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Sample records for elevated co2 increases

  1. Evidence that elevated CO2 levels can indirectly increase rhizosphere denitrifier activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, D. R.; Ritchie, K.; Stark, J. M.; Bugbee, B.

    1997-01-01

    We examined the influence of elevated CO2 concentration on denitrifier enzyme activity in wheat rhizoplanes by using controlled environments and solution culture techniques. Potential denitrification activity was from 3 to 24 times higher on roots that were grown under an elevated CO2 concentration of 1,000 micromoles of CO2 mol-1 than on roots grown under ambient levels of CO2. Nitrogen loss, as determined by a nitrogen mass balance, increased with elevated CO2 levels in the shoot environment and with a high NO3- concentration in the rooting zone. These results indicated that aerial CO2 concentration can play a role in rhizosphere denitrifier activity.

  2. Evidence that elevated CO2 levels can indirectly increase rhizosphere denitrifier activity.

    PubMed Central

    Smart, D R; Ritchie, K; Stark, J M; Bugbee, B

    1997-01-01

    We examined the influence of elevated CO2 concentration on denitrifier enzyme activity in wheat rhizoplanes by using controlled environments and solution culture techniques. Potential denitrification activity was from 3 to 24 times higher on roots that were grown under an elevated CO2 concentration of 1,000 micromoles of CO2 mol-1 than on roots grown under ambient levels of CO2. Nitrogen loss, as determined by a nitrogen mass balance, increased with elevated CO2 levels in the shoot environment and with a high NO3- concentration in the rooting zone. These results indicated that aerial CO2 concentration can play a role in rhizosphere denitrifier activity. PMID:11536820

  3. Processes leading to increased soil organic carbon in a Mojave Desert ecosystem under elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, A.; Evans, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    We observed increased soil organic carbon (SOC) following ten years of elevated atmospheric CO2 treatment at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility in the Mojave Desert. Physical and chemical fractions of surface soils collected under the dominant shrub, Larrea tridentata (Larrea), and plant interspace were analyzed for particle size, plant-derived n-alkanes, microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and neutral lipid fatty acids (NLFA) to explore potential mechanisms causing the observed increase in SOC. SOC concentrations under Larrea in bulk soils, coarse particulate organic matter (POM), fine POM and mineral-bound soil organic matter (SOM) under elevated CO2 were greater than those under ambient CO2 by 34%, 45%, 26% and 20%, respectively. Under Larrea, n-alkane concentrations were 52% greater under elevated compared to ambient CO2. Such increases in coarse POM and n-alkane concentrations suggest litter input from Larrea was at least one source for increased SOC under elevated CO2. While there was no significant difference in PLFA abundance between the CO2 treatments, elevated CO2 significantly increased the fungi to bacterial PLFA ratio. In addition, fungal and bacterial NLFA and NLFA 16:1ω5, a biomarker of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, were significantly higher under elevated than ambient CO2. These observations plus others suggest that Larrea allocated more photosynthate belowground to increased root exudation rather than increased fine root growth under elevated CO2. Thus, increased root exudates and microbial residues as well as episodic increases in litter input from Larrea are mechanisms behind the increased SOC under elevated CO2. Elevated CO2 did not increase SOC in surface soils in plant interspace despite incorporation of CO2 labeled with 13C under elevated CO2.

  4. Aboveground production does not increase after ten years of elevated CO2 in the Mojave Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newingham, B. A.; Vanier, C. H.; Charlet, D.; Zitzer, S. F.; Smith, S. D.

    2011-12-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) is assumed to increase primary production, particularly in desert systems through stimulatory effects on plant water-use efficiency. We examined the effects of elevated [CO2] at the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-air CO2 Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) in an intact Mojave Desert ecosystem. At the NDFF, ambient and elevated [CO2] levels were 360 and 550 μmol mol-1 [CO2], respectively. CO2 treatments were applied continuously from 1997-2007 in intact plots 25 m in diameter. While other studies focused on soil and root responses to elevated [CO2], our study focused on aboveground production of annuals and perennial plants. In 1997, diameters and heights of all perennial individuals were recorded and mapped. In 2007, diameters and heights were re-measured and aboveground biomass was harvested for every mapped perennial individual. Harvest data were used to construct regressions for twenty perennial species to predict starting biomass based on diameters and heights. Annual plants were harvested yearly at peak biomass from permanent transects. We found no significant effect of elevated [CO2] on total perennial plant biomass or cover at the end of the experiment. Regardless of [CO2] treatment, perennial cover increased while total biomass did not change over the ten years of the experiment. Perennial biomass allocation to vegetative, twig and woody biomass was not differentially affected by elevated [CO2], although leaf area index increased under elevated [CO2]. Similarly, there was no consistent elevated [CO2] effect on yearly production of annual (ephemeral) plants, although an exotic grass (Bromus madritensis subsp. rubens) exhibited a higher relative stimulation in production at elevated [CO2] than did native dicot and grass species. Other studies in our research group have shown that increases in production are only seen in wet years during the ten-year period of CO2 treatments at the NDFF, and so future effects of rising [CO2] may primarily

  5. Elevated CO2 improves lipid accumulation by increasing carbon metabolism in Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhilan; Chen, Yi-Feng; Du, Jianchang

    2016-02-01

    Supplying microalgae with extra CO2 is a promising means for improving lipid production. The molecular mechanisms involved in lipid accumulation under conditions of elevated CO2, however, remain to be fully elucidated. To understand how elevated CO2 improves lipid production, we performed sequencing of Chlorella sorokiniana LS-2 cellular transcripts during growth and compared transcriptional dynamics of genes involved in carbon flow from CO2 to triacylglycerol. These analyses identified the majority genes of carbohydrate metabolism and lipid biosynthesis pathways in C. sorokiniana LS-2. Under high doses of CO2 , despite down-regulation of most de novo fatty acid biosynthesis genes, genes involved in carbohydrate metabolic pathways including carbon fixation, chloroplastic glycolysis, components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and chloroplastic membrane transporters were upexpressed at the prolonged lipid accumulation phase. The data indicate that lipid production is largely independent of de novo fatty acid synthesis. Elevated CO2 might push cells to channel photosynthetic carbon precursors into fatty acid synthesis pathways, resulting in an increase of overall triacylglycerol generation. In support of this notion, genes involved in triacylglycerol biosynthesis were substantially up-regulated. Thus, elevated CO2 may influence regulatory dynamics and result in increased carbon flow to triacylglycerol, thereby providing a feasible approach to increase lipid production in microalgae. PMID:25973988

  6. Respiratory oxygen uptake is not decreased by an instantaneous elevation of [CO2], but is increased with long-term growth in the field at elevated [CO2].

    PubMed

    Davey, Phillip A; Hunt, Stephen; Hymus, Graham J; DeLucia, Evan H; Drake, Bert G; Karnosky, David F; Long, Stephen P

    2004-01-01

    Averaged across many previous investigations, doubling the CO2 concentration ([CO2]) has frequently been reported to cause an instantaneous reduction of leaf dark respiration measured as CO2 efflux. No known mechanism accounts for this effect, and four recent studies have shown that the measurement of respiratory CO2 efflux is prone to experimental artifacts that could account for the reported response. Here, these artifacts are avoided by use of a high-resolution dual channel oxygen analyzer within an open gas exchange system to measure respiratory O2 uptake in normal air. Leaf O2 uptake was determined in response to instantaneous elevation of [CO2] in nine contrasting species and to long-term elevation in seven species from four field experiments. Over six hundred separate measurements of respiration failed to reveal any decrease in respiratory O2 uptake with an instantaneous increase in [CO2]. Respiration was found insensitive not only to doubling [CO2], but also to a 5-fold increase and to decrease to zero. Using a wide range of species and conditions, we confirm earlier reports that inhibition of respiration by instantaneous elevation of [CO2] is likely an experimental artifact. Instead of the expected decrease in respiration per unit leaf area in response to long-term growth in the field at elevated [CO2], there was a significant increase of 11% and 7% on an area and mass basis, respectively, averaged across all experiments. The findings suggest that leaf dark respiration will increase not decrease as atmospheric [CO2] rises. PMID:14701915

  7. Will Elevated CO2 Increase Forest Productivity? Evidence from an Australian FACE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, L.

    2015-12-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 may enhance forest productivity via CO2 fertilisation and increased soil moisture associated with water savings. Quantification of the response of forest productivity to rising CO2 concentrations is important, as increased forest productivity may contribute to the mitigation of anthropogenic climate change. Vegetation greenness indices derived from digital photographs have been correlated with a number of measures of ecosystem productivity including total biomass, leaf area index and gross primary productivity. Our study examines the effect of elevated CO2 on patterns in overstorey and understorey vegetation greenness at a Free Air CO2 Enrichment facility (EucFACE) situated within a temperate eucalypt forest in Sydney, Australia. EucFACE consists of six treatment areas, three subjected to ambient CO2 ('ambient') and three with ambient plus 150 ppm CO2 ('elevated'). Each treatment area had one camera monitoring canopy greenness for a 12 month period and four cameras monitoring one understorey vegetation plot (2.25 m2) each for a 15 month period. Vegetation greenness was measured daily using the green chromatic coordinate (GCC). Understorey and overstorey GCC and rates of understorey greening and browning were not affected by elevated CO2. Periodic differences in canopy greening and browning between CO2 treatments were observed, though these probably reflect an insect defoliation event in one treatment area. Increases in canopy and understorey GCC were associated with a combination of extended periods of high soil volumetric water content (VWC) (>0.1) and high maximum temperatures (>25 °C). Browning appeared to be associated with a combination of periods of high maximum temperatures and low VWC or low minimum temperatures. Our short term findings suggest that eucalypt forest productivity will be sensitive to changes in climate, but may be relatively insensitive to changes in CO2 in the near future.

  8. Elevated CO2 increases productivity and invasive species success in an arid ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Stanley D.; Huxman, Travis E.; Zitzer, Stephen F.; Charlet, Therese N.; Housman, David C.; Coleman, James S.; Fenstermaker, Lynn K.; Seemann, Jeffrey R.; Nowak, Robert S.

    2000-11-01

    Arid ecosystems, which occupy about 20% of the earth's terrestrial surface area, have been predicted to be one of the most responsive ecosystem types to elevated atmospheric CO2 and associated global climate change. Here we show, using free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) technology in an intact Mojave Desert ecosystem, that new shoot production of a dominant perennial shrub is doubled by a 50% increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration in a high rainfall year. However, elevated CO 2 does not enhance production in a drought year. We also found that above-ground production and seed rain of an invasive annual grass increases more at elevated CO2 than in several species of native annuals. Consequently, elevated CO2 might enhance the long-term success and dominance of exotic annual grasses in the region. This shift in species composition in favour of exotic annual grasses, driven by global change, has the potential to accelerate the fire cycle, reduce biodiversity and alter ecosystem function in the deserts of western North America.

  9. Elevated atmospheric CO2 increases microbial growth rates and enzymes activity in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Dorodnikov, Maxim; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2010-05-01

    Increasing the belowground translocation of assimilated carbon by plants grown under elevated CO2 can cause a shift in the structure and activity of the microbial community responsible for the turnover of organic matter in soil. We investigated the long-term effect of elevated CO2 in the atmosphere on microbial biomass and specific growth rates in root-free and rhizosphere soil. The experiments were conducted under two free air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) systems: in Hohenheim and Braunschweig, as well as in the intensively managed forest mesocosm of the Biosphere 2 Laboratory (B2L) in Oracle, AZ. Specific microbial growth rates (μ) were determined using the substrate-induced respiration response after glucose and/or yeast extract addition to the soil. We evaluated the effect of elevated CO2 on b-glucosidase, chitinase, phosphatase, and sulfatase to estimate the potential enzyme activity after soil amendment with glucose and nutrients. For B2L and both FACE systems, up to 58% higher μ were observed under elevated vs. ambient CO2, depending on site, plant species and N fertilization. The μ-values increased linearly with atmospheric CO2 concentration at all three sites. The effect of elevated CO2 on rhizosphere microorganisms was plant dependent and increased for: Brassica napus=Triticum aestivumincrease or decrease of microbial growth rates depending on plant species. The μ-value increase was lower for microorganisms growing on yeast extract then for those growing on glucose, i.e. the effect of elevated CO2 was smoothed on rich vs. simple substrate. So, the r/K strategies ratio can be better revealed by studying growth on simple (glucose) than on rich substrate mixtures (yeast extract). After adding glucose, enzyme activities under elevated CO2 were

  10. Increased Activity of Rhizosphere and Hyphosphere Enzymes under Elevated CO2 in a Loblolly Pine Stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, I.; Phillips, R.

    2012-12-01

    The stimulatory effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 under global climate change on forest productivity has been predicted to decrease over time as pools of available N in soil become depleted, but empirical support for such progressive N limitation has been lacking. Increased N acquisition from soil depleted in inorganic nitrogen requires stimulation of the microbial processing of organic N, possibly through increasing C supply to soil by plant roots or mycorrhizal hyphae. Increases in (mycorr)rhizosphere C fluxes could stimulate microbes to produce extra-cellular enzymes that release N from SOM, feeding back from soil microsites to ecosystem-scale processes. We investigated the influence of elevated CO2 on root exudation and soil enzyme activity at the Duke Forest FACE site, USA, where loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) stands have been exposed to elevated CO2 for 14 years and N fertilization for five years. In each plot, root boxes containing acetate windows were installed in 2008. Two years after installation, we collected soils adjacent to root tips (the rhizosphere), hyphal tips (the hyphosphere) and bulk soil. We measured in situ root exudation rates from intact pine roots. Study objectives were to analyze (i) the influence of atmospheric CO2 on root exudation and extra-cellular enzyme activities, (ii) the influence of soil N availability in regulating these activities, and (iii) the relationship between the activities of enzymes involved in N cycling in soils and gross N transformations at soil microsites. Elevated atmospheric CO2 significantly increased the activity of β-1-4-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG) in the rhizosphere by almost 2.5 times (39 to 95 nmol h-1 g-1), and 1.6fold in the hyphosphere relative to ambient plots. NAG is an enzyme involved in the degradation of chitin from the cell walls of soil organisms, releasing absorbable forms of nitrogen. The activity of peroxidase, which degrades aromatic C compounds of SOM, increased significantly in the

  11. Elevated CO2 and temperature increase soil C losses from a soy-maize ecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Warming temperatures and increasing CO2 are likely to have large effects on the amount of carbon stored in soil, but predictions of these effects are poorly constrained. We elevated temperature (canopy: +2.8 °C; soil growing season: +1.8 °C; soil fallow: +2.3 °C) for three years within the 9th-11th ...

  12. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi increase organic carbon decomposition under elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Booker, Fitzgerald L; Tu, Cong; Burkey, Kent O; Zhou, Lishi; Shew, H David; Rufty, Thomas W; Hu, Shuijin

    2012-08-31

    The extent to which terrestrial ecosystems can sequester carbon to mitigate climate change is a matter of debate. The stimulation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) by elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) has been assumed to be a major mechanism facilitating soil carbon sequestration by increasing carbon inputs to soil and by protecting organic carbon from decomposition via aggregation. We present evidence from four independent microcosm and field experiments demonstrating that CO(2) enhancement of AMF results in considerable soil carbon losses. Our findings challenge the assumption that AMF protect against degradation of organic carbon in soil and raise questions about the current prediction of terrestrial ecosystem carbon balance under future climate-change scenarios. PMID:22936776

  13. Elevated atmospheric CO2 increases water use efficiency in Florida scrub oak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, B. G.; Hayek, L. C.; Johnson, D. P.; Li, J.; Powell, T. L.

    2009-12-01

    Plants are expected to have higher rates of photosynthesis and reduced transpiration as atmospheric CO2 (Ca) continues to rise. But will higher Ca reduce water loss, and increase water use efficiency and soil water in native ecosystems? We tested this question using large (3.0m by 2.8m) open top chambers to expose Florida scrub oak on Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge, Kennedy Space Center, FL, from May 1996 to June 2007 to elevated levels of atmospheric CO2, (Ce = Ca + 350ppm) compared to ambient Ca. Although Ce stimulated total shoot biomass 68% by the end of the study, the effect of Ce on annual growth declined each year (Seiler et al. 2009, Global Change Biology15, 356-367). Compared with the effects of Ca, Ce increased net ecosystem CO2 exchange approximately 70% on average for the entire study, increased leaf area index (LAI) seasonally, reduced evapotranspiration except during mid-summer of some years, and, depending on the relative effect of Ce on LAI, increased volumetric soil water content.. These results are consistent with the observation that continental river discharge has increased as Ca has risen throughout the past 50 years (Gedney et al., Nature, Vol. 439, 16 February 2006).

  14. ELEVATED CO2 INCREASES MICROBIAL CARBON SUBSTRATE USE AND N CYCLING IN MOJAVE DESERT SOILS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We assessed the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on microbial carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in Mojave Desert soils using extracellular enzyme activities (EEAs), community-level physiological profiles (CLPPs), and gross N transformation rates. Soils were collected from unvegetated interspac...

  15. Elevated CO2 concentration increase the mobility of Cd and Zn in the rhizosphere of hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingqiang; Tao, Qi; Liang, Chengfeng; Yang, Xiaoe

    2014-05-01

    The effects of elevated CO2 on metal species and mobility in the rhizosphere of hyperaccumulator are not well understood. We report an experiment designed to compare the effects of elevated CO2 on Cd/Zn speciation and mobility in the rhizosphere of hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) and a non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE) of Sedum alfredii grown under ambient (350 μl l(-1)) or elevated (800 μl l(-1)) CO2 conditions. No difference in solution pH of NHE was observed between ambient and elevated CO2 treatments. For HE, however, elevated CO2 reduced soil solution pH by 0.22 unit, as compared to ambient CO2 conditions. Elevated CO2 increased dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and organic acid levels in soil solution of both ecotypes, but the increase in HE solution was much greater than in NHE solution. After the growth of HE, the concentrations of Cd and Zn in soil solution decreased significantly regardless of CO2 level. The visual MINTEQ speciation model predicted that Cd/Zn-DOM complexes were the dominant species in soil solutions, followed by free Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) species for both ecotypes. However, Cd/Zn-DOM complexes fraction in soil solution of HE was increased by the elevated CO2 treatment (by 8.01 % for Cd and 8.47 % for Zn, respectively). Resin equilibration experiment results indicated that DOM derived from the rhizosphere of HE under elevated CO2 (HE-DOM-E) (90 % for Cd and 73 % for Zn, respectively) showed greater ability to form complexes with Cd and Zn than those under ambient CO2 (HE-DOM-A) (82 % for Cd and 61 % for Zn, respectively) in the undiluted sample. HE-DOM-E showed greater ability to extract Cd and Zn from soil than HE-DOM-A. It was concluded that elevated CO2 could increase the mobility of Cd and Zn due to the enhanced formation of DOM-metal complexes in the rhizosphere of HE S. alfredii. PMID:24453019

  16. Elevated CO2 increases plant uptake of organic and inorganic N in the desert shrub Larrea tridentata.

    PubMed

    Jin, Virginia L; Evans, R D

    2010-05-01

    Resource limitations, such as the availability of soil nitrogen (N), are expected to constrain continued increases in plant productivity under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)). One potential but under-studied N source for supporting increased plant growth under elevated CO(2) is soil organic N. In arid ecosystems, there have been no studies examining plant organic N uptake to date. To assess the potential effects of elevated atmospheric CO(2) on plant N uptake dynamics, we quantified plant uptake of organic and inorganic N forms in the dominant desert shrub Larrea tridentata under controlled environmental conditions. Seedlings of L. tridentata were grown in the Mojave Desert (NV, USA) soils that had been continuously exposed to ambient or elevated atmospheric CO(2) for 8 years at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility. After 6 months of growth in environmentally controlled chambers under ambient (380 micromol mol(-1)) or elevated (600 micromol mol(-1)) CO(2), pots were injected with stable isotopically labeled sole-N sources ((13)C-[2]-(15)N glycine, (15)NH(4) (+), or (15)NO(3) (-)) and moved back to their respective chambers for the remainder of the study. Plants were destructively harvested at 0, 2, 10, 24, and 49 days. Plant uptake of soil N derived from glycine, NH(4) (+), and NO(3) (-) increased under elevated CO(2) at days 2 and 10. Further, root uptake of organic N as glycine occurred as intact amino acid within the first hour after N treatment, indicated by approximately 1:1 M enrichment ratios of (13)C:(15)N. Plant N uptake responses to elevated CO(2) are often species-specific and could potentially shift competitive interactions between co-occurring species. Thus, physiological changes in root N uptake dynamics coupled with previously observed changes in the availability of soil N resources could impact plant community structure as well as ecosystem nutrient cycling under increasing atmospheric CO(2) levels in the Mojave Desert. PMID:20094733

  17. Increased Cell-Wall Extensibility in Elevated CO2 and O3 Indicates Modification of Leaf Cell-Wall Structure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean leaf size is increased by growth in elevated [CO2] and decreased in elevated [O3]. The mechanism likely involves changes in cell biophysical properties. Cell growth rate is a function of cell-wall extensibility, a measure of how easily the wall expands in response to turgor. Modification of...

  18. Vulnerability of lodging risk to elevated CO2 and increased soil temperature differs between rice cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthropogenic increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, [CO2], and subsequent increases in surface temperatures, are likely to impact the growth and yield of cereal crops. One means for yield reduction is for climate parameters to increase the occurrence of lodging. Using an in situ f...

  19. Altered Physiological Function, Not Structure, Drives Increased Radiation-Use Efficiency of Soybean Grown at Elevated CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies of elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) on crop canopies have found that radiation-use efficiency is increased more than radiation-interception efficiency. It is assumed that increased radiation-use efficiency is due to changes in leaf-level physiology; however, canopy stru...

  20. Elevated atmospheric [CO2 ] can dramatically increase wheat yields in semi-arid environments and buffer against heat waves.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Glenn J; Tausz, Michael; O'Leary, Garry; Mollah, Mahabubur R; Tausz-Posch, Sabine; Seneweera, Saman; Mock, Ivan; Löw, Markus; Partington, Debra L; McNeil, David; Norton, Robert M

    2016-06-01

    Wheat production will be impacted by increasing concentration of atmospheric CO2 [CO2 ], which is expected to rise from about 400 μmol mol(-1) in 2015 to 550 μmol mol(-1) by 2050. Changes to plant physiology and crop responses from elevated [CO2 ] (e[CO2 ]) are well documented for some environments, but field-level responses in dryland Mediterranean environments with terminal drought and heat waves are scarce. The Australian Grains Free Air CO2 Enrichment facility was established to compare wheat (Triticum aestivum) growth and yield under ambient (~370 μmol(-1) in 2007) and e[CO2 ] (550 μmol(-1) ) in semi-arid environments. Experiments were undertaken at two dryland sites (Horsham and Walpeup) across three years with two cultivars, two sowing times and two irrigation treatments. Mean yield stimulation due to e[CO2 ] was 24% at Horsham and 53% at Walpeup, with some treatment responses greater than 70%, depending on environment. Under supplemental irrigation, e[CO2 ] stimulated yields at Horsham by 37% compared to 13% under rainfed conditions, showing that water limited growth and yield response to e[CO2 ]. Heat wave effects were ameliorated under e[CO2 ] as shown by reductions of 31% and 54% in screenings and 10% and 12% larger kernels (Horsham and Walpeup). Greatest yield stimulations occurred in the e[CO2 ] late sowing and heat stressed treatments, when supplied with more water. There were no clear differences in cultivar response due to e[CO2 ]. Multiple regression showed that yield response to e[CO2 ] depended on temperatures and water availability before and after anthesis. Thus, timing of temperature and water and the crop's ability to translocate carbohydrates to the grain postanthesis were all important in determining the e[CO2 ] response. The large responses to e[CO2 ] under dryland conditions have not been previously reported and underscore the need for field level research to provide mechanistic understanding for adapting crops to a changing

  1. Altered physiological function, not structure, drives increased radiation-use efficiency of soybean grown at elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Rascher, Uwe; Biskup, Bernhard; Leakey, Andrew D B; McGrath, Justin M; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies of elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO(2)]) on crop canopies have found that radiation-use efficiency is increased more than radiation-interception efficiency. It is assumed that increased radiation-use efficiency is due to changes in leaf-level physiology; however, canopy structure can affect radiation-use efficiency if leaves are displayed in a manner that optimizes their physiological capacity, even though the canopy intercepts the same amount of light. In order to determine the contributions of physiology and canopy structure to radiation-use and radiation-interception efficiency, this study relates leaf-level physiology and leaf display to photosynthetic rate of the outer canopy. We used a new imaging approach that delivers three-dimensional maps of the outer canopy during the growing season. The 3D data were used to model leaf orientation and mean photosynthetic electron transport of the outer canopy to show that leaf orientation changes did not contribute to increased radiation-use; i.e. leaves of the outer canopy showed similar diurnal leaf movements and leaf orientation in both treatments. Elevated [CO(2)] resulted in an increased maximum electron transport rate (ETR(max)) of light reactions of photosynthesis. Modeling of canopy light interception showed that stimulated leaf-level electron transport at elevated [CO(2)], and not alterations in leaf orientation, was associated with stimulated radiation-use efficiency and biomass production in elevated [CO(2)]. This study provides proof of concept of methodology to quantify structure-function relationships in combination, allowing a quantitative estimate of the contribution of both effects to canopy energy conversion under elevated [CO(2)]. PMID:20407832

  2. Increased plant productivity and decreased microbial respiratory C loss by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria under elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Ming; Bell, Colin; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Pendall, Elise

    2015-03-01

    Increased plant productivity and decreased microbial respiratory C loss can potentially mitigate increasing atmospheric CO2, but we currently lack effective means to achieve these goals. Soil microbes may play critical roles in mediating plant productivity and soil C/N dynamics under future climate scenarios of elevated CO2 (eCO2) through optimizing functioning of the root-soil interface. By using a labeling technique with 13C and 15N, we examined the effects of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens on C and N cycling in the rhizosphere of a common grass species under eCO2. These microbial inoculants were shown to increase plant productivity. Although strong competition for N between the plant and soil microbes was observed, the plant can increase its capacity to store more biomass C per unit of N under P. fluorescens addition. Unlike eCO2 effects, P. fluorescens inoculants did not change mass-specific microbial respiration and accelerate soil decomposition related to N cycling, suggesting these microbial inoculants mitigated positive feedbacks of soil microbial decomposition to eCO2. The potential to mitigate climate change by optimizing soil microbial functioning by plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens is a prospect for ecosystem management.

  3. Increased plant productivity and decreased microbial respiratory C loss by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria under elevated CO2

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Ming; Bell, Colin; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Pendall, Elise

    2015-01-01

    Increased plant productivity and decreased microbial respiratory C loss can potentially mitigate increasing atmospheric CO2, but we currently lack effective means to achieve these goals. Soil microbes may play critical roles in mediating plant productivity and soil C/N dynamics under future climate scenarios of elevated CO2 (eCO2) through optimizing functioning of the root-soil interface. By using a labeling technique with 13C and 15N, we examined the effects of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens on C and N cycling in the rhizosphere of a common grass species under eCO2. These microbial inoculants were shown to increase plant productivity. Although strong competition for N between the plant and soil microbes was observed, the plant can increase its capacity to store more biomass C per unit of N under P. fluorescens addition. Unlike eCO2 effects, P. fluorescens inoculants did not change mass-specific microbial respiration and accelerate soil decomposition related to N cycling, suggesting these microbial inoculants mitigated positive feedbacks of soil microbial decomposition to eCO2. The potential to mitigate climate change by optimizing soil microbial functioning by plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens is a prospect for ecosystem management. PMID:25784647

  4. Can increased nitrogen uptake at elevated CO2 be explained by an hypothesis of optimal root function?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtrie, R. E.; Norby, R. J.; Näsholm, T.; Iversen, C.; Dewar, R. C.; Medlyn, B. E.

    2011-12-01

    Forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments have shown that annual nitrogen (N) uptake increases when trees are grown at elevated CO2 (eCO2) and that increased N uptake is critical for a sustained growth response to eCO2. Processes contributing to increased N uptake at eCO2 may include: accelerated decomposition of soil organic matter due to enhanced root carbon (C) exudation (so-called rhizosphere priming); increased C allocation to fine roots and increased root production at depth, both of which enhance N acquisition; differences in soil N availability with depth; changes in the abundance of N in chemical forms with differing mobility in soil; and reduced N concentrations, reduced maintenance respiration rates, and increased longevities of deeper roots. These processes have been synthesised in a model of annual N uptake in relation to the spatial distribution of roots. We hypothesise that fine roots are distributed spatially in order to maximise annual N uptake. The optimisation hypothesis leads to equations for the optimal vertical distribution of root biomass in relation to the distribution of available soil N and for maximum annual N uptake. We show how maximum N uptake and rooting depth are related to total root mass, and compare the optimal solution with an empirical function that has been fitted to root-distribution data from all terrestrial biomes. Finally, the model is used to explore the consequences of rhizosphere priming at eCO2 as observed at the Duke forest FACE experiment (Drake et al. 2011, Ecology Letters 14: 349-357) and of increasing N limitation over time as observed at the Oak Ridge FACE experiment (Norby et al. 2010, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 107: 19368-19373).

  5. Elevated CO2 increases root uptake of organic and inorganic N in the desert shrub, Larrea tridentata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We quantified the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on root nitrogen (N) uptake and leaf carbon (C) turnover in the desert shrub, Larrea tridentata. We also examined the impact of elevated CO2 on soil N fluxes and plant-soil feedbacks. Seedlings of L. tridentata were grown in reconstituted Mojave...

  6. INCREASED MOISTURE AND METHANOGENISIS CONTRIBUTE TO REDUCED METHANE OXIDATION IN ELEVATED CO2 SOILS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the mechanisms controlling carbon dioxide-induced soil change has taken on a new immediacy with recent awareness of the biogeochemical linkages in the cycles of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) and the roles these compounds will play in mediating future climate change. Factors im...

  7. Increased nitrate availability in the soil of a mixed mature temperate forest subjected to elevated CO2 concentration (canopy FACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleppi, Patrick; Inga, Bucher-Wallin; Frank, Hagedorn; Christian, Körner

    2013-04-01

    In a mature temperate forest in Hofstetten, Switzerland, deciduous tree canopies were subjected to a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) for a period of eight years. The effect of this treatment on the availability of nitrogen (N) in the soil was assessed along three transects across the experimental area, one under Fagus sylvatica, one under Quercus robur and Q. petraea and one under Carpinus betulus. Nitrate, ammonium and dissolved organic N (DON) were analysed in soil solution obtained with suction cups. Nitrate and ammonium were also captured in buried ion-exchange resin bags. These parameters were related to the local intensity of the FACE treatment as measured from the 13C depletion of dissolved inorganic carbon in the soil solution, because the CO2 used for the treatment was depleted in 13C (Schleppi et al., 2012). Over the eight years of the experiment, the CO2 enrichment reduced DON concentrations, did not affect ammonium, but induced higher nitrate concentrations, both in soil solution and in resin bags. In the nitrate captured in the resin bags, the natural abundance of the isotope 15N strongly increased. This indicates that the CO2 enrichment accelerated net nitrification, probably as an effect of the higher soil moisture resulting from the reduced transpiration of the CO2-enriched trees. It is also possible that N mineralisation was enhanced by root exudates (priming effect) or that the uptake of inorganic N by these trees decreased slightly as the result of a reduced N demand for fine root growth. In this mature deciduous forest we did not observe any progressive N limitation due to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations; on the contrary, we observed an enhanced N availability over the eight years of our measurements. This may, together with the global warming projected, exacerbate problems related to N saturation and nitrate leaching, although it is uncertain how long the observed trends will last in the future. Following the experiment with deciduous

  8. The transcriptome of Populus in elevated CO2 reveals increased anthocyanin biosynthesis during delayed autumnal senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Tallis, M.J.; Rogers, A.; Lin, Y.; Zhang, J.; Street, N. R.; Miglietta, F.; Karnosky, D. F.; Angelis, P. D.; Calfapietra, C.; Taylor, G.

    2010-03-01

    The delay in autumnal senescence that has occurred in recent decades has been linked to rising temperatures. Here, we suggest that increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} may partly account for delayed autumnal senescence and for the first time, through transcriptome analysis, identify gene expression changes associated with this delay. Using a plantation of Populus x euramericana grown in elevated [CO{sub 2}] (e[CO{sub 2}]) with free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) technology, we investigated the molecular and biochemical basis of this response. A Populus cDNA microarray was used to identify genes representing multiple biochemical pathways influenced by e[CO{sub 2}] during senescence. Gene expression changes were confirmed through real-time quantitative PCR, and leaf biochemical assays. Pathways for secondary metabolism and glycolysis were significantly up-regulated by e[CO{sub 2}] during senescence, in particular, those related to anthocyanin biosynthesis. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) representing the two most significantly up-regulated transcripts in e[CO{sub 2}], LDOX (leucoanthocyanidin dioxgenase) and DFR (dihydroflavonol reductase), gave (e[CO{sub 2}]/ambient CO{sub 2} (a[CO{sub 2}])) expression ratios of 39.6 and 19.3, respectively. We showed that in e[CO{sub 2}] there was increased autumnal leaf sugar accumulation and up-regulation of genes determining anthocyanin biosynthesis which, we propose, prolongs leaf longevity during natural autumnal senescence.

  9. Elevated CO2 increases water use efficiency by sustaining photosynthesis of water-limited maize and sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limited research has been conducted on responses of C4 crops to rising CO2 and climate change factors such as water stress. In this study, drought was imposed on corn and grain sorghum grown in carbon dioxide (CO2) at 360 (ambient) or 720 (elevated, double-ambient) ppm. Irrigation was withheld from ...

  10. Increases in nitrogen uptake rather than nitrogen-use efficiency support higher rates of temperate forest productivity under elevated CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Finzi, Adrien C; Norby, Richard J; Califapietra, Carlo; Gielen, Birgit; Iversen, Colleen M; Jackson, Robert B; Kubiske, Mark E; Childs, Joanne; Schlesinger, William H; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2007-01-01

    Forest ecosystems are important sinks for rising concentrations of atmospheric CO2. In a previous data synthesis of four forest FACE experiments (1), forest net primary production (NPP) increased by 23 2% when the forests were grown under atmospheric concentrations of CO2 predicted for the latter half of this century. Because nitrogen (N) availability commonly limits forest productivity, more N must be taken up from the soil and/or the N already assimilated by trees must be used more efficiently to support high rates of forest productivity under elevated CO2. Biogeochemical models predict that increases in forest NPP under elevated CO2 in N-limited ecosystems result in a significant increase in N-use efficiency (NUE), and that additional uptake of N by trees under elevated CO2 is only possible in ecosystems where N is not limiting. Here, experimental evidence demonstrates that patterns of N uptake and NUE under elevated CO2 differed from that predicted by biogeochemical models. The uptake of N increased under elevated CO2 at the Rhinelander, Duke and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) FACE sites, yet fertilization studies at the Duke and ORNL FACE sites showed that tree growth and forest NPP were strongly limited by N availability. By contrast, NUE increased under elevated CO2 only at the POP-EUROFACE site where fertilization studies showed that N was not limiting to tree growth. In reviewing data from the forest FACE experiments, we suggest that some combination of increasing fine root production, increased rates of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition, and increased allocation of carbon (C) to mycorrhizal fungi is likely to account for greater N uptake under elevated CO2 at the forest FACE sites. To accurately forecast the response of forest ecosystems to rising concentrations of atmospheric CO2, biogeochemical models must be reformulated to allow C transfers belowground that result in additional N uptake under elevated CO2.

  11. THE INVASIVE WEED TROPICAL SPIDERWORT INCREASES GROWTH UNDER ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive plants are considered to be a major threat to the earth’s biodiversity and cost U.S. agricultural and forest producers billions of dollars each year from decreased productivity and increased weed control costs. While considerable effort is being spent studying exotic plant pests, little co...

  12. Elevated CO2 decreases the response of the ethylene signaling pathway in Medicago truncatula and increases the abundance of the pea aphid.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huijuan; Sun, Yucheng; Li, Yuefei; Liu, Xianghui; Zhang, Wenhao; Ge, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The performance of herbivorous insects is greatly affected by plant nutritional quality and resistance, which are likely to be altered by rising concentrations of atmospheric CO2 . We previously reported that elevated CO2 enhanced biological nitrogen (N) fixation of Medicago truncatula, which could result in an increased supply of amino acids to the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum). The current study examined the N nutritional quality and aphid resistance of sickle, an ethylene-insensitive mutant of M. truncatula with supernodulation, and its wild-type control A17 under elevated CO2 in open-top field chambers. Regardless of CO2 concentration, growth and amino acid content were greater and aphid resistance was lower in sickle than in A17. Elevated CO2 up-regulated N assimilation and transamination-related enzymes activities and increased phloem amino acids in both genotypes. Furthermore, elevated CO2 down-regulated expression of 1-amino-cyclopropane-carboxylic acid (ACC), sickle gene (SKL) and ethylene response transcription factors (ERF) genes in the ethylene signaling pathway of A17 when infested by aphids and decreased resistance against aphids in terms of lower activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and polyphenol oxidase (PPO). Our results suggest that elevated CO2 suppresses the ethylene signaling pathway in M. truncatula, which results in an increase in plant nutritional quality for aphids and a decrease in plant resistance against aphids. PMID:24015892

  13. Drought increases heat tolerance of leaf respiration in Eucalyptus globulus saplings grown under both ambient and elevated atmospheric [CO2] and temperature.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Paul P G; Crous, Kristine Y; Ayub, Gohar; Duan, Honglang; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K; Ellsworth, David S; Tjoelker, Mark G; Evans, John R; Tissue, David T; Atkin, Owen K

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is resulting in increasing atmospheric [CO2], rising growth temperature (T), and greater frequency/severity of drought, with each factor having the potential to alter the respiratory metabolism of leaves. Here, the effects of elevated atmospheric [CO2], sustained warming, and drought on leaf dark respiration (R(dark)), and the short-term T response of R(dark) were examined in Eucalyptus globulus. Comparisons were made using seedlings grown under different [CO2], T, and drought treatments. Using high resolution T-response curves of R(dark) measured over the 15-65 °C range, it was found that elevated [CO2], elevated growth T, and drought had little effect on rates of R(dark) measured at T <35 °C and that there was no interactive effect of [CO2], growth T, and drought on T response of R(dark). However, drought increased R(dark) at high leaf T typical of heatwave events (35-45 °C), and increased the measuring T at which maximal rates of R(dark) occurred (Tmax) by 8 °C (from 52 °C in well-watered plants to 60 °C in drought-treated plants). Leaf starch and soluble sugars decreased under drought and elevated growth T, respectively, but no effect was found under elevated [CO2]. Elevated [CO2] increased the Q 10 of R(dark) (i.e. proportional rise in R(dark) per 10 °C) over the 15-35 °C range, while drought increased Q 10 values between 35 °C and 45 °C. Collectively, the study highlights the dynamic nature of the T dependence of R dark in plants experiencing future climate change scenarios, particularly with respect to drought and elevated [CO2]. PMID:25205579

  14. Drought increases heat tolerance of leaf respiration in Eucalyptus globulus saplings grown under both ambient and elevated atmospheric [CO2] and temperature

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Paul P. G.; Crous, Kristine Y.; Ayub, Gohar; Duan, Honglang; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K.; Ellsworth, David S.; Tjoelker, Mark G.; Evans, John R.; Tissue, David T.; Atkin, Owen K.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is resulting in increasing atmospheric [CO2], rising growth temperature (T), and greater frequency/severity of drought, with each factor having the potential to alter the respiratory metabolism of leaves. Here, the effects of elevated atmospheric [CO2], sustained warming, and drought on leaf dark respiration (R dark), and the short-term T response of R dark were examined in Eucalyptus globulus. Comparisons were made using seedlings grown under different [CO2], T, and drought treatments. Using high resolution T–response curves of R dark measured over the 15–65 °C range, it was found that elevated [CO2], elevated growth T, and drought had little effect on rates of R dark measured at T <35 °C and that there was no interactive effect of [CO2], growth T, and drought on T response of R dark. However, drought increased R dark at high leaf T typical of heatwave events (35–45 °C), and increased the measuring T at which maximal rates of R dark occurred (T max) by 8 °C (from 52 °C in well-watered plants to 60 °C in drought-treated plants). Leaf starch and soluble sugars decreased under drought and elevated growth T, respectively, but no effect was found under elevated [CO2]. Elevated [CO2] increased the Q 10 of R dark (i.e. proportional rise in R dark per 10 °C) over the 15–35 °C range, while drought increased Q 10 values between 35 °C and 45 °C. Collectively, the study highlights the dynamic nature of the T dependence of R dark in plants experiencing future climate change scenarios, particularly with respect to drought and elevated [CO2]. PMID:25205579

  15. Leaves: Elevated CO2 levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Burning fossil fuels and land use changes such as deforestation and urbanization have led to a dramatic rise in the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere since the onset of the Industrial Revolution. The highly dilute CO2 from the atmosphere enters plant leaves where it is concentr...

  16. Forest succession at elevated CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, James S.; Schlesinger, William H.

    2002-02-01

    We tested hypotheses concerning the response of forest succession to elevated CO2 in the FACTS-1 site at the Duke Forest. We quantified growth and survival of naturally recruited seedlings, tree saplings, vines, and shrubs under ambient and elevated CO2. We planted seeds and seedlings to augment sample sites. We augmented CO2 treatments with estimates of shade tolerance and nutrient limitation while controlling for soil and light effects to place CO2 treatments within the context of natural variability at the site. Results are now being analyzed and used to parameterize forest models of CO2 response.

  17. Mitochondria Increase Three-Fold and Mitochondrial Proteins and Lipid Change Dramatically in Postmeristematic Cells in Young Wheat Leaves Grown in Elevated CO2.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, E. J.; Williams, M.; Harwood, J. L.; Lindsay, J. G.; Leaver, C. J.; Leech, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    A dramatic stimulation in mitochondrial biogenesis during the very early stages of leaf development was observed in young wheat plants (Triticum aestivum cv Hereward) grown in elevated CO2 (650 [mu]L L-1). An almost 3-fold increase in the number of mitochondria was observed in the very young leaf cells at the base of the first leaf of a 7-d-old wheat plant. In the same cells large increases in the accumulation of a mitochondrial chaperonin protein and the mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex were detected by immunolabeling. Furthermore, the basal segment also shows a large increase in the rate of radiolabeling of diphosphatidylglycerol, a lipid confined to the inner mitochondrial membrane. This dramatic response in very young leaf cells to elevated CO2 suggests that the numerous documented positive effects of elevated CO2 on wheat leaf development are initiated as early as 12 h postmitosis. PMID:12228485

  18. Response to multi-generational selection under elevated [CO2] in two temperature regimes suggests enhanced carbon assimilation and increased reproductive output in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed Central

    Frenck, Georg; van der Linden, Leon; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Brix, Hans; Jørgensen, Rikke Bagger

    2013-01-01

    Functional plant traits are likely to adapt under the sustained pressure imposed by environmental changes through natural selection. Employing Brassica napus as a model, a multi-generational study was performed to investigate the potential trajectories of selection at elevated [CO2] in two different temperature regimes. To reveal phenotypic divergence at the manipulated [CO2] and temperature conditions, a full-factorial natural selection regime was established in a phytotron environment over the range of four generations. It is demonstrated that a directional response to selection at elevated [CO2] led to higher quantities of reproductive output over the range of investigated generations independent of the applied temperature regime. The increase in seed yield caused an increase in aboveground biomass. This suggests quantitative changes in the functions of carbon sequestration of plants subjected to increased levels of CO2 over the generational range investigated. The results of this study suggest that phenotypic divergence of plants selected under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration may drive the future functions of plant productivity to be different from projections that do not incorporate selection responses of plants. This study accentuates the importance of phenotypic responses across multiple generations in relation to our understanding of biogeochemical dynamics of future ecosystems. Furthermore, the positive selection response of reproductive output under increased [CO2] may ameliorate depressions in plant reproductive fitness caused by higher temperatures in situations where both factors co-occur. PMID:23762504

  19. Increased photosynthetic acclimation in alfalfa associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and cultivated in greenhouse under elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Goicoechea, Nieves; Baslam, Marouane; Erice, Gorka; Irigoyen, Juan José

    2014-11-15

    Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) can exhibit photosynthetic down-regulation when grown in greenhouse conditions under elevated atmospheric CO2. This forage legume can establish a double symbiosis with nitrogen fixing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), which may increase the carbon sink effect of roots. Our aim was to assess whether the association of alfalfa with AMF can avoid, diminish or delay the photosynthetic acclimation observed in previous studies performed with nodulated plants. The results, however, showed that mycorrhizal (M) alfalfa at the end of their vegetative period had lower carbon (C) discrimination than non-mycorrhizal (NM) controls, indicating photosynthetic acclimation under ECO2 in plants associated with AMF. Decreased C discrimination was due to the acclimation of conductance, since the amount of Rubisco and the expression of genes codifying both large and small subunits of Rubisco were similar or slightly higher in M than in NM plants. Moreover, M alfalfa accumulated a greater amount of soluble sugars in leaves than NM plants, thus favoring a down-regulation effect on photosynthetic rates. The enhanced contents of sugars in leaves coincided with a reduced percentage of arbuscules in roots, suggesting decreased sink of carbohydrates from shoots to roots in M plants. The shorter life cycle of alfalfa associated with AMF in comparison with the NM controls may also be related to the accelerated photosynthetic acclimation in M plants. Further research is needed to clarify to what extent this behavior could be extrapolated to alfalfa cultivated in the field and subjected to periodic cutting of shoots under climatic change scenarios. PMID:25240322

  20. Elevated CO2 increases tree-level intrinsic water use efficiency: insights from carbon and oxygen isotope analyses in tree rings across three forest FACE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Battipaglia, Giovanna; Saurer, Matthias; Cherubini, Paulo; Califapietra, Carlo; McCarthy, Heather R; Norby, Richard J; Cotrufo, M. Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Elevated CO2 increases intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi) of forests, but the magnitude of this effect and its interaction with climate is still poorly understood. We combined tree ring analysis with isotope measurements at three Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE, POP-EUROFACE, in Italy; Duke FACE in North Carolina and ORNL in Tennessee, USA) sites, to cover the entire life of the trees. We used 13C to assess carbon isotope discrimination ( 13C ci/ca) and changes in WUEi, while direct CO2 effects on stomatal conductance were explored using 18O as a proxy. Across all the sites, elevated CO2 increased 13C-derived WUEi on average by 73% for Liquidambar styraciflua, 77% for Pinus taeda and 75% for Populus sp., but through different ecophysiological mechanisms. Our findings provide a robust means of predicting WUEi responses from a variety of tree species exposed to variable environmental conditions over time, and species-specific relationships that can help modeling elevated CO2 and climate impacts on forest productivity, carbon and water balances.

  1. Elevated CO2 increases long-term N mineralization and plant N uptake in a semiarid grassland: Results from a five-year 15N tracer study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term primary production response to elevated CO2 depends on soil nitrogen (N) mineralization. Despite much effort, it is still uncertain how elevated CO2 affects long-term soil N dynamics. To examine the effect of doubling atmospheric CO2 concentration on N dynamics in a semiarid grassland ecos...

  2. Growth and control of invasive weeds under elevated CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmospheric concentrations of CO2 have been increasing since the onset of the industrial revolution. Regardless of the debate on the effects of this rise on climate, most plants exhibit a positive growth response to elevated CO2 due to increased photosynthesis, resource use efficiency, and/or alloca...

  3. Elevated CO2, not defoliation, enhances N cycling and increases short-term soil N immobilization regardless of N addition in a semiarid grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated CO2 and defoliation effects on nitrogen (N) cycling in rangeland soils remain poorly understood. Here we tested whether effects of elevated CO2 and defoliation (clipping to 2.5 cm height) on N cycling depended on soil N availability (addition of 1 vs. 11 g N/m2) in intact mesocosms extracte...

  4. Is guava phenolic metabolism influenced by elevated atmospheric CO2?

    PubMed

    Mendes de Rezende, Fernanda; Pereira de Souza, Amanda; Silveira Buckeridge, Marcos; Maria Furlan, Cláudia

    2015-01-01

    Seedlings of Psidium guajava cv. Pedro Sato were distributed into four open-top chambers: two with ambient CO(2) (∼390 ppm) and two with elevated CO(2) (∼780 ppm). Monthly, five individuals of each chamber were collected, separated into root, stem and leaves and immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen. Chemical parameters were analyzed to investigate how guava invests the surplus carbon. For all classes of phenolic compounds analyzed only tannins showed significant increase in plants at elevated CO(2) after 90 days. There was no significant difference in dry biomass, but the leaves showed high accumulation of starch under elevated CO(2). Results suggest that elevated CO(2) seems to be favorable to seedlings of P. guajava, due to accumulation of starch and tannins, the latter being an important anti-herbivore substance. PMID:25129845

  5. Elevated CO2 Effects on Mercury Content of Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natali, S. M.; Lerdau, M.; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.

    2006-12-01

    Fossil fuel combustion is the primary anthropogenic source of both CO2 and mercury (Hg) to the atmosphere. Terrestrial vegetation can act as a conduit for transferring atmospheric Hg into soils and freshwater systems. While the effects of CO2 on both terrestrial plants and soils have been well-studied, the impacts of these CO2 induced changes on Hg cycling are unknown. We found that elevated CO2 resulted in increased Hg concentration in forest soils. Soil Hg concentration in the top 20cm of soils was 26% greater and total Hg content was 22% greater under elevated CO2 (ambient + 200ppmv), relative to ambient at two FACE sites: Duke Forest, NC and Oak Ridge, TN. However, there was no significant CO2 effect on Hg inputs via leaf litter. Soil Hg was significantly correlated with soil organic matter and acidity, suggesting that CO2 mediated changes in soil properties may be affecting soil Hg content. Elevated atmospheric CO2 has the potential to increase the Hg trapping efficiency of soils, with still unknown effects on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem function.

  6. Varied Growth Response of Cogongrass Ecotypes to Elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Runion, G Brett; Prior, Stephen A; Capo-Chichi, Ludovic J A; Torbert, H Allen; van Santen, Edzard

    2015-01-01

    Cogongrass [Imperata cylindrica (L.) P. Beauv] is an invasive C4 perennial grass which is listed as one of the top ten worst weeds in the world and is a major problem in the Southeast US. Five cogongrass ecotypes [Florida (FL), Hybrid (HY), Louisiana (LA), Mobile (MB), and North Alabama (NA)] collected across the Southeast and a red-tip (RT) ornamental variety were container grown for 6 months in open top chambers under ambient and elevated (ambient plus 200 ppm) atmospheric CO2. Elevated CO2 increased average dry weight (13%) which is typical for grasses. Elevated CO2 increased height growth and both nitrogen and water use efficiencies, but lowered tissue nitrogen concentration; again, these are typical plant responses to elevated CO2. The HY ecotype tended to exhibit the greatest growth (followed by LA, NA, and FL ecotypes) whiles the RT and MB ecotypes were smallest. Interactions of CO2 with ecotype generally showed that the HY, LA, FL, and/or NA ecotypes showed a positive response to CO2 while the MB and RT ecotypes did not. Cogongrass is a problematic invasive weed in the southeastern U.S. and some ecotypes may become more so as atmospheric CO2 continues to rise. PMID:26779216

  7. Varied Growth Response of Cogongrass Ecotypes to Elevated CO2

    PubMed Central

    Runion, G. Brett; Prior, Stephen A.; Capo-chichi, Ludovic J. A.; Torbert, H. Allen; van Santen, Edzard

    2016-01-01

    Cogongrass [Imperata cylindrica (L.) P. Beauv] is an invasive C4 perennial grass which is listed as one of the top ten worst weeds in the world and is a major problem in the Southeast US. Five cogongrass ecotypes [Florida (FL), Hybrid (HY), Louisiana (LA), Mobile (MB), and North Alabama (NA)] collected across the Southeast and a red-tip (RT) ornamental variety were container grown for 6 months in open top chambers under ambient and elevated (ambient plus 200 ppm) atmospheric CO2. Elevated CO2 increased average dry weight (13%) which is typical for grasses. Elevated CO2 increased height growth and both nitrogen and water use efficiencies, but lowered tissue nitrogen concentration; again, these are typical plant responses to elevated CO2. The HY ecotype tended to exhibit the greatest growth (followed by LA, NA, and FL ecotypes) whiles the RT and MB ecotypes were smallest. Interactions of CO2 with ecotype generally showed that the HY, LA, FL, and/or NA ecotypes showed a positive response to CO2 while the MB and RT ecotypes did not. Cogongrass is a problematic invasive weed in the southeastern U.S. and some ecotypes may become more so as atmospheric CO2 continues to rise. PMID:26779216

  8. Does elevated CO2 alter silica uptake in trees?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fulweiler, Robinson W.; Maguire, Timothy J.; Carey, Joanna C.; Finzi, Adrien C.

    2015-01-13

    Human activities have greatly altered global carbon (C) and Nitrogen (N) cycling. In fact, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) have increased 40% over the last century and the amount of N cycling in the biosphere has more than doubled. In an effort to understand how plants will respond to continued global CO2 fertilization, longterm free-air CO2 enrichment experiments have been conducted at sites around the globe. Here we examine how atmospheric CO2 enrichment and N fertilization affects the uptake of silicon (Si) in the Duke Forest, North Carolina, a stand dominated by Pinus taeda (loblolly pine), and five hardwoodmore » species. Specifically, we measured foliar biogenic silica concentrations in five deciduous and one coniferous species across three treatments: CO2 enrichment, N enrichment, and N and CO2 enrichment. We found no consistent trends in foliar Si concentration under elevated CO2, N fertilization, or combined elevated CO2 and N fertilization. However, two-thirds of the tree species studied here have Si foliar concentrations greater than well-known Si accumulators, such as grasses. Based on net primary production values and aboveground Si concentrations in these trees, we calculated forest Si uptake rates under control and elevated CO2 concentrations. Due largely to increased primary production, elevated CO2 enhanced the magnitude of Si uptake between 20 and 26%, likely intensifying the terrestrial silica pump. This uptake of Si by forests has important implications for Si export from terrestrial systems, with the potential to impact C sequestration and higher trophic levels in downstream ecosystems.« less

  9. Does elevated CO2 alter silica uptake in trees?

    PubMed

    Fulweiler, Robinson W; Maguire, Timothy J; Carey, Joanna C; Finzi, Adrien C

    2014-01-01

    Human activities have greatly altered global carbon (C) and Nitrogen (N) cycling. In fact, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) have increased 40% over the last century and the amount of N cycling in the biosphere has more than doubled. In an effort to understand how plants will respond to continued global CO2 fertilization, long-term free-air CO2 enrichment experiments have been conducted at sites around the globe. Here we examine how atmospheric CO2 enrichment and N fertilization affects the uptake of silicon (Si) in the Duke Forest, North Carolina, a stand dominated by Pinus taeda (loblolly pine), and five hardwood species. Specifically, we measured foliar biogenic silica concentrations in five deciduous and one coniferous species across three treatments: CO2 enrichment, N enrichment, and N and CO2 enrichment. We found no consistent trends in foliar Si concentration under elevated CO2, N fertilization, or combined elevated CO2 and N fertilization. However, two-thirds of the tree species studied here have Si foliar concentrations greater than well-known Si accumulators, such as grasses. Based on net primary production values and aboveground Si concentrations in these trees, we calculated forest Si uptake rates under control and elevated CO2 concentrations. Due largely to increased primary production, elevated CO2 enhanced the magnitude of Si uptake between 20 and 26%, likely intensifying the terrestrial silica pump. This uptake of Si by forests has important implications for Si export from terrestrial systems, with the potential to impact C sequestration and higher trophic levels in downstream ecosystems. PMID:25628636

  10. Does elevated CO2 alter silica uptake in trees?

    PubMed Central

    Fulweiler, Robinson W.; Maguire, Timothy J.; Carey, Joanna C.; Finzi, Adrien C.

    2015-01-01

    Human activities have greatly altered global carbon (C) and Nitrogen (N) cycling. In fact, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) have increased 40% over the last century and the amount of N cycling in the biosphere has more than doubled. In an effort to understand how plants will respond to continued global CO2 fertilization, long-term free-air CO2 enrichment experiments have been conducted at sites around the globe. Here we examine how atmospheric CO2 enrichment and N fertilization affects the uptake of silicon (Si) in the Duke Forest, North Carolina, a stand dominated by Pinus taeda (loblolly pine), and five hardwood species. Specifically, we measured foliar biogenic silica concentrations in five deciduous and one coniferous species across three treatments: CO2 enrichment, N enrichment, and N and CO2 enrichment. We found no consistent trends in foliar Si concentration under elevated CO2, N fertilization, or combined elevated CO2 and N fertilization. However, two-thirds of the tree species studied here have Si foliar concentrations greater than well-known Si accumulators, such as grasses. Based on net primary production values and aboveground Si concentrations in these trees, we calculated forest Si uptake rates under control and elevated CO2 concentrations. Due largely to increased primary production, elevated CO2 enhanced the magnitude of Si uptake between 20 and 26%, likely intensifying the terrestrial silica pump. This uptake of Si by forests has important implications for Si export from terrestrial systems, with the potential to impact C sequestration and higher trophic levels in downstream ecosystems. PMID:25628636

  11. Restructuring of Epibacterial Communities on Fucus vesiculosus forma mytili in Response to Elevated pCO2 and Increased Temperature Levels.

    PubMed

    Mensch, Birte; Neulinger, Sven C; Graiff, Angelika; Pansch, Andreas; Künzel, Sven; Fischer, Martin A; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2016-01-01

    Marine multicellular organisms in composition with their associated microbiota-representing metaorganisms-are confronted with constantly changing environmental conditions. In 2110, the seawater temperature is predicted to be increased by ~5°C, and the atmospheric carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) is expected to reach approximately 1000 ppm. In order to assess the response of marine metaorganisms to global changes, e.g., by effects on host-microbe interactions, we evaluated the response of epibacterial communities associated with Fucus vesiculosus forma mytili (F. mytili) to future climate conditions. During an 11-week lasting mesocosm experiment on the island of Sylt (Germany) in spring 2014, North Sea F. mytili individuals were exposed to elevated pCO2 (1000 ppm) and increased temperature levels (Δ+5°C). Both abiotic factors were tested for single and combined effects on the epibacterial community composition over time, with three replicates per treatment. The respective community structures of bacterial consortia associated to the surface of F. mytili were analyzed by Illumina MiSeq 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing after 0, 4, 8, and 11 weeks of treatment (in total 96 samples). The results demonstrated that the epibacterial community structure was strongly affected by temperature, but only weakly by elevated pCO2. No interaction effect of both factors was observed in the combined treatment. We identified several indicator operational taxonomic units (iOTUs) that were strongly influenced by the respective experimental factors. An OTU association network analysis revealed that relationships between OTUs were mainly governed by habitat. Overall, this study contributes to a better understanding of how epibacterial communities associated with F. mytili may adapt to future changes in seawater acidity and temperature, ultimately with potential consequences for host-microbe interactions. PMID:27065988

  12. Restructuring of Epibacterial Communities on Fucus vesiculosus forma mytili in Response to Elevated pCO2 and Increased Temperature Levels

    PubMed Central

    Mensch, Birte; Neulinger, Sven C.; Graiff, Angelika; Pansch, Andreas; Künzel, Sven; Fischer, Martin A.; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    Marine multicellular organisms in composition with their associated microbiota—representing metaorganisms—are confronted with constantly changing environmental conditions. In 2110, the seawater temperature is predicted to be increased by ~5°C, and the atmospheric carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) is expected to reach approximately 1000 ppm. In order to assess the response of marine metaorganisms to global changes, e.g., by effects on host-microbe interactions, we evaluated the response of epibacterial communities associated with Fucus vesiculosus forma mytili (F. mytili) to future climate conditions. During an 11-week lasting mesocosm experiment on the island of Sylt (Germany) in spring 2014, North Sea F. mytili individuals were exposed to elevated pCO2 (1000 ppm) and increased temperature levels (Δ+5°C). Both abiotic factors were tested for single and combined effects on the epibacterial community composition over time, with three replicates per treatment. The respective community structures of bacterial consortia associated to the surface of F. mytili were analyzed by Illumina MiSeq 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing after 0, 4, 8, and 11 weeks of treatment (in total 96 samples). The results demonstrated that the epibacterial community structure was strongly affected by temperature, but only weakly by elevated pCO2. No interaction effect of both factors was observed in the combined treatment. We identified several indicator operational taxonomic units (iOTUs) that were strongly influenced by the respective experimental factors. An OTU association network analysis revealed that relationships between OTUs were mainly governed by habitat. Overall, this study contributes to a better understanding of how epibacterial communities associated with F. mytili may adapt to future changes in seawater acidity and temperature, ultimately with potential consequences for host-microbe interactions. PMID:27065988

  13. Elevated CO2 as a driver of global dryland greening

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xuefei; Wang, Lixin; McCabe, Matthew F.

    2016-01-01

    While recent findings based on satellite records indicate a positive trend in vegetation greenness over global drylands, the reasons remain elusive. We hypothesize that enhanced levels of atmospheric CO2 play an important role in the observed greening through the CO2 effect on plant water savings and consequent available soil water increases. Meta-analytic techniques were used to compare soil water content under ambient and elevated CO2 treatments across a range of climate regimes, vegetation types, soil textures and land management practices. Based on 1705 field measurements from 21 distinct sites, a consistent and statistically significant increase in the availability of soil water (11%) was observed under elevated CO2 treatments in both drylands and non-drylands, with a statistically stronger response over drylands (17% vs. 9%). Given the inherent water limitation in drylands, it is suggested that the additional soil water availability is a likely driver of observed increases in vegetation greenness. PMID:26869389

  14. Elevated CO2 as a driver of global dryland greening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xuefei; Wang, Lixin; McCabe, Matthew F.

    2016-02-01

    While recent findings based on satellite records indicate a positive trend in vegetation greenness over global drylands, the reasons remain elusive. We hypothesize that enhanced levels of atmospheric CO2 play an important role in the observed greening through the CO2 effect on plant water savings and consequent available soil water increases. Meta-analytic techniques were used to compare soil water content under ambient and elevated CO2 treatments across a range of climate regimes, vegetation types, soil textures and land management practices. Based on 1705 field measurements from 21 distinct sites, a consistent and statistically significant increase in the availability of soil water (11%) was observed under elevated CO2 treatments in both drylands and non-drylands, with a statistically stronger response over drylands (17% vs. 9%). Given the inherent water limitation in drylands, it is suggested that the additional soil water availability is a likely driver of observed increases in vegetation greenness.

  15. Does the growth response of woody plants to elevated CO2 increase with temperature? A model-oriented meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Baig, Sofia; Medlyn, Belinda E; Mercado, Lina M; Zaehle, Sönke

    2015-12-01

    The temperature dependence of the reaction kinetics of the Rubisco enzyme implies that, at the level of a chloroplast, the response of photosynthesis to rising atmospheric CO2 concentration (Ca ) will increase with increasing air temperature. Vegetation models incorporating this interaction predict that the response of net primary productivity (NPP) to elevated CO2 (eCa ) will increase with rising temperature and will be substantially larger in warm tropical forests than in cold boreal forests. We tested these model predictions against evidence from eCa experiments by carrying out two meta-analyses. Firstly, we tested for an interaction effect on growth responses in factorial eCa  × temperature experiments. This analysis showed a positive, but nonsignificant interaction effect (95% CI for above-ground biomass response = -0.8, 18.0%) between eCa and temperature. Secondly, we tested field-based eCa experiments on woody plants across the globe for a relationship between the eCa effect on plant biomass and mean annual temperature (MAT). This second analysis showed a positive but nonsignificant correlation between the eCa response and MAT. The magnitude of the interactions between CO2 and temperature found in both meta-analyses were consistent with model predictions, even though both analyses gave nonsignificant results. Thus, we conclude that it is not possible to distinguish between the competing hypotheses of no interaction vs. an interaction based on Rubisco kinetics from the available experimental database. Experiments in a wider range of temperature zones are required. Until such experimental data are available, model predictions should aim to incorporate uncertainty about this interaction. PMID:25940760

  16. Photosynthetic CO2 uptake in seedlings of two tropical tree species exposed to oscillating elevated concentrations of CO2.

    PubMed

    Holtum, Joseph A M; Winter, Klaus

    2003-11-01

    Do short-term fluctuations in CO2 concentrations at elevated CO2 levels affect net CO2 uptake rates of plants? When exposed to 600 microl CO2 l(-1), net CO2 uptake rates in shoots or leaves of seedlings of two tropical C3 tree species, teak (Tectona grandis L. f.) and barrigon [Pseudobombax septenatum (Jacq.) Dug.], increased by 28 and 52% respectively. In the presence of oscillations with half-cycles of 20 s, amplitude of ca. 170 microl CO2 l(-1) and mean of 600 microl CO2 l(-1), the stimulation in net CO2 uptake by the two species was reduced to 19 and 36%, respectively, i.e. the CO2 stimulation in photosynthesis associated with a change in exposure from 370 to 600 microl CO2 l(-1) was reduced by a third in both species. Similar reductions in CO2-stimulated net CO2 uptake were observed in T. grandis exposed to 40-s oscillations. Rates of CO2 efflux in the dark by whole shoots of T. grandis decreased by 4.8% upon exposure of plants grown at 370 microl CO2 l(-1) to 600 microl CO2 l(-1). The potential implications of the observations on CO2 oscillations and dark respiration are discussed in the context of free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) systems in which short-term fluctuations of CO2 concentration are a common feature. PMID:12905026

  17. Growth strategy of Norway spruce under air elevated [CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorny, R.; Urban, O.; Holisova, P.; Sprtova, M.; Sigut, L.; Slipkova, R.

    2012-04-01

    Plants will respond to globally increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) by acclimation or adaptation at physiological and morphological levels. Considering the temporal onset, physiological responses may be categorized as short-term and morphological ones as long-term responses. The degree of plant growth responses, including cell division and cell expansion, is highly variable. It depends mainly on the specie's genetic predisposition, environment, mineral nutrition status, duration of CO2 enrichment, and/or synergetic effects of other stresses. Elevated [CO2] causes changes in tissue anatomy, quantity, size, shape and spatial orientation and can result in altered sink strength. Since, there are many experimental facilities for the investigation of elevated [CO2] effects on trees: i) closed systems or open top chambers (OTCs), ii) semi-open systems (for example glass domes with adjustable lamella windows - DAWs), and iii) free-air [CO2] enrichments (FACE); the results are still unsatisfactory due to: i) relatively short-term duration of experiments, ii) cultivation of young plants with different growth strategy comparing to old ones, iii) plant cultivation under artificial soil and weather conditions, and iv) in non-representative stand structure. In this contribution we are discussing the physiological and morphological responses of Norway spruce trees cultivated in DAWs during eight consecutive growing seasons in the context with other results from Norway spruce cultivation under air-elevated [CO2] conditions. On the level of physiological responses, we discuss the changes in the rate of CO2 assimilation, assimilation capacity, photorespiration, dark respiration, stomatal conductance, water potential and transpiration, and the sensitivity of these physiological processes to temperature. On the level of morphological responses, we discuss the changes in bud and growth phenology, needle and shoot morphology, architecture of crown and root system, wood

  18. Increased invasive potential of non-native Phragmites australis: elevated CO2 and temperature alleviate salinity effects on photosynthesis and growth.

    PubMed

    Eller, Franziska; Lambertini, Carla; Nguyen, Loc Xuan; Brix, Hans

    2014-02-01

    The prospective rise in atmospheric CO2 and temperature may change the distribution and invasive potential of a species; and intraspecific invasive lineages may respond differently to climate change. In this study, we simulated a future climate scenario with simultaneously elevated atmospheric CO2 and temperature, and investigated its interaction with soil salinity, to assess the effects of global change on the ecophysiology of two competing haplotypes of the wetland grass Phragmites australis, that are invasive in the coastal marshes of North America. The two haplotypes with the phenotypes ‘EU-type’ (Eurasian haplotype) and ‘Delta-type’ (Mediterranean haplotype), were grown at 0‰ and 20‰ soil salinity, and at ambient or elevated climatic conditions (700 ppm CO2, +5 °C) in a phytotron system. The aboveground growth of both phenotypes was highest at the elevated climatic conditions. Growth at 20‰ salinity resulted in declined aboveground growth, lower transpiration rates (E), stomata conductance (gs), specific leaf area, photosynthetic pigment concentrations, and a reduced photosynthetic performance. The negative effects of salinity were, however, significantly less severe at elevated CO2 and temperature than at the ambient climatic conditions. The Delta-type P. australis had higher shoot elongation rates than the EU-type P. australis, particularly at high salinity. The Delta-type also had higher maximum light-saturated rates of photosynthesis (Asat), maximum carboxylation rates of Rubisco (Vcmax), maximum electron transport rates (Jmax), triose phosphate utilization rates (Tp), stomata conductance (gs), as well as higher Rubisco carboxylation-limited, RuBP regeneration-limited and Tp-regeneration limited CO2 assimilation rates than the EU-type under all growth conditions. Our results suggest that the EU-type will not become dominant over the Delta-type, since the Delta-type has superior ecophysiological traits. However, the projected rise in

  19. Effects of elevated CO2 on maize defense against mycotoxigenic Fusarium verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) increased maize susceptibility to Fusarium verticillioides stalk rot. Even though the pathogen biomass accumulated to significantly higher levels at double ambient [CO2] (2x[CO2]), the projected [CO2] concentration to occur at the end of this...

  20. Impacts of elevated CO2 on plant-microbial interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, S.; Herman, D.; Nuccio, E. E.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Brodie, E.; He, Z.; Zhou, J.; Firestone, M.

    2014-12-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 levels are predicted to alter C cycling and terrestrial ecosystem functions through effects on plant-microbial interactions. Under elevated CO2, plants transfer more C belowground. However, the fate, transformation and consequence of this extra C in soil are not well understood. We examined the influence of eCO2 on the belowground C cycling using Avena fatua, a common Mediterranean annual grass, with its root associated microbial community across multiple plant growth stages over one-growing season. Avena grown under eCO2 (700 ppm) 13CO2 increased both total C allocated belowground and the amount of root-derived 13C in the mineral-associated fraction. Although eCO2 did not show any significant impact on the abundance (quantified by qPCR) and composition (assessed by MiSeq 16S and ITS sequencing) of rhizosphere microbial community at any sampling time point, small but significant shifts on rhizosphere microbial functional potential were detected using GeoChip 5.0. In addition, the rhizosphere effect (i.e., impact of roots on rhizosphere community versus bulk soil) was much stronger in plants grown under eCO2 than these under ambient CO2 (aCO2). The rhizosphere enriched genes included key functional genes involved in C, N, P and S cycling as well as stress response. The signal intensities of a number of C cycling genes shifted significantly in rhizosphere communities associated with plants grown under eCO2, and many of these genes are involved in the decomposition of low molecular weight C compounds. When plants became senescent, the abundance of some genes encoding enzymes capable of decomposing macromolecular C compounds (e.g., xylanase, endopolygalacturonase) were significant higher in the rhizosphere of Avena grown in eCO2 than aCO2 condition, which may be due to the higher amount of Avena root debris detected at the end of season. Understanding modulations of plant-microbial interactions due to changing climate may allow improved

  1. Metagenomic Insights of Microbial Feedbacks to Elevated CO2 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Tu, Q.; Wu, L.; He, Z.; Deng, Y.; Van Nostrand, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the responses of biological communities to elevated CO2 (eCO2) is a central issue in ecology and global change biology, but its impacts on the diversity, composition, structure, function, interactions and dynamics of soil microbial communities remain elusive. In this study, we first examined microbial responses to eCO2 among six FACE sites/ecosystems using a comprehensive functional gene microarray (GeoChip), and then focused on details of metagenome sequencing analysis in one particular site. GeoChip is a comprehensive functional gene array for examining the relationships between microbial community structure and ecosystem functioning and is a very powerful technology for biogeochemical, ecological and environmental studies. The current version of GeoChip (GeoChip 5.0) contains approximately 162,000 probes from 378,000 genes involved in C, N, S and P cycling, organic contaminant degradation, metal resistance, antibiotic resistance, stress responses, metal homeostasis, virulence, pigment production, bacterial phage-mediated lysis, soil beneficial microorganisms, and specific probes for viruses, protists, and fungi. Our experimental results revealed that both ecosystem and CO2 significantly (p < 0.05) affected the functional composition, structure and metabolic potential of soil microbial communities with the ecosystem having much greater influence (~47%) than CO2 (~1.3%) or CO2 and ecosystem (~4.1%). On one hand, microbial responses to eCO2 shared some common patterns among different ecosystems, such as increased abundances for key functional genes involved in nitrogen fixation, carbon fixation and degradation, and denitrification. On the other hand, more ecosystem-specific microbial responses were identified in each individual ecosystem. Such changes in the soil microbial community structure were closely correlated with geographic distance, soil NO3-N, NH4-N and C/N ratio. Further metagenome sequencing analysis of soil microbial communities in one

  2. Elevated CO2 stimulates marsh elevation gain, counterbalancing sea-level rise

    PubMed Central

    Langley, J. Adam; McKee, Karen L.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Cherry, Julia A.; Megonigal, J. Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Tidal wetlands experiencing increased rates of sea-level rise (SLR) must increase rates of soil elevation gain to avoid permanent conversion to open water. The maximal rate of SLR that these ecosystems can tolerate depends partly on mineral sediment deposition, but the accumulation of organic matter is equally important for many wetlands. Plant productivity drives organic matter dynamics and is sensitive to global change factors, such as rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. It remains unknown how global change will influence organic mechanisms that determine future tidal wetland viability. Here, we present experimental evidence that plant response to elevated atmospheric [CO2] stimulates biogenic mechanisms of elevation gain in a brackish marsh. Elevated CO2 (ambient + 340 ppm) accelerated soil elevation gain by 3.9 mm yr−1 in this 2-year field study, an effect mediated by stimulation of below-ground plant productivity. Further, a companion greenhouse experiment revealed that the CO2 effect was enhanced under salinity and flooding conditions likely to accompany future SLR. Our results indicate that by stimulating biogenic contributions to marsh elevation, increases in the greenhouse gas, CO2, may paradoxically aid some coastal wetlands in counterbalancing rising seas. PMID:19325121

  3. Elevated CO2 stimulates marsh elevation gain, counterbalancing sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langley, J.A.; McKee, K.L.; Cahoon, D.R.; Cherry, J.A.; Megonigala, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Tidal wetlands experiencing increased rates of sea-level rise (SLR) must increase rates of soil elevation gain to avoid permanent conversion to open water. The maximal rate of SLR that these ecosystems can tolerate depends partly on mineral sediment deposition, but the accumulation of organic matter is equally important for many wetlands. Plant productivity drives organic matter dynamics and is sensitive to global change factors, such as rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. It remains unknown how global change will influence organic mechanisms that determine future tidal wetland viability. Here, we present experimental evidence that plant response to elevated atmospheric [CO2] stimulates biogenic mechanisms of elevation gain in a brackish marsh. Elevated CO2 (ambient 340 ppm) accelerated soil elevation gain by 3.9 mm yr1 in this 2-year field study, an effect mediated by stimulation of below-ground plant productivity. Further, a companion greenhouse experiment revealed that the CO2 effect was enhanced under salinity and flooding conditions likely to accompany future SLR. Our results indicate that by stimulating biogenic contributions to marsh elevation, increases in the greenhouse gas, CO2, may paradoxically aid some coastal wetlands in counterbalancing rising seas.

  4. Calcification by juvenile corals under heterotrophy and elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drenkard, E. J.; Cohen, A. L.; McCorkle, D. C.; de Putron, S. J.; Starczak, V. R.; Zicht, A. E.

    2013-09-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) threatens the existence of coral reefs by slowing the rate of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) production of framework-building corals thus reducing the amount of CaCO3 the reef can produce to counteract natural dissolution. Some evidence exists to suggest that elevated levels of dissolved inorganic nutrients can reduce the impact of OA on coral calcification. Here, we investigated the potential for enhanced energetic status of juvenile corals, achieved via heterotrophic feeding, to modulate the negative impact of OA on calcification. Larvae of the common Atlantic golf ball coral, Favia fragum, were collected and reared for 3 weeks under ambient (421 μatm) or significantly elevated (1,311 μatm) CO2 conditions. The metamorphosed, zooxanthellate spat were either fed brine shrimp (i.e., received nutrition from photosynthesis plus heterotrophy) or not fed (i.e., primarily autotrophic). Regardless of CO2 condition, the skeletons of fed corals exhibited accelerated development of septal cycles and were larger than those of unfed corals. At each CO2 level, fed corals accreted more CaCO3 than unfed corals, and fed corals reared under 1,311 μatm CO2 accreted as much CaCO3 as unfed corals reared under ambient CO2. However, feeding did not alter the sensitivity of calcification to increased CO2; ∆ calcification/∆Ω was comparable for fed and unfed corals. Our results suggest that calcification rates of nutritionally replete juvenile corals will decline as OA intensifies over the course of this century. Critically, however, such corals could maintain higher rates of skeletal growth and CaCO3 production under OA than those in nutritionally limited environments.

  5. Emiliania huxleyi increases calcification but not expression of calcification-related genes in long-term exposure to elevated temperature and pCO2

    PubMed Central

    Benner, Ina; Diner, Rachel E.; Lefebvre, Stephane C.; Li, Dian; Komada, Tomoko; Carpenter, Edward J.; Stillman, Jonathon H.

    2013-01-01

    Increased atmospheric pCO2 is expected to render future oceans warmer and more acidic than they are at present. Calcifying organisms such as coccolithophores that fix and export carbon into the deep sea provide feedbacks to increasing atmospheric pCO2. Acclimation experiments suggest negative effects of warming and acidification on coccolithophore calcification, but the ability of these organisms to adapt to future environmental conditions is not well understood. Here, we tested the combined effect of pCO2 and temperature on the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi over more than 700 generations. Cells increased inorganic carbon content and calcification rate under warm and acidified conditions compared with ambient conditions, whereas organic carbon content and primary production did not show any change. In contrast to findings from short-term experiments, our results suggest that long-term acclimation or adaptation could change, or even reverse, negative calcification responses in E. huxleyi and its feedback to the global carbon cycle. Genome-wide profiles of gene expression using RNA-seq revealed that genes thought to be essential for calcification are not those that are most strongly differentially expressed under long-term exposure to future ocean conditions. Rather, differentially expressed genes observed here represent new targets to study responses to ocean acidification and warming. PMID:23980248

  6. Elevated CO2 and plant species diversity interact to slow root decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    De Graaff, Marie-Anne; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Rula, Kelly L; Six, Johan W U A; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Classen, Aimee T

    2011-01-01

    Changes in plant species diversity can result in synergistic increases in decomposition rates, while elevated atmospheric CO2 can slow the decomposition rates; yet it remains unclear how diversity and changes in atmospheric CO2 may interact to alter root decomposition. To investigate how elevated CO2 interacts with changes in root-litter diversity to alter decomposition rates, we conducted a 120-day laboratory incubation. Roots from three species (Trifolium repens, Lespedeza cuneata, and Festuca pratense) grown under ambient or elevated CO2 were incubated individually or in combination in soils that were exposed to ambient or elevated CO2 for five years. Our experiment resulted in two main findings: (1) Roots from T. repens and L. cuneata, both nitrogen (N) fixers, grown under elevated CO2 treatments had significantly slower decomposition rates than similar roots grown under ambient CO2 treatments; but the decomposition rate of F. pratense roots (a non-N-fixing species) was similar regardless of CO2 treatment. (2) Roots of the three species grown under ambient CO2 and decomposed in combination with each other had faster decomposition rates than when they were decomposed as single species. However, roots of the three species grown under elevated CO2 had similar decomposition rates when they were incubated alone or in combination with other species. These data suggest that if elevated CO2 reduces the root decomposition rate of even a few species in the community, it may slow root decomposition of the entire plant community.

  7. Effects of elevated CO 2 and temperature on monoterpene emission of Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räisänen, Tommi; Ryyppö, Aija; Kellomäki, Seppo

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term (5 years) effects of elevated CO2 concentration (doubling of ambient CO2 concentration) and temperature (2-6 °C elevation) on the monoterpene emission of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) saplings (ca. 20 years old) grown in closed-top environmental chambers. The chamber treatments included: (1) ambient temperature and CO2, (2) ambient temperature and elevated CO2, (3) elevated temperature and ambient CO2, and (4) elevated temperature and elevated CO2. The variability of emissions during and after tree shoot growth was studied, and additionally the total cumulative emission of monoterpenes through a growing period (May-September) was estimated. When compared to the controls, the combination of elevated CO2 and temperature significantly increased normalized monoterpene emission rate for the whole growing period (+23%), whereas elevated CO2 had no significant effect (-4%), and elevated temperature even decreased (-41%) the emission rate. The increasing effect of the combination of elevated CO2 and temperature was strongest during shoot growth (+54%). After shoot growth, no significant differences in emission rate were found among the treatments. Emission modeling showed that the total amount of monoterpenes emitted from May to September was 2.38 mg gdw-1 in ambient conditions. The total emission in elevated CO2 was 5% greater and in elevated temperature 9% lesser than in ambient conditions. The combination of elevated CO2 and temperature increased the amount of emitted monoterpenes over the growing period by 126% compared to the total emission in ambient conditions.

  8. Nitrogen assimilation and transpiration: key processes conditioning responsiveness of wheat to elevated [CO2] and temperature.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Iván; Aroca, Ricardo; Garnica, María; Zamarreño, Ángel M; García-Mina, José M; Serret, Maria D; Parry, Martin; Irigoyen, Juan J; Aranjuelo, Iker

    2015-11-01

    Although climate scenarios have predicted an increase in [CO(2)] and temperature conditions, to date few experiments have focused on the interaction of [CO(2)] and temperature effects in wheat development. Recent evidence suggests that photosynthetic acclimation is linked to the photorespiration and N assimilation inhibition of plants exposed to elevated CO(2). The main goal of this study was to analyze the effect of interacting [CO(2)] and temperature on leaf photorespiration, C/N metabolism and N transport in wheat plants exposed to elevated [CO(2)] and temperature conditions. For this purpose, wheat plants were exposed to elevated [CO(2)] (400 vs 700 µmol mol(-1)) and temperature (ambient vs ambient + 4°C) in CO(2) gradient greenhouses during the entire life cycle. Although at the agronomic level, elevated temperature had no effect on plant biomass, physiological analyses revealed that combined elevated [CO(2)] and temperature negatively affected photosynthetic performance. The limited energy levels resulting from the reduced respiratory and photorespiration rates of such plants were apparently inadequate to sustain nitrate reductase activity. Inhibited N assimilation was associated with a strong reduction in amino acid content, conditioned leaf soluble protein content and constrained leaf N status. Therefore, the plant response to elevated [CO(2)] and elevated temperature resulted in photosynthetic acclimation. The reduction in transpiration rates induced limitations in nutrient transport in leaves of plants exposed to elevated [CO(2)] and temperature, led to mineral depletion and therefore contributed to the inhibition of photosynthetic activity. PMID:25958969

  9. Elevated CO2 effects on semiarid grassland plant in relation to water availability and competition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. It has been suggested that much of the elevated CO2 effect on plant productivity and N cycling in semiarid grasslands is related to a CO2-induced increase in soil moisture, but the relative importance of moisture-mediated and direct effects of CO2 remain unclear. 2. We grew five grassland species...

  10. The effect of elevated CO2 on carbon and nitrogen metabolism in soybean under FACE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crops have the potential to exploit the predicted increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]). Growth is typically stimulated at elevated [CO2], but a sustained and maximal exploitation of rising [CO2] is dependent on an adequate supply of nutrients, principally nitrogen, and suffi...

  11. Implications of elevated atmospheric CO2 on plant growth and water relations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Empirical records provide incontestable evidence for the global rise in CO2 concentration in the earth’s atmosphere. Plant growth can be stimulated by elevation of CO2; photosynthesis increases and economic yield is often enhanced. The application of more CO2 can result in less water use. Competitio...

  12. Increasing CO2 threatens human nutrition.

    PubMed

    Myers, Samuel S; Zanobetti, Antonella; Kloog, Itai; Huybers, Peter; Leakey, Andrew D B; Bloom, Arnold J; Carlisle, Eli; Dietterich, Lee H; Fitzgerald, Glenn; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Holbrook, N Michele; Nelson, Randall L; Ottman, Michael J; Raboy, Victor; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Sartor, Karla A; Schwartz, Joel; Seneweera, Saman; Tausz, Michael; Usui, Yasuhiro

    2014-06-01

    Dietary deficiencies of zinc and iron are a substantial global public health problem. An estimated two billion people suffer these deficiencies, causing a loss of 63 million life-years annually. Most of these people depend on C3 grains and legumes as their primary dietary source of zinc and iron. Here we report that C3 grains and legumes have lower concentrations of zinc and iron when grown under field conditions at the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration predicted for the middle of this century. C3 crops other than legumes also have lower concentrations of protein, whereas C4 crops seem to be less affected. Differences between cultivars of a single crop suggest that breeding for decreased sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 concentration could partly address these new challenges to global health. PMID:24805231

  13. Effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on denitrifying and nitrifying popualtions at terrestrial CO2 leakeage analogous sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christine, Dictor Marie; Catherine, Joulian; Valerie, Laperche; Stephanie, Coulon; Dominique, Breeze

    2010-05-01

    CO2 capture and geological storage (CCS) is recognized to be an important option for carbon abatement in Europe. One of the risks of CCS is the leakage from storage site. A laboratory was conducted on soil samples sampled near-surface from a CO2 leakage analogous site (Latera, Italy) in order to evaluate the impact of an elevated soil CO2 concentration on terrestrial bacterial ecosystems form near surface terrestrial environments and to determine a potential bacterial indicator of CO2 leakage from storage site. Surveys were conducted along a 50m long transect across the vent centre, providing a spectrum of CO2 flux rates, soil gas concentrations and compositions (Beaubien et al., 2007). A bacterial diversity studies, performed by CE-SSCP technique, on a soil profile with increasing CO2 soil concentrations (from 0.3% to 100%) showed that a change on bacterial diversity was noted when CO2 concentration was above 50 % of CO2. From this result, 3 soil samples were taken at 70 cm depth in 3 distinct zones (background soil CO2 content, soil CO2 content of 20% and soil CO2 content of 50%). Then theses soil samples were incubated under closed jars flushed with different air atmospheres (20, 50 and 90 % of CO2) during 18 months. At initial, 3, 6, 12 and 18 months, some soil samples were collected in order to estimate the denitrifying, nitrifying activities as a function of CO2 concentration content and times. Theses enzymatic activities were chosen because one occurs under anaerobic conditions (denitrification) and the other occurs under aerobic conditions (nitrification). Both of them were involved in the nitrogen cycle and are major actors of soil function and groundwater quality preservation. Metabolic diversity using BIOLOG Ecoplates was determined on every soil samples. Physico-chemical parameters (e.g. pH, bulk chemistry, mineralogy) were analyzed to have some information about the evolution of the soil during the incubation with increasing soil CO2 concentrations

  14. Resilience of Fungal Communities to Elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Veresoglou, Stavros D; Anderson, Ian C; de Sousa, Natalia M F; Hempel, Stefan; Rillig, Matthias C

    2016-08-01

    Soil filamentous fungi play a prominent role in regulating ecosystem functioning in terrestrial ecosystems. This necessitates understanding their responses to climate change drivers in order to predict how nutrient cycling and ecosystem services will be influenced in the future. Here, we provide a quantitative synthesis of ten studies on soil fungal community responses to elevated CO2. Many of these studies reported contradictory diversity responses. We identify the duration of the study as an influential parameter that determines the outcome of experimentation. Our analysis reconciles the existing globally distributed experiments on fungal community responses to elevated CO2 and provides a framework for comparing results of future CO2 enrichment studies. PMID:27273090

  15. Effect of elevated CO2 on photosynthesis in non-nutrient limited Pinus taeda plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.D.; Tissue, D.T.; Strain, B.R. )

    1994-06-01

    We examined the effect of elevated CO2 on photosynthetic capacity in non-nutrient limited Pinus taeda plants. Plants were grown in open-top chambers maintained at either ambient or ambient +30 Pa CO2. Leaf nitrogen levels indicated that no plants were N limited. Photosynthesis at the growth CO2 was significantly higher in plants grown at elevated CO2. However, elevated CO2 did not significantly affect rubisco activity and activation state, chlorophyll content, electron transport capacity or phosphate regeneration capacity. All parameters were significantly greater during the growing season than during the winter. Additionally, photosynthesis declined approximately 75% in elevated CO2-grown plants from May to January, but only 50% in ambient CO2-grown plants. These results indicate that elevated CO2 will not effect photosynthetic capacity grown plants. These results indicate that elevated CO2 will not affect photosynthetic capacity grown plants. These results indicate that elevated CO2 will not affect photosynthetic capacity in non-nutrient limited P. taeda, but will increase seasonal fluctuations in photosynthesis.

  16. Elevated atmospheric CO2 and O3 differentially alter nitrogen acquisition in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both CO2 and ozone (O3) concentrations in the atmosphere have increased over the past 50 years and are predicted to rise continually during this century. Elevated CO2 usually stimulates while elevated O3 often inhibits plant photosynthesis and primary production. Whether these changes are partly re...

  17. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 ON ROOT GROWTH AND PHYSIOLOGY FOR DESERT PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on the growth and physiology of roots have been measured in situ at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility. Minirhizotron measurements of fine root length production, mortality, and standing crop were not increased by elevated CO2. However, spec...

  18. Does a decade of elevated [CO2] affect a desert perennial plant community?

    PubMed

    Newingham, Beth A; Vanier, Cheryl H; Kelly, Lauren J; Charlet, Therese N; Smith, Stanley D

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effects of elevated [CO2 ] on plant community structure is crucial to predicting ecosystem responses to global change. Early predictions suggested that productivity in deserts would increase via enhanced water-use efficiency under elevated [CO2], but the response of intact arid plant communities to elevated [CO2 ] is largely unknown. We measured changes in perennial plant community characteristics (cover, species richness and diversity) after 10 yr of elevated [CO2] exposure in an intact Mojave Desert community at the Nevada Desert Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Facility. Contrary to expectations, total cover, species richness, and diversity were not affected by elevated [CO2]. Over the course of the experiment, elevated [CO2] had no effect on changes in cover of the evergreen C3 shrub, Larrea tridentata; alleviated decreases in cover of the C4 bunchgrass, Pleuraphis rigida; and slightly reduced the cover of C3 drought-deciduous shrubs. Thus, we generally found no effect of elevated [CO2] on plant communities in this arid ecosystem. Extended drought, slow plant growth rates, and highly episodic germination and recruitment of new individuals explain the lack of strong perennial plant community shifts after a decade of elevated [CO2]. PMID:24117700

  19. Effect of elevated CO2 on chlorpyriphos degradation and soil microbial activities in tropical rice soil.

    PubMed

    Adak, Totan; Munda, Sushmita; Kumar, Upendra; Berliner, J; Pokhare, Somnath S; Jambhulkar, N N; Jena, M

    2016-02-01

    Impact of elevated CO2 on chlorpyriphos degradation, microbial biomass carbon, and enzymatic activities in rice soil was investigated. Rice (variety Naveen, Indica type) was grown under four conditions, namely, chambered control, elevated CO2 (550 ppm), elevated CO2 (700 ppm) in open-top chambers and open field. Chlorpyriphos was sprayed at 500 g a.i. ha(-1) at maximum tillering stage. Chlorpyriphos degraded rapidly from rice soils, and 88.4% of initially applied chlorpyriphos was lost from the rice soil maintained under elevated CO2 (700 ppm) by day 5 of spray, whereas the loss was 80.7% from open field rice soil. Half-life values of chlorpyriphos under different conditions ranged from 2.4 to 1.7 days with minimum half-life recorded with two elevated CO2 treatments. Increased CO2 concentration led to increase in temperature (1.2 to 1.8 °C) that played a critical role in chlorpyriphos persistence. Microbial biomass carbon and soil enzymatic activities specifically, dehydrogenase, fluorescien diacetate hydrolase, urease, acid phosphatase, and alkaline phosphatase responded positively to elevated CO2 concentrations. Generally, the enzyme activities were highly correlated with each other. Irrespective of the level of CO2, short-term negative influence of chlorpyriphos was observed on soil enzymes till day 7 of spray. Knowledge obtained from this study highlights that the elevated CO2 may negatively influence persistence of pesticide but will have positive effects on soil enzyme activities. PMID:26790432

  20. Spatial response of coastal marshes to increased atmospheric CO2

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Katherine M.; Braswell, Anna E.; Marani, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The elevation and extent of coastal marshes are dictated by the interplay between the rate of relative sea-level rise (RRSLR), surface accretion by inorganic sediment deposition, and organic soil production by plants. These accretion processes respond to changes in local and global forcings, such as sediment delivery to the coast, nutrient concentrations, and atmospheric CO2, but their relative importance for marsh resilience to increasing RRSLR remains unclear. In particular, marshes up-take atmospheric CO2 at high rates, thereby playing a major role in the global carbon cycle, but the morphologic expression of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration, an imminent aspect of climate change, has not yet been isolated and quantified. Using the available observational literature and a spatially explicit ecomorphodynamic model, we explore marsh responses to increased atmospheric CO2, relative to changes in inorganic sediment availability and elevated nitrogen levels. We find that marsh vegetation response to foreseen elevated atmospheric CO2 is similar in magnitude to the response induced by a varying inorganic sediment concentration, and that it increases the threshold RRSLR initiating marsh submergence by up to 60% in the range of forcings explored. Furthermore, we find that marsh responses are inherently spatially dependent, and cannot be adequately captured through 0-dimensional representations of marsh dynamics. Our results imply that coastal marshes, and the major carbon sink they represent, are significantly more resilient to foreseen climatic changes than previously thought. PMID:26644577

  1. Spatial response of coastal marshes to increased atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, Katherine M; Braswell, Anna E; Marani, Marco

    2015-12-22

    The elevation and extent of coastal marshes are dictated by the interplay between the rate of relative sea-level rise (RRSLR), surface accretion by inorganic sediment deposition, and organic soil production by plants. These accretion processes respond to changes in local and global forcings, such as sediment delivery to the coast, nutrient concentrations, and atmospheric CO2, but their relative importance for marsh resilience to increasing RRSLR remains unclear. In particular, marshes up-take atmospheric CO2 at high rates, thereby playing a major role in the global carbon cycle, but the morphologic expression of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration, an imminent aspect of climate change, has not yet been isolated and quantified. Using the available observational literature and a spatially explicit ecomorphodynamic model, we explore marsh responses to increased atmospheric CO2, relative to changes in inorganic sediment availability and elevated nitrogen levels. We find that marsh vegetation response to foreseen elevated atmospheric CO2 is similar in magnitude to the response induced by a varying inorganic sediment concentration, and that it increases the threshold RRSLR initiating marsh submergence by up to 60% in the range of forcings explored. Furthermore, we find that marsh responses are inherently spatially dependent, and cannot be adequately captured through 0-dimensional representations of marsh dynamics. Our results imply that coastal marshes, and the major carbon sink they represent, are significantly more resilient to foreseen climatic changes than previously thought. PMID:26644577

  2. Elevated CO2 Affects Predator-Prey Interactions through Altered Performance

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Bridie J. M.; Domenici, Paolo; McCormick, Mark I.; Watson, Sue-Ann; Munday, Philip L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has shown that exposure to elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) affects how fishes perceive their environment, affecting behavioral and cognitive processes leading to increased prey mortality. However, it is unclear if increased mortality results from changes in the dynamics of predator-prey interactions or due to prey increasing activity levels. Here we demonstrate that ocean pCO2 projected to occur by 2100 significantly effects the interactions of a predator-prey pair of common reef fish: the planktivorous damselfish Pomacentrus amboinensis and the piscivorous dottyback Pseudochromis fuscus. Prey exposed to elevated CO2 (880 µatm) or a present-day control (440 µatm) interacted with similarly exposed predators in a cross-factored design. Predators had the lowest capture success when exposed to elevated CO2 and interacting with prey exposed to present-day CO2. Prey exposed to elevated CO2 had reduced escape distances and longer reaction distances compared to prey exposed to present-day CO2 conditions, but this was dependent on whether the prey was paired with a CO2 exposed predator or not. This suggests that the dynamics of predator-prey interactions under future CO2 environments will depend on the extent to which the interacting species are affected and can adapt to the adverse effects of elevated CO2. PMID:23484032

  3. Nematode Genera in Forest Soil Respond Differentially to Elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Neher, Deborah A; Weicht, Thomas R

    2013-09-01

    Previous reports suggest that fungivorous nematodes are the only trophic group in forest soils affected by elevated CO2. However, there can be ambiguity within trophic groups, and we examined data at a genus level to determine whether the conclusion remains similar. Nematodes were extracted from roots and soil of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) and sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua) forests fumigated with either ambient air or CO2-enriched air. Root length and nematode biomass were estimated using video image analysis. Most common genera included Acrobeloides, Aphelenchoides, Cephalobus, Ditylenchus, Ecphyadorphora, Filenchus, Plectus, Prismatolaimus, and Tylencholaimus. Maturity Index values and diversity increased with elevated CO2 in loblolly pine but decreased with elevated CO2 in sweet gum forests. Elevated CO2 treatment affected the occurrence of more nematode genera in sweet gum than loblolly pine forests. Numbers were similar but size of Xiphinema decreased in elevated CO2. Abundance, but not biomass, of Aphelenchoides was reduced by elevated CO2. Treatment effects were apparent at the genus levels that were masked at the trophic level. For example, bacterivores were unaffected by elevated CO2, but abundance of Cephalobus was affected by CO2 treatment in both forests. PMID:24115786

  4. Rhizosphere priming effects on soil N availability in forests exposed to elevated atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. P.; Bernhardt, E. S.

    2008-12-01

    The progressive nitrogen (N) limitation hypothesis suggests that the uptake of N due to rapid tree growth under elevated CO2 depletes pools of available N resulting in short-term increases in productivity under elevated CO2. To date however, a down-regulation of forest productivity under elevated CO2 has not been observed among the four forest FACE experiments suggesting that our understanding of the mechanisms by which trees influence soil N cycling needs further refinement. We sought to test the hypothesis that trees exposed to elevated CO2 increase soil N availability by 'priming' rhizosphere microbes via the release of root exudates. At the Duke Forest FACTS-1 site, NC, we collected exudates bi-monthly from intact fine roots of 25 year-old loblolly pine Pinus taeda trees exposed to elevated CO2 and N fertilization. In addition, we collected rhizosphere and bulk soil from the same plots in order to develop a time-integrated estimate of the plant- microbial response to the CO2 and N treatments. In general, there were strong interactive effects between CO2 and N fertilization on exudation and rhizosphere microbial activity. In non-fertilized plots, mass-specific exudation rates were 15% greater with CO2 enrichment. In fertilized soils the opposite patterns were detected, as CO2 decreased mass specific rates by 40% (relative to the ambient rates). In the soil, treatment effects on rhizosphere microbial activity were similar: elevated CO2 increased microbial activity in non-fertilized plots (29%) but decreased it in fertilized plots (15%). However, we found no differences in net N mineralization rates in the rhizosphere in response to either CO2 or N fertilization. Collectively, these results suggest that although changes in exudation and microbial activity are likely mediated by soil N availability, the degree to which such processes are responsible for increased soil N cycling in forests exposed to elevated CO2 remains unclear.

  5. Altered soil microbial community at elevated CO2 leads to loss of soil carbon

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Karen M.; Hungate, Bruce A.; Drake, Bert G.; Megonigal, J. Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Increased carbon storage in ecosystems due to elevated CO2 may help stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentrations and slow global warming. Many field studies have found that elevated CO2 leads to higher carbon assimilation by plants, and others suggest that this can lead to higher carbon storage in soils, the largest and most stable terrestrial carbon pool. Here we show that 6 years of experimental CO2 doubling reduced soil carbon in a scrub-oak ecosystem despite higher plant growth, offsetting ≈52% of the additional carbon that had accumulated at elevated CO2 in aboveground and coarse root biomass. The decline in soil carbon was driven by changes in soil microbial composition and activity. Soils exposed to elevated CO2 had higher relative abundances of fungi and higher activities of a soil carbon-degrading enzyme, which led to more rapid rates of soil organic matter degradation than soils exposed to ambient CO2. The isotopic composition of microbial fatty acids confirmed that elevated CO2 increased microbial utilization of soil organic matter. These results show how elevated CO2, by altering soil microbial communities, can cause a potential carbon sink to become a carbon source. PMID:17360374

  6. Elevated atmospheric CO2 levels affect community structure of rice root-associated bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Takashi; Liu, Dongyan; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ikeda, Seishi; Asakawa, Susumu; Tokida, Takeshi; Tago, Kanako; Hayatsu, Masahito; Aoki, Naohiro; Ishimaru, Ken; Ujiie, Kazuhiro; Usui, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Hayashi, Kentaro; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that elevated atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) affects rice yields and grain quality. However, the responses of root-associated bacteria to [CO2] elevation have not been characterized in a large-scale field study. We conducted a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment (ambient + 200 μmol.mol−1) using three rice cultivars (Akita 63, Takanari, and Koshihikari) and two experimental lines of Koshihikari [chromosome segment substitution and near-isogenic lines (NILs)] to determine the effects of [CO2] elevation on the community structure of rice root-associated bacteria. Microbial DNA was extracted from rice roots at the panicle formation stage and analyzed by pyrosequencing the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to characterize the members of the bacterial community. Principal coordinate analysis of a weighted UniFrac distance matrix revealed that the community structure was clearly affected by elevated [CO2]. The predominant community members at class level were Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria in the control (ambient) and FACE plots. The relative abundance of Methylocystaceae, the major methane-oxidizing bacteria in rice roots, tended to decrease with increasing [CO2] levels. Quantitative PCR revealed a decreased copy number of the methane monooxygenase (pmoA) gene and increased methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) in elevated [CO2]. These results suggest elevated [CO2] suppresses methane oxidation and promotes methanogenesis in rice roots; this process affects the carbon cycle in rice paddy fields. PMID:25750640

  7. Photosynthetic response of Cannabis sativa L., an important medicinal plant, to elevated levels of CO2.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Suman; Lata, Hemant; Khan, Ikhlas A; Elsohly, Mahmoud A

    2011-07-01

    The effect of elevated CO2 concentrations (545 and 700 μmol mol(-1)) on gas exchange and stomatal response of four high Δ(9)-THC yielding varieties of Cannabis sativa (HPM, K2, MX and W1) was studied to assess their response to the rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. In general, elevated CO2 concentration (700 μmol mol(-1)) significantly (p < 0.05) stimulated net photosynthesis (P N), water use efficiency (WUE) and internal CO2 concentration (C i), and suppressed transpiration (E) and stomatal conductance (g s) as compared to the ambient CO2 concentration (390 μmol mol(-1)) in all the varieties whereas, the effect of 545 μmol mol(-1) CO2 concentration was found insignificant (p < 0.05) on these parameters in most of the cases. No significant changes (p < 0.05) in the ratio of internal to the ambient CO2 concentration (C i/C a) was observed in these varieties under both the elevated CO2 concentrations (545 and 700 μmol mol(-1)). An average increase of about 48 %, 45 %, 44 % and 38 % in P N and, about 177 %, 157 %, 191 % and 182 % in WUE was observed due to elevated CO2 (700 μmol mol(-1)) as compared to ambient CO2 concentration in HPM, K2, MX and W1 varieties, respectively. The higher WUE under elevated CO2 conditions in Cannabis sativa, primarily because of decreased stomatal conductance and subsequently the transpiration rate, may enable this species to survive under expected harsh greenhouse effects including elevated CO2 concentration and drought conditions. The higher P N, WUE and nearly constant C i/C a ratio under elevated CO2 concentrations in this species reflect a close coordination between its stomatal and mesophyll functions. PMID:23573021

  8. Aridity under conditions of increased CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, Peter; Roderick, Micheal L.; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2016-04-01

    A string of recent of studies led to the wide-held assumption that aridity will increase under conditions of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and associated global warming. Such results generally build upon analyses of changes in the 'aridity index' (the ratio of potential evaporation to precipitation) and can be described as a direct thermodynamic effect on atmospheric water demand due to increasing temperatures. However, there is widespread evidence that contradicts the 'warmer is more arid' interpretation, leading to the 'global aridity paradox' (Roderick et al. 2015, WRR). Here we provide a comprehensive assessment of modeled changes in a broad set of dryness metrics (primarily based on a range of measures of water availability) over a large range of realistic atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We use an ensemble of simulations from of state-of-the-art climate models to analyse both equilibrium climate experiments and transient historical simulations and future projections. Our results show that dryness is, under conditions of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and related global warming, generally decreasing at global scales. At regional scales we do, however, identify areas that undergo changes towards drier conditions, located primarily in subtropical climate regions and the Amazon Basin. Nonetheless, the majority of regions, especially in tropical and mid- to northern high latitudes areas, display wetting conditions in a warming world. Our results contradict previous findings and highlight the need to comprehensively assess all aspects of changes in hydroclimatological conditions at the land surface. Roderick, M. L., P. Greve, and G. D. Farquhar (2015), On the assessment of aridity with changes in atmospheric CO2, Water Resour. Res., 51, 5450-5463

  9. Control of yellow and purple nutsedge in elevated co2 environments with glyphosate and halosulfuron

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) have significantly increased over the past century and are expected to continue increasing in the future. While elevated levels of CO2 will likely result in higher crop yields, weed growth is also highly likely to increase. An experiment was conduct...

  10. Adaptation to elevated CO2 in different biodiversity contexts

    PubMed Central

    Kleynhans, Elizabeth J.; Otto, Sarah P.; Reich, Peter B.; Vellend, Mark

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of migration, species persistence depends on adaption to a changing environment, but whether and how adaptation to global change is altered by community diversity is not understood. Community diversity may prevent, enhance or alter how species adapt to changing conditions by influencing population sizes, genetic diversity and/or the fitness landscape experienced by focal species. We tested the impact of community diversity on adaptation by performing a reciprocal transplant experiment on grasses that evolved for 14 years under ambient and elevated CO2, in communities of low or high species richness. Using biomass as a fitness proxy, we find evidence for local adaptation to elevated CO2, but only for plants assayed in a community of similar diversity to the one experienced during the period of selection. Our results indicate that the biological community shapes the very nature of the fitness landscape within which species evolve in response to elevated CO2. PMID:27510545

  11. Effects of Elevated Atmospheric CO2 on Rhizosphere Soil Microbial Communities in a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, L.M.; Buttner, M.P.; Cruz, P.; Smith, S.D.; Robleto, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide [CO2] on microbial communities in arid rhizosphere soils beneath Larrea tridentata were examined. Roots of Larrea were harvested from plots fumigated with elevated or ambient levels of [CO2] using Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) technology. Twelve bacterial and fungal rRNA gene libraries were constructed, sequenced and categorized into operational taxonomical units (OTUs). There was a significant decrease in OTUs within the Firmicutes (bacteria) in elevated [CO2], and increase in Basiomycota (fungi) in rhizosphere soils of plots exposed to ambient [CO2]. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that OTUs belonged to a wide range of bacterial and fungal taxa. To further study changes in bacterial communities, Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (QPCR) was used to quantify populations of bacteria in rhizosphere soil. The concentration of total bacteria 16S rDNA was similar in conditions of enriched and ambient [CO2]. However, QPCR of Gram-positive microorganisms showed a 43% decrease in the population in elevated [CO2]. The decrease in representation of Gram positives and the similar values for total bacterial DNA suggest that the representation of other bacterial taxa was promoted by elevated [CO2]. These results indicate that elevated [CO2] changes structure and representation of microorganisms associated with roots of desert plants. PMID:21779135

  12. Effects of Elevated Atmospheric CO(2) on Rhizosphere Soil Microbial Communities in a Mojave Desert Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, L M; Buttner, M P; Cruz, P; Smith, S D; Robleto, E A

    2011-10-01

    The effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide [CO(2)] on microbial communities in arid rhizosphere soils beneath Larrea tridentata were examined. Roots of Larrea were harvested from plots fumigated with elevated or ambient levels of [CO(2)] using Free-Air CO(2) Enrichment (FACE) technology. Twelve bacterial and fungal rRNA gene libraries were constructed, sequenced and categorized into operational taxonomical units (OTUs). There was a significant decrease in OTUs within the Firmicutes (bacteria) in elevated [CO(2)], and increase in Basiomycota (fungi) in rhizosphere soils of plots exposed to ambient [CO(2)]. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that OTUs belonged to a wide range of bacterial and fungal taxa. To further study changes in bacterial communities, Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (QPCR) was used to quantify populations of bacteria in rhizosphere soil. The concentration of total bacteria 16S rDNA was similar in conditions of enriched and ambient [CO(2)]. However, QPCR of Gram-positive microorganisms showed a 43% decrease in the population in elevated [CO(2)]. The decrease in representation of Gram positives and the similar values for total bacterial DNA suggest that the representation of other bacterial taxa was promoted by elevated [CO(2)]. These results indicate that elevated [CO(2)] changes structure and representation of microorganisms associated with roots of desert plants. PMID:21779135

  13. Impacts of Elevated Atmospheric CO 2 and O 3 on Paper Birch ( Betula papyrifera ): Reproductive Fitness

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Darbah, Joseph N. T.; Kubiske, Mark E.; Nelson, Neil; Oksanen, Elina; Vaapavuori, Elina; Karnosky, David F.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric CO 2 and tropospheric O 3 are rising in many regions of the world. Little is known about how these two commonly co-occurring gases will affect reproductive fitness of important forest tree species. Here, we report on the long-term effects of CO 3 and O 3 for paper birch seedlings exposed for nearly their entire life history at the Aspen FACE (Free Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment) site in Rhinelander, WI. Elevated CO 2 increased both male and female flower production, while elevated O 3 increased female flower production compared to trees in control rings. Interestingly, very little floweringmore » has yet occurred in combined treatment. Elevated CO 2 had significant positive effect on birch catkin size, weight, and germination success rate (elevated CO 2 increased germination rate of birch by 110% compared to ambient CO 2 concentrations, decreased seedling mortality by 73%, increased seed weight by 17%, increased root length by 59%, and root-to-shoot ratio was significantly decreased, all at 3 weeks after germination), while the opposite was true of elevated O 3 (elevated O 3 decreased the germination rate of birch by 62%, decreased seed weight by 25%, and increased root length by 15%). Under elevated CO 2 , plant dry mass increased by 9 and 78% at the end of 3 and 14 weeks, respectively. Also, the root and shoot lengths, as well as the biomass of the seedlings, were increased for seeds produced under elevated CO 2 , while the reverse was true for seedlings from seeds produced under the elevated O 3 . Similar trends in treatment differences were observed in seed characteristics, germination, and seedling development for seeds collected in both 2004 and 2005. Our results suggest that elevated CO 2 and O 3 can dramatically affect flowering, seed production, and seed quality of paper birch, affecting reproductive fitness of this species.« less

  14. Interactive effect of elevated CO2 and temperature on coral physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grottoli, A. G.; Cai, W.; Warner, M.; Melman, T.; Schoepf, V.; Baumann, J.; Matsui, Y.; Pettay, D. T.; Hoadley, K.; Xu, H.; Wang, Y.; Li, Q.; Hu, X.

    2011-12-01

    Increases in ocean acidification and temperature threaten coral reefs globally. However, the interactive effect of both lower pH and higher temperature on coral physiology and growth are poorly understood. Here, we present preliminary findings from a replicated controlled experiment where four species of corals (Acorpora millepora, Pocillopora damicornis, Montipora monasteriata, Turbinaria reniformis) were reared under the following six treatments for three weeks: 1) 400ppm CO2 and ambient temperature, 2) 400ppm CO2 and elevated temperature, 3) 650ppm CO2 and ambient temperature, 4) 650ppm CO2 and elevated temperature, 5) 800ppm CO2 and ambient temperature, 6) 800ppm CO2 and elevated temperature. Initial findings of photophysiological health (Fv/Fm), calcification rates (as measured by both buoyant weight and the total alkalinity methods), and energy reserves will be presented.

  15. Will elevated CO2 alter fuel characteristics and flammability of eucalypt woodlands?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Luke; Resco, Victor; Boer, Matthias; Bradstock, Ross; Sawyer, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 may enhance forest productivity via CO2 fertilisation and increased soil moisture associated with water savings, potentially resulting in increased woody plant abundance i.e. woody thickening. Changes to vegetation structure via woody thickening, as well as changes to vegetation properties (e.g. leaf characteristics and moisture content), may have important implications for ecosystem flammability and fire regimes. Understanding how elevated CO2 alters flammability and fire regimes will have implications for ecosystem dynamics, particularly carbon sequestration and emissions. We present data from Free Air CO2 Enrichment (EucFACE) and whole tree growth chamber (WTC) experiments to assess the effect of elevated CO2 on fuel properties and flammability of eucalypt woodlands. Experiments involved ambient (˜400 ppm) and elevated CO2treatments, with elevated treatments being +150 ppm and +240 ppm at EucFACE and the WTCs respectively. We examined the response of vegetation parameters known to influence ecosystem flammability, namely (i) understorey vegetation characteristics (ii) understorey fuel moisture and (iii) leaf flammability. Understorey growth experiments at EucFACE using seedlings of two common woody species (Hakea sericia, Eucalyptus tereticornis) indicate that elevated CO2 did not influence stem and leaf biomass, height or crown dimensions of seedlings after 12 months exposure to experimental treatments. Temporal changes to understorey live fuel moisture were assessed at EucFACE over an 18 month period using time lapse cameras. Understorey vegetation greenness was measured daily from digital photos using the green chromatic coordinate (GCC), an index that is highly correlated with live fuel moisture (R2 = 0.90). GCC and rates of greening and browning were not affected by elevated CO2, though they were highly responsive to soil moisture availability and temperature. This suggests that there is limited potential for elevated CO2 to alter

  16. Effect of elevated CO2 concentration on photosynthetic characteristics of hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii under cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingqiang; Tao, Qi; Di, Zhenzhen; Lu, Fan; Yang, Xiaoe

    2015-07-01

    The combined effects of elevated CO2 and cadmium (Cd) on photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence and Cd accumulation in hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance were investigated to predict plant growth under Cd stress with rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. Both pot and hydroponic experiments were conducted and the plants were grown under ambient (350 µL L(-1)) or elevated (800 µL L(-1)) CO2 . Elevated CO2 significantly (P < 0.05) increased Pn (105%-149%), Pnmax (38.8%-63.0%) and AQY (20.0%-34.8%) of S. alfredii in all the Cd treatments, but reduced chlorophyll concentration, dark respiration and photorespiration. After 10 days growth in medium with 50 µM Cd under elevated CO2 , PSII activities were significantly enhanced (P < 0.05) with Pm, Fv/Fm, Φ(II) and qP increased by 66.1%, 7.5%, 19.5% and 16.4%, respectively, as compared with ambient-grown plants. Total Cd uptake in shoot of S. alfredii grown under elevated CO2 was increased by 44.1%-48.5%, which was positively correlated with the increase in Pn. These results indicate that elevated CO2 promoted the growth of S. alfredii due to increased photosynthetic carbon uptake rate and photosynthetic light-use efficiency, and showed great potential to improve the phytoextraction of Cd by S. alfredii. PMID:25370532

  17. Tomato–Pseudomonas syringae interactions under elevated CO2 concentration: the role of stomata

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Sun, Zenghui; Shao, Shujun; Zhang, Shuai; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Zhang, Guanqun; Jiang, Yuping; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Xiaojian; Zhou, Yanhong; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) in agricultural and natural ecosystems is known to reduce plant stomatal opening, but it is unclear whether these CO2-induced stomatal alterations are associated with foliar pathogen infections. In this study, tomato plants were grown under ambient and elevated [CO2] and inoculated with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000, a strain that is virulent on tomato plants. We found that elevated [CO2] enhanced tomato defence against P. syringae. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that stomatal aperture of elevated [CO2] plants was considerably smaller than their ambient counterparts, which affected the behaviour of P. syringae bacteria on the upper surface of epidermal peels. Pharmacological experiments revealed that nitric oxide (NO) played a role in elevated [CO2]-induced stomatal closure. Silencing key genes involved in NO generation and stomatal closing, nitrate reductase (NR) and guard cell slow-type anion channel 1 (SLAC1), blocked elevated [CO2]-induced stomatal closure and resulted in significant increases in P. syringae infection. However, the SLAC1-silenced plants, but not the NR-silenced plants, still had significantly higher defence under elevated [CO2] compared with plants treated with ambient [CO2]. Similar results were obtained when the stomata-limiting factor for P. syringae entry was excluded by syringe infiltration inoculation. These results indicate that elevated [CO2] induces defence against P. syringae in tomato plants, not only by reducing the stomata-mediated entry of P. syringae but also by invoking a stomata-independent pathway to counteract P. syringae. This information is valuable for designing proper strategies against bacterial pathogens under changing agricultural and natural ecosystems. PMID:25336683

  18. Responses of Legume Versus Nonlegume Tropical Tree Seedlings to Elevated CO2 Concentration1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Cernusak, Lucas A.; Winter, Klaus; Martínez, Carlos; Correa, Edwin; Aranda, Jorge; Garcia, Milton; Jaramillo, Carlos; Turner, Benjamin L.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated responses of growth, leaf gas exchange, carbon-isotope discrimination, and whole-plant water-use efficiency (WP) to elevated CO2 concentration ([CO2]) in seedlings of five leguminous and five nonleguminous tropical tree species. Plants were grown at CO2 partial pressures of 40 and 70 Pa. As a group, legumes did not differ from nonlegumes in growth response to elevated [CO2]. The mean ratio of final plant dry mass at elevated to ambient [CO2] (ME/MA) was 1.32 and 1.24 for legumes and nonlegumes, respectively. However, there was large variation in ME/MA among legume species (0.92–2.35), whereas nonlegumes varied much less (1.21–1.29). Variation among legume species in ME/MA was closely correlated with their capacity for nodule formation, as expressed by nodule mass ratio, the dry mass of nodules for a given plant dry mass. WP increased markedly in response to elevated [CO2] in all species. The ratio of intercellular to ambient CO2 partial pressures during photosynthesis remained approximately constant at ambient and elevated [CO2], as did carbon isotope discrimination, suggesting that WP should increase proportionally for a given increase in atmospheric [CO2]. These results suggest that tree legumes with a strong capacity for nodule formation could have a competitive advantage in tropical forests as atmospheric [CO2] rises and that the water-use efficiency of tropical tree species will increase under elevated [CO2]. PMID:21788363

  19. Effects of elevated [CO2] on maize defence against mycotoxigenic Fusarium verticillioides

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Martha M; Huffaker, Alisa; Schmelz, Eric A; Dafoe, Nicole J; Christensen, Shawn; Sims, James; Martins, Vitor F; Swerbilow, Jay; Romero, Maritza; Alborn, Hans T; Allen, Leon HARTWELL; Teal, Peter EA

    2014-01-01

    Maize is by quantity the most important C4 cereal crop; however, future climate changes are expected to increase maize susceptibility to mycotoxigenic fungal pathogens and reduce productivity. While rising atmospheric [CO2] is a driving force behind the warmer temperatures and drought, which aggravate fungal disease and mycotoxin accumulation, our understanding of how elevated [CO2] will effect maize defences against such pathogens is limited. Here we report that elevated [CO2] increases maize susceptibility to Fusarium verticillioides proliferation, while mycotoxin levels are unaltered. Fumonisin production is not proportional to the increase in F. verticillioides biomass, and the amount of fumonisin produced per unit pathogen is reduced at elevated [CO2]. Following F. verticillioides stalk inoculation, the accumulation of sugars, free fatty acids, lipoxygenase (LOX) transcripts, phytohormones and downstream phytoalexins is dampened in maize grown at elevated [CO2]. The attenuation of maize 13-LOXs and jasmonic acid production correlates with reduced terpenoid phytoalexins and increased susceptibility. Furthermore, the attenuated induction of 9-LOXs, which have been suggested to stimulate mycotoxin biosynthesis, is consistent with reduced fumonisin per unit fungal biomass at elevated [CO2]. Our findings suggest that elevated [CO2] will compromise maize LOX-dependent signalling, which will influence the interactions between maize and mycotoxigenic fungi. Elevated [CO2] increases maize susceptibility to Fusarium verticillioides proliferation but mycotoxin levels are unaltered. The attenuation of maize 13-LOXs and JA production correlates with reduced terpenoid phytoalexins and increased susceptibility. Furthermore, the attenuated induction of 9-LOXs, which have been suggested to stimulate mycotoxin biosynthesis, is consistent with reduced fumonisin per unit fungal biomass at elevated [CO2]. PMID:24689748

  20. Effects of elevated [CO2 ] on maize defence against mycotoxigenic Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Martha M; Huffaker, Alisa; Schmelz, Eric A; Dafoe, Nicole J; Christensen, Shawn; Sims, James; Martins, Vitor F; Swerbilow, Jay; Romero, Maritza; Alborn, Hans T; Allen, Leon Hartwell; Teal, Peter E A

    2014-12-01

    Maize is by quantity the most important C4 cereal crop; however, future climate changes are expected to increase maize susceptibility to mycotoxigenic fungal pathogens and reduce productivity. While rising atmospheric [CO2 ] is a driving force behind the warmer temperatures and drought, which aggravate fungal disease and mycotoxin accumulation, our understanding of how elevated [CO2 ] will effect maize defences against such pathogens is limited. Here we report that elevated [CO2 ] increases maize susceptibility to Fusarium verticillioides proliferation, while mycotoxin levels are unaltered. Fumonisin production is not proportional to the increase in F. verticillioides biomass, and the amount of fumonisin produced per unit pathogen is reduced at elevated [CO2 ]. Following F. verticillioides stalk inoculation, the accumulation of sugars, free fatty acids, lipoxygenase (LOX) transcripts, phytohormones and downstream phytoalexins is dampened in maize grown at elevated [CO2 ]. The attenuation of maize 13-LOXs and jasmonic acid production correlates with reduced terpenoid phytoalexins and increased susceptibility. Furthermore, the attenuated induction of 9-LOXs, which have been suggested to stimulate mycotoxin biosynthesis, is consistent with reduced fumonisin per unit fungal biomass at elevated [CO2 ]. Our findings suggest that elevated [CO2 ] will compromise maize LOX-dependent signalling, which will influence the interactions between maize and mycotoxigenic fungi. PMID:24689748

  1. Impact of Elevated CO2 on Tobacco Caterpillar, Spodoptera litura on Peanut, Arachis hypogea

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasa Rao, M; Manimanjari, D; Vanaja, M; Rama Rao, CA; Srinivas, K; Rao, Vum; Venkateswarlu, B

    2012-01-01

    If the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the atmosphere changes in the future, as predicted, it could influence crops and insect pests. The growth and development of the tobacco caterpillar, Spodoptera litura (Fabricius) (Noctuidae: Lepidoptera), reared on peanut (Arachis hypogea L.) foliage grown under elevated CO2 (550 ppm and 700 ppm) concentrations in open top chambers at Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture, Hyderabad, India, were examined in this study. Significantly lower leaf nitrogen, higher carbon, higher relative proportion of carbon to nitrogen and higher polyphenols content expressed in terms of tannic acid equivalents were observed in the peanut foliage grown under elevated CO2 levels. Substantial influence of elevated CO2 on S. litura was noticed, such as longer larval duration, higher larval weights, and increased consumption of peanut foliage by S. litura larvae under elevated CO2 compared with ambient CO2. Relative consumption rate was significantly higher for S. litura larva fed plants grown at 550 and 700 ppm than for larvae fed plants grown at ambient condition. Decreased efficiency of conversion of ingested food, decreased efficiency of conversion of digested food, and decreased relative growth rate of larvae was observed under elevated CO2. The present results indicate that elevated CO2 levels altered the quality of the peanut foliage, resulting in higher consumption, lower digestive efficiency, slower growth, and longer time to pupation (one day more than ambient). PMID:23437971

  2. Guard cell hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide mediate elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement in tomato.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kai; Li, Xin; Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Guanqun; Liu, Yaru; Zhou, Yanhong; Xia, Xiaojian; Chen, Zhixiang; Yu, Jingquan

    2015-10-01

    Climate change as a consequence of increasing atmospheric CO2 influences plant photosynthesis and transpiration. Although the involvement of stomata in plant responses to elevated CO2 has been well established, the underlying mechanism of elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement remains largely unknown. We used diverse techniques, including laser scanning confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, biochemical methodologies and gene silencing to investigate the signaling pathway for elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Elevated CO2 -induced stomatal closure was dependent on the production of RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE 1 (RBOH1)-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) and NITRATE REDUCTASE (NR)-mediated nitric oxide (NO) in guard cells in an abscisic acid (ABA)-independent manner. Silencing of OPEN STOMATA 1 (OST1) compromised the elevated CO2 -induced accumulation of H2 O2 and NO, upregulation of SLOW ANION CHANNEL ASSOCIATED 1 (SLAC1) gene expression and reduction of stomatal aperture, whereas silencing of RBOH1 or NR had no effects on the expression of OST1. Our results demonstrate that as critical signaling molecules, RBOH1-dependent H2 O2 and NR-dependent NO act downstream of OST1 that regulate SLAC1 expression and elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement. This information is crucial to deepen the understanding of CO2 signaling pathway in guard cells. PMID:26308648

  3. Effects of Elevated CO2 Atmospheric CO2 on Soil Efflux in Conventional and Conservation Cropping Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 can affect both the quantity and quality of plant tissues, which will impact the cycling and storage of carbon within plant/soil systems and the rate of CO2 release back to the atmosphere. Research is needed to more accurately quantify the effects of elevated CO2 on soil CO...

  4. Forest soil carbon oxidation state and oxidative ratio responses to elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockaday, William C.; Gallagher, Morgan E.; Masiello, Caroline A.; Baldock, Jeffrey A.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Norby, Richard J.

    2015-09-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) of the biosphere is the stoichiometric ratio (O2/CO2) of gas exchange by photosynthesis and respiration—a key parameter in budgeting calculations of the land and ocean carbon sinks. Carbon cycle-climate feedbacks could alter the OR of the biosphere by affecting the quantity and quality of organic matter in plant biomass and soil carbon pools. This study considers the effect of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations ([CO2]) on the OR of a hardwood forest after nine growing seasons of Free-Air CO2 Enrichment. We measured changes in the carbon oxidation state (Cox) of biomass and soil carbon pools as a proxy for the ecosystem OR. The OR of net primary production, 1.039, was not affected by elevated [CO2]. However, the Cox of the soil carbon pool was 40% higher at elevated [CO2], and the estimated OR values for soil respiration increased from 1.006 at ambient [CO2] to 1.054 at elevated [CO2]. A biochemical inventory of the soil organic matter ascribed the increases in Cox and OR to faster turnover of reduced substrates, lignin and lipids, at elevated [CO2]. This implicates the heterotrophic soil community response to elevated [CO2] as a driver of disequilibrium in the ecosystem OR. The oxidation of soil carbon pool constitutes an unexpected terrestrial O2 sink. Carbon budgets constructed under the assumption of OR equilibrium would equate such a terrestrial O2 sink to CO2 uptake by the ocean. The potential for climate-driven disequilibriua in the cycling of O2 and CO2 warrants further investigation.

  5. Elevated CO2 effects on plant carbon, nitrogen and water relations: Six important lessons from FACE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both natural and managed ecosystems are currently exposed to an elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) level that has not been experienced by terrestrial vegetation since the early Miocene and are facing a future that portends uncertain consequences of ever increasing [CO2]. Understanding how...

  6. Nitrogen and carbon cycling in a grassland community ecosystem as affected by elevated atmospheric CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing global atmospheric CO2 concentration has led to concerns regarding its potential effects on terrestrial ecosystem and the long-term storage of C and N in soil. This study examined responses to elevated CO2 in a grass ecosystem invaded with a leguminous shrub Acacia farnesiana (L.) Willd (...

  7. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSES ON WESTERN CONIFER SEEDLINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The future productivity of forests will be affected by increased levels of atmospheric CO2 which will likely be associated with climate change and regional air pollutants such as O3. We have conducted two long-term experiments to determine the effects of elevated CO2 and other s...

  8. Ozone and density affect the response of biomass and seed yield to elevated CO2 in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropospheric O3 reduces growth and yield of many crop species, whereas CO2 ameliorates the negative effects of O3. Thus in a combined elevated CO2 and O3 atmosphere, seed yield is at least restored to that of charcoal-filtered (CF) air at ambient CO2. The CO2-induced yield increase in CF air is hi...

  9. Hyperosmotic stress and elevated pCO2 alter monoclonal antibody charge distribution and monosaccharide content.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Albert E; Miller, William M

    2002-01-01

    Medium osmolality increases with pCO2 at constant pH. Elevated pCO2 and osmolality inhibit hybridoma growth to similar extents in both serum-containing and serum-free media. The combination of osmolality and elevated pCO2 synergizes to negatively impact cell growth. IgG2a glycosylation by hybridoma cells was evaluated under elevated pCO2 (to 250 mmHg pCO2) and/or osmolality (to 476 mOsm/kg). IgG2a site occupancy did not change significantly under any of the conditions studied, which is consistent with the robust glycosylation of other antibodies produced under various environmental stresses. However, changes were observed in the IgG2a charge distribution. Changes in the isoelectric point (pI) were greater under hyperosmotic stress, increasing by 0.32 and 0.41 pH units at 435 mOsm/kg in serum-containing and serum-free medium, respectively. Hyperosmotic stress also resulted in a concomitant increase in the heterogeneity of the charge distribution. The mean pI in serum-containing medium decreased by 0.16 pH units at 250 mmHg pCO2 when osmolality was controlled at 320 mOsm/kg but increased by 0.20 pH units when the osmolality increased with pCO2 (195 mmHg pCO2-435 mOsm/kg). In serum-free medium, elevated pCO2 did not alter pI, regardless of medium osmolality. In contrast to elevated osmolality at control pCO2, elevated pCO2 did not significantly alter the IgG2a charge heterogeneity under any of the conditions studied. The IgG2a was not sialylated, so sialylation changes were not responsible for changes in the charge distribution. IgG2a galactose content decreased with elevated osmolality, as a result of either elevated NaHCO3 or NaCl. However, when osmolality was controlled at elevated pCO2, the galactose content tended to increase. The mannose content decreased with increasing stress, while the fucose content remained relatively unchanged. It is likely that the observed increases in the pI of murine IgG2a were due to increased organellar pH, which is reflected by

  10. Effects of Elevated CO2 Concentration on Photosynthesis and Respiration of Populus Deltodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Angela M.

    1998-01-01

    To determine how increased atmospheric CO2 will affect the physiology of cottonwood trees, cuttings of the cloned Populus deltodies [cottonwood] were grown in open-top chambers containing ambient or elevated CO2 concentration. The control treatment was maintained at ambient Biosphere 2 atmospheric CO2 (c. 450 +/- 50 micro l/l), and elevated CO2 treatment was maintained at approximately double ambient Biosphere 2 atmospheric CO2 (c. 1000 +/- 50 micro l/l). The effects of elevated CO2 on leaf photosynthesis, and stomatal conductance were measured. The cottonwoods exposed to CO2 enrichment showed no significant indication of photosynthetic down-regulation. There was no significant difference in the maximum assimilation rate between the treatment and the control (P less than 0.24). The CO2 enriched treatment showed a decreased stomatal conductance of 15% (P less than 0.03). The elevated CO2 concentrated atmosphere had an effect on the respiration rates of the plants; the compensation point of the treatment was on average 13% higher than the control (P less than 0.01).

  11. Effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on Gynostemma pentaphyllum physiology and bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jia-Dong; Mantri, Nitin; Sun, Bin; Jiang, Li; Chen, Ping; Jiang, Bo; Jiang, Zhengdong; Zhang, Jialei; Shen, Jiahao; Lu, Hongfei; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-06-01

    Recently, an important topic of research has been how climate change is seriously threatening the sustainability of agricultural production. However, there is surprisingly little experimental data regarding how elevated temperature and CO2 will affect the growth of medicinal plants and production of bioactive compounds. Here, we comprehensively analyzed the effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on the photosynthetic process, biomass, total sugars, antioxidant compounds, antioxidant capacity, and bioactive compounds of Gynostemma pentaphyllum. Two different CO2 concentrations [360 and 720μmolmol(-1)] were imposed on plants grown at two different temperature regimes of 23/18 and 28/23°C (day/night) for 60days. Results show that elevated CO2 and temperature significantly increase the biomass, particularly in proportion to inflorescence total dry weight. The chlorophyll content in leaves increased under the elevated temperature and CO2. Further, electron transport rate (ETR), photochemical quenching (qP), actual photochemical quantum yield (Yield), instantaneous photosynthetic rate (Photo), transpiration rate (Trmmol) and stomatal conductance (Cond) also increased to different degrees under elevated CO2 and temperature. Moreover, elevated CO2 increased the level of total sugars and gypenoside A, but decreased the total antioxidant capacity and main antioxidant compounds in different organs of G. pentaphyllum. Accumulation of total phenolics and flavonoids also decreased in leaves, stems, and inflorescences under elevated CO2 and temperature. Overall, our data indicate that the predicted increase in atmospheric temperature and CO2 could improve the biomass of G. pentaphyllum, but they would reduce its health-promoting properties. PMID:27054772

  12. Impact of elevated CO2 concentration under three soil water levels on growth of Cinnamomum camphora *

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xing-Zheng; Wang, Gen-Xuan; Shen, Zhu-Xia; Zhang, Hao; Qiu, Mu-Qing

    2006-01-01

    Forest plays very important roles in global system with about 35% land area producing about 70% of total land net production. It is important to consider both elevated CO2 concentrations and different soil moisture when the possible effects of elevated CO2 concentration on trees are assessed. In this study, we grew Cinnamomum camphora seedlings under two CO2 concentrations (350 μmol/mol and 500 μmol/mol) and three soil moisture levels [80%, 60% and 40% FWC (field water capacity)] to focus on the effects of exposure of trees to elevated CO2 on underground and aboveground plant growth, and its dependence on soil moisture. The results indicated that high CO2 concentration has no significant effects on shoot height but significantly impacts shoot weight and ratio of shoot weight to height under three soil moisture levels. The response of root growth to CO2 enrichment is just reversed, there are obvious effects on root length growth, but no effects on root weight growth and ratio of root weight to length. The CO2 enrichment decreased 20.42%, 32.78%, 20.59% of weight ratio of root to shoot under 40%, 60% and 80% FWC soil water conditions, respectively. And elevated CO2 concentration significantly increased the water content in aboveground and underground parts. Then we concluded that high CO2 concentration favours more tree aboveground biomass growth than underground biomass growth under favorable soil water conditions. And CO2 enrichment enhanced lateral growth of shoot and vertical growth of root. The responses of plants to elevated CO2 depend on soil water availability, and plants may benefit more from CO2 enrichment with sufficient water supply. PMID:16532530

  13. Impact of elevated CO2 concentration under three soil water levels on growth of Cinnamomum camphora.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xing-zheng; Wang, Gen-xuan; Shen, Zhu-xia; Zhang, Hao; Qiu, Mu-qing

    2006-04-01

    Forest plays very important roles in global system with about 35% land area producing about 70% of total land net production. It is important to consider both elevated CO(2) concentrations and different soil moisture when the possible effects of elevated CO(2) concentration on trees are assessed. In this study, we grew Cinnamomum camphora seedlings under two CO(2) concentrations (350 micromol/mol and 500 micromol/mol) and three soil moisture levels [80%, 60% and 40% FWC (field water capacity)] to focus on the effects of exposure of trees to elevated CO(2) on underground and aboveground plant growth, and its dependence on soil moisture. The results indicated that high CO(2) concentration has no significant effects on shoot height but significantly impacts shoot weight and ratio of shoot weight to height under three soil moisture levels. The response of root growth to CO(2) enrichment is just reversed, there are obvious effects on root length growth, but no effects on root weight growth and ratio of root weight to length. The CO(2) enrichment decreased 20.42%, 32.78%, 20.59% of weight ratio of root to shoot under 40%, 60% and 80% FWC soil water conditions, respectively. And elevated CO(2) concentration significantly increased the water content in aboveground and underground parts. Then we concluded that high CO(2) concentration favours more tree aboveground biomass growth than underground biomass growth under favorable soil water conditions. And CO(2) enrichment enhanced lateral growth of shoot and vertical growth of root. The responses of plants to elevated CO(2) depend on soil water availability, and plants may benefit more from CO(2) enrichment with sufficient water supply. PMID:16532530

  14. Sites of Action of Elevated CO2 on Leaf Development in Rice: Discrimination between the Effects of Elevated CO2 and Nitrogen Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Koichi; Konno, Masae; Miyazawa, Shin-Ichi; Miyao, Mitsue

    2014-01-01

    Elevated CO2 concentrations (eCO2) trigger various plant responses. Despite intensive studies of these responses, the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. In this work, we investigated when and how leaf physiology and anatomy are affected by eCO2 in rice plants. We analyzed the most recently fully expanded leaves that developed successively after transfer of the plant to eCO2. To discriminate between the effects of eCO2 and those of nitrogen deficiency, we used three different levels of N application. We found that a decline in the leaf soluble protein content (on a leaf area basis) at eCO2 was only observed under N deficiency. The length and width of the leaf blade were reduced by both eCO2 and N deficiency, whereas the blade thickness was increased by eCO2 but was not affected by N deficiency. The change in length by eCO2 became detectable in the secondly fully expanded leaf, and those in width and thickness in the thirdly fully expanded leaf, which were at the leaf developmental stages P4 and P3, respectively, at the onset of the eCO2 treatment. The decreased blade length at eCO2 was associated with a decrease in the epidermal cell number on the adaxial side and a reduction in cell length on the abaxial side. The decreased width resulted from decreased numbers of small vascular bundles and epidermal cell files. The increased thickness was ascribed mainly to enhanced development of bundle sheath extensions at the ridges of vascular bundles. These observations enable us to identify the sites of action of eCO2 on rice leaf development. PMID:24406628

  15. Effect of elevated CO2, O3, and UV radiation on soils.

    PubMed

    Formánek, Pavel; Rejšek, Klement; Vranová, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we have attempted to review the current knowledge on the impact of elevated CO2, O3, and UV on soils. Elevated CO2 increases labile and stabile soil C pool as well as efficiency of organic pollutants rhizoremediation and phytoextraction of heavy metals. Conversely, both elevated O3 and UV radiation decrease inputs of assimilates to the rhizosphere being accompanied by inhibitory effects on decomposition processes, rhizoremediation, and heavy metals phytoextraction efficiency. Contrary to elevated CO2, O3, or UV-B decreases soil microbial biomass, metabolisable C, and soil N t content leading to higher C/N of soil organic matter. Elevated UV-B radiation shifts soil microbial community and decreases populations of soil meso- and macrofauna via direct effect rather than by induced changes of litter quality and root exudation as in case of elevated CO2 or O3. CO2 enrichment or increased UV-B is hypothesised to stimulate or inhibit both plant and microbial competitiveness for soluble soil N, respectively, whereas O3 favours only microbial competitive efficiency. Understanding the consequences of elevated CO2, O3, and UV radiation for soils, especially those related to fertility, phytotoxins inputs, elements cycling, plant-microbe interactions, and decontamination of polluted sites, presents a knowledge gap for future research. PMID:24688424

  16. Effect of Elevated CO2, O3, and UV Radiation on Soils

    PubMed Central

    Rejšek, Klement; Vranová, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we have attempted to review the current knowledge on the impact of elevated CO2, O3, and UV on soils. Elevated CO2 increases labile and stabile soil C pool as well as efficiency of organic pollutants rhizoremediation and phytoextraction of heavy metals. Conversely, both elevated O3 and UV radiation decrease inputs of assimilates to the rhizosphere being accompanied by inhibitory effects on decomposition processes, rhizoremediation, and heavy metals phytoextraction efficiency. Contrary to elevated CO2, O3, or UV-B decreases soil microbial biomass, metabolisable C, and soil Nt content leading to higher C/N of soil organic matter. Elevated UV-B radiation shifts soil microbial community and decreases populations of soil meso- and macrofauna via direct effect rather than by induced changes of litter quality and root exudation as in case of elevated CO2 or O3. CO2 enrichment or increased UV-B is hypothesised to stimulate or inhibit both plant and microbial competitiveness for soluble soil N, respectively, whereas O3 favours only microbial competitive efficiency. Understanding the consequences of elevated CO2, O3, and UV radiation for soils, especially those related to fertility, phytotoxins inputs, elements cycling, plant-microbe interactions, and decontamination of polluted sites, presents a knowledge gap for future research. PMID:24688424

  17. Physiological and Transcriptome Responses to Combinations of Elevated CO2 and Magnesium in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yaofang; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Tang, Caixian; Guo, Longbiao; Yu, Jingquan

    2016-01-01

    The unprecedented rise in atmospheric CO2 concentration and injudicious fertilization or heterogeneous distribution of Mg in the soil warrant further research to understand the synergistic and holistic mechanisms involved in the plant growth regulation. This study investigated the influence of elevated CO2 (800 μL L(-1)) on physiological and transcriptomic profiles in Arabidopsis cultured in hydroponic media treated with 1 μM (low), 1000 μM (normal) and 10,000 μM (high) Mg2+. Following 7-d treatment, elevated CO2 increased the shoot growth and chlorophyll content under both low and normal Mg supply, whereas root growth was improved exclusively under normal Mg nutrition. Notably, the effect of elevated CO2 on mineral homeostasis in both shoots and roots was less than that of Mg supply. Irrespective of CO2 treatment, high Mg increased number of young leaf but decreased root growth and absorption of P, K, Ca, Fe and Mn whereas low Mg increased the concentration of P, K, Ca and Fe in leaves. Transcriptomics results showed that elevated CO2 decreased the expression of genes related to cell redox homeostasis, cadmium response, and lipid localization, but enhanced signal transduction, protein phosphorylation, NBS-LRR disease resistance proteins and subsequently programmed cell death in low-Mg shoots. By comparison, elevated CO2 enhanced the response of lipid localization (mainly LTP transfer protein/protease inhibitor), endomembrane system, heme binding and cell wall modification in high-Mg roots. Some of these transcriptomic results are substantially in accordance with our physiological and/or biochemical analysis. The present findings broaden our current understanding on the interactive effect of elevated CO2 and Mg levels in the Arabidopsis, which may help to design the novel metabolic engineering strategies to cope with Mg deficiency/excess in crops under elevated CO2. PMID:26881808

  18. Physiological and Transcriptome Responses to Combinations of Elevated CO2 and Magnesium in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Yaofang; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Tang, Caixian; Guo, Longbiao; Yu, Jingquan

    2016-01-01

    The unprecedented rise in atmospheric CO2 concentration and injudicious fertilization or heterogeneous distribution of Mg in the soil warrant further research to understand the synergistic and holistic mechanisms involved in the plant growth regulation. This study investigated the influence of elevated CO2 (800 μL L−1) on physiological and transcriptomic profiles in Arabidopsis cultured in hydroponic media treated with 1 μM (low), 1000 μM (normal) and 10000 μM (high) Mg2+. Following 7-d treatment, elevated CO2 increased the shoot growth and chlorophyll content under both low and normal Mg supply, whereas root growth was improved exclusively under normal Mg nutrition. Notably, the effect of elevated CO2 on mineral homeostasis in both shoots and roots was less than that of Mg supply. Irrespective of CO2 treatment, high Mg increased number of young leaf but decreased root growth and absorption of P, K, Ca, Fe and Mn whereas low Mg increased the concentration of P, K, Ca and Fe in leaves. Transcriptomics results showed that elevated CO2 decreased the expression of genes related to cell redox homeostasis, cadmium response, and lipid localization, but enhanced signal transduction, protein phosphorylation, NBS-LRR disease resistance proteins and subsequently programmed cell death in low-Mg shoots. By comparison, elevated CO2 enhanced the response of lipid localization (mainly LTP transfer protein/protease inhibitor), endomembrane system, heme binding and cell wall modification in high-Mg roots. Some of these transcriptomic results are substantially in accordance with our physiological and/or biochemical analysis. The present findings broaden our current understanding on the interactive effect of elevated CO2 and Mg levels in the Arabidopsis, which may help to design the novel metabolic engineering strategies to cope with Mg deficiency/excess in crops under elevated CO2. PMID:26881808

  19. Effect of elevated CO2 on degradation of azoxystrobin and soil microbial activity in rice soil.

    PubMed

    Manna, Suman; Singh, Neera; Singh, V P

    2013-04-01

    An experiment was conducted in open-top chambers (OTC) to study the effect of elevated CO2 (580 ± 20 μmol mol(-1)) on azoxystrobin degradation and soil microbial activities. Results indicated that elevated CO2 did not have any significant effect on the persistence of azoxystrobin in rice-planted soil. The half-life values for the azoxystrobin in rice soils were 20.3 days in control (rice grown at ambient CO2 outdoors), 19.3 days in rice grown under ambient CO2 atmosphere in OTC, and 17.5 days in rice grown under elevated CO2 atmosphere in OTC. Azoxystrobin acid was recovered as the only metabolite of azoxystrobin, but it did not accumulate in the soil/water and was further metabolized. Elevated CO2 enhanced soil microbial biomass (MBC) and alkaline phosphatase activity of soil. Compared with rice grown at ambient CO2 (both outdoors and in OTC), the soil MBC at elevated CO2 increased by twofold. Elevated CO2 did not affect dehydrogenase, fluorescein diacetate, and acid phosphatase activity. Azoxystrobin application to soils, both ambient and elevated CO2, inhibited alkaline phosphates activity, while no effect was observed on other enzymes. Slight increase (1.8-2 °C) in temperature inside OTC did not affect microbial parameters, as similar activities were recorded in rice grown outdoors and in OTC at ambient CO2. Higher MBC in soil at elevated CO2 could be attributed to increased carbon availability in the rhizosphere via plant metabolism and root secretion; however, it did not significantly increase azoxystrobin degradation, suggesting that pesticide degradation was not the result of soil MBC alone. Study suggested that increased CO2 levels following global warming might not adversely affect azoxystrobin degradation. However, global warming is a continuous and cumulative process, therefore, long-term studies are necessary to get more realistic assessment of global warming on fate of pesticide. PMID:22773147

  20. Elevated CO2 promotes long-term nitrogen accumulation only in combination with nitrogen addition.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Melissa A; Megonigal, J Patrick; Langley, J Adam

    2016-01-01

    Biogeochemical models that incorporate nitrogen (N) limitation indicate that N availability will control the magnitude of ecosystem carbon uptake in response to rising CO2 . Some models, however, suggest that elevated CO2 may promote ecosystem N accumulation, a feedback that in the long term could circumvent N limitation of the CO2 response while mitigating N pollution. We tested this prediction using a nine-year CO2 xN experiment in a tidal marsh. Although the effects of CO2 are similar between uplands and wetlands in many respects, this experiment offers a greater likelihood of detecting CO2 effects on N retention on a decadal timescale because tidal marshes have a relatively open N cycle and can accrue soil organic matter rapidly. To determine how elevated CO2 affects N dynamics, we assessed the three primary fates of N in a tidal marsh: (1) retention in plants and soil, (2) denitrification to the atmosphere, and (3) tidal export. We assessed changes in N pools and tracked the fate of a (15) N tracer added to each plot in 2006 to quantify the fraction of added N retained in vegetation and soil, and to estimate lateral N movement. Elevated CO2 alone did not increase plant N mass, soil N mass, or (15) N label retention. Unexpectedly, CO2 and N interacted such that the combined N+CO2 treatment increased ecosystem N accumulation despite the stimulation in N losses indicated by reduced (15) N label retention. These findings suggest that in N-limited ecosystems, elevated CO2 is unlikely to increase long-term N accumulation and circumvent progressive N limitation without additional N inputs, which may relieve plant-microbe competition and allow for increased plant N uptake. PMID:26577708

  1. Effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on soil CO2 and N2O effluxes in a loess grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cserhalmi, Dóra; Balogh, János; Papp, Marianna; Horváth, László; Pintér, Krisztina; Nagy, Zoltán

    2014-05-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration proved to be the primary factor causing global climate change. Exposition systems to study the response to increasing CO2 levels by the terrestrial vegetation include the open top chamber (OTC) exposition system, also used in this study. Response of biomass growth and ecophysiological variables (e.g. emission of greenhouse gases (CO2, N2O) from the soil) to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration were investigated in the OTC station, located in the Botanical Garden of the Szent István University, Gödöllő , Hungary. Loess grassland (Salvio nemorosae - Festucetum rupicolae) monoliths were studied in OTCs with target air CO2 concentration of 600 mikromol.mol-1 in 3 chambers. The chamber-effect (shade effect of the side of the chambers) was measured in 3 control chambers under present CO2 level. This management was compared to 3 free air parcels under the natural conditions. Changes of soil temperature and soil water content were recorded in each treatment, while PAR, air temperature, precipitation, wind velocity and humidity were measured by a micrometeorological station. Plant biomass was cut down to 5 cm height once a year. Leaf area index (LAI) was estimated weekly from ceptometer measurements, soil CO2 and N2O effluxes were also measured weekly during the growing period and less frequently during the rest of the year. Soil water content in the upper 30 cm of the soil was lower in the chambers by 3 % (v/v) in average than in the field plots. Soil temperature in the chambers at 3 cm depth was 1.5oC lower than in the free air parcels probably due to the shading effect of the larger biomass in the chambers. In the chambers (both the high CO2 and control ones) biomass values (536.59 ±222.43 gm-2) were higher than in the free parcels (315.67 ±73.36 gm-2). Average LAI was also higher (3.07 ± 2.78) in the chambers than in the free air treatment (2.08 ± 1.95). Soil respiration values in the high CO2 treatment was higher in

  2. Productivity responses of Acer rubrum and Taxodium distichum seedlings to elevated CO2 and flooding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vann, C.D.; Megonigal, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    Elevated levels of atmospheric CO2 are expected to increase photosynthetic rates of C3 tree species, but it is uncertain whether this will result in an increase in wetland seedling productivity. Separate short-term experiments (12 and 17 weeks) were performed on two wetland tree species, Taxodium distichum and Acer rubrum, to determine if elevated CO2 would influence the biomass responses of seedlings to flooding. T. distichum were grown in replicate glasshouses (n = 2) at CO2 concentrations of 350 or 700 ppm, and A. rubrum were grown in growth chambers at CO2 concentrations of 422 or 722 ppm. Both species were grown from seed. The elevated CO2 treatment was crossed with two water table treatments, flooded and non-flooded. Elevated CO2 increased leaf-level photosynthesis, whole-plant photosynthesis, and trunk diameter of T. distichum in both flooding treatments, but did not increase biomass of T. distichum or A. rubrum. Flooding severely reduced biomass, height, and leaf area of both T. distichum and A. rubrum. Our results suggest that the absence of a CO2-induced increase in growth may have been due to an O2 limitation on root production even though there was a relatively deep (??? 10 cm) aerobic soil surface in the non-flooded treatment. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Down-regulation of tissue N:P ratios in terrestrial plants by elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qi; Hui, Dafeng; Luo, Yiqi; Elser, James; Wang, Ying-ping; Loladze, Irakli; Zhang, Quanfa; Dennis, Sam

    2015-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations generally alter element stoichiometry in plants. However, a comprehensive evaluation of the elevated CO2 impact on plant nitrogen: phosphorus (N:P) ratios and the underlying mechanism has not been conducted. We synthesized the results from 112 previously published studies using meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of elevated CO2 on the N:P ratio of terrestrial plants and to explore the underlying mechanism based on plant growth and soil P dynamics. Our results show that terrestrial plants grown under elevated CO2 had lower N:P ratios in both above- and belowground biomass across different ecosystem types. The response ratio for plant N:P was negatively correlated with the response ratio for plant growth in croplands and grasslands, and showed a stronger relationship for P than for N. In addition, the CO2-induced down-regulation of plant N:P was accompanied by 19.3% and 4.2% increases in soil phosphatase activity and labile P, respectively, and a 10.1% decrease in total soil P. Our results show that down-regulation of plant N:P under elevated CO2 corresponds with accelerated soil P cycling. These findings should be useful for better understanding of terrestrial plant stoichiometry in response to elevated CO2 and of the underlying mechanisms affecting nutrient dynamics under climate change. PMID:26909440

  4. Down-regulation of tissue N:P ratios in terrestrial plants by elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Q.; Hui, D.; Luo, Y.; Elser, J. J.; Wang, Y.; Loladze, I.; Zhang, Q.; Dennis, S.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations generally alter element stoichiometry in plants. However, a comprehensive evaluation of the elevated CO2 impact on plant nitrogen:phosphorus (N:P) ratios and the underlying mechanism has not been conducted. We synthesized the results from 112 previously published studies using meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of elevated CO2 on the N:P ratio of terrestrial plants and to explore the underlying mechanism based on plant growth and soil P dynamics. Our results show that terrestrial plants grown under elevated CO2 had lower N:P ratios in both above- and below-ground biomass across different ecosystem types. The response ratio for plant N:P was negatively correlated with the response ratio for plant growth in croplands and grasslands, and showed a stronger relationship for P than for N. In addition, the CO2-induced down-regulation of plant N:P was accompanied by 19.3% and 4.2% increases in soil phosphatase activity and labile P, respectively, and a 10.1% decrease in total soil P. Our results show that down-regulation of plant N:P under elevated CO2 corresponds with accelerated soil P cycling. These findings should be useful for better understanding of terrestrial plant stoichiometry in response to elevated CO2 and of the underlying mechanisms affecting nutrient dynamics under climate change.

  5. Elevated atmospheric CO2 fuels leaching of old dissolved organic matter at the alpine treeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Frank; van Hees, Patrick A. W.; Handa, I. Tanya; HäTtenschwiler, Stephan

    2008-06-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM), the mobile form of soil organic matter (SOM), plays an important role in soil C cycling and in nutrient transport. We investigated the effects of 5 years of CO2 enrichment (370 versus 570 μmol CO2 mol-1) on DOM dynamics at the alpine treeline, including the analysis of fast-cycling components such as low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) biodegradability, and the decomposition of 14C-labeled oxalate. Concentrations of DOC in canopy throughfall were 20% higher at elevated CO2, probably driven by higher carbohydrate concentrations in leaves. In the organic soil layer, 5 years of CO2 enrichment increased water-extractable organic C by 17% and soil solution DOC at 5 cm depth by 20%. The 13C tracing of recently assimilated CO2 revealed that the input of recent plant-derived C (<15% of total DOC) was smaller than the CO2-induced increase in DOC. This strongly suggests that CO2 enrichment enhanced the mobilization of native DOC, which is supported by significant increases in dissolved organic nitrogen (DON). We mainly attribute these increases to a stimulated microbial activity as indicated by higher basal and soil respiration rates (+27%). The 14C-labeled oxalate was more rapidly mineralized from high CO2 soils. The concentrations of LMWOAs, but also those of "hydrophilic" DOC and biodegradable DOC (6% of total DOC), were, however, not affected by elevated CO2, suggesting that production and consumption of "labile" DOC were in balance. In summary, our data suggest that 5 years of CO2 enrichment speeded up the cycling of "labile" DOM and SOM in a late successional treeline ecosystem and increased the mobilization of older DOM through a stimulated microbial activity. Such a "priming effect" implies that elevated CO2 can accelerate the turnover of native SOM, and thus, it may induce increasing losses of old C from thick organic layers.

  6. Soil carbon and nitrogen turnover in a pine forest under elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichter, J.; Reblin, J.; Kaubris, A.; Austin, R.; Anderson, J.; Wong, N.; Wu, S.

    2010-12-01

    During twelve years of atmospheric CO2 fumigation at the Duke Forest Free-air Enrichment (FACE) experiment, annual net primary productivity increased approximately 25% under the elevated CO2 treatment. A corresponding increase in litterfall resulted in accumulation of approximately 300 g m-2 more carbon under elevated CO2 than under ambient CO2 concentration in the organic soil horizon of this loblolly pine forest. The net accumulation of carbon in the organic horizon under the elevated CO2 treatment occurred entirely during the first six years of the experiment with little change thereafter. However, while carbon accumulated in the organic horizon under elevated CO2, there were no detectable changes in the carbon or nitrogen contents of the bulk mineral soil. To further examine soil carbon and nitrogen content and turnover in soil organic matter pools of different turnover rates, samples of the upper mineral soil (0-5 cm depth) were separated by density, particle size fractionation, and acid digestion. Although no changes in soil carbon and nitrogen content attributable to the elevated CO2 treatment were detected in any of the SOM fractions, change in the 13C content of soil fractions under elevated CO2 indicated incorporation of new organic matter into all SOM fractions at comparable rates. This result suggests that soil microbial community composition and decomposition have been altered by the increased nitrogen demand associated with the CO2-induced growth enhancement, allowing species that are competitive under conditions of intense nitrogen limitation to mine “recalcitrant” SOM pools for the additional nitrogen required to meet the enhanced demand.

  7. The Effect of Elevated CO2 on the Growth Rate of Phytoplankton - Mesocosm Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Lee, K.; Koo, C.; Shin, K.; Lee, H.

    2004-12-01

    Recent independent lines of evidence suggest that higher CO2 concentration in surface seawater would accelerate growth of phytoplankton. A 20-day mesocosm experiment was carried out in June 2004 in the southern coastal region of Korea to investigate the influence of elevated CO2 concentration on the mono diatom species, Skeletonema costatum. The CO2 concentration of a control net was being left as an ambient condition (approximately 400ppm), while that of the other treatment was being maintained approximately 900ppm. The elevated production of Particulate Organic Carbon (POC), which was generated from increasing a primary production, was not discernable in this experiment. Therefore, a new study has been carried out with some modifications to observe possible increase in POC and Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) productions. The new experiment includes 5 mesocosms with different CO2 concentrations ranging from 280ppm to 900ppm. During the entire duration of this experiment, CO2 concentration in each treatment has remained constant.

  8. Does low stomatal conductance or photosynthetic capacity enhance growth at elevated CO2 in Arabidopsis?

    PubMed

    Easlon, Hsien Ming; Carlisle, Eli; McKay, John K; Bloom, Arnold J

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if low stomatal conductance (g) increases growth, nitrate (NO3 (-)) assimilation, and nitrogen (N) utilization at elevated CO2 concentration. Four Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) near isogenic lines (NILs) differing in g were grown at ambient and elevated CO2 concentration under low and high NO3 (-) supply as the sole source of N. Although g varied by 32% among NILs at elevated CO2, leaf intercellular CO2 concentration varied by only 4% and genotype had no effect on shoot NO3 (-) concentration in any treatment. Low-g NILs showed the greatest CO2 growth increase under N limitation but had the lowest CO2 growth enhancement under N-sufficient conditions. NILs with the highest and lowest g had similar rates of shoot NO3 (-) assimilation following N deprivation at elevated CO2 concentration. After 5 d of N deprivation, the lowest g NIL had 27% lower maximum carboxylation rate and 23% lower photosynthetic electron transport compared with the highest g NIL. These results suggest that increased growth of low-g NILs under N limitation most likely resulted from more conservative N investment in photosynthetic biochemistry rather than from low g. PMID:25583923

  9. Prairie Heating And CO2 Enrichment (PHACE) project: Semi-arid grassland responses to elevated CO2 and warming.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The new multi-factor Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment is a field experiment for subjecting a northern mixed-grass prairie, with and without weeds, to elevated CO2 and warming. This new experiment combines Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) technology with a newly designed ceramic heater system for exp...

  10. Acclimation of Photosynthesis to Elevated CO2 in Five C3 Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Rowan F.; Sharkey, Thomas D.; Seemann, Jeffrey R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of long-term (weeks to months) CO2 enhancement on (a) the gas-exchange characteristics, (b) the content and activation state of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rubisco), and (c) leaf nitrogen, chlorophyll, and dry weight per area were studied in five C3 species (Chenopodium album, Phaseolus vulgaris, Solanum tuberosum, Solanum melongena, and Brassica oleracea) grown at CO2 partial pressures of 300 or 900 to 1000 microbars. Long-term exposure to elevated CO2 affected the CO2 response of photosynthesis in one of three ways: (a) the initial slope of the CO2 response was unaffected, but the photosynthetic rate at high CO2 increased (S. tuberosum); (b) the initial slope decreased but the CO2-saturated rate of photosynthesis was little affected (C. album, P. vulgaris); (c) both the initial slope and the CO2-saturated rate of photosynthesis decreased (B. oleracea, S. melongena). In all five species, growth at high CO2 increased the extent to which photosynthesis was stimulated following a decrease in the partial pressure of O2 or an increase in measurement CO2 above 600 microbars. This stimulation indicates that a limitation on photosynthesis by the capacity to regenerate orthophosphate was reduced or absent after acclimation to high CO2. Leaf nitrogen per area either increased (S. tuberosum, S. melongena) or was little changed by CO2 enhancement. The content of rubisco was lower in only two of the five species, yet its activation state was 19% to 48% lower in all five species following long-term exposure to high CO2. These results indicate that during growth in CO2-enriched air, leaf rubisco content remains in excess of that required to support the observed photosynthetic rates. PMID:16666587

  11. Alteration of forest succession and carbon cycling under elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Miller, Adam D; Dietze, Michael C; DeLucia, Evan H; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J

    2016-01-01

    Regenerating forests influence the global carbon (C) cycle, and understanding how climate change will affect patterns of regeneration and C storage is necessary to predict the rate of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ) increase in future decades. While experimental elevation of CO2 has revealed that young forests respond with increased productivity, there remains considerable uncertainty as to how the long-term dynamics of forest regrowth are shaped by elevated CO2 (eCO2 ). Here, we use the mechanistic size- and age- structured Ecosystem Demography model to investigate the effects of CO2 enrichment on forest regeneration, using data from the Duke Forest Free-Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE) experiment, a forest chronosequence, and an eddy-covariance tower for model parameterization and evaluation. We find that the dynamics of forest regeneration are accelerated, and stands consistently hit a variety of developmental benchmarks earlier under eCO2 . Because responses to eCO2 varied by plant functional type, successional pathways, and mature forest composition differed under eCO2 , with mid- and late-successional hardwood functional types experiencing greater increases in biomass compared to early-successional functional types and the pine canopy. Over the simulation period, eCO2 led to an increase in total ecosystem C storage of 9.7 Mg C ha(-1) . Model predictions of mature forest biomass and ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of CO2 and H2 O were sensitive to assumptions about nitrogen limitation; both the magnitude and persistence of the ecosystem response to eCO2 were reduced under N limitation. In summary, our simulations demonstrate that eCO2 can result in a general acceleration of forest regeneration while altering the course of successional change and having a lasting impact on forest ecosystems. PMID:26316364

  12. Elevated CO2 further lengthens growing season under warming conditions.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Fox, Melissa; Steltzer, Heidi; Trlica, M J; McMaster, Gregory S; Andales, Allan A; LeCain, Dan R; Morgan, Jack A

    2014-06-12

    Observations of a longer growing season through earlier plant growth in temperate to polar regions have been thought to be a response to climate warming. However, data from experimental warming studies indicate that many species that initiate leaf growth and flowering earlier also reach seed maturation and senesce earlier, shortening their active and reproductive periods. A conceptual model to explain this apparent contradiction, and an analysis of the effect of elevated CO2--which can delay annual life cycle events--on changing season length, have not been tested. Here we show that experimental warming in a temperate grassland led to a longer growing season through earlier leaf emergence by the first species to leaf, often a grass, and constant or delayed senescence by other species that were the last to senesce, supporting the conceptual model. Elevated CO2 further extended growing, but not reproductive, season length in the warmed grassland by conserving water, which enabled most species to remain active longer. Our results suggest that a longer growing season, especially in years or biomes where water is a limiting factor, is not due to warming alone, but also to higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations that extend the active period of plant annual life cycles. PMID:24759322

  13. Diatom acclimation to elevated CO2 via cAMP signalling and coordinated gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennon, Gwenn M. M.; Ashworth, Justin; Groussman, Ryan D.; Berthiaume, Chris; Morales, Rhonda L.; Baliga, Nitin S.; Orellana, Mónica V.; Armbrust, E. V.

    2015-08-01

    Diatoms are responsible for ~40% of marine primary productivity, fuelling the oceanic carbon cycle and contributing to natural carbon sequestration in the deep ocean. Diatoms rely on energetically expensive carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to fix carbon efficiently at modern levels of CO2 (refs , , ). How diatoms may respond over the short and long term to rising atmospheric CO2 remains an open question. Here we use nitrate-limited chemostats to show that the model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana rapidly responds to increasing CO2 by differentially expressing gene clusters that regulate transcription and chromosome folding, and subsequently reduces transcription of photosynthesis and respiration gene clusters under steady-state elevated CO2. These results suggest that exposure to elevated CO2 first causes a shift in regulation, and then a metabolic rearrangement. Genes in one CO2-responsive cluster included CCM and photorespiration genes that share a putative cAMP-responsive cis-regulatory sequence, implying these genes are co-regulated in response to CO2, with cAMP as an intermediate messenger. We verified cAMP-induced downregulation of CCM gene δ-CA3 in nutrient-replete diatom cultures by inhibiting the hydrolysis of cAMP. These results indicate an important role for cAMP in downregulating CCM and photorespiration genes under elevated CO2 and provide insights into mechanisms of diatom acclimation in response to climate change.

  14. Elevated CO2 significantly delays reproductive development of soybean under Free-Air Concentration Enrichment (FACE).

    PubMed

    Castro, Joseph C; Dohleman, Frank G; Bernacchi, Carl J; Long, Stephen P

    2009-01-01

    The effect of rising atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide [CO(2)] on the reproductive development of soybean (Glycine max. Merr) has not been evaluated under open-air field conditions. Soybeans grown under Free-Air CO(2) Enrichment (FACE) exhibit warmer canopies due to decreased latent heat loss because of decreased stomatal conductance. According to development models based on accumulated thermal time, or growing degree days ( degrees Cd), increased canopy temperature should accelerate development. The SoyFACE research facility (Champaign, Illinois, USA) was used to test the hypothesis that development is accelerated in soybean when grown in [CO(2)] elevated to 548 micromol mol(-1). Canopy temperature was measured continuously with infrared thermometry, and used in turn to calculate GDD. Opposite to expectation, elevated [CO(2)], while increasing canopy temperature, delayed reproductive development by up to 3 days (P <0.05). Soybean grown in elevated [CO(2)] required approximately 49 degrees Cd more GDD (P <0.05) to complete full bloom stage (R2) and approximately 52 degrees Cd more GDD (P <0.05) to complete the beginning seed (R5) stage, but needed approximately 46 degrees Cd fewer GDD (P <0.05) to complete seed filling (R6). Soybeans grown in elevated [CO(2)] produced significantly more nodes (P <0.01) on the main stem than those grown under current [CO(2)]. This may explain the delay in completion of reproductive development and final maturation of the crop under elevated [CO(2)]. These results show a direct effect of rising [CO(2)] on plant development that will affect both projections of grain supply and may be significant to other species including those in natural communities. PMID:19561049

  15. A review of elevated atmospheric CO2 effects on plant growth and water relations: implications for horticulture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Empirical records provide incontestable evidence for the global rise in CO2 concentration in the earth's atmosphere. Plant growth can be stimulated by elevation of CO2; photosynthesis increases and economic yield is often enhanced. The application of more CO2 can increase plant water use efficiency ...

  16. How increasing CO2 leads to an increased negative greenhouse effect in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmithüsen, Holger; Notholt, Justus; König-Langlo, Gert; Lemke, Peter; Jung, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    CO2 is the strongest anthropogenic forcing agent for climate change since preindustrial times. Like other greenhouse gases, CO2 absorbs terrestrial surface radiation and causes emission from the atmosphere to space. As the surface is generally warmer than the atmosphere, the total long-wave emission to space is commonly less than the surface emission. However, this does not hold true for the high elevated areas of central Antarctica. For this region, the emission to space is higher than the surface emission; and the greenhouse effect of CO2 is around zero or even negative, which has not been discussed so far. We investigated this in detail and show that for central Antarctica an increase in CO2 concentration leads to an increased long-wave energy loss to space, which cools the Earth-atmosphere system. These findings for central Antarctica are in contrast to the general warming effect of increasing CO2.

  17. Tree species diversity interacts with elevated CO2 to induce a greater root system response.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew R; Lukac, Martin; Bambrick, Michael; Miglietta, Franco; Godbold, Douglas L

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of land-use change and the burning of fossil fuels, atmospheric concentrations of CO2 are increasing and altering the dynamics of the carbon cycle in forest ecosystems. In a number of studies using single tree species, fine root biomass has been shown to be strongly increased by elevated CO2 . However, natural forests are often intimate mixtures of a number of co-occurring species. To investigate the interaction between tree mixture and elevated CO2 , Alnus glutinosa, Betula pendula and Fagus sylvatica were planted in areas of single species and a three species polyculture in a free-air CO2 enrichment study (BangorFACE). The trees were exposed to ambient or elevated CO2 (580 μmol mol(-1) ) for 4 years. Fine and coarse root biomass, together with fine root turnover and fine root morphological characteristics were measured. Fine root biomass and morphology responded differentially to the elevated CO2 at different soil depths in the three species when grown in monocultures. In polyculture, a greater response to elevated CO2 was observed in coarse roots to a depth of 20 cm, and fine root area index to a depth of 30 cm. Total fine root biomass was positively affected by elevated CO2 at the end of the experiment, but not by species diversity. Our data suggest that existing biogeochemical cycling models parameterized with data from species grown in monoculture may be underestimating the belowground response to global change. PMID:23504733

  18. Regulation of hormonal responses of sweet pepper as affected by salinity and elevated CO2 concentration.

    PubMed

    Piñero, María Carmen; Houdusse, Fabrice; Garcia-Mina, Jose M; Garnica, María; Del Amor, Francisco M

    2014-08-01

    This study examines the extent to which the predicted CO2 -protective effects on the inhibition of growth, impairment of photosynthesis and nutrient imbalance caused by saline stress are mediated by an effective adaptation of the endogenous plant hormonal balance. Therefore, sweet pepper plants (Capsicum annuum, cv. Ciclón) were grown at ambient or elevated [CO2] (400 or 800 µmol mol(-1)) with a nutrient solution containing 0 or 80 mM NaCl. The results show that, under saline conditions, elevated [CO2] increased plant dry weight, leaf area, leaf relative water content and net photosynthesis compared with ambient [CO2], whilst the maximum potential quantum efficiency of photosystem II was not modified. In salt-stressed plants, elevated [CO2 ] increased leaf NO3(-) concentration and reduced Cl(-) concentration. Salinity stress induced ABA accumulation in the leaves but it was reduced in the roots at high [CO2], being correlated with the stomatal response. Under non-stressed conditions, IAA was dramatically reduced in the roots when high [CO2] was applied, which resulted in greater root DW and root respiration. Additionally, the observed high CK concentration in the roots (especially tZR) could prevent downregulation of photosynthesis at high [CO2], as the N level in the leaves was increased compared with the ambient [CO2], under salt-stress conditions. These results demonstrate that the hormonal balance was altered by the [CO2], which resulted in significant changes at the growth, gas exchange and nutritional levels. PMID:24152078

  19. Increased mtPDH Activity Through Antisense Inhibition of Mitochondrial Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Enhances Inflorescence Initiation, and Inflorescence Growth and Harvest Index at Elevated CO2 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Weraduwage, Sarathi M.; Micallef, Malgre C.; Marillia, Elizabeth-France; Taylor, David C.; Grodzinski, Bernard; Micallef, Barry J.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) is a key respiratory enzyme that links glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and it is negatively regulated by mtPDH kinase (mtPDHK). Arabidopsis lines carrying either a constitutive or seed-specific antisense construct for mtPDHK were used to test the hypothesis that alteration of mtPDH activity in a tissue- and dosage-dependent manner will enhance reproductive growth particularly at elevated CO2 (EC) through a combined enhancement of source and sink activities. Constitutive transgenic lines showed increased mtPDH activity in rosette leaves at ambient CO2 (AC) and EC, and in immature seeds at EC. Seed-specific transgenic lines showed enhanced mtPDH activity in immature seeds. A strong relationship existed between seed mtPDH activity and inflorescence initiation at AC, and at EC inflorescence stem growth, silique number and seed harvest index were strongly related to seed mtPDH activity. Leaf photosynthetic rates showed an increase in rosette leaves of transgenic lines at AC and EC that correlated with enhanced inflorescence initiation. Collectively, the data show that mtPDHK plays a key role in regulating sink and source activities in Arabidopsis particularly during the reproductive phase. PMID:26904065

  20. Increased mtPDH Activity Through Antisense Inhibition of Mitochondrial Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Enhances Inflorescence Initiation, and Inflorescence Growth and Harvest Index at Elevated CO2 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Weraduwage, Sarathi M; Micallef, Malgre C; Marillia, Elizabeth-France; Taylor, David C; Grodzinski, Bernard; Micallef, Barry J

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) is a key respiratory enzyme that links glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and it is negatively regulated by mtPDH kinase (mtPDHK). Arabidopsis lines carrying either a constitutive or seed-specific antisense construct for mtPDHK were used to test the hypothesis that alteration of mtPDH activity in a tissue- and dosage-dependent manner will enhance reproductive growth particularly at elevated CO2 (EC) through a combined enhancement of source and sink activities. Constitutive transgenic lines showed increased mtPDH activity in rosette leaves at ambient CO2 (AC) and EC, and in immature seeds at EC. Seed-specific transgenic lines showed enhanced mtPDH activity in immature seeds. A strong relationship existed between seed mtPDH activity and inflorescence initiation at AC, and at EC inflorescence stem growth, silique number and seed harvest index were strongly related to seed mtPDH activity. Leaf photosynthetic rates showed an increase in rosette leaves of transgenic lines at AC and EC that correlated with enhanced inflorescence initiation. Collectively, the data show that mtPDHK plays a key role in regulating sink and source activities in Arabidopsis particularly during the reproductive phase. PMID:26904065

  1. Forest response to elevated CO2 is conserved across a broad range of productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Norby, Richard J; DeLucia, E. H.; Gielen, Birgit; Califapietra, Carlo; Giardina, Christian P; King, John S.; Childs, Joanne; McCarthy, Heather R; Moore, D J; Ceulemans, Reinhart; DeAngelis, Paolo; Finzi, Adrien C; Karnosky, David; Kubiske, Mark E; Lukac, Martin; Pregitzer, Kurt; Scarascia-Mugnozza, Giuseppe E; Oren, Ram; Schlesinger, William H

    2005-12-01

    Climate change predictions derived from coupled carbon-climate models are highly dependent on assumptions about feedbacks between the biosphere and atmosphere. One critical feedback occurs if C uptake by the biosphere increases in response to the fossil-fuel driven increase in atmospheric [CO2] ('CO2 fertilization'), thereby slowing the rate of increase in atmospheric [CO2]. Carbon exchanges between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere are often first represented in models as net primary productivity (NPP). However, the contribution of CO2 fertilization to the future global C cycle has been uncertain, especially in forest ecosystems that dominate global NPP, and models that include a feedback between terrestrial biosphere metabolism and atmospheric [CO2] are poorly constrained by experimental evidence. We analyzed the response of NPP to elevated CO2 ({approx}550 ppm) in four free-air CO2 enrichment experiments in forest stands. We show that the response of forest NPP to elevated [CO2] is highly conserved across a broad range of productivity, with a stimulation at the median of 23 {+-} 2%. At low leaf area indices, a large portion of the response was attributable to increased light absorption, but as leaf area indices increased, the response to elevated [CO2] was wholly caused by increased light-use efficiency. The surprising consistency of response across diverse sites provides a benchmark to evaluate predictions of ecosystem and global models and allows us now to focus on unresolved questions about carbon partitioning and retention, and spatial variation in NPP response caused by availability of other growth limiting resources.

  2. Elevated CO2-Induced Responses in Stomata Require ABA and ABA Signaling.

    PubMed

    Chater, Caspar; Peng, Kai; Movahedi, Mahsa; Dunn, Jessica A; Walker, Heather J; Liang, Yun-Kuan; McLachlan, Deirdre H; Casson, Stuart; Isner, Jean Charles; Wilson, Ian; Neill, Steven J; Hedrich, Rainer; Gray, Julie E; Hetherington, Alistair M

    2015-10-19

    An integral part of global environment change is an increase in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 ([CO2]) [1]. Increased [CO2] reduces leaf stomatal apertures and density of stomata that plays out as reductions in evapotranspiration [2-4]. Surprisingly, given the importance of transpiration to the control of terrestrial water fluxes [5] and plant nutrient acquisition [6], we know comparatively little about the molecular components involved in the intracellular signaling pathways by which [CO2] controls stomatal development and function [7]. Here, we report that elevated [CO2]-induced closure and reductions in stomatal density require the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby adding a new common element to these signaling pathways. We also show that the PYR/RCAR family of ABA receptors [8, 9] and ABA itself are required in both responses. Using genetic approaches, we show that ABA in guard cells or their precursors is sufficient to mediate the [CO2]-induced stomatal density response. Taken together, our results suggest that stomatal responses to increased [CO2] operate through the intermediacy of ABA. In the case of [CO2]-induced reductions in stomatal aperture, this occurs by accessing the guard cell ABA signaling pathway. In both [CO2]-mediated responses, our data are consistent with a mechanism in which ABA increases the sensitivity of the system to [CO2] but could also be explained by requirement for a CO2-induced increase in ABA biosynthesis specifically in the guard cell lineage. Furthermore, the dependency of stomatal [CO2] signaling on ABA suggests that the ABA pathway is, in evolutionary terms, likely to be ancestral. PMID:26455301

  3. Harvest index, a parameter conditioning responsiveness of wheat plants to elevated CO2

    PubMed Central

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Sanz-Sáez, Álvaro; Jauregui, Iván; Irigoyen, Juan J.; Araus, José L.; Sánchez-Díaz, Manuel; Erice, Gorka

    2013-01-01

    The expansion of the world’s population requires the development of high production agriculture. For this purpose, it is essential to identify target points conditioning crop responsiveness to predicted [CO2]. The aim of this study was to determine the relevance of ear sink strength in leaf protein and metabolomic profiles and its implications in photosynthetic activity and yield of durum wheat plants exposed to elevated [CO2]. For this purpose, a genotype with high harvest index (HI) (Triticum durum var. Sula) and another with low HI (Triticum durum var. Blanqueta) were exposed to elevated [CO2] (700 µmol mol–1 versus 400 µmol mol–1 CO2) in CO2 greenhouses. The obtained data highlighted that elevated [CO2] only increased plant growth in the genotype with the largest HI; Sula. Gas exchange analyses revealed that although exposure to 700 µmol mol–1 depleted Rubisco content, Sula was capable of increasing the light-saturated rate of CO2 assimilation (Asat) whereas, in Blanqueta, the carbohydrate imbalance induced the down-regulation of Asat. The specific depletion of Rubisco in both genotypes under elevated [CO2], together with the enhancement of other proteins in the Calvin cycle, revealed that there was a redistribution of N from Rubisco towards RuBP regeneration. Moreover, the down-regulation of N, NO3 –, amino acid, and organic acid content, together with the depletion of proteins involved in amino acid synthesis that was detected in Blanqueta grown at 700 µmol mol–1 CO2, revealed that inhibition of N assimilation was involved in the carbohydrate imbalance and consequently with the down-regulation of photosynthesis and growth in these plants. PMID:23564953

  4. Root Damage by Insects Reverses the Effects of Elevated Atmospheric CO2 on Eucalypt Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Scott N.; Riegler, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Predicted increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are widely anticipated to increase biomass accumulation by accelerating rates of photosynthesis in many plant taxa. Little, however, is known about how soil-borne plant antagonists might modify the effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2), with root-feeding insects being particularly understudied. Root damage by insects often reduces rates of photosynthesis by disrupting root function and imposing water deficits. These insects therefore have considerable potential for modifying plant responses to eCO2. We investigated how root damage by a soil-dwelling insect (Xylotrupes gideon australicus) modified the responses of Eucalyptus globulus to eCO2. eCO2 increased plant height when E. globulus were 14 weeks old and continued to do so at an accelerated rate compared to those grown at ambient CO2 (aCO2). Plants exposed to root-damaging insects showed a rapid decline in growth rates thereafter. In eCO2, shoot and root biomass increased by 46 and 35%, respectively, in insect-free plants but these effects were arrested when soil-dwelling insects were present so that plants were the same size as those grown at aCO2. Specific leaf mass increased by 29% under eCO2, but at eCO2 root damage caused it to decline by 16%, similar to values seen in plants at aCO2 without root damage. Leaf C:N ratio increased by >30% at eCO2 as a consequence of declining leaf N concentrations, but this change was also moderated by soil insects. Soil insects also reduced leaf water content by 9% at eCO2, which potentially arose through impaired water uptake by the roots. We hypothesise that this may have impaired photosynthetic activity to the extent that observed plant responses to eCO2 no longer occurred. In conclusion, soil-dwelling insects could modify plant responses to eCO2 predicted by climate change plant growth models. PMID:24260232

  5. Nitrogen balance for wheat canopies (Triticum aestivum cv. Veery 10) grown under elevated and ambient CO2 concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, D. R.; Ritchie, K.; Bloom, A. J.; Bugbee, B. B.

    1998-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that elevated CO2 concentration would increase NO3- absorption and assimilation using intact wheat canopies (Triticum aestivum cv. Veery 10). Nitrate consumption, the sum of plant absorption and nitrogen loss, was continuously monitored for 23 d following germination under two CO2 concentrations (360 and 1000 micromol mol-1 CO2) and two root zone NO3- concentrations (100 and 1000 mmol m3 NO3-). The plants were grown at high density (1780 m-2) in a 28 m3 controlled environment chamber using solution culture techniques. Wheat responded to 1000 micromol mol-1 CO2 by increasing carbon allocation to root biomass production. Elevated CO2 also increased root zone NO3- consumption, but most of this increase did not result in higher biomass nitrogen. Rather, nitrogen loss accounted for the greatest part of the difference in NO3- consumption between the elevated and ambient [CO2] treatments. The total amount of NO3(-)-N absorbed by roots or the amount of NO3(-)-N assimilated per unit area did not significantly differ between elevated and ambient [CO2] treatments. Instead, specific leaf organic nitrogen content declined, and NO3- accumulated in canopies growing under 1000 micromol mol-1 CO2. Our results indicated that 1000 micromol mol-1 CO2 diminished NO3- assimilation. If NO3- assimilation were impaired by high [CO2], then this offers an explanation for why organic nitrogen contents are often observed to decline in elevated [CO2] environments.

  6. Virus infection mediates the effects of elevated CO2 on plants and vectors.

    PubMed

    Trębicki, Piotr; Vandegeer, Rebecca K; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A; Powell, Kevin S; Dader, Beatriz; Freeman, Angela J; Yen, Alan L; Fitzgerald, Glenn J; Luck, Jo E

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has increased significantly and is projected to double by 2100. To increase current food production levels, understanding how pests and diseases respond to future climate driven by increasing CO2 is imperative. We investigated the effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on the interactions among wheat (cv. Yitpi), Barley yellow dwarf virus and an important pest and virus vector, the bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi), by examining aphid life history, feeding behavior and plant physiology and biochemistry. Our results showed for the first time that virus infection can mediate effects of eCO2 on plants and pathogen vectors. Changes in plant N concentration influenced aphid life history and behavior, and N concentration was affected by virus infection under eCO2. We observed a reduction in aphid population size and increased feeding damage on noninfected plants under eCO2 but no changes to population and feeding on virus-infected plants irrespective of CO2 treatment. We expect potentially lower future aphid populations on noninfected plants but no change or increased aphid populations on virus-infected plants therefore subsequent virus spread. Our findings underscore the complexity of interactions between plants, insects and viruses under future climate with implications for plant disease epidemiology and crop production. PMID:26941044

  7. Virus infection mediates the effects of elevated CO2 on plants and vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trębicki, Piotr; Vandegeer, Rebecca K.; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A.; Powell, Kevin S.; Dader, Beatriz; Freeman, Angela J.; Yen, Alan L.; Fitzgerald, Glenn J.; Luck, Jo E.

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has increased significantly and is projected to double by 2100. To increase current food production levels, understanding how pests and diseases respond to future climate driven by increasing CO2 is imperative. We investigated the effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on the interactions among wheat (cv. Yitpi), Barley yellow dwarf virus and an important pest and virus vector, the bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi), by examining aphid life history, feeding behavior and plant physiology and biochemistry. Our results showed for the first time that virus infection can mediate effects of eCO2 on plants and pathogen vectors. Changes in plant N concentration influenced aphid life history and behavior, and N concentration was affected by virus infection under eCO2. We observed a reduction in aphid population size and increased feeding damage on noninfected plants under eCO2 but no changes to population and feeding on virus-infected plants irrespective of CO2 treatment. We expect potentially lower future aphid populations on noninfected plants but no change or increased aphid populations on virus-infected plants therefore subsequent virus spread. Our findings underscore the complexity of interactions between plants, insects and viruses under future climate with implications for plant disease epidemiology and crop production.

  8. Virus infection mediates the effects of elevated CO2 on plants and vectors

    PubMed Central

    Trębicki, Piotr; Vandegeer, Rebecca K.; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A.; Powell, Kevin S.; Dader, Beatriz; Freeman, Angela J.; Yen, Alan L.; Fitzgerald, Glenn J.; Luck, Jo E.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has increased significantly and is projected to double by 2100. To increase current food production levels, understanding how pests and diseases respond to future climate driven by increasing CO2 is imperative. We investigated the effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on the interactions among wheat (cv. Yitpi), Barley yellow dwarf virus and an important pest and virus vector, the bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi), by examining aphid life history, feeding behavior and plant physiology and biochemistry. Our results showed for the first time that virus infection can mediate effects of eCO2 on plants and pathogen vectors. Changes in plant N concentration influenced aphid life history and behavior, and N concentration was affected by virus infection under eCO2. We observed a reduction in aphid population size and increased feeding damage on noninfected plants under eCO2 but no changes to population and feeding on virus-infected plants irrespective of CO2 treatment. We expect potentially lower future aphid populations on noninfected plants but no change or increased aphid populations on virus-infected plants therefore subsequent virus spread. Our findings underscore the complexity of interactions between plants, insects and viruses under future climate with implications for plant disease epidemiology and crop production. PMID:26941044

  9. Root dynamics in native grassland exposed to elevated CO2 and warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendall, E.; Carrillo, Y.; Morgan, J. A.; Newcomb, J.

    2011-12-01

    Responses of belowground processes to global change play a major role in terrestrial ecosystem carbon (C) storage and feedbacks to climate, but remain understudied in comparison to aboveground processes. In grasslands, roots comprise about 75 percent of the biomass, and are responsible for increased inputs of C to soil pools under elevated CO2. Root exudation may also be responsible for increased rates of soil organic matter decomposition, or priming, potentially offsetting inputs of new C. Understanding the fate of belowground C allocation requires a better understanding of root processes including growth, rhizodeposition, turnover and decomposition. We studied root dynamics in mixed C3/C4 grassland at the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment experiment near Cheyenne, WY, where Free-Air CO2 Enrichment is applied at 600 ppm during daytime in the growing season, and temperature is elevated by 1.5/3 deg C day/night all year. We applied several belowground techniques, including direct biomass measurements coupled with C isotope labeling, root litter decomposition measured in litter bags and in plots with herbicide applied, and image analysis of intact and harvested root systems . Direct measurements indicated that elevated CO2 increased root biomass, a trend that became increasingly significant over the first four years of treatments. Warming by itself tended to decrease root biomass in the first two years, and this effect declined in the next two years of the experiment, suggesting a transient negative response of root growth to warming. Continuous 13C labeling in elevated CO2 plots allowed detection of a greater proportion of new C in warmed than ambient temperature plots, demonstrating greater allocation of C to roots exposed to both elevated CO2 and warming. A root litter bag decomposition experiment showed that C3 grass roots decomposed more rapidly with elevated CO2 alone, but more slowly when elevated CO2 was combined with warming, possibly due to soil drying. C4

  10. Effects of elevated CO2 levels on root morphological traits and Cd uptakes of two Lolium species under Cd stress*

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yan; Tang, Shi-rong; Ju, Xue-hai; Shu, Li-na; Tu, Shu-xing; Feng, Ren-wei; Giusti, Lorenzino

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the combined effects of elevated CO2 levels and cadmium (Cd) on the root morphological traits and Cd accumulation in Lolium multiflorum Lam. and Lolium perenne L. exposed to two CO2 levels (360 and 1000 μl/L) and three Cd levels (0, 4, and 16 mg/L) under hydroponic conditions. The results show that elevated levels of CO2 increased shoot biomass more, compared to root biomass, but decreased Cd concentrations in all plant tissues. Cd exposure caused toxicity to both Lolium species, as shown by the restrictions of the root morphological parameters including root length, surface area, volume, and tip numbers. These parameters were significantly higher under elevated levels of CO2 than under ambient CO2, especially for the number of fine roots. The increases in magnitudes of those parameters triggered by elevated levels of CO2 under Cd stress were more than those under non-Cd stress, suggesting an ameliorated Cd stress under elevated levels of CO2. The total Cd uptake per pot, calculated on the basis of biomass, was significantly greater under elevated levels of CO2 than under ambient CO2. Ameliorated Cd toxicity, decreased Cd concentration, and altered root morphological traits in both Lolium species under elevated levels of CO2 may have implications in food safety and phytoremediation. PMID:21462388

  11. Elevated atmospheric CO2 alters the arthropod community in a forest understory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Jason; Zangerl, Arthur R.; Berenbaum, May R.; Sparks, Jed P.; Elich, Lauren; Eisenstein, Alissa; DeLucia, Evan H.

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which overall population sizes and community composition of arthropods in a naturally occurring forest understory are altered by elevated CO2. The Free Air Concentration Enrichment (FACE) method was used to fumigate large, replicated plots in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, USA to achieve the CO2 concentration predicted for 2050 (˜580 μl l-1). In addition, the extent to which unrestricted herbivorous arthropods were spatially delimited in their resource acquisition was determined. Stable isotope data for spiders (δ13C and δ15N) were collected in ambient and elevated CO2 plots and analyzed to determine whether their prey species moved among plots. Elevated CO2 had no effect on total arthropod numbers but had a large effect on the composition of the arthropod community. Insects collected in our samples were identified to a level that allowed for an assignment of trophic classification (generally to family). For the groups of insects sensitive to atmospheric gas composition, there was an increase in the numbers of individuals collected in primarily predaceous orders (Araneae and Hymenoptera; from 60% to more than 150%) under elevated CO2 and a decrease in the numbers in primarily herbivorous orders (Lepidoptera and Coleoptera; from -30 to -45%). Isotopic data gave no indication that the treatment plots represented a "boundary" to the movement of insects or that there were distinct and independent insect populations inside and outside the treatment plots. A simple two-ended mixing model estimates 55% of the carbon and nitrogen in spider biomass originated external to the elevated CO2 plots. In addition to changes in insect performance, decreases in herbivorous arthropods and increases in predaceous arthropods may also be factors involved in reduced herbivory under elevated CO2 in this forest.

  12. Elevated CO2 Reduced Floret Death in Wheat Under Warmer Average Temperatures and Terminal Drought

    PubMed Central

    Dias de Oliveira, Eduardo; Palta, Jairo A.; Bramley, Helen; Stefanova, Katia; Siddique, Kadambot H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated CO2 often increases grain yield in wheat by enhancing grain number per ear, which can result from an increase in the potential number of florets or a reduction in the death of developed florets. The hypotheses that elevated CO2 reduces floret death rather than increases floret development, and that grain size in a genotype with more grains per unit area is limited by the rate of grain filling, were tested in a pair of sister lines contrasting in tillering capacity (restricted- vs. free-tillering). The hypotheses were tested under elevated CO2, combined with +3°C above ambient temperature and terminal drought, using specialized field tunnel houses. Elevated CO2 increased net leaf photosynthetic rates and likely the availability of carbon assimilates, which significantly reduced the rates of floret death and increased the potential number of grains at anthesis in both sister lines by an average of 42%. The restricted-tillering line had faster grain-filling rates than the free-tillering line because the free-tillering line had more grains to fill. Furthermore, grain-filling rates were faster under elevated CO2 and +3°C above ambient. Terminal drought reduced grain yield in both lines by 19%. Elevated CO2 alone increased the potential number of grains, but a trade-off in yield components limited grain yield in the free-tillering line. This emphasizes the need for breeding cultivars with a greater potential number of florets, since this was not affected by the predicted future climate variables. PMID:26635837

  13. Leaf dynamics of a deciduous forest canopy: no response to elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Norby, Richard J; Sholtis, Johnna D; Gunderson, Carla A; Jawdy, Sara S

    2003-08-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) and its seasonal dynamics are key determinants of terrestrial productivity and, therefore, of the response of ecosystems to a rising atmospheric CO(2) concentration. Despite the central importance of LAI, there is very little evidence from which to assess how forest LAI will respond to increasing [CO(2)]. We assessed LAI and related leaf indices of a closed-canopy deciduous forest for 4 years in 25-m-diameter plots that were exposed to ambient or elevated CO(2) (542 ppm) in a free-air CO(2) enrichment (FACE) experiment. LAI of this Liquidambar styraciflua (sweetgum) stand was about 6 and was relatively constant year-to-year, including the 2 years prior to the onset of CO(2) treatment. LAI throughout the 1999-2002 growing seasons was assessed through a combination of data on photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) transmittance, mass of litter collected in traps, and leaf mass per unit area (LMA). There was no effect of [CO(2)] on any expression of leaf area, including peak LAI, average LAI, or leaf area duration. Canopy mass and LMA, however, were significantly increased by CO(2) enrichment. The hypothesized connection between light compensation point (LCP) and LAI was rejected because LCP was reduced by [CO(2)] enrichment only in leaves under full sun, but not in shaded leaves. Data on PAR interception also permitted calculation of absorbed PAR (APAR) and light use efficiency (LUE), which are key parameters connecting satellite assessments of terrestrial productivity with ecosystem models of future productivity. There was no effect of [CO(2)] on APAR, and the observed increase in net primary productivity in elevated [CO(2)] was ascribed to an increase in LUE, which ranged from 1.4 to 2.4 g MJ(-1). The current evidence seems convincing that LAI of non-expanding forest stands will not be different in a future CO(2)-enriched atmosphere and that increases in LUE and productivity in elevated [CO(2)] are driven primarily by functional responses

  14. Bio-Energy Retains Its Mitigation Potential Under Elevated CO2

    PubMed Central

    Bellassen, Valentin; Njakou Djomo, Sylvestre; Lukac, Martin; Calfapietra, Carlo; Janssens, Ivan A.; Hoosbeek, Marcel R.; Viovy, Nicolas; Churkina, Galina; Scarascia-Mugnozza, Giuseppe; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2010-01-01

    Background If biofuels are to be a viable substitute for fossil fuels, it is essential that they retain their potential to mitigate climate change under future atmospheric conditions. Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration [CO2] stimulates plant biomass production; however, the beneficial effects of increased production may be offset by higher energy costs in crop management. Methodology/Main Findings We maintained full size poplar short rotation coppice (SRC) systems under both current ambient and future elevated [CO2] (550 ppm) and estimated their net energy and greenhouse gas balance. We show that a poplar SRC system is energy efficient and produces more energy than required for coppice management. Even more, elevated [CO2] will increase the net energy production and greenhouse gas balance of a SRC system with 18%. Managing the trees in shorter rotation cycles (i.e., 2 year cycles instead of 3 year cycles) will further enhance the benefits from elevated [CO2] on both the net energy and greenhouse gas balance. Conclusions/Significance Adapting coppice management to the future atmospheric [CO2] is necessary to fully benefit from the climate mitigation potential of bio-energy systems. Further, a future increase in potential biomass production due to elevated [CO2] outweighs the increased production costs resulting in a northward extension of the area where SRC is greenhouse gas neutral. Currently, the main part of the European terrestrial carbon sink is found in forest biomass and attributed to harvesting less than the annual growth in wood. Because SRC is intensively managed, with a higher turnover in wood production than conventional forest, northward expansion of SRC is likely to erode the European terrestrial carbon sink. PMID:20657833

  15. Stimulation of r- vs. K- selected microorganisms by elevated atmospheric CO2 depends on soil aggregate size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorodnikov, M.; Blagodatskaya, E.; Blagodatsky, S.; Fangmeier, A.; Kuzyakov, Y.

    2009-04-01

    Increased root exudation under elevated atmospheric CO2 and the contrasting environments in soil macro- and microaggregates could affect microbial growth strategy. We investigated the effect of elevated CO2 on the contribution of fast- (r-strategists) and slow-growing microorganisms (K-strategists) in soil macro- and microaggregates. We fractionated the bulk soil from the ambient and elevated (for 5 years) CO2 treatments of FACE-Hohenheim (Stuttgart) into large macro- (>2 mm), small macro- (0.25-2.00 mm), and microaggregates (<0.25 mm) using an "optimal moist" sieving. Microbial biomass (Cmic), the maximal specific growth rate (μ), growing microbial biomass (GMB) and lag-period (tlag) were estimated by the kinetics of CO2 emission from bulk soil and aggregates amended with glucose and nutrients. Although Corg and Cmic were unaffected by elevated CO2, μ values were significantly higher under elevated than ambient CO2 for bulk soil, small macroaggregates, and microaggregates. The substrate induced respiratory response increased with the decreasing of aggregates size under both CO2 treatments. Based on changes in μ, GMB, and lag-period, we conclude that elevated atmospheric CO2 stimulated the r-selected microorganisms, especially in soil microaggregates. Such an increase in r-selected microorganisms could increase C turnover in terrestrial ecosystems in a future elevated atmospheric CO2 environment.

  16. Decomposition of 14C-Labeled Roots in a Pasture Soil Exposed to 10 Years of Elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Groenigen, K.; Gorissen, T.; Six, J.; Harris, D.; Kuikman, P.; van Groenigen, J.; van Kessel, C.

    2003-12-01

    The net storage of soil C is determined by the balance between microbial decomposition rates and soil C input, both of which might be altered under prolonged elevated atmospheric CO2. Here we report on a study to determine the effect of elevated CO2 on root mineralization through changes in substrate quality, and the subsequent soil microbial response. 14C-labeled Lolium perenne root material, produced under ambient and elevated CO2 was incubated in soil for 64 days. The soils used for the incubation had been exposed to ambient and elevated CO2 under FACE-conditions for 10 years. Fertilizer N was applied at a rate of 140 and 560 kg N ha-1 yr-1 and the CO2 concentration was increased to 60 Pa pCO2. Lolium perenne root material grown under elevated CO2 significantly decreased microbial respiration in high N soils, whereas it enhanced microbial C assimilation in low N soils. The amount of 14CO2 respired per amount of 14C incorporated in the microbial biomass was significantly lower for high CO2 roots compared to low CO2 roots. We suggest that this is the result of an increased fungal:bacterial ratio, causing an increased metabolic efficiency. Soils exposed to elevated CO2 respired more native SOC, both with and without the addition of the root material. During the first stage of the incubation experiment, root material decomposed slower in high CO2 soils. Overall, the addition of root material decreased the decomposition of native SOC, thus causing a negative priming effect. Our results suggest that priming effects might obscure CO2 data in incubation experiments in which unlabeled substrate is applied. From the results obtained, we suggest that limited net C storage might occur through a slower turnover of root material grown under elevated CO2

  17. Control of yellow and purple nutsedge in elevated CO2 environments with glyphosate and halosulfuron.

    PubMed

    Marble, S Christopher; Prior, Stephen A; Runion, G Brett; Torbert, H Allen

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) have significantly increased over the past century and are expected to continue rising in the future. While elevated levels of CO2 will likely result in higher crop yields, weed growth is also highly likely to increase, which could increase the incidence of herbicide resistant biotypes. An experiment was conducted in 2012 to determine the effects of an elevated CO2 environment on glyphosate and halosulfuron efficacy for postemergence control of purple and yellow nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus L. and C. esculentus L.). Both species of nutsedge where grown in 3.0-L containers under either ambient or elevated (ambient + 200 μmol mol(-1)) CO2 in open-top field chambers and treated with either 0.5×, 1.0×, or 1.5× of the manufacturer's labeled rate of halosulfuron, glyphosate, or a tank mix of the two herbicides. The growth of both nutsedge species responded positively to elevated CO2, purple nutsedge had increased shoot and root dry weights and yellow nutsedge had increased shoot, root, and tuber dry weights and counts. Few treatment differences were observed among the herbicides at any of the rates tested. At 3 weeks following herbicide application, both purple and yellow nutsedge were adequately controlled by both herbicides and combinations at all rates tested, regardless of CO2 concentration. Based on this study, it is likely that predicted future CO2 levels will have little impact on the efficacy of single applications of halosulfuron or glyphosate for control of purple and yellow nutsedge at the growth stages described here, although scenarios demanding more persistent control efforts remain a question. PMID:25653664

  18. Control of yellow and purple nutsedge in elevated CO2 environments with glyphosate and halosulfuron

    PubMed Central

    Marble, S. Christopher; Prior, Stephen A.; Runion, G. Brett; Torbert, H. Allen

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) have significantly increased over the past century and are expected to continue rising in the future. While elevated levels of CO2 will likely result in higher crop yields, weed growth is also highly likely to increase, which could increase the incidence of herbicide resistant biotypes. An experiment was conducted in 2012 to determine the effects of an elevated CO2 environment on glyphosate and halosulfuron efficacy for postemergence control of purple and yellow nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus L. and C. esculentus L.). Both species of nutsedge where grown in 3.0-L containers under either ambient or elevated (ambient + 200 μmol mol−1) CO2 in open-top field chambers and treated with either 0.5×, 1.0×, or 1.5× of the manufacturer's labeled rate of halosulfuron, glyphosate, or a tank mix of the two herbicides. The growth of both nutsedge species responded positively to elevated CO2, purple nutsedge had increased shoot and root dry weights and yellow nutsedge had increased shoot, root, and tuber dry weights and counts. Few treatment differences were observed among the herbicides at any of the rates tested. At 3 weeks following herbicide application, both purple and yellow nutsedge were adequately controlled by both herbicides and combinations at all rates tested, regardless of CO2 concentration. Based on this study, it is likely that predicted future CO2 levels will have little impact on the efficacy of single applications of halosulfuron or glyphosate for control of purple and yellow nutsedge at the growth stages described here, although scenarios demanding more persistent control efforts remain a question. PMID:25653664

  19. Genotypic variation in rice yield enhancement by elevated CO2 relates to growth before heading, and not to maturity group

    PubMed Central

    Shimono, Hiroyuki; Okada, Masumi; Yamakawa, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiko; Hasegawa, Toshihiro

    2009-01-01

    Maturity group (based on the number of days to maturity) is an important growth trait for determining crop productivity, but there has been no attempt to examine the effects of elevated [CO2] on yield enhancement of rice cultivars with different maturity groups. Since early-maturing cultivars generally show higher plant N concentration than late-maturing cultivars, it is hypothesized that [CO2]-induced yield enhancement might be larger for early-maturing cultivars than late-maturing cultivars. To test this hypothesis, the effects of elevated [CO2] on yield components, biomass, N uptake, and leaf photosynthesis of cultivars with different maturity groups were examined for 2 years using a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE). Elevated [CO2] significantly increased grain yield and the magnitude significantly differed among the cultivars as detected by a significant [CO2]×cultivar interaction. Two cultivars (one with early and one with late maturity) responded more strongly to elevated [CO2] than those with intermediate maturity, resulting mainly from increases in spikelet density. Biomass and N uptake at the heading stage were closely correlated with grain yield and spikelet density over [CO2] and cultivars. Our 2 year field trial rejected the hypothesis that earlier cultivars would respond more to elevated [CO2] than later cultivars, but it is revealed that the magnitude of the growth enhancement before heading is a useful criterion for selecting rice cultivars capable of adapting to elevated [CO2]. PMID:19050063

  20. Effects of Elevated Atmospheric CO2 on Soil CO2 Efflux in Conventional and Conservation Cropping Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) can affect both the quantity and quality of plant tissues produced, which will impact the cycling and storage of carbon (C) within plant/soil systems and thus the rate of CO2 release back to the atmosphere. Research is needed to more accurately quantify the...

  1. High indoor CO2 concentrations in an office environment increases the transcutaneous CO2 level and sleepiness during cognitive work.

    PubMed

    Vehviläinen, Tommi; Lindholm, Harri; Rintamäki, Hannu; Pääkkönen, Rauno; Hirvonen, Ari; Niemi, Olli; Vinha, Juha

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform a multiparametric analysis on the environmental factors, the physiological stress reactions in the body, the measured alertness, and the subjective symptoms during simulated office work. Volunteer male subjects were monitored during three 4-hr work meetings in an office room, both in a ventilated and a non-ventilated environment. The environmental parameters measured included CO(2), temperature, and relative humidity. The physiological test battery consisted of measuring autonomic nervous system functions, salivary stress hormones, blood's CO(2)- content and oxygen saturation, skin temperatures, thermal sensations, vigilance, and sleepiness. The study shows that we can see physiological changes caused by high CO(2) concentration. The findings support the view that low or moderate level increases in concentration of CO(2) in indoor air might cause elevation in the blood's transcutaneously assessed CO(2). The observed findings are higher CO(2) concentrations in tissues, changes in heart rate variation, and an increase of peripheral blood circulation during exposure to elevated CO(2) concentration. The subjective parameters and symptoms support the physiological findings. This study shows that a high concentration of CO(2) in indoor air seem to be one parameter causing physiological effects, which can decrease the facility user's functional ability. The correct amount of ventilation with relation to the number of people using the facility, functional air distribution, and regular breaks can counteract the decrease in functional ability. The findings of the study suggest that merely increasing ventilation is not necessarily a rational solution from a technical-economical viewpoint. Instead or in addition, more comprehensive, anthropocentric planning of space is needed as well as instructions and new kinds of reference values for the design and realization of office environments. PMID:26273786

  2. Plant–Aphid Interactions Under Elevated CO2: Some Cues from Aphid Feeding Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yucheng; Guo, Huijuan; Ge, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Although the increasing concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) accelerates the accumulation of carbohydrates and increases the biomass and yield of C3 crop plants, it also reduces their nitrogen concentration. The consequent changes in primary and secondary metabolites affect the palatability of host plants and the feeding of herbivorous insects. Aphids are phloem feeders and are considered the only feeding guild that positively responds to elevated CO2. In this review, we consider how elevated CO2 modifies host defenses, nutrients, and water-use efficiency by altering concentrations of the phytohormones jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, ethylene, and abscisic acid. We will describe how these elevated CO2-induced changes in defenses, nutrients, and water statusfacilitate specific stages of aphid feeding, including penetration, phloem-feeding, and xylem absorption. We conclude that a better understanding of the effects of elevated CO2 on aphids and on aphid damage to crop plants will require research on the molecular aspects of the interaction between plant and aphid but also research on aphid interactions with their intra- and inter-specific competitors and with their natural enemies. PMID:27148325

  3. Plant-Aphid Interactions Under Elevated CO2: Some Cues from Aphid Feeding Behavior.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yucheng; Guo, Huijuan; Ge, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Although the increasing concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) accelerates the accumulation of carbohydrates and increases the biomass and yield of C3 crop plants, it also reduces their nitrogen concentration. The consequent changes in primary and secondary metabolites affect the palatability of host plants and the feeding of herbivorous insects. Aphids are phloem feeders and are considered the only feeding guild that positively responds to elevated CO2. In this review, we consider how elevated CO2 modifies host defenses, nutrients, and water-use efficiency by altering concentrations of the phytohormones jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, ethylene, and abscisic acid. We will describe how these elevated CO2-induced changes in defenses, nutrients, and water statusfacilitate specific stages of aphid feeding, including penetration, phloem-feeding, and xylem absorption. We conclude that a better understanding of the effects of elevated CO2 on aphids and on aphid damage to crop plants will require research on the molecular aspects of the interaction between plant and aphid but also research on aphid interactions with their intra- and inter-specific competitors and with their natural enemies. PMID:27148325

  4. Reduced plant nutrition under elevated CO2 depresses the immunocompetence of cotton bollworm against its endoparasite

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jin; Sun, Yucheng; Ge, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Estimating the immunocompetence of herbivore insects under elevated CO2 is an important step in understanding the effects of elevated CO2 on crop-herbivore-natural enemy interactions. Current study determined the effect of elevated CO2 on the immune response of Helicoverpa armigera against its parasitoid Microplitis mediator. H. armigera were reared in growth chambers with ambient or elevated CO2, and fed wheat grown in the concentration of CO2 corresponding to their treatment levels. Our results showed that elevated CO2 decreases the nutritional quality of wheat, and reduces the total hemocyte counts and impairs the capacity of hemocyte spreading of hemolymph of cotton bollworm larvae, fed wheat grown in the elevated CO2, against its parasitoid; however, this effect was insufficient to change the development and parasitism traits of M. mediator. Our results suggested that lower plant nutritional quality under elevated CO2 could decrease the immune response of herbivorous insects against their parasitoid natural enemies. PMID:24687002

  5. Reduced plant nutrition under elevated CO2 depresses the immunocompetence of cotton bollworm against its endoparasite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jin; Sun, Yucheng; Ge, Feng

    2014-04-01

    Estimating the immunocompetence of herbivore insects under elevated CO2 is an important step in understanding the effects of elevated CO2 on crop-herbivore-natural enemy interactions. Current study determined the effect of elevated CO2 on the immune response of Helicoverpa armigera against its parasitoid Microplitis mediator. H. armigera were reared in growth chambers with ambient or elevated CO2, and fed wheat grown in the concentration of CO2 corresponding to their treatment levels. Our results showed that elevated CO2 decreases the nutritional quality of wheat, and reduces the total hemocyte counts and impairs the capacity of hemocyte spreading of hemolymph of cotton bollworm larvae, fed wheat grown in the elevated CO2, against its parasitoid; however, this effect was insufficient to change the development and parasitism traits of M. mediator. Our results suggested that lower plant nutritional quality under elevated CO2 could decrease the immune response of herbivorous insects against their parasitoid natural enemies.

  6. [Effects of elevated CO2 concentration on the quality of agricultural products: a review].

    PubMed

    Chai, Ru-shan; Niu, Yao-fang; Zhu, Li-qing; Wang, Huan; Zhang, Yong-song

    2011-10-01

    The increasing concentration of atmospheric CO2 and the nutritional quality of human diets are the two important issues we are facing. At present, the atmospheric CO2 concentration is about 380 micromol mol(-1), and to be reached 550 micromol mol(-1) by 2050. A great deal of researches indicated that the quality of agricultural products is not only determined by inherited genes, but also affected by the crop growth environmental conditions. This paper summarized the common methods adopted at home and abroad for studying the effects of CO2 enrichment on the quality of agricultural products, and reviewed the research advances in evaluating the effects of elevated CO2 on the quality of rice, wheat, soybean, and vegetables. Many experimental results showed that elevated CO2 concentration causes a decrease of protein content in the grains of staple food crops and an overall decreasing trend of trace elements contents in the crops, but improves the quality of vegetable products to some extent. Some issues and future directions regarding the effects of elevated CO2 concentration on the quality of agricultural products were also discussed, based on the present status of related researches. PMID:22263486

  7. Contemporary evolution of an invasive grass in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 at a Mojave Desert FACE site

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Judah D; Rice, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 has been shown to rapidly alter plant physiology and ecosystem productivity, but contemporary evolutionary responses to increased CO2 have yet to be demonstrated in the field. At a Mojave Desert FACE (free-air CO2 enrichment) facility, we tested whether an annual grass weed (Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens) has evolved in response to elevated atmospheric CO2. Within 7 years, field populations exposed to elevated CO2 evolved lower rates of leaf stomatal conductance; a physiological adaptation known to conserve water in other desert or water-limited ecosystems. Evolution of lower conductance was accompanied by reduced plasticity in upregulating conductance when CO2 was more limiting; this reduction in conductance plasticity suggests that genetic assimilation may be ongoing. Reproductive fitness costs associated with this reduction in phenotypic plasticity were demonstrated under ambient levels of CO2. Our findings suggest that contemporary evolution may facilitate this invasive species' spread in this desert ecosystem. PMID:24674649

  8. Contemporary evolution of an invasive grass in response to elevated atmospheric CO(2) at a Mojave Desert FACE site.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Judah D; Rice, Kevin J

    2014-06-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 has been shown to rapidly alter plant physiology and ecosystem productivity, but contemporary evolutionary responses to increased CO2 have yet to be demonstrated in the field. At a Mojave Desert FACE (free-air CO2 enrichment) facility, we tested whether an annual grass weed (Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens) has evolved in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 . Within 7 years, field populations exposed to elevated CO2 evolved lower rates of leaf stomatal conductance; a physiological adaptation known to conserve water in other desert or water-limited ecosystems. Evolution of lower conductance was accompanied by reduced plasticity in upregulating conductance when CO2 was more limiting; this reduction in conductance plasticity suggests that genetic assimilation may be ongoing. Reproductive fitness costs associated with this reduction in phenotypic plasticity were demonstrated under ambient levels of CO2 . Our findings suggest that contemporary evolution may facilitate this invasive species' spread in this desert ecosystem. PMID:24674649

  9. Impact of elevated CO2, water table, and temperature changes on CO2 and CH4 fluxes from arctic tundra soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zona, Donatella; Haynes, Katherine; Deutschman, Douglas; Bryant, Emma; McEwing, Katherine; Davidson, Scott; Oechel, Walter

    2015-04-01

    Large uncertainties still exist on the response of tundra C emissions to future climate due, in part, to the lack of understanding of the interactive effects of potentially controlling variables on C emissions from Arctic ecosystems. In this study we subjected 48 soil cores (without active vegetation) from dominant arctic wetland vegetation types, to a laboratory manipulation of elevated atmospheric CO2, elevated temperature, and altered water table, representing current and future conditions in the Arctic for two growing seasons. To our knowledge this experiment comprised the most extensively replicated manipulation of intact soil cores in the Arctic. The hydrological status of the soil was the most dominant control on both soil CO2 and CH4 emissions. Despite higher soil CO2 emission occurring in the drier plots, substantial CO2 respiration occurred under flooded conditions, suggesting significant anaerobic respirations in these arctic tundra ecosystems. Importantly, a critical control on soil CO2 and CH4 fluxes was the original vascular plant cover. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration was correlated with cumulative CH4 emissions but not with cumulative CO2 suggesting C quality influenced CH4 production but not soil CO2 emissions. An interactive effect between increased temperature and elevated CO2 on soil CO2 emissions suggested a potential shift of the soils microbial community towards more efficient soil organic matter degraders with warming and elevated CO2. Methane emissions did not decrease over the course of the experiment, even with no input from vegetation. This result indicated that CH4 emissions are not carbon limited in these C rich soils. Overall CH4 emissions represented about 49% of the sum of total C (C-CO2 + C-CH4) emission in the wet treatments, and 15% in the dry treatments, representing a dominant component of the overall C balance from arctic soils.

  10. Does elevated pCO2 affect reef octocorals?

    PubMed Central

    Gabay, Yasmin; Benayahu, Yehuda; Fine, Maoz

    2013-01-01

    Increasing anthropogenic pCO2 alters seawater chemistry, with potentially severe consequences for coral reef growth and health. Octocorals are the second most important faunistic component in many reefs, often occupying 50% or more of the available substrate. Three species of octocorals from two families were studied in Eilat (Gulf of Aqaba), comprising the zooxanthellate Ovabunda macrospiculata and Heteroxenia fuscescens (family Xeniidae), and Sarcophyton sp. (family Alcyoniidae). They were maintained under normal (8.2) and reduced (7.6 and 7.3) pH conditions for up to 5 months. Their biolological features, including protein concentration, polyp weight, density of zooxanthellae, and their chlorophyll concentration per cell, as well as polyp pulsation rate, were examined under conditions more acidic than normal, in order to test the hypothesis that rising pCO2 would affect octocorals. The results indicate no statistically significant difference between the octocorals exposed to reduced pH values compared to the control. It is therefore suggested that the octocorals' tissue may act as a protective barrier against adverse pH conditions, thus maintaining them unharmed at high levels of pCO2. PMID:23533159

  11. Fungal communities respond to long-term CO2 elevation by community reassembly.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qichao; Yuan, Mengting; He, Zhili; Deng, Ye; Xue, Kai; Wu, Liyou; Hobbie, Sarah E; Reich, Peter B; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-04-01

    Fungal communities play a major role as decomposers in the Earth's ecosystems. Their community-level responses to elevated CO2 (eCO2), one of the major global change factors impacting ecosystems, are not well understood. Using 28S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and co-occurrence ecological network approaches, we analyzed the response of soil fungal communities in the BioCON (biodiversity, CO2, and N deposition) experimental site in Minnesota, USA, in which a grassland ecosystem has been exposed to eCO2 for 12 years. Long-term eCO2 did not significantly change the overall fungal community structure and species richness, but significantly increased community evenness and diversity. The relative abundances of 119 operational taxonomic units (OTU; ∼27% of the total captured sequences) were changed significantly. Significantly changed OTU under eCO2 were associated with decreased overall relative abundance of Ascomycota, but increased relative abundance of Basidiomycota. Co-occurrence ecological network analysis indicated that eCO2 increased fungal community network complexity, as evidenced by higher intermodular and intramodular connectivity and shorter geodesic distance. In contrast, decreased connections for dominant fungal species were observed in the eCO2 network. Community reassembly of unrelated fungal species into highly connected dense modules was observed. Such changes in the co-occurrence network topology were significantly associated with altered soil and plant properties under eCO2, especially with increased plant biomass and NH4 (+) availability. This study provided novel insights into how eCO2 shapes soil fungal communities in grassland ecosystems. PMID:25616796

  12. Fungal Communities Respond to Long-Term CO2 Elevation by Community Reassembly

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Qichao; Yuan, Mengting; He, Zhili; Deng, Ye; Xue, Kai; Wu, Liyou; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Reich, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal communities play a major role as decomposers in the Earth's ecosystems. Their community-level responses to elevated CO2 (eCO2), one of the major global change factors impacting ecosystems, are not well understood. Using 28S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and co-occurrence ecological network approaches, we analyzed the response of soil fungal communities in the BioCON (biodiversity, CO2, and N deposition) experimental site in Minnesota, USA, in which a grassland ecosystem has been exposed to eCO2 for 12 years. Long-term eCO2 did not significantly change the overall fungal community structure and species richness, but significantly increased community evenness and diversity. The relative abundances of 119 operational taxonomic units (OTU; ∼27% of the total captured sequences) were changed significantly. Significantly changed OTU under eCO2 were associated with decreased overall relative abundance of Ascomycota, but increased relative abundance of Basidiomycota. Co-occurrence ecological network analysis indicated that eCO2 increased fungal community network complexity, as evidenced by higher intermodular and intramodular connectivity and shorter geodesic distance. In contrast, decreased connections for dominant fungal species were observed in the eCO2 network. Community reassembly of unrelated fungal species into highly connected dense modules was observed. Such changes in the co-occurrence network topology were significantly associated with altered soil and plant properties under eCO2, especially with increased plant biomass and NH4+ availability. This study provided novel insights into how eCO2 shapes soil fungal communities in grassland ecosystems. PMID:25616796

  13. Interaction between C 4 barnyard grass and C 3 upland rice under elevated CO 2: Impact of mycorrhizae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianjun; Xu, Liming; Chen, Xin; Hu, Shuijin

    2009-03-01

    Atmospheric CO 2 enrichment may impact arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) development and function, which could have subsequent effects on host plant species interactions by differentially affecting plant nutrient acquisition. However, direct evidence illustrating this scenario is limited. We examined how elevated CO 2 affects plant growth and whether mycorrhizae mediate interactions between C 4 barnyard grass ( Echinochloa crusgalli (L.) Beauv.) and C 3 upland rice ( Oryza sativa L.) in a low nutrient soil. The monocultures and combinations with or without mycorrhizal inoculation were grown at ambient (400 ± 20 μmol mol -1) and elevated CO 2 (700 ± 20 μmol mol -1) levels. The 15N isotope tracer was introduced to quantify the mycorrhizally mediated N acquisition of plants. Elevated CO 2 stimulated the growth of C 3 upland rice but not that of C 4 barnyard grass under monoculture. Elevated CO 2 also increased mycorrhizal colonization of C 4 barnyard grass but did not affect mycorrhizal colonization of C 3 upland rice. Mycorrhizal inoculation increased the shoot biomass ratio of C 4 barnyard grass to C 3 upland rice under both CO 2 concentrations but had a greater impact under the elevated than ambient CO 2 level. Mycorrhizae decreased relative interaction index (RII) of C 3 plants under both ambient and elevated CO 2, but mycorrhizae increased RII of C 4 plants only under elevated CO 2. Elevated CO 2 and mycorrhizal inoculation enhanced 15N and total N and P uptake of C 4 barnyard grass in mixture but had no effects on N and P acquisition of C 3 upland rice, thus altering the distribution of N and P between the species in mixture. These results implied that CO 2 stimulation of mycorrhizae and their nutrient acquisition may impact competitive interaction of C 4 barnyard grass and C 3 upland rice under future CO 2 scenarios.

  14. Effects of Elevated CO2 and Nitrogen Deposition on Ecosystem Carbon Fluxes on the Sanjiang Plain Wetland in Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianbo; Zhu, Tingcheng; Ni, Hongwei; Zhong, Haixiu; Fu, Xiaoling; Wang, Jifeng

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasing atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen (N) deposition across the globe may affect ecosystem CO2 exchanges and ecosystem carbon cycles. Additionally, it remains unknown how increased N deposition and N addition will alter the effects of elevated CO2 on wetland ecosystem carbon fluxes. Methodology/Principal Findings Beginning in 2010, a paired, nested manipulative experimental design was used in a temperate wetland of northeastern China. The primary factor was elevated CO2, accomplished using Open Top Chambers, and N supplied as NH4NO3 was the secondary factor. Gross primary productivity (GPP) was higher than ecosystem respiration (ER), leading to net carbon uptake (measured by net ecosystem CO2 exchange, or NEE) in all four treatments over the growing season. However, their magnitude had interannual variations, which coincided with air temperature in the early growing season, with the soil temperature and with the vegetation cover. Elevated CO2 significantly enhanced GPP and ER but overall reduced NEE because the stimulation caused by the elevated CO2 had a greater impact on ER than on GPP. The addition of N stimulated ecosystem C fluxes in both years and ameliorated the negative impact of elevated CO2 on NEE. Conclusion/Significance In this ecosystem, future elevated CO2 may favor carbon sequestration when coupled with increasing nitrogen deposition. PMID:23818943

  15. Nitrogen Limitation is Reducing the Enhancement of NPP by Elevated CO2 in a Deciduous Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Norby, Richard J; Warren, Jeffrey; Iversen, Colleen M; Medlyn, Belinda; McMurtrie, Ross; Hoffman, Forrest M

    2008-01-01

    Accurate model representation of the long-term response of forested ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) is important for predictions of future concentrations of CO2. For biogeochemical models that predict the response of net primary productivity (NPP) to eCO2, free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments provide the only source of data for comparison. A synthesis of forest FACE experiments reported a 23% increase in NPP in eCO2, and this result has been used as a model benchmark. Here, we provide new evidence from a FACE experiment in a deciduous forest in Tennessee that N limitation has significantly reduced the stimulation of NPP by eCO2, consistent with predictions from ecosystem and global models that incorporate N feedbacks. The Liquidambar styraciflua stand has been exposed to current ambient atmospheric CO2 or air enriched with CO2 to 550 ppm since 1998. Results from the first 6 years of the experiment indicated that NPP was significantly enhanced by eCO2 and that this was a consistent and sustained response. Now, with 10 years of data, our analysis must be revised. The response of NPP to eCO2 has declined from 24% in 2001-2003 to 9% in 2007. The diminishing response to eCO2 since 2004 coincides with declining NPP in ambient CO2 plots. Productivity of this forest stand is limited by N availability, and the steady decline in forest NPP is closely related to changes in the N economy, as evidenced by declining foliar N concentrations. There is a strong linear relationship between foliar [N] and NPP, and the steeper slope in eCO2 indicates that the NPP response to eCO2 should diminish as foliar N declines. Increased fine-root production and root proliferation deeper in the soil have sustained N uptake, but not to an extent sufficient to benefit aboveground production. The mechanistic basis of the N effect on NPP resides in the photosynthetic machinery. The linear relationships between Jmax and Vcmax with foliar [N] did not change from 1998

  16. Nitrogen Limitation is Reducing the Enhancement of NPP by Elevated CO2 in a Deciduous Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norby, R. J.; Warren, J. M.; Iversen, C. M.; Medlyn, B. E.; McMurtrie, R. E.; Hoffman, F. M.

    2008-12-01

    Accurate model representation of the long-term response of forested ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) is important for predictions of future concentrations of CO2. For biogeochemical models that predict the response of net primary productivity (NPP) to eCO2, free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments provide the only source of data for comparison. A synthesis of forest FACE experiments reported a 23% increase in NPP in eCO2, and this result has been used as a model benchmark. Here, we provide new evidence from a FACE experiment in a deciduous forest in Tennessee that N limitation has significantly reduced the stimulation of NPP by eCO2, consistent with predictions from ecosystem and global models that incorporate N feedbacks. The Liquidambar styraciflua stand has been exposed to current ambient atmospheric CO2 or air enriched with CO2 to 550 ppm since 1998. Results from the first 6 years of the experiment indicated that NPP was significantly enhanced by eCO2 and that this was a consistent and sustained response. Now, with 10 years of data, our analysis must be revised. The response of NPP to eCO2 has declined from 24% in 2001-2003 to 9% in 2007. The diminishing response to eCO2 since 2004 coincides with declining NPP in ambient CO2 plots. Productivity of this forest stand is limited by N availability, and the steady decline in forest NPP is closely related to changes in the N economy, as evidenced by declining foliar N concentrations. There is a strong linear relationship between foliar [N] and NPP, and the steeper slope in eCO2 indicates that the NPP response to eCO2 should diminish as foliar N declines. Increased fine-root production and root proliferation deeper in the soil have sustained N uptake, but not to an extent sufficient to benefit aboveground production. The mechanistic basis of the N effect on NPP resides in the photosynthetic machinery. The linear relationships between Jmax and Vcmax with foliar [N] did not change from 1998

  17. Direct Effects of Elevated CO2 Levels on the Fitness Performance of Asian Corn Borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) for Multigenerations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haicui; Zhao, Lei; Yang, Qunfang; Wang, Zhenying; He, Kanglai

    2015-08-01

    Understanding direct response of insects to elevated CO2 should help to elucidate the mechanistic bases of the effects of elevated CO2 on interactions of insects with plants. This should improve our ability to predict shifts in insect population dynamics and community interactions under the conditions of climate change. Effects of elevated CO2 levels on the fitness-related parameters were examined for multigenerations in the Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenée). The larvae were allowed to feed on artificial diet, and reared in the closed-dynamic environment chambers with three CO2 levels (ambient, 550 μl/liter, and 750 μl/liter) for six generations. In comparison with the ambient CO2 level, mean larval survival rate decreased 9.9% in 750 μl/liter CO2 level, across O. furnacalis generations, and larval and pupal development times increased 7.5-16.4% and 4.5-13.4%, respectively, in two elevated CO2 levels. Pupal weight was reduced more than 12.2% in 750 μl/liter CO2 level. Across O. furnacalis generations, mean food consumption per larva increased 2.7, 7.0% and frass excretion per larva increased 14.4, 22.5% in the two elevated CO2 levels, respectively, compared with ambient CO2 level. Elevated CO2 levels resulted in the decline mean across O. furnacalis generations in mean relative growth rate, but increased in relative consumption rate. These results suggested that elevated CO2 would reduce the fitness-related parameters such as higher mortality, lower pupal weight, and longer development times in long term. It also reduced the larval food digestibility and utilizing efficiency; in turn, this would result in increase of food consumption. PMID:26314071

  18. Potential Effects of Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) on Coastal Wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the atmosphere has steadily increased from 280 parts per million (ppm) in preindustrial times to 381 ppm today and is predicted by some models to double within the next century. Some of the important pathways whereby changes in atmospheric CO2 may impact coastal wetlands include changes in temperature, rainfall, and hurricane intensity (fig. 1). Increases in CO2 can contribute to global warming, which may (1) accelerate sea-level rise through melting of polar ice fields and steric expansion of oceans, (2) alter rainfall patterns and salinity regimes, and (3) change the intensity and frequency of tropical storms and hurricanes. Sea-level rise combined with changes in storm activity may affect erosion and sedimentation rates and patterns in coastal wetlands and maintenance of soil elevations. Feedback loops between plant growth and hydroedaphic conditions also contribute to maintenance of marsh elevations through accumulation of organic matter. Although increasing CO2 concentration may contribute to global warming and climate changes, it may also have a direct impact on plant growth and development by stimulating photosynthesis or improving water use efficiency. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey are examining responses of wetland plants to elevated CO2 concentration and other factors. This research will lead to a better understanding of future changes in marsh species composition, successional rates and patterns, ecological functioning, and vulnerability to sea-level rise and other global change factors.

  19. Application of a two-pool model to soil carbon dynamics under elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    van Groenigen, Kees Jan; Xia, Jianyang; Osenberg, Craig W; Luo, Yiqi; Hungate, Bruce A

    2015-12-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations increase plant productivity and affect soil microbial communities, with possible consequences for the turnover rate of soil carbon (C) pools and feedbacks to the atmosphere. In a previous analysis (Van Groenigen et al., 2014), we used experimental data to inform a one-pool model and showed that elevated CO2 increases the decomposition rate of soil organic C, negating the storage potential of soil. However, a two-pool soil model can potentially explain patterns of soil C dynamics without invoking effects of CO2 on decomposition rates. To address this issue, we refit our data to a two-pool soil C model. We found that CO2 enrichment increases decomposition rates of both fast and slow C pools. In addition, elevated CO2 decreased the carbon use efficiency of soil microbes (CUE), thereby further reducing soil C storage. These findings are consistent with numerous empirical studies and corroborate the results from our previous analysis. To facilitate understanding of C dynamics, we suggest that empirical and theoretical studies incorporate multiple soil C pools with potentially variable decomposition rates. PMID:26313640

  20. The Interactive Effects of Elevated CO2 and Ozone on Leaf Thermotolerance in Field-Grown Glycine Max (Soybean)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human activity is increasing atmospheric CO2, which is increasing both mean global temperatures and acute heat stress (heat waves). Laboratory studies have shown that elevated CO2 can increase tolerance of photosynthesis to acute heat stress in C3 plants. However, human-caused increases in ground-...

  1. Non-destructive assessment of the effects of elevated CO 2 on plant community structure in a calcareous grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rötzel, Christina; Leadley, Paul W.; Körner, Christian

    Calcareous grassland was exposed to ambient or elevated CO 2 using a Screen-Aided CO 2 Control (SACC) system starting in March 1994. The effects of elevated CO 2 on plant community structure were studied using the point intercept method. Measurements were made in March 1994 prior to the start of CO 2 exposure and again in June 1994 at peak plant biomass. There were no significant differences in the initial structure of the communities based on their assigned CO 2 treatments in March. After 9 weeks of exposure of the community to elevated CO 2, the total number of intercepts per plot was not significantly different between CO 2 treatments; however, Carex flacca and Cirsium acaule had marginally significant (P=0.055 and P=0.06) increases in the % sward of the community at elevated CO 2 (number of intercepts for a single species divided by the total number of intercepts for all species). Measurements of leaf extension in Carex flacca showed that at least part of the increase in % sward at elevated CO 2 could be explained by greater leaf length per plant (P=0.02). These measurements and other experiments with calcareous grassland species and communities suggest that rising atmospheric CO 2 concentrations will probably alter the structure of calcareous grassland communities.

  2. Effect of elevated CO2 on the community metabolism of an experimental coral reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langdon, Chris; Broecker, Wallace S.; Hammond, Douglas E.; Glenn, Edward; Fitzsimmons, Kevin; Nelson, Steven G.; Peng, Tsung-Hung; Hajdas, Irka; Bonani, Georges

    2003-03-01

    The effect of elevated pCO2 on the metabolism of a coral reef community dominated by macroalgae has been investigated utilizing the large 2650 m3 coral reef mesocosm at the Biosphere-2 facility near Tucson, Arizona. The carbonate chemistry of the water was manipulated to simulate present-day and a doubled CO2 future condition. Each experiment consisted of a 1-2 month preconditioning period followed by a 7-9 day observational period. The pCO2 was 404 ± 63 μatm during the present-day pCO2 experiment and 658 ± 59 μatm during the elevated pCO2 experiment. Nutrient levels were low and typical of natural reefs waters (NO3- 0.5-0.9 μM, NH4+ 0.4 μM, PO43- 0.07-0.09 μM). The temperature and salinity of the water were held constant at 26.5 ± 0.2°C and 34.4 ± 0.2 ppt. Photosynthetically available irradiance was 10 ± 2 during the present-day experiment and 7.4 ± 0.5 mol photons m-2 d-1 during the elevated pCO2 experiment. The primary producer biomass in the mesocosm was dominated by four species of macroalgae; Haptilon cubense, Amphiroa fragillisima, Gelidiopsis intricata and Chondria dasyphylla. Algal biomass was 10.4 mol C m-2 during the present-day and 8.7 mol C m-2 and during the elevated pCO2 experiments. As previously observed, the increase in pCO2 resulted in a decrease in calcification from 0.041 ± 0.007 to 0.006 ± 0.003 mol CaCO3 m-2 d-1. Net community production (NCP) and dark respiration did not change in response to elevated pCO2. Light respiration measured by a new radiocarbon isotope dilution method exceeded dark respiration by a factor of 1.2 ± 0.3 to 2.1 ± 0.4 on a daily basis and by 2.2 ± 0.6 to 3.9 ± 0.8 on an hourly basis. The 1.8-fold increase with increasing pCO2 indicates that the enhanced respiration in the light was not due to photorespiration. Gross production (GPP) computed as the sum of NCP plus daily respiration (light + dark) increased significantly (0.24 ± 0.03 vs. 0.32 ± 0.04 mol C m-2 d-1). However, the conventional

  3. Responses of desert, semi-arid grassland and scrub-oak ecosystems to elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luus, Kristina; Walker, Anthony; de Kauwe, Martin; Hungate, Bruce; Megonigal, J. Patrick; Lu, Meng; Fenstermaker, Lynn; Nowak, Robert; Morgan, Jack; Medlyn, Belinda; Norby, Richard; Zaehle, Sönke

    2014-05-01

    We compared observations from free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments at dry (desert, semi-arid grassland and scrub-oak) sites, to predictions from a suite of ecosystem models with differing complexity, ranging from a parsimonious forest growth model (GDAY) to a comprehensive land surface model (OCN). Dry ecosystems have often been predicted to increase in net primary productivity (NPP) and net C uptake over time in response to elevated CO2 (eCO2) because of increased N fixation, and alleviation of drought-stress due to reduced stomatal conductance. However, experiments at the Nevada Desert FACE (NDFF), the semi-arid prairie grassland FACE (PHACE), and the scrub-oak Kennedy Space Center open-top chamber experiment (KSCO), have revealed that dry ecosystems display a more complex biogeochemical response to eCO2. Insights into the processes determining the responses of dry ecosystems to eCO2 were gained by evaluating model estimates against site data, and by dissecting model responses to eCO2. Site level findings at PHACE indicated that eCO2 enabled more rapid C turnover, resulting in a net ecosystem C loss. Conversely, at PHACE, models such as OCN simulated a decrease in N leaching and an increase in NPP because of eCO2, leading to increased C storage. Leaf cover and NPP at KSCO initially increased with eCO2 before declining due to reduced N fixation and increased N leaching. At NDFF, eCO2 only increased plant growth during one abnormally wet year; in subsequent years, soil crust cyanobacteria decreased in abundance, and gains in biomass were not sustained. In OCN simulations at NDFF, eCO2 increased water-use efficiency and NPP in years with average to above-average precipitation. Through examination of the reasons for discrepancies between observed and modeled ecosystem responses to eCO2, processes determining the biogeochemical responses of dry ecosystems to eCO2 were elucidated.

  4. Future Climate CO2 Levels Mitigate Stress Impact on Plants: Increased Defense or Decreased Challenge?

    PubMed

    AbdElgawad, Hamada; Zinta, Gaurav; Beemster, Gerrit T S; Janssens, Ivan A; Asard, Han

    2016-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 can stimulate plant growth by providing additional C (fertilization effect), and is observed to mitigate abiotic stress impact. Although, the mechanisms underlying the stress mitigating effect are not yet clear, increased antioxidant defenses, have been held primarily responsible (antioxidant hypothesis). A systematic literature analysis, including "all" papers [Web of Science (WoS)-cited], addressing elevated CO2 effects on abiotic stress responses and antioxidants (105 papers), confirms the frequent occurrence of the stress mitigation effect. However, it also demonstrates that, in stress conditions, elevated CO2 is reported to increase antioxidants, only in about 22% of the observations (e.g., for polyphenols, peroxidases, superoxide dismutase, monodehydroascorbate reductase). In most observations, under stress and elevated CO2 the levels of key antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes are reported to remain unchanged (50%, e.g., ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, ascorbate), or even decreased (28%, e.g., glutathione peroxidase). Moreover, increases in antioxidants are not specific for a species group, growth facility, or stress type. It seems therefore unlikely that increased antioxidant defense is the major mechanism underlying CO2-mediated stress impact mitigation. Alternative processes, probably decreasing the oxidative challenge by reducing ROS production (e.g., photorespiration), are therefore likely to play important roles in elevated CO2 (relaxation hypothesis). Such parameters are however rarely investigated in connection with abiotic stress relief. Understanding the effect of elevated CO2 on plant growth and stress responses is imperative to understand the impact of climate changes on plant productivity. PMID:27200030

  5. Future Climate CO2 Levels Mitigate Stress Impact on Plants: Increased Defense or Decreased Challenge?

    PubMed Central

    AbdElgawad, Hamada; Zinta, Gaurav; Beemster, Gerrit T. S.; Janssens, Ivan A.; Asard, Han

    2016-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 can stimulate plant growth by providing additional C (fertilization effect), and is observed to mitigate abiotic stress impact. Although, the mechanisms underlying the stress mitigating effect are not yet clear, increased antioxidant defenses, have been held primarily responsible (antioxidant hypothesis). A systematic literature analysis, including “all” papers [Web of Science (WoS)-cited], addressing elevated CO2 effects on abiotic stress responses and antioxidants (105 papers), confirms the frequent occurrence of the stress mitigation effect. However, it also demonstrates that, in stress conditions, elevated CO2 is reported to increase antioxidants, only in about 22% of the observations (e.g., for polyphenols, peroxidases, superoxide dismutase, monodehydroascorbate reductase). In most observations, under stress and elevated CO2 the levels of key antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes are reported to remain unchanged (50%, e.g., ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, ascorbate), or even decreased (28%, e.g., glutathione peroxidase). Moreover, increases in antioxidants are not specific for a species group, growth facility, or stress type. It seems therefore unlikely that increased antioxidant defense is the major mechanism underlying CO2-mediated stress impact mitigation. Alternative processes, probably decreasing the oxidative challenge by reducing ROS production (e.g., photorespiration), are therefore likely to play important roles in elevated CO2 (relaxation hypothesis). Such parameters are however rarely investigated in connection with abiotic stress relief. Understanding the effect of elevated CO2 on plant growth and stress responses is imperative to understand the impact of climate changes on plant productivity. PMID:27200030

  6. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on leaf dark respiration of Xanthium strumarium in light and in darkness.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lewis, J D; Tissue, D T; Seemann, J R; Griffin, K L

    2001-02-27

    Leaf dark respiration (R) is an important component of plant carbon balance, but the effects of rising atmospheric CO(2) on leaf R during illumination are largely unknown. We studied the effects of elevated CO(2) on leaf R in light (R(L)) and in darkness (R(D)) in Xanthium strumarium at different developmental stages. Leaf R(L) was estimated by using the Kok method, whereas leaf R(D) was measured as the rate of CO(2) efflux at zero light. Leaf R(L) and R(D) were significantly higher at elevated than at ambient CO(2) throughout the growing period. Elevated CO(2) increased the ratio of leaf R(L) to net photosynthesis at saturated light (A(max)) when plants were young and also after flowering, but the ratio of leaf R(D) to A(max) was unaffected by CO(2) levels. Leaf R(N) was significantly higher at the beginning but significantly lower at the end of the growing period in elevated CO(2)-grown plants. The ratio of leaf R(L) to R(D) was used to estimate the effect of light on leaf R during the day. We found that light inhibited leaf R at both CO(2) concentrations but to a lesser degree for elevated (17-24%) than for ambient (29-35%) CO(2)-grown plants, presumably because elevated CO(2)-grown plants had a higher demand for energy and carbon skeletons than ambient CO(2)-grown plants in light. Our results suggest that using the CO(2) efflux rate, determined by shading leaves during the day, as a measure for leaf R is likely to underestimate carbon loss from elevated CO(2)-grown plants. PMID:11226264

  7. Predicting the effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on catchment carbon and water fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohue, R. J.; Roderick, M. L.; McVicar, T.; Farquhar, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic activities are increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Among the many observed and expected impacts of this on our climate and biosphere, one is the so-called CO2 fertilisation effect. In this effect the efficiency with which vegetation can acquire carbon relative to its water use increases proportionally with CO2 concentration, and this biological response has implications for both carbon and water balances. Despite considerable research into the impacts of CO2 fertilisation, there is still uncertainty on the catchment scale response of vegetation to elevated CO2. Here we present a simple, conceptually based, generic model for quantifying how CO2 fertilisation affects the structure, water use and productivity of vegetation. Using this new Carbon Use Efficiency (CUE) model we can account for Free Air Carbon Enrichment (FACE) experimental results from a diverse range of sites. We use the CUE model to estimate the effect of the ~18% rise in CO2 over the past three decades on the globe's vegetation cover, and transpiration and carbon assimilation rates.

  8. Quantifying Direct and Indirect Effects of Elevated CO2 on Ecosystem Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatichi, S.; Leuzinger, S.; Paschalis, A.; Donnellan-Barraclough, A.; Hovenden, M. J.; Langley, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide are expected to affect carbon assimilation, evapotranspiration (ET) and ultimately plant growth. Direct leaf biochemical effects have been widely investigated, while indirect effects, although documented, are very difficult to quantify in experiments. We hypothesize that the interaction of direct and indirect effects is a possible reason for conflicting results concerning the magnitude of CO2 fertilization effects across different climates and ecosystems. A mechanistic ecohydrological model (Tethys-Chloris) is used to investigate the relative contribution of direct (through plant physiology) and indirect (via stomatal closure and thus soil moisture, and changes in Leaf Area Index, LAI) effects of elevated CO2 across a number of ecosystems. We specifically ask in which ecosystems and climate indirect effects are expected to be largest. Data and boundary conditions from flux-towers and free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments are used to force the model and evaluate its performance. Numerical results suggest that indirect effects of elevated CO2, through water savings and increased LAI, are very significant and sometimes larger than direct effects. Indirect effects tend to be considerably larger in water-limited ecosystems, while direct effects correlate positively with mean air temperature. Increasing CO2 from 375 to 550 ppm causes a total effect on Net Primary Production in the order of 15 to 40% and on ET from 0 to -8%, depending on climate and ecosystem type. The total CO2 effect has a significant negative correlation with the wetness index and positive correlation with vapor pressure deficit. These results provide a more general mechanistic understanding of relatively short-term (less than 20 years) implications of elevated CO2 on ecosystem response and suggest plausible magnitudes for the expected changes.

  9. Defoliation reduces soil biota - and modifies stimulating effects of elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Dam, Marie; Christensen, Søren

    2015-11-01

    To understand the responses to external disturbance such as defoliation and possible feedback mechanisms at global change in terrestrial ecosystems, it is necessary to examine the extent and nature of effects on aboveground-belowground interactions. We studied a temperate heathland system subjected to experimental climate and atmospheric factors based on prognoses for year 2075 and further exposed to defoliation. By defoliating plants, we were able to study how global change modifies the interactions of the plant-soil system. Shoot production, root biomass, microbial biomass, and nematode abundance were assessed in the rhizosphere of manually defoliated patches of Deschampsia flexuosa in June in a full-factorial FACE experiment with the treatments: increased atmospheric CO 2, increased nighttime temperatures, summer droughts, and all of their combinations. We found a negative effect of defoliation on microbial biomass that was not apparently affected by global change. The negative effect of defoliation cascades through to soil nematodes as dependent on CO 2 and drought. At ambient CO 2, drought and defoliation each reduced nematodes. In contrast, at elevated CO 2, a combination of drought and defoliation was needed to reduce nematodes. We found positive effects of CO 2 on root density and microbial biomass. Defoliation affected soil biota negatively, whereas elevated CO 2 stimulated the plant-soil system. This effect seen in June is contrasted by the effects seen in September at the same site. Late season defoliation increased activity and biomass of soil biota and more so at elevated CO 2. Based on soil biota responses, plants defoliated in active growth therefore conserve resources, whereas defoliation after termination of growth results in release of resources. This result challenges the idea that plants via exudation of organic carbon stimulate their rhizosphere biota when in apparent need of nutrients for growth. PMID:26640664

  10. Phytochemical changes in leaves of subtropical grasses and fynbos shrubs at elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattas, D.; Stock, W. D.; Mabusela, W. T.; Green, I. R.

    2005-07-01

    The effects of elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations on plant polyphenolic, tannin, nitrogen, phosphorus and total nonstructural carbohydrate concentrations were investigated in leaves of subtropical grass and fynbos shrub species. The hypothesis tested was that carbon-based secondary compounds would increase when carbon gain is in excess of growth requirements. This premise was tested in two ecosystems involving plants with different photosynthetic mechanisms and growth strategies. The first ecosystem comprised grasses from a C 4-dominated, subtropical grassland, where three plots were subjected to three different free air CO 2 enrichment treatments, i.e., elevated (600 to 800 μmol mol -1), intermediate (400 μmol mol -1) and ambient atmospheric CO 2. One of the seven grass species, Alloteropsis semialata, had a C 3 photosynthetic pathway while the other grasses were all C 4. The second ecosystem was simulated in a microcosm experiment where three fynbos species were grown in open-top chambers at ambient and 700 μmol mol -1 atmospheric CO 2 in low nutrient acid sands typical of south western coastal and mountain fynbos ecosystems. Results showed that polyphenolics and tannins did not increase in the grass species under elevated CO 2 and only in Leucadendron laureolum among the fynbos species. Similarly, foliar nitrogen content of grasses was largely unaffected by elevated CO 2, and among the fynbos species, only L. laureolum and Leucadendron xanthoconus showed changes in foliar nitrogen content under elevated CO 2, but these were of different magnitude. The overall decrease in nitrogen and phosphorus and consequent increase in C:N and C:P ratio in both ecosystems, along with the increase in polyphenolics and tannins in L. laureolum in the fynbos ecosystem, may negatively affect forage quality and decomposition rates. It is concluded that fast growing grasses do not experience sink limitation and invest extra carbon into growth rather than polyphenolics and

  11. Study type and plant litter identity modulating the response of litter decomposition to warming, elevated CO2, and elevated O3: A meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Kai; Peng, Changhui; Yang, Wanqin; Peng, Yan; Fang, Junmin; Wu, Fuzhong

    2015-03-01

    Plant litter decomposition is one of the most important ecosystem carbon flux processes in terrestrial ecosystems and is usually regarded as sensitive to climate change. The goal of the present study was to examine the effects of changing climate variables on litter decomposition. By synthesizing data from multiple terrestrial ecosystems, we quantified the response of the litter decomposition rate to the independent effects of warming, elevated carbon dioxide (CO2), elevated ozone (O3), and the combined effects of elevated CO2 + elevated O3. Across all case studies, warming increased the litter decomposition rate significantly by 4.4%, but this effect could be reduced as a result of the negatively significant effects of elevated CO2 and elevated CO2 + elevated O3. The combined effects of elevated CO2 + elevated O3 decreased the litter decomposition rate significantly, and the magnitude appeared to be higher than that of the elevated CO2 per se. Moreover, the study type (field versus laboratory), ecosystem type, and plant litter identity and functional traits (growth form and litter form) were all important moderators regulating the response of litter decomposition to climate warming and elevated CO2 and O3. Although litter decomposition rate may show a moderate change as a result of the effects of multiple changing climate variables, the process of litter decomposition would be strongly altered due to the differing mechanisms of the effects of each climate change variable, suggesting that the global carbon cycle and biogeochemistry could be substantially affected.

  12. Positive feedback between increasing atmospheric CO2 and ecosystem productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, I.; Hamilton, S. K.; Robertson, G. P.

    2009-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 will likely affect both the hydrologic cycle and ecosystem productivity. Current assumptions that increasing CO2 will lead to increased ecosystem productivity and plant water use efficiency (WUE) are driving optimistic predictions of higher crop yields as well as greater availability of freshwater resources due to a decrease in evapotranspiration. The plant physiological response that drives these effects is believed to be an increase in carbon uptake either by (a) stronger CO2 gradient between the stomata and the atmosphere, or by (b) reduced CO2 limitation of enzymatic carboxylation within the leaf. The (a) scenario will lead to increased water use efficiency (WUE) in plants. However, evidence for increased WUE is mostly based on modeling studies, and experiments producing a short duration or step-wise increase in CO2 concentration (e.g. free-air CO2 enrichment). We hypothesize that the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration is having a positive effect on ecosystem productivity and WUE. To investigate this hypothesis, we analyzed meteorological, ANPP, and soil CO2 flux datasets together with carbon isotopic ratio (13C/12C) of archived plant samples from the long term ecological research (LTER) program at Kellogg Biological Station. The datasets were collected between 1989 and 2007 (corresponding to an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration of ~33 ppmv at Mauna Loa). Wheat (Triticum aestivum) samples taken from 1989 and 2007 show a significant decrease in the C isotope discrimination factor (Δ) over time. Stomatal conductance is directly related to Δ, and thus Δ is inversely related to plant intrinsic WUE (iWUE). Historical changes in the 13C/12C ratio (δ13C) in samples of a perennial forb, Canada goldenrod (Solidago canadensis), taken from adjacent successional fields, indicate changes in Δ upon uptake of CO2 as well. These temporal trends in Δ suggest a positive feedback between the increasing CO2 concentration in the

  13. CO2 enrichment increases carbon and nitrogen input from fine roots in a deciduous forest.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Colleen M; Ledford, Joanne; Norby, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    * Greater fine-root production under elevated [CO2] may increase the input of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) to the soil profile because fine root populations turn over quickly in forested ecosystems. * Here, the effect of elevated [CO)] was assessed on root biomass and N inputs at several soil depths by combining a long-term minirhizotron dataset with continuous, root-specific measurements of root mass and [N]. The experiment was conducted in a CO(2)-enriched sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) plantation. * CO2) enrichment had no effect on root tissue density or [N] within a given diameter class. Root biomass production and standing crop were doubled under elevated [CO2]. Though fine-root turnover declined under elevated [CO2], fine-root mortality was also nearly doubled under CO2 enrichment. Over 9 yr, root mortality resulted in 681 g m(-2) of extra C and 9 g m(-2) of extra N input to the soil system under elevated [CO2]. At least half of these inputs were below 30 cm soil depth. * Increased C and N input to the soil under CO2 enrichment, especially below 30 cm depth, might alter soil C storage and N mineralization. Future research should focus on quantifying root decomposition dynamics and C and N mineralization deeper in the soil. PMID:18537885

  14. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on the nutrient uptake characteristics of Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi).

    PubMed

    Shinano, Takuro; Yamamoto, Takuya; Tawaraya, Keitaro; Tadokoro, Masaru; Koike, Takayoshi; Osaki, Mitsuru

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the response of Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi Sieb. & Zucc.) to elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration ([CO(2)]) (689 +/- 75 ppm in 2002 and 697 +/- 90 ppm in 2003) over 2 years in a field experiment with open-top chambers. Root activity was assessed as nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium uptake rates estimated from successive measurements of absorbed amounts. Dry matter production of whole plants was unaffected by elevated [CO(2)] in the first year of treatment, but increased significantly in response to elevated [CO(2)] in the second year. In contrast, elevated [CO(2)] increased the root to shoot ratio and fine root dry mass in the first year, but not in the second year. Elevated [CO(2)] had no effect on tissue N, P and K concentrations. Uptake rates of N, P and K correlated with whole-plant relative growth rates, but were unaffected by growth [CO(2)], as was ectomycorrhizal colonization, a factor assumed to be important for nutrient uptake in trees. We conclude that improved growth of Larix kaempferi in response to elevated [CO(2)] is accompanied by increased root biomass, but not by increased root activity. PMID:17169911

  15. Changes in life history parameters of Rhopalosiphum maidis (Homoptera: Aphididae) under four different elevated temperature and CO2 combinations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haicui; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Wenqiang; Wang, Zhenying; Ni, Xinzhi; Cai, Wanzhi; He, Kanglai

    2014-08-01

    Biological characteristics of corn leaf aphid, Rhopalosiphum maidis (Fitch), on barley, Hordeum vulgare L., were examined for two generations under four different elevated temperature and CO2 combinations. The developmental duration for each life stage was significantly reduced under the elevated temperature (+4 degrees C). The elevated CO2 (700-750 microl/liter) reduced only the development time of fourth-instar nymph. The overall duration of nymphal stage was reduced in the second generation. Thus, the temperature was the dominant factor to development duration of corn leaf aphid. The fecundity of corn leaf aphid was significantly increased under the elevated temperature and CO2, as well as in the later generation. Elevated temperature and CO2 increased the number of alate production, which may enhance the aphid migration or dispersal and the spread of plant viruses. Corn leaf aphid had the highest intrinsic rate of increase under the elevated temperature and CO2 combination in the second generation. These results indicate that the combined effects of both elevated temperature and CO2 on aphid biology may exacerbate aphid damage on barley under the climate change in accompany with elevated temperature and CO2 level. PMID:25195429

  16. A field experiment with elevated atmospheric CO2-mediated changes to C4 crop-herbivore interactions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haicui; Liu, Kaiqiang; Sun, Dandan; Wang, Zhenying; Lu, Xin; He, Kanglai

    2015-01-01

    The effects of elevated CO2 (E-CO2) on maize and Asian corn borer (ACB), Ostrinia furnacalis, in open-top chambers were studied. The plants were infested with ACB and exposed to ambient and elevated (550 and 750 μl/l) CO2. E-CO2 increased the plant height and kernel number per ear. The plants had lower nitrogen contents and higher TNC: N ratios under E-CO2 than at ambient CO2. The response of plant height to E-CO2 was significantly dampened in plants with ACB infestation. However, the weight gain of the survivors declined in plants grown under E-CO2. Moreover, the plant damage caused by ACB was not different among the treatments. Overwintering larvae developed under E-CO2 had a lower supercooling point than those developed under ambient CO2. The results indicated that there was a positive effect of E-CO2 on the accumulation of maize biomass, i.e., the "air-fertilizer" effect, which led to a nutritional deficiency in the plants. The fitness-related parameters of ACB were adversely affected by the CO2-mediated decreased in plant nutritional quality, and ACB might alter its food consumption to compensate for these changes. Larval damage to maize under E-CO2 appears to be offset by this "air-fertilizer" effect, with reductions in larval fitness. PMID:26381457

  17. A field experiment with elevated atmospheric CO2-mediated changes to C4 crop-herbivore interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Haicui; Liu, Kaiqiang; Sun, Dandan; Wang, Zhenying; Lu, Xin; He, Kanglai

    2015-09-01

    The effects of elevated CO2 (E-CO2) on maize and Asian corn borer (ACB), Ostrinia furnacalis, in open-top chambers were studied. The plants were infested with ACB and exposed to ambient and elevated (550 and 750 μl/l) CO2. E-CO2 increased the plant height and kernel number per ear. The plants had lower nitrogen contents and higher TNC: N ratios under E-CO2 than at ambient CO2. The response of plant height to E-CO2 was significantly dampened in plants with ACB infestation. However, the weight gain of the survivors declined in plants grown under E-CO2. Moreover, the plant damage caused by ACB was not different among the treatments. Overwintering larvae developed under E-CO2 had a lower supercooling point than those developed under ambient CO2. The results indicated that there was a positive effect of E-CO2 on the accumulation of maize biomass, i.e., the “air-fertilizer” effect, which led to a nutritional deficiency in the plants. The fitness-related parameters of ACB were adversely affected by the CO2-mediated decreased in plant nutritional quality, and ACB might alter its food consumption to compensate for these changes. Larval damage to maize under E-CO2 appears to be offset by this “air-fertilizer” effect, with reductions in larval fitness.

  18. A field experiment with elevated atmospheric CO2-mediated changes to C4 crop-herbivore interactions

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Haicui; Liu, Kaiqiang; Sun, Dandan; Wang, Zhenying; Lu, Xin; He, Kanglai

    2015-01-01

    The effects of elevated CO2 (E-CO2) on maize and Asian corn borer (ACB), Ostrinia furnacalis, in open-top chambers were studied. The plants were infested with ACB and exposed to ambient and elevated (550 and 750 μl/l) CO2. E-CO2 increased the plant height and kernel number per ear. The plants had lower nitrogen contents and higher TNC: N ratios under E-CO2 than at ambient CO2. The response of plant height to E-CO2 was significantly dampened in plants with ACB infestation. However, the weight gain of the survivors declined in plants grown under E-CO2. Moreover, the plant damage caused by ACB was not different among the treatments. Overwintering larvae developed under E-CO2 had a lower supercooling point than those developed under ambient CO2. The results indicated that there was a positive effect of E-CO2 on the accumulation of maize biomass, i.e., the “air-fertilizer” effect, which led to a nutritional deficiency in the plants. The fitness-related parameters of ACB were adversely affected by the CO2-mediated decreased in plant nutritional quality, and ACB might alter its food consumption to compensate for these changes. Larval damage to maize under E-CO2 appears to be offset by this “air-fertilizer” effect, with reductions in larval fitness. PMID:26381457

  19. Impact of increasing atmospheric co2 on carbon dynamics under different tillage practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration may impact production agriculture=s role in sequestering carbon (C). A 10-year study compared the effects of elevated CO2 on two cropping systems (conventional tillage and no-tillage). The experiment was a split-plot design replicated three times with these c...

  20. Harvesting Duke FACE: improving estimates of productivity and biomass under elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, H. R.; Oren, R.; Kim, D.; Tor-ngern, P.; Johnsen, K. H.; Maier, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Free air CO2 enrichment experiments (FACE) have greatly advanced our knowledge on the impacts of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations in developing and mature ecosystems. These experiments have provided years of data on changes in physiology and ecosystem functions, such as photosynthesis, water use, net primary productivity (NPP), ecosystem carbon storage, and nutrient cycling. As these experiments come to a close, there has also been the opportunity to add critically lacking biometric data, which can be obtained only through destructive measurements. After 15 years of CO2 elevation at the Duke Forest FACE, a 28 year old pine plantation with a hardwood understory, a vast array of biometric data was obtained through harvesting of >1150 trees in both elevated and ambient CO2 plots. Harvested trees included pines and hardwoods, understory and overstory trees. The harvest provided direct assessments of leaf, stem and branch biomass, as well as the vertical distribution of these masses. In combination with leaf and wood level properties (e.g. specific leaf area, wood density), it was possible to explore potential CO2 effects on allometric relationships between plant parts, and stem and canopy shape and distribution. Although stimulatory effects of elevated CO2 on NPP are well established in this forest (averaging 27%), harvest results thus far indicate few changes in basic allometric relationships, such as height-diameter relationships, proportion of mass contained in different plant parts (stems vs. leaves vs. branches), distribution of leaves within the canopy and stem shape. The coupling of site-specific biometric relationships with long-term data on tree growth and mortality will reduce current sources of uncertainty in estimates of NPP and carbon storage under future increased CO2 conditions. Recent efforts in data-model synthesis have demonstrated the critical need for such data as constraints and initial values in ecosystem and earth system models; these

  1. Will chemical defenses become more effective against specialist herbivores under elevated CO2?

    PubMed

    Landosky, John M; Karowe, David N

    2014-10-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 is known to affect plant-insect herbivore interactions. Elevated CO2 causes leaf nitrogen to decrease, the ostensible cause of herbivore compensatory feeding. CO2 may also affect herbivore consumption by altering chemical defenses via changes in plant hormones. We considered the effects of elevated CO2, in conjunction with soil fertility and damage (simulated herbivory), on glucosinolate concentrations of mustard (Brassica nigra) and collard (B. oleracea var. acephala) and the effects of leaf nitrogen and glucosinolate groups on specialist Pieris rapae consumption. Elevated CO2 affected B. oleracea but not B. nigra glucosinolates; responses to soil fertility and damage were also species-specific. Soil fertility and damage also affected B. oleracea glucosinolates differently under elevated CO2. Glucosinolates did not affect P. rapae consumption at either CO2 concentration in B. nigra, but had CO2-specific effects on consumption in B. oleracea. At ambient CO2, leaf nitrogen had strong effects on glucosinolate concentrations and P. rapae consumption but only gluconasturtiin was a feeding stimulant. At elevated CO2, direct effects of leaf nitrogen were weaker, but glucosinolates had stronger effects on consumption. Gluconasturtiin and aliphatic glucosinolates were feeding stimulants and indole glucosinolates were feeding deterrents. These results do not support the compensatory feeding hypothesis as the sole driver of changes in P. rapae consumption under elevated CO2. Support for hormone-mediated CO2 response (HMCR) was mixed; it explained few treatment effects on constitutive or induced glucosinolates, but did explain patterns in SEMs. Further, the novel feeding deterrent effect of indole glucosinolates under elevated CO2 in B. oleracae underscores the importance of defensive chemistry in CO2 response. We speculate that P. rapae indole glucosinolate detoxification mechanisms may have been overwhelmed under elevated CO2 forcing slowed

  2. Elevated CO2 and phosphate limitation favor Micromonas pusilla through stimulated growth and reduced viral impact.

    PubMed

    Maat, Douwe S; Crawfurd, Katherine J; Timmermans, Klaas R; Brussaard, Corina P D

    2014-05-01

    Growth and viral infection of the marine picoeukaryote Micromonas pusilla was studied under a future-ocean scenario of elevated partial CO2 (pCO2; 750 μatm versus the present-day 370 μatm) and simultaneous limitation of phosphorus (P). Independent of the pCO2 level, the ratios of M. pusilla cellular carbon (C) to nitrogen (N), C:P and N:P, increased with increasing P stress. Furthermore, in the P-limited chemostats at growth rates of 0.32 and 0.97 of the maximum growth rate (μmax), the supply of elevated pCO2 led to an additional rise in cellular C:N and C:P ratios, as well as a 1.4-fold increase in M. pusilla abundance. Viral lysis was not affected by pCO2, but P limitation led to a 150% prolongation of the latent period (6 to 12 h) and an 80% reduction in viral burst sizes (63 viruses per cell) compared to P-replete conditions (4 to 8 h latent period and burst size of 320). Growth at 0.32 μmax further prolonged the latent period by another 150% (12 to 18 h). Thus, enhanced P stress due to climate change-induced strengthened vertical stratification can be expected to lead to reduced and delayed virus production in picoeukaryotes. This effect is tempered, but likely not counteracted, by the increase in cell abundance under elevated pCO2. Although the influence of potential P-limitation-relieving factors, such as the uptake of organic P and P utilization during infection, is unclear, our current results suggest that when P limitation prevails in future oceans, picoeukaryotes and grazing will be favored over larger-sized phytoplankton and viral lysis, with increased matter and nutrient flow to higher trophic levels. PMID:24610859

  3. Effect of elevated CO2 on the community metabolism of an experimental coral reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langdon, C.; Broecker, W.; Hammond, D.; Glenn, E.; Fitzsimmons, K.; Nelson, S. G.; Peng, T.-S.; Hadjas, I.; Bonani, G.

    2003-04-01

    The effect of elevated pCO_2 on the metabolism of a coral reef community dominated by macroalgae has been investigated utilizing the large 2650 m^3 coral reef mesocosm at the Biosphere-2 facility near Tucson, Arizona. The carbonate chemistry of the water was manipulated to simulate present day and a doubled CO_2 future condition. Each experiment consisted of a 1-2 month preconditioning period followed by a 7-9 day observational period. The pCO_2 was 404om63 μatm during the present day pCO_2 experiment and 658±59 µatm during the elevated pCO_2 experiment. Nutrient levels were low and typical of natural reefs waters (NO_3^- 0.5-0.9 μM, NH_4^+ 0.4 μM, PO_43- 0.07-0.09 μM). The temperature and salinity of the water were held constant at 26.5±0.2^oC and 34.4±0.2 ppt. Photosynthetically available irradiance was 10±2 during the present day experiment and 7.4±0.5 mol photons m-2 d-1 during the elevated pCO_2 experiment. The primary producer biomass in the mesocosm was dominated by four species of macroalgae; Haptilon cubense, Amphiroa fragillisima, Gelidiopsis intricata and Chondria dasyphylla. Algal biomass was 10.4 mol C m-2 during the present day and 8.7 mol C m-2 and during the elevated pCO2 experiments. As previously observed, the increase in pCO_2 resulted in a decrease in calcification from 0.041± 0.007 to 0.006 ± 0.003 mol CaCO_3 m-2 d-1. Net community production (NCP) and dark respiration did not change in response to elevated pCO_2. Light respiration measured by a new radiocarbon isotope dilution method exceeded dark respiration by a factor of 1.2±0.3 to 2.1±0.4 on a daily basis and by 2.2±0.6 to 3.9±0.8 on an hourly basis. The 1.8-fold increase with increasing pCO2 indicates that the enhanced respiration in the light was not due to photorespiration. Gross production (GPP) computed as the sum of NCP plus daily respiration (light+dark) increased significantly (0.24±0.03 vs. 0.32±0.04 mol C m-2 d-1). However, the conventional calculation of GPP

  4. Increases in atmospheric CO2 have little influence on transpiration of a temperate forest canopy.

    PubMed

    Tor-ngern, Pantana; Oren, Ram; Ward, Eric J; Palmroth, Sari; McCarthy, Heather R; Domec, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Models of forest energy, water and carbon cycles assume decreased stomatal conductance with elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) based on leaf-scale measurements, a response not directly translatable to canopies. Where canopy-atmosphere are well-coupled, [CO2 ]-induced structural changes, such as increasing leaf-area index (LD), may cause, or compensate for, reduced mean canopy stomatal conductance (GS), keeping transpiration (EC) and, hence, runoff unaltered. We investigated GS responses to increasing [CO2] of conifer and broadleaved trees in a temperate forest subjected to 17-yr free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE; + 200 μmol mol(-1)). During the final phase of the experiment, we employed step changes of [CO2] in four elevated-[CO2 ] plots, separating direct response to changing [CO2] in the leaf-internal air-space from indirect effects of slow changes via leaf hydraulic adjustments and canopy development. Short-term manipulations caused no direct response up to 1.8 × ambient [CO2], suggesting that the observed long-term 21% reduction of GS was an indirect effect of decreased leaf hydraulic conductance and increased leaf shading. Thus, EC was unaffected by [CO2] because 19% higher canopy LD nullified the effect of leaf hydraulic acclimation on GS . We advocate long-term experiments of duration sufficient for slow responses to manifest, and modifying models predicting forest water, energy and carbon cycles accordingly. PMID:25346045

  5. Root and shoot performance of Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to elevated CO2: A physiologic, metabolic and transcriptomic response.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Iván; Aparicio-Tejo, Pedro M; Avila, Concepción; Rueda-López, Marina; Aranjuelo, Iker

    2015-09-15

    The responsiveness of C3 plants to raised atmospheric [CO2] levels has been frequently described as constrained by photosynthetic downregulation. The main goal of the current study was to characterize the shoot-root relationship and its implications in plant responsiveness under elevated [CO2] conditions. For this purpose, Arabidopsis thaliana plants were exposed to elevated [CO2] (800ppm versus 400ppm [CO2]) and fertilized with a mixed (NH4NO3) nitrogen source. Plant growth, physiology, metabolite and transcriptomic characterizations were carried out at the root and shoot levels. Plant growth under elevated [CO2] conditions was doubled due to increased photosynthetic rates and gas exchange measurements revealed that these plants maintain higher photosynthetic rates over extended periods of time. This positive response of photosynthetic rates to elevated [CO2] was caused by the maintenance of leaf protein and Rubisco concentrations at control levels alongside enhanced energy efficiency. The increased levels of leaf carbohydrates, organic acids and amino acids supported the augmented respiration rates of plants under elevated [CO2]. A transcriptomic analysis allowed the identification of photoassimilate allocation and remobilization as fundamental process used by the plants to maintain the outstanding photosynthetic performance. Moreover, based on the relationship between plant carbon status and hormone functioning, the transcriptomic analyses provided an explanation of why phenology accelerates under elevated [CO2] conditions. PMID:26519814

  6. Experimental Evidence Linking Elevated CO2, Rhizosphere C/N Stoichiometry and Microbial Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, Y.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Pendall, E.; LeCain, D. R.; Morgan, J.

    2012-12-01

    Soil C storage is a keystone of the global response to climate change. What the relationship between the efficiency of microbial decomposers and soil C storage is, and how changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and nutrient availability will affect this relationship is not understood. Although mechanisms are elusive, there is increased recognition of the importance of the plant rhizosphere in mediating ecosystem-scale impacts of climate change. We investigated the impact of elevated CO2 (eCO2), soil N availability and root tissue stoichiometry on microbial use of soil C. Starting from seed, we grew a temperate grass in its native soil, under 13C labelled ambient and eCO2 atmospheres. This approach enabled us to assess incorporation of plant-derived and native soil organic matter (SOM) C into microbes, dissolved organic C (DOC) and respiration via isotopic partitioning. N availability was modified via alteration of root tissue stoichiometry (with foliar N application) and direct N addition to soil. Microbial communities were assessed with phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA). eCO2 increased the respiration of plant-derived C, but decreased CO2production from SOM. This was accompanied by an increase in the SOM-derived microbial C, so that the amount of SOM-derived CO2 per unit of microbial C decreased with eCO2 (lower metabolic quotient, an index of microbial efficiency). SOM-derived microbial C was strongly and negatively related to the pool of SOM-derived DOC, supporting enhanced use of this C source. Together, these results indicate that eCO2 led to an increase in size and efficiency of the microbial populations utilizing SOM-C. Increased grazing, as indicated by more abundant PLFA markers of protozoa under eCO2, may have lowered maintenance-associated respiration, thus increasing efficiency. Greater plant inputs with eCO2 may have provided readily available C for labile-C consuming microbes, thus reducing competitive pressure on SOM-consuming populations, who are

  7. Impact of elevated CO2 levels on control of purple and yellow nutsedge with glyphosate and halosulfuron

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) have been steadily rising each year and are expected to continue increasing in the future which could have a significant impact on agricultural production. Previous research has shown that elevated CO2 increases the growth and yield of most plant sp...

  8. Potential of Microbes to Increase Geologic CO2 Storage Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, R.; Mitchell, A. C.; Ebigbo, A.; Phillips, A.; Cunningham, A. B.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into underground formations such as brine aquifers where microbe-rock-fluid interactions will occur. These interactions may be important for the long-term fate of the injected CO2. Concepts and results will be presented from bench to meso-scale experiments focusing on the utility of attached microorganisms and biofilms to enhance storage security of injected CO2, via mineral-trapping, solubility trapping, formation trapping, and leakage reduction. Batch and flow experiments at atmospheric and geologic CO2 storage-relevant pressures have demonstrated the ability of microbial biofilms to decrease the permeability of natural and artificial porous media, survive the exposure to scCO2, and facilitate the conversion of CO2 into long-term stable carbonate phases as well as increase the solubility of CO2 in brines. Recent work has focused on small and large scale (75 cm diameter, 38 cm high sandstone) radial flow systems as well as the molecular characterization and isolation of microbes from geologic carbon sequestration-relevant environments. Methods for microscopic and macroscopic visualization of relevant processes from the pore to the bulk scale are being developed and have been proven to be essential tools in establishing the necessary understanding to increase CO2 storage security. As a result, reactive transport models describing the influence of biological processes on CO2 storage security have been developed and are continuously being modified to include relevant processes.

  9. Changes to Extractable Soil Amino Compounds Under Elevated CO2 and Ozone in an Aspen Plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Top, S. M.; Filley, T. R.; Zhang, X.

    2011-12-01

    Forests growing under elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and ozone exhibit changes to root and foliar chemistry and quality that are related to changes in physiology, N limitation, and leaf damage. Additionally, there are documented changes to the activity of some understory invertebrate populations, and a variety of responses to soil organic matter ranging from accrual in the upper few centimeters to loss of soil C and N over the upper 20 cm. Under such conditions, however, the cycling of specific amino compounds is poorly understood. Knowledge of the role that new plant N plays in supporting soil microbial populations and soil C and N dynamics is important to fully understand relationships between N limitation under elevated CO2-induced productivity increases and available organic N pools in soil. We investigated the composition and concentration of hydrolysable amino compounds (amino acids and amino sugars) in litter, roots, soil, and earthworm fecal matter from the free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) sites at Rhinelander, WI. Under elevated CO2 amino acids, when normalized to total N, exhibited change in both amount (decrease) and composition among roots (<2mm) with depth over the upper 25 cm, however, root amino acids showed only minor changes with depth in the ambient and ozone treatments. Ozonated rings exhibited a lower release of amino compounds (with respect to total N) compared to ambient and elevated CO2, which may suggest poorer quality input. For soil organic matter extractable amino acids (normalized to total soil N) exhibited changes similar to roots among the treatment. These results indicate that CO2 and ozone significantly influence amino compound dynamics in both soil and input which should impact the overall ability to decompose and preserve soils in such environments.

  10. [Effects of drought stress, high temperature and elevated CO2 concentration on the growth of winter wheat].

    PubMed

    Si, Fu-Yan; Qiao, Yun-Zhou; Jiang, Jing-Wei; Dong, Bao-Di; Shi, Chang-Hai; Liu, Meng-Yu

    2014-09-01

    The impacts of climate change on the grain yield, photosynthesis, and water conditions of winter wheat were assessed based on an experiment, in which wheat plants were subjected to ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations, ambient and elevated temperatures, and low and high water conditions independently and in combination. The CO2 enrichment alone had no effect on the photosynthesis of winter wheat, whereas higher temperature and drought significantly decreased the photosynthetic rate. Water conditions in flag leaves were not significantly changed at the elevated CO2 concentration or elevated temperature. However, drought stress decreased the relative water content in flag leaves, and the combination of elevated temperature and drought reduced the water potential in flag leaves. The combination of elevated CO2 concentration, elevated temperature, and drought significantly reduced the photosynthetic rate and water conditions, and led to a 41.4% decrease in grain yield. The elevated CO2 concentration alone increased the grain yield by 21.2%, whereas the elevated temperature decreased the grain yield by 12.3%. The grain yield was not affected by the combination of elevated CO2 concentration and temperature, but the grain yield was significantly decreased by the drought stress if combined with any of the climate scenarios applied in this study. These findings suggested that maintaining high soil water content might be a vital means of reducing the potential harm caused by the climate change. PMID:25757312

  11. Interactive effects of salinity and elevated CO2 levels on juvenile eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Gary H; Ivanina, Anna V; Matoo, Omera B; Pörtner, Hans O; Lannig, Gisela; Bock, Christian; Beniash, Elia; Sokolova, Inna M

    2012-01-01

    Rising levels of atmospheric CO(2) lead to acidification of the ocean and alter seawater carbonate chemistry, which can negatively impact calcifying organisms, including mollusks. In estuaries, exposure to elevated CO(2) levels often co-occurs with other stressors, such as reduced salinity, which enhances the acidification trend, affects ion and acid-base regulation of estuarine calcifiers and modifies their response to ocean acidification. We studied the interactive effects of salinity and partial pressure of CO(2) (P(CO2)) on biomineralization and energy homeostasis in juveniles of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, a common estuarine bivalve. Juveniles were exposed for 11 weeks to one of two environmentally relevant salinities (30 or 15 PSU) either at current atmospheric P(CO2) (∼400 μatm, normocapnia) or P(CO2) projected by moderate IPCC scenarios for the year 2100 (∼700-800 μatm, hypercapnia). Exposure of the juvenile oysters to elevated P(CO2) and/or low salinity led to a significant increase in mortality, reduction of tissue energy stores (glycogen and lipid) and negative soft tissue growth, indicating energy deficiency. Interestingly, tissue ATP levels were not affected by exposure to changing salinity and P(CO2), suggesting that juvenile oysters maintain their cellular energy status at the expense of lipid and glycogen stores. At the same time, no compensatory upregulation of carbonic anhydrase activity was found under the conditions of low salinity and high P(CO2). Metabolic profiling using magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed altered metabolite status following low salinity exposure; specifically, acetate levels were lower in hypercapnic than in normocapnic individuals at low salinity. Combined exposure to hypercapnia and low salinity negatively affected mechanical properties of shells of the juveniles, resulting in reduced hardness and fracture resistance. Thus, our data suggest that the combined effects of elevated P(CO2) and

  12. Biomass Production Potential of a Wastewater Alga Chlorella vulgaris ARC 1 under Elevated Levels of CO2 and Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Chinnasamy, Senthil; Ramakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Bhatnagar, Ashish; Das, Keshav C.

    2009-01-01

    The growth response of Chlorella vulgaris was studied under varying concentrations of carbon dioxide (ranging from 0.036 to 20%) and temperature (30, 40 and 50°C). The highest chlorophyll concentration (11 μg mL–1) and biomass (210 μg mL–1), which were 60 and 20 times more than that of C. vulgaris at ambient CO2 (0.036%), were recorded at 6% CO2 level. At 16% CO2 level, the concentrations of chlorophyll and biomass values were comparable to those at ambient CO2 but further increases in the CO2 level decreased both of them. Results showed that the optimum temperature for biomass production was 30°C under elevated CO2 (6%). Although increases in temperature above 30°C resulted in concomitant decrease in growth response, their adverse effects were significantly subdued at elevated CO2. There were also differential responses of the alga, assessed in terms of NaH14CO3 uptake and carbonic anhydrase activity, to increases in temperature at elevated CO2. The results indicated that Chlorella vulgaris grew better at elevated CO2 level at 30°C, albeit with lesser efficiencies at higher temperatures. PMID:19333419

  13. Antioxidant capacity reduced in scallions grown under elevated CO 2 independent of assayed light intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Lanfang H.; Paré, Paul W.

    2009-10-01

    Long-duration manned space missions mandate the development of a sustainable life support system and effective countermeasures against damaging space radiation. To mitigate the risk of inevitable exposure to space radiation, cultivation of fresh fruits and vegetables rich in antioxidants is an attractive alternative to pharmacological agents. However it has yet to be established whether antioxidant properties of crops can be preserved or enhanced in a space environment where environmental conditions differ from that which plants have acclimated to on earth. Scallion ( Allium fistulosum) rich in antioxidant vitamins C and A, and flavonoids was used as a model plant to study the impact of a range of CO 2 concentrations and light intensities that are likely encountered in a space habitat on food quality traits. Scallions were hydroponically grown in controlled environmental chambers under a combination of 3 CO 2 concentrations of 400, 1200 and 4000 μmol mol -1 and 3 light intensity levels of 150, 300, 450 μmol m -2 s -1. Total antioxidant activity (TAA) of scallion extracts was determined using a radical cation scavenging assay. Both elevated CO 2 and increasing light intensity enhanced biomass accumulation, but effects on TAA (based on dry weight) differed. TAA was reduced for plants grown under elevated CO 2, but remained unchanged with increases in light intensity. Elevated CO 2 stimulated greater biomass production than antioxidants, while an increase in photosynthetic photo flux promoted the synthesis of antioxidant compounds at a rate similar to that of biomass. Consequently light is a more effective stimulus than CO 2 for antioxidant production.

  14. Crop responses to elevated CO2 and interactions with H2O, N, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Bruce A

    2016-06-01

    About twenty-seven years ago, free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) technology was developed that enabled the air above open-field plots to be enriched with CO2 for entire growing seasons. Since then, FACE experiments have been conducted on cotton, wheat, ryegrass, clover, potato, grape, rice, barley, sugar beet, soybean, cassava, rape, mustard, coffee (C3 crops), and sorghum and maize (C4 crops). Elevated CO2 (550ppm from an ambient concentration of about 353ppm in 1990) decreased evapotranspiration about 10% on average and increased canopy temperatures about 0.7°C. Biomass and yield were increased by FACE in all C3 species, but not in C4 species except when water was limiting. Yields of C3 grain crops were increased on average about 19%. PMID:27043481

  15. Elevated atmospheric CO2 impairs aphid escape responses to predators and conspecific alarm signals.

    PubMed

    Hentley, William T; Vanbergen, Adam J; Hails, Rosemary S; Jones, T Hefin; Johnson, Scott N

    2014-10-01

    Research into the impact of atmospheric change on predator-prey interactions has mainly focused on density dependent responses and trophic linkages. As yet, the chemical ecology underpinning predator-prey interactions has received little attention in environmental change research. Group living animals have evolved behavioral mechanisms to escape predation, including chemical alarm signalling. Chemical alarm signalling between conspecific prey could be susceptible to environmental change if the physiology and behavior of these organisms are affected by changes in dietary quality resulting from environmental change. Using Rubus idaeus plants, we show that elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 (eCO2) severely impaired escape responses of the aphid Amphorophora idaei to predation by ladybird larvae (Harmonia axyridis). Escape responses to ladybirds was reduced by >50% after aphids had been reared on plants grown under eCO2. This behavioral response was rapidly induced, occurring within 24 h of being transferred to plants grown at eCO2 and, once induced, persisted even after aphids were transferred to plants grown at ambient CO2. Escape responses were impaired due to reduced sensitivity to aphid alarm pheromone, (E)-β-farnesene, via an undefined plant-mediated mechanism. Aphid abundance often increases under eCO2, however, reduced efficacy of conspecific signalling may increase aphid vulnerability to predation, highlighting the need to study the chemical ecology of predator-prey interactions under environmental change. PMID:25273846

  16. Greater ecosystem carbon in the Mojave Desert after ten years exposure to elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R. D.; Koyama, A.; Sonderegger, D. L.; Charlet, T. N.; Newingham, B. A.; Fenstermaker, L. F.; Harlow, B.; Jin, V. L.; Ogle, K.; Smith, S. D.; Nowak, R. S.

    2014-05-01

    Carbon dioxide is the main greenhouse gas inducing climate change. Increased global CO2 emissions, estimated at 8.4 Pg C yr-1 at present, have accelerated from 1% yr-1 during 1990-1999 to 2.5% yr-1 during 2000-2009 (ref. ). The carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems is the greatest unknown in the global C budget because the actual magnitude, location and causes of terrestrial sinks are uncertain; estimates of terrestrial C uptake, therefore, are often based on the residuals between direct measurements of the atmospheric sink and well-constrained models of ocean uptake of CO2 (ref. ). Here we report significant terrestrial C accumulation caused by CO2 enhancement to net ecosystem productivity in an intact, undisturbed arid ecosystem following ten years of exposure to elevated atmospheric CO2. Results provide direct evidence that CO2 fertilization substantially increases ecosystem C storage and that arid ecosystems are significant, previously unrecognized, sinks for atmospheric CO2 that must be accounted for in efforts to constrain terrestrial and global C cycles.

  17. Oxidation in Environments with Elevated CO2 Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon H. Holcomb

    2009-05-01

    Efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from fossil energy power productions focus primarily on either pre- or post-combustion removal of CO2. The research presented here examines corrosion and oxidation issues associated with two types of post-combustion CO2 removal processes—oxyfuel combustion in refit boilers and oxyfuel turbines.

  18. Synthesis of Scrub-Oak Ecosystem Responses to Elevated CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Hungate, Bruce

    2014-11-07

    This report summarizes a synthesis project of a long-term global change experiment conducted at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, investigating how increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) influences the functioning of a fire-dominated scrub-oak ecosystem. The experiment began in 1996 and ended in 2007. Results presented here summarize the effects of elevated CO2 on plant growth, soil processes, carbon and nutrient cycling, and other responses. Products include archived data from the experiment, as well as six publications in the peer-reviewed literature.

  19. Deconvolution of Soil CO2 Efflux from Root, Litter, and SOM Components in a Ponderosa Pine Mesocosm Experiment Exposed to Elevated CO2 and O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, J. W.; Rygiewicz, P. T.; Johnson, M. G.; Andersen, C. P.

    2001-12-01

    Stable isotopes have become an important tool for determining the relative importance of CO2 sources and sinks contributing to the global carbon budget. Of particular importance is estimating the terrestrial CO2 flux which is difficult to decipher without determining the relative importance of autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration from below-ground sources. Whereas increased SOM respiration could indicate reduced C storage ultimately creating a stronger terrestrial CO2 source, increased autotrophic respiration could indicate greater NPP and therefore an overall stronger terrestrial sink. Here, we used the dual isotope, three equation mixing model approach of Lin et al. 1999 to determine the relative importance of root, litter, and SOM respiration in a `closed' chamber Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa, Doug. Ex Laws.) mesocosm experiment exposed to elevated CO2 and ozone. This approach uses the δ 13C and δ 18O signatures of surface CO2 efflux and the component litter, root and SOM fluxes to provide a system of three equations to solve for the three unknown source fluxes. To enhance our ability to determine the relative contribution of the different sources: 1) Keeling plots were used to measure δ 13C and δ 18O signatures of surface CO2 efflux, 2) mininert vials were used to measure signatures of root, soil, and litter respiration, and 3) the biomass-, volume- and respiration- weighted mean δ 18O signatures were calculated for roots versus soils across the evaporative gradient. Our results indicate that root and SOM respiration made up the bulk of CO2 flux, root respiration was higher under elevated CO2, and there was no effect of elevated ozone. Future experiments will determine the potential for using the dual isotope, three equation mixing model approach to determine the relative importance of root, litter, and SOM respiration under ambient CO2 conditions.

  20. Soil nitrogen status as a regulator of carbon substrate flows through microbial communities with elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Susan E.; Billings, Sharon A.

    2011-03-01

    To assess how microbial processing of organic C inputs to forest soils may be influenced by elevated CO2 and altered N dynamics, we followed the fate of 13C-labeled substrates in soils from the Duke Free Air Carbon Enrichment site where differences in soil N status have been imposed by 7 years of N amendments. Heterotrophic respiration and δ13C of respired CO2-C and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) were measured to track activities of microbial groups and estimate a relative measure of substrate use efficiency (PLFA-based SUE). Results indicate an increased proportion of fungal and actinomycete activity in elevated CO2 soils, which varied with substrate. The negative effect of N on vanillin phenolic-C incorporation into actinomycete PLFA suggests legacies of fertilization can mitigate increased C flow into actinomycetes with elevated CO2. Further, the fourfold increase in PLFA-based SUE for vanillin phenolic-C in elevated CO2 soils that received N suggests future enhanced N limitation in elevated CO2 soils may promote enhanced respiratory loss relative to incorporation of some C-substrates into microbial biomass. These short-term incubations did not reveal greater loss of soil organic carbon via respiration or shifts in SUE with elevated CO2. However, observed relative increases in activity of actinomycetes and fungi with elevated CO2 and mitigation of this effect on actinomycetes with N amendments suggests that elevated CO2 and predicted N limitation may alter the fate of slow-turnover soil organic matter (SOM) in two competing ways. Investigations need to focus on how these microorganisms may increase slow-turnover substrate use while possibly enhancing the prevalence of microbial cell wall structures that can serve as precursors of stabilized SOM.

  1. Soil warming enhances the hidden shift of elemental stoichiometry by elevated CO2 in wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangnan; Jiang, Dong; Liu, Fulai

    2016-01-01

    Increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and associated soil warming along with global climate change are expected to have large impacts on grain mineral nutrition in wheat. The effects of CO2 elevation (700 μmol l(-1)) and soil warming (+2.4 °C) on K, Ca and Mg concentrations in the xylem sap and their partitioning in different organs of wheat plant during grain filling were investigated. Results showed that the combination of elevated [CO2] and soil warming improved wheat grain yield, but decreased plant K, Ca and Mg accumulation and their concentrations in the leaves, stems, roots and grains. The reduced grain mineral concentration was attributed to the lowered mineral uptake as exemplified by both the decreased stomatal conductance and mineral concentration in the xylem sap. These findings suggest that future higher atmospheric [CO2] and warmer soil conditions may decrease the dietary availability of minerals from wheat crops. Breeding wheat cultivars possessing higher ability of mineral uptake at reduced xylem flux in exposure to climate change should be a target. PMID:27001555

  2. Soil warming enhances the hidden shift of elemental stoichiometry by elevated CO2 in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangnan; Jiang, Dong; Liu, Fulai

    2016-01-01

    Increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and associated soil warming along with global climate change are expected to have large impacts on grain mineral nutrition in wheat. The effects of CO2 elevation (700 μmol l−1) and soil warming (+2.4 °C) on K, Ca and Mg concentrations in the xylem sap and their partitioning in different organs of wheat plant during grain filling were investigated. Results showed that the combination of elevated [CO2] and soil warming improved wheat grain yield, but decreased plant K, Ca and Mg accumulation and their concentrations in the leaves, stems, roots and grains. The reduced grain mineral concentration was attributed to the lowered mineral uptake as exemplified by both the decreased stomatal conductance and mineral concentration in the xylem sap. These findings suggest that future higher atmospheric [CO2] and warmer soil conditions may decrease the dietary availability of minerals from wheat crops. Breeding wheat cultivars possessing higher ability of mineral uptake at reduced xylem flux in exposure to climate change should be a target. PMID:27001555

  3. Elevated CO2 does not offset greater water stress predicted under climate change for native and exotic riparian plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Laura G.; Shafroth, Patrick B.; Blumenthal, Dana M.; Morgan, Jack A.; LeCain, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    In semiarid western North American riparian ecosystems, increased drought and lower streamflows under climate change may reduce plant growth and recruitment, and favor drought-tolerant exotic species over mesic native species. We tested whether elevated atmospheric CO2 might ameliorate these effects by improving plant water-use efficiency. We examined the effects of CO2 and water availability on seedlings of two native (Populus deltoids spp. monilifera, Salix exigua) and three exotic (Elaeagnus angustifolia, Tamarix spp., Ulmus pumila) western North American riparian species in a CO2-controlled glasshouse, using 1-m-deep pots with different water-table decline rates. Low water availability reduced seedling biomass by 70–97%, and hindered the native species more than the exotics. Elevated CO2 increased biomass by 15%, with similar effects on natives and exotics. Elevated CO2 increased intrinsic water-use efficiency (Δ13Cleaf), but did not increase biomass more in drier treatments than wetter treatments. The moderate positive effects of elevated CO2 on riparian seedlings are unlikely to counteract the large negative effects of increased aridity projected under climate change. Our results suggest that increased aridity will reduce riparian seedling growth despite elevated CO2, and will reduce growth more for native Salix and Populus than for drought-tolerant exotic species.

  4. Elevated CO2 does not offset greater water stress predicted under climate change for native and exotic riparian plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Laura G.; Shafroth, Patrick B.; Blumenthal, Dana M.; Morgan, Jack A.; LeCain, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    * In semiarid western North American riparian ecosystems, increased drought and lower streamflows under climate change may reduce plant growth and recruitment, and favor drought-tolerant exotic species over mesic native species. We tested whether elevated atmospheric CO2 might ameliorate these effects by improving plant water-use efficiency. * We examined the effects of CO2 and water availability on seedlings of two native (Populus deltoides spp. monilifera, Salix exigua) and three exotic (Elaeagnus angustifolia, Tamarix spp., Ulmus pumila) western North American riparian species in a CO2-controlled glasshouse, using 1-m-deep pots with different water-table decline rates. * Low water availability reduced seedling biomass by 70–97%, and hindered the native species more than the exotics. Elevated CO2 increased biomass by 15%, with similar effects on natives and exotics. Elevated CO2 increased intrinsic water-use efficiency (Δ13Cleaf), but did not increase biomass more in drier treatments than wetter treatments. * The moderate positive effects of elevated CO2 on riparian seedlings are unlikely to counteract the large negative effects of increased aridity projected under climate change. Our results suggest that increased aridity will reduce riparian seedling growth despite elevated CO2, and will reduce growth more for native Salix and Populus than for drought-tolerant exotic species.

  5. Elevated-CO2 Response of Stomata and Its Dependence on Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhenzhu; Jiang, Yanling; Jia, Bingrui; Zhou, Guangsheng

    2016-01-01

    Stomata control the flow of gases between plants and the atmosphere. This review is centered on stomatal responses to elevated CO2 concentration and considers other key environmental factors and underlying mechanisms at multiple levels. First, an outline of general responses in stomatal conductance under elevated CO2 is presented. Second, stomatal density response, its development, and the trade-off with leaf growth under elevated CO2 conditions are depicted. Third, the molecular mechanism regulating guard cell movement at elevated CO2 is suggested. Finally, the interactive effects of elevated CO2 with other factors critical to stomatal behavior are reviewed. It may be useful to better understand how stomata respond to elevated CO2 levels while considering other key environmental factors and mechanisms, including molecular mechanism, biochemical processes, and ecophysiological regulation. This understanding may provide profound new insights into how plants cope with climate change. PMID:27242858

  6. Elevated-CO2 Response of Stomata and Its Dependence on Environmental Factors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenzhu; Jiang, Yanling; Jia, Bingrui; Zhou, Guangsheng

    2016-01-01

    Stomata control the flow of gases between plants and the atmosphere. This review is centered on stomatal responses to elevated CO2 concentration and considers other key environmental factors and underlying mechanisms at multiple levels. First, an outline of general responses in stomatal conductance under elevated CO2 is presented. Second, stomatal density response, its development, and the trade-off with leaf growth under elevated CO2 conditions are depicted. Third, the molecular mechanism regulating guard cell movement at elevated CO2 is suggested. Finally, the interactive effects of elevated CO2 with other factors critical to stomatal behavior are reviewed. It may be useful to better understand how stomata respond to elevated CO2 levels while considering other key environmental factors and mechanisms, including molecular mechanism, biochemical processes, and ecophysiological regulation. This understanding may provide profound new insights into how plants cope with climate change. PMID:27242858

  7. Elevated CO2 affects secondary metabolites in Robinia pseudoacacia L. seedlings in Cd- and Pb-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xia; Zhao, Yonghua; Liu, Tuo; Huang, Shuping

    2016-10-01

    Secondary metabolites play important roles in plant interactions with the environment. The co-occurrence of heavy metal contamination of soils and rising atmospheric CO2 has important effects on plant. It is important to explore the ways in which production of plant secondary metabolites is affected by heavy metals under elevated atmospheric CO2. We examined the effects of elevated CO2 on secondary metabolite contents in Robinia pseudoacacia seedlings grown in Cd- and lead (Pb)-contaminated soils. The increase in secondary metabolites was greater under Cd + Pb exposure than under exposure to individual metals regardless of elevated CO2 with the exception of condensed tannins in leaves and total alkaloids in stems. Except for phenolic compounds and condensed tannins, elevated CO2 was associated with increased secondary metabolite contents in leaves and stems of plants exposed to Cd, Pb, and Cd + Pb compared to plants exposed to ambient CO2 + metals. Changes in saponins in leaves and alkaloids in stems were greater than changes in the other secondary metabolites. Significant interactive effects of CO2, Cd, and Pb on secondary metabolites were observed. Saponins in leaves and alkaloids in stems were more sensitive than other secondary metabolites to elevated CO2 + Cd + Pb. Elevated CO2 could modulate plant protection and defense mechanisms in R. pseudoacacia seedlings exposed to heavy metals by altering the production of secondary metabolites. The increased Cd and Pb uptake under elevated CO2 suggested that R. pseudoacacia may be used in the phytoremediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils under global environmental scenarios. PMID:27376859

  8. Elevated CO2 effects on plant carbon, nitrogen, and water relations: six important lessons from FACE.

    PubMed

    Leakey, Andrew D B; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Bernacchi, Carl J; Rogers, Alistair; Long, Stephen P; Ort, Donald R

    2009-01-01

    Plant responses to the projected future levels of CO(2) were first characterized in short-term experiments lasting days to weeks. However, longer term acclimation responses to elevated CO(2) were subsequently discovered to be very important in determining plant and ecosystem function. Free-Air CO(2) Enrichment (FACE) experiments are the culmination of efforts to assess the impact of elevated CO(2) on plants over multiple seasons and, in the case of crops, over their entire lifetime. FACE has been used to expose vegetation to elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO(2) under completely open-air conditions for nearly two decades. This review describes some of the lessons learned from the long-term investment in these experiments. First, elevated CO(2) stimulates photosynthetic carbon gain and net primary production over the long term despite down-regulation of Rubisco activity. Second, elevated CO(2) improves nitrogen use efficiency and, third, decreases water use at both the leaf and canopy scale. Fourth, elevated CO(2) stimulates dark respiration via a transcriptional reprogramming of metabolism. Fifth, elevated CO(2) does not directly stimulate C(4) photosynthesis, but can indirectly stimulate carbon gain in times and places of drought. Finally, the stimulation of yield by elevated CO(2) in crop species is much smaller than expected. While many of these lessons have been most clearly demonstrated in crop systems, all of the lessons have important implications for natural systems. PMID:19401412

  9. Lower responsiveness of canopy evapotranspiration rate than of leaf stomatal conductance to open-air CO2 elevation in rice.

    PubMed

    Shimono, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Okada, Masumi

    2013-08-01

    An elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2 ]) can reduce stomatal conductance of leaves for most plant species, including rice (Oryza sativa L.). However, few studies have quantified seasonal changes in the effects of elevated [CO2 ] on canopy evapotranspiration, which integrates the response of stomatal conductance of individual leaves with other responses, such as leaf area expansion, changes in leaf surface temperature, and changes in developmental stages, in field conditions. We conducted a field experiment to measure seasonal changes in stomatal conductance of the uppermost leaves and in the evapotranspiration, transpiration, and evaporation rates using a lysimeter method. The study was conducted for flooded rice under open-air CO2 elevation. Stomatal conductance decreased by 27% under elevated [CO2 ], averaged throughout the growing season, and evapotranspiration decreased by an average of 5% during the same period. The decrease in daily evapotranspiration caused by elevated [CO2 ] was more significantly correlated with air temperature and leaf area index (LAI) rather than with other parameters of solar radiation, days after transplanting, vapor-pressure deficit and FAO reference evapotranspiration. This indicates that higher air temperatures, within the range from 16 to 27 °C, and a larger LAI, within the range from 0 to 4 m(2)  m(-2) , can increase the magnitude of the decrease in evapotranspiration rate caused by elevated [CO2 ]. The crop coefficient (i.e. the evapotranspiration rate divided by the FAO reference evapotranspiration rate) was 1.24 at ambient [CO2 ] and 1.17 at elevated [CO2 ]. This study provides the first direct measurement of the effects of elevated [CO2 ] on rice canopy evapotranspiration under open-air conditions using the lysimeter method, and the results will improve future predictions of water use in rice fields. PMID:23564676

  10. Effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on carbon allocation patterns in Eriphorum vaginatum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, L.

    2013-12-01

    Greenhouse gases of particular importance to the human induced greenhouse effect are, e.g., CO2 and CH4. Natural and agricultural wetlands together contribute with over 40 % of the annual atmospheric emissions of CH4 and are, therefore, considered to be the largest single contributor of this gas to the troposphere. There is a growing concern that increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 will stimulate CH4 production and emission from wetland ecosystems, resulting in feedback mechanisms that in future will increase the radiative forcing of these ecosystems. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on fluxes of CO2 and CH4, biomass allocation patterns and amount of labile substrates (i.e. low molecular weight organic acids, OAs) for CH4 production in the root vicinity of Eriophorum vaginatum. Eriophorum cores and plants were collected at Fäjemyr, a temperate ombrotrophic bog situated in the south of Sweden. These were cultivated under controlled environmental conditions in an atmosphere of 390 or 800 ppm of CO2 (n=5 per treatment). After a one month development period gas fluxes were measured twice per week over one month using a Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (Gasmet Dx-4030) and OAs using a liquid chromatography-ionspray tandem mass spectrometry system (Dionex ICS-2500 and Applied Biosystems 2000 Q-Trap triple quadrupole MS). The results clearly show that elevated CO2 significantly affects all measured parts of the carbon cycle. Greenhouse gas fluxes were significantly (repeated measures test) higher under elevated CO2 conditions, NEE p < 0.0001, Reco p = 0.005, GPP p = 0.012 and CH4 p = 0.022. As were biomass of leaves, roots and concentration of OAs around the roots of plants, p = 0.045, p = 0 = 0.045 and p = 0.045 respectively (Kruskal wallis 1-way anova). The study shows higher CH4 emissions under elevated CO2 and that this may be due to a priming effect, due to input of fresh labile-C via living roots and

  11. No cumulative effect of 10 years of elevated [CO2 ] on perennial plant biomass components in the Mojave Desert.

    PubMed

    Newingham, Beth A; Vanier, Cheryl H; Charlet, Therese N; Ogle, Kiona; Smith, Stanley D; Nowak, Robert S

    2013-07-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2 ]) generally increase primary production of terrestrial ecosystems. Production responses to elevated [CO2 ] may be particularly large in deserts, but information on their long-term response is unknown. We evaluated the cumulative effects of elevated [CO2 ] on primary production at the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air carbon dioxide enrichment) Facility. Aboveground and belowground perennial plant biomass was harvested in an intact Mojave Desert ecosystem at the end of a 10-year elevated [CO2 ] experiment. We measured community standing biomass, biomass allocation, canopy cover, leaf area index (LAI), carbon and nitrogen content, and isotopic composition of plant tissues for five to eight dominant species. We provide the first long-term results of elevated [CO2 ] on biomass components of a desert ecosystem and offer information on understudied Mojave Desert species. In contrast to initial expectations, 10 years of elevated [CO2 ] had no significant effect on standing biomass, biomass allocation, canopy cover, and C : N ratios of above- and belowground components. However, elevated [CO2 ] increased short-term responses, including leaf water-use efficiency (WUE) as measured by carbon isotope discrimination and increased plot-level LAI. Standing biomass, biomass allocation, canopy cover, and C : N ratios of above- and belowground pools significantly differed among dominant species, but responses to elevated [CO2 ] did not vary among species, photosynthetic pathway (C3 vs. C4 ), or growth form (drought-deciduous shrub vs. evergreen shrub vs. grass). Thus, even though previous and current results occasionally show increased leaf-level photosynthetic rates, WUE, LAI, and plant growth under elevated [CO2 ] during the 10-year experiment, most responses were in wet years and did not lead to sustained increases in community biomass. We presume that the lack of sustained biomass responses to elevated [CO2 ] is explained by inter

  12. Effects of Conventional Tillage and No-Tillage on Crop Gas Exchange Under Elevated Atmospheric CO2 Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration has led to concerns about potential effects on production agriculture. In the fall of 1997, a study was initiated to compare the response of two crop management systems (conventional and conservation) to elevated CO2. The study used a split-plot design replic...

  13. The impact of enhanced atmospheric CO2 concentrations on the responses of maize and soybean to elevated growth temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this review we argue that responses of plant growth and yield to CO2 enrichment and to elevated growth temperatures are principally mediated by changes in photosynthesis. Crop plants such as soybean, which possess the C3 cycle, exhibit increased photosynthetic rates in response to CO2 enrichment...

  14. Microgravity Droplet Combustion in CO2 Enriched Environments at Elevated Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Nayagam, V.; Williams, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Microgravity droplet combustion experiments were performed in elevated concentrations of CO2 at pressures of 1.0 atm, 3.0 atm, and 5.0 atm to examine the effects of a radiatively participating suppression agent in space applications. Methanol and n-heptane droplets, with an initial diameter of 2.0 mm supported on a quartz fiber, were used in these experiments. The ambient O2 concentration was held constant at 21% and the CO2 concentrations ranged from 0% to a maximum of 70%, by volume with the balance consisting of N2 . Results from the methanol tests showed slight decreases in burning rates with increased CO2 concentrations at all ambient pressures. The n-heptane tests show slight increases in burning rates with increasing CO2 concentrations at each pressure level. Instantaneous radiative heat flux was also measured using both a broadband radiometer (i.e., wavelengths from 0.6 microns to 40.0 microns) and a narrowband radiometer (i.e., centered at 5.6 microns with a filter width at half maximum of 1.5 microns). Radiative exchanges between the droplet and surrounding gases as well as the soot field produce departures from the classical quasisteady theory which would predict a decrease in burning rates with increasing CO2 concentrations in microgravity.

  15. Altered brain ion gradients following compensation for elevated CO2 are linked to behavioural alterations in a coral reef fish.

    PubMed

    Heuer, R M; Welch, M J; Rummer, J L; Munday, P L; Grosell, M

    2016-01-01

    Neurosensory and behavioural disruptions are some of the most consistently reported responses upon exposure to ocean acidification-relevant CO2 levels, especially in coral reef fishes. The underlying cause of these disruptions is thought to be altered current across the GABAA receptor in neuronal cells due to changes in ion gradients (HCO3(-) and/or Cl(-)) that occur in the body following compensation for elevated ambient CO2. Despite these widely-documented behavioural disruptions, the present study is the first to pair a behavioural assay with measurements of relevant intracellular and extracellular acid-base parameters in a coral reef fish exposed to elevated CO2. Spiny damselfish (Acanthochromis polyacanthus) exposed to 1900 μatm CO2 for 4 days exhibited significantly increased intracellular and extracellular HCO3(-) concentrations and elevated brain pHi compared to control fish, providing evidence of CO2 compensation. As expected, high CO2 exposed damselfish spent significantly more time in a chemical alarm cue (CAC) than control fish, supporting a potential link between behavioural disruption and CO2 compensation. Using HCO3(-) measurements from the damselfish, the reversal potential for GABAA (EGABA) was calculated, illustrating that biophysical properties of the brain during CO2 compensation could change GABAA receptor function and account for the behavioural disturbances noted during exposure to elevated CO2. PMID:27620837

  16. Nutrient supply has greater influence than sink strength on photosynthetic adaptation to CO2 elevation in white birch seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shouren; Dang, Qing-Lai; Cao, Bing

    2013-04-01

    To study the effects of source-sink ratio and nutrient supply on photosynthetic acclimation to CO(2) elevation, we subjected white birch seedlings to two levels of nutrient supply (high vs. low) and CO(2) concentrations (ambient vs. doubled [CO(2)]) for two months and then shaded the lower canopy on half of the seedlings to reduce source/sink ratio for an additional month. The CO(2) elevation significantly increased P(n) and IWUE at both nutrient levels but the increase was greater in the high than low nutrient treatment. The CO(2) elevation resulted in a down-regulation of V(cmax) in the low nutrient treatment but up-regulation of J(max), TPU, [Formula: see text] and J(c) in the high nutrient after 3 months of treatment. Both the CO(2) elevation and high nutrient supply increased the partition of total electron transport to carboxylation at the expense of oxidation. The seedlings responded to the shading of the lower canopy by reducing biomass allocation to roots rather than making physiological adjustments to unshaded leaves in the upper canopy. Our results suggest that the direction of photosynthetic acclimation to CO(2) elevation in white birch was nutrient-dependent and an increase in sink strength could reduce the feedback inhibition of photosynthesis. PMID:23415328

  17. Element Pool Changes within a Scrub-Oak Ecosystem after 11 Years of Exposure to Elevated CO2

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Benjamin D.; Dijkstra, Paul; Drake, Bert G.; Johnson, Dale W.; Ketterer, Michael E.; Megonigal, J. Patrick; Hungate, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of elevated CO2 on ecosystem element stocks are equivocal, in part because cumulative effects of CO2 on element pools are difficult to detect. We conducted a complete above and belowground inventory of non-nitrogen macro- and micronutrient stocks in a subtropical woodland exposed to twice-ambient CO2 concentrations for 11 years. We analyzed a suite of nutrient elements and metals important for nutrient cycling in soils to a depth of ∼2 m, in leaves and stems of the dominant oaks, in fine and coarse roots, and in litter. In conjunction with large biomass stimulation, elevated CO2 increased oak stem stocks of Na, Mg, P, K, V, Zn and Mo, and the aboveground pool of K and S. Elevated CO2 increased root pools of most elements, except Zn. CO2-stimulation of plant Ca was larger than the decline in the extractable Ca pool in soils, whereas for other elements, increased plant uptake matched the decline in the extractable pool in soil. We conclude that elevated CO2 caused a net transfer of a subset of nutrients from soil to plants, suggesting that ecosystems with a positive plant growth response under high CO2 will likely cause mobilization of elements from soil pools to plant biomass. PMID:23717607

  18. Water Quality in an Elevated CO2 Region: a Field Study at Mammoth Lakes, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, C. D.; Ellis, A. S.; Khachikian, C.; CenterEnergy; Sustainability

    2010-12-01

    Increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have led to concern with regard to the consequences of global warming. Efforts to limit, if not prevent, further increases are becoming a great priority. Among the variety of proposed mitigation methods is that of injecting CO2 into structural reservoirs in deep permeable geologic formations. Understanding the potential side effects on the environment should leaks occur is essential to our ability to prepare and mitigate environmental hazards. This study examines the effect of elevated soil levels of CO2 on water chemistry. In more specific terms, the purpose is to find geochemical signatures to indicate that elevated CO2 is causing observable changes in water chemistry. Preliminary targets elements are Si, Al and Sr in conjunction with major ions. Mammoth Mountain provides an excellent study area as CO2 gas from an underlying magma chamber has been leaking into the overlying soil, turning it into a natural analogue to a leaking CO2 storage formation. Accelerated weathering of minerals is hypothesized to occur in concert with elevated CO2 levels. Water samples were collected from Horseshoe Lake (adjacent to a high flux of soil CO2), streams that drain into Horseshoe lake, and from Mcleod Lake (with “normal” CO2 levels). Preliminary results show that the waters of Mammoth Lakes are generally dilute, with the major inputs being snowmelt and runoff from Mammoth Mountain. Water samples from the high CO2 Horseshoe Lake area have higher alkalinity (0.295 meq/L compared to 0.047 meq/L at McLeod Lake), an indication of more weathering occurring at the high CO2 lake. Weathering from alumnosilicate minerals is one of the main sources of dissolved ions to waters in the region. Al and Si concentrations are higher in the streams (39μg/L and 4575μg/L respectively) than in the lake (16μg/L and 3074 respectively). Al/Na molar ratios in Horseshoe Lake range from 0.008 - 0.028 while stream inputs to the lake

  19. Ecohydrological responses of dense canopies to environmental variability: 2. Role of acclimation under elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewry, D. T.; Kumar, P.; Long, S.; Bernacchi, C.; Liang, X.-Z.; Sivapalan, M.

    2010-12-01

    The ability to accurately predict land-atmosphere exchange of mass, energy, and momentum over the coming century requires the consideration of plant biochemical, ecophysiological, and structural acclimation to modifications of the ambient environment. Amongst the most important environmental changes experienced by terrestrial vegetation over the last century has been the increase in ambient carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, with a projected doubling in CO2 from preindustrial levels by the middle of this century. This change in atmospheric composition has been demonstrated to significantly alter a variety of leaf and plant properties across a range of species, with the potential to modify land-atmosphere interactions and their associated feedbacks. Free Air Carbon Enrichment (FACE) technology has provided significant insight into the functioning of vegetation in natural conditions under elevated CO2, but remains limited in its ability to quantify the exchange of CO2, water vapor, and energy at the canopy scale. This paper addresses the roles of ecophysiological, biochemical, and structural plant acclimation on canopy-scale exchange of CO2, water vapor, and energy through the application of a multilayer canopy-root-soil model (MLCan) capable of resolving changes induced by elevated CO2 through the canopy and soil systems. Previous validation of MLCan flux estimates were made for soybean and maize in the companion paper using a record of six growing seasons of eddy covariance data from the Bondville Ameriflux site. Observations of leaf-level photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and surface temperature collected at the SoyFACE experimental facility in central Illinois provide a basis for examining the ability of MLCan to capture vegetation responses to an enriched CO2 environment. Simulations of control (370 [ppm]) and elevated (550 [ppm]) CO2 environments allow for an examination of the vertical variation and canopy-scale responses of vegetation states and fluxes

  20. Interactive Effects of Elevated [CO2] and Drought on the Maize Phytochemical Defense Response against Mycotoxigenic Fusarium verticillioides

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Martha M.; Huffaker, Alisa; Schmelz, Eric A.; Dafoe, Nicole J.; Christensen, Shawn A.; McAuslane, Heather J.; Alborn, Hans T.; Allen, Leon Hartwell; Teal, Peter E. A.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in climate due to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) are predicted to intensify episodes of drought, but our understanding of how these combined conditions will influence crop-pathogen interactions is limited. We recently demonstrated that elevated [CO2] alone enhances maize susceptibility to the mycotoxigenic pathogen, Fusarium verticillioides (Fv) but fumonisin levels remain unaffected. In this study we show that maize simultaneously exposed to elevated [CO2] and drought are even more susceptible to Fv proliferation and also prone to higher levels of fumonisin contamination. Despite the increase in fumonisin levels, the amount of fumonisin produced in relation to pathogen biomass remained lower than corresponding plants grown at ambient [CO2]. Therefore, the increase in fumonisin contamination was likely due to even greater pathogen biomass rather than an increase in host-derived stimulants. Drought did not negate the compromising effects of elevated [CO2] on the accumulation of maize phytohormones and metabolites. However, since elevated [CO2] does not influence the drought-induced accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA) or root terpenoid phytoalexins, the effects elevated [CO2] are negated belowground, but the stifled defense response aboveground may be a consequence of resource redirection to the roots. PMID:27410032

  1. Interactive Effects of Elevated [CO2] and Drought on the Maize Phytochemical Defense Response against Mycotoxigenic Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Martha M; Huffaker, Alisa; Schmelz, Eric A; Dafoe, Nicole J; Christensen, Shawn A; McAuslane, Heather J; Alborn, Hans T; Allen, Leon Hartwell; Teal, Peter E A

    2016-01-01

    Changes in climate due to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) are predicted to intensify episodes of drought, but our understanding of how these combined conditions will influence crop-pathogen interactions is limited. We recently demonstrated that elevated [CO2] alone enhances maize susceptibility to the mycotoxigenic pathogen, Fusarium verticillioides (Fv) but fumonisin levels remain unaffected. In this study we show that maize simultaneously exposed to elevated [CO2] and drought are even more susceptible to Fv proliferation and also prone to higher levels of fumonisin contamination. Despite the increase in fumonisin levels, the amount of fumonisin produced in relation to pathogen biomass remained lower than corresponding plants grown at ambient [CO2]. Therefore, the increase in fumonisin contamination was likely due to even greater pathogen biomass rather than an increase in host-derived stimulants. Drought did not negate the compromising effects of elevated [CO2] on the accumulation of maize phytohormones and metabolites. However, since elevated [CO2] does not influence the drought-induced accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA) or root terpenoid phytoalexins, the effects elevated [CO2] are negated belowground, but the stifled defense response aboveground may be a consequence of resource redirection to the roots. PMID:27410032

  2. Tree and forest water use under elevated CO2 and temperature in Scandinavian boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg Hasper, Thomas; Wallin, Göran; Lamba, Shubhangi; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D.; Laudon, Hjalmar; Medhurst, Jane L.; Räntfors, Mats; Linder, Sune; Uddling, Johan

    2014-05-01

    According to experimental studies and models, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) and temperature have the potential to affect stomatal conductance and, consequently, tree and forest transpiration. This effect has in turn the capacity to influence the terrestrial energy and water balance, including affecting of the magnitude of river runoff. Furthermore, forest productivity is currently water-limited in southern Scandinavia and in a near future, under the projected climatic change, this limitation may become a reality in the central and northern parts of Scandinavia. In this study we examine the water-use responses in 12 40-year old native boreal Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) trees exposed to a factorial combination of two levels of [CO2] (ambient and doubled) and temperature (ambient and +2.8 °C in summer / +5.6 °C in winter), as well as of entire boreal forests to temporal variation in [CO2], temperature and precipitation over the past 50 years in central and northern Sweden. The controlled factorial CO2 and temperature whole-tree chamber experiment at Flakaliden study site demonstrated that Norway spruce trees lacked elevated [CO2]-induced water savings at guard cell, shoot, and tree levels in the years of measurements. Experimentally, elevated temperature did not result in increased shoot or tree water use as stomatal closure fully cancelled the effect of higher vapour pressure deficit in warmed air environment. Consistent with these results, large scale river runoff data and evapotranspiration estimates from large forested watersheds in central Sweden supported lack of elevated CO2-mediated water savings, and rather suggested that the increasing evapotranspiration trend found in this study was primarily linked to increasing precipitation, rising temperature and more efficient forest management. The results from the whole-tree chamber experiment and boreal forested watersheds have important implications for more accurate

  3. Photosynthesis and antioxidant defense system of Gynura Bicolor DC grown at different elevated CO2 levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minjuan; Liu, Hong; Fu, Yuming

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration [CO _{2}] will increase in the future and will affect global climate and ecosystem productivity. However, this is not clearly an area that requires further study on the most appropriate [CO _{2}] selection for plant growth and quality in a closed, controlled environment. The aim of this study was to determine the variation of photosynthetic characteristics and antioxidant status under five CO _{2} concentration (400, 800, 1200, 2000 and 3000 umol mol (-1) ) on the leaf of Gynura bicolor DC. Here the results show that net photosynthetic rate(Pn), Chl content, edible biomass(EB), leaf blade width(LBW), root weight(RW), fructose(Fru) and sucrose(Suc) of Gynura bicolor DC increased under elevated [CO _{2}] of 800 umol mol (-1) , 1200 umol mol (-1) and 2000 umol mol (-1) . On the contrary, photosynthesis and biomass production declined significantly at 3000 umol mol (-1) CO _{2}, While Lipid peroxidation (LPO), malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H _{2}O _{2}) achieved the highest levels. Furthermore, the contents of glutathione (GSH), vitamin C (VC), and vitamin E (VE), and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) reached the highest level at 2000 umol mol ({-1) }CO _{2}. Results imply that a significant increase in growth and antioxidant defense system of Gynura bicolor DC occurred under 800-2000 umol mol (-1) of CO _{2} concentration provided a theoretical basis for the application for plants selection in Bioregeneration Life Support System (BLSS) and a closed controlled environment.

  4. Root-shoot interactions explain the reduction of leaf mineral content in Arabidopsis plants grown under elevated [CO2 ] conditions.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Ivan; Aparicio-Tejo, Pedro M; Avila, Concepción; Cañas, Rafael; Sakalauskiene, Sandra; Aranjuelo, Iker

    2016-09-01

    Although shoot N depletion in plants exposed to elevated [CO2 ] has already been reported on several occasions, some uncertainty remains about the mechanisms involved. This study illustrates (1) the importance of characterizing root-shoot interactions and (2) the physiological, biochemical and gene expression mechanisms adopted by nitrate-fed Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under elevated [CO2 ]. Elevated [CO2 ] increases biomass and photosynthetic rates; nevertheless, the decline in total soluble protein, Rubisco and leaf N concentrations revealed a general decrease in leaf N availability. A transcriptomic approach (conducted at the root and shoot level) revealed that exposure to 800 ppm [CO2 ] induced the expression of genes involved in the transport of nitrate and mineral elements. Leaf N and mineral status revealed that N assimilation into proteins was constrained under elevated [CO2 ]. Moreover, this study also highlights how elevated [CO2 ] induced the reorganization of nitrate assimilation between tissues; root nitrogen assimilation was favored over leaf assimilation to offset the decline in nitrogen metabolism in the leaves of plants exposed to elevated [CO2 ]. PMID:26801348

  5. Implications of High Temperature and Elevated CO2 on Flowering Time in Plants.

    PubMed

    Jagadish, S V Krishna; Bahuguna, Rajeev N; Djanaguiraman, Maduraimuthu; Gamuyao, Rico; Prasad, P V Vara; Craufurd, Peter Q

    2016-01-01

    Flowering is a crucial determinant for plant reproductive success and seed-set. Increasing temperature and elevated carbon-dioxide (e[CO2]) are key climate change factors that could affect plant fitness and flowering related events. Addressing the effect of these environmental factors on flowering events such as time of day of anthesis (TOA) and flowering time (duration from germination till flowering) is critical to understand the adaptation of plants/crops to changing climate and is the major aim of this review. Increasing ambient temperature is the major climatic factor that advances flowering time in crops and other plants, with a modest effect of e[CO2].Integrated environmental stimuli such as photoperiod, temperature and e[CO2] regulating flowering time is discussed. The critical role of plant tissue temperature influencing TOA is highlighted and crop models need to substitute ambient air temperature with canopy or floral tissue temperature to improve predictions. A complex signaling network of flowering regulation with change in ambient temperature involving different transcription factors (PIF4, PIF5), flowering suppressors (HvODDSOC2, SVP, FLC) and autonomous pathway (FCA, FVE) genes, mainly from Arabidopsis, provides a promising avenue to improve our understanding of the dynamics of flowering time under changing climate. Elevated CO2 mediated changes in tissue sugar status and a direct [CO2]-driven regulatory pathway involving a key flowering gene, MOTHER OF FT AND TFL1 (MFT), are emerging evidence for the role of e[CO2] in flowering time regulation. PMID:27446143

  6. Implications of High Temperature and Elevated CO2 on Flowering Time in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jagadish, S. V. Krishna; Bahuguna, Rajeev N.; Djanaguiraman, Maduraimuthu; Gamuyao, Rico; Prasad, P. V. Vara; Craufurd, Peter Q.

    2016-01-01

    Flowering is a crucial determinant for plant reproductive success and seed-set. Increasing temperature and elevated carbon-dioxide (e[CO2]) are key climate change factors that could affect plant fitness and flowering related events. Addressing the effect of these environmental factors on flowering events such as time of day of anthesis (TOA) and flowering time (duration from germination till flowering) is critical to understand the adaptation of plants/crops to changing climate and is the major aim of this review. Increasing ambient temperature is the major climatic factor that advances flowering time in crops and other plants, with a modest effect of e[CO2].Integrated environmental stimuli such as photoperiod, temperature and e[CO2] regulating flowering time is discussed. The critical role of plant tissue temperature influencing TOA is highlighted and crop models need to substitute ambient air temperature with canopy or floral tissue temperature to improve predictions. A complex signaling network of flowering regulation with change in ambient temperature involving different transcription factors (PIF4, PIF5), flowering suppressors (HvODDSOC2, SVP, FLC) and autonomous pathway (FCA, FVE) genes, mainly from Arabidopsis, provides a promising avenue to improve our understanding of the dynamics of flowering time under changing climate. Elevated CO2 mediated changes in tissue sugar status and a direct [CO2]-driven regulatory pathway involving a key flowering gene, MOTHER OF FT AND TFL1 (MFT), are emerging evidence for the role of e[CO2] in flowering time regulation. PMID:27446143

  7. Antagonism between phytohormone signalling underlies the variation in disease susceptibility of tomato plants under elevated CO2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuai; Li, Xin; Sun, Zenghui; Shao, Shujun; Hu, Lingfei; Ye, Meng; Zhou, Yanhong; Xia, Xiaojian; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Increasing CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) have the potential to disrupt plant–pathogen interactions in natural and agricultural ecosystems, but the research in this area has often produced conflicting results. Variations in phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signalling could be associated with variations in the responses of pathogens to plants grown under elevated [CO2]. In this study, interactions between tomato plants and three pathogens with different infection strategies were compared. Elevated [CO2] generally favoured SA biosynthesis and signalling but repressed the JA pathway. The exposure of plants to elevated [CO2] revealed a lower incidence and severity of disease caused by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and by Pseudomonas syringae, whereas plant susceptibility to necrotrophic Botrytis cinerea increased. The elevated [CO2]-induced and basal resistance to TMV and P. syringae were completely abolished in plants in which the SA signalling pathway nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes 1 (NPR1) had been silenced or in transgenic plants defective in SA biosynthesis. In contrast, under both ambient and elevated [CO2], the susceptibility to B. cinerea highly increased in plants in which the JA signalling pathway proteinase inhibitors (PI) gene had been silenced or in a mutant affected in JA biosynthesis. However, plants affected in SA signalling remained less susceptible to this disease. These findings highlight the modulated antagonistic relationship between SA and JA that contributes to the variation in disease susceptibility under elevated [CO2]. This information will be critical for investigating how elevated CO2 may affect plant defence and the dynamics between plants and pathogens in both agricultural and natural ecosystems. PMID:25657213

  8. Arabidopsis Transcript and Metabolite Profiles: Ecotype-specific Acclimation to Open-air Elevated [CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A FACE (Free-Air CO2 Enrichment) experiment compared physiological parameters, and transcript and metabolite profiles of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes Col-0 and Cvi-0 at ambient (~375ppm) and elevated (~550ppm) CO2 concentration ([CO2]). Photosynthesis and photoassimilate pool sizes were enhanced in...

  9. A multi-biome gap in understanding of crop and ecosystem responses to elevated CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Open-top chamber (OTC) and Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments have advanced understanding of plant and ecosystem responses to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations ([CO2]). A key result from long-term experiments is that the magnitude of response to elevated [CO2] is dependent upo...

  10. Elevated CO2 maintains grassland net carbon uptake under a future heat and drought extreme.

    PubMed

    Roy, Jacques; Picon-Cochard, Catherine; Augusti, Angela; Benot, Marie-Lise; Thiery, Lionel; Darsonville, Olivier; Landais, Damien; Piel, Clément; Defossez, Marc; Devidal, Sébastien; Escape, Christophe; Ravel, Olivier; Fromin, Nathalie; Volaire, Florence; Milcu, Alexandru; Bahn, Michael; Soussana, Jean-François

    2016-05-31

    Extreme climatic events (ECEs) such as droughts and heat waves are predicted to increase in intensity and frequency and impact the terrestrial carbon balance. However, we lack direct experimental evidence of how the net carbon uptake of ecosystems is affected by ECEs under future elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2). Taking advantage of an advanced controlled environment facility for ecosystem research (Ecotron), we simulated eCO2 and extreme cooccurring heat and drought events as projected for the 2050s and analyzed their effects on the ecosystem-level carbon and water fluxes in a C3 grassland. Our results indicate that eCO2 not only slows down the decline of ecosystem carbon uptake during the ECE but also enhances its recovery after the ECE, as mediated by increases of root growth and plant nitrogen uptake induced by the ECE. These findings indicate that, in the predicted near future climate, eCO2 could mitigate the effects of extreme droughts and heat waves on ecosystem net carbon uptake. PMID:27185934

  11. Elevated CO2 maintains grassland net carbon uptake under a future heat and drought extreme

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Jacques; Picon-Cochard, Catherine; Augusti, Angela; Benot, Marie-Lise; Thiery, Lionel; Darsonville, Olivier; Landais, Damien; Piel, Clément; Defossez, Marc; Devidal, Sébastien; Escape, Christophe; Ravel, Olivier; Fromin, Nathalie; Volaire, Florence; Milcu, Alexandru; Bahn, Michael; Soussana, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Extreme climatic events (ECEs) such as droughts and heat waves are predicted to increase in intensity and frequency and impact the terrestrial carbon balance. However, we lack direct experimental evidence of how the net carbon uptake of ecosystems is affected by ECEs under future elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2). Taking advantage of an advanced controlled environment facility for ecosystem research (Ecotron), we simulated eCO2 and extreme cooccurring heat and drought events as projected for the 2050s and analyzed their effects on the ecosystem-level carbon and water fluxes in a C3 grassland. Our results indicate that eCO2 not only slows down the decline of ecosystem carbon uptake during the ECE but also enhances its recovery after the ECE, as mediated by increases of root growth and plant nitrogen uptake induced by the ECE. These findings indicate that, in the predicted near future climate, eCO2 could mitigate the effects of extreme droughts and heat waves on ecosystem net carbon uptake. PMID:27185934

  12. Changes in gene expression, cell physiology and toxicity of the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa at elevated CO2

    PubMed Central

    Sandrini, Giovanni; Cunsolo, Serena; Schuurmans, J. Merijn; Matthijs, Hans C. P.; Huisman, Jef

    2015-01-01

    Rising CO2 concentrations may have large effects on aquatic microorganisms. In this study, we investigated how elevated pCO2 affects the harmful freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. This species is capable of producing dense blooms and hepatotoxins called microcystins. Strain PCC 7806 was cultured in chemostats that were shifted from low to high pCO2 conditions. This resulted in a transition from a C-limited to a light-limited steady state, with a ~2.7-fold increase of the cyanobacterial biomass and ~2.5-fold more microcystin per cell. Cells increased their chlorophyll a and phycocyanin content, and raised their PSI/PSII ratio at high pCO2. Surprisingly, cells had a lower dry weight and contained less carbohydrates, which might be an adaptation to improve the buoyancy of Microcystis when light becomes more limiting at high pCO2. Only 234 of the 4691 genes responded to elevated pCO2. For instance, expression of the carboxysome, RuBisCO, photosystem and C metabolism genes did not change significantly, and only a few N assimilation genes were expressed differently. The lack of large-scale changes in the transcriptome could suit a buoyant species that lives in eutrophic lakes with strong CO2 fluctuations very well. However, we found major responses in inorganic carbon uptake. At low pCO2, cells were mainly dependent on bicarbonate uptake, whereas at high pCO2 gene expression of the bicarbonate uptake systems was down-regulated and cells shifted to CO2 and low-affinity bicarbonate uptake. These results show that the need for high-affinity bicarbonate uptake systems ceases at elevated CO2. Moreover, the combination of an increased cyanobacterial abundance, improved buoyancy, and higher toxin content per cell indicates that rising atmospheric CO2 levels may increase the problems associated with the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis in eutrophic lakes. PMID:25999931

  13. Increased CO2 stimulates reproduction in a coral reef fish.

    PubMed

    Miller, Gabrielle M; Watson, Sue-Ann; McCormick, Mark I; Munday, Philip L

    2013-10-01

    Ocean acidification is predicted to negatively impact the reproduction of many marine species, either by reducing fertilization success or diverting energy from reproductive effort. While recent studies have demonstrated how ocean acidification will affect larval and juvenile fishes, little is known about how increasing partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO(2)) and decreasing pH might affect reproduction in adult fishes. We investigated the effects of near-future levels of pCO(2) on the reproductive performance of the cinnamon anemonefish, Amphiprion melanopus, from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Breeding pairs were held under three CO(2) treatments [Current-day Control (430 μatm), Moderate (584 μatm) and High (1032 μatm)] for a 9-month period that included the summer breeding season. Unexpectedly, increased CO(2) dramatically stimulated breeding activity in this species of fish. Over twice as many pairs bred in the Moderate (67% of pairs) and High (55%) compared to the Control (27%) CO(2) treatment. Pairs in the High CO(2) group produced double the number of clutches per pair and 67% more eggs per clutch compared to the Moderate and Control groups. As a result, reproductive output in the High group was 82% higher than that in the Control group and 50% higher than that in the Moderate group. Despite the increase in reproductive activity, there was no difference in adult body condition among the three treatment groups. There was no significant difference in hatchling length between the treatment groups, but larvae from the High CO(2) group had smaller yolks than Controls. This study provides the first evidence of the potential effects of ocean acidification on key reproductive attributes of marine fishes and, contrary to expectations, demonstrates an initially stimulatory (hormetic) effect in response to increased pCO(2). However, any long-term consequences of increased reproductive effort on individuals or populations remain to be determined. PMID:23686937

  14. Can increased atmospheric CO2 levels trigger a runaway greenhouse?

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Ramses M; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Lindner, Valerie; Kasting, James F

    2014-08-01

    Recent one-dimensional (globally averaged) climate model calculations by Goldblatt et al. (2013) suggest that increased atmospheric CO(2) could conceivably trigger a runaway greenhouse on present Earth if CO(2) concentrations were approximately 100 times higher than they are today. The new prediction runs contrary to previous calculations by Kasting and Ackerman (1986), which indicated that CO(2) increases could not trigger a runaway, even at Venus-like CO(2) concentrations. Goldblatt et al. argued that this different behavior is a consequence of updated absorption coefficients for H(2)O that make a runaway more likely. Here, we use a 1-D climate model with similar, up-to-date absorption coefficients, but employ a different methodology, to show that the older result is probably still valid, although our model nearly runs away at ∼12 preindustrial atmospheric levels of CO(2) when we use the most alarmist assumptions possible. However, we argue that Earth's real climate is probably stable given more realistic assumptions, although 3-D climate models will be required to verify this result. Potential CO(2) increases from fossil fuel burning are somewhat smaller than this, 10-fold or less, but such increases could still cause sufficient warming to make much of the planet uninhabitable by humans. PMID:25061956

  15. Elevated CO2 enhances otolith growth in young fish.

    PubMed

    Checkley, David M; Dickson, Andrew G; Takahashi, Motomitsu; Radich, J Adam; Eisenkolb, Nadine; Asch, Rebecca

    2009-06-26

    A large fraction of the carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere by human activity enters the sea, causing ocean acidification. We show that otoliths (aragonite ear bones) of young fish grown under high CO2 (low pH) conditions are larger than normal, contrary to expectation. We hypothesize that CO2 moves freely through the epithelium around the otoliths in young fish, accelerating otolith growth while the local pH is controlled. This is the converse of the effect commonly reported for structural biominerals. PMID:19556502

  16. Responses of soil cellulolytic fungal communities to elevated atmospheric CO2 are complex and variableacross five ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Carolyn F; Zak, Donald R; Hungate, Bruce; Jackson, Robert B; Vilgalys, Rytas; Evans, R David; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Megonigal, J. Patrick; Kuske, Cheryl R

    2011-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO(2) generally increases plant productivity and subsequently increases the availability of cellulose in soil to microbial decomposers. As key cellulose degraders, soil fungi are likely to be one of the most impacted and responsive microbial groups to elevated atmospheric CO(2) . To investigate the impacts of ecosystem type and elevated atmospheric CO(2) on cellulolytic fungal communities, we sequenced 10 677 cbhI gene fragments encoding the catalytic subunit of cellobiohydrolase I, across five distinct terrestrial ecosystem experiments after a decade of exposure to elevated CO(2) . The cbhI composition of each ecosystem was distinct, as supported by weighted Unifrac analyses (all P-values; < 0.001), with few operational taxonomic units (OTUs) being shared across ecosystems. Using a 114-member cbhI sequence database compiled from known fungi, less than 1% of the environmental sequences could be classified at the family level indicating that cellulolytic fungi in situ are likely dominated by novel fungi or known fungi that are not yet recognized as cellulose degraders. Shifts in fungal cbhI composition and richness that were correlated with elevated CO(2) exposure varied across the ecosystems. In aspen plantation and desert creosote bush soils, cbhI gene richness was significantly higher after exposure to elevated CO(2) (550 mol mol(-1) ) than under ambient CO(2) (360 mol mol(-1) CO(2) ). In contrast, while the richness was not altered, the relative abundance of dominant OTUs in desert soil crusts was significantly shifted. This suggests that responses are complex, vary across different ecosystems and, in at least one case, are OTU-specific. Collectively, our results document the complexity of cellulolytic fungal communities in multiple terrestrial ecosystems and the variability of their responses to long-term exposure to elevated atmospheric CO(2) .

  17. The effects of elevated [CO2] on soybean gene expression. An analysis of growing and mature leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improvements in carbon assimilation and water use efficiency lead to increases in maximum leaf area index at elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]); however, the molecular drivers for this increase are unknown. We investigated the molecular basis for changes in leaf development at elevated [...

  18. Impact of elevated CO2 on a Florida Scrub-oak Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, Bert G

    2013-01-01

    Since May of 1996, we have conducted an experiment in Florida Scrub Oak to determine the impact of elevated atmospheric CO2 and climate change on carbon, water, and nutrient cycling in this important terrestrial ecosystem. Florida scrub oak is the name for a collective of species occupying much of the Florida peninsula. The dominant tree species are oaks and the dwarf structure of this community makes it an excellent system in which to test hypotheses regarding the potential capacity of woody ecosystems to assimilate and sequester anthropogenic carbon. Scrub oak is fire dependent with a return cycle of 10-15 years, a time which would permit an experiment to follow the entire cycle. Our site is located on Cape Canaveral at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. After burning in 1995, we built 16 open top chambers, half of which have been fumigated with pure CO2 sufficient to raise the concentration around the plants to 350 ppm above ambient. In the intervening 10 years we have non destructively measured biomass of shoots and roots, ecosystem gas exchange using chambers and eddy flux, leaf photosynthesis and respiration, soil respiration, and relevant environmental factors such as soil water availability, temperature, light, etc. The overwhelming result from analysis of our extensive data base is that elevated CO2 has had a profound impact on this ecosystem that, overall, has resulted in increased carbon accumulation in plant shoots, roots and litter. Our measurements of net ecosystem gas exchange also indicate that the ecosystem has accumulated carbon much in excess of the increased biomass or soil carbon suggesting a substantial export of carbon through the porous, sandy soil into the water table several meters below the surface. A major discovery is the powerful interaction between the stimulation of growth, photosynthesis, and respiration by elevated CO2 and other environmental factors particularly precipitation and nitrogen. Our measurements focused attention on

  19. Phosphorus availability and elevated CO2 affect biological nitrogen fixation and nutrient fluxes in a clover-dominated sward.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Everard J; McCaffery, Stephanie; Evans, John R

    2006-01-01

    The response of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) to elevated CO(2) was examined in white clover (Trifolium repens)-dominated swards under both high and low phosphorus availability. Mixed swards of clover and buffalo grass (Stenotaphrum secundatum) were grown for 15 months in 0.2 m2 sand-filled mesocosms under two CO2 treatments (ambient and twice ambient) and three nutrient treatments [no N, and either low or high P (5 or 134 kg P ha(-1)); the third nutrient treatment was supplied with high P and N (240 kg N ha(-1))]. Under ambient CO2, high P increased BNF from 410 to 900 kg ha(-1). Elevated CO2 further increased BNF to 1180 kg ha(-1) with high P, but there was no effect of CO2 on BNF with low P. Allocation of N belowground increased by approx. 50% under elevated CO2 irrespective of supplied P. The results suggest that where soil P availability is low, elevated CO2 will not increase BNF, and pasture quality could decrease because of a reduction in aboveground N. PMID:16390427

  20. Invasive forb benefits from water savings by native plants and carbon fertilization under elevated CO2 and warming.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Dana M; Resco, Víctor; Morgan, Jack A; Williams, David G; Lecain, Daniel R; Hardy, Erik M; Pendall, Elise; Bladyka, Emma

    2013-12-01

    As global changes reorganize plant communities, invasive plants may benefit. We hypothesized that elevated CO2 and warming would strongly influence invasive species success in a semi-arid grassland, as a result of both direct and water-mediated indirect effects. To test this hypothesis, we transplanted the invasive forb Linaria dalmatica into mixed-grass prairie treated with free-air CO2 enrichment and infrared warming, and followed survival, growth, and reproduction over 4 yr. We also measured leaf gas exchange and carbon isotopic composition in L. dalmatica and the dominant native C3 grass Pascopyrum smithii. CO2 enrichment increased L. dalmatica biomass 13-fold, seed production 32-fold, and clonal expansion seven-fold, while warming had little effect on L. dalmatica biomass or reproduction. Elevated CO2 decreased stomatal conductance in P. smithii, contributing to higher soil water, but not in L. dalmatica. Elevated CO2 also strongly increased L. dalmatica photosynthesis (87% versus 23% in P. smithii), as a result of both enhanced carbon supply and increased soil water. More broadly, rapid growth and less conservative water use may allow invasive species to take advantage of both carbon fertilization and water savings under elevated CO2 . Water-limited ecosystems may therefore be particularly vulnerable to invasion as CO2 increases. PMID:24033081

  1. Impacts of elevated atmospheric CO2 on nutrient content of important food crops

    PubMed Central

    Dietterich, Lee H.; Zanobetti, Antonella; Kloog, Itai; Huybers, Peter; Leakey, Andrew D. B.; Bloom, Arnold J.; Carlisle, Eli; Fernando, Nimesha; Fitzgerald, Glenn; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Holbrook, N. Michele; Nelson, Randall L.; Norton, Robert; Ottman, Michael J.; Raboy, Victor; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Sartor, Karla A.; Schwartz, Joel; Seneweera, Saman; Usui, Yasuhiro; Yoshinaga, Satoshi; Myers, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    One of the many ways that climate change may affect human health is by altering the nutrient content of food crops. However, previous attempts to study the effects of increased atmospheric CO2 on crop nutrition have been limited by small sample sizes and/or artificial growing conditions. Here we present data from a meta-analysis of the nutritional contents of the edible portions of 41 cultivars of six major crop species grown using free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) technology to expose crops to ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations in otherwise normal field cultivation conditions. This data, collected across three continents, represents over ten times more data on the nutrient content of crops grown in FACE experiments than was previously available. We expect it to be deeply useful to future studies, such as efforts to understand the impacts of elevated atmospheric CO2 on crop macro- and micronutrient concentrations, or attempts to alleviate harmful effects of these changes for the billions of people who depend on these crops for essential nutrients. PMID:26217490

  2. Evolutionary History and Novel Biotic Interactions Determine Plant Responses to Elevated CO2 and Nitrogen Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Wooliver, Rachel; Senior, John K.; Schweitzer, Jennifer A.; O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M.; Langley, J. Adam; Chapman, Samantha K.; Bailey, Joseph K.

    2014-01-01

    A major frontier in global change research is predicting how multiple agents of global change will alter plant productivity, a critical component of the carbon cycle. Recent research has shown that plant responses to climate change are phylogenetically conserved such that species within some lineages are more productive than those within other lineages in changing environments. However, it remains unclear how phylogenetic patterns in plant responses to changing abiotic conditions may be altered by another agent of global change, the introduction of non-native species. Using a system of 28 native Tasmanian Eucalyptus species belonging to two subgenera, Symphyomyrtus and Eucalyptus, we hypothesized that productivity responses to abiotic agents of global change (elevated CO2 and increased soil N) are unique to lineages, but that novel interactions with a non-native species mediate these responses. We tested this hypothesis by examining productivity of 1) native species monocultures and 2) mixtures of native species with an introduced hardwood plantation species, Eucalyptus nitens, to experimentally manipulated soil N and atmospheric CO2. Consistent with past research, we found that N limits productivity overall, especially in elevated CO2 conditions. However, monocultures of species within the Symphyomyrtus subgenus showed the strongest response to N (gained 127% more total biomass) in elevated CO2 conditions, whereas those within the Eucalyptus subgenus did not respond to N. Root:shoot ratio (an indicator of resource use) was on average greater in species pairs containing Symphyomyrtus species, suggesting that functional traits important for resource uptake are phylogenetically conserved and explaining the phylogenetic pattern in plant response to changing environmental conditions. Yet, native species mixtures with E. nitens exhibited responses to CO2 and N that differed from those of monocultures, supporting our hypothesis and highlighting that both plant

  3. Evolutionary history and novel biotic interactions determine plant responses to elevated CO2 and nitrogen fertilization.

    PubMed

    Wooliver, Rachel; Senior, John K; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M; Langley, J Adam; Chapman, Samantha K; Bailey, Joseph K

    2014-01-01

    A major frontier in global change research is predicting how multiple agents of global change will alter plant productivity, a critical component of the carbon cycle. Recent research has shown that plant responses to climate change are phylogenetically conserved such that species within some lineages are more productive than those within other lineages in changing environments. However, it remains unclear how phylogenetic patterns in plant responses to changing abiotic conditions may be altered by another agent of global change, the introduction of non-native species. Using a system of 28 native Tasmanian Eucalyptus species belonging to two subgenera, Symphyomyrtus and Eucalyptus, we hypothesized that productivity responses to abiotic agents of global change (elevated CO2 and increased soil N) are unique to lineages, but that novel interactions with a non-native species mediate these responses. We tested this hypothesis by examining productivity of 1) native species monocultures and 2) mixtures of native species with an introduced hardwood plantation species, Eucalyptus nitens, to experimentally manipulated soil N and atmospheric CO2. Consistent with past research, we found that N limits productivity overall, especially in elevated CO2 conditions. However, monocultures of species within the Symphyomyrtus subgenus showed the strongest response to N (gained 127% more total biomass) in elevated CO2 conditions, whereas those within the Eucalyptus subgenus did not respond to N. Root:shoot ratio (an indicator of resource use) was on average greater in species pairs containing Symphyomyrtus species, suggesting that functional traits important for resource uptake are phylogenetically conserved and explaining the phylogenetic pattern in plant response to changing environmental conditions. Yet, native species mixtures with E. nitens exhibited responses to CO2 and N that differed from those of monocultures, supporting our hypothesis and highlighting that both plant

  4. Challenges in Elevated CO2 Experiments on Forests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current forest Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments are reaching completion. It is the time to define the scientific goals and priorities of future experimental facilities. The overarching issues are three-fold: first, which are the most urgent scientific questions and which technological aspe...

  5. Mineralization of soil organic matter in two elevated CO2 by warming experiments in grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experimentally elevated atmospheric CO2 has enhanced carbon (C) allocation belowground, while ecosystem warming has led to losses of soil C due to enhanced mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM). Few investigations of possible interactions between elevated CO2 and temperature have been reported...

  6. DO ELEVATED CO2 AND N FERTILIZATION ALTER FINE ROOT-MYCORRHIZAE RELATIONSHIPS IN PINUS PONDEROSA?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite extensive studies on the response of plants to elevated CO2, climate change and N deposition, little is known about the response of roots and mycorrhizae in spite of their key role in plant water and nutrient acquisition. The effects of elevated CO2 and N fertilization on...

  7. Contrasting Effects of Elevated CO2 and Warming on Nitrogen Cycling in a Semiarid Grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulation models indicate that the nitrogen (N) cycle plays a key role in how other ecosystem processes such as plant productivity and carbon (C) sequestration respond to elevated CO2 and warming. However, combined effects of elevated CO2 and warming on N cycling have rarely been tested in the fie...

  8. Nitrate assimilation is inhibited by elevated CO2 in field-grown wheat.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To test the hypothesis that the decline in shoot organic nitrogen in C3 plants exposed to elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) atmospheres derives from CO2 inhibition of shoot nitrate (NO3–) assimilation, we analyzed wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), grown under elevated and ambient atmospheric concentrations ...

  9. Nitrogen-mediated effects of elevated CO2 on intra-aggregate soil pore structure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While previous elevated atmospheric CO2 research has addressed changes in belowground processes, its effects on soil structure remain virtually undescribed. This study examined the long-term effects of elevated CO2 and N fertilization on soil structural changes in a bahiagrass pasture grown on a san...

  10. Elevated CO2 affects plant responses to variation in boron availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of elevated CO2 on N relations are well studied, but effects on other nutrients, especially micronutrients, are not. We investigated effects of elevated CO2 on response to variation in boron (B) availability in three unrelated species: geranium (Pelargonium x hortorum), barley (Hordeum vulga...

  11. Elevated CO2 alters root N uptake and C turnover in Larrea tridentata L

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To examine the impact of elevated CO2 on root N uptake, soil N availability and the feedbacks between them, we quantified the effects of elevated CO2 and N additions on root N uptake and leaf C gain in Larrea tridentata seedlings grown in reconstituted Mojave Desert soils. After six months of growt...

  12. Elevated CO2 did not mitigate the effect of a short-term drought on biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wertin, Timothy M.; Phillips, Susan L.; Reed, Sasha C.; Belnap, Jayne

    2012-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are critical components of arid and semi-arid ecosystems that contribute significantly to carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fixation, water retention, soil stability, and seedling recruitment. While dry-land ecosystems face a number of environmental changes, our understanding of how biocrusts may respond to such perturbation remains notably poor. To determine the effect that elevated CO2 may have on biocrust composition, cover, and function, we measured percent soil surface cover, effective quantum yield, and pigment concentrations of naturally occurring biocrusts growing in ambient and elevated CO2 at the desert study site in Nevada, USA, from spring 2005 through spring 2007. During the experiment, a year-long drought allowed us to explore the interacting effects that elevated CO2 and water availability may have on biocrust cover and function. We found that, regardless of CO2 treatment, precipitation was the major regulator of biocrust cover. Drought reduced moss and lichen cover to near-zero in both ambient and elevated CO2 plots, suggesting that elevated CO2 did not alleviate water stress or increase C fixation to levels sufficient to mitigate drought-induced reduction in cover. In line with this result, lichen quantum yield and soil cyanobacteria pigment concentrations appeared more strongly dependent upon recent precipitation than CO2 treatment, although we did find evidence that, when hydrated, elevated CO2 increased lichen C fixation potential. Thus, an increase in atmospheric CO2 may only benefit biocrusts if overall climate patterns shift to create a wetter soil environment.

  13. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide increases soil carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Norby, Richard J; Jastrow, Julie D; Miller, Michael R; Matamala, Roser; Boutton, Thomas W; Rice, Charles W; Owensby, Clenton E

    2005-01-01

    In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, researchers from Argonne and Oak Ridge National Laboratories and Kansas State and Texas A&M Universities evaluated the collective results of earlier studies by using a statistical procedure called meta-analysis. They found that on average elevated CO2 increased soil carbon by 5.6 percent over a two to nine year period. They also measured comparable increases in soil carbon for Tennessee deciduous forest and Kansas grassland after five to eight years of experimental exposure to elevated CO2.

  14. Elevated CO2 Modifies N Acquisition of Medicago truncatula by Enhancing N Fixation and Reducing Nitrate Uptake from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huijuan; Sun, Yucheng; Li, Yuefei; Liu, Xianghui; Ren, Qin; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan; Ge, Feng

    2013-01-01

    The effects of elevated CO2 (750 ppm vs. 390 ppm) were evaluated on nitrogen (N) acquisition and assimilation by three Medicago truncatula genotypes, including two N-fixing-deficient mutants (dnf1-1 and dnf1-2) and their wild-type (Jemalong). The proportion of N acquisition from atmosphere and soil were quantified by 15N stable isotope, and N transportation and assimilation-related genes and enzymes were determined by qPCR and biochemical analysis. Elevated CO2 decreased nitrate uptake from soil in all three plant genotypes by down-regulating nitrate reductase (NR), nitrate transporter NRT1.1 and NR activity. Jemalong plant, however, produced more nodules, up-regulated N-fixation-related genes and enhanced percentage of N derived from fixation (%Ndf) to increase foliar N concentration and N content in whole plant (Ntotal Yield) to satisfy the requirement of larger biomass under elevated CO2. In contrast, both dnf1 mutants deficient in N fixation consequently decreased activity of glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase (GS/GOGAT) and N concentration under elevated CO2. Our results suggest that elevated CO2 is likely to modify N acquisition of M. truncatula by simultaneously increasing N fixation and reducing nitrate uptake from soil. We propose that elevated CO2 causes legumes to rely more on N fixation than on N uptake from soil to satisfy N requirements. PMID:24339920

  15. Elevated CO2 Influences Nematode-Induced Defense Responses of Tomato Genotypes Differing in the JA Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yucheng; Yin, Jin; Cao, Haifeng; Li, Chuanyou; Kang, Le; Ge, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations can affect the induced defense of plants against chewing herbivores but little is known about whether elevated CO2 can change the induced defense of plants against parasitic nematodes. This study examined the interactions between the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita and three isogenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) genotypes grown under ambient (390 ppm) and elevated (750 ppm) CO2 in growth chambers. In a previous study with open-top chambers in the field, we reported that elevated CO2 increased the number of nematode-induced root galls in a JA-defense-dominated genotype but not in a wild-type or JA-defense-recessive genotype. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that elevated CO2 will favor the salicylic acid (SA)-pathway defense but repress the jasmonic acid (JA)-pathway defense of plants against plant-parasitic nematodes. Our data showed that elevated CO2 reduced the JA-pathway defense against M. incognita in the wild-type and in a genotype in which defense is dominated by the JA pathway (a JA-defense-dominated genotype) but up-regulated the SA-pathway defense in the wild type and in a JA-defense-recessive genotype (jasmonate-deficient mutant). Our results suggest that, in terms of defense genes, secondary metabolites, and volatile organic compounds, induced defense of nematode-infected plants could be affected by elevated CO2, and that CO2-induced changes of plant resistance may lead to genotype-specific responses of plants to nematodes under elevated CO2. The changes in resistance against nematodes, however, were small relative to those reported for chewing insects. PMID:21629688

  16. Effects of elevated CO2 on biomass and fungi associated with two ecotypes of ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.)

    PubMed Central

    Runion, G. Brett; Prior, Stephen A.; Price, Andrew J.; McElroy, J. Scott; Torbert, H. Allen

    2014-01-01

    Herbicide resistant weed populations have developed due to the repeated application of herbicides. Elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 can have positive effects on weed growth, but how rising CO2 might affect herbicide resistant weeds is not known. Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) ecotypes known to be resistant or susceptible to glyphosate herbicide were exposed to either ambient or elevated (ambient +200 μ mol mol−1) concentrations of CO2 in open top chambers. Plants were harvested following 8 weeks of CO2 exposure; at this time, they had begun to exhibit disease symptoms including spots on leaves and stems. Elevated CO2 significantly increased top, root, and total plant biomass. Also, glyphosate resistant plants had significantly greater top, root, and total biomass than plants susceptible to the herbicide. There were no significant CO2 by ecotype interactions. Fungi from 13 genera were associated with ragweed, several of which can be either pathogens (i.e., Alternaria, Fusarium, Rhizoctonia), aiding the decline in health of the ragweed plants, or saprophytes existing on dead plant tissues. The common foliar disease powdery mildew was significantly higher on susceptible compared with resistant ragweed. Susceptible plants also showed an increased frequency of Rhizoctonia on leaves and Alternaria on stems; however, Fusarium occurred more frequently on resistant ragweed leaves. Fungi were not affected by CO2 concentration or its interaction with ecotype. This study reports the first information on the effects of elevated CO2 on growth of herbicide resistant weeds. This is also the first study examining the impact of herbicide resistance and elevated CO2 on fungi associated with weeds. What effects herbicide resistance might have on plant diseases and how rising atmospheric CO2 might impact these effects needs to be addressed, not only with important weeds but also with crops. PMID:25309569

  17. Effects of elevated CO2 on biomass and fungi associated with two ecotypes of ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.).

    PubMed

    Runion, G Brett; Prior, Stephen A; Price, Andrew J; McElroy, J Scott; Torbert, H Allen

    2014-01-01

    Herbicide resistant weed populations have developed due to the repeated application of herbicides. Elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 can have positive effects on weed growth, but how rising CO2 might affect herbicide resistant weeds is not known. Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) ecotypes known to be resistant or susceptible to glyphosate herbicide were exposed to either ambient or elevated (ambient +200 μ mol mol(-1)) concentrations of CO2 in open top chambers. Plants were harvested following 8 weeks of CO2 exposure; at this time, they had begun to exhibit disease symptoms including spots on leaves and stems. Elevated CO2 significantly increased top, root, and total plant biomass. Also, glyphosate resistant plants had significantly greater top, root, and total biomass than plants susceptible to the herbicide. There were no significant CO2 by ecotype interactions. Fungi from 13 genera were associated with ragweed, several of which can be either pathogens (i.e., Alternaria, Fusarium, Rhizoctonia), aiding the decline in health of the ragweed plants, or saprophytes existing on dead plant tissues. The common foliar disease powdery mildew was significantly higher on susceptible compared with resistant ragweed. Susceptible plants also showed an increased frequency of Rhizoctonia on leaves and Alternaria on stems; however, Fusarium occurred more frequently on resistant ragweed leaves. Fungi were not affected by CO2 concentration or its interaction with ecotype. This study reports the first information on the effects of elevated CO2 on growth of herbicide resistant weeds. This is also the first study examining the impact of herbicide resistance and elevated CO2 on fungi associated with weeds. What effects herbicide resistance might have on plant diseases and how rising atmospheric CO2 might impact these effects needs to be addressed, not only with important weeds but also with crops. PMID:25309569

  18. Elevated Atmospheric CO2 Triggers Compensatory Feeding by Root Herbivores on a C3 but Not a C4 Grass

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Scott N.; Lopaticki, Goran; Hartley, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Predicted increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations often reduce nutritional quality for herbivores by increasing the C∶N ratio of plant tissue. This frequently triggers compensatory feeding by aboveground herbivores, whereby they consume more shoot material in an attempt to meet their nutritional needs. Little, however, is known about how root herbivores respond to such changes. Grasslands are particularly vulnerable to root herbivores, which can collectively exceed the mass of mammals grazing aboveground. Here we provide novel evidence for compensatory feeding by a grass root herbivore, Sericesthis nigrolineata, under elevated atmospheric CO2 (600 µmol mol−1) on a C3 (Microlaena stipoides) but not a C4 (Cymbopogon refractus) grass species. At ambient CO2 (400 µmol mol−1) M. stipoides roots were 44% higher in nitrogen (N) and 7% lower in carbon (C) concentrations than C. refractus, with insects performing better on M. stipoides. Elevated CO2 decreased N and increased C∶N in M. stipoides roots, but had no impact on C. refractus roots. Root-feeders displayed compensatory feeding on M. stipoides at elevated CO2, consuming 118% more tissue than at ambient atmospheric CO2. Despite this, root feeder biomass remained depressed by 24%. These results suggest that compensatory feeding under elevated atmospheric CO2 may make some grass species particularly vulnerable to attack, potentially leading to future shifts in the community composition of grasslands. PMID:24651855

  19. Mineralization of Soil Organic Matter in Two Elevated CO2 by Warming Experiments in Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendall, E.; Hovenden, M.; Williams, A.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Morgan, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Experimentally elevated atmospheric CO2 has enhanced carbon (C) allocation belowground, while ecosystem warming has led to losses of soil C due to enhanced mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM). Few investigations of possible interactions between elevated CO2 and temperature have been reported, but the potential for C cycling effects not to be simply additive is high. We have taken advantage of two multi-factor global change experiments being conducted in mixed C3/C4 grasslands to evaluate similarities and differences in responses of SOM mineralization rates. The TasFACE experiment in Tasmania, Australia, has been running for over 5 years, while the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment (PHACE) experiment in Wyoming, USA, has been running for less than 2 years. Both experiments employ mini-FACE systems (enriched plots targeted at 550 at TasFACE and 600 ppm at PHACE) and overhead ceramic infrared emitters (heated plots targeted at +2 degrees C at TasFACE and +1.5/+3 degrees day/night at PHACE). Soil samples collected after 5 years at TasFACE and at the beginning of the second year at PHACE were incubated for three weeks to evaluate changes in labile SOM pool sizes and turnover rates. We hypothesized that elevated CO2 would enhance labile SOM pool size and that warming would reduce it, and that warming would stimulate decomposition rate. Preliminary results suggested that five years of warming enhanced decomposition rate in the TasFACE soils, but only under the C4 grass species, whereas the first two months of warming had no effects on decomposition rate at PHACE. Elevated CO2 increased mineralizable C pool sizes by 10 to 30 percent, depending on depth, in the TasFACE soils, but did not significantly alter C cycling in the PHACE soils. Short experimental duration likely explained the lack of treatment effects seen at PHACE. We plan to continue conducting parallel experiments to track temporal changes in C cycling with the expectation that interactive effects of

  20. Elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentration and temperature across an urban-rural transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, K.; Ziska, L. H.; Bunce, J. A.; Quebedeaux, B.

    The heat island effect and the high use of fossil fuels in large city centers are well documented, but by how much fossil fuel consumption is elevating atmospheric CO 2 concentrations and whether elevations in both atmospheric CO 2 and air temperature from rural to urban areas are consistently different from year to year are less well known. Our aim was to record atmospheric CO 2 concentrations, air temperature and other environmental variables in an urban area and compare it to suburban and rural sites to see if urban sites are experiencing climates expected globally in the future with climate change. A transect was established from Baltimore city center (Urban site), to the outer suburbs of Baltimore (suburban site) and out to an organic farm (rural site). At each site a weather station was set-up to monitor environmental variables for 5 years. Atmospheric CO 2 was consistently and significantly increased on average by 66 ppm from the rural to the urban site over the 5 years of the study. Air temperature was also consistently and significantly higher at the urban site (14.8 °C) compared to the suburban (13.6 °C) and rural (12.7 °C) sites. Relative humidity was not different between sites whereas the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) was significantly higher at the urban site compared to the suburban and rural sites. An increase in nitrogen deposition at the rural site of 0.6% and 1.0% compared to the suburban and urban sites was small enough not to affect soil nitrogen content. Dense urban areas with large populations and high vehicular traffic have significantly different microclimates compared to outlying suburban and rural areas. The increases in atmospheric CO 2 and air temperature are similar to changes predicted in the short term with global climate change, therefore providing an environment suitable for studying future effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems.

  1. Effects of Elevated CO2 on Litter Chemistry and Subsequent Invertebrate Detritivore Feeding Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dray, Matthew W.; Crowther, Thomas W.; Thomas, Stephen M.; A’Bear, A. Donald; Godbold, Douglas L.; Ormerod, Steve J.; Hartley, Susan E.; Jones, T. Hefin

    2014-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 can change foliar tissue chemistry. This alters leaf litter palatability to macroinvertebrate detritivores with consequences for decomposition, nutrient turnover, and food-web structure. Currently there is no consensus on the link between CO2 enrichment, litter chemistry, and macroinvertebrate-mediated leaf decomposition. To identify any unifying mechanisms, we presented eight invertebrate species from aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems with litter from Alnus glutinosa (common alder) or Betula pendula (silver birch) trees propagated under ambient (380 ppm) or elevated (ambient +200 ppm) CO2 concentrations. Alder litter was largely unaffected by CO2 enrichment, but birch litter from leaves grown under elevated CO2 had reduced nitrogen concentrations and greater C/N ratios. Invertebrates were provided individually with either (i) two litter discs, one of each CO2 treatment (‘choice’), or (ii) one litter disc of each CO2 treatment alone (‘no-choice’). Consumption was recorded. Only Odontocerum albicorne showed a feeding preference in the choice test, consuming more ambient- than elevated-CO2 birch litter. Species’ responses to alder were highly idiosyncratic in the no-choice test: Gammarus pulex and O. albicorne consumed more elevated-CO2 than ambient-CO2 litter, indicating compensatory feeding, while Oniscus asellus consumed more of the ambient-CO2 litter. No species responded to CO2 treatment when fed birch litter. Overall, these results show how elevated atmospheric CO2 can alter litter chemistry, affecting invertebrate feeding behaviour in species-specific ways. The data highlight the need for greater species-level information when predicting changes to detrital processing–a key ecosystem function–under atmospheric change. PMID:24465985

  2. Effects of elevated CO2 on fine root dynamics in a Mojave Desert community: A FACE study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, D.L.; Johnson, M.G.; Tingey, D.T.; Catricala, C.E.; Hoyman, T.L.; Nowak, R.S.

    2006-01-01

    Fine roots (??? 1mm diameter) are critical in plant water and nutrient absorption, and it is important to understand how rising atmospheric CO2 will affect them as part of terrestrial ecosystem responses to global change. This study's objective was to determine effects of elevated CO2 on production, mortality, and standing crops of fine root length over 2 years in a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) facility in the Mojave Desert of southern Nevada, USA. Three replicate 25m diameter FACE rings were maintained at ambient (??? 370 ??mol mol-1) and elevated CO2 (??? 550 ??mol mol-1) atmospheric concentrations. Twenty-eight minirhizotron tubes were placed in each ring to sample three microsite locations: evergreen Larrea shrubs, drought-deciduous Ambrosia shrubs, and along systematic community transects (primarily in shrub interspaces which account for ??? 85% of the area). Seasonal dynamics were similar for ambient and elevated CO2: fine root production peaked in April-June, with peak standing crop occurring about 1 month later, and peak mortality occurring during the hot summer months, with higher values for all three measures in a wet year compared with a dry year. Fine root standing crop, production, and mortality were not significantly different between treatments except standing crop along community transects, where fine root length was significantly lower in elevated CO2. Fine root turnover (annual cumulative mortality/mean standing crop) ranged from 2.33 to 3.17 year-1, and was not significantly different among CO2 treatments, except for community transect tubes where it was significantly lower for elevated CO2. There were no differences in fine root responses to CO2 between evergreen (Larrea) and drought-deciduous (Ambrosia) shrubs. Combined with observations of increased leaf-level water-use efficiency and lack of soil moisture differences, these results suggest that under elevated CO2 conditions, reduced root systems (compared with ambient CO2) appear sufficient

  3. Transcriptome and biomineralization responses of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata to elevated CO2 and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiguo; Liu, Chuang; Huang, Jingliang; Liu, Yangjia; Zhang, Shuwen; Zheng, Guilan; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2016-01-01

    Ocean acidification and global warming have been shown to significantly affect the physiological performances of marine calcifiers; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, the transcriptome and biomineralization responses of Pinctada fucata to elevated CO2 (pH 7.8 and pH 7.5) and temperature (25 °C and 31 °C) are investigated. Increases in CO2 and temperature induced significant changes in gene expression, alkaline phosphatase activity, net calcification rates and relative calcium content, whereas no changes are observed in the shell ultrastructure. “Ion and acid-base regulation” related genes and “amino acid metabolism” pathway respond to the elevated CO2 (pH 7.8), suggesting that P. fucata implements a compensatory acid-base mechanism to mitigate the effects of low pH. Additionally, “anti-oxidation”-related genes and “Toll-like receptor signaling”, “arachidonic acid metabolism”, “lysosome” and “other glycan degradation” pathways exhibited responses to elevated temperature (25 °C and 31 °C), suggesting that P. fucata utilizes anti-oxidative and lysosome strategies to alleviate the effects of temperature stress. These responses are energy-consuming processes, which can lead to a decrease in biomineralization capacity. This study therefore is important for understanding the mechanisms by which pearl oysters respond to changing environments and predicting the effects of global climate change on pearl aquaculture.

  4. Transcriptome and biomineralization responses of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata to elevated CO2 and temperature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiguo; Liu, Chuang; Huang, Jingliang; Liu, Yangjia; Zhang, Shuwen; Zheng, Guilan; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2016-01-01

    Ocean acidification and global warming have been shown to significantly affect the physiological performances of marine calcifiers; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, the transcriptome and biomineralization responses of Pinctada fucata to elevated CO2 (pH 7.8 and pH 7.5) and temperature (25 °C and 31 °C) are investigated. Increases in CO2 and temperature induced significant changes in gene expression, alkaline phosphatase activity, net calcification rates and relative calcium content, whereas no changes are observed in the shell ultrastructure. “Ion and acid-base regulation” related genes and “amino acid metabolism” pathway respond to the elevated CO2 (pH 7.8), suggesting that P. fucata implements a compensatory acid-base mechanism to mitigate the effects of low pH. Additionally, “anti-oxidation”-related genes and “Toll-like receptor signaling”, “arachidonic acid metabolism”, “lysosome” and “other glycan degradation” pathways exhibited responses to elevated temperature (25 °C and 31 °C), suggesting that P. fucata utilizes anti-oxidative and lysosome strategies to alleviate the effects of temperature stress. These responses are energy-consuming processes, which can lead to a decrease in biomineralization capacity. This study therefore is important for understanding the mechanisms by which pearl oysters respond to changing environments and predicting the effects of global climate change on pearl aquaculture. PMID:26732540

  5. Transcriptome and biomineralization responses of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata to elevated CO2 and temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiguo; Liu, Chuang; Huang, Jingliang; Liu, Yangjia; Zhang, Shuwen; Zheng, Guilan; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2016-01-01

    Ocean acidification and global warming have been shown to significantly affect the physiological performances of marine calcifiers; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, the transcriptome and biomineralization responses of Pinctada fucata to elevated CO2 (pH 7.8 and pH 7.5) and temperature (25 °C and 31 °C) are investigated. Increases in CO2 and temperature induced significant changes in gene expression, alkaline phosphatase activity, net calcification rates and relative calcium content, whereas no changes are observed in the shell ultrastructure. "Ion and acid-base regulation" related genes and "amino acid metabolism" pathway respond to the elevated CO2 (pH 7.8), suggesting that P. fucata implements a compensatory acid-base mechanism to mitigate the effects of low pH. Additionally, "anti-oxidation"-related genes and "Toll-like receptor signaling", "arachidonic acid metabolism", "lysosome" and "other glycan degradation" pathways exhibited responses to elevated temperature (25 °C and 31 °C), suggesting that P. fucata utilizes anti-oxidative and lysosome strategies to alleviate the effects of temperature stress. These responses are energy-consuming processes, which can lead to a decrease in biomineralization capacity. This study therefore is important for understanding the mechanisms by which pearl oysters respond to changing environments and predicting the effects of global climate change on pearl aquaculture. PMID:26732540

  6. Net mineralization of N at deeper soil depths as a potential mechanism for sustained forest production under elevated [CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Iversen, Colleen M; Hooker, Toby; Classen, Aimee T; Norby, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric [CO2] is projected to increase forest production, which could increase ecosystem carbon (C) storage. However, sustained forest production will depend on the nutrient balance of the forested ecosystem. Our aim was to examine the causes and consequences of increased fine-root production and mortality throughout the soil profile under elevated CO2 with respect to potential gross nitrogen (N) cycling rates. Our study was conducted in a CO2-enriched sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) plantation in Oak Ridge, TN, USA. We used isotope pool dilution methodology to measure potential gross N cycling rates in laboratory incubations of soil from four depth increments to 60 cm. Our objectives were two-fold: (1) determine whether N is available for root acquisition in deeper soil, and (2) determine whether increased inputs of labile C from greater fine-root mortality at depth under elevated [CO2] had altered N cycling rates. While gross N fluxes declined with soil depth, we found that N is potentially available for roots to access, especially below 15 cm depth where microbial consumption of mineral N was reduced. Overall, up to 60% of potential gross N mineralization, and 100% of potential net N mineralization, occurred below 15-cm depth at this site. This finding was supported by in situ measurements from ion-exchange resins, where total inorganic N availability at 55 cm depth was equal to or greater than N availability at 15 cm depth. While it is likely that trees grown under elevated [CO2] are accessing a larger pool of inorganic N by mining deeper soil, we found no effect of elevated [CO2] on potential gross or net N cycling rates. Thus, increased root exploration of the soil volume under elevated [CO2] may be more important than changes in potential gross N cycling rates in sustaining forest responses to rising atmospheric CO2.

  7. Effect of increasing CO2 on the terrestrial carbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Schimel, David; Fisher, Joshua B.

    2015-01-01

    Feedbacks from the terrestrial carbon cycle significantly affect future climate change. The CO2 concentration dependence of global terrestrial carbon storage is one of the largest and most uncertain feedbacks. Theory predicts the CO2 effect should have a tropical maximum, but a large terrestrial sink has been contradicted by analyses of atmospheric CO2 that do not show large tropical uptake. Our results, however, show significant tropical uptake and, combining tropical and extratropical fluxes, suggest that up to 60% of the present-day terrestrial sink is caused by increasing atmospheric CO2. This conclusion is consistent with a validated subset of atmospheric analyses, but uncertainty remains. Improved model diagnostics and new space-based observations can reduce the uncertainty of tropical and temperate zone carbon flux estimates. This analysis supports a significant feedback to future atmospheric CO2 concentrations from carbon uptake in terrestrial ecosystems caused by rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This feedback will have substantial tropical contributions, but the magnitude of future carbon uptake by tropical forests also depends on how they respond to climate change and requires their protection from deforestation. PMID:25548156

  8. Effect of increasing CO2 on the terrestrial carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Schimel, David; Stephens, Britton B; Fisher, Joshua B

    2015-01-13

    Feedbacks from the terrestrial carbon cycle significantly affect future climate change. The CO2 concentration dependence of global terrestrial carbon storage is one of the largest and most uncertain feedbacks. Theory predicts the CO2 effect should have a tropical maximum, but a large terrestrial sink has been contradicted by analyses of atmospheric CO2 that do not show large tropical uptake. Our results, however, show significant tropical uptake and, combining tropical and extratropical fluxes, suggest that up to 60% of the present-day terrestrial sink is caused by increasing atmospheric CO2. This conclusion is consistent with a validated subset of atmospheric analyses, but uncertainty remains. Improved model diagnostics and new space-based observations can reduce the uncertainty of tropical and temperate zone carbon flux estimates. This analysis supports a significant feedback to future atmospheric CO2 concentrations from carbon uptake in terrestrial ecosystems caused by rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This feedback will have substantial tropical contributions, but the magnitude of future carbon uptake by tropical forests also depends on how they respond to climate change and requires their protection from deforestation. PMID:25548156

  9. Arctic microbial community dynamics influenced by elevated CO2 levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brussaard, C. P. D.; Noordeloos, A. A. M.; Witte, H.; Collenteur, M. C. J.; Schulz, K.; Ludwig, A.; Riebesell, U.

    2012-09-01

    The Arctic Ocean ecosystem is particular vulnerable for ocean acidification (OA) related alterations due to the relatively high CO2 solubility and low carbonate saturation states of its cold surface waters. Thus far, however, there is only little known about the consequences of OA on the base of the food web. In a mesocosm CO2-enrichment experiment (overall CO2 levels ranged from ∼180 to 1100 μatm) in the Kongsfjord off Svalbard, we studied the consequences of OA on a natural pelagic microbial community. The most prominent finding of our study is the profound effect of OA on the composition and growth of the Arctic phytoplankton community, i.e. the picoeukaryotic photoautotrophs and to a lesser extent the nanophytoplankton prospered. A shift towards the smallest phytoplankton as a result of OA will have direct consequences for the structure and functioning of the pelagic food web and thus for the biogeochemical cycles. Furthermore, the dominant pico- and nanophytoplankton groups were found prone to viral lysis, thereby shunting the carbon accumulation in living organisms into the dissolved pools of organic carbon and subsequently affecting the efficiency of the biological pump in these Arctic waters.

  10. Arctic microbial community dynamics influenced by elevated CO2 levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brussaard, C. P. D.; Noordeloos, A. A. M.; Witte, H.; Collenteur, M. C. J.; Schulz, K.; Ludwig, A.; Riebesell, U.

    2013-02-01

    The Arctic Ocean ecosystem is particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification (OA) related alterations due to the relatively high CO2 solubility and low carbonate saturation states of its cold surface waters. Thus far, however, there is only little known about the consequences of OA on the base of the food web. In a mesocosm CO2-enrichment experiment (overall CO2 levels ranged from ~ 180 to 1100 μatm) in Kongsfjorden off Svalbard, we studied the consequences of OA on a natural pelagic microbial community. OA distinctly affected the composition and growth of the Arctic phytoplankton community, i.e. the picoeukaryotic photoautotrophs and to a lesser extent the nanophytoplankton thrived. A shift towards the smallest phytoplankton as a result of OA will have direct consequences for the structure and functioning of the pelagic food web and thus for the biogeochemical cycles. Besides being grazed, the dominant pico- and nanophytoplankton groups were found prone to viral lysis, thereby shunting the carbon accumulation in living organisms into the dissolved pools of organic carbon and subsequently affecting the efficiency of the biological pump in these Arctic waters.

  11. Dolomite-magnesian calcite relations at elevated temperatures and CO2 pressures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graf, D.L.; Goldsmith, J.R.

    1955-01-01

    The equilibrium thermal decomposition curve of dolomite has been determined up to a CO2 pressure of 20,000 lb/in.2, at which pressure dolomite decomposes at 857??C. Equilibrium was approached from both directions, by the breakdown and by the solid-state synthesis of dolomite. At elevated temperatures and pressures, calcites in equilibrium with periclase as well as those in equilibrium with dolomite contain Mg in solid solution. In the former, the Mg content increases with increasing CO2 pressure, and decreases with increasing temperature. In the latter, it is a function of temperature only. The exsolution curve of dolomite and magnesian calcite has been determined between 500?? and 800??C; at 500?? dolomite is in equilibrium with a magnesian calcite containing ~6 mol per cent MgCO2; at 800??, ~22 mol per cent. There appears to be a small but real deviation from the ideal 1 : 1 Ca : Mg ratio of dolomite, in the direction of excess Ca, for material in equilibrium with magnesian calcite at high temperature. The experimental findings indicate that very little Mg is stable in the calcites of sedimentary environments, but that an appreciable amount is stable under higher-temperature metamorphic conditions, if sufficient CO2 pressure is maintained. ?? 1955.

  12. Physiological responses during short-term acclimation to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration in Pinus nigra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maseyk, K. S.; Biron, P.; Richard, P.; Canale, L.; Bariac, T.

    2010-12-01

    The response of plants to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations is a key element shaping future biogeochemical cycles. While leaf scale manipulations of CO2 concentration provide us with a wealth of information on the biochemical response of leaf photosynthesis, these responses do not necessarily translate to whole plant responses at higher CO2 concentrations. Evidence from free air enrichment studies show different responses of plant gas exchange parameters in their degree of acclimation to long-term increases in atmospheric CO2, relative to those predicted from the instantaneous responses of leaf-level measurements. However, free air enrichment studies are also limited by the fact that they represent a single step change in CO2 and it is therefore of interest to understand how physiological responses derived from leaf-scale increases in CO2 compare to those from exposing the whole plant to increases CO2 across a range of elevated CO2 concentrations. Here we report on a study into the short-term leaf level physiological responses to CO2 concentration of small (1.5m) Pinus nigra trees that were maintained at different CO2 concentrations, therefore allowing potential whole-plant feedback effects to be incorporated into the responses. The trees were maintained at 20°C and 50-60% RH at three ambient CO2 concentrations (Ca of 380 ppm, 500 ppm, 800 ppm) for ~10 days each in a 10m3 growth chamber. The response of gas exchange parameters (assimilation rate, A, stomatal conductance, gs, internal CO2 concentration, Ci, transpiration, E) to leaf level changes in CO2 were measured at each ambient CO2 concentration, allowing the instantaneous response to be compared to the ‘acclimated’ response (i.e. that at the ambient concentration). Typical A-Ci response curves were seen at all CO2 concentrations, with saturation at Ci above 800ppm and Ca above 1500 ppm. However, even over this short period, assimilation rates at a given CO2 concentration deceased with increasing

  13. Effects of osmoprotectant compounds on NCAM polysialylation under hyperosmotic stress and elevated pCO(2).

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Albert E; Miller, William M

    2002-02-15

    Elevated osmolality and pCO(2) have been shown to alter sialylation in a protein-specific manner. In Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)MT2-l-8 cells, tPA sialylation changed only slightly from 40 to 250 mm Hg pCO(2), whereas neural cell adhesion molecule polysialic acid (NCAM PSA) content decreased by up to 70% at 250 mm Hg pCO(2), pH 7.2. NCAM PSA content also decreased with increasing NaCl or NH(4)Cl concentration. This suggests that PSA content is a sensitive indicator of conditions that may alter glycosylation. Amino acids and their derivatives have been used to protect hybridoma and CHO cell growth under hyperosmotic stress. We examined the impact of osmoprotectants on NCAM PSA content in CHO MT2-1-8 cells under hyperosmolality (up to 545 mOsm/kg) and at 195 and 250 mm Hg pCO(2). NCAM PSA content at 545 mOsm/kg was at least two-fold greater in the presence of glycine betaine or L-proline compared to that without osmoprotectant. Surprisingly, in the presence of 20 mM glycine betaine, PSA levels were 50-60% of the control level for osmolalities ranging from 320 to 545 mOsm/kg. Thus, glycine betaine inhibits NCAM polysialylation at osmolalities below 435 mOsm/kg and is beneficial at higher osmolalities. In contrast to glycine betaine, L-proline increased PSA content by 25-120% relative to the unprotected culture at < or =545 mOsm/kg. The decrease in NCAM PSA levels of CHO MT2-1-8 cells cultured at 195 mm Hg pCO(2)-435 mOsm/kg was not mitigated by the presence of 25 mM glycine betaine, glycine, or L-threonine, even though all of these compounds enhanced cell growth. At 250 mm Hg pCO(2), all osmoprotectants tested (20 mM L-threonine, L-proline, glycine, or glycine betaine) increased NCAM polysialylation, with 20 mM glycine betaine restoring NCAM PSA to near control levels. Thus, osmoprotectants may (partially) offset changes in glycosylation, as well as the inhibition of growth, in cells under environmental stress. Supernatant beta-galactosidase levels, which increase

  14. Elevated CO2 Atmosphere Minimizes the Effect of Drought on the Cerrado Species Chrysolaena obovata.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Vanessa F; Silva, Emerson A; Carvalho, Maria A M

    2016-01-01

    Chrysolaena obovata stores inulin in the rhizophores, associated with drought tolerance. While crop plants are widely studied concerning the interactive effects of high [CO2] and drought, few studies reported these effects in native species. Here, we evaluated the combined effects of these factors on water status and fructan metabolism in C. obovata, a native Cerrado species. Two lots of plants were kept at 380 and 760 ppm CO2 in open-top chambers. In each, [CO2] plants were divided into four groups and cultivated under different water availability: irrigation with 100 (control), 75 (low), 50 (medium), and 25% (severe drought) of the water evapotranspirated in the last 48 h. In each, water treatment plants were collected at 0, 9, 18, and 27 days. On day 27, all plants were re-watered to field capacity and, after 5 days, a new sampling was made. Water restriction caused a decrease in plant moisture, photosynthesis, and in enzymes of fructan metabolism. These changes were generally more pronounced in 25% plants under ambient [CO2]. In the later, increases in the proportion of hexoses and consequent modification of the fructan chain sizes were more marked than under high [CO2]. The results indicate that under elevated [CO2], the negative effects of water restriction on physiological processes were minimized, including the maintenance of rhizophore water potential, increase in water use efficiency, maintenance of photosynthesis and fructan reserves for a longer period, conditions that shall favor the conservation of this species in the predicted climate change scenarios. PMID:27379114

  15. Elevated CO2 Atmosphere Minimizes the Effect of Drought on the Cerrado Species Chrysolaena obovata

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Vanessa F.; Silva, Emerson A.; Carvalho, Maria A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Chrysolaena obovata stores inulin in the rhizophores, associated with drought tolerance. While crop plants are widely studied concerning the interactive effects of high [CO2] and drought, few studies reported these effects in native species. Here, we evaluated the combined effects of these factors on water status and fructan metabolism in C. obovata, a native Cerrado species. Two lots of plants were kept at 380 and 760 ppm CO2 in open-top chambers. In each, [CO2] plants were divided into four groups and cultivated under different water availability: irrigation with 100 (control), 75 (low), 50 (medium), and 25% (severe drought) of the water evapotranspirated in the last 48 h. In each, water treatment plants were collected at 0, 9, 18, and 27 days. On day 27, all plants were re-watered to field capacity and, after 5 days, a new sampling was made. Water restriction caused a decrease in plant moisture, photosynthesis, and in enzymes of fructan metabolism. These changes were generally more pronounced in 25% plants under ambient [CO2]. In the later, increases in the proportion of hexoses and consequent modification of the fructan chain sizes were more marked than under high [CO2]. The results indicate that under elevated [CO2], the negative effects of water restriction on physiological processes were minimized, including the maintenance of rhizophore water potential, increase in water use efficiency, maintenance of photosynthesis and fructan reserves for a longer period, conditions that shall favor the conservation of this species in the predicted climate change scenarios. PMID:27379114

  16. Carbon fluxes acclimate more strongly to elevated growth temperatures than to elevated CO2 concentrations in a northern conifer.

    PubMed

    Kroner, Yulia; Way, Danielle A

    2016-08-01

    Increasing temperatures and atmospheric CO2 concentrations will affect tree carbon fluxes, generating potential feedbacks between forests and the global climate system. We studied how elevated temperatures and CO2 impacted leaf carbon dynamics in Norway spruce (Picea abies), a dominant northern forest species, to improve predictions of future photosynthetic and respiratory fluxes from high-latitude conifers. Seedlings were grown under ambient (AC, c. 435 μmol mol(-1) ) or elevated (EC, 750 μmol mol(-1) ) CO2 concentrations at ambient, +4 °C, or +8 °C growing temperatures. Photosynthetic rates (Asat ) were high in +4 °C/EC seedlings and lowest in +8 °C spruce, implying that moderate, but not extreme, climate change may stimulate carbon uptake. Asat , dark respiration (Rdark ), and light respiration (Rlight ) rates acclimated to temperature, but not CO2 : the thermal optimum of Asat increased, and Rdark and Rlight were suppressed under warming. In all treatments, the Q10 of Rlight (the relative increase in respiration for a 10 °C increase in leaf temperature) was 35% higher than the Q10 of Rdark , so the ratio of Rlight to Rdark increased with rising leaf temperature. However, across all treatments and a range of 10-40 °C leaf temperatures, a consistent relationship between Rlight and Rdark was found, which could be used to model Rlight in future climates. Acclimation reduced daily modeled respiratory losses from warm-grown seedlings by 22-56%. When Rlight was modeled as a constant fraction of Rdark , modeled daily respiratory losses were 11-65% greater than when using measured values of Rlight . Our findings highlight the impact of acclimation to future climates on predictions of carbon uptake and losses in northern trees, in particular the need to model daytime respiratory losses from direct measurements of Rlight or appropriate relationships with Rdark . PMID:26728638

  17. Interactive Effects of Elevated CO2 Concentration and Irrigation on Photosynthetic Parameters and Yield of Maize in Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanchao; Zhang, Jiahua; Yao, Fengmei; Hao, Cui

    2014-01-01

    Maize is one of the major cultivated crops of China, having a central role in ensuring the food security of the country. There has been a significant increase in studies of maize under interactive effects of elevated CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and other factors, yet the interactive effects of elevated [CO2] and increasing precipitation on maize has remained unclear. In this study, a manipulative experiment in Jinzhou, Liaoning province, Northeast China was performed so as to obtain reliable results concerning the later effects. The Open Top Chambers (OTCs) experiment was designed to control contrasting [CO2] i.e., 390, 450 and 550 µmol·mol−1, and the experiment with 15% increasing precipitation levels was also set based on the average monthly precipitation of 5–9 month from 1981 to 2010 and controlled by irrigation. Thus, six treatments, i.e. C550W+15%, C550W0, C450W+15%, C450W0, C390W+15% and C390W0 were included in this study. The results showed that the irrigation under elevated [CO2] levels increased the leaf net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) of maize. Similarly, the stomatal conductance (Gs) and transpiration rate (Tr) decreased with elevated [CO2], but irrigation have a positive effect on increased of them at each [CO2] level, resulting in the water use efficiency (WUE) higher in natural precipitation treatment than irrigation treatment at elevated [CO2] levels. Irradiance-response parameters, e.g., maximum net photosynthetic rate (Pnmax) and light saturation points (LSP) were increased under elevated [CO2] and irrigation, and dark respiration (Rd) was increased as well. The growth characteristics, e.g., plant height, leaf area and aboveground biomass were enhanced, resulting in an improved of yield and ear characteristics except axle diameter. The study concluded by reporting that, future elevated [CO2] may favor to maize when coupled with increasing amount of precipitation in Northeast China. PMID:24848097

  18. Interactive effects of elevated CO2 concentration and irrigation on photosynthetic parameters and yield of maize in Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanchao; Zhang, Jiahua; Yao, Fengmei; Hao, Cui

    2014-01-01

    Maize is one of the major cultivated crops of China, having a central role in ensuring the food security of the country. There has been a significant increase in studies of maize under interactive effects of elevated CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and other factors, yet the interactive effects of elevated [CO2] and increasing precipitation on maize has remained unclear. In this study, a manipulative experiment in Jinzhou, Liaoning province, Northeast China was performed so as to obtain reliable results concerning the later effects. The Open Top Chambers (OTCs) experiment was designed to control contrasting [CO2] i.e., 390, 450 and 550 µmol·mol(-1), and the experiment with 15% increasing precipitation levels was also set based on the average monthly precipitation of 5-9 month from 1981 to 2010 and controlled by irrigation. Thus, six treatments, i.e. C550W+15%, C550W0, C450W+15%, C450W0, C390W+15% and C390W0 were included in this study. The results showed that the irrigation under elevated [CO2] levels increased the leaf net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) of maize. Similarly, the stomatal conductance (Gs) and transpiration rate (Tr) decreased with elevated [CO2], but irrigation have a positive effect on increased of them at each [CO2] level, resulting in the water use efficiency (WUE) higher in natural precipitation treatment than irrigation treatment at elevated [CO2] levels. Irradiance-response parameters, e.g., maximum net photosynthetic rate (Pnmax) and light saturation points (LSP) were increased under elevated [CO2] and irrigation, and dark respiration (Rd) was increased as well. The growth characteristics, e.g., plant height, leaf area and aboveground biomass were enhanced, resulting in an improved of yield and ear characteristics except axle diameter. The study concluded by reporting that, future elevated [CO2] may favor to maize when coupled with increasing amount of precipitation in Northeast China. PMID:24848097

  19. Effects of elevated CO2 on fish behaviour undiminished by transgenerational acclimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Megan J.; Watson, Sue-Ann; Welsh, Justin Q.; McCormick, Mark I.; Munday, Philip L.

    2014-12-01

    Behaviour and sensory performance of marine fishes are impaired at CO2 levels projected to occur in the ocean in the next 50-100 years, and there is limited potential for within-generation acclimation to elevated CO2 (refs , ). However, whether fish behaviour can acclimate or adapt to elevated CO2 over multiple generations remains unanswered. We tested for transgenerational acclimation of reef fish olfactory preferences and behavioural lateralization at moderate (656 μatm) and high (912 μatm) end-of-century CO2 projections. Juvenile spiny damselfish, Acanthochromis polyacanthus, from control parents (446 μatm) exhibited an innate avoidance to chemical alarm cue (CAC) when reared in control conditions. In contrast, juveniles lost their innate avoidance of CAC and even became strongly attracted to CAC when reared at elevated CO2 levels. Juveniles from parents maintained at mid-CO2 and high-CO2 levels also lost their innate avoidance of CAC when reared in elevated CO2, demonstrating no capacity for transgenerational acclimation of olfactory responses. Behavioural lateralization was also disrupted for juveniles reared under elevated CO2, regardless of parental conditioning. Our results show minimal potential for transgenerational acclimation in this fish, suggesting that genetic adaptation will be necessary to overcome the effects of ocean acidification on behaviour.

  20. Response to elevated CO2 in the temperate C3 grass Festuca arundinaceae across a wide range of soils.

    PubMed

    Nord, Eric A; Jaramillo, Raúl E; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    Soils vary widely in mineral nutrient availability and physical characteristics, but the influence of this variability on plant responses to elevated CO2 remains poorly understood. As a first approximation of the effect of global soil variability on plant growth response to CO2, we evaluated the effect of CO2 on tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) grown in soils representing 10 of the 12 global soil orders plus a high-fertility control. Plants were grown in small pots in continuously stirred reactor tanks in a greenhouse. Elevated CO2 (800 ppm) increased plant biomass in the high-fertility control and in two of the more fertile soils. Elevated CO2 had variable effects on foliar mineral concentration-nitrogen was not altered by elevated CO2, and phosphorus and potassium were only affected by CO2 in a small number of soils. While leaf photosynthesis was stimulated by elevated CO2 in six soils, canopy photosynthesis was not stimulated. Four principle components were identified; the first was associated with foliar minerals and soil clay, and the second with soil acidity and foliar manganese concentration. The third principle component was associated with gas exchange, and the fourth with plant biomass and soil minerals. Soils in which tall fescue did not respond to elevated CO2 account for 83% of global land area. These results show that variation in soil physical and chemical properties have important implications for plant responses to global change, and highlight the need to consider soil variability in models of vegetation response to global change. PMID:25774160

  1. Response to elevated CO2 in the temperate C3 grass Festuca arundinaceae across a wide range of soils

    PubMed Central

    Nord, Eric A.; Jaramillo, Raúl E.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Soils vary widely in mineral nutrient availability and physical characteristics, but the influence of this variability on plant responses to elevated CO2 remains poorly understood. As a first approximation of the effect of global soil variability on plant growth response to CO2, we evaluated the effect of CO2 on tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) grown in soils representing 10 of the 12 global soil orders plus a high-fertility control. Plants were grown in small pots in continuously stirred reactor tanks in a greenhouse. Elevated CO2 (800 ppm) increased plant biomass in the high-fertility control and in two of the more fertile soils. Elevated CO2 had variable effects on foliar mineral concentration—nitrogen was not altered by elevated CO2, and phosphorus and potassium were only affected by CO2 in a small number of soils. While leaf photosynthesis was stimulated by elevated CO2 in six soils, canopy photosynthesis was not stimulated. Four principle components were identified; the first was associated with foliar minerals and soil clay, and the second with soil acidity and foliar manganese concentration. The third principle component was associated with gas exchange, and the fourth with plant biomass and soil minerals. Soils in which tall fescue did not respond to elevated CO2 account for 83% of global land area. These results show that variation in soil physical and chemical properties have important implications for plant responses to global change, and highlight the need to consider soil variability in models of vegetation response to global change. PMID:25774160

  2. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 AND TEMPERATURE ON SOIL CARBON DENSITY FRACTIONS IN A DOUGLAS FIR MESOCOSM STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a 4-year full-factorial study of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and temperature on Douglas fir seedlings growing in reconstructed native forest soils in mesocosms. The elevated CO2 treatment was ambient CO2 plus 200 ppm CO2. The elevated temperature treatm...

  3. Elevated CO2 enhances biological contributions to elevation change in coastal wetlands by offsetting stressors associated with sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cherry, J.A.; McKee, K.L.; Grace, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    1. Sea-level rise, one indirect consequence of increasing atmospheric CO2, poses a major challenge to long-term stability of coastal wetlands. An important question is whether direct effects of elevated CO 2 on the capacity of marsh plants to accrete organic material and to maintain surface elevations outweigh indirect negative effects of stressors associated with sea-level rise (salinity and flooding). 2. In this study, we used a mesocosm approach to examine potential direct and indirect effects of atmospheric CO2 concentration, salinity and flooding on elevation change in a brackish marsh community dominated by a C3 species, Schoenoplectus americanus, and a C4 grass, Spartina patens. This experimental design permitted identification of mechanisms and their role in controlling elevation change, and the development of models that can be tested in the field. 3. To test hypotheses related to CO2 and sea-level rise, we used conventional anova procedures in conjunction with structural equation modelling (SEM). SEM explained 78% of the variability in elevation change and showed the direct, positive effect of S. americanus production on elevation. The SEM indicated that C3 plant response was influenced by interactive effects between CO2 and salinity on plant growth, not a direct CO2 fertilization effect. Elevated CO2 ameliorated negative effects of salinity on S. americanus and enhanced biomass contribution to elevation. 4. The positive relationship between S. americanus production and elevation change can be explained by shoot-base expansion under elevated CO 2 conditions, which led to vertical soil displacement. While the response of this species may differ under other environmental conditions, shoot-base expansion and the general contribution of C3 plant production to elevation change may be an important mechanism contributing to soil expansion and elevation gain in other coastal wetlands. 5. Synthesis. Our results revealed previously unrecognized interactions and

  4. Elevated CO2 alleviates high PAR and UV stress in the unicellular chlorophyte Dunaliella tertiolecta.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, Candela; Gordillo, Francisco J L; Palma, Armando; Lorenzo, M Rosario; Segovia, María

    2014-09-01

    The effects of increased CO2 and irradiance on the physiological performance of the chlorophyte Dunaliella tertiolecta were studied at different PAR and UVR (UVA + UVB) irradiances, simulating the solar radiation at different depths, at present (390 ppmv, LC) and predicted CO2 levels for the year 2100 (1000 ppmv, HC). Elevated CO2 resulted in higher optimum and effective quantum yields (F(v)/F(m) and ϕPSII, respectively), electron transport rates (ETR) and specific growth rates (μ). Cell stress was alleviated in HC with respect to LC as evidenced by a decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. DNA damage showed a 42-fold increase in cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation under the highest irradiance (1100 μmol quanta m(-2) s(-1)) in LC with respect to the lowest irradiance (200 μmol quanta m(-2) s(-1)). Photolyase (CII-PCD-PL) gene expression was upregulated under HC resulting in a drastic decrease in CPD accumulation to only 25% with respect to LC. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) accumulation was always higher in HC and the accumulation pattern indicated its involvement in repair or growth depending on the irradiance dose. The repressor of silencing (ROS1) was only marginally involved in the response, suggesting that photoreactivation was the most relevant mechanism to overcome UVR damage. Our results demonstrate that future scenarios of global change result in alleviation of irradiance stress by CO2-induced photoprotection in D. tertiolecta. PMID:25043601

  5. Intraspecific variation in juvenile tree growth under elevated CO2 alone and with O3: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Resco de Dios, Víctor; Mereed, Tessema E; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Tissue, David T; Voltas, Jordi

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are expected to increase throughout this century, potentially fostering tree growth. A wealth of studies have examined the variation in CO2 responses across tree species, but the extent of intraspecific variation in response to elevated CO2 (eCO2) has, so far, been examined in individual studies and syntheses of published work are currently lacking. We conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of eCO2 on tree growth (height, stem biomass and stem volume) and photosynthesis across genotypes to examine whether there is genetic variation in growth responses to eCO2 and to understand their dependence on photosynthesis. We additionally examined the interaction between the responses to eCO2 and ozone (O3), another global change agent. Most of the published studies so far have been conducted in juveniles and in Populus spp., although the patterns observed were not species dependent. All but one study reported significant genetic variation in stem biomass, and the magnitude of intraspecific variation in response to eCO2 was similar in magnitude to previous analyses on interspecific variation. Growth at eCO2 was predictable from growth at ambient CO2 (R(2) = 0.60), and relative rankings of genotype performance were preserved across CO2 levels, indicating no significant interaction between genotypic and environmental effects. The growth response to eCO2 was not correlated with the response of photosynthesis (P > 0.1), and while we observed 57.7% average increases in leaf photosynthesis, stem biomass and volume increased by 36 and 38.5%, respectively, and height only increased by 9.5%, suggesting a predominant role for carbon allocation in ultimately driving the response to eCO2 Finally, best-performing genotypes under eCO2 also responded better under eCO2 and elevated O3 Further research needs include widening the study of intraspecific variation beyond the genus Populus and examining the interaction between eCO2 and

  6. Elevated CO2 levels affect the activity of nitrate reductase and carbonic anhydrase in the calcifying rhodophyte Corallina officinalis

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Laurie C.

    2013-01-01

    The concentration of CO2 in global surface ocean waters is increasing due to rising atmospheric CO2 emissions, resulting in lower pH and a lower saturation state of carbonate ions. Such changes in seawater chemistry are expected to impact calcification in calcifying marine organisms. However, other physiological processes related to calcification might also be affected, including enzyme activity. In a mesocosm experiment, macroalgal communities were exposed to three CO2 concentrations (380, 665, and 1486 µatm) to determine how the activity of two enzymes related to inorganic carbon uptake and nutrient assimilation in Corallina officinalis, an abundant calcifying rhodophyte, will be affected by elevated CO2 concentrations. The activity of external carbonic anhydrase, an important enzyme functioning in macroalgal carbon-concentrating mechanisms, was inversely related to CO2 concentration after long-term exposure (12 weeks). Nitrate reductase, the enzyme responsible for reduction of nitrate to nitrite, was stimulated by CO2 and was highest in algae grown at 665 µatm CO2. Nitrate and phosphate uptake rates were inversely related to CO2, while ammonium uptake was unaffected, and the percentage of inorganic carbon in the algal skeleton decreased with increasing CO2. The results indicate that the processes of inorganic carbon and nutrient uptake and assimilation are affected by elevated CO2 due to changes in enzyme activity, which change the energy balance and physiological status of C. officinalis, therefore affecting its competitive interactions with other macroalgae. The ecological implications of the physiological changes in C. officinalis in response to elevated CO2 are discussed. PMID:23314813

  7. Elevated CO2 impacts bell pepper growth with consequences to Myzus persicae life history, feeding behaviour and virus transmission ability

    PubMed Central

    Dáder, Beatriz; Fereres, Alberto; Moreno, Aránzazu; Trębicki, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) impacts plant growth and metabolism. Indirectly, the performance and feeding of insects is affected by plant nutritional quality and resistance traits. Life history and feeding behaviour of Myzus persicae were studied on pepper plants under ambient (aCO2, 400 ppm) or elevated CO2 (eCO2, 650 ppm), as well as the direct impact on plant growth and leaf chemistry. Plant parameters were significantly altered by eCO2 with a negative impact on aphid’s life history. Their pre-reproductive period was 11% longer and fecundity decreased by 37%. Peppers fixed significantly less nitrogen, which explains the poor aphid performance. Plants were taller and had higher biomass and canopy temperature. There was decreased aphid salivation into sieve elements, but no differences in phloem ingestion, indicating that the diminished fitness could be due to poorer tissue quality and unfavourable C:N balance, and that eCO2 was not a factor impeding feeding. Aphid ability to transmit Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) was studied by exposing source and receptor plants to ambient (427 ppm) or elevated (612 ppm) CO2 before or after virus inoculation. A two-fold decrease on transmission was observed when receptor plants were exposed to eCO2 before aphid inoculation when compared to aCO2. PMID:26743585

  8. Elevated CO2 impacts bell pepper growth with consequences to Myzus persicae life history, feeding behaviour and virus transmission ability.

    PubMed

    Dáder, Beatriz; Fereres, Alberto; Moreno, Aránzazu; Trębicki, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) impacts plant growth and metabolism. Indirectly, the performance and feeding of insects is affected by plant nutritional quality and resistance traits. Life history and feeding behaviour of Myzus persicae were studied on pepper plants under ambient (aCO2, 400 ppm) or elevated CO2 (eCO2, 650 ppm), as well as the direct impact on plant growth and leaf chemistry. Plant parameters were significantly altered by eCO2 with a negative impact on aphid's life history. Their pre-reproductive period was 11% longer and fecundity decreased by 37%. Peppers fixed significantly less nitrogen, which explains the poor aphid performance. Plants were taller and had higher biomass and canopy temperature. There was decreased aphid salivation into sieve elements, but no differences in phloem ingestion, indicating that the diminished fitness could be due to poorer tissue quality and unfavourable C:N balance, and that eCO2 was not a factor impeding feeding. Aphid ability to transmit Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) was studied by exposing source and receptor plants to ambient (427 ppm) or elevated (612 ppm) CO2 before or after virus inoculation. A two-fold decrease on transmission was observed when receptor plants were exposed to eCO2 before aphid inoculation when compared to aCO2. PMID:26743585

  9. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 ON WATER CHEMISTRY AND MOSQUITO (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE) GROWTH UNDER COMPETITIVE CONDITIONS IN CONTAINER HABITATS

    PubMed Central

    Alto, Barry W.; Yanoviak, Stephen P.; Lounibos, L. Philip; Drake, Bert G.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the direct and indirect effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on freshwater container habitats and their larval mosquito occupants. We predicted that a doubling of atmospheric CO2 would (1) alter the chemical properties of water in this system, (2) slow degradation of leaf litter, and (3) decrease larval growth of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) mosquitoes raised on that litter under competitive conditions. Effects of elevated CO2 on water quality parameters were not detected, but the presence of leaf litter significantly reduced pH and dissolved oxygen relative to water-filled containers without litter. Degradation rates of oak leaf litter from plants grown under elevated CO2 atmospheres did not differ from breakdown rates of litter from ambient CO2 conditions. Litter from plants grown in an elevated CO2 atmospheres did not influence mosquito population growth, but mosquito production decreased significantly with increasing larval density. Differences among mosquito density treatments influenced survivorship most strongly among male Ae. albopictus and time to emergence most strongly among females, suggesting fundamental sex-determined differences in response to competition. Results of this and other studies indicate that direct and indirect effects of doubled atmospheric CO2 are minimal in artificial containers with freshwater. PMID:22661767

  10. Temporal dynamics of fine roots under long-term exposure to elevated CO2 in the Mojave Desert.

    PubMed

    Sonderegger, Derek L; Ogle, Kiona; Evans, R Dave; Ferguson, Scot; Nowak, Robert S

    2013-04-01

    Deserts are considered 'below-ground dominated', yet little is known about the impact of rising CO(2) in combination with natural weather cycles on long-term dynamics of root biomass. This study quantifies the temporal dynamics of fine-root production, loss and standing crop in an intact desert ecosystem exposed to 10 yr of elevated CO(2). We used monthly minirhizotron observations from 4 yr (2003-2007) for two dominant shrub species and along community transects at the Nevada Desert free-air CO(2) enrichment Facility. Data were synthesized within a Bayesian framework that included effects of CO(2) concentration, cover type, phenological period, antecedent soil water and biological inertia (i.e. the influence of prior root production and loss). Elevated CO(2) treatment interacted with antecedent soil moisture and had significantly greater effects on fine-root dynamics during certain phenological periods. With respect to biological inertia, plants under elevated CO(2) tended to initiate fine-root growth sooner and sustain growth longer, with the net effect of increasing the magnitude of production and mortality cycles. Elevated CO(2) interacts with past environmental (e.g. antecedent soil water) and biological (e.g. biological inertia) factors to affect fine-root dynamics, and such interactions are expected to be important for predicting future soil carbon pools. PMID:23356437

  11. Growth and Physiological Response of Tropical Lianas and Trees to Elevated CO2 and Soil Nutrient Availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvin, D. C.; Morrison, E.; Quebbeman, A.; Turner, B. L.; Winter, K.

    2012-12-01

    The recent increase in the abundance and size of native lianas (woody climbing vines) in tropical forests may lead to changes in species community composition and decreased carbon storage capacity (Schnitzer & Bongers 2011). Lianas are associated with an increased risk of tree mortality and decreased tree growth due to intense above and belowground competition with trees for light, water, and soil nutrients (Schnitzer & Bongers 2002). Increasing atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen deposition are potential drivers of the liana increase. Phosphorus availability, often assumed to be of key importance in constraining the productivity of lowland tropical forests, may decline as a consequence of increased nitrogen deposition (Matson et al. 1999). Our goal is to determine whether there is any difference in the growth and physiological response of tropical lianas and trees grown under elevated CO2, and whether any response differs as soil nitrogen and phosphorus availability change. We investigated locally abundant tropical liana and tree species grown in open-top chambers in Panama, half of which were maintained at twice-ambient levels of CO2. In two separate studies, seedlings were grown in pots that had either reduced soil nitrogen or phosphorus. Half of the pots in each experiment then received weekly additions of a nutrient mixture to return the soil nutrients to current levels found in neotropical forests. We found that elevated CO2 alone leads to a larger relative increase in the biomass of lianas than trees. The relative effect of elevated CO2 on the increase in liana biomass was much larger under low soil phosphorus availability. Nitrogen fertilization in combination with elevated CO2 led to a greater increase in tree height compared to lianas, but no other differences in growth response were found between the two plant types. These results suggest the liana increase will continue as elevated CO2 increases and phosphorus limitation is strengthened by increasing

  12. Feeding behaviour of juvenile snails ( Helix pomatia) to four plant species grown at elevated atmospheric CO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledergerber, S.; Leadley, P. W.; Stöcklin, J.; Baur, Bruno

    1998-02-01

    The feeding behaviour of juveniles of the land snail Helix pomatia was examined in model plant communities consisting of Trifolium repens, Hieracium pilosella, Bromus erectus and Prunella vulgaris that are common species in extensively managed calcareous grasslands in the Swiss Jura mountains. The plant communities were grown either at ambient (350 ppm) or elevated (600 ppm) CO 2 concentrations. Leaves of T. repens and P. vulgaris grown in elevated atmospheric CO 2 had a lower specific leaf area, and leaves of T. repens had lower percentage N on a dry weight basis than leaves grown under ambient CO 2 concentration. Snails fed on all four plant species, but showed a overwhelming preference for T. repens (percentages of total biomass consumed were 91.9% at 350 ppm and 97.6% at 600 ppm). The species-specific feeding intensity of juvenile H. pomatia did not differ between the two treatments. The total dry weight of T. repens consumed by the snails was marginally greater ( P = 0.06) at elevated CO 2, but there were no significant differences in leaf N or leaf area eaten. These findings are similar to numerous other studies showing that invertebrates increase their consumption of plant material to balance reductions in plant N concentrations at elevated CO 2. The leaf biomass, leaf area and amount of nitrogen consumed of the other three plant species did not differ significantly between the two CO 2 treatments. Helix pomatia that fed on plants grown at elevated CO 2 atmosphere showed a larger increase in relative wet weight than those that fed on plants from ambient CO 2 conditions. However, the weight gain of H. pomatia was poorly correlated with amount of plant tissue consumed, so we suggest that the effect of CO 2 on weight gain in H. pomatia was due to a change in the quality of T. repens leaves.

  13. Foliar quality influences tree-herbivore-parasitoid interactions: effects of elevated CO2, O3, and plant genotype.

    PubMed

    Holton, M Kim; Lindroth, Richard L; Nordheim, Erik V

    2003-10-01

    This study examined the effects of carbon dioxide (CO2)-, ozone (O3)-, and genotype-mediated changes in quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) chemistry on performance of the forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria) and its dipteran parasitoid (Compsilura concinnata) at the Aspen Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site. Parasitized and non-parasitized forest tent caterpillars were reared on two aspen genotypes under elevated levels of CO2 and O3, alone and in combination. Foliage was collected for determination of the chemical composition of leaves fed upon by forest tent caterpillars during the period of endoparasitoid larval development. Elevated CO2 decreased nitrogen levels but had no effect on concentrations of carbon-based compounds. In contrast, elevated O3 decreased nitrogen and phenolic glycoside levels, but increased concentrations of starch and condensed tannins. Foliar chemistry also differed between aspen genotypes. CO2, O3, genotype, and their interactions altered forest tent caterpillar performance, and differentially so between sexes. In general, enriched CO2 had little effect on forest tent caterpillar performance under ambient O3, but reduced performance (for insects on one aspen genotype) under elevated O3. Conversely, elevated O3 improved forest tent caterpillar performance under ambient, but not elevated, CO2. Parasitoid larval survivorship decreased under elevated O3, depending upon levels of CO2 and aspen genotype. Additionally, larval performance and masses of mature female parasitoids differed between aspen genotypes. These results suggest that host-parasitoid interactions in forest systems may be altered by atmospheric conditions anticipated for the future, and that the degree of change may be influenced by plant genotype. PMID:12898383

  14. Effects of elevated CO2 on dynamics of microcystin-producing and non-microcystin-producing strains during Microcystis blooms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Kong, Fanxiang; Shi, Xiaoli; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Min; Yu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to elucidate the effects of different CO2 concentrations (270, 380, and 750 μL/L) on the competition of microcystin-producing (MC-producing) and non-MC-producing Microcystis strains during dense cyanobacteria blooms, an in situ simulation experiment was conducted in the Meiliang Bay of Lake Taihu in the summer of 2012. The abundance of total Microcystis and MC-producing Microcystis genotypes was quantified based on the 16S rDNA and mcyD gene using real-time PCR. The results showed that atmospheric CO2 elevation would significantly decrease the pH value and increase the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration. Changes in CO2 concentration did not show significant influence on the abundance of total Microcystis population. However, CO2 concentrations may be an important factor in determining the subpopulation structure of Microcystis. The enhancement of CO2 concentrations could largely increase the competitive ability of non-MC-producing over MC-producing Microcystis, resulting in a higher proportion of non-MC-producing subpopulation in treatments using high CO2 concentrations. Concurrently, MC concentration in water declined when CO2 concentrations were elevated. Therefore, we concluded that the increase of CO2 concentrations might decrease potential health risks of MC for human and animals in the future. PMID:25597684

  15. Elevated atmospheric CO2 affected photosynthetic products in wheat seedlings and biological activity in rhizosphere soil under cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xia; Liu, Tuo; Zhao, Yonghua; He, Yunhua; Yang, Mingyan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of elevated CO2 (700 ± 23 μmol mol(-1)) on photosynthetic products in wheat seedlings and on organic compounds and biological activity in rhizosphere soil under cadmium (Cd) stress. Elevated CO2 was associated with decreased quantities of reducing sugars, starch, and soluble amino acids, and with increased quantities of soluble sugars, total sugars, and soluble proteins in wheat seedlings under Cd stress. The contents of total soluble sugars, total free amino acids, total soluble phenolic acids, and total organic acids in the rhizosphere soil under Cd stress were improved by elevated CO2. Compared to Cd stress alone, the activity of amylase, phenol oxidase, urease, L-asparaginase, β-glucosidase, neutral phosphatase, and fluorescein diacetate increased under elevated CO2 in combination with Cd stress; only cellulase activity decreased. Bacterial abundance in rhizosphere soil was stimulated by elevated CO2 at low Cd concentrations (1.31-5.31 mg Cd kg(-1) dry soil). Actinomycetes, total microbial abundance, and fungi decreased under the combined conditions at 5.31-10.31 mg Cd kg(-1) dry soil. In conclusion, increased production of soluble sugars, total sugars, and proteins in wheat seedlings under elevated CO2 + Cd stress led to greater quantities of organic compounds in the rhizosphere soil relative to seedlings grown under Cd stress only. Elevated CO2 concentrations could moderate the effects of heavy metal pollution on enzyme activity and microorganism abundance in rhizosphere soils, thus improving soil fertility and the microecological rhizosphere environment of wheat under Cd stress. PMID:26315595

  16. Parental exposure to elevated pCO2 influences the reproductive success of copepods

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, Gemma; Lindeque, Penelope; Flynn, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Substantial variations are reported for egg production and hatching rates of copepods exposed to elevated carbon dioxide concentrations (pCO2). One possible explanation, as found in other marine taxa, is that prior parental exposure to elevated pCO2 (and/or decreased pH) affects reproductive performance. Previous studies have adopted two distinct approaches, either (1) expose male and female copepoda to the test pCO2/pH scenarios, or (2) solely expose egg-laying females to the tests. Although the former approach is more realistic, the majority of studies have used the latter approach. Here, we investigated the variation in egg production and hatching success of Acartia tonsa between these two experimental designs, across five different pCO2 concentrations (385–6000 µatm pCO2). In addition, to determine the effect of pCO2 on the hatching success with no prior parental exposure, eggs produced and fertilized under ambient conditions were also exposed to these pCO2 scenarios. Significant variations were found between experimental designs, with approach (1) resulting in higher impacts; here >20% difference was seen in hatching success between experiments at 1000 µatm pCO2 scenarios (2100 year scenario), and >85% at 6000 µatm pCO2. This study highlights the potential to misrepresent the reproductive response of a species to elevated pCO2 dependent on parental exposure. PMID:25221371

  17. DOES SOIL CO2 EFFLUX ACCLIMATIZETO ELEVATED TEMPERATURE AND CO2 DURING LONG-TERM TREATMENT OF DOUGLAS-FIR SEEDLINGS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the effects of elevated soil temperature and atmospheric CO2 efflux (SCE) during the third an fourth years of study. We hypothesized that elevated temperature would stimulate SCE, and elevated CO2 would also stimulate SCE with the stimulation being greater at hig...

  18. Nitrogen fertilization has a stronger effect on soil nitrogen-fixing bacterial communities than elevated atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    Berthrong, Sean T; Yeager, Chris M; Gallegos-Graves, Laverne; Steven, Blaire; Eichorst, Stephanie A; Jackson, Robert B; Kuske, Cheryl R

    2014-05-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is the primary supply of N to most ecosystems, yet there is considerable uncertainty about how N-fixing bacteria will respond to global change factors such as increasing atmospheric CO2 and N deposition. Using the nifH gene as a molecular marker, we studied how the community structure of N-fixing soil bacteria from temperate pine, aspen, and sweet gum stands and a brackish tidal marsh responded to multiyear elevated CO2 conditions. We also examined how N availability, specifically, N fertilization, interacted with elevated CO2 to affect these communities in the temperate pine forest. Based on data from Sanger sequencing and quantitative PCR, the soil nifH composition in the three forest systems was dominated by species in the Geobacteraceae and, to a lesser extent, Alphaproteobacteria. The N-fixing-bacterial-community structure was subtly altered after 10 or more years of elevated atmospheric CO2, and the observed shifts differed in each biome. In the pine forest, N fertilization had a stronger effect on nifH community structure than elevated CO2 and suppressed the diversity and abundance of N-fixing bacteria under elevated atmospheric CO2 conditions. These results indicate that N-fixing bacteria have complex, interacting responses that will be important for understanding ecosystem productivity in a changing climate. PMID:24610855

  19. [Effects of simulated elevation of atmospheric CO2 concentration on the physiological features of spring phytoplankton in Taihu Lake].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu-Hui; Tang, Long-Sheng; Shi, Xiao-Li; Yang, Zhou; Kong, Fan-Xiang

    2013-06-01

    To disclose the impact of different CO2 concentrations (270 x 10(-6), 380 x 10(-6), 750 x 10(-6)) on physiological features of spring phytoplankton, an in situ simulated experiment was carried out in Meiliang Bay of Taihu Lake from 29 April to 26 May in 2012. The results showed that atmospheric CO2 elevation would significantly alter the pH value and carbonate chemical environments of Taihu Lake, resulting in weakening the advantages of carbon concentrating mechanism (CCM) of phytoplankton. Phytoplankton in Taihu Lake tended to use more dissolved CO2 (CO2, aq) due to the deliberate CO2 sequestration under the high CO2 level treatment. When atmospheric CO2 concentration doubles at the end of century, the maximum growth rate constant of phytoplankton (U(max)), NPP, chlorophyll a (Chl-a)-specific NPP would increase by 63.1%, 69.6% and 33.8%, respectively. Atmospheric CO2 elevation promoted the maximum photosynthetic efficiency of chlorophyta and bacillariophyta in Taihu Lake and its promotion effect on bacillariophyta was more notable than that on chlorophyta. However, it did not change the photosynthetic efficiency of cyanobacteria which was very low in spring. Meanwhile, the stoichiometry value of phytoplankton changed significantly due to the CO2 elevation, as phytoplankton cells assimilated more C and N, but less P under the treatment of high CO2 level. Our results indicated the enhanced CO2 level could dramatically change the physiological features of phytoplankton. This information would help us to understand and predict the response of phytoplankton in Taihu Lake to the future climate change. PMID:23947023

  20. Interaction of Elevated Ultraviolet-B Radiation and CO2 on Productivity and Photosynthetic Characteristics in Wheat, Rice, and Soybean 1

    PubMed Central

    Teramura, Alan H.; Sullivan, Joe H.; Ziska, Lewis H.

    1990-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Bannock), rice (Oryza sativa L. cv IR-36), and soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr cv Essex) were grown in a factorial greenhouse experiment to determine if CO2-induced increases in photosynthesis, biomass, and yield are modified by increases in ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation corresponding to stratospheric ozone depletion. The experimental conditions simulated were: (a) an increase in CO2 concentration from 350 to 650 microliters per liter; (b) an increase in UV-B radiation corresponding to a 10% ozone depletion at the equator; and (c) a and b in combination. Seed yield and total biomass increased significantly with elevated CO2 in all three species when compared to the control. However, with concurrent increases in UV-B and CO2, no increase in either seed yield (wheat and rice) or total biomass (rice) was observed with respect to the control. In contrast, CO2-induced increases in seed yield and total plant biomass were maintained or increased in soybean within the elevated CO2, UV-B environment. Whole leaf gas exchange indicated a significant increase in photosynthesis, apparent quantum efficiency (AQE) and water-use-efficiency (WUE) with elevated CO2 in all 3 species. Including elevated UV-B radiation with high CO2 eliminated the effect of high CO2 on photosynthesis and WUE in rice and the increase in AQE associated with high CO2 in all species. Elevated CO2 did not change the apparent carboxylation efficiency (ACE) in the three species although the combination of elevated CO2 and UV-B reduced ACE in wheat and rice. The results of this experiment illustrate that increased UV-B radiation may modify CO2-induced increases in biomass, seed yield and photosynthetic parameters and suggest that available data may not adequately characterize the potential effect of future, simultaneous changes in CO2 concentration and UV-B radiation. PMID:16667735

  1. Decreased water limitation under elevated CO2 amplifies potential for forest carbon sinks.

    PubMed

    Farrior, Caroline E; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Dybzinski, Ray; Levin, Simon A; Pacala, Stephen W

    2015-06-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and changing rainfall regimes are creating novel environments for plant communities around the world. The resulting changes in plant productivity and allocation among tissues will have significant impacts on forest carbon storage and the global carbon cycle, yet these effects may depend on mechanisms not included in global models. Here we focus on the role of individual-level competition for water and light in forest carbon allocation and storage across rainfall regimes. We find that the complexity of plant responses to rainfall regimes in experiments can be explained by individual-based competition for water and light within a continuously varying soil moisture environment. Further, we find that elevated CO2 leads to large amplifications of carbon storage when it alleviates competition for water by incentivizing competitive plants to divert carbon from short-lived fine roots to long-lived woody biomass. Overall, we find that plant dependence on rainfall regimes and plant responses to added CO2 are complex, but understandable. The insights developed here will serve as an important foundation as we work to predict the responses of plants to the full, multidimensional reality of climate change, which involves not only changes in rainfall and CO2 but also changes in temperature, nutrient availability, and disturbance rates, among others. PMID:26039985

  2. Decreased water limitation under elevated CO2 amplifies potential for forest carbon sinks

    PubMed Central

    Farrior, Caroline E.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Dybzinski, Ray; Levin, Simon A.; Pacala, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and changing rainfall regimes are creating novel environments for plant communities around the world. The resulting changes in plant productivity and allocation among tissues will have significant impacts on forest carbon storage and the global carbon cycle, yet these effects may depend on mechanisms not included in global models. Here we focus on the role of individual-level competition for water and light in forest carbon allocation and storage across rainfall regimes. We find that the complexity of plant responses to rainfall regimes in experiments can be explained by individual-based competition for water and light within a continuously varying soil moisture environment. Further, we find that elevated CO2 leads to large amplifications of carbon storage when it alleviates competition for water by incentivizing competitive plants to divert carbon from short-lived fine roots to long-lived woody biomass. Overall, we find that plant dependence on rainfall regimes and plant responses to added CO2 are complex, but understandable. The insights developed here will serve as an important foundation as we work to predict the responses of plants to the full, multidimensional reality of climate change, which involves not only changes in rainfall and CO2 but also changes in temperature, nutrient availability, and disturbance rates, among others. PMID:26039985

  3. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on marine benthic invertebrates and fish.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changkeun; Hong, Seongjin; Kwon, Bong-Oh; Lee, Jung-Ho; Ryu, Jongseong; Park, Young-Gyu; Kang, Seong-Gil; Khim, Jong Seong

    2016-08-01

    Concern about leakage of carbon dioxide (CO2) from deep-sea storage in geological reservoirs is increasing because of its possible adverse effects on marine organisms locally or at nearby coastal areas both in sediment and water column. In the present study, we examined how elevated CO2 affects various intertidal epibenthic (benthic copepod), intertidal endobenthic (Manila clam and Venus clam), sub-tidal benthic (brittle starfish), and free-living (marine medaka) organisms in areas expected to be impacted by leakage. Acute lethal and sub-lethal effects were detected in the adult stage of all test organisms exposed to varying concentrations of CO2, due to the associated decline in pH (8.3 to 5.2) during 96-h exposure. However, intertidal organisms (such as benthic copepods and clams) showed remarkable resistance to elevated CO2, with the Venus clam being the most tolerant (LpH50 = 5.45). Sub-tidal species (such as brittle starfish [LpH50 = 6.16] and marine medaka [LpH50 = 5.91]) were more sensitive to elevated CO2 compared to intertidal species, possibly because they have fewer defensive capabilities. Of note, the exposure duration might regulate the degree of acute sub-lethal effects, as evidenced by the Venus clam, which showed a time-dependent effect to elevated CO2. Finally, copper was chosen as a model toxic element to find out the synergistic or antagonistic effects between ocean acidification and metal pollution. Combination of CO2 and Cu exposure enhances the adverse effects to organisms, generally supporting a synergistic effect scenario. Overall, the significant variation in the degree to which CO2 adversely affected organisms (viz., working range and strength) was clearly observed, supporting the general concept of species-dependent effects of elevated CO2. PMID:27074931

  4. Improved Criteria for Increasing CO2 Storage Potential with CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauman, J.; Pawar, R.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years it has been found that deployment of CO2 capture and storage technology at large scales will be difficult without significant incentives. One of the technologies that has been a focus in recent years is CO2 enhanced oil/gas recovery, where additional hydrocarbon recovery provides an economic incentive for deployment. The way CO2 EOR is currently deployed, maximization of additional oil production does not necessarily lead to maximization of stored CO2, though significant amounts of CO2 are stored regardless of the objective. To determine the potential of large-scale CO2 storage through CO2 EOR, it is necessary to determine the feasibility of deploying this technology over a wide range of oil/gas field characteristics. In addition it is also necessary to accurately estimate the ultimate CO2 storage potential and develop approaches that optimize oil recovery along with long-term CO2 storage. This study uses compositional reservoir simulations to further develop technical screening criteria that not only improve oil recovery, but maximize CO2 storage during enhanced oil recovery operations. Minimum miscibility pressure, maximum oil/ CO2 contact without the need of significant waterflooding, and CO2 breakthrough prevention are a few key parameters specific to the technical aspects of CO2 enhanced oil recovery that maximize CO2 storage. We have developed reduced order models based on simulation results to determine the ultimate oil recovery and CO2 storage potential in these formations. Our goal is to develop and demonstrate a methodology that can be used to determine feasibility and long-term CO2 storage potential of CO2 EOR technology.

  5. Nitrate assimilation is inhibited by elevated CO2 in field-grown wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    J. Bloom, Arnold; Burger, Martin; A. Kimball, Bruce; J. Pinter, Paul, Jr.

    2014-06-01

    Total protein and nitrogen concentrations in plants generally decline under elevated CO2 atmospheres. Explanations for this decline include that plants under elevated CO2 grow larger, diluting the protein within their tissues; that carbohydrates accumulate within leaves, downregulating the amount of the most prevalent protein Rubisco; that carbon enrichment of the rhizosphere leads to progressively greater limitations of the nitrogen available to plants; and that elevated CO2 directly inhibits plant nitrogen metabolism, especially the assimilation of nitrate into proteins in leaves of C3 plants. Recently, several meta-analyses have indicated that CO2 inhibition of nitrate assimilation is the explanation most consistent with observations. Here, we present the first direct field test of this explanation. We analysed wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown under elevated and ambient CO2 concentrations in the free-air CO2 enrichment experiment at Maricopa, Arizona. In leaf tissue, the ratio of nitrate to total nitrogen concentration and the stable isotope ratios of organic nitrogen and free nitrate showed that nitrate assimilation was slower under elevated than ambient CO2. These findings imply that food quality will suffer under the CO2 levels anticipated during this century unless more sophisticated approaches to nitrogen fertilization are employed.

  6. Effect of Elevated CO2 Concentration, Elevated Temperature and No Nitrogen Fertilization on Methanogenic Archaeal and Methane-Oxidizing Bacterial Community Structures in Paddy Soil

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongyan; Tago, Kanako; Hayatsu, Masahito; Tokida, Takeshi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Usui, Yasuhiro; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Asakawa, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) enhance the production and emission of methane in paddy fields. In the present study, the effects of elevated [CO2], elevated temperature (ET), and no nitrogen fertilization (LN) on methanogenic archaeal and methane-oxidizing bacterial community structures in a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experimental paddy field were investigated by PCR-DGGE and real-time quantitative PCR. Soil samples were collected from the upper and lower soil layers at the rice panicle initiation (PI) and mid-ripening (MR) stages. The composition of the methanogenic archaeal community in the upper and lower soil layers was not markedly affected by the elevated [CO2], ET, or LN condition. The abundance of the methanogenic archaeal community in the upper and lower soil layers was also not affected by elevated [CO2] or ET, but was significantly increased at the rice PI stage and significantly decreased by LN in the lower soil layer. In contrast, the composition of the methane-oxidizing bacterial community was affected by rice-growing stages in the upper soil layer. The abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria was significantly decreased by elevated [CO2] and LN in both soil layers at the rice MR stage and by ET in the upper soil layer. The ratio of mcrA/pmoA genes correlated with methane emission from ambient and FACE paddy plots at the PI stage. These results indicate that the decrease observed in the abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria was related to increased methane emission from the paddy field under the elevated [CO2], ET, and LN conditions. PMID:27600710

  7. ELEVATED CO2 AND ELEVATED TEMPERATURE HAVE NO EFFECT ON DOUGLAS-FIR FINE-ROOT DYNAMICS IN NITROGEN-POOR SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Here, we investigate fine-root production, mortality and standing crop of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) seedlings exposed to elevated atmospheric CO2 and elevated air temperature. We hypothesized that these treatments would increase fine-root production, but that mortality ...

  8. Elevated CO2 Reduces the Resistance and Tolerance of Tomato Plants to Helicoverpa armigera by Suppressing the JA Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Qin; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan; Kang, Le; Wang, Chenzhu; Li, Chuanyou; Ge, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Both resistance and tolerance, which are two strategies that plants use to limit biotic stress, are affected by the abiotic environment including atmospheric CO2 levels. We tested the hypothesis that elevated CO2 would reduce resistance (i.e., the ability to prevent damage) but enhance tolerance (i.e., the ability to regrow and compensate for damage after the damage has occurred) of tomato plants to the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. The results showed that elevated CO2 reduced resistance by decreasing the jasmonic acid (JA) level and activities of lipoxygenase, proteinase inhibitors, and polyphenol oxidase in wild-type (WT) plants infested with H. armigera. Consequently, the activities of total protease, trypsin-like enzymes, and weak and active alkaline trypsin-like enzymes increased in the midgut of H. armigera when fed on WT plants grown under elevated CO2. Unexpectedly, the tolerance of the WT to H. armigera (in terms of photosynthetic rate, activity of sucrose phosphate synthases, flower number, and plant biomass and height) was also reduced by elevated CO2. Under ambient CO2, the expression of resistance and tolerance to H. armigera was much greater in wild type than in spr2 (a JA-deficient genotype) plants, but elevated CO2 reduced these differences of the resistance and tolerance between WT and spr2 plants. The results suggest that the JA signaling pathway contributes to both plant resistance and tolerance to herbivorous insects and that by suppressing the JA signaling pathway, elevated CO2 will simultaneously reduce the resistance and tolerance of tomato plants. PMID:22829948

  9. Effects of elevated pCO2 on the metabolism of a temperate rhodolith Lithothamnion corallioides grown under different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Noisette, Fanny; Duong, Gwendoline; Six, Christophe; Davoult, Dominique; Martin, Sophie

    2013-08-01

    Coralline algae are considered among the most sensitive species to near future ocean acidification. We tested the effects of elevated pCO2 on the metabolism of the free-living coralline alga Lithothamnion corallioides ("maerl") and the interactions with changes in temperature. Specimens were collected in North Brittany (France) and grown for 3 months at pCO2 of 380 (ambient pCO2 ), 550, 750, and 1000 μatm (elevated pCO2 ) and at successive temperatures of 10°C (ambient temperature in winter), 16°C (ambient temperature in summer), and 19°C (ambient temperature in summer +3°C). At each temperature, gross primary production, respiration (oxygen flux), and calcification (alkalinity flux) rates were assessed in the light and dark. Pigments were determined by HPLC. Chl a, carotene, and zeaxanthin were the three major pigments found in L. corallioides thalli. Elevated pCO2 did not affect pigment content while temperature slightly decreased zeaxanthin and carotene content at 10°C. Gross production was not affected by temperature but was significantly affected by pCO2 with an increase between 380 and 550 μatm. Light, dark, and diel (24 h) calcification rates strongly decreased with increasing pCO2 regardless of the temperature. Although elevated pCO2 only slightly affected gross production in L. corallioides, diel net calcification was reduced by up to 80% under the 1,000 μatm treatment. Our findings suggested that near future levels of CO2 will have profound consequences for carbon and carbonate budgets in rhodolith beds and for the sustainability of these habitats. PMID:27007207

  10. Challenges in elevated CO2 experiments on forests

    SciTech Connect

    Califapietra, Carlo; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A.; Beier, Claus; DeAngelis, Paolo; Karnosky, David; King, John S.; Lukac, Martin; Norby, Richard J; Oren, Ram; Scarascia-Mugnozza, Giuseppe E; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2010-01-01

    Current forest Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) experiments are reaching completion. Therefore, it is time to define the scientific goals and priorities of future experimental facilities. In this opinion article, we discuss the following three overarching issues (i) What are the most urgent scientific questions and how can they be addressed? (ii) What forest ecosystems should be investigated? (iii) Which other climate change factors should be coupled with elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations in future experiments to better predict the effects of climate change? Plantations and natural forests can have conflicting purposes for high productivity and environmental protection. However, in both cases the assessment of carbon balance and how this will be affected by elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations and the interacting climate change factors is the most pressing priority for future experiments.

  11. Impacts of elevated CO2, climate change and their interactions on water budgets in four different catchments in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Ying-Ping; Yu, Qiang; Eamus, Derek; O'Grady, Anthony

    2014-11-01

    Future water availability is affected directly by climate change mainly through changes in precipitation and indirectly by the biological effects of climate change and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (eCO2) through changes in vegetation water use. Previous studies of climate change impact on hydrology have focused on the direct impact and little has been reported in the literature on catchment-scale the indirect impact. In this study, we calibrated an ecohydrological model (WAVES) and used this model to estimate the direct and indirect effects and the interactive effect between climate change and eCO2 on water availability in four different catchments in Australia with contrasting climate regime and vegetation cover. These catchments were: a water-limited forest catchment and an energy-limited forest catchment, a water-limited grass catchment and an energy-limited grass catchment. The future meteorological forcing was projected from 12 GCMs representing a period centred on 2050s and future CO2 concentration was set as 550 ppm. Modelling experiments show that impacts of eCO2 and projected climate change on vegetation growth, evapotranspiration (ET) and runoff were in the same magnitude but opposite directions in all four catchments, except for the effects on runoff in the energy-limited grass catchment. Predicted responses of runoff to eCO2 indicate that eCO2 increased runoff in the energy-limited forest catchment by ∼2% but decreased runoff in other three catchments from 1% to 18%. This study indicates that rising CO2 increases ecosystem water use efficiency but it does not necessarily result in increased runoff because elevated CO2 also stimulates vegetation growth and increases ET. Elevated CO2 was proved to have greater impacts on runoff than climate change in the forest catchments. Modelling experiments also suggest that interactive effects between climate and CO2 are important, especially for predicting leaf area index (LAI) and ET in grassland

  12. Elevated CO2 and O3 modify N turnover rates, but not N2O emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to predict and mitigate future climate change, it is essential to understand effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) and O3 (eO3) on N-cycling, including N2O emissions, due to plant mediated changes. This is of particular interest for agroecosystems, since N-cycling and N2O emissions are responsive ...

  13. Soil microbial responses to elevated CO2 and O3 in a nitrogen-aggrading agroecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite decades of study, the underlying mechanisms by which soil microbes respond to rising atmospheric CO2 and ozone remain poorly understood. A prevailing hypothesis, which states that changes in C availability induced by elevated CO2 and ozone drive alterations in soil microbes and the processe...

  14. Controls over soil N pools in a semiarid grassland under elevated CO2 and warming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term responses of terrestrial ecosystems to global change will likely be regulated by N availability. Very few studies have addressed the combined effects of warming and elevated CO2 (eCO2) on N availability. The stock of soil N determines availability for organisms, but also for loss to the at...

  15. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 AND N-FERTILIZATION ON SURVIVAL OF PONDEROSA PINE FINE ROOTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used minihizaotrons to assess the effects of elevated CO2N and season on the life-span of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. Ex Laws.) fine roots. CO2 levels were ambient air (A), ambient air + 175 ?mol mol-1 (A+175) and ambient air + 350 ?mol mol-1 (A+350). N treatments ...

  16. Jasmonate-mediated stomatal closure under elevated CO2 revealed by time-resolved metabolomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar stomatal movements are critical for regulating plant water status and gas exchange. Elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are known to induce stomatal closure. However, current knowledge on CO2 signal transduction in stomatal guard cells is limited. Here we report the metabolomic respo...

  17. Changes in the activities of starch metabolism enzymes in rice grains in response to elevated CO2 concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Li-Yong; Lin, Er-Da; Zhao, Hong-Liang; Feng, Yong-Xiang

    2016-05-01

    The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is currently (2012) 393.1 μmol mol-1, an increase of approximately 42 % over pre-industrial levels. In order to understand the responses of metabolic enzymes to elevated CO2 concentrations, an experiment was conducted using the Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE )system. Two conventional japonica rice varieties ( Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica) grown in North China, Songjing 9 and Daohuaxiang 2, were used in this study. The activities of ADPG pyrophosphorylase, soluble and granule-bound starch synthases, and soluble and granule-bound starch branching enzymes were measured in rice grains, and the effects of elevated CO2 on the amylose and protein contents of the grains were analyzed. The results showed that elevated CO2 levels significantly increased the activity of ADPG pyrophosphorylase at day 8, 24, and 40 after flower, with maximum increases of 56.67 % for Songjing 9 and 21.31 % for Daohuaxiang 2. Similarly, the activities of starch synthesis enzymes increased significantly from the day 24 after flower to the day 40 after flower, with maximum increases of 36.81 % for Songjing 9 and 66.67 % for Daohuaxiang 2 in soluble starch synthase (SSS), and 25.00 % for Songjing 9 and 36.44 % for Daohuaxiang 2 in granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS), respectively. The elevated CO2 concentration significantly increased the activity of soluble starch branching enzyme (SSBE) at day 16, 32, and 40 after flower, and also significantly increased the activity of granule-bound starch branching enzyme (GBSBE) at day 8, 32, and 40 after flower. The elevated CO2 concentration increased the peak values of enzyme activity, and the timing of the activity peaks for SSS and GBSBE were earlier in Songjing 9 than in Daohuaxiang 2. There were obvious differences in developmental stages between the two varieties of rice, which indicated that the elevated CO2 concentration increased enzyme activity expression and starch synthesis, affecting the final contents

  18. Changes in the activities of starch metabolism enzymes in rice grains in response to elevated CO2 concentration.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li-Yong; Lin, Er-Da; Zhao, Hong-Liang; Feng, Yong-Xiang

    2016-05-01

    The global atmospheric CO(2) concentration is currently (2012) 393.1 μmol mol(-1), an increase of approximately 42 % over pre-industrial levels. In order to understand the responses of metabolic enzymes to elevated CO(2) concentrations, an experiment was conducted using the Free Air CO(2) Enrichment (FACE )system. Two conventional japonica rice varieties (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica) grown in North China, Songjing 9 and Daohuaxiang 2, were used in this study. The activities of ADPG pyrophosphorylase, soluble and granule-bound starch synthases, and soluble and granule-bound starch branching enzymes were measured in rice grains, and the effects of elevated CO(2) on the amylose and protein contents of the grains were analyzed. The results showed that elevated CO(2) levels significantly increased the activity of ADPG pyrophosphorylase at day 8, 24, and 40 after flower, with maximum increases of 56.67 % for Songjing 9 and 21.31 % for Daohuaxiang 2. Similarly, the activities of starch synthesis enzymes increased significantly from the day 24 after flower to the day 40 after flower, with maximum increases of 36.81 % for Songjing 9 and 66.67 % for Daohuaxiang 2 in soluble starch synthase (SSS), and 25.00 % for Songjing 9 and 36.44 % for Daohuaxiang 2 in granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS), respectively. The elevated CO(2) concentration significantly increased the activity of soluble starch branching enzyme (SSBE) at day 16, 32, and 40 after flower, and also significantly increased the activity of granule-bound starch branching enzyme (GBSBE) at day 8, 32, and 40 after flower. The elevated CO(2) concentration increased the peak values of enzyme activity, and the timing of the activity peaks for SSS and GBSBE were earlier in Songjing 9 than in Daohuaxiang 2. There were obvious differences in developmental stages between the two varieties of rice, which indicated that the elevated CO(2) concentration increased enzyme activity expression and starch synthesis, affecting the

  19. Combined effects of CO2 enrichment and elevated growth temperatures on metabolites in soybean leaflets; evidence for dynamic changes of TCA cycle intermediates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean (Glycine max [Merr.]L.) was grown in indoor chambers with ambient (38 Pa) and elevated (70 Pa) CO2 and day/night temperature treatments of 28/20, 32/24, and 36/28 °C. Net rates of CO2 assimilation increased with growth temperature and were enhanced an additional 25% on average by CO2 enrich...

  20. Inter-annual changes in detritus-based food chains can enhance plant growth response to elevated atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    Hines, Jes; Eisenhauer, Nico; Drake, Bert G

    2015-12-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 generally enhances plant growth, but the magnitude of the effects depend, in part, on nutrient availability and plant photosynthetic pathway. Due to their pivotal role in nutrient cycling, changes in abundance of detritivores could influence the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on essential ecosystem processes, such as decomposition and primary production. We conducted a field survey and a microcosm experiment to test the influence of changes in detritus-based food chains on litter mass loss and plant growth response to elevated atmospheric CO2 using two wetland plants: a C3 sedge (Scirpus olneyi) and a C4 grass (Spartina patens). Our field study revealed that organism's sensitivity to climate increased with trophic level resulting in strong inter-annual variation in detritus-based food chain length. Our microcosm experiment demonstrated that increased detritivore abundance could not only enhance decomposition rates, but also enhance plant growth of S. olneyi in elevated atmospheric CO2 conditions. In contrast, we found no evidence that changes in the detritus-based food chains influenced the growth of S. patens. Considered together, these results emphasize the importance of approaches that unite traditionally subdivided food web compartments and plant physiological processes to understand inter-annual variation in plant production response to elevated atmospheric CO2. PMID:25953075

  1. NPR1-dependent salicylic acid signaling is not involved in elevated CO2-induced heat stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Li, Xin; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Elevated CO2 can protect plants from heat stress (HS); however, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we used a set of Arabidopsis mutants such as salicylic acid (SA) signaling mutants nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related gene 1 (npr1-1 and npr1-5) and heat-shock proteins (HSPs) mutants (hsp21 and hsp70-1) to understand the requirement of SA signaling and HSPs in elevated CO2-induced HS tolerance. Under ambient CO2 (380 µmol mol−1) conditions, HS (42°C, 24 h) drastically decreased maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) in all studied plant groups. Enrichment of CO2 (800 µmol mol−1) with HS remarkably increased the Fv/Fm value in all plant groups except hsp70-1, indicating that NPR1-dependent SA signaling is not involved in the elevated CO2-induced HS tolerance. These results also suggest an essentiality of HSP70-1, but not HSP21 in elevated CO2-induced HS mitigation. PMID:25874349

  2. Effects of elevated CO2 on the photosynthesis and nitrate reductase activity of Pyropia haitanensis (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) grown at different nutrient levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunxiang; Zou, Dinghui

    2015-03-01

    Pyropia haitanensis, a commercially important species, was cultured at two CO2 concentrations (390×10-6 and 700×10-6 (parts per million)) and at low and high nutrient levels, to explore the effect of elevated CO2 on the species under nutrient enrichment. Results show that in CO2-enriched thalli, relative growth rate (RGR) was enhanced under nutrient enrichment. Elevated CO2 decreased phycobiliprotein (PB) contents, but increased the contents of soluble carbohydrates. Nutrient enrichment increased the contents of chlorophyll a (Chl a) and PB, while soluble carbohydrate content decreased. CO2 enrichment enhanced the relative maximum electronic transport rate and light saturation point. In nutrient-enriched thalli the activity of nitrate reductase (NRA) increased under elevated CO2. An instantaneous pH change in seawater (from 8.1 to 9.6) resulted in reduction of NRA, and the thalli grown under both elevated CO2 and nutrient enrichment exhibited less pronounced reduction than in algae grown at the ambient CO2. The thermal optima of NRA under elevated CO2 and/or nutrient enrichment shifted to a lower temperature (10-15°C) compared to that in ambient conditions (20°C). We propose that accelerated photosynthesis could result in growth increment. N assimilation remained high in acidified seawater and reflected increased temperature sensitivity in response to elevated CO2 and eutrophication.

  3. Effects of elevated CO2 leaf diets on gypsy moth (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) respiration rates.

    PubMed

    Foss, Anita R; Mattson, William J; Trier, Terry M

    2013-06-01

    Elevated levels of CO2 affect plant growth and leaf chemistry, which in turn can alter host plant suitability for insect herbivores. We examined the suitability of foliage from trees grown from seedlings since 1997 at Aspen FACE as diet for the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae: paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marshall) in 2004-2005, and trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michaux) in 2006-2007, and measured consequent effects on larval respiration. Leaves were collected for diet and leaf chemistry (nutritional and secondary compound proxies) from trees grown under ambient (average 380 ppm) and elevated CO2 (average 560 ppm) conditions. Elevated CO2 did not significantly alter birch or aspen leaf chemistry compared with ambient levels with the exception that birch percent carbon in 2004 and aspen moisture content in 2006 were significantly lowered. Respiration rates were significantly higher (15-59%) for larvae reared on birch grown under elevated CO2 compared with ambient conditions, but were not different on two aspen clones, until larvae reached the fifth instar, when those consuming elevated CO2 leaves on clone 271 had lower (26%) respiration rates, and those consuming elevated CO2 leaves on clone 216 had higher (36%) respiration rates. However, elevated CO2 had no apparent effect on the respiration rates of pupae derived from larvae fed either birch or aspen leaves. Higher respiration rates for larvae fed diets grown under ambient or elevated CO2 demonstrates their lower efficiency of converting chemical energy of digested food stuffs extracted from such leaves into their biosynthetic processes. PMID:23726059

  4. Responses of wheat and rice to factorial combinations of ambient and elevated CO2 and temperature in FACE experiments.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chuang; Yin, Xinyou; He, Shuaiqi; Jiang, Wenyu; Si, Chuanfei; Struik, Paul C; Luo, Weihong; Li, Gang; Xie, Yingtian; Xiong, Yan; Pan, Genxing

    2016-02-01

    Elevated CO2 and temperature strongly affect crop production, but understanding of the crop response to combined CO2 and temperature increases under field conditions is still limited while data are scarce. We grew wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.) under two levels of CO2 (ambient and enriched up to 500 μmol mol(-1) ) and two levels of canopy temperature (ambient and increased by 1.5-2.0 °C) in free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) systems and carried out a detailed growth and yield component analysis during two growing seasons for both crops. An increase in CO2 resulted in higher grain yield, whereas an increase in temperature reduced grain yield, in both crops. An increase in CO2 was unable to compensate for the negative impact of an increase in temperature on biomass and yield of wheat and rice. Yields of wheat and rice were decreased by 10-12% and 17-35%, respectively, under the combination of elevated CO2 and temperature. The number of filled grains per unit area was the most important yield component accounting for the effects of elevated CO2 and temperature in wheat and rice. Our data showed complex treatment effects on the interplay between preheading duration, nitrogen uptake, tillering, leaf area index, and radiation-use efficiency, and thus on yield components and yield. Nitrogen uptake before heading was crucial in minimizing yield loss due to climate change in both crops. For rice, however, a breeding strategy to increase grain number per m(2) and % filled grains (or to reduce spikelet sterility) at high temperature is also required to prevent yield reduction under conditions of global change. PMID:26279285

  5. Distinct responses of soil microbial communities to elevated CO2 and O3 in a soybean agro-ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhili; Xiong, Jinbo; Kent, Angela D; Deng, Ye; Xue, Kai; Wang, Gejiao; Wu, Liyou; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Jizhong

    2014-01-01

    The concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and tropospheric ozone (O3) have been rising due to human activities. However, little is known about how such increases influence soil microbial communities. We hypothesized that elevated CO2 (eCO2) and elevated O3 (eO3) would significantly affect the functional composition, structure and metabolic potential of soil microbial communities, and that various functional groups would respond to such atmospheric changes differentially. To test these hypotheses, we analyzed 96 soil samples from a soybean free-air CO2 enrichment (SoyFACE) experimental site using a comprehensive functional gene microarray (GeoChip 3.0). The results showed the overall functional composition and structure of soil microbial communities shifted under eCO2, eO3 or eCO2+eO3. Key functional genes involved in carbon fixation and degradation, nitrogen fixation, denitrification and methane metabolism were stimulated under eCO2, whereas those involved in N fixation, denitrification and N mineralization were suppressed under eO3, resulting in the fact that the abundance of some eO3-supressed genes was promoted to ambient, or eCO2-induced levels by the interaction of eCO2+eO3. Such effects appeared distinct for each treatment and significantly correlated with soil properties and soybean yield. Overall, our analysis suggests possible mechanisms of microbial responses to global atmospheric change factors through the stimulation of C and N cycling by eCO2, the inhibition of N functional processes by eO3 and the interaction by eCO2 and eO3. This study provides new insights into our understanding of microbial functional processes in response to global atmospheric change in soybean agro-ecosystems. PMID:24108327

  6. Elevated pCO2 effects on the geochemistry of carbonate aquifers: calcite dissolution as a driver of elevated metal concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunsch, A.; Navarre-Sitchler, A. K.; Moore, J.; McCray, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Geological carbon capture, utilization and storage has gained momentum in the last decade as a viable option of reducing anthropogenic emissions of CO2, with several demonstration projects completed, in progress or planned for upcoming years. However, large-scale CO2-injection operations are accompanied by concerns of CO2 leakage from deep geological repositories and subsequent contact with shallower aquifers, such as underground sources of drinking water. Direct toxicity of CO2 is of lesser concern; rather, it is the acidification of aquifers from increased CO2 partial-pressures (pCO2), which may lead to release of metals into groundwater through mineral dissolution and metal desorption. Previous geochemical studies have suggested that the presence of calcite in aquifer material would reduce the hazard of metal release by effectively buffering acidity via calcite dissolution at elevated pCO2, thus placing carbonate aquifers at lesser risk in case of CO2 leakage. Yet calcite is rarely found in pure form, and often contains a wide range of impurities, including metals such as As, Cr, and Pb, in solid-solution. Dissolution of calcite during acidity buffering is accompanied by release of these impurities from the calcite lattice. We show through experimental work that dissolution of calcite is the primary mechanism responsible for elevated concentrations of metals in carbonate aquifers at high pCO2. It is also evident that the mechanism responsible for metal release, i.e. dissolution or desorption, is metal-specific and pCO2-specific. Modeling work based on our experimental results suggests that in reducing aquifers calcite can contribute more to release of metals than sulfides, which are generally viewed as likely sources of metals in aquifers, during a hypothetical 30-year CO2 leak. In addition, modeling work suggests that when sulfide minerals are present in a carbonate aquifer, metals release would be more sensitive to pO2 than to pCO2.

  7. Long-Term Response of Terrestrial Productivity to Elevated CO2 Remains a Grand Challenge in Terrestrial Biogeochemistry (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finzi, A.

    2013-12-01

    There is large variability in the long-term response of terrestrial net primary production (NPP) to elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 (eCO2). In some ecosystems productivity remains higher under eCO2 compared to aCO2 at the decadal time scale. In other ecosystem productivity under eCO2 increases transiently, returning to levels observed at aCO2 in a few years or less. The diversity of ecosystem responses is as fascinating as it is difficult to understand. A number of scientists, including this one, have postulated that soil water and nutrient supply constrain productivity responses and that in the absence of increases in soil resource uptake productivity must decline because there is little evidence for increases in resource use efficiency, with perhaps the exception of grassland water-use efficiency in some instances. This contention is challenged by the data as they are currently understood. As such there is no unifying explanation for the diversity of these responses and hence models cannot be reasonably expected to accurately predict the timing and magnitude of terrestrial-C sequestration over the next century. Research on the impacts of elevated CO2 has not yet answered a fundamentally important, policy-relevant question in global change science. In this talk I present an analysis of the NPP literature from long-term experiments at eCO2 published to date (>5 years duration) in an effort to stimulate a discussion of why productivity responses to eCO2 vary from ecosystem to ecosystem. Explaining variations in productivity response to eCO2 is a grand challenge in terrestrial biogeochemistry.

  8. Elevated CO2 shifts the functional structure and metabolic potentials of soil microbial communities in a C4 agroecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jinbo; He, Zhili; Shi, Shengjing; Kent, Angela; Deng, Ye; Wu, Liyou; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentration is continuously increasing, and previous studies have shown that elevated CO2 (eCO2) significantly impacts C3 plants and their soil microbial communities. However, little is known about effects of eCO2 on the compositional and functional structure, and metabolic potential of soil microbial communities under C4 plants. Here we showed that a C4 maize agroecosystem exposed to eCO2 for eight years shifted the functional and phylogenetic structure of soil microbial communities at both soil depths (0–5 cm and 5–15 cm) using EcoPlate and functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0) analyses. The abundances of key genes involved in carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycling were significantly stimulated under eCO2 at both soil depths, although some differences in carbon utilization patterns were observed between the two soil depths. Consistently, CO2 was found to be the dominant factor explaining 11.9% of the structural variation of functional genes, while depth and the interaction of depth and CO2 explained 5.2% and 3.8%, respectively. This study implies that eCO2 has profound effects on the functional structure and metabolic potential/activity of soil microbial communities associated with C4 plants, possibly leading to changes in ecosystem functioning and feedbacks to global change in C4 agroecosystems. PMID:25791904

  9. Elevated CO2 shifts the functional structure and metabolic potentials of soil microbial communities in a C4 agroecosystem.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jinbo; He, Zhili; Shi, Shengjing; Kent, Angela; Deng, Ye; Wu, Liyou; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentration is continuously increasing, and previous studies have shown that elevated CO2 (eCO2) significantly impacts C3 plants and their soil microbial communities. However, little is known about effects of eCO2 on the compositional and functional structure, and metabolic potential of soil microbial communities under C4 plants. Here we showed that a C4 maize agroecosystem exposed to eCO2 for eight years shifted the functional and phylogenetic structure of soil microbial communities at both soil depths (0-5 cm and 5-15 cm) using EcoPlate and functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0) analyses. The abundances of key genes involved in carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycling were significantly stimulated under eCO2 at both soil depths, although some differences in carbon utilization patterns were observed between the two soil depths. Consistently, CO2 was found to be the dominant factor explaining 11.9% of the structural variation of functional genes, while depth and the interaction of depth and CO2 explained 5.2% and 3.8%, respectively. This study implies that eCO2 has profound effects on the functional structure and metabolic potential/activity of soil microbial communities associated with C4 plants, possibly leading to changes in ecosystem functioning and feedbacks to global change in C4 agroecosystems. PMID:25791904

  10. Elevated CO2 shifts the functional structure and metabolic potentials of soil microbial communities in a C4 agroecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Jinbo; He, Zhili; Shi, Shengjing; Kent, Angela; Deng, Ye; Wu, Liyou; van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-03-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentration is continuously increasing, and previous studies have shown that elevated CO2 (eCO2) significantly impacts C3 plants and their soil microbial communities. However, little is known about effects of eCO2 on the compositional and functional structure, and metabolic potential of soil microbial communities under C4 plants. Here we showed that a C4 maize agroecosystem exposed to eCO2 for eight years shifted the functional and phylogenetic structure of soil microbial communities at both soil depths (0-5 cm and 5-15 cm) using EcoPlate and functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0) analyses. The abundances of key genes involved in carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycling were significantly stimulated under eCO2 at both soil depths, although some differences in carbon utilization patterns were observed between the two soil depths. Consistently, CO2 was found to be the dominant factor explaining 11.9% of the structural variation of functional genes, while depth and the interaction of depth and CO2 explained 5.2% and 3.8%, respectively. This study implies that eCO2 has profound effects on the functional structure and metabolic potential/activity of soil microbial communities associated with C4 plants, possibly leading to changes in ecosystem functioning and feedbacks to global change in C4 agroecosystems.

  11. Echinometra sea urchins acclimatized to elevated pCO2 at volcanic vents outperform those under present-day pCO2 conditions.

    PubMed

    Uthicke, Sven; Ebert, Thomas; Liddy, Michelle; Johansson, Charlotte; Fabricius, Katharina E; Lamare, Miles

    2016-07-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations will significantly reduce ocean pH during the 21st century (ocean acidification, OA). This may hamper calcification in marine organisms such as corals and echinoderms, as shown in many laboratory-based experiments. Sea urchins are considered highly vulnerable to OA. We studied an Echinometra species on natural volcanic CO2 vents in Papua New Guinea, where they are CO2 -acclimatized and also subjected to secondary ecological changes from elevated CO2 . Near the vent site, the urchins experienced large daily variations in pH (>1 unit) and pCO2 (>2000 ppm) and average pH values (pHT 7.73) much below those expected under the most pessimistic future emission scenarios. Growth was measured over a 17-month period using tetracycline tagging of the calcareous feeding lanterns. Average-sized urchins grew more than twice as fast at the vent compared with those at an adjacent control site and assumed larger sizes at the vent compared to the control site and two other sites at another reef near-by. A small reduction in gonad weight was detected at the vents, but no differences in mortality, respiration, or degree of test calcification were detected between urchins from vent and control populations. Thus, urchins did not only persist but actually 'thrived' under extreme CO2 conditions. We suggest an ecological basis for this response: Increased algal productivity under increased pCO2 provided more food at the vent, resulting in higher growth rates. The wider implication of our observation is that laboratory studies on non-acclimatized specimens, which typically do not consider ecological changes, can lead to erroneous conclusions on responses to global change. PMID:26762613

  12. Impact of elevated CO2 concentration on dynamics of leaf photosynthesis in Fagus sylvatica is modulated by sky conditions.

    PubMed

    Urban, Otmar; Klem, Karel; Holišová, Petra; Šigut, Ladislav; Šprtová, Mirka; Teslová-Navrátilová, Petra; Zitová, Martina; Špunda, Vladimír; Marek, Michal V; Grace, John

    2014-02-01

    It has been suggested that atmospheric CO2 concentration and frequency of cloud cover will increase in future. It remains unclear, however, how elevated CO2 influences photosynthesis under complex clear versus cloudy sky conditions. Accordingly, diurnal changes in photosynthetic responses among beech trees grown at ambient (AC) and doubled (EC) CO2 concentrations were studied under contrasting sky conditions. EC stimulated the daily sum of fixed CO2 and light use efficiency under clear sky. Meanwhile, both these parameters were reduced under cloudy sky as compared with AC treatment. Reduction in photosynthesis rate under cloudy sky was particularly associated with EC-stimulated, xanthophyll-dependent thermal dissipation of absorbed light energy. Under clear sky, a pronounced afternoon depression of CO2 assimilation rate was found in sun-adapted leaves under EC compared with AC conditions. This was caused in particular by stomata closure mediated by vapour pressure deficit. PMID:24316065

  13. Gene expression responses of paper birch to elevated O3 and CO2 during leaf maturation and senescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontunen-Soppela, S.; Parviainen, J.; Ruhanen, H.; Brosché, M.; Keinanen, M.; Thakur, R. C.; Kolehmainen, M.; Kangasjarvi, J.; Oksanen, E.; Karnosky, D. F.; Vapaavuori, E.

    2009-12-01

    Forest trees are exposed to increasing concentrations of O3 and CO2 simultaneously. The rise of concentration in these gases causes changes in the gene expression of trees, which can be small in acclimated trees, but yet pivotal for the metabolism of the trees. We have studied the response of paper birch (Betula papyrifera) leaf gene expression to elevated O3 and CO2 concentrations during leaf maturation and senescence. The hypotheses were:(1) Elevated O3 induces oxidative stress in leaves. During long O3-exposure repair mechanisms are activated. Because chemical defense requires energy and carbon uptake is reduced, leaf senescence is activated earlier. Alternatively, the senescence-associated processes, remobilization and storage of carbohydrates and nutrients, may not be completed. (2) In the combination of elevated CO2+O3, the O3-caused damages are not seen or they are smaller, due to closure of the stomata under elevated CO2 and decreased O3 uptake by the leaves. On the other hand, elevated CO2 may provide energy and increase defense chemicals, enabling leaves to repair the O3-caused damages. Gene expression responses of paper birch leaves to elevated O3 and CO2 were studied with microarray analyses. Samples were collected from the long-term O3 and CO2 fumigation experiment Aspen FACE in Rhinelander, WI, USA (http://aspenface.mtu.edu/). The site contains 12 FACE rings receiving CO2, O3, CO2+O3, and ambient air (controls). Birches have been exposed to elevated CO2 (550ppm) and O3 (1.5X ambient) since 1998. Leaf samples were collected in July, August and September 2004. The cDNA-microarrays used for hybridizations consisted of Populus euphratica ESTs representing ca 6500 different genes. In order to detect similar gene expression patterns within samplings and treatments, the microarray data was analyzed with multivariate methods; clustering with Self-Organizing Map, finding optimal cluster grouping by K-means clustering and visualizing the results with Sammon

  14. CO2 enrichment and N addition increase nutrient loss from decomposing leaf litter in subtropical model forest ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juxiu; Fang, Xiong; Deng, Qi; Han, Tianfeng; Huang, Wenjuan; Li, Yiyong

    2015-01-01

    As atmospheric CO2 concentration increases, many experiments have been carried out to study effects of CO2 enrichment on litter decomposition and nutrient release. However, the result is still uncertain. Meanwhile, the impact of CO2 enrichment on nutrients other than N and P are far less studied. Using open-top chambers, we examined effects of elevated CO2 and N addition on leaf litter decomposition and nutrient release in subtropical model forest ecosystems. We found that both elevated CO2 and N addition increased nutrient (C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg and Zn) loss from the decomposing litter. The N, P, Ca and Zn loss was more than tripled in the chambers exposed to both elevated CO2 and N addition than those in the control chambers after 21 months of treatment. The stimulation of nutrient loss under elevated CO2 was associated with the increased soil moisture, the higher leaf litter quality and the greater soil acidity. Accelerated nutrient release under N addition was related to the higher leaf litter quality, the increased soil microbial biomass and the greater soil acidity. Our results imply that elevated CO2 and N addition will increase nutrient cycling in subtropical China under the future global change. PMID:25608664

  15. CO2 enrichment and N addition increase nutrient loss from decomposing leaf litter in subtropical model forest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juxiu; Fang, Xiong; Deng, Qi; Han, Tianfeng; Huang, Wenjuan; Li, Yiyong

    2015-01-01

    As atmospheric CO2 concentration increases, many experiments have been carried out to study effects of CO2 enrichment on litter decomposition and nutrient release. However, the result is still uncertain. Meanwhile, the impact of CO2 enrichment on nutrients other than N and P are far less studied. Using open-top chambers, we examined effects of elevated CO2 and N addition on leaf litter decomposition and nutrient release in subtropical model forest ecosystems. We found that both elevated CO2 and N addition increased nutrient (C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg and Zn) loss from the decomposing litter. The N, P, Ca and Zn loss was more than tripled in the chambers exposed to both elevated CO2 and N addition than those in the control chambers after 21 months of treatment. The stimulation of nutrient loss under elevated CO2 was associated with the increased soil moisture, the higher leaf litter quality and the greater soil acidity. Accelerated nutrient release under N addition was related to the higher leaf litter quality, the increased soil microbial biomass and the greater soil acidity. Our results imply that elevated CO2 and N addition will increase nutrient cycling in subtropical China under the future global change.

  16. The impact of elevated CO2 concentration on the quality of algal starch as a potential biofuel feedstock.

    PubMed

    Tanadul, Orn-U-Ma; VanderGheynst, Jean S; Beckles, Diane M; Powell, Ann L T; Labavitch, John M

    2014-07-01

    Cultured microalgae are viewed as important producers of lipids and polysaccharides, both of which are precursor molecules for the production of biofuels. This study addressed the impact of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) on Chlorella sorokiniana production of starch and on several properties of the starch produced. The production of C. sorokiniana biomass, lipid and starch were enhanced when cultures were supplied with 2% CO2. Starch granules from algae grown in ambient air and 2% CO2 were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The granules from algae grown in 2% CO2 were disk-shaped and contained mainly stromal starch; granules from cultures grown in ambient air were cup-shaped with primarily pyrenoid starch. The granules from cells grown in 2% CO2 had a higher proportion of the accumulated starch as the highly branched, amylopectin glucan than did granules from cells grown in air. The rate of hydrolysis of starch from 2% CO2-grown cells was 1.25 times greater than that from air-grown cells and 2-11 times higher than the rates of hydrolysis of starches from cereal grains. These data indicate that culturing C. sorokiniana in elevated CO2 not only increases biomass yield but also improves the structure and composition of starch granules for use in biofuel generation. These modifications in culture conditions increase the hydrolysis efficiency of the starch hydrolysis, thus providing potentially important gains for biofuel production. PMID:24474069

  17. Decrease in CO2 efflux from northern hardwater lakes with increasing atmospheric warming.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Kerri; Vogt, Richard J; Bogard, Matthew J; Wissel, Björn; Tutolo, Benjamin M; Simpson, Gavin L; Leavitt, Peter R

    2015-03-12

    Boreal lakes are biogeochemical hotspots that alter carbon fluxes by sequestering particulate organic carbon in sediments and by oxidizing terrestrial dissolved organic matter to carbon dioxide (CO2) or methane through microbial processes. At present, such dilute lakes release ∼1.4 petagrams of carbon annually to the atmosphere, and this carbon efflux may increase in the future in response to elevated temperatures and increased hydrological delivery of mineralizable dissolved organic matter to lakes. Much less is known about the potential effects of climate changes on carbon fluxes from carbonate-rich hardwater and saline lakes that account for about 20 per cent of inland water surface area. Here we show that atmospheric warming may reduce CO2 emissions from hardwater lakes. We analyse decadal records of meteorological variability, CO2 fluxes and water chemistry to investigate the processes affecting variations in pH and carbon exchange in hydrologically diverse lakes of central North America. We find that the lakes have shifted progressively from being substantial CO2 sources in the mid-1990s to sequestering CO2 by 2010, with a steady increase in annual mean pH. We attribute the observed changes in pH and CO2 uptake to an atmospheric-warming-induced decline in ice cover in spring that decreases CO2 accumulation under ice, increases spring and summer pH, and enhances the chemical uptake of CO2 in hardwater lakes. Our study suggests that rising temperatures do not invariably increase CO2 emissions from aquatic ecosystems. PMID:25731167

  18. Unique Responsiveness of Angiosperm Stomata to Elevated CO2 Explained by Calcium Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Brodribb, Timothy J.; McAdam, Scott A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Angiosperm and conifer tree species respond differently when exposed to elevated CO2, with angiosperms found to dynamically reduce water loss while conifers appear insensitive. Such distinct responses are likely to affect competition between these tree groups as atmospheric CO2 concentration rises. Seeking the mechanism behind this globally important phenomenon we targeted the Ca2+-dependent signalling pathway, a mediator of stomatal closure in response to elevated CO2, as a possible explanation for the differentiation of stomatal behaviours. Sampling across the diversity of vascular plants including lycophytes, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms we show that only angiosperms possess the stomatal behaviour and prerequisite genetic coding, linked to Ca2+-dependent stomatal signalling. We conclude that the evolution of Ca2+-dependent stomatal signalling gives angiosperms adaptive benefits in terms of highly efficient water use, but that stomatal sensitivity to high CO2 may penalise angiosperm productivity relative to other plant groups in the current era of soaring atmospheric CO2. PMID:24278470

  19. Canopy warming caused photosynthetic acclimation and reduced seed yield in maize grown at ambient and elevated [CO2 ].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Vera, Ursula M; Siebers, Matthew H; Drag, David W; Ort, Donald R; Bernacchi, Carl J

    2015-11-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2 ]) and attendant increases in growing season temperature are expected to be the most important global change factors impacting production agriculture. Although maize is the most highly produced crop worldwide, few studies have evaluated the interactive effects of elevated [CO2 ] and temperature on its photosynthetic physiology, agronomic traits or biomass, and seed yield under open field conditions. This study investigates the effects of rising [CO2 ] and warmer temperature, independently and in combination, on maize grown in the field throughout a full growing season. Free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) technology was used to target atmospheric [CO2 ] to 200 μmol mol(-1) above ambient [CO2 ] and infrared heaters to target a plant canopy increase of 3.5 °C, with actual season mean heating of ~2.7 °C, mimicking conditions predicted by the second half of this century. Photosynthetic gas-exchange parameters, leaf nitrogen and carbon content, leaf water potential components, and developmental measurements were collected throughout the season, and biomass and yield were measured at the end of the growing season. As predicted for a C4 plant, elevated [CO2 ] did not stimulate photosynthesis, biomass, or yield. Canopy warming caused a large shift in aboveground allocation by stimulating season-long vegetative biomass and decreasing reproductive biomass accumulation at both CO2 concentrations, resulting in decreased harvest index. Warming caused a reduction in photosynthesis due to down-regulation of photosynthetic biochemical parameters and the decrease in the electron transport rate. The reduction in seed yield with warming was driven by reduced photosynthetic capacity and by a shift in aboveground carbon allocation away from reproduction. This field study portends that future warming will reduce yield in maize, and this will not be mitigated by higher atmospheric [CO2 ] unless appropriate adaptation traits can be introduced

  20. Maintenance of C sinks sustains enhanced C assimilation during long-term exposure to elevated [CO2] in Mojave Desert shrubs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the first few years of elevated atmospheric [CO2] treatment at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility, photosynthetic downregulation was observed in desert shrubs grown under elevated [CO2], especially under relatively wet environmental conditions. Nonetheless, those plants maintained increased Asat...

  1. Elevated CO2 alters the feeding behaviour of the pea aphid by modifying the physical and chemical resistance of Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huijuan; Sun, Yucheng; Li, Yuefei; Liu, Xianghui; Wang, Pingyan; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan; Ge, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Elevated CO(2) compromises the resistance of leguminous plants against chewing insects, but little is known about whether elevated CO(2) modifies the resistance against phloem-sucking insects or whether it has contrasting effects on the resistance of legumes that differ in biological nitrogen fixation. We tested the hypothesis that the physical and chemical resistance against aphids would be increased in Jemalong (a wild type of Medicago truncatula) but would be decreased in dnf1 (a mutant without biological nitrogen fixation) by elevated CO(2). The non-glandular and glandular trichome density of Jemalong plants increased under elevated CO(2), resulting in prolonged aphid probing. In contrast, dnf1 plants tended to decrease foliar trichome density under elevated CO(2), resulting in less surface and epidermal resistance to aphids. Elevated CO(2) enhanced the ineffective salicylic acid-dependent defence pathway but decreased the effective jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent defence pathway in aphid-infested Jemalong plants. Therefore, aphid probing time decreased and the duration of phloem sap ingestion increased on Jemalong under elevated CO(2), which, in turn, increased aphid growth rate. Overall, our results suggest that elevated CO(2) decreases the chemical resistance of wild-type M. truncatula against aphids, and that the host's biological nitrogen fixation ability is central to this effect. PMID:24697655

  2. Response diversity of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes in elevated [CO2] in the field.

    PubMed

    Li, Pinghua; Sioson, Allan; Mane, Shrinivasrao P; Ulanov, Alexander; Grothaus, Gregory; Heath, Lenwood S; Murali, T M; Bohnert, Hans J; Grene, Ruth

    2006-11-01

    Free Air [CO(2)] Enrichment (FACE) allows for plant growth under fully open-air conditions of elevated [CO(2)] at concentrations expected to be reached by mid-century. We used Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes Col-0, Cvi-0, and WS to analyze changes in gene expression and metabolite profiles of plants grown in "SoyFACE" (http://www.soyface.uiuc.edu/), a system of open-air rings within which [CO(2)] is elevated to approximately 550 ppm. Data from multiple rings, comparing plants in ambient air and elevated [CO(2)], were analyzed by mixed model ANOVA, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and data-mining tools. In elevated [CO(2)], decreases in the expression of genes related to chloroplast functions characterized all lines but individual members of distinct multi-gene families were regulated differently between lines. Also, different strategies distinguished the lines with respect to the regulation of genes related to carbohydrate biosynthesis and partitioning, N-allocation and amino acid metabolism, cell wall biosynthesis, and hormone responses, irrespective of the plants' developmental status. Metabolite results paralleled reactions seen at the level of transcript expression. Evolutionary adaptation of species to their habitat and intrinsic genetic plasticity seem to determine the nature of responses to elevated [CO(2)]. Irrespective of their underlying genetic diversity, and evolutionary adaptation to different habitats, a small number of common, predominantly stress-responsive, signature transcripts appear to characterize responses of the Arabidopsis ecotypes in FACE. PMID:16941220

  3. Double Mutation in Photosystem II Reaction Centers and Elevated CO2 Grant Thermotolerance to Mesophilic Cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Dinamarca, Jorge; Shlyk-Kerner, Oksana; Kaftan, David; Goldberg, Eran; Dulebo, Alexander; Gidekel, Manuel; Gutierrez, Ana; Scherz, Avigdor

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthetic biomass production rapidly declines in mesophilic cyanobacteria grown above their physiological temperatures largely due to the imbalance between degradation and repair of the D1 protein subunit of the heat susceptible Photosystem II reaction centers (PSIIRC). Here we show that simultaneous replacement of two conserved residues in the D1 protein of the mesophilic Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, by the analogue residues present in the thermophilic Thermosynechococcus elongatus, enables photosynthetic growth, extensive biomass production and markedly enhanced stability and repair rate of PSIIRC for seven days even at 43°C but only at elevated CO2 (1%). Under the same conditions, the Synechocystis control strain initially presented very slow growth followed by a decline after 3 days. Change in the thylakoid membrane lipids, namely the saturation of the fatty acids is observed upon incubation for the different strains, but only the double mutant shows a concomitant major change of the enthalpy and entropy for the light activated QA−→QB electron transfer, rendering them similar to those of the thermophilic strain. Following these findings, computational chemistry and protein dynamics simulations we propose that the D1 double mutation increases the folding stability of the PSIIRC at elevated temperatures. This, together with the decreased impairment of D1 protein repair under increased CO2 concentrations result in the observed photothermal tolerance of the photosynthetic machinery in the double mutant PMID:22216094

  4. Tropical forest responses to increasing [CO2]: current knowledge and opportunities for future research

    SciTech Connect

    Cernusak, Lucas; Winter, Klaus; Dalling, James; Holtum, Joseph; Jaramillo, Carlos; Korner, Christian; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Norby, Richard J; Poulter, Benjamin; Turner, Benjamin; Wright, S. Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric [CO2] (ca) will undoubtedly affect the metabolism of tropical forests worldwide; however, critical aspects of how tropical forests will respond remain largely unknown. Here we review the current state of knowledge about physiological and ecological responses, with the aim of providing a framework that can help to guide future experimental research. Modelling studies have indicated that elevated ca can potentially stimulate photosynthesis more in the tropics than at higher latitudes, because suppression of photorespiration by elevated ca increases with temperature. However, canopy leaves in tropical forests could also potentially reach a high temperature threshold under elevated ca that will moderate the rise in photosynthesis. Belowground responses, including fine root production, nutrient foraging, and soil organic matter processing, will be especially important to the integrated ecosystem response to elevated CO2. Water-use efficiency will increase as ca rises, potentially impacting upon soil moisture status and nutrient availability. Recruitment may be differentially altered for some functional groups, potentially decreasing ecosystem carbon storage. Whole-forest CO2 enrichment experiments are urgently needed to test predictions of tropical forest functioning under elevated ca. Smaller scale experiments in the understory and in gaps would also be informative, and could provide stepping stones toward stand-scale manipulations.

  5. Interactive effects of elevated temperature and CO2 on two phylogeographically distinct clones of common reed (Phragmites australis)

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Franziska; Lambertini, Carla; Nguyen, Loc Xuan; Achenbach, Luciana; Brix, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The aboveground growth, physiological and biochemical parameters of two clones of the cosmopolitan wetland grass Phragmites australis, grown at four treatment combinations of temperature and CO2, were investigated to elucidate whether their climate response differed due to inherent differences in their ecological adaptation. The two phylogeographically distinct P. australis clones (DK clone, European genetic background; ALG clone, Mediterranean genetic background) were grown for 151 days in phytotrons at 19/12 °C (day/night temperature) and 390 ppm CO2, and at elevated temperature (+5 °C) and CO2 (700 ppm) with treatment factors alone or in combination. The ALG clone had 2–4 times higher aboveground biomass, higher light-saturated rates of photosynthesis (Pmax), maximum electron transport rates (ETRmax) and Rubisco activity, and higher photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency than the DK clone. The DK clone, however, produced more shoots, leaves and side-shoots, and had 9–51 % higher specific leaf area and 15–39 % higher leaf nitrogen concentration than the ALG clone. Although elevated atmospheric CO2 alone barely affected the aboveground growth of the two P. australis clones, simultaneously elevated temperature and CO2 stimulated growth and aboveground biomass. Overall, elevated CO2 stimulated photosynthesis, but the clones responded differently to a concomitant increase in CO2 and temperature, depending on the phylogeographic background of the plant. The DK clone showed overall stronger responses, and can be considered the more plastic of the two clones with respect to CO2 and temperature. Thus, the DK clone may be better adapted to climate change than the ALG clone, at least in the short term.

  6. ELEVATED CO2 AND ELEVATED TEMPERATURE AFFECT CARBON AND NITROGEN CONCENTRATIONS BUT NOT ACCUMULATION IN PSEUDOTSUGA MENZIESII SEEDLINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the impact of climate change on concentrations and accumulation of C and N in trees, we grew Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco (Douglas-fir) seedlings treated with ambient or elevated (+180 mol mol-1) CO2, and with ambient or elevated (+3.5 C) temperature for f...

  7. Physiological ecology of desert biocrust moss following 10 years exposure to elevated CO2: evidence for enhanced photosynthetic thermotolerance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coe, Kirsten K.; Belnap, Jayne; Grote, Edmund E.; Sparks, Jed P.

    2012-01-01

    In arid regions, biomes particularly responsive to climate change, mosses play an important biogeochemical role as key components of biocrusts. Using the biocrust moss Syntrichia caninervis collected from the Nevada Desert Free Air CO2 Enrichment Facility, we examined the physiological effects of 10 years of exposure to elevated CO2, and the effect of high temperature events on the photosynthetic performance of moss grown in CO2-enriched air. Moss exposed to elevated CO2 exhibited a 46% decrease in chlorophyll, a 20% increase in carbon and no difference in either nitrogen content or photosynthetic performance. However, when subjected to high temperatures (35–40°C), mosses from the elevated CO2 environment showed higher photosynthetic performance and photosystem II (PSII) efficiency compared to those grown in ambient conditions, potentially reflective of a shift in nitrogen allocation to components that offer a higher resistance of PSII to heat stress. This result suggests that mosses may respond to climate change in markedly different ways than vascular plants, and observed CO2-induced photosynthetic thermotolerance in S. caninervis will likely have consequences for future desert biogeochemistry.

  8. Maintenance of C sinks sustains enhanced C assimilation during long-term exposure to elevated [CO2] in Mojave Desert shrubs.

    PubMed

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Ebbets, Allison L; Evans, R Dave; Tissue, David T; Nogués, Salvador; van Gestel, Natasja; Payton, Paxton; Ebbert, Volker; Adams, Williams W; Nowak, Robert S; Smith, Stanley D

    2011-10-01

    During the first few years of elevated atmospheric [CO(2)] treatment at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility, photosynthetic downregulation was observed in desert shrubs grown under elevated [CO(2)], especially under relatively wet environmental conditions. Nonetheless, those plants maintained increased A (sat) (photosynthetic performance at saturating light and treatment [CO(2)]) under wet conditions, but to a much lesser extent under dry conditions. To determine if plants continued to downregulate during long-term exposure to elevated [CO(2)], responses of photosynthesis to elevated [CO(2)] were examined in two dominant Mojave Desert shrubs, the evergreen Larrea tridentata and the drought-deciduous Ambrosia dumosa, during the eighth full growing season of elevated [CO(2)] treatment at the NDFF. A comprehensive suite of physiological processes were collected. Furthermore, we used C labeling of air to assess carbon allocation and partitioning as measures of C sink activity. Results show that elevated [CO(2)] enhanced photosynthetic performance and plant water status in Larrea, especially during periods of environmental stress, but not in Ambrosia. δ(13)C analyses indicate that Larrea under elevated [CO(2)] allocated a greater proportion of newly assimilated C to C sinks than Ambrosia. Maintenance by Larrea of C sinks during the dry season partially explained the reduced [CO(2)] effect on leaf carbohydrate content during summer, which in turn lessened carbohydrate build-up and feedback inhibition of photosynthesis. δ(13)C results also showed that in a year when plant growth reached the highest rates in 5 years, 4% (Larrea) and 7% (Ambrosia) of C in newly emerging organs were remobilized from C that was assimilated and stored for at least 2 years prior to the current study. Thus, after 8 years of continuous exposure to elevated [CO(2)], both desert perennials maintained their photosynthetic capacities under elevated [CO(2)]. We conclude that C storage, remobilization

  9. Photosynthesis, productivity, and yield of maize are not affected by open-air elevation of CO2 concentration in the absence of drought.

    PubMed

    Leakey, Andrew D B; Uribelarrea, Martin; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Naidu, Shawna L; Rogers, Alistair; Ort, Donald R; Long, Stephen P

    2006-02-01

    While increasing temperatures and altered soil moisture arising from climate change in the next 50 years are projected to decrease yield of food crops, elevated CO2 concentration ([CO2]) is predicted to enhance yield and offset these detrimental factors. However, C4 photosynthesis is usually saturated at current [CO2] and theoretically should not be stimulated under elevated [CO2]. Nevertheless, some controlled environment studies have reported direct stimulation of C4 photosynthesis and productivity, as well as physiological acclimation, under elevated [CO2]. To test if these effects occur in the open air and within the Corn Belt, maize (Zea mays) was grown in ambient [CO2] (376 micromol mol(-1)) and elevated [CO2] (550 micromol mol(-1)) using Free-Air Concentration Enrichment technology. The 2004 season had ideal growing conditions in which the crop did not experience water stress. In the absence of water stress, growth at elevated [CO2] did not stimulate photosynthesis, biomass, or yield. Nor was there any CO2 effect on the activity of key photosynthetic enzymes, or metabolic markers of carbon and nitrogen status. Stomatal conductance was lower (-34%) and soil moisture was higher (up to 31%), consistent with reduced crop water use. The results provide unique field evidence that photosynthesis and production of maize may be unaffected by rising [CO2] in the absence of drought. This suggests that rising [CO2] may not provide the full dividend to North American maize production anticipated in projections of future global food supply. PMID:16407441

  10. [Eco-physiological response of Quercus variabilis seedlings to increased atmospheric CO2 and N supply].

    PubMed

    Du, Qi-Ran; Lei, Jing-Pin; Liu, Jian-Feng; Wang, Peng-Cheng; Xiao, Wen-Fa; Pan, Lei

    2014-01-01

    The effect of CO2 enhancement, nitrogen deposition and their interaction on the northern boundary (Zhuanghe in Liaoning Province) of Quercus variabilis seedlings was studied by controlling the CO2 concentration (700 micromol x mol(-1); 400 micromol x mol(-1)) and nitrogen level (non nitrogen fertilizer: CK; nitrogen fertilizer: 120 kg N x hm(-2)). The results showed that under elevated CO2 the Q. variabilis seedlings' leaf morphology, photosynthetic pigments and leaf nitrogen content tended to decrease, and the dark respiration rate decreased 63. 3% and soluble sugar increased 2.6%. Nitrogen deposition significantly promoted the Q. variabilis seedlings' leaf morphology and photosynthetic pigments, leading to increased leaf nitrogen content, decreased potassium content, and 26.7% of increase in nitrogen to potassium ratio. CO2 and N interaction played a significant role on promoting the Q. variabilis seedlings' leaf morphology and photosynthetic. The maximum net photosynthetic and light saturation point were 1.4 and 2.6 times of the control, while dark respiration and light compensation point decreased 65.9% and 50.0%, respectively. Elevated CO2 and nitrogen deposition had a positive effect on Q. variabilis seedlings to some degree, which might result in the movement of distribution boundary of Q. variabilis to north. PMID:24765838

  11. MONOTERPENE LEVELS IN NEEDLES OF DOUGLAS-FIR EXPOSED TO ELEVATED CO2 AND TEMPERATURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Levels of monoterpenes in current year needles of douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) seedlings were measured at the conclusion of four years of exposure to ambient or elevated CO2 (+ 179 mmol.mol-1), and ambient or elevated temperature (+ 3.5 C). Eleven monoterpen...

  12. Constraints to nitrogen acquisition of terrestrial plants under elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhaozhong; Rütting, Tobias; Pleijel, Håkan; Wallin, Göran; Reich, Peter B.; Kammann, Claudia I.; Newton, Paul C. D.; Kobayashi, Kazuhiko; Luo, YunJian; Uddling, Johan

    2016-04-01

    A key part of the uncertainty in terrestrial feedbacks on climate change is related to how and to what extent nitrogen (N) availability constrains the stimulation of terrestrial productivity by elevated CO2 (eCO2), and whether or not this constraint will become stronger over time. We explored the ecosystem-scale relationship between responses of plant productivity and N acquisition to eCO2 in free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments in grassland, cropland and forest ecosystems and found that: (i) in all three ecosystem types, this relationship was positive, linear and strong (r2 = 0.68), but exhibited a negative intercept such that plant N acquisition was decreased by 10% when eCO2 caused neutral or modest changes in productivity. As the ecosystems were markedly N limited, plants with minimal productivity responses to eCO2 likely acquired less N than ambient CO2-grown counterparts because access was decreased, and not because demand was lower. (ii) Plant N concentration was lower under eCO2, and this decrease was independent of the presence or magnitude of eCO2-induced productivity enhancement, refuting the long-held hypothesis that this effect results from growth dilution. (iii) Effects of eCO2 on productivity and N acquisition did not diminish over time, while the typical eCO2-induced decrease in plant N concentration did. Our results suggest that, at the decennial timescale covered by FACE studies, N limitation of eCO2-induced terrestrial productivity enhancement is associated with negative effects of eCO2 on plant N acquisition rather than with growth dilution of plant N or processes leading to progressive N limitation.

  13. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on invasive plants: comparison of purple and yellow nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus L. and C. esculentus L.).

    PubMed

    Rogers, H H; Runion, G B; Prior, S A; Price, A J; Torbert, H A; Gjerstad, D H

    2008-01-01

    The rise in atmospheric CO(2) concentration coupled with its direct, often positive, effect on the growth of plants raises the question of the response of invasive plants to elevated atmospheric CO(2) levels. Response of two invasive weeds [purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus L.) and yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L.)] to CO(2) enrichment was tested. Plants were exposed to ambient (375 micromol mol(-1)) or elevated CO(2) (ambient + 200 micromol mol(-1)) for 71 d in open top chambers. Photosynthetic rate did not differ between CO(2) treatments for either species. Conductance was lower in purple nutsedge and tended to be lower in yellow nutsedge. Purple nutsedge had higher instantaneous water use efficiency; a similar trend was noted for yellow nutsedge. Purple nutsedge had greater leaf area, root length and numbers of tubers and tended to have more tillers under high CO(2). In yellow nutsedge, only tuber number increased under CO(2) enrichment. Leaf dry weight was greater for both species when grown under elevated CO(2). Only purple nutsedge made seed heads; CO(2) level did not change seed head dry weight. Root dry weight increased under the high CO(2) treatment for purple nutsedge only, but tuber dry weight increased for both. Total dry weight of both species increased at elevated CO(2). Purple nutsedge (under elevated CO(2)) tended to increase allocation belowground, which led to greater root-to-shoot ratio (R:S); R:S of yellow nutsedge was unaffected by CO(2) enrichment. Findings suggest both species, purple more than yellow nutsedge, may be more invasive in a future high-CO(2) world. PMID:18268302

  14. Tissue chemistry and carbon allocation in seedlings of Pinus palustris subjected to elevated atmospheric CO(2) and water stress.

    PubMed

    Runion, G. B.; Entry, J. A.; Prior, S. A.; Mitchell, R. J.; Rogers, H. H.

    1999-04-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) seedlings were grown in 45-l pots and exposed to ambient or elevated (365 or 730 &mgr;mol CO(2) mol(-1)) CO(2) concentration in open-top chambers for 20 months. Two water-stress treatments (target values of -0.5 or -1.5 MPa xylem pressure potential) were imposed 19 weeks after initiation of the study. At harvest, tissues (needles, stems, taproots, coarse roots, and fine roots) were analyzed for carbon (C), nitrogen (N), nonpolar extractives (fats, waxes, and oils), nonstructural carbohydrates (sugars and starch), structural components (cellulose and lignin), and tannins. The greatest dry weights and lowest N concentrations occurred in tissues of plants grown at elevated CO(2) or with adequate water. Although allocation of C fractions among tissues was generally unaffected by treatments, concentrations of the analyzed compounds were influenced by treatments in needles and taproots, but not in stems and lateral roots. Needles and taproots of plants exposed to elevated CO(2) had increased concentrations of nonstructural carbohydrates. Among plant tissues, elevated CO(2) caused reductions in structural C concentrations and foliar concentrations of fats, waxes and oils. PMID:12651576

  15. Root Herbivores Drive Changes to Plant Primary Chemistry, but Root Loss Is Mitigated under Elevated Atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Scott W; Johnson, Scott N; Jones, T Hefin; Ostle, Nick J; Hails, Rosemary S; Vanbergen, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    Above- and belowground herbivory represents a major challenge to crop productivity and sustainable agriculture worldwide. How this threat from multiple herbivore pests will change under anthropogenic climate change, via altered trophic interactions and plant response traits, is key to understanding future crop resistance to herbivory. In this study, we hypothesized that atmospheric carbon enrichment would increase the amount (biomass) and quality (C:N ratio) of crop plant resources for above- and belowground herbivore species. In a controlled environment facility, we conducted a microcosm experiment using the large raspberry aphid (Amphorophora idaei), the root feeding larvae of the vine weevil (Otiorhynchus sulcatus), and the raspberry (Rubus idaeus) host-plant. There were four herbivore treatments (control, aphid only, weevil only and a combination of both herbivores) and an ambient (aCO2) or elevated (eCO2) CO2 treatment (390 versus 650 ± 50 μmol/mol) assigned to two raspberry cultivars (cv Glen Ample or Glen Clova) varying in resistance to aphid herbivory. Contrary to our predictions, eCO2 did not increase crop biomass or the C:N ratio of the plant tissues, nor affect herbivore abundance either directly or via the host-plant. Root herbivory reduced belowground crop biomass under aCO2 but not eCO2, suggesting that crops could tolerate attack in a CO2 enriched environment. Root herbivory also increased the C:N ratio in leaf tissue at eCO2, potentially due to decreased N uptake indicated by lower N concentrations found in the roots. Root herbivory greatly increased root C concentrations under both CO2 treatments. Our findings confirm that responses of crop biomass and biochemistry to climate change need examining within the context of herbivory, as biotic interactions appear as important as direct effects of eCO2 on crop productivity. PMID:27379129

  16. Root Herbivores Drive Changes to Plant Primary Chemistry, but Root Loss Is Mitigated under Elevated Atmospheric CO2

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Scott W.; Johnson, Scott N.; Jones, T. Hefin; Ostle, Nick J.; Hails, Rosemary S.; Vanbergen, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Above- and belowground herbivory represents a major challenge to crop productivity and sustainable agriculture worldwide. How this threat from multiple herbivore pests will change under anthropogenic climate change, via altered trophic interactions and plant response traits, is key to understanding future crop resistance to herbivory. In this study, we hypothesized that atmospheric carbon enrichment would increase the amount (biomass) and quality (C:N ratio) of crop plant resources for above- and belowground herbivore species. In a controlled environment facility, we conducted a microcosm experiment using the large raspberry aphid (Amphorophora idaei), the root feeding larvae of the vine weevil (Otiorhynchus sulcatus), and the raspberry (Rubus idaeus) host-plant. There were four herbivore treatments (control, aphid only, weevil only and a combination of both herbivores) and an ambient (aCO2) or elevated (eCO2) CO2 treatment (390 versus 650 ± 50 μmol/mol) assigned to two raspberry cultivars (cv Glen Ample or Glen Clova) varying in resistance to aphid herbivory. Contrary to our predictions, eCO2 did not increase crop biomass or the C:N ratio of the plant tissues, nor affect herbivore abundance either directly or via the host-plant. Root herbivory reduced belowground crop biomass under aCO2 but not eCO2, suggesting that crops could tolerate attack in a CO2 enriched environment. Root herbivory also increased the C:N ratio in leaf tissue at eCO2, potentially due to decreased N uptake indicated by lower N concentrations found in the roots. Root herbivory greatly increased root C concentrations under both CO2 treatments. Our findings confirm that responses of crop biomass and biochemistry to climate change need examining within the context of herbivory, as biotic interactions appear as important as direct effects of eCO2 on crop productivity. PMID:27379129

  17. Mesozooplankton community development at elevated CO2 concentrations: results from a mesocosm experiment in an Arctic fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niehoff, B.; Schmithüsen, T.; Knüppel, N.; Daase, M.; Czerny, J.; Boxhammer, T.

    2013-03-01

    The increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere caused by burning fossil fuels leads to increasing pCO2 and decreasing pH in the world ocean. These changes may have severe consequences for marine biota, especially in cold-water ecosystems due to higher solubility of CO2. However, studies on the response of mesozooplankton communities to elevated CO2 are still lacking. In order to test whether abundance and taxonomic composition change with pCO2, we have sampled nine mesocosms, which were deployed in Kongsfjorden, an Arctic fjord at Svalbard, and were adjusted to eight CO2 concentrations, initially ranging from 185 μatm to 1420 μatm. Vertical net hauls were taken weekly over about one month with an Apstein net (55 μm mesh size) in all mesocosms and the surrounding fjord. In addition, sediment trap samples, taken every second day in the mesocosms, were analysed to account for losses due to vertical migration and mortality. The taxonomic analysis revealed that meroplanktonic larvae (Cirripedia, Polychaeta, Bivalvia, Gastropoda, and Decapoda) dominated in the mesocosms while copepods (Calanus spp., Oithona similis, Acartia longiremis and Microsetella norvegica) were found in lower abundances. In the fjord copepods prevailed for most of our study. With time, abundance and taxonomic composition developed similarly in all mesocosms and the pCO2 had no significant effect on the overall community structure. Also, we did not find significant relationships between the pCO2 level and the abundance of single taxa. Changes in heterogeneous communities are, however, difficult to detect, and the exposure to elevated pCO2 was relatively short. We therefore suggest that future mesocosm experiments should be run for longer periods.

  18. Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen allergenicity: SuperSAGE transcriptomic analysis upon elevated CO2 and drought stress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pollen of common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) is a main cause of allergic diseases in Northern America. The weed has recently become spreading as a neophyte in Europe, while climate change may also affect the growth of the plant and additionally may also influence pollen allergenicity. To gain better insight in the molecular mechanisms in the development of ragweed pollen and its allergenic proteins under global change scenarios, we generated SuperSAGE libraries to identify differentially expressed transcripts. Results Ragweed plants were grown in a greenhouse under 380 ppm CO2 and under elevated level of CO2 (700 ppm). In addition, drought experiments under both CO2 concentrations were performed. The pollen viability was not altered under elevated CO2, whereas drought stress decreased its viability. Increased levels of individual flavonoid metabolites were found under elevated CO2 and/or drought. Total RNA was isolated from ragweed pollen, exposed to the four mentioned scenarios and four SuperSAGE libraries were constructed. The library dataset included 236,942 unique sequences, showing overlapping as well as clear differently expressed sequence tags (ESTs). The analysis targeted ESTs known in Ambrosia, as well as in pollen of other plants. Among the identified ESTs, those encoding allergenic ragweed proteins (Amb a) increased under elevated CO2 and drought stress. In addition, ESTs encoding allergenic proteins in other plants were also identified. Conclusions The analysis of changes in the transcriptome of ragweed pollen upon CO2 and drought stress using SuperSAGE indicates that under global change scenarios the pollen transcriptome was altered, and impacts the allergenic potential of ragweed pollen. PMID:24972689

  19. "Responses of Soil Microorganisms and Microbial Mediated Processes During Succession to Elevated CO2 in Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems".

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Michael Allen

    2000-11-27

    Summary Hypothesis 1. Mycorrhizal fungal types, diversity and activity will increase under elevated CO2. Generally activity increased and composition changed. No change in types was observed. It is important to note that overall nutrient cycling was affected by elevated CO2, largely by increasing turnover, not standing crop. These changes were not apparent at any one sampling date, but could only be determined over the longer course of the experiment. Hypothesis 2. Mycorrhizal fungal types, diversity and activity will decrease under NOx addition. Mycorrhizae showed no change in the % infection of mycorrhizae. However, the species composition changed and the relative form of N predominating changed, as increasing N turnover was apparent. Hypothesis 3. Mycorrhizal fungal types, diversity and activity will decline precipitously under elevated CO2 coupled with NOx additions. There are no CO2 X NOx field study facilities in our region. However, we undertook some small-scale plot fertilization studies. At the Michigan open-topped chambers, and in growth chamber studies we found that added N plus CO2 increased the allocation of C to the bacterial food web causing more rapid nutrient cycling and fewer mycorrhizae. Preliminary results indicate that the NO3 fertilization overwhelmed any CO2 effect and no significant interactions were found. We will re-evaluate how to undertake these studies. Hypothesis 4. Mycorrhizal fungal types, diversity and activity will decline under El Nino years and during La Nina years compared with more ?normal? years. Mycorrhizal activity was dramatically affected by precipitation. During wet, El Nino years, EM predominated with a shift to AM during dry, La Nina years. The total amount of fungal hyphae was higher during wetter years. These data suggest that understanding mycorrhizae by climate/CO2/ NOx interactions will be crucial in determining the patterns and rates of nutrient and carbon dynamics in ecosystems.

  20. [Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen application on cotton biomass, nitrogen utilization and soil urease activity].

    PubMed

    Lyu, Ning; Yin, Fei-hu; Chen, Yun; Gao, Zhi-jian; Liu, Yu; Shi, Lei

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a semi-open-top artificial climate chamber was used to study the effect of CO2 enrichment (360 and 540 µmol · mol(-1)) and nitrogen addition (0, 150, 300 and 450 kg · hm(-2)) on cotton dry matter accumulation and distribution, nitrogen absorption and soil urease activity. The results showed that the dry matter accumulation of bud, stem, leaf and the whole plant increased significantly in the higher CO2 concentration treatment irrespective of nitrogen level. The dry matter of all the detected parts of plant with 300 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen addition was significantly higher than those with the other nitrogen levels irrespective of CO2 concentration, indicating reasonable nitrogen fertilization could significantly improve cotton dry matter accumulation. Elevated CO2 concentration had significant impact on the nitrogen absorption contents of cotton bud and stem. Compared to those under CO2 concentration of 360 µmol · mol(-1), the nitrogen contents of bud and stem both increased significantly under CO2 concentration of 540 µmol · mol(-1). The nitrogen content of cotton bud in the treatment of 300 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen was the highest among the four nitrogen fertilizer treatments. While the nitrogen contents of cotton stem in the treatments of 150 kg · hm(-2) and 300 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen levels were higher than those in the treatment of 0 kg · hm(-2) and 450 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen levels. The nitrogen content of cotton leaf was significantly influenced by the in- teraction of CO2 elevation and N addition as the nitrogen content of leaf increased in the treatments of 0, 150 and 300 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen levels under the CO2 concentration of 540 µmol · mol(-1). The nitrogen content in cotton root was significantly increased with the increase of nitrogen fertilizer level under elevated CO2 (540 µmol · mol(-1)) treatment. Overall, the cotton nitrogen absorption content under the elevated CO2 (540 µmol · mol(-1)) treatment was higher than that

  1. Carbon Input Control Over Soil Organic Matter Dynamics in a Temperate Grassland Exposed to Elevated CO2 and Warming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated CO2 generally increases soil C pools. However, greater available C concentrations can potentially stimulate soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition. The effects of climate warming on C storage can also be positive or negative. There is a high degree of uncertainty on the combined effects of...

  2. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 AND TEMPERATURE ON THE RESPONSE OF PONDEROSA PINE TO OZONE: A SIMULATION ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forests regulate numerous biogeochemical cycles, storing and cycling carbon, water, and nutrients, however, there is concern how climate change, elevated CO2 and tropospheric O3 will affect these processes. We investigated the potential impact of increased O3 in combination wit...

  3. Elevated CO2 does not offset greater water stress predicted under climate change for native and exotic riparian plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In semiarid western North American riparian ecosystems, increased drought and lower streamflows under climate change may reduce plant growth and recruitment, and favor drought-tolerant exotic species over mesic native species. We tested whether elevated atmospheric CO2 might ameliorate these effects...

  4. The importance of intraspecific variation in tree responses to elevated [CO2]: breeding and management of future forests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One strategy for managing forests to sustain or increase productivity under global climate change is to initiate breeding programs which maximize responses to elevated [CO2] within species. The basis for any breeding program is intraspecific variation in the traits of interest, and for forests, grow...

  5. ROOT PRODUCTION AND TISSUE QUALITY IN A SHORTGRASS STEPPE EXPOSED TO ELEVATED CO2: USING A NEW INGROWTH METHOD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A modified root ingrowth method was developed to minimize destructive sampling in experiments with limited space, and used to estimate belowground net primary production and root tissue quality in a native semiarid grassland exposed to elevated CO2 for five years. Increases in root production of ove...

  6. Effects of elevated CO 2 on flowering phenology and nectar production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhardt, Andreas; Rusterholz, Hans-Peter

    Effects of elevated CO 2 on flowering phenology and nectar production were studied in five important nectar plants of calcareous grasslands, i.e. Lotus corniculatus, Trifolium pratense, Betonica officinalis, Scabiosa columbaria and Centaurea jacea. Glasshouse experiments showed that flowering probability was significantly enhanced in C. jacea. B. officinalis flowered carlier and L. corniculatus produced more flowers under elevated CO 2. In contrast, the number of flowers decreased in T. pratense. The amount of nectar produced per flower was not affected in the investigated legumes ( T. pratense, L. corniculatus), but was significantly reduced in the other forbs. Elevated CO 2 did not significantly affect nectar sugar concentration and sugar composition. However, S. columbaria and C. jacea produced significantly less total sugar per flower under elevated CO 2. The nectar amino acid concentration remained unaffected in all investigated plant species whereas the total of amino acids produced per flower was significantly reduced in all non-legumes. In addition, the amino acid composition changed significantly in all investigated species except for C. jacea. The observed effects are unexpected and are a potential threat to flower visitors such as most butterflies which have no alternative food resources except nectar. Changes in nectar production due to elevated CO 2 could also generally have detrimental effects on the interactions of flowers and their pollinators.

  7. A multi-biome gap in understanding of crop and ecosystem responses to elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Leakey, Andrew D B; Bishop, Kristen A; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A

    2012-06-01

    A key finding from elevated [CO(2)] field experiments is that the impact of elevated [CO(2)] on plant and ecosystem function is highly dependent upon other environmental conditions, namely temperature and the availability of nutrients and soil moisture. In addition, there is significant variation in the response to elevated [CO(2)] among plant functional types, species and crop varieties. However, experimental data on plant and ecosystem responses to elevated [CO(2)] are strongly biased to economically and ecologically important systems in the temperate zone. There is a multi-biome gap in experimental data that is most severe in the tropics and subtropics, but also includes high latitudes. Physiological understanding of the environmental conditions and species found at high and low latitudes suggest they may respond differently to elevated [CO(2)] than well-studied temperate systems. Addressing this knowledge gap should be a high priority as it is vital to understanding 21st century food supply and ecosystem feedbacks on climate change. PMID:22284851

  8. Changes in the microbial community structure of bacteria, archaea and fungi in response to elevated CO(2) and warming in an Australian native grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Helen L; Mele, Pauline M; Bougoure, Damian S; Allan, Claire Y; Norng, Sorn; Piceno, Yvette M; Brodie, Eoin L; Desantis, Todd Z; Andersen, Gary L; Williams, Amity L; Hovenden, Mark J

    2012-12-01

    The microbial community structure of bacteria, archaea and fungi is described in an Australian native grassland soil after more than 5 years exposure to different atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) (ambient, +550 ppm) and temperatures (ambient, + 2°C) under different plant functional types (C3 and C4 grasses) and at two soil depths (0-5 cm and 5-10 cm). Archaeal community diversity was influenced by elevated [CO2], while under warming archaeal 16S rRNA gene copy numbers increased for C4 plant Themeda triandra and decreased for the C3 plant community (P < 0.05). Fungal community diversity resulted in three groups based upon elevated [CO2], elevated [CO2] plus warming and ambient [CO2]. Overall bacterial community diversity was influenced primarily by depth. Specific bacterial taxa changed in richness and relative abundance in response to climate change factors when assessed by a high-resolution 16S rRNA microarray (PhyloChip). Operational taxonomic unit signal intensities increased under elevated [CO2] for both Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, and increased under warming for Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria. For the interaction of elevated [CO2] and warming there were 103 significant operational taxonomic units (P < 0.01) representing 15 phyla and 30 classes. The majority of these operational taxonomic units increased in abundance for elevated [CO2] plus warming plots, while abundance declined in warmed or elevated [CO2] plots. Bacterial abundance (16S rRNA gene copy number) was significantly different for the interaction of elevated [CO2] and depth (P < 0.05) with decreased abundance under elevated [CO2] at 5-10 cm, and for Firmicutes under elevated [CO2] (P < 0.05). Bacteria, archaea and fungi in soil responded differently to elevated [CO2], warming and their interaction. Taxa identified as significantly climate-responsive could show differing trends in the direction of response ('+' or '-') under elevated CO2 or warming, which could then not be used to

  9. Glycine uptake in heath plants and soil microbes responds to elevated temperature, CO 2 and drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, Louise C.; Michelsen, Anders; Jonasson, Sven; Beier, Claus; Ambus, Per

    2009-11-01

    Temperate terrestrial ecosystems are currently exposed to climatic and air quality changes with increased atmospheric CO 2, increased temperature and prolonged droughts. The responses of natural ecosystems to these changes are focus for research, due to the potential feedbacks to the climate. We here present results from a field experiment in which the effects of these three climate change factors are investigated solely and in all combinations at a temperate heath dominated by heather ( Calluna vulgaris) and wavy hair-grass ( Deschampsia flexuosa). Climate induced increases in plant production may increase plant root exudation of dissolved organic compounds such as amino acids, and the release of amino acids during decomposition of organic matter. Such free amino acids in soil serve as substrates for soil microorganisms and are also acquired as nutrients directly by plants. We investigated the magnitude of the response to the potential climate change treatments on uptake of organic nitrogen in an in situ pulse labelling experiment with 15N 13C 2-labelled glycine (amino acid) injected into the soil. In situ root nitrogen acquisition by grasses responded significantly to the climate change treatments, with larger 15N uptake in response to warming and elevated CO 2 but not additively when the treatments were combined. Also, a larger grass leaf biomass in the combined T and CO 2 treatment than in individual treatments suggest that responses to combined climate change factors cannot be predicted from the responses to single factors treatments. The soil microbes were superior to plants in the short-term competition for the added glycine, as indicated by an 18 times larger 15N recovery in the microbial biomass compared to the plant biomass. The soil microbes acquired glycine largely as an intact compound (87%), with no effects of the multi factorial climate change treatment through one year.

  10. Elevated CO2 and the Sensitivity of Simulated Crop Yield to Variability in Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, A. W.; Absar, M.; Surendran Nair, S.; Preston, B. L.

    2013-12-01

    It is known that the response of crop yields to elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations ('CO2 fertilization') can vary with climatic conditions (e.g., precipitation and soil moisture). Likewise, the sensitivity of crop yield to changes in climate may vary with atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The latter is an important consideration when extrapolating crop sensitivities derived from historical climate variability to a future world with higher levels of atmospheric CO2. Here we report on our investigation of how climate sensitivity of model simulated crop yield is influenced by rising and elevated CO2. Initial results from the EPIC crop model for simulated cotton yield at a site in southeastern Texas show very little if any difference in sensitivity to annual precipitation with static versus rising CO2 concentrations. These model results are consistent with experimental results from the Maricopa, Arizona Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment in which there was little or no difference in the productivity response of cotton under ample versus limited supplies of water. This contrasts with experimental results for wheat and sorghum, especially sorghum, in which the response to elevated CO2 was larger when water supply was limited. We report on the interaction between CO2 and the sensitivity of yield to climate with comparisons for different crops, between the EPIC and DSSAT crop models, across different indices of climate change, and between wet and dry climatic domains of the southern United States of America. This investigation is part of our ongoing effort better understand the sensitivity of crop yield to climate in order to inform regional integrated assessment modeling and considerations of adaption to climate change in the Gulf Coastal region of the southern United States.

  11. Photosynthetic downregulation in leaves of the