetic technique of the low permeable soil polluted by the arsenic in combination with chromium and copper ions. The chosen mixture of ions was imitating leak of pesticide well known as chromate copper arsenate (CCA). The chosen technique is showing a big promise to be used in the future as a portable, easy to install and run on sites with spills or leaks hard to reach otherwise; such as in the dense populated and urbanized areas. Laboratory electrokinetic experiments were designed to understand and possibly manipulate main mechanisms involved during forced migration of ions. All tests were conducted on artificially contaminated kaolinite (low permeable clay soil). Electrokinetic migration was inducted by the low voltage dc current applied through soil column. Series of experiments were designed to assess the efficiency of arsenic-chromium-copper remediation by applying (1) only dc current; and (2) by altering the soil environment. Obtained results showed that arsenic could be successfully removed from the soil in one day (25 hours) span. It was significant time reduction, very important during emergency response. Mass recovered at the end of each test depended on initial condition of soil and type of flushing solution. The best results were obtained, when soil was flushed with either NaOH or NaOCl (total removal efficiency 74.4% and 78.1%, respectively). Direct analysis of remained arsenic in soil after these tests confirmed

  18. Statistical Analysis of Major Ion and Trace Element Geochemistry of Water, 1986-2006, at Seven Wells Transecting the Freshwater/Saline-Water Interface of the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, Barbara J.

    2008-01-01

    This report by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, describes the results of a statistical analysis of major ion and trace element geochemistry of water at seven wells transecting the freshwater/saline-water interface of the Edwards aquifer in San Antonio, Texas, either over time or in response to variations in hydrologic conditions. The data used in this report were collected during 1986-2006. The seven monitoring wells are screened at different depths in the aquifer at three sites that form a generally north-to-south transect. The three wells of the southern site and the deeper of the two middle-site wells are open to the freshwater/saline-water transition zone, which contains saline water. The shallower well of the middle site and the two wells of the northern site are open to the freshwater zone. Mean specific conductance (SC) values were greater at transition-zone wells than at freshwater-zone wells, but SC did not vary systematically with depth. Concentrations of all major ions except bicarbonate were greater at transition-zone wells than at freshwater-zone wells, but concentrations tended to be more variable at freshwater-zone wells. Mean molar ratios of magnesium:calcium, sulfate:chloride, and sodium:chloride were similar at transition-zone wells and freshwater-zone wells. Concentrations of trace elements for many water samples at the seven transect wells were below the laboratory analytical reporting level. Detections of trace elements were more frequent at transition-zone wells, and mean concentrations of cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, and silver were elevated at transition-zone wells relative to freshwater-zone wells. All strong correlations between SC and major ions were positive, and in general there were more and stronger correlations between SC and major ions in the water from the freshwater-zone wells than from the transition-zone wells. Except for the shallowest transition-zone well, the transition

  19. Ion optics of RHIC EBIS

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Okamura, M.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Tan, Y.; Kuznetsov, G.

    2011-09-10

    RHIC EBIS has been commissioned to operate as a versatile ion source on RHIC injection facility supplying ion species from He to Au for Booster. Except for light gaseous elements RHIC EBIS employs ion injection from several external primary ion sources. With electrostatic optics fast switching from one ion species to another can be done on a pulse to pulse mode. The design of an ion optical structure and the results of simulations for different ion species are presented. In the choice of optical elements special attention was paid to spherical aberrations for high-current space charge dominated ion beams. The combination of a gridded lens and a magnet lens in LEBT provides flexibility of optical control for a wide range of ion species to satisfy acceptance parameters of RFQ. The results of ion transmission measurements are presented.

  20. Chemical weathering in the plain and peninsular sub-basins of the Ganga: Impact on major ion chemistry and elemental fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Santosh K.; Singh, Sunil K.; Krishnaswami, S.

    2010-04-01

    Concentrations of major ions, Sr and 87Sr/ 86Sr have been measured in the Gomti, the Son and the Yamuna, tributaries of the Ganga draining its peninsular and plain sub-basins to determine their contribution to the water chemistry of the Ganga and silicate and carbonate erosion of the Ganga basin. The results show high concentrations of Na and Sr in the Gomti, the Yamuna and the Ganga (at Varanasi) with much of the Na in excess of Cl. The use of this 'excess Na' (Na∗ = Na riv - Cl riv) a common index of silicate weathering yield values of ˜18 tons km -2 yr -1 for silicate erosion rate (SER) in the Gomti and the Yamuna basins. There are however, indications that part of this Na∗ can be from saline/alkaline soils abundant in their basins, raising questions about its use as a proxy to determine SER of the Ganga plain. Independent estimation of SER based on dissolved Si as a proxy give an average value of ˜5 tons km -2 yr -1 for the peninsular and the plain drainages, several times lower than that derived using Na∗. The major source of uncertainty in this estimate is the potential removal of Si from rivers by biological and chemical processes. The Si based SER and CER (carbonate erosion rate) are also much lower than that in the Himalayan sub-basin of the Ganga. The lower relief, runoff and physical erosion in the peninsular and the plain basins relative to the Himalayan sub-basin and calcite precipitation in them all could be contributing to their lower erosion rates. Budget calculations show that the Yamuna, the Son and Gomti together account for ˜75% Na, 41% Mg and ˜53% Sr and 87Sr of their supply to the Ganga from its major tributaries, with the Yamuna dominating the contribution. The results highlight the important role of the plain and peninsular sub-basins in determining the solute and Sr isotope budgets of the Ganga. The study also shows that the anthropogenic contribution accounts for ⩽10% of the major ion fluxes of the Ganga at Rajmahal during high

  1. Research of the thermal-tension condition and the elemental composition gradient changes of binary systems produced by combined ion-plasma method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blesman, A. I.; Postnikov, D. V.; Polonyankin, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    To increase the life cycle of the constructional steel products working at high temperatures in air environment the combined ion-plasma method of surface modification was elaborated. Using the method described in the paper, constructional steel J24056 samples with different refractory metal coatings such as molybdenum and tantalum and film-thickness up to 10 microns were prepared. The calculations of the temperature distribution and the tension on the depth of the specified sample brand coated steel were performed. The research of oxygen distribution in the surface layer after high temperature annealing in an air atmosphere has been conducted. An estimation model of the oxygen distribution within the grains in a binary steel-coating system is proposed in the paper.

  2. Quick release latch for reactor scram

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Melvin L.; Shawver, Bruce M.

    1976-01-01

    A simple, reliable, and fast-acting means for releasing a control element and allowing it to be inserted rapidly into the core region of a nuclear reactor for scram purposes. A latch mechanism grips a coupling head on a nuclear control element to connect the control element to the control drive assembly. The latch mechanism is closed by tensioning a cable or rod with an actuator. The control element is released by de-energizing the actuator, providing fail-safe, rapid release of the control element to effect reactor shutdown. A sensing rod provides indication that the control element is properly positioned in the latch. Two embodiments are illustrated, one involving a collet-type latch mechanism, the other a pliers-type latch mechanism with the actuator located inside the reactor vessel.

  3. Quick release latch for reactor scram

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, M.L.; Shawver, B.M.

    1975-09-16

    A simple, reliable, and fast-acting means for releasing a control element and allowing it to be inserted rapidly into the core region of a nuclear reactor for scram purposes is described. A latch mechanism grips a coupling head on a nuclear control element to connect the control element to the control drive assembly. The latch mechanism is closed by tensioning a cable or rod with an actuator. The control element is released by de-energizing the actuator, providing fail-safe, rapid release of the control element to effect reactor shutdown. A sensing rod provides indication that the control element is properly positioned in the latch. Two embodiments are illustrated, one involving a collet- type latch mechanism, the other a pliers-type latch mechanism with the actuator located inside the reactor vessel. (auth)

  4. Lysozyme loading and release from Se doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Hao, Hang; Zhang, Shengmin

    2016-04-01

    Element-substituted hydroxyapatite (HA) based nanocomposites have become a promising therapeutic material for improving bone defect repair. Selenium substituted HA nanoparticles can both induce apoptosis of bone tumor cells and enhance osteointegration. However, the effect of selenite ions on the proteins in combination with the HA nanoparticles remains to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of selenium doping concentration on the loading and release of lysozyme (LSM) as a model protein drug. The selenium substituted HA-LSM composites with different doping concentrations were synthesized and characterized. The subsequent delivery of lysozyme was studied in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS). We found that selenium substituted HA-LSM composites with Se:P=10% showed the highest amount of lysozyme loading (41.7%), whereas the amount of lysozyme loaded in undoped HA nanoparticles was the lowest (34.1%). The doped selenium interacts with lysozyme molecules, which leads to the increase of β-sheet and unordered, and the decrease of self-association, α-helix and β-turns in protein structures. Moreover, selenium addition significantly slows the protein release from HA-LSM composites. The composites with Se:P=10% release lysozyme at the slightly slower rate among the samples with different Se doping concentrations. It also shows that the released lysozyme retains most of its enzymatic activity. PMID:26838882

  5. Ion trap device

    DOEpatents

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-26

    An ion trap device is disclosed. The device includes a series of electrodes that define an ion flow path. A radio frequency (RF) field is applied to the series of electrodes such that each electrode is phase shifted approximately 180 degrees from an adjacent electrode. A DC voltage is superimposed with the RF field to create a DC gradient to drive ions in the direction of the gradient. A second RF field or DC voltage is applied to selectively trap and release the ions from the device. Further, the device may be gridless and utilized at high pressure.

  6. Fluorine-ion conductivity of different technological forms of solid electrolytes R 1- y M y F3- y (LaF3 Type ) ( M = Ca, Sr, Ba; R Are Rare Earth Elements)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, N. I.; Sobolev, B. P.

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated the conductivity of some representatives of different technological forms of fluoride-conducting solid electrolytes R 1- y M y F3- y ( M = Ca, Sr, Ba; R are rare earth elements) with an LaF3 structure: single crystals, cold- and hot-pressing ceramics based on a charge prepared in different ways (mechanochemical synthesis, solid-phase synthesis, and fragmentation of single crystals), polycrystalline alloys, etc. It is shown (by impedance spectroscopy), that different technological forms of identical chemical composition ( R, M, y) exhibit different electrical characteristics. The maximum conductivity is observed for the single-crystal form of R 1- y M y F3- y tysonite phases, which provides (in contrast to other technological forms) the formation of true volume ion-conducting characteristics.

  7. Hydrophobic Effects in the Critical Destabilization and Release Dynamics of Degradable Multilayer Films

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Renée C.; Leung, Amy; Kim, Byeong-Su; Hammond, Paula T.

    2009-01-01

    Recent research has highlighted the ability of hydrolytically degradable electrostatic layer-by-layer films to act as versatile drug delivery systems capable of multi-agent release. A key element of these films is the potential to gain precise control of release by evoking a surface-erosion mechanism. Here we sought to determine the extent to which manipulation of chemical structure could be used to control release from hydrolytically degradable layer-by-layer films through modification of the degradable polycation. Toward this goal, films composed of poly(β-amino ester)s, varying only in the choice of diacrylate monomer, and the model biological drug, dextran sulfate, were used to ascertain the role of alkyl chain length, steric hindrance, and hydrophobicity on release dynamics. Above a critical polycation hydrophobicity, as determined using octanol:water coefficients, the film becomes rapidly destabilized and quickly released its contents. These findings indicate that in these unique electrostatic assemblies, hydrolytic susceptibility is dependent not only on hydrophobicity, but a complex balance between hydrophobic composition, charge density, and stability of electrostatic ion pairs. Computational determination of octanol:water coefficients allowed for the reliable prediction of release dynamics. The determination of a correlation between octanol:water coefficient and release duration will enables advanced engineering to produce custom drug delivery systems. PMID:20161308

  8. Hydrophobic Effects in the Critical Destabilization and Release Dynamics of Degradable Multilayer Films.

    PubMed

    Smith, Renée C; Leung, Amy; Kim, Byeong-Su; Hammond, Paula T

    2009-03-01

    Recent research has highlighted the ability of hydrolytically degradable electrostatic layer-by-layer films to act as versatile drug delivery systems capable of multi-agent release. A key element of these films is the potential to gain precise control of release by evoking a surface-erosion mechanism. Here we sought to determine the extent to which manipulation of chemical structure could be used to control release from hydrolytically degradable layer-by-layer films through modification of the degradable polycation. Toward this goal, films composed of poly(β-amino ester)s, varying only in the choice of diacrylate monomer, and the model biological drug, dextran sulfate, were used to ascertain the role of alkyl chain length, steric hindrance, and hydrophobicity on release dynamics. Above a critical polycation hydrophobicity, as determined using octanol:water coefficients, the film becomes rapidly destabilized and quickly released its contents. These findings indicate that in these unique electrostatic assemblies, hydrolytic susceptibility is dependent not only on hydrophobicity, but a complex balance between hydrophobic composition, charge density, and stability of electrostatic ion pairs. Computational determination of octanol:water coefficients allowed for the reliable prediction of release dynamics. The determination of a correlation between octanol:water coefficient and release duration will enables advanced engineering to produce custom drug delivery systems. PMID:20161308

  9. Identification of leaking TRIGA fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Bennion, John S.; Crawford, Kevan C.; Gansauge, Todd C.; Sandquist, Gary M.

    1990-07-01

    The 100 kW TRIGA Mark I Nuclear Reactor at the University of Utah achieved initial criticality in October, 1975. Previously irradiated fuel consisting of stainless-steel- and aluminum-clad elements was acquired from the University of Arizona and the U.S. Army's Harry Diamond Laboratories in Adelphi, Maryland. Past core configurations have been comprised of both types of fuel with the aluminum-clad elements normally restricted to outer hexagonal rings of the core to provide a large safety margin between actual fuel temperature and limits set forth in the facility Technical Specifications. On October 20, 1987, trace cesium-137 contamination was discovered during routine analysis of the ion-exchange resin in the demineralizer circuit. The presence of Cs-137 indicated a possible clad defect resulting in the leakage of fission products. Reactor operations were allowed only to assist in identifying the source of the leakage. Pool water samples obtained following a two-hour operation at full power were spectroscopically analyzed and found to contain very small amounts of short-lived noble gases (e.g., Kr-85m, Kr-87, Kr-88, Xe-138) and their decay daughter products (e.g., Rb-88, Cs-138). Samples of the gaseous effluent from the facility collected in activated charcoal canisters showed no indication of fission product contamination. The small amount of activity released to the pool water suggested that a single defective element was responsible for the leakage. The instrumented fuel element and the aluminum-clad fuel were initially suspected as sources of the leakage. A simple scheme was devised to identify the defective element by exchanging four or five elements from the core with fuel in storage and then operating the reactor at 90 kW power for two hours. A pool water sample was then taken and analyzed to determine if the damaged element had been removed from the core. This process was repeated several times until all of the aluminum-clad fuel and several stainless

  10. Extraction and isolation of TPE from other elements on ion exchangers in aqueous and aqueous-organic solutions of phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1988-07-01

    The behavior of Am-Es and other actinides on anion and cation exchange resins in aqueous and aqueous-organic solutions of phosphoric acid has been studied in a wide range of concentration of various components of the solution. The sorptivity of transplutonium elements (TPE) on anion exchangers from dilute H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ with a concentration less than or equal to 1 M in presence of organic solvents (alcohols, ketones, etc.) and on cation exchangers from concentrated H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ has been found to be significant. The possibility of use of phosphoric acid solutions for isolation of TPE from Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, and Zr and separation of TPE in different oxidation states in presence of a high-purity oxidant has been shown.

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides from the Aurein Family Form Ion-Selective Pores in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Michaela; Senges, Christoph Helmut Rudi; Zhang, Jin; Suleman, Selina; Nguyen, Michael; Kumar, Prashant; Chiriac, Alina Iulia; Stepanek, Jennifer Janina; Raatschen, Nadja; May, Caroline; Krämer, Ute; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Straus, Suzana Katarina; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism of action of aurein 2.2 and aurein 2.3, antimicrobial peptides from the frog Litoria aurea, was investigated. Proteomic profiling of the Bacillus subtilis stress response indicates that the cell envelope is the main target for both aureins. Upon treatment, the cytoplasmic membrane depolarizes and cellular ATP levels decrease. Global element analysis shows that intracellular concentrations of certain metal ions (potassium, magnesium, iron, and manganese) strongly decrease. Selective translocation of some ions over others was demonstrated in vitro. The same set of ions also leaks from B. subtilis cells treated with sublethal concentrations of gramicidin S, MP196, and nisin. Aureins do not permeabilize the cell membrane for propidium iodide thus excluding formation of large, unspecific pores. Our data suggest that the aureins acts by forming small pores thereby causing membrane depolarization, and by triggering the release of certain metal ions thus disturbing cellular ion homeostasis. PMID:25821129

  12. Completing the series of +2 ions for the lanthanide elements: synthesis of molecular complexes of Pr2+, Gd2+, Tb2+, and Lu2+.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Matthew R; Bates, Jefferson E; Ziller, Joseph W; Furche, Filipp; Evans, William J

    2013-07-01

    The first examples of crystallographically characterizable complexes of Tb(2+), Pr(2+), Gd(2+), and Lu(2+) have been isolated, which demonstrate that Ln(2+) ions are accessible in soluble molecules for all of the lanthanides except radioactive promethium. The first molecular Tb(2+) complexes have been obtained from the reaction of Cp'3Ln (Cp' = C5H4SiMe3, Ln = rare earth) with potassium in the presence of 18-crown-6 in Et2O at -35 °C under argon: [(18-crown-6)K][Cp'3Tb], {[(18-crown-6)K][Cp'3Tb]}n, and {[K(18-crown-6)]2(μ-Cp')}{Cp'3Tb}. The first complex is analogous to previously isolated Y(2+), Ho(2+), and Er(2+) complexes, the second complex shows an isomeric structural form of these Ln(2+) complexes, and the third complex shows that [(18-crown-6)K](1+) alone is not the only cation that will stabilize these reactive Ln(2+) species, a result that led to further exploration of cation variants. With 2.2.2-cryptand in place of 18-crown-6 in the Cp'3Ln/K reaction, a more stable complex of Tb(2+) was produced as well as more stable Y(2+), Ho(2+), and Er(2+) analogs: [K(2.2.2-cryptand)][Cp'3Ln]. Exploration of this 2.2.2-cryptand-based reaction with the remaining lanthanides for which Ln(2+) had not been observed in molecular species provided crystalline Pr(2+), Gd(2+), and Lu(2+) complexes. These Ln(2+) complexes, [K(2.2.2-cryptand)][Cp'3Ln] (Ln = Y, Pr, Gd, Tb, Ho, Er, Lu), all have similar UV-vis spectra and exhibit Ln-C(Cp') bond distances that are ~0.03 Å longer than those in the Ln(3+) precursors, Cp'3Ln. These data, as well as density functional theory calculations and EPR spectra, suggest that a 4f(n)5d(1) description of the electron configuration in these Ln(2+) ions is more appropriate than 4f(n+1). PMID:23697603

  13. Risk analysis approach. [of carbon fiber release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The assessment of the carbon fiber hazard is outlined. Program objectives, requirements of the risk analysis, and elements associated with the physical phenomena of the accidental release are described.

  14. Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source for Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Beene, James R; Havener, Charles C; Vane, C Randy; Gottwald, T.; Wendt, K.; Mattolat, C.; Lassen, J.

    2009-01-01

    A resonant ionization laser ion source based on all-solid-state, tunable Ti:Sapphire lasers is being developed for the production of pure radioactive ion beams. It consists of a hot-cavity ion source and three pulsed Ti:Sapphire lasers operating at a 10 kHz pulse repetition rate. Spectroscopic studies are being conducted to develop ionization schemes that lead to ionizing an excited atom through an auto-ionization or a Rydberg state for numerous elements of interest. Three-photon resonant ionization of 12 elements has been recently demonstrated. The overall efficiency of the laser ion source measured for some of these elements ranges from 1 to 40%. The results indicate that Ti:Sapphire lasers could be well suited for laser ion source applications. The time structures of the ions produced by the pulsed lasers are investigated. The information may help to improve the laser ion source performance.

  15. Multi-source ion funnel

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Keqi; Belov, Mikhail B.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Udseth, Harold R.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-12-27

    A method for introducing ions generated in a region of relatively high pressure into a region of relatively low pressure by providing at least two electrospray ion sources, providing at least two capillary inlets configured to direct ions generated by the electrospray sources into and through each of the capillary inlets, providing at least two sets of primary elements having apertures, each set of elements having a receiving end and an emitting end, the primary sets of elements configured to receive a ions from the capillary inlets at the receiving ends, and providing a secondary set of elements having apertures having a receiving end and an emitting end, the secondary set of elements configured to receive said ions from the emitting end of the primary sets of elements and emit said ions from said emitting end of the secondary set of elements. The method may further include the step of providing at least one jet disturber positioned within at least one of the sets of primary elements, providing a voltage, such as a dc voltage, in the jet disturber, thereby adjusting the transmission of ions through at least one of the sets of primary elements.

  16. Gliotransmission: Exocytotic release from astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Parpura, Vladimir; Zorec, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Gliotransmitters are chemicals released from glial cells fulfilling a following set of criteria: i) they are synthesized by and/or stored in glia; ii) their regulated release is triggered by physiological and/or pathological stimuli; iii) they activate rapid (milliseconds to seconds) responses in neighboring cells; and iv) they play a role in (patho)physiological processes. Astrocytes can release a variety of gliotransmitters into the extracellular space using several different mechanisms. In this review, we focus on exocytotic mechanism(s) underlying the release of three classes of gliotransmitters: (i) amino acids, such as, glutamate and D-serine; (ii) nucleotides, like adenosine 5'-triphosphate; and (iii) peptides, such as, atrial natriuretic peptide and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. It is becoming clear that astrocytes are endowed with elements that qualify them as cells communicating with neurons and other cells within the central nervous system by employing regulated exocytosis. PMID:19948188

  17. Nitrogen release during coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.L.; Mitchell, R.E.; Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.

    1995-02-01

    Experiments in entrained flow reactors at combustion temperatures are performed to resolve the rank dependence of nitrogen release on an elemental basis for a suite of 15 U.S. coals ranging from lignite to low-volatile bituminous. Data were obtained as a function of particle conversion, with overall mass loss up to 99% on a dry, ash-free basis. Nitrogen release rates are presented relative to both carbon loss and overall mass loss. During devolatilization, fractional nitrogen release from low-rank coals is much slower than fractional mass release and noticeably slower than fractional carbon release. As coal rank increases, fractional nitrogen release rate relative to that of carbon and mass increases, with fractional nitrogen release rates exceeding fractional mass and fractional carbon release rates during devolatilization for high-rank (low-volatile bituminous) coals. At the onset of combustion, nitrogen release rates increase significantly. For all coals investigated, cumulative fractional nitrogen loss rates relative to those of mass and carbon passes through a maximum during the earliest stages of oxidation. The mechanism for generating this maximum is postulated to involve nascent thermal rupture of nitrogen-containing compounds and possible preferential oxidation of nitrogen sites. During later stages of oxidation, the cumulative fractional loss of nitrogen approaches that of carbon for all coals. Changes in the relative release rates of nitrogen compared to those of both overall mass and carbon during all stages of combustion are attributed to a combination of the chemical structure of coals, temperature histories during combustion, and char chemistry.

  18. Xyce release and distribution management : version 1.2.

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, Scott Alan; Williamson, Charles Michael

    2003-10-01

    This document presents a high-level description of the Xyce {trademark} Parallel Electronic Simulator Release and Distribution Management Process. The purpose of this process is to standardize the manner in which all Xyce software products progress toward release and how releases are made available to customers. Rigorous Release Management will assure that Xyce releases are created in such a way that the elements comprising the release are traceable and the release itself is reproducible. Distribution Management describes what is to be done with a Xyce release that is eligible for distribution.

  19. Mapping selected trace elements and major ions, 2000-2012, Mojave River and Morongo groundwater basins, southwestern Mojave Desert, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metzger, Loren F.; Landon, Matthew K.; House, Sally F.; Olsen, Lisa D.

    2015-01-01

    The population of the Mojave River and Morongo groundwater basins has grown rapidly during the last several decades, increasing from an estimated population of almost 273,000 in 1990 (Mojave Water Agency, 2004) to more than 453,000 in 2010 (Mojave Water Agency, 2014). Groundwater is the primary source of potable water in both basins (Mojave Water Agency, 2014). Previous studies noted elevated concentrations of several trace elements, nitrate, and total dissolved solids in groundwater in portions of the two basins (Christensen and Fields-Garland, 2001; Ball and Izbicki, 2004; Izbicki and others, 2008; Mathany and Belitz, 2009; Wright and Belitz, 2010; Dawson and Belitz, 2012; and Izbicki and others, 2012). Since 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected water-quality data annually from a network of wells and has provided quality-assurance for Mojave Water Agency (MWA) data that are stored in the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) database. The new data and results from the joint State of California and USGS Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) program assessments of regional water quality (these data are also stored in NWIS), in combination with ongoing MWA/USGS groundwater-quality monitoring provide a timely opportunity for mapping of groundwater quality in the Mojave River and Morongo groundwater basins. The purpose of this report is to provide maps and time-series plots of concentrations of selected water-quality constituents (arsenic, boron, chromium-6, total chromium, dissolved oxygen, fluoride, iron, manganese, nitriate plus nitrite as nitrogen, total dissolved solids, uranium, and vanadium) in the Mojave River and Morongo groundwater basins using data collected by the USGS and MWA from 2000 to 2012. These maps and plots can be accessed on this website.

  20. Multi-elemental characterization of tunnel and road dusts in Houston, Texas using dynamic reaction cell-quadrupole-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: evidence for the release of platinum group and anthropogenic metals from motor vehicles.

    PubMed

    Spada, Nicholas; Bozlaker, Ayse; Chellam, Shankararaman

    2012-07-20

    Platinum group elements (PGEs) including Rh, Pd, and Pt are important tracers for vehicular emissions, though their measurement is often challenging and difficult to replicate in environmental campaigns. These challenges arise from sample preparation steps required for PGE quantitation, which often cause severe isobaric interferences and spectral overlaps from polyatomic species of other anthropogenically emitted metals. Consequently, most previous road dust studies have either only quantified PGEs or included a small number of anthropogenic elements. Therefore a novel analytical method was developed to simultaneously measure PGEs, lanthanoids, transition and main group elements to comprehensively characterize the elemental composition of urban road and tunnel dusts. Dust samples collected from the vicinity of high-traffic roadways and a busy underwater tunnel restricted to single-axle (predominantly gasoline-driven) vehicles in Houston, TX were analyzed for 45 metals with the newly developed method using dynamic reaction cell-quadrupole-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (DRC-q-ICP-MS). Average Rh, Pd and Pt concentrations were 152±52, 770±208 and 529±130 ng g(-1) respectively in tunnel dusts while they varied between 6 and 8 ng g(-1), 10 and 88 ng g(-1) and 35 and 131 ng g(-1) in surface road dusts. Elemental ratios and enrichment factors demonstrated that PGEs in dusts originated from autocatalyst attrition/abrasion. Strong evidence is also presented for mobile source emissions of Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba, W and Pb. However, all other elements including rare earths most likely arose from weathering, erosion and resuspension of crustal material. These are the first such detailed measurements in Houston, the largest city in TX and fourth largest in the United States. We posit that such investigations will assist in better understanding PGE concentrations in urban environments while providing elemental data necessary to better understand

  1. Radioactive ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Bower, Kenneth E.; Weeks, Donald R.

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity.

  2. Radioactive ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Bower, K.E.; Weeks, D.R.

    1997-08-12

    Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity. 2 figs.

  3. Ion thrusting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An ion thrusting system is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which a gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas molecules passing therethrough to form ions and electrons, and an accelerator element which accelerates the ions to form thrust. In some variations, a potential is applied to the ionization membrane may be reversed to thrust ions in an opposite direction. The ionization membrane may also include an opening with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of the gas being ionized. Methods of manufacture and use are also provided.

  4. Results of critical velocity experiments with barium, strontium, and calcium releases from CRRES satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hampton, D. L.; Delamere, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the NASA Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) chemical release program in September 1990, two Ba and also one each Sr and Ca canisters of a boron-titanium thermite mixture, which vaporizes the element on ignition, were released near perigee after dusk in the South Pacific to study the critical velocity effect proposed by Alfven. The critical velocities of these three elements are 2.7, 3.5, and 5.4 km/s respectively, all well below the orbital velocity of 9.4 km/s. On September 10, 1990, a Sr and Ba pair (G-13, or critical ionization velocity (CIV) I) was released near Rarotonga at approximately 515 km altitude in a background electron density of 3.4 x 10(exp 6)/cu cm. On September 14, 1990, G-14 or CIV II released a Ca and Ba pair west of New Caledonia near 595 km at an electron density of 1.5 x 10(exp 6)/cu cm. Ions of all three elements were observed with low-light level imagers from two aircraft after they had transited up the magnetic field lines into the sunlight. Emissions from the spherically expanding neutral gas shells below the solar terminator, observed with cameras filtered for the Ba(+) ion line at 4554 A and also in unfiltered imagers for approximately 15 s after release, are probably due to excitation by hot electrons created in the CIV process. The ions created clearly lost much of their energy, which we now show can be explained by elastic collisions: Ba(+) + O. Inventories of the observed ions indicate yields of 0.15% and 1.84% for Ba in the first and second experiments, 0.02% for Sr and 0.27% for Ca. Ionization from all the releases continued along the satellite trajectory much longer (greater than 45 s) than expected for a CIV process. The ion production along the satellite track versus time typically shows a rapid rise to a peak in a few seconds followed by an exponential decrease to a level essentially constant rate. The characteristic distances for CIV I and II are 47 and 62 km, respectively. We interpret the

  5. Active ion tracer experiments attempted in conjunction with the ion composition experiment on GEOS-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. T.

    It is pointed out that to date six ion injection/tracer experiments have been attempted in conjunction with the GEOS-2 Ion Composition Experiment: three rocket borne Ba shaped-charge releases (Porcupine 3 and 4 and Ba-GEOS), one Li release, and two periods of operation of the Xe(+) accelerator on the SCATHA satellite. The characteristics of each of these six releases are outlined, and upper limits are placed on possible ion fluxes reaching GEOS-2. The order of magnitude of ion fluxes to be expected from each release is estimated, and it is shown that three of the experiments had no real chance of succeeding in the first place.

  6. A Composite Element that Binds Basic Helix Loop Helix and Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors Is Important for Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Regulation of the Follicle-Stimulating Hormone β Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ciccone, Nick A.; Lacza, Charlemagne T.; Hou, Melody Y.; Gregory, Susan J.; Kam, Kyung-Yoon; Xu, Shuyun; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2008-01-01

    Although FSH plays an essential role in controlling gametogenesis, the biology of FSHβ transcription remains poorly understood, but is known to involve the complex interplay of multiple endocrine factors including GnRH. We have identified a GnRH-responsive element within the rat FSHβ promoter containing an E-box and partial cAMP response element site that are bound by the basic helix loop helix transcription factor family members, upstream stimulating factor (USF)-1/USF-2, and the basic leucine zipper member, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), respectively. Expression studies with CREB, USF-1/USF-2, and activating protein-1 demonstrated that the USF transcription factors increased basal transcription, an effect not observed if the cognate binding site was mutated. Conversely, expression of a dominant negative CREB mutant or CREB knockdown attenuated induction by GnRH, whereas dominant negative Fos or USF had no effect on the GnRH response. GnRH stimulation specifically induced an increase in phosphorylated CREB occupation of the FSHβ promoter, leading to the recruitment of CREB-binding protein to enhance gene transcription. In conclusion, a composite element bound by both USF and CREB serves to integrate signals for basal and GnRH-stimulated transcription of the rat FSHβ gene. PMID:18550775

  7. Elemental health

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.

    1997-01-01

    Trace elements used in nutritional supplements and vitamins are discussed in the article. Relevant studies are briefly cited regarding the health effects of selenium, chromium, germanium, silicon, zinc, magnesium, silver, manganese, ruthenium, lithium, and vanadium. The toxicity and food sources are listed for some of the elements. A brief summary is also provided of the nutritional supplements market.

  8. Release of Chromium from Orthopaedic Arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Afolaranmi, G.A.; Tettey, J; Meek, R.M.D; Grant, M.H

    2008-01-01

    Many orthopaedic implants are composed of alloys containing chromium. Of particular relevance is the increasing number of Cobalt Chromium bearing arthroplasies being inserted into young patients with osteoarthritis. Such implants will release chromium ions. These patients will be exposed to the released chromium for over 50 years in some cases. The subsequent chromium ion metabolism and redistribution in fluid and tissue compartments is complex. In addition, the potential biological effects of chromium are also controversial, including DNA and chromosomal damage, reduction in CD8 lymphocyte levels and possible hypersensitivity reactions (ALVAL). The establishment of these issues and the measurement of chromium in biological fluids is the subject of this review. PMID:19461924

  9. Ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

  10. Model for TCLP Releases from Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

    2003-05-01

    A first-order property model for normalized Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) release as a function of glass composition was developed using data collected from various studies. The normalized boron release is used to estimate the release of toxic elements based on the observation that the boron release represents the conservative release for those constituents of interest. The current TCLP model has two targeted application areas: (1) delisting of waste-glass product as radioactive (not mixed) waste and (2) designating the glass wastes generated from waste-glass research activities as hazardous or non-hazardous. This report describes the data collection and model development for TCLP releases and discusses the issues related to the application of the model.

  11. Ion Monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2003-11-18

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for significantly reducing capacitance effects in detector electrodes arising due to movement of the instrument relative to the item/location being monitored in ion detection based techniques. The capacitance variations are rendered less significant by placing an electrically conducting element between the detector electrodes and the monitored location/item. Improved sensitivity and reduced noise signals arise as a result. The technique also provides apparatus and method suitable for monitoring elongate items which are unsuited to complete enclosure in one go within a chamber. The items are monitored part by part as the pass through the instrument, so increasing the range of items or locations which can be successfully monitored.

  12. Ca2+ release by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate is blocked by the K(+)-channel blockers apamin and tetrapentylammonium ion, and a monoclonal antibody to a 63 kDa membrane protein: reversal of blockade by K+ ionophores nigericin and valinomycin and purification of the 63 kDa antibody-binding protein.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, F; Soons, K; Flaumenhauft, R; Watras, J; Baio-Larue, C; Matthews, E; Feinstein, M B

    1994-06-15

    Ins(1,4,5)P3-induced Ca2+ release from platelet membrane vesicles was blocked by apamin, a selective inhibitor of low-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels, and by tetrapentylammonium ion, and was weakly inhibited by tetraethylammonium ion. Other K(+)-channel blockers, i.e. charybdotoxin, 4-aminopyridine and glybenclamide were ineffective. A monoclonal antibody (mAb 213-21) obtained by immunizing mice with the InsP3-sensitive membrane fraction from platelets also blocked Ca2+ release by InsP3 from membrane vesicles obtained from platelets, cerebellum, aortic smooth muscle, HEL cells and sea-urchin eggs. ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake and binding of [3H]InsP3 to platelet membranes was unaffected by either K(+)-channel blockers or mAb 213-21. Blockade of Ca2+ release by apamin, tetrapentylammonium and mAb 213-21 was not affected by the Na+/H+ carrier monensin or the protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), but could be completely reversed by the K+/H+ ionophore nigericin and partially reversed by the K+ carrier valinomycin. The antibody-binding protein (ABP) solubilized from platelets, cerebellum, and smooth muscle chromatographed identically on gel filtration, anion-exchange and heparin-TSK h.p.l.c. ABP was purified to apparent homogeneity from platelets and aortic smooth muscle as a 63 kDa protein by immunoaffinity chromatography on mAb 213-21-agarose. These results suggest that optimal Ca2+ release by InsP3 from platelet membrane vesicles may require the tandem function of a K+ channel. A counterflow of K+ ions could prevent the build-up of a membrane potential (inside negative) that would tend to oppose Ca2+ release. The 63 kDa protein may function to regulate K+ permeability that is coupled to the Ca2+ efflux via the InsP3 receptor. PMID:8010949

  13. Pharmaceutical Applications of Ion-Exchange Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, David

    2005-01-01

    The historical uses of ion-exchanged resins and a summary of the basic chemical principles involved in the ion-exchanged process are discussed. Specific applications of ion-exchange are provided that include drug stabilization, pharmaceutical excipients, taste-masking agents, oral sustained-release products, topical products for local application…

  14. Dual mode ion mobility spectrometer and method for ion mobility spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Miller, Carla J [Idaho Falls, ID; Tremblay, Paul L [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2007-08-21

    Ion mobility spectrometer apparatus may include an ion interface that is operable to hold positive and negative ions and to simultaneously release positive and negative ions through respective positive and negative ion ports. A first drift chamber is operatively associated with the positive ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A first ion detector operatively associated with the first drift chamber detects positive ions from the first drift chamber. A second drift chamber is operatively associated with the negative ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A second ion detector operatively associated with the second drift chamber detects negative ions from said second drift chamber.

  15. ION PRODUCING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, E.O.

    1958-09-16

    Improvements are presented in calutron devices and, more specifically, dealswith an improved mounting arrangement fer the ion source of the calutron. An important feature of the invention resides in a pluraiity of insulators so mounted as to be accessible from the exterior of the calutron tank and supporting at their inner ends the ion source. These insutators are arranged in mutually parallel relation and also parallel to the flux of the nmgnetic field, whereby the strain of the supporting elements is reduced to a minimum. In addition the support assembly is secured to a removable wall portion of the task to facilitate withdrawal and examination of the ion producing mechanism.

  16. Elemental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Esther Gnanamalar Sarojini; Saat, Rohaida Mohd.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a learning module integrating three disciplines--physics, chemistry, and biology--and based on four elements: carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and silicon. Includes atomic model and silicon-based life activities. (YDS)

  17. Superheavy Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of creating elements with an atomic number of around 114. Describes the underlying physics responsible for the limited extent of the periodic table and enumerates problems that must be overcome in creating a superheavy nucleus. (GS)

  18. Ion Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.; Weir, Sue B.

    1996-01-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic and interesting phenomena in the Solar system, releasing up to 1032 ergs of energy on timescales of several tens of seconds to several tens of minutes. Much of this energy is in the form of suprathermal electrons and ions, which remain trapped at the Sun and produce a wide variety of radiations, as well as escape into interplanetary space, where they can be directly observed. The radiation from trapped particles consists in general of (1) continuum emission; (2) narrow gamma-ray nuclear deexcitation lines; and (3) high-energy neutrons observed in space or by ground-based neutron monitors. The particles that escape into space consist of both electrons and ions, which often have compositions quite different than that of the ambient solar atmosphere. Flares thus present many diagnostics of the particle acceleration mechanism(s), the identification of which is the ultimate goal of flare research. Moreover, flares in fact offer the only opportunity in astrophysics to study the simultaneous energization of both electrons and ions. Hopefully, an understanding of flares with their wealth of diagnostic data will lead to a better understanding of particle acceleration at other sites in the Universe. It is now generally accepted that flares are roughly divided into two classes: impulsive and gradual. Gradual events are large, occur high in the corona, have long-duration soft and hard X-rays and gamma rays, are electron poor, are associated with Type II radio emission and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and produce energetic ions with coronal abundance ratios. Impulsive events are more compact, occur lower in the corona, produce short-duration radiation, and exhibit dramatic abundance enhancements in the energetic ions. Their He-3/He-4 ratio is - 1, which is a huge increase over the coronal value of about 5 x 10(exp -4), and they also posses smaller but still significant enhancements of Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe relative to He-4, C, N, and O

  19. Chemical release module facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasoner, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical release module provides the capability to conduct: (1) thermite based metal vapor releases; (2) pressurized gas releases; (3) dispersed liquid releases; (4) shaped charge releases from ejected submodules; and (5) diagnostic measurements with pi supplied instruments. It also provides a basic R-F and electrical system for: (1) receiving and executing commands; (2) telemetering housekeeping data; (3) tracking; (4) monitoring housekeeping and control units; and (5) ultrasafe disarming and control monitoring.

  20. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  1. Nuclear reactor fuel element

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Carl E.; Crouthamel, Carl E.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel element is described which has an outer cladding, a central core of fissionable or mixed fissionable and fertile fuel material and a layer of oxygen gettering material on the inner surface of the cladding. The gettering material reacts with oxygen released by the fissionable material during irradiation of the core thereby preventing the oxygen from reacting with and corroding the cladding. Also described is an improved method for coating the inner surface of the cladding with a layer of gettering material.

  2. The New Element Berkelium (Atomic Number 97)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Ghiorso, A.

    1950-04-26

    An isotope of the element with atomic number 97 has been discovered as a product of the helium-ion bombardment of americium. The name berkelium, symbol Bk, is proposed for element 97. The chemical separation of element 97 from the target material and other reaction products was made by combinations of precipitation and ion exchange adsorption methods making use of its anticipated (III) and (IV) oxidation states and its position as a member of the actinide transition series. The distinctive chemical properties made use of in its separation and the equally distinctive decay properties of the particular isotope constitute the principal evidence for the new element.

  3. High current vacuum arc ion source for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, N.; Schein, J.; Gensler, S.; Prasad, R.R.; Krishnan, M.; Brown, I.

    1999-07-01

    Heavy Ion fusion (HIF) is one of the approaches for the controlled thermonuclear power production. A source of heavy ions with charge states 1+ to 2+, in {approximately}0.5 A current beams with {approximately}20 {micro}s pulse widths and {approximately}10 Hz repetition rates are required. Thermionic sources have been the workhorse for the HIF program to date, but suffer from sloe turn-on, heating problems for large areas, are limited to low (contact) ionization potential elements and offer relatively low ion fluxes with a charge state limited to 1+. Gas injection sources suffer from partial ionization and deleterious neutral gas effects. The above shortcomings of the thermionic ion sources can be overcome by a vacuum arc ion source. The vacuum arc ion source is a good candidate for HIF applications. It is capable of providing ions of various elements and different charge states, in short and long pulse bursts, with low emittance and high beam currents. Under a Phase-I STTR from DOE, the feasibility of the vacuum arc ion source for the HIF applications is investigated. An existing ion source at LBNL was modified to produce {approximately}0.5 A, {approximately}60 keV Gd (A{approximately}158) ion beams. The experimental effort concentrated on beam noise reduction, pulse-to-pulse reproducibility and achieving low beam emittance at 0.5 A ion current level. Details of the source development will be reported.

  4. The New Element Americium (Atomic Number 95)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Seaborg, G.T.; James, R.A.; Morgan, L.O.

    1948-01-01

    Several isotopes of the new element 95 have been produced and their radiations characterized. The chemical properties of this tripositive element are similar to those of the typical tripositive lanthanide rare-earth elements. Element 95 is different from the latter in the degree and rate of formation of certain compounds of the complex ion type, which makes possible the separation of element 95 from the lanthanide rare-earths. The name americium (after the Americas) and the symbol Am are suggested for the element on the basis of its position as the sixth member of the actinide rare-earth series, analogous to europium, Eu, of the lanthanide series.

  5. Chemistry of the superheavy elements.

    PubMed

    Schädel, Matthias

    2015-03-13

    The quest for superheavy elements (SHEs) is driven by the desire to find and explore one of the extreme limits of existence of matter. These elements exist solely due to their nuclear shell stabilization. All 15 presently 'known' SHEs (11 are officially 'discovered' and named) up to element 118 are short-lived and are man-made atom-at-a-time in heavy ion induced nuclear reactions. They are identical to the transactinide elements located in the seventh period of the periodic table beginning with rutherfordium (element 104), dubnium (element 105) and seaborgium (element 106) in groups 4, 5 and 6, respectively. Their chemical properties are often surprising and unexpected from simple extrapolations. After hassium (element 108), chemistry has now reached copernicium (element 112) and flerovium (element 114). For the later ones, the focus is on questions of their metallic or possibly noble gas-like character originating from interplay of most pronounced relativistic effects and electron-shell effects. SHEs provide unique opportunities to get insights into the influence of strong relativistic effects on the atomic electrons and to probe 'relativistically' influenced chemical properties and the architecture of the periodic table at its farthest reach. In addition, they establish a test bench to challenge the validity and predictive power of modern fully relativistic quantum chemical models. PMID:25666065

  6. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Bean, R.W.

    1963-11-19

    A ceramic fuel element for a nuclear reactor that has improved structural stability as well as improved cooling and fission product retention characteristics is presented. The fuel element includes a plurality of stacked hollow ceramic moderator blocks arranged along a tubular raetallic shroud that encloses a series of axially apertured moderator cylinders spaced inwardly of the shroud. A plurality of ceramic nuclear fuel rods are arranged in the annular space between the shroud and cylinders of moderator and appropriate support means and means for directing gas coolant through the annular space are also provided. (AEC)

  7. Field ionizing elements and applications thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A field ionizing element formed of a membrane that houses electrodes therein that are located closer to one another than the mean free path of the gas being ionized. The membrane includes a supporting portion, and a non supporting portion where the ions are formed. The membrane may be used as the front end for a number of different applications including a mass spectrometer, a thruster, an ion mobility element, or an electrochemical device such as a fuel cell.

  8. Delayed simultaneous release mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, X. W.; Webb, J. B. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The disclosed appendage release mechanism is particularly adapted for use with spacecraft operating with despin mechanisms and releasable appendages. It includes a flexible loop and a number of appendage releasing devices which are attached to the flexible loop. The appendage releasing devices are made up of piston-cams and ball latches which hold the appendages as long as the flexible loop is maintained in a taut condition, but which release the appendages upon relaxation of the flexible loop. The flexible loop remains taut as long as the despin weights remain attached, but relaxes when the despin weights are released.

  9. Quantification of Energy Release in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Energy release rate is usually suggested as a quantifier for assessing structural damage tolerance. Computational prediction of energy release rate is based on composite mechanics with micro-stress level damage assessment, finite element structural analysis and damage progression tracking modules. This report examines several issues associated with energy release rates in composite structures as follows: Chapter I demonstrates computational simulation of an adhesively bonded composite joint and validates the computed energy release rates by comparison with acoustic emission signals in the overall sense. Chapter II investigates the effect of crack plane orientation with respect to fiber direction on the energy release rates. Chapter III quantifies the effects of contiguous constraint plies on the residual stiffness of a 90 deg ply subjected to transverse tensile fractures. Chapter IV compares ICAN and ICAN/JAVA solutions of composites. Chapter V examines the effects of composite structural geometry and boundary conditions on damage progression characteristics.

  10. Quantification of Energy Release in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2003-01-01

    Energy release rate is usually suggested as a quantifier for assessing structural damage tolerance. Computational prediction of energy release rate is based on composite mechanics with micro-stress level damage assessment, finite element structural analysis and damage progression tracking modules. This report examines several issues associated with energy release rates in composite structures as follows: Chapter I demonstrates computational simulation of an adhesively bonded composite joint and validates the computed energy release rates by comparison with acoustic emission signals in the overall sense. Chapter II investigates the effect of crack plane orientation with respect to fiber direction on the energy release rates. Chapter III quantifies the effects of contiguous constraint plies on the residual stiffness of a 90 ply subjected to transverse tensile fractures. Chapter IV compares ICAN and ICAN/JAVA solutions of composites. Chapter V examines the effects of composite structural geometry and boundary conditions on damage progression characteristics.

  11. Element Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herald, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Describes a research assignment for 8th grade students on the elements of the periodic table. Students use web-based resources and a chemistry handbook to gather information, construct concept maps, and present the findings to the full class using the mode of their choice: a humorous story, a slideshow or gameboard, a brochure, a song, or skit.…

  12. Mercury, elemental

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mercury , elemental ; CASRN 7439 - 97 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  13. Superheavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, S.

    The nuclear shell model predicts that the next doubly magic shell closure beyond 208Pb is at a proton number Z=114, 120, or 126 and at a neutron number N=172 or 184. The outstanding aim of experimental investigations is the exploration of this region of spherical `SuperHeavy Elements' (SHEs). Experimental methods have been developed which allowed for the identification of new elements at production rates of one atom per month. Using cold fusion reactions which are based on lead and bismuth targets, relatively neutron-deficient isotopes of the elements from 107 to 113 were synthesized at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, and/or at RIKEN in Wako, Japan. In hot fusion reactions of 48Ca projectiles with actinide targets more neutron-rich isotopes of the elements from 112 to 116 and even 118 were produced at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia. Recently, part of these data which represent the first identification of nuclei located on the predicted island of SHEs were confirmed in two independent experiments. The decay data reveal that for the heaviest elements, the dominant decay mode is α emission rather than fission. Decay properties as well as reaction cross-sections are compared with results of theoretical studies. Finally, plans are presented for the further development of the experimental set-up and the application of new techniques. At a higher sensitivity, the detailed exploration of the region of spherical SHEs will be in the center of interest of future experimental work. New data will certainly challenge theoretical studies on the mechanism of the synthesis, on the nuclear decay properties, and on the chemical behavior of these heaviest atoms at the limit of stability.

  14. TOXICS RELEASE INVENTORY (TRI)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) site is designed to provide information on toxic chemical releases including collected data, guidance documents, program planning, background, history, and, program contacts, among other things. The data included in this homepage have been submi...

  15. Wall-loss distribution of charge breeding ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. C.; Oyaizu, M.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.; Niki, K.; Okada, M.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Otokawa, Y.; Osa, A.; Ichikawa, S.

    2012-02-15

    We investigated the ion-loss distribution on the sidewall of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma chamber using the 18-GHz ECR charge breeder at the Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex (TRIAC). Similarities and differences between the ion-loss distributions (longitudinal and azimuthal) of different ion species (i.e., radioactive {sup 111}In{sup 1+} and {sup 140}Xe{sup 1+} ions that are typical volatile and nonvolatile elements) was qualitatively discussed to understand the element dependence of the charge breeding efficiency. Especially, the similarities represent universal ion loss characteristics in an ECR charge breeder, which are different from the loss patterns of electrons on the ECRIS wall.

  16. High Performance Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using Hourglass Electrodynamic Funnel And Internal Ion Funnel

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2005-11-22

    A method and apparatus enabling increased sensitivity in ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry instruments which substantially reduces or eliminates the loss of ions in ion mobility spectrometer drift tubes utilizing a device for transmitting ions from an ion source which allows the transmission of ions without significant delay to an hourglass electrodynamic ion funnel at the entrance to the drift tube and/or an internal ion funnel at the exit of the drift tube. An hourglass electrodynamic funnel is formed of at least an entry element, a center element, and an exit element, wherein the aperture of the center element is smaller than the aperture of the entry element and the aperture of the exit elements. Ions generated in a relatively high pressure region by an ion source at the exterior of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel are transmitted to a relatively low pressure region at the entrance of the hourglass funnel through a conductance limiting orifice. Alternating and direct electrical potentials are applied to the elements of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby drawing ions into and through the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby introducing relatively large quantities of ions into the drift tube while maintaining the gas pressure and composition at the interior of the drift tube as distinct from those at the entrance of the electrodynamic funnel and allowing a positive gas pressure to be maintained within the drift tube, if desired. An internal ion funnel is provided within the drift tube and is positioned at the exit of said drift tube. The advantage of the internal ion funnel is that ions that are dispersed away from the exit aperture within the drift tube, such as those that are typically lost in conventional drift tubes to any subsequent analysis or measurement, are instead directed through the exit of the drift tube, vastly increasing the amount of ions exiting the drift tube.

  17. Elemental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    He set out to prove that ocean sediments contain elevated levels of the rare element iridium because of the natural weathering of the continents. Instead, what Ariel Anbar found was new evidence that a meteorite may have had a role in the mass extinctions that marked the end of the Cretaceous era.By studying the geochemical properties of iridium, Anbar, a professor of earth and environmental sciences and chemistry at the University of Rochester, found that the residence time—a measure of the rate at which an element settles out of water into sediments—of iridium in ocean water is 2000 to 20,000 years. That finding suggests that a large deposit of iridium could have lingered in the world's oceans long enough to explain the thickness of the iridium-rich sediment layers at the K-T boundary.

  18. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Zumwalt, L.R.

    1961-11-28

    A fuel element was developed for a gas cooled nuclear reactor. The element is constructed in the form of a compacted fuel slug including carbides of fissionable material in some cases with a breeder material carbide and a moderator which slug is disposed in a canning jacket of relatively impermeable moderator material. Such canned fuel slugs are disposed in an elongated shell of moderator having greater gas permeability than the canning material wherefore application of reduced pressure to the space therebetween causes gas diffusing through the exterior shell to sweep fission products from the system. Integral fission product traps and/or exterior traps as well as a fission product monitoring system may be employed therewith. (AEC)

  19. Plasma emission spectroscopy for operating and developing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) H- ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Welton, Robert F; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2014-01-01

    An RF-driven, Cs-enhanced H- ion source feeds the SNS accelerator with a high current (typically >50 mA), ~1.0 ms pulsed beam at 60 Hz. To achieve the persistent high current beam for several weeks long service cycles, each newly installed ion source undergoes a rigorous conditioning and cesiation processes. Plasma conditioning outgases the system and sputter-cleans the ion conversion surfaces. A cesiation process immediately following the plasma conditioning releases Cs to provide coverage on the ion conversion surfaces. The effectiveness of the ion source conditioning and cesiation is monitored with plasma emission spectroscopy using a high-sensitivity optical spectrometer. Plasma emission spectroscopy is also used to provide a mean for diagnosing and confirming a failure of the insulating coating of the ion source RF antenna which is immersed in the plasma. Emissions of composition elements of the antenna coating material, Na emission being the most significant, drastically elevate to signal a failure when it happens. Plasma spectra of the developmental ion source with an AlN chamber and an external RF antenna are also briefly discussed.

  20. Plasma emission spectroscopy for operating and developing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) H(-) ion sources.

    PubMed

    Han, B X; Welton, R F; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Santana, M; Stockli, M P

    2014-02-01

    A RF-driven, Cs-enhanced H(-) ion source feeds the SNS accelerator with a high current (typically >50 mA), ∼1.0 ms pulsed beam at 60 Hz. To achieve the persistent high current beam for several weeks long service cycles, each newly installed ion source undergoes a rigorous conditioning and cesiation processes. Plasma conditioning outgases the system and sputter-cleans the ion conversion surfaces. A cesiation process immediately following the plasma conditioning releases Cs to provide coverage on the ion conversion surfaces. The effectiveness of the ion source conditioning and cesiation is monitored with plasma emission spectroscopy using a high-sensitivity optical spectrometer. Plasma emission spectroscopy is also used to provide a means for diagnosing and confirming a failure of the insulating coating of the ion source RF antenna which is immersed in the plasma. Emissions of composition elements of the antenna coating material, Na emission being the most significant, drastically elevate to signal a failure when it happens. Plasma spectra of the developmental ion source with an AlN (aluminum nitrite) chamber and an external RF antenna are also briefly discussed. PMID:24593570

  1. The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

    1948-01-01

    Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

  2. Rare earth element association with foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Natalie L.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Elderfield, Henry; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Lomas, Michael W.

    2012-10-01

    Neodymium isotopes are becoming widely used as a palaeoceanographic tool for reconstructing the source and flow direction of water masses. A new method using planktonic foraminifera which have not been chemically cleaned has proven to be a promising means of avoiding contamination of the deep ocean palaeoceanographic signal by detrital material. However, the exact mechanism by which the Nd isotope signal from bottom waters becomes associated with planktonic foraminifera, the spatial distribution of rare earth element (REE) concentrations within the shell, and the possible mobility of REE ions during changing redox conditions, have not been fully investigated. Here we present REE concentration and Nd isotope data from mixed species of planktonic foraminifera taken from plankton tows, sediment traps and a sediment core from the NW Atlantic. We used multiple geochemical techniques to evaluate how, where and when REEs become associated with planktonic foraminifera as they settle through the water column, reside at the surface and are buried in the sediment. Analyses of foraminifera shells from plankton tows and sediment traps between 200 and 2938 m water depth indicate that only ˜20% of their associated Nd is biogenically incorporated into the calcite structure. The remaining 80% is associated with authigenic metal oxides and organic matter, which form in the water column, and remain extraneous to the carbonate structure. Remineralisation of these organic and authigenic phases releases ions back into solution and creates new binding sites, allowing the Nd isotope ratio to undergo partial equilibration with the ambient seawater, as the foraminifera fall through the water column. Analyses of fossil foraminifera shells from sediment cores show that their REE concentrations increase by up to 10-fold at the sediment-water interface, and acquire an isotopic signature of bottom water. Adsorption and complexation of REE3+ ions between the inner layers of calcite contributes

  3. Ion detection device and method with compressing ion-beam shutter

    DOEpatents

    Sperline, Roger P [Tucson, AZ

    2009-05-26

    An ion detection device, method and computer readable medium storing instructions for applying voltages to shutter elements of the detection device to compress ions in a volume defined by the shutter elements and to output the compressed ions to a collector. The ion detection device has a chamber having an inlet and receives ions through the inlet, a shutter provided in the chamber opposite the inlet and configured to allow or prevent the ions to pass the shutter, the shutter having first and second shutter elements, a collector provided in the chamber opposite the shutter and configured to collect ions passed through the shutter, and a processing unit electrically connected to the first and second shutter elements. The processing unit applies, during a first predetermined time interval, a first voltage to the first shutter element and a second voltage to the second shutter element, the second voltage being lower than the first voltage such that ions from the inlet enter a volume defined by the first and second shutter elements, and during a second predetermined time interval, a third voltage to the first shutter element, higher than the first voltage, and a fourth voltage to the second shutter element, the third voltage being higher than the fourth voltage such that ions that entered the volume are compressed as the ions exit the volume and new ions coming from the inlet are prevented from entering the volume. The processing unit is electrically connected to the collector and configured to detect the compressed ions based at least on a current received from the collector and produced by the ions collected by the collector.

  4. Risk methodology overview. [for carbon fiber release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Credeur, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    Some considerations of risk estimation, how risk is measured, and how risk analysis decisions are made are discussed. Specific problems of carbon fiber release are discussed by reviewing the objective, describing the main elements, and giving an example of the risk logic and outputs.

  5. ELECTROMAGNETIC RELEASE MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Michelson, C.

    1960-09-13

    An electromagnetic release mechanism is offered that may be used, for example, for supporting a safety rod for a nuclear reactor. The release mechanism is designed to have a large excess holding force and a rapid, uniform, and dependable release. The fast release is accomplished by providing the electromagnet with slotttd polts separated by an insulating potting resin, and by constructing the poles with a ferro-nickel alloy. The combination of these two features materially reduces the eddy current power density whenever the magnetic field changes during a release operation. In addition to these features, the design of the armature is such as to provide ready entrance of fluid into any void that might tend to form during release of the armature. This also improves the release time for the mechanism. The large holding force for the mechanism is accomplished by providing a small, selected, uniform air gap between the inner pole piece and the armature.

  6. Corrosion behavior of dental alloys used for retention elements in prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Nierlich, Judith; Papageorgiou, Spyridon N; Bourauel, Christoph; Hültenschmidt, Robert; Bayer, Stefan; Stark, Helmut; Keilig, Ludger

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the corrosion behavior of 10 different high noble gold-based dental alloys, used for prosthodontic retention elements, according to ISO 10271. Samples of 10 high-noble and noble gold-based dental alloys were subjected to: (i) static immersion tests with subsequent analysis of ion release for eight different elements using mass spectrometry; (ii) electrochemical tests, including open-circuit potential and potentiodynamic scans; and (iii) scanning electron microscopy, followed by energy-dispersive X-ray microscopy. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Sidak multiple-comparisons post-hoc test at a level of significance of α = 0.05. Significant differences were found among the 10 alloys studied for all ions (P < 0.001). The potentiodynamic analysis showed values from -82.5 to 102.8 mV for the open-circuit potential and from 566.7 to 1367.5 mV for the breakdown potential. Both the open-circuit and the breakdown potential varied considerably among these alloys. Scanning electron microscopy analysis confirmed the existence of typically small-diameter corrosion defects, whilst the energy-dispersive X-ray analysis found no significant alteration in the elemental composition of the alloys. The results of this study reveal the variability in the corrosive resistance among the materials used for retention elements in prosthodontics. PMID:27061513

  7. Hydrogen release from irradiated elastomers measured by Nuclear Reaction Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagielski, J.; Ostaszewska, U.; Bielinski, D. M.; Grambole, D.; Romaniec, M.; Jozwik, I.; Kozinski, R.; Kosinska, A.

    2016-03-01

    Ion irradiation appears as an interesting method of modification of elastomers, especially friction and wear properties. Main structural effect caused by heavy ions is a massive loss of hydrogen from the surface layer leading to its smoothening and shrinking. The paper presents the results of hydrogen release from various elastomers upon irradiation with H+, He+ and Ar+ studied by using Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) method. The analysis of the experimental data indicates that the hydrogen release is controlled by inelastic collisions between ions and target electrons. The last part of the study was focused on preliminary analysis of mechanical properties of irradiated rubbers.