Science.gov

Sample records for elevated-temperature structural materials

  1. Elevated Temperature Crack Growth Behavior in HSCT Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Ashok

    1998-01-01

    Structures in super-sonic aircraft are subjected to conditions of high temperature and cyclic and sustained loading for extended periods of time. The durability of structures fabricated from aluminum and certain titanium alloys in such demanding conditions is of primary concern to the designers and manufacturers of futuristic transport aircraft. Accordingly, the major goal of this project was to evaluate the performance and durability of high temperature aluminum and titanium alloys for use in high speed civil transport (HSCT) structures. Additional goals were to develop time-dependent fracture mechanics methodology and test methods for characterizing and predicting elevated temperature crack growth behavior in creep-brittle materials such as ones being considered for use in HSCT structures and to explore accelerated methods of simulating microstructural degradation during service and measuring degraded properties in these materials.

  2. The Effect of Elevated Temperature on Concrete Materials and Structures - a Literature Review.

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this limited study was to provide an overview of the effects of elevated temperature on the behavior of concrete materials and structures. In meeting this objective the effects of elevated temperatures on the properties of ordinary Portland cement concrete constituent materials and concretes are summarized. The effects of elevated temperature on high-strength concrete materials are noted and their performance compared to normal strength concretes. A review of concrete materials for elevated-temperature service is presented. Nuclear power plant and general civil engineering design codes are described. Design considerations and analytical techniques for evaluating the response of reinforced concrete structures to elevated-temperature conditions are presented. Pertinent studies in which reinforced concrete structural elements were subjected to elevated temperatures are described.

  3. "Ultra"-Fast Fracture Strength of Advanced Structural Ceramic Materials Studied at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1999-01-01

    The accurate determination of inert strength is important in reliable life prediction of structural ceramic components. At ambient temperature, the inert strength of a brittle material is typically regarded as free of the effects of slow crack growth due to stress corrosion. Therefore, the inert strength can be determined either by eliminating active species, especially moisture, with an appropriate inert medium, or by using a very high test rate. However, at elevated temperatures, the concept or definition of the inert strength of brittle ceramic materials is not clear, since temperature itself is a degrading environment, resulting in strength degradation through slow crack growth and/or creep. Since the mechanism to control strength is rate-dependent viscous flow, the only conceivable way to determine the inert strength at elevated temperatures is to utilize a very fast test rate that either minimizes the time for or eliminates slow crack growth. Few experimental studies have measured the elevated-temperature, inert (or "ultra"-fast fracture) strength of advanced ceramics. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, an experimental study was initiated to better understand the "ultra"-fast fracture strength behavior of advanced ceramics at elevated temperatures. Fourteen advanced ceramics - one alumina, eleven silicon nitrides, and two silicon carbides - have been tested using constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing in flexure with a series of stress rates including the "ultra"-fast stress rate of 33 000 MPa/sec with digitally controlled test frames. The results for these 14 advanced ceramics indicate that, notwithstanding possible changes in flaw populations as well as flaw configurations because of elevated temperatures, the strength at 33 000 MPa/sec approached the room-temperature strength or reached a higher value than that determined at the conventional test rate of 30 MPa/sec. On the basis of the experimental data, it can be stated that the elevated-temperature

  4. Elevated-Temperature Tribology of Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2010-01-01

    The wear of metals and alloys takes place in many forms, and the type of wear that dominates in each instance is influenced by the mechanics of contact, material properties, the interfacial temperature, and the surrounding environment. The control of elevated-temperature friction and wear is important for applications like internal combustion engines, aerospace propulsion systems, and metalworking equipment. The progression of interacting, often synergistic processes produces surface deformation, subsurface damage accumulation, the formation of tribolayers, and the creation of free particles. Reaction products, particularly oxides, play a primary role in debris formation and microstructural evolution. Chemical reactions are known to be influenced by the energetic state of the exposed surfaces, and that surface energy is in turn affected by localized deformation and fracture. At relatively low temperatures, work-hardening can occur beneath tribo-contacts, but exposure to high temperatures can modify the resultant defect density and grain structure to affect the mechanisms of re-oxidation. As research by others has shown, the rate of wear at elevated temperatures can either be enhanced or reduced, depending on contact conditions and nature of oxide layer formation. Furthermore, the thermodynamic driving force for certain chemical reactions is moderated by kinetics and microstructure. The role of deformation, oxidation, and tribo-corrosion in the elevated temperature tribology of metallic alloys will be exemplified by three examples involving sliding wear, single-point abrasion, and repetitive impact plus slip.

  5. Methods for structural design at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, A. M.; Jones, W. E., Jr.; Leimbach, K. R.

    1973-01-01

    A procedure which can be used to design elevated temperature structures is discussed. The desired goal is to have the same confidence in the structural integrity at elevated temperature as the factor of safety gives on mechanical loads at room temperature. Methods of design and analysis for creep, creep rupture, and creep buckling are presented. Example problems are included to illustrate the analytical methods. Creep data for some common structural materials are presented. Appendix B is description, user's manual, and listing for the creep analysis program. The program predicts time to a given creep or to creep rupture for a material subjected to a specified stress-temperature-time spectrum. Fatigue at elevated temperature is discussed. Methods of analysis for high stress-low cycle fatigue, fatigue below the creep range, and fatigue in the creep range are included. The interaction of thermal fatigue and mechanical loads is considered, and a detailed approach to fatigue analysis is given for structures operating below the creep range.

  6. Aircraft structures research at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duberg, John E

    1955-01-01

    A review is made of the test techniques that have been developed and used by the NACA for experimental research in aircraft structures at elevated temperatures. Some experimental results are presented. Remarks are included on the problem of model scaling for testing of structures at high temperatures. (author)

  7. 49 CFR 172.325 - Elevated temperature materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Elevated temperature materials. 172.325 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.325 Elevated temperature materials. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a bulk packaging containing an elevated temperature material must be...

  8. 49 CFR 172.325 - Elevated temperature materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Elevated temperature materials. 172.325 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.325 Elevated temperature materials. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a bulk packaging containing an elevated temperature material must be...

  9. 49 CFR 172.325 - Elevated temperature materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Elevated temperature materials. 172.325 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.325 Elevated temperature materials. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a bulk packaging containing an elevated temperature material must be...

  10. 49 CFR 172.325 - Elevated temperature materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Elevated temperature materials. 172.325 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.325 Elevated temperature materials. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a bulk packaging containing an elevated temperature material must be...

  11. 49 CFR 172.325 - Elevated temperature materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Elevated temperature materials. 172.325 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.325 Elevated temperature materials. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a bulk packaging containing an elevated temperature material must be...

  12. The emittance of space radiator materials measured at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Mirtich, M.J.; DiFilippo, F.; Barry, J.; Kussmaul, M.

    1994-09-01

    The spectral emittances of textured space radiator materials between 1.7 and 14.7 {mu}m have been evaluated at room temperature and elevated temperature (630{degrees}C) in air. Heating in air caused a permanent increase in spectral emittance for all materials tested: HCl/ion beam textured 304 stainless steel, untextured Ti (6 percent Al, 4 percent V), and sandblasted Ti (6 percent Al, 4 percent V). Changes in the surface chemistry and/or surface morphology of these materials were also observed. Elevated temperature spectral emittance was measured in an argon atmosphere and compared to the measurements in air. Similarity between the room temperature and elevated temperature spectral emittance measurements was also investigated, and limited agreement was found.

  13. Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a final report for the period of 12/1/03 through 11/30/04 for NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3-776, entitled "Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials." During this final period, major efforts were focused on both the determination of mechanical properties of advanced ceramic materials and the development of mechanical test methodologies under several different programs of the NASA-Glenn. The important research activities made during this period are: 1. Mechanical properties evaluation of two gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides. 2) Mechanical testing for fuel-cell seal materials. 3) Mechanical properties evaluation of thermal barrier coatings and CFCCs and 4) Foreign object damage (FOD) testing.

  14. Structural efficiencies of various aluminum, titanium, and steel alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerl, George J; Hughes, Philip J

    1953-01-01

    Efficient temperature ranges are indicated for two high-strength aluminum alloys, two titanium alloys, and three steels for some short-time compression-loading applications at elevated temperatures. Only the effects of constant temperatures and short exposure to temperature are considered, and creep is assumed not to be a factor. The structural efficiency analysis is based upon preliminary results of short-time elevated-temperature compressive stress-strain tests of the materials. The analysis covers strength under uniaxial compression, elastic stiffness, column buckling, and the buckling of long plates in compression or in shear.

  15. The effects of elevated temperatures on the structural properties of fiber composite materials suitable for use in space shuttle and other space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of high temperatures on the structural properties of fiber composite materials for use in spacecraft structures are investigated. Various mechanical properties of boron reinforced aluminum alloys were measured. It was observed that cycling these materials through temperatures that varied from room temperature to 425 C could seriously degrade the properties. The extent of the observed effects depended on alloy type and the maximum cyclic temperature used. Results are discussed in terms of upper and lower strength bonds calculated from the strengths of individual fibers.

  16. 49 CFR 173.247 - Bulk packaging for certain elevated temperature materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 101 and IM 102 portable tanks; UN portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain elevated temperature... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.247 Bulk packaging for certain elevated temperature materials....

  17. 49 CFR 173.247 - Bulk packaging for certain elevated temperature materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 101 and IM 102 portable tanks; UN portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain elevated temperature... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.247 Bulk packaging for certain elevated temperature materials....

  18. 49 CFR 173.247 - Bulk packaging for certain elevated temperature materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 101 and IM 102 portable tanks; UN portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain elevated temperature... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.247 Bulk packaging for certain elevated temperature materials....

  19. 49 CFR 173.247 - Bulk packaging for certain elevated temperature materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 101 and IM 102 portable tanks; UN portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain elevated temperature... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.247 Bulk packaging for certain elevated temperature materials....

  20. Design and analysis of aerospace structures at elevated temperatures. [aircraft, missiles, and space platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. I.

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of approaches that have emerged as useful in the incorporation of thermal loading considerations into advanced composite materials-based aerospace structural design practices. Sources of structural heating encompass not only propulsion system heat and aerodynamic surface heating at supersonic speeds, but the growing possibility of intense thermal fluxes from directed-energy weapons. The composite materials in question range from intrinsically nonheat-resistant polymer matrix systems to metal-matrix composites, and increasingly to such ceramic-matrix composites as carbon/carbon, which are explicitly intended for elevated temperature operation.

  1. Shell structures in aluminum nanocontacts at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Costa-Krämer, José Luis; León, Natalia; Guerrero, Carlo; Díaz, Marisel

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum nanocontact conductance histograms are studied experimentally from room temperature up to near the bulk melting point. The dominant stable configurations for this metal show a very early crossover from shell structures at low wire diameters to ionic subshell structures at larger diameters. At these larger radii, the favorable structures are temperature-independent and consistent with those expected for ionic subshell (faceted) formations in face-centered cubic geometries. When approaching the bulk melting temperature, these local stability structures become less pronounced as shown by the vanishing conductance histogram peak structure. PMID:22325572

  2. 49 CFR 173.247 - Bulk packaging for certain elevated temperature materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 101 and IM 102 portable tanks; UN portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain elevated temperature... SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Bulk Packaging for Hazardous Materials...

  3. Diamond structure recovery during ion irradiation at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deslandes, Alec; Guenette, Mathew C.; Belay, Kidane; Elliman, Robert G.; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Thomsen, Lars; Riley, Daniel P.; Lumpkin, Gregory R.

    2015-12-01

    CVD diamond is irradiated by 5 MeV carbon ions, with each sample held at a different temperature (300-873 K) during irradiations. The defect structures resulting from the irradiations are evident as vacancy, interstitial and amorphous carbon signals in Raman spectra. The observed variation of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) and peak position of the diamond peak suggests that disorder in the diamond lattice is reduced for high temperature irradiations. The dumbbell interstitial signal is reduced for irradiations at 873 K, which suggests this defect is unstable at these temperatures and that interstitials have migrated to crystal surfaces. Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy results indicate that damage to the diamond structure at the surface has occurred for room temperature irradiations, however, this structure is at least partially recovered for irradiations performed at 473 K and above. The results suggest that, in a high temperature irradiation environment such as a nuclear fusion device, in situ annealing of radiation-created defects can maintain the diamond structure and prolong the lifetime of diamond components.

  4. Geopolymeric materials prepared using Class F fly ash and elevated temperature curing

    SciTech Connect

    Bakharev, T. . E-mail: tanya.bakharev@eng.monash.edu.au

    2005-06-01

    This paper reports the results of the study of the influence of elevated temperature curing on phase composition, microstructure and strength development in geopolymer materials prepared using Class F fly ash and sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. In particular, the effect of storage at room temperature before the application of heat on strength development and phase composition was studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and SEM were utilised in this study. Long precuring at room temperature before application of heat was beneficial for strength development in all studied materials, as strength comparable to 1 month of curing at elevated temperature can develop in this case only after 24 h of heat curing. The main product of reaction in the geopolymeric materials was amorphous alkali aluminosilicate gel. However, in the case of sodium hydroxide activator in addition to it, traces of chabazite, Linde Type A, Na-P1 (gismondine) zeolites and hydroxysodalite were also present. The type of zeolite present and composition of aluminosilicate gel were dependent on the curing history.

  5. Material property data and their use in design and analysis for an elevated temperature solar code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, I.

    1981-11-01

    Specific properties of the materials, temperatures, and operating parameters for elevated temperature solar thermal power plants are considered as a basis for developing standards of implementation. Physical and mechanical properties such as thermal conductivity, elastic modulus, expansion, strength, and creep are discussed and recommendations for ASME Code I and III materials are cited where feasible. Inelastic behavior tests involving beam bending, pipe ratcheting, torsion-torsion tests, and axial cyclic tests of various stainless steel specimens and Incoloy 800 material are reported. Peculiarities of problems for solar applications are noted to be a lack of information of basic material behavior due to the low amount of actual operational experience, a large number of transient temperature cycles, and primary creep.

  6. Composition of sputtered material from CuNi alloy during Xe + ion sputtering at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Shigeyuki; Shimizu, Hazime; Ichimura, Singo

    1995-04-01

    Polycrystalline CuNi alloys were sputtered by 3 kV Xe + ions at elevated temperatures to analyze the ion-beam-induced diffusion. The time evolution of the composition of the sputtered materials from the start of the sputtering was measured by TOF-SNMS (time-of-flight sputtered neutral mass spectrometry). During removal of the Gibbsian segregation layer of copper, the sputtered flux consisted of almost only copper atoms. Then, the copper content gradually decreased due to the formation of a sputter-induced copper-depleted surface layer, and reached an almost steady state with still higher copper content than the bulk composition. From the temperature dependence of the composition at the quasi-steady state the activation energy of copper transportation through a high diffusivity path was derived to be 54 kJ mol -1 (0.56 eV). The high diffusivity path was assigned to copper diffusion through grain boundaries.

  7. Reliability and life prediction of ceramic composite structures at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1994-01-01

    Methods are highlighted that ascertain the structural reliability of components fabricated of composites with ceramic matrices reinforced with ceramic fibers or whiskers and subject to quasi-static load conditions at elevated temperatures. Each method focuses on a particular composite microstructure: whisker-toughened ceramics, laminated ceramic matrix composites, and fabric reinforced ceramic matrix composites. In addition, since elevated service temperatures usually involve time-dependent effects, a section dealing with reliability degradation as a function of load history has been included. A recurring theme throughout this chapter is that even though component failure is controlled by a sequence of many microfailure events, failure of ceramic composites will be modeled using macrovariables.

  8. Effect of Preloading on Fatigue Strength in Dynamic Fatigue Testing of Ceramic Materials at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1995-01-01

    Previously derived solutions of fatigue strength as a function of preloading were verified by applying preloads to elevated temperature dynamic fatigue tests of 96 wt% alumina at 1000 C and NC 132 silicon nitride at 1100 C. The technique was found very useful in identification and control of the governing failure mechanism when multiple failure mechanisms, such as slow crack growth, creep and oxidation occurred simultaneously at elevated temperatures.

  9. Evaluation of pore structures and cracking in cement paste exposed to elevated temperatures by X-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kwang Yeom; Yun, Tae Sup; Park, Kwang Pil

    2013-08-15

    When cement-based materials are exposed to the high temperatures induced by fire, which can rapidly cause temperatures of over 1000 °C, the changes in pore structure and density prevail. In the present study, mortar specimens were subjected to a series of increasing temperatures to explore the temperature-dependent evolution of internal pore structure. High-performance X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to observe the evolution of temperature-induced discontinuities at the sub-millimeter level. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the cause of physical changes in the heated mortar specimens. Results exhibit the changes in pore structure caused by elevated temperatures, and thermally induced fractures. We discuss the progressive formation of thermally induced fracture networks, which is a prerequisite for spalling failure of cement-based materials by fire, based on visual observations of the 3D internal structures revealed by X-ray CT.

  10. Apparatus for Measuring Spectral Emissivity of Solid Materials at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Dengfeng; Tan, Hong; Xuan, Yimin; Han, Yuge; Li, Qiang

    2016-05-01

    Spectral emissivity measurements at high temperature are of great importance for both scientific research and industrial applications. A method to perform spectral emissivity measurements is presented based on two sample heating methods, the flat plate and tubular furnace. An apparatus is developed to measure the normal spectral emissivity of solid material at elevated temperatures from 1073 K to 1873 K and wavelengths from 2 \\upmu hbox {m} to 25 \\upmu hbox {m}. Sample heating is accomplished by a torch flame or a high temperature furnace. Two different variable temperature blackbody sources are used as standard references and the radiance is measured by a FTIR spectrometer. Following calibration of the spectral response and background radiance of the spectrometer, the effect of the blackbody temperature interval on calibration results is discussed. Measurements are performed of the normal spectral emissivity of SiC and graphite over the prescribed temperature and wavelength range. The emissivity of SiC at high temperatures is compared with the emissivity at room temperature, and the influence of an oxide layer formed at the surface of SiC on the emissivity is studied. The effect of temperature on the emissivity of graphite is also investigated. Furthermore, a thorough analysis of the uncertainty components of the emissivity measurement is performed.

  11. Structural characteristics and elevated temperature mechanical properties of AJ62 Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kubásek, J. Vojtěch, D.; Martínek, M.

    2013-12-15

    Structure and mechanical properties of the novel casting AJ62 (Mg–6Al–2Sr) alloy developed for elevated temperature applications were studied. The AJ62 alloy was compared to commercial casting AZ91 (Mg–9Al–1Zn) and WE43 (Mg–4Y–3RE) alloys. The structure was examined by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometry. Mechanical properties were characterized by Viskers hardness measurements in the as-cast state and after a long-term heat treatment at 250 °C/150 hours. Compressive mechanical tests were also carried out both at room and elevated temperatures. Compressive creep tests were conducted at a temperature of 250 °C and compressive stresses of 60, 100 and 140 MPa. The structure of the AJ62 alloy consisted of primary α-Mg dendrites and interdendritic nework of the Al{sub 4}Sr and massive Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 13}Sr phases. By increasing the cooling rate during solidification from 10 and 120 K/s the average dendrite arm thickness decreased from 18 to 5 μm and the total volume fraction of the interdendritic phases from 20% to 30%. Both factors slightly increased hardness and compressive strength. The room temperature compressive strength and hardness of the alloy solidified at 30 K/s were 298 MPa and 50 HV 5, i.e. similar to those of the as-cast WE43 alloy and lower than those of the AZ91 alloy. At 250 °C the compressive strength of the AJ62 alloy decreased by 50 MPa, whereas those of the AZ91 and WE43 alloys by 100 and 20 MPa, respectively. The creep rate of the AJ62 alloy was higher than that of the WE43 alloy, but significantly lower in comparison with the AZ91 alloy. Different thermal stabilities of the alloys were discussed and related to structural changes during elevated temperature expositions. - Highlights: • Small effect of cooling rate on the compressive strength and hardness of AJ 62 • A bit lower compressive strength of AJ 62 compared to AZ91 at room temperature • Higher resistance of the AJ 62

  12. Microwave-enhanced electrochemical cycling performance of the LiNi0.2Mn1.8O4 spinel cathode material at elevated temperature.

    PubMed

    Raju, Kumar; Nkosi, Funeka P; Viswanathan, Elumalai; Mathe, Mkhulu K; Damodaran, Krishnan; Ozoemena, Kenneth I

    2016-05-14

    The well-established poor electrochemical cycling performance of the LiMn2O4 (LMO) spinel cathode material for lithium-ion batteries at elevated temperature stems from the instability of the Mn(3+) concentration. In this work, a microwave-assisted solid-state reaction has been used to dope LMO with a very low amount of nickel (i.e., LiNi0.2Mn1.8O4, herein abbreviated as LMNO) for lithium-ion batteries from Mn3O4 which is prepared from electrolytic manganese oxide (EMD, γ-MnO2). To establish the impact of microwave irradiation on the electrochemical cycling performance at an elevated temperature (60 °C), the Mn(3+) concentration in the pristine and microwave-treated LMNO samples was independently confirmed by XRD, XPS, (6)LiMAS-NMR and electrochemical studies including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The microwave-treated sample (LMNOmic) allowed for the clear exposure of the {111} facets of the spinel, optimized the Mn(3+) content, promoting structural and cycle stability at elevated temperature. At room temperature, both the pristine (LMNO) and microwave-treated (LMNOmic) samples gave comparable cycling performance (>96% capacity retention and ca. 100% coulombic efficiency after 100 consecutive cycling). However, at an elevated temperature (60 °C), the LMNOmic gave an improved cycling stability (>80% capacity retention and ca. 90% coulombic efficiency after 100 consecutive cycling) compared to the LMNO. For the first time, the impact of microwave irradiation on tuning the average manganese redox state of the spinel material to enhance the cycling performance of the LiNi0.2Mn1.8O4 at elevated temperature and lithium-ion diffusion kinetics has been clearly demonstrated. PMID:27113855

  13. Sandwich-structured polymer nanocomposites with high energy density and great charge-discharge efficiency at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Liu, Feihua; Yang, Tiannan; Gadinski, Matthew R; Zhang, Guangzu; Chen, Long-Qing; Wang, Qing

    2016-09-01

    The demand for a new generation of high-temperature dielectric materials toward capacitive energy storage has been driven by the rise of high-power applications such as electric vehicles, aircraft, and pulsed power systems where the power electronics are exposed to elevated temperatures. Polymer dielectrics are characterized by being lightweight, and their scalability, mechanical flexibility, high dielectric strength, and great reliability, but they are limited to relatively low operating temperatures. The existing polymer nanocomposite-based dielectrics with a limited energy density at high temperatures also present a major barrier to achieving significant reductions in size and weight of energy devices. Here we report the sandwich structures as an efficient route to high-temperature dielectric polymer nanocomposites that simultaneously possess high dielectric constant and low dielectric loss. In contrast to the conventional single-layer configuration, the rationally designed sandwich-structured polymer nanocomposites are capable of integrating the complementary properties of spatially organized multicomponents in a synergistic fashion to raise dielectric constant, and subsequently greatly improve discharged energy densities while retaining low loss and high charge-discharge efficiency at elevated temperatures. At 150 °C and 200 MV m(-1), an operating condition toward electric vehicle applications, the sandwich-structured polymer nanocomposites outperform the state-of-the-art polymer-based dielectrics in terms of energy density, power density, charge-discharge efficiency, and cyclability. The excellent dielectric and capacitive properties of the polymer nanocomposites may pave a way for widespread applications in modern electronics and power modules where harsh operating conditions are present. PMID:27551101

  14. Evaluation of a strain-gage load calibration on a low-aspect-ratio wing structure at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reardon, Lawrence F.

    1989-01-01

    The environmental aspect of elevated temperature and its relationship to the science of strain gage calibrations of aircraft structures are addressed. A section of a wing designed for a high-speed aircraft structure was used to study this problem. This structure was instrumented with strain gages calibrated at both elevated and room temperatures. Load equations derived from a high-temperature load calibration were compared with equations derived from an identical load calibration at room temperature. The implications of the high temperature load calibration were studied from the viewpoint of applicability and necessity. Load equations derived from the room temperature load calibration resulted in generally lower equation standard errors than equations derived from the elevated temperature load calibration. A distributed load was applied to the structure at elevated temperature and strain gage outputs were measured. This applied load was then calculated using equations derived from both the room temperature and elevated temperature calibration data. It was found that no significant differences between the two equation systems existed in terms of computing this applied distributed load, as long as the thermal shifts resulting from thermal stresses could be identified. This identification requires a heating of the structure. Therefore, it is concluded that for this structure, a high temperature load calibration is not required. However, a heating of the structure is required to determine thermal shifts.

  15. Micro-structural optimization of polybenzimidazole-based membranes for H2/CO2 separation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rajinder P; Li, Xin; Dudeck, Kevin W; Benicewicz, Brian C; Berchtold, Kathryn A

    2012-06-12

    There is compelling need to develop novel separation methods to improve the energy efficiency of synthesis (syn) gas processing operations including H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/CO production to meet power, chemicals, and fuel producer needs, as well as carbon capture and removal of other undesirable syngas impurities. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic process conditions and compatible with large gas volumes. H{sub 2} selective membrane technology is a promising method for syngas separations at elevated temperatures (>150 C) that could be positioned upstream or downstream of one or more of the water-gas-shift reactors (WGSRs) or integrated with a WGSR depending on application specific syngas processing. Polybenzimidazole (PBI)-based polymer chemistries are exceptional candidates for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separations at elevated temperatures. In general, these materials possess excellent chemical resistance, very high glass transition temperatures (> 400 C), good mechanical properties, and an appropriate level of processability. Although commercially available PBI polymers have demonstrated commercially attractive H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity, their H{sub 2} permeability is low. Our team s employing structural and chemical manipulations to tailor the polymer free-volume achitecture with the ultimate goal of enhancing H{sub 2} permselectivity while retaining the inherent hermochemical stability characteristics of PBI. We will discuss our synthetic approaches and their influences on the gas transport behavior of these PBI-based materials. In general, a decrease in H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was observed with an increase in H{sub 2} permeability. H{sub 2} permeability and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity at 250 C ranged from 50 to 1000 barrer and 5 to 45, respectively.

  16. Effects of elevated temperatures on different restorative materials: An aid to forensic identification processes

    PubMed Central

    Pol, Chetan A.; Ghige, Suvarna K.; Gosavi, Suchitra R.; Hazarey, Vinay K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heat-induced alterations to dental and restorative materials can be of great interest to forensic dentistry. Knowing the specific optical behavior of dental materials can be of high importance as recognition of changes induced by high temperatures can lead to the determination of material which was used in a dental restoration, facilitating identification of burned human remains. Aim: To observe the effects of predetermined temperatures (200°C–400°C–600°C–800°C–1000°C) on unrestored teeth and different restorative materials macroscopically and then examine them under a stereomicroscope for the purpose of identification. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 375 extracted teeth which were divided into five groups of 75 teeth each as follows: group 1- unrestored teeth, group 2- teeth restored with all-ceramic crowns, Group 3- with class I silver amalgam filling, group 4- with class I composite restoration, and group 5- with class I glass ionomer cement restoration. Results: Unrestored and restored teeth display a series of specific macroscopic & stereomicroscopic structural changes for each range of temperature. Conclusion: Dental tissues and restorative materials undergo a series of changes which correlate well with the various temperatures to which they were exposed. These changes are a consequence of the nature of the materials and their physicochemical characteristics. PMID:26005305

  17. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yau, J. F.; Malik, S. N.; Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Laflen, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Elevated Temperature Crack Growth Project is to evaluate proposed nonlinear fracture mechanics methods for application to combustor liners of aircraft gas turbine engines. During the first year of this program, proposed path-independent (P-I) integrals were reviewed for such applications. Several P-I integrals were implemented into a finite-element postprocessor which was developed and verified as part of the work. Alloy 718 was selected as the analog material for use in the forthcoming experimental work. A buttonhead, single-edge notch specimen was designed and verified for use in elevated-temperature strain control testing with significant inelastic strains. A crack mouth opening displacement measurement device was developed for further use.

  18. CO{sub 2}-gasification reactivity of different carbonaceous materials at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, J.; Wu, S.; Wu, Y.; Gao, J.

    2009-07-01

    At the atmospheric pressure and at the temperatures between 1,223 and 1,673 K, the CO{sub 2} gasification reactivity of seven different carbonaceous materials comprising coal tar pitch coke, petroleum coke, natural graphite, carbon black and three coal chars was investigated by using thermogravimetric analysis. Their crystalline structures were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). It is found that the reactivity of the chars, pitch coke and petroleum coke produced from liquid phase carbonization, is several times poorer than that of the coal chars produced from solid phase carbonization and even lower than that of natural graphite. At the same time, it is obtained that under the condition of the chemical reaction control, the apparent activation energies of the former are in the range of 135.82-174.92 kJ/mol, while those of the latter are between 89.95 kJ/mol and 110.05 kJ/mol. Besides, the reactivity of the sample has a certain correlation with the crystalline structure of the sample, i.e., the larger the fraction of the relatively better crystalline structure is, the poorer the reactivity of the sample is.

  19. Chemical structure of cement aged at normal and elevated temperatures and pressures, Part II: Low permeability class G oilwell cement

    SciTech Connect

    Le Saout, Gwenn . E-mail: gwenn.lesaout@epfl.ch; Lecolier, Eric; Rivereau, Alain; Zanni, Helene

    2006-03-15

    Recently, Low Permeability Cement formulation has been developed for oilwell cementing. Therefore, it is important to understand the physical and chemical processes causing cement degradation in the downhole environment. In this study, we have characterised a Low Permeability Class G oilwell Cement immersed for one year in brine at T = 293 K, p = 10{sup 5} Pa and T = 353 K, p = 7 x 10{sup 6} Pa using {sup 29}Si, {sup 27}Al NMR and XRD techniques. Elevated temperature and pressure conditions increase the rate of the pozzolanic reaction and have significant effects on the polymerisation of C-S-H and on the incorporation of Al in the C-S-H structure. Leaching resulted in the formation of calcite and a more polymerised C-S-H with the appearance of tobermorite in the sample cured at elevated temperature and pressure.

  20. The viscoplastic behavior of SCS6/Ti-15-3 metal matrix composite materials at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Mark E.

    1988-01-01

    Titanium-based metal matrix composite materials (MMC'S) are being considered for use in the National Aerospace Plane. It is expected that these materials will be subjected to temperatures ranging up to about 820 C (1500 F). The present study was a preliminary investigation intended to quantify the level of viscoplastic behavior exhibited by SCS6/Ti-15-3 MMC's at elevated temperatures. The study consisted of a series of uniaxial creep/creep recovery tests. These tests were conducted in air at a temperature of 535 C (1000 F). Three distinct types of specimens were tested: Ti-15-3 heat matrix specimens (O2/plus or minus 45) sub s composite specimens, and (90 sub 2/plus or minus 45) sub s composite specimens. Tensile loads were applied to the specimens using a lever-arm creep frame equipped with a high temperature furnace. Specimen creep stains were monitored using an LVDT-based extensometer.

  1. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Material at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Dana K. Morton; Spencer D. Snow; Tom E. Rahl; Robert K. Blandford

    2007-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. However, three previous papers [1, 2, 3] reported on impact testing and analysis results performed at the Idaho National Laboratory using 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel base material specimens that began the investigation of these characteristics. The goal of the work presented herein is to add the results of additional tensile impact testing for 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick dog-bone shaped test specimens, additional tests achieved target strain rates of 5, 10, and 22 per second at room temperature, 300, and 600 degrees Fahrenheit. Elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at each designated strain rate and temperature are presented herein.

  2. Progress in understanding the mechanical behavior of pressure-vessel materials at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Brinkman, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    Progress during the 1970's on the production of high-temperature mechanical properties data for pressure vessel materials was reviewed. The direction of the research was toward satisfying new data requirements to implement advances in high-temperature inelastic design methods. To meet these needs, servo-controlled testing machines and high-resolution extensometry were developed to gain more information on the essential behavioral features of high-temperature alloys. The similarities and differences in the mechanical response of various pressure vessel materials were identified. High-temperature pressure vessel materials that have received the most attention included Type 304 stainless steel, Type 316 stainless steel, 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, alloy 800H, and Hastelloy X.

  3. Materials compatibility with oxidizer-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of oxygen compatibility and resistance to ignition of candidate materials for use in a liquid rocket engine designed to incorporate an oxidizer rich preburner-LOX turbopump configuration was discussed. The program was divided into two basic tasks. The first task was to develop a preliminary design of an oxidizer turbopump preburner section complete with thermal and MS Parameter analyses and to develop a conceptual design of the main injector with a preliminary engine specification as the final product. The second task was directed totally at testing materials in oxygen-rich environments.

  4. Elevated temperature erosion studies on some materials for high temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Jianren.

    1991-01-01

    The surface degradation of materials due to high temperature erosion or combined erosion corrosion is a serious problem in many industrial and aeronautical applications. As such, it has become an important design consideration in many situations. The materials investigated in the present studies are stainless steels, Ti-6Al-4V, alumina ceramics, with and without silicate glassy phase, and zirconia. These are some of the potential materials for use in the high temperature erosive-corrosive environments. The erosion or erosion-corrosion experiments were performed in a high temperature sand-blast type of test rig. The variables studied included the temperature, material composition, heat treatment condition, impingement velocity and angle, erodent concentration, etc. The morphological features of the eroded or eroded-corroded surfaces, substrate deformation, and oxide characteristics were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis. The scratch test, single ball impact, and indentation tests were used to understand the behavior of oxide film in particle impacts. Based on these studies, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the mechanical or combined mechanical and chemical actions in erosion was developed.

  5. Simultaneous moduli measurement of elastic materials at elevated temperatures using an ultrasonic waveguide method.

    PubMed

    Periyannan, Suresh; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2015-11-01

    A novel technique for simultaneously measuring the moduli of elastic isotropic material, as a function of temperature, using two ultrasonic guided wave modes that are co-generated using a single probe is presented here. This technique can be used for simultaneously measuring Young's modulus (E) and shear modulus (G) of different materials over a wide range of temperatures (35 °C-1200 °C). The specimens used in the experiments have special embodiments (for instance, a bend) at one end of the waveguide and an ultrasonic guided wave generator/detector (transducer) at the other end for obtaining reflected signals in a pulse-echo mode. The orientation of the transducer can be used for simultaneously generating/receiving the L(0,1) and/or T(0,1) using a single transducer in a waveguide on one end. The far end of the waveguides with the embodiment is kept inside a heating device such as a temperature-controlled furnace. The time of flight difference, as a function of uniform temperature distribution region (horizontal portion) of bend waveguides was measured and used to determine the material properties. Several materials were tested and the comparison between values reported in the literature and measured values were found to be in agreement, for both elastic moduli (E and G) measurements, as a function of temperature. This technique provides significant reduction in time and effort over conventional means of measurement of temperature dependence of elastic moduli. PMID:26628161

  6. Thermal Output of WK-Type Strain Gauges on Various Materials at Cryogenic and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalkowski, Matthew K.; Rivers, H. Kevin; Smith, Russell W.

    1998-01-01

    Strain gage apparent strain (thermal output) is one of the largest sources of error associated with the measurement of strain when temperatures and mechanical loads are varied. In this paper, experimentally determined apparent strains of WK-type strain gages, installed on both metallic and composite-laminate materials of various lay-ups and resin systems for temperatures ranging from -450 F to 230 F are presented. For the composite materials apparent strain in both the 0 ply orientation angle and the 90 ply orientation angle were measured. Metal specimens tested included: aluminum-lithium alloy (Al-LI 2195-T87), aluminum alloy (Al 2219-T87), and titanium alloy. Composite materials tested include: graphite-toughened-epoxy (IM7/997- 2), graphite-bismaleimide (IM7/5260), and graphite-K3 (IM7/K3B). The experimentally determined apparent strain data are curve fit with a fourth-order polynomial for each of the materials studied. The apparent strain data and the polynomials that are fit to the data are compared with those produced by the strain gage manufacturer, and the results and comparisons are presented. Unacceptably high errors between the manufacture's data and the experimentally determined data were observed (especially at temperatures below - 270-F).

  7. Elevated Temperature, Residual Compressive Strength of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Structure Manufactured Out-of-Autoclave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Sutter, James K.; Burke, Eric R.; Dixon, Genevieve D.; Gyekenyesi, Thomas G.; Smeltzer, Stanley S.

    2012-01-01

    Several 1/16th-scale curved sandwich composite panel sections of a 10 m diameter barrel were fabricated to demonstrate the manufacturability of large-scale curved sections using minimum gauge, [+60/-60/0]s, toughened epoxy composite facesheets co-cured with low density (50 kilograms per cubic meters) aluminum honeycomb core. One of these panels was fabricated out of autoclave (OoA) by the vacuum bag oven (VBO) process using Cycom(Registered Trademark) T40-800b/5320-1 prepreg system while another panel with the same lay-up and dimensions was fabricated using the autoclave-cure, toughened epoxy prepreg system Cycom(Registered Trademark) IM7/977-3. The resulting 2.44 m x 2 m curved panels were investigated by non-destructive evaluation (NDE) at NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) to determine initial fabrication quality and then cut into smaller coupons for elevated temperature wet (ETW) mechanical property characterization. Mechanical property characterization of the sandwich coupons was conducted including edge-wise compression (EWC), and compression-after-impact (CAI) at conditions ranging from 25 C/dry to 150 C/wet. The details and results of this characterization effort are presented in this paper.

  8. Structure and elevated temperature properties of carbon-free ferritic alloys strengthened by a Laves phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandarkar, M. D.; Zackay, V. F.; Parker, E. R.; Bhat, M. S.

    1975-01-01

    A Laves phase, Fe2Ta, was utilized to obtain good elevated temperature properties in a carbon-free iron alloy containing 1 at. pct Ta and 7 at. pct Cr. Room temperature embrittlement resulting from the precipitation of the Laves phase at grain boundaries was overcome by spheroidizing the precipitate. This was accomplished by thermally cycling the alloys through the alpha to gamma transformation. The short-time yield strength of the alloys decreased very slowly with increase in test temperature up to 600 C, but above this temperature, the strength decreased rapidly. Results of constant load creep and stress rupture tests conducted at several temperatures and stresses indicated that the rupture and creep strengths of spheroidized 1 Ta-7 Cr alloy were higher than those of several commercial steels containing chromium and/or molybdenum carbides but lower than those of steels containing substantial amounts of tungsten and vanadium. When molybdenum was added to the base Fe-Ta-Cr alloy, the rupture and creep strengths were considerably increased.

  9. Tensile behavior of glass/ceramic composite materials at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, J. F.; Grande, D. H.; Jacobs, J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the tensile behavior of high-temperature composite materials containing continuous Nicalon ceramic fiber reinforcement and glass and glass/ceramic matrices. The longitudinal properties of these materials can approach theoretical expectations for brittle matrix composites, failing at a strength and ultimate strain level consistent with those of the fibers. The brittle, high-modulus matrices result in a nonlinear stress-strain curve due to the onset of stable matrix cracking at 10 to 30 percent of the fiber strain to failure, and at strains below this range in off-axis plies. Current fibers and matrices can provide attractive properties well above 1000 C, but composites experience embrittlement in oxidizing atmospheres at 800 to 1000 C due to oxidation of a carbon interface reaction layer.The oxidation effect greatly increases the interface bond strength, causing composite embrittlement.

  10. Electrical Properties of Materials for Elevated Temperature Resistance Strain Gage Application. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1987-01-01

    The objective was to study the electrical resistances of materials that are potentially useful as resistance strain gages at 1000 C. Transition metal carbides and nitrides, boron carbide and silicon carbide were selected for the experimental phase of this research. Due to their low temperature coefficient of resistance and good stability, TiC, ZrC, B sub 4 C and beta-SiC are suggested as good candidates for high temperature resistance strain gage applications.

  11. Design Issues for Using Magnetic Materials in Radiation Environments at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.

    2013-01-01

    One of the challenges of designing motors and alternators for use in nuclear powered space missions is accounting for the effects of radiation. Terrestrial reactor power plants use distance and shielding to minimize radiation damage but space missions must economize volume and mass. Past studies have shown that sufficiently high radiation levels can affect the magnetic response of hard and soft magnetic materials. Theoretical models explaining the radiation-induced degradation have been proposed but not verified. This paper reviews the literature and explains the cumulative effects of temperature, magnetic-load, and radiation-level on the magnetic properties of component materials. Magnetic property degradation is very specific to alloy choice and processing history, since magnetic properties are very much entwined with specific chemistry and microstructural features. However, there is basic theoretical as well as supportive experimental evidence that the negative impact to magnetic properties will be minimal if the bulk temperature of the material is less than fifty percent of the Curie temperature, the radiation flux is low, and the demagnetization field is small. Keywords: Magnets, Permanent Magnets, Power Converters, Nuclear Electric Power Generation, Radiation Tolerance.

  12. Consideration of Conductive Motor Winding Materials at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Groh, Henry C., III

    2015-01-01

    A brief history of conductive motor winding materials is presented, comparing various metal motor winding materials and their properties in terms of conductivity, density and cost. The proposed use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and composites incorporating CNTs is explored as a potential way to improve motor winding conductivity, density, and reduce motor size which are important to electric aircraft technology. The conductivity of pure Cu, a CNT yarn, and a dilute Cu-CNT composite was measured at room temperature and at several temperatures up to 340 C. The conductivity of the Cu-CNT composite was about 3 percent lower than pure copper's at all temperatures measured. The conductivity of the CNT yarn was about 200 times lower than copper's, however, the yarn's conductivity dropped less with increasing temperature compared to Cu. It is believed that the low conductivity of the yarn is due primarily to high interfacial resistances and the presence of CNTs with low, semiconductor like electrical properties (s-CNT). It is believed the conductivity of the CNT-Cu composite could be improved by not using s-CNT, and instead using only CNTs with high, metallic like electrical properties (m-CNT); and by increasing the vol% m-CNTs.

  13. Alterations in gill structure in tropical reef fishes as a result of elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bowden, A J; Gardiner, N M; Couturier, C S; Stecyk, J A W; Nilsson, G E; Munday, P L; Rummer, J L

    2014-09-01

    Tropical regions are expected to be some of the most affected by rising sea surface temperatures (SSTs) because seasonal temperature variations are minimal. As temperatures rise, less oxygen dissolves in water, but metabolic requirements of fish and thus, the demand for effective oxygen uptake, increase. Gill remodelling is an acclimation strategy well documented in freshwater cyprinids experiencing large seasonal variations in temperature and oxygen as well as an amphibious killifish upon air exposure. However, no study has investigated whether tropical reef fishes remodel their gills to allow for increased oxygen demands at elevated temperatures. We tested for gill remodelling in five coral reef species (Acanthochromis polyacanthus, Chromis atripectoralis, Pomacentrus moluccensis, Dascyllus melanurus and Cheilodipterus quinquelineatus) from populations in northern Papua New Guinea (2° 35.765' S; 150° 46.193' E). Fishes were acclimated for 12-14 days to 29 and 31°C (representing their seasonal range) and 33 and 34°C to account for end-of-century predicted temperatures. We measured lamellar perimeter, cross-sectional area, base thickness, and length for five filaments on the 2nd gill arches and qualitatively assessed 3rd gill arches via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All species exhibited significant differences in the quantitative measurements made on the lamellae, but no consistent trends with temperature were observed. SEM only revealed alterations in gill morphology in P. moluccensis. The overall lack of changes in gill morphology with increasing temperature suggests that these near-equatorial reef fishes may fail to maintain adequate O2 uptake under future climate scenarios unless other adaptive mechanisms are employed. PMID:24862962

  14. Localized corrosion testing of CRA materials in elevated temperature sour gas environments

    SciTech Connect

    Felton, P.; Oldfield, J.W.; Al-Maslamani, M.

    1999-11-01

    An exposure test program has been undertaken to investigate the localized corrosion resistance of Alloys 28, 825, G3 and 625 in two simulated sour gas environments at 150 C. The chloride levels in these test environments, containing 30 psi (0.21 MPa) H{sub 2}S and 101 psi (0.70 MPa) CO{sub 2}, were 150 ppm and 30,000 ppm. The general corrosion rate of each material was found to be negligible in each test. Alloy 825 alone was susceptible to minor pitting and crevice initiation in the 150 ppm chloride environment. Increasing the chloride level to 30,000 ppm resulted in more severe crevice attack of Alloy 825 and crevice corrosion of Alloy 28. Alloys G3 and 625 were not susceptible to localized corrosion in either test environment. The exposure tests were supported by complementary electrochemical polarization curves in the low chloride environment. The curves did not exhibit clearly defined passive regions, which were masked by additional anodic current from the oxidation of H{sub 2}S.

  15. Compatibility of strontium-90 fluoride with containment materials at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-08-01

    The use of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ as a heat-source fuel requires that the /sup 90/Sr be adequately contained during heat-source service. A program for determining the compatibility of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ with containment materials at heat-source operating temperatures is described. These compatibility studies included: initial and supplemental screening tests; WESF /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ capsule demonstration tests; thermal gradient test; and long-term tests. TZM, Haynes Alloy 25, and Hastelloy C-276 were the three materitals selected for evaluation at 600/sup 0/, 800/sup 0/ and 1000/sup 0/C for periods up to 30,000 h. Results showed that all three alloys suffered substantial attack when exposed to the /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/, although the TZM was more resistant to attack than the Hastelloy C-276 and Haynes Alloy 25. The latter two alloys appeared to provide about equal resistance to fluoride attack for exposures longer than about 12,000 h. Attack of the alloys tested by the /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ was due primarily to impurities.

  16. Studies on effects of elevated temperature for guided-wave structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Ajay; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2007-04-01

    Large thermal variations can cause significant changes in guided-wave (GW) propagation and transduction for structural health monitoring (SHM). This work focuses on GW SHM using surface-bonded piezoelectric wafer transducers in metallic plates for the temperature range encountered in internal spacecraft structures (20°C to 150°C). First, studies done to determine a suitable bonding agent are documented. That was then used in controlled experiments to examine changes in GW propagation and transduction using PZT-5A piezoelectric wafers under quasi-statically varying temperature (also from 20°C to 150°C). Modeling efforts to explain the experimentally observed increase in time-of-flight and change in sensor response amplitude with increasing temperature are detailed. Finally, these results are used in detection and location of mild and moderate damage using the pulse-echo GW testing approach within the temperature range.

  17. Experiments to study strain gage load calibrations on a wing structure at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaghan, R. C.; Fields, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study changes in strain-gage bridge load calibrations on a wing structure heated to temperatures of 200 F, 400 F, and 600 F. Data were also obtained to define the experimental repeatability of strain-gage bridge outputs. Experiments were conducted to establish the validity of the superposition of bridge outputs due to thermal and mechanical loads during a heating simulation of Mach 3 flight. The strain-gage bridge outputs due to load cycle at each of the above temperature levels were very repeatable. A number of bridge calibrations were found to change significantly as a function of temperature. The sum of strain-gage bridge outputs due to individually applied thermal and mechanical loads compared well with that due to combined or superimposed loads. The validity of superposition was, therefore, established.

  18. Effect of elevated temperature on the composition, structure, and mechanical properties of diffusion chromized steel

    SciTech Connect

    Osintsev, V.D.

    1986-05-01

    The author studies the effect of operating temperature for equipment in contact sections of sulfuric acid workshops on the structure and mechanical properties of the chromized coatings and core of chromized articles. The ferrite lattice spacing was determined in a DRON-0.5 diffractometer according to the line in copper K /sub alpha/ radiation exposure was carried out after layer-by-layer anodic etching of the coating in an aqueous solution. It was shown that diffusion chromizing may lead to a reduction in strength properties compared with those of unchromized steel. As a base for chromized articles intended for operation at temperatures up to 475/sup 0/C it is desirable to use steels 09G2 or 09G25, or for operation at temperatures up to 540/sup 0/C, steels 12KhM and 12MKh.

  19. Investigation of Problems Associated with the Use of Alloyed Molybdenum Sheet in Structures at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathauser, Eldon E.; Stein, Bland A.; Rummler, Donald R.

    1960-01-01

    The results of an experimental study to explore the capabilities and limitations of thin Mo-0.5Ti molybdenum-alloy sheet for structural applications at high temperatures are presented. Evaluation tests at temperatures ranging from room temperature,to 3000 F were made on resistance-welded corrugated-core sandwiches that were coated with a commercially available oxidation resistant coating known as W-2 and on coated oxidation and tensile specimens. The performance of the corrugated-core sandwiches in compressive strength and static oxidation tests, tensile properties of the coated molybdenum sheet, and the life of the coated specimens in static oxidation tests are given. A description of the equipment and procedures utilized in performing the evaluation tests is included.

  20. In situ soft XAS study on nickel-based layered cathode material at elevated temperatures: A novel approach to study thermal stability

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Won-Sub; Haas, Otto; Muhammad, Shoaib; Kim, Hyunchul; Lee, Wontae; Kim, Donghwi; Fischer, Daniel A.; Jaye, Cherno; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Nam, Kyung-Wan

    2014-01-01

    Tracking thermally induced reactions has always been challenging for electrode materials of electrochemical battery systems. Traditionally, a variety of calorimetric techniques and in situ XRD at elevated temperatures has been used to evaluate the thermal stability of electrode materials. These techniques are capable of providing variations in heat capacity, mass and average bulk composition of materials only. Herein, we report investigation of thermal characteristics of Li0.33Ni0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 by using in situ soft XAS measurements in combination with XRD. Fluorescence yield and partial electron yield measurements are used simultaneously to obtain element selective surface and bulk information. Fluorescence yield measurements reveal no energy change of the absorption peak and thus no valence state change in the bulk. However, electron yield measurements indicate that NiO-type rock salt structure is formed at the surface at temperatures above 200°C while no evidence for a surface reaction near Co sites in investigated temperature range is found. These results clearly show that in situ soft XAS can give a unique understanding of the role of each element in the structural transformation under thermal abuse offering a useful guidance in developing new battery system with improved safety performance. PMID:25351344

  1. In situ soft XAS study on nickel-based layered cathode material at elevated temperatures: A novel approach to study thermal stability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yoon, Won -Sub; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Haas, Otto; Muhammad, Shoaib; Kim, Hyunchul; Lee, Wontae; Kim, Donghwi; Fischer, Daniel A.; Jaye, Cherno; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; et al

    2014-10-29

    Tracking thermally induced reactions has always been challenging for electrode materials of electrochemical battery systems. Traditionally, a variety of calorimetric techniques and in situ XRD at elevated temperatures has been used to evaluate the thermal stability of electrode materials. These techniques are capable of providing variations in heat capacity, mass and average bulk composition of materials only. Herein, we report investigation of thermal characteristics of Li0.33Ni0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 by using in situ soft XAS measurements in combination with XRD. Fluorescence yield and partial electron yield measurements are used simultaneously to obtain element selective surface and bulk information. Fluorescence yield measurements reveal nomore » energy change of the absorption peak and thus no valence state change in the bulk. However, electron yield measurements indicate that NiO-type rock salt structure is formed at the surface at temperatures above 200°C while no evidence for a surface reaction near Co sites in investigated temperature range is found. These results clearly show that in situ soft XAS can give a unique understanding of the role of each element in the structural transformation under thermal abuse offering a useful guidance in developing new battery system with improved safety performance.« less

  2. In situ soft XAS study on nickel-based layered cathode material at elevated temperatures: A novel approach to study thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Won-Sub; Haas, Otto; Muhammad, Shoaib; Kim, Hyunchul; Lee, Wontae; Kim, Donghwi; Fischer, Daniel A.; Jaye, Cherno; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Nam, Kyung-Wan

    2014-10-01

    Tracking thermally induced reactions has always been challenging for electrode materials of electrochemical battery systems. Traditionally, a variety of calorimetric techniques and in situ XRD at elevated temperatures has been used to evaluate the thermal stability of electrode materials. These techniques are capable of providing variations in heat capacity, mass and average bulk composition of materials only. Herein, we report investigation of thermal characteristics of Li0.33Ni0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 by using in situ soft XAS measurements in combination with XRD. Fluorescence yield and partial electron yield measurements are used simultaneously to obtain element selective surface and bulk information. Fluorescence yield measurements reveal no energy change of the absorption peak and thus no valence state change in the bulk. However, electron yield measurements indicate that NiO-type rock salt structure is formed at the surface at temperatures above 200°C while no evidence for a surface reaction near Co sites in investigated temperature range is found. These results clearly show that in situ soft XAS can give a unique understanding of the role of each element in the structural transformation under thermal abuse offering a useful guidance in developing new battery system with improved safety performance.

  3. In situ soft XAS study on nickel-based layered cathode material at elevated temperatures: A novel approach to study thermal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Won -Sub; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Haas, Otto; Muhammad, Shoaib; Kim, Hyunchul; Lee, Wontae; Kim, Donghwi; Fischer, Daniel A.; Jaye, Cherno; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Nam, Kyung -Wan

    2014-10-29

    Tracking thermally induced reactions has always been challenging for electrode materials of electrochemical battery systems. Traditionally, a variety of calorimetric techniques and in situ XRD at elevated temperatures has been used to evaluate the thermal stability of electrode materials. These techniques are capable of providing variations in heat capacity, mass and average bulk composition of materials only. Herein, we report investigation of thermal characteristics of Li0.33Ni0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 by using in situ soft XAS measurements in combination with XRD. Fluorescence yield and partial electron yield measurements are used simultaneously to obtain element selective surface and bulk information. Fluorescence yield measurements reveal no energy change of the absorption peak and thus no valence state change in the bulk. However, electron yield measurements indicate that NiO-type rock salt structure is formed at the surface at temperatures above 200°C while no evidence for a surface reaction near Co sites in investigated temperature range is found. These results clearly show that in situ soft XAS can give a unique understanding of the role of each element in the structural transformation under thermal abuse offering a useful guidance in developing new battery system with improved safety performance.

  4. Effect of service exposure on fatigue crack propagation of Inconel 718 turbine disc material at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Dae-Ho; Choi, Myung-Je; Goto, Masahiro; Lee, Hong-Chul; Kim, Sangshik

    2014-09-15

    In this study, the fatigue crack propagation behavior of Inconel 718 turbine disc with different service times from 0 to 4229 h was investigated at 738 and 823 K. No notable change in microstructural features, other than the increase in grain size, was observed with increasing service time. With increasing service time from 0 to 4229 h, the fatigue crack propagation rates tended to increase, while the ΔK{sub th} value decreased, in low ΔK regime and lower Paris' regime at both testing temperatures. The fractographic observation using a scanning electron microscope suggested that the elevated temperature fatigue crack propagation mechanism of Inconel 718 changed from crystallographic cleavage mechanism to striation mechanism in the low ΔK regime, depending on the grain size. The fatigue crack propagation mechanism is proposed for the crack propagating through small and large grains in the low ΔK regime, and the fatigue crack propagation behavior of Inconel 718 with different service times at elevated temperatures is discussed. - Highlights: • The specimens were prepared from the Inconel 718 turbine disc used for 0 to 4229 h. • FCP rates were measured at 738 and 823 K. • The ΔK{sub th} values decreased with increasing service time. • The FCP behavior showed a strong correlation with the grain size of used turbine disc.

  5. Susceptibility of Lasioderma serricorne (F.)(Coleoptera: Anobiidae) life stages to elevated temperatures used during structural heat treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat treatment of food-processing facilities involves using elevated temperatures (46 to 60°C for 24 h) for management of stored-product insect pests. Heat treatment is a viable alternative in certain circumstances to the fumigant methyl bromide in certain situations, which is being phased out in t...

  6. Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term Irradiation at Elevated Temperature: Critical Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Was, Gary; Jiao, Zhijie; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2013-12-20

    The in-service degradation of reactor core materials is related to underlying changes in the irradiated microstructure. During reactor operation, structural components and cladding experience displacement of atoms by collisions with neutrons at temperatures at which the radiation-induced defects are mobile, leading to microstructure evolution under irradiation that can degrade material properties. At the doses and temperatures relevant to fast reactor operation, the microstructure evolves by microchemistry changes due to radiation-induced segregation, dislocation loop formation and growth, radiation induced precipitation, destabilization of the existing precipitate structure, as well as the possibility for void formation and growth. These processes do not occur independently; rather, their evolution is highly interlinked. Radiation-induced segregation of Cr and existing chromium carbide coverage in irradiated alloy T91 track each other closely. The radiation-induced precipitation of Ni-Si precipitates and RIS of Ni and Si in alloys T91 and HCM12A are likely related. Neither the evolution of these processes nor their coupling is understood under the conditions required for materials performance in fast reactors (temperature range 300-600°C and doses to 200 dpa and beyond). Further, predictive modeling is not yet possible, as models for microstructure evolution must be developed along with experiments to characterize these key processes and provide tools for extrapolation. To extend the range of operation of nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials in advanced nuclear energy and transmutation systems to that required for the fast reactor, the irradiation-induced evolution of the microstructure, microchemistry, and the associated mechanical properties at relevant temperatures and doses must be understood. This project builds upon joint work at the proposing institutions, under a NERI-C program that is scheduled to end in September, to understand the effects of

  7. Characterization of microstructure and property evolution in advanced cladding and duct: Materials exposed to high dose and elevated temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Allen, Todd R.; Kaoumi, Djamel; Wharry, Janelle P.; Jiao, Zhijie; Topbasi, Cem; Kohnert, Aaron; Barnard, Leland; Certain, Alicia; Field, Kevin G.; Was, Gary S.; et al

    2015-05-20

    Designing materials for performance in high-radiation fields can be accelerated through a carefully chosen combination of advanced multiscale modeling paired with appropriate experimental validation. Here, the studies reported in this work, the combined efforts of six universities working together as the Consortium on Cladding and Structural Materials, use that approach to focus on improving the scientific basis for the response of ferritic–martensitic steels to irradiation. A combination of modern modeling techniques with controlled experimentation has specifically focused on improving the understanding of radiation-induced segregation, precipitate formation and growth under radiation, the stability of oxide nanoclusters, and the development of dislocationmore » networks under radiation. Experimental studies use both model and commercial alloys, irradiated with both ion beams and neutrons. Lastly, transmission electron microscopy and atom probe are combined with both first-principles and rate theory approaches to advance the understanding of ferritic–martensitic steels.« less

  8. Characterization of microstructure and property evolution in advanced cladding and duct: Materials exposed to high dose and elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Todd R.; Kaoumi, Djamel; Wharry, Janelle P.; Jiao, Zhijie; Topbasi, Cem; Kohnert, Aaron; Barnard, Leland; Certain, Alicia; Field, Kevin G.; Was, Gary S.; Morgan, Dane L.; Motta, Arthur T.; Wirth, Brian D.; Yang, Y.

    2015-05-20

    Designing materials for performance in high-radiation fields can be accelerated through a carefully chosen combination of advanced multiscale modeling paired with appropriate experimental validation. Here, the studies reported in this work, the combined efforts of six universities working together as the Consortium on Cladding and Structural Materials, use that approach to focus on improving the scientific basis for the response of ferritic–martensitic steels to irradiation. A combination of modern modeling techniques with controlled experimentation has specifically focused on improving the understanding of radiation-induced segregation, precipitate formation and growth under radiation, the stability of oxide nanoclusters, and the development of dislocation networks under radiation. Experimental studies use both model and commercial alloys, irradiated with both ion beams and neutrons. Lastly, transmission electron microscopy and atom probe are combined with both first-principles and rate theory approaches to advance the understanding of ferritic–martensitic steels.

  9. Superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of rapidly solidified, dispersion strengthened aluminum alloys for elevated temperature structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, E. Y.; Kennedy, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Rapidly solidified alloys, based upon the Al-Fe-V-Si system and designed for elevated temperature applications, were evaluated for superplasticity and diffusion bonding behavior. Alloys with 8, 16, 27, and 36 volume percent silicide dispersoids were produced; dispersoid condition was varied by rolling at 300, 400, and 500 C (572, 752, and 932 F). Superplastic behavior was evaluated at strain rates from 1 x 10(exp -6)/s to 8.5/s at elevated temperatures. The results indicate that there was a significant increase in elongation at higher strain rates and at temperatures above 600 C (1112 F). However, the exposure of the alloys to temperatures greater than 600 C (1112 F) resulted in the coarsening of the strengthening dispersoid and the degradation of mechanical properties. Diffusion bonding was possible using low gas pressure at temperatures greater than 600 C (1112 F) which also resulted in degraded properties. The bonding of Al-Fe-V-Si alloys to 7475 aluminum alloy was performed at 516 C (960 F) without significant degradation in microstructure. Bond strengths equal to 90 percent that of the base metal shear strength were achieved. The mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of the alloys were investigated.

  10. Elevated temperature fatigue testing of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschberg, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    The major technology areas needed to perform a life prediction of an aircraft turbine engine hot section component are discussed and the steps required for life prediction are outlined. These include the determination of the operating environment, the calculation of the thermal and mechanical loading of the component, the cyclic stress-strain and creep behavior of the material required for structural analysis, and the structural analysis to determine the local stress-strain-temperature-time response of the material at the critical location in the components. From a knowledge of the fatigue, creep, and failure resistance of the material, a prediction of the life of the component is made. Material characterization and evaluation conducted for the purpose of calculating fatigue crack initiation lives of components operating at elevated temperatures are emphasized.

  11. Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    A three year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for non-proportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved undertanding were through several critical non-proportional loading experiments. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C.

  12. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to extend the work performed in the base program (CR 182247) into the regime of time-dependent crack growth under isothermal and thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) loading, where creep deformation also influences the crack growth behavior. The investigation was performed in a two-year, six-task, combined experimental and analytical program. The path-independent integrals for application to time-dependent crack growth were critically reviewed. The crack growth was simulated using a finite element method. The path-independent integrals were computed from the results of finite-element analyses. The ability of these integrals to correlate experimental crack growth data were evaluated under various loading and temperature conditions. The results indicate that some of these integrals are viable parameters for crack growth prediction at elevated temperatures.

  13. Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term and Elevated Temperature Irradiation: Modeling and Experimental Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, Brian; Morgan, Dane; Kaoumi, Djamel; Motta, Arthur

    2013-12-01

    irradiation. This project will focus on modeling microstructural and microchemical evolution of irradiated alloys by performing detailed modeling of such microstructure evolution processes coupled with well-designed in situ experiments that can provide validation and benchmarking to the computer codes. The broad scientific and technical objectives of this proposal are to evaluate the microstructure and microchemical evolution in advanced ferritic/martensitic and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys for cladding and duct reactor materials under long-term and elevated temperature irradiation, leading to improved ability to model structural materials performance and lifetime. Specifically, we propose four research thrusts, namely Thrust 1: Identify the formation mechanism and evolution for dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a<100> and determine whether the defect microstructure (predominately dislocation loop/dislocation density) saturates at high dose. Thrust 2: Identify whether a threshold irradiation temperature or dose exists for the nucleation of growing voids that mark the beginning of irradiation-induced swelling, and begin to probe the limits of thermal stability of the tempered Martensitic structure under irradiation. Thrust 3: Evaluate the stability of nanometer sized Y- Ti-O based oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) particles at high fluence/temperature. Thrust 4: Evaluate the extent to which precipitates form and/or dissolve as a function of irradiation temperature and dose, and how these changes are driven by radiation induced segregation and microchemical evolutions and determined by the initial microstructure.

  14. 1-3 connectivity composite material made from lithium niobate and cement for ultrasonic condition monitoring at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, G; Cochran, A; Kirk, K J; McNab, A

    2002-05-01

    We have designed, manufactured and tested a piezoelectric composite material to operate at temperatures above 400 degrees C. The material is a 1-3 connectivity composite with pillars of Z-cut lithium niobate in a matrix of alumina cement. The composite material produced shorter pulses than a monolithic plate of lithium niobate and remained intact upon cooling. Results are presented from room temperature and high temperature testing. This material could be bonded permanently to a test object, making it possible to carry out condition monitoring over an extended period. A new excitation method was also developed to enable remote switching between array elements. PMID:12159936

  15. Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1985-01-01

    A 3 year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for nonproportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved understanding were through several critical nonproportional loading experiments. The direction of cracking observed on failed specimens was also recorded and used to guide the development of the theory. Cyclic deformation responses were permanently recorded digitally during each test. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C. In contrast to some other metals, loading path in nonproportional loading had little effect on fatigue lives. Strain rate had a small effect on fatigue lives at 649 C. Of the various correlating parameters the modified plastic work and octahedral shear stress were the most successful.

  16. Corrosion resistance and behavior of construction materials exposed to dilute sulfuric acid at elevated temperatures under static conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.T.

    1994-10-01

    Laboratory investigation has been undertaken to determine the electrochemical behavior and corrosion resistance of various construction materials in a simulated hydrolysis environment (5 wt % sulfuric acid) at temperatures ranging from 90 to 220C. Tests were performed in an autoclave-type electrochemical cell. The corrosion behavior of the test materials was determined using computer-controlled DC potentiodynamic polarization. Corrosion rates of the test materials were determined using AC impedance techniques. Among the stainless steels tested, only alloy N08026 (Carpenter 20Mo-6) performed satisfactory up to a temperature of 100C. The alloy passivated spontaneously in the environment and corroded at a rate of less than 2 mpy. None of the stainless steels tested could be used at 120{degrees}C or above. A number of nickel-based alloys tested had good corrosion resistance up to 100C, but their corrosion rate exceeded 2 mpy at higher temperatures. Zirconium alloys were satisfactory up to 180C. Only tantalum and a tantalum-niobium alloy were satisfactory up to 220C.

  17. The mechanical properties of fluoride salts at elevated temperatures. [candidate thermal energy storage materials for solar dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    The deformation behavior of CaF2 and LiF single crystals compressed in the 111 and the 100 line directions, respectively, are compared with the mechanical properties of polycrystalline LiF-22 (mol pct) CaF2 eutectic mixture in the temperature range 300 to 1275 K for strain rates varying between 7 x 10 to the -7th and 0.2/s. The true stress-strain curves for the single crystals were found to exhibit three stages in an intermediate range of temperatures and strain rates, whereas those for the eutectic showed negative work-hardening rates after a maximum stress. The true stress-strain rate data for CaF2 and LiF-22 CaF2 could be represented by a power-law relation with the strain rate sensitivities lying between 0.05 and 0.2 for both materials. A similar relation was found to be unsatisfactory in the case of LiF.

  18. Combined effect of elevated UVB, elevated temperature and fertilization on growth, needle structure and phytochemistry of young Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Virjamo, Virpi; Sutinen, Sirkka; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta

    2014-07-01

    Simultaneously with warming climate, other climatic and environmental factors are also changing. Here, we investigated for the first time the effects of elevated temperature, increased ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation, fertilization and all combinations of these on the growth, secondary chemistry and needle structure of 1-year-old Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) seedlings in an outdoor experiment. After one growing season, elevated temperature increased root : shoot ratio and concentrations of needle piperidine alkaloids, while concentrations of needle catechins and acetophenones and bark flavonoids decreased compared with ambient temperature seedlings. UVB-radiation increased concentrations of bark condensed tannins, while fertilization increased total biomass and concentrations of needle catechins. In addition to the main effects, concentrations of some individual phenolic compounds showed UV × temperature or UV × temperature × fertilization interactions, and fertilization modified temperature response on root : shoot ratio. All the treatments described here affected the defence chemistry profiles of the seedlings, which may imply some changes in plant-herbivore interactions in connection with changing climate. The interactions between treatments indicate a need for further experiments involving several simultaneously affecting environmental changes. PMID:24804850

  19. Elevated temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittain, J. O.; Geslin, D.; Lei, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    One of the goals of the HOST Program is the development of electrical resistance strain gages for static strain measurements at temperatures equal to or greater than 1273 K. Strain gage materials must have a reproducible or predictable response to temperature, time and strain. It is the objective of this research to investigate criteria for the selection of materials for such applications through electrical properties studies. The results of the investigation of two groups of materials, refractory compounds and binary alloy solid solutions are presented.

  20. Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

    2007-11-16

    The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

  1. Isochemical control over structural state and mechanical properties in Pd-based metallic glass by sputter deposition at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magagnosc, Daniel J.; Feng, Gang; Yu, Le; Cheng, Xuemei; Gianola, Daniel S.

    2016-08-01

    Sputter deposition, while varying the substrate temperature, is employed to isochemically control the structural state and concomitant mechanical response in a Pd-based metallic glass at the time of glass formation. Increasing the deposition temperature from 333 K to 461 K results in a 33.5% increase in hardness to 9.69 GPa for amorphous films. Further increasing the temperature leads to a decrease in hardness, indicating low and high temperature deposition regimes where increased surface mobility allows access to a more relaxed and more rejuvenated structure, respectively. Through this mechanism we access the range of achievable structural states, from ultrastable to highly liquid-like glasses.

  2. Elevated temperature aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meschter, Peter (Inventor); Lederich, Richard J. (Inventor); O'Neal, James E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Three aluminum-lithium alloys are provided for high performance aircraft structures and engines. All three alloys contain 3 wt % copper, 2 wt % lithium, 1 wt % magnesium, and 0.2 wt % zirconium. Alloy 1 has no further alloying elements. Alloy 2 has the addition of 1 wt % iron and 1 wt % nickel. Alloy 3 has the addition of 1.6 wt % chromium to the shared alloy composition of the three alloys. The balance of the three alloys, except for incidentql impurities, is aluminum. These alloys have low densities and improved strengths at temperatures up to 260.degree. C. for long periods of time.

  3. The development of gamma-gamma-prime lamellar structures in a nickel-base superalloy during elevated temperature mechanical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics of the formation and subsequent development of the directional coarsening of the gamma-prime precipitate in model Ni-Al-Mo-Ta superalloy single crystals are examined during tensile creep under various stress levels at 982 and 1038 C. Special attention is given to the gamma and gamma-prime relation to creep time and strain in order to trace the changing gamma-gamma-prime morphology. Directional coarsening of gamma-prime is found to begin during primary creep and its rate is shown to increase with an increase in temperature or stress level. The length of gamma-prime thickness increased linearly with time up to a plateau reached after the onset of steady state creep. The raft thickness, equal to the gamma-prime size, remained constant at this initial value up through the onset of the tertiary creep. The interlaminar spacing indicates the stability of directionally coarsened structure.

  4. Effect of isomeric structures of branched cyclic hydrocarbons on densities and equation of state predictions at elevated temperatures and pressures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Bamgbade, Babatunde A; Burgess, Ward A; Tapriyal, Deepak; Baled, Hseen O; Enick, Robert M; McHugh, Mark A

    2013-07-25

    The cis and trans conformation of a branched cyclic hydrocarbon affects the packing and, hence, the density, exhibited by that compound. Reported here are density data for branched cyclohexane (C6) compounds including methylcyclohexane, ethylcyclohexane (ethylcC6), cis-1,2-dimethylcyclohexane (cis-1,2), cis-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane (cis-1,4), and trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane (trans-1,4) determined at temperatures up to 525 K and pressures up to 275 MPa. Of the four branched C6 isomers, cis-1,2 exhibits the largest densities and the smallest densities are exhibited by trans-1,4. The densities are modeled with the Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EoS), the high-temperature, high-pressure, volume-translated (HTHP VT) PREoS, and the perturbed chain, statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) EoS. Model calculations highlight the capability of these equations to account for the different densities observed for the four isomers investigated in this study. The HTHP VT-PREoS provides modest improvements over the PREoS, but neither cubic EoS is capable of accounting for the effect of isomer structural differences on the observed densities. The PC-SAFT EoS, with pure component parameters from the literature or from a group contribution method, provides improved density predictions relative to those obtained with the PREoS or HTHP VT-PREoS. However, the PC-SAFT EoS, with either set of parameters, also cannot fully account for the effect of the C6 isomer structure on the resultant density. PMID:23815675

  5. Effect of Isomeric Structures of Branched Cyclic Hydrocarbons on Densities and Equation of State Predictions at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yue; Bamgbade, Babatunde A; Burgess, Ward A; Tapriyal, Deepak; Baled, Hseen O; Enick, Robert M; McHugh, Mark

    2013-07-25

    The cis and trans conformation of a branched cyclic hydrocarbon affects the packing and, hence, the density, exhibited by that compound. Reported here are density data for branched cyclohexane (C6) compounds including methylcyclohexane, ethylcyclohexane (ethylcC6), cis-1,2-dimethylcyclohexane (cis-1,2), cis-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane (cis-1,4), and trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane (trans-1,4) determined at temperatures up to 525 K and pressures up to 275 MPa. Of the four branched C6 isomers, cis-1,2 exhibits the largest densities and the smallest densities are exhibited by trans-1,4. The densities are modeled with the Peng–Robinson (PR) equation of state (EoS), the high-temperature, high-pressure, volume-translated (HTHP VT) PREoS, and the perturbed chain, statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) EoS. Model calculations highlight the capability of these equations to account for the different densities observed for the four isomers investigated in this study. The HTHP VT-PREoS provides modest improvements over the PREoS, but neither cubic EoS is capable of accounting for the effect of isomer structural differences on the observed densities. The PC-SAFT EoS, with pure component parameters from the literature or from a group contribution method, provides improved density predictions relative to those obtained with the PREoS or HTHP VT-PREoS. However, the PC-SAFT EoS, with either set of parameters, also cannot fully account for the effect of the C6 isomer structure on the resultant density.

  6. Buffer strips in composites at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    The composite material 'buffer strip' concept is presently investigated at elevated temperatures for the case of graphite/polyimide buffer strip panels using a (45/0/45/90)2S layup, where the buffer strip material was 0-deg S-glass/polyimide. Each panel was loaded in tension until it failed, and radiographs and crack opening displacements were recorded during the tests to determine fracture onset, fracture arrest, and the extent of damage in the buffer strip after crack arrest. At 177 + or - 3 C, the buffer strips increased the panel strength by at least 40 percent in comparison with panels without buffer strips. Compared to similar panels tested at room temperature, those tested at elevated temperature had lower residual strengths, but higher failure strains.

  7. Ion implantation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Leaf, G.K.

    1985-11-01

    A kinetic model has been developed to investigate the synergistic effects of radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and preferential sputtering on the spatial redistribution of implanted solutes during implantation at elevated temperatures. Sample calculations were performed for Al and Si ions implanted into Ni. With the present model, the influence of various implantation parameters on the evolution of implant concentration profiles could be examined in detail.

  8. Effect of Elevated CO2 Concentration, Elevated Temperature and No Nitrogen Fertilization on Methanogenic Archaeal and Methane-Oxidizing Bacterial Community Structures in Paddy Soil

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongyan; Tago, Kanako; Hayatsu, Masahito; Tokida, Takeshi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Usui, Yasuhiro; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Asakawa, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) enhance the production and emission of methane in paddy fields. In the present study, the effects of elevated [CO2], elevated temperature (ET), and no nitrogen fertilization (LN) on methanogenic archaeal and methane-oxidizing bacterial community structures in a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experimental paddy field were investigated by PCR-DGGE and real-time quantitative PCR. Soil samples were collected from the upper and lower soil layers at the rice panicle initiation (PI) and mid-ripening (MR) stages. The composition of the methanogenic archaeal community in the upper and lower soil layers was not markedly affected by the elevated [CO2], ET, or LN condition. The abundance of the methanogenic archaeal community in the upper and lower soil layers was also not affected by elevated [CO2] or ET, but was significantly increased at the rice PI stage and significantly decreased by LN in the lower soil layer. In contrast, the composition of the methane-oxidizing bacterial community was affected by rice-growing stages in the upper soil layer. The abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria was significantly decreased by elevated [CO2] and LN in both soil layers at the rice MR stage and by ET in the upper soil layer. The ratio of mcrA/pmoA genes correlated with methane emission from ambient and FACE paddy plots at the PI stage. These results indicate that the decrease observed in the abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria was related to increased methane emission from the paddy field under the elevated [CO2], ET, and LN conditions. PMID:27600710

  9. Modeling of High-Strain-Rate Deformation, Fracture, and Impact Behavior of Advanced Gas Turbine Engine Materials at Low and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Nathenson, David; Prakash, Vikas

    2003-01-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides have received considerable attention over the last decade. These alloys are known to have low density, good high temperature strength retention, and good oxidation and corrosion resistance. However, poor ductility and low fracture toughness have been the key limiting factors in the full utilization of these alloys. More recently, Gamma-met PX has been developed by GKSS, Germany. These alloys have been observed to have superior strengths at elevated temperatures and quasi-static deformation rates and good oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures when compared with other gamma titanium aluminides. The present paper discusses results of a study to understand dynamic response of gamma-met PX in uniaxial compression. The experiments were conducted by using a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar between room temperature and 900 C and strain rates of up to 3500 per second. The Gamma met PX alloy showed superior strength when compared to nickel based superalloys and other gamma titanium aluminides at all test temperatures. It also showed strain and strain-rate hardening at all levels of strain rates and temperatures and without yield anomaly up to 900 C. After approximately 600 C, thermal softening is observed at all strain rates with the rate of thermal softening increasing dramatically between 800 and 900 C. However, these flow stress levels are comparatively higher in Gamma met PX than those observed for other TiAl alloys.

  10. Elevated-Temperature "Ultra" Fast Fracture Strength of Advanced Ceramics: An Approach to Elevated-Temperature "Inert" Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    The determination of "ultra" fast fracture strengths of five silicon nitride ceramics at elevated temperatures has been made by using constant stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") testing with a series of "ultra" fast test rates. The test material included four monolithic and one SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitrides. Of the five test materials, four silicon nitrides exhibited the elevated -temperature strengths that approaches their respective room-temperature strengths at an "ultra" fast test rate of 3.3 x 10(exp 4) MPa/s. This implies that slow cracks growth responsible for elevated-temperature failure can be eliminated or minimized by using the "ultra" fast test rate. These ongoing experimental results have shed light on laying a theoretical and practical foundation on the concept and definition of elevated-temperature "inert" strength behavior of advanced ceramics.

  11. Monotonic and cyclic deformation behavior of a SiCw/6061 Al composite at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Sun, Z.M.; Kobayashi, T.

    1996-10-15

    With the advent of new processing techniques, the technological interest and research activity in the development of metal-matrix composites have increased rapidly. Particularly, discontinuously reinforced composites, such as whisker and particle reinforced aluminum-based metal-matrix composites, exhibit attractive advantages, such as high specific modulus, high specific strength, good fatigue resistance and easy fabrication. They have emerged as a new class of structural materials for ambient and elevated temperature applications in aerospace and automobile industries. Therefore, great attention has been paid on their mechanical properties. However, a limited number of investigations on the cyclic deformation behavior have been reported, and little research has been done in this aspect at elevated temperature. The present study is based on a previous study at room temperature to investigate the monotonic and cyclic deformation behavior of a SiC whisker reinforced 6061 Al alloy composite and its unreinforced counterpart at elevated temperature.

  12. Electride-like phases at extreme compression and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonev, Stanimir; Dubois, Jonathan

    The transformation of materials into electride-like structures under the application of extreme pressure has attracted a lot of interest recently. Theoretical studies have predicted the existence of low-coordinated crystal phases, where the conduction electrons are localized in the interstitial atomic regions, for a number of elements at high density. Most of these works have been limited to static lattice calculations. The pressures where such transformations are projected to occur are accessible in shock-wave experiments, but at elevated temperatures. In this talk I will discuss the temperature dependence of elecride structures, both solids and liquids, as well as the requirements for their accurate simulation. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. The Deformation-DIA: A Novel Apparatus for Measuring the Strength of Materials at High Strain to Pressures at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W

    2004-03-10

    The primary focus of this 3-year project was to develop and put to use an instrument to test experimentally the effect of pressure on body centered cubic (BCC) metals and other materials of interest to the Stockpile Stewardship program. Well-resolved materials testing requires measurements of load and deformation rate be measured at separable conditions of temperature, pressure, and plastic strain. The new apparatus at the heart of this work, the Deformation-DIA (D-DIA), began the project as a design concept. Its principal feature would be the capability to extend the conditions for such controlled materials testing from the current pressure limit of about 3 to almost 15 GPa, a factor of 5 increase. Once constructed and successfully tested, the plan of the project was to deform samples of BCC metals at arbitrary temperature and high pressures in order to provide preliminary measurements of strength and to prove its worth to the Stockpile Stewardship program. The project has been a stunning success. Progress toward demonstrating the worth of the D-DIA as a workhorse instrument for materials strength measurement at high pressure was given a huge boost by the fact that the machine itself functioned flawlessly from the very start, allowing the investigators to focus on measurement quality rather than technical operational issues. By the end of the project, we had deformed several samples of polycrystalline molybdenum (Mo) and tantalum (Ta) under very precisely controlled conditions, and for the Ta, had produced the first rudimentary measurements of strength to pressures of 8 GPa.

  14. Determination of Plate Compressive Strengths at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerl, George J; Roberts, William M

    1950-01-01

    The results of local-instability tests of h-section plate assemblies and compressive stress-strain tests of extruded 75s-t6 aluminum alloy, obtained to determine flat-plate compressive strength under stabilized elevated temperature conditions, are given for temperatures up to 600 degrees F. The results show that methods available for calculating the critical compressive stress at room temperature can also be used at elevated temperatures if the applicable compressive stress-strain curve for the material is given.

  15. Properties of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) materials after long-term exposure to elevated temperatures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swab, J.J.

    1989-03-01

    Seven commercially available yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) materials were evaluated. Room temperature properties were measured before and after heat treatments at 1000C. Microstructure and phase stability were also examined. In all but one case, the Y-TZPs showed very little change in room temperature properties after long times at this temperature. Results show that pressure-assisted processing greatly improves the strength by reducing porosity and keeping the grain size extremely fine, but this reduces the toughness because finer grains are more difficult to transform. In addition, a small amount of cubic zirconia appears to enhance the toughness of fine-grained Y-TZP while maintaining good strength. During processing, a small amount of cubic zirconia is formed and allowed to grow. This creates regions poor in yttria which can transform spontaneously in the presence of a crack-tip stress field.

  16. Structure and properties of La-modified Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3 at ambient and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksel, Elena; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Foronda, Humberto M.; Dittmer, Robert; Damjanovic, Dragan; Jones, Jacob L.

    2012-09-01

    The crystal structure and property changes of sodium bismuth titanate (Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3, NBT) piezoelectric ceramics are reported as a function of La modification (0.5-2.0 at. %) and increasing temperature using high resolution x-ray diffraction, permittivity, depolarization, and polarization and strain hysteresis measurements. La substitution is found to decrease the depolarization temperature of NBT (e.g., 1.5 at. % La substitution lowers the depolarization temperature by 60 °C relative to the unmodified composition) with little impact on the room temperature polarization and strain hysteresis. The room temperature structures of the various NBT compositions were modeled using a mixture of the monoclinic Cc space group and the cubic Pm3¯m phase, where the Pm3¯m phase is used to model local regions in the material which do not obey the long range Cc space group. With increasing La substitution, the lattice parameter distortions associated with the Cc phase approached that of the prototypical cubic unit cell and the fraction of the Pm3¯m phase increased. The relationship between these crystallographic changes and the depolarization behavior of La-modified NBT is discussed.

  17. A Study of Advanced Materials for Gas Turbine Coatings at Elevated Temperatures Using Selected Microstructures and Characteristic Environments for Syngas Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Ravinder Diwan; Patrick Mensah; Guoqiang Li; Nalini Uppu; Strphen Akwaboa; Monica Silva; Ebubekir Beyazoglu; Ogad Agu; Naresh Polasa; Lawrence Bazille; Douglas Wolfe; Purush Sahoo

    2011-02-10

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that can be suitable for use in industrial gas turbine engines have been processed and compared with electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) microstructures for applications in advanced gas turbines that use coal-derived synthesis gas. Thermo-physical properties have been evaluated of the processed air plasma sprayed TBCs with standard APS-STD and vertically cracked APS-VC coatings samples up to 1300 C. Porosity of these selected coatings with related microstructural effects have been analyzed in this study. Wet and dry thermal cycling studies at 1125 C and spalling resistance thermal cycling studies to 1200 C have also been carried out. Type I and Type II hot corrosion tests were carried out to investigate the effects of microstructure variations and additions of alumina in YSZ top coats in multi-layered TBC structures. The thermal modeling of turbine blade has also been carried out that gives the capability to predict in-service performance temperature gradients. In addition to isothermal high temperature oxidation kinetics analysis in YSZ thermal barrier coatings of NiCoCrAlY bond coats with 0.25% Hf. This can affect the failure behavior depending on the control of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) growth at the interface. The TGO growth kinetics is seen to be parabolic and the activation energies correspond to interfacial growth kinetics that is controlled by the diffusion of O{sub 2} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The difference between oxidation behavior of the VC and STD structures are attributed to the effects of microstructure morphology and porosity on oxygen ingression into the zirconia and TGO layers. The isothermal oxidation resistance of the STD and VC microstructures is similar at temperatures up to 1200 C. However, the generally thicker TGO layer thicknesses and the slightly faster oxidation rates in the VC microstructures are attributed to the increased ingression of oxygen through the grain boundaries of the vertically

  18. Failure of welds at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Stevick, G.R. )

    1994-04-01

    This thesis presents several new insights into creep crack growth problems: (1) the potential for stress concentrations resulting from the mismatch of creep properties between weld and base metals, (2) a creep crack growth model that includes the effects of stress triaxiality, and (3) a crack initiation model based on the statistical distribution of inclusion size and spacing. Longitudinally welded piping is used extensively in the power industry for high temperature applications. An elastic-creep finite element analysis of a typical symmetric, double-V longitudinal weld shows that a material stress concentration will develop in 1--2 years if creep properties of the weld and base metals are different. The stress concentration in the weld peaks mid-wall at the weld fusion line on both sides for the typical case in which creep strain rate of the weld metal is greater than that of the base metal. Finite element analysis results also showed that differences in material properties have a significant effect on the stress field after a crack has formed. The increased stress helps explain recent premature failures of longitudinally welded pipe in the power industry and suggest that the weld efficiency factors permitted by the ASME/ANSI B31.1 Piping Code should be reevaluated for longitudinal pipe welds at elevated temperatures.

  19. An experimental investigation into the behavior of glassfiber reinforced polymer elements at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Kenny Zongxi

    This thesis presents a literature review and results of an experimental study about the effects of high temperatures and cyclic loading on the physical and mechanical properties of pultruded glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) square tubes used in civil engineering structural applications. Most laboratory researches have focused mainly on the effect of elevated temperature on the compressive strength of the GFRP square tubes. Limited research has focused on the tensile strength of GFRP coupons under elevated temperatures. Dynamic Mechanical Analyses (DMA) was performed to assess the viscoelastic behavior including the glass transition temperature of GFRP. Sixteen GFRP coupons were tested under elevated temperatures to investigate the tensile strength and the effect of elevated temperatures to the tensile strength of GFRP. The results of an experimental program performed on fifty GFRP square tubes with different designs in 1.83m at normal temperatures were discussed to investigate compression performance. Another experimental program was performed on 20 GFRP square tubes with different designs in 1.22m under elevated temperatures. The experiments results were discussed and showed that the compressive strength of GFRP material was influenced by several factors including the glass transition v temperature and the connection bolts. Failure modes under 25°C and 75°C were crushing and the failure modes with the temperatures above 75°C were not typical crushing due to the glass transition of GFRP. Sixteen GFRP square tubes with length of 0.61m were tested with the same experimental program under elevated temperatures as the control group. Twelve GFRP square tubes with the same size were subjected to cyclic loading under elevated temperatures to investigate the effect of the cyclic loading to the compression properties of GFRP material. According to the experimental results and the discussion, the stiffness was reduced by the cyclic loading. On the contrary, the

  20. Apparatus for elevated temperature compression or tension testing of specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Thomas S.

    1992-05-01

    In order to support materials selection for the next generation supersonic civilian passenger transport aircraft, a testing apparatus was developed to evaluate certain materials under conditions of high load and elevated temperature. In order to elevate the temperature of the material during standard tension and compression testing the test specimen is surrounded by a pair of supports which include internal heating means. These supports also prevent buckling of the specimen during compression testing.

  1. Performance Evaluation of Fiber Bragg Gratings at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juergens, Jeffrey; Adamovsky, Grigory; Floyd, Bertram

    2004-01-01

    The development of integrated fiber optic sensors for smart propulsion systems demands that the sensors be able to perform in extreme environments. In order to use fiber optic sensors effectively in an extreme environment one must have a thorough understanding of the sensor s limits and how it responds under various environmental conditions. The sensor evaluation currently involves examining the performance of fiber Bragg gratings at elevated temperatures. Fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) are periodic variations of the refractive index of an optical fiber. These periodic variations allow the FBG to act as an embedded optical filter passing the majority of light propagating through a fiber while reflecting back a narrow band of the incident light. The peak reflected wavelength of the FBG is known as the Bragg wavelength. Since the period and width of the refractive index variation in the fiber determines the wavelengths that are transmitted and reflected by the grating, any force acting on the fiber that alters the physical structure of the grating will change what wavelengths are transmitted and what wavelengths are reflected by the grating. Both thermal and mechanical forces acting on the grating will alter its physical characteristics allowing the FBG sensor to detect both temperature variations and physical stresses, strain, placed upon it. This ability to sense multiple physical forces makes the FBG a versatile sensor. This paper reports on test results of the performance of FBGs at elevated temperatures. The gratings looked at thus far have been either embedded in polymer matrix materials or freestanding with the primary focus of this paper being on the freestanding FBGs. Throughout the evaluation process, various parameters of the FBGs performance were monitored and recorded. These parameters include the peak Bragg wavelength, the power of the Bragg wavelength, and total power returned by the FBG. Several test samples were subjected to identical test conditions to

  2. Viscoelastoplastic Deformation and Damage Response of Titanium Alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Saleeb, Atef F.; Kasemer, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    Time-dependent deformation and damage behavior can significantly affect the life of aerospace propulsion components. Consequently, one needs an accurate constitutive model that can represent both reversible and irreversible behavior under multiaxial loading conditions. This paper details the characterization and utilization of a multi-mechanism constitutive model of the GVIPS class (Generalized Viscoplastic with Potential Structure) that has been extended to describe the viscoelastoplastic deformation and damage of the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. Associated material constants were characterized at five elevated temperatures where viscoelastoplastic behavior was observed, and at three elevated temperatures where damage (of both the stiffness reduction and strength reduction type) was incurred. Experimental data from a wide variety of uniaxial load cases were used to correlate and validate the proposed GVIPS model. Presented are the optimized material parameters, and the viscoelastoplastic deformation and damage responses at the various temperatures.

  3. Constitutive Modeling and Testing of Polymer Matrix Composites Incorporating Physical Aging at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced polymer matrix composites (PMC's) are desirable for structural materials in diverse applications such as aircraft, civil infrastructure and biomedical implants because of their improved strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios. For example, the next generation military and commercial aircraft requires applications for high strength, low weight structural components subjected to elevated temperatures. A possible disadvantage of polymer-based composites is that the physical and mechanical properties of the matrix often change significantly over time due to the exposure of elevated temperatures and environmental factors. For design, long term exposure (i.e. aging) of PMC's must be accounted for through constitutive models in order to accurately assess the effects of aging on performance, crack initiation and remaining life. One particular aspect of this aging process, physical aging, is considered in this research.

  4. Evaluation of components on a ductwork system at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.K.; Chern, C.Y.

    1995-12-31

    This paper evaluates the adequacy of a Deactivation Furnace System (DFS) for operation at elevated temperatures (from 1,100 F to 1,800 F). The piping components included in this evaluation are ductwork, flanges, expansion joints, duct support structures, bolts and other load bearing elements. The DFS is designed in accordance with ANSI/ASME B31.1 and B31.3 Codes. However, for the evaluations of elevated temperature conditions, ASME III Code Case N-253-6, Construction of Class 2 or Class 3 components for Elevated Temperature Service, and Code Case N-47-28, Class 1 components in Elevated Temperature Service, are used. To consider creep effects, the primary membrane stresses of piping components are calculated and compared with the stress to rupture based on the duration of operation temperature. The primary-membrane-plus-bending stresses are calculated to determine the use-fraction sum due to service loadings. If the calculated use-fraction sum of a component should exceed the allowable, the limited useful life could be predicted.

  5. Application of non-porous alumina based ceramics as structural material for devices handling tritium at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Maksimkin, I.P.; Baluev, V.V.; Boitsov, I.E.; Vertey, A.V.; Malkov, I.L.; Musyaev, R.K.; Popov, V.V.; Sitdikov, D.T.; Khapov, A.S.; Grishechkin, S.K.; Kiselev, V.G.

    2015-03-15

    The article presents results of comparative tests for the determination of deuterium fluxes permeating through walls of austenitic stainless steel AISI304 (DIN 1.4301) chamber and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} based ceramic F99.7 chamber. Both chambers represent a piece of φ(ext)=26*φ(int)=22*117 mm{sup 3} tube with spherical bottom ending. It is shown that at 773 K and deuterium pressure of 1200 mbar the permeated deuterium flux through the stainless steel chamber constituted 8*10{sup -5} cm{sup 3}/s, while the flux through ceramic one it did not exceed the sensitivity of the measurement method threshold, namely about 1.5*10{sup -7} cm{sup 3}/s. The ceramic chamber turned out to survive more than 10{sup 3} cycles of heating up to 773 K with no damages. It did not lose its tightness up to 10 bar of internal deuterium pressure. The authors also present test results of a prototype bed for reversible tritium storage. The bed's case was made of alumina based ceramic F99.7, titanium being used as tritide making metal and high frequency induction used for heating the tritide metal. (authors)

  6. Binder/HMX Interaction in PBX9501 at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saw, Cheng K.; Tarver, Craig M.

    2004-07-01

    Plastic bonded explosives (PBX) generally consist of 85-95 % by weight energetic material, such as HMX, and 5-15 % polymeric binder. Understanding of the structure and morphology at elevated temperatures and pressures is important for predicting of PBX behavior in accident scenarios. The crystallographic behavior of pure HMX has been measured as functions of temperature and grain size. The investigation is extended to the high temperature behavior of PBX 9501 (95% HMX, 2.5 % Estane, 2.5 % BDNPA/F). The results show that the HMX β- to δ-phase transition in PBX 9501 is similar to that in neat HMX. However, in the presence of the PBX 9501 binder, δ-phase HMX readily converts back to β-phase during cooling. Using the same temperature profile, the conversion rate decreases for each subsequent heating and cooling cycle. As observed in earlier experiments, no reverse conversion is observed without the polymer binder. It is proposed that the reversion of δ-phase to β-phase is due to changes in the surface molecular potential caused by the influence of the polymer binder on the δ-phase. Upon thermal cycling, the polymer binder segregates from the HMX particles and thus reduces the influence of the binder on the surface molecules. This segregation increases the resistance for the δ-phase to β-phase transition, as demonstrated in an aged PBX 9501 material for which the reversion is not observed.

  7. Thermodynamics, Diffusion, and Structure of Liquid NaAlSi3O8 at Elevated Temperature and Pressure from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, R.; Spera, F. J.; Ghiorso, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Thermodynamic properties of silicate melts at high temperature (T) and pressure (P) are crucial to understanding Earth accretion, magma oceans, petrogenesis, and crustal growth. However, equations of state for silicate liquids at mantle conditions are scarce, due to experimental challenges. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations allow investigation of thermodynamic and transport properties of silicate melts at high P and T and enable the correlation of liquid structure with computed properties. Using classical MD, we studied liquid NaAlSi3O8 in the range 0-42 GPa and 3000-5137 K. Density ranged from 2.2 to 3.6 g/cm3, and all simulations were performed in the microcanonical (NEV) ensemble using the potential from Matsui (1998). An equation of state with internal energy E(V,T) was developed using the RT scaling-Vinet formulation (Ghiorso et al., 2009). From thermodynamic relationships, the Grüneisen parameter, isobaric expansivity, isothermal compressibility, heat capacity, and other functions are computed over the P-T range of the MD simulations. Diffusion coefficients (D) range from 1.5×10-9 to 5.9×10-8 m2/s and typically order Na>Al>O>Si at a given state point. Generally, D decreases with P and increases with T except for a low P anomalous region along the 3065 K isotherm. Anomalous diffusion for Al, Si, and O is congruent with laboratory experiments at P<10 GPa (e.g., Shimizu and Kushiro, 1984; Poe et al., 1997; Tinker and Lesher, 2001; Tinker et al., 2003). Activation energy for Na is on the order of -75.3 kJ/mol with activation volume -1.74 cm3/mol. The anomalous peak in diffusivity for Si and O occurs at ~3 GPa, which marks a subtle increase in the average coordination number (CN) for O around O from 9.35 to 10.31. The average CN for O around O generally increases with P, but it systematically drops at 8, 15, and 20 GPa for 3065, 3944, and 5137 K, respectively. The concentrations of AlO5 and SiO5 polyhedra maximize near 16 and 35 GPa, respectively.

  8. Friction Tests in Magnesium Tube Hydroforming at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yeong-Maw; Wang, Kuo-Hsing; Kuo, Tsung-Yu

    2011-05-04

    In metal forming, lubricants have a variety of functions. The top priority is usually reduction of friction in order to increase the formability of the materials and reduce tool wear. Because magnesium alloys have very poor formability at room temperature, it is essential to manufacture a part from Magnesium alloys at elevated temperatures. The aim of this paper is to present a friction test method to evaluate the performance of different kinds of lubricants and determine their coefficients of friction at elevated temperatures in tube hydroforming of magnesium alloys. A self-designed experimental apparatus is used to carry out the experiments of friction tests. The coefficient of friction between the tube and die at guiding zone is determined. The effects of the internal pressure, the axial feeding velocity and temperatures on the friction forces and coefficients of friction for different lubricants are discussed.

  9. Void evolution in polycarbonate at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. H.; Li, C. L.; Lee, Sanboh; Kuo Feng Chou

    2011-08-15

    The void evolution in polycarbonate (PC) at elevated temperatures was investigated. Internal cylindrical cracks and voids were induced in PC by Nd-YAG laser irradiation. During the annealing at temperatures of 177-197 deg. C, the spherical void grows to a maximum size, which then decreases, and is finally leveling off. A model of void evolution based on the evaporation and condensation mechanisms for growth and shrinkage is proposed. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data. The activation energies of evaporation and condensation processes are determined to be 477.31 and 611.49 kJ/mol, respectively.

  10. Void evolution in polycarbonate at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. H.; Feng Chou, Kuo; Li, C. L.; Lee, Sanboh

    2011-08-01

    The void evolution in polycarbonate (PC) at elevated temperatures was investigated. Internal cylindrical cracks and voids were induced in PC by Nd-YAG laser irradiation. During the annealing at temperatures of 177-197 °C, the spherical void grows to a maximum size, which then decreases, and is finally leveling off. A model of void evolution based on the evaporation and condensation mechanisms for growth and shrinkage is proposed. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data. The activation energies of evaporation and condensation processes are determined to be 477.31 and 611.49 kJ/mol, respectively.

  11. Gas-Alloy Interactions at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Arroyave, Raymundo; Gao, Michael

    2012-11-07

    The understanding of the stability of metals and alloys against oxidation and other detrimental reactions, to the catalysis of important chemical reactions and the minimization of defects associated with processing and synthesis have one thing in common: At the most fundamental level, all these scientific/engineering problems involve interactions between metals and alloys (in the solid or liquid state) and gaseous atmospheres at elevated temperatures. In this special issue, we have collected a series of articles that illustrate the application of different theoretical, computational, and experimental techniques to investigate gas-alloy interactions.

  12. A statistical study on tensile characteristics of stainless steel at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SungHo, Park; NoSeok, Park; JaeHoon, Kim

    2010-07-01

    This study describes the tensile test results of AISI type 304 deformed at room and elevated temperatures. It has been known that the normal distribution fits well with the strength of typical structural materials. The Weibull distribution has many characteristics in the reliability design. In this paper, we showed that the Weibull distribution can be used to describe the scattering of strength data as well as normal distribution by testing goodness of fit. It is found that the parameters of Weibull distribution have decreasing tendency for temperature rise and the coefficient of variation has increasing tendency for temperature rise.

  13. Ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography using elevated temperature.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yanqiao; Liu, Yansheng; Lee, Milton L

    2006-02-01

    Fast liquid chromatographic (LC) methods are important for a variety of applications. Reducing the particle diameter (d(p)) is the most effective way to achieve fast separations while preserving high efficiency. Since the pressure drop along a packed column is inversely proportional to the square of the particle size, when columns packed with small particles (<2 microm) are used, ultrahigh pressures (>689 bar) must be applied to overcome the resistance to mobile phase flow. Elevating the column temperature can significantly reduce the mobile phase viscosity, allowing operation at higher flow rate for the same pressure. It also leads to a decrease in retention factor. The advantage of using elevated temperatures in LC is the ability to significantly shorten separation time with minimal loss in column efficiency. Therefore, combining elevated temperature with ultrahigh pressure facilitates fast and efficient separations. In this study, C6-modified 1.0 microm nonporous silica particles were used to demonstrate fast separations using a temperature of 80 degrees C and a pressure of 2413 bar. Selected separations were completed in 30 s with efficiencies as high as 220,000 plates m(-1). PMID:16376355

  14. Elevated temperature strength of Cr-W alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Omer N.; Schrems, Karol K.

    2004-09-01

    Cr alloys containing 0-30 weight percent W were investigated for their strength and ductility. These experimental alloys are intended for use in elevated temperature applications. Alloys were melted in a water-cooled, copper-hearth arc furnace. Microstructure of the alloys was studied using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and light microscopy. A hot hardness tester was used to study the strength of these materials up to 1200ºC. Compression tests at the same temperature range were also conducted.

  15. Elevated temperature forming method and preheater apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Krajewski, Paul E; Hammar, Richard Harry; Singh, Jugraj; Cedar, Dennis; Friedman, Peter A; Luo, Yingbing

    2013-06-11

    An elevated temperature forming system in which a sheet metal workpiece is provided in a first stage position of a multi-stage pre-heater, is heated to a first stage temperature lower than a desired pre-heat temperature, is moved to a final stage position where it is heated to a desired final stage temperature, is transferred to a forming press, and is formed by the forming press. The preheater includes upper and lower platens that transfer heat into workpieces disposed between the platens. A shim spaces the upper platen from the lower platen by a distance greater than a thickness of the workpieces to be heated by the platens and less than a distance at which the upper platen would require an undesirably high input of energy to effectively heat the workpiece without being pressed into contact with the workpiece.

  16. Promoted Metals Combustion at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Carl D.; Herald, Stephen D.; Davis, S. Eddie

    2005-01-01

    Promoted combustion testing of materials, Test 17 of NASA STD-6001, has been used to assess metal propensity to burn in oxygen rich environments. An igniter is used at the bottom end of a rod to promote ignition, and if combustion is sustained, the burning progresses from the bottom to the top of the rod. The physical mechanisms are very similar to the upward flammability test, Test 1 of NASA STD-6001. The differences are in the normal environmental range of pressures, oxygen content, and sample geometry. Upward flammability testing of organic materials can exhibit a significant transitional region between no burning to complete quasi-state burning. In this transitional region, the burn process exhibits a probabilistic nature. This transitional region has been identified for metals using the promoted combustion testing method at ambient initial temperatures. The work given here is focused on examining the transitional region and the quasi-steady burning region both at conventional ambient testing conditions and at elevated temperatures. A new heated promoted combustion facility and equipment at Marshall Space Flight Center have just been completed to provide the basic data regarding the metals operating temperature limits in contact with oxygen rich atmospheres at high pressures. Initial data have been obtained for Stainless Steel 304L, Stainless Steel 321, Haynes 214, and Inconel 718 at elevated temperatures in 100-percent oxygen atmospheres. These data along with an extended data set at ambient initial temperature test conditions are examined. The pressure boundaries of acceptable, non-burning usage is found to be lowered at elevated temperature.

  17. Elevated temperature deformation of thoria dispersed nickel-chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    The deformation behavior of thoria nickel-chromium (TD-NiCr) was examined over the temperature range 593 C (1100 F) to 1260 C (2300 F) in tension and compression and at 1093 C (2000 F) in creep. Major emphasis was placed on: (1) the effects of the material and test related variables (grain size, temperature, stress and strain rate) on the deformation process; and (2) the evaluation of single crystal TD-NiCr material produced by a directional recrystallization process. Elevated temperature yield strength levels and creep activation enthalpies were found to increase with increasing grain size reaching maximum values for the single crystal TD-NiCr. Stress exponent of the steady state creep rate was also significantly higher for the single crystal TD-NiCr as compared to that determined for the polycrystalline materials. The elevated temperature deformation of TD-NiCr was analyzed in terms of two concurrent, parallel processes: diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding, and dislocation motion.

  18. High strain rate behavior of pure metals at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Gabriel; Bonora, Nicola; Ruggiero, Andrew; Iannitti, Gianluca; Domenico, Gentile

    2013-06-01

    In many applications and technology processes, such as stamping, forging, hot working etc., metals and alloys are subjected to elevated temperature and high strain rate deformation process. Characterization tests, such as quasistatic and dynamic tension or compression test, and validation tests, such as Taylor impact and DTE - dynamic tensile extrusion -, provide the experimental base of data for constitutive model validation and material parameters identification. Testing material at high strain rate and temperature requires dedicated equipment. In this work, both tensile Hopkinson bar and light gas gun where modified in order to allow material testing under sample controlled temperature conditions. Dynamic tension tests and Taylor impact tests, at different temperatures, on high purity copper (99.98%), tungsten (99.95%) and 316L stainless steel were performed. The accuracy of several constitutive models (Johnson and Cook, Zerilli-Armstrong, etc.) in predicting the observed material response was verified by means of extensive finite element analysis (FEA).

  19. Thermal Behavior of Cylindrical Buckling Restrained Braces at Elevated Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Elnaz; Tahir, Mahmood Md.; Yasreen, Airil

    2014-01-01

    The primary focus of this investigation was to analyze sequentially coupled nonlinear thermal stress, using a three-dimensional model. It was meant to shed light on the behavior of Buckling Restraint Brace (BRB) elements with circular cross section, at elevated temperature. Such bracing systems were comprised of a cylindrical steel core encased in a strong concrete-filled steel hollow casing. A debonding agent was rubbed on the core's surface to avoid shear stress transition to the restraining system. The numerical model was verified by the analytical solutions developed by the other researchers. Performance of BRB system under seismic loading at ambient temperature has been well documented. However, its performance in case of fire has yet to be explored. This study showed that the failure of brace may be attributed to material strength reduction and high compressive forces, both due to temperature rise. Furthermore, limiting temperatures in the linear behavior of steel casing and concrete in BRB element for both numerical and analytical simulations were about 196°C and 225°C, respectively. Finally it is concluded that the performance of BRB at elevated temperatures was the same as that seen at room temperature; that is, the steel core yields prior to the restraining system. PMID:24526915

  20. Thermal behavior of cylindrical buckling restrained braces at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Elnaz; Tahir, Mahmood Md; Zahmatkesh, Farshad; Yasreen, Airil; Mirza, Jahangir

    2014-01-01

    The primary focus of this investigation was to analyze sequentially coupled nonlinear thermal stress, using a three-dimensional model. It was meant to shed light on the behavior of Buckling Restraint Brace (BRB) elements with circular cross section, at elevated temperature. Such bracing systems were comprised of a cylindrical steel core encased in a strong concrete-filled steel hollow casing. A debonding agent was rubbed on the core's surface to avoid shear stress transition to the restraining system. The numerical model was verified by the analytical solutions developed by the other researchers. Performance of BRB system under seismic loading at ambient temperature has been well documented. However, its performance in case of fire has yet to be explored. This study showed that the failure of brace may be attributed to material strength reduction and high compressive forces, both due to temperature rise. Furthermore, limiting temperatures in the linear behavior of steel casing and concrete in BRB element for both numerical and analytical simulations were about 196°C and 225°C, respectively. Finally it is concluded that the performance of BRB at elevated temperatures was the same as that seen at room temperature; that is, the steel core yields prior to the restraining system. PMID:24526915

  1. Phase distribution and microstructural changes of self-compacting cement paste at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, G. . E-mail: ye.guang@citg.tudelft.nl; Liu, X.; De Schutter, G.; Taerwe, L.; Vandevelde, P.

    2007-06-15

    Self-compacting concrete, as a new smart building material with various advanced properties, has been used for a wide range of structures and infrastructures. However little investigation have been reported on the properties of Self-compacting when it is exposed to elevated temperatures. Previous experiments on fire test have shown the differences between high performance concrete and traditional concrete at elevated temperature. This difference is largely depending on the microstructural properties of concrete matrix, i.e. the cement paste, especially on the porosity, pore size distribution and the connectivity of pores in cement pastes. In this contribution, the investigations are focused on the cement paste. The phase distribution and microstructural changes of self-compacting cement paste at elevated temperatures are examined by mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. The chemical decomposition of self-compacting cement paste at different temperatures is determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The experimental results of self-compacting cement paste are compared with those of high performance cement paste and traditional cement paste. It was found that self-compacting cement paste shows a higher change of the total porosity in comparison with high performance cement paste. When the temperature is higher than 700 deg. C, a dramatic loss of mass was observed in the self-compacting cement paste samples with addition of limestone filler. This implies that the SCC made by this type of self-compacting cement paste will probably show larger damage once exposed to fire. Investigation has shown that 0.5 kg/m{sup 3} of Polypropylene fibers in the self-compacting cement paste can avoid the damage efficiently.

  2. The effect of HVOF sprayed coatings on the elevated temperature high cycle fatigue behavior of a martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    This study reports the influence of three High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) applied coatings on the high cycle fatigue resistance of a martensitic stainless steel substrate at room and elevated temperatures. It was found that chromium carbide and tungsten carbide coated specimens exhibited significantly lower fatigue capability compared to the substrate material at elevated temperatures while IN625 coated specimens exhibited a small beneficial effect. An attempt is made to explain the observed behavior in terms of elastic modulus mismatch, thermal expansion mismatch, residual stress and coating/substrate properties. It is concluded that coated metallic components must be analyzed as composite structures and that data generated for design properties must be performed on specimens which represent the geometry and characteristics of intended component.

  3. Elevated temperature effects on fatigue and fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Piascik, R.S.; Gangloff, R.P.; Saxena, A.

    1997-12-31

    The intent of this meeting was to reinforce the recent merger of ASTM Committees E09 on Fatigue and E24 on Fracture Mechanics, forming Committee E08 on Fatigue and Fracture. This special technical publication highlights a topical subset of the meeting, that is, research on the critical effect of temperature on the fatigue and fracture of structural materials. Papers highlighted: Integration of damage evolution, from the distributed form to that focused at a crack tip; High-resolution experimental probes of fatigue and fracture processes; Measurement and modeling of the important role of time in microstructural degradation, damage evolution, and crack growth; Models that provide quantitative predictions and are tested by high-quality experimentation; and Performance of next-generation structural metals and composites, characterized within a framework useful in component life prediction. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  4. Strengths of serpentinite gouges at elevated temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, D.A.; Ma, S.; Summers, R.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    Serpentinite has been proposed as a cause of both low strength and aseismic creep of fault zones. To test these hypotheses, we have measured the strength of chrysotile-, lizardite-, and antigorite-rich serpentinite gouges under hydrothermal conditions, with emphasis on chrysotile, which has thus far received little attention. At 25??C, the coefficient of friction, ??, of chrysotile gouge is roughly 0.2, whereas the lizardite- and antigorite-rich gouges are at least twice as strong. The very low room temperature strength of chrysotile is a consequence of its unusually high adsorbed water content. When the adsorbed water is removed, chrysotile is as strong as pure antigorite gouge at room temperature. Heating to ???200??C causes the frictional strengths of all three gouges to increase. Limited data suggest that different polytypes of a given serpentine mineral have similar strengths; thus deformation-induced changes in polytype should not affect fault strength. At 25??C, the chrysotile gouge has a transition from velocity strengthening at low velocities to velocity weakening at high velocities, consistent with previous studies. At temperatures up to ???200??C, however, chrysotile strength is essentially independent of velocity at low velocities. Overall, chrysotile has a restricted range of velocity-strengthening behavior that migrates to higher velocities with increasing temperature. Less information on velocity dependence is available for the lizardite and antigorite gouges, but their behavior is consistent with that outlined for chrysotile. The marked changes in velocity dependence and strength of chrysotile with heating underscore the hazards of using room temperature data to predict fault behavior at depth. The velocity behavior at elevated temperatures does not rule out serpentinite as a cause of aseismic slip, but in the presence of a hydrostatic fluid pressure gradient, all varieties of serpentine are too strong to explain the apparent weakness of faults such

  5. Process Simulation of Aluminium Sheet Metal Deep Drawing at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Winklhofer, Johannes; Trattnig, Gernot; Sommitsch, Christof

    2010-06-15

    Lightweight design is essential for an economic and environmentally friendly vehicle. Aluminium sheet metal is well known for its ability to improve the strength to weight ratio of lightweight structures. One disadvantage of aluminium is that it is less formable than steel. Therefore complex part geometries can only be realized by expensive multi-step production processes. One method for overcoming this disadvantage is deep drawing at elevated temperatures. In this way the formability of aluminium sheet metal can be improved significantly, and the number of necessary production steps can thereby be reduced. This paper introduces deep drawing of aluminium sheet metal at elevated temperatures, a corresponding simulation method, a characteristic process and its optimization. The temperature and strain rate dependent material properties of a 5xxx series alloy and their modelling are discussed. A three dimensional thermomechanically coupled finite element deep drawing simulation model and its validation are presented. Based on the validated simulation model an optimised process strategy regarding formability, time and cost is introduced.

  6. The mechanical behavior of extruded powder aluminum subjected to biaxial loadings at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, T.O.; Berghaus, D.G.; Peacock, H.B.

    1990-12-31

    The goal of this investigation is to develop a description of the biaxial behavior of extruded powder aluminum at elevated temperature. Specimens made of extruded 101 ALCOA (Aluminum Company of America) powder aluminum and specimens made from 1100 commercial aluminum rod are tested biaxially in tension-torsion and compression-torsion loadings at the extrusion temperature. The powder aluminum is examined microscopically and stereological methods are used to give a quantified description of the material behavior in terms of changes in the laminar powder material structure. A model for the biaxial (tension-torsion) behavior of extruded powder aluminum is developed. This description is consistent with a previous analysis of behavior in pure tension.

  7. The mechanical behavior of extruded powder aluminum subjected to biaxial loadings at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, T.O.; Berghaus, D.G. ); Peacock, H.B. )

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this investigation is to develop a description of the biaxial behavior of extruded powder aluminum at elevated temperature. Specimens made of extruded 101 ALCOA (Aluminum Company of America) powder aluminum and specimens made from 1100 commercial aluminum rod are tested biaxially in tension-torsion and compression-torsion loadings at the extrusion temperature. The powder aluminum is examined microscopically and stereological methods are used to give a quantified description of the material behavior in terms of changes in the laminar powder material structure. A model for the biaxial (tension-torsion) behavior of extruded powder aluminum is developed. This description is consistent with a previous analysis of behavior in pure tension.

  8. Powder processing of NiAl for elevated temperature strength

    SciTech Connect

    Whittenberger, J.D.; Hebsur, M.; Grahle, P.; Arzt, E.; Behr, R.; Zoeltzer, K.

    1997-12-31

    In an effort to superimpose two different elevated temperature strengthening mechanisms in NiAl, one lot of an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) NiAl powder has been milled in liquid nitrogen (cryomilled) to introduce AlN particles at the grain boundaries, and a second lot of ODS powder was simply roasted in gaseous nitrogen as an alternative means to produce AlN reinforced grain boundaries. Powder from both of these lots as well as the starting material have been consolidated by hot extrusion and tested at 1,300 K. Both nitrogen roasting and cryomilling produced AlN within the ODS NiAl matrix which strengthened the alloy; however, based on the AlN content, cryomilling is more effective.

  9. Literature survey on oxidations and fatigue lives at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.; Oshida, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Nickel-base superalloys are the most complex and the most widely used for high temperature applications such as aircraft engine components. The desirable properties of nickel-base superalloys at high temperatures are tensile strength, thermomechanical fatigue resistance, low thermal expansion, as well as oxidation resistance. At elevated temperature, fatigue cracks are often initiated by grain boundary oxidation, and fatigue cracks often propagate along grain boundaries, where the oxidation rate is higher. Oxidation takes place at the interface between metal and gas. Properties of the metal substrate, the gaseous environment, as well as the oxides formed all interact to make the oxidation behavior of nickel-base superalloys extremely complicated. The important topics include general oxidation, selective oxidation, internal oxidation, grain boundary oxidation, multilayer oxide structure, accelerated oxidation under stress, stress-generation during oxidation, composition and substrate microstructural changes due to prolonged oxidation, fatigue crack initiation at oxidized grain boundaries and the oxidation accelerated fatigue crack propagation along grain boundaries.

  10. Helium and deuterium implantation in tungsten at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipiti, B. B.; Kulcinski, G. L.

    2005-12-01

    High temperature helium and deuterium implantation on tungsten has been studied using the University of Wisconsin inertial electrostatic confinement device. Helium or deuterium ions from a plasma source were driven into polished tungsten powder metallurgy samples. Deuterium implantation did not damage the surface of the specimens at elevated temperatures (˜1200 °C). Helium implantation resulted in a porous surface structure above 700 °C. A helium fluence scan, ion energy scan, and temperature scan were all completed. With 30 keV ions, the pore formation started just below 4 × 10 16 He +/cm 2. The pore size increased and the pore density decreased with increasing fluence and temperature. The energy scan from 20 to 80 keV showed no consistent trend.

  11. Elevated temperature mechanical properties of line pipe steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Taylor Roth

    The effects of test temperature on the tensile properties of four line pipe steels were evaluated. The four materials include a ferrite-pearlite line pipe steel with a yield strength specification of 359 MPa (52 ksi) and three 485 MPa (70 ksi) yield strength acicular ferrite line pipe steels. Deformation behavior, ductility, strength, strain hardening rate, strain rate sensitivity, and fracture behavior were characterized at room temperature and in the temperature range of 200--350 °C, the potential operating range for steels used in oil production by the steam assisted gravity drainage process. Elevated temperature tensile testing was conducted on commercially produced as-received plates at engineering strain rates of 1.67 x 10 -4, 8.33 x 10-4, and 1.67 x 10-3 s-1. The acicular ferrite (X70) line pipe steels were also tested at elevated temperatures after aging at 200, 275, and 350 °C for 100 h under a tensile load of 419 MPa. The presence of serrated yielding depended on temperature and strain rate, and the upper bound of the temperature range where serrated yielding was observed was independent of microstructure between the ferrite-pearlite (X52) steel and the X70 steels. Serrated yielding was observed at intermediate temperatures and continuous plastic deformation was observed at room temperature and high temperatures. All steels exhibited a minimum in ductility as a function of temperature at testing conditions where serrated yielding was observed. At the higher temperatures (>275 °C) the X52 steel exhibited an increase in ductility with an increase in temperature and the X70 steels exhibited a maximum in ductility as a function of temperature. All steels exhibited a maximum in flow strength and average strain hardening rate as a function of temperature. The X52 steel exhibited maxima in flow strength and average strain hardening rate at lower temperatures than observed for the X70 steels. For all steels, the temperature where the maximum in both flow

  12. Structural materials for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, Darrel R.

    1989-01-01

    The long-term performance of structural materials in the space environment is a key research activity within NASA. The primary concerns for materials in low Earth orbit (LEO) are atomic oxygen erosion and space debris impact. Atomic oxygen studies have included both laboratory exposures in atomic oxygen facilities and flight exposures using the Shuttle. Characterization of atomic oxygen interaction with materials has included surface recession rates, residual mechanical properties, optical property measurements, and surface analyses to establish chemical changes. The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is scheduled to be retrieved in 1989 and is expected to provide a wealth of data on atomic oxygen erosion in space. Hypervelocity impact studies have been conducted to establish damage mechanisms and changes in mechanical properties. Samples from LDEF will be analyzed to determine the severity of space debris impact on coatings, films, and composites. Spacecraft placed in geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) will be subjected to high doses of ionizing radiation which for long term exposures will exceed the damage threshold of many polymeric materials. Radiation interaction with polymers can result in chain scission and/or cross-linking. The formation of low molecular weight products in the epoxy plasticize the matrix at elevated temperatures and embrittle the matrix at low temperatures. This affects both the matrix-dominated mechanical properties and the dimensional stability of the composite. Embrittlement of the matrix at low temperatures results in enhanced matrix microcracking during thermal cycling. Matrix microcracking changes the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of composite laminates and produces permanent length changes. Residual stress calculations were performed to estimate the conditions necessary for microcrack development in unirradiated and irradiated composites. The effects of UV and electron exposure on the optical properties of transparent

  13. A model for the biaxial post-yield behavior of extruded powder aluminum at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, T.O.; Berghaus, D.G. ); Peacock, H.B. )

    1990-01-01

    A model has been developed which describes the post-yield behavior of extruded powder aluminum tested biaxially in tension and torsion at elevated temperature. Plots of shear stress versus shear strain for the powder aluminum loaded in simple torsion show that the shear stress increases linearly to the yield point, then remains relatively constant in a pure plastic type of behavior. For the tension-torsion tests, there is an initial linear region up to the yield point followed by a fairly linear decrease in shear stress. A similar linear decrease in axial stress with increasing axial strain is observed in uniaxial tension tests. The model for post-yield behavior of extruded powder aluminum gives a quantified description of the macroscopic material behavior in terms of changes in the laminar powder aluminum structure.

  14. A model for the biaxial post-yield behavior of extruded powder aluminum at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, T.O.; Berghaus, D.G.; Peacock, H.B.

    1990-12-31

    A model has been developed which describes the post-yield behavior of extruded powder aluminum tested biaxially in tension and torsion at elevated temperature. Plots of shear stress versus shear strain for the powder aluminum loaded in simple torsion show that the shear stress increases linearly to the yield point, then remains relatively constant in a pure plastic type of behavior. For the tension-torsion tests, there is an initial linear region up to the yield point followed by a fairly linear decrease in shear stress. A similar linear decrease in axial stress with increasing axial strain is observed in uniaxial tension tests. The model for post-yield behavior of extruded powder aluminum gives a quantified description of the macroscopic material behavior in terms of changes in the laminar powder aluminum structure.

  15. Elevated temperature deformation of TD-nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrovic, J. J.; Kane, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    Sensitivity of the elevated temperature deformation of TD-nickel to grain size and shape was examined in both tension and creep. Elevated temperature strength increased with increasing grain diameter and increasing L/D ratio. Measured activation enthalpies in tension and creep were not the same. In tension, the internal stress was not proportional to the shear modulus. Creep activation enthalpies increased with increasing L/D ratio and increasing grain diameter, to high values compared with that of the self diffusion enthalpy. It has been postulated that two concurrent processes contribute to the elevated temperature deformation of polycrystalline TD-nickel: (1) diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding, and (2) dislocation motion.

  16. Tantalum alloys resist creep deformation at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckman, R. W., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    Dispersion-strengthened tantalum-base alloys possess high strength and good resistance to creep deformation at elevated temperatures in high vacuum environments. They also have ease of fabrication, good weldability, and corrosion resistance to molten alkali metals.

  17. Integrated research in constitutive modelling at elevated temperatures, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisler, W. E.; Allen, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Topics covered include: numerical integration techniques; thermodynamics and internal state variables; experimental lab development; comparison of models at room temperature; comparison of models at elevated temperature; and integrated software development.

  18. Plastic Deformation Characteristics Of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Sheets At Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jingee; Lee, Jongshin; You, Bongsun; Choi, Seogou; Kim, Youngsuk

    2007-05-01

    Using lightweight materials is the emerging need in order to reduce the vehicle's energy consumption and pollutant emissions. Being a lightweight material, magnesium alloys are increasingly employed in the fabrication of automotive and electronic parts. Presently, magnesium alloys used in automotive and electronic parts are mainly processed by die casting. The die casting technology allows the manufacturing of parts with complex geometry. However, the mechanical properties of these parts often do not meet the requirements concerning the mechanical properties (e.g. endurance strength and ductility). A promising alternative can be forming process. The parts manufactured by forming could have fine-grained structure without porosity and improved mechanical properties such as endurance strength and ductility. Because magnesium alloy has low formability resulted form its small slip system at room temperature it is usually formed at elevated temperature. Due to a rapid increase of usage of magnesium sheets in automotive and electronic industry it is necessary to assure database for sheet metal formability and plastic yielding properties in order to optimize its usage. Especially, plastic yielding criterion is a critical property to predict plastic deformation of sheet metal parts in optimizing process using CAE simulation. Von-Mises yield criterion generally well predicts plastic deformation of steel sheets and Hill'1979 yield criterion predicts plastic deformation of aluminum sheets. In this study, using biaxial tensile test machine yield loci of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet were obtained at elevated temperature. The yield loci ensured experimentally were compared with the theoretical predictions based on the Von-Mises, Hill, Logan-Hosford, and Barlat model.

  19. Reduced graphene oxides: light-weight and high-efficiency electromagnetic interference shielding at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bo; Cao, Maosheng; Lu, Mingming; Cao, Wenqiang; Shi, Honglong; Liu, Jia; Wang, Xixi; Jin, Haibo; Fang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Wenzhong; Yuan, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Chemical graphitized r-GOs, as the thinnest and lightest material in the carbon family, exhibit high-efficiency electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding at elevated temperature, attributed to the cooperation of dipole polarization and hopping conductivity. The r-GO composites show different temperature-dependent imaginary permittivities and EMI shielding performances with changing mass ratio. PMID:24648151

  20. Electromigration in Sintered Nanoscale Silver Films at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calata, Jesus N.; Lu, Guo-Quan; Ngo, Khai; Nguyen, Luu

    2014-01-01

    Sintered nanoscale silver is a promising interconnection material for semiconductor devices because it provides improved joint properties compared with solder and wire bonds. It has higher electrical and thermal conductivity and is capable of higher operating temperature. Joints with die shear strength above 20 MPa can be formed at around 250°C even without applied pressure. Sintered silver joints were also found to be an order of magnitude more reliable than solder joints and wire bonds. In this work, the electromigration behavior of sintered nanosilver material under conditions of high applied current density and elevated temperature was investigated. Thin strips of sintered nanosilver formed on ceramic substrates were tested under current densities exceeding 150 kA/cm2 at temperatures of 150°C and above. Results based on the percentage change in sample resistance showed that the sintered silver lasted at least ten times longer than aluminum wire bonds. Examination of failed strips revealed that hairline cracks formed during sintering were the main cause of failure. Otherwise, defect-free samples exhibited a 10-fold increase in lifetime over wire bonds under similar conditions.

  1. Mechanisms of time-dependent crack growth at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Stock, S.R.

    1990-04-15

    Objective of this 3-y study was to conduct creep and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments and to characterize the crack tip damage mechanisms in a model material (Cu-1wt%Sb), which is known to cavitate at grain boundaries under creep deformation. Results were: In presence of large scale cavitation damage and crack branching, time rate of creep crack growth da/dt does not correlate with C[sub t] or C[sup *]. When cavitation damage is constrained, da/dt is characterized by C[sub t]. Area fraction of grain boundary cavitated is the single damage parameter for the extent of cavitation damage ahead of crack tips. C[sub t] is used for the creep-fatigue crack growth behavior. In materials prone to rapid cavity nucleation, creep cracks grow faster initially and then reach a steady state whose growth rate is determined by C[sub t]. Percent creep life exhausted correlates with average cavity diameter and fraction of grain boundary area occupied by cavities. Synchrotron x-ray tomographic microscopy was used to image individual cavities in Cu-1wt% Sb. A methodology was developed for predicting the remaining life of elevated temperature power plant components; (C[sub t])[sub avg] was used to correlate creep-fatigue crack growth in Cr-Mo and Cr-Mo-V steel and weldments.

  2. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons and methods for making such materials. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  3. Elevated Temperature, Notched Compression Performance of Out of Autoclave Processed Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Sutter, James K.; Dixon, Genevieve D.; Smeltzer, Satn S.

    2013-01-01

    Curved honeycomb sandwich panels composed of carbon fiber reinforced toughened-epoxy polymer facesheets are being evaluated for potential use as payload fairing components on the NASA heavy-lift space launch system (HL-SLS). These proposed composite sandwich panels provide the most efficient aerospace launch structures, and offer mass and thermal advantages when compared with existing metallic payload fairing structures. NASA and industry are investigating recently developed carbon fiber epoxy prepreg systems which can be fabricated using out-of autoclave (OOA) processes. Specifically, OOA processes using vacuum pressure in an oven and thereby significantly reducing the cost associated with manufacturing large (up to 10 m diameter) composite structures when compared with autoclave. One of these OOA composite material systems, CYCOM(R) 5320-1, was selected for manufacture of a 1/16th scale barrel portion of the payload fairing; such that, the system could be compared with the well-characterized prepreg system, CYCOM(R) 977-3, typically processed in an autoclave. Notched compression coupons for each material were obtained from the minimum-gauge flat laminate [60/-60/0]S witness panels produced in this manufacturing study. The coupons were also conditioned to an effective moisture equilibrium point and tested according to ASTM D6484M-09 at temperatures ranging from 25 C up to 177 C. The results of this elevated temperature mechanical characterization study demonstrate that, for thin coupons, the OHC strength of the OOA laminate was equivalent to the flight certified autoclave processed composite laminates; the limitations on the elevated temperature range are hot-wet conditions up to 163 C and are only within the margins of testing error. At 25 C, both the wet and dry OOA material coupons demonstrated greater OHC failure strengths than the autoclave processed material laminates. These results indicate a substantial improvement in OOA material development and

  4. Elevated temperature fiber push-out testing

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, J.I.

    1995-10-01

    The potential use of fiber-reinforced composite materials for high temperature applications makes the development of interface test methodology at those high temperatures very desirable. A facility for performing high temperature fiber push-out tests will be described with emphasis on critical issues in experimental procedure. Examples from several composite systems illustrate the temperature dependence and environmental sensitivity of fiber debonding and sliding. Interpretation of the temperature dependence will be made primarily in terms of changes in residual stresses along with additional effects due to changes in matrix ductility and interfacial wear. Examples will show that high temperature fiber push-out testing can often distinguish between chemical and frictional fiber/matrix bonding in cases where room temperature only testing cannot.

  5. Elevated temperature crack growth in advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porr, William C., Jr.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Rapidly solidified Al-Fe-V-Si powder metallurgy alloy FVS0812 is among the most promising of the elevated temperature aluminum alloys developed in recent years. The ultra fine grain size and high volume fraction of thermally stable dispersoids enable the alloy to maintain tensile properties at elevated temperatures. In contrast, this alloy displays complex and potentially deleterious damage tolerant and time dependent fracture behavior that varies with temperature. J-Integral fracture mechanics were used to determine fracture toughness (K sub IC) and crack growth resistance (tearing modulus, T) of extruded FVS0812 as a function of temperature. The alloy exhibits high fracture properties at room temperature when tested in the LT orientation, due to extensive delamination of prior ribbon particle boundaries perpendicular to the crack front. Delamination results in a loss of through thickness constraint along the crack front, raising the critical stress intensity necessary for precrack initiation. The fracture toughness and tensile ductility of this alloy decrease with increasing temperature, with minima observed at 200 C. This behavior results from minima in the intrinsic toughness of the material, due to dynamic strain aging, and in the extent of prior particle boundary delaminations. At 200 C FVS0812 fails at K levels that are insufficient to cause through thickness delamination. As temperature increases beyond the minimum, strain aging is reduced and delamination returns. For the TL orientation, K (sub IC) decreased and T increased slightly with increasing temperature from 25 to 316 C. Fracture in the TL orientation is governed by prior particle boundary toughness; increased strain localization at these boundaries may result in lower toughness with increasing temperature. Preliminary results demonstrate a complex effect of loading rate on K (sub IC) and T at 175 C, and indicate that the combined effects of time dependent deformation, environment, and strain aging

  6. Palladium based cermet composite for hydrogen separation at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yen-Chang; Lin, Chien-Cheng; Lin, Wei-Lin; Wang, Jeng-Han; Chen, San-Yuan; Lin, Pang; Wu, Pu-Wei

    2015-01-01

    A cermet composite consisting of palladium and BaCe0.4Zr0.4Gd0.1Dy0.1O3-x (BCZGD) is fabricated by mixing palladium and BCZGD powders in a ball mill, followed by pressing and sintering at 1450 °C for 24 h in air. The Pd-BCZGD cermet demonstrates impressive hydrogen permeation flux in a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at elevated temperature, in which the palladium plays the predominant role of facile transport in the hydrogen atoms whereas the BCZGD provides channels for proton conduction. Material characterization including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) are performed. XRD patterns indicate pure phases of fcc palladium and perovskite BCZGD. SEM images and element mapping suggest a homogeneous mixture of cermet without noticeable defect and phase segregation. TGA results confirm stability of the cermet against carbon dioxide without chemical decomposition. The hydrogen permeation flux is determined via a gas chromatography from 400 to 700 °C at various hydrogen concentration gradients. We record a hydrogen flux of 1.25 cm3 min-1 cm-2 in 50% hydrogen and 50% carbon dioxide at 700 °C, with a selectivity of H2/CO2 approaching infinity.

  7. Mesoscale Molecular Dynamics of Geomaterials: the Glass Transition, Long-Range Structure of Amorphous Silicates and Relation between Structure, Dynamics and Properties of geomaterials at elevated Temperature and Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Spera

    2006-07-31

    Objectives: Our aims were (1) Large particle-number Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of molten silicate and aluminosilicate geomaterials (e.g., CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}, MgSiO{sub 3}, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) with emphasis on understanding the connection between atomic structure and properties at temperatures and pressures characteristic of Earth's mantle (2) Study of the transport properties and equations of state for silicate liquids based on the MD results (3) Development of geochemical models for the evolution of crustal magma bodies undergoing simultaneous assimilation, fractional crystallization, periodic recharge and periodic eruption and application to magmatic systems (4) Study of current-day rates of generation and eruption of magma on earth.

  8. Materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venneri, Samuel L.

    1988-01-01

    Information on materials and structures for use in space is given in viewgraph form. Information is given on the Materials and Structures Division of NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology. The Division's space research and development budget is given. Further information is given on space materials and structures, space environmental effects, radiation effects, high temperature materials research, metal matrix composites, SiC fiber reinforced titanium alloys, structural dynamics, and control of flexible structures.

  9. Novel silica surface charge density mediated control of the optical properties of embedded optically active materials and its application for fiber optic pH sensing at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Congjun; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; Su, Xin; Keller, Murphy; Brown, Thomas D.; Baltrus, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Silica and silica incorporated nanocomposite materials have been extensively studied for a wide range of applications. Here we demonstrate an intriguing optical effect of silica that, depending on the solution pH, amplifies or attenuates the optical absorption of a variety of embedded optically active materials with very distinct properties, such as plasmonic Au nanoparticles, non-plasmonic Pt nanoparticles, and the organic dye rhodamine B (not a pH indicator), coated on an optical fiber. Interestingly, the observed optical response to varying pH appears to follow the surface charge density of the silica matrix for all the three different optically active materials. To the best of our knowledge, this optical effect has not been previously reported and it appears universal in that it is likely that any optically active material can be incorporated into the silica matrix to respond to solution pH or surface charge density variations. A direct application of this effect is for optical pH sensing which has very attractive features that can enable minimally invasive, remote, real time and continuous distributed pH monitoring. Particularly, as demonstrated here, using highly stable metal nanoparticles embedded in an inorganic silica matrix can significantly improve the capability of pH sensing in extremely harsh environments which is of increasing importance for applications in unconventional oil and gas resource recovery, carbon sequestration, water quality monitoring, etc. Our approach opens a pathway towards possible future development of robust optical pH sensors for the most demanding environmental conditions. The newly discovered optical effect of silica also offers the potential for control of the optical properties of optically active materials for a range of other potential applications such as electrochromic devices.Silica and silica incorporated nanocomposite materials have been extensively studied for a wide range of applications. Here we demonstrate an

  10. Novel silica surface charge density mediated control of the optical properties of embedded optically active materials and its application for fiber optic pH sensing at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congjun; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Su, Xin; Keller, Murphy; Brown, Thomas D; Baltrus, John P

    2015-02-14

    Silica and silica incorporated nanocomposite materials have been extensively studied for a wide range of applications. Here we demonstrate an intriguing optical effect of silica that, depending on the solution pH, amplifies or attenuates the optical absorption of a variety of embedded optically active materials with very distinct properties, such as plasmonic Au nanoparticles, non-plasmonic Pt nanoparticles, and the organic dye rhodamine B (not a pH indicator), coated on an optical fiber. Interestingly, the observed optical response to varying pH appears to follow the surface charge density of the silica matrix for all the three different optically active materials. To the best of our knowledge, this optical effect has not been previously reported and it appears universal in that it is likely that any optically active material can be incorporated into the silica matrix to respond to solution pH or surface charge density variations. A direct application of this effect is for optical pH sensing which has very attractive features that can enable minimally invasive, remote, real time and continuous distributed pH monitoring. Particularly, as demonstrated here, using highly stable metal nanoparticles embedded in an inorganic silica matrix can significantly improve the capability of pH sensing in extremely harsh environments which is of increasing importance for applications in unconventional oil and gas resource recovery, carbon sequestration, water quality monitoring, etc. Our approach opens a pathway towards possible future development of robust optical pH sensors for the most demanding environmental conditions. The newly discovered optical effect of silica also offers the potential for control of the optical properties of optically active materials for a range of other potential applications such as electrochromic devices. PMID:25572664

  11. Gas Generation Testing of Neptunium Oxide at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, JM

    2004-01-30

    Elevated temperature gas generation tests have been conducted using neptunium dioxide produced on a laboratory scale using the HB-Line Phase II flowsheet. These tests were performed to determine what effect elevated temperatures would have on the neptunium dioxide in comparison to neptunium dioxide tested at ambient temperature. The headspace gas compositions following storage at elevated temperatures associated with normal conditions of transport (NCT) have been measured. These test results show an increase in hydrogen generation rate at elevated temperature and significant removal of oxygen from the headspace gas. The elevated temperature gas generation tests described in this report involved heating small test vessels containing neptunium dioxide and measuring the headspace gas pressure and composition at the end of the test period. Four samples were used in these tests to evaluate the impact of process variables on the gas generation rate. Two samples were calcined to 600 degrees Celsius and two were calcined to 650 degrees Celsius. Each test vessel contained approximately 9.5 g of neptunium dioxide. Following exposure to 75 per cent relative humidity (RH) for five days, these samples were loaded in air and then heated to between 105 and 115 degrees Celsius for about one month. At the conclusion of the test period, the headspace gas of each container was analyzed using a micro-gas chromatograph installed in the glovebox where the experiments were conducted. The pressure, volume, and composition data for the headspace gas samples were used to calculate average H2 generation rates.

  12. Failure mechanisms of notched laminated composites under compressive loading at room and elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jung Hyun

    1999-10-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of failure of composite structures and developing mechanism based failure criteria are important considerations in designing structures made of composite materials. The compressive response of composite materials and structures has received considerable attention due to their significance in the aerospace industry and the complexity associated with compressive failure. Several competing failure mechanisms such as fiber instability, fiber/matrix interfacial failure, fiber microbuckling/kinking, delamination initiation and delamination buckling may become active in compressive loading. Environmental effect such as an elevated temperature can alter and affect these failure mechanisms. In this thesis, a micromechanics based finite element predictive model for notched strength of multidirectional laminates is presented. The in-situ shear response of the matrix, the fiber mechanical properties, the lay-up (stacking sequence) and fiber volume fraction serve as input to the model. The prediction of the model is found to match favorably with experimental data. The effect of ply angle and its influence on the failure mechanism are quantified and compared with a set of available experimental data. The present work is the first development of a non-empirical mechanics based failure prediction methodology for notched compressive strength of composite laminates. Both an experimental and an analytical study are presented herein.

  13. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  14. Lightweight Materials & Structures

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Lightweight Materials and Structures (LMS) project will mature high-payoff structures and materials technologies that have direct application to NASA’s future space exploration needs.One of the...

  15. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  16. Elevated Temperature Compressive Properties of Zr-Modified Nial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Noebe, R. D.

    1996-01-01

    Small Zr additions are known to substantially affect the deformation behavior and strength of polycrystalline NiAl, yet little information is currently available regarding the high-temperature properties of such alloys. Utilizing prealloyed powder technology, a series of four NiAl alloys have been produced containing from 0.05 to 0.7 at. pct Zr. The creep behavior of these alloys was characterized in compression between 1000 and 1400 K at strain rates ranging from approx. O.1 to 10(exp -9)/ sec. All the Zr-modified alloys were significantly stronger than binary NiAl under lower temperature and faster strain-rate conditions; however, the single-phase materials (Zr less than or equal to 0.1 at. pct) and binary NiAl had similar strengths at high temperatures and slow strain rates. The two-phase NiAl-Ni, AlZr alloys containing 0.3 and 0.7 at. pct Zr had nearly identical strengths. While the two-phase alloys were stronger than the single-phase materials at all test conditions, the degree of microstructural damage in the two-phase alloys due to internal oxidation during testing appeared to increase with Zr level. Balancing the poor oxidation behavior with the consistent strength advantage of the two-phase alloys, it is concluded that optimum elevated-temperature properties could be obtained in Heusler-strengthened NiAl containing between 0.1 and 0.3 at. pct Zr.

  17. An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Mo oxidation in Pb at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shanshan; Olive, Daniel; Terry, Jeff; Segre, Carlo U.

    2009-06-30

    The corrosion of fuel cladding and structural materials by lead and lead-bismuth eutectic in the liquid state at elevated temperatures is an issue that must be considered when designing advanced nuclear systems and high-power spallation neutron targets. In this work, lead corrosion studies of molybdenum were performed to investigate the interaction layer as a function of temperature by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In situ X-ray absorption measurements on a Mo substrate with a 3-6 {micro}m layer of Pb deposited by thermal evaporation were performed at temperatures up to 900 C and at a 15{sup o} angle to the incident X-rays. The changes in the local atomic structure of the corrosion layer are visible in the difference extended X-ray absorption fine structure and the linear combination fitting of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure to as-deposited molybdenum sample and molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub 2} and MoO{sub 3}) standards. The data are consistent with the appearance of MoO{sub 3} in an intermediate temperature range (650-800 C) and the more stable MoO{sub 2} phase dominating at high and low temperatures.

  18. Characterization of interphase environmental degradation at elevated temperature of fiber-reinforced TMCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matikas, Theodore E.

    2009-03-01

    Fiber reinforced metallic composite materials are being considered for a number of applications because of their attractive mechanical properties as compared to monolithic metallic alloys. An engineered interphase, including the bond strength between the composite's constituents, contributes to a large extent to the improvement of strength and stiffness properties of this class of materials. However, in high temperature applications, where combination of cyclic loading with environmental effects is expected, consideration should be given to interphase degradation, especially in the vicinity of stress risers, such as notches and holes. The applicability of damage tolerance analysis in structural components made of titanium matrix composite materials designed to operate under high temperature environments would depend on the availability of adequate characterization methods for the evaluation of interfacial degradation. The objective of this work is to provide a basic understanding of interfacial degradation mechanisms due to oxidation in environmentally exposed titanium-based composites subjected to cyclic stresses. A nondestructive method has been developed enabling highresolution monitoring of interfacial damage initiation and accumulation as well as surface/subsurface cracking behavior during interrupted fatigue tests. This nondestructive technique is based on surface acoustic wave propagation in the composites and can detect minute changes in elastic properties of the interfacial region due to elevated temperatures as well as oxygen effects.

  19. Effect of curing conditions on the dimensional and thermal stability of calcium phosphate cement for elevated temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Blom, Johan; Rahier, Hubert; Wastiels, Jan

    2014-12-15

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are attractive materials for elevated temperature applications, like moulds to process thermoplastics up to 300 °C. The CPC resulting from the reaction of wollastonite with phosphoric acid cured at room temperature however contains hydrated phases like brushite, and is thus not stable when exposed to temperatures above 200 °C. A non-contact method based on digital image correlation demonstrated that isothermal curing at 60 °C reduces the thermal shrinkage up to 300 °C by 25%. This curing method results in the direct formation of the more stable monetite in a shorter curing time. The correlated results of TGA, pH of the filtration water, and DSC analysis on partially cured material indicate this. XRD diffractograms and SEM images in combination with EDX show the evolution of the transformation of wollastonite into monetite, and the structure and morphology of the formed material.

  20. Elevated temperature creep properties for selected active metal braze alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    Active metal braze alloys reduce the number of processes required for the joining of metal to ceramic components by eliminating the need for metallization and/or Ni plating of the ceramic surfaces. Titanium (Ti), V, and Zr are examples of active element additions which have been used successfully in such braze alloys. Since the braze alloy is expected to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch strains between the metal and ceramic materials, a knowledge of its elevated temperature mechanical properties is important. In particular, the issue of whether or not the creep strength of an active metal braze alloy is increased or decreased relative to its non-activated counterpart is important when designing new brazing processes and alloy systems. This paper presents a survey of high temperature mechanical properties for two pairs of conventional braze alloys and their active metal counterparts: (a) the conventional 72Ag-28Cu (Cusil) alloy, and the active braze alloy 62.2Ag- 36.2Cu-1.6Ti (Cusil ABA), and (b) the 82Au-18Ni (Nioro) alloy and the active braze alloy Mu-15.5M-0.75Mo-1.75V (Nioro ABA). For the case of the Cusil/Cusil ABA pair, the active metal addition contributes to solid solution strengthening of the braze alloy, resulting in a higher creep strength as compared to the non-active alloy. In the case of the Nioro/Nioro ABA pair, the Mo and V additions cause the active braze alloy to have a two-phase microstructure, which results in a reduced creep strength than the conventional braze alloy. The Garofalo sinh equation has been used to quantitatively describe the stress and temperature dependence of the deformation behavior. It will be observed that the effective stress exponent in the Garofalo sinh equation is a function of the instantaneous value of the stress argument.

  1. Materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, Theodore T.; Langenbeck, Sharon L.; Al-Jamily, Ghanim; Arnold, Joe; Barbee, Troy; Coulter, Dan; Dolgin, Ben; Fichter, Buck; George, Patricia; Gorenstein, Paul

    1992-01-01

    Materials and structures technology covers a wide range of technical areas. Some of the most pertinent issues for the Astrotech 21 missions include dimensionally stable structural materials, advanced composites, dielectric coatings, optical metallic coatings for low scattered light applications, low scattered light surfaces, deployable and inflatable structures (including optical), support structures in 0-g and 1-g environments, cryogenic optics, optical blacks, contamination hardened surfaces, radiation hardened glasses and crystals, mono-metallic telescopes and instruments, and materials characterization. Some specific examples include low coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) structures (0.01 ppm/K), lightweight thermally stable mirror materials, thermally stable optical assemblies, high reliability/accuracy (1 micron) deployable structures, and characterization of nanometer level behavior of materials/structures for interferometry concepts. Large filled-aperture concepts will require materials with CTE's of 10(exp 9) at 80 K, anti-contamination coatings, deployable and erectable structures, composite materials with CTE's less than 0.01 ppm/K and thermal hysteresis, 0.001 ppm/K. Gravitational detection systems such as LAGOS will require rigid/deployable structures, dimensionally stable components, lightweight materials with low conductivity, and high stability optics. The Materials and Structures panel addressed these issues and the relevance of the Astrotech 21 mission requirements by dividing materials and structures technology into five categories. These categories, the necessary development, and applicable mission/program development phasing are summarized. For each of these areas, technology assessments were made and development plans were defined.

  2. Hot deformation behaviour of alloys for applications at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyzelle, Benoit

    The present study investigated the deformation behaviour, microstructure evolution and fracture behaviour under hot working conditions of alloys designed for elevated-temperature applications. For this purpose, iron-aluminum and titanium-aluminum alloys were selected and their compositions are: Fe-8.5wt%Al-5.5Cr-2.0Mo-0.2Zr-0.03C, Fe-16.5Al-5.5Cr-1.0Nb-0.05C and Ti-33.3Al-2.8Mn-4.8Nb. These alloys were tested in the as-cast condition and in the form of hot-rolled + annealed plate for the iron-aluminum alloys and in the HIP'ed condition for the titanium-aluminum alloy. Isothermal compression tests were carried out with a Gleeble 2000 over a range of temperatures from 800 to 1250°C and constant strain rates from 10-3 to 10 s-1. In general, the flow curves are marked by a peak stress and softening which decline as temperature rises, and a flow stress which diminishes with rise in temperature and decrease in strain rate. The flow behaviour at peak stress (sigmap) and 0.5 true strain of these materials was described well by the Zener-Hollomon parameter Z=3˙exp /RTQHW , where Z=K3sinha sn . A numerical curve-fitting method was used to yield values of the following parameters: (i) stress exponent, n and (ii) activation energy, QHW . The dynamic material modeling approach was performed to extract from hot compression data: (i) the strain rate sensitivity parameter, m, (ii) the efficiency of power dissipation, eta, and (iii) the instability parameter, xi. The microstructure evolution and fracture behaviour were assessed using optical and electron microscopy. The deformation processes occuring were determined by correlation of the sigma-epsilon curves, m and microstructural observations. The resulting deformation map indicates that at lower temperatures and higher strain rates, the dominant restoration occurs by dynamic recovery, while at lower strain rates and higher temperatures dynamic recrystallization is the operative mode. At the highest temperatures, dynamic

  3. DOES CRITICAL MASS DECREASE AS TEMPERATURE INCREASES: A REVIEW OF FIVE BENCHMARK EXPERIMENTS THAT SPAN A RANGE OF ELEVATED TEMPERATURES AND CRITICAL CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, K.

    2009-06-10

    conditions examined, modeling of the systems at room temperature is conservative as compared to modeling the systems at elevated temperatures, it is possible to design a system in which the critical mass at room temperature is non-conservative compared to a system at elevated temperatures. As the temperature of the systems evaluated in this review was increased, the system's overall {alpha}{sub T} was negative at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, the review demonstrates that to accurate asses the effect of increased temperature on a system's k{sub eff}, changes in fissile, moderator, cladding, and, in some cases, structural material cross sections must be combined with other factors that influence reactivity, such as volumetric thermal expansion of fissile, moderating, reflector, and other interacting media. Altering the microscopic cross sections of fissile and moderating regions for temperature changes, without adjusting the corresponding densities at elevated temperatures can lead to an incorrect assessment of the impact of elevated temperature on a fissile system.

  4. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    Various topics relating to composite structural materials for use in aircraft structures are discussed. The mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers, carbon fiber-epoxy interface bonds, composite fractures, residual stress in high modulus and high strength carbon fibers, fatigue in composite materials, and the mechanical properties of polymeric matrix composite laminates are among the topics discussed.

  5. Upsettability and forming limit of magnesium alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Heung Sik; Kim, Si Pom; Park, Young Chul; Park, Joon Hong; Baek, Seung Gul

    2012-11-01

    In recent years, Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have become a center of special interest in the automotive industry. Due to their high specific mechanical properties, they offer a significant weight saving potential in modern vehicle constructions. Most Mg alloys show very good machinability and processability, and even the most complicated die casting parts can be easily produced. In this study, Microstructure, Vickers hardness and tensile tests were examined and performed for each specimen to verify effects of forming conditions. Also to verify upsettability and forming limit of the specimen at room temperature and elevated temperature, upsetting experiments were performed. For comparison, experiments at elevated temperature were performed for various Mg alloy, such as AZ31, AZ91, and AM50. The experimental results were compared with those of CAE analysis to propose forming limit of Magnesium alloys.

  6. Mechanical properties of polyimide coated optical fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Dyer, Robert S.; Lago, Ralph J.; Stolov, Andrei A.; Li, Jie

    2016-03-01

    High temperature mechanical strength and reliability of optical fibers have become important subjects as optical fibers are increasingly used for harsher environments. Theories and models of fiber mechanical properties established for traditional telecommunications applications may need to be validated for applications at elevated temperatures. In this paper, we describe the test setup for high temperature tensile strength of fiber and report initial results of dynamic tensile strength of polyimide coated optical fiber at 300 and 350ºC for different heating time intervals. The results are compared with room temperature strength data, data available in the literature, and our earlier work on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) weight loss of the polyimide coating and the observations on surface morphology at elevated temperatures. Interesting observations are discussed and possible explanations are proposed.

  7. Composite coatings for elevated temperature erosion-corrosion protection in fossil-fueled boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Verstak, A.; Wang, B.; Baranovski, V.; Beliaev, A.

    1998-12-31

    Fluidized bed combustors components suffer severe erosion, frequently accomplished by corrosive gases attack at elevated temperatures. The tubes damage rate depends on the boiler design bed constituents and combustion parameters, however an accelerated metal wastage is usually found in the same specific areas of different boilers. New HVOF sprayed coatings are developed for the tube erosion-corrosion protection, based on Cr{sub 2}C{sub 2}/Ni-Cr, Cr-Ti-C/Ni-Cr-Mo, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiAl composite materials. The combustion arc Fe-Cr-C coatings were found as an economical solution for relatively low erosion rate zones. The coatings properties and behavior under simulated elevated temperature erosion conditions and in the operating boilers are discussed.

  8. Modal Acoustic Emission of Damage Accumulation in Woven SiC/SiC at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, G. N.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites exhibit significant nonlinear stress-strain behavior that makes them attractive as potential materials for many high temperature applications. The mechanisms for this nonlinear stress-strain behavior are all associated with various types of damage in the composites, e.g. transverse matrix cracks and individual fiber failures. Modal acoustic emission has been employed to aid in discerning the damage accumulation that occurs during elevated temperature tensile stress-rupture of woven Hi-Nicalon fiber, BN interphase, SiC matrix composites. It is shown that modal acoustic emission is an effective monitor of the relative damage accumulation in the composites and locator of the damage and failure events as a function of strain (stress), time at temperature, and temperature gradients along the length of the elevated temperature test specimen.

  9. Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application

    DOEpatents

    Chan, Kwai S.; Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry; Liang, Wuwei

    2012-07-31

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

  10. Diffusive Gas Loss from Silica Glass Ampoules at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in the pressure of hydrogen, helium and neon due to diffusion through the wall of silica crystal growth ampoules at elevated temperatures were determined experimentally. We show that, while both He- and Ne-losses closely follow conventional model of diffusive gas permeation through the wall, hydrogen losses, in particular at low fill pressures, can be much larger. This is interpreted in terms of the high solubility of hydrogen in silica glasses.

  11. Intrinsic relationship between electronic structures and phase transition of SrBi{sub 2−x}Nd{sub x}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} ceramics from ultraviolet ellipsometry at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Z. H.; Jiang, K.; Xu, L. P.; Li, Y. W.; Hu, Z. G. Chu, J. H.

    2014-02-07

    The ferroelectric orthorhombic to paraelectric tetragonal phase transition of SrBi{sub 2−x}Nd{sub x}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} (x = 0, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2) layer-structured ceramics has been investigated by temperature-dependent spectroscopic ellipsometry. Based on the analysis of dielectric functions from 0 to 500 °C with double Tauc-Lorentz dispersion model, the interband transitions located at ultraviolet region have shown an abrupt variation near the Curie temperature. The changes of dielectric functions are mainly due to the thermal-optical and/or photoelastic effect. Moreover, the characteristic alteration in interband transitions can be ascribed to distortion of NbO{sub 6} octahedron and variation of hybridization between Bi 6s and O 2p states during the structure transformation.

  12. Elevated-temperature fracture resistances of monolithic and composite ceramics using chevron-notched bend tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Asish; Jenkins, Michael G.; Ferber, Mattison K.; Peussa, Jouko; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1992-01-01

    The quasi-static fracture behaviors of monolithic ceramics (SiC, Si3N4, MgAl2O4), self-reinforced monoliths (acicular grained Si3N4, acicular grained mullite), and ceramic matrix composites (SiC whisker/Al2O3 matrix, TiB2 particulate/SiC matrix, SiC fiber/CVI SiC matrix, Al2O3 fiber/CVI SiC matrix) were measured over the temperature range of 20 to 1400 C. The chevron notched, bend bar test geometry was essential for characterizing the elevated temperature fracture resistances of this wide range of quasi-brittle materials during stable crack growth. Fractography revealed the differences in the fracture behavior of the different materials at the various temperatures. The fracture resistances of the self-reinforced monoliths were comparable to those of the composites and the fracture mechanisms were found to be similar at room temperature. However at elevated temperatures the differences of the fracture behavior became apparent where the superior fracture resistance of the self-reinforced monoliths were attributed to the minor amounts of glassy, intergranular phases which were often more abundant in the composites and affected the fracture behavior when softened by elevated temperatures.

  13. Kinetics of HMX and Phase Transitions: Effects of Grain Size at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Saw, C K

    2002-06-13

    To date a global kinetic rate law has not been written to accurately describe solid-solid phase transformations of HMX and TATB where contributions from grain size effects, binder contents, and impurity levels are explicitly defined. Our recent work presented at the 2001 SCCM topical APS meeting, Atlanta, GA, demonstrated one can not confidently use the second harmonic generation (SHG) diagnostic to study energetic material phase transitions where non-uniform grain size distributions are present. For example, in HMX, the early arrival of SHG before the XRD in the SHG/XRD simultaneous high temperature experiment clearly indicates the partial molecular conversion from centrosymmetric to non-centrosymmetric without any structural changes as exhibit by the XRD pattern. This conversion is attributed to the changes of the surface molecules due to the differences in potential between the surface and the bulk. The present paper reports on accurate XRD measurements following changes of {beta}-HMX to {delta}-HMX at elevated temperature. The results are compared for sample with 2 different grain sizes for HMX. We report accurate temperature dependent lattice parameters and hence volume and linear thermal expansion coefficients along each crystallographic axis. We have also conducted kinetic studies of the behavior of 2 grain-sizes of HMX and concluded that their kinetics, are drastically different.

  14. Composite structural materials. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of filamentary composite materials in the design and construction of primary aircraft structures is considered with emphasis on efforts to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, and reliability and life prediction. The redesign of a main spar/rib region on the Boeing 727 elevator near its actuator attachment point is discussed. A composite fabrication and test facility is described as well as the use of minicomputers for computer aided design. Other topics covered include (1) advanced structural analysis methids for composites; (2) ultrasonic nondestructive testing of composite structures; (3) optimum combination of hardeners in the cure of epoxy; (4) fatigue in composite materials; (5) resin matrix characterization and properties; (6) postbuckling analysis of curved laminate composite panels; and (7) acoustic emission testing of composite tensile specimens.

  15. Comparative performance of geopolymers made with metakaolin and fly ash after exposure to elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Daniel L.Y.; Sanjayan, Jay G. Sagoe-Crentsil, Kwesi

    2007-12-15

    This paper presents the results of a study on the effect of elevated temperatures on geopolymers manufactured using metakaolin and fly ash of various mixture proportions. Both types of geopolymers (metakaolin and fly ash) were synthesized with sodium silicate and potassium hydroxide solutions. The strength of the fly ash-based geopolymer increased after exposure to elevated temperatures (800 deg. C). However, the strength of the corresponding metakaolin-based geopolymer decreased after similar exposure. Both types of geopolymers were subjected to thermogravimetric, scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry tests. The paper concludes that the fly ash-based geopolymers have large numbers of small pores which facilitate the escape of moisture when heated, thus causing minimal damage to the geopolymer matrix. On the other hand, metakaolin geopolymers do not possess such pore distribution structures. The strength increase in fly ash geopolymers is also partly attributed to the sintering reactions of un-reacted fly ash particles.

  16. Performance of MOV Stem Lubricants at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, Kevin George; Nitzel, Michael Everett; Watkins, John Clifford

    2001-07-01

    This paper documents the results of recent tests sponsored by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and performed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These tests address the effectiveness of the lubricant used on the threaded portion of the valve stem, where the stem nut turns on the stem. Recent testing indicates that an elevated temperature environment can lead to significant increases in the friction coefficient at the stem/stem-nut interface. Most valve actuator qualification tests are performed at room temperature. Similarly, in-service tests are run at ambient plant temperatures, usually 70 to 100°F. Since design conditions can lead to valve operating temperatures in the 200 to 300°F range, it is important to know whether a temperature-induced increase in friction at the stem/stem-nut interface will prevent the required operation of critical valves. Lubricant aging is another phenomenon that might have deleterious effects on the thrust output of a valve actuator. Laboratory experience and field experience both indicate that after long periods in elevated temperature environments, the lubricants may lose their lubrication qualities. The scope of the current test program includes testing of five different lubricants on four different valve stems. Pending completion of the testing, results of the tests conducted using two of the four stems are discussed. The test series included collection of baseline data at room temperature, single step temperature tests where the temperature of the test setup was elevated directly to 250°F, and step testing where the temperature was elevated in steps to 130, 190, and 250°F, then returned to 70°F. All greases tested showed evidence of physical change after elevated temperature tests. Except for one particular lubricant, all of the greases tested showed increased coefficients of friction at elevated temperatures. Numerous other preliminary conclusions are presented

  17. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    Overall emphasis is on basic long-term research in the following categories: constituent materials, composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology; and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Research in basic composition, characteristics, and processing science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to present and future problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of this comprehensive program are presented.

  18. Electrospun melamine resin-based multifunctional nonwoven membrane for lithium ion batteries at the elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingfu; Yu, Yong; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Jianjun; Liu, Zhihong; Cui, Guanglei

    2016-09-01

    A flame retardant and thermally dimensional stable membrane with high permeability and electrolyte wettability can overcome the safety issues of lithium ion batteries (LIBs) at elevated temperatures. In this work, a multifunctional thermoset nonwoven membrane composed of melamine formaldehyde resin (MFR) nano-fibers was prepared by a electro-spinning method. The resultant porous nonwoven membrane possesses superior permeability, electrolyte wettability and thermally dimensional stability. Using the electrospun MFR membrane, the LiFePO4/Li battery exhibits high safety and stable cycling performance at the elevated temperature of 120 °C. Most importantly, the MFR membrane contains lone pair electron in the nitrogen element, which can chelate with Mn2+ ions and suppress their transfer across the separator. Therefore, the LiMn2O4/graphite cells with the electrospun MFR multifunctional membranes reveal an improved cycle performance even at high temperature. This work demonstrated that electrospun MFR is a promising candidate material for high-safety separator of LIBs with stable cycling performance at elevated temperatures.

  19. Complexation of neptunium(V) with fluoride in aqueous solutions at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Friese, Judah I.

    2009-02-01

    Over the past several decades, the production and testing of nuclear weapons in the U.S. have created significant amounts of high-level nuclear wastes (HLW) that are currently stored in underground tanks across the U.S. DOE (Department of Energy) sites. Eventually, the HLW will be made into the waste form and disposed of in geological repositories for HLW. Among the radioactive materials, neptunium is of great concern in the post-closure chemical environment in the repository because of the long half-life of 237Np (2.14•106 years) and the high mobility of Np(V), the most stable oxidation state of neptunium. It is estimated that 237Np, together with 129I and 99Tc, will be the major contributors to the potential total annual dose from the repository beyond 10000 years [1]. Due to the high radiation energy released from the HLW, the postclosure repository is expected to remain at elevated temperatures for thousands of years [1]. If the waste package is breached and becomes in contact with groundwater, neptunium, as well as other radioactive materials will be in aqueous solutions at elevated temperatures. Interactions of radioactive materials with the chemical components in groundwater play an important role in determining their migration in the repository. To predict the migration behavior of neptunium, it is necessary to have sufficient and reliable thermodynamic data on its complexation with the ligands that are present in the groundwater of the repository (e.g., OH–, F–, SO42– ,PO43– and CO32) at elevated temperatures. However, such data are scarce and scattered for 25°C, and nearly nonexistent for elevated temperatures [2]. To provide reliable thermodynamic data, we have conducted investigations of the complexation of actinides, including thorium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium, at elevated temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, including formation constants, enthalpy and heat capacity of complexation are experimentally determined. This paper

  20. Mechanical Properties of T650-35/AFR-PE-4 at Elevated Temperatures for Lightweight Aeroshell Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Karen S.; Collins, TImothy J.

    2006-01-01

    Considerable efforts have been underway to develop multidisciplinary technologies for aeroshell structures that will significantly increase the allowable working temperature for the aeroshell components, and enable the system to operate at higher temperatures while sustaining performance and durability. As part of these efforts, high temperature polymer matrix composites and fabrication technologies are being developed for the primary load bearing structure (heat shield) of the spacecraft. New high-temperature resins and composite material manufacturing techniques are available that have the potential to significantly improve current aeroshell design. In order to qualify a polymer matrix composite (PMC) material as a candidate aeroshell structural material, its performance must be evaluated under realistic environments. Thus, verification testing of lightweight PMC's at aeroshell entry temperatures is needed to ensure that they will perform successfully in high-temperature environments. Towards this end, a test program was developed to characterize the mechanical properties of two candidate material systems, T650-35/AFR-PE-4 and T650-35/RP46. The two candidate high-temperature polyimide resins, AFR-PE-4 and RP46, were developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory and NASA Langley Research Center, respectively. This paper presents experimental methods, strength, and stiffness data of the T650-35/AFR-PE-4 material as a function of elevated temperatures. The properties determined during the research test program herein, included tensile strength, tensile stiffness, Poisson s ratio, compressive strength, compressive stiffness, shear modulus, and shear strength. Unidirectional laminates, a cross-ply laminate and two eight-harness satin (8HS)-weave laminates (4-ply and 10-ply) were tested according to ASTM standard methods at room and elevated temperatures (23, 316, and 343 C). All of the relevant test methods and data reduction schemes are outlined along with

  1. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the RPI composites program is to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability and life prediction. Concommitant goals are to educate engineers to design and use composite materials as normal or conventional materials. A multifaceted program was instituted to achieve these objectives.

  2. The Thermal Expansion, Elastic and Fracture Properties of Porous Cordierite at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Pandey, Amit; Watkins, Thomas R; More, Karren

    2012-01-01

    The properties that determine the thermal shock resistance in materials are reported for porous cordierite, a leading candidate material for the fabrication of diesel particulate filters. Fracture toughness and slow crack growth tests were performed on test specimens obtained from the walls of diesel particulate filter monolithic substrates using the double-torsion test method at temperatures between 20 C and 900 C. The thermal expansion and elastic properties were characterized between 20 C and 1000 C. The role of the microstructure of porous cordierite in determining its unusual thermal expansion and elevated temperature Young's modulus and fracture toughness are discussed.

  3. Technology for Elevated Temperature Tests of Structural Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.

    1999-01-01

    A technique for full-field measurement of surface temperature and in-plane strain using a single grid imaging technique was demonstrated on a sample subjected to thermally-induced strain. The technique is based on digital imaging of a sample marked by an alternating line array of La2O2S:Eu(+3) thermographic phosphor and chromium illuminated by a UV lamp. Digital images of this array in unstrained and strained states were processed using a modified spin filter. Normal strain distribution was determined by combining unstrained and strained grid images using a single grid digital moire technique. Temperature distribution was determined by ratioing images of phosphor intensity at two wavelengths. Combined strain and temperature measurements demonstrated on the thermally heated sample were DELTA-epsilon = +/- 250 microepsilon and DELTA-T = +/- 5 K respectively with a spatial resolution of 0.8 mm.

  4. Elevated temperature alters carbon cycling in a model microbial community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosier, A.; Li, Z.; Thomas, B. C.; Hettich, R. L.; Pan, C.; Banfield, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Earth's climate is regulated by biogeochemical carbon exchanges between the land, oceans and atmosphere that are chiefly driven by microorganisms. Microbial communities are therefore indispensible to the study of carbon cycling and its impacts on the global climate system. In spite of the critical role of microbial communities in carbon cycling processes, microbial activity is currently minimally represented or altogether absent from most Earth System Models. Method development and hypothesis-driven experimentation on tractable model ecosystems of reduced complexity, as presented here, are essential for building molecularly resolved, benchmarked carbon-climate models. Here, we use chemoautotropic acid mine drainage biofilms as a model community to determine how elevated temperature, a key parameter of global climate change, regulates the flow of carbon through microbial-based ecosystems. This study represents the first community proteomics analysis using tandem mass tags (TMT), which enable accurate, precise, and reproducible quantification of proteins. We compare protein expression levels of biofilms growing over a narrow temperature range expected to occur with predicted climate changes. We show that elevated temperature leads to up-regulation of proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and protein modification, and down-regulation of proteins involved in growth and reproduction. Closely related bacterial genotypes differ in their response to temperature: Elevated temperature represses carbon fixation by two Leptospirillum genotypes, whereas carbon fixation is significantly up-regulated at higher temperature by a third closely related genotypic group. Leptospirillum group III bacteria are more susceptible to viral stress at elevated temperature, which may lead to greater carbon turnover in the microbial food web through the release of viral lysate. Overall, this proteogenomics approach revealed the effects of climate change on carbon cycling pathways and other

  5. Grain boundary oxidation and fatigue crack growth at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.; Oshida, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth rate at elevated temperatures can be accelerated by grain boundary oxidation. Grain boundary oxidation kinetics and the statistical distribution of grain boundary oxide penetration depth were studied. At a constant delta K-level and at a constant test temperature, fatigue crack growth rate, da/dN, is a function of cyclic frequency, nu. A fatigue crack growth model of intermittent micro-ruptures of grain boundary oxide is constructed. The model is consistent with the experimental observations that, in the low frequency region, da/dN is inversely proportional to nu, and fatigue crack growth is intergranular.

  6. The elevated temperature behavior of particle reinforced Al matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    The elevated temperature modulus, strength and creep of SiC particle reinforced composites produced by the DURALCAN{trademark} are discussed. It is shown that the reinforcing particles provide an increased modulus over the complete temperature range studied, and the temperature dependence of the composite modulus is controlled by the temperature dependence of the matrix modulus. The composite strength decreases with increasing temperature, reflecting softening of the matrix due to over aging, and as a result, is dependent on the thermal stability of the matrix. The particles provide increased creep resistance, and there are differences between the creep of melt processed composites and those produced by powder metallurgy.

  7. Light thermal structures and materials for high speed flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.

    1992-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, unified viscoplastic constitutive models have evolved to meet this need. These constitutive models provide a means for representing a material's response from the elastic through the plastic range including strain-rate dependent plastic flow, creep, and stress relaxation. Rate-dependent plasticity effects are known to be important at elevated temperatures. The purpose of this paper is to describe computational and experimental research programs underway at the Light Thermal Structures Center focused on the investigation of the response of structures and materials to local heating. In the first part of the paper, finite element thermoviscoplastic analysis is highlighted. In the second part of the paper, the thermal-structures experimental program is outlined.

  8. Description of a system for interlocking elevated temperature mechanical tests

    SciTech Connect

    Schmale, D.T.; Poulter, G.A.

    1995-07-01

    Long term mechanical creep and fatigue testing at elevated temperatures requires reliable systems with safeguards to prevent destruction of equipment, loss of data and negative environmental impacts. Toward this goal, a computer controlled system has been developed and built for interlocking tests run on elevated temperature mechanical test facilities. Sensors for water flow, water pressure, water leakage, temperature, power and hydraulic status are monitored to control specimen heating equipment through solid state relays and water solenoid valves. The system is designed to work with the default interlocks present in the RF generators and mechanical tests systems. Digital hardware consists of two National Instruments 1/0 boards mounted in a Macintosh IIci computer. Software is written in National Instruments LabVIEW. Systems interlocked include two MTS closed loop servo controlled hydraulic test frames, one with an RF generator and one with both an RF generator and a quartz lamp furnace. Control for individual test systems is modularized making the addition of more systems simple. If any of the supporting utilities fail during tests, heating systems, chill water and hydraulics are powered down, minimizing specimen damage and eliminating equipment damage. The interlock control is powered by an uninterruptible power supply. Upon failure the cause is documented in an ASCII file.

  9. Oxidative stress causes coral bleaching during exposure to elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesser, M. P.

    1997-07-01

    Elevated temperatures and solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation have been implicated as recent causes for the loss of symbiotic algae (i.e., bleaching) in corals and other invertebrates with photoautotrophic symbionts. One hypothesized mechanism of coral bleaching involves the production of reduced oxygen intermediates, or toxic oxygen, in the dinoflagellate symbionts and host tissues that subsequently causes cellular damage and expulsion of symbionts. Measurements of photosynthesis in the Caribbean coral Agaricia tenuifolia, taken during temperature-induced stress and exposure to full solar radiation, showed a decrease in photosynthetic performance followed by bleaching. Exposure of corals to exogenous antioxidants that scavenge reactive oxygen species during temperature-induced stress improves maximum photosynthetic capacity to rates indistinguishable from corals measured at the ambient temperature of their site of collection. Additionally, these antioxidants prevent the coral from " bleaching " and affect the mechanism of symbiont loss from the coral host. These observations confirm a role for oxidative stress, whether caused by elevated temperatures or exposure to UV radiation, in the bleaching phenomenon.

  10. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of filamentary composite materials, whose development may be considered as entering its second generation, continues to generate intense interest and applications activity. Fiber reinforced composite materials offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been achieved since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. Rather limited applications to primary aircraft structure have been made, however, mainly in a material-substitution mode on military aircraft, except for a few experiments currently underway on large passenger airplanes in commercial operation. To fulfill the promise of composite materials completely requires a strong technology base. NASA and AFOSR recognize the present state of the art to be such that to fully exploit composites in sophisticated aerospace structures, the technology base must be improved. This, in turn, calls for expanding fundamental knowledge and the means by which it can be successfully applied in design and manufacture.

  11. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported in studies of constituent materials composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology, and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Topics discussed include: mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; fatigue in composite materials; experimental and theoretical studies of moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates and neat resins; numerical investigations of the micromechanics of composite fracture; delamination failures of composite laminates; effect of notch size on composite laminates; improved beam theory for anisotropic materials; variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; numerical analysis composite processing; heat treatment of metal matrix composites, and the RP-1 and RP2 gliders of the sailplane project.

  12. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    A multifaceted program is described in which aeronautical, mechanical, and materials engineers interact to develop composite aircraft structures. Topics covered include: (1) the design of an advanced composite elevator and a proposed spar and rib assembly; (2) optimizing fiber orientation in the vicinity of heavily loaded joints; (3) failure mechanisms and delamination; (4) the construction of an ultralight sailplane; (5) computer-aided design; finite element analysis programs, preprocessor development, and array preprocessor for SPAR; (6) advanced analysis methods for composite structures; (7) ultrasonic nondestructive testing; (8) physical properties of epoxy resins and composites; (9) fatigue in composite materials, and (10) transverse thermal expansion of carbon/epoxy composites.

  13. Composite Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    The development and application of filamentary composite materials, is considered. Such interest is based on the possibility of using relatively brittle materials with high modulus, high strength, but low density in composites with good durability and high tolerance to damage. Fiber reinforced composite materials of this kind offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been made since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. There were only limited applied to the primary structure of operational vehicles, mainly as aircrafts.

  14. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Research in the basic composition, characteristics, and processng science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of his program are presented.

  15. Materials and structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorelli, R. A.; Glasgow, T. K.; Halford, G. R.; Levine, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    Materials and structures performance limitations, particularly for the hot section of the engine in which these limitations limit the life of components, are considered. Failure modes for components such as blades, vanes, and combustors and how they are affected by the environment for such components are discussed. Methods used to improve the materials used for such components are: (1) application of directional structures to turbine components for high strength at high temperatures; (2) improved coatings to increase oxidation and corrosion resistance; (3) increase strength and stiffness with reduced weight by applying higher specific properties of composite materials; and (4) cost effective processing such as near net shape powder methods applied to disks. Life prediction techniques developed to predict component life accurately in advance of service and progress in improving the intermediate and cold section components of turbine engines are covered.

  16. Tolerance of LSS plant component to elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Ushakova, S A; Tikhomirov, A A

    2002-06-01

    Stability of LSS based on biological regeneration of water, air and food subject to damaging factors is largely dependent on the behavior of the photosynthesizing component represented, mainly, by higher plants. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the tolerance of uneven-aged wheat and radish cenoses to temperature effects different in time and value. Estimation of thermal tolerance of plants demonstrated that exposure for 20 h to the temperature increasing to 45 degrees C brought about irreversible damage both in photosynthetic processes (up to 80% of initial value) and the processes of growth and development. Kinetics of visible photosynthesis during exposure to elevated temperatures can be used to evaluate critical exposure time within the range of which the damage of metabolic processes is reversible. With varying light intensity and air temperature it is possible to find a time period admissible for the plants to stay under adverse conditions without considerable damage of metabolic processes. PMID:12053940

  17. Complexation of Neptunium(V) with Fluoride at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin; Xia, Yuanxian; Friese, Judah I.

    2008-06-16

    Complexation of neptunium(V) with fluoride at elevated temperatures was studied by spectrophotometry and microcalorimetry. Two successive complexes, NpO{sub 2}F(aq) and NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}{sup -}, were identified by spectrophotometry in the temperature range of 10-70 C. Thermodynamic parameters, including the equilibrium constants and enthalpy of complexation between Np(V) and fluoride at 10-70 C were determined. Results show that the complexation of Np(V) with fluoride is endothermic and that the complexation is enhanced by the increase in temperature - a two-fold increase in the stability constants of NpO{sub 2}F(aq) and more than five-fold increase in the stability constants of NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}{sup -} as the temperature is increased from 10 to 70 C.

  18. Room Temperature and Elevated Temperature Composite Sandwich Joint Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Sandra P.

    1998-01-01

    Testing of composite sandwich joint elements has been completed to verify the strength capacity of joints designed to carry specified running loads representative of a high speed civil transport wing. Static tension testing at both room and an elevated temperature of 350 F and fatigue testing at room temperature were conducted to determine strength capacity, fatigue life, and failure modes. Static tension test results yielded failure loads above the design loads for the room temperature tests, confirming the ability of the joint concepts tested to carry their design loads. However, strength reductions as large as 30% were observed at the elevated test temperature, where all failure loads were below the room temperature design loads for the specific joint designs tested. Fatigue testing resulted in lower than predicted fatigue lives.

  19. EROSION OF ELEVATED TEMPERATURE CORROSION SCALES ON METALS

    SciTech Connect

    Maasberg, J.A.; Levy, A.V.

    1981-05-01

    Combined erosion-corrosion poses a considerable problem to the design of long lifetime metallic components in energy conversion systems. To gain some insight into this problem, scales were formed on stainless steel at elevated temperature and subsequently were eroded at room temperature to determine the nature of the erosion rates and the mechanism of scale removal. Thin corrosion scales were formed on 310 stainless steel and an experimental Fe-18Cr-5Al-1Hf alloy at high temperatures (9ooo and 980°C) in gas mixtures with various levels of oxygen and combined oxygen-sulfur. The corroded specimens were eroded at room temperature in an air-solid particle stream using 50{micro}m SiC at 60 ms{sup -1}. The conditions of the corrosive exposures, the rates of erosion of these scales and the microscopic appearance of the eroded surface were correlated to determine the mechanism of thin scale erosion.

  20. Elevated temperature fracture of RS/PM aluminum alloy 8009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porr, William C., Jr.; Yang, Leng; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    The fracture behavior of advanced powder metallurgy Al-Fe-V-Si alloy 8009 (previously called FVS0812) is being characterized under monotonic loads, as a function of temperature. Particular attention is focused on contributions to the fracture mechanism from the fine grained dispersoid strengthened microstructure, dissolved solute from rapid solidification, and the moist air environment. Time-dependent crack growth is characterized in advanced aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures with the fracture mechanics approach, and cracking mechanisms are examined with a metallurgical approach. Specific tasks were to obtain standard load crack growth experimental information from a refined testing system; to correlate crack growth kinetics with the j-integral and time dependent C(sub t)(t); and to investigate the intermediate temperature embrittlement of 8009 alloy in order to understand crack growth mechanisms.

  1. Thermodynamics of Neptunium (V) Complexes with Phosphate at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Y.; Friese, Judah I.; Bachelor, Paula P.; Moore, Dean A.; Rao, Linfeng

    2009-06-01

    Abstract – The complexation of Np(V) with phosphate at elevated temperatures was studied by a synergistic extraction method. A mixed buffer solution of TRIS and MES was used to maintain an appropriate pH value during the distribution experiments. The distribution ratio of Np(V) between the organic and aqueous phases was found to decrease as the concentrations of phosphate were increased. Stability constants of the 1:1 and 1:2 Np(V)-HPO42- complexes, dominant in the aqueous phase under the experimental conditions, were calculated from the effect of [HPO42-] on the distribution ratio. The thermodynamic parameters including enthalpy and entropy of complexation between Np(V) and HPO42- at 25o C – 55o C were calculated by the temperature coefficient method.

  2. Hydrologic property alterations due to elevated temperatures at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, A.L.; Nash, M.H.; Nash, M.S.

    1994-12-31

    Yucca Mountain is currently being evaluated as a potential site for a high level nuclear waste repository. The pre-emplacement hydrologic properties of the rock are important in determining the suitability of the site; however, post emplacement thermal loads and associated drying may permanently alter the character of the rock. A preliminary study was undertaken to determine the effects of elevated temperatures on hydrologic properties of the welded Topopah Spring member of the Paintbrush Tuff and a zeolitic, nonwelded tuff from the Tuffaceous Beds of Calico Hills. Rock outcrop samples were collected and dried in the laboratory at different temperatures (up to 400 degrees C). Hydrologic and physical properties -were tested before and after each of the drying cycles.

  3. Friction Properties of Molybdenum Alloyed Steel at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jianliang; Xiong Dangsheng; Wu Hongyan

    2011-01-17

    The high-temperature properties of steel surface can be improved by molybdenum surface alloying. Molybdenzing was carried out on carbon steel in the multi-function double glow plasma surface alloying furnace. The friction and wear tests were conducted on a high temperature ball-on-disk tribometer under the temperature of 25 deg. C{approx}600 deg. C. The contents of alloy element varied with alloyed layer were detected by SEM attached with EDS. The molybdenized layer is composed of the deposited layer and diffused layer. The micro-hardness of alloyed layer decreases from HV650 on the top layer to HV240. The friction coefficient of molybdenized layer decreases from 0.5{approx}0.6 to 0.2{approx}0.3 and wear rate decreases by 20% at elevated temperature after molybdenizing.

  4. Microchip Electrophoresis at Elevated Temperatures and High Separation Field Strengths

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Indranil; Marczak, Steven P.; Jacobson, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    We report free-solution microchip electrophoresis performed at elevated temperatures and high separation field strengths. We used microfluidic devices with 11-cm long separation channels to conduct separations at temperatures between 22 (ambient) and 45 °C and field strengths from 100 to 1000 V/cm. To evaluate separation performance, N-glycans were used as a model system and labeled with 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid to impart charge for electrophoresis and render them fluorescent. Typically, increased diffusivity at higher temperatures leads to increased axial dispersion and poor separation performance; however, we demonstrate that sufficiently high separation field strengths can be used to offset the impact of increased diffusivity in order to maintain separation efficiency. Efficiencies for these free-solution separations are the same at temperatures of 25, 35, and 45 °C with separation field strengths ≥500 V/cm. PMID:24114979

  5. Young's modulus of cement paste at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Odelson, Joshua B.; Kerr, Elizabeth A.; Vichit-Vadakan, Wilasa . E-mail: WVichitVadakan@ctlgroup.com

    2007-02-15

    Calcium silicate hydrate is a porous hydrate that is sensitive to temperature and readily loses strength at elevated temperatures. Mechanical and chemical changes in the microstructure, due to escaping water, can significantly affect the mechanical properties, but these changes occur over different temperature ranges. By measuring Young's modulus as a function of temperature using the dynamic mechanical analyzer, the temperature range in which the greatest change in stiffness occurs can be identified. Additional mineralogy, pore size distribution, and composition analysis from high temperature X-ray diffraction, nitrogen sorption, and thermogravimetric analysis will demonstrate the changes in the microstructure. The results demonstrate that over 90% of the loss in stiffness occurs below 120 deg. C. Therefore, the damage is due to microcracking caused by pore water expansion and evaporation and not the change in mineralogy or composition. More damage, as indicated by greater loss in stiffness, occurs in stiffer and less permeable samples where higher stresses can develop.

  6. Tolerance of LSS Plant Component to Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, S. A.; Tikhomirov, A. A.

    2002-06-01

    Stability of LSS based on biological regeneration of water, air and food subject to damaging factors is largely dependent on the behavior of the photosynthesizing component represented, mainly, by higher plants. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the tolerance of uneven-aged wheat and radish cenoses to temperature effects different in time and value. Estimation of thermal tolerance of plants demonstrated that exposure for 20 h to the temperature increasing to 45°C brought about irreversible damage both in photosynthetic processes (up to 80% of initial value) and the processes of growth and development. Kinetics of visible photosynthesis during exposure to elevated temperatures can be used to evaluate critical exposure time within the range of which the damage of metabolic processes is reversible. With varying light intensity and air temperature it is possible to find a time period admissible for the plants to stay under adverse conditions without considerable damage of metabolic processes.

  7. Compressive Strength of Stainless-Steel Sandwiches at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathauser, Eldon E.; Pride, Richard A.

    1959-01-01

    Experimental results are presented from crippling tests of stainless-steel sandwich specimens in the temperature range from 80 F to 1,200 F. The specimens included resistance-welded 17-7 PH stainless-steel sandwiches with single-corrugated cores, type 301 stainless-steel sandwiches with double-corrugated cores, and brazed 17-7 PH stainless-steel sandwiches with honeycomb cores. The experimental strengths are compared with predicted buckling and crippling strengths. The crippling strengths were predicted from the calculated maximum strength of the individual plate elements of the sandwiches and from a correlation procedure which gives the elevated-temperature crippling strength when the experimental room-temperature crippling strengths are known. Photographs of some of the tested specimens are included to show the modes of failure.

  8. Elevated temperature crack growth in aluminum alloys: Tensile deformation of 2618 and FVS0812 aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leng, Yang; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Understanding the damage tolerance of aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures is essential for safe applications of advanced materials. The objective of this project is to investigate the time dependent subcritical cracking behavior of powder metallurgy FVS0812 and ingot metallurgy 2618 aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures. The fracture mechanics approach was applied. Sidegrooved compact tension specimens were tested at 175, 250, and 316 C under constant load. Subcritical crack growth occurred in each alloy at applied stress intensity levels (K) of between about 14 and 25 MPa/m, well below K (sub IC). Measured load, crack opening displacement and displacement rate, and crack length and growth rate (da/dt) were analyzed with several continuum fracture parameters including, the C-integral, C (sub t), and K. Elevated temperature growth rate data suggest that K is a controlling parameter during time dependent cracking. For FVS0812, da/dt is highest at 175 C when rates are expressed as a function of K. While crack growth rate is not controlled by C (sub t) at 175 C, da/dt appears to better correlate with C (sub t) at higher temperatures. Creep brittle cracking at intermediate temperatures, and perhaps related to strain aging, is augmented by time dependent transient creep plasticity at higher temperatures. The C (sub t) analysis is, however, complicated by the necessity to measure small differences in the elastic crack growth and creep contributions to the crack opening displacement rate. A microstructural study indicates that 2618 and FVS0812 are likely to be creep brittle materials, consistent with the results obtained from the fracture mechanics study. Time dependent crack growth of 2618 at 175 C is characterized by mixed transgranular and intergranular fracture. Delamination along the ribbon powder particle boundaries occurs in FVS0812 at all temperatures. The fracture mode of FVS0812 changes with temperature. At 175 C, it is characterized as dimpled rupture

  9. Mechanical properties of long carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic (LFT) at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiushi

    Long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT) possess high specific modulus and strength, superior damage tolerance and fracture toughness and have found increasing use in transportation, military, and aerospace applications. However, one of the impediments to utilizing these materials is the lack of performance data in harsh conditions, especially at elevated temperature. In order to quantify the effect of temperature on the mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites, carbon fiber PAA composite plates containing 20% and 30% carbon fiber were produced using extrusion/compression molding process and tested at three representative temperatures, room temperature (RT 26°C), middle temperature (MID 60°C) and glass transition temperature (Tg 80°C). A heating chamber was designed and fabricated for the testing at elevated temperature. As temperature increases, flexural modulus, flexural strength, tensile modulus and tensile strength decrease. The highest reduction observed in stiffness (modulus) values of 30% CF/PAA at Tg in the 00 orientation is 75%. The reduction values were larger for the transverse (perpendicular to flow direction) samples than the longitudinal (flow direction) samples. The property reduction in 30% CF/PAA is larger than 20% CF/PAA. Furthermore, an innovative method was developed to calculate the fiber content in carbon fiber reinforced composites by burning off the neat resin and sample in a tube furnace. This method was proved to be accurate (within 1.5 wt. % deviation) by using burning off data obtained from CF/Epoxy and CF/Vinyl Ester samples. 20% and 30% carbon/PAA samples were burned off and carbon fiber content was obtained using this method. The results of the present study will be helpful in determining the end-user applications of these composite materials. Keywords: Long Carbon Fibers, Elevated Temperature, Mechanical Properties, Burn off Test.

  10. Zeta Potential in Intact Natural Carbonates at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mahrouqi, D.; Vinogradov, J.; Jackson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of zeta potential have been used to monitor subsurface flows in many natural brine systems. Numerous studies report zeta potentials in carbonates using crushed samples at low ionic strength and laboratory temperatures. However, natural brines have much higher salinity; moreover, temperatures are considerably higher in many subsurface settings. The variation of zeta potentials with temperature has not been examined in natural carbonates. We report zeta potential values interpreted from streaming potential measurements in two intact carbonate rock samples, saturated with artificial brines at elevated temperatures. We measure streaming potential using an experimental set-up that incorporates in-situ measurements of saturated rock conductivity, brine temperature, brine pH, brine electrical conductivity, pressure difference and voltage at temperatures up to 120oC. The streaming potential measurements are complemented with brine effluent studies. We find that the interpreted zeta potential is negative and decreases in magnitude with increasing temperature at low ionic strength (0.01M) and independent of temperature at high ionic strength (0.5M); consistent with published zeta potential in intact natural sandstones. The concentration of Ca2+ (main potential determining ion) also decreases with temperature at low ionic strength, but remains constant at high ionic strength. The temperature dependence of the zeta potential is consistent between two different natural carbonate samples and can be explained by the temperature dependence of pCa2+. We suggest that zeta potential of carbonate is independent of temperature or pH when pCa2+ remains constant. A linear variation of pH vs. pCa2+ is exhibited, at ambient and elevated temperatures, when pCa2+ is allowed to change with pH. This linear variation explains the numerous published data that shows apparent relationship between zeta potential of carbonates and pH.

  11. Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures. Part II. Capacity fade analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadass, P.; Haran, Bala; White, Ralph; Popov, Branko N.

    A complete capacity fade analysis was carried out for Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures. The major causes of capacity loss were identified and a complete capacity fade balance was carried out to account for the total capacity loss of Li-ion battery as a function of cycle number and temperature. The three most significant parameters that cause capacity loss were loss of secondary active material (LiCoO 2/carbon) and primary active material (Li +) and the rate capability losses. Intrinsic capacity measurements for both positive and negative electrode has been used to estimate the capacity loss due to secondary active material and a charge balance gives the capacity lost due to primary active material (Li +). Capacity fade has been quantified with secondary active material loss dominating the other losses.

  12. On the interaction of water-soluble binders and nano silicon particles: alternative binder towards increased cycling stability at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Klamor, S; Schröder, M; Brunklaus, G; Niehoff, P; Berkemeier, F; Schappacher, F M; Winter, M

    2015-02-28

    Silicon based composites are among the most promising negative electrodes for lithium ion battery applications due to their high theoretical capacities. One major drawback of silicon based anodes are their large volume changes during lithiation and delithiation. Although many efforts have been made in view of new binder materials and improved electrolytes, the resulting battery cell suffers from severe capacity fading at ambient or elevated temperatures, respectively. The strong reactivity with the electrolyte is considered to be responsible for the reduced cycle life at elevated temperatures. In this work we introduce silicon composite anodes with a novel composition based on a gellan gum binder material that show an improved cycling performance at ambient temperature and at 60 °C. To elucidate the influence of the binder material, we investigated the structure of the silicon based composite anodes in order to understand the nature of the interaction of the gellan gum based binder polymers with the silicon particles in comparison with a common CMC binder. Also the influence of the choice of binder on the interactions at the interface between electrode surface and electrolyte were studied. A combination of powerful techniques including solid state NMR, TEM and EELS, XPS as well as FTIR were applied. PMID:25623421

  13. The Effects of Elevated Temperatures on the Response of Resins Under Dynamic and Static Loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilat, Amos

    2005-01-01

    The overall objective of the research is to experimentally study the combined effects of temperature and strain rate on the response of two resins that are commonly used for the matrix material in composites. The resins are loaded at various temperatures in shear and in tension over a wide range of strain rates. These two types of loadings provide an opportunity to examine also the effect that temperature might have on the effects of the hydrostatic stress component on the material response. The experimental data provide the information needed for NASA scientists for the development of a nonlinear, strain rate, and temperature dependent deformation and strength models for composites that can subsequently be used in design. This year effort was directed into the development and testing of the epoxy resin at elevated temperatures. Two types of epoxy resins were tested in shear at high strain rates of about 10(exp-4)/s and elevated temperatures of 50 and 8OC. The results show that the temperature significantly affects the response of epoxy.

  14. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L.

    2012-05-31

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP) and the

  15. The Deformation of the Multi-Layered Panel of Sheet Metals Under Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Wook; Woo, Dong-Uk

    A Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) stack consists of several layered unit cells. In each unit cell, the stiff structure of the separator plate contains the softer components, such as electrodes. When surface pressure acts on the stack over an extended period of time at elevated temperatures, the stiffness of the separator plate tends to degrade. Moreover, the demands for large electrode area (to increase the electric capacity of a unit cell) and thinner separator plates (to reduce weight) complicate the design of a separator plate with high stiffness. To evaluate the stiffness of the separator plate at elevated temperatures, we design and test a tiny, multi-layered separator plate specimen using a three-point bending tool. To determine the optimal structure of the separator plate, we investigate three design factors: angle, pitch and height. We adopt the Taguchi method to evaluate the experiments, and use finite element analysis to examine the experimental results. Based on these results, pitch is the most effective of these factors. As the pitch narrows, the stiffness of the separator plate increases. Therefore, we propose the pitch factor as a design criterion for the separator plate of the MCFC stack.

  16. Interface degradation in CAS/Nicalon during elevated temperature aging

    SciTech Connect

    Plucknett, K.P.; Cain, R.L.; Lewis, M.H.

    1995-03-01

    A CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} (CAS)/Nicalon glass-ceramic matrix composite has been subjected to elevated temperature oxidation heat-treatments between 375 and 1200{degrees}C, for up to 100 hours. Micro- and macro-mechanical properties have been determined by fiber push-down, using a mechanical properties microprobe, and flexure testing, respectively. Aging between 450 and 800{degrees}C results in significant property degradation, with reduced bending modulus and flexure strength, increased fiber sliding stress, and a transition to a purely brittle failure mode. Aging degradation is due to oxidative removal of the carbon interlayer, with the subsequent formation of a silica bond between fiber and matrix. At higher temperatures, carbon is retained due to the formation of a protective silica plug at exposed fiber ends, with the subsequent retention of composite properties. Short duration pre-treatment schedules, at 1000 or 1100{degrees}C, were developed to prevent intermediate temperature property degradation.

  17. Concrete Materials and Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wilby, C.B.

    1991-12-31

    Concrete Materials and Structures provides one of the most comprehensive treatments on the topic of concrete engineering. The author covers a gamut of concrete subjects ranging from concrete mix design, basic reinforced concrete theory, prestressed concrete, shell roofs, and two-way slabs-including a through presentation of Hillerborg`s strip method. Prior to Wilby`s book, the scope of these topics would require at least four separate books to cover. With this new book he has succeeded, quite remarkably, in condensing a fairly complete knowledge of concrete engineering into one single easy-to-carry volume.

  18. Factor Study for the Separator Plate of Mcfc Having Uniform Stiffness at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Wook; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Jun, Joong-Hwan

    A molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) is composed of several stacks of unit cells. A unit cell is composed of two electrodes and a matrix that is inserted between separator plates. Separator plates should properly contact the electrodes to reduce the electricity loss arising from contact resistance. To this end, a pressure of about 2 kgf/cm2 is usually applied on the top of the stack, which results in the separator plates being somewhat compacted. Furthermore, the stiffness of the separator plates becomes degraded at elevated temperatures due to softening of the plate materials. Therefore, a nonuniform temperature distribution across the separator plates induced by exothermic reactions of the oxidant and reactant gases leads to a non-uniform plate stiffness. This study has firstly evaluated the change in separator plate stiffness as temperature changes by applying pressure to the plates. Secondly, using the Taguchi method, several design factors that affect stiffness have been investigated to determine which has the most influence. Based on these results, a new design for the separators, which allows for uniform stiffness at elevated temperatures, has been proposed.

  19. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1987-01-01

    The development and application of composite materials to aerospace vehicle structures which began in the mid 1960's has now progressed to the point where what can be considered entire airframes are being designed and built using composites. Issues related to the fabrication of non-resin matrix composites and the micro, mezzo and macromechanics of thermoplastic and metal matrix composites are emphasized. Several research efforts are presented. They are entitled: (1) The effects of chemical vapor deposition and thermal treatments on the properties of pitch-based carbon fiber; (2) Inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; (3) Analysis of fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; (4) Delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; (5) Numerical investigation of the microhardness of composite fracture; and (6) General beam theory for composite structures.

  20. Combined Mode I and Mode II Fracture of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of ZrO2 - 8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Precracks were introduced in test specimens using the single-edge-v-notched beam (SEVNB) method incorporated with final diamond polishing to achieve sharp crack tips. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of KI/KII were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behaviors of the coating material were compared with those of monolithic advanced ceramics determined previously. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the plasma- sprayed thermal barrier coating material was predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  1. Combined Mode I and Mode II Fracture of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of ZrO2- 8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Precracks were introduced in test specimens using the single-edge-v-notched beam (SEVNB) method incorporated with final diamond polishing to achieve sharp crack tips. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of K(sub I)/K(sub II) were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behaviors of the coating material were compared with those of monolithic advanced ceramics determined previously. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating material was predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  2. The elevated temperature erosion behavior of HVOF tungsten carbide cermet coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.Q.

    1995-12-31

    A series of elevated temperature erosion tests was carried out on HVOF Wc-17Co cermet coating specimens at 300 C and 450 C at particle velocities of 30 m/s and 60 m/s and at impact angles of 30{degree} and 90{degree}, using bed ashes and fly ashes retrieved from operating CFBC boilers. The elevated temperature erosion behavior of HVOF WC-17Co coatings was compared with those of AISI 1018 steel, and other thermal sprayed coatings including a HVOF 75%Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-25%NiCr cermet coating, an arc-sprayed FeCrSiB metallic coating and a flame-sprayed Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-6SiO{sub 2}-4Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic coating. The morphologies of specimens were examined by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The microhardness of the surface of the specimens was measured. It was found that the hardness of the coatings had no direct relationship with erosion-corrosion wastage and the erosion behavior of coatings is closely related to their microstructure and composition. In general, the coatings with larger splat size, coarse and heterogeneous structure, higher porosity and the presence of craze cracks or inclusions have the higher erosion wastage. However, the effect of microstructure of coatings on the erosion behavior varied with erosion test conditions.

  3. The Mechanical Behavior of a 25Cr Super Duplex Stainless Steel at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasebikan, B. A.; Akisanya, A. R.; Deans, W. F.

    2013-02-01

    Super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) is a candidate material for production tubing in oil and gas wells and subsea pipelines used to transport corrosive hydrocarbon fluids. The suitability of this material for high temperature applications is examined in this article. The uniaxial tensile properties are determined for a 25Cr SDSS over a range of temperature relevant to high pressure-high temperature oil and gas wells. It is shown that there is a significant effect of temperature on the uniaxial tensile properties. Elevated temperature was shown to reduce the Young's modulus and increase the strain hardening index; temperature effects on these two parameters are usually neglected in the design of subsea pipelines and oil well tubulars, and this could lead to wrong predictions of the collapse pressure. The manufacturing process of the super duplex tubular did not lead to significant anisotropy in the hardness and the ultimate tensile and uniaxial yield strengths.

  4. Factors Controlling Elevated Temperature Strength Degradation of Silicon Carbide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    For 5 years, the cooperative agreement NCC3-763 has focused on the development and understanding of Sic-based composites. Most of the work was performed in the area of SiC fiber-reinforced composites for UEET and NGLT and in collaboration with Goodrich Corporation under a partially reimbursable Space Act Agreement. A smaller amount of work was performed on C fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites for NGLT. Major accomplishments during this agreement included: Improvements to the interphase used in melt-infiltrated (MI) SiC/SiC composites which increases the life under stressed-oxidation at intermediate temperatures referred to as "outside-debonding". This concept is currently in the patent process and received a Space Act Award. Mechanistic-based models of intermediate temperature degradation for MI SiC/SiC Quantification and relatively robust relationships for matrix crack evolution under stress in SiC/SiC composites which serve as the basis for stress-strain and elevated temperature life models The furthering of acoustic emission as a useful tool in composite damage evolution and the extension of the technique to other composite systems Development of hybrid C-SiC fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites Numerous presentations at conferences, industry partners, and government centers and publications in recognized proceedings and journals. Other recognition of the author's accomplishments by NASA with a TGIR award (2004), NASA's Medal for Public Service (2004), and The American Ceramic Society s Richard M. Fulrath Award (2005). The following will briefly describe the work of the past five years in the three areas of interest: SiC/SiC composite development, mechanistic understanding and modeling of SiC/SiC composites, and environmental durability of C/SiC composites. More detail can be found in the publications cited at the end of this report.

  5. Trihalomethane hydrolysis in drinking water at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Lu; Yang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Mao; Karanfil, Tanju; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2015-07-01

    Hydrolysis could contribute to the loss of trihalomethanes (THMs) in the drinking water at elevated temperatures. This study was aimed at investigating THM hydrolysis pertaining to the storage of hot boiled water in enclosed containers. The water pH value was in the range of 6.1-8.2 and the water temperature was varied from 65 to 95 °C. The effects of halide ions, natural organic matter, and drinking water matrix were investigated. Results showed that the hydrolysis rates declined in the order following CHBrCl2 > CHBr2Cl > CHBr3 > CHCl3. THM hydrolysis was primarily through the alkaline pathway, except for CHCl3 in water at relatively low pH value. The activation energies for the alkaline hydrolysis of CHCl3, CHBrCl2, CHBr2Cl and CHBr3 were 109, 113, 115 and 116 kJ/mol, respectively. No hydrolysis intermediates could accumulate in the water. The natural organic matter, and probably other constituents, in drinking water could substantially decrease THM hydrolysis rates by more than 50%. When a drinking water was at 90 °C or above, the first order rate constants for THM hydrolysis were in the magnitude of 10(-2)‒10(-1) 1/h. When the boiled real tap water was stored in an enclosed container, THMs continued increasing during the first few hours and then kept decreasing later on due to the competition between hydrolysis and further formation. The removal of THMs, especially brominated THMs, by hydrolysis would greatly reduce one's exposure to disinfection by-products by consuming the boiled water stored in enclosed containers. PMID:25898249

  6. Behavior of reinforcement SCC beams under elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, Hamoon; Farhang, Kianoosh

    2015-09-01

    This experimental study focuses on the behavior of heated reinforced concrete beams. Four types of concrete mixtures were used for the tested self-compacting concrete beams. A total of 72 reinforced concrete beams and 72 standard cylindrical specimens were tested. The compressive strength under uniaxial loading at 23 °C ranged from 30 to 45 MPa. The specimens were exposed to different temperatures. The test parameters of interest were the compressive strength and the temperature of the specimens. The effect of changes in the parameters was examined so as to control the behavior of the tested concrete and that of the reinforced concrete beam. The results indicated that flexibility and compressive strength of the reinforced concrete beams decreased at higher temperatures. Furthermore, heating beyond 400 °C produced greater variations in the structural behavior of the materials in both the cylindrical samples and the reinforced concrete beams.

  7. Constitutive equations for meeting elevated-temperature-design needs

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, C.E.; Robinson, D.N.

    1981-01-01

    Constitutive equations for representing the inelastic behavior of structural alloys at temperatures in the creep regime are discussed from the viewpoint of advances made over the past decade. An emphasis is placed on the progress that has been made in meeting the needs of the program whose design process is based in part on a design-by-inelastic-analysis approach. In particular, the constitutive equations that have been put into place for current use in design analyses are discussed along with some material behavior background information. Equations representing short-term plastic and long-term creep behaviors are considered. Trends towards establishing improved equations for use in the future are also described. Progress relating to fundamentals of continuum mechanics, physical modeling, phenomenological modeling, and implementation is addressed.

  8. An assessment of buffer strips for improving damage tolerance of composite laminates at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    Buffer strips greatly improve the damage tolerance of graphite/epoxy laminates loaded in tension. Graphite/polyimide buffer strip panels were made and tested to determine their residual strength at ambient and elevated (177 C) temperature. Each panel was cut in the center to represent damage. Panels were radiographed and crack-opening displacements were recorded to indicate fracture, fracture arrest, and the extent of damage in the buffer strip after arrest. All panels had the same buffer strip spacing and width. The buffer strip material was 0 deg S-glass/PMR-15. The buffer strips were made by replacing narrow strips of the 0 deg graphite plies with strips of the 0 deg S-glass on either a one-for-one or a two-for-one basis. Half of the panels were heated to 177 + or - 3 C before and during the testing. Elevated temperature did not alter the fracture behavior of the buffer configuration.

  9. Elevated Temperature Properties of Titanium Carbide Base Ceramals Containing Nickel or Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, A L; Colteryahn, L E

    1951-01-01

    Elevated-temperature properties of titanium carbide base ceramals containing nickel or iron were determined in oxidation, modulus of rupture, tensile strength, and thermal-shock resistance. These materials followed the general growth law and exhibited two stages in oxidation. The following tensile strengths were found at 2000 degrees F: 13.3 weight percent nickel, 16, 150 pounds per square inch; 11.8 weight percent iron, 12,500 pounds per square inch; unalloyed titanium carbide, 16,450 pounds per square inch. Nickel or iron additions to titanium carbide improved the thermal-shock resistance, nickel more. The path of fracture in tensile and thermal-shock specimens was found to progress approximately 50 percent intergranularly and 50 percent transgranularly.

  10. Fatigue and flexural response of advanced carbon-carbon composites at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahfuz, Hassan; Das, Partha S.; Jeelani, Shaik; Baker, Dean M.; Johnson, Sigurd A.

    1992-01-01

    The flexural response of SiC-coated carbon-carbon composites (ACC-4) at room and elevated temperatures is presented. Three-point bending tests were performed on virgin and mission-cycled specimens, and the variation in flexural strength is examined. The load-deflection behavior of the material at various temperatures is investigated, and the Weibull (1939) analysis of the strength data is performed. Micrographs of various cross sections in the damaged zone were taken, and the failure mechanisms are discussed. Fatigue tests were conducted under flexural loads, and the S-N diagram with the corresponding Weibull analysis are presented. Untested as well as fractured specimens under static and dynamic loading were C-scanned to identify the damaged zone and visualize the extent of the damage. Failure analyses are presented for both static and cyclic loading on the basis of NDE, the micrographs, and the experimental data.

  11. Elevated temperature cracking of RSP aluminum alloy 8009 - Characterization of the environmental influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porr, William C., Jr.; Leng, Yang; Gangloff, Richard P.; Reynolds, Anthony

    1991-01-01

    Degradation of the material properties of the Al alloy is examined to determine the effects of moist air and predissolved hydrogen on elevated-temperature fatigue and fracture resistance. Experiments are conducted at 175 C in both moist air and high vacuum with as-processed specimens and specimens that are vacuum-heat-treated. Fracture mechanics characterizations are made for initiation and propagation fracture toughnesses during rising load, fatigue-crack propagation kinetics, and sustained-load crack-growth rates. Time-dependent embrittlement at intermediate temperatures is identified in both plate and extrusion samples of the Al-Fe-Si-V alloy 8009. Intermediate temperature cracking is found to be the same for each case in both vacuum and moist air, and the vacuum heat treatment does not significantly affect the results.

  12. A Study on Fretting Fatigue Life in Elevated Temperature for Incoloy 800

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jae Do; Woo, Seung Wan; Chung, Il Sup; Yoon, Dong Hwan; Park, Dae Kyu

    Incoloy 800, which is used within steam generator tubes, is a heat resistant material since it is an iron-nickel-chromium alloy. However, construction of a systematic database is needed to receive integrity data defecting insurance of specific data about room and elevated temperature fretting fatigue behavior for Incoloy 800. Accordingly, this study investigates the specific change in fatigue limitations under the condition of the fretting fatigue as compared to that under the condition of the plain fatigue by performing plain and fretting fatigue tests on Incoloy 800 at 320°C, real operating temperature and at room-temperature, respectively. The change in the frictional force is measured during the fretting fatigue testing against the repeated cycle, and the mechanism of fretting fatigue is investigated through the observation of the fatigue-fracture surface.

  13. Generation of Constant Life Diagram under Elevated Temperature Ratcheting of 316LN Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Aritra; Nagesha, A.; Sandhya, R.; Mathew, M. D.

    2016-04-01

    Combined influence of mean stress and stress amplitude on the cyclic life under elevated temperature (823-923 K) ratcheting of 316LN austenitic stainless steel is discussed. Constant life Haigh diagrams have been generated, using different combinations of stress amplitude and mean stress. In the plastic domain, the allowable stress was found to increase or decrease with mean stress depending on the temperature and combination of mean stress - stress amplitude employed. Strong influence of dynamic strain aging (DSA) was found at 823 K which affected the mode of deformation of the material in comparison with 923 K. Failure mode expressed through a fracture mechanism map was found to change from fatigue to necking depending on the test temperature as well as combinations of mean stress and stress amplitude. Occurrence of DSA at 823 K proved to be beneficial by way of extending the safe zone of operation to higher R-ratios in comparison with 923 K.

  14. Evaluation of fatigue properties of 316FR stainless steel welded joints at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kaguchi, Hitoshi; Koto, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Terutaka; Taguchi, Kosei; Sukekawa, Masayuki

    1996-12-01

    316FR is an improved version of type 316 stainless steel for elevated temperature use with lower carbon content than conventional type 316 stainless steel. Fatigue properties of GTAW joints of 316FR stainless steel have been investigated. Heat affected zone (HAZ) of 316FR becomes harder than base metal. A method based on the stress-strain relationship of three elements, which are base metal, HAZ and weld portions, has been proposed and applied to the evaluations of fatigue tests. The tri-metal analysis model gives good agreements between experimental results and predicted fatigue lives of the 316FR welded joints. This material is to be used in the DFBR reactor in Japan.

  15. Microstructure and tensile properties of tungsten at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tielong; Dai, Yong; Lee, Yongjoong

    2016-01-01

    In order to support the development of the 5 MW spallation target for the European Spallation Source, the effect of fabrication process on microstructure, ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), tensile and fracture behaviour of powder-metallurgy pure tungsten materials has been investigated. A hot-rolled (HR) tungsten piece of 12 mm thickness and a hot-forged (HF) piece of about 80 mm thickness were used to simulate the thin and thick blocks in the target. The two tungsten pieces were characterized with metallography analysis, hardness measurement and tensile testing. The HR piece exhibits an anisotropic grain structure with an average size of about 330 × 140 × 40 μm in rolling, long transverse and short transverse (thickness) directions. The HF piece possesses a bimodal grain structure with about 310 × 170 × 70 μm grain size in deformed part and about 25 μm sized grains remained from sintering process. Hardness (HV0.2) of the HR piece is slightly greater than that of the HF one. The ductility of the HR tungsten specimens is greater than that of the HF tungsten. For the HF tungsten piece, specimens with small grains in gauge section manifest lower ductility but higher strength. The DBTT evaluated from the tensile results is 250-300 °C for the HR tungsten and about 350 °C for the HF tungsten.

  16. Investigation of the Compressive Strength and Creep Lifetime of 2024-T3 Aluminum-Alloy Plates at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathauser, Eldon E; Deveikis, William D

    1957-01-01

    The results of elevated-temperature compressive strength and creep tests of 2024-t3 (formerly 24s-t3) aluminum alloy plates supported in v-grooves are presented. The strength-test results indicate that a relation previously developed for predicting plate compressive strength for plates of all materials at room temperature is also satisfactory for determining elevated-temperature strength. Creep-lifetime results are presented for plates in the form of master creep-lifetime curves by using a time-temperature parameter that is convenient for summarizing tensile creep-rupture data. A comparison is made between tensile and compressive creep lifetime for the plates and a method that made use of isochronous stress-strain curves for predicting plate-creep failure stresses is investigated.

  17. Smart materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, Robert S.; Heyman, Joseph S.

    1993-01-01

    Embedded optical fibers allow not only the cure-monitoring and in-service lifetime measurements of composite materials, but the NDE of material damage and degradation with aging. The capabilities of such damage-detection systems have been extended to allow the quantitative determination of 2D strain in materials by several different methods, including the interferometric and the numerical. It remains to be seen, what effect the embedded fibers have on the strength of the 'smart' materials created through their incorporation.

  18. Elevated Temperature Primary Load Design Method Using Pseudo Elastic-Perfectly Plastic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Peter; Sham, Sam; Jetter, Robert I

    2012-01-01

    A new primary load design method for elevated temperature service has been developed. Codification of the procedure in an ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III Code Case is being pursued. The proposed primary load design method is intended to provide the same margins on creep rupture, yielding and creep deformation for a component or structure that are implicit in the allowable stress data. It provides a methodology that does not require stress classification and is also applicable to a full range of temperature above and below the creep regime. Use of elastic-perfectly plastic analysis based on allowable stress with corrections for constraint, steady state stress and creep ductility is described. This approach is intended to ensure that traditional primary stresses are the basis for design, taking into account ductility limits to stress re-distribution and multiaxial rupture criteria.

  19. An anisotropic thermomechanical damage model for concrete at transient elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Baker, Graham; de Borst, René

    2005-11-15

    The behaviour of concrete at elevated temperatures is important for an assessment of integrity (strength and durability) of structures exposed to a high-temperature environment, in applications such as fire exposure, smelting plants and nuclear installations. In modelling terms, a coupled thermomechanical analysis represents a generalization of the computational mechanics of fracture and damage. Here, we develop a fully coupled anisotropic thermomechanical damage model for concrete under high stress and transient temperature, with emphasis on the adherence of the model to the laws of thermodynamics. Specific analytical results are given, deduced from thermodynamics, of a novel interpretation on specific heat, evolution of entropy and the identification of the complete anisotropic, thermomechanical damage surface. The model is also shown to be stable in a computational sense, and to satisfy the laws of thermodynamics. PMID:16243703

  20. Constitutive Equations for Use in Design Analyses of Long-life Elevated Temperature Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugh, C. E.; Robinson, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    Design analysis needs and procedures relative to elevated temperature components in liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) system were examined. The effects of the thermal transients on the pressure boundary components are enhanced by the excellent heat transfer properties of the liquid sodium coolant. Design criteria for high temperature nuclear reactor components recognize the potential occurrence of inelastic structural response. Specifically, criteria and limits were developed which reflect a recognition of this potential and employ design by analysis concepts that requires that inelastic (elastic-plastic and creep) analyses be performed. Constitutive equations to represent multiaxial time-dependent responses of LMFBR alloys are established. The development of equations applicable under cyclic loading conditions are outlined.

  1. Evolution of Intermetallics, Dispersoids, and Elevated Temperature Properties at Various Fe Contents in Al-Mn-Mg 3004 Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Chen, X.-G.

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, great interests are rising on aluminum alloys for the applications at elevated temperature, driven by the automotive and aerospace industries requiring high strength, light weight, and low-cost engineering materials. As one of the most promising candidates, Al-Mn-Mg 3004 alloys have been found to possess considerably high mechanical properties and creep resistance at elevated temperature resulted from the precipitation of a large number of thermally stable dispersoids during heat treatment. In present work, the effect of Fe contents on the evolution of microstructure as well as high-temperature properties of 3004 alloys has been investigated. Results show that the dominant intermetallic changes from α-Al(MnFe)Si at 0.1 wt pct Fe to Al6(MnFe) at both 0.3 and 0.6 wt pct Fe. In the Fe range of 0.1-0.6 wt pct studied, a significant improvement on mechanical properties at elevated temperature has been observed due to the precipitation of dispersoids, and the best combination of yield strength and creep resistance at 573 K (300 °C) is obtained in the 0.3 wt pct Fe alloy with the finest size and highest volume fraction of dispersoids. The superior properties obtained at 573 K (300 °C) make 3004 alloys more promising for high-temperature applications. The relationship between the Fe content and the dispersoid precipitation as well as the materials properties has been discussed.

  2. An Elevated-Temperature Tension-Compression Test and Its Application to Magnesium AZ31B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Kun

    Many metals, particularly ones with HCP crystal structures, undergo deformation by combinations of twinning and slip, the proportion of which depends on variables such as temperature and strain rate. Typical techniques to reveal such mechanisms rely on metallography, x-ray diffraction, or electron optics. Simpler, faster, less expensive mechanical tests were developed in the current work and applied to Mg AZ31B. An apparatus was designed, simulated, optimized, and constructed to enable the large-strain, continuous tension/compression testing of sheet materials at elevated temperature. Thermal and mechanical FE analyses were used to locate cartridge heaters, thus enabling the attainment of temperatures up to 350°C within 15 minutes of start-up, and ensuring temperature uniformity throughout the gage length within 8°C. The low-cost device also makes isothermal testing possible at strain rates higher than corresponding tests in air. Analysis was carried out to predict the attainable compressive strains using novel finite element (FE) modeling and a single parameter characteristic of the machine and fixtures. The limits of compressive strain vary primarily with the material thickness and the applied-side-force-to-material-strength ratio. Predictions for a range of sheet alloys with measured buckling strains from -0.04 to -0.17 agreed within a standard deviation of 0.025 (0.015 excluding one material that was not initially flat). In order to demonstrate the utility of the new method, several sheet materials were tested over a range of temperatures. Some of the data obtained is the first of its kind. Magnesium AZ31B sheets were tested at temperatures up to 250°C with strain rate of 0.001/s. The inflected stress-strain curve observed in compression at room temperature disappeared between 125°C and 150°C, corresponding to the suppression of twinning, and suggesting a simple method for identifying the deformation mechanism transition temperature. The temperature

  3. Elevated temperature tribology of cobalt and tantalum-based alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Scharf, T. W.; Prasad, S. V.; Kotula, P. G.; Michael, J. R.; Robino, C. V.

    2014-12-31

    This paper describes the friction and wear behavior of a Co–Cr alloy sliding on a Ta–W alloy. Measurements were performed in a pin-on-flat configuration with a hemispherically tipped Co-base alloy pin sliding on a Ta–W alloy flat from ambient to 430°C. Focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to identify the friction-induced changes to the chemistry and crystal structure in the subsurface regions of wear tracks. During sliding contact, transfer of material varied as a function of the test temperature, either from pin-to-flat, flat-to-pin, or both, resulting in either wear loss and/or volumemore » gain. Friction coefficients (μ) and wear rates also varied as a function of test temperature. The lowest friction coefficient (μ=0.25) and wear rate (1×10–4 mm3/N•m) were observed at 430°C in argon atmosphere. This was attributed to the formation of a Co-base metal oxide layer (glaze), predominantly (Co, Cr)O with Rocksalt crystal structure, on the pin surface. Part of this oxide film transferred to the wear track on Ta–W, providing a self-mated oxide-on-oxide contact. Once the oxide glaze is formed, it is able to provide friction reduction for the entire temperature range of this study, ambient to 430°C. Furthermore, the results of this study indicate that glazing the surfaces of Haynes alloys with continuous layers of cobalt chrome oxide prior to wear could protect the cladded surfaces from damage.« less

  4. Elevated temperature tribology of cobalt and tantalum-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Scharf, T. W.; Prasad, S. V.; Kotula, P. G.; Michael, J. R.; Robino, C. V.

    2014-12-31

    This paper describes the friction and wear behavior of a Co–Cr alloy sliding on a Ta–W alloy. Measurements were performed in a pin-on-flat configuration with a hemispherically tipped Co-base alloy pin sliding on a Ta–W alloy flat from ambient to 430°C. Focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to identify the friction-induced changes to the chemistry and crystal structure in the subsurface regions of wear tracks. During sliding contact, transfer of material varied as a function of the test temperature, either from pin-to-flat, flat-to-pin, or both, resulting in either wear loss and/or volume gain. Friction coefficients (μ) and wear rates also varied as a function of test temperature. The lowest friction coefficient (μ=0.25) and wear rate (1×10–4 mm3/N•m) were observed at 430°C in argon atmosphere. This was attributed to the formation of a Co-base metal oxide layer (glaze), predominantly (Co, Cr)O with Rocksalt crystal structure, on the pin surface. Part of this oxide film transferred to the wear track on Ta–W, providing a self-mated oxide-on-oxide contact. Once the oxide glaze is formed, it is able to provide friction reduction for the entire temperature range of this study, ambient to 430°C. Furthermore, the results of this study indicate that glazing the surfaces of Haynes alloys with continuous layers of cobalt chrome oxide prior to wear could protect the cladded surfaces from damage.

  5. Exposure Of NIF Relevant Polymeric Samples To Deuterium-Tritium Gas At Elevated Temperature And Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ebey, P S; Dole, J M; Nobile, A; Schoonover, J R; Burmann, J; Cook, B; Letts, S; Sanchez, J; Nikroo, A

    2005-06-24

    The purpose of the experiments described in this paper was to expose samples of polymeric materials to a mixture of deuterium-tritium (DT) gas at elevated temperature and pressure to investigate the effects (i.e. damage) on the materials. The materials and exposure parameters were chosen with to be relevant to proposed uses of similar materials in inertial fusion ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. Two types of samples were exposed and tested. The first type consisted of 10 4-lead ribbon cables of fine manganin wire insulated with polyimide. Wires of this type are proposed for use in thermal shimming of hohlraums and the goal of this experiment was to measure the change in electrical resistance of the insulation due to tritium exposure. The second type of sample consisted of 20 planar polymer samples that may be used as ignition capsule materials. The exposure was at 34.5 GPa (5010 psia) and 70 C for 48 hours. The change in electrical resistance of the wire insulation will be presented. The results for capsule materials will be presented in a separate paper in this issue.

  6. Recovery Strategy and Mechanism of Aged Lithium Ion Batteries after Shallow Depth of Discharge at Elevated Temperature.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yingzhi; Du, Chunyu; Gao, Yunzhi; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Lingling; Guan, Ting; Yang, Lijie; Cheng, Xinqun; Zuo, Pengjian; Ma, Yulin; Yin, Geping

    2016-03-01

    Performance degradation of prismatic lithium ion batteries (LIBs) with LiCoO2 and mesocarbon microbead as active materials is investigated at an elevated temperature for shallow depth of discharge. Aged LIBs are disassembled to characterize the interface morphology, bulk structure, and reversible capacity of an individual electrode. It is found that the formation of interfacial blocking layer (IBL) on the anode results in the cathode state of charge (SOC) offset, which is the primary reason for the cathode degradation. The main capacity degradation of the anode is attributed to the IBL on the anode surface that impedes the intercalation and deintercalation of lithium ions. Because the full battery capacity is limited by the cathode during aging, the cathode SOC offset is the most important reason for the full battery capacity loss. Interestingly, the capacity of aged LIBs can be recovered to a relative high level after adding the electrolyte, rather than the solvent. This recovery is attributed to the relief of the cathode SOC offset and the dissolution of the anode IBL, which reopens the intercalation and deintercalation paths of lithium ions on the anode. Moreover, it is revealed that the relief of cathode SOC offset and the dissolution of anode IBL trigger and promote mutually to drive the recovery of LIBs. PMID:26848629

  7. Evaluation Of Liner Back-pressure Due To Concrete Pore Pressure At Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.J.; Rashid, Y.R.; Liu, A.S.; Gou, B.

    2006-07-01

    GE's latest evolution of the boiling water reactor, the ESBWR, has innovative passive design features that reduce the number and complexity of active systems, which in turn provide economic advantages while also increasing safety. These passive systems used for emergency cooling also mean that the primary containment system will experience elevated temperatures with longer durations than conventional plants in the event of design basis accidents. During a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), the drywell in the primary containment structure for the ESBWR will be exposed to saturated steam conditions for up to 72 hours following the accident. A containment spray system may be activated that sprays the drywell area with water to condense the steam as part of the recovery operations. The liner back-pressure will build up gradually over the 72 hours as the concrete temperatures increase, and a sudden cool down could cause excessive differential pressure on the liner to develop. For this analysis, it is assumed that the containment spray is activated at the end of the 72-hour period. A back-pressure, acting between the liner and the concrete wall of the containment, can occur as a result of elevated temperatures in the concrete causing steam and saturated vapor pressures to develop from the free water remaining in the pores of the concrete. Additional pore pressure also develops under the elevated temperatures from the non-condensable gases trapped in the concrete pores during the concrete curing process. Any buildup of this pore pressure next to the liner, in excess of the drywell internal pressure, will act to push the liner away from the concrete with a potential for tearing at the liner anchorages. This paper describes the methods and analyses used to quantify this liner back-pressure so that appropriate measures are included in the design of the liner and anchorage system. A pore pressure model is developed that calculates the pressure distribution across the concrete

  8. Gasket performance of SWG in ROTT and short term estimation at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Asahina, M.; Nishida, T.; Yamanaka, Y.

    1996-12-01

    This paper deals with the sealability at room temperature and the durability at elevated temperature of SWG (spiral wound gasket). The fillers in the gasket specimens are chosen as newly developed non-asbestos, asbestos and flexible graphite. The effects of inner and outer rings inserted in the gasket specimens on the new PVRC gaskets constants are examined by using the ROTT test procedure (room temperature tightness test). The durability of SWG at elevated temperature is estimated by using the weight loss of filler and the stress-deflection curve of SWG obtained after aging at elevated temperatures. As a result, the sealability and the durability of newly developed non-asbestos SWG is the same as asbestos SWG, and the durability of flexible graphite SWG at elevated temperatures in this method conform to the boundary temperature in field and it is shown that this method is available to estimate the durability of gaskets at elevated temperatures.

  9. Influence of Elevated Temperatures on Pet-Concrete Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albano, C.; Camacho, N.; Hernández, M.; Matheus, A.; Gutiérrez, A.

    2008-08-01

    Lightweight aggregate is an important material in reducing the unit weight of concrete complying with special concrete structures of large high-rise buildings. Besides, the use of recycled PET bottles as lightweight aggregate in concrete is an effective contribution for environment preservation. So, the objective of the present work was to study experimentally the flexural strength of the PET -concrete blends and the thermal degradation of the PET in the concrete, when the blends with 10 and 20% in volume of PET were exposed to different temperatures (200, 400, 600 °C). The flexural strength of concrete-PET exposed to a heat source is strongly dependent on the temperature, water/cement ratio, as well as the content and particle size of PET. However, the activation energy is affected by the temperature, location of the PET particles on the slabs and the water/cement ratio. Higher water content originates thermal and hydrolytic degradation on the PET, while on the concrete, a higher vapor pressure which causes an increase in crack formation. The values of the activation energy are higher on the center of the slabs than on the surface, since concrete is a poor heat conductor.

  10. Microscopic evaluation of vesicles shed by erythrocytes at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Moore, Timothy; Sorokulova, Iryna; Pustovyy, Oleg; Globa, Ludmila; Pascoe, David; Rudisill, Mary; Vodyanoy, Vitaly

    2013-11-01

    The images of human erythrocytes and vesicles were analyzed by a light microscopy system with spatial resolution of better than 90 nm. The samples were observed in an aqueous environment and required no freezing, dehydration, staining, shadowing, marking, or any other manipulation. Temperature elevation resulted in significant concentration increase of structurally transformed erythrocytes (echinocytes) and vesicles in the blood. The process of vesicle separation from spiculated erythrocytes was video recorded in real time. At a temperature of 37°C, mean vesicle concentrations and diameters were found to be 1.50 ± 0.35 × 10(6) vesicles per microliter and 0.365 ± 0.065 μm, respectively. The vesicle concentration increased approximately threefold as the temperature increased from 37 to 40°C. It was estimated that 80% of all vesicles found in the blood are smaller than 0.4 μm. Accurate account of vesicle numbers and dimensions suggest that 86% of the lost erythrocyte material is lost not by vesiculation but by another, as yet, unknown mechanism. PMID:23964014

  11. Selection of flowing liquid lead target structural materials for accelerator driven transmutation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.J.; Buksa, J.J.

    1994-08-01

    The beam entry window and container for a liquid lead spallation target will be exposed to high fluxes of protons and neutrons that are both higher in magnitude and energy than have been experienced in proton accelerators and fission reactors, as well as in a corrosive environment. The structural material of the target should have a good compatibility with liquid lead, a sufficient mechanical strength at elevated temperatures, a good performance under an intense irradiation environment, and a low neutron absorption cross section; these factors have been used to rank the applicability of a wide range of materials for structural containment Nb-1Zr has been selected for use as the structural container for the LANL ABC/ATW molten lead target. Corrosion and mass transfer behavior for various candidate structural materials in liquid lead are reviewed, together with the beneficial effects of inhibitors and various coatings to protect substrate against liquid lead corrosion. Mechanical properties of some candidate materials at elevated temperatures and the property changes resulting from 800 MeV proton irradiation are also reviewed.

  12. A semiconductor/mixed ion and electron conductor heterojunction for elevated-temperature water splitting.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaofei; Melas-Kyriazi, John; Feng, Zhuoluo A; Melosh, Nicholas A; Chueh, William C

    2013-10-01

    Photoelectrochemical cells (PECs) have been studied extensively for dissociating water into hydrogen and oxygen. Key bottlenecks for achieving high solar-to-hydrogen efficiency in PECs include increasing solar spectrum utilization, surmounting overpotential losses, and aligning the absorber/electrochemical redox levels. We propose a new class of solid-state PECs based on mixed ionic and electronic conducting (MIEC) oxides that operates at temperatures significantly above ambient and utilizes both the light and thermal energy available from concentrated sunlight to dissociate water vapor. Unlike thermochemical and hybrid photo-thermochemical water-splitting routes, the elevated-temperature PEC is a single-step approach operating isothermally. At the heart of the solid-state PEC is a semiconductor light absorber coated with a thin MIEC layer for improved catalytic activity, electrochemical stability, and ionic conduction. The MIEC, placed between the gas phase and the semiconductor light absorber, provides a facile path for minority carriers to reach the water vapor as well as a path for the ionic carriers to reach the solid electrolyte. Elevated temperature operation allows reasonable band misalignments at the interfaces to be overcome, reduces the required overpotential, and facilitates rapid product diffusion away from the surface. In this work, we simulate the behavior of an oxygen-ion-conducting photocathode in 1-D. Using the detailed-balance approach, in conjunction with recombination and electrochemical reaction rates, the practical efficiency is calculated as a function of temperature, solar flux, and select material properties. For a non-degenerate light absorber with a 2.0 eV band-gap and an uphill band offset of 0.3 eV, an efficiency of 17% and 11% is predicted at 723 and 873 K, respectively. PMID:23939203

  13. Elastic Properties and Internal Friction of Two Magnesium Alloys at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Freels, M.; Liaw, P. K.; Garlea, E.; Morrell, J. S.; Radiovic, M.

    2011-06-01

    The elastic properties and internal friction of two magnesium alloys were studied from 25 C to 450 C using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS). The Young's moduli decrease with increasing temperature. At 200 C, a change in the temperature dependence of the elastic constants is observed. The internal friction increases significantly with increasing temperature above 200 C. The observed changes in the temperature dependence of the elastic constants and the internal friction are the result of anelastic relaxation by grain boundary sliding at elevated temperatures. Elastic properties govern the behavior of a materials subjected to stress over a region of strain where the material behaves elastically. The elastic properties, including the Young's modulus (E), shear modulus (G), bulk modulus (B), and Poisson's ratio (?), are of significant interest to many design and engineering applications. The choice of the most appropriate material for a particular application at elevated temperatures therefore requires knowledge of its elastic properties as a function of temperature. In addition, mechanical vibration can cause significant damage in the automotive, aerospace, and architectural industries and thus, the ability of a material to dissipate elastic strain energy in materials, known as damping or internal friction, is also important property. Internal friction can be the result of a wide range of physical mechanisms, and depends on the material, temperature, and frequency of the loading. When utilized effectively in engineering applications, the damping capacity of a material can remove undesirable noise and vibration as heat to the surroundings. The elastic properties of materials can be determined by static or dynamic methods. Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS), used in this study, is a unique and sophisticated non-destructive dynamic technique for determining the complete elastic tensor of a solid by measuring the resonant spectrum of mechanical resonance for a

  14. Small Bioactive Lipoplex (SBL) Nanoparticles Self-Assembled at Elevated Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Leaf

    2009-03-01

    Conventional lipoplex (cationic liposome/DNA complex) serves well for gene transfer in cultured cells. However, their in vivo gene delivery activity is limited due to its relatively large size (>100 nm). This is due to incomplete charge neutralization as a result of the steric hindrance during the complexation between DNA and liposomes. Behr et al hypothesized that monomolecular DNA condensate can be prepared if the DNA sees the cationic lipid as monomers. Indeed, small nanoparticles (˜30 nm) were prepared by using a single-chain cationic amphiphile which has a high solubility at the physiological condition. To stabilize the monomolecular condensate, Behr has included a SH group in the cationic amphiphile which could be oxidized to form a dimer. Unfortunately, the stabilized nanoparticles showed no transfection activity when delivered into cells. We hypothesized that similar small lipoplex can be prepared by using a double-chain cationic amphiphile if both DNA and the amphiphile can be soluble in the same solvent. A hydrofluorocarbon HFC-152a is an excellent solvent for the cationic lipid DOTAP at an elevated temperature (˜35 ^oC) and pressure (˜300 atm). Since the solvent can accommodate small amounts of water, DNA or siRNA could be introduced into the system to allow lipoplex formation. The resulting Small Bioactive Lipoplex (SBL) is 30-50 nm in diameter and can transfect cultured cells. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy showed that SBL are solid nanoparticles without any lipid bilayer structure. Since plasmid DNA is fragile at elevated temperature and pressure, we have concentrated our effort in siRNA which is stable under the same conditions. The new formulation shows great promise as an in vivo delivery vector when small particles are required for efficient penetration into the tissues.

  15. Dynamic Fracture Initiation Toughness at Elevated Temperatures With Application to the New Generation of Titanium Aluminide Alloys. Chapter 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Prakash, Vikas; Draper, Susan; Shukla, Arun (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    Recently, a new generation of titanium aluminide alloy, named Gamma-Met PX, has been developed with better rolling and post-rolling characteristics. I'revious work on this alloy has shown the material to have higher strengths at room and elevated temperatures when compared with other gamma titanium aluminides. In particular, this new alloy has shown increased ductility at elevated temperatures under both quasi-static and high strain rate uniaxial compressive loading. However, its high strain rate tensile ductility at room and elevated temperatures is limited to approx. 1%. In the present chapter, results of a study to investigate the effects of loading rate and test temperature on the dynamic fracture initiation toughness in Gamma-Met PX are presented. Modified split Hopkinson pressure bar was used along with high-speed photography to determine the crack initiation time. Three-point bend dynamic fracture experiments were conducted at impact speeds of approx. 1 m/s and tests temperatures of up-to 1200 C. The results show that thc dynamic fracture initiation toughness decreases with increasing test temperatures beyond 600 C. Furthermore, thc effect of long time high temperature air exposure on the fracture toughness was investigated. The dynamic fracture initiation toughness was found to decrease with increasing exposure time. The reasons behind this drop are analyzed and discussed.

  16. Effects of elevated temperature on the viscoplastic modeling of graphite/polymeric composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.

    1991-01-01

    To support the development of new materials for the design of next generation supersonic transports, a research program is underway at NASA to assess the long term durability of advanced polymer matrix composites (PMC's). One of main objectives of the program was to explore the effects of elevated temperature (23 to 200 C) on the constitutive model's material parameters. To achieve this goal, test data on the observed nonlinear, stress-strain behavior of IM7/5260 and IM7/8320 composites under tension and compression loading were collected and correlated against temperature. These tests, conducted under isothermal conditions using variable strain rates, included such phenomena as stress relaxation and short term creep. The second major goal was the verification of the model by comparison of analytical predictions and test results for off axis and angle ply laminates. Correlation between test and predicted behavior was performed for specimens of both material systems over a range of temperatures. Results indicated that the model provided reasonable predictions of material behavior in load or strain controlled tests. Periods of loading, unloading, stress relaxation, and creep were accounted for.

  17. Sputtering graphite coating to improve the elevated-temperature cycling ability of the LiMn2O4 electrode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiexi; Zhang, Qiaobao; Li, Xinhai; Wang, Zhixing; Guo, Huajun; Xu, Daguo; Zhang, Kaili

    2014-08-14

    To improve the cycle performance of LiMn2O4 at elevated temperature, a graphite layer is introduced to directly cover the surface of a commercial LiMn2O4-based electrode via room-temperature DC magnetron sputtering. The as-modified cathodes display improved capacity retention as compared to the bare LiMn2O4 cathode (BLMO) at 55 °C. When sputtering graphite for 30 min, the sample shows the best cycling performance at 55 °C, maintaining 96.2% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Reasons with respect to the graphite layer for improving the elevated-temperature performance of LiMn2O4 are systematically investigated via the methods of cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The results demonstrate that the graphite coated LiMn2O4 cathode has much less increased electrode polarization and electrochemical impedance than BLMO during the elevated-temperature cycling process. Furthermore, the graphite layer is able to alleviate the severe dissolution of manganese ions into the electrolyte and mitigate the morphological and structural degradation of LiMn2O4 during cycling. A model for the electrochemical kinetics process is also suggested for explaining the roles of the graphite layer in suppressing the Mn dissolution. PMID:24963917

  18. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of four boron nitride coated ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coguill, Scott L.; Adams, Donald F.; Zimmerman, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    Six types of uncoated ceramic fibers were static tensile and tensile creep tested at various elevated temperatures. Three types of boron nitride coated fibers were also tested. Room temperature static tensile tests were initially performed on all fibers, at gage lengths of 1, 2, and 4 inches, to determine the magnitude of end effects from the gripping system used. Tests at one elevated temperature, at gage lengths of 8 and 10 inches, were also conducted, to determine end effects at elevated temperatures. Fiber cross sectional shapes and areas were determined using scanning electron microscopy. Creep testing was typically performed for 4 hours, in an air atmosphere.

  19. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Transverse properties of fiber constituents in composites, fatigue in composite materials, matrix dominated properties of high performance composites, numerical investigation of moisture effects, numerical investigation of the micromechanics of composite fracture, advanced analysis methods, compact lug design, and the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes projects are discussed.

  20. Elevated Temperature Fatigue Endurance of Three Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Verrilli, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    High-cycle fatigue endurance of three candidate materials for the acoustic liners of the Enabling Propulsion Materials Nozzle Program was investigated. The ceramic matrix composite materials investigated were N720/AS (Nextel 720, 3M Corporation), Sylramic S200 (Dow Corning), and UT 22. High-cycle fatigue tests were conducted in air at 910 C on as-machined specimens and on specimens subjected to tensile cyclic load excursions every 160 hr followed by thermal exposure at 910 C in a furnace up to total exposure times of 2066 and 4000 hr. All the fatigue tests were conducted in air at 100 Hz with a servohydraulic test machine. In the as-machined condition, among the three materials investigated only the Sylramic S200 exhibited a deterministic type of high-cycle fatigue behavior. Both the N720/AS and UT-22 exhibited significant scatter in the experimentally observed high-cycle fatigue lives. Among the thermally exposed specimens, N720/AS and Sylramic S200 materials exhibited a reduction in the high-cycle fatigue lives, particularly at the exposure time of 4000 hr.

  1. Materials, structures, and devices for high-speed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woollam, John A.; Snyder, Paul G.

    1992-12-01

    Advances in materials, devices, and instrumentation made under this grant began with ex-situ null ellipsometric measurements of simple dielectric films on bulk substrates. Today highly automated and rapid spectroscopic ellipsometers are used for ex-situ characterization of very complex multilayer epitaxial structures. Even more impressive is the in-situ capability, not only for characterization but also for the actual control of the growth and etching of epitaxial layers. Spectroscopic ellipsometry has expanded from the research lab to become an integral part of the production of materials and structures for state of the art high speed devices. Along the way, it has contributed much to our understanding of the growth characteristics and material properties. The following areas of research are summarized: Si3N4 on GaAs, null ellipsometry; diamondlike carbon films; variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) development; GaAs-AlGaAs heterostructures; Ta-Cu diffusion barrier films on GaAs; GaAs-AlGaAs superlattices and multiple quantum wells; superconductivity; in situ elevated temperature measurements of III-V's; optical constants of thermodynamically stable InGaAs; doping dependence of optical constants of GaAs; in situ ellipsometric studies of III-V epitaxial growth; photothermal spectroscopy; microellipsometry; and Si passivation and Si/SiGe strained-layer superlattices.

  2. Materials, structures, and devices for high-speed electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, John A.; Snyder, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    Advances in materials, devices, and instrumentation made under this grant began with ex-situ null ellipsometric measurements of simple dielectric films on bulk substrates. Today highly automated and rapid spectroscopic ellipsometers are used for ex-situ characterization of very complex multilayer epitaxial structures. Even more impressive is the in-situ capability, not only for characterization but also for the actual control of the growth and etching of epitaxial layers. Spectroscopic ellipsometry has expanded from the research lab to become an integral part of the production of materials and structures for state of the art high speed devices. Along the way, it has contributed much to our understanding of the growth characteristics and material properties. The following areas of research are summarized: Si3N4 on GaAs, null ellipsometry; diamondlike carbon films; variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) development; GaAs-AlGaAs heterostructures; Ta-Cu diffusion barrier films on GaAs; GaAs-AlGaAs superlattices and multiple quantum wells; superconductivity; in situ elevated temperature measurements of III-V's; optical constants of thermodynamically stable InGaAs; doping dependence of optical constants of GaAs; in situ ellipsometric studies of III-V epitaxial growth; photothermal spectroscopy; microellipsometry; and Si passivation and Si/SiGe strained-layer superlattices.

  3. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The composite aircraft program component (CAPCOMP) is a graduate level project conducted in parallel with a composite structures program. The composite aircraft program glider (CAPGLIDE) is an undergraduate demonstration project which has as its objectives the design, fabrication, and testing of a foot launched ultralight glider using composite structures. The objective of the computer aided design (COMPAD) portion of the composites project is to provide computer tools for the analysis and design of composite structures. The major thrust of COMPAD is in the finite element area with effort directed at implementing finite element analysis capabilities and developing interactive graphics preprocessing and postprocessing capabilities. The criteria for selecting research projects to be conducted under the innovative and supporting research (INSURE) program are described.

  4. Preliminary investigation of the compressive strength and creep lifetime of 2024-T3 (formerly 24S-T3) aluminum-alloy plates at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathauser, Eldon E; Deveikis, William D

    1955-01-01

    The results of elevated-temperature compressive strength and creep tests of 2024-T3 (formerly 23S-T3) aluminum-alloy plates supported in V-grooves are presented. For determining elevated-temperature strength, where creep effects are negligible, a relation previously developed for predicting plate compressive strength at room temperature was satisfactory. Creep-lifetime results are presented for the plates in the form of master creep-lifetime curves by using a time-temperature parameter that is convenient for summarizing tensile creep-rupture data. A comparison is made between tensile and compressive creep lifetime for the plates, and the magnitude by which the design stress is decreased because of material creep and loss of strength due to exposure at elevated temperatures is indicated.

  5. Advanced composite structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Advanced material concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Kreisler S. Y.; Landis, Abraham L.; Chow, Andrea W.; Hamlin, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    To achieve acceptable performance and long-term durability at elevated temperatures (350 to 600 F) for high-speed transport systems, further improvements of the high-performance matrix materials will be necessary to achieve very long-term (60,000-120,000 service hours) retention of mechanical properties and damage tolerance. This report emphasizes isoimide modification as a complementary technique to semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (SIPN's) to achieve greater processibility, better curing dynamics, and possibly enhanced thermo-mechanical properties in composites. A key result is the demonstration of enhanced processibility of isoimide-modified linear and thermo-setting polyimide systems.

  6. Hypervelocity impact damage response and characterization of thin plate targets at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Brooke Myers

    The performance of a typical International Space Station (ISS) shield against the meteoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) impact threat is generally modeled by damage equations for the outer shield and the rear pressure wall. In their current forms, these damage equations neglect the on-orbit temperature extremes witnessed by the ISS. To address IF and HOW temperature extremes affect the performance of the ISS' typical M/OD shield, a comprehensive study was undertaken that investigated hole diameters in .063" thick 6061-T6 aluminum targets impacted at velocities from ˜2-7 km/s at 20°C, 110°C, and 210°C. Robust graphical and analytical analyses confirmed the existence of a statistically significant temperature effect, i.e., hole diameters in heated targets were larger than those in room temperature targets. A new temperature-dependent model was found via multivariable regression analysis that incorporates a linear velocity term and a temperature term based on a form of the cumulative distribution function. Numerical modeling of hypervelocity impacts (HVI) into elevated temperature targets was also performed to determine whether or not currently available material and failure models can adequately simulate the differences observed between room and elevated temperature target hole diameters. Statistical analyses showed that AUTODYN simulated the heated data almost as well as the room temperature data. However, the slightly worse Goodness of Fit (GOF) values between the heated empirical vs. simulated comparisons suggest that the simulations do not completely account for the observed temperature effect. A series of materials tests and observations were carried out on the post-impacted target plates to help explain the empirical data results with respect to material variability and deformation features. Rockwell B and K macro-hardness tests revealed that the hardness values for the targets impacted at 110°C were statistically significantly higher compared to those

  7. A complex permittivity and permeability measurement system for elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friederich, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The three goals of this research include: (1) to fully develop a method to measure the permittivity and permeability of special materials as a function of frequency in the range of 2.6 to 18 GHz, and of temperatures in the range of 25 to 1100 C; (2) to assist LeRC in setting up an in-house system for the measurement of high-temperature permittivity and permeability; and (3) to measure the complex permittivity and permeability of special materials as a function of frequency and temperature to demonstrate the capability of the method. The method chosen for characterizing the materials relies on perturbation of a resonant cavity with a small volume of sample material. Different field configurations in the cavity can be used to separate electric and magnetic effects. The cavity consists of a section of rectangular waveguide terminated at each end of a vertical slot iris. The center of one wall is a small hole through which the sample is introduced.

  8. A complex permittivity and permeability measurement system for elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friederich, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The three goals of this research include: (1) to fully develop a method to measure the permittivity and permeability of special materials as a function of frequency in the range of 2.6 to 18 GHz, and of temperature in the range of 25 to 1100 C; (2) to assist LeRC in setting up an in-house system for the measurement of high-temperature permittivity and permeability; and (3) to measure the complex permittivity and permeability of special materials as a function of frequency and temperature to demonstrate the capability of the method. The method chosen for characterizing the materials relies on perturbation of a resonant cavity with a small volume of sample material. Different field configurations in the cavity can be used to separate electric and magnetic effects. The cavity consists of a section of rectangular waveguide terminated at each end of a vertical slot iris. In the center of one wall is a small hole through which the sample is introduced.

  9. Integrated research in constitutive modelling at elevated temperatures, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisler, W. E.; Allen, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Four current viscoplastic models are compared experimentally with Inconel 718 at 1100 F. A series of tests were performed to create a sufficient data base from which to evaluate material constants. The models used include Bodner's anisotropic model; Krieg, Swearengen, and Rhode's model; Schmidt and Miller's model; and Walker's exponential model.

  10. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Progress and plans are reported for investigations of: (1) the mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; (2) fatigue in composite materials; (3) moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates; (4) the theory of inhomogeneous swelling in epoxy resin; (5) numerical studies of the micromechanics of composite fracture; (6) free edge failures of composite laminates; (7) analysis of unbalanced laminates; (8) compact lug design; (9) quantification of Saint-Venant's principles for a general prismatic member; (10) variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; and (11) the wing fuselage ensemble of the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes.

  11. Selected durability studies of geopolymer concrete with respect to carbonation, elevated temperature, and microbial induced corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badar, Mohammad Sufian

    This thesis reports a comprehensive study related to the experimental evaluation of carbonation in reinforced geopolymer concrete, the evaluation of geopolymer concretes at elevated temperature, and the resistance of geopolymer concrete to microbial induced corrosion (MIC). Carbonation: Reinforced concretes, made of geopolymer, prepared from two class F fly ashes and one class C fly ash, were subjected to accelerated carbonation treatment for a period of 450 days. Electrochemical, microstructure and pore structure examinations were performed to evaluate the effect of corrosion caused due to carbonation. GPC specimens prepared from class F fly ash exhibited lower corrosion rates by a factor of 21, and higher pH values (pH>12) when compared with concrete specimens prepared from class C Fly ash (GPCMN). Microstructure and pore characterization of GPC prepared using class F fly ash revealed lower porosity by a factor of 2.5 as compared with thier counterparts made using GPC-MN. The superior performace of GPC prepared with the class F fly ash could be attributed to the dense pore structure and formation of the protective layer of calcium and sodium alumino silicate hydrates (C/N-A-S-H) geopolymeric gels around the steel reinforcement. Elevated Temperature: Geopolymers are an emerging class of cementitious binders which possess a potential for high temperature resistance that could possibly be utilized in applications such as nozzles, aspirators and refractory linings. This study reports on the results of an investigation into the performance of a fly ash based geopolymer binder in high temperature environments. Geopolymer concrete (GPC) was prepared using eleven types of fly ashes obtained from four countries. High content alumina and silica sand was used in the mix for preparing GPC. GPC was subjected to thermal shock tests following ASTM C 1100-88. The GPC samples prepared with tabular alumina were kept at 1093° C and immediately quenched in water. GPC specimens

  12. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1988-01-01

    A decade long program to develop critical advanced composite technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concept and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life predictions is reviewed. Specific goals are discussed. The status of the chemical vapor deposition effects on carbon fiber properties; inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; and numerical analysis of composite micromechanical behavior are presented.

  13. Exothermic and thermal runaway behaviour of some ionic liquids at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, R; Surianarayanan, M; Armel, V; MacFarlane, D R; Sridhar, V P

    2009-11-01

    The exothermic behaviour and intrinsic safety of a number of ionic liquids being considered for battery and solar cell applications have been investigated at elevated temperatures by analysing data from accelerated rate calorimetric (ARC) studies. PMID:19826700

  14. Hypersonic Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) and hot structures are required for a range of hypersonic vehicles ranging from ballistic reentry to hypersonic cruise vehicles, both within Earth's atmosphere and non-Earth atmospheres. The focus of this presentation is on air breathing hypersonic vehicles in the Earth's atmosphere. This includes single-stage to orbit (SSTO), two-stage to orbit (TSTO) accelerators, access to space vehicles, and hypersonic cruise vehicles. This paper will start out with a brief discussion of aerodynamic heating and thermal management techniques to address the high heating, followed by an overview of TPS for rocket-launched and air-breathing vehicles. The argument is presented that as we move from rocket-based vehicles to air-breathing vehicles, we need to move away from the insulated airplane approach used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter to a wide range of TPS and hot structure approaches. The primary portion of the paper will discuss issues and design options for CMC TPS and hot structure components, including leading edges, acreage TPS, and control surfaces. The current state-of-the-art will be briefly discussed for some of the components.

  15. Elevated temperature creep behavior of Inconel alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    Purohit, A.; Burke, W.F.

    1984-07-01

    Inconel 625 in the solution-annealed condition has been selected as the clad material for the fuel and control rod housing assemblies of the Upgraded Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT Upgrade or TU). The clad is expected to be subjected to temperatures up to about 1100/sup 0/C. Creep behavior for the temperature range of 800/sup 0/C to 1100/sup 0/C of Inconel alloy 625, in four distinct heat treated conditions, was experimentally evaluated.

  16. Elevated temperature triggers human respiratory syncytial virus F protein six-helix bundle formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yunus, Abdul S.; Jackson, Trent P.; Crisafi, Katherine; Burimski, Irina; Kilgore, Nicole R.; Zoumplis, Dorian; Allaway, Graham P.; Wild, Carl T.; Salzwedel, Karl

    2010-01-20

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants, immunocompromised patients, and the elderly. The RSV fusion (F) protein mediates fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane during virus entry and is a primary target for antiviral drug and vaccine development. The F protein contains two heptad repeat regions, HR1 and HR2. Peptides corresponding to these regions form a six-helix bundle structure that is thought to play a critical role in membrane fusion. However, characterization of six-helix bundle formation in native RSV F protein has been hindered by the fact that a trigger for F protein conformational change has yet to be identified. Here we demonstrate that RSV F protein on the surface of infected cells undergoes a conformational change following exposure to elevated temperature, resulting in the formation of the six-helix bundle structure. We first generated and characterized six-helix bundle-specific antibodies raised against recombinant peptides modeling the RSV F protein six-helix bundle structure. We then used these antibodies as probes to monitor RSV F protein six-helix bundle formation in response to a diverse array of potential triggers of conformational changes. We found that exposure of 'membrane-anchored' RSV F protein to elevated temperature (45-55 deg. C) was sufficient to trigger six-helix bundle formation. Antibody binding to the six-helix bundle conformation was detected by both flow cytometry and cell-surface immunoprecipitation of the RSV F protein. None of the other treatments, including interaction with a number of potential receptors, resulted in significant binding by six-helix bundle-specific antibodies. We conclude that native, untriggered RSV F protein exists in a metastable state that can be converted in vitro to the more stable, fusogenic six-helix bundle conformation by an increase in thermal energy. These findings help to better define the mechanism of

  17. Time-dependent deformation at elevated temperatures in basalt from El Hierro, Stromboli and Teide volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, P. M.; Fahrner, D.; Harnett, C. E.; Fazio, M.

    2014-12-01

    Time dependent deformation describes the process whereby brittle materials deform at a stress level below their short-term material strength (Ss), but over an extended time frame. Although generally well understood in engineering (where it is known as static fatigue or "creep"), knowledge of how rocks creep and fail has wide ramifications in areas as diverse as mine tunnel supports and the long term stability of critically loaded rock slopes. A particular hazard relates to the instability of volcano flanks. A large number of flank collapses are known such as Stromboli (Aeolian islands), Teide, and El Hierro (Canary Islands). Collapses on volcanic islands are especially complex as they necessarily involve the combination of active tectonics, heat, and fluids. Not only does the volcanic system generate stresses that reach close to the failure strength of the rocks involved, but when combined with active pore fluid the process of stress corrosion allows the rock mass to deform and creep at stresses far lower than Ss. Despite the obvious geological hazard that edifice failure poses, the phenomenon of creep in volcanic rocks at elevated temperatures has yet to be thoroughly investigated in a well controlled laboratory setting. We present new data using rocks taken from Stromboli, El Heirro and Teide volcanoes in order to better understand the interplay between the fundamental rock mechanics of these basalts and the effects of elevated temperature fluids (activating stress corrosion mechanisms). Experiments were conducted over short (30-60 minute) and long (8-10 hour) time scales. For this, we use the method of Heap et al., (2011) to impose a constant stress (creep) domain deformation monitored via non-contact axial displacement transducers. This is achieved via a conventional triaxial cell to impose shallow conditions of pressure (<25 MPa) and temperature (<200 °C), and equipped with a 3D laboratory seismicity array (known as acoustic emission, AE) to monitor the micro

  18. A Modified Johnson-Cook Model for Sheet Metal Forming at Elevated Temperatures and Its Application for Cooled Stress-Strain Curve and Spring-Back Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc-Toan, Nguyen; Tien-Long, Banh; Young-Suk, Kim; Dong-Won, Jung

    2011-08-01

    In this study, a modified Johnson-Cook (J-C) model and an innovated method to determine (J-C) material parameters are proposed to predict more correctly stress-strain curve for tensile tests in elevated temperatures. A MATLAB tool is used to determine material parameters by fitting a curve to follow Ludwick's hardening law at various elevated temperatures. Those hardening law parameters are then utilized to determine modified (J-C) model material parameters. The modified (J-C) model shows the better prediction compared to the conventional one. As the first verification, an FEM tensile test simulation based on the isotropic hardening model for boron sheet steel at elevated temperatures was carried out via a user-material subroutine, using an explicit finite element code, and compared with the measurements. The temperature decrease of all elements due to the air cooling process was then calculated when considering the modified (J-C) model and coded to VUMAT subroutine for tensile test simulation of cooling process. The modified (J-C) model showed the good agreement between the simulation results and the corresponding experiments. The second investigation was applied for V-bending spring-back prediction of magnesium alloy sheets at elevated temperatures. Here, the combination of proposed J-C model with modified hardening law considering the unusual plastic behaviour for magnesium alloy sheet was adopted for FEM simulation of V-bending spring-back prediction and shown the good comparability with corresponding experiments.

  19. A Modified Johnson-Cook Model for Sheet Metal Forming at Elevated Temperatures and Its Application for Cooled Stress-Strain Curve and Spring-Back Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Duc-Toan, Nguyen; Tien-Long, Banh; Young-Suk, Kim; Dong-Won, Jung

    2011-08-22

    In this study, a modified Johnson-Cook (J-C) model and an innovated method to determine (J-C) material parameters are proposed to predict more correctly stress-strain curve for tensile tests in elevated temperatures. A MATLAB tool is used to determine material parameters by fitting a curve to follow Ludwick's hardening law at various elevated temperatures. Those hardening law parameters are then utilized to determine modified (J-C) model material parameters. The modified (J-C) model shows the better prediction compared to the conventional one. As the first verification, an FEM tensile test simulation based on the isotropic hardening model for boron sheet steel at elevated temperatures was carried out via a user-material subroutine, using an explicit finite element code, and compared with the measurements. The temperature decrease of all elements due to the air cooling process was then calculated when considering the modified (J-C) model and coded to VUMAT subroutine for tensile test simulation of cooling process. The modified (J-C) model showed the good agreement between the simulation results and the corresponding experiments. The second investigation was applied for V-bending spring-back prediction of magnesium alloy sheets at elevated temperatures. Here, the combination of proposed J-C model with modified hardening law considering the unusual plastic behaviour for magnesium alloy sheet was adopted for FEM simulation of V-bending spring-back prediction and shown the good comparability with corresponding experiments.

  20. Surface mapping of field-induced piezoelectric strain at elevated temperature employing full-field interferometry.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Tim; Quast, Tatjana; Bartl, Guido; Schmitz-Kempen, Thorsten; Weaver, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Piezoelectric actuators and sensors are widely used for flow control valves, including diesel injectors, ultrasound generation, optical positioning, printing, pumps, and locks. Degradation and failure of material and electrical properties at high temperature typically limits these applications to operating temperatures below 200°C, based on the ubiquitous Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 ceramic. There are, however, many applications in sectors such as automotive, aerospace, energy and process control, and oil and gas, where the ability to operate at higher temperatures would open up new markets for piezoelectric actuation. Presented here is a review of recent progress and initial results toward a European effort to develop measurement techniques to characterize high-temperature materials. Full-field, multi-wavelength absolute length interferometry has, for the first time, been used to map the electric-field-induced piezoelectric strain across the surface of a PZT ceramic. The recorded variation as a function of temperature has been evaluated against a newly developed commercial single-beam system. Conventional interferometry allows measurement of the converse piezoelectric effect with high precision and resolution, but is often limited to a single point, average measurement and to limited sample environments because of optical aberrations in varying atmospheres. Here, the full-field technique allows the entire surface to be analyzed for strain and, in a bespoke sample chamber, for elevated temperatures. PMID:25585393

  1. Effect of Load Rate on Ultimate Tensile Strength of Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2001-01-01

    The strengths of three continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/CAS-II, SiC/MAS-5 and SiC/SiC, were determined as a function of test rate in air at 1100 to 1200 C. All three composite materials exhibited a strong dependency of strength on test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress-rate) to another (constant stress loading) suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law type of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics. It was further found that constant stress-rate testing could be used as an alternative to life prediction test methodology even for composite materials, at least for short range of lifetimes and when ultimate strength is used as the failure criterion.

  2. Thermomechanical model to assess stresses developed during elevated-temperature cleaning of coated optics.

    PubMed

    Liddell, H P H; Lambropoulos, J C; Jacobs, S D

    2014-09-10

    A thermomechanical model is developed to estimate the stress response of an oxide coating to elevated-temperature chemical cleaning. Using a hafnia-silica multilayer dielectric pulse compressor grating as a case study, we demonstrate that substrate thickness can strongly affect the thermal stress response of the thin-film coating. As a result, coatings on large, thick substrates may be susceptible to modes of stress-induced failure (crazing or delamination) not seen in small parts. We compare the stress response of meter-scale optics to the behavior of small-scale test or "witness" samples, which are expected to be representative of their full-size counterparts. The effects of materials selection, solution temperature, and heating/cooling rates are explored. Extending the model to other situations, thermal stress results are surveyed for various combinations of commonly used materials. Seven oxide coatings (hafnia, silica, tantala, niobia, alumina, and multilayers of hafnia-silica and alumina-silica) and three glass substrates (BK7, borosilicate float glass, and fused silica) are examined to highlight some interesting results. PMID:25321665

  3. The effect of elevated temperature on the toxicity of the laboratory cultured dinoflagellate Ostreopsis lenticularis (Dinophyceae).

    PubMed

    Ashton, Mayra; Tosteson, Thomas; Tosteson, Carmen

    2003-06-01

    Ostreopsis lenticularis Fukuyo 1981, is the major benthic dinoflagellate vector implicated in ciguatera fish poisoning in finfish on the southwest coast of Puerto Rico. Clonal laboratory cultures of O. lenticularis (clone 301) exposed to elevated temperatures (30-31 degrees C) for 33 and 54 days showed significant increases in the quantity of extractable toxin they produced as compared to their toxicities versus cells grown at temperatures of 25-26 degrees C. O lenticularis samples collected directly from the field following exposure to elevated temperatures for comparable periods of time also showed significant increases in extractable toxin. The increased toxicity of both field sampled and laboratory grown O. lenticularis exposed to elevated temperatures may result from the effects of elevated temperatures on their metabolism and/or the bacterial symbionts found associated with these microalgae. The number of bacteria associated with cultured O. lenticularis exposed to elevated temperatures was significantly reduced. Increased toxin recovery from O. lenticularis exposed to elevated temperatures may have resulted from the direct effect of temperature on toxin production and/or the reduction of Ostreopsis associated bacterial flora that consume toxin in the process of their growth. This reduction in the quantity of associated bacterial flora in temperature treated cultures may result in increased toxin recovery from O. lenticularis due to a reduction in the consumption of toxin by these symbiont bacteria. PMID:15264548

  4. Elevated Temperature Tensile Tests on DU–10Mo Rolled Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Schulthess, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Tensile mechanical properties for uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum (U–10Mo) foils are required to support modeling and qualification of new monolithic fuel plate designs. It is expected that depleted uranium-10 wt% Mo (DU–10Mo) mechanical behavior is representative of the low enriched U–10Mo to be used in the actual fuel plates, therefore DU-10Mo was studied to simplify material processing, handling, and testing requirements. In this report, tensile testing of DU-10Mo fuel foils prepared using four different thermomechanical processing treatments were conducted to assess the impact of foil fabrication history on resultant tensile properties.

  5. Response of ferritic steels to nonsteady loading at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1984-04-01

    High-temperature operating experience is lacking in pressure vessel materials that have strength levels above 586 MPa. Because of their tendency toward strain softening, we have been concerned about their behavior under nonsteady loading. Testing was undertaken to explore the extent of softening produced by monotonic and cyclic strains. The specific materials included bainitic 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel, a micro-alloyed version of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel, a micro-alloyed version of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel containing vanadium, titanium, and boron, and a martensitic 9Cr-1Mo-V-Nb steel. Tests included tensile, creep, variable stress creep, relaxation, strain cycling, stress cycling, and non-isothermal creep ratchetting experiments. We found that these steels had very low uniform elongation and exhibited small strains to the onset of tertiary creep compared to annealed 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel. Repeated relaxation test data also indicated a limited capacity for strain hardening. Reversal strains produced softening. The degree of softening increased with increased initial strength level. We concluded that the high strength bainitic and martensitic steels should perform well when used under conditions where severe cyclic operation does not occur.

  6. Fatigue crack growth behavior of Ti-1100 at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, D.C.; Nicholas, T.

    1995-12-31

    Effects of temperature, frequency, and cycles with superimposed hold times are evaluated in Ti-1100 in order to study the complex creep-fatigue-environment interactions in this material. Crack growth rate tests conducted at cyclic loading frequency of 1.0 Hz show that raising the temperature from 593 to 650 C has only a slightly detrimental effect on crack growth rate, although these temperatures produce growth rates significantly higher than at room temperature. From constant {Delta}K tests, the effects of temperature at constant frequency show a minimum crack growth rate at 250 C. From the minimum crack growth rate at 250 C, the crack growth rate increases linearly with temperature. Increases in frequency at constant temperatures of 593 and 650 C produce a continuous decrease in growth rate in going from 0.001 to 1.0 Hz, although the behavior is primarily cycle dependent in this region. Tests at 1.0 Hz with superimposed hold times from 1 to 1,000 s are used to evaluate creep-fatigue-environment interactions. Hold times at maximum load are found to initially decrease and then increase the cyclic crack growth rate with increasing duration. This is attributed to crack-tip blunting during short hold times and environmental degradation at long hold times. Hold times at minimum load show no change in growth rates, indicating that there is no net environmental degradation to the bulk material beyond that experienced during the baseline 1 Hz cycling.

  7. Deflagration Behavior of PBX 9501 at Elevated Temperature and Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J L; Koerner, J G

    2008-04-15

    We report the deflagration behavior of PBX 9501 at pressures up to 300 MPa and temperatures of 150-180 C where the sample has been held at the test temperature for several hours before ignition. The purpose is to determine the effect on the deflagration behavior of material damage caused by prolonged exposure to high temperature. This conditioning is similar to that experienced by an explosive while it being heated to eventual explosion. The results are made more complicated by the presence of a significant thermal gradient along the sample during the temperature ramp and soak. Three major conclusions are: the presence of nitroplasticizer makes PBX 9501 more thermally sensitive than LX-04 with an inert Viton binder; the deflagration behavior of PBX 9501 is more extreme and more inconsistent than that of LX-04; and something in PBX 9501 causes thermal damage to 'heal' as the deflagration proceeds, resulting in a decelerating deflagration front as it travels along the sample.

  8. Enhanced thermoelectric performance of carbon nanotubes at elevated temperature.

    PubMed

    Jiang, P H; Liu, H J; Fan, D D; Cheng, L; Wei, J; Zhang, J; Liang, J H; Shi, J

    2015-11-01

    The electronic and transport properties of the (10, 0) single-walled carbon nanotube are studied by performing first-principles calculations and semi-classical Boltzmann theory. It is found that the (10, 0) tube exhibits a considerably large Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity which are highly desirable for good thermoelectric materials. Together with the lattice thermal conductivity predicted by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, the room temperature ZT value of the (10, 0) tube is estimated to be 0.15 for p-type carriers. Moreover, the ZT value exhibits strong temperature dependence and can reach to 0.77 at 1000 K. Such a ZT value can be further enhanced to as high as 1.9 by isotopic substitution and chemisorptions of hydrogen on the tube surface. PMID:26426972

  9. Reduction of permeability in granite at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Moore, D E; Lockner, D A; Byerlee, J D

    1994-09-01

    The addition of hydrothermal fluids to heated, intact granite leads to permeability reductions in the temperature range of 300 degrees to 500 degrees C, with the rate of change generally increasing with increasing temperature. The addition of gouge enhances the rate of permeability reduction because of the greater reactivity of the fine material. Flow rate is initially high in a throughgoing fracture but eventually drops to the level of intact granite. These results support the fault-valve model for the development of mesothermal ore deposits, in which seals are formed at the base of the seismogenic zone of high-angle thrust faults. The lower temperature results yield varying estimates of mineral-sealing rates at shallower depths in fault zones, although they generally support the hypothesis that such seals develop in less time than the recurrence interval for moderate to large earthquakes on the San Andreas fault. PMID:17801532

  10. Elevated-Temperature Tests Under Static and Aerodynamic Conditions on Honeycomb-Core Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Joseph M.; Johnson, Aldie E., Jr.

    1959-01-01

    Stainless-steel honeycomb-core sandwich panels which differed primarily in skin thicknesses were tested at elevated temperatures under static and aerodynamic conditions. The results of these tests were evaluated to determine the insulating effectiveness and structural integrity of the panels. The static radiant-heating tests were performed in front of a quartz-tube radiant heater at panel skin temperatures up to 1,5000 F. The aerodynamic tests were made in a Mach 1.4 heated blowdown wind tunnel. The tunnel temperature was augmented by additional heat supplied by a radiant heater which raised the panel surface temperature above 8000 F during air flow. Static radiant-heating tests of 2 minutes duration showed that all the panels protected the load-carrying structure about equally well. Thin-skin panels showed an advantage for this short-time test over thick-skin panels from a standpoint of weight against insulation. Permanent inelastic strains in the form of local buckles over each cell of the honeycomb core caused an increase in surface roughness. During the aero- dynamic tests all of the panels survived with little or no damage, and panel flutter did not occur.

  11. Coupled Effect of Elevated Temperature and Cooling Conditions on the Properties of Ground Clay Brick Mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Abd El Aziz, Magdy; Abdelaleem, Salh; Heikal, Mohamed

    2013-12-01

    When a concrete structure is exposed to fire and cooling, some deterioration in its chemical resistivity and mechanical properties takes place. This deterioration can reach a level at which the structure may have to be thoroughly renovated or completely replaced. In this investigation, four types of cement mortars, ground clay bricks (GCB)/sand namely 0/3, 1/2, 2/1 and 3/0, were used. Three different cement contents were used: 350, 400 and 450 kg/m3. All the mortars were prepared and cured in tap water for 3 months and then kept in laboratory atmospheric conditions up to 6 months. The specimens were subjected to elevated temperatures up to 700°C for 3h and then cooled by three different conditions: water, furnace, and air cooling. The results show that all the mortars subjected to fire, irrespective of cooling mode, suffered a significant reduction in compressive strength. However, the mortars cooled in air exhibited a relativity higher reduction in compressive strength rather than those water or furnace cooled. The mortars containing GCB/sand (3/0) and GCB/sand (1/2) exhibited a relatively higher thermal stability than the others.

  12. Analytical ultrasonics for structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kupperman, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    The application of ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements to characterize the microstructure of structural materials is discussed. Velocity measurements in cast stainless steel are correlated with microstructural variations ranging from equiaxed (elastically isotropic) to columnar (elastically anisotropic) grain structure. The effect of the anisotropic grain structure on the deviation of ultrasonic waves in cast stainless steel is also reported. Field-implementable techniques for distinguishing equiaxed from columnar grain structures in cast strainless steel structural members are presented. The application of ultrasonic velocity measurements to characterize structural ceramics in the green state is also discussed.

  13. Fire retardancy with structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    Impregnating wood with chemicals to reduce or prevent combustion is discussed. Basic types of materials for fireproofing purposes and methods of applications are described. It is concluded that effective fireproofing materials have been developed and their application to wooden structures represents acceptable safety management procedures.

  14. An uncoupled viscoplastic constitutive model for metals at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisler, W. E.; Cronenworth, J.

    1983-01-01

    An uncoupled constitutive model for predicting the transient response of thermal and rate dependent, inelastic material behavior is presented. The uncoupled model assumes that there is a temperature below which the total strain consists essentially of elastic and rate insensitive inelastic strains only. Above this temperature, the rate dependent inelastic strain (creep) dominates. The rate insensitive inelastic strain component is modeled in an incremental form with a yield function, flow rule and hardening law. Revisions to the hardening rule permit the model to predict temperature-dependent kinematic-isotropic hardening behavior, cyclic saturation, asymmetric stress-strain response upon stress reversal, and variable Bauschinger effect. The rate dependent inelastic strain component is modeled using a rate equation in terms of back stress, drag stress and exponent n as functions of temperature and strain. A sequence of hysteresis loops and relaxation tests are utilized to define the rate dependent inelastic strain rate. Evaluation of the model is performed by comparison with experiments involving various thermal and mechanical load histories on 5086 aluminum alloy, 304 stainless steel and Hastelloy-X.

  15. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-07-09

    This paper describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describingmore » the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.« less

  16. Thermal diffusivity of oxide perovskite compounds at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, Anne M.

    2010-05-01

    The phonon component of thermal diffusivity (D) for eleven compounds (synthetic SrTiO3, SrTiO3:Fe3+, BaTiO3, KTaO3, KNbO3, NdGaO3, YAlO3, YAlO3:Tm, LaAlO3, La0.29Sr0.66Al0.65Ta0.35O3, and natural Ca1.01Mn0.001Fe0.007Ti0.99O3) with various perovskite structures was measured from ambient temperature (T) up to ˜2000 K using contact-free, laser-flash analysis, from which effects of ballistic radiative transfer were removed. Structural transitions (e.g., orthorhombic to tetragonal) below 800 K were manifest as sharp steps in 1/D. Above 800 K, structural transitions occur over intervals of ˜150 K. Similarly broad peaks accompany changes from colorless to black, attributable to partial reduction in Ti, Nb, or Ta from contact with graphite coatings. Otherwise, D decreases with increasing T and, if substitutional disorder exists, approaches a constant (Dsat) near 1600 K. Our data are best described as D-1 following a low order polynomial in T. Ordered, cubic perovskites occupy a single trend for D(T )-1, defining the contribution of the ideal lattice. Distortion, disorder, and polymorphism affect D-1 in a manner that is consistent with the damped harmonic oscillator-phonon gas model which relates phonon lifetimes to infrared peak widths. Calculated D-values at ambient and high T agree with measurements. The behavior of D is simple compared to that of thermal conductivity, k =ρCPD, where ρ is density and CP is heat capacity. Combining our data with cryogenic measurements of YAlO3 and LaAlO3 shows that D-1 depends on T similarly to CP, consistent with phonon lifetime depending on the density of states but, the best description for D-1(T) is a proportionality to αT from ˜0 K up to the limit of measurements, where α is thermal expansivity, a strongly anharmonic property. At low T, D-1 due to phonon scattering follows that of CP, generally∝T3, so klat=k0+k1T. Defects being present preclude scattering at sample walls, adding a small constant D0-1 ˜0.0001 mm-2 s as T

  17. Heat transfer in quartz, orthoclase, and sanidine at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfer, M.; Schilling, F.

    on reaching 0.4-0.5 nm at 800 °C and thus already in the range of the interatomic distances of 0.27-0.34 nm. The pronounced difference in thermal diffusivity behavior between quartz and orthoclase, which have a related tectosilicate structure, is connected to additional cations of K, Na, and Al within the feldspar structure.

  18. Electromagnetic Property and Tunable Microwave Absorption of 3D Nets from Nickel Chains at Elevated Temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Cao, Mao-Sheng; Luo, Qiang; Shi, Hong-Long; Wang, Wen-Zhong; Yuan, Jie

    2016-08-31

    We fabricated the nickel chains by a facile wet chemical method. The morphology of nickel chains were tailored by adjusting the amount of PVP during the synthesis process. Both the complex permittivity and permeability of the three-dimensional (3D) nets constructed by nickel chains present strong dependences on temperature in the frequency range of 8.2-12.4 GHz and temperature range of 323-573 K. The peaks in imaginary component of permittivity and permeability mainly derive from interfacial polarizations and resonances, devoting to dielectric and magnetic loss, respectively. The effect from both dielectric and magnetism contribute to enhancing the microwave absorption. The maximum absorption value of the 3D nickel chain nets is approximately -50 dB at 8.8 GHz and 373 K with a thickness of 1.8 mm, and the bandwidth less than -10 dB almost covers the whole investigated frequency band. These are encouraging findings, which provide the potential advantages of magnetic transition metal-based materials for microwave absorption application at elevated temperature. PMID:27509241

  19. Numerical Modeling of Magnesium Alloy Sheet Metal Forming at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myeong-Han; Oh, Soo-Ik; Kim, Heon-Young; Kim, Hyung-Jong; Choi, Yi-Chun

    2007-05-17

    The development of light-weight vehicle is in great demand for enhancement of fuel efficiency and dynamic performance. The vehicle weight can be reduced effectively by using lightweight materials such as magnesium alloys. However, the use of magnesium alloys in sheet forming processes is still limited because of their low formability at room temperature and the lack of understanding of the forming process of magnesium alloys at elevated temperatures. In this study, uniaxial tensile tests of the magnesium alloy AZ31B-O at various temperatures were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of this alloy relevant for forming of magnesium sheets. To construct a FLD (forming limit diagram), a forming limit test were conducted at temperature of 100 and 200 deg. C. For the evaluation of the effects of the punch temperature on the formability of a rectangular cup drawing with AZ31B-O, numerical modelling was conducted. The experiment results indicate that the stresses and possible strains of AZ31B-O sheets largely depend on the temperature. The stress decreases with temperature increase. Also, the strain increase with temperature increase. The numerical modelling results indicate that formability increases with the decrease in the punch temperature at the constant temperature of the die and holder.

  20. Piezoelectric response of BiFeO3 ceramics at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojac, Tadej; Makarovic, Maja; Walker, Julian; Ursic, Hana; Damjanovic, Dragan; Kos, Tomaz

    2016-07-01

    The high Curie temperature (TC ˜ 825 °C) of BiFeO3 has made this material potentially attractive for the development of high-TC piezoelectric ceramics. Despite significant advances in the search of new BiFeO3-based compositions, the piezoelectric behavior of the parent BiFeO3 at elevated temperatures remains unexplored. We present here a systematic analysis of the converse, longitudinal piezoelectric response of BiFeO3 measured in situ as a function of temperature (25-260 °C), driving-field frequency, and amplitude. Earlier studies performed at room temperature revealed that the frequency and field dependence of the longitudinal response of BiFeO3 is dominated by linear and nonlinear piezoelectric Maxwell-Wagner mechanisms, originating from the presence of local conductive paths along domain walls and grain boundaries within the polycrystalline matrix. This study shows that the same mechanisms are responsible for the distinct temperature dependence of the piezoelectric coefficient and phase angle and thus identifies the local electrical conductivity as the key for controlling the temperature dependent piezoelectric response of BiFeO3 and possibly other, more complex BiFeO3-based compositions.

  1. Dolomite-magnesian calcite relations at elevated temperatures and CO2 pressures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graf, D.L.; Goldsmith, J.R.

    1955-01-01

    The equilibrium thermal decomposition curve of dolomite has been determined up to a CO2 pressure of 20,000 lb/in.2, at which pressure dolomite decomposes at 857??C. Equilibrium was approached from both directions, by the breakdown and by the solid-state synthesis of dolomite. At elevated temperatures and pressures, calcites in equilibrium with periclase as well as those in equilibrium with dolomite contain Mg in solid solution. In the former, the Mg content increases with increasing CO2 pressure, and decreases with increasing temperature. In the latter, it is a function of temperature only. The exsolution curve of dolomite and magnesian calcite has been determined between 500?? and 800??C; at 500?? dolomite is in equilibrium with a magnesian calcite containing ~6 mol per cent MgCO2; at 800??, ~22 mol per cent. There appears to be a small but real deviation from the ideal 1 : 1 Ca : Mg ratio of dolomite, in the direction of excess Ca, for material in equilibrium with magnesian calcite at high temperature. The experimental findings indicate that very little Mg is stable in the calcites of sedimentary environments, but that an appreciable amount is stable under higher-temperature metamorphic conditions, if sufficient CO2 pressure is maintained. ?? 1955.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF ELEVATED TEMPERATURE PROPERTIES OF HEAT EXCHANGER AND STEAM GENERATOR ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Wright; L.J. Carroll; C.J. Cabet; T. Lillo; J.K. Benz; J.A. Simpson; A. Chapman; R.N. Wright

    2012-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant project is considering Alloy 800H and Alloy 617 for steam generator and intermediate heat exchangers. It is envisioned that a steam generator would operate with reactor outlet temperatures from 750 to 800 C, while an intermediate heat exchanger for primary to secondary helium would operate up to an outlet temperature of 950 C. Although both alloys are of interest due in part to their technical maturity, a number of specific properties require further characterization for design of nuclear components. Strain rate sensitivity of both alloys has been characterized and is found to be significant above 600 C. Both alloys also exhibit dynamic strain aging, characterized by serrated flow, over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates. High temperature tensile testing of Alloy 617 has been conducted over a range of temperatures. Dynamic strain aging is a concern for these materials since it is observed to result in reduced ductility for many solid solution alloys. Creep, fatigue, and creep-fatigue properties of Alloy 617 have been measured as well, with the goal of determining the influence of the temperature, strain rate and atmosphere on the creep fatigue life of Alloy 617. Elevated temperature properties and implications for codification of the alloys will be described.

  3. Superior properties of SmBCO coated conductors at high magnetic fields and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuger, R.; Eisterer, M.; Oh, S. S.; Weber, H. W.

    2010-03-01

    In addition to the well investigated YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ (Y-123, YBCO) compound, many other rare earth-123 compounds are candidate materials for the production of coated conductors. Sm-123 seems to be an excellent alternative because of its higher transition temperature ( T c) and higher critical current densities ( J c) in external magnetic fields. Because of the fast decrease of J c in YBCO at elevated temperatures, especially around the boiling point of liquid nitrogen, the slightly higher T c can be an important advantage. Recently, significant progress has been made in the production of long length Sm-123 based coated conductors. We report here on transport measurements on these conductors in the liquid nitrogen temperature range. The critical current densities were determined as a function of the applied field and the crystallographic orientation under maximum Lorentz force configuration. A shift of the c-axis (∼7°) from the tape normal was found. The conductor properties were compared to those of commercially available YBCO coated conductors. The critical current densities as well as the irreversibility fields are higher in the SmBCO tapes, thus demonstrating the superior properties of the Sm-123 compound.

  4. Development of optical tools for the characterization of selective solar absorber at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraud, Philemon; Braillon, Julien; Delord, Christine; Raccurt, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Durability of solar components for CSP (Concentrated Solar Power Plant) technologies is a key point to lower cost and ensure their large deployment. These technologies concentrated the solar radiation by means of mirrors on a receiver tube where it is collected as thermal energy. The absorbers are submitted to strong environmental constraints and the degradation of their optical properties (emittance and solar absorbance) have a direct impact on performance. The objective is to develop new optical equipment for characterization of this solar absorber in condition of use that is to say in air and at elevated temperature. In this paper we present two new optical test benches developed for optical characterization of solar absorbers in condition of use up to 800°C. The first equipment is an integrated sphere with heated sample holder which measures the hemispherical reflectance between 280 and 2500 nm to calculate the solar absorbance at high temperature. The second optical test bench measures the emittance of samples up to 1000°C in the range of 1.25 to 28.57 µm. Results of high temperature measurements on a series of metallic absorbers with selective coating and refractory material for high thermal receiver are presented.

  5. Strength, Fracture Toughness, and Slow Crack Growth of Zirconia/alumina Composites at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2003-01-01

    Various electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells were fabricated by hot pressing 10 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (10-YSZ) reinforced with two different forms of alumina particulates and platelets each containing 0 to 30 mol% alumina. Flexure strength and fracture toughness of platelet composites were determined as a function of alumina content at 1000 C in air and compared with those of particulate composites determined previously. In general, elevated-temperature strength and fracture toughness of both composite systems increased with increasing alumina content. For a given alumina content, flexure strength of particulate composites was greater than that of platelet composites at higher alumina contents (greater than or equal to 20 mol%), whereas, fracture toughness was greater in platelet composites than in particulate composites, regardless of alumina content. The results of slow crack growth (SCG) testing, determined at 1000 C via dynamic fatigue testing for three different composites including 0 mol% (10-YSZ matrix), 30 mol % particulate and 30 mol% platelet composites, showed that susceptibility to SCG was greatest with SCG parameter n = 6 to 8 for both 0 and 30 mol% particulate composites and was least with n = 33 for the 30 mol% platelet composite.

  6. Effects of Elevated Temperature on Concrete with Recycled Coarse Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salau, M. A.; Oseafiana, O. J.; Oyegoke, T. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper discusses the effects of heating temperatures of 200°C, 400°C and 600°C each for 2 hours at a heating rate of 2.5°C/min on concrete with the content of Natural Coarse Aggregates (NCA) partially replaced with Recycled Coarse Aggregates (RCA), obtained from demolished building in the ratio of 0%, 15% and 30%.There was an initial drop in strength from 100°C to 200°C which is suspected to be due to the relatively weak interfacial bond between the RCA and the hardened paste within the concrete matrix;a gradual increase in strength continued from 200°C to 450°C and steady drop occurred again as it approached 600°C.With replacement proportion of 0%, 15% and 30% of NCA and exposure to peak temperature of 600°C, a relative concrete strength of 23.6MPa, 25.3MPa and 22.2MPa respectively can be achieved for 28 days curing age. Furthermore, RAC with 15% NCA replacement when exposed to optimum temperature of 450°C yielded high compressive strength comparable to that of control specimen (normal concrete). In addition, for all concrete samples only slight surface hairline cracks were noticed as the temperature approached 400°C. Thus, the RAC demonstrated behavior just like normal concrete and may be considered fit for structural use.

  7. Modifications of system for elevated temperature tensile testing and stress-strain measurement of metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, J.O.

    1994-09-01

    Composites consisting of tungsten alloy wires in superalloy matrices are being studied because they offer the potential for increased strength compared to current materials used at temperatures up to a least 1093{degrees}C (2000{degrees}F). Previous research at the NASA Lewis Research Center and at other laboratories in the U.S., Europe, and Japan has demonstrated laboratory feasibility for fiber reinforced superalloys (FRS). The data for the mechanical and physical properties used to evaluate candidate materials is limited and a need exists for a more detailed and complete data base. The focus of this work was to develop a test procedure to provide a more complete FRS data base to quantitatively evaluate the composite`s potential for component applications. This paper will describe and discuss the equipment and procedures under development to obtain elevated temperature tensile stress-strain, strength and modulus data for the first generation of tungsten reinforced superalloy composite (TFRS) materials. Tensile stress-strain tests were conducted using a constant crosshead speed tensile testing machine and a modified load-strain measuring apparatus. Elevated temperature tensile tests were performed using a resistance wound commercial furnace capable of heating tests specimens up to 1093{degrees}C (2000{degrees}F). Tensile stress-strain data were obtained for hollow tubular stainless steel specimens serving as a prototype for future composite specimens.

  8. Modifications of system for elevated temperature tensile testing and stress-strain measurement of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    Composites consisting of tungsten alloy wires in superalloy matrices are being studied because they offer the potential for increased strength compared to current materials used at temperatures up to at least 1093 C (2000F). Previous research at the NASA Lewis Research Center and at other laboratories in the U.S., Europe, and Japan has demonstrated laboratory feasibility for fiber reinforced superalloys (FRS). The data for the mechanical and physical properties used to evaluate candidate materials is limited and a need exists for a more detailed and complete data base. The focus of this work is to develop a test procedure to provide a more complete FRS data base to quantitatively evaluate the composite's potential for component applications. This paper will describe and discuss the equipment and procedures under development to obtain elevated temperature tensile stress-strain, strength and modulus data for the first generation of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite (TFRS) materials. Tensile stress-strain tests are conducted using a constant crosshead speed tensile testing machine and a modified load-strain measuring apparatus. Elevated temperature tensile tests are performed using a resistance wound commercial furnace capable of heating test specimens up to 1093 C (2000 F). Tensile stress-strain data are obtained for hollow tubular stainless steel specimens serving as a prototype for future composite specimens.

  9. Elevated temperature fretting fatigue of nickel based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gean, Matthew C.

    This document details the high temperature fretting fatigue of high temperature nickel based alloys common to turbine disk and blade applications. The research consists of three area of focus: Experiments are conducted to determine quantitatively the fretting fatigue lives of advanced nickel based alloys; Analytical tools are developed and used to investigate the fretting fatigue response of the material; Fractographic analysis of the experimental results is used to improve the analytical models employed in the analysis of the experiments. Sixty three fretting fatigue experiments were conducted at 649 °C using a polycrystalline Nickel specimen in contact with directionally solidified and single crystal Nickel pads. Various influences on the fretting fatigue life are investigated. Shot peened Rene' 95 had better fretting fatigue life compared to shot peened Rene' 88. Shot peening produced a 2x increase in life for Rene' 95, but only a marginal improvement in the fretting fatigue life for Rene' 88. Minor cycles in variable amplitude loading produces significant damage to the specimen. Addition of occasional overpeaks in load produces improvements in fretting fatigue life. Contact tractions and stresses are obtained through a variety of available tools. The contact tractions can be efficiently obtained for limited geometries, while FEM can provide the contact tractions for a broader class of problems, but with the cost of increased CPU requirements. Similarly, the subsurface contact stresses can be obtained using the contact tractions as a boundary condition with either a semi-analytical FFT method or FEM. It is found that to calculate contact stresses the FFT was only marginally faster than FEM. The experimental results are combined with the analysis to produce tools that are used to design against fretting fatigue. Fractographic analysis of the fracture surface indicates the nature of the fretting fatigue crack behavior. Interrupted tests were performed to analyze

  10. Supported Gold and Platinum Clusters: Stability under Vacuum and Hydrogen at Elevated Temperatures; Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajda, Stefan; Winans, Randall; Ballentine, Gregory; Bouhelier, Alexandre; Elam, Jeffrey; Lee, Byeongdu; Pellin, Michael; Seifert, Soenke; Tikhonov, George; Wiederrecht, Gary

    2006-03-01

    The Achilles heal of supported clusters remains their low stability at elevated temperatures or when exposed to reactive gases. In this paper, the stability of Aun and Ptn clusters (n=6-10) supported on SiO2, Al2O3 & TiO2 films is addressed. The clusters were heated in vacuum and in H2 atmosphere, their stability monitored by synchrotron grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering. Pt clusters supported on Al2O3 did not undergo sintering in vacuum and when exposed to hydrogen during a lengthy heat treatment reaching 400C; Au clusters on SiO2 remained stable up to 350C. These temperatures are considerably higher than those characteristic for the onset of the catalytic activity of these clusters. Results on heat-induced structural isomerization of clusters will be shown. Single-particle UV-VIS spectra of Au-particles obtained by dark-field microscopy will be presented as well.

  11. Thermo-elastic behavior of deformed woven fabric composites at elevated temperatures: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Vu-Khanh, T.; Liu, B.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a study on the effects of temperature on the thermo-elastic properties of woven fabric composites. The thermo-mechanical behavior of woven fabric composites is characterized by a laminate composed of four fictional unidirectional plies, called the sub-plies model. The model allows determination of the thermo-elastic properties of deformed fabric composites (non-orthogonal structure) and direct use of layered shell elements in finite element codes. A special procedure is also proposed to measure the fiber undulation effect and to predict the on-axis thermo-elastic coefficients of the equivalent constituent plies. The thermo-elastic behavior at elevated temperature was investigated on graphite/epoxy fabric composites. Experimental measurements were carried out from 23 C to 177 C. The results revealed that the equivalent thermal expansion coefficients of the sub-plies remain almost constant over a wide range of temperature. However, the equivalent elastic moduli and Poison`s ratio of the sub-plies vary nonlinearly with temperature. Semiempirical equations based on the experimental data were also developed to predict the equivalent on-axis thermo-elastic properties of the fictional constituent plies in the sub-plies model as a function of temperature.

  12. An elevated temperature study of a Ti adhesion layer on polyimide

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A.A.; Cordill, M.J.; Bowles, L.; Schalko, J.; Dehm, G.

    2013-01-01

    Titanium layers are used to promote adhesion between polymer substrates for flexible electronics and the Cu or Au conducting lines. Good adhesion of conducting lines in flexible circuits is critical in improving circuit performance and increasingcircuit lifetime. Nominally 50 nm thick Ti films on polyimide (PI) are investigated by fragmentation testing under uniaxial tensile load in the as-deposited state, at 350 °C, and after annealing. The cracking and buckling of the films show clear differences between the as-deposited and the thermally treated samples, cracks are much straighter and buckles are smaller following heat treatment. These changes are correlated to a drop in adhesion of the samples following heat treatment. Adhesion values are determined from the buckle dimensions using a total energy approach as described in the work of Cordill et al. (Acta Mater. 2010). Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of the Ti/PI interface found evidence of a ~ 5 nm thick interlayer between the largely columnar Ti and the amorphous PI. This interlayer is amorphous in the as-deposited state but nano-crystalline in those coatings tested at elevated temperature or annealed. It is put forward that this alteration of the interfacial structure causes the reduced adhesion. PMID:23525510

  13. Amplitude-Frequency Analysis of Signals of Acoustic Emission from Granite Fractured at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, I. P.; Chmel‧, A. E.

    2015-05-01

    The problem of stability of underground structures serving to store radioactive waste, to gasify carbon, and to utilize geothermal energy is associated with the action of elevated temperatures and pressures. The acoustic-emission method makes it possible to monitor the accumulation of microcracks arising in stress fields of both thermal and mechanical origin. In this report, the authors give results of a laboratory investigation into the acoustic emission from granite subjected to impact fracture at temperatures of up to 600°C. An amplitude-frequency analysis of acousticemission signals has enabled the authors to evaluate the dimension of the arising microcracks and to determine their character (intergranular or intragranular). It has been shown that intergranular faults on the boundaries between identical minerals predominate at room temperature (purely mechanical action); at a temperature of 300°C (impact plus thermoelastic stresses), there also appear cracks on the quartz-feldspar boundaries; finally, at temperatures of 500-600°C, it is intragranular faults that predominate in feldspar. The dimensions of the above three types of microcracks are approximately 2, 0.8, and 0.3 mm respectively.

  14. Engineered thermostable fungal cellulases exhibit efficient synergistic cellulose hydrolysis at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Trudeau, Devin L; Lee, Toni M; Arnold, Frances H

    2014-12-01

    A major obstacle to using widely available and low-cost lignocellulosic feedstocks to produce renewable fuels and chemicals is the high cost and low efficiency of the enzyme mixtures used to hydrolyze cellulose to fermentable sugars. One possible solution entails engineering current cellulases to function efficiently at elevated temperatures in order to boost reaction rates and exploit several other advantages of a higher temperature process. Here, we describe the creation of the most stable reported fungal endoglucanase, a derivative of Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei) Cel5A, by combining stabilizing mutations identified using consensus design, chimera studies, and structure-based computational methods. The engineered endoglucanase has an optimal temperature that is 17°C higher than wild type H. jecorina Cel5A, and hydrolyzes 1.5 times as much cellulose over 60 h at its optimum temperature compared to the wild type enzyme at its optimal temperature. This enzyme complements previously engineered highly active, thermostable variants of the fungal cellobiohydrolases Cel6A and Cel7A in a thermostable cellulase mixture that hydrolyzes cellulose synergistically at an optimum temperature of 70°C over 60 h.The thermostable mixture produces three times as much total sugar as the best mixture of the wild type enzymes operating at its optimum temperature of 60°C, clearly demonstrating the advantage of higher temperature cellulose hydrolysis. PMID:24916885

  15. Weld heat-affected-zone response to elevated-temperature deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, R.J.; Nippes, E.F.

    1996-11-01

    The mechanical response to elevated-temperature deformation was assessed for weld heat-affected-zone (HAZ) and base-metal microstructures in 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. A constant-displacement-rate (CDR) test, capable of determining long-time, notch-sensitivity tendencies, was implemented on a Gleeble 1,500 thermal/mechanical simulator and an Instron. Microstructures representative of the coarse-grained, grain-refined, and intercritical regions of the HAZ were simulated on a Gleeble. Microstructural reproduction reflected the preheat and postweld heat treatments in accordance with the required codes. A K{sub 1} analysis of the data was conducted, which showed that small-scale yielding criteria were adhered to throughout the test. The test results indicated that the high-temperature extensometer control of the Instron was better able to maintain stable crack growth after peak load than the crosshead control of the Gleeble. The CDR test was seen to be an effective, short-time procedure to delineate and compare the strength and relative service life of the structures present in the weld HAZ.

  16. Qualification of diesel generator exhaust carbon steel piping to intermitted elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ratiu, M.D.; Moisidis, N.T.

    1996-02-01

    The diesel generator exhaust piping, usually made up of carbon steel piping (e.g., ASME SA-106, SA-53), is subjected to successive short time exposures at elevated temperatures up to 1,000 F (538 C). A typical design of this piping, without consideration for creep-fatigue cumulative damage, is at least incomplete, if not inappropriate. Also, a design for creep-fatigue, usually employed for long-term exposure to elevated temperatures, would be too conservative and will impose replacement of the carbon steel piping with heat-resistant CrMo alloy piping. The existing ASME standard procedures do not explicitly provide acceptance criteria for the design qualification to withstand these intermittent exposures to elevated temperatures. The serviceability qualification proposed is based on the evaluation of equivalent full temperature cycles which are presumed/expected to be experienced by the exhaust piping during the design operating life of the diesel engine. The proposed serviceability analysis consists of: (a) determination of the permissible stress at elevated temperatures, and (b) estimation of creep-fatigue damage for the total expected cycles of elevated temperature exposures following the procedure provided in ASME Code Cases N-253-6 and N-47-28.

  17. Elevated temperature alters proteomic responses of individual organisms within a biofilm community

    SciTech Connect

    Mosier, Annika; Li, Zhou; Thomas, Brian; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Pan, Chongle; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities that underpin global biogeochemical cycles will likely be influenced by elevated temperature associated with environmental change. Here, we test an approach to measure how elevated temperature impacts the physiology of individual microbial groups in a community context, using a model microbial-based ecosystem. The study is the first application of tandem mass tag (TMT)-based proteomics to a microbial community. We accurately, precisely and reproducibly quantified thousands of proteins in biofilms growing at 40, 43 and 46 1C. Elevated temperature led to upregulation of proteins involved in amino-acid metabolism at the level of individual organisms and the entire community. Proteins from related organisms differed in their relative abundance and functional responses to temperature. Elevated temperature repressed carbon fixation proteins from two Leptospirillum genotypes, whereas carbon fixation proteins were significantly upregulated at higher temperature by a third member of this genus. Leptospirillum group III bacteria may have been subject to viral stress at elevated temperature, which could lead to greater carbon turnover in the microbial food web through the release of viral lysate. Overall, these findings highlight the utility of proteomics-enabled community-based physiology studies, and provide a methodological framework for possible extension to additional mixed culture and environmental sample analyses.

  18. Elevated temperature alters proteomic responses of individual organisms within a biofilm community

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Annika C; Li, Zhou; Thomas, Brian C; Hettich, Robert L; Pan, Chongle; Banfield, Jillian F

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities that underpin global biogeochemical cycles will likely be influenced by elevated temperature associated with environmental change. Here, we test an approach to measure how elevated temperature impacts the physiology of individual microbial groups in a community context, using a model microbial-based ecosystem. The study is the first application of tandem mass tag (TMT)-based proteomics to a microbial community. We accurately, precisely and reproducibly quantified thousands of proteins in biofilms growing at 40, 43 and 46 °C. Elevated temperature led to upregulation of proteins involved in amino-acid metabolism at the level of individual organisms and the entire community. Proteins from related organisms differed in their relative abundance and functional responses to temperature. Elevated temperature repressed carbon fixation proteins from two Leptospirillum genotypes, whereas carbon fixation proteins were significantly upregulated at higher temperature by a third member of this genus. Leptospirillum group III bacteria may have been subject to viral stress at elevated temperature, which could lead to greater carbon turnover in the microbial food web through the release of viral lysate. Overall, these findings highlight the utility of proteomics-enabled community-based physiology studies, and provide a methodological framework for possible extension to additional mixed culture and environmental sample analyses. PMID:25050524

  19. Elevated temperature alters proteomic responses of individual organisms within a biofilm community

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mosier, Annika; Li, Zhou; Thomas, Brian; Hettich, Robert; Pan, Chongle; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities that underpin global biogeochemical cycles will likely be influenced by elevated temperature associated with environmental change. Here, we test an approach to measure how elevated temperature impacts the physiology of individual microbial groups in a community context, using a model microbial-based ecosystem. The study is the first application of tandem mass tag (TMT)-based proteomics to a microbial community. We accurately, precisely and reproducibly quantified thousands of proteins in biofilms growing at 40, 43 and 46 1C. Elevated temperature led to upregulation of proteins involved in amino-acid metabolism at the level of individual organisms and the entire community. Proteinsmore » from related organisms differed in their relative abundance and functional responses to temperature. Elevated temperature repressed carbon fixation proteins from two Leptospirillum genotypes, whereas carbon fixation proteins were significantly upregulated at higher temperature by a third member of this genus. Leptospirillum group III bacteria may have been subject to viral stress at elevated temperature, which could lead to greater carbon turnover in the microbial food web through the release of viral lysate. Overall, these findings highlight the utility of proteomics-enabled community-based physiology studies, and provide a methodological framework for possible extension to additional mixed culture and environmental sample analyses.« less

  20. Elevated temperature alters proteomic responses of individual organisms within a biofilm community.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Annika C; Li, Zhou; Thomas, Brian C; Hettich, Robert L; Pan, Chongle; Banfield, Jillian F

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities that underpin global biogeochemical cycles will likely be influenced by elevated temperature associated with environmental change. Here, we test an approach to measure how elevated temperature impacts the physiology of individual microbial groups in a community context, using a model microbial-based ecosystem. The study is the first application of tandem mass tag (TMT)-based proteomics to a microbial community. We accurately, precisely and reproducibly quantified thousands of proteins in biofilms growing at 40, 43 and 46 °C. Elevated temperature led to upregulation of proteins involved in amino-acid metabolism at the level of individual organisms and the entire community. Proteins from related organisms differed in their relative abundance and functional responses to temperature. Elevated temperature repressed carbon fixation proteins from two Leptospirillum genotypes, whereas carbon fixation proteins were significantly upregulated at higher temperature by a third member of this genus. Leptospirillum group III bacteria may have been subject to viral stress at elevated temperature, which could lead to greater carbon turnover in the microbial food web through the release of viral lysate. Overall, these findings highlight the utility of proteomics-enabled community-based physiology studies, and provide a methodological framework for possible extension to additional mixed culture and environmental sample analyses. PMID:25050524

  1. Effect of Mo Addition on Strength of Fire-Resistant Steel at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Rongchun; Sun, Feng; Zhang, Lanting; Shan, Aidang

    2014-08-01

    A series of Fe-Mo-C steels with Mo addition from 0.1 to 0.8 wt.% has been prepared for studying the effect of Mo on the elevated-temperature strength of fire-resistant steel. Two heat treatments were performed for obtaining either ferrite microstructure or ferrite-bainite microstructure to study the contributions from two strengthening mechanisms with Mo addition, namely solid-solution strengthening and bainite strengthening. The results show that solid-solution strengthening is the predominant elevated-temperature strengthening mechanism of Mo in fire-resistant steel. This strengthening effect has a huge contribution in improving elevated-temperature strength when Mo content is below 0.5 wt.%, and the yield strength at 600 °C goes up by a significant 13.7 MPa per 0.1 wt.% Mo addition. However, it becomes relatively weak when Mo content is more than or equal to 0.5 wt.%. Moreover, results indicate that the elevated-temperature strength remarkably increases when the volume fraction of bainite is above 15%. Furthermore, it is found that the ferrite grain size has minor effect on elevated-temperature strength of fire-resistant steel. Results also provide fundamentals of designing low-cost fire-resistant steels with excellent strength.

  2. Modal Acoustic Emission Used at Elevated Temperatures to Detect Damage and Failure Location in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are being developed for elevated-temperature engine applications. A leading material system in this class of materials is silicon carbide (SiC) fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites. Unfortunately, the nonoxide fibers, matrix, and interphase (boron nitride in this system) can react with oxygen or water vapor in the atmosphere, leading to strength degradation of the composite at elevated temperatures. For this study, constant-load stress-rupture tests were performed in air at temperatures ranging from 815 to 960 C until failure. From these data, predictions can be made for the useful life of such composites under similar stressed-oxidation conditions. During these experiments, the sounds of failure events (matrix cracking and fiber breaking) were monitored with a modal acoustic emission (AE) analyzer through transducers that were attached at the ends of the tensile bars. Such failure events, which are caused by applied stress and oxidation reactions, cause these composites to fail prematurely. Because of the nature of acoustic waveform propagation in thin tensile bars, the location of individual source events and the eventual failure event could be detected accurately.

  3. Coupled DDD-FEM modeling on the mechanical behavior of microlayered metallic multilayer film at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Minsheng; Li, Zhenhuan

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the mechanical behavior of the microlayered metallic thin films (MMMFs) at elevated temperature, an enhanced discrete-continuous model (DCM), which couples rather than superposes the two-dimensional climb/glide-enabled discrete dislocation dynamics (2D-DDD) with the linearly elastic finite element method (FEM), is developed in this study. In the present coupling scheme, two especial treatments are made. One is to solve how the plastic strain captured by the DDD module is transferred properly to the FEM module as an eigen-strain; the other is to answer how the stress field computationally obtained by the FEM module is transferred accurately to the DDD module to drive those discrete dislocations moving correctly. With these two especial treatments, the interactions between adjacent dislocations and between dislocation pile-ups and inter-phase boundaries (IBs), which are crucial to the strengthening effect in MMMFs, are carefully taken into account. After verified by comparing the computationally predicted results with the theoretical solutions for a dislocation residing in a homogeneous material and nearby a bi-material interface, this 2D-DDD/FEM coupling scheme is used to model the tensile mechanical behaviors of MMMFs at elevated temperature. The strengthening mechanism of MMMFs and the layer thickness effect are studied in detail, with special attentions to the influence of dislocation climb on them.

  4. A unique elevated-temperature tension-torsion fatigue test rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, E. H.; Chan, C. T.

    1987-06-01

    A unique tension-torsion fatigue test set up is described that allows strain-controlled tests at temperatures exceeding 649 C. The machine uses a large die set as a load frame resulting in lower cost and superior parallel positioning of the crossheads. Disposable weld-on grips were found to be cost effective for elevated-temperature testing. A new extensometer using commercially available capacitance probes was developed which can operate at the elevated temperature without cooling. Capacitance ring probes were utilized in an attempt to measure through-thickness strains. The characteristic behavior of the ring probes is discussed. Design modifications needed to make a successful measurement of through-thickness strains at elevated temperatures are presented.

  5. High-resolution absorption cross sections of C2H6 at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, Robert J.; Buzan, Eric; Dulick, Michael; Bernath, Peter F.

    2015-11-01

    Infrared absorption cross sections near 3.3 μm have been obtained for ethane, C2H6. These were acquired at elevated temperatures (up to 773 K) using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and tube furnace with a resolution of 0.005 cm-1. The integrated absorption was calibrated using composite infrared spectra taken from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). These new measurements are the first high-resolution infrared C2H6 cross sections at elevated temperatures.

  6. Structural instabilities involving time dependent materials : theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minahen, Timothy M.

    The creep buckling of viscoelastic structures is studied analytically and experimentally to investigate structural stability in the presence of time dependent materials. The theory of linear viscoelasticity is used to model polymeric column specimens subjected to constant compressive end loads. A strength of materials approach (Euler-Bernoulli beam theory) is employed to model the moment-curvature relation for the column. The growth of initial imperfections is calculated using the hereditary integral formulation. Solution techniques are developed for small displacements and then generalized to include the effects of large displacements and rotations. A failure criterion based on maximum deformation allows the column life to be estimated directly from the material relaxation modulus. A discussion generalizing the results to include plates and shells is presented.Rectangular cross-section polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) specimens with hinged boundary conditions are used to study viscoelastic buckling experimentally. Constant compressive end loads are applied using a servo-controlled load frame while the specimens are kept in a temperature cabinet at elevated temperatures (accelerating the creep behavior). Specimen shortening and out-of-plane deflections are monitored during the tests. The relaxation modulus of PMMA is approximated by a Prony-Dirichlet series and the model is used to simulate the laboratory experiments. Model and experimental results show good agreement during the "glassy" and slow growth phases of the column response. As the growth rate increases some deviations between theory and experiment are seen. It is shown that the deviations are not a result of geometric nonlinearities, but may, in part, be explained by material nonlinearities not accounted for in the model.

  7. Tensile deformation behaviors of Zircaloy-4 alloy at ambient and elevated temperatures: In situ neutron diffraction and simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongjia; Sun, Guangai; Woo, Wanchuck; Gong, Jian; Chen, Bo; Wang, Yandong; Fu, Yong Qing; Huang, Chaoqiang; Xie, Lei; Peng, Shuming

    2014-03-01

    Tensile stress-strain relationship of a rolled Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) plate was examined in situ using a neutron diffraction method at room temperature (RT, 25 °C) and an elevated temperature (250 °C). Variations of lattice strains were obtained as a function of macroscopic bulk strains along prismatic (101¯0), basal (0 0 0 2) and pyramidal (101¯1) planes in the hexagonal close-packed structure of the Zr-4. The mechanisms of strain responses in these three major planes were simulated using elastic-plastic self-consistent (EPSC) model based on Hill-Hutchinson method, thus the inter-granular stresses and deformation systems of each individual grain under loading were obtained. Results show that there is a good agreement between the EPSC modeling and neutron diffraction measurements in terms of macroscopic stress-strain relationship and lattice strain evolutions of the planes at RT. However, there is a slight discrepancy in the lattice strains obtained from the EPSC modeling and neutron diffraction when the specimen was deformed at 250 °C. Analysis of grain structure and texture obtained using electron back-scattered diffraction suggests that dynamic recovery process is significant during the tensile deformation at the elevated temperature, which was not considered in the simulation.

  8. Space Shuttle Orbiter - Leading edge structural design/analysis and material allowables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. W.; Curry, D. M.; Kelly, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC), a structural composite whose development was targeted for the high temperature reentry environments of reusable space vehicles, has successfully demonstrated that capability on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Unique mechanical properties, particularly at elevated temperatures up to 3000 F, make this material ideally suited for the 'hot' regions of multimission space vehicles. Design allowable characterization testing, full-scale development and qualification testing, and structural analysis techniques will be presented herein that briefly chart the history of the RCC material from infancy to eventual multimission certification for the Orbiter. Included are discussions pertaining to the development of the design allowable data base, manipulation of the test data into usable forms, and the analytical verification process.

  9. Composite structural materials. [aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The development of composite materials for aircraft applications is addressed with specific consideration of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life prediction. The design and flight testing of composite ultralight gliders is documented. Advances in computer aided design and methods for nondestructive testing are also discussed.

  10. Response of AM fungi spore population to elevated temperature and nitrogen addition and their influence on the plant community composition and productivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Yang, Xue; Guo, Rui; Guo, Jixun

    2016-01-01

    To examine the influence of elevated temperature and nitrogen (N) addition on species composition and development of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and the effect of AMF on plant community structure and aboveground productivity, we conducted a 5-year field experiment in a temperate meadow in northeast China and a subsequent greenhouse experiment. In the field experiment, N addition reduced spore population diversity and richness of AMF and suppressed the spore density and the hyphal length density (HLD). Elevated temperature decreased spore density and diameter and increased the HLD, but did not affect AMF spore population composition. In the greenhouse experiment, AMF altered plant community composition and increased total aboveground biomass in both elevated temperature and N addition treatments; additionally, AMF also increased the relative abundance and aboveground biomass of the grasses Leymus chinensis (Poaceae) and Setaria viridis (Gramineae) and significantly reduced the relative abundance and aboveground biomass of the Suaeda corniculata (Chenopodiaceae). Although elevated temperature and N addition can affect species composition or suppress the development of AMF, AMF are likely to play a vital role in increasing plant diversity and productivity. Notably, AMF might reduce the threat of climate change induced degradation of temperate meadow ecosystems. PMID:27098761

  11. Response of AM fungi spore population to elevated temperature and nitrogen addition and their influence on the plant community composition and productivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Yang, Xue; Guo, Rui; Guo, Jixun

    2016-01-01

    To examine the influence of elevated temperature and nitrogen (N) addition on species composition and development of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and the effect of AMF on plant community structure and aboveground productivity, we conducted a 5-year field experiment in a temperate meadow in northeast China and a subsequent greenhouse experiment. In the field experiment, N addition reduced spore population diversity and richness of AMF and suppressed the spore density and the hyphal length density (HLD). Elevated temperature decreased spore density and diameter and increased the HLD, but did not affect AMF spore population composition. In the greenhouse experiment, AMF altered plant community composition and increased total aboveground biomass in both elevated temperature and N addition treatments; additionally, AMF also increased the relative abundance and aboveground biomass of the grasses Leymus chinensis (Poaceae) and Setaria viridis (Gramineae) and significantly reduced the relative abundance and aboveground biomass of the Suaeda corniculata (Chenopodiaceae). Although elevated temperature and N addition can affect species composition or suppress the development of AMF, AMF are likely to play a vital role in increasing plant diversity and productivity. Notably, AMF might reduce the threat of climate change induced degradation of temperate meadow ecosystems. PMID:27098761

  12. Directionally Solidified NiAl-Based Alloys Studied for Improved Elevated-Temperature Strength and Room-Temperature Fracture Toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Raj, Sai V.; Locci, Ivan E.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2000-01-01

    Efforts are underway to replace superalloys used in the hot sections of gas turbine engines with materials possessing better mechanical and physical properties. Alloys based on the intermetallic NiAl have demonstrated potential; however, they generally suffer from low fracture resistance (toughness) at room temperature and from poor strength at elevated temperatures. Directional solidification of NiAl alloyed with both Cr and Mo has yielded materials with useful toughness and elevated-temperature strength values. The intermetallic alloy NiAl has been proposed as an advanced material to extend the maximum operational temperature of gas turbine engines by several hundred degrees centigrade. This intermetallic alloy displays a lower density (approximately 30-percent less) and a higher thermal conductivity (4 to 8 times greater) than conventional superalloys as well as good high-temperature oxidation resistance. Unfortunately, unalloyed NiAl has poor elevated temperature strength (approximately 50 MPa at 1027 C) and low room-temperature fracture toughness (about 5 MPa). Directionally solidified NiAl eutectic alloys are known to possess a combination of high elevated-temperature strength and good room-temperature fracture toughness. Research has demonstrated that a NiAl matrix containing a uniform distribution of very thin Cr plates alloyed with Mo possessed both increased fracture toughness and elevated-temperature creep strength. Although attractive properties were obtained, these alloys were formed at low growth rates (greater than 19 mm/hr), which are considered to be economically unviable. Hence, an investigation was warranted of the strength and toughness behavior of NiAl-(Cr,Mo) directionally solidified at faster growth rates. If the mechanical properties did not deteriorate with increased growth rates, directional solidification could offer an economical means to produce NiAl-based alloys commercially for gas turbine engines. An investigation at the NASA Glenn

  13. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, W.Y.

    1984-07-27

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  14. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-06

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  15. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-01

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  16. Adaptive structures: some materials and structural issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Donald; Lloyd, Peter A.; Hopgood, P.; Mahon, Steve W.; Bowles, A. R.

    2000-08-01

    The concept of using embedded or surface-bonded solid-state actuators to effect shape change in carbon fibre composite laminates continues to have technical merit and appeal. Conventional laminate design methods tend to lead to stiff structures, whilst it is easiest to impose a change of shape on a compliant structure. This presents a possible conflict of design and suggests that the useful performance of solid- state actuators will always be limited by the stiffness of the host laminate. One possible solution is to increase the in-plane work capacity of the actuators either by using improved materials such as phase change perovskites like PLZT or improved eletroding techniques such as inter-digitated electrodes (IDEs). In this study, the performance of several different actuator/laminate systems have been modelled to determine a baseline capability in pure bending. Four cases have been considered for different panel thicknesses and lay-up sequences. The materials performance and IDE design issues have also been addressed. Modelling indicates that even with conventional actuator materials, structural displacements can be produced which could provide useful shape change in applications such as missile roll control.

  17. Selected durability studies of geopolymer concrete with respect to carbonation, elevated temperature, and microbial induced corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badar, Mohammad Sufian

    This thesis reports a comprehensive study related to the experimental evaluation of carbonation in reinforced geopolymer concrete, the evaluation of geopolymer concretes at elevated temperature, and the resistance of geopolymer concrete to microbial induced corrosion (MIC). Carbonation: Reinforced concretes, made of geopolymer, prepared from two class F fly ashes and one class C fly ash, were subjected to accelerated carbonation treatment for a period of 450 days. Electrochemical, microstructure and pore structure examinations were performed to evaluate the effect of corrosion caused due to carbonation. GPC specimens prepared from class F fly ash exhibited lower corrosion rates by a factor of 21, and higher pH values (pH>12) when compared with concrete specimens prepared from class C Fly ash (GPCMN). Microstructure and pore characterization of GPC prepared using class F fly ash revealed lower porosity by a factor of 2.5 as compared with thier counterparts made using GPC-MN. The superior performace of GPC prepared with the class F fly ash could be attributed to the dense pore structure and formation of the protective layer of calcium and sodium alumino silicate hydrates (C/N-A-S-H) geopolymeric gels around the steel reinforcement. Elevated Temperature: Geopolymers are an emerging class of cementitious binders which possess a potential for high temperature resistance that could possibly be utilized in applications such as nozzles, aspirators and refractory linings. This study reports on the results of an investigation into the performance of a fly ash based geopolymer binder in high temperature environments. Geopolymer concrete (GPC) was prepared using eleven types of fly ashes obtained from four countries. High content alumina and silica sand was used in the mix for preparing GPC. GPC was subjected to thermal shock tests following ASTM C 1100-88. The GPC samples prepared with tabular alumina were kept at 1093° C and immediately quenched in water. GPC specimens

  18. Immobilization of imidazole moieties in polymer electrolyte composite membrane for elevated temperature fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Zhou, Bei; Ye, Gongbo; Pan, Mu; Zhang, Haining

    2015-12-01

    Development of membrane electrolyte with reasonable proton conductivity at elevated temperature without external humidification is essential for practical applications of elevated temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Herein, a novel polymer electrolyte composite membrane using imidazole as anhydrous proton carriers for elevated temperature fuel cells is investigated. The imidazole moieties are immobilized inside the Nafion/poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) composite membrane through in situ formation of imidazole functionalized silica nanoparticles in Nafion dispersion. The thus-formed membrane exhibits strong Coulombic interaction between negatively charged sulfonic acid groups of Nafion and protonated imidazole moieties, leading to an anhydrous proton conductivity of 0.018 S cm-1 at 180 °C. With the introduction of PTFE matrix, the mechanical strength of the membrane is greatly improved. The peak power density of a single cell assembled from the hybrid membrane is observed to be 130 mW cm-2 under 350 mA cm-2 at 110 °C without external humidification and it remains stable for 20 h continuous operation. The obtained results demonstrate that the developed composite membranes could be utilized as promising membrane electrolytes for elevated temperature fuel cells.

  19. Physical and chemical changes in whey protein concentrate stored at elevated temperature and humidity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemistry of whey protein concentrate (WPC) under adverse storage conditions was monitored to provide information on shelf life in hot, humid areas. WPC34 (34.9 g protein/100 g) and WPC80 (76.8 g protein/100 g) were stored for up to 18 mo under ambient conditions and at elevated temperature and...

  20. CHARACTERISTICS OF MERCURY DESORPTION FROM SORBENTS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES. (R822721C697)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigated the dynamic desorption characteristics of mercury during the thermal treatment of mercury-loaded sorbents at elevated temperatures under fixed-bed operations. Experiments were carried out in a 25.4 mm ID quartz bed enclosed in an electric furnace. ...

  1. CHARACTERISTICS OF MERCURY DESORPTION FROM SORBENTS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES. (R826694C697)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigated the dynamic desorption characteristics of mercury during the thermal treatment of mercury-loaded sorbents at elevated temperatures under fixed-bed operations. Experiments were carried out in a 25.4 mm ID quartz bed enclosed in an electric furnace. ...

  2. The analysis of fatigue crack growth mechanism and oxidation and fatigue life at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1988-01-01

    Two quantitative models based on experimentally observed fatigue damage processes have been made: (1) a model of low cycle fatigue life based on fatigue crack growth under general-yielding cyclic loading; and (2) a model of accelerated fatigue crack growth at elevated temperatures based on grain boundary oxidation. These two quantitative models agree very well with the experimental observations.

  3. Apparent activation energy of subcritical crack growth of SiC/SiC composites at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y.S.; Stackpoole, M.M.; Bordia, R.

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the environmental effect of oxygen-containing gases on the subcritical crack growth of continuous fiber (Nicalon {open_quotes}SiC{close_quotes}) reinforced ceramic matrix (SiC) composites at elevated temperatures. This is a continuing project and the primary goal for this time period is to obtain an apparent activation energy for SiC/SiC materials with two different interfaces: carbon and boron nitride coatings. In the past six months, the authors have conducted studies of subcritical crack growth on SiC/SiC composite materials in a corrosive (O{sub 2}) as well as an inert (Ar) atmosphere for temperatures ranging from 800 to 1100{degree}C.

  4. Influence of Ca content and oxygen partial pressure on microstructural evolution of (Co,Ca)O at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kusinski, J; Cieniek, L; Petot-Ervas, G; Petot, C; Baldinozzi, G

    2006-10-01

    Ca-doped (1, 1.7, 5 and 10 mol% CaO) cobalt oxide single-crystal samples, with an [001] orientation, were annealed at elevated temperatures of 1000-1200 degrees C for different times and at different oxygen partial pressures. The microstructure was examined by means of transmission light and electron microscopy. High-temperature X-ray diffractometry was used, with the aim of determining the temperature of the CoO <--> Co(3)O(4) transition in these materials. Extensive precipitation of Ca-free Co(3)O(4) spinel crystals was observed with increasing Ca content and oxygen activity. It is suggested that the electrical conductivity changes in this material may be related to this precipitation, because it changes the electronic state of cobalt cations. PMID:17100900

  5. Effect of Load Rate on Tensile Strength of Various CFCCs at Elevated Temperatures: An Approach to Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2001-01-01

    Strength of three continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/CAS-11, SiC/MAS-5 and SiC/SiC, was determined as a function of test rate in air at 1100 - 1200 C. All three composite materials exhibited a strong dependency of strength on test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress-rate) to another (constant stress loading) suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law tyw of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics. It was further found that constant stress-rate testing could be used as an alternative to life prediction test methodology even for the composite materials at least for the short range of lifetime.

  6. Failure of laminated composites at thickness discontinuities under complex loading and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangwook

    1998-12-01

    Failure initiation of laminated composites with discontinuous thickness is examined in terms of typical structural load description (tension, shear force and bending moment) rather than in terms of micromechanics considerations. Because transverse shear produced relatively small effects in failure initiation, results are presented as tension-bending interactions. Two loading frames were designed to apply moments and tension simultaneously. Four types of specimens of different stacking sequence were examined to determine failure initiation, and analyzed subsequently via a finite element analysis (ABAQUS). Depending on the stacking sequence across the interface of the step, two different failure modes are identified: For uni-directional fiber orientation across the interface in the tension direction, failure occurs through cracking and delamination which is governed by a fracture mechanics criterion. While the initiation strength for this failure mode is higher than for the cross-ply configurations, the residual strength after initiation is only marginally higher, providing virtually no margin of safety (10%). For cases involving cross-plies on either side of the interface, failure initiation occurs by matrix cracking, with a critical strain across the fibers providing a universal failure criterion. In these cases the residual load bearing capability was 30 to 45% higher than the failure initiation loads. The interaction between moment and tension at failure initiation is linear, an observation that does not hold for the delamination failure driven by crack propagation. It is found that all failures can be described in terms of a common fracture principle; the stress or strain criteria are interchangeable with the fracture energy computations, provided one allows for a range of values of associated fracture energies. Assuming that time dependent aspects of the failure process are not dominant, elevated temperatures did not change the general results of how bending

  7. Elevated temperature enhances normal early embryonic development in the coral Platygyra acuta under low salinity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, Apple Pui Yi; Ang, Put

    2015-06-01

    To better understand the possible consequences of climate change on reef building scleractinian corals in a marginal environment, laboratory experiments were conducted to examine the interactive effects of changes in salinity and temperature on percent fertilization success and early embryonic development of the coral Platygyra acuta. In the present study, a salinity of 24 psu (ambient 32 psu) reduced fertilization success by 60 %. Normal embryonic development was reduced by >80 % at 26 psu (ambient 33 psu) with 100 % abnormal development at 22 psu under ambient temperature. Elevated temperature (+3 °C) above the ambient spawning temperature did not show any negative effects on fertilization success. However, there was a trend for more abnormal embryos to develop at elevated temperature in the 2 d of the spawning event. The interactive effects between salinity and temperature are statistically significant only on normal embryonic development of P. acuta, but not on its fertilization success. Salinity was revealed to be the main factor affecting both fertilization success and normal embryonic development. Interestingly, the much lower fertilization success (76 %) observed in the second day of spawning (Trial 2) under ambient temperature recovered to 99 % success under elevated (+3 °C) temperature conditions. Moreover, elevated temperature enhanced normal early embryonic development under lowered salinity (26 psu). This antagonistic interactive effect was consistently observed in two successive nights of spawning. Overall, our results indicate that, in terms of its fertilization success and embryonic development, P. acuta is the most tolerant coral species to reduced salinity thus far reported in the literature. Elevated temperature, at least that within the tolerable range of the corals, could apparently alleviate the potential negative effects from salinity stresses. This mitigating role of elevated temperature appears not to have been reported on corals before.

  8. The Environmental Cost of Misinformation: Why the Recommendation to Use Elevated Temperatures for Handwashing is Problematic

    PubMed Central

    Carrico, Amanda R.; Spoden, Micajah; Wallston, Kenneth A.; Vandenbergh, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple government and health organizations recommend the use of warm or hot water in publications designed to educate the public on best practices for washing one’s hands. This is despite research suggesting that the use of an elevated water temperature does not improve handwashing efficacy, but can cause hand irritation. There is reason to believe that the perception that warm or hot water is more effective at cleaning one’s hands is pervasive, and may be one factor that is driving up unnecessary energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. We examine handwashing practices and beliefs about water temperature using a survey of 510 adults in the United States. The survey included measures of handwashing frequency, duration, the proportion of time an elevated temperature was used, and beliefs about water temperature and handwashing efficacy. We also estimate the energy consumed and resultant carbon dioxide equivalent emissions (CO2eq) in the U.S. due to the use of elevated temperatures during handwashing. Participants used an elevated temperature 64% of the time, causing 6.3 million metric tons (MMt) of CO2eq which is 0.1% of total annual emissions and 0.3% of commercial and residential sector emissions. Roughly 69% of the sample believed that elevated temperatures improve handwashing efficacy. Updating these beliefs could prevent 1 MMt of CO2eq annually, exceeding the total emissions from many industrial sources in the U.S. including the Lead and Zinc industries. In addition to causing skin irritation, the recommendation to use an elevated temperature during handwashing contributes to another major threat to public health—climate change. Health and consumer protection organizations should consider advocating for the use of a “comfortable” temperature rather than warm or hot water. PMID:23814480

  9. Nondestructive Evaluation of Stiffness and Stresses of Ceramic Candle Filters at Elevated Temperature under Vibrational Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, R.H.L.; Kiriakidia, A.

    2002-09-19

    In recent years a significant amount of effort has been devoted to develop damage-tolerant hot gas filter elements, which can withstand chemical, high pressure and extreme thermal cyclic loading in the coal-based environment (Alvin 1999, Spain and Starrett 1999). Ceramic candle filters have proven to be an effective filter for the ash laden gas streams, protecting the gas turbine components from exposure to particulate matter (Lippert et al. 1994). Ceramic candle filters need to sustain extreme thermal environment and vibration-induced stresses over a great period of time. Destructive tests have been used to describe physical, mechanical and thermal properties of the filters and to relate these properties and behaviors to in-service performance, and ultimately to predict the useful life of the filter materials (Pontius and Starrett 1994, Alvin et al. 1994). Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques have been developed to determine the deterioration or the presence of damage and to estimate the remaining stiffness of ceramic candle filters (Chen and Kiriakidis 2001). This paper presents a study of parameters involved in the prediction of remaining life of ceramic candle filters under service conditions. About one hundred ceramic candle filters from previous studies (Chen and Kiriakidis 2000) and forty-six filters received during this project have been nondestructively evaluated. They are divided in Pall Vitropore, Schumacher and Coors filters. Forty-six of these filters were used having various in-service exposure times at the PSDF and the rest were unused filters. Dynamic characterization tests were employed to investigate the material properties of ceramic candle filters. The vibration frequency changes due to exposure hours, dust cake accumulation, candle's axisymmetry, boundary conditions and elevated temperatures are studied. Investigations on fatigue stresses of the filters due to vibration of the plenum and back pulse shaking are also studied. Finite element

  10. The effects of physical aging at elevated temperatures on the viscoelastic creep on IM7/K3B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Feldman, Mark

    1994-01-01

    Physical aging at elevated temperature of the advanced composite IM7/K3B was investigated through the use of creep compliance tests. Testing consisted of short term isothermal, creep/recovery with the creep segments performed at constant load. The matrix dominated transverse tensile and in-plane shear behavior were measured at temperatures ranging from 200 to 230 C. Through the use of time based shifting procedures, the aging shift factors, shift rates and momentary master curve parameters were found at each temperature. These material parameters were used as input to a predictive methodology, which was based upon effective time theory and linear viscoelasticity combined with classical lamination theory. Long term creep compliance test data was compared to predictions to verify the method. The model was then used to predict the long term creep behavior for several general laminates.

  11. Ultimate Tensile Strength as a Function of Test Rate for Various Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Ultimate tensile strength of five different continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/BSAS (2D 2 types), SiC/MAS-5 (2D), SiC/SiC (2D enhanced), and C/SiC(2D) was determined as a function of test rate at I 100 to 1200 'C in air. All five composite materials exhibited a significant dependency of ultimate strength on test rate such that the ultimate strength decreased with decreasing test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress rate) to another (constant stress loading) for SiC/BSAS suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law type of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics.

  12. Infrared spectroscopic studies of the effect of elevated temperature on the association of pyroglutamic acid with clay and other minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macklin, J. W.; White, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    Fourier transform i.r. measurements of L-pyroglutamic acid dispersed in a matrix of a clay, silica or alumina have been obtained at various temperatures between 25 and 220 degrees C. The i.r. spectrum of L-pyroglutamic acid varies in a manner dependent upon the matrix material and shows considerable change as the temperature of the mixtures is increased. The differences in the spectrum at elevated temperatures are explained in terms of a chemical reaction between hydroxyl groups in the matrix and the carboxylic acid. The i.r. spectra of trimethylsilyl derivatives of L-pyroglutamic acid and aluminum pyroglutamate were also measured to assist the understanding of spectra and interpretation of the spectral changes dependent upon increasing temperature.

  13. Characterization of Wafer-Level Au-In-Bonded Samples at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luu, Thi-Thuy; Hoivik, Nils; Wang, Kaiying; Aasmundtveit, Knut E.; Vardøy, Astrid-Sofie B.

    2015-06-01

    Wafer-level bonding using Au-In solid liquid interdiffusion (SLID) bonding is a promising approach to enable low-temperature assembly and MEMS packaging/encapsulation. Due to the low-melting point of In, wafer-level bonding can be performed at considerably lower temperatures than Sn-based bonding; this work treats bonds performed at 453 K (180 °C). Following bonding, the die shear strength at elevated temperatures was investigated from room temperature to 573 K (300 °C), revealing excellent mechanical integrity at these temperatures well above the bonding temperature. For shear test temperatures from room temperature to 473 K (200 °C), the measured shear strength was stable at 30 MPa, whereas it increased to 40 MPa at shear test temperature of 573 K (300 °C). The fracture surfaces of Au-In-bonded samples revealed brittle fracture modes (at the original bond interface and at the adhesion layers) for shear test temperatures up to 473 K (200 °C), but ductile fracture mode for shear test temperature of 573 K (300 °C). The as-bonded samples have a layered structure consisting of the two intermetallic phases AuIn and γ', as shown by cross section microscopy and predicted from the phase diagram. The change in behavior for the tests at 573 K (300 °C) is attributed to a solid-state phase transition occurring at 497 K (224 °C), where the phase diagram predicts a AuIn/ψ structure and a phase boundary moving across the initial bond interface. The associated interdiffusion of Au and In will strengthen the initial bond interface and, as a consequence, the measured shear strength. This work provides experimental evidence for the high-temperature stability of wafer-level, low-temperature bonded, Au-In SLID bonds. The high bond strength obtained is limited by the strength at the initial bond interface and at the adhesion layers, showing that the Au-In SLID system itself is capable of even higher bond strength.

  14. Explosive scabbling of structural materials

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Bonzon, Lloyd L.

    2002-01-01

    A new approach to scabbling of surfaces of structural materials is disclosed. A layer of mildly energetic explosive composition is applied to the surface to be scabbled. The explosive composition is then detonated, rubbleizing the surface. Explosive compositions used must sustain a detonation front along the surface to which it is applied and conform closely to the surface being scabbled. Suitable explosive compositions exist which are stable under handling, easy to apply, easy to transport, have limited toxicity, and can be reliably detonated using conventional techniques.

  15. Method of binding structural material

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, Arun S.; Antink, Allison L.

    2007-12-25

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic. The ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  16. Effects of elevated temperature postharvest on color aspect, physiochemical characteristics, and aroma components of pineapple fruits.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuanhe; Liu, Yan

    2014-12-01

    In this work, 2 separate experiments were performed to describe the influence of elevated temperature treatments postharvest on the color, physiochemical characteristics and aroma components of pineapple fruits during low-temperature seasons. The L* (lightness) values of the skin and pulp of pineapple fruits were decreased. The a* (greenness-redness) and b* (blueness-yellowness) values of the skin and pulp were all markedly increased. The elevated temperature significantly increased the contents of total soluble solids (TSS) and slightly affected contents of vitamin C (nonsignificant). Titratable acidity (TA) of pineapple fruits were notably decreased, whereas the values of TSS/TA of pineapple fruits were significantly increased. The firmness of the pineapple fruits decreased and more esters and alkenes were identified. The total relative contents of esters were increased, and the total relative contents of alkenes were decreased. PMID:25367439

  17. Fatigue crack growth at elevated temperature 316 stainless steel and H-13 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. C.; Liu, H. W.

    1976-01-01

    Crack growths were measured at elevated temperatures under four types of loading: pp, pc, cp, and cc. In H-13 steel, all these four types of loading gave nearly the same crack growth rates, and the length of hold time had negligible effects. In AISI 316 stainless steel, the hold time effects on crack growth rate were negligible if the loading was tension-tension type; however, these effects were significant in reversed bending load, and the crack growth rates under these four types of loading varied considerably. Both tensile and compressive hold times caused increased crack growth rate, but the compressive hold period was more deleterious than the tensile one. Metallographic examination showed that all the crack paths under different types of loading were largely transgranular for both CTS tension-tension specimens and SEN reversed cantilever bending specimens. In addition, an electric potential technique was used to monitor crack growth at elevated temperature.

  18. Microstructural stability of wrought, laser and electron beam glazed NARloy-Z alloy at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J.; Jerman, G.; Bhat, B.; Poorman, R.

    1993-01-01

    Microstructure of wrought, laser, and electron-beam glazed NARloy-Z(Cu-3 wt.% Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr) was investigated for thermal stability at elevated temperatures (539 to 760 C (1,100 to 1,400 F)) up to 94 h. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis were employed for studying microstructural evolution and kinetics of precipitation. Grain boundary precipitation and precipitate free zones (PFZ's) were observed in the wrought alloy after exposing to temperatures above 605 C (1,120 F). The fine-grained microstructure observed in the laser and electron-beam glazed NARloy-Z was much more stable at elevated temperatures. Microstructural changes correlated well with hardness measurements.

  19. Elevated Temperature Strength of Fine-Grained INCONEL Alloy MA754

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Totemeier; T.M. Lillo; J.A. Simpson

    2005-09-01

    Elevated temperature tensile and creep-rupture tests were performed on INCONEL alloy MA754 in an as-rolled, fine-grained condition. Tensile tests were performed at 25, 800, 900, and 1000°C; creep-rupture tests were performed at 800, 900, and 1000°C. The elevated temperature strength in the fine-grained condition was approximately 25% of the standard, coarse-grained annealed condition. While good ductility was observed in tensile tests at a nominal strain rate of 1×10-3 sec-1, ductility in creep-rupture tests was very low, with failure elongations less than 5% and no reduction in area. Creep deformation appeared to occur solely by cavity formation and growth.

  20. Improved Mechanical Properties of Various Fabric-Reinforced Geocomposite at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samal, Sneha; Phan Thanh, Nhan; Petríková, Iva; Marvalová, Bohadana

    2015-07-01

    This article signifies the improved performance of the various types of fabric reinforcement of geopolymer as a function of physical, thermal, mechanical, and heat-resistant properties at elevated temperatures. Geopolymer mixed with designed Si:Al ratios of 15.6 were synthesized using three different types of fabric reinforcement such as carbon, E-glass, and basalt fibers. Heat testing was conducted on 3-mm-thick panels with 15 × 90 mm surface exposure region. The strength of carbon-based geocomposite increased toward a higher temperature. The basalt-reinforced geocomposite strength decreased due to the catastrophic failure in matrix region. The poor bridging effect and dissolution of fabric was observed in the E-glass-reinforced geocomposite. At an elevated temperature, fiber bridging was observed in carbon fabric-reinforced geopolymer matrix. Among all the fabrics, carbon proved to be suitable candidate for the high-temperature applications in thermal barrier coatings and fire-resistant panels.

  1. Effects of the operating pressure on the performance of water electrolysis cells at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, Y.; Yasudo, M.; Hine, F.

    1988-12-01

    The influence of pressure on the performance and the thermal behavior of an alkaline water electrolyzer operated at elevated temperatures was studied. The pressure dependence of cell voltage was not significant. On the other hand, the effects of pressure on the thermal behavior were great depending on the operating conditions mainly caused by the suppression of water vaporization. The optimum conditions of the operating temperature and pressure are also discussed from an economic point of view.

  2. Mechanical properties of turbine blade alloys in hydrogen at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluca, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanical properties of single crystal turbine blade alloys in a gaseous hydrogen environment were determined. These alloys are proposed for use in space propulsion systems in pure or partial high pressure hydrogen environments at elevated temperatures. Mechanical property tests included: tensile, creep, low fatigue (LCF), and crack growth. Specimens were in both transverse and longitudinal directions relative to the casting solidification direction. Testing was conducted on solid specimens exposed to externally pressurized environments of gaseous hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched steam.

  3. The optical functions of silicon at elevated temperatures and their application to pulsed laser annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, G.E. Jr.; Lowndes, D.H.; Wood, R.F.

    1993-06-01

    The results of measurements of the optical functions of silicon at elevated temperatures are reviewed and the results applied to pulsed laser annealing of silicon. Several optical experiments which were performed to understand the physics of pulsed laser annealing are described, and related to detailed thermal modeling. The fabrication of silicon solar cells using both thermal and laser processing is described, both of which give very goods results.

  4. Feasibility demonstration of a hyperfiltration technique to reclaim shower wastewater at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hester, J. C.; Brandon, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    A feasibility demonstration of a hyperfiltration technique to determine its capability to reclaim shower wastewater at elevated temperature was conducted. Approximately twenty (20) gallons of typical shower water were processed through a dynamically formed membrane at a temperature of 167 F. Chemical and bacterial analyses of the product water are presented which show compliance with all potable water requirements established for extended manned space missions. In addition, subsystem characteristics and capabilities are discussed.

  5. Initial stages of gold adsorption on silicon stepped surface at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kosolobov, S. S. Song, Se Ahn; Rodyakina, E. E.; Latyshev, A. V.

    2007-04-15

    Experimental study performed by ultrahigh vacuum reflection electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy reveals step instability on Si(111) surface during gold deposition at elevated temperatures (higher than 900 deg. C). Our results show that transformations of regular atomic steps into the system of step bunches and vice versa depend on the gold coverage and direction of the electrical current heating the sample. The mechanism and conditions of the surface morphology transformations are discussed.

  6. Theoretical Study of Midwave Infrared HgCdTe nBn Detectors Operating at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, Nima Dehdashti; Jolley, Gregory; Umana-Membreno, Gilberto A.; Antoszewski, Jarek; Faraone, Lorenzo

    2015-09-01

    We report a theoretical study of mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) unipolar n-type/barrier/ n-type (nBn) detectors for midwave infrared (MWIR) applications at elevated temperatures. The results obtained indicate that the composition, doping, and thickness of the barrier layer in MWIR HgCdTe nBn detectors can be optimized to yield performance levels comparable with those of ideal HgCdTe p- n photodiodes. It is also shown that introduction of an additional barrier at the back contact layer of the detector structure (nBnn+) leads to substantial suppression of the Auger generation-recombination (GR) mechanism; this results in an order-of-magnitude reduction in the dark current level compared with conventional nBn or p- n junction-based detectors, thus enabling background-limited detector operation above 200 K.

  7. Microstructure and mechanical properties of sputter deposited Ni/Ni3Al multilayer films at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Feng, Kai; Li, Zhuguo; Lu, Fenggui; Huang, Jian; Wu, Yixiong

    2016-08-01

    Nano-structured Ni/Ni3Al multilayer was prepared by magnetron sputtering, with individual layer thicknesses h varying from 10 to 160 nm. The microstructure and hardness of Ni/Ni3Al multilayer were investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nanoindentation. The results show that the hardness increases with decreasing h for as-deposited and 500 °C annealed multilayers. When annealed at 700 °C, the hardness approach a peak value at h = 40 nm with followed by softening at smaller h. The influence of individual layer thickness, grain size as well as formation of ordered Ni3Al on strengthening mechanisms of Ni/Ni3Al multilayers at elevated temperature are discussed.

  8. Photosynthetic response to elevated temperature in the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium microadriaticum in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Prieto, R; Matta, J L; Robins, W A; Trench, R K

    1992-01-01

    Elevated temperature (28-34 degrees C) has been hypothesized as the primary cause of the loss of algal endosymbionts in coral reef-associated invertebrates, a phenomenon observed on a world-wide scale over the last decade. In past studies of this "bleaching" phenomenon, there has been an underlying assumption that temperature adversely affects the animal hosts, the algae thereby being relegated to a more passive role. Because photosynthesis is a sensitive indicator of thermal stress in plants and has a central role in the nutrition of symbiotic invertebrates, we have tested the hypothesis that elevated temperature adversely affects photosynthesis in the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium microadriaticum. The results, based on analyses of light-mediated O2 evolution and in vivo fluorescence, indicate that photosynthesis is impaired at temperatures above 30 degrees C and ceases completely at 34-36 degrees C. These observations are discussed in the context of possible mechanisms that may function in the disassociation of algal-invertebrate symbioses in response to elevated temperature. PMID:11607337

  9. Effects of elevated temperature on protein breakdown in muscles from septic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hall-Angeras, M.A.; Angeras, U.H.; Hasselgren, P.O.; Fischer, J.E. )

    1990-04-01

    Elevated temperature has been proposed to contribute to accelerated muscle protein degradation during fever and sepsis. The present study examined the effect of increased temperature in vitro on protein turnover in skeletal muscles from septic and control rats. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP); control rats were sham operated. After 16 h, the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) muscles were incubated at 37 or 40 degrees C. Protein synthesis was determined by measuring incorporation of (14C)phenylalanine into protein. Total and myofibrillar protein breakdown was assessed from release of tyrosine and 3-methylhistidine (3-MH), respectively. Total protein breakdown was increased at 40 degrees C by 15% in EDL and by 29% in SOL from control rats, whereas 3-MH release was not affected. In muscles from septic rats, total and myofibrillar protein breakdown was increased by 22 and 30%, respectively, at 40 degrees C in EDL but was not altered in SOL. Protein synthesis was unaffected by high temperature both in septic and nonseptic muscles. The present results suggest that high temperature is not the primary mechanism of increased muscle protein breakdown in sepsis because the typical response to sepsis, i.e., a predominant increase in myofibrillar protein breakdown, was not induced by elevated temperature in normal muscle. It is possible, however, that increased temperature may potentiate protein breakdown that is already stimulated by sepsis because elevated temperature increased both total and myofibrillar protein breakdown in EDL from septic rats.

  10. Carbohydrate concentrations and freezing stress resistance of silver birch buds grown under elevated temperature and ozone.

    PubMed

    Riikonen, Johanna; Kontunen-Soppela, Sari; Vapaavuori, Elina; Tervahauta, Arja; Tuomainen, Marjo; Oksanen, Elina

    2013-03-01

    The effects of slightly elevated temperature (+0.8 °C), ozone (O3) concentration (1.3 × ambient O3 concentration) and their combination on over-wintering buds of Betula pendula Roth were studied after two growing seasons of exposure in the field. Carbohydrate concentrations, freezing stress resistance (FSR), bud dry weight to fresh weight ratio, and transcript levels of cytochrome oxidase (COX), alternative oxidase (AOX) and dehydrin (LTI36) genes were studied in two clones (clones 12 and 25) in December. Elevated temperature increased the bud dry weight to fresh weight ratio and the ratio of raffinose family oligosaccharides to sucrose and the transcript levels of the dehydrin (LTI36) gene (in clone 12 only), but did not alter the FSR of the buds. Genotype-specific alterations in carbohydrate metabolism were found in the buds grown under elevated O3. The treatments did not significantly affect the transcript level of the COX or AOX genes. No clear pattern of an interactive effect between elevated temperature and O3 concentration was found. According to these data, the increase in autumnal temperatures and slightly increasing O3 concentrations do not increase the risk for freeze-induced damage in winter in silver birch buds, although some alterations in bud physiology occur. PMID:23425688

  11. The rheology of structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ning

    2000-10-01

    In this work, the rheological properties of structured materials are studied via both theoretical (continuum mechanics and molecular theory) and experimental approaches. Through continuum mechanics, a structural model, involving shear-induced structural breakdown and buildup, is extended to model biofluids. In particular, we study the cases of steady shear flow, hysteresis, yield stress, small amplitude oscillatory flow as well as non-linear viscoelasticity. Model predictions are successfully compared with experimental data on complex materials such as blood and a penicillin suspension. Next, modifications are introduced into the network model. A new formulation involving non-affine motion is proposed and its applications are presented. The major improvement is that a finite elongational viscosity is predicted for finite elongational rate, contrary to infinite elongational viscosities existing at some elongational rates predicted by most previous network models. Comparisons with experimental data on shear viscosity, primary normal stress coefficient and elongational viscosity are given, in terms of the same set of model parameters. Model predictions for the stress growth are also shown. The model is successfully tested with data on a polyisobutylene solution (S1), on a polystyrene solution and on a poly-alpha-methylstyrene solution. A further extension of the network model is related to the prediction of the stress jump phenomenon which is defined as the instantaneous gain or loss of stress on startup or cessation of a deformation. It is not predicted by most existing models. In this work, the internal viscosity idea used in the dumbbell model is incorporated into the transient network model. Via appropriate approximations, a closed form constitutive equation, which predicts a stress jump, is obtained. Successful comparisons with the available stress jump measurements are given. In addition, the model yields good quantitative predictions of the standard steady

  12. Mechanism of degradation of surface hardening at elevated temperature in TiAlV-alloys by in situ synchrotron radiation diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berberich, F.; Matz, W.; Kreißig, U.; Schell, N.; Mücklich, A.

    2003-01-01

    The surface hardness of the technically important alloy Ti-6Al-4V (wt.%) can be improved by nitrogen implantation. The structural mechanisms of hardening and of the stability of the improved hardness at elevated temperatures are studied. Ion implanted (II) and plasma immersion ion implanted (PII) samples were used. The formation of small TiN crystallites was detected in the as-implanted state, but only for the II samples a considerable surface hardness increase (factor 3) is observed. The in situ XRD experiments showed, that the TiN phase is stable up to temperatures of 650 °C for both types of implantation. At higher temperature Ti 2N is formed which is stable up to 770 °C. ERDA results indicate a diffusion of nitrogen into the bulk material. The redistribution of N is responsible for the hardness changes: a slight decrease for II samples but an improvement by a factor of 2.5 for PII samples. The improvements/degradations of hardness and wear are discussed in correlation with the nitrogen depth distribution below the surface.

  13. Ab initio studies of equations of state and chemical reactions of reactive structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharieva, Roussislava

    subject of studies of the shock or thermally induced chemical reactions of the two solids comprising these reactive materials, from first principles, is a relatively new field of study. The published literature on ab initio techniques or quantum mechanics based approaches consists of the ab initio or ab initio-molecular dynamics studies in related fields that contain a solid and a gas. One such study in the literature involves a gas and a solid. This is an investigation of the adsorption of gasses such as carbon monoxide (CO) on Tungsten. The motivation for these studies is to synthesize alternate or synthetic fuel technology by Fischer-Tropsch process. In this thesis these studies are first to establish the procedure for solid-solid reaction and then to extend that to consider the effects of mechanical strain and temperature on the binding energy and chemisorptions of CO on tungsten. Then in this thesis, similar studies are also conducted on the effect of mechanical strain and temperature on the binding energies of Titanium and hydrogen. The motivations are again to understand the method and extend the method to such solid-solid reactions. A second motivation is to seek strained conditions that favor hydrogen storage and strain conditions that release hydrogen easily when needed. Following the establishment of ab initio and ab initio studies of chemical reactions between a solid and a gas, the next step of research is to study thermally induced chemical reaction between two solids (Ni+Al). Thus, specific new studies of the thesis are as follows: (1) Ab initio Studies of Binding energies associated with chemisorption of (a) CO on W surfaces (111, and 100) at elevated temperatures and strains and (b) adsorption of hydrogen in titanium base. (2) Equations of state of mixtures of reactive material structures from ab initio methods. (3) Ab initio studies of the reaction initiation, transition states and reaction products of intermetallic mixtures of (Ni+Al) at elevated

  14. Mechanical Behavior of Gamma-Met PX under Uniaxial Loading at Elevated Temperatures and High Strain Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Prakash, Vikas; Draper, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides have received considerable attention over the last decade. These alloys are known to have low density, good high temperature strength retention and good oxidation and corrosion resistance. However, poor ductility and low fracture toughness have been the key limiting factors in the full utilization of these alloys. More recently, a new generation of gamma titanium aluminide alloys, commonly referred to as Gamma-met PX, has been developed by GKSS, Germany. These alloys have been observed to have superior strength and better oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures when compared with conventional gamma titanium aluminides. The present paper discusses results of a study to understand the uniaxial mechanical behavior in both compression and tension of Gamma-Met PX at elevated temperatures and high strain rates. The compression and tensile tests are conducted using a modified split-Hopkinson bar apparatus at test temperatures ranging from room temperature to 900 C and strain rates of up to 3500/s. Under uniaxial compression, in the temperature range from room to 600 C, the flow stress is observed to be nearly independent of test temperature. However, at temperatures higher than 600 C thermal softening is observed at all strain rates with the rate of thermal softening increasing dramatically between 800 C and 900 C. The room temperature tensile tests show negligible strain-rate dependence on both yield stress and flow stress. With an increase in test temperature from room to 900 C the material shows a drop in both yield and flow stress at all levels of plastic strain. However, the measured flow stress is still higher when compared to nickel based super-alloys and other gamma titanium aluminides under similar test conditions. Also, no anomaly in yield stress is observed up to 900 C.

  15. Microstructure, excess solid solubility, and elevated-temperature mechanical behavior of spray-atomized and codeposited Al-Ti-SiCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, M.; Juarez-Islas, J.; Frazier, W. E.; Mohamed, F. A.; Lavernia, E. J.

    1992-12-01

    In the present study, the microstructure, thermal stability, and elevated temperature mechanical behavior of Al-Ti-SiCP metal matrix composites (MMCs) processed by spray atomization and codeposition were investigated. The evolution of the microstructure of the spray-deposited material before and after thermal annealing was studied using X-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and optical microscopy. The thermal stability of the spray-deposited materials was determined by monitoring the changes in hardness after isochronal thermal anneals at various temperatures. The results of X-ray and microanalysis studies revealed the presence of a supersaturated solid solution of Ti in α Al in the spray-atomized and codeposited material, with Ti concentrations in the 0.8 to 1.1 wt pet range. The formation of an extended solid solution was discussed in light of the cooling rates present during atomization and, subsequently, during deposition. Regarding mechanical behavior, the present results suggest that the as-spray deposited and hot extruded Al-Ti matrix is thermally stable up to a temperature of 400 °C and that the excess solid solubility of Ti in a Al, resulting from the rapid quench during processing, is maintained up to a temperature of 300 °C. The elevated-temperature mechanical properties of the hot extruded spray-deposited materials were studied following a 100-hour exposure at 250 °C, 350 °C, and 450 °C; the roomtemperature mechanical properties were also determined. Results show that the elevated-temperature yield strength of the spray-deposited and extruded materials compared favorably to those of an equivalent alloy made by powder metallurgical materials, were superior to those of the ingot material, but were inferior to those of mechanically alloyed Al-Ti materials. In addition, TEM studies showed no evidence of interfacial reactions at the Al-Ti/SiCP interface.

  16. Application of X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy to the study of nuclear structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shanshan

    One of key technologies for the next generation nuclear systems are advanced materials, including high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistance core materials and so on. Local structure determination in these systems, which often are crystallographically intractable, is critical to gaining an understanding of their properties. In this thesis, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), including Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), is used to examine the geometric and electronic structure of nuclear structural materials under varying conditions. The thesis is divided into two main sections. The first examines the structural analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) which are dispersion strengthened by an ultra high density of Y-Ti-O enriched nano-features, resulting in remarkable high temperature creep strength and radiation damage resistance. Titanium and Yttrium K-edge XAS shows commercial alloys MA957 and J12YWT more closely resemble the as received Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti (wt. %) powders, and mechanically alloyed (MA) powders with 0.25Y2O3 (wt. %). It shows that a significant fraction of substitutional Ti remains dissolved in the (BCC) ferrite matrix. In contrast, annealed powders and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidated alloys show high temperature heat treatments shift the Y and Ti to more oxidized states that are consistent with combinations of Y2Ti2O7 and, especially, TiO. The second section describes corrosion studies of Pb with 316L stainless steel, molybdenum and spinet (MgAl2O4) at high temperature by XAS. The corrosion of fuel cladding and structural materials by liquid lead at elevated temperatures is an issue that must be considered when designing advanced nuclear systems and high-power spallation neutron targets. The results of ex-situ studies show that a Mo substrate retained a smooth and less corroded surface than 316L stainless steel sample at elevated temperature. In

  17. Characterization of lignin derived from water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatment of poplar wood at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Yan, Lishi; Wang, Zheming; Laskar, Dhrubojyoti D.; Swita, Marie S.; Cort, John R.; Yang, Bin

    2015-12-01

    In this study, flowthrough pretreatment of biomass has high potential to valorize lignin derivatives to high-value products, which is vital to enhance the economy of biorefinery plants. Comprehensive understanding of lignin behaviors and solubilization chemistry in aqueous pretreatment such as water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatment is of fundamental importance to achieve the goal of providing flexible platform for lignin utilization. In this study, the effects of flowthrough pretreatment conditions on lignin separation from poplar wood were reported as well as the characteristics of three sub-sets of lignin produced from the pretreatment, including residual lignin in pretreated solid residues (ReL), recovered insoluble lignin in pretreated liquid (RISL), and recovered soluble lignin in pretreatment liquid (RSL). Both the water-only and 0.05% (w/w) sulfuric acid pretreatments were performed at temperatures from 160 to 270°C on poplar wood in a flowthrough reactor system for 2-10 min. Results showed that water-only flowthrough pretreatment primarily removed syringyl (S units). Increased temperature and/or the addition of sulfuric acid enhanced the removal of guaiacyl (G units) compared to water-only pretreatments at lower temperatures, resulting in nearly complete removal of lignin from the biomass. Results also suggested that more RISL was recovered than ReL and RSL in both dilute acid and water-only flowthrough pretreatment at elevated temperatures. NMR spectra of the RISL revealed significant β-O-4 cleavage, α-β deoxygenation to form cinnamyl-like end groups, and slight β-5 repolymerization in both water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatments. In conclusion, elevated temperature and/or dilute acid greatly enhanced lignin removal to almost 100% by improving G unit removal besides S unit removal in flowthrough system. A new lignin chemistry transformation pathway was proposed and revealed the complexity of lignin structural change during

  18. Cryogenic structural materials for superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-02-22

    This paper reviews research in the United States and Japan on structural materials for high-field superconducting magnets. Superconducting magnets are used for magnetic fusion energy devices and for accelerators that are used in particle-physics research. The cryogenic structural materials that we review are used for magnet cases and support structures. We expect increased materials requirements in the future.

  19. Properties of materials in high pressure hydrogen at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental efforts in this program for this period. Mechanical property tests of wrought and cast nickel-base alloys and one wrought cobalt-base alloy were conducted in 34.5 MN/sq m (5000-psig) helium and hydrogen or hydrogen mixtures. Comparison of test results was made to determine degradation of properties due to the hydrogen environments. All testing was conducted on solid specimens exposed to external gaseous pressure. Specific mechanical properties determined and the testing methods used are summarized.

  20. Properties of materials in high pressure hydrogen at cryogenic, room, and elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. A., Jr.; Vanwanderham, M. C.

    1973-01-01

    Various tests were conducted to determine the mechanical properties of 12 alloys that are commonly used or proposed for use in pressurized gaseous hydrogen or hydrogen containing environments. Properties determined in the hydrogen environments were compared to properties determined in a pure helium environment at the same conditions to establish environmental degradation. The specific mechanical properties tested include: high-cycle fatigue, low-cycle fatigue, fracture mechanics, creep-rupture, and tensile.

  1. Changes in life history parameters of Rhopalosiphum maidis (Homoptera: Aphididae) under four different elevated temperature and CO2 combinations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haicui; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Wenqiang; Wang, Zhenying; Ni, Xinzhi; Cai, Wanzhi; He, Kanglai

    2014-08-01

    Biological characteristics of corn leaf aphid, Rhopalosiphum maidis (Fitch), on barley, Hordeum vulgare L., were examined for two generations under four different elevated temperature and CO2 combinations. The developmental duration for each life stage was significantly reduced under the elevated temperature (+4 degrees C). The elevated CO2 (700-750 microl/liter) reduced only the development time of fourth-instar nymph. The overall duration of nymphal stage was reduced in the second generation. Thus, the temperature was the dominant factor to development duration of corn leaf aphid. The fecundity of corn leaf aphid was significantly increased under the elevated temperature and CO2, as well as in the later generation. Elevated temperature and CO2 increased the number of alate production, which may enhance the aphid migration or dispersal and the spread of plant viruses. Corn leaf aphid had the highest intrinsic rate of increase under the elevated temperature and CO2 combination in the second generation. These results indicate that the combined effects of both elevated temperature and CO2 on aphid biology may exacerbate aphid damage on barley under the climate change in accompany with elevated temperature and CO2 level. PMID:25195429

  2. Compartment-specific transcriptomics in a reef-building coral exposed to elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Mayfield, Anderson B; Wang, Yu-Bin; Chen, Chii-Shiarng; Lin, Chung-Yen; Chen, Shu-Hwa

    2014-12-01

    Although rising ocean temperatures threaten scleractinian corals and the reefs they construct, certain reef corals can acclimate to elevated temperatures to which they are rarely exposed in situ. Specimens of the model Indo-Pacific reef coral Pocillopora damicornis collected from upwelling reefs of Southern Taiwan were previously found to have survived a 36-week exposure to 30°C, a temperature they encounter infrequently and one that can elicit the breakdown of the coral-dinoflagellate (genus Symbiodinium) endosymbiosis in many corals of the Pacific Ocean. To gain insight into the subcellular pathways utilized by both the coral hosts and their mutualistic Symbiodinium populations to acclimate to this temperature, mRNAs from both control (27°C) and high (30°C)-temperature samples were sequenced on an Illumina platform and assembled into a 236 435-contig transcriptome. These P. damicornis specimens were found to be ~60% anthozoan and 40% microbe (Symbiodinium, other eukaryotic microbes, and bacteria), from an mRNA-perspective. Furthermore, a significantly higher proportion of genes from the Symbiodinium compartment were differentially expressed after two weeks of exposure. Specifically, at elevated temperatures, Symbiodinium populations residing within the coral gastrodermal tissues were more likely to up-regulate the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in metabolism than their coral hosts. Collectively, these transcriptome-scale data suggest that the two members of this endosymbiosis have distinct strategies for acclimating to elevated temperatures that are expected to characterize many of Earth's coral reefs in the coming decades. PMID:25354956

  3. Insights into the potential aggregation liabilities of the b12 Fab fragment via elevated temperature molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Buck, Patrick M; Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Satish K

    2013-03-01

    Aggregation is a common hurdle faced during the development of antibody therapeutics. In this study, we explore the potential aggregation liabilities of the Fab (fragment antigen-binding) from a human IgG1κ antibody via multiple elevated temperature molecular dynamic simulations, analogous to accelerated stability studies performed during formulation development. Deformation and solvent exposure changes in response to thermal stress were monitored for individual structural domains (V(H), V(L), C(H)1 and C(L)), their interfaces (V(H):V(L) and C(H)1:C(L)), edge beta-strands and sequence-predicted aggregation-prone regions (APRs). During simulations, domain interfaces deformed prior to the unfolding of individual domains. However, interfacial beta-strands retained their secondary structure and remained solvent protected longer than all other strands or loops. Thus, APRs located in interfacial beta-strands are effectively blocked from self-association. Structural deformations were also observed in complementarity-determining regions, edge beta-strands and adjoining framework beta-strands, which increased their solvent-accessible surface area and exposed APRs in these regions. From the analysis of these structural changes, two potential aggregation liabilities were identified in the V(H) domain of this Fab. Insights gained from this investigation should be useful in devising a rational structure-based strategy for the design and selection of antibody candidates with high potency and improved developability. PMID:23188804

  4. Shape of isolated domains in lithium tantalate single crystals at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, V. Ya.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Chezganov, D. S.; Lobov, A. I.; Baturin, I. S.; Smirnov, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    The shape of isolated domains has been investigated in congruent lithium tantalate (CLT) single crystals at elevated temperatures and analyzed in terms of kinetic approach. The obtained temperature dependence of the growing domain shape in CLT including circular shape at temperatures above 190 °C has been attributed to increase of relative input of isotropic ionic conductivity. The observed nonstop wall motion and independent domain growth after merging in CLT as opposed to stoichiometric lithium tantalate have been attributed to difference in wall orientation. The computer simulation has confirmed applicability of the kinetic approach to the domain shape explanation.

  5. Effects of selected thermophilic microorganisms on crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this program is to determine the chemical and physical effects of thermophilic and thermoadapted organisms on crude oils and cores at elevated temperatures and pressures. Ultimately a data base will be generated which will be used in technical and economic feasibility studies leading to field applications. Progress to date are described for: construction of core-flooding systems; studies of trends in biochemical interactions between different microorganisms and crude oils; and comparative studies of interaction between different crude oils and microorganisms.

  6. Effects of selected thermophilic microorganisms on crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1992-10-01

    The objective of this program is to determine the chemical and physical effects of thermophilic and thermoadapted organisms on crude oils and cores at elevated temperatures and pressures. Ultimately a data base will be generated which will be used in technical and economic feasibility studies leading to field applications. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: duration of biotreatment and media effects where comparative studies of microbial effects on different types of heavy oils are discussed; construction of core-flooding systems; and microscopic comparison of reaction mixtures.

  7. Effects of nuclear radiation and elevated temperature storage on electroexplosive devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menichelli, V. J.

    1976-01-01

    Aerospace type electroexplosive devices (EEDs) were subjected to nuclear radiation. Components and chemicals used in the EEDs were also included. The kind of radiation and total dosage administered were those which may be experienced in a space flight of 10 years duration, based on information available at this time. After irradiation, the items were stored in elevated constant-temperature ovens to accelerate early effects of the exposure to radiation. Periodically, samples were withdrawn for visual observation and testing. Significant changes occurred which were attributed to elevated-temperature storage and not radiation.

  8. Shape of isolated domains in lithium tantalate single crystals at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Shur, V. Ya. Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Baturin, I. S.; Chezganov, D. S.; Lobov, A. I.; Smirnov, M. M.

    2013-12-09

    The shape of isolated domains has been investigated in congruent lithium tantalate (CLT) single crystals at elevated temperatures and analyzed in terms of kinetic approach. The obtained temperature dependence of the growing domain shape in CLT including circular shape at temperatures above 190 °C has been attributed to increase of relative input of isotropic ionic conductivity. The observed nonstop wall motion and independent domain growth after merging in CLT as opposed to stoichiometric lithium tantalate have been attributed to difference in wall orientation. The computer simulation has confirmed applicability of the kinetic approach to the domain shape explanation.

  9. Tensile deformation of 2618 and Al-Fe-Si-V aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leng, Y.; Porr, W. C., Jr.; Gangloff, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    The present study experimentally characterizes the effects of elevated temperature on the uniaxial tensile behavior of ingot metallurgy 2618 Al alloy and the rapidly solidified FVS 0812 P/M alloy by means of two constitutive formulations: the Ramberg/Osgood equation and the Bodner-Partom (1975) incremental formulation for uniaxial tensile loading. The elastoplastic strain-hardening behavior of the ingot metallurgy alloy is equally well represented by either formulation. Both alloys deform similarly under decreasing load after only 1-5 percent uniform tensile strain, a response which is not described by either constitutive relation.

  10. How bone tissue and cells experience elevated temperatures during orthopaedic cutting: an experimental and computational investigation.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Eimear B; Vaughan, Ted J; Niebur, Glen L; Casey, Conor; Tallon, David; McNamara, Laoise M

    2014-02-01

    During orthopaedic surgery elevated temperatures due to cutting can result in bone injury, contributing to implant failure or delayed healing. However, how resulting temperatures are experienced throughout bone tissue and cells is unknown. This study uses a combination of experiments (forward-looking infrared (FLIR)) and multiscale computational models to predict thermal elevations in bone tissue and cells. Using multiple regression analysis, analytical expressions are derived allowing a priori prediction of temperature distribution throughout bone with respect to blade geometry, feed-rate, distance from surface, and cooling time. This study offers an insight into bone thermal behavior, informing innovative cutting techniques that reduce cellular thermal damage. PMID:24317222

  11. Crevice corrosion -- NaCl concentration map for Alloy 625 at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Toshiaki; Kojima, Yoichi; Tsujikawa, Shigeo

    1995-12-31

    The repassivation potentials, Er, for metal/metal-crevice of Alloy 625 were determined in 0.3--10% NaCl solutions for temperatures up to 250 C. The ER were found to be the least noble at temperatures around 100 and 125 C. The Er became more noble as temperature increased; this tendency was particularly strong in diluted solutions. Based on the experimental data, a crevice corrosion map showing the critical condition in terms of temperature and NaCl concentration was presented. As for the map, a wide repassivation region was found in elevated temperatures, similar to that of commercially pure titanium, C.P.Ti.

  12. The effect of elevated temperature and substrate on free-living Symbiodinium cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitschke, M. R.; Davy, S. K.; Cribb, T. H.; Ward, S.

    2015-03-01

    Elevated temperatures can produce a range of serious, deleterious effects on marine invertebrate— Symbiodinium symbioses. The responses of free-living Symbiodinium to elevated temperature, however, have been little studied, especially in the context of their natural habitat. In this study, we investigated physiological responses of two Symbiodinium cultures to elevated temperature, an exclusively free-living ITS2 clade A (strain HI-0509) and the symbiosis-forming ITS2 type A1 (strain CCMP2467). Free-living Symbiodinium strains have recently been isolated from benthic sediments, and both cultures were therefore grown with or without a microhabitat of carbonate sediment at 25, 28 or 31 °C. Maximum quantum yield of photosystem II ( F v/ F m) and specific growth rate were measured as response variables. In culture, Symbiodinium cells exhibit motility in a helical swimming pattern, and therefore, revolutions per minute (RPM) were also measured with video microscopy. The exclusively free-living clade A was physiologically superior to Symbiodinium A1 across all measured variables and treatment combinations. F v/ F m remained relatively stable through time (at approximately 0.55) and was not substantially affected by temperature or the presence or the absence of sediment. Populations of the exclusively free-living Symbiodinium A reproduced faster with sediment than without and exhibited high levels of motility across all treatments (surpassing 300 RPM). In contrast, the F v/ F m of A1 dropped to 0.42 in sediment (relative to cultures without sediment) and exhibited dramatic declines in cell concentration, most severely at 31 °C. A > 50 % reduction in motility was also observed at 31 °C. Even in the absence of sediment, elevated temperature was observed to reduce population growth and cell motility of type A1. We suggest that vital behaviours linked to motility (such as vertical migration and the locating of potential hosts) may become impaired during future thermal

  13. Note: A method for minimizing oxide formation during elevated temperature nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, I. C.; Hodge, A. M.; Garcia-Sanchez, E.

    2014-09-15

    A standardized method to protect metallic samples and minimize oxide formation during elevated-temperature nanoindentation was adapted to a commercial instrument. Nanoindentation was performed on Al (100), Cu (100), and W (100) single crystals submerged in vacuum oil at 200 °C, while the surface morphology and oxidation was carefully monitored using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results were compared to room temperature and 200 °C nanoindentation tests performed without oil, in order to evaluate the feasibility of using the oil as a protective medium. Extensive surface characterization demonstrated that this methodology is effective for nanoscale testing.

  14. Evaluation of diffuse neutron scattering at elevated temperatures and local decomposition in Ni-Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portmann, M. J.; Schönfeld, B.; Kostorz, G.; Altorfer, F.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2003-07-01

    It is demonstrated that in the diffuse neutron scattering of alloys at elevated temperatures (i) the temperature dependence of the linear absorption coefficient is the reason for problems encountered hitherto in the evaluation of diffuse wide-angle scattering and (ii) small-angle neutron scattering has to be corrected for thermal diffuse scattering. These corrections are applied to published data of Ni-8.4 at. % Au and Ni-9.6 at. % Ti and are used to firmly establish that local decomposition is also present in Au-rich Ni-Au above the miscibility gap.

  15. A falsification of the thermal specialization paradigm: compensation for elevated temperatures in Antarctic fishes

    PubMed Central

    Seebacher, Frank; Davison, William; Lowe, Cara J; Franklin, Craig E

    2005-01-01

    Specialization to a particular environment is one of the main factors used to explain species distributions. Antarctic fishes are often cited as a classic example to illustrate the specialization process and are regarded as the archetypal stenotherms. Here we show that the Antarctic fish Pagothenia borchgrevinki has retained the capacity to compensate for chronic temperature change. By displaying astounding plasticity in cardiovascular response and metabolic control, the fishes maintained locomotory performance at elevated temperatures. Our falsification of the specialization paradigm indicates that the effect of climate change on species distribution and extinction may be overestimated by current models of global warming. PMID:17148152

  16. Final report of comprehensive testing program for concrete at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Oland, C.B.; Naus, D.J.; Robinson, G.C.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this program was to define the variations in physical (thermal) and mechanical (strength) properties of limestone aggregate concrete and lightweight insulating concrete exposed to elevated temperatures that could occur as a result of a postulated large sodium spill in a lined LMFBR equipment cell. To meet this objective, five test series were conducted: (1) unconfined compression, (2) shear, (3) rebar bond, (4) sustained loading (creep), and (5) thermal properties. Mechanical property results are presented for concretes subjected to temperature up to 621{sup 0}C (1150{sup 0}F).

  17. Radiation effects on structural materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoniem, N.M.

    1991-06-28

    This report discusses the following topics on the effect radiation has on thermonuclear reactor materials: Atomic Displacements; Microstructure Evolution; Materials Engineering, Mechanics, and Design; Research on Low-Activation Steels; and Research Motivated by Grant Support.

  18. Microstructural characteristics of adiabatic shear localization in a metastable beta titanium alloy deformed at high strain rate and elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Hongyi; Zeng, Weidong; Wang, Gui; Kent, Damon; Dargusch, Matthew

    2015-04-15

    The microstructural evolution and grain refinement within adiabatic shear bands in the Ti6554 alloy deformed at high strain rates and elevated temperatures have been characterized using transmission electron microscopy. No stress drops were observed in the corresponding stress–strain curve, indicating that the initiation of adiabatic shear bands does not lead to the loss of load capacity for the Ti6554 alloy. The outer region of the shear bands mainly consists of cell structures bounded by dislocation clusters. Equiaxed subgrains in the core area of the shear band can be evolved from the subdivision of cell structures or reconstruction and transverse segmentation of dislocation clusters. It is proposed that dislocation activity dominates the grain refinement process. The rotational recrystallization mechanism may operate as the kinetic requirements for it are fulfilled. The coexistence of different substructures across the shear bands implies that the microstructural evolution inside the shear bands is not homogeneous and different grain refinement mechanisms may operate simultaneously to refine the structure. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The microstructure within the adiabatic shear band was characterized by TEM. • No stress drops were observed in the corresponding stress–strain curve. • Dislocation activity dominated the grain refinement process. • The kinetic requirements for rotational recrystallization mechanism were fulfilled. • Different grain refinement mechanisms operated simultaneously to refine the structure.

  19. Mechanical alloying processing with applications to structural materials. Final report, August 1994--March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, T.H.

    1998-06-01

    Relationships among the synthesis, processing, structure and properties of materials generated through mechanical alloying (MA) or mechanosynthesis are described. Several materials classes: cermets, particulate metal matrix composites (MMC), and tungsten heavy alloys (WHA) have been produced, and their properties and structures evaluated. Niobium carbide and tungsten, carbide cermets can be conveniently generated either through room temperature synthesis (NbC cermets) or by room temperature milling followed by elevated temperature exposure (WC cermets). Cermet microstructures following consolidation are fine, and the materials demonstrate exceptional hardnesses albeit their fracture toughnesses are generally low. Al based MMC can be synthesized similarly. The composites they have studied utilize aluminum carbide as a reinforcement. The yield strengths of these MMC are approximately twice those of high strength aerospace Al alloys. Noncrystalline WHA can be generated via MA. During consolidation, these alloys are prone to crystallization. Nonetheless, because of their fine structure the crystalline products manifest high hardnesses relative to conventional WHA. Current efforts are focusing on retaining the noncrystalline phase during consolidation so as to produce materials having particularly desirable mechanical properties.

  20. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  1. Lifetimes statistics for single Kevlar 49 aramid filaments in creep-rupture at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.F.

    1987-01-01

    Kevlar 49 fibrous composites are routinely fabricated to have strengths above 1.5 GPa(200 ksi), but in many applications one would like to sustain such stresses for long time periods, sometimes at elevated temperatures. Thus the temperature dependence of the creep-rupture process in the fibers is of interest. Experimental data are presented for the lifetime of single Kevlar 49 filaments under constant stress at elevated temperatures. The goal of this research was to fully characterize the statistical strength and lifetime behavior of single filaments in order to separate fiber effects from fiber/matrix interactions in the creep-rupture lifetime of Kevlar 49/epoxy composites as described for example in Phoenix and Wu (1983). First we conducted experiments to determine distributions for the strength of filaments from the two distinct spools as a function of temperature. As expected, the data could generally be fitted by a two-parameter Weibull distribution. Lifetime experiments at 80 and 130/sup 0/C were conducted at several stress levels chosen as suitable fractions of the Weibull scale parameter for short-term strength for that temperature. The lifetime data were well modelled by a two-parameter Weibull distribution with large variability.

  2. ELEVATED TEMPERATURE SENSORS FOR ON-LINE CRITICAL EQUIPMENT HEALTH MONITORING

    SciTech Connect

    James Sebastian

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this research program is to improve high temperature piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) sensor technology to make it useful for instrumentation and health monitoring of current and future electrical power generation equipment. The program will extend the temperature range of the sensor from approximately 700 C to above 1000 C, and ultrasonic coupling to objects at these temperatures will be investigated and tailored for use with the sensor. The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) AlN deposition process was successfully transferred from film production on tungsten carbide substrates to titanium alloy and silicon carbide (SiC) substrates in the first year of the program, and additional substrates were evaluated. In the second year of the program, additional substrate research was performed with the goal of improving the performance of using SiC substrates. While greatly improved bandwidth was achieved, sensor survival at elevated temperature remains problematic. The elevated temperature coupling work continued with significant experimentation. Molten glasses were found to work within a limited temperature range, but metal foils applied with heat and pressure were found to have superior performance overall. The final year of the program will be dedicated to making further advances in AlN/ substrate behavior, and the design and implementation of a sensor demonstration experiment at very high temperature in a simulated industrial application.

  3. Chemical and mechanical stability of sodium sulfate activated slag after exposure to elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Rashad, A.M.; Bai, Y.; Basheer, P.A.M.; Collier, N.C.; Milestone, N.B.

    2012-02-15

    The chemical and mechanical stability of slag activated with two different concentrations of sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) after exposure to elevated temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 Degree-Sign C with an increment of 200 Degree-Sign C has been examined. Compressive strengths and pH of the hardened pastes before and after the exposure were determined. The various decomposition phases formed were identified using X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} activated slag has a better resistance to the degradation caused by exposure to elevated temperature up to 600 Degree-Sign C than Portland cement system as its relative strengths are superior. The finer slag and higher Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration gave better temperature resistance. Whilst the pH of the hardened pastes decreased with an increase in temperature, it still maintained a sufficiently high pH for the protection of reinforcing bar against corrosion.

  4. Effect of elevated temperature on fecundity and reproductive timing in the coral Acropora digitifera.

    PubMed

    Paxton, Camille W; Baria, Maria Vanessa B; Weis, Virginia M; Harii, Saki

    2016-08-01

    The synchrony of spawning is of paramount importance to successful coral reproduction. The precise timing of spawning is thought to be controlled by a set of interacting environmental factors, including regional wind field patterns, timing of the sunset, and sea surface temperatures (SST). Climate change is resulting in increased SST, which is causing physiological stress in corals and could also be altering spawning synchrony and timing. In this study, we examined the effect of increasing seawater temperature by 2°C for 1 month prior to the predicted spawning time on reproduction in the coral Acropora digitifera. This short period of elevated temperature caused spawning to advance by 1 day. In animals incubated at elevated temperature, egg number per egg bundle did not change, however, egg volume significantly decreased as did sperm number. Our results indicate that temperature is acting both as a proximate cue to accelerate timing and as a stressor on gametogenesis to reduce fecundity. This finding suggests that increasing SSTs could play a dramatic role in altering reproductive timing and the success of corals in an era of climate change. PMID:26349407

  5. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1989-01-01

    Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperature was performed. J.P. Stevens, Co., Astroquartz 9288 glass fiber; Nippon Carbon, Ltd., (Dow Corning) nicalon NLM-102 silicon carbide fiber; and 3M Company Nextel 312, 380, and 480 alumina/silica/boria fibers were supplied in unsized tows. Single fibers were separated from the tows and tested in static tension and tensile creep. Elevated test temperatures ranged from 400 C to 1300 C and varied for each fiber. Room temperature static tension was also performed. Computer software was written to reduce all single fiber test data into engineering constants using ASTM Standard Test Method D3379-75 as a reference. A high temperature furnace was designed and built to perform the single fiber elevated temperature testing up to 1300 C. A computerized single fiber creep apparatus was designed and constructed to perform four fiber creep tests simultaneously at temperatures up to 1300 C. Computer software was written to acquire and reduce all creep data.

  6. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperature was performed. J.P. Stevens, Co., Astroquartz 9288 glass fiber, Nippon Carbon, Ltd., (Dow Corning) Nicalon NLM-102 silicon carbide fiber, and 3M Company Nextel 312, 380, and 480 alumina/silica/boria fibers were supplied in unsized tows. Single fibers were separated from the tows and tested in static tension and tensile creep. Elevated test temperatures ranged from 400 to 1300 C and varied for each fiber. Room temperature static tension was also performed. Computer software was written to reduce all single fiber test data into engineering constants using ASTM Standard Test Method D3379-75 as a reference. A high temperature furnace was designed and built to perform the single fiber elevated temperature testing up to 1300 C. A computerized single fiber creep apparatus was designed and constructed to perform four fiber creep tests simultaneously at temperatures up to 1300 C. Computer software was written to acquire and reduce all creep data.

  7. Coralline algal physiology is more adversely affected by elevated temperature than reduced pH.

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Elizondo, Román Manuel; Enríquez, Susana

    2016-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the physiological responses of coralline algae to ocean acidification (OA) and global warming, by exposing algal thalli of three species with contrasting photobiology and growth-form to reduced pH and elevated temperature. The analysis aimed to discern between direct and combined effects, while elucidating the role of light and photosynthesis inhibition in this response. We demonstrate the high sensitivity of coralline algae to photodamage under elevated temperature and its severe consequences on thallus photosynthesis and calcification rates. Moderate levels of light-stress, however, were maintained under reduced pH, resulting in no impact on algal photosynthesis, although moderate adverse effects on calcification rates were still observed. Accordingly, our results support the conclusion that global warming is a stronger threat to algal performance than OA, in particular in highly illuminated habitats such as coral reefs. We provide in this study a quantitative physiological model for the estimation of the impact of thermal-stress on coralline carbonate production, useful to foresee the impact of global warming on coralline contribution to reef carbon budgets, reef cementation, coral recruitment and the maintenance of reef biodiversity. This model, however, cannot yet account for the moderate physiological impact of low pH on coralline calcification. PMID:26740396

  8. Coralline algal physiology is more adversely affected by elevated temperature than reduced pH

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez-Elizondo, Román Manuel; Enríquez, Susana

    2016-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the physiological responses of coralline algae to ocean acidification (OA) and global warming, by exposing algal thalli of three species with contrasting photobiology and growth-form to reduced pH and elevated temperature. The analysis aimed to discern between direct and combined effects, while elucidating the role of light and photosynthesis inhibition in this response. We demonstrate the high sensitivity of coralline algae to photodamage under elevated temperature and its severe consequences on thallus photosynthesis and calcification rates. Moderate levels of light-stress, however, were maintained under reduced pH, resulting in no impact on algal photosynthesis, although moderate adverse effects on calcification rates were still observed. Accordingly, our results support the conclusion that global warming is a stronger threat to algal performance than OA, in particular in highly illuminated habitats such as coral reefs. We provide in this study a quantitative physiological model for the estimation of the impact of thermal-stress on coralline carbonate production, useful to foresee the impact of global warming on coralline contribution to reef carbon budgets, reef cementation, coral recruitment and the maintenance of reef biodiversity. This model, however, cannot yet account for the moderate physiological impact of low pH on coralline calcification. PMID:26740396

  9. Response and Tolerance Mechanism of Cotton Gossypium hirsutum L. to Elevated Temperature Stress: A Review.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Kashif Rafiq; Ali, Farhan; Shah, Farooq; Younas, Muhammad; Shah, Tariq; Shahwar, Durri; Hassan, Waseem; Ahmad, Zahoor; Qi, Chao; Lu, Yanli; Iqbal, Amjad; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cotton is an important multipurpose crop which is highly sensitive to both biotic and abiotic stresses. Proper management of this cash crop requires systematic understanding of various environmental conditions that are vital to yield and quality. High temperature stress can severely affect the viability of pollens and anther indehiscence, which leads to significant yield losses. Cotton can respond to withstand adverse environmental condition in several phases among which the accumulation of chemicals is extremely vital. Calcium, kinases, reactive oxygen species, carbohydrate, transcription factors, gene expression regulation, and plant hormones signaling pathways are playing a handy role in activating the major genes responsible to encounter and defend elevated temperature stress. The production of heat shock proteins is up-regulated when crops are unleashed to high temperature stress. Molecular breeding can play a functional role to identify superior genes for all the important attributes as well as provide breeder ready markers for developing ideotypes. The development of high-temperature resistant transgenic cultivars of cotton can grant a stability benefit and can also ameliorate the production capacity in response to elevated temperature. PMID:27446165

  10. Improving xylitol production at elevated temperature with engineered Kluyveromyces marxianus through over-expressing transporters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Dongmei; Gao, Xiaolian; Hong, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Three transporter genes including Kluyveromyces marxianus aquaglyceroporin gene (KmFPS1), Candida intermedia glucose/xylose facilitator gene (CiGXF1) or glucose/xylose symporter gene (CiGXS1) were over-expressed in K. marxianus YZJ017 to improve xylitol production at elevated temperatures. The xylitol production of YZJ074 that harbored CiGXF1 was improved to 147.62g/L in Erlenmeyer flask at 42°C. In fermenter, 99.29 and 149.60g/L xylitol were produced from 99.55 and 151.91g/L xylose with productivity of 4.14 and 3.40g/L/h respectively at 42°C. Even at 45°C, YZJ074 could produce 101.30g/L xylitol from 101.41g/L xylose with productivity of 2.81g/L/h. Using fed-batch fermentation through repeatedly adding non-sterilized substrate directly, YZJ074 could produce 312.05g/L xylitol which is the highest yield reported to date. The engineered strains YZJ074 which can produce xylitol at elevated temperatures is an excellent foundation for xylitol bioconversion. PMID:25465792

  11. Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Hafnium-Based Bulk Metallic Glass at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshri, Anup Kumar; Behl, Lovish; Lahiri, Debrupa; Dulikravich, George S.; Agarwal, Arvind

    2016-07-01

    Dry sliding wear behavior of hafnium-based bulk metallic glass was studied at two loads (5 and 15 N) and two temperatures (298 and 673 K) using aluminum oxide (Al2O3) ball as a wear counterpart. At 5 N load, wear reduced by ~71% on increasing the temperature from 298 to 673 K. At a higher load of 15 N, the weight loss reduction was much lower (45%) on increasing the temperature from 298 to 673 K. Decreased wear weight loss on increasing the temperature was attributed to the increased hardness of the Hf-based metallic glass at high temperatures. Micro-hardness of the alloy at 293 K was found to be 636 Hv, which gradually increased to 655 Hv on annealing at 673 K. Improvement in the hardness at elevated temperature is attributed to: (1) free volume annihilation, (2) surface oxide formation and (3) nano-crystallites precipitation. Reduced wear at elevated temperature resulted in smaller volume of debris generation that restricted three-body wear to obtain lower coefficient of friction (COF) (0.25-0.35) compared to COF (0.65-0.75) at room temperature.

  12. Physiological acclimation to elevated temperature in a reef-building coral from an upwelling environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayfield, A. B.; Fan, T.-Y.; Chen, C.-S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent work has found that pocilloporid corals from regions characterized by unstable temperatures, such as those exposed to periodic upwelling, display a remarkable degree of phenotypic plasticity. In order to understand whether important reef builders from these upwelling reefs remain physiologically uncompromised at temperatures they will experience in the coming decades as a result of global climate change, a long-term elevated temperature experiment was conducted with Pocillopora damicornis specimens collected from Houbihu, a small embayment within Nanwan Bay, southern Taiwan that is characterized by 8-9 °C temperature changes during upwelling events. Upon nine months of exposure to nearly 30 °C, all colony (mortality and surface area), polyp ( Symbiodinium density and chlorophyll a content), tissue (total thickness), and molecular (gene expression and molecular composition)-level parameters were documented at similar levels between experimental corals and controls incubated at 26.5 °C, suggesting that this species can readily acclimate to elevated temperatures that cause significant degrees of stress, or even bleaching and mortality, in conspecifics of other regions of the Indo-Pacific. However, the gastrodermal tissue layer was relatively thicker in corals of the high temperature treatment sampled after nine months, possibly as an adaptive response to shade Symbiodinium from the higher photosynthetically active radiation levels that they were experiencing at that sampling time. Such shading may have prevented high light and high temperature-induced photoinhibition, and consequent bleaching, in these samples.

  13. Response and Tolerance Mechanism of Cotton Gossypium hirsutum L. to Elevated Temperature Stress: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, Kashif Rafiq; Ali, Farhan; Shah, Farooq; Younas, Muhammad; Shah, Tariq; Shahwar, Durri; Hassan, Waseem; Ahmad, Zahoor; Qi, Chao; Lu, Yanli; Iqbal, Amjad; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cotton is an important multipurpose crop which is highly sensitive to both biotic and abiotic stresses. Proper management of this cash crop requires systematic understanding of various environmental conditions that are vital to yield and quality. High temperature stress can severely affect the viability of pollens and anther indehiscence, which leads to significant yield losses. Cotton can respond to withstand adverse environmental condition in several phases among which the accumulation of chemicals is extremely vital. Calcium, kinases, reactive oxygen species, carbohydrate, transcription factors, gene expression regulation, and plant hormones signaling pathways are playing a handy role in activating the major genes responsible to encounter and defend elevated temperature stress. The production of heat shock proteins is up-regulated when crops are unleashed to high temperature stress. Molecular breeding can play a functional role to identify superior genes for all the important attributes as well as provide breeder ready markers for developing ideotypes. The development of high-temperature resistant transgenic cultivars of cotton can grant a stability benefit and can also ameliorate the production capacity in response to elevated temperature. PMID:27446165

  14. Elevated-Temperature Ferritic and Martensitic Steels and Their Application to Future Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, RL

    2005-01-31

    In the 1970s, high-chromium (9-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels became candidates for elevated-temperature applications in the core of fast reactors. Steels developed for conventional power plants, such as Sandvik HT9, a nominally Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.25V-0.2C steel (composition in wt %), were considered in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Now, a new generation of fission reactors is in the planning stage, and ferritic, bainitic, and martensitic steels are again candidates for in-core and out-of-core applications. Since the 1970s, advances have been made in developing steels with 2-12% Cr for conventional power plants that are significant improvements over steels originally considered. This paper will review the development of the new steels to illustrate the advantages they offer for the new reactor concepts. Elevated-temperature mechanical properties will be emphasized. Effects of alloying additions on long-time thermal exposure with and without stress (creep) will be examined. Information on neutron radiation effects will be discussed as it applies to ferritic and martensitic steels.

  15. Corrosion resistance and behavioral characteristics of metals exposed to 70 percent by weight sulfuric acid at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.T.; Farina, G.E.

    1994-10-01

    The development of a concentrated acid hydrolysis process may necessitate the storage, handling, and processing of concentrated solution of sulfuric acid at temperatures in excess of 70{degrees}C. Due to the corrosivity of the sulfuric acid at elevated temperatures, a series of corrosion tests was conducted to determine the corrosion performance and behavior of various construction materials using immersion and electrochemical techniques. Test results showed that among the stainless steels tested, only Carpenter 20Mo-6 performed satisfactorily up to 70{degrees}C. It passivated spontaneously and corroded at a rate less than 40 {mu}m/yr (1.6 mpy). Among numerous nickel-based alloys tested, only Hastelloy B-2 had excellent corrosion resistance up to 100{degrees}C with a corrosion rate less than 50 {mu}/yr (2 mpy), although the alloy did not passivate. Zirconium alloy Zr 702 provided excellent corrosion resistance to 100{degrees}C. The alloy passivated spontaneously, but its passive range decreased, evidently with increase in temperature. Tantalum and KBI-40 provided excellent corrosion protection at all test temperatures. The materials passivated spontaneously with a wide passive range.

  16. Long-term performance of ceramic matrix composites at elevated temperatures: Modelling of creep and creep rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, W.A.; Fabeny, B.; Ibnabdeljalil, M.; Iyengar, N.; Reifsnider, K.L.

    1996-07-31

    The models developed, contain explicit dependences on constituent material properties and their changes with time, so that composite performance can be predicted. Three critical processes in ceramic composites at elevated temperatures have been modeled: (1) creep deformation of composite vs stress and time-dependent creep of fibers and matrix, and failure of these components; (2) creep deformation of ``interface`` around broken fibers; and (3) lifetime of the composite under conditions of fiber strength loss over time at temperature. In (1), general evolution formulas are derived for relaxation time of matrix stresses and steady-state creep rate of composite; the model is tested against recent data on Ti-MMCs. Calculations on a composite of Hi-Nicalon fibers in a melt-infiltrated SiC matrix are presented. In (2), numerical simulations of composite failure were made to map out time-to-failure vs applied load for several sets of material parameters. In (3), simple approximate relations are obtained between fiber life and composite life that should be useful for fiber developers and testers. Strength degradation data on Hi-Nicalon fibers is used to assess composite lifetime vs fiber lifetime for Hi-Nicalon fiber composites.

  17. Deformation mechanisms in a precipitation-strengthened ferritic superalloy revealed by in situ neutron diffraction studies at elevated temperatures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Shenyan; Gao, Yanfei; An, Ke; Zheng, Lili; Wu, Wei; Teng, Zhenke; Liaw, Peter K

    2014-10-22

    In this study, the ferritic superalloy Fe–10Ni–6.5Al–10Cr–3.4Mo strengthened by ordered (Ni,Fe)Al B2-type precipitates is a candidate material for ultra-supercritical steam turbine applications above 923 K. Despite earlier success in improving its room-temperature ductility, the creep resistance of this material at high temperatures needs to be further improved, which requires a fundamental understanding of the high-temperature deformation mechanisms at the scales of individual phases and grains. In situ neutron diffraction has been utilized to investigate the lattice strain evolution and the microscopic load-sharing mechanisms during tensile deformation of this ferritic superalloy at elevated temperatures. Finite-element simulations based on the crystal plasticitymore » theory are employed and compared with the experimental results, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on these interphase and intergranular load-partitioning studies, it is found that the deformation mechanisms change from dislocation slip to those related to dislocation climb, diffusional flow and possibly grain boundary sliding, below and above 873 K, respectively. Insights into microstructural design for enhancing creep resistance are also discussed.« less

  18. Deformation mechanisms in a precipitation-strengthened ferritic super alloy revealed by in situ neutron dffraction studies at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shenyan; Gao, Yanfei; An, Ke; Zheng, Lili; Teng, Zhenke; Wu, Wei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    The ferritic superalloy Fe–10Ni–6.5Al–10Cr–3.4Mo strengthened by ordered (Ni,Fe)AlB2-type precipitates is a candidate material for ultra-supercritical steam turbine applications above 923 K. Despite earlier success in improving its room-temperature ductility, the creep resistance of this material at high temperatures needs to be further improved, which requires a fundamental understanding of the high-temperature deformation mechanisms at the scales of individual phases and grains. In situ neutron diffraction has been utilized to investigate the lattice strain evolution and the microscopic load-sharing mechanisms during tensile deformation of this ferritic superalloy at elevated temperatures. Finite-element simulations based on the crystal plasticity theory are employed and compared with the experimental results, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on these interphase and intergranular load-partitioning studies, it is found that the deformation mechanisms change from dislocation slip to those related to dislocation climb, diffusional flow and possibly grain boundary sliding, below and above 873 K, respectively. Insights into microstructural design for enhancing creep resistance are also discussed.

  19. Deformation mechanisms in a precipitation-strengthened ferritic superalloy revealed by in situ neutron diffraction studies at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shenyan; Gao, Yanfei; An, Ke; Zheng, Lili; Wu, Wei; Teng, Zhenke; Liaw, Peter K

    2014-10-22

    In this study, the ferritic superalloy Fe–10Ni–6.5Al–10Cr–3.4Mo strengthened by ordered (Ni,Fe)Al B2-type precipitates is a candidate material for ultra-supercritical steam turbine applications above 923 K. Despite earlier success in improving its room-temperature ductility, the creep resistance of this material at high temperatures needs to be further improved, which requires a fundamental understanding of the high-temperature deformation mechanisms at the scales of individual phases and grains. In situ neutron diffraction has been utilized to investigate the lattice strain evolution and the microscopic load-sharing mechanisms during tensile deformation of this ferritic superalloy at elevated temperatures. Finite-element simulations based on the crystal plasticity theory are employed and compared with the experimental results, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on these interphase and intergranular load-partitioning studies, it is found that the deformation mechanisms change from dislocation slip to those related to dislocation climb, diffusional flow and possibly grain boundary sliding, below and above 873 K, respectively. Insights into microstructural design for enhancing creep resistance are also discussed.

  20. The elevated-temperature mechanical behavior of as-cast and wrought Ti-6Al-4V-1B

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Boehlert, C. J.; Howe, Jane Y; Payzant, E Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This work studied the effect of processing on the elevated-temperature [728 K (455 C)] fatigue deformation behavior of Ti-6Al-4V-1B for maximum applied stresses between 300 to 700 MPa (R = 0.1, 5 Hz). The alloy was evaluated in the as-cast form as well as in three wrought forms: cast-and-extruded, powder metallurgy (PM) rolled, and PM extruded. Processing caused significant differences in the microstructure, which in turn impacted the fatigue properties. The PM-extruded material exhibited a fine equiaxed {alpha} + {beta} microstructure and the greatest fatigue resistance among all the studied materials. The {beta}-phase field extrusion followed by cooling resulted in a strong {alpha}-phase texture in which the basal plane was predominately oriented perpendicular to the extrusion axis. The TiB whiskers were also aligned in the extrusion direction. The {alpha}-phase texture in the extrusions resulted in tensile-strength anisotropy. The tensile strength in the transverse orientation was lower than that in the longitudinal orientation, but the strength in the transverse orientation remained greater than that for the as-cast Ti-6Al-4V. The ratcheting behavior during fatigue is also discussed.

  1. Mechanisms of time-dependent crack growth at elevated temperature. Final project report, July 1, 1986--August 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Stock, S.R.

    1990-04-15

    Objective of this 3-y study was to conduct creep and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments and to characterize the crack tip damage mechanisms in a model material (Cu-1wt%Sb), which is known to cavitate at grain boundaries under creep deformation. Results were: In presence of large scale cavitation damage and crack branching, time rate of creep crack growth da/dt does not correlate with C{sub t} or C{sup *}. When cavitation damage is constrained, da/dt is characterized by C{sub t}. Area fraction of grain boundary cavitated is the single damage parameter for the extent of cavitation damage ahead of crack tips. C{sub t} is used for the creep-fatigue crack growth behavior. In materials prone to rapid cavity nucleation, creep cracks grow faster initially and then reach a steady state whose growth rate is determined by C{sub t}. Percent creep life exhausted correlates with average cavity diameter and fraction of grain boundary area occupied by cavities. Synchrotron x-ray tomographic microscopy was used to image individual cavities in Cu-1wt% Sb. A methodology was developed for predicting the remaining life of elevated temperature power plant components; (C{sub t}){sub avg} was used to correlate creep-fatigue crack growth in Cr-Mo and Cr-Mo-V steel and weldments.

  2. Structural Materials for Innovative Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yvon, Pascal

    2011-07-01

    This series of slides deal with: the goals for advanced fission reactor systems; the requirements for structural materials; a focus on two important types of materials: ODS and CMC; a focus on materials under irradiation (multiscale modelling, experimental simulation, 'smart' experiments in materials testing reactors); some concluding remarks.

  3. Effects of multigenerational exposure to elevated temperature on reproduction, oxidative stress, and Cu toxicity in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Bae, Eunhye; Samanta, Palas; Yoo, Jisu; Jung, Jinho

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the effect of temperature (20 and 25°C) on reproduction, oxidative stress, and copper (Cu) toxicity in Daphnia magna across three generations (F0, F1, and F2). Exposing D. magna to elevated temperature significantly decreased the number of offspring per female per day, the time to first brood, and body length compared to exposure to the optimal temperature (p<0.05). In addition, elevated temperature induced a significantly higher production of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation (p<0.05). These findings suggest that D. magna likely responded to thermal stress by investing more energy into defense mechanisms, rather than growth and reproduction. In addition, oxidative stress at the elevated temperature gradually increased with each generation, possibly owing to the reduced fitness of the offspring. Exposing D. magna to 25°C (EC50=34±3µgL(-1)) substantially increased the median effective concentration of Cu in all generations compared to exposure to 20°C (EC50=25±3µgL(-1)), indicating a decrease in acute toxicity at elevated temperature. However, elevated temperature significantly increased the oxidative stress induced by a sublethal concentration of Cu (10µgL(-1)). The interaction between elevated temperature and Cu exposure appears to be synergistic; however, this needs to be confirmed using multiple generations in a long-term experiment. PMID:27376351

  4. Material Selection for Cryogenic Support Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Erik; Kellaris, Nicholas; Daal, Miguel; Sadoulet, Bernard; Golwala, Sunil; Hollister, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    Design specifications for the support structures of low temperature instrumentation often call for low thermal conductivity between temperature stages, high stiffness, and specific load bearing capabilities. While overall geometric design plays an important role in both overall stiffness and heat conduction between stages, material selection can affect a structure's properties significantly. In this contribution, we suggest and compare several alternative materials to the current standard materials for building cryogenic support structures.

  5. Materials analogue of zero-stiffness structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arun; Subramaniam, Anandh

    2011-04-01

    Anglepoise lamps and certain tensegrities are examples of zero-stiffness structures. These structures are in a state of neutral equilibrium with respect to changes in configuration of the system. Using Eshelby's example of an edge dislocation in a thin plate that can bend, we report the discovery of a non-trivial new class of material structures as an analogue to zero-stiffness structures. For extended positions of the edge dislocation in these structures, the dislocation experiences a zero image force. Salient features of these material structures along with the key differences from conventional zero-stiffness structures are pointed out.

  6. Determination of design allowable strength properties of elevated-temperature alloys. Part 1: Coated columbium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favor, R. J.; Maykuth, D. J.; Bartlett, E. S.; Mindlin, H.

    1972-01-01

    A program to determine the characteristics of two coated columbium alloy systems for spacecraft structures is discussed. The alloy was evaluated as coated base material, coated butt-welded material, and material thermal/pressure cycled prior to testing up to 30 cycles. Evaluation was by means of tensile tests covering the temperature range to 2400 F. Design allowables were computed and are presented as tables of data. The summary includes a room temperature property table, effect of temperature curves, and typical stress-strain curves.

  7. Environmentally enhanced crack growth in nickel-based alloys at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, M.; Chen, S.F.; Chen, G.S.; Wei, R.P.

    1997-12-31

    A recent understanding of environmentally enhanced sustained-load crack growth in nickel-based superalloys at elevated temperatures is presented. This understanding is based on the results of coordinated studies of crack growth kinetics, surface chemistry, and microstructure in a commercial Inconel 718. The results suggest that environmental enhancement of sustained-load crack growth in Inconel 718 is associated with the formation and rupture of niobium oxides at grain boundary surfaces and is controlled mainly by the rate of oxidation and decomposition of niobium carbides at the grain boundaries. Data on other nickel-based alloys in the literature appear to support this suggested role of niobium. Initial results from a study of a niobium-free Ni-18Cr-18Fe alloy (its base composition is identical to Inconel 718) confirm the possible influence of niobium and the proposed mechanism. Some open issues for further investigation are discussed.

  8. Strengthening sapphire at elevated temperatures by SiO 2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Li-Ping; Liu, Zheng-Tang; Li, Qiang

    2007-04-01

    SiO 2 films have been prepared on sapphire by radio frequency magnetron reactive sputtering in order to increase the optical and mechanical properties of infrared windows and domes of sapphire at elevated temperatures. Infrared transmission and flexural strength of uncoated and coated sapphires have been investigated at different temperatures. SiO 2 films were shown to have apparent antireflective effect on sapphire substrate at room temperature. With increasing temperature, the coated sapphires have larger average transmission than the uncoated ones. The temperature was proven to only weakly affect the absorption coefficient and antireflection capability of the deposited films. It is also indicated that the flexural strengths of the c-axis sapphire samples coated with SiO 2 films are increased by 1.2 and 1.5 times than those of uncoated at 600 and 800 °C, respectively.

  9. Fundamental studies of ceramic/metal interfacial reactions at elevated temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, S. M.; Billings, G. W.; Indacochea, J. E.

    2000-12-14

    This work characterizes the interfaces resulting from exposing oxide and non-oxide ceramic substrates to zirconium metal and stainless steel-zirconium containing alloys. The ceramic/metal systems together were preheated at about 600 C and then the temperatures were increased to the test maximum temperature, which exceeded 1800 C, in an atmosphere of high purity argon. Metal samples were placed onto ceramic substrates, and the system was heated to elevated temperatures past the melting point of the metallic specimen. After a short stay at the peak temperature, the system was cooled to room temperature and examined. The chemical changes across the interface and other microstructural developments were analyzed with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). This paper reports on the condition of the interfaces in the different systems studied and describes possible mechanisms influencing the microstructure.

  10. Gas diffusion electrode setup for catalyst testing in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wiberg, Gustav K. H. E-mail: m.arenz@chem.ku.dk; Fleige, Michael; Arenz, Matthias E-mail: m.arenz@chem.ku.dk

    2015-02-15

    We present a detailed description of the construction and testing of an electrochemical cell setup allowing the investigation of a gas diffusion electrode containing carbon supported high surface area catalysts. The setup is designed for measurements in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperature, i.e., very close to the actual conditions in high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs). The cell consists of a stainless steel flow field and a PEEK plastic cell body comprising the electrochemical cell, which exhibits a three electrode configuration. The cell body and flow field are braced using a KF-25 vacuum flange clamp, which allows an easy assembly of the setup. As demonstrated, the setup can be used to investigate temperature dependent electrochemical processes on high surface area type electrocatalysts, but it also enables quick screening tests of HT-PEMFC catalysts under realistic conditions.

  11. Acoustic inspection of bond strength of steel-reinforced mortar after exposure to elevated temperatures

    PubMed

    Chiang; Tsai; Kan

    2000-03-01

    In order to evaluate the bond strength between the reinforcement and concrete after fire damage, a combination of acoustic through-transmission and pull-out tests were used. Previous studies have shown a 25% decrease in the ultrasonic pulse velocity at 90% of the maximum load at room temperature. The specimens were kept in the oven at an elevated temperature for 1, 2, or 3 h. They were then removed and cooled to room temperature. Inspection was conducted using a high-power ultrasonic pulse velocity system while a pull-out load was applied. The correlation between preheated temperature, acoustic wave velocity, and the applied load was analyzed. Initial results show that bond strength and pulse velocity decreased substantially as the temperature or the heating time increased. PMID:10829721

  12. Room and elevated temperature Mechanical Behavior of 9-12% Cr Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Omer N.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Schrems, Karol K.

    2005-02-01

    The mechanical properties of medium Cr steels used in fossil fired power plants are very good because of their excellent high temperature microstructural stability. However, as the desire to increase the operating temperature (>650C) of the plant goes up, the need for steels that maintain their strength at these temperatures also increases. The mechanical properties of three medium Cr steels (0.08C-(9-12)Cr-1.2Ni-0.7Mo-3.0Cu-3.0Co-0.5Ti) were investigated through hardness, hot hardness and tensile measurements. The strength of the 9-12%Cr steels at room temperature after long-term isothermal aging (750C; 1000 hours) compares favorably with that of other power plant steels (e.g., P91). In addition, the elevated temperature strength and hot hardness also behave similarly. The mechanical behavior will be discussed in terms of the strength, elongation and tensile fracture characteristics.

  13. Lifetime degradation and regeneration in multicrystalline silicon under illumination at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredemeier, Dennis; Walter, Dominic; Herlufsen, Sandra; Schmidt, Jan

    2016-03-01

    We examine the carrier lifetime evolution of block-cast multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers under illumination (100 mW/cm2) at elevated temperature (75°C). Samples are treated with different process steps typically applied in industrial solar cell production. We observe a pronounced degradation in lifetime after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 900°C. However, we detect only a weak lifetime instability in mc-Si wafers which are RTA-treated at 650°C. After completion of the degradation, the lifetime is observed to recover and finally reaches carrier lifetimes comparable to the initial state. To explain the observed lifetime evolution, we suggest a defect model, where metal precipitates in the mc-Si bulk dissolve during the RTA treatment.

  14. Fatigue life prediction of an intermetallic matrix composite at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    A strain-based fatigue life prediction method is proposed for an intermetallic matrix composite (IMC) under tensile cyclic loadings at elevated temperatures. Styled after the Universal Slopes method, the model utilizes the composite's tensile properties to estimate fatigue life. Factors such as fiber volume ratio, number of plys and temperature dependence are implicitly incorporated into the model through these properties. The model constants are determined by using unidirectional fatigue data at temperatures of 425 and 815 C. Fatigue lives from two independent sources are used to verify the model at temperatures of 650 and 760 C. Cross-ply lives at 760 C are also predicted. It is demonstrated that the correlation between experimental and predicted lives is within a factor of two.

  15. Fatigue life prediction of an intermetallic matrix composite at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    A strain-based fatigue life prediction method is proposed for an intermetallic matrix composite (IMC) under tensile cyclic loadings at elevated temperatures. Styled after the 'Universal Slopes' method, the model utilizes the composite's tensile properties to estimate fatigue life. Factors such as fiber volume ratio (Vf), number of plys and temperature dependence are implicitly incorporated into the model through these properties. The model constants are determined by using unidirectional fatigue data at temperatures of 425 and 815 C. Fatigue lives from two independent sources are used to verify the model at temperatures of 650 and 760 C. Cross-ply lives at 760 C are also predicted. It is demonstrated that the correlation between experimental and predicted lives is within a factor of two.

  16. Direct Selective Laser Sintering/Melting of High Density Alumina Powder Layers at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckers, J.; Meyers, S.; Kruth, J. P.; Vleugels, J.

    Direct selective laser sintering (SLS) or selective laser melting (SLM) are additive manufacturing techniques that can be used to produce three-dimensional ceramic parts directly, without the need for a sacrificial binder. In this paper, a low laser energy density is applied to SLS/SLM high density powder layers of sub-micrometer alumina at elevated temperatures (up to 800̊C). In order to achieve this, a furnace was designed and built into a commercial SLS machine. This furnace was able to produce a homogeneously heated cylindrical zone with a height of 60 mm and a diameter of 32 mm. After optimizing the layer deposition and laser scanning parameters, two ceramic parts with a density up to 85% and grain sizes as low as 5 μm were successfully produced.

  17. Effect of elevated temperature curing on properties of alkali-activated slag concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Bakharev, T.; Sanjayan, J.G.; Cheng, Y.B.

    1999-10-01

    This investigation is focused on the effect of curing temperature on microstructure, shrinkage, and compressive strength of alkali-activated slag (AAS) concrete. Concrete prepared using sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide as the activator had greater early and flexural strength than ordinary Portland cement concrete of the same water/binder ratio, but it also had high autogenous and drying shrinkage. Heat treatment was found to be very effective in reducing drying shrinkage of AAS concrete and promoting high early strength. However, strength of AAS concrete at later ages was reduced. Microstructural study revealed an inhomogeneity in distribution of hydration product in AAS concrete that can be a cause of strength reduction. Pretreatment at room temperature before elevated temperature curing further improved early strength and considerably decreased shrinkage in AAS concrete.

  18. THERMODYNAMICS OF NEPTUNIUM(V) FLOURIDE AND SULFATE AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    L. Rao; G. Tian; Y. Xia; J.I. Friese

    2006-03-06

    Complexation of neptunium(V) with fluoride and sulfate at elevated, temperatures was studied by microcalorimetry. Thermodynamic parameters, including the equilibrium constants and enthalpy of protonation of fluoride and sulfate, and the enthalpy of complexation between Np(V) and fluoride and sulfate at 25-70 C were determined. Results show that the complexation of Np(V) with fluoride and sulfate is endothermic and that the complexation is enhanced by the increase in temperature--a threefold increase in the stability constants of NpO{sub 2}F(aq) and NpO{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{sup -} as the temperature is increased from 25 to 70 C.

  19. Influence of elevated temperature and acid mine drainage on mortality of the crayfish Cambarus bartonii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartman, K.J.; Hom, C.D.; Mazik, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Effects of elevated temperature and acid mine drainage (AMD) on crayfish mortality were investigated in the Stony River, Grant County, West Virginia. During summers 2003 and 2004, four-week in situ bioassays were performed along a thermal and AMD gradient with the native crayfish Cambarus bartonii. Crayfish mortality was analyzed in conjunction with temperature and AMD related variables (pH, specific conductivity). Mortality was significantly higher (48-88%) at sites with high temperatures during 2003 (max = 33.0??C), but no significant differences were observed in 2004 (max = 32.0??C). Temperatures were higher in 2003 than 2004 due to increased discharge from a cooling reservoir flowing into the river. Additionally, duration of high temperature was approximately four days in 2003 as compared with only one day in 2004. No significant relationship between acid mine drainage variables and crayfish mortality was apparent.

  20. Uncertainty Of The Measurement Of DC Conductivity Of Eramics At Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štubňa, Igor; Trnovcová, Viera; Vozár, Libor; Csáki, Štefan

    2015-01-01

    The electrical DC conductivity is measured at room and elevated temperatures on green ceramic samples prepared from kaolin. The arrangement of the sample, with two platinum wire electrodes inserted in the kaolin prism that was used is suitable for measurements of temperature dependences of the DC conductivity from 20 °C to 1100 °C in the air. The uncertainty analysis taking into account thermal expansion of the sample, homogeneity of the temperature field, measurement regime, corrosion of the electrodes, and overlapping of the electrodes is done for 1000 °C. Uncertainties connected with current and voltage measurements and uncertainties connected with the instruments that were used are also considered. The sum of all the partial uncertainties gives an expanded uncertainty of the conductivity measurement. The uncertainty varies with temperature and reaches the value of ˜ 6.5% at 1000 °C.

  1. INFLUENCE OF SUBSTRATE-COFACTOR RATIOS ON PARTIALLY PURIFIED INORGANIC PYROPHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES.

    PubMed

    MATHEMEIER, P F; MORITA, R Y

    1964-12-01

    Mathemeier, Paul F. (Oregon State University, Corvallis), and Richard Y. Morita. Influence of substrate-cofactor ratios on partially purified inorganic pyrophosphatase activity at elevated temperatures. J. Bacteriol. 88:1661-1666. 1964.-Inorganic pyrophosphatase of Bacillus stearothermophilus was studied for optimal substrate-cofactor ratios at 60 to 100 C. Mg(++) was the primary cofactor, and Co(++) resulted in 50% enzyme activity at 60 C. The pH optima differed for the Mg(++) activated and Co(++) activated pyrophosphatase. At 80 C and above, Co(++) replaced Mg(++) as the optimal cofactor in the enzyme reaction. The optimal ratio of pyrophosphate to Mg(++) varied from 2 to 0.25, dependent on enzyme concentration. The optimal pyrophosphate-cobalt ratio was constant at 1.0. The enzyme catalyzed appreciable pyrophosphate hydrolysis at 95 C. PMID:14240954

  2. Modeling the effects of elevated temperatures on action potential propagation in unmyelinated axons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Mohit; Jenkins, Michael W.; Chiel, Hillel J.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2016-03-01

    Infrared lasers (λ=1.87 μm) are capable of inducing a thermally mediated nerve block in Aplysia and rat nerves. While this block is spatially precise and reversible in sensory and motor neurons, the mechanism of block is not clearly understood. Model predictions show that, at elevated temperatures, the rates of opening and closing of the voltage gated ion channels are disrupted and normal functioning of the gates is hindered. A model combining NEURON with Python is presented here that can simulate the behavior of unmyelinated nerve axons in the presence of spatially and temporally varying temperature distributions. Axon behavior and underlying mechanism leading to conduction block is investigated. The ability to understand the photothermal interaction of laser light and temperature dependence of membrane ion channels in-silico will help speed explorations of parameter space and guide future experiments testing the feasibility of selectively blocking pain conduction fibers (Photonic Analgesia of Nerves (PAIN)) in humans.

  3. Photoluminescence in silicon implanted with erbium ions at an elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, N. A. Kalyadin, A. E.; Shek, E. I.; Sakharov, V. I.; Serenkov, I. T.; Vdovin, V. I.; Parshin, E. O.; Makoviichuk, M. I.

    2011-08-15

    Photoluminescence spectra of n-type silicon upon implantation with erbium ions at 600 Degree-Sign C and oxygen ions at room temperature and subsequent annealings at 1100 Degree-Sign C in a chlorine-containing atmosphere have been studied. Depending on the annealing duration, photoluminescence spectra at 80 K are dominated by lines of the Er{sup 3+} ion or dislocation-related luminescence. The short-wavelength shift of the dislocation-related luminescence line observed at this temperature is due to implantation of erbium ions at an elevated temperature. At room temperature, lines of erbium and dislocation-related luminescence are observed in the spectra, but lines of near-band-edge luminescence predominate.

  4. Correlation between mobile continents and elevated temperatures in the subcontinental mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Charitra; Rozel, Antoine; Tackley, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Rolf et al. (EPSL, 2012) and Coltice et al. (Science, 2012) have previously shown that continents exert a first order influence on Earth's mantle flow by affecting convective wavelength and surface heat flow. With stationary continents, Heron and Lowman (JGR, 2014) highlighted the decreasing role of continental insulation on subcontinental temperatures with higher Rayleigh number (Ra). However, the question whether there exists a correlation between mobile continents and elevated temperatures in the subcontinental mantle or not remains to be answered. By systematically varying parameters like core-mantle boundary (CMB) temperature, continental size, and mantle heating modes (basal and internal); we model thermo-chemical mantle convection with 2D spherical annulus geometry (Hernlund and Tackley, PEPI 2008) using StagYY (Tackley, PEPI 2008). Starting with a simple incompressible model having mobile continents, we observe this correlation. Furthermore, this correlation still holds when the model complexity is gradually increased by introducing internal heating, compressibility, and melting. In general, downwellings reduce the mantle temperature away from the continents, thereby resulting in correlation between mobile continents and elevated temperatures in the subcontinental mantle. For incompressible models (Boussinesq approximation), correlation exists and the dominant degree of convection varies with the continental distribution. When internal heating is switched on, correlation is observed but it is reduced as there are less cold regions in the mantle. Even for compressible models with melting, big continents are able to focus the heat underneath them. The dominant degree of convection changes with continental breakup. Additionally, correlation is observed to be higher in the upper mantle (300 - 1000 km) compared to the lower mantle (1000 - 2890 km). At present, mobile continents in StagYY are simplified into a compositionally distinct field drifting at the top of

  5. Time-dependent crack growth behavior of alloy 617 and alloy 230 at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Shawoon Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Two Ni-base solid-solution-strengthened superalloys: INCONEL 617 and HAYNES 230 were studied to check sustained loading crack growth (SLCG) behavior at elevated temperatures appropriate for Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) applictaions with constant stress intensity factor (Kmax= 27.75 MPa✓m) in air. The results indicate a time-dependent rate controlling process which can be characterized by a linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) parameter -- stress intensity factor (K). At elevated temperatures, the crack growth mechanism was best described using a damage zone concept. Based on results and study, SAGBOE (stress accelerated grain boundary oxidation embrittlement) is considered the primary reason for time-dependent SLCG. A thermodynamic equation was considered to correlate all the SLCG results to determine the thermal activation energy in the process. A phenomenological model based on a time-dependent factor was developed considering the previous researcher's time-dependent fatigue crack propagation (FCP) results and current SLCG results to relate cycle-dependent and time-dependent FCP for both alloys. Further study includes hold time (3+300s) fatigue testing and no hold (1s) fatigue testing with various load ratios (R) at 700°C with a Kmax of 27.75 MPa✓m. Study results suggest an interesting point: crack growth behavior is significantly affected with the change in R value in cycle-dependent process whereas in time-dependent process, change in R does not have any significant effect. Fractography study showed intergranular cracking mode for all time-dependent processes and transgranular cracking mode for cycle-dependent processes. In Alloy 230, SEM images display intergranular cracking with carbide particles, dense oxides and dimple mixed secondary cracks for time-dependent 3+300s FCP and SLCG test. In all cases, Alloy 230 shows better crack growth resistance compared to Alloy 617.

  6. Plant Pathogenic Microbial Communication Affected by Elevated Temperature in Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum.

    PubMed

    Saha, N D; Chaudhary, A; Singh, S D; Singh, D; Walia, S; Das, T K

    2015-11-01

    Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria regulate specific gene expression in a population density-dependent manner by sensing level of Acyl-Homoserine Lactone (HSL) molecules which they produce and liberate to the environment, called Quorum Sensing (QS). The production of virulence factors (extracellular enzyme viz. cellulase, pectinase, etc.) in Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc) is under strong regulation of QS. The QS signal molecule, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-Homoserine Lactone (OHHL) was found as the central regulatory system for the virulence factor production in Pcc and is also under strict regulation of external environmental temperature. Under seven different incubation temperatures (24, 26, 28, 30, 33, 35, and 37 °C) in laboratory condition, highest amount of OHHL (804 violacein unit) and highest (79 %) Disease Severity Index (DSI) were measured at 33 °C. The OHHL production kinetics showed accumulation of highest concentration of OHHL at late log phase of the growth but diminution in the concentration occurred during stationary phase onwards to death phase. At higher temperature (35 and 37 °C) exposure, OHHL was not at detectable range. The effect of temperature on virulence factor production is the concomitant effect of HSL production and degradation which justifies less disease severity index in cross-inoculated tomato fruits incubated at 35 and 37 °C. The nondetection of the OHHL in the elevated temperature may because of degradation as these signal molecules are quite sensitive and prone to get degraded under different physical factors. This result provides the rationale behind the highest disease severity up to certain elevated temperature and leaves opportunities for investigation on mutation, co-evolution of superior plant pathogen with more stable HSL signals-mediated pathogenesis under global warming context. PMID:26271295

  7. Effects of selected thermophilic microorganisms on crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1995-07-01

    During the past several years, a considerable amount of work has been carried out showing that microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is promising and the resulting biotechnology may be deliverable. At the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), systematic studies have been conducted which dealt with the effects of thermophilic and thermoadapted bacteria on the chemical and physical properties of selected types of crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Particular attention was paid to heavy crude oils from Venezuela, California, Alabama, Arkansas, Wyoming, Alaska, and other oil producing areas. Current studies indicate that during the biotreatment several chemical and physical properties of crude oils are affected. The oils are (1) emulsified; (2) acidified; (3) there is a qualitative and quantitative change in light and heavy fractions of the crudes; (4) there are chemical changes in fractions containing sulfur compounds; (5) there is an apparent reduction in the concentration of trace metals; (6) the qualitative and quantitative changes appear to be microbial species dependent; and (7) there is a distinction between {open_quotes}biodegraded{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}biotreated{close_quotes} oils. Preliminary results indicate the introduced microorganisms may become the dominant species in the bioconversion of oils. These studies also indicate the biochemical interactions between crude oils and microorganisms follow distinct trends, characterized by a group of chemical markers. Core-flooding experiments have shown significant additional crude oil recoveries are achievable with thermophilic microorganisms at elevated temperatures similar to those found in oil reservoirs. In addition, the biochemical treatment of crude oils has technological applications in downstream processing of crude oils such as in upgrading of low grade oils and the production of hydrocarbon based detergents.

  8. Elevated temperature viscous remanent magnetization of natural and synthetic multidomain magnetite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelso, Paul R.; Banerjee, Subir K.

    1994-01-01

    The time-temperature relationship of magnetization is a subject of much interest and debate by paleomagnetists, rock magnetists, and magnetic anomaly modellers. We have investigated this relationship by studying the viscous remanent magnetization (VRM) of coarse-grained multidomain (MD) magnetite. Our experiments covered the temperature range from 22 to 400 C, times from minutes to months, and included both Australian granulite samples and multidomain magnetite samples synthesized by the glass ceramic method. VRM acquisition was found to generally increase with temperature but not always at the rate predicted from classical thermal fluctuation theories. Thermal cycling between room temperature (at which the measurements were made) and the VRM acquisition temperature sharply decreased the temperature dependence of the VRM. Room temperature VRM acquisition accelerates with time when plotted on a semilog plot, whereas at elevated temperature the curves are quasilinear against log(time) for both the natural and synthetic samples. This change in behavior may suggest a variation in the VRM acquisition mechanism as a function of temperature for MD magnetite. The granulites have a nearly linear increase in VRM acquisition rate with temperature whereas the glass ceramics display little change in the acquisition rate between 22 and 200 C, but increase by nearly a factor of 3 by 400 C. The increase in VRM of the glass ceramics between 200 and 400 C is in general qualitative agreement with thermal fluctuation theory. There was no systematic change in the rate of VRM acquisition with grain size for the multidomain magnetites used in this study. Elevated temperature (e.g., 400 C) VRM acquisition by the deep crustal granulites, if extrapolated over the Brunhes chron, would produce a magnetization of several A/m which, if true, is of the order required by models for the source of long-wavelength magnetic anomalies.

  9. Effects of episodic low aragonite saturation and elevated temperature on the physiology of Stylophora pistillata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lürig, M.; Kunzmann, A.

    2015-05-01

    As global climate change is predicted to gradually alter the oceans' carbonate system and water temperature, knowledge about the effects an altered marine environment has on the physiology of reef building (hermatypic) coral species is more widely established. However, although it is recognized that seawater temperature and the carbonate system of a coral reef can change rapidly and with great amplitude, little is known about how the interaction of these natural fluctuations with long term effects of climate change may affect the metabolism and productivity of hermatypic corals. To investigate this, we acclimated the hermatypic coral Stylophora pistillata to a "worst case" scenario for carbon dioxide emissions (aragonite saturation state [ΩARAG] = 1.6), and tested how exposure to short term (24 h) elevated temperature (+ 3 °C) and further lowered ΩARAG (-1 unit) affected its photosynthesis and respiration. While episodic exposure to very low ΩARAG had only little effect on S. pistillata's physiology, short term heat stress caused a shift from net oxygen production to consumption and partial coral bleaching. Higher gross coral respiration, and lowered photosynthetic activity under episodically elevated temperature may have been the result of photoinhibition and partial coral bleaching. These findings suggest that fluctuating environmental conditions in combination with a low ΩARAG background signal may impair basic metabolic processes in calcifying corals. In a future high-CO2 world short term stress could be relevant for reef ecosystem processes, and may affect the resilience of coral reefs to other external influences and effects of climate change.

  10. Computational and Experimental Design of Fe-Based Superalloys for Elevated-Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, Peter K.; Fine, Morris E.; Ghosh, Gautam; Asta, Mark D.; Liu, Chain T.; Sun, Zhiqian; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Wang, Gongyao

    2012-04-13

    Analogous to nickel-based superalloys, Fe-based superalloys, which are strengthened by coherent B2- type precipitates are proposed for elevated-temperature applications. During the period of this project, a series of ferritic superalloys have been designed and fabricated by methods of vacuum-arc melting and vacuum-induction melting. Nano-scale precipitates were characterized by atom-probe tomography, ultrasmall- angle X-ray scattering, and transmission-electron microscopy. A duplex distribution of precipitates was found. It seems that ferritic superalloys are susceptible to brittle fracture. Systematic endeavors have been devoted to understanding and resolving the problem. Factors, such as hot rolling, precipitate volume fractions, alloy compositions, precipitate sizes and inter-particle spacings, and hyperfine cooling precipitates, have been investigated. In order to understand the underlying relationship between the microstructure and creep behavior of ferric alloys at elevated temperatures, in-situ neutron studies have been carried out. Based on the current result, it seems that the major role of β' with a 16%-volume fraction in strengthening ferritic alloys is not load sharing but interactions with dislocations. The oxidation behavior of one ferritic alloy, FBB8 (Fe-6.5Al-10Ni-10Cr-3.4Mo-0.25Zr-0.005B, weight percent), was studied in dry air. It is found that it possesses superior oxidation resistance at 1,023 and 1,123 K, compared with other creep-resistant ferritic steels [T91 (modified 9Cr-1Mo, weight percent) and P92 (9Cr-1.8W-0.5Mo, weight percent)]. At the same time, the calculation of the interfacial energies between the -iron and B2-type intermetallics (CoAl, FeAl, and NiAl) has been conducted.

  11. Alcohol electrooxidation at Pt and Pt-Ru sputtered electrodes under elevated temperature and pressurized conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Minoru; Sugii, Hiromasa; Uchida, Isamu

    2008-05-01

    The electrooxidation properties of methanol and 2-propanol, which are both promising candidates for direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs), have been studied under elevated temperature and pressurized conditions. Sputter-deposited Pt and Pt-Ru electrodes were well-characterized and utilized for the electrochemical measurement of the alcohol oxidation at 25-100 °C. The Pt electrode prepared at 600 °C had a flat surface, and the Pt-Ru formed an alloy. The electrochemical measurements were carried out in a gas-tight cell under elevated temperature, which accompanies the pressurized condition. This is a representative example of the DAFC rising temperature operation. As a result, at 25 °C, the onset potential of the 2-propanol oxidation is about 400 mV more negative than that of the methanol oxidation, and current density of the 2-propanol oxidation exceeds that of the methanol oxidation. Conversely, at 100 °C, the methanol oxidation current density overcomes that of 2-propanol, and the onset potentials of the two are almost the same. The highest current density for the methanol oxidation is obtained at the Pt:Ru = 50:50 electrode, whereas at the Pt:Ru = 35:65 for the 2-propanol oxidation. A Tafel plot analysis was employed to investigate the reaction mechanism. For the methanol oxidation, the number of electrons transferred during the rate-determining process is estimated to be 1 at 25 °C and 2 at 100 °C. This suggests that the methanol reaction mechanism differs at 25 and 100 °C. In contrast, the rate-determining process of the 2-propanol oxidation at 25 and 100 °C was expected to be 1-electron transfer which accompanies the proton-elimination reaction to produce acetone. Consequently, it is deduced that methanol and 2-propanol have an advantage under the rising temperature and room temperature operation, respectively.

  12. Tensile behavior and cyclic creep of continuous fiber-reinforced glass matrix composites at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccaccini, A. R.; West, G.; Janczak, J.; Lewis, M. H.; Kern, H.

    1997-06-01

    In this study we investigated the stress-strain behavior at room and elevated temperatures and the tensile creep and cyclic creep response of a unidirectional SiC fiber-reinforced aluminosilicate glass matrix composite. The interfacial condition of the as-received material was measured by a push-out indentation technique. The stress-strain behavior was that expected for this kind of composite, i.e. “pseudoductile” behavior with extensive fiber “pull-out” at room temperature and brittle failure at intermediate temperatures (750 °C) due to oxidation embrittlement. The stiffness of the composite at 750°C was analyzed for different loading rates, highlighing the influence of the loading rate on apparent composite stiffness, due to matrix softening. The creep studies were conducted at temperatures above and below the softening temperature of the glass (T g, 745 °C) in air. The cyclic creep experiments showed the existence of extensive viscous strain recovery during the unloading period. The creep strain recovery was quantified using strain recovery ratios. These ratios showed a slight dependence on the temperatures investigated (700 and 750 °C). The crept composites retained their “graceful” fracture behavior only partially after testing, indicating that oxidation of the fiber/matrix interface due to oxygen diffusion through the matrix occurred in the peripheral area of the samples.

  13. An experimental investigation into the behavior of concrete elements rerofitted with NSM composite strips at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namrou, Abdul Rahman

    Near-surface-mounted (NSM) fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) is another strengthening alternative of externally bonded fiber reinforced polymers. NSM FRP is a promising alternative technology that has emerged for enhancing the strength capacity of concrete structures. Most laboratory researches have focused mainly on the overall member performance and/or the bonding performance of the NSM bars or strips. Limited research has focused on the effect of temperature exposure on NSM FRP performance. The results of an experimental program performed on forty-eight (48) concrete block specimen with NSM carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) strengthening systems at elevated temperatures that reaches to 200°C [392°F] to investigate flexural performance. The effect of using two different adhesive systems (epoxy anchoring system) with manufacturer recommendation at ordinary and high temperature exposures is also studied. The adhesive was injected in a NSM groove size (25 mm [1 in] deep x 13 mm [0.5 in] wide) the width and depth of the groove were greater than 3 and 1.5 times the CFRP thickness and width, respectively. Test results show that the interfacial strength of the specimens bonded with the ordinary epoxy is maintained until 75°C [167°F] is reached, while the strength noticeably decreases with an increasing temperature above this limit. The specimens with the high-temperature epoxy preserve interfacial capacity up to 200°C [392°F] despite a trend of strength-decrease being observed. The failure of the test specimens is brittle irrespective of adhesive type. Interfacial damage is localized along the bond-line with the presence of hairline cracks that further develop when interfacial failure is imminent. This thesis also presents an experimental result concerning the bond performance of concrete-adhesive at elevated temperatures that reaches to 200°C [392°F] applied for three hours. Then, the concrete prisms were tested under three point flexural loading. The

  14. Characterization of lignin derived from water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatment of poplar wood at elevated temperatures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Libing; Yan, Lishi; Wang, Zheming; Laskar, Dhrubojyoti D.; Swita, Marie S.; Cort, John R.; Yang, Bin

    2015-12-01

    In this study, flowthrough pretreatment of biomass has high potential to valorize lignin derivatives to high-value products, which is vital to enhance the economy of biorefinery plants. Comprehensive understanding of lignin behaviors and solubilization chemistry in aqueous pretreatment such as water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatment is of fundamental importance to achieve the goal of providing flexible platform for lignin utilization. In this study, the effects of flowthrough pretreatment conditions on lignin separation from poplar wood were reported as well as the characteristics of three sub-sets of lignin produced from the pretreatment, including residual lignin in pretreated solid residues (ReL),more » recovered insoluble lignin in pretreated liquid (RISL), and recovered soluble lignin in pretreatment liquid (RSL). Both the water-only and 0.05% (w/w) sulfuric acid pretreatments were performed at temperatures from 160 to 270°C on poplar wood in a flowthrough reactor system for 2-10 min. Results showed that water-only flowthrough pretreatment primarily removed syringyl (S units). Increased temperature and/or the addition of sulfuric acid enhanced the removal of guaiacyl (G units) compared to water-only pretreatments at lower temperatures, resulting in nearly complete removal of lignin from the biomass. Results also suggested that more RISL was recovered than ReL and RSL in both dilute acid and water-only flowthrough pretreatment at elevated temperatures. NMR spectra of the RISL revealed significant β-O-4 cleavage, α-β deoxygenation to form cinnamyl-like end groups, and slight β-5 repolymerization in both water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatments. In conclusion, elevated temperature and/or dilute acid greatly enhanced lignin removal to almost 100% by improving G unit removal besides S unit removal in flowthrough system. A new lignin chemistry transformation pathway was proposed and revealed the complexity of lignin structural change

  15. Materials and structures/ACEE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Light weight composites made from graphite fibers, glass, or man made materials held in an epoxy matrix, and their application to airframe design are reviewed. The Aircraft Energy Efficiency program is discussed. Characteristics of composites, acceptable risks, building parts and confidence, and aeroelastic tailoring are considered.

  16. Managing Training Materials with Structured Text Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streit, Les D.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes characteristics of structured text design; benefits of its use in training; benefits for developers of training materials and steps in preparing training materials. A case study illustrating how the structured text design process solved the sales training needs of the Mercedes-Benz Truck Company is presented. (MBR)

  17. Polymorphism and the crystal structures of InSb at elevated temperature and pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, S.-C.; Spain, I. L.; Skelton, E. F.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents polycrystalline X-ray diffraction data for three high-pressure phases of InSb. The study employed two types of diamond-anvil pressure cells. The X-ray diffraction parameters were recorded at different fixed pressures and temperatures on flat film. The experiment utilized Zr-filtered Mo radiation. The intensities were estimated from the X-ray photographs using a semiautomated microdensitometer.

  18. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittenber, David B.

    The objective of this work was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)'s ability to act as a structural material. As a chemical treatment, aligned kenaf fibers were treated with sodium hydroxide (alkalization) in different concentrations and durations and then manufactured into kenaf fiber / vinyl ester composite plates. Single fiber tensile properties and composite flexural properties, both in dry and saturated environments, were assessed. Based on ASTM standard testing, a comparison of flexural, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical properties was also made between an untreated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a chemically treated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a glass fiber reinforced composite, and oriented strand board (OSB). The mechanical properties were evaluated for dry samples, samples immersed in water for 50 hours, and samples immersed in water until saturation (~2700 hours). Since NFRPs are more vulnerable to environmental effects than synthetic fiber composites, a series of weathering and environmental tests were conducted on the kenaf fiber composites. The environmental conditions studied include real-time outdoor weathering, elevated temperatures, immersion in different pH solutions, and UV exposure. In all of these tests, degradation was found to be more pronounced in the NFRPs than in the glass FRPs; however, in nearly every case the degradation was less than 50% of the flexural strength or stiffness. Using a method of overlapping and meshing discontinuous fiber ends, large mats of fiber bundles were manufactured into composite facesheets for structural insulated panels (SIPs). The polyisocyanurate foam cores proved to be poorly matched to the strength and stiffness of the NFRP facesheets, leading to premature core shear or delamination failures in both flexure and compressive testing. The NFRPs were found to match well with the theoretical stiffness prediction methods of classical lamination

  19. Structures and materials technology for hypersonic aerospacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomb, Harvey G., Jr.; Murrow, Harold N.; Card, Michael F.

    1990-01-01

    Major considerations in structural design of a transatmospheric aerospacecraft are discussed. The general direction of progress in structures and materials technology is indicated, and technical areas in structures and materials where further research and development is necessary are indicated. Various structural concepts under study and materials which appear to be most applicable are discussed. Structural design criteria are discussed with particular attention to the factor-of-safety approach and the probabilistic approach. Structural certification requirements for the aerospacecraft are discussed. The kinds of analyses and tests which would be required to certify the structural integrity, safety, and durability of the aerospacecraft are discussed, and the type of test facility needed to perform structural certification tests is identified.

  20. Confined Water Dissociation in Disordered Silicate Nanometer-Channels at Elevated Temperatures: Mechanism, Dynamics and Impact on Substrates.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dongshuai; Li, Dengke; Zhao, Tiejun; Li, Zongjin

    2016-05-01

    The effects of elevated temperature on the physical and chemical properties of water molecules filled in the nanometer-channels of calcium silicate hydrate have been investigated by performing reactive molecular dynamics simulation on C-S-H gel subjected to high temperature from 500 to 1500 K. The mobility of interlayer water molecules is temperature-dependent: with the elevation of temperature, the self-diffusivity of water molecules increases, and the glassy dynamic nature of interlayer water at low temperature transforms to bulk water characteristic at high temperature. In addition, the high temperature contributes to the water dissociation and hydroxyl group formation, and proton exchange between neighboring water molecules and calcium silicate substrate frequently happens. The hydrolytic reaction of water molecules results in breakage of the silicate chains and weakens the connectivity of the ionic-covalent bonds in the C-S-H skeleton. However, the broken silicate chains can repolymerize together to form branch structures to resist thermal attacking. PMID:27077726

  1. Foreign Object Damage Behavior of a SiC/SiC Composite at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Pereira, J. Michael; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Choi, Sung R.

    2004-01-01

    Foreign object damage (FOD) behavior of a gas-turbine grade SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) was determined at 25 and 1316 C, employing impact velocities from 115 to 440 meters per second by 1.59-mm diameter stell-ball projectiles. Two different types of specimen support were used at each temperature: fully supported and partially supported. For a given temperature, the degree of post-impact strength degradation increased with increasing impact velocity, and was greater in a partially supported configuration than in a fully supported one. The elevated-temperature FOD resistance of the composite, particularly under partially supported loading at higher impact velocities greater than or equal to 350 meters per second, was significantly less than the ambient-temperature counterpart, attributed to a weakening effect of the composite. For fully supported loading, frontal contact stress played a major role in generating composite damage; whereas, for partially supported loading, both frontal contact and backside bending stresses were combined sources of damage generation. The SiC/SiC composite was able to survive higher energy impacts without complete structural failure but suffered more strength affecting damage from low energy impacts than AS800 and SN282 silicon nitrides.

  2. A zero density change phase change memory material: GeTe-O structural characteristics upon crystallisation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xilin; Dong, Weiling; Zhang, Hao; Simpson, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen-doped germanium telluride phase change materials are proposed for high temperature applications. Up to 8 at.% oxygen is readily incorporated into GeTe, causing an increased crystallisation temperature and activation energy. The rhombohedral structure of the GeTe crystal is preserved in the oxygen doped films. For higher oxygen concentrations the material is found to phase separate into GeO2 and TeO2, which inhibits the technologically useful abrupt change in properties. Increasing the oxygen content in GeTe-O reduces the difference in film thickness and mass density between the amorphous and crystalline states. For oxygen concentrations between 5 and 6 at.%, the amorphous material and the crystalline material have the same density. Above 6 at.% O doping, crystallisation exhibits an anomalous density change, where the volume of the crystalline state is larger than that of the amorphous. The high thermal stability and zero-density change characteristic of Oxygen-incorporated GeTe, is recommended for efficient and low stress phase change memory devices that may operate at elevated temperatures. PMID:26068587

  3. Recent global trends in structural materials research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Hideyuki; Ohmura, Takahito; Nishimura, Toshiyuki

    2013-02-01

    Structural materials support the basis of global society, such as infrastructure and transportation facilities, and are therefore essential for everyday life. The optimization of such materials allows people to overcome environmental, energy and resource depletion issues on a global scale. The creation and manufacture of structural materials make a large contribution to economies around the world every year. The use of strong, resistant materials can also have profound social effects, providing a better quality of life at both local and national levels. The Great East Japan Earthquake of 11 March 2011 caused significant structural damage in the Tohoku and Kanto regions of Japan. On a global scale, accidents caused by the ageing and failure of structural materials occur on a daily basis. Therefore, the provision and inspection of structural reliability, safety of nuclear power facilities and construction of a secure and safe society hold primary importance for researchers and engineers across the world. Clearly, structural materials need to evolve further to address both existing problems and prepare for new challenges that may be faced in the future. With this in mind, the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) organized the 'NIMS Conference 2012' to host an extensive discussion on a variety of global issues related to the future development of structural materials. Ranging from reconstruction following natural disasters, verification of structural reliability, energy-saving materials to fundamental problems accompanying the development of materials for high safety standards, the conference covered many key issues in the materials industry today. All the above topics are reflected in this focus issue of STAM, which introduces recent global trends in structural materials research with contributions from world-leading researchers in this field. This issue covers the development of novel alloys, current methodologies in the characterization of structural

  4. HSCT materials and structures: An MDC perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Jay O.

    1992-01-01

    The key High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) features which control the materials selection are discussed. Materials are selected based on weight and production economics. The top-down and bottoms-up approaches to material selection are compared for the Mach 2.4 study baseline aircraft. The key materials and structures related tasks which remain to be accomplished prior to proceeding with the building of the HSCT aircraft are examined.

  5. Mapping the Structure of Heterogeneous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Cohen, N. S.; Hernan, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    Image-processing microdensitometer/Fourier analyzer yields statistics of subcomponent distribution. Nondestructive method for studying structure heterogeneous materials uses energy-dispersive X-ray analysis in scanning electron microscope. Scanning microdensitometer/Fourier analyzer (SMFA) is applied to SEM images to obtain statistics about sample structure. Method originally developed for studying effect on combustion of fine structure of composite solid propellants.

  6. Radiation Effects on Spacecraft Structural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An J.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Hunter, Hamilton T.; Singleterry, Robert C. Jr.

    2002-07-01

    Research is being conducted to develop an integrated technology for the prediction of aging behavior for space structural materials during service. This research will utilize state-of-the-art radiation experimental apparatus and analysis, updated codes and databases, and integrated mechanical and radiation testing techniques to investigate the suitability of numerous current and potential spacecraft structural materials. Also included are the effects on structural materials in surface modules and planetary landing craft, with or without fission power supplies. Spacecraft structural materials would also be in hostile radiation environments on the surface of the moon and planets without appreciable atmospheres and moons around planets with large intense magnetic and radiation fields (such as the Jovian moons). The effects of extreme temperature cycles in such locations compounds the effects of radiation on structural materials. This paper describes the integrated methodology in detail and shows that it will provide a significant technological advance for designing advanced spacecraft. This methodology will also allow for the development of advanced spacecraft materials through the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of material degradation in the space radiation environment. Thus, this technology holds a promise for revolutionary advances in material damage prediction and protection of space structural components as, for example, in the development of guidelines for managing surveillance programs regarding the integrity of spacecraft components, and the safety of the aging spacecraft. (authors)

  7. Space structures concepts and materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowitzky, A. M.; Supan, E. C.

    1988-01-01

    An extension is preseted of the evaluation of graphite/aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC) for space structures application. A tubular DWG graphite/aluminum truss assembly was fabricated having the structural integrity and thermal stability needed for space application. DWG is a proprietary thin ply continuous graphite reinforced aluminum composite. The truss end fittings were constructed using the discontinuous ceramic particulate reinforced MMC DWAl 20 (trademark). Thermal stability was incorporated in the truss by utilizing high stiffness, negative coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) P100 graphite fibers in a 6061 aluminum matrix, crossplied to provide minimized CTE in the assembled truss. Tube CTE was designed to be slightly negative to offset the effects of the end fitting and sleeve, CTE values of which are approx. 1/2 that of aluminum. In the design of the truss configuration, the CTE contribution of each component was evaluated to establish the component dimension and layup configuration required to provide a net zero CTE in the subassemblies which would then translate to a zero CTE for the entire truss bay produced.

  8. Energy absorption of composite material and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from a joint research program on helicopter crashworthiness conducted by the U.S. Army Aerostructures Directorate and NASA Langley. Through the ongoing research program an in-depth understanding has been developed on the cause/effect relationships between material and architectural variables and the energy-absorption capability of composite material and structure. Composite materials were found to be efficient energy absorbers. Graphite/epoxy subfloor structures were more efficient energy absorbers than comparable structures fabricated from Kevlar or aluminum. An accurate method of predicting the energy-absorption capability of beams was developed.

  9. A pilot test of polymer flooding in an elevated-temperature reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Tielong, Chen; Zhengyu, Song; Fan, Y.

    1996-12-31

    A pilot test of polymer flooding has been conducted in Shuanghe reservoir located in southeast Henan oil field, China. The target reservoir has a net thickness of 15.56 meters (50 ft), an average permeability of 420 md, and temperature of 75{degrees}C (167{degrees}F). The polymers used are two types of modified partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamides, named S525 and S625, which have molecular weights of 16,700,000 and 19,670,000 daltons, respectively. The objective of this pilot test is to investigate the feasibility of polymer flooding for improving oil recovery in an elevated-temperature reservoir. The polymer flooding started in February 1994. Up through December 1995, a total of 246 tons (about 0.5 x 106 lb) of dry polymer had been used with an injection concentration of 900-1100 ppm. The pore volume injected reached 0.2164. As a result, oil production increased by 22,000 tons (184,000 bbl) and water production decreased by 153,000 tons (962,000 bbl), which accounts for the incremental oil recovery of 3.8% and water-cut reduction of 5.6% in the test block. It is estimated that by the end of this project, the ultimate increase in oil production will exceed 63,000 tons (528,000 bbl) with the enhanced oil recovery going up to 9.8%. The yield is 0.2 tons more oil produced per kilogram of polymer injected or 0.7 barrel of oil produced per pound of polymer. The success of the pilot test is attributed to a few techniques used during the implementation of the flooding, including prevention of polymer thermal degradation, good reservoir description, and the profile modification carried out before and after the polymer injection. This pilot test illustrates a case where polymers with extra-high molecular weight are successfully injected in an elevated-temperature reservoir to control the mobility ratio and modify the permeability profile.

  10. Materials support for HITAF

    SciTech Connect

    Breder, K.; Tennery, V.J.

    1994-09-01

    The primary objective of this work is to compare the mechanical performance of structural ceramic materials which are being proposed for use in the air heater of a coal fired high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) for power generation. The effort is focused on providing preliminary evaluations of key mechanical properties required of ceramic materials for this application. The critical properties studied include fast fracture strength distribution at room temperature and two elevated temperatures, any trends in slow crack growth (SCG) susceptibility at elevated temperatures, and preliminary creep behavior. In addition residual fast fracture strength of a limited number of specimens corroded in a coal ash environment will be evaluated at a later stage in the project.

  11. Finite Element Analysis of the Random Response Suppression of Composite Panels at Elevated Temperatures using Shape Memory Alloy Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Zhong, Z. W.; Mei, Chuh

    1994-01-01

    A feasibility study on the use of shape memory alloys (SMA) for suppression of the random response of composite panels due to acoustic loads at elevated temperatures is presented. The constitutive relations for a composite lamina with embedded SMA fibers are developed. The finite element governing equations and the solution procedures for a composite plate subjected to combined acoustic and thermal loads are presented. Solutions include: 1) Critical buckling temperature; 2) Flat panel random response; 3) Thermal postbuckling deflection; 4) Random response of a thermally buckled panel. The preliminary results demonstrate that the SMA fibers can completely eliminate the thermal postbuckling deflection and significantly reduce the random response at elevated temperatures.

  12. Revolutionary opportunities for materials and structures study

    SciTech Connect

    Schweiger, F.A.

    1987-02-01

    The revolutionary opportunities for materials and structures study was performed to provide Government and Industry focus for advanced materials technology. Both subsonic and supersonic engine studies and aircraft fuel burn and DOC evaluation are examined. Year 2010 goal materials were used in the advanced engine studies. These goal materials and improved component aero yielded subsonic fuel burn and DOC improvements of 13.4 percent and 5 percent, respectively and supersonic fuel burn and DOC improvements of 21.5 percent and 18 percent, respectively. Conclusions are that the supersonic study engine yielded fuel burn and DOC improvements well beyond the program goals; therefore, it is appropriate that advanced material programs be considered.

  13. Revolutionary opportunities for materials and structures study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweiger, F. A.

    1987-01-01

    The revolutionary opportunities for materials and structures study was performed to provide Government and Industry focus for advanced materials technology. Both subsonic and supersonic engine studies and aircraft fuel burn and DOC evaluation are examined. Year 2010 goal materials were used in the advanced engine studies. These goal materials and improved component aero yielded subsonic fuel burn and DOC improvements of 13.4 percent and 5 percent, respectively and supersonic fuel burn and DOC improvements of 21.5 percent and 18 percent, respectively. Conclusions are that the supersonic study engine yielded fuel burn and DOC improvements well beyond the program goals; therefore, it is appropriate that advanced material programs be considered.

  14. Material issues for lunar/Martian structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radford, Donald W.; Sadeh, Willy Z.; Cheng, Boyle C.

    1991-01-01

    Development of structures in the lunar/Martian environment depends upon the use of the most appropriate materials. Advanced composite materials are apparently the best candidates for use in structures on planetary surfaces and in space in view of their unique properties, tailorability and light weight. The physical and mechanical properties of advanced composite materials as related to their use in lunar/Martian structures are reviewed. Polymer matrix composites are recommended as the best materials in the first exploration stages of a lunar/Martian base. Increased use of ceramic and metal matrix composites is expected in the more advanced exploration stages. The pressing need for the development of tailored radiation shielding composite materials is discussed.

  15. An automated flow calorimeter for heat capacity and enthalpy measurements at elevated temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Yesavage, V.F.

    1990-08-31

    The need for highly accurate thermal property data for a broad range of new application fluids is well documented. To facilitate expansion of the current thermophysical database, an automated flow calorimeter was developed for the measurement of highly accurate isobaric heat capacities and enthalpies of fluids at elevated temperatures and pressures. The experimental technique utilizes traditional electrical power input, adiabatic flow calorimetry with a precision metering pump that eliminates the need for on-line flow rate monitoring. In addition, a complete automation system, greatly simplifies the operation of the apparatus and increases the rapidity of the measurement process. The range over which the instrument was tested, was 300--600 K and 0--12 Mpa, although the calorimeter should perform up to the original design goals of 700 K and 30 MPa. The new flow calorimeter was evaluated by measuring the mean, isobaric, specific heat capacities of liquid water and n-pentane. These experiments yielded an average deviation from the standard literature data of +0.02% and a total variation of 0.05%. Additional data analysis indicated that the overall measurement uncertainty was conservatively estimated as 0.2% with an anticipated precision of 0.1--0.15% at all operating conditions. 44 refs., 27 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Superior magnetic softness at elevated temperature of Si-rich Fe-based nanocrystalline alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Rui-min; Wang, Zhi; Jia, Yun-yun; Wen, Zhuan-ping; Wang, Bo-wen; Zhang, Tao

    2012-10-01

    An excellent high-temperature magnetic softness was observed in a Si-rich nanocrystalline Fe74.5Cu1Nb2Si17.5B5 alloy. The Curie temperatures of amorphous and crystal phases, TCA* and TCcry, for this alloy were detected to be 365 °C and 580 °C, respectively. For the 480 °C-annealed alloy, the initial permeability μi drops to nearly zero just above TCA*; however, for the 540 °C-annealed alloy, the μi of about 10 000 at f = 10 kHz has no perceivable decline in this temperature range and can hold up to more than 400 °C. Such a magnetic softness at elevated temperature is superior to that of Finemet-type Fe-based nanocrystalline alloys ever reported. The origin of the high temperature magnetic softness was interpreted by the enhancement effect of Curie temperature in residual amorphous matrix.

  17. 'Effects of Elevated Temperature on Dehalococcoides Dechlorination Performance and DNA and RNA Biomarker Abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Kelly E; Costanza, Jed; Cruz-Garcia, Claribel; Ramaswamy, Nivedhya; Pennell, Kurt; Loeffler, Frank E

    2011-01-01

    Coupling thermal treatment with microbial reductive dechlorination is a promising remedy for tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) contaminated source zones. Laboratory experiments evaluated Dehalococcoides (Dhc) dechlorination performance, viability, and biomarker gene (DNA) and transcript (mRNA) abundances during exposure to elevated temperatures. The PCE-dechlorinating consortia BDI and OW produced ethene when incubated at temperatures of 30 C, but vinyl chloride (VC) accumulated when cultures were incubated at 35 or 40 C. Cultures incubated at 40 C for less than 49 days resumed VC dechlorination following cooling; however, incubation at 45 C resulted in complete loss of dechlorination activity. Dhc 16S rRNA, bvcA, and vcrA gene abundances in cultures showing complete dechlorination to ethene at 30 C exceeded those measured in cultures incubated at higher temperatures, consistent with observed dechlorination activities. Conversely, biomarker gene transcript abundances per cell in cultures incubated at 35 and 40 C were generally at least one order-of-magnitude greater than those measured in ethene-producing cultures incubated at 30 C. Even in cultures accumulating VC, transcription of the vcrA gene, which is implicated in VC-to-ethene dechlorination, was up-regulated. Temperature stress caused the up-regulation of Dhc reductive dehalogenase gene expression indicating that Dhc gene expression measurements should be interpreted cautiously as Dhc biomarker gene transcript abundances may not correlate with dechlorination activity.

  18. Elevated temperature creep properties of the 54Fe-29Ni-17Co "Kovar" alloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, John Joseph, Jr.; Rejent, Jerome Andrew; Schmale, David T.

    2009-01-22

    The outline of this presentation is: (1) Applications of Kovar Alloy in metal/ceramic brazing; (2) Diffusion bonding of precision-photoetched Kovar parts; (3) Sample composition and annealing conditions; (4) Intermediate temperature creep properties (350-650 C); (5) Power law creep correlations--with and without modulus correction; (6) Compressive stress-strain properties (23-900 C); (7) Effect of creep deformation on grain growth; and (8) Application of the power law creep correlation to the diffusion bonding application. The summary and conclusions are: Elevated temperature creep properties of Kovar from 750-900 C obey a power law creep equation with a stress exponent equal to 4.9, modulus compensated activation energy of 47.96 kcal/mole. Grain growth in Kovar creep samples tested at 750 and 800 C is quite sluggish. Significant grain growth occurs at 850 C and above, this is consistent with isothermal grain growth studies performed on Kovar alloy wires. Finite element analysis of the diffusion bonding of Kovar predict that stresses of 30 MPa and higher are needed for good bonding at 850 C, we believe that 'sintering' effects must be accounted for to allow FEA to be predictive of actual processing conditions. Additional creep tests are planned at 250-650 C.

  19. Highly stable concentrated nanoemulsions by the phase inversion composition method at elevated temperature.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lijie; Li, Chao; Xu, Jian; Hao, Jingcheng; Sun, Dejun

    2012-10-16

    Oil-in-water nanoemulsions were produced in the system water/Span 80-Tween 80/paraffin oil via the phase inversion composition (PIC) method at elevated temperature. With the increase of preparation temperature from 20 to 70 °C, we found that the emulsion droplet diameter decreases from 10.3 μm to 51 nm, proving the formation of nanoemulsions. The viscosity of nanoemulsions clearly increases with droplet volume fraction, φ, but the droplet size changes less. Significantly, at φ ≤ 0.5, the size distribution of nanoemulsions can be kept unchangeable more than 5 months. These results proved that the highly viscous paraffin oil can hardly be dispersed by the PIC method at 25 °C, but the increase in preparation temperature makes it possible for producing monodisperse nanoemulsions. Once the nanoemulsion is produced, the stability against Ostwald ripening is outstanding due to the extremely low solubility of the paraffin oil in the continuous phase. The highly stable nanoemulsions are of great importance in practical applications. PMID:22985401

  20. Microstructure and Elevated Temperature Properties of Die-cast AZ91- xNd Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Limin; An, Jian; Liu, Yongbing

    2008-10-01

    The effect of Nd addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a die-cast AZ91 alloy was investigated in the present work. The results show that the die-cast AZ91 alloy is composed of α-Mg matrix and γ-Mg17Al12 phase. Nd addition into the AZ91 alloy leads to the formation of rare earth containing intermetallic phase. Al4Nd phase forms when Nd content is less than or equal to 1.0 wt.%. Al2Nd phase appears simultaneously when Nd content reaches to 3.0 wt.%. The size and volume fraction of γ-Mg17Al12 phase decrease, because of the newly formed Al-Nd phase. And the γ-Mg17Al12 phase distributes from reticular to dispersive. Nd addition has a little effect on the room temperature properties of the die-cast AZ91 alloy, but greatly improves the elevated temperature properties. The tensile strength of AZ91-0.5Nd and AZ91-1.0Nd alloy tested at 150 °C is even close to the room temperature strength. The AZ91-1.0Nd alloy has the optimal properties.

  1. Defect Monitoring at Elevated Temperatures (>500 °C) Using AN Array of Ultrasonic Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, A. J. C.; Cegla, F. B.

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes the development of an array of ultrasonic waveguides that can be permanently installed on high temperature pipework. The work was motivated by the need for monitoring of thermal fatigue cracks in power station boiler outlet pipes. The defect monitoring concept is described and simulated results are presented for the operating envelope of the array. The effects of component geometry, array location and signal to noise ratios on measured defect size were investigated. Results show that the array is capable of measuring defects ranging from the size of an ultrasonic wavelength to 40 percent thickness of the component to within ±0.2 mm of the defect length. Experimental tests using a prototype array attached to a 30 mm thick steel plate containing a 5 mm deep and 0.3 mm wide notch in a furnace at 550 °C showed that monitoring at elevated temperatures is possible. A mean defect length of 5.09 mm with standard deviation of 0.13 mm was measured over a 2 week period. Further tests at even higher temperatures (up to 730 °C) were used to accelerate creep in the attachment mechanism and showed that long-term exposure to temperatures at 550 °C should not have a detrimental effect on the system.

  2. Fatigue Hysteresis of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Longbiao

    2016-02-01

    When the fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) are first loading to fatigue peak stress, matrix multicracking and fiber/matrix interface debonding occur. Under fatigue loading, the stress-strain hysteresis loops appear as fiber slipping relative to matrix in the interface debonded region upon unloading/reloading. Due to interface wear at room temperature or interface oxidation at elevated temperature, the interface shear stress degredes with increase of the number of applied cycles, leading to the evolution of the shape, location and area of stress-strain hysteresis loops. The evolution characteristics of fatigue hysteresis loss energy in different types of fiber-reinforced CMCs, i.e., unidirectional, cross-ply, 2D and 2.5D woven, have been investigated. The relationships between the fatigue hysteresis loss energy, stress-strain hysteresis loops, interface frictional slip, interface shear stress and interface radial thermal residual stress, matrix stochastic cracking and fatigue peak stress of fiber-reinforced CMCs have been established.

  3. Microstructure and elevated temperature wear behavior of induction melted Fe-based composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ge; Meng, Huimin; Liu, Junyou

    2014-10-01

    Fe-based composite coating prepared onto the component of guide wheel using ultrasonic frequency inductive cladding (UFIC) technique has been investigated in terms of microstructure, phase constitutions, microhardness and elevated temperature wear behavior by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Vickers microhardness tester and ball-on-disc wear tester. The results indicated that the primary phase in the coating contained austenite γ-Fe, eutectic γ-Fe/(Cr,Fe)2B, boride (Cr,Fe)2B and precipitation enriched in Mo. The average microhardness of the coating was 760 ± 10 HV0.2, which was three times higher than that of the substrate. With increasing temperature, the friction coefficients of the coating and high-chromium cast iron decreased gradually while the wear rates increased during dry sliding wear condition. The relative wear resistance of the coating was 1.63 times higher than that of the high-chromium cast iron at 500 °C, which was ascribed to the hard borides with high thermal stability uniformly embedded in the coating and the formation of dense transfer layer formed onto the worn surface. The high temperature wear mechanism of the coating was dominated by mild abrasive wear. The study revealed that Fe-based composite coating had excellent high temperature wear resistance under dry sliding wear condition.

  4. Thermal diffusivity and specific heat of dental casting alloys at room and elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, K

    1997-06-01

    Thermal diffusivity and specific heat of four groups of dental casting alloys (Ag-based, Au-Pd, high karat and Ni-based alloys) were determined. Measurements were carried out from room temperature to 750 degrees C in an evacuated electric furnace with a laser flash thermal constant analyzer. There was no significant difference between the values of thermal diffusivity in the Ag-based and high karat alloys; 18-24 and 40-53 mm2/s, at room temperature and at 600 degrees C, respectively. For Au-Pd and Ni-based alloys, diffusivity was 8-12 and 3-4 mm2/s at room temperature, and 19-22 and 5-6 mm2/s at 600 degrees C, respectively. The thermal diffusivity of the alloys was significantly low compared to that of the pure-metals of which they were composed. Specific heat was determined as 0.14-0.16, 0.24-0.34, 0.17-0.19 and 0.45-0.51 kJ/(kg.K) for high karat, Ag-based, Au-Pd and Ni-based alloys, respectively, at room temperature. Oxidation of the Ni-based alloy at elevated temperature affected the value of specific heat measured. PMID:9550004

  5. Deformation Behavior and Dynamic Recovery Kinetics of Ultrahigh Strength Steel BR1500HS at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yufeng; Ji, Shuai; Zhang, Yandong; Wu, Dongsen; Quan, Guozheng

    2015-10-01

    The flow behaviors of ultrahigh strength steel BR1500HS at elevated temperature were studied by performing hot tension tests at the temperatures of 773 K, 873 K, 1023 K and 1173 K, and strain rates of 0.01 s-1, 0.1 s-1 and 1 s-1 on a Gleeble 3500 thermo-mechanical simulator. The true stress-strain curves were obtained and their characteristics were analyzed. Relationships among the maximum stress, temperature and strain rate were described by means of the conventional hyperbolic sine equation. The average deformation activation energy in the whole deformation temperatures was determined as Q = 235.257 KJ/mol by regression analysis. Based on σ(dσ/dɛ) verse σ2 curves, the values of dynamic recovery (DRV) rate coefficient, r, saturated stress, σrec, and yield strength, σ0, under different deformation conditions were calculated. In order to estimate the DRV volume fractions, the modified Avrami type equation including r (r = 106.911351Z-0.059) as a function of the temperature compensating parameter, Z, was established, and then the effects of deformation conditions on the DRV kinetics were described in details.

  6. Reduced group delay dispersion in quantum dot passively mode-locked lasers operating at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mee, J. K.; Raghunathan, R.; Murrell, D.; Braga, A.; Li, Y.; Lester, L. F.

    2014-09-01

    A detailed study of the pulse characteristics emitted from a monolithic Quantum Dot (QD) passively Mode-Locked Laser (MLL) has been performed using a state-of-the-art Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (FROG) pulse measurement system. While traditionally the time-domain pulse characteristics of semiconductor MLLs have been studied using digital sampling oscilloscope or intensity autocorrelation techniques, the FROG measurements allow for simultaneous characterization of time and frequency, which has been shown to be necessary and sufficient for true determination of mode-locked stability. In this paper, FROG pulse measurements are presented on a two-section QD MLL operating over wide temperature excursions. The FROG measurement allows for extraction of the temporal and spectral intensity and phase profiles from which the Group Delay Dispersion (GDD) can be determined. The magnitude of the GDD is found to decrease from 16.1 to 3.5 ps/nm when the temperature is increased from 20 to 50 oC, mirroring the trend of pulse width reduction at elevated temperature, which has been shown to correlate strongly with reduced unsaturated absorption. The possibility to further optimize pulse generation via intra-cavity dispersion compensation in a novel three-section MLL design is also examined, and shows strong potential toward providing valuable insight into the optimal cavity designs and operating parameters for QD MLLs.

  7. Aluminum-Silicon Alloy Having Improved Properties at Elevated Temperatures and Articles Cast Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An aluminum alloy suitable for high temperature applications, such as heavy duty pistons and other internal combustion applications. having the following composition, by weight percent (wt %): Silicon: 11.0-14.0; Copper: 5.6-8.0; Iron: 0-0.8; Magnesium: 0.5-1.5; Nickel: 0.05-0.9; Manganese: 0.5-1.5; Titanium: 0.05-1.2; Zirconium: 0.12-1.2; Vanadium: 0.05-1.2; Zinc: 0.005-0.9; Strontium: 0.001-0.1; Aluminum: balance. In this alloy the ratio of silicon:magnesium is 10-25, and the ratio of copper:magnesium is 4-15. After an article is cast from this alloy, the article is treated in a solutionizing step which dissolves unwanted precipitates and reduces any segregation present in the original alloy. After this solutionizing step, the article is quenched, and is then aged at an elevated temperature for maximum strength.

  8. Significantly improved cyclability of lithium manganese oxide under elevated temperature by an easily oxidized electrolyte additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunmin; Rong, Haibo; Mai, Shaowei; Luo, Xueyi; Li, Xiaoping; Li, Weishan

    2015-12-01

    Spinel lithium manganese oxide, LiMn2O4, is a promising cathode for lithium ion battery in large-scale applications, because it possesses many advantages compared with currently used layered lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) and olivine phosphate (LiFePO4), including naturally abundant resource, environmental friendliness and high and long work potential plateau. Its poor cyclability under high temperature, however, limits its application. In this work, we report a significant cyclability improvement of LiMn2O4 under elevated temperature by using dimethyl phenylphonite (DMPP) as an electrolyte additive. Charge/discharge tests demonstrate that the application of 0.5 wt.% DMPP yields a capacity retention improvement from 16% to 82% for LiMn2O4 after 200 cycles under 55 °C at 1 C (1C = 148 mAh g-1) between 3 and 4.5 V. Electrochemical and physical characterizations indicate that DMPP is electrochemically oxidized at the potential lower than that for lithium extraction, forming a protective cathode interphase on LiMn2O4, which suppresses the electrolyte decomposition and prevents LiMn2O4 from crystal destruction.

  9. OSL at elevated temperatures: Towards the simultaneous thermal and optical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polymeris, George S.

    2015-01-01

    In routine OSL dating measurements, a preheat procedure at high temperatures is used to empty the shallow traps. Thus no contribution from shallow traps was expected as each OSL measurement is subsequently performed at moderately high temperatures, around 110-125 °C. The present work attempts to consider the OSL measurements performed at elevated temperatures without any previous preheat as a case of simultaneous thermal and optical stimulation of the same trap. Towards this direction, a set of proposed equations is derived for all three different cases of optical stimulation modes, namely CW-OSL, LM-OSL as well as PS-LM-OSL. According to these equations, indicative features of thermally activated OSL processes are expected, such as the steepening of CW-OSL decay curves as either stimulation temperature or intensity increases, as well as the shifting of the stimulation time of the maximum intensity for both LM-OSL and PS-LM-OSL curves towards shorter times with increasing temperatures. Experimentally, specific measurement sequences after varying stimulation temperature and/or intensity were applied in order to estimate the values of associated trap parameters, such as activation energy and photo-ionization cross-section. Experimental OSL data from a milky natural quartz sample stand in good agreement of these theoretical considerations in the case of 110 °C TL peak and the intense OSL component C2 monitored at RT.

  10. Elevated-temperature tensile and creep properties of several ferritic stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The elevated-temperature mechanical properties of several ferritic stainless steels were determined. The alloys evaluated included Armco 18SR, GE 1541, and NASA-18T-A. Tensile and creep strength properties at 1073 and 1273 K and residual room temperature tensile properties after creep testing were measured. In addition, 1273 K tensile and creep tests and residual property testing were conducted with Armco 18SR and GE 1541 which were exposed for 200 hours to a severe oxidizing environment in automotive thermal reactors. Aside from the residual tensile properties for Armco 18SR, prior exposure did not affect the mechanical properties of either alloy. The 1273 K creep strength parallel to the sheet-rolling direction was similar for all three alloys. At 1073 K, NASA-18T-A had better creep strength than either Armco 18SR or GE 1541. NASA-18T-A possesses better residual properties after creep testing than either Armco 18SR or Ge 1541.

  11. Creep and precipitation behaviors of AL6XN austenitic steel at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, L. J.; Sun, J.; Xing, H.

    2012-08-01

    Creep behaviors of the solution-treated AL6XN austenitic stainless steel have been investigated at 873-1023 K and 120-260 MPa. The results showed that the creep stress exponent and activation energy of the AL6XN steel are 5 and 395.4 kJ/mol, respectively in the power-law breakdown regime. TEM observations revealed that dislocations distributed homogenously in grains. The creep deformation mechanism is mainly attributed to viscous dislocation glide. Precipitates in the steel after creep deformation were additionally analyzed by TEM, and the results showed that there are four different types of precipitates, such as M23C6, M6C, σ phase and Laves phase. The M23C6 carbides were observed at grain boundaries in the steel after creep at 873 K. The M6C, σ phase and Laves phase precipitates were found when the creep temperature increases to 923-1023 K. Although the AL6XN steel exhibited low steady state creep rates, a high volume fraction of brittle precipitates of σ and Laves phases reduced the creep lifetime of the steel at elevated temperatures.

  12. Friction and Wear Behavior of 30CrMnSiA Steel at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Sheng-guan; Lai, Fu-qiang; Wang, Guang-hong; Yuan, Zhi-min; Li, Xiao-qiang; Guo, Hui

    2016-04-01

    The friction and wear properties of 30CrMnSiA steel were investigated at elevated temperature from 100 to 600 °C. Thereafter, the wear debris and worn surfaces were examined to understand the wear mechanisms. The remained debris with relatively high hardness created three-body abrasion at lower temperatures (100-300 °C). Abrasive wear prevailed at the conditions with high friction coefficients and wear rates. A significant change in friction and wear behavior occurred at 400 °C. At the temperature of 400 °C, oxidation induced mild wear was found because of the formation of load-bearing oxide film. Both the friction coefficients and wear rates of the steel were lowest at 400 °C. At the temperatures of 500-600 °C, a mild-to-severe wear transition occurred which resulted in an increase in the friction coefficients and wear rates of the steel. This is related to the decrease in the strength of matrix and hardness of worn surfaces and subsurfaces. The predominant wear mechanism is considered to be severe abrasive, adhesive wear and a fatigue delamination of the oxide film.

  13. Rheological and Mechanical Property Measurements of PMDI foam at Elevated Temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    Nemer, Martin B.; Brooks, Carlton F.; Bion Shelden; Soehnel, Melissa Marie; Barringer, David Alan

    2014-10-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the viscosity of liquefied 20 lb/ft 3 poly methyl ene diisocyanate (PMDI) foam and the stress required to puncture solid PMDI foam at elevated temperatures. For the rheological measurements th e foam was a priori liquefied in a pressure vessel such that the volatiles were not lost in the liquefaction process. The viscosity of the liquefied PMDI foam was found to be Newtonian with a power law dependence on temperature log 10 ( m/Pa s) = 20.6 - 9.5 log 10 (T/degC) for temperatures below 170 degC. Above 170 degC, the viscosity was in the range of 0. 3 Pa s which is close to the lower measurement limit ([?] 0.1 Pa s) of the pressurized rheometer. The mechanical pressure required to break th rough 20lb/ft 3 foam was 500 - 800 psi at temperatures from room temperature up to 180 degC . The mechanical pressure required to break through 10 lb/ft 3 was 170 - 300 psi at temperatures from room temperature up to 180 degC. We have not been able to cause gas to break through the 20 lb/ft 3 PMDI foam at gas pressures up to 100 psi.

  14. Sintering characteristics of FeCuAl green compacts formed at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Zabri, N. H. M.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the sintering characteristics of FeCuAl green compacts formed at elevated temperature and sintered at different temperature. Iron ASC 100.29, copper, and aluminum powders were blended mechanically in a low speed mixer. The blended powder mass was subsequently compacted at 150°C. The defect-free green compacts were then sintered at argon gas fired furnace at a heating/cooling rate of 10°C/minute by varying the sintering temperature. The alloyability of the sintered products were examined through XRD whereas the sintered samples were also characterized for their physical and mechanical properties and their microstructures were evaluated. The results revealed that all elements in the samples appeared and single face fcc Cu and bcc Fe (Al) solid solution were found. SEM micrographs revealed that high sintering temperature caused the reduction of pores and loss of grain boundaries in the sample. The metal elements also distributed uniformly. The combination of the iron, copper and aluminum green compacts sintered at 700°C for 90 minutes produced the best mechanical and physical properties.

  15. Effects of selected thermophilic microorganisms on crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. 1991 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1993-10-01

    During the past several years, a considerable amount of work has been carried out showing that microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is promising and the resulting biotechnology may be deliverable. In this laboratory systematic studies are being conducted which deal with the effects of thermophilic and thermoadapted bacteria on the chemical and physical properties of selected types of crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Particular attention is being paid to heavy crude oils such as Boscan and Cerro Negro (Venezuela), Monterey (California) and those from Alabama and Arkansas. Current studies indicate that during the biotreatment several properties of crude oils are affected. The oils are (1) emulsified; (2) acidified; (3) there is a qualitative and quantitative change in light and heavy fractions of the crudes; (4) there are chemical changes in fractions containing sulfur compounds; (5) there is an apparent solubilization of trace metals; and (6) the qualitative and quantitative chemical and physical changes appear to be microbial species dependent. Effects on heavy crude oils are also compared to those on lighter oils such as oils from the Wyoming petroleum reserve. Microbial oil interactions are monitored routinely by a consortium of analytical techniques which are continuously upgraded and are capable of multiparameter analysis. The results generated in fiscal year 1991, describing (1) through (6), are presented and discussed in this report.

  16. Shock Sensitivity of LX-04 Containing Delta Phase HMX at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P A; Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Vandersall, K S; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Hsu, P C; Maienschein, J L

    2003-07-11

    LX-04 is a widely used HMX-based plastic bonded explosive, which contains 85 weight % HMX and 15 weight % Viton binder. The sensitivity of LX-04 to a single stimulus such as heat, impact, and shock has been previously studied. However, hazard scenarios can involve multiple stimuli, such as heating to temperatures close to thermal explosion conditions followed by fragment impact, producing a shock in the hot explosive. The sensitivity of HMX at elevated temperatures is further complicated by the beta to delta solid-state phase transition, which occurs at approximately 165 C. This paper presents the results of shock initiation experiments conducted with LX-04 preheated to 190 C, as well as density measurements and small scale safety test results of the {delta} phase HMX at room temperature. This work shows that LX-04 at 190 C is more shock sensitive than LX-04 at 150 C or 170 C due to the volume increase during the {beta} to {delta} solid phase transition, which creates more hot spots, and the faster growth of reaction during shock compression.

  17. Interaction of hydroxyapatite-titanium at elevated temperature in vacuum environment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunzhi; Kim, Kyo-Han; Agrawal, C Mauli; Ong, Joo L

    2004-07-01

    In this study, the interaction between hydroxyapatite (HA) and titanium (Ti) at elevated temperature in vacuum environment was investigated. The 80 wt% HA-20 wt% Ti powder mixtures and 90 wt% HA-10 wt% Ti powder mixtures were dry pressed and heat-treated at 1100 degrees C in vacuum environment. HA powders and the commercially pure Ti powders were used as controls. The heat-treated samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy disperse spectra. XRD and SEM indicated densification of metallic Ti specimens during the in-vacuum heat treatment. Heat treatment of HA specimens in vacuum resulted in the loss of hydroxyl groups as well the formation of a secondary beta-tricalcium phosphate phase. Metallic Ti was not observed in the in-vacuum heat-treated HA-Ti specimens. However, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, tetracalcium phosphate and calcium titanium oxide were observed for the in-vacuum heat-treated HA-Ti specimens. It was concluded that the in-vacuum heat-treatment process completely converted the metal-ceramics composites to ceramic composites. PMID:14967524

  18. Creep testing of foil-gage metals at elevated temperature using an automated data acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L. B.

    1983-01-01

    A method is being developed to obtain creep data on foil gage metals at elevated temperatures using an automated data acquisition system in conjunction with a mechanically counter balanced extensometer. The automated system components include the Hewlett-Packard (HP) 9845A desktop computer, the HP 3455A digital voltmeter and the HP 3495A scanner. Software for test monitoring and data collection was developed; data manipulation, including curve plotting was done with a HP regression analysis software package. Initial creep tests were conducted on .003 in. thick foil specimens of Ti-6A1-4V at temperatures of 800 F and 1000 F and at stress levels of 25 ksi and 45 ksi. For comparison, duplicate tests were run on .049 in. thick specimens sheet of the same alloy. During testing, the furnace and specimen temperature, bridge voltage, strain and load output were automatically monitored and recorded at predetermined intervals. Using the HP regression analysis program, recorded strain output was plotted as a function of time. These resultant creep curves indicate that, under similar conditions of temperature and stress, foil gage specimens exhibit a higher creep rate than sheet specimens.

  19. Production of hydrogen bromide by bromine-methane reactions at elevated temperature.

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Larson, Richard S.

    2003-05-01

    Hydrogen bromide is a potentially useful intermediate for hydrogen production by electrolysis because it has a low cell potential and is extremely soluble in water. Processes have been proposed to exploit these properties, but among the important issues to be resolved is the efficiency of HBr production from hydrocarbon precursors. This investigation evaluated a fundamental facet of such a technology by studying the reaction of methane and bromine at elevated temperature to determine the yield and kinetics of HBr formation. Laboratory experimentation and computational chemistry were combined to provide a description of this reaction for possible application to reactor design at a larger scale. Experimental studies with a tubular flow reactor were used to survey a range of reactant ratios and reactor residence times at temperatures between 500 C and 800 C. At temperatures near 800 C with excess methane, conversions of bromine to HBr exceeded 90% and reaction products included solid carbon (soot) in stoichiometric amounts. At lower temperatures, HBr conversion was significantly reduced, the products included much less soot, and the formation of bromocarbon compounds was indicated qualitatively. Calculations of chemical equilibrium behavior and reaction kinetics for the experimental conditions were performed using the Sandia CHEMKIN package. An elementary multistep mechanism for the gas-phase chemistry was used together with a surface mechanism that assumed facile deposition of radical species at the reactor walls. Simulations with the laminar-flow boundary-layer code of the CHEMKIN package gave reasonable agreement with experimental data.

  20. An automated flow calorimeter for heat capacity and enthalpy measurements at elevated temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesavage, Victor F.

    1990-08-01

    The need for highly accurate thermal property data for a broad range of new application fluids is well documented. To facilitate expansion of the current thermophysical database, an automated flow calorimeter was developed for the measurement of highly accurate isobaric heat capacities and enthalpies of fluids at elevated temperatures and pressures. The experimental technique utilizes traditional electrical power input, adiabatic flow calorimetry with a precision metering pump that eliminates the need for on-line flow rate monitoring. In addition, a complete automation system greatly simplifies the operation of the apparatus and increases the rapidity of the measurement process. The range over which the instrument was tested was 300 to 600 K and 0 to 12 Mpa, although the calorimeter should perform up to the original design goals of 700 K and 30 MPa. The new flow calorimeter was evaluated by measuring the mean, isobaric, specific heat capacities of liquid water and n-pentane. These experiments yielded an average deviation from the standard literature data of +0.02 percent and a total variation of 0.05 percent. Additional data analysis indicated that the overall measurement uncertainty was conservatively estimated as 0.2 percent with an anticipated precision of 0.1 to 0.15 percent at all operating conditions.