Science.gov

Sample records for elias katrin laikoja

  1. The KATRIN experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Marcus; Katrin Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The KArlsruhe TRitium Neutrino mass experiment, KATRIN, aims to search for the mass of the electron neutrino with a sensitivity of 0.2eV/c2 (90% C.L.) and a detection limit of 0.35 eV/c2 (5σ). Both a positive or a negative result will have far reaching implications for cosmology and the standard model of particle physics and will give new input for astroparticle physics and cosmology. The major components of KATRIN are being set up at the Karlsruhe Institut of Technology in Karlsruhe, Germany, and test measurements of the individual components have started. Data taking with tritium is scheduled to start in 2012.

  2. The Katrin Experiment: Status and Outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parno, D. S.

    2014-01-01

    The KATRIN experiment, presently under construction in Karlsruhe, Germany, will improve on previous laboratory limits on the neutrino mass by a factor of ten. KATRIN will use a high-activity, gaseous T2 source and a very high-resolution spectrometer to measure the shape of the high-energy tail of the tritium-decay β spectrum. The shape measurement will also be sensitive to new physics, including sterile neutrinos and Lorentz violation. This report summarizes recent progress in the experiment.

  3. Status of the neutrino mass experiment KATRIN

    SciTech Connect

    Bornschein, L.; Bornschein, B.; Sturm, M.; Roellig, M.; Priester, F.

    2015-03-15

    The most sensitive way to determine the neutrino mass scale without further assumptions is to measure the shape of a tritium beta spectrum near its kinematic end-point. Tritium is the nucleus of choice because of its low endpoint energy, superallowed decay and simple atomic structure. Within an international collaboration the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is currently being built up at KIT. KATRIN will allow a model-independent measurement of the neutrino mass scale with an expected sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c{sup 2} (90% CL). KATRIN will use a source of ultrapure molecular tritium. This contribution presents the status of the KATRIN experiment, thereby focusing on its Calibration and Monitoring System (CMS), which is the last component being subject to research/development. After a brief overview of the KATRIN experiment in Section II the CMS is introduced in Section III. In Section IV the Beta Induced X-Ray Spectroscopy (BIXS) as method of choice to monitor the tritium activity of the KATRIN source is described and first results are presented.

  4. Status of the KATRIN Neutrino Mass Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parno, Diana; Katrin Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN), presently under construction in Germany, will probe the absolute mass scale of the neutrino through the kinematics of tritium beta decay, a nearly model-independent approach. To achieve the projected sensitivity of 0.2 eV at the 90% confidence level, KATRIN will use a windowless, gaseous tritium source and a large magnetic adiabatic collimation-electrostatic filter. The collaboration has now completed a second commissioning phase of the spectrometer and detector section, and construction of the tritium sections is proceeding well. We will report on the current status of the experiment and the outlook for data-taking with tritium. US participation in KATRIN is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Award Number DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  5. KATRIN: Measuring the Mass Scale of Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oblath, Noah; Katrin Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    Over the past decade, experiments studying neutrinos from atmospheric, solar, and reactor sources have shown conclusively that neutrinos change flavor and, as a consequence, have a small but finite mass. However, the scale of neutrino masses remains an open question that is of great importance for many areas of physics. The most direct method to measure the neutrino mass scale is still via beta decay. The talk will focus primarily on the status of the KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN), currently under construction. KATRIN combines an ultra-luminous molecular windowless gaseous tritium source with a high-resolution integrating spectrometer to gain sensitivity to the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. The projected sensitivity of the experiment on the neutrino mass is 0.2 eV at 90% C.L. In this talk I will discuss the status of the KATRIN experiment.

  6. 77 FR 22800 - Wilderness Eligibility Reclassifications, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... National Park Service Wilderness Eligibility Reclassifications, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Wilderness Eligibility Reclassification, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. SUMMARY: Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve...

  7. The anatomist Hans Elias: A Jewish German in exile.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, S

    2012-04-01

    Hans Elias (1907 to 1985) was an anatomist, an educator, a mathematician, a cinematographer, a painter, and a sculptor. Above all, he was a German of Jewish descent, who had to leave his home country because of the policies of the National Socialist (NS) regime. He spent his life in exile, first in Italy and then in the United States. His biography is exemplary for a generation of younger expatriates from National Socialist Germany who had to find a new professional career under difficult circumstances. Elias was a greatly productive morphologist whose artistic talent led to the foundation of the new science of stereology and made him an expert in scientific cinematography. He struggled hard to fulfill his own high expectations of himself in terms of his effectiveness as a scientist, educator, and politically acting man in this world. Throughout his life this strong-willed and outspoken man never lost his great fondness for Germany and many of its people, while reserving some of his sharpest criticism for fellow anatomists who were active in National Socialist Germany, among them his friend Hermann Stieve, Max Clara, and Heinrich von Hayek. Hans Elias' life is well documented in his unpublished diaries and memoirs, and thus allows fresh insights into a time period when some anatomists were among the first victims of NS policies and other anatomists became involved in the execution of such policies. PMID:22038841

  8. Mar Elias, Arab Christians of Israel, and the Sign of the White Dove

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denman, Brian D.; Loller, Marie; Spence, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to relate the formation of a tertiary institution as part of Mar Elias Educational Institutions and to identify the spheres of influence and relevant factors that may lead to its success or demise. It considers the relevance of its founding president, Abuna Elias Chacour, whose installation as Archbishop of the Galilee…

  9. Commissioning Measurements of the KATRIN Main Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierman, Kevin; Katrin Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Beginning in May 2013, the KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) collaboration began measurements to commission the 10-m diameter main spectrometer. KATRIN utilizes the spectrometer to provide magnetic adiabatic collimation and electrostatic filtering designed to analyze the tritium beta decay spectrum for contributions from the neutrino mass. In order to achieve an order-of-magnitude improvement on previous neutrino mass experiments the desired sensitivity of the apparatus must be 200 meV in the decay endpoint region. Goals of the recent measurements include identification and reduction of backgrounds and determination of the spectrometer transfer function. Backgrounds have been probed by utilizing electromagnetic field configurations to explore decays in the spectrometer, Penning traps and field emission. A 148-pixel PIN diode array is employed to detect particles exiting the spectrometer, which permits angular and radial distributions of particles to be analyzed. This has allowed for high precision comparison between measurements and simulations of expected backgrounds to be investigated in order to commission the spectrometer. This work is supported by grants from the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics and the Helmholtz Association.

  10. Electron line shape of the KATRIN monitor spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slezák, M.; Bauer, S.; Dragoun, O.; Erhard, M.; Schlösser, K.; Špalek, A.; Vénos, D.; Zbořil, M.

    2013-12-01

    Conversion electrons emitted from 83mKr implanted into a solid substrate will serve as a powerful tool for monitoring of the energy scale stability in the KATRIN neutrino experiment. An appropriate description of the conversion line shape is essential to determine the energy of the emitted electrons. It is shown that the Doniach-Šunjić line shape gives a significantly better fit to the conversion electron spectra than the previously used double Voigt model. The electron spectra were obtained with the KATRIN MAC-E filter monitor spectrometer.

  11. Focal-plane detector system for the KATRIN experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amsbaugh, J. F.; Barrett, J.; Beglarian, A.; Bergmann, T.; Bichsel, H.; Bodine, L. I.; Bonn, J.; Boyd, N. M.; Burritt, T. H.; Chaoui, Z.; Chilingaryan, S.; Corona, T. J.; Doe, P. J.; Dunmore, J. A.; Enomoto, S.; Formaggio, J. A.; Fränkle, F. M.; Furse, D.; Gemmeke, H.; Glück, F.; Harms, F.; Harper, G. C.; Hartmann, J.; Howe, M. A.; Kaboth, A.; Kelsey, J.; Knauer, M.; Kopmann, A.; Leber, M. L.; Martin, E. L.; Middleman, K. J.; Myers, A. W.; Oblath, N. S.; Parno, D. S.; Peterson, D. A.; Petzold, L.; Phillips, D. G.; Renschler, P.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Schwarz, J.; Steidl, M.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Thümmler, T.; Van Wechel, T. D.; VanDevender, B. A.; Vöcking, S.; Wall, B. L.; Wierman, K. L.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wüstling, S.

    2015-04-01

    The focal-plane detector system for the KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment consists of a multi-pixel silicon p-i-n-diode array, custom readout electronics, two superconducting solenoid magnets, an ultra high-vacuum system, a high-vacuum system, calibration and monitoring devices, a scintillating veto, and a custom data-acquisition system. It is designed to detect the low-energy electrons selected by the KATRIN main spectrometer. We describe the system and summarize its performance after its final installation.

  12. Characterization of the KATRIN Focal Plane Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodine, Laura; Leber, Michelle; Myers, Allan; Tolich, Kazumi; Vandevender, Brent; Wall, Brandon

    2008-10-01

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) Experiment is a next generation tritium beta decay experiment designed to measure directly the electron neutrino mass with a sensitivity of 0.2 eV. In the experiment, electrons from tritium decay of a gaseous source are magnetically guided through analyzing solenoidal retarding electrostatic spectrometers and detected via a focal plane detector. The focal plane detector is a 90mm diameter, 500 micron thick monolithic silicon pin-diode array with 148 pixels. The diode contacts have a titanium nitride overlayer and are connected to preamplifiers via an array of spring-loaded pogo pins. This novel connection scheme minimizes backgrounds from radioactive materials near the detector, facilitates characterization and replacement of the detector wafer, but requires a unique mounting design. The force of the pins strains the silicon, possibly altering the detector properties and performance. Results on the mechanical, thermal and electrical performance of a prototype detector under stress from pogo pin readouts will be presented.

  13. Penning Trap Searches in the KATRIN Main Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierman, Kevin; Katrin Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment (KATRIN) aims to make a precision measurement of the tritium beta decay spectrum with a projected sensitivity to neutrino mass of 200 meV. Meeting this goal requires low backgrounds in the beta decay endpoint region. In KATRIN, spatially confined charged particles represent a potential source of backgrounds and systematic errors. Trapping conditions can occur in KATRIN's 10m diameter main spectrometer due to the high magnetic and electrostatic fields required to momentum analyze the electrons. Backgrounds are generated by trapped particles due to scattering off residual gas in the spectrometer causing negative ions to be accelerated towards KATRIN's detector system. Additionally, systematic errors in the neutrino mass measurement can be caused by the electrostatic field generated by trapped electrons. To search for these conditions, the spectrometer was probed by a monoenergetic electron source to determine trapping probabilities as a function of the applied electric and magnetic fields. We acknowledge the support of the German Helmholtz Association, the German Ministry for Education and Research, the Helmholtz Alliance for Astroparticle Physics, the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic, and the US Department of Energy.

  14. Infrared Observations of Hot Gas and Cold Ice Toward the Low Mass Protostar Elias 29

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boogert, A. C. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Ceccarelli, C.; Boonman, A. M. S.; vanDishoeck, E. F.; Keane, J. V.; Whittet, D. C. B.; deGraauw, T.

    2000-01-01

    We have obtained the full 1-200 micrometer spectrum of the low luminosity (36 solar luminosity Class I protostar Elias 29 in the rho Ophiuchi molecular cloud. It provides a unique opportunity to study the origin and evolution of interstellar ice and the interrelationship of interstellar ice and hot core gases around low mass protostars. We see abundant hot CO and H2O gas, as well as the absorption bands of CO, CO2, H2O and "6.85 micrometer" ices. We compare the abundances and physical conditions of the gas and ices toward Elias 29 with the conditions around several well studied luminous, high mass protostars. The high gas temperature and gas/solid ratios resemble those of relatively evolved high mass objects (e.g. GL 2591). However, none of the ice band profiles shows evidence for significant thermal processing, and in this respect Elias 29 resembles the least evolved luminous protostars, such as NGC 7538 : IRS9. Thus we conclude that the heating of the envelope of the low mass object Elias 29 is qualitatively different from that of high mass protostars. This is possibly related to a different density gradient of the envelope or shielding of the ices in a circumstellar disk. This result is important for our understanding of the evolution of interstellar ices, and their relation to cometary ices.

  15. Environmental gamma radiation in the KATRIN Spectrometer Hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kippenbrock, Luke; Katrin Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The KATRIN (KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino) experiment, presently undergoing final assembly in Germany, will use tritium β-decay to probe the electron antineutrino mass down to a sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c2 (90% confidence level). The experimental apparatus has been designed to limit the effect of known and predicted backgrounds near the beta endpoint energy. However, recent commissioning measurements with the main spectrometer have shown that an elusive background source still remains. In this talk, the interaction of environmental gamma radiation inside the KATRIN main spectrometer is studied as a potential background creation mechanism. Geant4 simulations of the gamma flux, derived from concrete radioassay measurements, are compared with detector background rates collected under multiple gamma radiation conditions. Funded by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics under Grant #DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  16. First tritium results of the KATRIN test experiment TRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Eichelhardt, F.; Bornschein, B.; Bornschein, L.; Kazachenko, O.; Kernert, N.; Sturm, M.

    2008-07-15

    The TRAP experiment (Tritium Argon frost Pump) has been built at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK) as a test rig for the Cryogenic Pumping Section (CPS) of the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment (KATRIN). TRAP employs a heterogeneous layer of pre-condensed argon to adsorb hydrogen isotopes at {approx} 4.2 K This paper presents results obtained in the first three tritium experiments with TRAP. (authors)

  17. Precision high voltage divider for the KATRIN experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thümmler, Th; Marx, R.; Weinheimer, Ch

    2009-10-01

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment aims to determine the absolute mass of the electron antineutrino from a precise measurement of the tritium β-spectrum near its endpoint at 18.6 keV with a sensitivity of 0.2 eV c-2. KATRIN uses an electrostatic retardation spectrometer of MAC-E filter type for which it is crucial to monitor high voltages of up to 35 kV with a precision and long-term stability at the ppm level. Since devices capable of this precision are not commercially available, a new high voltage divider for direct voltages of up to 35 kV has been designed, following the new concept of the standard divider for direct voltages of up to 100 kV developed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB)PTB is the German National Metrology Institute providing scientific and technical services.. The electrical and mechanical design of the divider, the screening procedure for the selection of the precision resistors, and the results of the investigation and calibration at the PTB are reported here. During the latter, uncertainties at the low ppm level have been deduced for the new divider, thus qualifying it for the precision measurements of the KATRIN experiment.

  18. Synoptic variability of extreme snowfall in the St. Elias Mountains, Yukon, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andin, Caroline; Zdanowicz, Christian; Copland, Luke

    2015-04-01

    Glaciers in the Wrangell and St. Elias Mountains (Alaska and Yukon) are presently experiencing some of the highest regional wastage rates worldwide. While the effect of regional temperatures on glacier melt rates in this region has been investigated, comparatively little is known about how synoptic climate variations, for example in the position and strength of the Aleutian Low, modulate snow accumulation on these glaciers. Such information is needed to accurately forecast future wastage rates, glacier-water resource availability, and contributions to sea-level rise. Starting in 2000, automated weather stations (AWS) were established in the central St-Elias Mountains (Yukon) at altitudes ranging from 1190 to 5400 m asl, to collect climatological data in support of glaciological research. These data are the longest continuous year-round observations of surface climate ever obtained from this vast glaciated region. Here we present an analysis of snowfall events in the icefields of the St-Elias Mountains based on a decade-long series of AWS observations of snow accumulation. Specifically, we investigated the synoptic patterns and air mass trajectories associated with the largest snowfall events (> 25 cm/12 hours) that occurred between 2002 and 2012. Nearly 80% of these events occurred during the cold season (October-March), and in 74 % of cases the precipitating air masses originated from the North Pacific south of 50°N. Zonal air mass advection over Alaska, or from the Bering Sea or the Arctic Ocean, was comparatively rare (20%). Somewhat counter-intuitively, dominant surface winds in the St. Elias Mountains during high snowfall events were predominantly easterly, probably due to boundary-layer frictional drag and topographic funneling effects. Composite maps of sea-level pressure and 700 mb winds reveal that intense snowfall events between 2002 and 2012 were associated with synoptic situations characterized by a split, eastwardly-shifted or longitudinally

  19. Commissioning of the vacuum system of the KATRIN Main Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenz, M.; Babutzka, M.; Bahr, M.; Barrett, J. P.; Bauer, S.; Beck, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behrens, J.; Bergmann, T.; Besserer, U.; Blümer, J.; Bodine, L. I.; Bokeloh, K.; Bonn, J.; Bornschein, B.; Bornschein, L.; Büsch, S.; Burritt, T. H.; Chilingaryan, S.; Corona, T. J.; De Viveiros, L.; Doe, P. J.; Dragoun, O.; Drexlin, G.; Dyba, S.; Ebenhöch, S.; Eitel, K.; Ellinger, E.; Enomoto, S.; Erhard, M.; Eversheim, D.; Fedkevych, M.; Felden, A.; Fischer, S.; Formaggio, J. A.; Fränkle, F.; Furse, D.; Ghilea, M.; Gil, W.; Glück, F.; Gonzalez Ureña, A.; Görhardt, S.; Groh, S.; Grohmann, S.; Grössle, R.; Gumbsheimer, R.; Hackenjos, M.; Hannen, V.; Harms, F.; Haußmann, N.; Heizmann, F.; Helbing, K.; Herz, W.; Hickford, S.; Hilk, D.; Hillen, B.; Höhn, T.; Holzapfel, B.; Hötzel, M.; Howe, M. A.; Huber, A.; Jansen, A.; Kernert, N.; Kippenbrock, L.; Kleesiek, M.; Klein, M.; Kopmann, A.; Kosmider, A.; Kovalík, A.; Krasch, B.; Kraus, M.; Krause, H.; Krause, M.; Kuckert, L.; Kuffner, B.; La Cascio, L.; Lebeda, O.; Leiber, B.; Letnev, J.; Lobashev, V. M.; Lokhov, A.; Malcherek, E.; Mark, M.; Martin, E. L.; Mertens, S.; Mirz, S.; Monreal, B.; Müller, K.; Neuberger, M.; Neumann, H.; Niemes, S.; Noe, M.; Oblath, N. S.; Off, A.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Osipowicz, A.; Otten, E.; Parno, D. S.; Plischke, P.; Poon, A. W. P.; Prall, M.; Priester, F.; Ranitzsch, P. C.-O.; Reich, J.; Rest, O.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Röllig, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Rupp, S.; Ryšavý, M.; Schlösser, K.; Schlösser, M.; Schönung, K.; Schrank, M.; Schwarz, J.; Seiler, W.; Seitz-Moskaliuk, H.; Sentkerestiová, J.; Skasyrskaya, A.; Slezák, M.; Špalek, A.; Steidl, M.; Steinbrink, N.; Sturm, M.; Suesser, M.; Telle, H. H.; Thümmler, T.; Titov, N.; Tkachev, I.; Trost, N.; Unru, A.; Valerius, K.; Vénos, D.; Vianden, R.; Vöcking, S.; Wall, B. L.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weber, M.; Weinheimer, C.; Weiss, C.; Welte, S.; Wendel, J.; Wierman, K. L.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Winzen, D.; Wolf, J.; Wüstling, S.; Zacher, M.; Zadoroghny, S.; Zbořil, M.

    2016-04-01

    The KATRIN experiment will probe the neutrino mass by measuring the β-electron energy spectrum near the endpoint of tritium β-decay. An integral energy analysis will be performed by an electro-static spectrometer (``Main Spectrometer''), an ultra-high vacuum vessel with a length of 23.2 m, a volume of 1240 m3, and a complex inner electrode system with about 120 000 individual parts. The strong magnetic field that guides the β-electrons is provided by super-conducting solenoids at both ends of the spectrometer. Its influence on turbo-molecular pumps and vacuum gauges had to be considered. A system consisting of 6 turbo-molecular pumps and 3 km of non-evaporable getter strips has been deployed and was tested during the commissioning of the spectrometer. In this paper the configuration, the commissioning with bake-out at 300 °C, and the performance of this system are presented in detail. The vacuum system has to maintain a pressure in the 10‑11 mbar range. It is demonstrated that the performance of the system is already close to these stringent functional requirements for the KATRIN experiment, which will start at the end of 2016.

  20. Penning discharge in the KATRIN pre-spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fränkle, F. M.; Glück, F.; Valerius, K.; Bokeloh, K.; Beglarian, A.; Bonn, J.; Bornschein, L.; Drexlin, G.; Habermehl, F.; Leber, M. L.; Osipowicz, A.; Otten, E. W.; Steidl, M.; Thümmler, T.; Weinheimer, C.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolf, J.; Zadorozhny, S. V.

    2014-07-01

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment is a next-generation, large-scale tritium β-decay experiment to determine the neutrino mass by investigating the kinematics of tritium β-decay with a sensitivity of 200 meV/c2 using the MAC-E filter technique. In order to reach this sensitivity a low background level of 10-2 counts per second (cps) is required. A major background concern in MAC-E filters is the presence of Penning traps. A Penning trap is a special configuration of electromagnetic fields that allows the storage of electrically charged particles. This paper describes the mechanism of Penning discharges and the corresponding measurements performed at the test setup of the KATRIN pre-spectrometer. These investigations led to the conclusion that the observed electric breakdown, strong discharges and extremely large background rates were due to discharges caused by Penning traps located at both ends of the pre-spectrometer. Furthermore, the paper describes the design of a new set of electrodes (modified ground electrodes and new ``anti-Penning'' electrodes) to successfully remove these traps. After the installation of these electrodes in the pre-spectrometer, the measurements confirmed that the strong Penning discharges disappeared. The experience gained from the pre-spectrometer was used to design the electrode system of the main spectrometer. Recent measurements with the main spectrometer showed no indications of Penning trap related backgrounds.

  1. Introduction to direct neutrino mass measurements and KATRIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thümmler, T.; Katrin Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    The properties of neutrinos and especially their rest mass play an important role at the intersections of cosmology, particle physics and astroparticle physics. At present there are two complementary approaches to address this topic in laboratory experiments. The search for neutrinoless double beta decay probes whether neutrinos are Majorana particles and determines an effective neutrino mass value. On the other hand experiments such as MARE, KATRIN and the recently proposed Project 8 will investigate the spectral shape of β-decay electrons close to their kinematic endpoint in order to determine the neutrino rest mass with a model-independent method. Here, because of neutrino flavour mixing, the neutrino mass appears as an average of all neutrino mass eigenstates contributing to the electron neutrino. The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is currently the experiment in the most advanced status of commissioning. It combines an ultra-luminous molecular windowless gaseous tritium source with an integrating high-resolution spectrometer of MAC-E filter type. It will investigate the neutrino rest mass with 0.2 eV/c (90% C.L.) sensitivity and allow β spectroscopy close to the T endpoint at 18.6 keV with unprecedented precision.

  2. New Insights into Tectonics of the Saint Elias, Alaska, Region Based on Local Seismicity and Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert, N. A.; Zabelina, I.; Freymueller, J. T.

    2013-12-01

    Saint Elias Mountains in southern Alaska are manifestation of ongoing tectonic processes that include collision of the Yakutat block with and subduction of the Yakutat block and Pacific plate under the North American plate. Interaction of these tectonic blocks and plates is complex and not well understood. In 2005 and 2006 a network of 22 broadband seismic sites was installed in the region as part of the SainT Elias TEctonics and Erosion Project (STEEP), a five-year multi-disciplinary study that addressed evolution of the highest coastal mountain range on Earth. High quality seismic data provides unique insights into earthquake occurrence and velocity structure of the region. Local earthquake data recorded between 2005 and 2010 became a foundation for detailed study of seismotectonic features and crustal velocities. The highest concentration of seismicity follows the Chugach-St.Elias fault, a major on land tectonic structure in the region. This fault is also delineated in tomographic images as a distinct contrast between lower velocities to the south and higher velocities to the north. The low-velocity region corresponds to the rapidly-uplifted and exhumed sediments on the south side of the range. Earthquake source parameters indicate high degree of compression and undertrusting processes along the coastal area, consistent with multiple thrust structures mapped from geological studies in the region. Tomographic inversion reveals velocity anomalies that correlate with sedimentary basins, volcanic features and subducting Yakutat block. We will present precise earthquake locations and source parameters recorded with the STEEP and regional seismic network along with the results of P- and S-wave tomographic inversion.

  3. Twenty-seven fingers without a palm is not a hand: a conversation with Elias Zerhouni.

    PubMed

    Zerhouni, Elias

    2004-01-01

    The director of the National Institutes of Health, Elias Zerhouni, looks back on his first eighteen months at the helm of the NIH. During his tenure, appointed by a Republican president but himself a political Independent, Zerhouni has been called upon to navigate the treacherous waters where science meets politics. His efforts have been assisted by a new Roadmap supplemented by the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine, regarding the organization and priorities of the NIH. Priorities include continuing to work on infectious and chronic diseases, both at home and abroad, and focusing the efforts of twenty-seven separate institutes under one director and a common organizational mission. PMID:15451994

  4. Are bison exotic in the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peek, James M.; Miquelle, Dale G.; Wright, R. Gerald

    1987-03-01

    The effect of past distributions of animal populations now extinct in an area from unknown causes is considered relative to their status as exotic or native in national parks. The example is the bison (Bison bison) on the Copper and Chitina river drainages in Alaska in the USA which was introduced prior to establishment of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. The fossil record suggests that bison were present as recently as 500 years ago in Alaska. The policy of the US National Park Service to maintain natural ecosystems and restrict or eliminate exotic species raises the issue of whether this species should be treated as exotic or native.

  5. An angular-selective electron source for the KATRIN experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, M.; Bokeloh, K.; Hein, H.; Bauer, S.; Baumeister, H.; Bonn, J.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Ostrick, B.; Rosendahl, S.; Streubel, S.; Valerius, K.; Zbořil, M.; Weinheimer, C.

    2014-11-01

    The KATRIN experiment is going to search for the average mass of the electron antineutrino with a sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c2. It uses a retardation spectrometer of MAC-E filter type to accurately measure the shape of the electron spectrum at the endpoint of tritium beta decay. In order to achieve the planned sensitivity the transmission properties of the spectrometer have to be understood with high precision for all initial conditions. For this purpose an electron source has been developed that emits single electrons at adjustable total energy and adjustable emission angle. The emission is pointlike and can be moved across the full flux tube that is imaged onto the detector. Here, we demonstrate that this novel type of electron source can be used to investigate the transmission properties of a MAC-E filter in detail.

  6. Status and commissioning of the Karlsruhe tritium neutrino experiment KATRIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuemmler, Thomas; Katrin Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Neutrino properties, and especially the determination of the neutrino rest mass, play an important role at the intersections of cosmology, particle physics and astroparticle physics. At present there are two complementary approaches to address this topic in laboratory experiments. The search for neutrinoless double β decay probes whether neutrinos are Majorana particles and determines an effective neutrino mass value. Experiments based on single β decay investigate electrons close to their kinematic endpoint in order to determine the neutrino mass by a modelindependent method. The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is currently the experiment in the most advanced status of commissioning. Applying an ultra-luminous molecular windowless gaseous tritium source and an integrating high-resolution spectrometer of MAC-E filter type, it allows β spectroscopy close to the tritium endpoint with unprecedented precision and will reach a sensitivity of 200 meV/c2 (90% C.L.) on the neutrino mass.

  7. Enhancing learning, innovation, adaptation, and sustainability in health care organizations: the ELIAS performance management framework.

    PubMed

    Persaud, D David

    2014-01-01

    The development of sustainable health care organizations that provide high-quality accessible care is a topic of intense interest. This article provides a practical performance management framework that can be utilized to develop sustainable health care organizations. It is a cyclical 5-step process that is premised on accountability, performance management, and learning practices that are the foundation for a continuous process of measurement, disconfirmation, contextualization, implementation, and routinization This results in the enhancement of learning, innovation, adaptation, and sustainability (ELIAS). Important considerations such as recognizing that health care organizations are complex adaptive systems and the presence of a dynamic learning culture are necessary contextual factors that maximize the effectiveness of the proposed framework. Importantly, the ELIAS framework utilizes data that are already being collected by health care organizations for accountability, improvement, evaluation, and strategic purposes. Therefore, the benefit of the framework, when used as outlined, would be to enhance the chances of health care organizations achieving the goals of ongoing adaptation and sustainability, by design, rather than by chance. PMID:25068873

  8. 78 FR 13379 - Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Alaska; Proposed Mining Plan of Operations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Alaska; Proposed Mining Plan of... of operations to conduct a mining operation on lands embracing the Shamrock (AA026813) and Tony...

  9. Reconsidering Feminisms and the Work of Norbert Elias for Understanding Gender, Sport and Sport-Related Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Louise

    2008-01-01

    This paper reconsiders the relationships between feminist perspectives and the figurational/process-sociological perspective of Norbert Elias for understanding gender, sport and sport-related activities. The main aim of the article is to respond to Colwell's claim that there are differences between feminist and figurational approaches to…

  10. Orogenic Response to Augmented Erosion Associated with Northern Hemisphere Glaciation: The St. Elias Orogen of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, A. L.; Gulick, S. P.; Spotila, J. A.; Worthington, L. L.; Upton, P.; Jaeger, J. M.; Pavlis, T. L.

    2009-12-01

    Active orogens are thought to behave as internally deforming critical-taper wedges that are in rough long-term equilibrium with regional boundary conditions. Deformation, kinematics, and the thermal evolution of orogenic systems are therefore believed to be significantly influenced by spatial and temporal variations in climate. The exact role of cryosphere-geosphere interactions in natural systems, however, continues to be elusive. Here we quantify the spatial patterns of denudation and deformation, and their temporal variations, in the heavily glaciated St Elias orogen in southern Alaska. The tractable size and high latitude of the St. Elias orogen provides an ideal setting to address the real world orogenic response to focused denudation and climate change. Independent of any known change in regional tectonic convergence rate, the St. Elias orogen was subjected to the most severe transition in climate during Cenozoic time, the Late Neogene and Pleistocene onset and advance of glaciers. Low-temperature bedrock thermochronometry, thermokinematic modelling, and offshore seismic reflection and borehole data demonstrate an association between augmented glacial denudation and orogenic evolution. Coeval with the onset of enhanced glacier coverage in mid-Pleistocene time, onshore denudation and offshore sedimentation accelerated ~ten-fold, with the highest rates of exhumation (4 km/Myr (±25%)) located around a narrow zone where the mean Quaternary glacial equilibrium line altitude (ELA) intersects mean topography on the windward flank of the orogen. This climatically driven mass redistribution coincided with the transfer of strain away the seaward deformation front as well as accelerated motion along both a backthrust running the length of the orogen and a series of forethrusts that lie beneath the zone of highest glacial flux. In a cause and effect response, the expansion of glaciers thus appears to have driven an orogen scale structural reorganization leading to the

  11. A broad-band FT-ICR Penning trap system for KATRIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubieto-Díaz, M.; Rodríguez, D.; Lukic, S.; Nagy, Sz; Stahl, S.; Blaum, K.

    2009-12-01

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment KATRIN aims at improving the upper limit of the mass of the electron antineutrino to about 0.2 eV (90% c.l.) by investigating the -decay of tritium gas molecules . The experiment is currently under construction to start first data taking in 2012. One source of systematic uncertainties in the KATRIN experiment is the formation of ion clusters when tritium decays and decay products interact with residual tritium molecules. It is essential to monitor the abundances of these clusters since they have different final state energies than tritium ions. For this purpose, a prototype of a cylindrical Penning trap has been constructed and tested at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, which will be installed in the KATRIN beam line. This system employs the technique of Fourier-Transform Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance in order to measure the abundances of the different stored ion species.

  12. Mid-Pleistocene climate transition drives net mass loss from rapidly uplifting St. Elias Mountains, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Gulick, Sean P S; Jaeger, John M; Mix, Alan C; Asahi, Hirofumi; Bahlburg, Heinrich; Belanger, Christina L; Berbel, Glaucia B B; Childress, Laurel; Cowan, Ellen; Drab, Laureen; Forwick, Matthias; Fukumura, Akemi; Ge, Shulan; Gupta, Shyam; Kioka, Arata; Konno, Susumu; LeVay, Leah J; März, Christian; Matsuzaki, Kenji M; McClymont, Erin L; Moy, Chris; Müller, Juliane; Nakamura, Atsunori; Ojima, Takanori; Ribeiro, Fabiana R; Ridgway, Kenneth D; Romero, Oscar E; Slagle, Angela L; Stoner, Joseph S; St-Onge, Guillaume; Suto, Itsuki; Walczak, Maureen D; Worthington, Lindsay L; Bailey, Ian; Enkelmann, Eva; Reece, Robert; Swartz, John M

    2015-12-01

    Erosion, sediment production, and routing on a tectonically active continental margin reflect both tectonic and climatic processes; partitioning the relative importance of these processes remains controversial. Gulf of Alaska contains a preserved sedimentary record of the Yakutat Terrane collision with North America. Because tectonic convergence in the coastal St. Elias orogen has been roughly constant for 6 My, variations in its eroded sediments preserved in the offshore Surveyor Fan constrain a budget of tectonic material influx, erosion, and sediment output. Seismically imaged sediment volumes calibrated with chronologies derived from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program boreholes show that erosion accelerated in response to Northern Hemisphere glacial intensification (∼ 2.7 Ma) and that the 900-km-long Surveyor Channel inception appears to correlate with this event. However, tectonic influx exceeded integrated sediment efflux over the interval 2.8-1.2 Ma. Volumetric erosion accelerated following the onset of quasi-periodic (∼ 100-ky) glacial cycles in the mid-Pleistocene climate transition (1.2-0.7 Ma). Since then, erosion and transport of material out of the orogen has outpaced tectonic influx by 50-80%. Such a rapid net mass loss explains apparent increases in exhumation rates inferred onshore from exposure dates and mapped out-of-sequence fault patterns. The 1.2-My mass budget imbalance must relax back toward equilibrium in balance with tectonic influx over the timescale of orogenic wedge response (millions of years). The St. Elias Range provides a key example of how active orogenic systems respond to transient mass fluxes, and of the possible influence of climate-driven erosive processes that diverge from equilibrium on the million-year scale. PMID:26598689

  13. Mid-Pleistocene climate transition drives net mass loss from rapidly uplifting St. Elias Mountains, Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, John M.; Mix, Alan C.; Asahi, Hirofumi; Bahlburg, Heinrich; Belanger, Christina L.; Berbel, Glaucia B. B.; Childress, Laurel; Cowan, Ellen; Drab, Laureen; Forwick, Matthias; Fukumura, Akemi; Ge, Shulan; Gupta, Shyam; Konno, Susumu; LeVay, Leah J.; März, Christian; McClymont, Erin L.; Moy, Chris; Müller, Juliane; Nakamura, Atsunori; Ojima, Takanori; Ribeiro, Fabiana R.; Ridgway, Kenneth D.; Romero, Oscar E.; Slagle, Angela L.; Stoner, Joseph S.; St-Onge, Guillaume; Suto, Itsuki; Walczak, Maureen D.; Worthington, Lindsay L.; Bailey, Ian; Enkelmann, Eva; Reece, Robert; Swartz, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Erosion, sediment production, and routing on a tectonically active continental margin reflect both tectonic and climatic processes; partitioning the relative importance of these processes remains controversial. Gulf of Alaska contains a preserved sedimentary record of the Yakutat Terrane collision with North America. Because tectonic convergence in the coastal St. Elias orogen has been roughly constant for 6 My, variations in its eroded sediments preserved in the offshore Surveyor Fan constrain a budget of tectonic material influx, erosion, and sediment output. Seismically imaged sediment volumes calibrated with chronologies derived from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program boreholes show that erosion accelerated in response to Northern Hemisphere glacial intensification (∼2.7 Ma) and that the 900-km-long Surveyor Channel inception appears to correlate with this event. However, tectonic influx exceeded integrated sediment efflux over the interval 2.8–1.2 Ma. Volumetric erosion accelerated following the onset of quasi-periodic (∼100-ky) glacial cycles in the mid-Pleistocene climate transition (1.2–0.7 Ma). Since then, erosion and transport of material out of the orogen has outpaced tectonic influx by 50–80%. Such a rapid net mass loss explains apparent increases in exhumation rates inferred onshore from exposure dates and mapped out-of-sequence fault patterns. The 1.2-My mass budget imbalance must relax back toward equilibrium in balance with tectonic influx over the timescale of orogenic wedge response (millions of years). The St. Elias Range provides a key example of how active orogenic systems respond to transient mass fluxes, and of the possible influence of climate-driven erosive processes that diverge from equilibrium on the million-year scale. PMID:26598689

  14. Norbert Elias's motion pictures: history, cinema and gestures in the process of civilization.

    PubMed

    Algazi, Gadi

    2008-09-01

    Norbert Elias's project in The process of civilization (1939) involved reconstructing invisible movement--both the slow tempoof long-term historical change and the modification of psychic structures and embodied dispositions. To do this, he resorted to uncommon devices: treating historical texts as constituting a series amenable to a rudimentary discourse analysis, he constructed an imagined 'curve of civilization' serving as an approximation of the hidden process of change. Elias's curve was not supposed to represent single past states, but movement itself, its direction and pace. This novel concept of historical representation was related to the perception of cinema as a new medium making actual movement visible. But beyond making it possible to imagine how one could telescope long-term historical process, cinema also held the promise of serving as a microscope, making the minute movements of the human body, gestures and manners available for close inspection. While anthropologists were devising ways of using the new medium to document fleeting gestures and bodily postures, it was used by popular audiences as a source for remodelling behaviour and acquiring polite manners and body techniques, as noticed by such acute observers as Marcel Mauss and Joseph Roth. Hence, popular appropriation of the cinema gave rise to a heightened awareness of the historicity of gestures and the changing modalities of their transmission. Cinema was itself part of the accelerated motion of history, of a perceived change of pace in the process of civilization, which in its turn shed light on its historical antecedents and played an essential role in rethinking the notion of civilization and culture. PMID:19227624

  15. Resolving the reactor neutrino anomaly with the KATRIN neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formaggio, J. A.; Barrett, J.

    2011-11-01

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) combines an ultra-luminous molecular tritium source with an integrating high-resolution spectrometer to gain sensitivity to the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. The projected sensitivity of the experiment on the electron neutrino mass is 200 meV at 90% C.L. With such unprecedented resolution, the experiment is also sensitive to physics beyond the Standard Model, particularly to the existence of additional sterile neutrinos at the eV mass scale. A recent analysis of available reactor data appears to favor the existence of such a sterile neutrino with a mass splitting of | Δmsterile | 2 ⩾ 1.5eV2 and mixing strength of sin2 2θsterile = 0.17 ± 0.08 at 95% C.L. Upcoming tritium beta decay experiments should be able to rule out or confirm the presence of the new phenomenon for a substantial fraction of the allowed parameter space.

  16. Recent Exhumation in the Chugach, St. Elias, and Fairweather Ranges, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spotila, J. A.; Berger, A. L.; McAleer, R. J.

    2006-12-01

    The motion of the Yakutat block into North America has produced a band of crustal deformation that begins near the tip of the Aleutian megathrust, continues through the eastern Chugach Range and St. Elias Mountains, and wraps southeastward along the Fairweather transform. Because of the extreme climate of the southern Alaska margin, this oblique collision has developed under the intense action of glacial erosion for the past few million years. This makes this orogen suitable for investigating the nature of feedbacks between climate, tectonics, and topography. We have measured the spatial and temporal patterns of exhumation at scales of orogenic evolution using apatite (U-Th)/He dating. In conjunction with previously published (U-Th)/He and fission-track ages (O'Sullivan and Currie, 1996; O'Sullivan et al., 1997; Buscher et al., 2002; Spotila et al., 2004; Johnston, 2005; Meigs et al., 2006; Perry et al., 2006), our new low-temperature cooling ages are beginning to reveal patterns of vertical strain localization on individual structures and in climatic zones, as well as the balance between tectonic influx and erosional efflux in the orogen. Data obtained thus far form a rough bull's eye pattern of concentric rings of cooling ages in the core of the orogen that become older with distance away from focused exhumation near the bend in the plate boundary. A similar bull's eye of young ages occurs along the Fairweather Range southeast of the bend and continuing to Glacier Bay, such that the zone of rapid exhumation is actually boomerang in shape. This is surprising, given that geologic and geodetic data indicate the Fairweather fault is pure strike-slip. Uplift and exhumation of the Fairweather corridor instead implies plate motion is oblique, with a significant component of partitioned shortening. Further west within the core of the Yakutat collision, the youngest apatite helium ages, less than 1 Ma, occur in a band along the coast that extends westwards from Mt. St

  17. The Western Chugach-St. Elias Orogen, Alaska: Strain Partitioning and the Effect of Glacial Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, A. L.; Spotila, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    The ongoing collision between the Yakutat terrane and the North American plate in southeastern Alaska's St. Elias orogen is a modern analog for the tectonic processes which produced, and shaped, much of the Cordillera. With convergence rates comparable to that of the Himalaya (>4 cm/yr), a young and dynamic zone of thin-skinned interplate deformation has constructed the highest coastal relief on Earth, and given rise to the second and third highest peaks in North America (5,959 and 5,489 m). The orogen receives upwards of 4 m precipitation annually, has been heavily glaciated for the last 5 Ma, and contains some of the fastest short-term erosion rates known. Over the last few years, evidence has steadily mounted that within such tectonic settings, climate and tectonics exist as a coupled system (i.e. Taiwan and Nanga Parbat). Our ongoing research, aimed at quantifying spatial patterns in exhumation rate as well as the location of active structures within the western half of the St. Elias orogen, bolsters this new paradigm. Bedrock ([U-Th]/He) cooling ages in apatite show that exhumation is currently focused on the windward side of the orogen. Time- averaged, long-term, exhumation rates near the coast are generally ~2-3 mm/yr, versus <0.5 mm/yr on the leeward side of the range. However, the rapid exhumation rates along the windward flank are not spatially uniform with the highest rates measured thus far >~5.5 mm/yr (0.4 Ma cooling age) situated near the Bering and Steller Glaciers. This locus of exhumation could reflect a redistribution of strain by focused erosion beneath these large outlet glaciers. Yet, the structural mechanism of this focused strain is still speculative. Pairs of helium ages spanning the foot-wall and hanging-wall of the Chugach-St. Elias thrust, the suture between the North American plate and colliding Yakutat terrane, imply that the thrust became inactive at some time between 2 and 5 Ma. Because of the coincidence in timing between this

  18. Mercury in fishes from Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kowalski, Brandon M.; Willacker, James J.; Zimmerman, Christian E.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, mercury (Hg) concentrations were examined in fishes from Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Alaska, the largest and one of the most remote units in the national park system. The goals of the study were to (1) examine the distribution of Hg in select lakes of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve; (2) evaluate the differences in Hg concentrations among fish species and with fish age and size; and (3) assess the potential ecological risks of Hg to park fishes, wildlife, and human consumers by comparing Hg concentrations to a series of risk benchmarks. Total Hg concentrations ranged from 17.9 to 616.4 nanograms per gram wet weight (ng/g ww), with a mean (± standard error) of 180.0 ±17.9 across the 83 individuals sampled. Without accounting for the effects of size, Hg concentrations varied by a factor of 10.9 across sites and species. After accounting for the effects of size, Hg concentrations were even more variable, differing by a factor of as much as 13.2 within a single species sampled from two lakes. Such inter-site variation suggests that site characteristics play an important role in determining fish Hg concentrations and that more intensive sampling may be necessary to adequately characterize Hg contamination in the park. Size-normalized Hg concentrations also differed among three species sampled from Tanada Lake, and Hg concentrations were strongly correlated with age. Furthermore, potential risks to park fish, wildlife, and human users were variable across lakes and species. Although no fish from two of the lakes studied (Grizzly Lake and Summit Lake) had Hg concentrations exceeding any of the benchmarks used, concentrations in Copper Lake and Tanada Lake exceeded conservative benchmarks for bird (90 ng/g ww in whole-body) and human (150 ng/g ww in muscle) consumption. In Tanada Lake, concentrations in most fishes also exceeded benchmarks for risk to moderate- and low-sensitivity avian consumers (180 and 270 ng/g ww in

  19. Measurement and reduction of low-level radon background in the KATRIN experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fränkle, F. M.

    2013-08-08

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment is a next generation, model independent, large scale experiment to determine the mass of the electron anti-neutrino by investigating the kinematics of tritium beta decay with a sensitivity of 200 meV/c{sup 2}. The measurement setup consists of a high luminosity windowless gaseous molecular tritium source (WGTS), a differential and cryogenic pumped electron transport and tritium retention section, a tandem spectrometer section (pre-spectrometer and main spectrometer) for energy analysis, followed by a detector system for counting transmitted beta decay electrons. Measurements performed at the KATRIN pre-spectrometer test setup showed that the decay of radon (Rn) atoms in the volume of the KATRIN spectrometers is a major background source. Rn atoms from low-level radon emanation of materials inside the vacuum region of the KATRIN spectrometers are able to penetrate deep into the magnetic flux tube so that the alpha decay of Rn contributes to the background. Of particular importance are electrons emitted in processes accompanying the Rn alpha decay, such as shake-off, internal conversion of excited levels in the Rn daughter atoms and Auger electrons. Lowenergy electrons (< 100 eV) directly contribute to the background in the signal region. High-energy electrons can be stored magnetically inside the volume of the spectrometer and are able to create thousands of secondary electrons via subsequent ionization processes with residual gas molecules. In order to reduce the Rn induced background different active and passive counter measures were developed and tested. This proceeding will give an overview on Rn sources within the KATRIN spectrometer, describes how Rn decays inside the spectrometer produce background events at the detector and presents different counter measures to reduce the Rn induced background.

  20. Interim report on the St. Elias, Alaska earthquake of 28 February 1979

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lahr, John C.; Plafker, George; Stephens, C.D.; Foglean, K.A.; Blackford, M.E.

    1979-01-01

    On 28 February 1979 an earthquake with surface wave magnitude (Ms) of 7.7 (W. Person, personal communication, 1979) occurred beneath the Chugach and St. Elias mountains of southern Alaska (fig. 1). This is a region of complex tectonics resulting from northwestward convergence between the Pacific and North American plates. To the east, the northwest-trending Fairweather fault accommodates the movement with dextral slip of about 5.5 cm/yr (Plafker, Hudson, and others, 1978); to the west, the Pacific plate underthrusts Alaska at the Aleutian trench, which trends southwestward (Plafker 1969). The USGS has operated a telemetered seismic network in southern Alaska since 1971 and it was greatly expanded along the eastern Gulf of Alaska in September 1974. The current configuration of stations is shown in Figure 9. Technical details of the network are available in published earthquake catalogs (Lahr, Page, and others, 1974; Fogleman, Stephens, and others, 1978). Preliminary analysis of the data from this network covering the time period September 1, 1978 through March 10, 1979, as well as worldwide data for the main shock will be discussed in this paper.

  1. Testing Models of Modern Glacial Erosion of the St. Elias Mountains, Alaska Using Marine Sediment Provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penkrot, M. L.; Jaeger, J. M.; Loss, D. P.; Bruand, E.

    2015-12-01

    The glaciated coastal St. Elias Range in Alaska is a primary site to examine climate-tectonic interactions. Work has primarily focused on the Bering-Bagley and Malaspina-Seward ice fields, utilizing detrital and bedrock zircon and apatite geochronology to examine local exhumation and glacial erosion (Berger et al., 2008; Enkelmann et al., 2009; Headly et al., 2013). These studies argue for specific regions of tectonically focused or climatically widespread glacial erosion. Analyzed zircon and apatite grains are sand size, however glacial erosion favors the production of finer-grained sediments. This study focuses on the geochemical provenance of the silt-size fraction (15-63μm) of surface sediments collected throughout the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) seaward of the Bering and Malaspina glaciers to test if the exhumation patterns observed in zircon and apatites are also applicable for the silt size fraction. Onshore bedrock Al-normalized elemental data were used to delineate sediment sources, and a subset of provenance-applicable elements was chosen. Detrital thermochronologic data suggest that sediment produced by the Bagley/Bering system is derived from bedrock on the windward side with input from the Chugach Metamorphic Complex (CMC) underlying the Bagley only during glacial surge events (Headly et al., 2013). Geochemical observations of GOA silt deposited during the 1994-95 surge event confirm input of CMC sediment (elevated in Cr, Ni, Sc, Sr, depleted in Hf, Pb and Rb relative to Kultieth and Poul Creek formations). We also observe a windward-side sediment source (Kultieth and Poul Creek). It is hypothesized that the sediment carried by the Malaspina is primarily from CMC rock underlying the Seward ice field mixed with Yakataga formation rock that underlies the Seward throat (Headly et al., 2013). Geochemical observations of GOA silt support this hypothesis.

  2. [On atrophy. A doctoral dissertation by Elias Til-landz in 1670].

    PubMed

    Kallinen, M

    1998-01-01

    Elias Til-landz is known as the most industrious professor of medicine at the Academy of Turku (Abo) during the 17th century. This article describes his student years in Uppsala and Leiden, and surveys the contents of his hitherto unanalysed doctoral thesis De Athrophia as evidence of his intellectual connections. Til-landz (originally called Tillander) studied philosophy at the Academy of Turku and medicine in Uppsala. Medicine attracted only a handful of students at Turku, most probably because of the low status of the occupation and the scarce opportunities for career. At the University of Uppsala - the biggest university of 17th-century Sweden - the professors of medicine were prominent men in their field and well versed in the new philosophical currents as well. It was neverless usual for Swedish medical students in the 17th century to complete their studies abroad, especially at the famous University of Leiden. It is probable that Til-landz had written his doctoral thesis himself. He defended it in Leiden on 11th March 1670 under the formal guidance of J.F. Gronovius, who was professor of the Greek language and history. In his thesis Til-landz shows intimate knowledge of the new medical authorities of the age, such as Walter Charleton, Francis Glisson, Santorio Santorio, etc. His approach to physiology follows Franciscus De le Boe Sylvius's iatrochemical theories. In Til-landz's view atrophy can affect either the whole body (general atrophy) or some parts only (special atrophy). It is caused by the lack or poor quality of blood and is mostly cured by diet, emesis or bathing. PMID:11625410

  3. Neutrinos secretly converting to lighter particles to please both KATRIN and the cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzan, Yasaman; Hannestad, Steen

    2016-02-01

    Within the framework of the Standard Model of particle physics and standard cosmology, observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) set stringent bounds on the sum of the masses of neutrinos. If these bounds are satisfied, the upcoming KATRIN experiment which is designed to probe neutrino mass down to ~ 0.2 eV will observe only a null signal. We show that the bounds can be relaxed by introducing new interactions for the massive active neutrinos, making neutrino masses in the range observable by KATRIN compatible with cosmological bounds. Within this scenario, neutrinos convert to new stable light particles by resonant production of intermediate states around a temperature of T~ keV in the early Universe, leading to a much less pronounced suppression of density fluctuations compared to the standard model.

  4. Electron line shape and transmission function of the KATRIN monitor spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slezák, M.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of the neutrino mass is of particular interest in modern neutrino physics. Besides the neutrinoless double beta decay and cosmological observation information about the neutrino mass is obtained from single beta decay by observing the shape of the electron spectrum near the endpoint. The KATRIN β decay experiment aims to push the limit on the effective electron antineutrino mass down to 0.2 eV/c2. To reach this sensitivity several systematic effects have to be under control. One of them is the fluctuations of the absolute energy scale, which therefore has to be continuously monitored at very high precision. This paper shortly describes KATRIN, the technique for continuous monitoring of the absolute energy scale and recent improvements in analysis of the monitoring data.

  5. Tests of by-pass diodes at cryogenic temperatures for the KATRIN magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, W.; Bolz, H.; Jansen, A.; Müller, K.; Steidl, M.; Hagedorn, D.

    2014-01-27

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) requires a series of superconducting solenoid magnets for guiding beta-electrons from the source to the detector. By-pass diodes will operate at liquid helium temperatures to protect the superconducting magnets and bus bars in case of quenches. The operation conditions of the by-pass diodes depend on the different magnet systems of KATRIN. Therefore, different diode stacks are designed with adequate copper heat sinks assuming adiabatic conditions. The by-pass diode stacks have been submitted to cold tests both at liquid nitrogen and liquid helium temperatures for checking operation conditions. This report presents the test set up and first results of the diode characteristics at 300 K and 77 K, as well as of endurance tests of the diode stacks at constant current load at 77 K and 4.2 K.

  6. Electron line shape and transmission function of the KATRIN monitor spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Slezák, M.

    2013-12-30

    Knowledge of the neutrino mass is of particular interest in modern neutrino physics. Besides the neutrinoless double beta decay and cosmological observation information about the neutrino mass is obtained from single beta decay by observing the shape of the electron spectrum near the endpoint. The KATRIN β decay experiment aims to push the limit on the effective electron antineutrino mass down to 0.2 eV/c{sup 2}. To reach this sensitivity several systematic effects have to be under control. One of them is the fluctuations of the absolute energy scale, which therefore has to be continuously monitored at very high precision. This paper shortly describes KATRIN, the technique for continuous monitoring of the absolute energy scale and recent improvements in analysis of the monitoring data.

  7. Cooling history of the St. Elias syntaxis, southeast Alaska, revealed by geochronology and thermochronology of cobble-sized glacial detritus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkowski, Sarah; Enkelmann, Eva; Drost, Kerstin; Pfänder, Jörg A.; Stübner, Konstanze; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the spatiotemporal evolution of exhumation in the ice-covered St. Elias syntaxis area, southeast Alaska, using multiple thermochronometers and geochronometers from cobble-sized glacial detritus. Multiple thermochronometers reveal the cooling histories from 500 to 60°C of 27 glacially transported cobbles from the two largest catchments of the syntaxis. Cobble lithologies and 21 zircon U-Pb ages (~277-31 Ma) were examined to determine sample provenance. Furthermore, eight amphibole and seven biotite 40Ar/39Ar ages (~276-16 Ma and ~50-42 Ma, respectively), four zircon and six apatite (U-Th)/He ages (~35-4.8 Ma and ~4.2-0.6 Ma, respectively), and four apatite fission track ages (~17-1.6 Ma) were used to reconstruct the individual cobble cooling histories. An additional four bedrock samples from the Fairweather Range yielded three biotite 40Ar/39Ar ages between ~42 and 5 Ma. A compilation of published bedrock and new cobble cooling histories from the St. Elias Mountains and Fairweather Range reveals the regional Cenozoic cooling and exhumation history, emphasizing the position of the St. Elias syntaxis as a transitional zone between transpression and subduction settings. The new cobble and bedrock data indicate an onset of rapid exhumation at ~5 Ma that was limited in duration (2-3 Myr) and amount (~10 km) in the syntaxial region. This study also demonstrates the usefulness of cobbles for revealing thermal histories of otherwise inaccessible regions as cobble analysis combines advantages of bedrock and detrital thermochronology.

  8. Composition and sources of atmospheric dusts in snow at 3200 meters in the St. Elias Range, southeastern Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkley, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    Dusts in snow from the accumulation zone in the St. Elias Range appear from their chemical compositions to have come from terranes of rocks of ferromagnesian composition. These dusts, with respect to their composition and to the moderate degree of variation that occurs through a depositional year, are similar those deposited in Greenland. The high portion of the St. Elias Range is isolated from dominance by any local dust source terranes, because of altitude and the extent of the surrounding glacierized and snow-covered region. In Greenland the altitude is typically lower, but local sources are even less likely to dominate the character of the dusts deposited into the ice record there. The similar compositions and moderate compositional variations of dusts from these two places bear on the question of whether the dusts that are transported over long distances by the atmosphere under modern and glacial-period conditions are uniform and representative of a broad regional or even hemispheric background dust. The dusts in the snow were measured by means of a suite of major, minor, and trace rock-forming metals chosen to give information about rock types, their constituent minerals, degree of degradation (weathering), and energies of atmospheric uptake from source. The variations in amounts of rock dust through the year in the St. Elias Range snowpack have no time-stratigraphic correspondence to the also large variations in concentrations of other species that are not constituents of rock-derived dusts, such the anions chloride, sulfate, and nitrate; the highs and lows of the two types of materials are apparently completely independent. The structure revealed by the moderately fine-scale sampling of the present study (??? 10 increments/y) serves as a background for the interpretation of analysis of ice core samples, in which annual layers may be too compressed to permit analysis of sub-annual samples. ?? 1994.

  9. 1450 m^3 at 10^-9 Pa: One of the KATRIN Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Christian Day; R. Gumbsheimer; W. Herz; J. Wolf; J. Bonn; R. Reid; G.R. Myneni

    2006-11-12

    The KATRIN project is a challenging experiment to measure the mass of the electron neutrino directly with a sensitivity of 0.2 eV. It is a next generation tritium beta-decay experiment scaling up the size and precision of previous experiments by an order of magnitude as well as the intensity of the tritium beta source. Ultrafine spectrometric analysis of the energy distribution of the decay electrons at their very endpoint of 18.57 keV is the key to derive the neutrino mass. This is provided by a high-resolution spectrometer of unique size (10 m in diameter, 22 m in length). To avoid any negative influence from residual gas, the spectrometer vessel is designed to UHV/XHV conditions (an ultimate total pressure of below 10{sup -9} Pa and a wall outgassing rate below 10{sup -13} Pam{sup 3}/scm{sup 2}). The paper shortly describes the experimental idea behind KATRIN. The emphasis will then be given to the pumping concept for how to achieve the target parameters and to the manufacturing of the spectrometer tank. Critical issues will also be discussed (surface treatment, welding, transportation). Finally, a description of the current status and an outlook on the overall KATRIN schedule completes the paper.

  10. A geologic guide to Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park and Preserve, Alaska; a tectonic collage of northbound terranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winkler, Gary R.; with contributions by MacKevett, E. M., Jr.; Plafker, George; Richter, D.H.; Rosenkrans, D.S.; Schmoll, H.R.

    2000-01-01

    Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park and Preserve, the largest unit in the U.S. National Park System, encompasses near 13.2 million acres of geological wonderments. This geologic guide presents history of exploration and Earth-science investigation; describes the complex geologic makeup; characterizes the vast college of accretion geologic terranes in this area of Alaska's continental margin; recapitulates the effects of earthquakes, volcanoes, and glaciers; characterizes the copper and gold resources of the parklands; and describes outstanding locales within the park and preserve area. A glossary of geologic terms and a categorized list of additional sources of information complete this report.

  11. Tectonic processes during oblique collision: Insights from the St. Elias orogen, northern North American Cordillera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavlis, T.L.; Picornell, C.; Serpa, L.; Bruhn, R.L.; Plafker, G.

    2004-01-01

    Oblique convergence in the St. Elias orogen of southern Alaska and northwestern Canada has constructed the world's highest coastal mountain range and is the principal driver constructing all of the high topography in northern North America. The orogen originated when the Yakutat terrane was excised from the Cordilleran margin and was transported along margin-parallel strike-slip faults into the subduction-transform transition at the eastern end of the Aleutian trench. We examine the last 3 m.y. of this collision through an analysis of Euler poles for motion of the Yakutat microplate with respect to North America and the Pacific. This analysis indicates a Yakutat-Pacific pole near the present southern triple junction of the microplate and' predicts convergence to dextral-oblique convergence across the offshore Transition fault, onland structures adjacent to the Yakutat foreland, or both, with plate speeds increasing from 10 to 30 mm/yr from southeast to northwest. Reconstructions based on these poles show that NNW transport of the collided block into the NE trending subduction zone forced contraction of EW line elements as the collided block was driven into the subduction-transform transition. This suggests the collided block was constricted as it was driven into the transition. Constriction provides an explanation for observed vertical axis refolding of both earlier formed fold-thrust systems and the collisional suture at the top of the fold-thrust stack. We also suggest that this motion was partially accommodated by lateral extrusion of the western portion of the orogen toward the Aleutian trench. Important questions remain regarding which structures accommodated parts of this motion. The Transition fault may have accommodated much of the Yakutat-Pacific convergence on the basis of our analysis and previous interpretations of GPS-based geodetic data. Nonetheless, it is locally overlapped by up to 800 m of undeformed sediment, yet elsewhere shows evidence of young

  12. Gaseous source of 83mKr conversion electrons for the neutrino experiment KATRIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vénos, D.; Slezák, M.; Dragoun, O.; Inoyatov, A.; Lebeda, O.; Pulec, Z.; Sentkerestiová, J.; Špalek, A.

    2014-12-01

    The metastable 83mKr with short half-life of 1.83 h is intended as a space distributed source of monoenergetic electrons for energy calibration and systematic studies in the Karlsruhe tritium neutrino experiment (KATRIN). The efficient production of the parent radionuclide 83Rb at cyclotron U-120M was implemented. The release of the 83mKr from zeolite (molecular sieve), in which the parent radionuclide 83Rb (T1/2 = 86.2 d) was trapped, was studied under various conditions using the gamma spectroscopy. Residual gas analysis of ultra high vacuum over the zeolite was performed as well.

  13. Environmental geochemical studies of selected mineral deposits in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eppinger, Robert G.; Briggs, Paul H.; Rosenkrans, Danny; Ballestrazze, Vanessa

    2000-01-01

    Environmental geochemical investigations at Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Alaska, between 1994 and 1997 included studies of the Kennecott stratabound copper mines and mill area; historic mines and mill in the Bremner District, gold placer mines at Gold Hill; the undisturbed porphyry, Cu-Mo deposits at Orange Hill and Bond Creek, and the historic mines and mill at Nabesna, The study was in cooperation with the National Park Service and focused on sample media including surface water, bedload sediment, rock, mine waste, and mill tailings samples. Results demonstrate that bedrock geology and mineral deposit type must be considered when environmental geochemical effects of historic or active mine areas are evaluated.

  14. World heritage site - Bien du Patrimoine Mondial - Kluane/Wrangell-St. Elias/Glacier Bay/Tatshenshini-Alsek

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Labay, Keith A.; Wilson, Frederic H.

    2004-01-01

    The four parks depicted on this map make up a single World Heritage Site that covers 24.3 million acres. Together, they comprise the largest internationally protected land-based ecosystem on the planet. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) established the World Heritage Program in 1972 for the identification and protection of the world?s irreplaceable natural and cultural resources. World Heritage Sites are important as storehouses of memory and evolution, as anchors for sustainable tourism and community, and as laboratories for the study and understanding of the earth and culture. This World Heritage Site protects the prominent mountain ranges of Kluane, Wrangell, Saint Elias, and Chugach. It includes many of the tallest peaks on the continent, the world's largest non-polar icefield, extensive glaciers, vital watersheds, and expanses of dramatic wilderness. [Les quatre parcs figurant sur cette carte ne constituent qu?un seul site du patrimoine mondial recouvrant plus de 99 millions de km2, ce qui en fait le plus grand ecosysteme terrestre protege par loi internationale. En 1972, L?UNESCO (l?organisation des Nations Unies pour les sciences, l'education et la culture) a etabli le programme du patrimoine mondial afin d?identifier et de proteger les ressources naturelles et culturelles irremplacables de notre plan?te. Si les sites du patrimoine mondial sont si importants c'est parce qu'ils representent a la fois des livres ouverts sur l?histoire de la Terre, le point de depart du tourisme durable et du developpement des collectivites, des laboratoires pour etudier et comprendre la nature et la culture. Ce site du patrimoine mondial assure la protection des chaines de montagnes de Kluane, Wrangell, Saint Elias, et Chugach. On y trouve plusieurs des plus hauts sommets du continent, le plus grand champ de glace non-polaire du monde, d?immenses glaciers, des bassins hydrologiques essentiels, et de la nature sauvage a perte de vue.

  15. Computational Modeling of the Class I Low-Mass Protostar Elias 29 Applying Optical Constants of Ices Processed By High Energy Cosmic Ray Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, W. R. M.; Pilling, S.

    2015-04-01

    We present a study of the effects of high energy cosmic rays (CRs) over the astrophysical ices, observed toward the embedded class I protostar Elias 29, by using computational modeling and laboratory data. Its spectrum was observed with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) covering 2.3-190 μm. The modeling employed the three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code RADMC-3D and laboratory data of bombarded ice grains by CR analogs and unprocessed ices (not bombarded). We are assuming that Elias 29 has a self-irradiated disk with inclination i = 60.°0, surrounded by an envelope with a bipolar cavity. The results show that absorption features toward Elias 29 are better reproduced by assuming a combination between unprocessed astrophysical ices at low temperature (H2O, CO, CO2) and bombarded ices (H2O:CO2) by high energy CRs. Evidences of the ice processing around Elias 29 can be observed by the good fitting around 5.5-8.0 μm, by polar and apolar ice segregation in 15.15-15.25 μm, and by the presence of the CH4 and HCOOH ices. Given that non-nitrogen compounds were employed in this work, we assume that absorption around 5.5-8.0 μm should not be associated with the NH4+ ion (see the 2003 work of Shutte & Khanna ), but more probably with aliphatic ethers (e.g., R1-OCH2-R2), CH3CHO, and related species. The results obtained in this paper are important because they show that the environment around protostars is better modeled considering processed samples and, consequently, demonstrate the chemical evolution of the astrophysical ices.

  16. Exhumation at orogenic indentor corners under long-term glacial conditions: Example of the St. Elias orogen, Southern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spotila, James A.; Berger, Aaron L.

    2010-07-01

    Syntaxial bends in convergent plate boundaries, or indentor corners, display some of the most intriguing deformation patterns on Earth and are type localities for "aneurysms" of coupled erosion, thermal weakening, and strain. The St. Elias orogen in Alaska is a small, young convergent system that has been dominated by a glacial climate for much of its history and exhibits two prominent indentor corners that are not well understood. We have added 40 new apatite (U-Th)/He ages to the already extensive dataset for the low-temperature cooling history of this orogen to constrain the pattern of exhumation in these indentor corners. Ages from the western syntaxis show minor variation across the structural hinge, suggesting that the bend has little effect on the pattern of exhumation and that structures, including the Bagley fault, connect smoothly from the orogen core to the subduction zone to the southwest. Rock uplift on the north flank of the range appears to increase steadily towards the eastern syntaxis, which represents the apex in the right-angle bend between a transform fault in the south and the collision zone in the west. Based on age-elevation relationships, zones of relative rock uplift can be defined in which the Mt. Logan massif, or the area just north of the eastern syntaxis, experienced ˜ 4.8 km greater rock uplift than background levels northwest of the western syntaxis. A bulge in relative rock uplift is symmetric about the hinge in the eastern indentor corner. However, rates of denudation in this bulge are not as rapid as the core of the fold and thrust belt and are lower than those implied by detrital cooling ages from beneath the Seward Glacier. This implies that a large bull's eye of ultra-rapid (˜ 5 mm/yr) exhumation does not occur and that the subpopulation of young detrital ages may be sourced from a narrow transpressional zone along the Fairweather fault. Unlike the Himalayan syntaxes, it thus appears that an aneurysm of coupled erosion

  17. Simulation of background from low-level tritium and radon emanation in the KATRIN spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Leiber, B.; Collaboration: KATRIN Collaboration

    2013-08-08

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment is a large-scale experiment for the model independent determination of the mass of electron anti-neutrinos with a sensitivity of 200 meV/c{sup 2}. It investigates the kinematics of electrons from tritium beta decay close to the endpoint of the energy spectrum at 18.6 keV. To achieve a good signal to background ratio at the endpoint, a low background rate below 10{sup −2} counts per second is required. The KATRIN setup thus consists of a high luminosity windowless gaseous tritium source (WGTS), a magnetic electron transport system with differential and cryogenic pumping for tritium retention, and electro-static retarding spectrometers (pre-spectrometer and main spectrometer) for energy analysis, followed by a segmented detector system for counting transmitted beta-electrons. A major source of background comes from magnetically trapped electrons in the main spectrometer (vacuum vessel: 1240 m{sup 3}, 10{sup −11} mbar) produced by nuclear decays in the magnetic flux tube of the spectrometer. Major contributions are expected from short-lived radon isotopes and tritium. Primary electrons, originating from these decays, can be trapped for hours, until having lost almost all their energy through inelastic scattering on residual gas particles. Depending on the initial energy of the primary electron, up to hundreds of low energetic secondary electrons can be produced. Leaving the spectrometer, these electrons will contribute to the background rate. This contribution describes results from simulations for the various background sources. Decays of {sup 219}Rn, emanating from the main vacuum pump, and tritium from the WGTS that reaches the spectrometers are expected to account for most of the background. As a result of the radon alpha decay, electrons are emitted through various processes, such as shake-off, internal conversion and the Auger deexcitations. The corresponding simulations were done using the KASSIOPEIA

  18. High-voltage monitoring with a solenoid retarding spectrometer at the KATRIN experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhard, M.; Bauer, S.; Beglarian, A.; Bergmann, T.; Bonn, J.; Drexlin, G.; Goullon, J.; Groh, S.; Glück, F.; Kleesiek, M.; Haußmann, N.; Höhn, T.; Johnston, K.; Kraus, M.; Reich, J.; Rest, O.; Schlösser, K.; Schupp, M.; Slezák, M.; Thümmler, T.; Vénos, D.; Weinheimer, C.; Wüstling, S.; Zbořil, M.

    2014-06-01

    The KATRIN experiment will measure the absolute mass scale of neutrinos with a sensitivity of mν = 200meV/c2 by means of an electrostatic spectrometer set close to the tritium β-decay endpoint at 18.6keV. Fluctuations of the energy scale must be under control within ±60mV (±3ppm). Since a precise voltage measurement in the range of tens of kV is on the edge of current technology, a nuclear standard will be deployed additionally. Parallel to the main spectrometer the same retarding potential will be applied to the monitor spectrometer to measure 17.8-keV K-conversion electrons of 83mKr. This article describes the setup of the monitor spectrometer and presents its first measurement results.

  19. Prototype of an angular-selective photoelectron calibration source for the KATRIN experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valerius, K.; Hein, H.; Baumeister, H.; Beck, M.; Bokeloh, K.; Bonn, J.; Glück, F.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Ostrick, B.; Zbořil, M.; Weinheimer, Ch

    2011-01-01

    The method of direct neutrino mass determination based on the kinematics of tritium beta decay, which is adopted by the KATRIN experiment, makes use of a large, high-resolution electrostatic spectrometer with magnetic adiabatic collimation. In order to target a sensitivity on m(ν) of 0.2eV/c2, a detailed understanding of the electromagnetic properties of the electron spectrometer is essential, requiring comprehensive calibration measurements with dedicated electron sources. In this paper we report on a prototype of a photoelectron source providing a narrow energy spread and angular selectivity. Both are key properties for the characterisation of the spectrometer. The angular selectivity is achieved by applying non-parallel strong electric and magnetic fields: Directly after being created, photoelectrons are accelerated rapidly and non-adiabatically by a strong electric field before adiabatic magnetic guiding takes over.

  20. Cenozoic evolution of the Yakutat-North American collision zone and structural accommodation of St. Elias syntaxis exhumation, Alaska/Yukon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkowski, Sarah; Enkelmann, Eva; Ehlers, Todd

    2016-04-01

    Active convergent margins potentially pose multiple natural hazards to human life and infrastructure. Tectonic strain may be further focused where convergent margins are warped into broad syntaxes. However, the processes responsible for upper plate deformation in these settings are not well understood. The St. Elias syntaxis in southeast Alaska and southwest Yukon is located at the eastern corner of the Yakutat microplate, which indents into the North American Plate and subducts at a flat angle beneath Alaska. High rates of long-term glacial erosion and exhumation (>2 mm/yr) are found on the southern, coastal flanks of the St. Elias orogen, but the deepest and most rapid exhumation is focused at the St. Elias syntaxis. In this location, transform motion transitions into subduction of the wedge-shaped, oceanic plateau of the Yakutat microplate. In order to map the spatio-temporal pattern of exhumation in the Yakutat-North American collision zone, we conducted zircon and apatite fission-track analyses of predominantly detrital, sand-sized material and five bedrock samples from 47 different glacio-fluvial catchments covering an area of ~45,000 km2 around the St. Elias syntaxis. Integration of the new thermochronologic data with prior work and other geologic and geophysical observations yielded information on past terrane accretion events at the North American margin since the late Mesozoic and the evolution of exhumation at the St. Elias syntaxis in the context of the ongoing Yakutat-North American plate collision. Our results indicate a migrating focus of the most rapid exhumation from north to south and from the upper (North American Plate) to the lower (Yakutat microplate) plate in the syntaxis area over the past ~10 Myr. This migration occurred in response to a change in plate motions, increasingly thicker crust of the subducting Yakutat microplate, and changes in surface processes after glaciation began that resulted in modification of the rheology. We propose a

  1. Multi-method geo- and thermochronology of glacially transported cobbles reveals the tectonic and exhumation history of the St. Elias Mountains (Alaska/Yukon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkowski, Sarah; Enkelmann, Eva; Drost, Kerstin; Pfänder, Jörg; Stübner, Konstanze; Ehlers, Todd

    2016-04-01

    Multi-method dating is a powerful tool to understand tectonic processes and mountain building. In the case of inaccessible mountain regions, e.g., due to extensive glaciation, the dating of detrital material and bedrock samples from rare outcrops with geo- and thermochronologic methods is often the only applicable approach to study the timing and rates of tectonic processes. The St. Elias Mountains of southeast Alaska and southwest Yukon are an example of a heavily glaciated orogen. With the help of detrital thermochronology of sand-sized material, exhumation patterns could be mapped, though with a low spatial resolution. In contrast, geo- and thermochronology applied to glacially derived cobbles yields provenance information from cobble lithology, zircon U-Pb dating, and the entire cooling history from multiple mineral phases. Multi-grain and multi-aliquot analyses yield high-precision crystallization and cooling ages, while sand-sized detritus requires analysis of single minerals particularly resistant to weathering. We present a reconstruction of the Cenozoic tectonic and exhumation history of the St. Elias Mountains that was obtained from the analysis of 27 carefully selected and prepared cobble samples taken from two of the largest glacial catchments of the St. Elias Mountains. A total of 21 zircon U-Pb data sets as well as eight amphibole and seven biotite 40Ar/39Ar ages constrain the (maximum) formation and cooling ages, respectively, of the rocks in the source area. In addition, four zircon and six apatite (U-Th)/He ages as well as four apatite fission-track ages reveal the exhumation history of these source rocks. Integration of the cobble results with an additional three bedrock biotite 40Ar/39Ar ages and published geo- and thermochronologic data from along the St. Elias Mountains reveals details on the timing and rates of the Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the North American margin in southeast Alaska. Documented are the earliest Eocene spreading

  2. 1. Characterizing contributions of glacier melt and groundwater in alpine glacierized watersheds of the Saint-Elias Mountain range (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Emilie; Baraer, Michel; Chesnokova, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Changes in the hydrological processes of alpine glacierized watersheds have been observed in most regions of the world; these have an important impact on water resources and can affect downstream ecosystems and populations. Subarctic catchments such as those found in southern Yukon (Canada) are particularly sensitive to climate related hydrological changes. To further understand the ongoing evolution of subarctic hydrological systems, we applied natural tracers based investigations in the Saint-Elias mountain range of the Yukon. The main goal was to identify water sources and their relative contributions to outflows in an alpine glacierized catchment. During the summer of 2015, we collected more than 100 water samples in two sub-watersheds of the glacier-fed Duke River watershed. Samples were analyzed for organic carbon, major ions and stable water isotopes (δ18O and δ2H). The resulting dataset was then processed using statistical methods and the hydrochemical basin characterization method (HBCM). Results show that on the sampling period, watershed outflows consisted mainly of glacier meltwater with a non-negligible contribution of other water sources such as icings and ice-cored moraines. In this study, supraglacial processes are shown playing a particularly important role in the watersheds' hydrology.

  3. Iceberg calving as a primary source of regional‐scale glacier‐generated seismicity in the St. Elias Mountains, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neel, Shad; Larsen, Christopher F.; Rupert, Natalia; Hansen, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Since the installation of the Alaska Regional Seismic Network in the 1970s, data analysts have noted nontectonic seismic events thought to be related to glacier dynamics. While loose associations with the glaciers of the St. Elias Mountains have been made, no detailed study of the source locations has been undertaken. We performed a two-step investigation surrounding these events, beginning with manual locations that guided an automated detection and event sifting routine. Results from the manual investigation highlight characteristics of the seismic waveforms including single-peaked (narrowband) spectra, emergent onsets, lack of distinct phase arrivals, and a predominant cluster of locations near the calving termini of several neighboring tidewater glaciers. Through these locations, comparison with previous work, analyses of waveform characteristics, frequency-magnitude statistics and temporal patterns in seismicity, we suggest calving as a source for the seismicity. Statistical properties and time series analysis of the event catalog suggest a scale-invariant process that has no single or simple forcing. These results support the idea that calving is often a response to short-lived or localized stress perturbations. Our results demonstrate the utility of passive seismic instrumentation to monitor relative changes in the rate and magnitude of iceberg calving at tidewater glaciers that may be volatile or susceptible to ensuing rapid retreat, especially when existing seismic infrastructure can be used.

  4. Tectonic Processes Along the Southeastern Margin of Alaska - The Neogene Sedimentary Record: Yakataga Formation, St. Elias Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witmer, J. W.; Ridgway, K. D.; Brennan, P. R.; Arnaud, E.; Pavlis, T.

    2008-12-01

    Neogene collision of the Yakutat microplate with the southern Alaskan continental margin is associated with extreme rates of exhumation and erosion of the St. Elias Mountains. The exhumation and the concurrent development of temperate glaciers are recorded in the ~5000 m of sedimentary strata of the Yakataga Formation. We present new data from measured stratigraphic sections that document along-strike and temporal changes within the Yakataga Formation along this collisional margin during Miocene to Pleistocene time. In the eastern part of our study area, the Yakataga Formation consists of lenticular sandstone and conglomerate facies associated with fan-delta depositional environments that are overlain by thick-bedded glaciomarine strata. These strata grade to finer-grained sandstone and convoluted mudstone typical of marine shelf environments in the central part of our study area. Along strike in the westernmost part of our study area the Yakataga Formation is interpreted to be laterally equivalent to Neogene strata of the Redwood Formation. These strata include thick-bedded, macrofossil-rich sandstone, well-rounded conglomerate, and thin-bedded mudstone facies that are characteristic of nearshore and shelf depositional environments. These sediments were likely sourced by fluvial systems along the continental margin that served as the backstop for Neogene collision. Preliminary compositional data also suggest that the Redwood Formation was derived from a different source than the Yakataga Formation. Along-strike changes in structural configuration of the Yakataga Formation are also observed. In the easternmost part of our study area adjacent to the Dangerous River zone (DRZ), a possible remnant strike-slip fault system, unconformities between the Yakataga Formation and underlying strata require erosion of 1000s of meters of missing Eocene-Miocene strata. We interpret this part of the mountain range to have undergone the greatest amount of Neogene exhumation. In the

  5. The St. Elias orogen as an early stage in the development of indentor corners: Initial results from the STEEP project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, T. L.; Bruhn, R. L.; Koons, P.; Berger, A.; Spotila, J.; Barker, A.; Chapman, J.; Doser, D.; Pavlis, G.

    2006-12-01

    The actively deforming St. Elias orogen of southern Alaska is developed at the transition between the Aleutian trench and the Queen Charlottes transform, and has produced a "one sided" indentor corner as the collided block has been carried obliquely into the subduction-transform transition. A distinctive feature generated within this evolving corner is a 90o bend in the suture at the western edge of the orogen that is associated with a refolding of earlier thin-skinned fold-thrust systems in the collided block. The refolding is recognizable in the area between the bent suture and a major glacial valley, the Bering Glacier, but is absent to the east. Bruhn et al. (2004, GSAB) used this observation to infer an active structure along the Bering Glacier, and speculated that the refolding may be active. New data collected as part of the St. Elias Erosion and tectonics Project (STEEP) provides support for this hypothesis from two observations: 1) clear evidence that many of the hundreds of surface ruptures in this region represent fault-scarps-- probably representing fold-related, bedding- plane slip during refolding; and 2) extremely young (locally <500Ka) U-Th-He apatite cooling ages just west of the Bering Glacier are consistent with the hypothesis of an active structure along the glacial valley. However, young cooling ages to the east of the Bering Glacier as well as geomorphology suggest that at least one of the fold-thrust belt structures is also active, indicating that the interplay of active faults is complex. Additional support for active deformation along the Bering Glacier comes from the spatial distribution of seismicity between the Bering Glacier and Bagley icefield and these observations should be further constrained as data are obtained from the new STEEP broadband seismic network in the area. Analog (sand) and numerical models suggest that this type of feature can originate as the indentor is driven into the corner through a variable vertical axis

  6. Next generation KATRIN high precision voltage divider for voltages up to 65kV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S.; Berendes, R.; Hochschulz, F.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Rosendahl, S.; Thümmler, T.; Schmidt, M.; Weinheimer, C.

    2013-10-01

    The KATRIN (KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino) experiment aims to determine the mass of the electron antineutrino with a sensitivity of 200 meV by precisely measuring the electron spectrum of the tritium beta decay. This will be done by the use of a retarding spectrometer of the MAC-E-Filter type. To achieve the desired sensitivity the stability of the retarding potential of -18.6 kV has to be monitored with a precision of 3 ppm over at least two months. Since this is not feasible with commercial devices, two ppm-class high voltage dividers were developed, following the concept of the standard divider for DC voltages of up to 100 kV of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). In order to reach such high accuracies different effects have to be considered. The two most important ones are the temperature dependence of resistance and leakage currents, caused by insulators or corona discharges. For the second divider improvements were made concerning the high-precision resistors and the thermal design of the divider. The improved resistors are the result of a cooperation with the manufacturer. The design improvements, the investigation and the selection of the resistors, the built-in ripple probe and the calibrations at PTB will be reported here. The latter demonstrated a stability of about 0.1 ppm/month over a period of two years.

  7. Glacial climate driven sedimentation overwhelms tectonics in the battle for control of margin architecture: Southeast Alaska, St. Elias Orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, S. P.; Jaeger, J. M.; Willems, B.; Powell, R. D.; Lowe, L. A.

    2006-12-01

    The interplay of tectonic and climatic processes is fundamental to the development of mountain belts and the ensuing patterns of deformation and erosion. Of equal significance is the interaction of tectonic and climatic processes in the development of orogenic sedimentary basins, or in the case of a coastal mountain belt, in the growth of a continental margin. The Chugach-St. Elias Orogeny, which is driven by the collision of the Yakutat microplate with North America in southeast Alaska, has generated the highest coastal relief in the world. The combined forces of tectonic uplift and glacial erosion have resulted in the accumulation of over 5 km of sediment to form the continental shelf and the creation of the Surveyor Fan that is over 2 km thick proximally. High-resolution GI-gun seismic data allow for detailed examination of the margin architecture off the Bering Glacier within the leading edge of the Yakutat block. The deformation and growth of the margin appears to have first undergone a tectonically dominated phase followed more recently by a glacially dominated phase. During the tectonically dominated period a broad anticline-syncline system helped create accommodation space and the margin both shallowed and widened to its current 50 km width. Based on ties with industry well cuttings, the dominance switched sometime between 0.75 and 1.25 Ma to being completely controlled by glacial advance-retreat patterns. The mappable glacial sequences are undeformed by the underlying anticlines and display several notable features: 1) erosional bases that can often be mapped across the entire shelf, terminating at the shelf edge, 2) little evidence for terminal or retreat moraines on the shelf suggesting very rapid and single phase retreat of the glacier, 3) incomplete glacial sequences due to erosion by later advances, and 4) minimal creation of accommodation space. We investigate the cause of the switch to glacial dominance, the mechanisms and causes of the potentially

  8. Linkages of Erosion, Tectonics, and Climate in a Glacial Setting: Lessons Learned in Alaska's St. Elias Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spotila, J. A.; Berger, A. L.

    2009-12-01

    A microplate collision in the southern Alaskan syntaxis provides useful analogies and lessons for the erosive-tectonic coupling that occur at Earth’s other great orogens. The St. Elias orogen is a relatively small collision produced by impingement of the Yakutat terrane in the transform-subduction crook of the northernmost Pacific-North America plate boundary. Due to convergence rates comparable to those in the Himalaya and a severe maritime glacial climate, deformation and rock uplift in this orogen rival Earth’s most extreme tectonic environments. Ongoing multidisciplinary investigations have documented several key phenomena that are relevant to orogenic processes worldwide. Previously obtained bedrock thermochronometry has revealed that glaciers exert an important control on tectonic crustal efflux. Long-term denudation is focused where mean Quaternary glacial ELA intersects the windward flank of the orogen. Quaternary enhancement of glaciation also appears to have dramatically accelerated denudation and forced a reorganization of orogenic wedge architecture. These results imply that glaciers are more significant to orogenic belts than implied by the topographic “buzz saw” hypothesis, in that they actually dictate long-term patterns of strain and mass transfer at the orogen-scale. New data refine the spatial and temporal patterns of exhumation in the orogen and enable more robust assessment of flux steady-state, or how exhumation has kept pace with tectonic crustal influx. Results suggest that, despite the presence of such an efficient erosive system, a component of tectonic influx is likely accommodated by subduction or lateral advection via intraplate transform faults. We suggest that a continuous dextral fault connects the mapped Totschunda-Denali and Fairweather faults, enabling a significant component of plate convergence to bypass the orogen. Finally, the refined pattern of exhumation sheds light onto the possible existence of tectonic

  9. Hydrologic conditions and hazards in the Kennicott River basin, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park Preserve, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rickman, R.L.; Rosenkrans, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    McCarthy, Alaska, is on the Kennicott River, about 1 mile from the terminus of Kennicott Glacier in the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. Most visitors to McCarthy and the park cross the West Fork Kennicott River using a hand-pulled tram and cross the East Fork Kennicott River on a temporary footbridge. Outburst floods from glacier-dammed lakes result in channel erosion, aggradation, and migration of the Kennicott River, which disrupt transportation links, destroy property, and threaten life. Hidden Creek Lake, the largest of six glacier-dammed lakes in the Kennicott River Basin, has annual outbursts that cause the largest floods on the Kennicott River. Outbursts from Hidden Creek Lake occur from early fall to mid-summer, and lake levels at the onset of the outbursts have declined between 1909 and 1995. Criteria for impending outbursts for Hidden Creek Lake include lake stage near or above 3,000 to 3,020 feet, stationary or declining lake stage, evidence of recent calving of large ice blocks from the ice margin, slush ice and small icebergs stranded on the lakeshore, and fresh fractures in the ice-margin region. The lower Kennicott Glacier has thinned and retreated since about 1860. The East and West Fork Kennicott River channels migrated in response to changes in the lower Kennicott Glacier. The largest channel changes occur during outburst floods from Hidden Creek Lake, whereas channel changes from the other glacier-dammed lake outbursts are small. Each year, the West Fork Kennicott River conveys a larger percentage of the Kennicott Glacier drainage than it did the previous year. Outburst floods on the Kennicott River cause the river stage to rise over a period of several hours. Smaller spike peaks have a very rapid stage rise. Potential flood magnitude was estimated by combining known maximum discharges from Hidden Creek Lake and Lake Erie outburst floods with a theoretical large regional flood. Flood hazard areas at the transportation corridor were

  10. Extreme mass flux from the glaciated, collisional St. Elias Orogen: Preliminary results from IODP Expedition 341 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, S. P.; Jaeger, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 341 drilled a cross-margin transect to investigate the linkages between global climate change, modification of the dynamics of surficial processes, and subsequent tectonic responses. The Gulf of Alaska (GoA) borders the St. Elias orogen, the highest coastal mountain range on Earth. Exp. 341 drilled five sites within a regional seismic reflection grid that spans from the distal Surveyor Fan to the continental shelf. More than 3000 m of high-quality core coupled with seismic reflection profiles collected with nested vertical resolution allows us to address the major objectives of drilling in the GoA. These objectives were to: 1) document the tectonic response of an active orogenic system to late Miocene to recent climate change; 2) establish the timing of advance/retreat phases of the northern Cordilleran ice sheet to test its relation to dynamics of other global ice sheets; 3) implement an expanded source-to-sink study of the interactions between glacial, tectonic, and oceanographic processes responsible for creation of one of the thickest Neogene high-latitude continental margin sequences; 4) understand the dynamics of productivity, nutrients, freshwater input to the ocean, and ocean circulation in the northeast Pacific and their role in the global carbon cycle, and 5) document the spatial and temporal behavior of the geomagnetic field at extremely high temporal resolution in an under-sampled region of the globe. The Exp. 341 cross-margin transect discovered transitions in sediment accumulation rates from >100 m/Ma at the distal site to > 1000 m/Ma in the proximal fan, slope and on the continental shelf that provide a telescoping view of strata formation from the Miocene to the Holocene. Complete recovery and development of spliced sedimentary records of the Pleistocene through Holocene were achieved at the distal, proximal, and slope Sites U1417, U1418, and U1419, respectively, because of exceptional piston core

  11. Status of the KATRIN Experiment and Prospects to Search for keV-mass Sterile Neutrinos in Tritium β-decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Susanne

    In this contribution the current status and future perspectives of the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) Experiment are presented. The prime goal of this single β-decay experiment is to probe the absolute neutrino mass scale with a sensitivity of 200 meV (90% CL). We discuss first results of the recent main spectrometer commissioning measurements, successfully verifying the spectrometer's basic vacuum, transmission and background properties. We also discuss the prospects of making use of the KATRIN tritium source, to search for sterile neutrinos in the multi-keV mass range constituting a classical candidate for Warm Dark Matter. Due to the very high source luminosity, a statistical sensitivity down to active-sterile mixing angles of sin2θ < 1 . 10-7 (90% CL) could be reached.

  12. Status of the KATRIN experiment and prospects to search for keV-mass sterile neutrinos in tritium β-decay

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mertens, Susanne

    2015-03-24

    In this contribution the current status and future perspectives of the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) Experiment are presented. The prime goal of this single β-decay experiment is to probe the absolute neutrino mass scale with a sensitivity of 200 meV (90% CL). We discuss first results of the recent main spectrometer commissioning measurements, successfully verifying the spectrometer’s basic vacuum, transmission and background properties. We also discuss the prospects of making use of the KATRIN tritium source, to search for sterile neutrinos in the multi-keV mass range constituting a classical candidate for Warm Dark Matter. Due to the very high sourcemore » luminosity, a statistical sensitivity down to active-sterile mixing angles of sin² θ < 1 · 10⁻⁷ (90% CL) could be reached.« less

  13. Status of the KATRIN experiment and prospects to search for keV-mass sterile neutrinos in tritium β-decay

    SciTech Connect

    Mertens, Susanne

    2015-03-24

    In this contribution the current status and future perspectives of the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) Experiment are presented. The prime goal of this single β-decay experiment is to probe the absolute neutrino mass scale with a sensitivity of 200 meV (90% CL). We discuss first results of the recent main spectrometer commissioning measurements, successfully verifying the spectrometer’s basic vacuum, transmission and background properties. We also discuss the prospects of making use of the KATRIN tritium source, to search for sterile neutrinos in the multi-keV mass range constituting a classical candidate for Warm Dark Matter. Due to the very high source luminosity, a statistical sensitivity down to active-sterile mixing angles of sin² θ < 1 · 10⁻⁷ (90% CL) could be reached.

  14. An online FT-ICR Penning-trap mass spectrometer for the DPS2-F section of the KATRIN experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, M.; Ascher, P.; Cakirli, R. B.; Golzke, H.; Rodríguez, D.; Stahl, S.; Ubieto-Díaz, M.; Blaum, K.

    2014-09-01

    Two Fourier-transform ion-cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) Penning-trap mass spectrometers will be installed in the pumping section of the KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment. This experiment aims at determining the electron anti-neutrino mass m(νebar) with a sensitivity of 0.2 eV (90% C.L.) by high-resolution tritium β-spectroscopy. The tritium source creates various types of ions, which have to be reduced in order to reach the required low background level. The purpose of the FT-ICR mass spectrometers is the identification of the ion flux components as well as their abundance. Furthermore, the pumping efficiency of the differential pumping section DPS2-F can be determined since these Penning traps will be installed one at the entrance and one at the exit. In this paper the operation of the FT-ICR system is described. Experimental results are presented concerning the cryogenic broad-band amplifier system for the FT-ICR detection as well as the characterisation of the mass spectrometer with respect to, e.g., noise density and detection limit.

  15. High-resolution Near-surface Permafrost Modeling for the 21st Century, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, S. K.; Marchenko, S. S.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Swanson, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    Permafrost within most part of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve (WRST) is discontinuous and warm i.e. within a few degrees of thawing. It is the physical foundation on which the ecosystems in the park rest. Thawing of permafrost alters this foundation, and can alter ecosystems and landscapes. Nonetheless, the data on permafrost condition and extent within WRST is limited. The current and future permafrost distribution and thickness of active layer can be modeled, given sufficient data about ground properties, vegetation, topography, and climate. We used GIPL 1.0 (Spatially Distributed Model of Permafrost Dynamics in Alaska) model; and downscaled climate forcing from 5 Global Circulation Models (GCM) that work best for Alaska and high-resolution soil landscape and ecotype maps from National Park Service (NPS) as model inputs to develop high-resolution permafrost maps for the recent past (2001-10) and the future decades (2050s and 2090s). The soil landscape and ecotype maps were derived from Landsat TM scenes (Jorgenson et al. 2008). The modeling effort resulted in recent and future permafrost maps of WRST at a spatial resolution of 28.5 m, the best resolution permafrost maps available for any part of Alaska. The model mapped 80% of WRST as underlain by near-surface permafrost during the decade of 2001-10 (Fig. 1) and predicted 50% decrease in the near-surface permafrost extent by 2050s owing to a 2 °C increase in the mean decadal air temperature and slightly higher precipitation. According to the 5 GCM projections, the decadal air temperature will increase by another 2 °C between 2050s and 2090s which will likely cause further increase in the ground temperature and decrease in the permafrost extent. The model predicts a meager 15% of WRST would still remain underlain by near-surface permafrost toward the end of the 21st century. Comparison of the modeled permafrost distribution with in situ observation of permafrost presence/absence at 430 sites

  16. Water quality of the Chokosna, Gilahina, Lakina Rivers, and Long Lake watershed along McCarthy Road, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Alaska, 2007–08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brabets, Timothy P.; Ourso, Robert T.; Miller, Matthew P.; Brasher, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The Chokosna, Gilahina, and Lakina River basins, and the Long Lake watershed are located along McCarthy Road in Wrangell–St. Elias National Park and Preserve. The rivers and lake support a large run of sockeye (red) salmon that is important to the commercial and recreational fisheries in the larger Copper River. To gain a better understanding of the water quality conditions of these watersheds, these basins were studied as part of a cooperative study with the National Park Service during the open water periods in 2007 and 2008. Water type of the rivers and Long Lake is calcium bicarbonate with the exception of that in the Chokosna River, which is calcium bicarbonate sulfate water. Alkalinity concentrations ranged from 63 to 222 milligrams per liter, indicating a high buffering capacity in these waters. Analyses of streambed sediments indicated that concentrations of the trace elements arsenic, chromium, and nickel exceed levels that might be toxic to fish and other aquatic organisms. However, these concentrations reflect local geology rather than anthropogenic sources in this nearly pristine area. Benthic macroinvertebrate qualitative multi-habitat and richest targeted habitat samples collected from six stream sites along McCarthy Road indicated a total of 125 taxa. Insects made up the largest percentage of macroinvertebrates, totaling 83 percent of the families found. Dipterans (flies and midges) accounted for 43 percent of all macroinvertebrates found. Analysis of the macroinvertebrate data by non-metric multidimensional scaling indicated differences between (1) sites at Long Lake and other stream sites along McCarthy Road, likely due to different basin characteristics, (2) the 2007 and 2008 data, probably from the higher rainfall in 2008, and (3) macroinvertebrate data collected in south-central Alaska, which represents a different climate zone. The richness, abundance, and community composition of periphytic algae taxa was variable between sampling sites

  17. Partial melting of amphibolite to trondhjemite at Nunatak Fiord, St. Elias Mountains, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, F.; McLellan, E.L.; Plafker, G.

    1985-01-01

    At Nunatak Fiord, 55km NE of Yakutat, Alaska, a uniform layer of Cretaceous basalt ca. 3km thick was metamorphosed ca. 67 million years ago to amphibolite and locally partially melted to pegmatitic trondhjemite. Segregations of plagioclase-quartz+/-biotite rock, leucosomes in amphibolite matrix, range from stringers 5-10mm thick to blunt pods as thick as 6m. They tend to be parallel to foliation of the amphibolite, but crosscutting is common. The assemblage aluminous hornblende-plagioclase-epidote-sphene-quartz gave a hydrous melt that crystallized to plagioclase-quartz+/-biotite pegmatitic trondhjemite. 5-10% of the rock melted. Eu at 2x chondrites is positively anomalous. REE partitioning in melt/residum was controlled largely by hornblende and sphene. Though the mineralogical variability precludes quantitative modeling, partial melting of garnet-free amphibolite to heavy-REE-depleted trondhjemitic melt is a viable process.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Polarimetric measures of selected variable stars (Elias+, 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, N. M. Ii; Koch, R. H.; Pfeiffer, R. J.

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize and interpret unpublished optical polarimetry for numerous program stars that were observed over the past decades at the Flower and Cook Observatory (FCO), University of Pennsylvania. We also make the individual calibrated measures available for long-term comparisons with new data. We employ three techniques to search for intrinsic variability within each dataset. First, when the observations for a given star and filter are numerous enough and when a period has been determined previously via photometry or spectroscopy, the polarimetric measures are plotted versus phase. If a statistically significant pattern appears, we attribute it to intrinsic variability. Second, we compare means of the FCO data to means from other workers. If they are statistically different, we conclude that the object exhibits long-term intrinsic variability. Third, we calculate the standard deviation for each program star and filter and compare it to the standard deviation estimated from comparable polarimetric standards. If the standard deviation of the program star is at least three times the value estimated from the polarimetric standards, the former is considered intrinsically variable. All of these statements are strengthened when variability appears in multiple filters. (3 data files).

  19. 78 FR 50106 - Aniakchak National Monument Subsistence Resource Commission and the Wrangell-St. Elias National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ..., contact Designated Federal Official Diane Chung, Superintendent, at (907) 246-3305; Mary McBurney at (907... applying for Aniakchak National Monument SRC membership, contact the Superintendent at P.O. Box 7, King Salmon, AK 99613, or visit the park Web site at: http://www.nps.gov.ania/contacts.htm ....

  20. Hydrologic and mass-movement hazards near McCarthy Wrangell-St Elias National Park and Preserve, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, S.H.; Glass, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    At the confluence of McCarthy Creek and the Kennicott River, about 1 mile from the terminus of Kennicott Glacier, Alaska, McCarthy Creek and Kennicott River basins are prone to several natural hazards including floods; formation and failure of natural dams; stream erosion and sediment deposi- tion; snow avalanches; aufeis; and the mass wasting of rock, soil, and debris. Low-lying areas along the Kennicott River flood annually, commonly during late July or early August, as a result of outbursts from glacier-dammed lakes, but these floods can occur during any month of the year. Flood plains along McCarthy Creek and its tributaries are frequently flooded and prone to rapid erosion and deposition during intense rainfall and periods of rapid snow- melt. Sediments from continual mass wasting accumu- late in stream channels and are mobilized during floods. Several lateral erosion, scour, and deposition resulting from floods in September 1980 and August 1985 destroyed bridges and several historic structures at McCarthy were jeopardized by the rapidly eroding northern streambank of McCarthy Creek. Flood discharges were determined indirectly using the slope-area method at two high-gradient reaches on the Kennicott River, four on McCarthy Creek, and one on Nikolai Creek. During the flood of September 13, 1980, peak discharge for McCarthy Creek at McCarthy was 4,500 cubic feet per second.

  1. Subglacial drainage characterization on a small surge type alpine glacier on the St. Elias range, Yukon Territory, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rada, C.; Schoof, C.

    2014-12-01

    Subglacial drainage is known to play an important role in glacier dynamics trough its influence on basal sliding. However, drainage is also the most poorly understood dynamic process due to the difficulties of observing, identifying and modeling the physics involved. In an effort to improve understanding of subglacial hydrological processes, we have monitored a small, approximately 100 m thick surge-type alpine glacier for seven years. 225 boreholes, positioned to capture the spatial structure of the drainage system over a 0.4 km² study area in its upper ablation area, were instrumented with permanent pressure transducers, in addition to a permanent GPS array and weather station installed on the glacier. Our principal results are i) Each year the drainage system experiences a relatively brief (1-2 month) period of activity driven by diurnal surface melt, with a spring event and a spatial reorganization of the drainage system. ii) The evolution of the drainage system can lead to very narrow main drainage axes, poorly connected laterally but traceable over long downslope distances (>500 m) with very little attenuation of the pressure signal, indicating that leakage into englacial or subglacial storage is relatively small. In at least one instance, a borehole have reached directly a channel with highly turbulent water flow. iii) Our data also indicates the occurrence of distributed drainage over extended spatial regions, co-existing in close spatial proximity with channelized areas showing little evidence of hydraulic connection between them. v) Crevasses appear to have a significant influence on the pattern of drainage. vi) While most neighboring boreholes exhibit uncorrelated winter water pressures, there is strong evidence for winter-time drainage activity in the form of pressure oscillations along main drainage axes. vii) There is strong evidence for interannual variability in the distributed versus channelized character of drainage, with drainage axes shifting in space. Some of these results are consistent with established ideas about drainage physics, while others suggest refinements to existing understanding . We discuss how our results fit into current efforts to model subglacial drainage and alterations to drainage model physics that are suggested by our observations.

  2. Predicting Mothers' Reports of Children's Mental Health Three Years after Hurricane Katrin.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Sarah R; Godoy, Leandra; Rhodes, Jean E; Carter, Alice S

    2013-01-01

    This study explored pathways through which hurricane-related stressors affected the psychological functioning of elementary school aged children who survived Hurricane Katrina. Participants included 184 mothers from the New Orleans area who completed assessments one year pre-disaster (Time 1), and one and three years post-disaster (Time 2 and Time 3, respectively). Mothers rated their children's behavior problems at Time 3 only (n = 251 children; 53.0% male; Mean age: 10.19 years, SD = 1.68 years). A path analytic model indicated that hurricane-related stressors were associated with increased maternal psychological distress and school mobility in the first post-disaster year, which were associated with higher child internalizing and externalizing symptoms three years post-disaster. Mediation analysis indicated that hurricane-related stressors were associated with child symptoms indirectly, through their impact on maternal psychological distress. Findings underscore the importance of interventions that boost maternal and child mental health and support children through post-disaster school transitions. PMID:23471125

  3. Plate Margin Deformation and Active Tectonics Along the Northern Edge of the Yakutat Terrane in the Saint Elias Orogen, Alaska and Yukon, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhn, Ronald L.; Sauber, Jeanne; Cotton, Michele M.; Pavlis, Terry L.; Burgess, Evan; Ruppert, Natalia; Forster, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    The northwest directed motion of the Pacific plate is accompanied by migration and collision of the Yakutat terrane into the cusp of southern Alaska. The nature and magnitude of accretion and translation on upper crustal faults and folds is poorly constrained, however, due to pervasive glaciation. In this study we used high-resolution topography, geodetic imaging, seismic, and geologic data to advance understanding of the transition from strike-slip motion on the Fairweather fault to plate margin deformation on the Bagley fault, which cuts through the upper plate of the collisional suture above the subduction megathrust. The Fairweather fault terminates by oblique-extensional splay faulting within a structural syntaxis, allowing rapid tectonic upwelling of rocks driven by thrust faulting and crustal contraction. Plate motion is partly transferred from the Fairweather to the Bagley fault, which extends 125 km farther west as a dextral shear zone that is partly reactivated by reverse faulting. The Bagley fault dips steeply through the upper plate to intersect the subduction megathrust at depth, forming a narrow fault-bounded crustal sliver in the obliquely convergent plate margin. Since . 20 Ma the Bagley fault has accommodated more than 50 km of dextral shearing and several kilometers of reverse motion along its southern flank during terrane accretion. The fault is considered capable of generating earthquakes because it is linked to faults that generated large historic earthquakes, suitably oriented for reactivation in the contemporary stress field, and locally marked by seismicity. The fault may generate earthquakes of Mw <= 7.5.

  4. 75 FR 48721 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement on Nabesna Off-Road Vehicle Management Plan, Wrangell-St...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... requested from Meg Jensen, Superintendent, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, P.O. Box 439...-delivered to Meg Jensen, Superintendent, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, P.O. Box 439,...

  5. 76 FR 52690 - Final Environmental Impact Statement on Nabesna Off-Road Vehicle Management Plan, Wrangell-St...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ..., Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... (FEIS) on Off-Road Vehicle Management in the Nabesna District of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and... from Bruce Rogers, Project Manager, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, PO Box 439,...

  6. Validation of 3D Code KATRIN For Fast Neutron Fluence Calculation of VVER-1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel by Ex-Vessel Measurements and Surveillance Specimens Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhalandinov, A.; Tsofin, V.; Kochkin, V.; Panferov, P.; Timofeev, A.; Reshetnikov, A.; Makhotin, D.; Erak, D.; Voloschenko, A.

    2016-02-01

    Usually the synthesis of two-dimensional and one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculations is used to evaluate neutron fluence on VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) for prognosis of radiation embrittlement. But there are some cases when this approach is not applicable. For example the latest projects of VVER-1000 have upgraded surveillance program. Containers with surveillance specimens are located on the inner surface of RPV with fast neutron flux maximum. Therefore, the synthesis approach is not suitable enough for calculation of local disturbance of neutron field in RPV inner surface behind the surveillance specimens because of their complicated and heterogeneous structure. In some cases the VVER-1000 core loading consists of fuel assemblies with different fuel height and the applicability of synthesis approach is also ambiguous for these fuel cycles. Also, the synthesis approach is not enough correct for the neutron fluence estimation at the RPV area above core top. Because of these reasons only the 3D neutron transport codes seem to be satisfactory for calculation of neutron fluence on the VVER-1000 RPV. The direct 3D calculations are also recommended by modern regulations.

  7. "I Couldn't Wait for the Day": Young Workers' Reflections on Education during the Transition to Work in the 1960s. CLMS Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, John; O'Connor, Henrietta

    Researchers analyzed 500 never-before-analyzed interviews from a study conducted by Norbert Elias and other researchers at University of Leicester in 1962, which was one of the first studies of the transition from school to work. The Elias study explored how young people in England experienced work and adjusted their lives to the work role. All of…

  8. Detector-related backgrounds in the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leber, Michelle; Katrin Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment, or KATRIN, is a next generation tritium beta decay experiment to directly measure neutrino mass with an expected sensitivity of 0.2 eV [KATRIN Design Report 2004 see http://www-ik.fzk.de/~katrin/]. Neutrino mass does not fit into the Standard Model, and determining this mass may set the scale of new physics. To achieve this level of sensitivity, backgrounds in the experiment must be minimized. A complete Geant4 [Agostinelli S et al. 2003 Nuclear Instr. Methods A 506 250-303 Allison J et al. 2006 IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science53 No. 1 270-8] simulation of KATRIN's focal plane detector and surrounding region is being developed. These simulations will help guide the design and selection of shielding and detector construction materials to reduce backgrounds from cosmic rays and natural radioactivity.

  9. 36 CFR 13.150 - Use for authorized commercial fishing activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Krusenstern National Monument, the Malaspina Glacier Forelands area of Wrangell-Saint Elias National Preserve, and the Dry Bay area of Glacier Bay National Preserve is authorized pursuant to the provisions of §...

  10. 36 CFR 13.150 - Use for authorized commercial fishing activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Krusenstern National Monument, the Malaspina Glacier Forelands area of Wrangell-Saint Elias National Preserve, and the Dry Bay area of Glacier Bay National Preserve is authorized pursuant to the provisions of §...

  11. 36 CFR 13.150 - Use for authorized commercial fishing activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Krusenstern National Monument, the Malaspina Glacier Forelands area of Wrangell-Saint Elias National Preserve, and the Dry Bay area of Glacier Bay National Preserve is authorized pursuant to the provisions of §...

  12. 36 CFR 13.150 - Use for authorized commercial fishing activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Krusenstern National Monument, the Malaspina Glacier Forelands area of Wrangell-Saint Elias National Preserve, and the Dry Bay area of Glacier Bay National Preserve is authorized pursuant to the provisions of §...

  13. 36 CFR 13.150 - Use for authorized commercial fishing activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Krusenstern National Monument, the Malaspina Glacier Forelands area of Wrangell-Saint Elias National Preserve, and the Dry Bay area of Glacier Bay National Preserve is authorized pursuant to the provisions of §...

  14. 75 FR 60459 - Sunshine Act Notices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ...: EmblemHealth Services Company LLC and Health Insurance Plan of Greater New York by its counsel, Jerry H...: Google by its counsel, Marc E. Elias, Esq. and Jonathan S. Berkon, Esq. of Perkins Coie, LLP....

  15. Against the Odds Exhibition Opens

    MedlinePlus

    ... the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson NIH Director Dr. Elias ... addresses visitors to the opening of the exhibition. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson Brothers Niko and Theo ...

  16. Sulfur dioxide emission rates from Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, 2007–2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, T.; Sutton, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Kīlauea Volcano has one of the longest running volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rate databases on record. Sulfur dioxide emission rates from Kīlauea Volcano were first measured by Stoiber and Malone (1975) and have been measured on a regular basis since 1979 (Elias and Sutton, 2007, and references within). Compilations of SO2 emission-rate and wind-vector data from 1979 through 2006 are available on the USGS Web site (Elias and others, 1998; Elias and Sutton, 2002; Elias and Sutton, 2007). This report updates the database, documents the changes in data collection and processing methods, and highlights how SO2 emissions have varied with eruptive activity at Kīlauea Volcano for the interval 2007–2010.

  17. Sulfur Dioxide Emission Rates from Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, an Update: 2002-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates from Kilauea Volcano were first measured by Stoiber and Malone (1975) and have been measured on a regular basis since 1979 (Greenland and others, 1985; Casadevall and others, 1987; Elias and others, 1998; Sutton and others, 2001, Elias and Sutton, 2002, Sutton and others, 2003). Compilations of SO2 emission-rate and wind-vector data from 1979 through 2001 are available on the web. (Elias and others, 1998 and 2002). This report updates the database through 2006, and documents the changes in data collection and processing that have occurred during the interval 2002-2006. During the period covered by this report, Kilauea continued to release SO2 gas predominantly from its summit caldera and east rift zone (ERZ) (Elias and others, 1998; Sutton and others, 2001, Elias and others, 2002, Sutton and others, 2003). These two distinct sources are always measured independently (fig.1). Sulphur Banks is a minor source of SO2 and does not contribute significantly to the total emissions for Kilauea (Stoiber and Malone, 1975). From 1979 until 2003, summit and east rift zone emission rates were derived using vehicle- and tripod- based Correlation Spectrometry (COSPEC) measurements. In late 2003, we began to augment traditional COSPEC measurements with data from one of the new generation of miniature spectrometer systems, the FLYSPEC (Horton and others, 2006; Elias and others, 2006, Williams-Jones and others, 2006).

  18. 76 FR 72713 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-25

    ...). Inventors: Katrin D. Mayer, Bruno Bezerril D. Andrade, F. Alan Sher, and Daniel L. Barber (NIAID... inventions listed below are owned by an agency of the U.S. Government and are available for licensing in the U.S. in accordance with 35 U.S.C. 207 to achieve expeditious commercialization of results...

  19. A GLIMPSE INTO THE EYE OF THE EMERGENCY RESPONSE AT EPA KATRINA AND RITA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation was given at the Texas Environmental Health Association Annual Meeting in Round Rock, TX on October 12, 2005. The keynote address was focused on the conditions after Katrins, organizing response, field response, EPA's role in emergency response, what is EPA doi...

  20. 76 FR 79212 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Information Collection for Community Harvest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... subsistence activities. A survey will be used to estimate subsistence harvests and to describe community subsistence economies. This project will survey residents of several communities in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve and Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve on these topics. The...

  1. Questioning the Homogenization of Irregular Migrants in Educational Policy: From (Il)Legal Residence to Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemelsoet, Elias

    2011-01-01

    In this article Elias Hemelsoet questions the way irregular migrants are approached in educational policymaking. In most cases, estimations of the number of irregular migrants serve--despite large methodological problems--as a starting point for policymaking. Given the very diverse composition of this group of people, the question is whether…

  2. A New Source of Research Money

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Daniel S.

    2007-01-01

    These are especially difficult times for researchers who depend on government money. Their "anxiety is palpable," Elias A. Zerhouni, director of the National Institutes of Health, wrote last 2006. Moreover, Leo Furcht, president of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, warned Congress that "we are, quite simply, losing our…

  3. Mary Tyler Moore Helps Launch NIH MedlinePlus Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. Among those attending the NIH MedlinePlus magazine launch on Capitol Hill were (l-r) NIH Director Dr. Elias Zerhouni, Rep. Ralph Regula (R-OH), Mary Tyler Moore, former Rep. Paul Rogers, and NLM ... issue of NIH MedlinePlus magazine. In September, the FNLM was fortunate to have ...

  4. The Film. The Bobbs-Merrill Series in Composition and Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarris, Andrew, Ed.

    Prefaced by a brief discussion of early films and film criticism, 10 essays treat selected modern directors and their works. Essays on Stanley Kubrick's "Lolita," the early works of Elia Kazan, and the response of French critics to Jerry Lewis explore the American scene, while Francois Truffaut's "Jules and Jim," the early work of Robert Bressen,…

  5. 77 FR 58868 - Teleconference for the National Park Service Alaska Region's Subsistence Resource Commission Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... National Park Service Teleconference for the National Park Service Alaska Region's Subsistence Resource Commission Program AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of open public meetings. SUMMARY: The Lake Clark National Park Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC) and the Wrangell-St. Elias...

  6. Configurations of Activity: From the Coupling of Individual Actions to the Emergence of Collective Activity. A Study of Mathematics Teaching Situation in Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veyrunes, Philippe; Gal-Petitfaux, Nathalie; Durand, Marc

    2009-01-01

    This article presents and uses the notion of configuration of activity, which extends the Norbert Elias's original concept of social configuration based on the study and analysis of individual and collective activity. Although this concept embraces all types of social activities, in the present study the authors used it to describe and analyse…

  7. Commentary: Implementing Social-Emotional and Academic Innovations--Reflections, Reactions, and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Stephen N.; Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Roach, Andrew T.

    2003-01-01

    The article "Implementation, Sustainability, and Scaling Up of Social-Emotional and Academic Innovations in Public Schools" by Elias, Zins, Graczyk, and Weissberg (2003) is a thought-provoking contribution, and one that begs for more application. Some of the points the authors raise have been articulated in the school and clinical evidence-based…

  8. Delta Pi Epsilon National Research Conference Proceedings (Indianapolis, Indiana, November 14-16, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Robert B., Ed.

    The following are among the 34 papers included: "An Assessment of Support Staff Training in Public Two-Year Colleges" (Kuceyeski); "Attitude and Motivation of Vocational Student Teachers toward Teaching Commerce and Entrepreneurship" (Pihie, Elias); "Barriers Adult Office Education Students Encounter in Pursuit of Educational Goals" (Reusch);…

  9. 75 FR 62538 - Sunshine Act Notices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... Sunshine Act Notices AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. DATE AND TIME: Thursday, October 7, 2010, at 10 a... public. ITEMS TO BE DISCUSSED: Draft Advisory Opinion 2010-19: Google by its counsel, Marc E. Elias, Esq... accommodations, should contact Lisa Chapman, Recording Secretary, at (202) 694-1040, at least 72 hours prior...

  10. Training Needs in Gerontology. Hearings, Special Committee on Aging, United States Senate. Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Special Committee on Aging.

    At the second day of hearings on training needs in gerontology the witnesses were Stephen Kurzman accompanied by Arthur S. Flemming, John Lapp, Gerald D. LaVeck; George Maddox; Elias Cohen; Wilma Donahue; Brin Hawkins with Lettie Graves and Yolanda Owens; and John B. Martin. (MS)

  11. 75 FR 51103 - Notice of Public Meetings for the National Park Service (NPS) Alaska Region's Subsistence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ...The Lake Clark National Park SRC, Aniakchak National Monument SRC and Wrangell-St. Elias SRC plan to meet to develop and continue work on National Park Service (NPS) subsistence hunting program recommendations and other related subsistence management issues. The NPS SRC program is authorized under Title VIII, Section 808 of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, Public Law......

  12. 36 CFR 13.1912 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1912 Section 13.1912 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve § 13.1912 Solid waste disposal. (a) A...

  13. Sulfur Dioxide Emission Rates from Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, an Update: 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A. Jefferson

    2002-01-01

    Introduction Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates from Kilauea Volcano were first measured by Stoiber and Malone (1975) and have been measured on a regular basis since 1979 (Greenland and others, 1985; Casadevall and others, 1987; Elias and others, 1998; Sutton and others, 2001). A compilation of SO2 emission-rate and wind-vector data from 1979 through 1997 is available as Open-File Report 98-462 (Elias and others, 1998) and on the web at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/products/OF98462/. The purpose of this report is to update the existing database through 2001. Kilauea releases SO2 gas predominantly from its summit caldera and east rift zone (ERZ) (fig. 1), as described in previous reports (Elias and others, 1998; Sutton and others, 2001). These two distinct sources are quantified independently. The summit and east rift zone emission rates reported here were derived using vehicle-based Correlation Spectrometry (COSPEC) measurements as described in Elias and others (1998). In 1998 and 1999, these measurements were augmented with airborne and tripod-based surveys.

  14. Philosophies of Adult Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    This article offers a typology of philosophical traditions in environmental education for adults, based on five philosophical perspectives of adult education described by Elias and Merriam. These five traditions are liberal, progressive, behaviorist, humanist, and radical adult environmental education, respectively. A summary of each philosophy's…

  15. Identifying Configurations of Higher Education: Reflections on Concepts That Compare Complex Cultural Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alheit, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the idea of qualitative comparing in order to create a "heuristic concept" that will enable relational structures to be examined, drawing on the sociological tradition founded by Norbert Elias. Subsequently, an empirical research example -- the comparison of three "mentality spaces" in post-socialist…

  16. Preventing School Problems--Promoting School Success: Strategies and Programs That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minke, Kathleen M., Ed.; Bear, George C., Ed.

    This book discusses the prevention of problems and the promotion of success for school children today. Chapters include: (1) "Preventing Aggression and Violence" (George G. Bear, Carolyn Webster-Stratton, Michael J. Furlong, and Sabrina Rhee); (2) "Promoting Social and Emotional Competence in Children" (Joseph E. Zins, Maurice J. Elias, Mark T.…

  17. Issues in Education: Emotional Intelligences--A Missing Link in Educating Our Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Shirley W.; Wadlington, Elizabeth; Enloe, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate goal of education is to provide individuals with the emotional and academic skills necessary for academic and workplace success, as well as to develop informed and responsible community members (Elias, Arnold, & Hussey, 2003). Recent years have seen an explosion of deep interest, debate, and even controversy regarding concepts related…

  18. AMI 15 GHz detection of ASASSN-16fp (AT 2016coi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooley, K. P.; Fender, R. P.; Cantwell, T.; Titterington, D.; Carey, S.; Hickish, J.; Perrott, Y. C.; Razavi-Ghods, N.; Scott, P.; Grainge, K.; Scaife, A.

    2016-06-01

    We observed the type Ic supernova ASASSN-16fp in UGC 11868 (Holoien et al., ATel #9086; Elias-Rosa ATel #9090; d=10Mpc; discovery date 2016 May 27.55) with the AMI Large Array at 15 GHz between 28-31 May 2016.

  19. UC Berkeley's Undocumented Student Program: Holistic Strategies for Undocumented Student Equitable Success across Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Ruben Elias Canedo; So, Meng L.

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, Ruben Elias Canedo Sanchez and Meng L. So share the history and development of the Undocumented Student Program at the University of California, Berkeley. In describing the creation of the program, the authors offer reflections on the strategies employed to holistically support undocumented students' success on campus. By drawing on…

  20. The Provision of School Assemblies as a Primary Prevention Psycho-Educational Strategy, for Early Adolescents in Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsley-Scott, Janis

    2012-01-01

    School psychologists are becoming more and more involved in helping our youth to learn better coping strategies, decision making skills, and develop tolerance with others. According to Elias (2002), school psychologists are valuable resources for early adolescents to learn skills necessary to avoid high-risk behaviors, including alcohol and drug…

  1. 77 FR 9961 - Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... filed a proposed plan of operations to conduct mining operations on lands embracing Mineral Survey No. 923, patented mineral property within Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. Public... Office Box 439, Copper Center, Alaska 99573. National Park Service, Alaska Regional...

  2. What's Happening in July?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro, Leonor; And Others

    Designed as a teacher resource, the booklet provides brief information on eight July events: Independence Day; The Patron Saint Festivals and the Festival of Loiza, celebrated by Puerto Ricans; and the birthdays of P. T. Barnum, Elias Howe, John Quincy Adams, Luis Munoz Rivera, and Simon Bolivar. Information is provided on the Declaration of…

  3. Eventos de Julio (July Events).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pla, Myrna; Toro, Leonor

    Written in Spanish, this booklet contains brief information on 10 July events celebrated by Puerto Ricans: United States Declaration of Independence; the birthdays of P.T. Barnum, Elias Howe, John Quincy Adams, Luis Munoz Rivera, and Simon Bolivar; Marisol Malaret (first puerto Rican to be "Miss Universe"); Puerto Rican Constitution; Las Fiestas…

  4. New upper bounds on the rate of a code via the Delsarte-MacWilliams inequalities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R. J.; Rodemich, E. R.; Rumsey, H., Jr.; Welch, L. R.

    1977-01-01

    An upper bound on the rate of a binary code as a function of minimum code distance (using a Hamming code metric) is arrived at from Delsarte-MacWilliams inequalities. The upper bound so found is asymptotically less than Levenshtein's bound, and a fortiori less than Elias' bound. Appendices review properties of Krawtchouk polynomials and Q-polynomials utilized in the rigorous proofs.

  5. Sustaining Professional Learning Communities. The Soul of Educational Leadership Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankstein, Alan M., Ed.; Houston, Paul D., Ed.; Cole, Robert W., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    The third volume of "The Soul of Educational Leadership" series offers key concepts and strategies for sustaining the critically important work of professional learning communities. With contributions from Shirley Hord, Maurice Elias, Karen Seashore Louis, Andy Hargreaves, and other nationally known educators, this essential reading for all school…

  6. Education for Social Change: Highlander Education in the Appalachian Mountains and Study Circles in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    The article explores how education promotes social change. Using the philosophical foundations of adult education outlined by Elias and Merriam (2001, "Philosophical foundations of adult education" (3rd ed.), Krieger) as an analytical framework, the article compares the similarities and differences between popular education forms in two…

  7. 77 FR 4578 - Alaska Region's Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC) Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ... National Park Service Alaska Region's Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC) Program AGENCY: National Park... Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC) program. ] SUMMARY: The Wrangell-St. Elias National Park SRC will meet to develop and continue work on NPS subsistence program recommendations and other related...

  8. Using Social and Emotional Learning to Foster Academic Achievement in Secondary Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jennifer L.; Jones, Karrie A.; Vermette, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Teaching social-emotional skills to secondary students has been linked to higher student achievement, more positive student motivation and more socially acceptable classroom behaviors (Elias & Arnold, 2006; Weissburg et al., 2003; Kress et al., 2004). Much of the current literature on social-emotional learning (SEL) focuses on research. This piece…

  9. Biopower and the "Civilisation" of Children's Bodies in a Preschool Bathroom: An Australian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliff, Ken; Millei, Zsuzsa

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore a vital, if rarely focused upon, space in early childhood settings (0-5 years): the bathroom. In bathrooms, more or less fundamental biological, self-care, and "civilising" (Elias 1978) processes are performed by children, such as those related to personal hygiene, the management of bodily discharges, the…

  10. Children at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendelievich, Elias, Ed.

    The aim of this book is to examine the problem of child labor in various parts of the world: to make the phenomenon known, to analyze its causes, and to propose possible solutions. In Part I (by Elias Mendelievich), an introduction first outlines the problem. Chapter 2 examines pertinent international and national legislation and the International…

  11. A Correction for Recruitment Bias in Norms Derived from Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, J. Michael; Cottle, Cindy C.

    2011-01-01

    Normative comparisons are an integral component of neuropsychological test interpretation and provide the basis for an inference of abnormal function and impairment. In order to remedy a deficit of normative standards for a large number of neuropsychology tests, Mitrushina, Boone, Razani, and D'Elia (2005) used the meta-analysis of studies that…

  12. Role of the UV external radiation field on the presence of astrophysical ices in protostellars environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson Monteiro Rocha, Will; Pilling, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    The astrophysical ices survival is directly related with the temperature and ionizing radiation field in protostellars environments such as disks and envelopes. Computational models has shown that pure volatile molecules like CO and CH _{4} should survive only inside densest regions of molecular clouds or protoplanetary disks On the other hand, solid molecules such as H _{2}O and CH _{3}OH can be placed around 5 - 10 AU from the central protostar. Unlike of the previous models, we investigate the role of the UV external radiation field on the presence of ices in disks and envelopes. Once that a star-forming region is composed by the formation of many protostars, the external radiation field should be an important component to understand the real localization of the ices along the sight line. To address this topic it was employed the radiative transfer code RADMC-3D based on the Monte Carlo method. The code was used to model the spectrum and the near-infrared image of Elias 29. The initial parameters of the disk and envelope was taken from our previous paper (Rocha & Pilling (2015), ApJ 803:18). The opacities of the ices were calculated from the complex refractive index obtained at laboratory experiments perfomed at Grand Accélerateur National d'Íons Lourds (GANIL), by using the NKABS code from Rocha & Pilling (2014), SAA 123:436. The partial conclusions that we have obtained shows that pure CO volatile molecule cannot be placed at disk or envelope of Elias 29, unlike shown in our paper about Elias 29. Once it was observed in Elias 29 spectrum obtained with Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) between 2.5 - 190 μm, this molecule should be placed in foreground molecular clouds or trapped in the water ice matrix. The next calculations will be able to show where are placed the ices such as CH _{3}OH and CH _{3}CHO observed in Elias 29 spectrum.

  13. Monte Carlo calculations of the intrinsic detector backgrounds for the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leber, Michelle L.

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment (KATRIN) aims to measure the absolute neutrino mass, an open question in neutrino physics. KATRIN exploits the fact that the beta-decay spectral shape near the endpoint depends on the neutrino mass. Using a gaseous tritium source and a precise electrostatic spectrometer, KATRIN will measure the integral beta-decay spectrum in a silicon detector. KATRIN strives for a sensitivity of 0.2 eV (90% CL) to the neutrino mass, ten times better than the current limit. A measurement at this level of sensitivity has broad implications for cosmology and particle physics. To maximize sensitivity to the small beta-decay signal, the KATRIN silicon detector must have minimal intrinsic backgrounds. The background goal for the detector is less than 10-3 counts per second (1 mHz) in the region of interest near the 18.6 keV signal. In this dissertation, we present estimates of the detector background rate calculated with a custom Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation. The simulation includes a detailed description of the detector system and attributes of the intrinsic background sources, natural radioactivity and cosmic rays. We identified the largest background sources, optimized the detector region design to minimize the background rate, and performed measurements to confirm the simulation results. In particular, we have measured the radiation field from radioactivity in all objects in the detector laboratory using a germanium detector. The simulated germanium detector rate agrees within 5% of the measured rate. In addition, various calibration spectra measured with silicon and germanium detectors are within 7% of the simulated spectra. The results from our simulations indicate that we should observe a background of [2.54 +/- 0.11(stat.) +0.36-0.35 (sys.)]mHz at the nominal magnetic field of 3 T and zero post acceleration. The largest background sources are radiation from the laboratory environment and cosmic-ray photons. Utilizing 20 kV of

  14. Moving to atomic tritium for neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazkaz, Kareem; Project8 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    For direct measurements of the neutrino mass, the tritium-based experiments Mainz and Troitsk have provided the most sensitive measurements to date, with upper limits near 2200 meV. The KATRIN experiment, beginning its first science run in 2016, also uses tritium as its source and has an anticipated ultimate sensitivity of 200 meV. The largest single systematic effect limiting the mass sensitivity beyond KATRIN is the energy sharing between the emitted beta particle and the resulting T-3He molecule. It therefore behooves all future tritium-based experiments to use atomic, rather than molecular, tritium. In this presentation we will outline experimental considerations of atomic tritium: production, purification, inhibiting recombination, and cooling. We will discuss these considerations within the context of Project8, a tritium-based, cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy neutrino mass measurement with an ultimate target sensitivity of 50 meV. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Performance of a TiN-coated monolithic silicon pin-diode array under mechanical stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanDevender, B. A.; Bodine, L. I.; Myers, A. W.; Amsbaugh, J. F.; Howe, M. A.; Leber, M. L.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Tolich, K.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Wall, B. L.

    2012-05-01

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment (KATRIN) will detect tritium β-decay electrons that pass through its electromagnetic spectrometer with a highly segmented monolithic silicon pin-diode focal-plane detector (FPD). This pin-diode array will be on a single piece of 500-μm-thick silicon, with contact between titanium nitride (TiN)-coated detector pixels and front-end electronics made by spring-loaded pogo pins. The pogo pins will exert a total force of up to 50 N on the detector, deforming it and resulting in mechanical stress up to 50 MPa in the silicon bulk. We have evaluated a prototype pin-diode array with a pogo-pin connection scheme similar to the KATRIN FPD. We find that pogo pins make good electrical contact to TiN and observe no effects on detector resolution or reverse-bias leakage current which can be attributed to mechanical stress.

  16. Testing molecular effects for tritium-based neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parno, Diana; Bodine, Laura; Robertson, R. G. Hamish

    2015-10-01

    The upcoming KATRIN experiment will use the kinematics of tritium beta decay to probe the neutrino mass. The tritium source is molecular, however, and one of KATRIN's largest expected systematic uncertainties arises from the population of molecular final states following beta decay. To study this uncertainty, the Tritium Recoil-Ion Mass Spectrometer will measure the dissociation probability of the daughter molecule following beta decay, addressing a discrepancy between modern, high-precision theoretical calculations and two mass spectrometry measurements from the 1950s. We will describe the novel measurement technique and the commissioning of the experiment. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Award Number DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  17. Direct neutrino mass experiments and exotic charged current interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludl, Patrick Otto; Rodejohann, Werner

    2016-06-01

    We study the effect of exotic charged current interactions on the electron energy spectrum in tritium decay, focussing on the KATRIN experiment and a possible modified setup that has access to the full spectrum. Both sub-eV and keV neutrino masses are considered. We perform a fully relativistic calculation and take all possible new interactions into account, demonstrating the possible sizable distortions in the energy spectrum.

  18. Exact relativistic {beta} decay endpoint spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, S. S.; Nasri, S.; Schechter, J.; Tortola, M. A.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2007-10-15

    The exact relativistic form for the {beta} decay endpoint spectrum is derived and presented in a simple factorized form. We show that our exact formula can be well approximated to yield the endpoint form used in the fit method of the KATRIN Collaboration. We also discuss the three-neutrino case and how information from neutrino oscillation experiments may be useful in analyzing future {beta} decay endpoint experiments.

  19. Recent Observations and Structural Analysis of Surge-Type Glaciers in the Glacier Bay Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, H.; Herzfeld, U. C.

    2003-12-01

    The Chugach-St.-Elias Mountains in North America hold the largest non-polar connected glaciated area of the world. Most of its larger glaciers are surge-type glaciers. In the summer of 2003, we collected aerial photographic and GPS data over numerous glaciers in the eastern St. Elias Mountains, including the Glacier Bay area. Observed glaciers include Davidson, Casement, McBride, Riggs, Cushing, Carroll, Rendu, Tsirku, Grand Pacific, Melbern, Ferris, Margerie, Johns Hopkins, Lamplugh, Reid, Burroughs, Morse, Muir and Willard Glaciers, of which Carroll, Rendu, Ferris, Grand Pacific, Johns Hopkins and Margerie Glaciers are surge-type glaciers. Our approach utilizes a quantitative analysis of surface patterns, following the principles of structural geology for the analysis of brittle-deformation patterns (manifested in crevasses) and ductile deformation patterns (visible in folded moraines). First results will be presented.

  20. Analytical and Clinical Comparison of Two Fully Automated Immunoassay Systems for the Diagnosis of Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Gary L.; Santora, Debby; Fasano, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Here we compared analytical and clinical performance characteristics of two novel automated assay systems for the detection of celiac disease (CD) specific antibodies: QUANTA Flash (INOVA Diagnostics, Inc.) and EliA (Thermo Scientific). Methods. A total of 74 biopsy-proven CD patients (2 with IgA deficiency) and 138 controls were tested by both methods. Results. Sensitivities of QUANTA Flash assays ranged from 35.1% to 90.5% and specificities from 96.4% to 99.3%, while sensitivities for EliA assays ranged from 37.8% to 90.5% (equivocal considered positive) and specificities from 97.1% to 100.0%. Good qualitative agreement was found between all assays. Thirty-four (50.0%) of the 68 QUANTA Flash h-tTG IgA positive results were higher than 10 times the upper limit of normal (ULN). In contrast, only 22.8% of the EliA tTG IgA positive samples were >10x ULN. Seventy-three (98.6%) biopsy-proven CD patients were correctly identified with the QUANTA Flash h-tTG IgA+DGP IgG combination, while 64 (86.5%) and 72 (97.3%) (depending on equivocal range) were identified with the same combination of EliA assays. Conclusion. The QUANTA Flash CD assays have outstanding clinical performance. Of particular clinical significance, in light of proposals to decrease the absolute necessity of biopsy, was the demonstration that 50% of the QUANTA Flash h-tTG IgA results were >10x ULN. PMID:24741592

  1. Novel fiber lasers and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenteno, Luis A.; Walton, Donnell T.

    2003-07-01

    Glass fiber lasers were invented in the 60's by Elias Snitzer at Americal Optical, soon after the invention of the first solid-state glass laser. However, it was not until the 80's when these waveguide devices were deployed in industrial applications, driven largely by the technological success of the semiconductor laser diode, which provided practical and efficient pumps, and by the advent of low loss rare-earth-doped optical fiber.

  2. Mapping the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Annas, G.C.; Elias, S.

    1992-01-01

    This article is a review of the book Mapping the Human Genome: Using Law and Ethics as Guides, edited by George C. Annas and Sherman Elias. The book is a collection of essays on the subject of using ethics and laws as guides to justify human gene mapping. It addresses specific issues such problems related to eugenics, patents, insurance as well as broad issues such as the societal definitions of normality.

  3. SIRIUS FEL project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Michel; Moret-Bailly, Jacques

    1991-07-01

    This article presents a 6 MV electrostatic accelerator-driven free electron laser project, with a wavelength range of 80 to 1000 μm. The study of this facility, called SIRIUS (source intense de rayonnement infra-rouge pour utilisations scientifiques), is based on the facility realized by Elias at the University of California, Santa Barbara. We plan to improve some important technological features.

  4. Dichotomy Between the age of the Penultimate Glaciation for Different Source Areas of the Northern Cordilleran Ice Sheet, Yukon Territory, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, B. C.; Bond, J. D.; Gosse, J. C.

    2006-12-01

    Terrestrial in situ cosmogenic 10Be was measured to date large boulders that were exposed following deglaciation of the penultimate glaciation of the Cordilleran ice sheet (CIS) in western Yukon Territory, Canada. Ages of 54-51 ka indicate a Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 4 (early Wisconsinan) age for this glaciation, the first such confirmed evidence in the Canadian Cordillera. These results are in apparent contrast to the MIS 6 age of the penultimate Reid glaciation to the east in central Yukon, but are equivalent to exposure ages on penultimate drift in Alaska. Thus there is a dichotomy between MIS 4 and 6 glacial extents for at least two of the source areas for the northern portion of Cordilleran ice sheet, the St. Elias - Coast mountains lobes and the more easterly Selwyn Lobe, indicating different responses to climatic forcing during glaciations. The northern CIS was a precipitation-limited system and we propose variation in regional moisture, specifically how moisture penetrates the St. Elias and Coast mountains, as the possible cause of the dichotomy between glacial advances. Causes for regional variation in precipitation remain unclear but likely involve the style of precipitation delivery over the St. Elias Mountains as controlled by the extent of the Laurentide Ice Sheet and broad variations in position and intensity of the Aleutian Low. When the Aleutian Low is well developed and/or more easterly, meridional flow occurs. This results in strengthened moisture flux from the Pacific, and an increase in the size of the rain shadow. When the Aleutian Low is weaker and/or located further west, atmospheric flow is more zonal, with flow westward over the St. Elias/Coast mountains. There is a reduced moisture flux but the orographic affect is reduced as is the size and magnitude of the rain shadow. Zonal conditions were used to explain periods during the Holocene when O-isotopes indicated more effective precipitation in the present rain shadow area. A similar

  5. Unique forbidden beta decays and neutrino mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvornický, Rastislav; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-01

    The measurement of the electron energy spectrum in single β decays close to the endpoint provides a direct determination of the neutrino masses. The most sensitive experiments use β decays with low Q value, e.g. KATRIN (tritium) and MARE (rhenium). We present the theoretical spectral shape of electrons emitted in the first, second, and fourth unique forbidden β decays. Our findings show that the Kurie functions for these unique forbidden β transitions are linear in the limit of massless neutrinos like the Kurie function of the allowed β decay of tritium.

  6. Statistical criteria for search of heavy neutrino in tritium spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhov, Alexey; Tkachov, Fyodor

    2016-05-01

    The method of quasi-optimal weights is applied to constructing (quasi-)optimal criteria for search of heavy (4th generation) neutrino contribution in experimental β-decay spectra. Various approaches to searching for anomalous contributions in spectra are discussed. In particular the tritium β-decay spectrum (for instance, in Troitsk-v-mass, Mainz Neutrino Mass and KATRIN experiments) is analyzed using the derived special criteria. The power functions constructed for each criteria show the efficiency of the derived quasi-optimal criteria as statistical instruments for detecting the anomalous contributions in the spectra. The overall sensitivity of the criteria is estimated.

  7. Direct Neutrino Mass Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanDevender, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    Neutrino flavor oscillation experiments have demonstrated that the three Standard Model neutrino flavor eigenstates are mixed with three mass eigenstates whose mass eigenvalues are nondegenerate. The oscillation experiments measure the differences between the squares of the mass eigenvalues but tell us nothing about their absolute values. The unknown absolute neutrino mass scale has important implications in particle physics and cosmology. Beta decay endpoint measurements are presented as a model-independent method to measure the absolute neutrino mass. The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment (KATRIN) is explored in detail.

  8. Unique forbidden beta decays and neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornický, Rastislav; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-28

    The measurement of the electron energy spectrum in single β decays close to the endpoint provides a direct determination of the neutrino masses. The most sensitive experiments use β decays with low Q value, e.g. KATRIN (tritium) and MARE (rhenium). We present the theoretical spectral shape of electrons emitted in the first, second, and fourth unique forbidden β decays. Our findings show that the Kurie functions for these unique forbidden β transitions are linear in the limit of massless neutrinos like the Kurie function of the allowed β decay of tritium.

  9. Seismic component of the STEEP project, Alaska: Results of the first field season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, R. A.; Estes, S.; Stachnik, J.; Lafevers, M.; Roush, J.; Sanches, R.; Fuerst, E.; Sandru, J.; Ruppert, N.; Pavlis, G.; Bauer, M.

    2005-12-01

    STEEP (SainT Elias Erosion/tectonics Project) is a five year, multi-disciplinary study that addresses evolution of the highest coastal mountain range on Earth - the St. Elias Mountains of southern Alaska and northwestern Canada. The overall goal of the project is to develop a comprehensive model for the St. Elias orogen that accounts for the interaction of regional plate tectonic processes, structural development, and rapid erosion. The seismic component of this project includes passive seismic experiment utilizing the IRIS PASSCAL Program instruments. The total project consists of 22 new, telemetered, digital broad band seismic stations, most accessible by helicopter only. There are 12 existing short period stations in the area. Eight new stations were installed in the coastal region in June 2005. Freewave IP radios provide the telemetry to the newly installed VSAT at the Bering Glacier camp site. The challenge was to find ice-free locations, on bedrock, large enough to install equipment and still have a helicopter landing zone nearby. The stations consist of Quanterra Q330 digitizers with baler, a STS-2 seismometer installed in a vault, a Freewave IP radio, a Scala 900 Mhz antenna, twenty 100 AH rechargeable batteries with a 2400AH backup Celair primary battery, and three solar panels mounted on hut. The acquired data is recorded in real time at the Alaska Earthquake Information Center located in Fairbanks and is incorporated into the standard data processing procedures. High quality data allows for more reliable automatic earthquake detections in the region with lower magnitude threshold. In addition to tectonic earthquakes, glacial events that occur within the vast ice fields of the region are also regularly detected. Broadband instruments complement regional broadband network for more reliable calculations of the regional moment tensors.

  10. DIRECT DETERMINATION OF THE HF/H{sub 2} ABUNDANCE RATIO IN INTERSTELLAR GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Indriolo, Nick; Neufeld, D. A.; Seifahrt, A.; Richter, M. J.

    2013-02-20

    We report the first detection of the v = 1-0, R(0) ro-vibrational transition of HF at 2.499385 {mu}m arising from interstellar gas. The line is seen in absorption toward three background sources-HD 154368, Elias 29, and AFGL 2136 IRS 1-all of which have reported H{sub 2} column densities determined from observations of H{sub 2}. This allows for the first direct determination of the HF/H{sub 2} abundance ratio. We find values of N(HF)/N(H{sub 2}) = 1.15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} and 0.69 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} for HD 154368 and Elias 29, respectively. The sight line toward AFGL 2136 IRS 1 also shows absorption from the v = 1-0, R(1) transition of HF, indicating warm, dense (n {sub H} {approx}> 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) gas, likely very close to the central protostar. Ascribing portions of the HF absorption to warm and cold gas, we find N(HF)/N(H{sub 2}) = (1.7-2.9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} and (0.33-0.58) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} for the two components, respectively. Except for the warm component toward AFGL 2136 IRS 1, all observed HF/H{sub 2} ratios are well below N(HF)/N(H{sub 2}) = 3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}, the value predicted if nearly all gas phase fluorine is in the form of HF. Models of fluorine chemistry that account for depletion onto grains are able to reproduce the results toward HD 154368, but not in the cold, dense gas toward AFGL 2136 IRS 1 and Elias 29. Most likely, some combinations of simplifying assumptions made in the chemical models are responsible for these discrepancies.

  11. The Employee Diversity Team Wants to Take You around the World in Film | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer The NCI at Frederick Employee Diversity Team (EDT) has prepared a new display that features a sample of the foreign films from the team’s collection in the Scientific Library. “Foreign films really help stimulate an awareness of different cultures and countries. I think it is a great celebration of diversity to have the Employee Diversity Team promote films from across the globe and make them available to our employees,” said Amber Elia, program analyst, NCI at Frederick Office of Scientific Operations, and member of the EDT.

  12. Dynamic behavior of the Bering Glacier-Bagley icefield system during a surge, and other measurements of Alaskan glaciers with ERS SAR imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingle, Craig S.; Fatland, Dennis R.; Voronina, Vera A.; Ahlnaes, Kristina; Troshina, Elena N.

    1997-01-01

    ERS-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery was employed for the measurement of the dynamics of the Bagley icefield during a major surge in 1993-1994, the measurement of ice velocities on the Malaspina piedmont glacier during a quiescent phase between surges, and for mapping the snow lines and the position of the terminus of Nabesna glacier on Mount Wrangell (a 4317 m andesitic shield volcano) in the heavily glacierized Saint Elias and Wrangell Mountains of Alaska. An overview and summary of results is given. The methods used include interferometry, cross-correlation of sequential images, and digitization of boundaries using terrain-corrected SAR imagery.

  13. Metchnikoff and the centenary of probiotics: an update of their use in gastroenteric pathology during the age of development.

    PubMed

    Caramia, G

    2008-12-01

    Acute gastroenteritis, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, diarrhea due to Clostridium difficile and traveller's diarrhea, Helicobacter pylori infection and intestinal inflammatory diseases are primitive and/or secondary pathological conditions that alter the intestinal mucosa and microbiota. For years researchers have searched for solutions to restore and rebalance normal transit and intestinal flora. Elia Metchnikoff was the first one to introduce oral bacteriotherapy, that uses very efficient microorganisms that prevent putrefaction and aging. Oral bacteriotherapy has now evolved in probiotics, whose helpful action to prevent and treat some gastroenteric pathologies is currently being studied. PMID:18971903

  14. Gulf of Alaska as seen from STS-59

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The spring thaw along the coast of the Gulf of Alaska has not touched the St. Elias Mountains, southeast of Yakutat Bay and Malaspina Glacier. A prominent glacier flows from Mt. Fairweather (15,300 feet) at right center, to form Cape Fairweather. Another glacier to the northwest almost reaches the sea; the valley of the Alsek River forms a broad, braided plain at upper left. the low sun elevation and oblique angle of this photograph provide a 3-dimensional appearance to the black-and-white landscape.

  15. More interstellar emission features at 3.3-3.6 micrometers!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokunaga, A. T.; Nagata, T.; Sellgren, K.; Smith, R. G.; Onaka, T.; Nakada, Y.; Sakata, A.; Wada, S.

    1986-01-01

    The present data set consists of 3.20 to 3.55 micron spectra of HD44179, NGC 7027, BD+30 3639, and Elias 1 obtained with a cooled-grating array spectrometer (CGAS) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. Emission features and details of the emission feature profiles are presented for high resolution spectra. Greater complexity is shown than might be expected. It is significant that the 3.29 micron feature has an invariant central wavelength, even at high resolution, and this strongly supports the case for a very specific substance or mixture of substances which is giving rise to this feature.

  16. Kinetic ballooning modes at the tokamak transport barrier with negative magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagiwa, M.; Hirose, A.; Elia, M.

    1997-11-01

    Stability of the kinetic ballooning modes is investigated for plasma parameters at the internal transport barrier in tokamak discharges with negative magnetic shear employing a kinetic shooting code with long shooting distance. It is found that the second stability regime with respect to the pressure gradient parameter, which was predicted for negative shear [A. Hirose and M. Elia, Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 76}, 628 (1996)], can possibly disappear. The mode with comparatively low toroidal mode number and mode frequency below 100 kHz is found to be destabilized marginally only around the transport barrier characterized by steep pressure and density gradients. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Investigations of volcanic and earthquake-related deformation: Observations and models from Long Valley Caldera, northwestern Peloponnese, and northwestern Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lujia

    2011-12-01

    The advent of Global Positioning System (GPS) has revolutionized geodesy with high accuracy, fast speed, simple use, and low cost. This dissertation investigates three topics on volcano and earthquake-related deformation using GPS measurements and models to demonstrate the power of the new generation of geodetic methods. The three topics include the 2002-2003 continued episodic inflation at Long Valley Caldera in eastern California, the coseismic and postseismic response of the energetic 2008 MW 6.4 Achaia-Elia Earthquake in northwest Peloponnese, Greece, and the interseismic megathrust coupling and forearc sliver transport near the Nicoya Peninsula in northwest Costa Rica.

  18. Socrates, discussion and moral education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembert, Ron B.

    1995-01-01

    For Socrates, as he appears in Plato's dialogues, the process of discussion is essential for preparing human beings to lead a moral life. Only through discussion, Socrates maintains, can we be led to an understanding of such concepts as wisdom, courage and justice. The author of this article believes that the Socratic notion of the moral value of discussion is still valid. In support of this view, he examines two recent works: Dialogues on Moral Education by John Wilson and Barbara Cowell, and Moral Education, Secular and Religious by John L. Elias. Finally, the author suggests how the Socratic concept of dialogue might be used in moral education today.

  19. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-01

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2β) searches, single β-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy. Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium β-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope (137Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R&D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2β decay and single β-decay.

  20. Direct neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thümmler, T.

    2011-07-01

    The determination of the neutrino rest mass plays an important role at the intersections of cosmology, particle physics and astroparticle physics. This topic is currently being addressed by two complementary approaches in laboratory experiments. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments probe whether neutrinos are Majorana particles and determine an effective neutrino mass value. Single beta decay experiments such as KATRIN and MARE investigate the spectral shape of β-decay electrons close to their kinematic endpoint in order to determine the neutrino rest mass with a model-independent method. Owing to neutrino flavour mixing, the neutrino mass parameter appears as an average of all neutrino mass eigenstates contributing to the electron neutrino. The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is currently the experiment in the most advanced status of commissioning. Applying an ultra-luminous molecular windowless gaseous tritium source and an integrating high-resolution spectrometer of MAC-E filter type, it allows β-spectroscopy close to the T 2 end-point with unprecedented precision and will reach a sensitivity of 200 meV/ c 2 (90% C.L.) on the neutrino rest mass.

  1. Progress with the MPIK/UW-PTMS in Heidelberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Christoph; Blaum, Klaus; Höcker, Martin; Ketter, Jochen; Pinegar, David B.; Streubel, Sebastian; Van Dyck, Robert S.

    2011-07-01

    The precise determination of the 3He/3H mass ratio, and hence the tritium β-decay endpoint energy E 0, is of relevance for the measurement of the electron anti-neutrino mass performed by the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN). By determining this ratio to an uncertainty of 1 part in 1011, systematic errors of E 0 can be checked in the data analysis of KATRIN. To reach this precision, a Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer was constructed at the University of Washington and has been transferred to the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg at the end of 2008. Since then it is called MPIK/UW-PTMS. Special design features are the utilization of an external ion source and a double trap configuration. The external Penning ion source efficiently ionizes the helium and tritium gas and can give superior elimination of unwanted ion species compared to the previously utilized in-trap-ionization by electrons from a field-emission point. The design as a double Penning trap allows a faster measurement procedure. This should help to avoid problems resulting from long-term drifts in the experimental conditions. Additionally, the laboratory in Heidelberg was carefully prepared to have very stable environmental conditions. Experimental challenges and the first Heidelberg results with the new spectrometer are presented.

  2. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  3. Sulfur Dioxide Emission Rates of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, 1979-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A.J.; Stokes, J.B.; Casadevall, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates from Kilauea Volcano were first measured by Stoiber and Malone (1975) and have been measured on a regular basis since 1979 (Casadevall and others, 1987; Greenland and others, 1985; Elias and others, 1993; Elias and Sutton, 1996). The purpose of this report is to present a compilation of Kilauea SO2 emission rate data from 1979 through 1997 with ancillary meteorological data (wind speed and wind direction). We have included measurements previously reported by Casadevall and others (1987) for completeness and to improve the usefulness of this current database compilation. Kilauea releases SO2 gas predominantly from its summit caldera and rift zones (fig. 1). From 1979 through 1982, vehicle-based COSPEC measurements made within the summit caldera were adequate to quantify most of the SO2 emitted from the volcano. Beginning in 1983, the focus of SO2 release shifted from the summit to the east rift zone (ERZ) eruption site at Pu`u `O`o and, later, Kupaianaha. Since 1984, the Kilauea gas measurement effort has been augmented with intermittent airborne and tripod-based surveys made near the ERZ eruption site. In addition, beginning in 1992 vehicle-based measurements have been made along a section of Chain of Craters Road approximately 9 km downwind of the eruption site. These several types of COSPEC measurements continue to the present.

  4. Ice Nucleation by High Molecular Weight Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, W.

    2003-12-01

    Deep convection in the tropics is frequently associated with biomass burning. Recent work has suggested that the size of ice crystals in the anvils of tropical cumulonimbus clouds may be affected by biomass burning, though the mechanism for such an effect is uncertain (Sherwood, 2002). We will present results of an investigation of the role that high molecular weight organic compounds, known to be produced in biomass burning (Elias et al., 1999), may play in tropical cirrus anvils through heterogeneous nucleation of ice. In particular, we examine the mechanisms underlying heterogeneous nucleation of ice by films of long chain alcohols by studying the interaction of the alcohols and water/ice using temperature controlled, Attenuated Total Reflection - Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. The mechanisms are interpreted in the context of recent criticisms of some aspects of classical nucleation theory (Seeley and Seidler, 2001; Oxtoby, 1998). References V. Elias, B. Simoneit, A. Pereira, J. Cabral, and J. Cardoso, Detection of high molecular weight organic tracers in vegetation smoke samples by high-temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Environ. Sci. Tecnol., 33, 2369-2376, 1999. D. Oxtoby, Nucleation of first-order phase transitions. Acc. Chem. Res., 31, 91-97, 1998. L. Seeley and G. Seidler, Preactivation in the nucleation of ice by Langmuir films of aliphatic alcohols. J. Chem. Phys., 114, 10464-10470, 2001. S. Sherwood, Aerosols and ice particle size in tropical cumulonimbus. J. Climate, 15, 1051-1063, 2002.

  5. Supercomputing Sheds Light on the Dark Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Salman Habib

    2012-11-15

    At Argonne National Laboratory, scientists are using supercomputers to shed light on one of the great mysteries in science today, the Dark Universe. With Mira, a petascale supercomputer at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, a team led by physicists Salman Habib and Katrin Heitmann will run the largest, most complex simulation of the universe ever attempted. By contrasting the results from Mira with state-of-the-art telescope surveys, the scientists hope to gain new insights into the distribution of matter in the universe, advancing future investigations of dark energy and dark matter into a new realm. The team's research was named a finalist for the 2012 Gordon Bell Prize, an award recognizing outstanding achievement in high-performance computing.

  6. Prospects for cosmic neutrino detection in tritium experiments in the case of hierarchical neutrino masses

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias

    2008-06-01

    We discuss the effects of neutrino mixing and the neutrino mass hierarchy when considering the capture of the cosmic neutrino background (CNB) on radioactive nuclei. The implications of mixing and hierarchy at future generations of tritium decay experiments are considered. We find that the CNB should be detectable at these experiments provided that the resolution for the kinetic energy of the outgoing electron can be pushed to a few 0.01 eV for the scenario with inverted neutrino mass hierarchy, about an order of magnitude better than that of the upcoming KATRIN experiment. Another order of magnitude improvement is needed in the case of normal neutrino mass hierarchy. We also note that mixing effects generally make the prospects for CNB detection worse due to an increased maximum energy of the normal beta decay background.

  7. Kamstrup's wow-effect: re-examined and expanded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Elizabeth M.; Dickmann, Ellyn M.; Johnson, Barbara Z.

    2016-03-01

    This review examines Anna Katrine Kamstrup's article "The wow-effect in science teacher education; technology; sociomateriality." In the discussion below we explore three key areas of her ethnographic research. First, we reconsider Kamstrup's article through the lens of technology as a pedagogical choice and philosophy. This is followed by our discussion of aspects of her study within the context of a basic understanding that entry-level pre-service teachers need to fully understand both the process of learning and scientific principles as these are important foundational factors in determining whether or not the wow-effect will occur as expected. Finally, our review team presents multiple areas in Kamstrup's article as potential points for further elaboration.

  8. Changes to Irradiation Conditions of VVER-1000 Surveillance Specimens Resulting from Fuel Assemblies with Greater Fuel Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panferov, Pavel; Kochkin, Viacheslav; Erak, Dmitry; Makhotin, Denis; Reshetnikov, Alexandr; Timofeev, Andrey

    2016-02-01

    The goal of the work was to obtain experimental data on the influence of newtype fuel assemblies with higher fuel rods on the irradiation conditions of surveillance specimens installed on the baffe of VVER-1000. For this purpose, two surveillance sets with container assemblies of the same design irradiated in reactors with different fuel assemblies in the core were investigated. Measurements of neutron dosimeters from these sets and retrospective measurements of 54Mn activity accumulated in each irradiated specimen allow a detailed distribution of the fast neutron flux in the containers to be obtained. Neutron calculations have been done using 3D discrete ordinate code KATRIN. On the basis of the obtained results, a change of the lead factor due to newtype fuel assemblies was evaluated for all types of VVER-1000 container assemblies.

  9. Absolute mass of neutrinos and the first unique forbidden {beta} decay of {sup 187}Re

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornicky, Rastislav; Simkovic, Fedor; Muto, Kazuo; Faessler, Amand

    2011-04-15

    The planned rhenium {beta}-decay experiment, called the ''Microcalorimeter Arrays for a Rhenium Experiment'' (MARE), might probe the absolute mass scale of neutrinos with the same sensitivity as the Karlsruhe tritium neutrino mass (KATRIN) experiment, which will take commissioning data in 2011 and will proceed for 5 years. We present the energy distribution of emitted electrons for the first unique forbidden {beta} decay of {sup 187}Re. It is found that the p-wave emission of electron dominates over the s wave. By assuming mixing of three neutrinos, the Kurie function for the rhenium {beta} decay is derived. It is shown that the Kurie plot near the end point is within a good accuracy linear in the limit of massless neutrinos like the Kurie plot of the superallowed {beta} decay of {sup 3}H.

  10. Investigation of durability of optical coatings in highly purified tritium gas

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, S.; Schoenung, K.; Bornschein, B.; Rolli, R.; Schaefer, V.; Sturm, M.

    2015-03-15

    Anti-reflection coated windows are part of Raman spectroscopy systems for tritium analytics in the KATRIN experiment and fusion-related applications. Damages of such windows were observed after three months of expo-sure to highly purified tritium gas in the LOOPINO facility. In this work, the origin of the damages was investigated, identified and eliminated. Coating samples manufactured by various physical vapor deposition methods have been tested for durability by exposure to pure tritium gas and subsequent visual inspection. Electron beam deposited coatings showed indications for damage after 17 days of tritium exposure in contrast to samples manufactured by ion assisted deposition or sputtering. An improved coating layout of the sample cell is presented for reliable long-term monitoring of tritium gas using Raman spectroscopy. (authors)

  11. Post service examination of turbomolecular pumps after stress testing with Kg-scale tritium throughput

    SciTech Connect

    Priester, F.; Roelling, M.

    2015-03-15

    Turbomolecular pumps (TMP) will be used with large amounts of tritium in future fusion machines like ITER, DEMO and in the KATRIN Experiment. In this work, a stress test of a large, magnetically levitated TMP (Leybold MAG W2800) with a tritium throughput of 1.1 kg over 384 days of operation was performed at TLK. After this, the pump was dismantled and the tritium uptake in several parts was deter-mined. Especially the non-metallic parts of the pump have absorbed large amounts of tritium and are most likely responsible for the observed pollution of the process gas. The total tritium uptake of the TMP was estimated with 0.1-1.1 TBq. No radiation-induced damages were found on the inner parts of the pump. The TMP showed no signs of functional limitations during the 384 days of operation. (authors)

  12. SDAV Viz July Progress Update: LANL

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, Christopher Meyer

    2012-07-30

    SDAV Viz July Progress Update: (1) VPIC (Vector Particle in Cell) Kinetic Plasma Simulation Code - (a) Implemented first version of an in-situ adapter based on Paraview CoProcessing Library, (b) Three pipelines: vtkDataSetMapper, vtkContourFilter, vtkPistonContour, (c) Next, resolve issue at boundaries of processor domains; add more advanced viz/analysis pipelines; (2) Halo finding/merger trees - (a) Summer student Wathsala W. from University of Utah is working on data-parallel halo finder algorithm using PISTON, (b) Timo Bremer (LLNL), Valerio Pascucci (Utah), George Zagaris (Kitware), and LANL people are interested in using merger trees for tracking the evolution of halos in cosmo simulations; discussed possible overlap with work by Salman Habib and Katrin Heitmann (Argonne) during their visit to LANL 7/11; (3) PISTON integration in ParaView - Now available from ParaView github.

  13. The Absolute Mass of Neutrino and the First Unique Forbidden β-DECAY of 187Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvornický, Rastislav; Šimkovic, Fedor; Muto, Kazuo

    2011-10-01

    The planned rhenium β-decay experiment MARE might probe the absolute mass scale of neutrinos with the same sensitivity as the tritium β-decay experiment KATRIN, which will start data taking in 2011 and will proceed for five years. We present the energy distribution of emitted electrons for the first unique forbidden β-decay of 187Re. It is found that the p-wave emission of electron dominates over the s-wave. By assuming mixing of three neutrinos the Kurie function for the rhenium β-decay is derived. It is shown that the Kurie plot near the endpoint is within a good accuracy linear in the limit of massless neutrinos like the Kurie plot of the superallowed βof 3H.

  14. Upper Bound of 0.28 eV on Neutrino Masses from the Largest Photometric Redshift Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Shaun A.; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Lahav, Ofer

    2010-07-16

    We present a new limit of (95% CL) on the sum of the neutrino masses assuming a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmology. This relaxes slightly to and when quasinonlinear scales are removed and w{ne}-1, respectively. These are derived from a new photometric catalogue of over 700 000 luminous red galaxies (MegaZ DR7) with a volume of 3.3 (Gpc h{sup -1}){sup 3} and redshift range 0.45KATRIN, are unlikely to obtain a detection.

  15. Anharmonicity of internal atomic oscillation and effective antineutrino mass evaluation from gaseous molecular tritium β-decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhov, Alexey V.; Titov, Nikita A.

    2016-07-01

    Data analysis of the next-generation effective antineutrino mass measurement experiment KATRIN requires reliable knowledge of systematic corrections. In particular, the width of the daughter molecular ion excitation spectrum rovibrational band should be known with better than 1% precision. Very precise ab initio quantum calculations exist, and we compare them with the well-known tritium molecule parameters within the framework of a phenomenological model. The rovibrational band width with accuracy of a few percent is interpreted as a result of the zero-point atomic oscillation in the harmonic potential. The Morse interatomic potential is used to investigate the impact of anharmonic atomic oscillations. The calculated corrections cannot account for the difference between the ab initio quantum calculations and the phenomenological model.

  16. The Ars alchemie: the first Latin text on practical alchemy.

    PubMed

    Vinciguerra, Antony

    2009-03-01

    The Ars alchemie is a collection of alchemical recipes associated with the names of the Arabic-Latin translator Michael Scot and the major general of the Friars Minor, Elias Cortona, of the first half of the thirteenth century. This articles investigates the various forms in which this text appears in the four manuscripts that contain it. It shows the dependence of one of its prologues on the work of an earlier translator, Hugo of Santalla, and the overlap of its contents with other alchemical treatises: Liber luminis luminum, Liber Dedali, Liber de aluminibus et salibus and Liber Hermetis de blchkmkb. Its mention of the alum of Aleppo corresponds with references to trade in this material in the thirteenth century. Its main characteristics are its compilatory nature and its emphasis on practical applications. PMID:19831260

  17. Ketamine use in Taiwan: Moral panic, civilizing processes, and democratization.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Liang-Yin

    2014-07-01

    Ketamine use among young people in Taiwan has increased in recent years. Believing ketamine users to be a threat to social order and harsh punishment to be a deterrent, some legislators have called for upgrading ketamine use to a more serious criminal offence. These calls have been repeatedly rebuffed by the advisory council which sets drug policy, suggesting that the perceived problem does not correlate to the actual one. In this commentary, I argue that the calls of legislators constitute a 'moral panic,' and follow Rohloff (2011) in connecting the phenomenon to Elias' (2000) concept of civilizing and decivilizing processes. In addition, I demonstrate that moral panic - in the ketamine case at least - is shaped by the legacy of authoritarianism. PMID:24975444

  18. Spatial Variations in Deformation and Exhumation at the Yakutat plate corner, SE Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enkelmann, E.; Ehlers, T. A.; Falkowski, S.; Grabowski, D.

    2012-12-01

    Quantification of exhumation processes near plate boundaries provides insights into the mechanics and history of deformation along transpressional structures. Here we present an analysis of regional variations in plate deformation near the corner of the obliquely converging Yakutat Terrane and North American plate. Techniques used include an integration of bedrock and detrital thermochronometer ages collected around the major faults in the region. The Yakutat Terrane is transported northward along the western margin of North America and is colliding with the southern margin of Alaska, forming the St. Elias Mountains. The boundaries of the Yakutat Terrane to North America are formed by the dextral Fairweather transform fault in the east and the Chugach-St. Elias thrust and the fold-and thrust belt to the north. One of the major questions is how stress from the Fairweather transform is transferred and distributed inboard when the transform fault runs into the continent and deformation style changes to convergent. This region of change in deformation is called the St. Elias syntaxis and is characterized by a 90° bend of the major structures, the highest mountain peaks (5959 m), high local relief (5000 m), and it is mainly covered by thick ice fields and glaciers. This ice cover hampers field observations, structural measurements, and rock sampling and thus it is unclear how strain is distributed in the syntaxis region. Observed cooling ages indicate that the region of the St. Elias syntaxis contains 3-2 Ma detrital zircon fission track (ZFT) ages in the Seward-Malaspina Glacier outwash, indicating cooling rates of >100°C/Ma somewhere in the catchment. We revisited the Malaspina Glacier and investigated the petrology and cooling ages of clast-size material. Zircon U-Th/He ages of 3-2 Ma are observed in clasts of various lithologies including amphibolite, granulite, gneiss, and undeformed granite and granodiorite. This variety in rock types suggest that rapid

  19. Felt stigma and obesity: introducing the generalized other.

    PubMed

    Barlösius, Eva; Philipps, Axel

    2015-04-01

    People with a big body are tainted in western societies. Although most research on obesity occurs in the medical context, few studies investigate characteristics and effects of feelings and fears related to the fat stigma in the absence of overt discrimination. By linking Norbert Elias's and George H. Mead's theoretical frameworks, this paper offers a different approach to understanding and investigating felt stigma. The study is based on secondary data (25 semistructured interviews with children and adolescents). It explores internalized societal perspectives on overweight and obesity and inquires into the way in which interviewees handle the blame frame of personal responsibility during their interview. The preliminary findings suggest that specific forms of managing one's self-presentation in interviews indicate felt stigma. Consequently, the paper argues for an analytical approach that extends the focus on the content of interviews to include its dynamics. PMID:25658623

  20. Roberge-Weiss endpoint in Nf=2 QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonati, Claudio; Cossu, Guido; D'Elia, Massimo; Sanfilippo, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    We present the results of extensive simulations regarding the critical behavior at the endpoint of the Roberge-Weiss transition for Nf=2 QCD. We confirm early evidence, presented in Ref. [M. D’Elia and F. Sanfilippo, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-799810.1103/PhysRevD.80.111501 80, 111501(R) (2009).], according to which the Roberge-Weiss endpoint is first order in the limit of large or small quark masses, and second order for intermediate masses. A systematic study of the transition strength as a function of the quark mass in the first order regions, permits us to estimate the tricritical values of the quark mass separating the second order region from the first order ones.

  1. New Hires at the National Cancer Institute at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Fifty-six people joined the facility in January, February, and March 2014. The National Cancer Institute welcomes… Shailesh Ambre • Lucia Babini • Hideaki Bando • Sandip Basu • Konstantinos Dimas • Amber Elia • Lan Jin • Yifei Li • Hanhan Liu • Hugo Martinez • Manasi Mayekar • Michele Newton • Sheikh Rahman • Luis Rodriguez • Eric Sterner • Emmanuel Tavares • Yanping Wang • Sarah Watters

  2. The 2012 interferometric imaging beauty contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Fabien; Cotton, William D.; Lawson, Peter R.; Ridgway, Steve T.; Aarnio, Alicia; Monnier, John D.; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Schertl, Dieter; Weigelt, Gerd; Thiébaut, Eric; Soulez, Férréol; Mary, David; Millour, Florentin; Vannier, Martin; Young, John; Elias, Nicholas M.; Schmitt, Henrique R.; Rengaswamy, Sridharan

    2012-07-01

    We present the results of the fifth Interferometric Imaging Beauty Contest. The contest consists in blind imaging of test data sets derived from model sources and distributed in the OIFITS format. Two scenarios of imaging with CHARA/MIRC-6T were offered for reconstruction: imaging a T Tauri disc and imaging a spotted red supergiant. There were eight different teams competing this time: Monnier with the software package MACIM; Hofmann, Schertl and Weigelt with IRS; Thiebaut and Soulez with MiRA ; Young with BSMEM; Mary and Vannier with MIROIRS; Millour and Vannier with independent BSMEM and MiRA entries; Rengaswamy with an original method; and Elias with the radio-astronomy package CASA. The contest model images, the data delivered to the contestants and the rules are described as well as the results of the image reconstruction obtained by each method. These results are discussed as well as the strengths and limitations of each algorithm.

  3. [Project HOPE contribution to the setting up of the professional identity of the first nurses from Alagoas, 1973-1977].

    PubMed

    Costa, Laís de Miranda Crispim; dos Santos, Regina Maria; Santos, Tânia Cristina Franco; Trezza, Maria Cristina Soares Figueiredo; Leite, Josete Luzia

    2014-01-01

    Social-historical study conducted to examine the contribution of the American Nurses of Project HOPE to the configuration of the professional identity of the first trained nurses in Alagoas, in the period of 1973-1977. The theoretical framework was the "Civilizing Process" of Norbert Elias. Primary sources were official documents and personal files of 13 respondents by oral history; the secondary sources were authors of the History of Brazil/Alagoas. Data analysis showed that the configuration of the professional identity of the first trained nurses in Alagoas was a civilizing process, with all the nuances that make up the power relations. There was a significant contribution of American Nursing. However the movement of resistance to this domination was very strong, resulting in a Course that could take advantage of technological advancement and prestige brought by the United States, to build a unique Nursing from the social fabric embroidery at this meeting with so many different cultures. PMID:25271576

  4. Processing of icy mantles in protostellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiar, J. E.; Gerakines, P. A.; Whittet, D. C.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Tielens, A. G.; Adamson, A. J.; Boogert, A. C.

    1998-01-01

    We have obtained CO absorption profiles of several young stellar objects (YSOs), spanning a range of mass and luminosity, in order to investigate their ice mantle composition. We present the first detection of CO toward the class I YSO L1489 IRS in the Taurus dark cloud. In general, the CO profiles for YSOs show evidence for both processed and pristine ices in the same line of sight, strong indirect evidence for CO, is suggested in R CrA IRS 7, L1489 IRS, Elias 18, and GL 961E. Toward other sources (R CrA IRS 1, IRS 2, W33A, NGC 7538 IRS 9, Mon R2 IRS 2) CO is present in (nearly) pure form. We propose an evolutionary scenario to explain the chemical diversity of the icy mantles toward these objects.

  5. An Approximation to the Periodic Solution of a Differential Equation of Abel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.

    2011-10-01

    The Abel equation, in canonical form, is y^' = sint- y^3 (*) and corresponds to the singular (ɛ --> 0) limit of the nonlinear, forced oscillator ɛy^'' + y^' + y^3 = sint, ɛ-> 0. (**) Equation (*) has the property that it has a unique periodic solution defined on (-∞,∞). Further, as t increases, all solutions are attracted into the strip |y| < 1 and any two different solutions y1(t) and y2(t) satisfy the condition Lim [y1(t) - y2(t)] = 0, (***) t --> ∞ and for t negatively decreasing, each solution, except for the periodic solution, becomes unbounded.ootnotetextU. Elias, American Mathematical Monthly, vol.115, (Feb. 2008), pps. 147-149. Our purpose is to calculate an approximation to the unique periodic solution of Eq. (*) using the method of harmonic balance. We also determine an estimation for the blow-up time of the non-periodic solutions.

  6. A Flock of Words: live music performance with holograms and interactive multimedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, Doris K.

    1998-02-01

    This paper describes A Flock of Words, a cross-media music performance realized in collaboration with composer Robert Rowe. An interactive computer system linked large-scale holograms, video projection, animation, robotic lighting effects, and computer music. With a text from Elias Cannetti's Crowds and Power, an artificial-life algorithm animates swarming words. Projected onto the large holograms, the text flies in and out of linear readability, set off by computer music signals. A Flock of Words uses custom computer software to analyze the music being performance by an ensemble of human players and guide the simultaneous projection of real-time animation onto holograms, video, holographic lighting, and computer music. To stage the piece, we created an interactive computer system combining large-scale holograms, video projection, animation, robotic lighting effects, and computer music. The real-time animation was an adaptation of Craig Reynolds's Boids algorithm, which we dubbed `woids', and was used for animating flocking words.

  7. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE FU ORIONIS STAR V1735 CYGNI

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Sokal, Kimberly R.; Guedel, Manuel; Briggs, Kevin R.

    2009-05-01

    The variable star V1735 Cyg (=Elias 1-12) lies in the IC 5146 dark cloud and is a member of the class of FU Orionis objects whose dramatic optical brightenings are thought to be linked to episodic accretion. We report the first X-ray detections of V1735 Cyg and a deeply embedded class I protostar lying 24'' to its northeast. X-ray spectra obtained with EPIC on XMM-Newton reveal very high-temperature plasma (kT > 5 keV) in both objects, but no large flares. Such hard X-ray emission is not anticipated from accretion shocks and is a signature of magnetic processes. We place these new results into the context of what is presently known about the X-ray properties of FU Orionis stars and other accreting young stellar objects.

  8. Mercury in mosses Hylocomium splendens (Hedw.) B.S.G. and Pleurozium schreberi (Brid.) Mitt. from Poland and Alaska: understanding the origin of pollution sources.

    PubMed

    Migaszewski, Zdzisław M; Gałuszka, Agnieszka; Dołegowska, Sabina; Crock, James G; Lamothe, Paul J

    2010-09-01

    This report shows baseline concentrations of mercury in the moss species Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium schreberi from the Kielce area and the remaining Holy Cross Mountains (HCM) region (south-central Poland), and Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park and Preserve (Alaska) and Denali National Park and Preserve (Alaska). Like mosses from many European countries, Polish mosses were distinctly elevated in Hg, bearing a signature of cross-border atmospheric transport combined with local point sources. In contrast, Alaskan mosses showed lower Hg levels, reflecting mostly the underlying geology. Compared to HCM, Alaskan and Kielce mosses exhibited more uneven spatial distribution patterns of Hg. This variation is linked to topography and location of local point sources (Kielce) and underlying geology (Alaska). Both H. splendens and P. schreberi showed similar bioaccumulative capabilities of Hg in all four study areas. PMID:20638128

  9. Empirical description of the hadron-hadron and hadron-nucleus interaction at the accelerator energy range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubiak, G.; Szabelski, J.; Wdowczyk, J.; Piotrowska, A.; Kempa, J.

    1985-01-01

    Taking into account several assumptions, a formula is transformed into two expressions for kaon and baryon plus antibaryon production in proton interaction and for pion production in pion interactions. Combining both formulae, expression are obtained for the spectrum of kaons and baryons plus antibaryons produced in the meson interactions. For analysis of the cosmic ray propagation in the atmosphere in actual fact, instead of the formulae for interactions of protons and mesons with protons, formulae appropriate for interactions with air nuclei was used. Using the method outlined among others by Elias et al. (1980) simple corrections were introduced to the derived expressions to account for the fact that the target is an air nucleus.

  10. Environmentally conscious alternative energy production

    SciTech Connect

    Kutz, M.

    2007-09-15

    This fourth volume of the series describes and compares the environmental and economic impacts of renewable and conventional power generation technologies. Chapter heading are: Economic comparisons of power generation technologies (Todd Nemec); Solar energy applications (Jan F. Kreider); Fuel cells (Matthew W. Mench); Geothermal resources and technology: an introduction (Peter D. Blair); Wind power generation (Todd Nemec); Cogeneration (Jerald Caton); Hydrogen energy (Elias K. Stefanakos, Yogi Goswami, S.S. Srinivasan, and J.T. Wolan); Clean power generation from coal (Prabir Basu and James Butler); and Using waste heat from power plants (Herbert A. Ingley). The chapter on clean coal power generation from coal has been abstracted separately on the Coal Abstracts database. 2 apps.

  11. Nonperturbative renormalization group calculation of quasiparticle velocity and dielectric function of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Carsten; Rückriegel, Andreas; Sharma, Anand; Kopietz, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Using a nonperturbative functional renormalization group approach, we calculate the renormalized quasiparticle velocity v (k ) and the static dielectric function ɛ (k ) of suspended graphene as functions of an external momentum k . Our numerical result for v (k ) can be fitted by v (k ) /vF=A +B ln(Λ0/k ) , where vF is the bare Fermi velocity, Λ0 is an ultraviolet cutoff, and A =1.37 , B =0.51 for the physically relevant value (e2/vF=2.2 ) of the coupling constant. In contrast to calculations based on the static random-phase approximation, we find that ɛ (k ) approaches unity for k →0 . Our result for v (k ) agrees very well with a recent measurement by Elias et al. [Nat. Phys. 7, 701 (2011), 10.1038/nphys2049].

  12. Mercury in mosses Hylocomium splendens (Hedw.) B.S.G. and Pleurozium schreberi (Brid.) Mitt. from Poland and Alaska: Understanding the origin of pollution sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Migaszewski, Z.M.; Galuszka, A.; Dole, ogonekgowska S.; Crock, J.G.; Lamothe, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    This report shows baseline concentrations of mercury in the moss species Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium schreberi from the Kielce area and the remaining Holy Cross Mountains (HCM) region (south-central Poland), and Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park and Preserve (Alaska) and Denali National Park and Preserve (Alaska). Like mosses from many European countries, Polish mosses were distinctly elevated in Hg, bearing a signature of cross-border atmospheric transport combined with local point sources. In contrast, Alaskan mosses showed lower Hg levels, reflecting mostly the underlying geology. Compared to HCM, Alaskan and Kielce mosses exhibited more uneven spatial distribution patterns of Hg. This variation is linked to topography and location of local point sources (Kielce) and underlying geology (Alaska). Both H. splendens and P. schreberi showed similar bioaccumulative capabilities of Hg in all four study areas. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  13. Asymptotic bound for heat-bath algorithmic cooling.

    PubMed

    Raeisi, Sadegh; Mosca, Michele

    2015-03-13

    The purity of quantum states is a key requirement for many quantum applications. Improving the purity is limited by fundamental laws of thermodynamics. Here, we are probing the fundamental limits for a natural approach to this problem, namely, heat-bath algorithmic cooling (HBAC). The existence of the cooling limit for HBAC techniques was proved by Schulman, Mor, and Weinstein. A bound for this value was found by Elias et al. and numerical testing supported the hypothesis that their bound may be the actual limit. A proof or disproof of whether their bound was the actual limit remained open for the past decade. Here, for the first time, we prove this limit. In the context of quantum thermodynamics, this corresponds to the maximum extractable work from the quantum system. We also establish, in the case of higher dimensional reset systems, how the performance of HBAC depends on the energy spectrum of the reset system. PMID:25815911

  14. Monte Carlo Study of the Semimetal-Insulator Phase Transition in Monolayer Graphene with a Realistic Interelectron Interaction Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulybyshev, M. V.; Buividovich, P. V.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Polikarpov, M. I.

    2013-08-01

    We report on the results of the first-principles numerical study of spontaneous breaking of chiral (sublattice) symmetry in suspended monolayer graphene due to electrostatic interaction, which takes into account the screening of Coulomb potential by electrons on σ orbitals. In contrast to the results of previous numerical simulations with unscreened potential, we find that suspended graphene is in the conducting phase with unbroken chiral symmetry. This finding is in agreement with recent experimental results by the Manchester group [D. C. Elias et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 701 (2011); A. S. Mayorov et al., Nano Lett. 12, 4629 (2012)]. Further, by artificially increasing the interaction strength, we demonstrate that suspended graphene is quite close to the phase transition associated with spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking, which suggests that fluctuations of chirality and nonperturbative effects might still be quite important.

  15. Roberge-Weiss endpoint in N{sub f}=2 QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bonati, Claudio; Cossu, Guido; D'Elia, Massimo; Sanfilippo, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    We present the results of extensive simulations regarding the critical behavior at the endpoint of the Roberge-Weiss transition for N{sub f}=2 QCD. We confirm early evidence, presented in Ref. [M. D'Elia and F. Sanfilippo, Phys. Rev. D 80, 111501(R) (2009).], according to which the Roberge-Weiss endpoint is first order in the limit of large or small quark masses, and second order for intermediate masses. A systematic study of the transition strength as a function of the quark mass in the first order regions, permits us to estimate the tricritical values of the quark mass separating the second order region from the first order ones.

  16. Evidence for chemical processing of precometary icy grains in circumstellar environments of pre-main-sequence stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegler, Stephen C.; Weintraub, David A.; Rettig, Terrence W.; Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Whittet, Douglas C. B.; Kulesa, Craig A.

    1995-01-01

    We report the detection of a broad absorption feature near 2166/cm in the spectrum of the Taurus cloud cource Elias 18. This pre-main-sequence source is the second in Taurus, the third in our survey, and the fifth known in the sky to show the broad 2166/cm absorption feature. Of equal importance, this feature is not seen toward several other embedded sources in our survey, nor is it seen toward the source Elias 16, located behind the Taurus cloud. Laboratory experiments with interstellar ice analogs show that such a feature is associated with a complex C triple bonded to N containing compound (called X(C triple bonded to N)) that results from high-energy processing (ultraviolet irradiation or ion bombardment) of simple ice components into more complex, organic components. We find a nonlinear anticorrelation between the abundance of X(C triple bonded to N) and frozen CO components in nonpolar lattices. We find no correlation between the abundance of X(C triple bonded to N) and frozen CO in polar lattices. Because the abundances of frozen CO and H2O are strongly correlated with each other and with visual extinction toward sources embedded in and located behind the Taurus molecular cloud, these ice components usually are associated with intracloud material. Our results indicate that X(C triple bonded to N) molecules result from chemical processing of dust grains dominated by nonpolar icy mantles in the local environments of pre-main-sequence stars. Such processing of icy grains in the early solar system may be an important source of organic compounds observed in minor solar system bodies. The delivery of these organic compounds to the surface of the primitive Earth through comet impacts may have provided the raw materials for prebiotic chemistry.

  17. Spectra of small Koronis family members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Rivkin, A.; Trilling, D.; Moskovitz, N.

    2014-07-01

    The space-weathering process and its implications for the relationships between S- and Q-type asteroids and ordinary chondrite meteorites are long-standing problems in asteroid science. Although the visible and near-infrared spectra of S- and Q-type objects qualitatively show the same absorption features and quantitatively show evidence of the same minerals, the S types display increased spectral slopes and muted absorption features compared to the Q types. This spectral mismatch is consistent with the effects of the space weathering process. Binzel et al. provided the missing link between Q- and S-type bodies in near-Earth space by showing a reddening of spectral slope in objects from 0.1 to 5 km that corresponded to the transition from Q- to S-type spectra. This result implied that size, and therefore age, is related to the relationship between Q- and S-type. The existence of Q-type objects in the main belt was not confirmed until Mothe-Diniz and Nesvorny (2008) found them in young S-type clusters. To investigate the trend from Q to S in the main belt, we examined space weathering within the old main-belt Koronis family using a spectrophotometric survey (Rivkin et al. 2011, Thomas et al. 2011). Rivkin et al. (2011) identified several potential Q-type objects within the Koronis family. Our Q-type candidates were identified using broad-band spectrophotometry and could not be taxonomically classified on that basis alone. We obtained follow-up visible and near-infrared spectral observations of our potential Q-type objects, (26970) Elias, (45610) 2000 DJ_{48}, and (37411) 2001 XF_{152}, using Gemini and Magellan. We will present the results of these spectral follow-up observations. Observations of (26970) Elias demonstrate that the object is more consistent with the average Q-type spectrum than the average S-type spectrum.

  18. Lithospheric discontinuity structure in Alaska, thickness variations determined by Sp receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Driscoll, Leland J.; Miller, Meghan S.

    2015-04-01

    We present the first broad-scale image of lithospheric thickness across the major tectonic domains of Alaska based on S wave receiver functions and joint interpretation with the potential field, seismic velocity, and heat flow measurements. Thus, we provide context for the distribution of strain throughout the Alaskan orocline. In the north, below the Brooks Range, a 130 km thick lithosphere is resolved, consistent with the presence of strong lithosphere that deflects strain to the south into central and southern Alaska. In southern Alaska beneath the Chugach and St. Elias Mountains, multiple interfaces are present, and we interpret a thinner (80-90 km) North American lithosphere above a deeper interface that represents the base of the Yakutat microplate, thereby extending it to the area below the Wrangell Volcanic Field and St. Elias Mountains. Immediately north of the E-W striking Denali Fault, shallow negative conversions (80 km) denote thin lithosphere in the greater back-arc region where heat flow is observed to be high. Thin lithosphere in eastern Alaska and adjacent Yukon Territory coincides with the occurrence of inboard crustal seismicity and may be indicative of transmitted compression caused by the collision of the Yakutat microplate. Relatively thin lithosphere (<90 km) south of the Arctic Alaska domain that is deforming throughout the Alaskan orocline may result from lithospheric thinning associated with guided deformation. Expansion of this model using the upcoming Transportable Array will be critical to establish lateral continuity (or lack thereof) of lithospheric structure and directly discriminate between existing regional deformation models.

  19. Regional atmospheric circulation change in the North Pacific during the Holocene inferred from lacustrine carbonate oxygen isotopes, Yukon Territory, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Lesleigh; Abbott, Mark B.; Finney, Bruce P.; Burns, Stephen J.

    2005-07-01

    Analyses of sediment cores from Jellybean Lake, a small, evaporation-insensitive groundwater-fed lake, provide a record of changes in North Pacific atmospheric circulation for the last ˜7500 yr at 5- to 30-yr resolution. Isotope hydrology data from the southern Yukon indicate that the oxygen isotope composition of water from Jellybean Lake reflects the composition of mean-annual precipitation, δ 18O p. Recent changes in the δ 18O of Jellybean sedimentary calcite (δ 18O ca) correspond to changes in the North Pacific Index (NPI), a measure of the intensity and position of the Aleutian Low (AL) pressure system. This suggests that δ 18O p variability was related to the degree of fractionation during moisture transport from the Gulf of Alaska across the St. Elias Mountains and that Holocene shifts were controlled by the intensity and position of the AL. Following this model, between ˜7500 and 4500 cal yr B.P., long-term trends suggest a predominantly weaker and/or westward AL. Between ˜4500 and 3000 cal yr B.P. the AL shifted eastward or intensified before shifting westward or weakening between ˜3000 and 2000 cal yr B.P. Rapid shifts eastward and/or intensification occurred ˜1200 and 300 cal yr B.P. Holocene changes in North Pacific atmospheric circulation inferred from Jellybean Lake oxygen isotopes correspond with late Holocene glacial advances in the St. Elias Mountains, changes in North Pacific salmon abundance, and shifts in atmospheric circulation over the Beaufort Sea.

  20. Evidence for Chemical Processing of Precometary Icy Grains In Circumstellar Environments of Pre-Main-Sequence Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teglier, Stephen C.; Weintraub, David A.; Rettig, Terrence W.; Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Whittet, Douglas C.; Kulesa, Craig A.

    1995-01-01

    We report the detection of a broad absorption feature near 2166 cm-1 in the spectrum of the Taurus cloud source Elias 18. This pre-main-sequence source is the second in Taurus, the third in our survey, and the fifth known in the sky to show the broad 2166 cm-1 absorption feature. Of equal importance, this feature is not seen toward several other embedded sources in our survey, nor is it seen toward the source Elias 16, located behind the Taurus cloud. Laboratory experiments with interstellar ice analogs show that such a feature is associated with a complex C=-N containing compound [called X(C=-N)] that results from high-energy processing (ultraviolet irradiation or ion bombardment) of simple ice components into more complex, organic components, We find a nonlinear anticorrelation between the abundance of X(C=-N) and frozen CO in non- polar lattices. We find no correlation between the abundance of X(C=-N) and frozen CO in polar lattices. Because the abundances of frozen CO and H20 are strongly correlated with each other and with visual extinction toward sources embedded in and located behind the Taurus molecular cloud, these ice components usually are associated with intracloud material. Our results indicate that X(C=-N) molecules result from chemical processing of dust grains dominated by nonpolar icy mantles in the local environments of pre-main- sequence stars. Such processing of icy grains in the early solar system may be an important source of organic compounds observed in minor solar system bodies. The delivery of these organic compounds to the surface of the primitive Earth through comet impacts may have provided the raw materials for prebiotic chemistry.

  1. Deformation in the Yakataga seismic gap, Southern Alaska, 1980- 1986 ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Lisowski, M.

    1988-01-01

    A 60-by-40-km trilateration network in the Yakataga seismic gap was surveyed in 1980, 1982, 1984, and 1986 with precise electro-optical distance-measuring equipment to measure strain accumulation. The overall deformation is roughly approximated by a 0.24+ or -0.03 mu strain/yr N32oW+ or -2.4o uniaxial contraction that is uniform in time. However, the spatial distribution of deformation shows some concentration of convergence in the neighbourhood of the Chugach-St. Elias fault and of right-lateral shear across the Contact fault. A simple dislocation model of the plate interaction in the Yakataga gap fits the observed deformation reasonably well but seems to require that the motion of the Pacific plate relative to the North American plate be directed more nearly N36oW than N15oW, the generally accepted direction of relative motion for this location. However, the direction of plate motion inferred from the dislocation model depends upon details of the interaction at the plate boundary that may not have been modeled accurately. A nearby but smaller trilateration network at Icy Bay was surveyed in 1982, 1984, and 1986. This network spans the SW corner of the rupture zone of the 1979 St. Elias earthquake. The deformation at Icy Bay consists of left-lateral shear across a NE trending zone. The relation of this deformation to strain accumulation in the Yakataga gap, postseismic relaxation associated with the 1979 earthquake, or rebound from the unloading associated with the rapid recession of the Guyot glacier is not understood.-Authors

  2. The Evolution of the Surveyor Fan and Channel System, Gulf of Alaska based on Core-Log-Seismic Integration at IODP Site U1417

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morey, S.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Walton, M. A. L.; Swartz, J. M.; Worthington, L. L.; Reece, R.; Somchat, K.; Wagner, P. F.; Jaeger, J. M.; Mix, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The transition to quasi-periodic ~100-kyr glacial cycles during the mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT, ~1.2 Ma) saw an acceleration of sediment delivery from the St. Elias orogen. Eroded sediment from the St. Elias Mountains is transferred to the deep sea via glacially carved shelf troughs and eventually to the Aleutian Trench via the Surveyor Channel and Fan system. By analyzing the submarine sediments in this Fan, we can evaluate the source-to-sink relationship between the erosion of an orogen and deep-sea deposition and inform our understanding of the impact of climate on local tectonics. Our work seeks to update depositional models of the unique sedimentary sequences, architecture, and origins of the glacially-fed Surveyor Fan using well-log-seismic correlation and new data from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 341. Exp. 341 results question proposed ages of major fan stratigraphic packages, necessitating this update. We created an integrated velocity model using discrete core-based p-wave velocities acquired at site U1417 from 100-152m, down-hole sonic log velocities from 152m-476m, and then projected the trend of the sonic log velocity from 476m to the base of the borehole. Previous work has interpreted the Sequence I/II boundary (~300 mbsf at U1417) to correspond with the start of the Surveyor Fan and the onset of tidewater glaciation in the late Miocene and the Sequence II/III boundary (~160 mbsf at U1417) to coincide with the intensification of glaciation and subsequent increase in sediment flux at the MPT. Our updated velocity model places these major sequence boundaries at the correct depths in borehole site U1417. We can use the revised velocity model to correlate lithologic, biostratigraphic, paleomagnetic, and logging data from the borehole/cores to seismic data, allowing for construction of a temporal model for the evolution of the Surveyor fan. We can then examine the relationship between glacial-interglacial cycle duration and

  3. Southern Alaska as an Example of the Long-Term Consequences of Mountain Building Under the Influence of Glaciers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meigs, Andrew; Sauber, Jeanne

    2000-01-01

    Southern Alaska is a continent-scale region of ongoing crustal deformation within the Pacific-North American plate boundary zone. Glaciers and glacial erosion have dictated patterns of denudation in the orogen over the last approx. 5 My. The orogen comprises three discrete topographic domains from south to north, respectively: (1) the Chugach/St. Elias Range; (2) the Wrangell Mountains; and (3) the eastern Alaska Range. Although present deformation is distributed across the orogen, much of the shortening and uplift are concentrated in the Chugach/St. Elias Range. A systematic increase in topographic wavelength of the range from east to west reflects east-to-west increases in the width of a shallowly-dipping segment of the plate interface, separation of major upper plate structures, and a decrease in the obliquity of plate motion relative to the plate boundary. Mean elevation decays exponentially from approx. 2500 m to approx. 1100 m from east to west, respectively. Topographic control on the present and past distribution of glaciers is indicated by close correspondence along the range between mean elevation and the modern equilibrium line altitude of glaciers (ELA) and differences in the modern ELA, mean annual precipitation and temperature across the range between the windward, southern and leeward, northern flanks. Net, range- scale erosion is the sum of: (1) primary bedrock erosion by glaciers and (2) erosion in areas of the landscape that are ice-marginal and are deglaciated at glacial minima. Oscillations between glacial and interglacial climates controls ice height and distribution, which, in turn, modulates the locus and mode of erosion in the landscape. Mean topography and the mean position of the ELA are coupled because of the competition between rock uplift, which tends to raise the ELA, and enhanced orographic precipitation accompanying mountain building, which tends to lower the ELA. Mean topography is controlled both by the 60 deg latitude and maritime

  4. Deciphering the Transitional Tectonics of the Southern Alaska Margin Through Gulf Sedimentology and Geophysics: IODP Expedition 341

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, R.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Jaeger, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Southern Alaska is a complex amalgam of tectonic environments, centered on the subduction/collision of the Yakutat Block with North America. Along the Aleutians in the west, the Pacific Plate subducts normally beneath North America, with a gradually shallowing subduction angle towards the Yakutat Terrane to the east. The western region of the Yakutat Block undergoes nearly flat-slab subduction beneath North America, whereas it transitions to collision in the northeast, which is the primary driver for the growth of the Chugach-St. Elias orogen. Farther to the east, the collisional system transitions to a transform boundary with the Fairweather-Queen Charlotte fault system. The collisional system contributes to farfield tectonic effects in many regions, including northern Alaska and the Pacific Plate, but also combines with glaciation to drive sedimentation in the Gulf of Alaska. Glaciation has periodically increased in the St. Elias Range since the Miocene, but began dominating erosion and spurred enhanced exhumation since the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation, at ~2.5 Ma. Results from IODP Expedition 341 show the first appearance of ice-rafted debris and a doubling of Gulf sedimentation at site U1417 at this age, and a major increase in sedimentation at ~1 Ma at sites U1417 and U1418. Glacigenic sediment flux into the Gulf of Alaska represents the majority of accumulation in the deepwater Surveyor Fan, and was the impetus for formation of the Surveyor Channel system. Climate events correlate to three major differentiable sequences across the Surveyor Fan that have been previously mapped using seismic reflection profiles. The change in morphology observed throughout the sequences allows us to characterize the influence that a glaciated orogen can have in shaping margin processes and the sediment pathways from source to sink. IODP Expedition 341 results allow us to now apply this method at higher resolution time scales (i.e., 100 kyr). We will explore

  5. Focused rock uplift above the subduction décollement at Montague and Hinchinbrook Islands, Prince William Sound, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferguson, Kelly M; Armstrong, Phillip A; Arkle Jeanette C; Haeussler, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Megathrust splay fault systems in accretionary prisms have been identified as conduits for long-term plate motion and significant coseismic slip during subduction earthquakes. These fault systems are important because of their role in generating tsunamis, but rarely are emergent above sea level where their long-term (million year) history can be studied. We present 32 apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) and 27 apatite fission-track (AFT) ages from rocks along an emergent megathrust splay fault system in the Prince William Sound region of Alaska above the shallowly subducting Yakutat microplate. The data show focused exhumation along the Patton Bay megathrust splay fault system since 3–2 Ma. Most AHe ages are younger than 5 Ma; some are as young as 1.1 Ma. AHe ages are youngest at the southwest end of Montague Island, where maximum fault displacement occurred on the Hanning Bay and Patton Bay faults and the highest shoreline uplift occurred during the 1964 earthquake. AFT ages range from ca. 20 to 5 Ma. Age changes across the Montague Strait fault, north of Montague Island, suggest that this fault may be a major structural boundary that acts as backstop to deformation and may be the westward mechanical continuation of the Bagley fault system backstop in the Saint Elias orogen. The regional pattern of ages and corresponding cooling and exhumation rates indicate that the Montague and Hinchinbrook Island splay faults, though separated by only a few kilometers, accommodate kilometer-scale exhumation above a shallowly subducting plate at million year time scales. This long-term pattern of exhumation also reflects short-term seismogenic uplift patterns formed during the 1964 earthquake. The increase in rock uplift and exhumation rate ca. 3–2 Ma is coincident with increased glacial erosion that, in combination with the fault-bounded, narrow width of the islands, has limited topographic development. Increased exhumation starting ca. 3–2 Ma is interpreted to be due to rock uplift

  6. Spectral and Structure Modeling of Low and High Mass Young Stars Using a Radiative Trasnfer Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson Rocha, Will; Pilling, Sergio

    The spectroscopy data from space telescopes (ISO, Spitzer, Herchel) shows that in addition to dust grains (e.g. silicates), there is also the presence of the frozen molecular species (astrophysical ices, such as H _{2}O, CO, CO _{2}, CH _{3}OH) in the circumstellar environments. In this work we present a study of the modeling of low and high mass young stellar objects (YSOs), where we highlight the importance in the use of the astrophysical ices processed by the radiation (UV, cosmic rays) comes from stars in formation process. This is important to characterize the physicochemical evolution of the ices distributed by the protostellar disk and its envelope in some situations. To perform this analysis, we gathered (i) observational data from Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) related with low mass protostar Elias29 and high mass protostar W33A, (ii) absorbance experimental data in the infrared spectral range used to determinate the optical constants of the materials observed around this objects and (iii) a powerful radiative transfer code to simulate the astrophysical environment (RADMC-3D, Dullemond et al, 2012). Briefly, the radiative transfer calculation of the YSOs was done employing the RADMC-3D code. The model outputs were the spectral energy distribution and theoretical images in different wavelengths of the studied objects. The functionality of this code is based on the Monte Carlo methodology in addition to Mie theory for interaction among radiation and matter. The observational data from different space telescopes was used as reference for comparison with the modeled data. The optical constants in the infrared, used as input in the models, were calculated directly from absorbance data obtained in the laboratory of both unprocessed and processed simulated interstellar samples by using NKABS code (Rocha & Pilling 2014). We show from this study that some absorption bands in the infrared, observed in the spectrum of Elias29 and W33A can arises after the ices

  7. Clinical utility of quantitative multi-antibody Polycheck immunoassays in the diagnosis of coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Ewa; Grzywnowicz, Maciej; Oralewska, Beata; Cielecka-Kuszyk, Joanna; Trojanowska, Ilona; Cukrowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical utility of multi-antibody strategies in the diagnosis of coeliac disease (CD), the new quantitative Polycheck immunoassays were analysed. METHODS: Polycheck Celiac Panels (PCPs) are immunoenzyme screening assays for the quantitative measurement of coeliac-specific immunoglobulin class G (IgG) or class A (IgA) in serum. Lines of relevant antigens are coated together with five IgG or IgA standard lines used for the standard curve as positive control. PCP IgA consists of human recombinant human tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and deamidated gliadin peptides (DGP) as targets to detect IgA antibodies. PCP IgG consists of tTG, DGP and IF (intrinsic factor) antigens to detect antibodies in IgG class. PCPs were performed on 50 CD patients, including 6 cases with selective IgA deficiency, and 50 non-coeliac controls. CD diagnosis was performed according to the ESPGHAN recommendations: The presence of specific anti-tTG-IgA or anti-DGP-IgG (in the case of IgA deficiency) antibodies, typical histopathological changes in duodenal mucosa described in Marsh-Oberhüber classification as at least grade 2. The diagnosis of the majority of the control subjects was functional gastrointestinal disorders. The PCP results were compared with reference EliA Celikey. RESULTS: The usage of PCPs led to the correct identification of all CD patients. In our study, PCPs showed 100% agreement with the histopathological results. PCP IgA test showed a 98% concordance and correlated positively (R = 0.651, P = 0.0014) with EliA Celikey test. The highest specificity and positive predictive value (both 100%) were observed for the detection of Polycheck anti-tTG-IgA antibodies. The highest sensitivity and negative predictive value (both 100%) were achieved by Polycheck anti-DGP-IgG antibody detection. The best performance (98% sensitivity and negative predictive value, 100% specificity and positive predictive value, diagnostic accuracy - AU ROC 99%) was observed for the

  8. Progress at the Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer ``THe-Trap''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoecker, Martin; Eronen, Tommi; Ketter, Jochen; Streubel, Sebastian; Blaum, Klaus; van Dyck, Robert S.

    2012-03-01

    In 2008, the ``University of Washington Penning-Trap Mass Spectrometer'' (UW-PTMS), originally designed and built by the Van Dyck group, was moved to the Max-Planck-Insitute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. It was set up in a dedicated laboratory that meets both the radiation-safety requirements, and the environment-stabilization demands for a high-precision measurement of the tritium/helium-3 mass ratio. Our goal is to measure this mass ratio with a relative uncertainty of 10-11, which would be more than an order of magnitude better than the previous best measurement. It would decrease the uncertainty in the tritium beta decay Q-value (an important parameter in the ongoing search for the neutrino mass by experiments such as KATRIN) by the same factor. In order to emphasize the specialization of our experiment with regard to Tritium and ^3Helium, it was renamed to ``THe-Trap''. THe-Trap features a double Penning-trap for rapid ion exchange, an external ion source to minimize trap contamination, a novel Zener-based voltage source, and active as well as passive stabilization of temperature, pressure and the magnetic field of the superconducting magnet. An overview of the project and a report on the recent progress will be given.

  9. Dead layer on silicon p-i-n diode charged-particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, B. L.; Amsbaugh, John F.; Beglarian, A.; Bergmann, T.; Bichsel, H. C.; Bodine, L. I.; Boyd, N. M.; Burritt, Tom H.; Chaoui, Z.; Corona, T. J.; Doe, Peter J.; Enomoto, S.; Harms, F.; Harper, Gregory; Howe, M. A.; Martin, E. L.; Parno, D. S.; Peterson, David; Petzold, Linda; Renschler, R.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Schwarz, J.; Steidl, M.; Van Wechel, T. D.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wustling, S.; Wierman, K. J.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2014-04-21

    Abstract Semiconductor detectors in general have a dead layer at their surfaces that is either a result of natural or induced passivation, or is formed during the process of making a contact. Charged particles passing through this region produce ionization that is incompletely collected and recorded, which leads to departures from the ideal in both energy deposition and resolution. The silicon p-i-n diode used in the KATRIN neutrinomass experiment has such a dead layer. We have constructed a detailed Monte Carlo model for the passage of electrons from vacuum into a silicon detector, and compared the measured energy spectra to the predicted ones for a range of energies from 12 to 20 keV. The comparison provides experimental evidence that a substantial fraction of the ionization produced in the "dead" layer evidently escapes by discussion, with 46% being collected in the depletion zone and the balance being neutralized at the contact or by bulk recombination. The most elementary model of a thinner dead layer from which no charge is collected is strongly disfavored.

  10. Direct nuclear probes of neutrino mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parno, Diana

    2016-03-01

    Neutrinos have non-zero mass, as demonstrated by an extensive experimental program in neutrino oscillations. The absolute mass scale of neutrinos, however, remains elusive. In this talk, I will review past and future laboratory-based efforts to measure the neutrino mass directly, with minimal model dependence, through the endpoint kinematics of nuclear beta decays. The KATRIN collaboration expects to begin taking data on tritium within the next year; the Project 8 collaboration has recently demonstrated an important proof-of-principle milestone for a new tritium-based concept; and three collaborations---ECHo, HOLMES, and NuMECS---are making substantial progress toward a competitive holmium-based measurement. I will discuss some of the technical and scientific challenges faced by each approach, and give an update on the current status of the field. I gratefully acknowledge support from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Award Number DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  11. Probing the Absolute Mass Scale of Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. Joseph A. Formaggio

    2011-10-12

    The experimental efforts of the Neutrino Physics Group at MIT center primarily around the exploration of neutrino mass and its significance within the context of nuclear physics, particle physics, and cosmology. The group has played a prominent role in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, a neutrino experiment dedicated to measure neutrino oscillations from 8B neutrinos created in the sun. The group is now focusing its efforts in the measurement of the neutrino mass directly via the use of tritium beta decay. The MIT group has primary responsibilities in the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino mass experiment, expected to begin data taking by 2013. Specifically, the MIT group is responsible for the design and development of the global Monte Carlo framework to be used by the KATRIN collaboration, as well as responsibilities directly associated with the construction of the focal plane detector. In addition, the MIT group is sponsoring a new research endeavor for neutrino mass measurements, known as Project 8, to push beyond the limitations of current neutrino mass experiments.

  12. Towards high-precision measurement of the Tritium - He-3 mass difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Redshaw, Matthew; Victoria, Juliette; Myers, Edmund

    2004-05-01

    An independent measurement of the mass difference of ^3He-^3T provides an important check of systematic errors in tritium beta-decay experiments that set limits to the electron anti-neutrino mass [1]. Using the precision Penning trap system developed at MIT but recently relocated to Florida State University [2], and the simultaneous two-ion cyclotron frequency measurement technique recently developed at MIT [3], we aim to measure this mass difference to better than 30 meV/c^2, more than an order of magnitude improvement over previous measurements [4,5]. Problems being addressed include producing single T^+ ions in the trap without spoiling the vacuum with ^3He, and the extension of the MIT techniques to ions of lighter mass. [1] KATRIN: http://iklau1.fzk.de/tritium [2] See abstract by Redshaw et al. [3] S. Rainville, J.K. Thompson, and D.E. Pritchard, Science 303, 334 (2004). [4] R.S. Van Dyck, D.L. Farnham, and P.B. Schwinberg, PRL 70, 2888 (1993). [5] G. Audi, A.H. Wapstra, and C. Thibault, Nuclear Physics A729, 337 (2003).

  13. Advanced data extraction infrastructure: Web based system for management of time series data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingaryan, S.; Beglarian, A.; Kopmann, A.; Vöcking, S.

    2010-04-01

    During operation of high energy physics experiments a big amount of slow control data is recorded. It is necessary to examine all collected data checking the integrity and validity of measurements. With growing maturity of AJAX technologies it becomes possible to construct sophisticated interfaces using web technologies only. Our solution for handling time series, generally slow control data, has a modular architecture: backend system for data analysis and preparation, a web service interface for data access and a fast AJAX web display. In order to provide fast interactive access the time series are aggregated over time slices of few predefined lengths. The aggregated values are stored in the temporary caching database and, then, are used to create generalizing data plots. These plots may include indication of data quality and are generated within few hundreds of milliseconds even if very high data rates are involved. The extensible export subsystem provides data in multiple formats including CSV, Excel, ROOT, and TDMS. The search engine can be used to find periods of time where indications of selected sensors are falling into the specified ranges. Utilization of the caching database allows performing most of such lookups within a second. Based on this functionality a web interface facilitating fast (Google-maps style) navigation through the data has been implemented. The solution is at the moment used by several slow control systems at Test Facility for Fusion Magnets (TOSKA) and Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN).

  14. Light sterile neutrino sensitivity of 163Ho experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastaldo, L.; Giunti, C.; Zavanin, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    We explore the sensitivity of 163Ho electron capture experiments to neutrino masses in the standard framework of three-neutrino mixing and in the framework of 3+1 neutrino mixing with a sterile neutrino which mixes with the three standard active neutrinos, as indicated by the anomalies found in short-baseline neutrino oscillations experiments. We calculate the sensitivity to neutrino masses and mixing for different values of the energy resolution of the detectors, of the unresolved pileup fraction and of the total statistics of events, considering the expected values of these parameters in the two planned stages of the ECHo project (ECHo-1k and ECHo-1M). We show that an extension of the ECHo-1M experiment with the possibility to collect 1016 events will be competitive with the KATRIN experiment. This statistics will allow to explore part of the 3+1 mixing parameter space indicated by the global analysis of short-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. In order to cover all the allowed region, a statistics of about 1017 events will be needed.

  15. Upper bound of 0.28 eV on neutrino masses from the largest photometric redshift survey.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shaun A; Abdalla, Filipe B; Lahav, Ofer

    2010-07-16

    We present a new limit of ∑m(v) ≤ 0.28 (95% CL) on the sum of the neutrino masses assuming a flat ΛCDM cosmology. This relaxes slightly to ∑m(ν) ≤ 0.34 and ∑m(v) ≤ 0.47 when quasinonlinear scales are removed and w≠ -1, respectively. These are derived from a new photometric catalogue of over 700,000 luminous red galaxies (MegaZ DR7) with a volume of 3.3  (Gpc h(-1))(3) and redshift range 0.45 < z < 0.65. The data are combined with WMAP 5-year CMB, baryon acoustic oscillations, supernovae, and a Hubble Space Telescope prior on h. When combined with WMAP these data are as constraining as adding all supernovae and baryon oscillation data available. The upper limit is one of the tightest constraints on the neutrino from cosmology or particle physics. Further, if these bounds hold, they all predict that current-to-next generation neutrino experiments, such as KATRIN, are unlikely to obtain a detection. PMID:20867754

  16. Assessment of molecular effects on neutrino mass measurements from tritium β decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodine, L. I.; Parno, D. Â. S.; Robertson, R. Â. G. Â. H.

    2015-03-01

    The β decay of molecular tritium currently provides the highest sensitivity in laboratory-based neutrino mass measurements. The upcoming Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment will improve the sensitivity to 0.2 eV, making a percent-level quantitative understanding of molecular effects essential. The modern theoretical calculations available for neutrino mass experiments agree with spectroscopic data. Moreover, when neutrino mass experiments performed in the 1980s with gaseous tritium are reevaluated using these modern calculations, the extracted neutrino mass squared values are consistent with zero instead of being significantly negative. However, the calculated molecular final-state branching ratios are in conflict with dissociation experiments performed in the 1950s. We reexamine the theory of the final-state spectrum of molecular-tritium decay and its effect on the determination of the neutrino mass, with an emphasis on the role of the vibrational- and rotational-state distribution in the ground electronic state. General features can be reproduced quantitatively from considerations of kinematics and zero-point motion. We summarize the status of validation efforts and suggest means for resolving the apparent discrepancy in dissociation rates.

  17. High-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental studies.

    PubMed

    Kluge, H-Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry for fundamental studies in metrology and atomic, nuclear and particle physics requires extreme sensitivity and efficiency as well as ultimate resolving power and accuracy. An overview will be given on the global status of high-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental physics and metrology. Three quite different examples of modern mass spectrometric experiments in physics are presented: (i) the retardation spectrometer KATRIN at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, employing electrostatic filtering in combination with magnetic-adiabatic collimation-the biggest mass spectrometer for determining the smallest mass, i.e. the mass of the electron anti-neutrino, (ii) the Experimental Cooler-Storage Ring at GSI-a mass spectrometer of medium size, relative to other accelerators, for determining medium-heavy masses and (iii) the Penning trap facility, SHIPTRAP, at GSI-the smallest mass spectrometer for determining the heaviest masses, those of super-heavy elements. Finally, a short view into the future will address the GSI project HITRAP at GSI for fundamental studies with highly-charged ions. PMID:20530821

  18. On the Proof of Dark Matter, the Law of Gravity, and the Mass of Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Garry W.; Shan, Huan Yuan; Zhao, Hong Sheng; Famaey, Benoit

    2007-01-01

    We develop a new method to predict the density associated with weak-lensing maps of (un)relaxed clusters in a range of theories interpolating between general relativity (GR) and modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND). We apply it to fit the lensing map of the Bullet merging cluster 1E 0657-56, in order to constrain more robustly the nature and amount of collisionless matter in clusters beyond the usual assumption of spherical equilibrium (Pointecouteau & Silk) and the validity of GR on cluster scales (Clowe et al.). Strengthening the proposal of previous authors, we show that the Bullet Cluster is dominated by a collisionless-most probably nonbaryonic-component in GR as well as in MOND, a result consistent with the dynamics of many X-ray clusters. Our findings add to the number of known pathologies for a purely baryonic MOND, including its inability to fit the latest data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. A plausible resolution of all these issues and standard issues of cold dark matter (CDM) with galaxy rotation curves is the ``marriage'' of MOND with ordinary hot neutrinos of 2 eV. This prediction is just within the GR-independent maximum of neutrino mass from current β-decay experiments and will be falsifiable by the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment by 2009. Issues of consistency with strong-lensing arcs and the large relative velocity of the two clusters comprising the Bullet Cluster are also addressed.

  19. Forbidden unique beta-decays and neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornický, Rastislav; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2013-12-30

    The measurement of the electron spectrum in beta-decays provides a robust direct determination of the values of neutrino masses. The planned rhenium beta-decay experiment, called the “Microcalorimeter Arrays for a Rhenium Experiment” (MARE), might probe the absolute mass scale of neutrinos with the same sensitivity as the Karlsruhe tritium neutrino mass (KATRIN) experiment, which is expected to collect data in a near future. In this contribution we discuss the spectrum of emitted electrons close to the end point in the case of the first unique forbidden beta-decay of {sup 79}Se, {sup 107}Pd and {sup 187}Re. It is found that the p{sub 3/2}-wave emission dominates over the s{sub 1/2}-wave. It is shown that the Kurie plot near the end point is within a good accuracy linear in the limit of massless neutrinos like the Kurie plot of the superallowed beta-decay of {sup 3}H.

  20. Measurements of relative binding of cohesin and dockerin mutants using an advanced ELISA technique for high-affinity interactions.

    PubMed

    Slutzki, Michal; Barak, Yoav; Reshef, Dan; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    The cellulosome is a large bacterial extracellular multienzyme complex able to degrade crystalline cellulosic substrates. The complex contains catalytic and noncatalytic subunits, interconnected by high-affinity cohesin-dockerin interactions. In this chapter, we introduce an optimized method for comparative binding among different cohesins or cohesin mutants to the dockerin partner. This assay offers advantages over other methods (such as ELISA, cELIA, SPR, and ITC) for particularly high-affinity binding interactions. In this approach, the high-affinity interaction of interest occurs in the liquid phase during the equilibrated binding step, whereas the interaction with the immobilized phase is used only for detection of the unbound dockerins that remain in the solution phase. Once equilibrium conditions are reached, the change in free energy of binding (ΔΔG(binding)), as well as the affinity constant of mutants, can be estimated against the known affinity constant of the wild-type interaction. In light of the above, we propose this method as a preferred alternative for the relative quantification of high-affinity protein interactions. PMID:22608739

  1. Symbolic violence and the neighbourhood: the educational aspirations of 7-8 year old working-class girls.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Paul; Healy, Julie

    2004-12-01

    This article focuses on the experiences of 7-8 year old working-class girls in Belfast, Northern Ireland and their attitudes towards education. It shows how their emerging identities tend to emphasize relationships, marriage and motherhood at the expense of a concern with education and future careers. The article suggests that one important factor that can help explain this is the influence of the local neighbourhood. In drawing upon Bourdieu's concepts of symbolic violence and habitus and Elias' notion of figuration, the article shows how the local neighbourhood represents the parameters of the girls' social worlds. It provides the context within which the girls tend to focus on social relations within their community and particularly on family relationships, marriage and children. It also provides the context within which the girls tend to develop strong interdependent relationships with their mothers that also tend to encourage and reinforce the girls' particular gendered identities. The article concludes by arguing that there is a need for more research on working-class girls and education to look beyond the school to incorporate, more fully, an understanding of the influence of the family and local neighbourhood on their attitudes towards education and their future career aspirations. PMID:15663422

  2. Ideas for Use of an IPad in Introductory Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurora, Tarlok S.

    2014-03-01

    Mobile devices such as an IPad, tablet computers and smartphones offer an opportunity to collect information to facilitate physics teaching and learning. The data collected with built-in sensors, such as a video camera, may be analyzed on the mobile device itself or on a desktop computer. In this work, first, the circular motion of a steel ball rolling in a cereal bowl was analyzed to show that it consisted of two simple harmonic motions, in perpendicular directions. Secondly, motion of two balls-one dropped vertically down, and the other one launched as a projectile - was analyzed. Data was analyzed with Logger Pro software, and value of g was determined graphically. Details of the work, its limitations and additional examples will be described. The material so obtained may be used as a demonstration, in a classroom, to clarify physics concepts. In a school, where students are required to have such portable devices, one may assign such activities as homework, to enhance student engagement in learning physics. The author is thankful to USciences for the IPad; and Rich Cosgriff, Phyllis Blumberg and Elia Eschenazi for useful discussions.

  3. Absorption features in the 3 micron spectra of highly obscured objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert G.; Sellgren, Kris; Tokunaga, Alan T.

    1989-01-01

    Using the IRTF cooled-grating spectrometer moderate resolution 2.4 to 3.8 micron spectra of a selection of IR protostars and one object located behind the Taurus dark cloud were obtained. Two examples of the spectra are presented. It is clear that the absorption near 3.07 micron is dominated by H2O ice and a comparison between the spectra and a simple H2O ice model allows a temperature estimate for the hottest ice-coated grains in these sources. Higher resolution observations showed no indication of the absorption due to the N-H stretching vibration of NH3 near 2.963 micron. The most plausible explanation for the 3.3 and 3.45 micron features appears to be absorption by the mixture of hydrocarbons, although they cannot be identified with features already attributed to hydrocarbons in the ISM, reflection nebulae and Comets. However these features appear the same for all sources in the sample, including Elias 16, thus implying a very similar mixture of molecules in each source.

  4. Analysis and Measurement of the Sympathetic and Sensory Innervation of White and Brown Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Cheryl H.; Zarebidaki, Eleen; Ehlen, J. Christopher; Bartness, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we provide a detailed account of how to denervate white and brown adipose tissue (WAT and BAT) and how to measure sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity to these and other tissues neurochemically. The brain controls many of the functions of WAT and BAT via the SNS innervation of the tissues, especially lipolysis and thermogenesis, respectively. There is no clearly demonstrated parasympathetic innervation of WAT or the major interscapular BAT (IBAT) depot. WAT and BAT communicate with the brain neurally via sensory nerves. We detail the surgical denervation (eliminating both innervations) of several WAT pads and IBAT. We also detail more selective chemical denervation of the SNS innervation via intra-WAT/IBAT 6-hydroxy-dopamine (a catecholaminergic neurotoxin) injections and selective chemical sensory denervation via intra-WAT/IBAT capsaicin (a sensory nerve neurotoxin) injections. Verifications of the denervations are provided (HPLC-EC detection for SNS, ELIA for calcitonin gene-related peptide (proven sensory nerve marker)). Finally, assessment of the SNS drive to WAT/BAT or other tissues is described using the alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine method combined with HPLC-EC, a direct neurochemical measure of SNS activity. These methods have proven useful for us and for other investigators interested in innervation of adipose tissues. The chemical denervation approach has been extended to nonadipose tissues as well. PMID:24480348

  5. X-ray Observations of the Variable Star V1735 Cygni and the IC 5146 Dark Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Steve L.; Briggs, K. R.; Guedel, M.; Sokal, K. R.

    2008-09-01

    The variable star V1735 Cyg (= Elias 1-12) is located in the IC 5146 dark cloud, a region of active low-mass star formation that has been extensively studied in the optical and infrared. We present results of an X-ray observation of IC 5146 with XMM-Newton, centered on V1735 Cyg. This star is a member of the class of FU Orionis variables that undergo strong optical outbursts thought to be linked to episodic accretion. Hard X-ray emission was detected from V1735 Cyg at a characteristic temperature kT > 5 keV, in some respects similar to that recently detected in the prototype FU Ori (Skinner et al. 2006, ApJ, 643, 995). We compare the X-ray properties of V1735 Cyg and FU Ori and discuss possible emission mechanisms in the framework of a complex physical environment that likely involves accretion, strong winds, magnetic fields, and possible binarity. We also report the discovery of a second X-ray source located 24 arc-secs northeast of V1735 Cyg that may be associated with a deeply embedded young star previously detected in sub-mm observations. This research is supported by NASA/GSFC grant NNX06AE93G.

  6. A radio survey of weak T Tauri stars in Taurus-Auriga

    SciTech Connect

    O'neal, D.; Feigelson, E.D.; Mathieu, R.D.; Myers, P.C. Wisconsin Univ., Madison Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA )

    1990-11-01

    A multi-epoch 5 GHz survey of candidate or confirmed weak T Tauri stars in the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud complex was conducted with the Very Large Array. The stars were chosen from those having detectable X-ray or chromospheric emission, and weak-emission-line pre-main-sequence stars found by other means. Snapshots of 99 VLA fields containing 119 candidate stars were obtained with a sensitivity of 0.7 mJy; most fields were observed on two or three dates. Nine radio sources coincident with cataloged stars were found. One may be an RS CVn binary system; the other eight are pre-main-sequence stars. Three of the detected stars - HD 283447, V410 Tau, and FK X-ray 1 - were previously known radio sources. Five new detections are Herbig's Anon 1, Hubble 4, HDE 283572, Elias 12, and HK Tau/c. At least five of the sources are variable, and no linear or circular polarization was found. Several lines of evidence suggest that the radio-detected weak T Tauri stars are quite young, perhaps younger on average than nondetected stars. 54 refs.

  7. Helminth Infection Increases the Probability of Indeterminate QuantiFERON Gold in Tube Results in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Gebreegziabiher, Dawit; Desta, Kassu; Howe, Rawleigh; Abebe, Markos

    2014-01-01

    Background. Approximately one-third of the world population is infected with M. tuberculosis and helminths (Kariminia et al. (2009), Walson et al. (2010)). Pregnancy and Helminth infection are known to suppress the TH1 response (Kariminia et al. (2009), Elias et al. (2006)) on which the QuantiFERON Gold in Tube (QFT-GIT) assay, that measures the released IFN-γ upon in vitro stimulation with mycobacterial antigens, relies on (Thomas et al. (2010)). Objective. To determine whether QFT-GIT indeterminate result is significantly associated with helminth infection or not. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, eighty-five pregnant mothers were screened for parasitic and LTBI using Kato-Katz and QFT-GIT test-respectively, Result. The prevalence of helminth infection in pregnant mothers was 23 (27%) of this 17 (20%) was due to Schistosoma mansoni. Among the total of 85 study participants 26.8% were QFT-GIT positive and 14 (17%) had indeterminate results. Three samples (21.4%) were randomly selected from the indeterminate QFT-GIT results and retested to check the reproducibility of the assay and remained indeterminate. QFT-GIT indeterminate result showed significant association with helminth infection. Conclusion. Helminth infections were significantly associated with indeterminate QFT-GIT results in pregnant mothers. Therefore further study is important to evaluate the possible effect of helminth infection by excluding the effect of pregnancy, as pregnancy also downregulates cellular immunity. PMID:24701572

  8. Cutaneous leishmaniasis in western Venezuela caused by infection with Leishmania venezuelensis and L. braziliensis variants.

    PubMed

    Bonfante-Garrido, R; Meléndez, E; Barroeta, S; de Alejos, M A; Momen, H; Cupolillo, E; McMahon-Pratt, D; Grimaldi, G

    1992-01-01

    Between 1975 and 1987, epidemiological studies were carried out in several rural and urban communities in the central part of western Venezuela, especially in the state of Lara. 115 positive cultures were obtained from human cases and identified by their reactivity patterns to a cross-panel of specific monoclonal antibodies using a radioimmune binding assay; 53 were Leishmania venezuelensis and 62 were L. braziliensis. Most of these stocks were also characterized by isoenzyme electrophoresis, which confirmed the identification of the L. venezuelensis isolates. The enzyme electrophoretic profiles of the L. braziliensis isolates, however, revealed two populations with distinct electromorphs, one related to the World Health Organization L. braziliensis reference strain while the other population appeared to be a hybrid between L. braziliensis and L. guyanensis. L. braziliensis variants showed the widest geographical distribution, and were found in 7 states: Districto Federal (Caracas); Lara (Barquisimeto, Crespo, Iribarren, Jimenez, Morán, Palavecino, Torres, Urdaneta); Nueva Esparta (Margarita); Portuguesa (Las Cruces, Rio Amarillo); Trujillo (Cuicas); Yaracuy (Agua Fria, Cambural, Guaremal); and Zulia (Zipa-Yare). L. venezuelensis was found in the following endemic regions: Lara (Barquisimeto, Iribarren, Jimenez, Morán); Merida (Zéa); and Yaracuy (Campos Elias), showing that this parasite has a much wider geographical distribution than was initially recognized and that both these species can occur simultaneously within the same endemic region. Five isolates of L. braziliensis were made from infected donkeys (Equus asinus) in Urdaneta, Lara State, suggesting a possible domestic reservoir of L. braziliensis. PMID:1440772

  9. Extent of endocrine disruption in fish of western and Alaskan National Parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schreck, Carl B.; Kent, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In 2008 2009, 998 fish were collected from 43 water bodies across 11 western Alaskan national parks and analyzed for reproductive abnormalities. Exposure to estrogenic substances such as pesticides can induce abnormalities like intersex. Results suggest there is a greater propensity for male intersex fish collected from parks located in the Rocky Mountains, and specifically in Rocky Mountain NP. Individual male intersex fish were also identified at Lassen Volcanic, Yosemite, and WrangellSt. Elias NPs. The preliminary finding of female intersex was determined to be a false positive. The overall goal of this project was to assess the general health of fish from eleven western national parks to infer whether health impacts may be linked to contaminant health thresholds for animal andor human health. This was accomplished by evaluating the presence of intersex fish with eggs developing in male gonads or sperm developing in female gonads using histology. In addition, endocrine disrupting compounds and other contaminants were quantified in select specimens. General histologic appearance of the gonadal tissue and spleen were observed to assess health.

  10. British Muslims and the UK government's 'war on terror' within: evidence of a clash of civilizations or emergent de-civilizing processes?

    PubMed

    Vertigans, Stephen

    2010-03-01

    In the immediate aftermath of the September 2001 attacks on America, defending civilization was quickly established at the core of the 'war on terror'. Unintentionally or otherwise this incorporation of civilization connected with Samuel Huntington's 'Clash of Civilizations' thesis. Within the 'war on terror' the dark side of counterterrorism has become apparent through international practices like extrajudicial killing, extraordinary rendition and torture. The impact of Western governments' policies upon their indigenous Muslim populations has also been problematic but social and political analysis has been relatively limited. This paper seeks to help address the scarcity of sociological contributions. Hidden costs of the UK government's attempts to utilize violence and enhance social constraints within the nation-state are identified. It is argued that although counterterrorism strategies are contributing to a self-fulfilling spiral of hatred that could be considered evidence in support of the 'Clash of Civilizations', the thesis is unhelpful when trying to grasp the underlying processes. Instead the paper draws upon Norbert Elias's application of the concepts of 'civilizing' and 'de-civilizing' to help improve levels of understanding about the processes and consequences of particular Muslim communities being targeted by security forces. The paper concludes with an exploration of the majority of the population's acquiescence and willingness to accept restraints upon Muslims in order to safeguard their own security. PMID:20377595

  11. Contributions of Contingencies in Modern Societies to “Privacy” in the Behavioral Relations of Cognition and Emotion

    PubMed Central

    Tourinho, Emmanuel Zagury; Borba, Aécio; Vichi, Christian; Leite, Felipe Lustosa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine specific features of modern individualistic societies that contribute to “emotions” and “cognitions” becoming a matter of privacy. Although some behavior analysts identify emotions and cognitions as “private events,” we argue with Skinner (1945) that cognitions and emotions are relations among events and that their origin is in public events in the contingencies of reinforcement maintained by other people. Guided by Elias (1939/1996), we suggest that the shift from feudal economies to market economies involved the increasing individualization of society's members. This individualizing process includes the socially maintained contingencies that bring some verbal responses under control of private stimulation and reduce the magnitude of some verbal responses to a covert level. Behavioral relations in which either stimuli or responses (or both) cannot be observed by others set the stage for a concept of “privacy.” Changes in societal contingencies that gave rise to individualization and the attribution of privacy to cognitions and emotions are suggested to include the following: (a) increasing frequency of individual consequences that have no apparent or direct relevance to the group; (b) increasing numbers of concurrent contingencies and choice requirements; (c) conflicts between immediate and delayed consequences for the individual; and (d) conflicts between consequences for the individual and for the group. PMID:22532738

  12. TerraHertz Free Electron Laser Applications for Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2003-01-01

    The development of a Free Electron Laser (EL) operating in the terahertz frequency regime by the group at the University of Hawaii (Elias et al.) represents a significant new opportunity in the area of atmospheric remote sensing. The FEL has 2 salient features that create a unique opportunity. First of all it represents the only source in this frequency range with sufficient power to enable lidar instrumentation. Secondly its very high electrical efficiency (several times more efficient than any currently employed spaceborne laser) renders it a strong candidate for use in satellite remote sensing. On the negative side the atmosphere is rather strongly absorbing throughout this frequency range due primarily to the water vapor continuum absorption. This means that the instruments using this laser will not be able to access the lower troposphere because of its very high water concentration.. However the instrument will be very capable of measurements in the upper troposphere and stratosphere. A passive instrument, the Microwave Limb Sounder on the UARS satellite operated by Jet Propulsion Laboratory, has already demonstrated that this wavelength region can be used for chemical species with strong emission lines. A lidar would complement the capabilities of this instrument by providing the capability to measure absorbing species in the upper atmosphere. I will discuss the design of such an instrument in greater detail and estimate its performance in measuring a number of chemical species of interest to the Earth Science community.

  13. Field-Based and Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging for Applied Research in the State of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, A.; Buchhorn, M.; Cristobal, J.; Kokaly, R. F.; Graham, P. R.; Waigl, C. F.; Hampton, D. L.; Werdon, M.; Guldager, N.; Bertram, M.; Stuefer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Hyperspectral imagery acquired using Hyspex VNIR-1800 and SWIR-384 camera systems have provided unique information on terrestrial and aquatic biogeochemical parameters, and diagnostic mineral properties in exposed outcrops in selected sites in the state of Alaska. The Hyspex system was configured for in-situ and field scanning by attaching it to a gimbal-mounted rotational stage on a robust tripod. Scans of vertical faces of vegetation and rock outcrops were made close to the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, in an abandoned mine near Fairbanks, and on exposures of Orange Hill in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park. Atmospherically corrected integrated VNIR_SWIR spectra were extracted which helped to study varying nitrogen content in the vegetation, and helped to distinguish the various micas. Processed imagery helped to pull out carbonates, clays, sulfates, and alteration-related minerals. The same instrument was also mounted in airborne configuration on two different aircrafts, a DeHavilland Beaver and a Found Bush Hawk. Test flights were flown over urban and wilderness areas that presented a variety of landcover types. Processed imagery shows promise in mapping man-made surfaces, phytoplankton, and dissolved materials in inland water bodies. Sample data and products are available on the University of Alaska Fairbanks Hyperspectral Imaging Laboratory (HyLab) website at http://hyperspectral.alaska.edu.

  14. Creating Geoscience Leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskop, J.; Buskop, W.

    2013-12-01

    The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization recognizes 21 World Heritage in the United States, ten of which have astounding geological features: Wrangell St. Elias National Park, Olympic National Park, Mesa Verde National Park, Chaco Canyon, Glacier National Park, Carlsbad National Park, Mammoth Cave, Great Smokey Mountains National Park, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, and Everglades National Park. Created by a student frustrated with fellow students addicted to smart phones with an extreme lack of interest in the geosciences, one student visited each World Heritage site in the United States and created one e-book chapter per park. Each chapter was created with original photographs, and a geological discovery hunt to encourage teen involvement in preserving remarkable geological sites. Each chapter describes at least one way young adults can get involved with the geosciences, such a cave geology, glaciology, hydrology, and volcanology. The e-book describes one park per chapter, each chapter providing a geological discovery hunt, information on how to get involved with conservation of the parks, geological maps of the parks, parallels between archaeological and geological sites, and how to talk to a ranger. The young author is approaching UNESCO to publish the work as a free e-book to encourage involvement in UNESCO sites and to prove that the geosciences are fun.

  15. Nurses' daily life: gender relations from the time spent in hospital1

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Audrey Vidal

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the everyday life of nurses through the sexual work division as well as through interdependence relations and the time in hospital. Method: quanti-qualitative study, based on the Time Use Survey and in Norbert Elias's Configuration Theory of Interdependencies. Daily shifts distribution record, directed by 42 participants - with self-confrontation - by interviews which drew dialogues on subjective aspects of the everyday experiences related to use of time, based on a job at a university hospital. The theoretical intake that founded data analysis was based on concepts of conflicts of interest, power struggles, sexual work division and polychronic-monochronic concepts - whether the work environment demands multitasking nurses or not. Results: time records allowed to observe differences between the groups studied, useful to identify conflicts, tensions, power struggles and gender inequalities in interviewees' everyday affairs that do not only affect physical and mental health, but also their way of life. Conclusion: the analytical path pointed out the need for public policies that promote equity in gender relations, keeping at sight the exercise of plural discourses and tolerant stances capable to respect differences between individual and collective time. PMID:26487146

  16. Regional Atmospheric Circulation Change in the North Pacific During the Holocene Inferred from Lacustrine Carbonate Oxygen Isotopes, Yukon Territory, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L.; Abbott, M. B.; Finney, B. P.; Burns, S. J.

    2004-12-01

    Analyses of sediment cores from Jellybean Lake, a small, hydrologically-open groundwater-fed lake, provide a record of changes in North Pacific atmospheric circulation for the last 7500 years at twenty to thirty-year resolution. A regional isotope hydrology study in the southern Yukon indicates that the oxygen isotope composition of water from Jellybean Lake reflects the oxygen isotope composition of mean annual precipitation. Thus, the oxygen isotope history of Jellybean Lake inferred from sedimentary carbonate oxygen isotope ratios suggests multi-decadal shifts in the oxygen isotope composition of mean annual precipitation superimposed on century and millennial trends. Recent fluctuations of Jellybean oxygen isotopes correlate well with changes in the North Pacific Index, a measure of the intensity and position of the Aleutian Low. We propose that oxygen isotope variability of precipitation in the interior of the Yukon is related to the degree of fractionation during moisture transport from the Gulf of Alaska across the St Elias Mountains that is ultimately controlled by the position and strength of the Aleutian Low. Following this model, Aleutian Low intensity during the early to middle Holocene was relatively reduced and increasing intensity coincided with the initial onset of Neoglacial advances. Rapid shifts during the last two millennia corresponds with glacial activity, changes in North Pacific salmon abundance, and shifts in atmospheric circulation over the Beaufort Sea.

  17. Examination of vigilance and disengagement of threat in social anxiety with a probe detection task.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Heide; Amir, Nader

    2009-05-01

    Selective attention for threat faces in social anxiety is commonly measured with a probe detection task. Various studies that have used this task show socially anxious individuals exhibit selective attention for threat faces (Mogg & Bradley, 2002; Mogg, Philippot, & Bradley, 2004b; Pishyar, Harris, & Menzies, 2004). Selective attention for threat when measured with a probe detection task is interpreted as an attentional shift toward threat ("vigilance"). Yet, there is data that show socially anxious individuals may have difficulty in shifting their attention away from threat ("disengagement"; Amir, Elias, Klumpp, & Przeworski, 2003). A step toward clarifying the extent to which selective attention for threat comprises vigilance or disengagement effects is described by Koster, Crombez, Verschuere, and de Houwer (2004). We adapted their modified probe detection task to examine vigilance and disengagement effects for threat and happy faces in individuals with and without social anxiety. The results indicate that socially anxious individuals exhibit vigilance for threat faces, but not for happy faces, compared to individuals without social anxiety. Our study is consistent with cognitive theories of anxiety that propose vigilance for threat may contribute to the maintenance of anxiety disorders. PMID:19253172

  18. Calculated Properties of Fully Hydrogenated Single Layers of BN, BC2N, and Graphene: Graphane and Its BN-Containing Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Averill, Frank; Morris, James R; Cooper, Valentino R

    2009-01-01

    Carbon is an attractive material for hydrogen adsorption, due to its light weight, variety of structures, and ability to both physisorb and chemisorb hydrogen. Recently, fully hydrogenated graphene layers ( graphane ) have been predicted to exist [J.O. Sofo et al., Phys. Rev. B 75, 15340 (2007)], and experimentally observed [D.C. Elias et al., Science 323, 610 (2009)]. In this work, we examine analogues of graphane, in particular BNH2 and BC2NH4. Unlike graphene, these materials have a band gap without hydrogenation. Our results indicate that the hydrogenation product of BN is metastable: the fully hydrogenated compound BNH2 is higher in energy than hexagonal BN sheets plus H2 molecules, in sharp contrast with graphane. We find that BC2NH4 is energetically very close to hexagonal BC2N+2H2 molecules. Furthermore our examination of the relative binding strengths of rows of symmetry related hydrogen atoms on BC2NH4shows that this compound is marginally higher in energy than BC2NH2 plus an H2 molecule, with the hydrogen atoms in BC2NH2 absorbed on the carbon sites. These remaining hydrogen atoms are not as strongly bound as in graphane, indicating that the average hydrogen chemisorption energy is controllable by changing the carbon content in the B-C-N layer.

  19. Immunologic reactions triggered during irritant contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, B J

    1998-06-01

    This article discusses a novel approach to the understanding of human skin barrier function with particular emphasis on the immunologic consequences of barrier perturbation. Clearly, the most important homeostatic function of the skin is to restrict the ebb and flow of water molecules to maintain a physiological balance with respect to hydration between the inside of the body and the external environment. The early investigators of barrier function initially focused on defining the biophysical properties of the stratum corneum and integrating the concepts of Singer and Nicholson1 into various models such as the brick and mortar concept by Elias2 and the domain mosaic model by Forslind.3 Rather than examining lipids, cholesterol, and free fatty acids in the stratum corneum, the authors have been interested in characterizing the types of specialized proteins termed cytokines that are intimately linked to the barrier structure and function of human and rodent skin.4 Cytokines are key mediators of inflammatory and immunologic reactions throughout the body; how these cytokines are modulated in response to changes in barrier function provides new insights that pass beyond the physical/mechanical protective nature of skin into the immunologic sphere of influence for barrier function and cutaneous homeostasis. PMID:9601898

  20. Earthquakes - Volcanoes (Causes and Forecast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, E.

    2009-04-01

    EARTHQUAKES - VOLCANOES (CAUSES AND FORECAST) ELIAS TSIAPAS RESEARCHER NEA STYRA, EVIA,GREECE TEL.0302224041057 tsiapas@hol.gr The earthquakes are caused by large quantities of liquids (e.g. H2O, H2S, SO2, ect.) moving through lithosphere and pyrosphere (MOHO discontinuity) till they meet projections (mountains negative projections or projections coming from sinking lithosphere). The liquids are moved from West Eastward carried away by the pyrosphere because of differential speed of rotation of the pyrosphere by the lithosphere. With starting point an earthquake which was noticed at an area and from statistical studies, we know when, where and what rate an earthquake may be, which earthquake is caused by the same quantity of liquids, at the next east region. The forecast of an earthquake ceases to be valid if these components meet a crack in the lithosphere (e.g. limits of lithosphere plates) or a volcano crater. In this case the liquids come out into the atmosphere by the form of gasses carrying small quantities of lava with them (volcano explosion).

  1. Collared Pikas as a Model Species for Studying the Biological Impacts of Climate Change in Alpine Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donovan, K. S.; Hik, D.

    2007-12-01

    Climate models suggest that global temperatures could rise between 1.4° C and 5.8° C over the next 100 years, and that these effects will be most extreme in northern mountain regions. Pikas (Ochotona, Lagomorpha) are widespread small mammals in the alpine environments of Asia and North America. They are cold adapted and consequently sensitive to warming global temperatures. Considerable research has shown a poleward migration of many species as a result of rising temperatures, but high alpine dwelling species, like the pika, may already be trapped at the top of mountains. Little is known about the threshold values of environmental conditions under which pikas either persist or disappear. Collared pikas (Ochotona collaris) inhabit alpine meadows in the Kluane region of the southwest Yukon. Sites located along an environmental gradient from nunataks in the St Elias Icefields to the Ruby Range Mountains have experienced different climatic and glacial histories. Using baseline data from the long-term study in the Ruby Ranges, we report on differences in the ecological and climatic conditions of sites along this gradient and how this translates into differences in the behavioural and population ecology of the pikas living there. By looking at these differences we can infer the potential impacts of a warming climate, and the subsequent ecological changes on collared pika populations in order to clarify the causes of local extinction and allow us to develop models for predicting ecological responses as conditions change under future climate regimes.

  2. Identification of geostructures of continental crust, particularly as they relate to mineral resource evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gryc, G. (Principal Investigator); Lathram, E. H.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The southeastward continuation of a fault that has been mapped in the vicinity of Dan Creek, Alaska, shows up as a lineament on ERTS-1 image 1043-20163 that can be traced for more than 50 miles southeastward to beyond the Alaska-Canada boundary. The lineament probably reflects a major fault that is significant in understanding the complicated tectonics of the Wrangell Mountains-Saint Elias Mountains complex. From a study of the ERTS-1 image, low level vertical photography, and limited field work in the largely unmapped region, E.M. Mackevett, Jr., speculates that the eastern part of the fault may mark the southern boundary of a mild-Paleozoic metamorphic terrane that constitutes the westernmost known extent of the Alexander terrane of Berg, Jones, and Richter (1972) and correlates with the Kaskawulsh Group in Canada. This terrane, which consists dominantly of marble, was recognized during 1972 reconnaissance mapping in the eastcentral part of the McCarthy quadrangle by MacKevett, D.L. Jones, and D.H. Richter and contrasts strongly with the dominantly volcanic and volcanoclastic terrane of Pennsylvanian and Permian age that forms the basement in most of the McCarthy quadrangle.

  3. Binding of multiple features in memory by high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Dermot M; Gaigg, Sebastian B; Gardiner, John M

    2014-09-01

    Diminished episodic memory and diminished use of semantic information to aid recall by individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are both thought to result from diminished relational binding of elements of complex stimuli. To test this hypothesis, we asked high-functioning adults with ASD and typical comparison participants to study grids in which some cells contained drawings of objects in non-canonical colours. Participants were told at study which features (colour, item, location) would be tested in a later memory test. In a second experiment, participants studied similar grids and were told that they would be tested on object-location or object-colour combinations. Recognition of combinations was significantly diminished in ASD, which survived covarying performance on the Color Trails Test (D'Elia et al. Color trails test. Professional manual. Psychological Assessment Resources, Lutz, 1996), a test of executive difficulties. The findings raise the possibility that medial temporal as well as frontal lobe processes are dysfunctional in ASD. PMID:24696375

  4. The contributions of Carl Ludwig to cardiology.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, H G

    1999-03-01

    The basic instruments for measuring functional cardiovascular parameters and the most important discoveries made by Carl Ludwig and his disciples in cardiovascular physiology are described and put into perspective in regard to the further development of his methods and ideas. The most important apparatus was the kymograph, which, for the first time, made recording and documenting of functional parameters possible. This instrument was also used for the functional evaluation of the isolated perfused frog heart that was developed by Elias Cyon in Ludwig's Leipzig Physiological Institute. In the isolated frog heart, important phenomena were discovered such as the staircase ('Treppe'), the absolute refractory period and the all-or-none law of the heart. The isolated dog heart was used to determine the origin of the first heart sound, which was characterized as a muscle tone. To measure regional blood flow and eventually cardiac output, a flowmeter ('Stromuhr') was designed. Precise measurements of cardiac output became possible only when Adolf Fick had developed his principle, which served as the basis for the modern indicator methods. Cyon and Ludwig also discoverd the depressor nerve, which constitutes the basis of the baroreceptor reflex. Finally, the precise localization of the vasomotor centre in the ventrolateral medulla was achieved in Ludwig's Leipzig Physiological Institute. This was confirmed more than 100 years later with modern neuroanatomical methods making use of retrograde axonal transport. Thus, Ludwig and his scholars made major substantial contributions to cardiovascular knowledge that can be considered to constitute the basis of modern cardiology. PMID:10202196

  5. Quantitative morphologic analysis of the Gulf of Alaska Yakutat margin: evidence for recent trough mouth fan growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, J. M.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Goff, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Glaciated continental shelves are host to numerous morphologic features that help understand past glacier dynamics. Southeastern Alaska is home to the St. Elias Mountains, an active orogen being impacted by temperate marine glaciers. During glacial periods ice streams advance across the continental shelf, carving shelf-crossing troughs that reach the shelf edge. We use high-resolution multibeam data to develop the relationship between two troughs, the Yakutat and Alsek Sea Valleys, and associated continental slope morphology. The shelf and slope geomorphology can be divided into statistical groupings that relate to the relative balance of erosion and deposition. Our analysis indicates that only the Yakutat system has been able to build an incipient trough-mouth fan. The extreme sediment supply from this region was able to overwhelm the steep initial topography of the transform margin, while farther to the east sediment slope-bypass dominates. This analysis provides an extreme end member to existing studies of temperate glaciation along continental margins. The unique interplay between rapid uplift due to ongoing collision and the massive erosion caused by temperate glaciers in a coastal system with extremely high precipitation provides for sedimentary flux far greater than other systems and thus allows for formation of a trough mouth fan in spite of a tectonically generated steep slope.

  6. Gulf of Alaska continental slope morphology: Evidence for recent trough mouth fan formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, John M.; Gulick, Sean P. S.; Goff, John A.

    2015-01-01

    continental shelves are host to numerous morphologic features that help understand past glacier dynamics. Southeastern Alaska is home to the St. Elias mountains, an active orogen that also hosts temperate marine glaciers. During glacial periods ice streams advance across the continental shelf, carving shelf-crossing troughs that reach the shelf edge. We use high-resolution multibeam data to develop the relationship between the Yakutat and Alsek Sea Valleys and the resulting continental slope morphology. The shelf and slope geomorphology can be divided into statistical groupings that relate to the relative balance of erosion and deposition. Our analysis indicates that only the Yakutat system has been able to build an incipient trough-mouth fan. The extreme sediment supply from this region was able to overwhelm the steep initial topography of the transform margin while further to the east sediment slope-bypass dominates. This analysis provides an extreme end member to existing studies of temperate glaciation along continental margins. The unique interplay between rapid uplift due to ongoing collision and the massive erosion caused by temperate glaciers provides for sedimentary flux far above most other systems.

  7. Molluscan evidence for early middle Miocene marine glaciation in southern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marincovich, L., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Profound cooling of Miocene marine climates in southern Alaska culminated in early middle Miocene coastal marine glaciation in the northeastern Gulf of Alaska. This climatic change resulted from interaction of the Yakutat terrane with southern Alaska beginning in late Oligocene time. The ensuing extreme uplift of the coastal Chugach and St. Elias Mountains resulted in progressive regional cooling that culminated in coastal marine glaciation beginning in the early middle Miocene (15-16 Ma) and continuing to the present. The counterclockwise flow of surface water from the frigid northeastern Gulf of Alaska resulted in a cold-temperate shallow-marine environment in the western Gulf of Alaska, as it does today. Ironically, dating of Gulf of Alaska marine glaciation as early middle Miocene is strongly reinforced by the presence of a few tropical and subtropical mollusks in western Gulf of Alaska faunas. Shallow-marine waters throughout the Gulf of Alaska were cold-temperate to cold in the early middle Miocene, when the world ocean was undergoing peak Neogene warming. -Author

  8. A social/emotional theory of 'mental illness'.

    PubMed

    Scheff, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    One reason that theories of mental illness have made little progress may be their focus on individuals, omitting the social/relational and emotional world. Adding these components will be difficult, however: in modern societies they have become virtually invisible, particularly the emotion of shame. The theory outlined here is based on the work of Cooley, Elias, Lewis and Goffman: shame is both social and individual and, if anticipation is included, virtually omnipresent in modern societies. It is proposed that most symptoms of mental illness are products of shame and relational feedback loops: emotion and alienation can both spiral leading to further alienation and chaotic or hidden emotions. Almost everyone is especially ashamed of their shame. Being ashamed of one's shame and/or anger can spiral when not acknowledged. Under certain conditions, these spirals continue without limit, generating immense force for acting out symptoms or depression. To the extent that this theory is true, we would need to rename the field using non-medical terms, such as emotional/social dysfunction. PMID:22723517

  9. Interspecies and interregional comparisons of the chemistry of PAHs and trace elements in mosses Hylocomium splendens (Hedw.) B.S.G. and Pleurozium schreberi (Brid.) Mitt. from Poland and Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Migaszewski, Z.M.; Galuszka, A.; Crock, J.G.; Lamothe, P.J.; Dolegowska, S.

    2009-01-01

    Comparative biogeochemical studies performed on the same plant species in remote areas enable pinpointing interspecies and interregional differences of chemical composition. This report presents baseline concentrations of PAHs and trace elements in moss species Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium schreberi from the Holy Cross Mountains (south-central Poland) (HCM) and Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park and Preserve (Alaska) and Denali National Park and Preserve (Alaska). Total PAH concentrations in the mosses of HCM were in the range of 473-2970 ??g kg-1 (dry weight basis; DW), whereas those in the same species of Alaska were 80-3390 ??g kg-1 DW. Nearly all the moss samples displayed the similar ring sequence: 3 > 4 > 5 > 6 for the PAHs. The 3 + 4 ring/total PAH ratios show statistically significant differences between HCM (0.73) and Alaska (0.91). The elevated concentrations of PAHs observed in some sampling locations of the Alaskan parks were linked to local combustion of wood, with a component of vehicle particle- and vapor-phase emissions. In HCM, the principal source of PAH emissions has been linked to residential and industrial combustion of coal and vehicle traffic. In contrast to HCM, the Alaskan mosses were distinctly elevated in most of the trace elements, bearing a signature of??the underlying geology. H.??splendens and P. schreberi showed diverse bioaccumulative capabilities of PAHs in all three study areas. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. High-spectral resolution observations of the 3.29 micron emission feature: Comparison to QCC and PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokunaga, Alan T.; Sellgren, Kris; Sakata, Akira; Wada, S.; Onaka, Takashi; Nakada, Y.; Nagata, T.

    1989-01-01

    Two of the most promising explanations for the origin of the interstellar emission features observed at 3.29, 3.4, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 microns are: quenched carbonaceous composite (QCC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). High resolution spectra are given of the 3.29 micron emission feature which were taken with the Cooled Grating Array Spectrometer at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and previously published. These spectra show that the peak wavelength of the 3.29 micron feature is located at 3.295 + or - 0.005 micron and that it is coincident with the peak absorbance of QCC. The peak wavelength of the 3.29 micron feature appears to be the same in all of the sources observed thus far. However, the width of the feature in HD 44179 and Elias 1 is only 0.023 micron, which is smaller than the 0.043 micron width in NGC 7027, IRAS 21282+5050, the Orion nebula, and BD+30 deg 3639. Spectra of NGC 7027, QCC, and PAHs is shown. QCC matches the 3.29 micron interstellar emission feature very closely in the wavelength of the peak, and it produces a single feature. On the other hand, PAHs rarely match the peak of the interstellar emission feature, and characteristically produce multiple features.

  11. Public-private partnerships in translational medicine: concepts and practical examples.

    PubMed

    Luijten, Peter R; van Dongen, Guus A M S; Moonen, Chrit T; Storm, Gert; Crommelin, Daan J A

    2012-07-20

    The way forward in multidisciplinary research according to former NIH's director Elias Zerhouni is to engage in predictive, personalized, preemptive and participatory medicine. For the creation of the optimal innovation climate that would allow for such a strategy, public-private partnerships have been widely proposed as an important instrument. Public-private partnerships have become an important instrument to expedite translational research in medicine. The Netherlands have initiated three large public-private partnerships in the life sciences and health area to facilitate the translation of valuable basic scientific concepts to new products and services in medicine. The focus of these partnerships has been on drug development, improved diagnosis and regenerative medicine. The Dutch model of public-private partnership forms the blueprint of a much larger European initiative called EATRIS. This paper will provide practical examples of public-private partnerships initiated to expedite the translation of new technology for drug development towards the clinic. Three specific technologies are in focus: companion diagnostics using nuclear medicine, the use of ultra high field MRI to generate sensitive surrogate endpoints based on endogenous contrast, and MRI guidance for High Intensity Focused Ultrasound mediated drug delivery. PMID:22465390

  12. European National Society Cardiovascular Journals

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso, F.; Ambrosio, G.; Pinto, F.J.; van der Wall, E.E.

    2008-01-01

    Anesti Kondili MD, Djamaleddine Nibouche MD, Karlen Adamyan MD, Kurt Huber MD, Hugo Ector MD, Izet Masic MD, Rumiana Tarnovska MD, Mario Ivanusa MD, Vladimír Stane˘k MD, Jørgen Videbæk MD, Mohamed Hamed MD, Alexandras Laucevicius MD, Pirjo Mustonen MD, Jean-Yves Artigou MD, Ariel Cohen MD, Mamanti Rogava MD, Michael Böhm MD, Eckart Fleck MD, Gerd Heusch MD, Rainer Klawki MD, Panos Vardas MD, Christodoulos Stefanadis MD, József Tenczer MD, Massimo Chiariello MD, Aleksandras Laucevicius MD, Joseph Elias MD, Halima Benjelloun MD, Olaf Rødevand MD, Piotr Kul/akowski MD, Edvard Apetrei MD, Victor A. Lusov MD, Rafael G. Oganov MD, Velibor Obradovic MD, Gabriel Kamensky MD, Miran F. Kenda MD, Christer Höglund MD, Thomas F. Lüscher MD, René Lerch MD, Moufid Jokhadar MD, Habib Haouala MD, Vedat Sansoy MD, Valentin Shumakov MD, Adam Timmis MD. (European National Society Cardiovascular Journals Editors, see Appendix for complete affiliations) PMID:18665206

  13. The modern atmospheric background dust load: Recognition in Central Asian snowpack, and compositional constraints

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkley, T.; Pertsiger, F.; Zavjalova, L.

    1997-01-01

    Dusts in strata of snowpack in the Alai-Pamir range, Kirghizstan, Central Asia, have chemical compositions that are in the same restricted range as those of the dusts found in snowpacks at three other locations: central south Greenland, the St. Elias range (Alaska), and coastal Antarctica, where special-type local dust sources certainly cannot dominate. This similarity at the four widely separated sites appears to indicate that there is a modern atmospheric background dust that is the same on a regional, hemispheric, or global scale. The common compositional range is that of average crustal rock, or of moderately ferromagnesian volcanic rock. It is not that of carbonate, nor highly siliciceous rocks. Previously, the existence of an atmospheric background dust has been postulated only on the basis of its particle size distribution, and only from observations in polar regions. The present study partially determines the chemical composition of the background dust, and confirms its existence in snowpack at four localities worldwide, including the center of the earth's largest continent where dusts of local source have considerable influence. U.S. copyright. Published in 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Holocene Pacific - North American plate interaction in southern Alaska: implications for the Yakataga seismic gap.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lahr, J.C.; Plafker, G.

    1980-01-01

    The St. Elias, Alaska, earthquake (magnitude 7.1 MS) on February 28, 1979, occurred along the complex Pacific-North American plate boundary between Yakutat Bay and Prince William Sound, rupturing only a fraction of the seismic gap identified in that region. To aid in evaluating the potential for, and likely site of, a future earthquake occurring in the remainder of the gap, we have formulated a kinematic model of neotectonic deformation in southern Alaska from available geologic and seismic data. In this model the part of the North American plate bordering on the Gulf of Alaska is divided into three subblocks, which are partially coupled to the Pacific plate. On the basis of the model, the gap-filling rupture or ruptures would most likely be along the north-dipping thrust faults of the Pamplona zone between Icy Bay and the eastern end of the Aleutian Trench. If the accumulated strain of 3.8 m postulated for this region were released suddenly in one event involving the remainder of the gap, the result would be an earthquake as large as magnitude 8. -Authors

  15. An 18 million year record of vegetation and climate change in northwestern Canada and Alaska: Tectonic and global climatic correlates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, J.M.; Ager, T.A.; Adam, D.P.; Leopold, E.B.; Liu, Gaisheng; Jette, H.; Schweger, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    We reconstruct long-term vegetation/paleoclimatic trends, spanning the last 18 million years, in Alaska. Yukon and far western Northwest Territories. Twenty-one average percentage spectra for pollen and spores are assembled from eight surface/subsurface sections. The sections are dated independently or by correlation. Pollen and spore ratios indicate the direction of change in vegetation and climatic parameters growing season temperature (T(est)), tree canopy density (C(est)) and paludification at study sites (P(est)). A global warm peak ca. 15 Ma is shown by the abundance of thermophilous taxa, including Fagus and Quercus. A temperature decline immediately following 15 Ma parallels climatic reconstructions based on marine oxygen isotopes. Subsequent declines correlate to the Messinian event and the onset of late Pliocene Pleistocene glaciation. After 7 Ma herbs and shrubs become more important elements of the palynological assemblages, suggesting a more continental, colder/drier climate. However, a late Pliocene warm interval is evident. Vegetation/climatic changes during the early to late Miocene show synchrony with, and are most economically attributable to, global events. After 7 Ma, vegetation/climate change is attributed primarily to latest Miocene-to-Pleistocene uplift of the Alaska Range and St. Elias Mrs. The continuing influence of global climatic patterns is shown in the late Pliocene warm interval, despite uplift to the south. The opening of the Bering Strait ca. 3 Ma may have moderated the climate in the study area.

  16. Measurement of Turbulent Water Vapor Fluxes from Lightweight Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. M.; Ramanathan, V.; Nguyen, H.; Lehmann*, K.

    2010-12-01

    wind tunnel investigations and the outcomes from test flights planned for September 2010 at a marine location are discussed. Acknowledgments We would like to acknowledge the significant contributions to this system made by the late Katrin Lehmann whose life was tragically cut short by a hiking accident. Katrin was responsible for the initial design, construction and programming of the UAS elements, and in doing so laid solid foundations for the system. We are indebted to NOAA, for funding this project through the research grant NOAA NA17RJ1231. Thank you also to Mike Marston of NASA, the BAE systems crew Phillip Corcoran and Rafael Gaytan, and Mike Rizen of UCSD Physics workshop for their mission roles. We would also like to thank NSF for long term support of the C4 UAS Program.

  17. Small neutrino masses from gravitational θ -term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvali, Gia; Funcke, Lena

    2016-06-01

    We present how a neutrino condensate and small neutrino masses emerge from a topological formulation of gravitational anomaly. We first recapitulate how a gravitational θ -term leads to the emergence of a new bound neutrino state analogous to the η' meson of QCD. Then we show the consequent formation of a neutrino vacuum condensate, which effectively generates small neutrino masses. Afterwards we outline numerous phenomenological consequences of our neutrino mass generation model. The cosmological neutrino mass bound vanishes since we predict the neutrinos to be massless until the phase transition in the late Universe, T ˜meV . Coherent radiation of new light particles in the neutrino sector can be detected in prospective precision experiments. Deviations from an equal flavor rate due to enhanced neutrino decays in extraterrestrial neutrino fluxes can be observed in future IceCube data. These neutrino decays may also necessitate modified analyses of the original neutrino spectra of the supernova SN 1987A. The current cosmological neutrino background only consists of the lightest neutrinos, which, due to enhanced neutrino-neutrino interactions, either bind up, form a superfluid, or completely annihilate into massless bosons. Strongly coupled relic neutrinos could provide a contribution to cold dark matter in the late Universe, together with the new proposed particles and topological defects, which may have formed during neutrino condensation. These enhanced interactions could also be a source of relic neutrino clustering in our Galaxy, which possibly makes the overdense cosmic neutrino background detectable in the KATRIN experiment. The neutrino condensate provides a mass for the hypothetical B -L gauge boson, leading to a gravity-competing force detectable in short-distance measurements. Prospective measurements of the polarization intensities of gravitational waves can falsify our neutrino mass generation model.

  18. PREFACE: Beyond Kyoto - the necessary road

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margrethe Basse, Ellen

    2009-03-01

    Project Manager Henrik Dalgaard for his excellent editorial services and to stud.mag. Nanna Katrine Lüders Kaalund for her practical assistance with the proceedings. The European Commission under the Regional Development Fund has funded the conference and the publication of the proceedings.

  19. Search for the Cosmic Neutrino Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faessler, A.; Hodak, R.; Kovalenko, S.; Simkovic, F.

    2015-02-01

    One expects three Cosmic Backgrounds: (1) The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) originated 380000 years after the Big Bang (BB). (2) The Neutrino Background decoupled about one second after the BB, while (3) the Cosmic Gravitational Wave Background created by the inflationary expansion decoupled directly after the BB. Only the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) has been detected and is well studied. Its spectrum follows Planck's black body radiation formula and shows a remarkable constant temperature of T0γ ≈ 2.7 K independent of the direction. The present photon density is about 370 photons per cm3. The size of the hot spots, which deviates only in the fifth decimal of the temperature from the average value, tells us, that the universe is flat. About 380 000 years after the Big Bang at a temperature of T0γ = 3000 K already in the matter dominated era the electrons combine with the protons and 4He and the photons move freely in the neutral universe and form the CMB. So the temperature and distribution of the photons give us information of the universe 380 000 years after the Big Bang. The Cosmic Neutrino Background (CνB) decoupled from matter already one second after the BB at a temperature of about 1010 K. Today their temperature is ~ 1.95 K and the average density is 56 electron-neutrinos and the total density of all neutrinos about 336 per cm3. Measurement of these neutrinos is an extremely challenging experimental problem which can hardly be solved with the present technologies. On the other hand it represents a tempting opportunity to check one of the key elements of the Big Bang Cosmology and to probe the early stages of the universe. The search for the CνB with the induced beta decay νe+3H → 3He + e- using KATRIN (KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment) is the topic of this contribution.

  20. Quantitative comparisons of numerical models of brittle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, S.

    2009-04-01

    Numerical modelling of brittle deformation in the uppermost crust can be challenging owing to the requirement of an accurate pressure calculation, the ability to achieve post-yield deformation and localisation, and the choice of rheology (plasticity law). One way to approach these issues is to conduct model comparisons that can evaluate the effects of different implementations of brittle behaviour in crustal deformation models. We present a comparison of three brittle shortening experiments for fourteen different numerical codes, which use finite element, finite difference, boundary element and distinct element techniques. Our aim is to constrain and quantify the variability among models in order to improve our understanding of causes leading to differences between model results. Our first experiment of translation of a stable sand-like wedge serves as a reference that allows for testing against analytical solutions (e.g., taper angle, root-mean-square velocity and gravitational rate of work). The next two experiments investigate an unstable wedge in a sandbox-like setup which deforms by inward translation of a mobile wall. All models accommodate shortening by in-sequence formation of forward shear zones. We analyse the location, dip angle and spacing of thrusts in detail as previous comparisons have shown that these can be highly variable in numerical and analogue models of crustal shortening and extension. We find that an accurate implementation of boundary friction is important for our models. Our results are encouraging in the overall agreement in their dynamic evolution, but show at the same time the effort that is needed to understand shear zone evolution. GeoMod2008 Team: Markus Albertz, Michele Cooke, Susan Ellis, Taras Gerya, Luke Hodkinson, Kristin Hughes, Katrin Huhn, Boris Kaus, Walter Landry, Bertrand Maillot, Christophe Pascal, Anton Popov, Guido Schreurs, Christopher Beaumont, Tony Crook, Mario Del Castello and Yves Leroy

  1. The effect of broadleaf woodland on aluminium speciation in stream water in an acid-sensitive area in the UK.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Jennifer L; Lynam, Philippa; Heal, Kate V; Palmer, Sheila M

    2012-11-15

    Acidification can result in the mobilisation and release of toxic inorganic monomeric aluminium (Al) species from soils into aquatic ecosystems. Although it is well-established that conifer trees enhance acidic atmospheric deposition and exacerbate soil and water acidification, the effect of broad-leaved woodland on soil and water acidification is less clear. This study investigated the effect of broadleaf woodland cover on the acid-base chemistry and Al species present in stream water, and processes controlling these in the acid-sensitive area around Loch Katrine, in the central Highlands, Scotland, UK, where broadleaf woodland expansion is occurring. A nested sampling approach was used to identify 22 stream sampling locations, in sub-catchments of 3.2-61 ha area and 0-45% broadleaf woodland cover. In addition, soils sampled from 68 locations were analysed to assess the influence of: (i) broadleaf woodland cover on soil characteristics and (ii) soil characteristics on stream water chemistry. Stream water pH was negatively correlated with sub-catchment % woodland cover, indicating that woodland cover is enhancing stream water acidification. Concentrations of all stream water Al species (monomeric total, organic and inorganic) were positively correlated with % woodland cover, although not significantly, but were below levels that are toxic to fish. Soil depth, O horizon depth and soil chemistry, particularly of the A horizon, appeared to be the dominant controls on stream water chemistry rather than woodland cover. There were significant differences in soil acid-base chemistry, with significantly lower O horizon pH and A horizon base saturation and higher A horizon exchangeable Al in the wooded catchments compared to the control. This is evidence that the mobile anion effect is already occurring in the study catchments and suggests that stream water acidification arising from broadleaf woodland expansion could occur, especially where tree density is high and acid

  2. Late Quaternary glacial relief evolution revealed by luminescence thermochronometry (Granite Range, Alaska)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valla, P.; Guralnik, B.; Lowick, S.; Champagnac, J.; Herman, F.; Jain, M.; Murray, A.

    2012-12-01

    Long-term exhumation and topographic evolution of mountain belts arise from complex coupling between tectonics, climate and surface processes. Glacial and periglacial processes are especially potent agents to reshape the alpine landscapes by valley carving and/or limiting topography. The recent development of luminescence thermochronometry (e.g., Herman et al., 2010) and its very low closure temperature (0-60°C) opens a new spatial and temporal "window" for the study of latest stages of rock exhumation and thus to address potential topographic relief changes during the late Quaternary. We apply this new method in the Wrangell-St Elias National Park (Alaska), an alpine landscape that exhibits typical glacial features (U-shaped valleys, cirques, moraines). This setting provides an exceptional opportunity to infer potential differences in relief evolution under a gradient of glacial forcing. The Granite Range presents a consistent and progressive eastward increase in the mean elevation, glacier activity, and topographic relief, while low-temperature thermochonometry data display rather homogeneous, yet largely scattered (apatite (U-Th)/He ages of ~15±7 Ma) throughout the massif (e.g., Spotila and Berger, 2010 and references therein). We sampled four elevation profiles over an 80-km East-West transect across the Granite Range (bounded by Tana River to the West and Chitina River to the North). Feldspar separates from 15 bedrock surface samples were dated using an IR-50 SAR protocol (e.g., Murray et al., 2000), and exhibit good internal reproducibility. Apparent ages vary from ~250 ka in the western part of the range, towards younger ages of ~30 ka in the east, thus supporting the notion of high rates of erosion correlated with intense glacial/periglacial activity. We then use a kinetic model to convert apparent ages in mean cooling histories, and couple it with Pecube model (Braun et al., 2012) to extract tectono-geomorphic scenarios. Our results reveal spatially

  3. Towards untangling the changing tectonic and climatic influence on deposition on the Surveyor Fan, Gulf of Alaska: A single grain geochemical and geochronological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Barbara; Bahlburg, Heinrich; Drewer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The Surveyor Fan depositional system, Gulf of Alaska, serves as a recorder of onshore processes in the evolving St. Elias orogen, the highest coastal mountain range on earth. Here, the relative contribution of tectonics and climate to clast production and denudation are controversial and need to be determined in detail. Absence of major onshore sediment traps allows fast transport of orogenic sediment to the ocean, minimising modifications of the sediment during transport. Exhumation and climatically controlled variations in glacier type and extent influence denudation rates and the characteristics of the sediments. We apply diverse tools of single grain geochemical provenance analysis to Neogene sediments from IODP 341 expedition sites U1417 (distal Surveyor Fan), U1418 (proximal Surveyor Fan), U1419 (continental slope) and U1420 (continental shelf). This will allow for deriving information about the relative contributions of tectonics and climate on rates and locations of exhumation and denudation as well as their temporal and spatial interplay in the evolving St. Elias orogen. Target of the sampling were sands and silts, covering the Miocene to Pleistocene stratigraphy of the four sites. We apply microprobe analysis for main element geochemistry on different heavy minerals; cathodoluminescence imaging, U/Pb dating and REE and trace element measuring on zircons as well as 40Ar/39Ar dating of hornblende and mica. First analyses point towards dominant sediment sources in the area of the Chugach Metamorphic Complex (CMC). U/Pb dating of zircons of samples in different stratigraphic positions from sites U1417 and U1418 shows peaks in age spectra between ca. 50 and 60 Ma, the youngest being 25.3 Ma ± 0.6 Ma, the oldest 1305.8 ± 38.1 Ma of age. Additional analyses of REE and trace elements from the same zircons imply granitoid sources, mainly granodiorites and tonalites, for most zircons measured. REE and trace element spectra of the 50 to 60 Ma zircons strongly

  4. Trans-Alaska Crustal Transect and continental evolution involving subduction underplating and synchronous foreland thrusting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuis, G.S.; Moore, T.E.; Plafker, G.; Brocher, T.M.; Fisher, M.A.; Mooney, W.D.; Nokleberg, W.J.; Page, R.A.; Beaudoin, B.C.; Christensen, N.I.; Levander, A.R.; Lutter, W.J.; Saltus, R.W.; Ruppert, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the crustal structure and tectonic evolution of the North American continent in Alaska, where the continent has grown through magmatism, accretion, and tectonic underplating. In the 1980s and early 1990s, we conducted a geological and geophysical investigation, known as the Trans-Alaska Crustal Transect (TACT), along a 1350-km-long corridor from the Aleutian Trench to the Arctic coast. The most distinctive crustal structures and the deepest Moho along the transect are located near the Pacific and Arctic margins. Near the Pacific margin, we infer a stack of tectonically underplated oceanic layers interpreted as remnants of the extinct Kula (or Resurrection) plate. Continental Moho just north of this underplated stack is more than 55 km deep. Near the Arctic margin, the Brooks Range is underlain by large-scale duplex structures that overlie a tectonic wedge of North Slope crust and mantle. There, the Moho has been depressed to nearly 50 km depth. In contrast, the Moho of central Alaska is on average 32 km deep. In the Paleogene, tectonic underplating of Kula (or Resurrection) plate fragments overlapped in time with duplexing in the Brooks Range. Possible tectonic models linking these two regions include flat-slab subduction and an orogenic-float model. In the Neogene, the tectonics of the accreting Yakutat terrane have differed across a newly interpreted tear in the subducting Pacific oceanic lithosphere. East of the tear, Pacific oceanic lithosphere subducts steeply and alone beneath the Wrangell volcanoes, because the overlying Yakutat terrane has been left behind as underplated rocks beneath the rising St. Elias Range, in the coastal region. West of the tear, the Yakutat terrane and Pacific oceanic lithosphere subduct together at a gentle angle, and this thickened package inhibits volcanism. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  5. Reaction path modelling used to explore the relationship between secondary mineral precipitation and low Si content in the meltwaters of a polythermal surge-type glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crompton, J. W.; Flowers, G. E.; Kirste, D. M.; Hagedorn, B.

    2014-12-01

    The subglacial chemical weathering environment is characterized by low temperatures and the hydrolysis and carbonation of freshly comminuted mineral surfaces. Such conditions motivate the hypothesis that relatively low silica fluxes should be found in glacierized basins. Additionally, it is often assumed that glacier meltwaters are far from saturation and that the water chemistry is controlled solely by the dissolution of primary silicates and trace quantities of sulphide and carbonate minerals. Alternatively, we propose that the formation of secondary minerals and precipitates in the delayed drainage system play an important role in controlling the low silica fluxes observed in subglacial envrionments. Borehole and proglacial meltwater samples were collected from a polythermal surge-type glacier overlying granodiorite bedrock in the St. Elias Mountains of Yukon, Canada. The meltwater chemistry, along with the mineralogy of the bedrock and suspended sediments indicate the presence of mineral precipitation accompanied by substantial basal freeze-on. This is supported by field evidence of debris rich basal ice at the terminus and at the base of a borehole. The surplus of Cl- above the supraglacial input is used to calculate the amount of basal freeze-on in the delayed drainage system, and the amount of mixing between the delayed and fast drainage systems. We use Geochemist's Workbench for reaction path modelling with a focus on the silica composition to simulate the chemical evolution of glacial meltwater from (1) the initial water rock contact, (2) basal freeze on, and (3) mixing and post mixing reactions. Unless there is a substantial degree of non-stoichiometric dissolution, we find that the observed proglacial water chemistry at the terminus is largely controlled by the hydrochemistry of water in the delayed drainage system. Lastly, we use this model to explore the relationship between the proglacial water chemistry and the daily glacier surface velocities for

  6. sPLA2 and the epidermal barrier

    PubMed Central

    Ilic, Dusko; Bollinger, James M.; Gelb, Michael; Mauro, Theodora M.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian epidermis provides both an interface and a protective barrier between the organism and its environment. Lipid, processed into water-impermeable bilayers between the outermost layers of the epidermal cells, forms the major barrier that prevents water from exiting the organism, and also prevents toxins and infectious agents from entering. The secretory phospholipase 2 (sPLA2) enzymes control important processes in skin and other organs, including inflammation and differentiation. sPLA2 activity contributes to epidermal barrier formation and homeostasis by generating free fatty acids, which are required both for formation of lamellar membranes and also for acidification of the stratum corneum (SC). sPLA2 is especially important in controlling SC acidification and establishment of an optimum epidermal barrier during the first postnatal week. Several sPLA2 isoforms are present in the epidermis. We find that two of these isoforms, sPLA2 IIA and sPLA2 IIF, localize to the upper stratum granulosum and increase in response to experimental barrier perturbation. sPLA2F−/− mice also demonstrate a more neutral SC pH than do their normal littermates, and their initial recovery from barrier perturbation is delayed. These findings confirm that sPLA2 enzymes perform important roles in epidermal development, and suggest that the sPLA2IIF isoform may be central to SC acidification and barrier function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous Barrier. Guest Editors: Kenneth R. Feingold and Peter Elias. PMID:24269828

  7. Demography and decline of the Mentasta Caribou Herd, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Kurt J.; Barten, Neil L.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated population trends in the Mentasta caribou (Rangifer tarandus (L., 1758)) herd in Wrangell a?? St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Alaska, from 1990 to 1997 and determined factors contributing to its decline. We postulated that predation-related mortality of adult females and juveniles was the proximate cause of the decline, and that survival of juvenile caribou reflected interactions with winter severity, calving distribution, timing of births, density of caribou, and physical condition of neonates at birth. The population declined at its greatest rate from 1990 to 1993 (r = a??0.32) and at a lower rate from 1994 to 1997 (r = a??0.09). Recruitment (number of calves/100 females during September) averaged 4/100 during the rapid population decline from 1990 to 1993 and 13/100 from 1994 to 1997. Parturition rate of adult females ranged from 65% to 97%. Survival of adult females and juveniles ranged from 0.77 to 0.86 and from 0.00 to 0.22, respectively. Approximately 43%, 59%, and 79% of all juvenile mortality occurred by 1, 2, and 4 weeks of age, respectively. We confirmed predation-related mortality as the primary proximate cause of population decline, with gray wolves (Canis lupus L., 1758), bears (species of the genus Ursus L., 1758), and other predators accounting for 57%, 38%, and 5%, respectively, of all juvenile mortality, and bears causing disproportionate mortality among 0- to 1-week-old neonates. We supported the hypotheses that timing of birth and habitat conditions at the birth site, particularly mottled snow patterns, affected vulnerability and survival of neonates, and birth mass affected survival of juveniles through summer. We speculate that the population will continue to decline before reaching a low-density equilibrium that is sustained by density-dependent changes in the functional responses of predators.

  8. Comparative Phylogeography Highlights the Double-Edged Sword of Climate Change Faced by Arctic- and Alpine-Adapted Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Hayley C.; Gunderson, Aren M.; Weksler, Marcelo; Fedorov, Vadim B.; Olson, Link E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that alpine and arctic organisms may have distinctly different phylogeographic histories from temperate or tropical taxa, with recent range contraction into interglacial refugia as opposed to post-glacial expansion out of refugia. We use a combination of phylogeographic inference, demographic reconstructions, and hierarchical Approximate Bayesian Computation to test for phylodemographic concordance among five species of alpine-adapted small mammals in eastern Beringia. These species (Collared Pikas, Hoary Marmots, Brown Lemmings, Arctic Ground Squirrels, and Singing Voles) vary in specificity to alpine and boreal-tundra habitat but share commonalities (e.g., cold tolerance and nunatak survival) that might result in concordant responses to Pleistocene glaciations. All five species contain a similar phylogeographic disjunction separating eastern and Beringian lineages, which we show to be the result of simultaneous divergence. Genetic diversity is similar within each haplogroup for each species, and there is no support for a post-Pleistocene population expansion in eastern lineages relative to those from Beringia. Bayesian skyline plots for four of the five species do not support Pleistocene population contraction. Brown Lemmings show evidence of late Quaternary demographic expansion without subsequent population decline. The Wrangell-St. Elias region of eastern Alaska appears to be an important zone of recent secondary contact for nearctic alpine mammals. Despite differences in natural history and ecology, similar phylogeographic histories are supported for all species, suggesting that these, and likely other, alpine- and arctic-adapted taxa are already experiencing population and/or range declines that are likely to synergistically accelerate in the face of rapid climate change. Climate change may therefore be acting as a double-edged sword that erodes genetic diversity within populations but promotes divergence and the generation of

  9. Comparative phylogeography highlights the double-edged sword of climate change faced by arctic- and alpine-adapted mammals.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Hayley C; Gunderson, Aren M; Weksler, Marcelo; Fedorov, Vadim B; Olson, Link E

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that alpine and arctic organisms may have distinctly different phylogeographic histories from temperate or tropical taxa, with recent range contraction into interglacial refugia as opposed to post-glacial expansion out of refugia. We use a combination of phylogeographic inference, demographic reconstructions, and hierarchical Approximate Bayesian Computation to test for phylodemographic concordance among five species of alpine-adapted small mammals in eastern Beringia. These species (Collared Pikas, Hoary Marmots, Brown Lemmings, Arctic Ground Squirrels, and Singing Voles) vary in specificity to alpine and boreal-tundra habitat but share commonalities (e.g., cold tolerance and nunatak survival) that might result in concordant responses to Pleistocene glaciations. All five species contain a similar phylogeographic disjunction separating eastern and Beringian lineages, which we show to be the result of simultaneous divergence. Genetic diversity is similar within each haplogroup for each species, and there is no support for a post-Pleistocene population expansion in eastern lineages relative to those from Beringia. Bayesian skyline plots for four of the five species do not support Pleistocene population contraction. Brown Lemmings show evidence of late Quaternary demographic expansion without subsequent population decline. The Wrangell-St. Elias region of eastern Alaska appears to be an important zone of recent secondary contact for nearctic alpine mammals. Despite differences in natural history and ecology, similar phylogeographic histories are supported for all species, suggesting that these, and likely other, alpine- and arctic-adapted taxa are already experiencing population and/or range declines that are likely to synergistically accelerate in the face of rapid climate change. Climate change may therefore be acting as a double-edged sword that erodes genetic diversity within populations but promotes divergence and the generation of

  10. Summit CO2 emission rates by the CO2/SO2 ratio method at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi, during a period of sustained inflation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hager, S.A.; Gerlach, T.M.; Wallace, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    The emission rate of carbon dioxide escaping from the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi, proved highly variable, averaging 4900 ± 2000 metric tons per day (t/d) in June–July 2003 during a period of summit inflation. These results were obtained by combining over 90 measurements of COSPEC-derived SO2emission rates with synchronous CO2/SO2 ratios of the volcanic gas plume along the summit COSPEC traverse. The results are lower than the CO2 emission rate of 8500 ± 300 t/d measured by the same method in 1995–1999 during a period of long-term summit deflation [Gerlach, T.M., McGee, K.A., Elias, T., Sutton, A.J. and Doukas, M.P., 2002. Carbon dioxide emission rate of Kīlauea Volcano: Implications for primary magma and the summit reservoir. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth, 107(B9): art. no.-2189.]. Analysis of the data indicates that the emission rates of the present study likely reflect changes in the magma supply rate and residence time in the summit reservoir. It is also likely that emission rates during the inflation period were heavily influenced by SO2 pulses emitted adjacent to the COSPEC traverse, which biased CO2/SO2 ratios towards low values that may be unrepresentative of the global summit gas plume. We conclude that the SO2 pulses are consequences of summit re-inflation under way since 2003 and that CO2 emission rates remain comparable to, but more variable than, those measured prior to re-inflation.

  11. Latitudinal variations (18°-23°S) in denudation rates of western Andean Syntaxis, Chile, South America.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starke, Jessica; Ehlers, Todd A.; Schaller, Mirjam

    2016-04-01

    Keywords: Cosmogenic nuclides, denudation rates, channel steepness, Chi, syntax, North Chile, South Peru Syntaxial regions of orogens (e.g. the western and eastern Himalayan Syntaxes, St. Elias Mountains Alaska) are regions where curved segments of subducting plates meet and the subducting plate is bent forms a rigid indentor. Previous studies of syntaxial regions in the Himalaya and Alaska document localized and rapid deformation and denudation due to vigorous fluvial or glacial erosional processes. In this study we investigate denudation around an arid end-member syntaxial orogen in South America to understand the interactions between climate and tectonic processes in localizing denudation. We present 35 new cosmogenic 10Be analyses of river sediments to quantify spatial variations in erosion along the Andean Coastal Cordillera and Western Cordillera. The sizes of the drainage basin vary from 5 - 5000 square kilometers. These measurements are linked to analysis of digital topography, variations in fluvial steepness indices and Chi- plots. Cosmogenic derived denudation rates range from 2.5 - 130 mm/kyr. Denudation rates decrease generally from the syntaxis (near Arica, Chile) towards the south (near Antofagasta, Chile) and from the Western Cordillera to the Coastal Cordillera. Topographic analysis of channel steepness variations and Chi-plots also document spatial variations in fluvial erosion and are consistent with spatial pattern in cosmogenic derived denudation rates. In summary the results document both a north to south and east to west variation in denudation around the western Andean margin. The spatial pattern of denudation is consistent with recently proposed patterns of syntaxial deformation driven by the geometry of the bent subducting plate. Denudation rates are also likely influenced to a lesser degree by a latitudinal variation in climate along the Andean margin.

  12. Learning mathematics in two dimensions: a review and look ahead at teaching and learning early childhood mathematics with children's literature.

    PubMed

    Flevares, Lucia M; Schiff, Jamie R

    2014-01-01

    In the past 25 years an identifiable interest in using children's literature in mathematics learning emerged (Clyne and Griffiths, 1991; Welchman-Tischler, 1992; Hong, 1996; Hellwig etal., 2000; Haury, 2001). We critically review the rationales given for the use of picture books in mathematics learning, with a special focus on geometry due to its underrepresentation in this body of literature and the need for greater focus on this topic. The benefits and effectiveness of using picture books for children's mathematics learning and interest have been documented (Hong, 1996; O'Neill etal., 2004; Young-Loveridge, 2004). For geometry, although much learning of shape ideas should be hands-on, two-dimensional figures are essential to develop children's understanding of plane geometry. Books may effectively engage pre-literate children with plane shapes (van den Heuvel-Panhuizen and van den Boogaard, 2008; Skoumpourdi and Mpakopoulou, 2011) and shapes as gestalt wholes or prototypes (van Hiele, 1986; Clements etal., 1999; Hannibal, 1999). We review several guidelines and evaluative criteria for book selection, including Cianciolo (2000), Schiro (1997), Hunsader (2004), and van den Heuvel-Panhuizen and Elia (2012). Geometry concepts have proven challenging for young students, but their difficulties may stem, in part, from inadequate teacher training and professional development (Clements and Sarama, 2000; Chard etal., 2008) which lead to misconceptions (Oberdorf and Taylor-Cox, 1999; Inan and Dogan-Temur, 2010). Using picture books in teacher training may be an inviting way for early childhood teachers to enhance their own knowledge. We will examine the literature for guidance on incorporating children's literature into teacher training. In closing we will outline a comprehensive, multi-pronged agenda for best instructional practices for selection and use of children's books in mathematics activities and for teacher training. PMID:24904475

  13. Learning mathematics in two dimensions: a review and look ahead at teaching and learning early childhood mathematics with children’s literature

    PubMed Central

    Flevares, Lucia M.; Schiff, Jamie R.

    2014-01-01

    In the past 25 years an identifiable interest in using children’s literature in mathematics learning emerged (Clyne and Griffiths, 1991; Welchman-Tischler, 1992; Hong, 1996; Hellwig etal., 2000; Haury, 2001). We critically review the rationales given for the use of picture books in mathematics learning, with a special focus on geometry due to its underrepresentation in this body of literature and the need for greater focus on this topic. The benefits and effectiveness of using picture books for children’s mathematics learning and interest have been documented (Hong, 1996; O’Neill etal., 2004; Young-Loveridge, 2004). For geometry, although much learning of shape ideas should be hands-on, two-dimensional figures are essential to develop children’s understanding of plane geometry. Books may effectively engage pre-literate children with plane shapes (van den Heuvel-Panhuizen and van den Boogaard, 2008; Skoumpourdi and Mpakopoulou, 2011) and shapes as gestalt wholes or prototypes (van Hiele, 1986; Clements etal., 1999; Hannibal, 1999). We review several guidelines and evaluative criteria for book selection, including Cianciolo (2000), Schiro (1997), Hunsader (2004), and van den Heuvel-Panhuizen and Elia (2012). Geometry concepts have proven challenging for young students, but their difficulties may stem, in part, from inadequate teacher training and professional development (Clements and Sarama, 2000; Chard etal., 2008) which lead to misconceptions (Oberdorf and Taylor-Cox, 1999; Inan and Dogan-Temur, 2010). Using picture books in teacher training may be an inviting way for early childhood teachers to enhance their own knowledge. We will examine the literature for guidance on incorporating children’s literature into teacher training. In closing we will outline a comprehensive, multi-pronged agenda for best instructional practices for selection and use of children’s books in mathematics activities and for teacher training. PMID:24904475

  14. Northern Cordilleran Ice Sheet Dynamics in Coastal Alaska from MIS 3 to the Present: Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penkrot, M. L.; Jaeger, J. M.; LeVay, L.; St-Onge, G.; Mix, A. C.; Bahlburg, H.; Davies-Walczak, M.; Gulick, S. P. S.

    2014-12-01

    Establishing the timing of northwestern Cordilleran ice sheet (NCIS) advance-retreat cycles in southern Alaska allows for investigation of global synchronicity in glacial-age climate forcing. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 341 targeted the glacial dynamics of the NCIS in the coastal St. Elias range. Sediment cores from Site U1419 encompass times of global ice advance and retreat from MIS 3 to the present, based on a preliminary age model with 5-kya resolution developed using oxygen isotopes from benthic and planktonic foraminifera and stratigraphic correlation with a previously C-14 dated site survey core (Davies et al., 2011; doi:10.1029/2010PA002051). CT images of cores were used to identify sedimentary facies and relative ice sheet proximity. Six sedimentary facies were identified in the images; massive mud with and without lonestones, laminations with and without lonestones, massive and stratified diamict (>1 clast/cm). Elemental scanning XRF data were used to delineate possible downcore changes in sediment provenance using provenance-sensitive transition metals. Diamict and gravelly mud are the most common facies, indicative of persistent glacial input interpreted as marine-terminating glacial systems. Stratified diamicts are interpreted as periods of maximum ice extent (~18-20 ka), whereas massive mud (~14 ka-present) suggests terminus retreat. Intervals of laminated mud with and without lonestones are interpreted as periods of reduced ice cover, with the most recent (~14.5 kya) coinciding with the Bølling Interstade of northern Europe/Greenland (Davies et al., 2011). Downcore changes in Al-normalized metal XRF counts vary along with sedimentary lithoficies, suggesting changes in sediment provenance that may be related to the quantity of glacigenic sediment delivery to this location.

  15. Quantifying the Flow Kinematics of Debris-Covered Glaciers with Repeat Airborne LiDAR and Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, J. W.; Larsen, C. F.; Levy, J. S.; Petersen, E. I.

    2014-12-01

    Debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers encompass a range of compositions and activity, including relict glaciers containing ice that has survived long after accumulation has ceased. Hence they are useful paleoclimate indicators in some cases, and if currently active will respond differently to ongoing climate change than glaciers without a protective cover. Their flow dynamics are not well understood, partially due to their typically slow velocities (centimeters per year in many cases); furthermore, their unique surface morphologies, including lobate fronts and arcuate ridges, likely result from viscous flow influenced by a combination of composition, structure, and climatic factors. However, basic connections between flow kinematics and surface morphology have not yet been established, limiting our ability to understand these features and extract paleoclimate information. In order to address this problem, we have acquired repeat, high-resolution topographic maps of debris-covered and rock glaciers in the Wrangell-St. Elias range of Alaska and Sierra Nevada, California. This was accomplished using both scanning LiDAR and photogrammetry to produce digital terrain models (DTMs) with approx. 25 cm resolution. Differencing the DTMs provides full-surface deformation fields that indicate up to meters of annual motion in some cases. The flow field is highly correlated with surface features; in particular, compressional ridges. We are undertaking surface geophysics measurements on Sourdough Rock Glacier in Alaska to relate internal structure and composition to the observed morphology and flow kinematics. Our results demonstrate the utility of repeat topographic mapping and will help provide new insights into the climatic significance of rock and debris-covered glaciers on both Earth and Mars.

  16. A tornado and waterspout climatology for Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sioutas, Michalis V.

    2011-06-01

    The results of a systematic investigation and recording of tornado and waterspout occurrence in Greece for the 10-year period 2000-2009 are presented. This is the first database developed in Greece in an attempt to collect and record comprehensive information about tornadoes, waterspouts, funnel clouds, dust devils and other whirlwind phenomena. The primary research purpose of this database is to search, diagnose and record tornado and waterspout occurrences and identify their morphological and climatological features. Based on the 10-year data, a mean annual number of 1.1 tornadoes per unit area of 10 4 km 2, is depicted for Greece. The seasonality appears differently for various parts, with winter most active tornado season for western Greece and summer for northern Greece. Spatial distribution showed that tornadoes are more frequent over western Greece and the Ionian coasts with a local maximum over northwest Peloponnese. Waterspouts occur in both the Aegean and the Ionian Sea mostly in summer and autumn, with a peak in September, while a considerable geographical maximum is located over north off the shore of Iraklion, Crete Island. A preliminary estimate of probability of tornado occurrence for each of the 51 Greek prefectures plus the Mount Athos area, showed highest values for Kerkyra Island and Elias prefectures, western Greece. Analysis based on intensities as assessed by damage data, indicated that the majority of tornadoes reached T4 of the T-scale or F2 of the F-scale. Short wave trough is found as the most relevant synoptic circulation pattern to tornadic activity. Thermodynamic and wind parameters showed a wide range of values, suggesting that threat levels should be adjusted for various areas since tornadoes and waterspouts can occur in different environments.

  17. Preliminary comments about beam loss

    SciTech Connect

    Groom, D.

    1985-10-01

    A variety of beam loss questions are being investigated. They affect several design issues, ranging from machine-associated background in the detectors to the radiation lifetime of the main-ring magnets: (1) Muons. Oppositely directed muon beams from prompt muon production, primary meson decay, and a variety of other processes radiate from each IR. If they were not fanned by the insertion dipoles, the beams would be sufficiently intense and energetic that they would present a radiation hazard even after penetrating 2 km of soil or rock. (2) Machine-associated background in the IR`s. About 30 mb of the total cross section is elastic or quasi-elastic, and most of the protons are in a Gaussian spot with sigma = 9 mr. These particles are well within the machine acceptance, but there is a grey area in the tail of the distributions in which the scattered particles `almost` remain in orbit - they continue for some distance but eventually hit a wall. (3) Cryogenic load. This problem has been addressed to some degree in the RDS, but considerably more detail is needed. It appears that a very large fraction of the inelastic particle energy will be deposited here. (4) Radiation damage in the ring. The lifetime of both magnets and electronics in the tunnel might be limited by radiation due to particle loss. Early results are not reassuring. Tevatron measurements, reported to the authors by John Elias, indicate that most of the tunnel background comes from particle loss due to beam-gas collisions.

  18. THE BLAST SURVEY OF THE VELA MOLECULAR CLOUD: DYNAMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE DENSE CORES IN VELA-D

    SciTech Connect

    Olmi, Luca; Angles-Alcazar, Daniel; De Luca, Massimo; Elia, Davide; Giannini, Teresa; Lorenzetti, Dario; Massi, Fabrizio; Martin, Peter G.; Strafella, Francesco E-mail: olmi@arcetri.astro.i

    2010-11-10

    The Vela-D region, according to the nomenclature given by Murphy and May, of the star-forming complex known as the Vela molecular ridge (VMR), has recently been analyzed in detail by Olmi, who studied the physical properties of 141 pre- and proto-stellar cold dust cores, detected by the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) during a much larger (55 deg{sup 2}) Galactic plane survey encompassing the whole VMR. This survey's primary goal was to identify the coldest dense dust cores possibly associated with the earliest phases of star formation. In this work, the dynamical state of the Vela-D cores is analyzed. Comparison to dynamical masses of a sub-sample of the Vela-D cores estimated from the {sup 13}CO survey of Elia is complicated by the fact that the {sup 13}CO linewidths are likely to trace the lower density intercore material, in addition to the dense gas associated with the compact cores observed by BLAST. In fact, the total internal pressure of these cores, if estimated using the {sup 13}CO linewidths, appears to be higher than the cloud ambient pressure. If this were the case, then self-gravity and surface pressure would be insufficient to bind these cores and an additional source of external confinement (e.g., magnetic field pressure) would be required. However, if one attempts to scale down the {sup 13}CO linewidths, according to the observations of high-density tracers in a small sample of sources, then most proto-stellar cores would be effectively gravitationally bound.

  19. Crustal And Lithospheric Thickness Variation Across Alaska In Advance Of Earthscope Transportable Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Driscoll, L.; Miller, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Alaskan northern Cordillera is situated at the nexus of a major Pacific-North America plate boundary transition, characterized by the geometric complexity of a highly curved strike-slip fault system and ongoing shallow angle subduction. Existing seismic data from stations throughout southern Alaska and northward across the Dalton Highway are analyzed. Preliminary P wave receiver functions are presented to identify lateral variations in crustal thickness. S wave receiver functions reveal velocity discontinuities within the upper mantle, and we identify novel lithospheric structures. In the northern interior below the Brooks Range, 130 km thick lithosphere contrasts with the interior region that has shallow negative conversions (80 km), marking thinner lithosphere in the greater backarc region where heat flow is observed to be high. In the southeast Coastal Ranges, we interpret a thinner (80-90 km) North American lithosphere above a deeper interface that represents the base of the colliding Yakutat microplate. These imaging results provide context for the distribution of strain throughout the Alaskan Orocline. The presence of thick lithosphere below the Brooks Range may indicate strong lithosphere that deflects strain into central and southwestern Alaska. Thin lithosphere in east Alaska and adjacent Yukon Territory coincides with the occurrence of inboard crustal seismicity, and may be indicative of transmitted compression caused by the collision of the Yakutat microplate. The spatial distribution of the subducted portion of the Yakutat is found to lie below the Wrangell Volcanic Field and St. Elias Mountains. We establish new tectonic elements within a complex lithospheric system, and produce hypotheses that will be suitable for testing with upcoming seismic installations.

  20. Impact of the Yakutat indentor corner on present-day tectonics and fault activity in SE Alaska - SW Yukon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzotti, S.; Marechal, A.; Ritz, J. F.; Ferry, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present an active tectonic model of the SE Alaska - SW Yukon region based principally on the integration of recent GPS velocity data and new fault-slip rates derived from geomorphology. In this region, the Yakutat collision results in complex tectonics with patterns of strain localization and strain partitioning that strongly vary across the various mountain ranges and active faults. We propose that deformation and fault activity in the St. Elias and Chugach Mountains are primarily controlled by the eastern syntaxis of the Yakutat collision, which produces a semi-radial tectonic pattern: Velocities, principal horizontal shortening rates, and maximum horizontal stress orientations rotate by 60 - 80 ° around the syntaxis, from roughly parallel to the relative Pacific - North America motion at the front of the collision to roughly orthogonal southeast of the syntaxis. The interaction between this strain pattern and major inherited tectonic structures inland of the collision zone (i.e., Denali and Duke River Faults) results in various reactivation modes of these structures. Specifically, the Denali Fault shows a very pronounced lateral variations of activity from ~12 mm/a of dextral slip rate in its central section to ~1 mm/a of mostly shortening slip rate along its southern section. This marked change of activity is associated with a possible relay system where the Duke River and Totschunda Faults accommodate a major part (8 - 12 mm/a) of the inland strain transfer directly in front of the syntaxis. This new tectonic model retains some questions, in particular regarding the mechanisms of deformation and strain transfer (1) from the syntaxis to the Duke River - Totschunda system and (2) at the junction between Totschunda and Denali Faults. Numerical models of present-day deformation may help address these issues and provide information about relative strength of the various crustal and inherited fault elements of this system.

  1. Rapid Ice Mass Loss: Does It Have an Influence on Earthquake Occurrence in Southern Alaska?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauber, Jeanne M.

    2008-01-01

    The glaciers of southern Alaska are extensive, and many of them have undergone gigatons of ice wastage on time scales on the order of the seismic cycle. Since the ice loss occurs directly above a shallow main thrust zone associated with subduction of the Pacific-Yakutat plate beneath continental Alaska, the region between the Malaspina and Bering Glaciers is an excellent test site for evaluating the importance of recent ice wastage on earthquake faulting potential. We demonstrate the influence of cumulative glacial mass loss following the 1899 Yakataga earthquake (M=8.1) by using a two dimensional finite element model with a simple representation of ice fluctuations to calculate the incremental stresses and change in the fault stability margin (FSM) along the main thrust zone (MTZ) and on the surface. Along the MTZ, our results indicate a decrease in FSM between 1899 and the 1979 St. Elias earthquake (M=7.4) of 0.2 - 1.2 MPa over an 80 km region between the coast and the 1979 aftershock zone; at the surface, the estimated FSM was larger but more localized to the lower reaches of glacial ablation zones. The ice-induced stresses were large enough, in theory, to promote the occurrence of shallow thrust earthquakes. To empirically test the influence of short-term ice fluctuations on fault stability, we compared the seismic rate from a reference background time period (1988-1992) against other time periods (1993-2006) with variable ice or tectonic change characteristics. We found that the frequency of small tectonic events in the Icy Bay region increased in 2002-2006 relative to the background seismic rate. We hypothesize that this was due to a significant increase in the rate of ice wastage in 2002-2006 instead of the M=7.9, 2002 Denali earthquake, located more than 100km away.

  2. Gulf of Alaska Cryosphere and Paleoceanography in the Neogene: IODP Expedition 341 Southern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, J. M.; Gulick, S. P. S.

    2014-12-01

    Neogene climate reflects the transition into a colder, more variable world dominated by the onset and intensification of major Northern Hemisphere glaciations. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 341 recovered a cross-margin transect of pelagic facies from this subarctic, high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll modern setting to glacigenic material from the exhuming coastal mountains. The recovered sedimentary record extends from the late Miocene through the Pleistocene/Holocene. Shipboard results indicate a ~doubling in sediment accumulation rates at ~2.56 Ma at the deep-water distal Site U1417, which is interpreted as the onset of significant glacial coverage in the St. Elias Range after the Pliocene-Pleistocene transition, resulting in the start of deposition in the Surveyor Fan. At all sites, clast-rich mud and/or diamict are prevalent in the Pleistocene, indicating the persistent transport of glacigenic sediment by ice, iceberg or sea-ice rafting. An unanticipated observation is the often sharp transitions between these ice-dominated facies and more biogenic-rich, often bioturbated, muddy lithologies that might be related to increased biological productivity, enhanced nutrient supply, and/or decreased input of terrigenous sediments. All sites contained variable preservation of biosiliceous and calcareous microfossils that indicate dynamic water column productivity and/or variable sediment geochemistry from the late Miocene to the present. At deep-water sites, strong variations in environmentally sensitive planktic foraminifera, radiolarians, and diatoms record alternating warming and cooling intervals during the last 1.2 Ma. At Site U1417, planktic foraminifera and radiolarian taxa abundances indicate cooler conditions in the Pleistocene relative to the Pliocene/late Miocene. Especially high sedimentation rates during the late Pleistocene hold promise for future studies related to suborbital-scale variability in paleoproductivity and glacigenic sedimentation.

  3. Cenozoic tectono-thermal history of the Tordrillo Mountains, Alaska: Paleocene-Eocene ridge subduction, decreasing relief, and late Neogene faulting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benowitz, Jeff A.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Layer, Paul W.; O'Sullivan, Paul B.; Wallace, Wes K.; Gillis, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Topographic development inboard of the continental margin is a predicted response to ridge subduction. New thermochronology results from the western Alaska Range document ridge subduction related orogenesis. K-feldspar thermochronology (KFAT) of bedrock samples from the Tordrillo Mountains in the western Alaska Range complement existing U-Pb, 40Ar/39Ar and AFT (apatite fission track) data to provide constraints on Paleocene pluton emplacement, and cooling as well as Late Eocene to Miocene vertical movements and exhumation along fault-bounded blocks. Based on the KFAT analysis we infer rapid exhumation-related cooling during the Eocene in the Tordrillo Mountains. Our KFAT cooling ages are coeval with deposition of clastic sediments in the Cook Inlet, Matanuska Valley and Tanana basins, which reflect high-energy depositional environments. The Tordrillo Mountains KFAT cooling ages are also the same as cooling ages in the Iliamna Lake region, the Kichatna Mountains of the western Alaska Range, and Mt. Logan in the Wrangell-St. Elias Mountains, thus rapid cooling at this time encompasses a broad region inboard of, and parallel to, the continental margin extending for several hundred kilometers. We infer these cooling events and deposition of clastic rocks are related to thermal effects that track the eastward passage of a slab window in Paleocene-Eocene time related to the subduction of the proposed Resurrection-Kula spreading ridge. In addition, we conclude that the reconstructed KFATmax negative age-elevation relationship is likely related to a long period of decreasing relief in the Tordrillo Mountains.

  4. Cenozoic tectono-thermal history of the Tordrillo Mountains, Alaska: Paleocene-Eocene ridge subduction, decreasing relief, and late Neogene faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benowitz, Jeff A.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Layer, Paul W.; O'Sullivan, Paul B.; Wallace, Wes K.; Gillis, Robert J.

    2012-04-01

    Topographic development inboard of the continental margin is a predicted response to ridge subduction. New thermochronology results from the western Alaska Range document ridge subduction related orogenesis. K-feldspar thermochronology (KFAT) of bedrock samples from the Tordrillo Mountains in the western Alaska Range complement existing U-Pb, 40Ar/39Ar and AFT (apatite fission track) data to provide constraints on Paleocene pluton emplacement, and cooling as well as Late Eocene to Miocene vertical movements and exhumation along fault-bounded blocks. Based on the KFAT analysis we infer rapid exhumation-related cooling during the Eocene in the Tordrillo Mountains. Our KFAT cooling ages are coeval with deposition of clastic sediments in the Cook Inlet, Matanuska Valley and Tanana basins, which reflect high-energy depositional environments. The Tordrillo Mountains KFAT cooling ages are also the same as cooling ages in the Iliamna Lake region, the Kichatna Mountains of the western Alaska Range, and Mt. Logan in the Wrangell-St. Elias Mountains, thus rapid cooling at this time encompasses a broad region inboard of, and parallel to, the continental margin extending for several hundred kilometers. We infer these cooling events and deposition of clastic rocks are related to thermal effects that track the eastward passage of a slab window in Paleocene-Eocene time related to the subduction of the proposed Resurrection-Kula spreading ridge. In addition, we conclude that the reconstructed KFATmax negative age-elevation relationship is likely related to a long period of decreasing relief in the Tordrillo Mountains.

  5. Accelerating chemical database searching using graphics processing units.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pu; Agrafiotis, Dimitris K; Rassokhin, Dmitrii N; Yang, Eric

    2011-08-22

    The utility of chemoinformatics systems depends on the accurate computer representation and efficient manipulation of chemical compounds. In such systems, a small molecule is often digitized as a large fingerprint vector, where each element indicates the presence/absence or the number of occurrences of a particular structural feature. Since in theory the number of unique features can be exceedingly large, these fingerprint vectors are usually folded into much shorter ones using hashing and modulo operations, allowing fast "in-memory" manipulation and comparison of molecules. There is increasing evidence that lossless fingerprints can substantially improve retrieval performance in chemical database searching (substructure or similarity), which have led to the development of several lossless fingerprint compression algorithms. However, any gains in storage and retrieval afforded by compression need to be weighed against the extra computational burden required for decompression before these fingerprints can be compared. Here we demonstrate that graphics processing units (GPU) can greatly alleviate this problem, enabling the practical application of lossless fingerprints on large databases. More specifically, we show that, with the help of a ~$500 ordinary video card, the entire PubChem database of ~32 million compounds can be searched in ~0.2-2 s on average, which is 2 orders of magnitude faster than a conventional CPU. If multiple query patterns are processed in batch, the speedup is even more dramatic (less than 0.02-0.2 s/query for 1000 queries). In the present study, we use the Elias gamma compression algorithm, which results in a compression ratio as high as 0.097. PMID:21696144

  6. Margin Architecture and Sediment Flux as Controls on Submarine Fan Development: Tectonic-Climate Interactions in the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, S. P. S.; Montelli, A.; Swartz, J. M.; Morey, S.; Jaeger, J. M.; Mix, A. C.; Reece, R.; Somchat, K.; Wagner, P. F.; Worthington, L. L.

    2015-12-01

    The oblique collision of the Yakutat microplate into southeast Alaska generates the St. Elias Mountains, a coastal orogen with significant moisture from the Gulf of Alaska resulting in large, temperate glacial systems that expand to and eventually cross the continental shelf during glacial maxima. We present an overview of the evolution of sediment routing on this margin from integration of seismic images, updated age models and core-log-seismic correlations from IODP Expedition 341 drilling sites, and mapping efforts from shelf, slope, and fan. We focus on the three dominant glacial systems during the climatically important intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation at the Plio-Pleistocene transition and the further intensification of glaciation since the mid-Pleistocene transition. Along strike, sediment delivery to deepwater from the three glacial systems varied according to Pleistocene shelf accommodation space. The Alsek crossed a narrower shelf with a bedrock high near the shelf edge; the Malaspina-Hubbard system crossed an undeformed, ~1 km deep shelf; the Bering-Bagley system crossed a several km deep shelf deforming as an active fold and thrust belt. The Malaspina and Bering catchments exhibit high exhumation rates onshore due to the Yakutat collision and upon reaching the shelf edge these glaciers generate trough mouth fans (TMFs) on the adjacent continental slope but only after first filling the available accommodation with glacigenic sediment and lowering the slope gradient through progradation. The Alsek crosses the shelf earliest but never with sufficient sediment flux to generate a TMF. An east-west transition in adjacent deepwater submarine channels that feed and generate the Surveyor Fan suggests that shelf accommodation and sediment flux are primary controls on sediment routing from orogen to submarine fan. Both of these parameters are in turn a function of initial tectonic architecture and ongoing orogen dynamics.

  7. Analysis of Regionally Detected Icequakes Using the STEEP Network, South-Central AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neel, S.; Leblanc, L.; Larsen, C.; Truffer, M.; Hansen, R.; Rupert, N.; Pavlis, G.; None, N.

    2007-12-01

    Glaciers produce seismic energy that is detectable from local to teleseismic distances. Glaciolgical processes including calving, surface crevassing, basal sliding and other, yet unresolved source processes are capable of producing recordable seismicity. Twenty-two broadband sensors deployed in south-central Alaska during the SainT Elias TEctonics and Erosion Project (STEEP) provide an excellent means to study glacier-generated seismicity at regional distances. These instruments surround over 7500 km2 of glacier area including the Bering Glacier, Bagley Icefield and the tidewater calving glaciers of Icy Bay (Yahtse, Guyot, Tyndal). Our analysis shows that icequakes nominally occur several times hourly, and can be separated from tectonic seismicity using their unique spectral characteristics and hypocenter locations. The events typically propagate over 50-75 km distances, but occasionally are recorded at stations over 150 km away from the energy source. Hypocenters for more than 1000 events were manually calculated through a 26-day interval during October 2006, and suggest that a majority of the icequakes are associated with calving at tidewater glaciers that terminate in Icy Bay. Events with similar time and frequency domain characteristics also occur at locations away from calving fronts, but less often, and their mechanical origin remains undetermined. Automated detections from a frequency domain event detector exhibit strong correlation with the handpicked time series, and extend our analysis to all available data collected during 2006. We present the time distribution of several categories of icequakes and compare these distributions to environmental variables such as precipitation, temperature and tides to explore potential forcing for observed variability in icequake occurrence.

  8. Translational Geoscience: Converting Geoscience Innovation into Societal Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffries, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Translational geoscience — which involves the conversion of geoscience discovery into societal, economic, and environmental impacts — has significant potential to generate large benefits but has received little systematic attention or resources. In contrast, translational medicine — which focuses on the conversion of scientific discovery into health improvement — has grown enormously in the past decade and provides useful models for other fields. Elias Zerhouni [1] developed a "new vision" for translational science to "ensure that extraordinary scientific advances of the past decade will be rapidly captured, translated, and disseminated for the benefit of all Americans." According to Francis Collins, "Opportunities to advance the discipline of translational science have never been better. We must move forward now. Science and society cannot afford to do otherwise." On 9 July 2015, the White House issued a memorandum directing U.S. federal agencies to focus on translating research into broader impacts, including commercial products and decision-making frameworks [3]. Natural hazards mitigation is one of many geoscience topics that would benefit from advances in translational science. This paper demonstrates that natural hazards mitigation can benefit from advances in translational science that address such topics as improving emergency preparedness, communicating life-saving information to government officials and citizens, explaining false positives and false negatives, working with multiple stakeholders and organizations across all sectors of the economy and all levels of government, and collaborating across a broad range of disciplines. [1] Zerhouni, EA (2005) New England Journal of Medicine 353(15):1621-1623. [2] Collins, FS (2011) Science Translational Medicine 3(90):1-6. [3] Donovan, S and Holdren, JP (2015) Multi-agency science and technology priorities for the FY 2017 budget. Executive Office of the President of the United States, 5 pp.

  9. Dorsal scapholunate stabilization using Viegas' capsulodesis: 25 cases with 26 months-follow-up.

    PubMed

    Camus, E J; Van Overstraeten, L

    2013-12-01

    Intercarpal instability is often secondary to a scapholunate interosseous (SLIO) ligament lesion. Its reconstruction is thus essential. Classical capsulodesis techniques fix the scaphoid in extension and do not reproduce the physiologic ligamentous isometry of the wrist. The authors use the technique of Viegas, which seems to respect this isometry: the dorsal intercarpal ligament is re-inserted dorsally to reattach the capsule on the dorsal SLIO and to reinforce it. Between 2006 and 2010, 25 wrists were operated on in 12 men and 12 women of mean age 38 years. All patients presented with pain often associated with loss of power, decreased mobility or a debilitating click. The mean follow-up was 26 months. Postoperative and preoperative data were compared. Flexion/extension range increased by 2.6°, radioulnar deviation increased by 21.1°. Grip strength increased by 8.7 kgf. Pain decreased by 3 points on the VAS and the PRWE improved by 59 points. We observed four CRPS, one EPL lesion and one case of superficial track pin infection. We got eleven excellent results, nine good, two moderate and three bad, two of which were re-operated. Viegas' capsulodesis does not present major technical difficulty. The results show no stiffness in flexion/extension. There was evident improvement in radioulnar deviation, grip strength, pain and PRWE scores. This technique provides effective treatment for a difficult or irreparable lesion of the SLIO ligament, without fixed carpal instability corresponding to Geissler arthroscopic stages 2 to 4 and Garcia-Elias stages 3 and 4. The capsulodesis produces an effective stabilization without stiffness. Precautions should be undertaken to avoid CRPS and pin complications. PMID:24210760

  10. IFESS 2005 Special Session 5 Artifical Vision

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, J.D.; Greenbaum, E.; Delbeke, J.; Troyk, P.R.; Sawan, M.

    2005-07-01

    A special session on visual prostheses was held during the Annual Meeting of the International Functional Electrical Stimulation Society (IFESS), in Montreal, Canada, July 5-9, 2005. IFESS is a meeting that typically attracts researchers in implantable nerve stimulators, functional electrical stimulation, and rehabilitation. All of these areas have significant overlap with the retinal prosthesis, but these areas have decades of research behind them. The special session provided a forum for researchers with vast experience in nerve stimulation to interact with leading research in retinal and cortical visual prostheses. The grant paid for the travel and conference costs of the presenters in the session. The session was chaired by James Weiland (the PI on this grant). The session co-chair was Phil Troyk, Ph.D., from the Illinois Institute of Technology. The Department of Energy was acknowledged at the start of the session as the sponsor. The following talks were delivered: Clinical Trial of a Prototype Retinal Prosthesis James Weiland, Ph.D. Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California The U.S. Department of Energy's Artificial Sight Program Elias Greenbaum, Ph.D. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee A 16-Channel stimulator ASIC for use in an intracortical visual prosthesis Phillip R. Troyk, Ph.D. Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois Two approaches to the Optic Nerve Visual Prosthesis Jean Delbeke, M.D. University Cath de Louvain, Louvain, Belgium Design and Implementation of High Power Efficiency Modules for a Cortical Visual Stimulator Mohammad Sawan, Ph.D. Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, Canada Remaining funds from the grant were used to support Dr. Weiland's travel to the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology in May 2006, with DOE approval, where several projects, supported by the DOE artificial retina program, were presented.

  11. Austrian Carbon Calculator (ACC) - modelling soil carbon dynamics in Austrian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedy, Katrin; Freudenschuss, Alexandra; Zethner, Gehard; Spiegel, Heide; Franko, Uwe; Gründling, Ralf; Xaver Hölzl, Franz; Preinstorfer, Claudia; Haslmayr, Hans Peter; Formayer, Herbert

    2014-05-01

    Austrian Carbon Calculator (ACC) - modelling soil carbon dynamics in Austrian soils. The project funded by the Klima- und Energiefonds, Austrian Climate Research Programme, 4th call Authors: Katrin Sedy, Alexandra Freudenschuss, Gerhard Zethner (Environment Agency Austria), Heide Spiegel (Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety), Uwe Franko, Ralf Gründling (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research) Climate change will affect plant productivity due to weather extremes. However, adverse effects could be diminished and satisfying production levels may be maintained with proper soil conditions. To sustain and optimize the potential of agricultural land for plant productivity it will be necessary to focus on preserving and increasing soil organic carbon (SOC). Carbon sequestration in agricultural soils is strongly influenced by management practice. The present management is affected by management practices that tend to speed up carbon loss. Crop rotation, soil cultivation and the management of crop residues are very important measures to influence carbon dynamics and soil fertility. For the future it will be crucial to focus on practical measures to optimize SOC and to improve soil structure. To predict SOC turnover the existing humus balance model the application of the "Carbon Candy Balance" was verified by results from Austrian long term field experiments and field data of selected farms. Thus the main aim of the project is to generate a carbon balancing tool box that can be applied in different agricultural production regions to assess humus dynamics due to agricultural management practices. The toolbox will allow the selection of specific regional input parameters for calculating the C-balance at field level. However farmers or other interested user can also apply their own field data to receive the result of C-dynamics under certain management practises within the next 100 years. At regional level the impact of predefined changes in agricultural management

  12. Modeling the Effects of Climate Change on Permafrost in National Parks of Alaska: Will Permafrost Survive the Climate Warming of 21st Century?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, S. K.; Marchenko, S. S.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Swanson, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost underlies ~70% of all National Park Service administered land in Alaska and it provides a stable foundation to parks' ecosystems and wildlife habitats. However, the strength of this foundation is waning as its temperature is rising in response to recent climate warming. Consequently, thermokarst activities are on the rise and they are altering the parks' landscape, ecosystems, and wildlife habitats. In order to effectively respond to these changes park managers need up-to-date knowledge of the current permafrost temperature and distribution, and how they might evolve with changing climate in the future. To help decision makers understand and respond to the changing permafrost condition, we are modeling near-surface permafrost dynamics—permafrost temperature, distribution, and active layer thickness—in eight national parks of Alaska at a decadal time scale. We are using GIPL 1.0 model (Spatially Distributed Model of Permafrost Dynamics in Alaska), the best available climate inputs, and high-resolution (28 m) ecotype, soil landscape, and snow inputs. Here we present results for two national parks—Denali National Park and Preserve (DENA) and Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve (WRST). Areas underlain by glaciers and permanent ice-fields were excluded. In DENA, the model suggested near-surface permafrost in 51% of the park area for the 2000 decade, predicted its decline to 6% by 2050s, and 1% by 2090s. In WRST, the model suggested near-surface permafrost in 72% of the park area for the 2000 decade, predicted its decline to 42% by 2050s, and 15% by 2090s. In summary, the near-surface permafrost will likely be degrading in most parts of DENA and WRST towards the end of the current century except at higher elevations where climate models continue to project colder temperature. The modeled maps of DENA and WRST showed 86% and 95% agreement with the field observations of permafrost presence/ absence at 1375 and 430 sites, respectively. In

  13. IMPROVING SCIENCE EDUCATION AND CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN RURAL ALASKA:The Synergistic Connection between Educational Outreach Efforts in the Copper Valley, Alaska.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solie, D. J.; McCarthy, S.

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the High frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) Education Outreach is to enhance the science education opportunities in the Copper Valley region in Alaska. In the process, we also educate local residents about HAARP and its research. Funded jointly by US Air Force and Navy, HAARP is located at Gakona Alaska, a very rural region of central Alaska with a predominantly Native population. The main instrument at HAARP is a vertically directed, phased array RF transmitter which is primarily an ionospheric research tool, however, its geophysical research applications range from terrestrial to near-space. Research is conducted at HAARP in collaboration with scientists and institutions world-wide. The HAARP Education Outreach Program, run through the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute has been active for over six years and in that time has become an integral part of science education in the Copper Valley for residents of all ages. HAARP education outreach efforts are through direct involvement in local schools in the Copper River School District (CRSD) and the Prince William Sound Community College (PWSCC), as well as public lectures and workshops, and intern and student research programs. These outreach efforts require cooperation and coordination between the CRSD, PWSCC, the University of Alaska Fairbanks Physics Department and the NSF sponsored Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program (ANSEP) and HAARP researchers. The HAARP Outreach program also works with other organizations promoting science education in the region, such as the National Park Service (Wrangell- St. Elias National Park) and the Wrangell Institute for Science and Environment (WISE) a newly formed regional non-profit organization. We work closely with teachers in the schools, adapting to their needs and the particular scientific topic they are covering at the time. Because of time and logistic constraints, outreach visits to schools are episodic, occurring roughly

  14. Intermediate-Term Declines in Seismicity at Mt. Wrangell and Mt. Veniaminof Volcanoes, Alaska, Following the November 3, 2002 Mw 7.9 Denali Fault Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, J. J.; McNutt, S. R.

    2003-12-01

    On November 3, 2002 a Mw 7.9 earthquake ruptured segments of the Denali Fault and adjacent faults in interior Alaska providing a unique opportunity to look for intermediate-term (days to weeks) responses of Alaskan volcanoes to shaking from a large regional earthquake. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors 24 volcanoes with seismograph networks. We examined one station per volcano, generally the closest to the vent (typically within 5 km) unless noise, or other factors made the data unusable. Data were digitally filtered between 0.8 and 5 Hz to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. Data for the period four weeks before to four weeks after the Mw 7.9 earthquake were then plotted at a standard scale used for AVO routine monitoring. Mt. Veniaminof volcano, which has had recent mild eruptions and a rate of ten earthquakes per day on station VNNF, suffered a drop in seismicity by a factor of two after the earthquake; this lasted for 15 days. Wrangell, the closest volcano to the epicenter, had a background rate of about 16 earthquakes per day. Data from station WANC could not be measured for 3 days after the Mw 7.9 earthquake because the large number and size of aftershocks impeded identification of local earthquakes. For the following 30 days, however, its seismicity rate dropped by a factor of two. Seismicity then remained low for an additional 4 months at Wrangell, whereas that at Veniaminof returned to normal within weeks. The seismicity at both Mt. Veniaminof and Mt. Wrangell is dominated by low-frequency volcanic events. The detection thresholds for both seismograph networks are low and stations VNNF and WANC operated normally during the time of our study, thus we infer that the changes in seismicity may be related to the earthquake. It is known that Wrangell increased its heat output after the Mw 9.2 Alaska earthquake of 1964 and again after the Ms 7.1 St.Elias earthquake of 1979. The other volcanoes showed no changes in seismicity that can be attributable to

  15. Intermediate-Term Declines in Seismicity at Two Volcanoes in Alaska Following the Mw7.9 Denali Fault Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, S. R.; Sanchez, J. J.; Moran, S. C.; Power, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    The Mw7.9 Denali Fault earthquake provided an opportunity to look for intermediate-term (days to weeks) responses of Alaskan volcanoes to shaking from a large regional earthquake. The Alaska Volcano Observatory monitors 24 volcanoes with seismic networks. We examined one station for each volcano, generally the closest (typically 5 km from the vent) unless noise, site response, or other factors made the data unusable. Data were digitally bandpass filtered between 0.8 and 5 Hz to reduce noise from microseisms and wind. Data for the period three days before to three days after the Mw7.9 earthquake were then plotted at a standard scale used for AVO routine monitoring. Shishaldin volcano, which has a background rate of several hundred seismic events per day on station SSLS, showed no change from before to after the earthquake. Veniaminof volcano, which has had recent mild eruptions and a rate of several dozen seismic events per day on station VNNF, suffered a drop in seismicity at the time of the earthquake by a factor of 2.5; this lasted for 15 days. We tested this result using a different station, VNSS, and a different method of counting (non-filtered data on helicorder records) and found the same result. We infer that Veniaminof's activity was modified by the Mw7.9 earthquake. Wrangell, the closest volcano, had a background rate of about 10 events per day. Data from station WANC could not be measured for 8 days after the Mw7.9 earthquake because the large number of aftershocks precluded identification of local seismicity. For the following eight days, however, its seismicity rate was 30 percent lower than before. While subtle, we infer that this may be related to the earthquake. It is known that Wrangell increased its heat output after the Mw9.2 Alaska earthquake of 1964 and again after the Ms7.1 St. Elias earthquake of 1979. The other 21 volcanoes showed no changes in seismicity from 3 days before to 3 days after the Mw7.9 event. We conclude that intermediate

  16. Constraints on the age and provenance of the Chugach accretionary complex from detrital zircons in the Sitka Graywacke near Sitka, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeussler, Peter J.; Gehrels, George E.; Karl, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    Graywacke implies that it lay to the south when it was deposited and offscraped. Thus, although source areas as far north as the St. Elias Mountains and south-central Alaska are possible, they were most likely in coastal and interior British Columbia.

  17. A new method for GPS-based wind speed determinations during airborne volcanic plume measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doukas, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    Begun nearly thirty years ago, the measurement of gases in volcanic plumes is today an accepted technique in volcano research. Volcanic plume measurements, whether baseline gas emissions from quiescent volcanoes or more substantial emissions from volcanoes undergoing unrest, provide important information on the amount of gaseous output of a volcano to the atmosphere. Measuring changes in gas emission rates also allows insight into eruptive behavior. Some of the earliest volcanic plume measurements of sulfur dioxide were made using a correlation spectrometer (COSPEC). The COSPEC, developed originally for industrial pollution studies, is an upward-looking optical spectrometer tuned to the ultraviolet absorption wavelength of sulfur dioxide (Millán and Hoff, 1978). In airborne mode, the COSPEC is mounted in a fixed-wing aircraft and flown back and forth just underneath a volcanic plume, perpendicular to the direction of plume travel (Casadevall and others, 1981; Stoiber and others, 1983). Similarly, for plumes close to the ground, the COSPEC can be mounted in an automobile and driven underneath a plume if a suitable road system is available (Elias and others, 1998). The COSPEC can also be mounted on a tripod and used to scan a volcanic plume from a fixed location on the ground, although the effectiveness of this configuration declines with distance from the plume (Kyle and others, 1990). In the 1990’s, newer airborne techniques involving direct sampling of volcanic plumes with infrared spectrometers and electrochemical sensors were developed in order to measure additional gases such as CO2 and H2S (Gerlach and others, 1997; Gerlach and others, 1999; McGee and others, 2001). These methods involve constructing a plume cross-section from several measurement traverses through the plume in a vertical plane. Newer instruments such as open-path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers are now being used to measure the gases in volcanic plumes mostly from fixed

  18. Identification of Gas Phase PAHs in Absorption Towards Protostellar Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse D.; Temi, Pasquale; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The infrared emission bands (also known as the UIR bands.) have recently been observed in absorption at 3.25 micrometers in the ices surrounding a few proto-stellar objects at 11.2 micrometers in MonR2, and at 6.2 micrometers towards two sources near the galactic center. The UIR bands have been observed in emission for many years, but identifying these bands has proven to be both difficult and contentious as no one has yet found a single material that provides a good match to the features. However, most investigators agree that some form of carbon-based material with aromatic bonds is the most likely candidate, and many arguments favor free molecules (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) as the carriers of at least the narrow emission bands. Since the emission arises not from a single molecule but from a family of molecules, identifying which PAHs are contributing to the infrared emission bands is difficult. The identification is further complicated by the fact that the emission at short wavelengths is dominated by small molecules while at long wavelengths it is dominated by large molecules. Thus, for example, the emission at 3.3 micrometers is from a different mix of molecules than those which produce the 11.2 micrometer band. To complicate matters further, the molecular mix includes both neutral and ionic species. In absorption, the same mixture of molecules contributes at all wavelengths and the molecules should be neutral, potentially simplifying comparisons with lab data. Also, absorption strengths measured in the lab are directly applicable to interstellar absorption bands without the need to model an emission spectrum of an unknown mixture of ionized and neutral PAHs. In this paper we show that a mixture of argon matrix isolated PAH molecules can reproduce the 3.25 micrometers absorption band seen in the ISO SWS spectra of four embedded Infrared sources, S140 IRS1, AFGL 2591, Elias 29, and AFGL 989. In section 2 we describe the ISO SWS data analysis and

  19. PREFACE: IC-MSQUARE 2012: International Conference on Mathematical Modelling in Physical Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmas, Theocharis; Vagenas, Elias; Vlachos, Dimitrios

    2013-02-01

    like to thank the members of the International Scientific Committee and the members of the Organizing Committee. Conference Chairmen Theocharis Kosmas Department of Physics, University of Ioannina Elias Vagenas RCAAM, Academy of Athens Dimitrios Vlachos Department of Computer Science and Technology, University of Peloponnese The PDF also contains a list of members of the International Scientific Committes and details of the Keynote and Invited Speakers.

  20. Effects of Volcanoes on the Natural Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    The primary focus of this project has been on the development of techniques to study the thermal and gas output of volcanoes, and to explore our options for the collection of vegetation and soil data to enable us to assess the impact of this volcanic activity on the environment. We originally selected several volcanoes that have persistent gas emissions and/or magma production. The investigation took an integrated look at the environmental effects of a volcano. Through their persistent activity, basaltic volcanoes such as Kilauea (Hawaii) and Masaya (Nicaragua) contribute significant amounts of sulfur dioxide and other gases to the lower atmosphere. Although primarily local rather than regional in its impact, the continuous nature of these eruptions means that they can have a major impact on the troposphere for years to decades. Since mid-1986, Kilauea has emitted about 2,000 tonnes of sulfur dioxide per day, while between 1995 and 2000 Masaya has emotted about 1,000 to 1,500 tonnes per day (Duffel1 et al., 2001; Delmelle et al., 2002; Sutton and Elias, 2002). These emissions have a significant effect on the local environment. The volcanic smog ("vog" ) that is produced affects the health of local residents, impacts the local ecology via acid rain deposition and the generation of acidic soils, and is a concern to local air traffic due to reduced visibility. Much of the work that was conducted under this NASA project was focused on the development of field validation techniques of volcano degassing and thermal output that could then be correlated with satellite observations. In this way, we strove to develop methods by which not only our study volcanoes, but also volcanoes in general worldwide (Wright and Flynn, 2004; Wright et al., 2004). Thus volcanoes could be routinely monitored for their effects on the environment. The selected volcanoes were: Kilauea (Hawaii; 19.425 N, 155.292 W); Masaya (Nicaragua; 11.984 N, 86.161 W); and Pods (Costa Rica; 10.2OoN, 84.233 W).

  1. Crustal deformation associated with glacial fluctuations in the eastern Chugach Mountains, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauber, Jeanne; Plafker, George; Molnia, Bruce F.; Bryant, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    significant in relation to the stress drops in recent earthquakes (≈ 2 to 10 MPa) but small in relation to the estimated tectonic stress magnitude. Therefore the occurrence of an earthquake such as the St. Elias (1979, MS = 7.2) may have been advanced in time; however, most of the ongoing stress accumulation would be primarily due to tectonic forces.

  2. Seasonal evolution of glacier velocity and portraits of basal motion across southeast Alaska via cross-correlation of optical satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, W. H., Jr.; Anderson, R. S.; Moon, T. A.; Fahnestock, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate how glacier geometry and geographic setting govern a glacier's response to meltwater and precipitation inputs. Does the up-glacier limit of enhanced summer basal motion vary across glaciers? Do non-surge glaciers show consistent spatial patterns of basal motion from year to year? We investigate such questions by documenting the seasonal-to-annual evolution of surface velocity for over 25 surge- and non-surge type glaciers in the Wrangell-St Elias ranges of southeast Alaska, USA, during 2013-2015. We use the Python-implemented PYCORR image cross-correlation software to estimate ice surface velocity fields over ~35,000 km2 covered by four Landsat-8 (L8) scenes. PYCORR is an optimized version of IMCORR, and takes less than 5 minutes to process a full L8 scene. This computational efficiency allows us to calculate dozens of velocity fields for each scene to provide high temporal resolution. We automate the extraction of velocity profiles along longitudinal glacier profiles to document their temporal evolution over timespans ranging from 16 days to greater than one year at spatial resolution of several tens to several hundred meters. This method provides much greater spatial coverage than GPS-derived velocities, and succeeds in terrain of rough surface texture and significant temporal elevation change, both of which present substantial challenges for deriving InSAR velocities. Preliminary data on Kennicott Glacier (Figure 1) resolve the annual velocity cycle in which speeds are lowest over winter and highest in summer reflecting meltwater-induced basal motion. We find notable seasonal velocity fluctuations at distances of more than 30 km from the glacier terminus. While longitudinal stress gradient coupling may explain a portion of these velocity variations, local basal motion must contribute, as the relatively thin (~500 m) ice cannot transmit longitudinal stresses over such distances. Regions downstream of tributary junctions show consistently

  3. The Distribution and Abundance of Mercury Methylating Microorganisms in Mid-Atlantic Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, E. F. U.; Gilmour, C. C.; Schwartz, G.; Christensen, G. A.; King, A. J.; Elias, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of the genes responsible for microbial methylmercury production, hgcAB, has led to the identification of novel Hg methylators with diverse metabolisms including Fe and SO42- reducing bacteria, syntrophs, and methanogens. We recently developed DNA probes for hgcA in each group of methylators: Deltaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Archaea [Christensen, 2015]. In this study, we use the probes to determine quantity and distribution of hgcA+ organisms in mid-Atlantic marshes and sediments, and in Hg-contaminated wetland soils. We also analyze hgcA distribution over a 28-day soil slurry experiment designed to evaluate the impact of activated carbon on Hg methylation and demethylation [Gilmour, 2015]. Initial soils show Deltaproteobacteria comprise most hgcA+ organisms. Methanogens encompass >45% of the remaining methylators. The addition of SO42- to induce SO42- reducing conditions in slurries caused the number of hgcA+ Deltaproteobacteria to increase and the number of hgcA+ methanogens to decrease to >32%. In soils and slurries, Firmicutes were below detection, suggesting our Firmicute primers are either unrepresentative in natural samples, or that hgcA+ Firmicutes are rare. This observation is interesting as Firmicutes include organisms with divergent metabolisms, and their role in environmental methylation is still unknown. Slurries also show no correlation between hgcA abundance and Hg concentrations. We now plan to explore how hgcA abundance relates to Hg-methylation and electron acceptor availability. Our results offer initial insights into the natural distribution of hgcA, supporting the idea that the distribution of different methylators is related to electron acceptors and redox chemistry. Christensen, G., Wymore, AM, King, A, Pdar, M, Hurt Jur, RA, Santillan, EFU, Gilmour, CC, Brandt, CC, Brown, SD, Palumbo, AV, Elias, DA (2015), A Study of Mercury Methylation Genetics: Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of hgcAB in Pure Culture, paper presented

  4. Dynamics and internal structure of an Alaskan debris-covered glacier from repeat airborne photogrammetry and surface geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, John; Levy, Joseph; Petersen, Eric; Larsen, Chris; Fahnestock, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers encompass a range of compositions and activity, and can be useful paleoclimate indicators. They also respond differently to ongoing climate change than glaciers without a protective cover. Their flow dynamics are not well understood, and their unique surface morphologies, including lobate fronts and arcuate ridges, likely result from viscous flow influenced by a combination of composition, structure, and climatic factors. However, basic connections between flow kinematics and surface morphology have not yet been established, limiting our ability to understand these features. In order to begin to address this problem we have undertaken airborne and surface studies of multiple debris-covered glaciers in Alaska and the western U.S. Sourdough Rock Glacier in the St. Elias Mountains, Alaska, is completely debris-covered and exhibits numerous transverse compressional ridges. Its trunk also exhibits highly regular bumps and swales with a wavelength of ~175 m and amplitudes up to 12 m. In the middle trunk, lineations (boulder trains and furrows) bend around a point roughly 200m from the eastern edge. We acquired five high-resolution airborne surveys of Sourdough Rock Glacier between late 2013 and late 2015 using lidar and photogrammetry to assess annual and seasonal change at the sub-meter level. Differencing the DTMs provides vertical change while feature tracking in orthophotos provide horizontal velocities that indicate meters of annual motion. The flow field is highly correlated with surface features; in particular, compressional ridges in the lower lobe. Stranded, formerly active lobes are also apparent. Surface geophysical studies were undertaken to constrain internal structure and composition using a combination of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) at 50 and 100 MHz in six transects, and time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) measurements at 47 locations, primarily in an along-flow transect and two cross-flow transects. We infer

  5. Crustal Deformation Associated with Glacial Fluctuations in the Eastern Chugach Mountains, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauber, Jeanne; Plafker, George; Molnia, Bruce F.; Bryant, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    ) between 0 and 10 km was approximately equal 1.0 MPa, which is significant in relation to the stress drops in recent earthquakes (approximately 2 to 10 MPa) but small in relation to the estimated tectonic stress magnitude. Therefore the occurrence of an earthquake such as the St. Elias (1979, M(sub S) = 7.2) may have been advanced in time; however, most of the ongoing stress accumulation would be primarily due to tectonic forces.

  6. BOOK REVIEW: String Theory in a Nutshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skenderis, Kostas

    2007-11-01

    The book 'String Theory in a Nutshell' by Elias Kiritsis provides a comprehensive introduction to modern string theory. String theory is the leading candidate for a theory that successfully unifies all fundamental forces of nature, including gravity. The subject has been continuously developing since the early 1970s, with classic textbooks on the subject being those of Green, Schwarz and Witten (1987) and Polchinski (1998). Since the latter was published there have been substantial developments, in particular in understanding black holes and gravity/gauge theory dualities. A textbook treatment of this important material is clearly needed, both by students and researchers in string theory and by mathematicians and physicists working in related fields. This book has a good selection of material, starting from basics and moving into classic and modern topics. In particular, Kiritsis' presentation of the basic material is complementary to that of the earlier textbooks and he includes a number of topics which are not easily found or covered adequately elsewhere, for example, loop corrections to string effective couplings. Overall the book nicely covers the major advances of the last ten years, including (non-perturbative) string dualities, black hole physics, AdS/CFT and matrix models. It provides a concise but fairly complete introduction to these subjects which can be used both by students and by researchers. Moreover the emphasis is on results that are reasonably established, as is appropriate for a textbook; concise summaries are given for subjects which are still in flux, with references to relevant reviews and papers. A positive feature of the book is that the bibliography sections at the end of each chapter provide a comprehensive guide to the literature. The bibliographies point to reviews and pedagogical papers on subjects covered in this book as well as those that were omitted. It is rare for a textbook to contain such a self-contained and detailed guide to

  7. Hydrological changes prints in subarctic watersheds discharge records: a case study in the Duke River watershed, Yukon, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnokova, A.; Baraer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrological changes from alpine glacierized watersheds have been reported from almost all the regions of the world. In most cases those changes have, or are foreseen to have, marked impacts on water resources with implications for downstream population and ecosystems. One of the ways to assess climate change impacts on glacierized watersheds is to conduct appropriate statistical analyses on historical hydrometric data where long and accurate time series exist. In the Yukon, Canada, a fair number of hydrometric time series are made accessible by institutions such as Environment Canada or the Yukon National Parks Organisation. Some of those time series have been studied previously at a regional scale in the territory. In the present study, focusing on the Duke River watershed area, we reanalyse these datasets based on a larger number of discharge characteristics and compare results with regional meteorological data analysis. We perform non-parametric trend analysis to assess long-term changes in watersheds response to climate-induced variability. Eight watersheds with varying glacierized area were chosen for this study. Main glaciers in the region are situated in St. Elias Mountains and are characterised by ubiquitous mass loss (Arendt et al., 2002; Barrand and Sharp, 2010). Historical hydrometric data analysis shows two distinct hydrological regimes in the area: (i) - snow fed rivers with peak runoff following spring snowmelt, and (ii) - glacier fed rivers with peak runoff following glacier ablation in July. While total discharge during ablation season does not vary significantly between watersheds with different regimes, the difference in late summer runoff is close to 50%. Moreover, trend analysis provides evidence of changes in hydrological regimes in the area. As a response to ubiquitous temperature increase, hydrologically active period for highly glacieized watershed (with glacierized area of 30%) has shifted from the beginning of August to the beginning of

  8. Surge-like behavior at the non-surge type Matanuska Glacier, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, M.; Abe, T.

    2014-12-01

    Seasonal glacier velocity changes are attributed to subglacial slip associated with water pressure changes that occur because of the seasonal variability of meltwater input. Abe and Furuya (2014) reported winter speed-up signals and their downglacier propagation at a number of glaciers near the border of Alaska and Yukon, based on ALOS/PALSAR radar image analyses. Here we perform the similar analyses at the Chugach mountain range of South Central Alaska, and report the spatial-temporal evolution of the Matanuska Glacier. Matanuska Glacier is the largest accessible glacier in Alaska with its nearly 40 km length and 5 km width near the terminus. Comparing the winter velocity images in 2007, 2008 and 2010, those in 2010 were about 1.5-2 times faster than those during the previous two years. In addition, comparing the fall and winter velocities, winter velocities were apparently faster at every 2007-2008, 2009-2010, and 2010-2011 season. These data indicate winter speed-up or mini-surge signals even at a temperate and non-surgetype Matanuska Glacier. We also examine the spatial-temporal elevation changes, using data from the LiDAR altimeter in the Icebridge mission, and found significant elevation increase near the terminus. Winter speed-up may not be uncommon at Alaskan/Yukon glaciers. Lingle and Fatland (2003) detected faster speed in winter than in fall at non-surging Seward Glacier in the St. Elias Mountains; this is the only published and unambiguous report of winter speed-up, to our knowledge. Combined with earlier glacier hydrological studies, Lingle and Fatland proposed englacial water storage and gravity-driven water flow toward the bed in winter regardless of whether a given glacier is surge-type or not, and considered that the capacity of englacial water storage would control if a given glacier was surge-type or not. We consider that our measurements are complementary to Lingle and Fatland's observations and lend further support for their hypothesis. Basal

  9. Landslide dynamics from seismology and satellite remote sensing (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, C. P.; Ekstrom, G.; Hibert, C.; Allen, J.

    2013-12-01

    Each year, a half-dozen or more kilometer-scale landslides strike mountain regions around the world. Each involves the acceleration and deceleration of millions of tons of debris at bulk rates of 1-3m/s^2, generating peak bulk-averaged forces well in excess of 10GN and exciting seismic waves whose long-period components are detectable at distances exceeding 1000km. We have studied around 40 such teleseismogenic (but not earthquake-triggered) landslides for the period 1980-2013, focusing mainly on inverting the long-period waveforms to infer time-series of landslide dynamical properties (the landslide force history or LFH; [1]), and recently extending our analysis to consider high-frequency seismicity recorded for well-instrumented events. It is now feasible to detect, measure and roughly geolocate >50GN, Msw>4.7 landslide events within a few hours of their occurrence, even if the landslides strike in very remote areas. Each rapid LFH inversion generates a good estimate of the runout geometry, which, for remote events, turns out to be very useful when trying to confirm and precisely locate the landslide occurrence in satellite imagery. With the advent of Landsat 8 it is now feasible to make such a confirmation within a week or so, weather permitting. A recent example is the rapid detection of a ~40Mt landslide in the Wrangell Mountains of Alaska that struck on 2013-07-25: the event was detected and roughly located with a few hours; within a few days, an LFH inversion gave its scale and runout path; the inversion and correlative short-period waveform analysis generated a sharper estimate for its location; a Landsat 8 image over the area was acquired within 8 days, and the new landslide scar was spotted shortly thereafter. This event extends our catalog of landslide source inversions and corroborates our general conclusions from this work, which are: (i) the glaciated mountains of Alaska, notably the St Elias Range and its neighbors, are the most catastrophic

  10. Tsunami source model the 2011 Tohoku earthquake inferred from tsunami waveforms and coastal inundation heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, C. P.; Ekstrom, G.; Hibert, C.; Allen, J.

    2011-12-01

    Each year, a half-dozen or more kilometer-scale landslides strike mountain regions around the world. Each involves the acceleration and deceleration of millions of tons of debris at bulk rates of 1-3m/s^2, generating peak bulk-averaged forces well in excess of 10GN and exciting seismic waves whose long-period components are detectable at distances exceeding 1000km. We have studied around 40 such teleseismogenic (but not earthquake-triggered) landslides for the period 1980-2013, focusing mainly on inverting the long-period waveforms to infer time-series of landslide dynamical properties (the landslide force history or LFH; [1]), and recently extending our analysis to consider high-frequency seismicity recorded for well-instrumented events. It is now feasible to detect, measure and roughly geolocate >50GN, Msw>4.7 landslide events within a few hours of their occurrence, even if the landslides strike in very remote areas. Each rapid LFH inversion generates a good estimate of the runout geometry, which, for remote events, turns out to be very useful when trying to confirm and precisely locate the landslide occurrence in satellite imagery. With the advent of Landsat 8 it is now feasible to make such a confirmation within a week or so, weather permitting. A recent example is the rapid detection of a ~40Mt landslide in the Wrangell Mountains of Alaska that struck on 2013-07-25: the event was detected and roughly located with a few hours; within a few days, an LFH inversion gave its scale and runout path; the inversion and correlative short-period waveform analysis generated a sharper estimate for its location; a Landsat 8 image over the area was acquired within 8 days, and the new landslide scar was spotted shortly thereafter. This event extends our catalog of landslide source inversions and corroborates our general conclusions from this work, which are: (i) the glaciated mountains of Alaska, notably the St Elias Range and its neighbors, are the most catastrophic

  11. Ert Applied to the Characterization of Subsidence in Mexico City: Ancient Structures Affecting Urban Utilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arango, C.; Chavez, R. E.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; Hernández-Quintero, E.

    2013-05-01

    The problem of subsidence in Mexico City is basically due to the rapid extraction of groundwater for water supply in addition to the geological conditions. The most typical manifestations of the phenomena are presented as cracks and fractures due to compaction of ancient lake clayish sediments. This phenomenon has caused major affectations to city infrastructure because of the differential subsidence. Fractured buildings, sinkholes, among others manifestations, are potentially sources of collapses, which exposes the population to a serious risk. A small portion of Iztacalco County is being affected by this problem, specifically, in a crossroad formed by two important avenues: La Viga and Plutarco Elias Calles, where the area apparently increases its topographical level. The Electrical Resistivity Tomography technique was selected in order to obtain a resistivity image of the subsoil, which allows identify the main features associated to the terrain uprising. Three (ERT) profiles 200 m, were deployed on the mentioned crossroad in order to characterize the subsurface structures affecting the topographical level of the avenues. A big resistivity anomaly (~ 1000 ohm-m) could be observed towards the central part of the crossroad, coinciding with the major lifting level on surface. This feature appears at 15 m deep in all the profiles and depicts an approximate extension of 100 m in the E-W direction and 60 m in N-S axis. On the other hand, the surrounding material seems to correspond to a higher-saturated environment (lacustrine sediments <10 ohm-m). Shallow anomalies were also detected related to urban artifacts (pipes, sewers, etcetera). The apparently terrain uprising can be associated to a differential subsidence. However, the mentioned avenues were ancient water channels since pre-Hispanic times, where the caudal was enough to allow small steam boating at late nineteenth century. These waterways served as main routes for the exchange of goods during colonial times

  12. Extreme QCD 2012 (xQCD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-04-01

    Acknowledgements This conference would not have been possible without the generous support from Brookhaven National Laboratory and the George Washington University INS and IMPACT institutes, Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, the Office of Vice-President for Research, and the Department of Physics. We thank them wholeheartedly. We are also very grateful for the support of our colleagues on the local organizing committee, Walter Freeman and Frank Lee, and on the International Advisory Committee: Simon Hands, Tetsuo Hatsuda, Frithjof Karsch, Maria Paola Lombardo, Tereza Mendes, Atsushi Nakamura, Owe Philipsen, Claudia Ratti, Paul Romatschke, Misha Stephanov, and Nu Xu. List of participants Alexandru, Andrei George Washington University Bazavov, Alexei Brookhaven National Laboratory Bloch, Jacques University of Regensburg Braun-Munzinger, Peter EMMI, GSI Breto Rangel, Guillermo CMS/UC Davis D'Elia, Massimo University of Pisa, INFN Dexheimer, Veronica UFSC - Federal University of Santa Catarina Ding, Heng-Tong Brookhaven National Laboratory Dion, Alan Stony Brook University Dumitru, Adrian RBRC and Baruch College, CUNY Freeman, Walter George Washington University Gavai, Rajiv Tata Institute (TIFR), Mumbai Hanada, Masanori KEK Theory Center Hands, Simon Swansea University Hegde, Prasad Brookhaven National Laboratory Heinke, Craig University of Alberta Horvath, Ivan University of Kentucky Karsch, Frithjof Brookhaven National Laboratory Krieg, Stefan Wuppertal University Lattimer, James Stony Brook University Lee, Frank George Washington University Li, Anyi Institute for Nuclear Theory Liu, Keh-Fei University of Kentucky Lombardo, Maria Paola INFN - LNF Lottini, Stefano Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main Maezawa, Yu Brookhaven National Laboratory Miura, Kohtaroh Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati - INFN Monnai, Akihiko The University of Tokyo Mukherjee, Swagato Brookhaven National Laboratory Myers, Joyce University of Groningen Nakamura, Atsushi RIISE, Hiroshima

  13. Towards understanding North Pacific climate variabilty with instrumental and ice core records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, Eric P.

    Reconstructing climate variability prior to the instrumental era is critical to advance our understanding of the Earth's climate system. Although many paleoclimate records from the North Atlantic basin have been studied, relatively few paleoclimate records have been recovered in the North Pacific leaving a gap in our knowledge concerning North Pacific climate variability. The Eclipse and Mount Logan Prospector-Russell ice cores are favorably located in the St. Elias Mountains, Yukon, Canada to document North Pacific climate variability over the late Holocene. Detailed analysis reveals a consistent relationship of surface air temperature (SAT) anomalies associated with extreme Arctic Oscillation (AO) and Pacific-North America (PNA) index values, and a consistent relationship of North Pacific sea level pressure (SLP) anomalies associated with extreme Mt. Logan annual [Na+] and Eclipse cold season accumulation values. Spatial SAT anomaly patterns are most consistent for AO and PNA index values ≥1.5 and ≤-1.5 during the period 1872-2010. The highest and lowest ˜10% of Eclipse warm and cold season stable isotopes are associated with distinct atmospheric circulation patterns. The most-fractionated isotope values occur with a weaker Aleutian Low, and the least-fractionated isotope values occur with an amplification of the Aleutian Low and northwestern North American ridge. The assumption of stationarity between ice core records and sea-level pressure was tested for the Eclipse cold season accumulation and Mt. Logan annual sodium concentration records for 1872-2001. A stationary relationship was found for ≥95% of years when Mt. Logan sodium concentrations were ≤1.32 microg/L, with positive SLP anomalies in the eastern North Pacific. This high frequency supports the use of low sodium values at Mt. Logan for a reconstruction of SLP prior to 1872. Negative SLP anomalies in the North Pacific occurred for extreme high sodium concentration years and positive SLP

  14. America's First Carl Sagan: Ormsby MacKnight Mitchel, Pre-Civil War Astronomer and Lecturer on the Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, D. E.

    2002-12-01

    In the years before television, videos, radio. movies, or even loudspeakers, Ormsby MacKnight Mitchel (1809-1862) was the best-known popularizer of astronomy and the scientific study of the universe in nineteenth-century America. Each winter he traveled the country by railroad, steamer, and stagecoach, speaking to large paying crowds in principal cities from Boston, New York, and Philadelphia through Cincinnati to New Orleans on the cosmos and our place in it, with special attention to possible inhabitants of planers orbiting other stars. Mitchel had much the same attraction as Sagan did in our time, and awakened many people's interest in astronomy through the human angle, as Carl did. His argument was simple, and according to Frank Triplett goes back thousands of years: other stars are suns, our sun has planets with people on one of them, why should not other stars also have populated planets? But first Mitchel, like Sagan, always explained clearly the discoveries of astronomy that fleshed out this argument with facts. He emphasized the ``clockwork universe", governed by gravity, that Newton, Herschel, and Laplace had investigated and found to be stable. There were many other similarities between these two great popularizers. Mitchel's base was the Cincinnati Observatory, which he had founded, raising the funds for it himself in small contributions from hundreds of ``members", which he publicised as far more democratic than support from European kings and lords. He went abroad to get a telescope, and finally found his ``Great [12-inch] Refractor" in Munich, with help from John Quincy Adams, Astronomer Royal George Biddle Airy, and Paris Observatory Director Fracois Arago, in spite of a rebuff by President John Tyler. These episodes have similarities in Sagan's lobbying NASA for close-up images of Mars. Views of other American professional astronomers on life on other worlds will also be described briefly, from Denison Olmsted, Elias Loomis, Charles A. Young (who

  15. Geological Controls on Glacier Surging?: Statistics and Speculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, G. E.; Crompton, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Glacier surging represents an end-member behavior in the spectrum of ice dynamics, involving marked acceleration and high flow speeds due to abrupt changes in basal mechanics. Though much effort has been devoted to understanding the role of basal hydrology and thermal regime in fast glacier flow, fewer studies have addressed the potential role of the geologic substrate. One interesting observation is that surge-type glaciers appear almost universally associated with unconsolidated (till) beds, and several large-scale statistical studies have revealed correlations between glacier surging and bedrock properties. We revisit this relationship using field measurements. We selected 20 individual glaciers for sampling in a 40x40 km region of the St. Elias Mountains of Yukon, Canada. Eleven of these glaciers are known to surge and nine are not. The 20 study glaciers are underlain by lithologies that we have broadly classified into two types: metasedimentary only and mixed metasedimentary-granodiorite. We characterized geological and geotechnical properties of the bedrock in each basin, and analyzed the hydrochemistry and mineralogy and grain size distribution (GSD) of the suspended sediments in the proglacial streams. Here we focus on some intriguing results of the GSD analysis. Using statistical techniques, including significance testing and principal component analysis, we find that: (1) lithology determines GSD for non-surge-type glaciers, with metasedimentary basins associated with finer mean grain sizes and mixed-lithology basins with coarser mean grain sizes, but (2) the GSDs associated with surge-type glaciers are intermediate between the distributions described above, and are statistically indistinguishable between metasedimentary and mixed lithology basins. The latter suggests either that surge-type glaciers in our study area occur preferentially in basins where various processes conspire to produce a characteristic GSD, or that the surge cycle itself exerts an

  16. Late Quaternary glacial relief evolution and fracture-density control on erosion revealed by low-temperature thermochronometry and remote sensing (Granite Range, Alaska)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valla, Pierre; Champagnac, Jean-Daniel; Herman, Frédéric; Lowick, Sally; Guralnik, Benny; Shuster, David; Fellin, Giuditta

    2013-04-01

    Long-term erosion and topographic evolution of mountain belts arise from complex coupling between tectonics, climate and surface processes. The Granite Range (Wrangell-St Elias National Park, Alaska) presents an ideal setting to study such interactions. Its alpine landscape, preserving typical glacial features (U-shaped valleys, cirques), appears highly smoothed in the west, and progressively more rugged towards the east. In the field, this is evidenced by minor and only localized faulting of massive bedrock (granite and paragneiss) in the west, while the eastern part shows highly fractured bedrock (penetrative faults, fault gouges). Remote-sensing analysis confirms that fracture density is much higher towards east, and also reveals high post-glacial incision only in areas associated with high fracture density. To quantify our morphometric observations, we sampled four elevation profiles (~15 samples in total) over an 80-km East-West transect for low-temperature thermochrometry. Apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He dating provides ages between ~10 and 30 Ma, in agreement with published data, and shows apparent low long-term exhumation rates (~0.05-0.1 km/Ma). Preliminary 4He/3He thermochronometry data reveal a more complex exhumation history, with a significant increase since ~6-5 Ma which can be related to either onset of glaciations in Alaska or a major change in tectonic activity occurring at that period. Further data collected within the Granite Range will help to decipher the origin of this late-Miocene acceleration in exhumation. We also performed luminescence thermochronometry measured on feldspar separates from bedrock samples. Our results show a strong East-West gradient in samples saturation ratio. Apparent ages vary from ~250 ka in the western part of the range, towards younger ages of ~30 ka in the east. This pattern reveals spatially variable erosion rates during the late Quaternary associated with a major fracture-density control on erosion, and further supports the

  17. Young tectonics of a complex plate boundary zone: Indentation, rotation, and escape in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, W. K.; Ruppert, N. A.

    2012-12-01

    Convergence of thick crust of the Yakutat block with the southern margin of Alaska is widely recognized as a dominant influence on the tectonics of Alaska since at least late Miocene time. It is less clear how this convergence relates to the distribution, type, and orientation of geologic structures, and to the boundaries between the tectonic provinces that they define. We propose that convergence of Yakutat block includes two distinct components that influence deformation and topography in different ways: 1) The crust of the exposed, southern Yakutat block is too thick to subduct, which has caused the collisional St. Elias orogen. Detachment of the upper part of the mafic basement allows delamination and sinking of the remaining mafic crust and lithospheric mantle. The collisional orogen drives rigid counterclockwise rotation of the southern Alaska block south of the arcuate, right-lateral Denali fault. The western boundary of this block is a zone of distributed contraction in the western Alaska Range and Cook Inlet. 2) The northern part of the Yakutat block is thin enough to subduct but thick and buoyant enough to cause localized flat-slab subduction orthogonal to rotation of the southern Alaska block. Consequences include the gently antiformal Talkeetna Mountains that span the forearc basin, a gap in the magmatic arc, and a basement-involved fold-and-thrust belt in the northern Alaska Range. An arcuate oroclinal hinge from southern Alaska to the northeastern Brooks Range reflects indentation since at least Paleocene time. Traction above the subducted Yakutat block along the southern part of this hinge drives current indentation. North of the subducted Yakutat block, indentation is reflected by left-lateral block rotation that accommodates shortening between the Denali and Tintina faults and by contraction farther north along the northern edge of the arcuate northeastern Brooks Range. Western Alaska accommodates both northward indentation and westward convergence

  18. Velocity Variations of the Kaskawulsh Glacier, Yukon Territory, 2009-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Samantha

    Laser altimetry and satellite gravity surveys indicate that the St Elias Icefields are currently losing mass and are among the largest non-polar sea level contributors in the world. However, a poor understanding of glacier dynamics in the region is a major hurdle in evaluating regional variations in ice motion and the relationship between changing surface conditions and ice flux. This study combines in-situ dGPS measurements and advanced Radarsat-2 (RS-2) processing techniques to determine daily and seasonal ice velocities for the Kaskawulsh Glacier from summer 2009 to summer 2011. Three permanent dGPS stations were installed along the centreline of the glacier in 2009, with an additional permanent station on the South Arm in 2010. The Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method is used to process the dGPS data using high accuracy orbital reconstruction. RS-2 imagery was acquired on a 24-day cycle from January to March 2010, and from October to March 2010-2011 in a combination of ultra-fine and fine beam modes. Seasonal velocity regimes are readily identifiable in the dGPS results, with distinct variations in both horizontal velocity and vertical motion. The Spring Regime consists of an annual peak in horizontal velocity that corresponds closely with the onset of the melt season and progresses up-glacier, following the onset of melt at each station. The Summer Regime sees variable horizontal velocity and vertical uplift, superimposed on a long-term decline in motion. The Fall Regime sees a gradual slowing at all stations with little variation in horizontal velocity or vertical position. Rapid but short accelerations lasting up to 10 days were seen in the Winter regimes in both 2010 and 2011, occurring at various times throughout each regime. These events initiated at the Upper Station and progress down-glacier at propagation speeds up to 16,380 m day-1 and were accompanied by vertical uplift lasting for similar periods. Three velocity maps, one from the winter of 2010

  19. Geochemical Fluxes Associated With a Long-range Dust Cloud From the Gobi Desert Region, Central Asia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdanowicz, C. M.; Hall, G. E.; Vaive, J. E.

    2003-12-01

    In early April, 2001, an exceptionally intense series of dust storms originated in the Gobi desert region of southern Mongolia and northern China. The dust cloud generated during these storms was tracked by satellite over the North Pacific Ocean and was detected all across North America. Instrumented floats deployed in the subarctic western Pacific Ocean revealed a near-doubling of the carbon biomass in the mixed layer over the 2-week period following the passage of the dust cloud, illustrating the impact of the dust on biological productivity in the surface Ocean (Bishop et al. 2002, Nature vol. 298). During its passage over northwestern America ca April 13, 2001, the Gobi dust plume deposited a widespread, distinctive layer of yellowish-red dust-laden snow, up to 5-cm thick, in the icefields of the St-Elias mountains, Yukon Territory. The dust fallout was probably enhanced by snowfall scavenging associated with orographic uplift of the moist Pacific air mass over the high mountain range (max elevation 5959 m). Samples of dust-laden snow were collected from a series of sites on the Mount Logan massif (60 N, 140 W), during a glaciological research expedition. The samples, collected between elevations of 2400 and 5340 m, contained as much as 80 ppm (mass) of dust. The dust particles were analyzed in the laboratories of the Geological Survey of Canada to characterize their physical attributes (e.g., grain size distribution) as well as their bulk mineralogical and geochemical composition. The concentrations of over 60 major, minor and trace elements were determined using ICP-MS an ICP-ES, including some important nutrients and biolimiting to biointermediate elements such as P, Si, Ba and Ca. Using these measurements, we calculated first-order estimates of the depositional fluxes for various geochemical elements associated with the Gobi dust fallout. Such detailed compositional data on far-traveled dust clouds are rarely available. We hope our findings presented here

  20. Subduction of thick crust: the Alaska example (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abers, G. A.; Kim, Y.; Christensen, D. H.

    2013-12-01

    It is a paradigm of plate tectonics that oceanic lithosphere subducts readily, while lithosphere transporting much thicker continental crust does not. Analyses of plate buoyancy have included a variety of effects, such as eclogitization, crustal compositional stratification, and plate strength, but all lead to the conclusion that crust needs to be thinner than about 15-25 km in order to subduct. A test of this conclusion is underway in southern Alaska, where the Yakutat terrane is being driven by the Pacific plate into the Alaskan margin. Its crust is 15-30 km thick, varying along strike, with a seismic velocity structure resembling an oceanic plateau; thus it spans the predicted limit in thickness of subductable crust. In the eastern thicker part, the terrane appears to be colliding and driving orogenesis in the St. Elias-Chugach ranges, although voluminous volcanism of the Wrangell Volcanic Field may be a consequence of some crust subducting. Farther west, the Yakutat terrane is 15-20 km thick and clearly subducting beneath the Prince William Sound and Kenai Peninsula. It forms the slab subducting beneath the central Alaska Range 400 km inland. The thick crust has been imaged at all depths less than 130 km, through receiver functions, travel-time tomography, and offshore by active-source imaging, with similar structure in most images. Greater than 130 km depth the imaged crust vanishes in seismic images, consistent with predicted depths of eclogitization of weakly hydrated metagabbroic crust, and the lack of a velocity contrast between eclogite and peridotite. Lithosphere including the thick Yakutat crust gives a net buoyancy close to neutral, so its subduction will depend on other factors. The high buoyancy may be responsible for the remarkably shallow dip of the plate at depths less than 50 km, producing one of the widest seismogenic thrust zones on the planet, allowing it to host the great (Mw 9.3) 1964 Gulf of Alaska earthquake. The shallow dip may also aid

  1. Bursts of calving activity and controls on the terminus position of Yahtse Glacier, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomaus, T. C.; Larsen, C. F.; West, M. E.; Oneel, S.

    2011-12-01

    The tidewater glacier terminus is the interface that links oceanic and glaciological processes. Tidewater glaciers contribute large amounts of cold, fresh water to their fjords. Ocean heat exerts a significant control on glacier mass balance. On the Gulf of Alaska, the terminus of tidewater Yahtse Glacier has advanced slowly since its 1990 post-Little Ice Age minimum. At Yahtse's terminus, ice flowing at 18 m/d encounters water with temperatures of up to 10.5°C (measured 1.5 km from the terminus). Profiles of temperature and salinity in Icy Bay, in which Yahtse Glacier terminates, have revealed a strongly stratified, single-cell circulation pattern. Fresh, glacier outflow exits the bay atop warm, saline Gulf of Alaska water. The Alaska Coastal Current, a major source of Icy Bay water, has warmed by 1°C over the last 40 years. These observations prompt the question of how a tidewater advance may be sustained in spite of warming ocean and atmosphere temperatures. Superimposed on Yahtse Glacier's longer-term advance have been smaller-scale summer retreats and winter-spring re-advances. These smaller fluctuations indicate that factors that change on short timescales, such as ocean conditions and weather, also have an important control on terminus position. Observed bursts in calving frequency are a further reflection of the unsteady conditions at the glacier terminus. In the present study, we use seismograms recorded on bedrock within 500 m of the glacier terminus as a calving counter. The epicenters of a significant majority of glacier-generated seismic events within the St. Elias Mountains have been located to within 15 km of the terminus of Yahtse Glacier. Previous study at Yahtse Glacier has revealed that at least 75% of these seismic events originate from calving processes, most notably through the interactions between iceberg and water. Calving frequency is characterized by a relatively steady rate of background events, punctuated by bursts of calving activity

  2. Laurentian and Baltican components of Terranes in NW Washington: Implications for Displacement of Paleozoic Terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schermer, E. R.; Brown, N.; Gehrels, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    Cordillera. Although our prior work suggested connections to Turtleback complex (San Juan Islands) and Alexander terrane (Karheen formation) based on U-Pb data, Hf data appear to rule out such connections. However some elements of Alexander terrane (St Elias and Banks Island) are similar to YAC, and further work is needed to resolve the tectonic links.

  3. A Grazing Encounter Between Two Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    sets were obtained by Debra Meloy Elmegreen (Vassar College), Bruce G. Elmegreen (IBM Research Division), Michele Kaufman (Ohio State U.), Elias Brinks (Universidad de Guanajuato, Mexico), Curt Struck (Iowa State University), Magnus Thomasson (Onsala Space Obs., Sweden), Maria Sundin (Goteborg University, Sweden), and Mario Klaric (Columbia, South Carolina).

  4. PREFACE: Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, Maia; Zakrzewski, Wojciech

    2011-03-01

    the meeting was that all plenary talks presented the state-of-the-art and were at the same time educational and exciting, promoting the multidisciplinary aspects of the research, and thus were inspirational for young scientists considering work in these fields. The plenary talks, each lasting 1 hour, were given by distinguished world experts and some young 'rising stars': Richard Ward, Ulf Leonhardt, Jens Eisert, Michael Berry, Shahn Majid, Arndt von Haeseler, Michio Jimbo, Katrin Wendland, Raymond Goldstein, Mark Trodden, Maria Vozmediano and Giulio Chiribella. The public lecture was given by Francesco Iachello and was open to participants and other people from the Newcastle-Durham region. In addition, talks of 30 minutes duration each and including more technical content, were given in four parallel sessions. Each parallel session had a designated time for informal interaction with the speakers, discussions of new directions of research and for forming new collaborations. The poster session, in a room where posters were exhibited for the duration of the conference, was easily accessible, and had a friendly and relaxed atmosphere, encouraging discussions of work and exchanges of new ideas. To secure a high quality scientific programme, all contributions were reviewed. Another interesting feature of the conference was the Open Forum on the Friday afternoon, which was lively and well attended. It took the form of a question and answer session with a panel chaired by Allan Solomon, with the following members: Gerald Goldin, Jean-Pierre Gazeau, Mark Trodden and Giulio Chiribella. The focus was on new directions of research, novel applications and the further development of group theory, education, training and career opportunities for young researchers. The participants were asked to submit questions in advance; examples are: "What is the role of symmetries and conservation principles in deducing underlying physics from experimental data?" and "What are the most

  5. Characterization of residuals from ice particles and droplets sampled in mid-latitude natural and aviation-influenced cirrus and in tropical deep convective cloud systems during ML-CIRRUS and ACRIDICON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertes, Stephan; Kästner, Udo; Schulz, Christiane; Klimach, Thomas; Krüger, Mira; Schneider, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    Airborne sampling of cloud particles inside different cirrus cloud types and inside deep convective clouds was conducted during the HALO missions ML-CIRRUS over Europe in March/April 2014 and ACRIDICON over Amazonia in September 2014. ML-CIRRUS aims at the investigation of the for-mation, evolution, microphysical state and radiative effects of different natural and aviation-induced cirrus clouds in the mid-latitudes. The main objectives of ACRIDICON are the microphysical vertical profiling, vertical aerosol transport and the cloud processing of aerosol particles (compari-son in- and outflow) of tropical deep convective cloud systems in clean and polluted air masses and over forested and deforested regions. The hydrometeors (drops and ice particles) are sampled by a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) which has to be installed in the front part of the upper fuselage of the HALO aircraft. Such an intake position implies a size dependent abundance of cloud particles with respect to ambient conditions that was studied by particle trajectory simulations (Katrin Witte, HALO Technical Note 2008-003-A). On the other hand, this sampling location avoids that large ice crystals which could potentially bias the cloud particle sampling by shattering and break-up at the inlet shroud and tip enter the inlet. Both aspects as well as the flight conditions of HALO were taken into account for an optimized CVI design for HALO (HALO-CVI). Interstitial particles are pre-segregated and the condensed phase is evaporated/sublimated by the CVI, such that the residuals from cloud droplets and ice particles (CDR and IPR) can be microphysically and chemically analyzed by respective aerosol sensors located in the cabin. Although an even more comprehensive characterization of CDR and IPR was carried out, we like to report on the following measurements of certain aerosol properties. Particle number concentra-tion and size distribution are measured by a condensation particle counter (CPC) and an

  6. Mercury in fishes from 21 national parks in the Western United States: inter- and intra-park variation in concentrations and ecological risk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Willacker, James J.; Flanagan Pritz, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    of fish sampled were above a benchmark for risk to highly sensitive avian consumers (90 ng/g ww), and THg concentrations in 68 percent of fish sampled were above exposure levels recommended by the Great Lakes Advisory Group (50 ng/g ww) for unlimited consumption by humans. Of the fish assessed for risk to human consumers (that is, species that are large enough to be consumed by recreational or subsistence anglers), only one individual fish from Yosemite National Park had a muscle Hg concentration exceeding the benchmark (950 ng/g ww) at which no human consumption is advised. Zion, Capital Reef, Wrangell-St. Elias, and Lake Clark National Parks all contained sites in which most fish exceeded benchmarks for the protection of human and wildlife health. This finding is particularly concerning in Zion and Capitol Reef National Parks because the fish from these parks were speckled dace, a small, invertebrate-feeding species, yet their Hg concentrations were as high or higher than those in the largest, long-lived predatory species, such as lake trout. Future targeted research and monitoring across park habitats would help identify patterns of Hg distribution across the landscape and facilitate management decisions aimed at reducing the ecological risk posed by Hg contamination in sensitive ecosystems protected by the National Park Service.

  7. The Mount Logan (Yukon) Ice Cores: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, D. A.

    2004-05-01

    Three ice cores were taken at different elevations on or near My Logan in the years 2001 and 2002. The summit core (PRCol) comes from the summit plateau ( 5340 masl, length 187 m to bedrock, mean temperature -29 C ) and was done by the Geological Survey of Canada. The NIPR group cored 210m on the flanks of the mountain at King Col (4200 masl mean temperature -16C) and the UNH group cored 20 km from the mountain at Eclipse "Dome" (3015 masl,length 345 m mean temperature -5C) . The three cores were done cooperatively by GSC, NIPR and UNH and cover nominally 30 ka, 1 ka and 2ka respectively . Located very close to the Gulf of Alaska these core records are thought to reflect the climate history of the Pacific Ocean and having three widely spaced elevations, the sites "see" different distances to different sources. The lowest site (Eclipse) has excellent seasonals but a very muted δ 18O history with no obvious little ice age, whereas the most recent 1ka of the PRCol summit sites contains two very large and sudden δ 18O and d (deuterium excess) shifts at 1850 AD and ~ 800 AD. The δ 18O shifts which happen from one year to the next are about 4 o/oo . The summit site (PRCol) δ 18O response is "backwards", ie the Little Ice Age δ 18O values are 4 o/oo more positive than recent ones. The PRCol δ 18O and d suggest that the source water can either be ëlocalí (Gulf of Alaska) or very distant (tropics) . The Eclipse site seems only to get the local water . A massive dust storm originating in central Asia (Gobi) in April 2001 dumped a visible layer all over the St Elias Mountains and this layer was sampled, to provide a calibration "Asian dust event". The satellite and isotoic signatures both agreed that Gobi was the source. The PRCol record covers the Holocene and well back into the ice age. The transition is defined by a sudden ECM shift on the flanks of a more gradual O18 shift. Acknowledgements. Logan consortium consists of : Geological Survey of Canada : Jocelyne

  8. Confidence intervals in Flow Forecasting by using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagoulia, Dionysia; Tsekouras, George

    2014-05-01

    variable of different ANN structures [3]. The performance of each ANN structure is evaluated by the voting analysis based on eleven criteria, which are the root mean square error (RMSE), the correlation index (R), the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), the mean percentage error (MPE), the mean percentage error (ME), the percentage volume in errors (VE), the percentage error in peak (MF), the normalized mean bias error (NMBE), the normalized root mean bias error (NRMSE), the Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient (E) and the modified Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient (E1). The next day flow for the test set is calculated using the best ANN structure's model. Consequently, the confidence intervals of various confidence levels for training, evaluation and test sets are compared in order to explore the generalisation dynamics of confidence intervals from training and evaluation sets. [1] H.S. Hippert, C.E. Pedreira, R.C. Souza, "Neural networks for short-term load forecasting: A review and evaluation," IEEE Trans. on Power Systems, vol. 16, no. 1, 2001, pp. 44-55. [2] G. J. Tsekouras, N.E. Mastorakis, F.D. Kanellos, V.T. Kontargyri, C.D. Tsirekis, I.S. Karanasiou, Ch.N. Elias, A.D. Salis, P.A. Kontaxis, A.A. Gialketsi: "Short term load forecasting in Greek interconnected power system using ANN: Confidence Interval using a novel re-sampling technique with corrective Factor", WSEAS International Conference on Circuits, Systems, Electronics, Control & Signal Processing, (CSECS '10), Vouliagmeni, Athens, Greece, December 29-31, 2010. [3] D. Panagoulia, I. Trichakis, G. J. Tsekouras: "Flow Forecasting via Artificial Neural Networks - A Study for Input Variables conditioned on atmospheric circulation", European Geosciences Union, General Assembly 2012 (NH1.1 / AS1.16 - Extreme meteorological and hydrological events induced by severe weather and climate change), Vienna, Austria, 22-27 April 2012.

  9. PREFACE: First Mediterranean Conference on Classical and Quantum Gravity (MCCQG 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilakos, Spyros; Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Christodoulakis, Theodosios; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2010-04-01

    quite fruitful, enjoyable 'Mediterranean' atmosphere for the exchange of ideas and discussion. It is a pleasure to thank our administrative and technical staff Georgia Angelopoulou, Athina Pouri, Mando Zambeli and Manolis Zoulias for their untiring assistance. We also thank the staff of the OAC for the enthusiastic support and their hospitality. We are grateful to the Academy of Athens and the Tomalla Foundation for their generous financial support which made MCCQG possible. Finally, our gratitude goes to all the participants and especially the many experienced scientists. Their contributions highlighted the meeting. The success of the MCCQG is due to them and to the enthusiasm of the younger participants. The Editors March 2010 COMMITTEES Organising Committee Spyros Basilakos (RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Greece) Mariano Cadoni (University and INFN Cagliari, Italy) Marco Cavaglià (University of Mississippi, USA) Theodosios Christodoulakis (University of Athens, Greece) Elias Vagenas (RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Greece) Advisory Committee Ignatios Antoniadis (CERN, Switzerland) Orfeu Bertolami (IST, Lisbon, Portugal) Loriano Bonora (SISSA, Trieste, Italy) George Contopoulos (Academy of Athens, Greece) Ruth Durrer (Geneva University, Switzerland) Enrique Gaztanaga (IEEC, Barcelona, Spain) Gabriela Gonzalez (Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, USA) Marc Henneaux (Brussels University, Belgium) Roman Jackiw (MIT, USA) Claus Kiefer (Cologne University, Germany) Stefano Liberati (SISSA, Trieste, Italy) Ofer Lahav (University College London, UK) Roy Maartens (University of Portsmouth, UK) Don Marolf (UC Santa Barbara, USA) Hermann Nicolai (AEI, Potsdam, Germany) Augusto Sagnotti (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, Italy) Mairi Sakellariadou (King's College London, UK) Jorge Zanelli (CECS, Valdivia, Chile) SPONSORS Academy of Athens The Tomalla Foundation Università di Cagliari University of Mississippi University of Athens LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Abdalla, Elcio (Instituto de

  10. Investigating Cenozoic climate change in tectonically active regions with a high-resolution atmospheric general circulation model (ECHAM5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutz, Sebastian; Ehlers, Todd; Li, Jingmin; Werner, Martin; Stepanek, Christian; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    Studies of Cenozoic palaeo-climates contribute to our understanding of contemporary climate change by providing insight into analogues such as the Pliocene (PLIO), and by evaluation of GCM (General Circulation Models) performance using the Mid-Holocene (MH) and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Furthermore, climate is a factor to be considered in the evolution of ecology, landscapes and mountains, and in the reconstruction of erosion histories. In this study, we use high-resolution (T159) ECHAM5 simulations to investigate pre-industrial (PI) and the the above mentioned palaeo-climates for four tectonically active regions: Alaska (St. Elias Range), the US Northwest Pacific (Cascade Range), western South America (Andes) and parts of Asia (Himalaya-Tibet). The PI climate simulation is an AMIP (Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project) style ECHAM5 experiment, whereas MH and LGM simulation are based on simulations conducted at the Alfred Wegner Institute, Bremerhaven. Sea surface boundary conditions for MH were taken from coupled atmosphere-ocean model simulations (Wei and Lohmann, 2012; Zhang et al, 2013) and sea surface temperatures and sea ice concentration for the LGM are based on GLAMAP project reconstructions (Schäfer-Neth and Paul, 2003). Boundary conditions for the PLIO simulation are taken from the PRISM (Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping) project and the employed PLIO vegetation boundary condition is created by means of the transfer procedure for the PRISM vegetation reconstruction to the JSBACH plant functional types as described by Stepanek and Lohmann (2012). For each of the investigated areas and time slices, the regional simulated climates are described by means of cluster analyses based on the variability of precipitation, 2m air temperature and the intra-annual amplitude of the values. Results indicate the largest differences to a PI climate are observed for LGM and PLIO climates in the form of widespread cooling and warming

  11. Repeat Photography of Alaskan Glaciers and Landscapes as Both Art and as a Means of Communicating Climat Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnia, B. F.

    2013-12-01

    , Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Denali National Park and Preserve, the northern and northwestern Prince William Sound area of the Chugach National Forest, and the Mendenhall Glacier area of the Tongass National Forest to document and determine the extent of changing glaciers and landscapes. The use of repeat photography to document temporal change is not new. It originated as a glacier-monitoring technique in the European Alps more than 150 years ago. What is unique in this Alaskan application of repeat photography is the systematic approach being used to obtain photographic documentation of glacier and landscape change for every glacier-hosting fiord in western southcentral Alaska, as well as at many Alaskan valley glacier sites. What is also unique is the development of an annotated website which presents many pairs of these photographs as well as ancillary materials to help convey the basics of Alaskan glaciers and climate change. The website, titled 'Glacier and Landscape Change in Response to Changing Climate', (http://www.usgs.gov/climate_landuse/glaciers/) was awarded the 2010 USGS Shoemaker External Communications Award.

  12. Deformation record of 4-d accommodation of strain in the transition from transform to oblique convergent plate margin, southern Alaska (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeske, S.; Benowitz, J.; Enkelmann, E.; Pavlis, T. L.

    2013-12-01

    Crustal deformation at the transition from a dextral transform to subduction in the northern Cordillera is complicated by both the bend of the margin and the presence of low-angle subduction of an oceanic plateau, the Yakutat microplate, into the 'corner'. The dextral Denali Fault system located ~400 km inboard of the plate margin shows a similar transition from a dominantly strike-slip to transpressional regime as it curves to the west. Thermochronologic and structural studies in both areas indicate crustal response through the transition region is highly varied along and across strike. Previous thermochronology along the Fairweather fault SE of the St. Elias bend shows the most rapid exhumation occurs in close proximity to the fault, decreasing rapidly away from it. Enkelmann et al. (2010) and more recent detrital zircon FT (Falkowski et al., 2013 AGU abstract) show rapid and deep exhumation concentrated in the syntaxis, but over a fairly broad area continuing north beyond the Fairweather fault. Although the region is dominantly under ice, borders of the rapidly exhuming region appear to be previously identified major high-angle faults. This suggests that structures controlling the extreme exhumation may have significant oblique slip component, or, if flower structure, are reverse faults, and the region may be exhuming by transpression, with a significant component of pure shear. Southwest of the syntaxis, where convergence dominates over strike-slip, thin-skinned fold-and-thrust belts in the Yakutat microplate strata account for the shortening. The long-term record of convergence in this area is more cryptic due to sediment recycling through deep underplating and/or limited exhumation by upper crustal shortening, but a wide range of thermochronologic studies suggests that initial exhumation in the region began ~ 30 Ma and most rapid exhumation in the syntaxis began ~ 5 Ma. In the eastern Alaska Range a significant component of strike-slip, in addition to

  13. Strong and Electroweak Matter 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskola, Kari J.; Kainulainen, Kimmo; Kajantie, Keijo; Rummukainen, Kari

    results confront models / M. D'Elia and M. P. Lombardo -- Singlet free energies of a static quark-antiquark pair / K. Petrov -- Contributions to transport theory from multi-particle interactions and production processes / M. E. Carrington -- Transport coefficients and the 2PI effective action in the large N limit / G. Aarts and J. M. Martinez Resco -- Thermal features far from equilibrium: prethermalization / S. Borsányi -- QCD phase diagram at small Baryon densities from imaginary [symbol]: status report / O. Philipsen and Ph. de Forcrand -- Two loop renormalisation of the magnetic coupling in hot QCD and spatial Wilson loop / P. Giovannangeli -- Thermodynamics of deconfined QCD at small and large chemical potential / A. Ipp -- Evading the infrared problem of thermal QCD / Y. Schroder -- Chiral mesons in hot matter / A. Gómez Nicola, F. J. Llanes-Estrada and J. R. Peláez -- Thermal production of axinos in the early universe / A. Brandenburg and F. D. Steffen -- The 2-PI-1/N approximation applied to tachyonic preheating / A. Tranberg, A. Arrizabalaga and J. Smit -- Nonequilibrium dynamics in scalar hybrid models / J. Baacke and A. Heinen -- Photon mass in inflation and nearly minimal magnetogenesis / T. Prokopec -- Transport equations for chiral fermions to order [symbol] and electroweak Baryogenesis / S. Weinstock, M. G. Schmidt and T. Prokopec -- The gapless 2SC phase / M. Huang and I. A. Shovkovy -- Gapless CFL and its competition with mixed phases / M. Alford, C. Kouvaris and K. Rajagopal -- Transport coefficients in color superconducting quark matter / C. Manuel -- Renormalization and resummation in finite temperature field theories / A. Jakovác and Zs. Szép -- Renormalization and gauge symmetry for 2PI effective actions / U. Reinosa -- Out-of-equilibrium massless Schwinger model / R. F. Alvarez-Estrada -- Selfconsistent calculations of hadrons at finite temperature / C. Beckmann -- Fermion production in classical fields / D. D. Dietrich -- Numerical study of

  14. Winter speed-up of ice flow at quiescent surge-type glaciers in Yukon, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, M.; Abe, T.

    2013-12-01

    Glacier surge exhibits order-of-magnitude faster velocity and km-scale terminus advance during its short active phase after a long quiescent period. The observations of glacier surge are still limited, and the mechanisms of glacier surge cycle remain elusive. Moreover, with the exception of several well-examined glaciers, the glacier dynamics during their quiescent periods remains even more uncertain due to the paucity of surface velocity measurement data. Here we examined spatial-temporal changes in the ice surface velocity of surge-type glaciers in the St. Elias Mountains near the border of Alaska and Yukon during the period from December 2006 to March 2011. We applied the offset-tracking (feature-tracking) technique to the L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images derived from the Japanese Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS). The Chitina, Anderson, Walsh, and Logan Glaciers, the major subpolar surge-type glaciers of the Chitina River valley system, could be examined with the highest temporal resolution because of the overlap of multiple satellite tracks. We have found significant upstream accelerations from fall to winter at a number of glaciers during their quiescence. Moreover, whereas the upstream propagating summer speed-up was observed, the winter speed-up propagated from upstream to downglacier. Although the winter speed-up seems to be at odds with the well-known summer speed-up, these observations are consistent with the fragmentary but well-known fact of glacier surge that often initiates in winter, suggesting that some of the mechanisms would be valid even during quiescent phases. Ice surface velocity at mountain glaciers and ice sheets typically exhibits the greatest acceleration from spring to early summer, followed by deceleration in mid-summer to fall, and is slowest in winter. These short-term velocity changes are attributed to subglacial slip associated with water pressure changes that occur because of the seasonal variability of

  15. Long-term variation in the upper atmosphere as seen in the amplitude of the geomagnetic solar quiet daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Nose, M.; Hori, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Tsuda, T.

    2011-12-01

    It has been well-known that geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation is produced by global ionospheric currents flowing in the E-region from middle latitudes to the magnetic equator. These currents are generated by a dynamo process via interaction between the neutral wind and ionospheric plasma in a region of the thermosphere and ionosphere. From the Ohm's equation, the ionospheric currents strongly depend on the ionospheric conductivity, polarization electric field and neutral wind. Then, to investigate the Sq amplitude is essential for understanding the long-term variations in the ionospheric conductivity and neutral wind of the thermosphere and ionosphere. Elias et al. [2010] found that the Sq amplitude tends to increase by 5.4-9.9 % in the middle latitudes from 1961 to 2001. They mentioned that the long-term variation of ionospheric conductivity associated with geomagnetic secular variation mainly determines the Sq trend, but that the rest component is ionospheric conductivity enhancement associated with cooling effects in the thermosphere due to increasing the greenhouse gases. In this talk, we clarify the characteristics of the long-term variation in the Sq amplitude using the long-term observation data of geomagnetic field and neutral wind. These observation data have been provided by the IUGONET (Inter-university Upper atmosphere Global Observation NETwork) project. In the present analysis, we used the F10.7 flux as an indicator of the variation in the solar irradiance in the EUV and UV range, geomagnetic field data with time resolution of 1 hour. The definition of the Sq amplitude is the difference of the H-component between the maximum and minimum per day when the Kp index is less than 4. As a result, the Sq amplitude at all the stations strongly depends on 11-year solar activity, and tends to enhance more during the high activities (19- and 22- solar cycles) than during the low activity (20-solar cycle). The Fourier spectra of the F10.7 flux and Sq

  16. Long-term variation in the upper atmosphere as seen in the geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Yatagai, A. I.; Nose, M.; Hori, T.; Otsuka, Y.

    2012-12-01

    It has been well-known that geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation is produced by the global ionospheric currents flowing in the E-region, which are generated by dynamo process via interaction between the neutral wind and ionospheric plasma in a region of the lower thermosphere and ionosphere. Then, to investigate the Sq amplitude is essential for understanding the long-term variations in the ionospheric conductivity and neutral wind of the lower thermosphere and ionosphere. Recently, Elias et al. [2010] reported that the Sq amplitude tends to increase by 5.4-9.9 % in the middle latitudes in a period of 1961-2001. They mentioned that the long-term variation of ionospheric conductivity associated with geomagnetic secular variation mainly determines the Sq trend, but that the rest component is due to ionospheric conductivity enhancement associated with cooling effect in the thermosphere due to increasing greenhouse gas. In the present study, we clarify the characteristics of the long-term variation in the Sq amplitude using the long-term observation data of geomagnetic field and neutral wind. In the present analysis, we used the F10.7 solar flux as a good indicator of the variation in the solar irradiance in the EUV and UV range as well as geomagnetic field data with time resolution of 1 hour observed at 184 geomagnetic stations. The definition of the Sq amplitude is the difference of the H-component between the maximum and minimum every day when the Kp index is less than 4. As a result, the long-term variation in the Sq amplitude at all the geomagnetic stations shows a strong correlation with the solar F10.7 flux which depends on 11-year solar activity. The relationship between the Sq amplitude and F10.7 flux was not linear but nonlinear. This nonlinearity could be interpreted as the decrease of production rate of electrons and ions in the ionosphere for the strong EUV and UV fluxes as already reported by Balan et al. [1993]. In order to minimize the solar

  17. Carbon Fluxes Between the Atmosphere, Terrestrial, and River Systems Across a Glacier-Dominated Landscape in Southcentral Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulueta, R. C.; Welker, J. M.; Tomco, P. L.

    2011-12-01

    The coastal Gulf of Alaska region is experiencing rapid and accelerating changes due to local and regional warming. Predicted high latitude warming may result in rapid recession of glaciers with subsequent changes in river discharge, nutrient fluxes into the rivers, shifts in landscape vegetation cover, and altered CO2 fluxes affecting the regional carbon balance. As glaciers recede an increase in glacier-dominated river discharge and a change in seasonality of the river discharge are expected. Recently deglaciated landscapes will, over time, be occupied by a succession of vegetation cover that are likely to alter the fluxes of carbon both between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems, and between terrestrial ecosystems and stream and river systems. As the landscape evolves from deglaciated forelands it is expected that there is low to no CO2 fluxes between the atmosphere and the recently deglaciated landscape, as well as dissolved organic and inorganic carbon inputs into rivers and streams. These recently deglaciated landscapes will transition to early successional plant species and on towards mature spruce forests. Each transitional terrestrial ecosystem will have different carbon cycling between the atmosphere, terrestrial, and aquatic systems until the mature spruce forests which is expected to have high carbon uptake and sequestration as well as increased inputs of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon into the rivers and streams. A new research project was initiated in the summer of 2011 focusing on glacier-dominated landscapes within the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve in southcentral Alaska with the objective to quantify how the transition from deglaciated forelands to mature spruce forests (a successional sequence) alters the patterns and magnitudes of CO2 exchange, the dissolved carbon inputs from terrestrial to aquatic systems and the extent to which these are manifested due to changes in glacier coverage. We seek to examine present

  18. Recent Elevation Changes on Bagley Ice Valley, Guyot and Yahtse Glaciers, Alaska, from ICESat Altimetry, Star-3i Airborne, and SRTM Spaceborne DEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muskett, R. R.; Sauber, J. M.; Lingle, C. S.; Rabus, B. T.; Tangborn, W. V.; Echelmeyer, K. A.

    2005-12-01

    Three- to 5-year surface elevation changes on Bagley Ice Valley, Guyot and Yahtse Glaciers, in the eastern Chugach and St. Elias Mtns of south-central Alaska, are estimated using ICESat-derived data and digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data. The surface elevations of these glaciers are influenced by climatic warming superimposed on surge dynamics (in the case of Bagley Ice Valley) and tidewater glacier dynamics (in the cases of Guyot and Yahtse Glaciers) in this coastal high-precipitation regime. Bagley Ice Valley / Bering Glacier last surged in 1993-95. Guyot and Yahtse Glaciers, as well as the nearby Tyndell Glacier, have experienced massive tidewater retreat during the past century, as well as during recent decades. The ICESat-derived elevation data we employ were acquired in early autumn in both 2003 and 2004. The NASA/NIMA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) DEM that we employ was derived from X-band InSAR data acquired during this 11-22 Feb. 2000 mission and processed by the German Aerospace Center. This DEM was corrected for estimated systematic error, and a mass balance model was employed to account for seasonal snow accumulation. The Star-3i airborne, X-band, InSAR-derived DEM that we employ was acquired 4-13 Sept. 2000 by Intermap Technologies, Inc., and was also processed by them. The ICESat-derived profiles crossing Bagley Ice Valley, differenced with Star-3i DEM elevations, indicate preliminary mean along-profile elevation increases of 5.6 ± 3.4 m at 1315 m altitude, 7.4 ± 2.7 m at 1448 m altitude, 4.7 ± 1.9 m at 1557 m altitude, 1.3 ± 1.4 m at 1774 m altitude, and 2.5 ± 1.5 m at 1781 m altitude. This is qualitatively consistent with the rising surface on Bagley Ice Valley observed by Muskett et al. [2003]. The ICESat-derived profiles crossing Yahtse Glacier, differenced with the SRTM DEM elevations, indicate preliminary mean elevation changes (negative implies decrease) of -0.9 ± 3

  19. Overall impact of speed-related initiatives and factors on crash outcomes.

    PubMed

    D'Elia, A; Newstead, S; Cameron, M

    2007-01-01

    reinforce the benefits of reducing low level speeding - the central message of "Wipe Off 5". These strategies were implemented across the entire state of Victoria with the intention of covering as many road users as possible. This study aimed to evaluate the overall effectiveness of the speed-related package. The study objectives were: to document the increased speed camera activity in each speed limit zone and in Melbourne compared with the rest of Victoria; to evaluate the overall effect on crash outcomes of the package; to account as far as possible for the effect on crash outcomes of non-speed road safety initiatives and socio-economic factors, which would otherwise influence the speed-related package evaluation; and to examine speed trends in Melbourne and on Victorian rural highways, especially the proportions of vehicles travelling at excessive speeds. This paper presents the results of the evaluation of the overall impact on crash outcomes associated with the speed-related package, after adjusting as far as possible for the effect of non-speed road safety initiatives and socio-economic factors. D'Elia, Newstead and Cameron (2007) document the study results in full. PMID:18184508

  20. Tectonics, Climate and Earth's highest peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robl, Jörg; Prasicek, Günther; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Prominent peaks characterized by high relief and steep slopes are among the most spectacular morphological features on Earth. In collisional orogens they result from the interplay of tectonically driven crustal thickening and climatically induced destruction of overthickened crust by erosional surface processes. The glacial buzz-saw hypothesis proposes a superior status of climate in limiting mountain relief and peak altitude due to glacial erosion. It implies that peak altitude declines with duration of glacial occupation, i.e., towards high latitudes. This is in strong contrast with high peaks existing in high latitude mountain ranges (e.g. Mt. St. Elias range) and the idea of peak uplift due to isostatic compensation of spatially variable erosional unloading an over-thickened orogenic crust. In this study we investigate landscape dissection, crustal thickness and vertical strain rates in tectonically active mountain ranges to evaluate the influence of erosion on (latitudinal) variations in peak altitude. We analyze the spatial distribution of serval thousand prominent peaks on Earth extracted from the global ETOPO1 digital elevation model with a novel numerical tool. We compare this dataset to crustal thickness, thickening rate (vertical strain rate) and mean elevation. We use the ratios of mean elevation to peak elevation (landscape dissection) and peak elevation to crustal thickness (long-term impact of erosion on crustal thickness) as indicators for the influence of erosional surface processes on peak uplift and the vertical strain rate as a proxy for the mechanical state of the orogen. Our analysis reveals that crustal thickness and peak elevation correlate well in orogens that have reached a mechanically limited state (vertical strain rate near zero) where plate convergence is already balanced by lateral extrusion and gravitational collapse and plateaus are formed. On the Tibetan Plateau crustal thickness serves to predict peak elevation up to an altitude

  1. Development of a glacially dominated shelf-slope-fan system in tectonically active southeast Alaska: Results of IODP Expedition 341 core-log-seismic integrated studies at glacial cycle resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, Sean; Jaeger, John; Mix, Alan; Swartz, John; Worthington, Lindsay; Reece, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Collision of the Yakutat microplate with North American formed the St. Elias Mountains in coastal Gulf of Alaska. While the tectonic driver for orogenesis has been ongoing since the Miocene, results from the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 341 suggests that direct climatic perturbation of active orogenesis through glacial erosion is non-linear. Geophysical studies of the glaciated continental margin, slope, and adjacent deep-sea Surveyor Fan allow examination of the glaciated orogen from source to sink. Using high-resolution and crustal-scale seismic data and through comparison with other glaciated margins, we can identify key diagnostic seismic morphologies and facies indicative of glacial proximity and sediment routing. Expedition drilling results calibrated these images suggesting a timeline for initial advances of the Cordilleran ice sheet related glacial systems onto the shelf and a further timeline for the development of ice streams that reach the shelf edge. Comparisons can be made within this single margin between evolution of the tectonic-glacial system where erosion and sediment transport are occurring within a fold and thrust belt versus on a more stable shelf region. Onshore the Bering-Bagley glacial system in the west flows across the Yakataga fold and thrust belt, allowing examination of whether glacial erosion can cause tectonic feedbacks, whereas offshore the Bering-Bagley system interacts with the Pamplona Zone thrusts in a region of significant sediment accommodation. Results from Expedition 341 imply that timing of glacial advance to the shelf edge in this region may be driven by the necessity of filling up the accommodation through aggradation followed by progradation and thus is autogenic. In contrast the Malaspina-Hubbard glacial system to the east encountered significantly less accommodation and more directly responded to climatic forcing including showing outer shelf glacial occupation since the mid-Pleistocene transition-MPT to

  2. Observing Weather in Venus's Lower Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, E. F.; Bullock, M. A.; Chanover, N. J.; Lemmon, M. T.

    2003-05-01

    References Carlson, R.W., K.H. Baines, T. Encrenaz, F.W. Tay-lor, P. Drossart, L.W. Kamp, J.B. Pollack, E. Lellouch, A.D. Collard, S.B. Calcutt, D.H. Grinspoon, P.R. Weissman, W.D. Smythe, A.C. Ocampo, G.E. Danielson, F.P. Fanale, T.V. Johnson, H.H. Kieffer, D.L. Matson, T.B. McCord, and L.A. Soderblom, Galileo infrared imaging spectrometer measurements at Venus, Science, 253, 1541-1548, 1991. Chanover, N.J., D.A. Glenar, and J.J. Hillman, Multispectral near-IR imaging of Venus nightside cloud features, Journal of Geophysical Research, 103, 31,335-31,348, 1998. Crisp, D., S. McMuldroch, S.K. Stephens, W.M. Sinton, B. Ragent, K.W. Hodapp, R.G. Probst, L.R. Doyle, D.A. Allen, and J. Elias, Ground-based near-infrared imaging observations of Venus during the Galileo encounter, Science, 253, 1538-1541, 1991b.

  3. The provenance of clasts deposited on the Surveyor Fan, Gulf of Alaska: First results of IODP Expedition 341

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahlburg, H.; Childress, L. B.; Cowan, E. A.; Forwick, M.; Moy, C. M.; Müller, J.; Ribeiro, F.; Ridgway, K. D.

    2013-12-01

    Provenance analysis is a key instrument for elucidating the denudation history of source terranes and for quantifying their respective contributions to sedimentary routing systems and the detrital composition of sedimentary systems. The submarine Surveyor Fan in the Gulf of Alaska is sourced by the highest coastal range on Earth, the Chugach-St. Elias orogenic system along the southern Alaska convergent margin. Exhumation, uplift and denudation of the orogenic system since the Miocene are governed by the interplay of climate with convergent tectonic processes. The denudational activity of Neogene and Quaternary glacier systems significantly influenced the exhumation and uplift history of the mountain belt, and sourced the c. 1000 km long Surveyor fan system. First results obtained in 2013 during IODP Expedition 341 at Sites U1417 and U1418, on the distal and proximal Surveyor Fan, respectively, reveal that the Miocene to Holocene stratigraphy of the Surveyor Fan is dominated by thick mud and biogenic ooze deposits. These are punctuated by debris flow deposits, thin-bedded turbidites, and diamicts. Larger clasts (granules to cobbles) occur in non-glacial Miocene to Pliocene debris flow deposits, and in glacial Pleistocene muds and diamicts as ice-rafted lonestones and debris accumulations. Here we report first onboard results of counts of lithologies occurring at both sites. The stratigraphic succession encountered at Site U1417 on the distal Surveyor Fan ranges from the non-glacial Miocene and Pliocene to the glacial Pleistocene, and Holocene. The main clast types contained in the sediment are of metamorphic origin. In decreasing order of abundance occur argillite, metasiltstone and basalt. Sandstone, siltstone, granite and quartzite are minor lithologies. When grouped as metamorphic (M), sedimentary (S) and igneous (I), the average clast ratio is M73I12S15. The stratigraphy at Site U1418 on the proximal fan covers the glacial Pleistocene, and Holocene. The clasts

  4. Feasibility study on earthquake early warning application to schools: the example of the ITIS 'E. Majorana', Somma Vesuviana, Naples (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emolo, Antonio; Zollo, Aldo; Picozzi, Matteo; Martino, Claudio; Elia, Luca; Verderame, Gerardo; De Risi, Maria Teresa; Ricci, Paolo; Lombardi, Anna; Bindi, Dino; Parolai, Stefano; Boxberger, Tobias; Miranda, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    empirical regression analysis, to produce an alert level at each station that can be correlated with the expected local damage in a robust way. At the same time, by means of the software PRESTo and a newly developed prototype of a low-cost EEW sentinel, these data have been also used to run an EEW drill at a few school classes. Finally, the preliminary results of the vulnerability study carried out at the school will be also shown. Indeed, after some preliminary in-situ surveys, structural and non-structural components, which are involved in the vulnerability analysis, have been identified. Hence, geometrical and mechanical model definition was performed and dynamic properties were carried out through a modal analysis. The evaluation of the seismic capacity has been performed through an incremental nonlinear static analysis approach, thus identifying seismic intensity levels leading to different Damage States in structural and non-structural components. References Satriano, Elia et al. (2010). PRESTo, the earthquake early warning system for Southern Italy: Concepts, capabilities and future perspectives. Soil Dyn Earthq Eng, doi 10.1016/j.soildyn.2010.06.008. Zollo et al. (2010). A threshold-based earthquake early warning using dense accelerometer networks. Geophys. J. Int. 183, 963-974.

  5. Antibodies of IgG, IgA and IgM isotypes against cyclic citrullinated peptide precede the development of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We and others have previously shown that antibodies against cyclic citrullinated proteins (anti-CCP) precede the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in a more recent study we reported that individuals who subsequently developed RA had increased concentrations of several cytokines and chemokines years before the onset of symptoms of joint disease. Here we aimed to evaluate the prevalence and predictive values of anti-CCP antibodies of IgG, IgM and IgA isotype in individuals who subsequently developed RA and also to relate these to cytokines and chemokines, smoking, genetic factors and radiographic score. Methods A case-control study (1:4 ratio) was nested within the Medical Biobank and the Maternity cohorts of Northern Sweden. Patients with RA were identified from blood donors predating the onset of disease by years. Matched controls were selected randomly from the same registers. IgG, IgA and IgM anti-CCP2 antibodies were determined using EliA anti-CCP assay on ImmunoCAP 250 (Phadia AB, Uppsala, Sweden). Results Of 86 patients with RA identified as blood donors prior to the onset of symptoms, samples were available from 71 for analyses. The median (Q1 to Q3) predating time was 2.5 years (1.1 to 5.9 years). The sensitivity of anti-CCP antibodies in the pre-patient samples was 35.2% for IgG, 23.9% for IgA, and 11.8% for IgM. The presence of IgG and IgA anti-CCP antibodies was highly significant compared with controls. IgG and IgA anti-CCP2 predicted RA significantly in conditional logistic regression models odds ratio (OR) = 94.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 12.7 to 695.4 and OR = 11.1, 95% CI 4.4 to 28.1, respectively, the IgM anti-CCP showed borderline significance OR = 2.5 95% CI 0.9 to 6.3. Concentrations of all anti-CCP isotypes increased the closer to the onset of symptoms the samples were collected with an earlier and higher increase for IgG and IgA compared with IgM anti-CCP. IgA and IgG anti-CCP positive individuals had different

  6. PREFACE: First Mediterranean Conference on Classical and Quantum Gravity (MCCQG 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilakos, Spyros; Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Christodoulakis, Theodosios; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2010-04-01

    quite fruitful, enjoyable 'Mediterranean' atmosphere for the exchange of ideas and discussion. It is a pleasure to thank our administrative and technical staff Georgia Angelopoulou, Athina Pouri, Mando Zambeli and Manolis Zoulias for their untiring assistance. We also thank the staff of the OAC for the enthusiastic support and their hospitality. We are grateful to the Academy of Athens and the Tomalla Foundation for their generous financial support which made MCCQG possible. Finally, our gratitude goes to all the participants and especially the many experienced scientists. Their contributions highlighted the meeting. The success of the MCCQG is due to them and to the enthusiasm of the younger participants. The Editors March 2010 COMMITTEES Organising Committee Spyros Basilakos (RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Greece) Mariano Cadoni (University and INFN Cagliari, Italy) Marco Cavaglià (University of Mississippi, USA) Theodosios Christodoulakis (University of Athens, Greece) Elias Vagenas (RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Greece) Advisory Committee Ignatios Antoniadis (CERN, Switzerland) Orfeu Bertolami (IST, Lisbon, Portugal) Loriano Bonora (SISSA, Trieste, Italy) George Contopoulos (Academy of Athens, Greece) Ruth Durrer (Geneva University, Switzerland) Enrique Gaztanaga (IEEC, Barcelona, Spain) Gabriela Gonzalez (Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, USA) Marc Henneaux (Brussels University, Belgium) Roman Jackiw (MIT, USA) Claus Kiefer (Cologne University, Germany) Stefano Liberati (SISSA, Trieste, Italy) Ofer Lahav (University College London, UK) Roy Maartens (University of Portsmouth, UK) Don Marolf (UC Santa Barbara, USA) Hermann Nicolai (AEI, Potsdam, Germany) Augusto Sagnotti (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, Italy) Mairi Sakellariadou (King's College London, UK) Jorge Zanelli (CECS, Valdivia, Chile) SPONSORS Academy of Athens The Tomalla Foundation Università di Cagliari University of Mississippi University of Athens LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Abdalla, Elcio (Instituto de

  7. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Kong, M. G.; Zimmermann, J. L.

    2009-11-01

    -pressure microwave plasmas in an N2 and O2 gas mixture M K Singh, A Ogino and M Nagatsu Degradation of adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma H J Lee, C H Shon, Y S Kim, S Kim, G C Kim and M G Kong The acidification of lipid film surfaces by non-thermal DBD at atmospheric pressure in air A Helmke, D Hoffmeister, N Mertens, S Emmert, J Schuette and W Vioel Reduction and degradation of amyloid aggregates by a pulsed radio-frequency cold atmospheric plasma jet D L Bayliss, J L Walsh, G Shama, F Iza and M G Kong The effect of low-temperature plasma on bacteria as observed by repeated AFM imaging René Pompl, Ferdinand Jamitzky, Tetsuji Shimizu, Bernd Steffes, Wolfram Bunk, Hans-Ulrich Schmidt, Matthias Georgi, Katrin Ramrath, Wilhelm Stolz, Robert W Stark, Takuya Urayama, Shuitsu Fujii and Gregor Eugen Morfill Removal and sterilization of biofilms and planktonic bacteria by microwave-induced argon plasma at atmospheric pressure Mi Hee Lee, Bong Joo Park, Soo Chang Jin, Dohyun Kim, Inho Han, Jungsung Kim, Soon O Hyun, Kie-Hyung Chung and Jong-Chul Park Cell permeabilization using a non-thermal plasma M Leduc, D Guay, R L Leask and S Coulombe Physical and biological mechanisms of direct plasma interaction with living tissue Danil Dobrynin, Gregory Fridman, Gary Friedman and Alexander Fridman Nosocomial infections-a new approach towards preventive medicine using plasmas G E Morfill, T Shimizu, B Steffes and H-U Schmidt Generation and transport mechanisms of chemical species by a post-discharge flow for inactivation of bacteria Takehiko Sato, Shiroh Ochiai and Takuya Urayama Low pressure plasma discharges for the sterilization and decontamination of surfaces F Rossi, O Kylián, H Rauscher, M Hasiwa and D Gilliland Contribution of a portable air plasma torch to rapid blood coagulation as a method of preventing bleeding S P Kuo, O Tarasenko, J Chang, S Popovic, C Y Chen, H W Fan, A Scott, M Lahiani, P Alusta, J D Drake and M Nikolic A two

  8. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Kong, M. G.; Zimmermann, J. L.

    2009-11-01

    -pressure microwave plasmas in an N2 and O2 gas mixture M K Singh, A Ogino and M Nagatsu Degradation of adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma H J Lee, C H Shon, Y S Kim, S Kim, G C Kim and M G Kong The acidification of lipid film surfaces by non-thermal DBD at atmospheric pressure in air A Helmke, D Hoffmeister, N Mertens, S Emmert, J Schuette and W Vioel Reduction and degradation of amyloid aggregates by a pulsed radio-frequency cold atmospheric plasma jet D L Bayliss, J L Walsh, G Shama, F Iza and M G Kong The effect of low-temperature plasma on bacteria as observed by repeated AFM imaging René Pompl, Ferdinand Jamitzky, Tetsuji Shimizu, Bernd Steffes, Wolfram Bunk, Hans-Ulrich Schmidt, Matthias Georgi, Katrin Ramrath, Wilhelm Stolz, Robert W Stark, Takuya Urayama, Shuitsu Fujii and Gregor Eugen Morfill Removal and sterilization of biofilms and planktonic bacteria by microwave-induced argon plasma at atmospheric pressure Mi Hee Lee, Bong Joo Park, Soo Chang Jin, Dohyun Kim, Inho Han, Jungsung Kim, Soon O Hyun, Kie-Hyung Chung and Jong-Chul Park Cell permeabilization using a non-thermal plasma M Leduc, D Guay, R L Leask and S Coulombe Physical and biological mechanisms of direct plasma interaction with living tissue Danil Dobrynin, Gregory Fridman, Gary Friedman and Alexander Fridman Nosocomial infections-a new approach towards preventive medicine using plasmas G E Morfill, T Shimizu, B Steffes and H-U Schmidt Generation and transport mechanisms of chemical species by a post-discharge flow for inactivation of bacteria Takehiko Sato, Shiroh Ochiai and Takuya Urayama Low pressure plasma discharges for the sterilization and decontamination of surfaces F Rossi, O Kylián, H Rauscher, M Hasiwa and D Gilliland Contribution of a portable air plasma torch to rapid blood coagulation as a method of preventing bleeding S P Kuo, O Tarasenko, J Chang, S Popovic, C Y Chen, H W Fan, A Scott, M Lahiani, P Alusta, J D Drake and M Nikolic A two

  9. The Gobbling Dwarf that Exploded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-07-01

    100 is available as ESO Press Photo 08a/06. More Information These results are reported in a paper in Science Express published on 12 July 2007 ("Detection of circumstellar material in a normal Type Ia Supernova", by F. Patat et al.). The team is composed of F. Patat and L. Pasquini (ESO), P. Chandra and R. Chevalier (University of Virginia, USA), S. Justham, Ph. Podsiadlowski , and C. Wolf (University of Oxford, UK), A. Gal-Yam and J.D. Simon (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA), I.A. Crawford (Birkbeck College London, UK), P.A. Mazzali, W. Hillebrandt, and N. Elias-Rosa (Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics, Garching, Germany), A.W.A. Pauldrach (Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany), K. Nomoto (University of Tokyo, Japan), S. Benetti, E. Cappellaro, A. Renzini , F. Sabbadin, and M. Turatto (INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico, Padova, Italy), D.C. Leonard (San Diego State University, USA), and A. Pastorello (Queen's University Belfast, UK). P.A. Mazzali is also associated with INAF/Trieste, Italy.

  10. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-09-01

    AbeTakashiUniversity of Tokyotabe@nt.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp AmusiaMironRacah Institute of Physics, Jerusalemamusia@vms.huji.ac.il BaldoMarcelloINFN Cataniabaldo@ct.infn.it BansalManiePanjab University, Chandigarhbansalmanni@gmail.com BarrancoFranciscoUniversity of Sevillebarranco@us.es BertschGeorgeUniversity of Washington, Seattlebertsch@u.washington.edu BhagwatAmeeyaCBS Mumbaiameeya@kth.se BorderieBernardIPN Orsayborderie@ipno.in2p3.fr CarbonellJaumeLPSC Grenoblejaume.carbonell@lpsc.in2p3.fr CarlsonJoeLos Alamos National Laboratorycarlson@lanl.gov ColòGianlucaINFN - Università degli Studi di Milanocolo@mi.infn.it DanielewiczPawelNSCL, Michigan State Universitydanielewicz@nscl.msu.edu DescouvemontPierreUniversité Libre de Bruxellespdesc@ulb.ac.be Dohet-EralyJérémyUniversité Libre de Bruxellesjdoheter@ulb.ac.be DraayerJerryLouisiana State Universitydraayer@lsu.edu DufourMarianneIPHC, Université de Strasbourgmarianne.dufour@ires.in2p3.fr DuguetThomasCEA Saclaythomas.duguet@cea.fr DukelskyJorgeCSIC Madriddukelsky@iem.cfmac.csic.es EbranJean-PaulCEA-DAM, Arpajonebran@ipno.in2p3.fr FreerMartinUniversity of Birminghamm.freer@bham.ac.uk FujiiShinichiroUniversity of Tokyosfujii@cns.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp FunakiYasuroRIKEN Nishina Center, Wakofunaki@riken.jp GrassoMarcellaIPN Orsaygrasso@ipno.in2p3.fr HaginoKouichiTohoku Universityhagino@nucl.phys.tohoku.ac.jp HansenHubertUniversité Claude Bernard Lyon 1hansen@ipnl.in2p3.fr HolzmannMarkusLPMMC Grenoblemarkus@lptl.jussieu.fr HoriuchiHisashiRCNP, Osaka Universityhoriuchi@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp HoriuchiWataruGSI Darmstadtw.horiuchi@gsi.de HupinGuillaumeGANIL, Caenhupin@ganil.fr JinMengHuazhong Normal University, Wuhanjinm@iopp.ccnu.edu.cn KamimuraMasayasuRIKEN Nishina Center, Wakomkamimura@riken.jp Kanada-En'yoYoshikoKyoto Universityyenyo@ruby.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp KatoKiyoshiHokkaido University, Sapporokato@nucl.sci.hokudai.ac.jp KawabataTakahiroKyoto Universitykawabata@scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp KhanEliasIPN Orsaykhan@ipno.in2p3.fr

  11. In situ measurement of the Icelandic Holuhraun/ Bárðarbunga volcanic plume in an early "young state" using a LOAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignelles, Damien; Roberts, Tjarda; Carboni, Elisa; Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Dagsson Waldhauserovà, Pavla; Berthet, Gwenael; Jegou, Fabrice; Baptiste Renard, Jean; Olafsson, Haraldur; Bergsson, Baldur; Yeo, Richard; Fannar Reynisson, Njall; Grainger, Roy; Pfeffer, Melissa; Lurton, Thibaut; Duverger, Vincent; Coute, Benoit

    2016-04-01

    analysis of IASI satellite remote sensing data, thus demonstrating in-situ validation of this recent satellite algorithm (Carboni et al. 2015). This experimentation shows that under such difficult field campaign conditions (strong wind, low temperatures, only car batteries for power supply, night time and active volcano close to the launch site) it is possible to launch meteorological balloons with novel payloads to directly sample in-situ the near-source plume, determine the plume altitude, identify dynamical phases of the plume and document the size distribution of particles inside a plume which is only a quarter of an hour old. Carboni, E., Grainger, R., Walker, J., Dudhia, A., Siddans, R.: A new scheme for sulphur dioxide retrieval from IASI measurements: application to the Eyjafjallajökull eruption of April and May 2010, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 11417-11434, 2012/doi:10.5194/acp-12-11417-2012, 2012. Gíslason, S.R., Stefánsdóttir, G., Pfeffer, M.A., Barsotti, S., Jóhannsson, Th., Galeczka, I., Bali, E., Sigmarsson, O., Stefánsson, A., Keller, N.S., Sigurdsson, Á., Bergsson, B., Galle, B., Jacobo, V.C., Arellano, S., Aiuppa, A., Jónasdóttir, E.B., Eiríksdóttir, E.S., Jakobsson, S., Guðfinnsson, G.H., alldórsson, S.A., Gunnarsson, H., Haddadi, B., Jónsdóttir, I., Thordarson, Th., Riishuus, M., ögnadóttir, Th., Dürig, T., Pedersen, G.B.M., Höskuldsson, Á., Gudmundsson, M.T.: Environmental pressure from the 2014-15 eruption of Bárðarbunga volcano, Iceland. Geochem. Persp. Let. 1, 84-93, 2015. Renard, J.B., Dulac, F., Berthet, G., Lurton, T., Vignelles, D., Jégou, F., Tonnelier, T., Thaury, C., Jeannot, M., Couté, B., Akiki, R., Verdier, N., Mallet, M., Gensdarmes, F., Charpentier, P., Duverger, V., Dupont, J.V., Mesmin, S., Elias, T., Crenn, V., Sciare, J., Giacomoni, J., Gobbi, M., Hamonou, E., Olafsson, H., Dagsson-Waldhauserova, P., Camy-Peyret, C., Mazel, C., Décamps, T., Piringer, M., Surcin, J., and Daugeron, D.: LOAC: a small aerosol optical

  12. Saccharide Composition in Fine and Coarse Particulate Matter and Soils in Central Arizona and Use of Saccharides as Molecular Markers for Source Apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y.; Clements, A.; Fraser, M.

    2009-04-01

    were analyzed in size segregated soil and ambient PM samples at Higley; intra- and inter- comparisons were made between the ambient PM and three types of soil dust samples (agricultural soil, native soil, road dust) based on the particle size (fine vs. coarse), seasonality, and relative composition of 12 saccharide compounds. Based on the ambient concentrations of major saccharides and a number of other specific compounds (including elemental and organic carbon, ions, metals, alkanes, organic acids, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) that are simultaneously resolved in Higley PM samples, a Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model was performed to determine the key contributors to PM10 and PM2.5 levels. Six distinct factors were isolated, with two factors dominated by the enrichment of saccharide compounds. There was not consistency between the source profiles of these two saccharide rich source factors with the saccharide composition of the local size-segregated soil samples, which implies that there may be other major sources contributing to ambient PM saccharides. One possible alternative is that PBAPs that are injected directly into the atmosphere instead of residing in the surface soil and being re-entrained through soil erosion or agricultural processing. To our knowledge, this study is the first of its kind to compare the saccharide composition between the fine and coarse fraction of different soils types in two seasons, and to relate the contribution from soil dust to ambient PM using saccharide species. REFERENCE [1] AirData: Access to Air Pollution data. [cited 2009 Jan 11, 2009]; Available from: http://www.epa.gov/air/data/index.html [2] Allergy and Asthma in the Southwestern United States. [cited 2009 Jan 11, 2009]; Available from: http://allergy.peds.arizona.edu/southwest/swpollen.html [3] Cox, C.S., Wathes, C.M., 1995. Bioaerosols Handbook, Lewis Publishers, NY [4] Simoneit, B.R.T., Elias, V.O., et al., 2004. "Sugars - Dominant water-soluble organic

  13. Biomarker based reconstruction of Pleistocene climate and environmental conditions in the Gulf of Alaska: Preliminary results obtained from IODP Expedition 341 sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Juliane; Sanchez Montes, Maria Luisa; McClymont, Erin; Stein, Ruediger; Fahl, Kirsten; Mangelsdorf, Kai; Wilkes, Heinz; 341 Scientists, Expedition

    2014-05-01

    A remarkable sedimentary record that extends from the Miocene to the late Pleistocene/Holocene has been drilled during IODP Expedition 341 (May - July 2013) in the Gulf of Alaska. The recovery and examination of sediments along a transect of five drill sites (U1417 - U1421) from the deep ocean towards the continental slope and shelf offshore the St. Elias Mountains enables the reconstruction of the palaeoceanographic and environmental development in the NE Pacific during a period of significant global cooling and directly addresses the overall research objectives of the IODP programme. The knowledge about palaeo sea surface conditions and their relation to climate changes in the subpolar NE Pacific is relatively scarce and mainly confined to the past 17 ka BP (Barron et al., 2009; Davies et al., 2011; Addison et al., 2012). Biomarker based reconstructions of the sea surface conditions (i.e. sea surface temperature (SST), sea ice coverage, marine primary productivity) that characterised the subpolar NE Pacific during critical time intervals of Plio- and Pleistocene climate change may provide new information on oceanic and atmospheric feedback mechanisms and further enable the identification of teleconnections between the palaeoceanographic evolution in the North Pacific and the North Atlantic. Here we present preliminary biomarker data obtained from sediments from the distal deepwater site U1417 and the proximal site U1419 located at the Gulf of Alaska continental slope. Variability in the distribution and abundance of short- and long-chain n-alkanes, sterols, and C25-highly branched isoprenoids (HBIs) is interpreted to reflect changes in the environmental setting. These data provide insight in marine primary productivity changes (in response to cooling and warming intervals) and the variable input of terrigenous organic matter via meltwater and/or iceberg discharge events. The C25-HBI diene/triene ratio - hitherto used as a sea ice proxy in the Southern Ocean

  14. EDITORIAL: Northern Hemisphere high latitude climate and environmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groisman, Pavel; Soja, Amber

    2007-10-01

    funded projects (always with international participation) in the United States, Russian Federation, China, European Union, Japan, and Canada have been mutually united to explore the scientifically significant Northern Eurasian region. NEESPI scientists have been quite productive during the past two years (2005 2006) publishing more than 200 books, book chapters, and papers in refereed journals. NEESPI sessions at international conferences are open to everyone who works on environmental and climate change problems in Northern Eurasia and the circumpolar boreal zone. This thematic issue brings together articles from the authors who presented their latest results at the Annual Fall American Geophysical Union Meeting in San Francisco (December 2006). The research letters in this issue are preceded by two editorial papers (Leptoukh et al and Sherstyukov et al) devoted to informational support of research in the NEESPI domain that is critical to the success of the Initiative. The following papers are quite diverse and are assembled into five groups devoted to studies of climate and hydrology, land cover and land use, the biogeochemical cycle and its feedbacks, the cryosphere, and human dimensions in the NEESPI domain and the circumpolar boreal zone. Focus on Northern Hemisphere High Latitude Climate and Environmental Change Contents The articles below represent the first accepted contributions and further additions will appear in the near future. Editorials NASA NEESPI Data and Services Center for Satellite Remote Sensing Information Gregory Leptoukh, Ivan Csiszar, Peter Romanov, Suhung Shen, Tatiana Loboda and Irina Gerasimov NEESPI Science and Data Support Center for Hydrometeorological Information in Obninsk, Russia B G Sherstyukov, V N Razuvaev, O N Bulygina and P Ya Groisman Climate and hydrology Changes in the fabric of the Arctic's greenhouse blanket Jennifer A Francis and Elias Hunter Spatial variations of summer precipitation trends in South Korea, 1973 2005 Heejun

  15. Variations of marine pore water salinity and chlorinity in Gulf of Alaska sediments (IODP Expedition 341)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    März, Christian; Mix, Alan C.; McClymont, Erin; Nakamura, Atsunori; Berbel, Glaucia; Gulick, Sean; Jaeger, John; Schneider (LeVay), Leah

    2014-05-01

    of pore waters in continental margin settings has been reported in association with dissociating gas hydrate deposits (Hesse, 2003), but neither seismic profiles nor sediment records showed any indications for the presence of gas hydrates at the Gulf of Alaska sites. An alternative and intriguing explanation for these almost brackish waters in the glaciomarine shelf and slope deposits is the presence of glacial meltwater that could either be "fossil" (stored in the glaciomarine sediments since the last glacial termination) or "recent" (i.e., actively flowing from currently melting glaciers of the St. Elias Mountain Range along permeable layers within the shelf deposits). As these relatively fresh waters are found at three distinct drill sites, it can be assumed that they are distributed all along the Gulf of Alaska shelf and slope, and similar findings have been reported at other glaciated continental margins, e.g., off East Greenland (DeFoor et al., 2011) and Antarctica (Mann and Gieskes, 1975; Chambers, 1991; Lu et al., 2010). While a recent review has highlighted the importance of fresh and brackish water reservoirs in continental shelf deposits worldwide (Post et al., 2013), we suggest that climatic and depositional processes affecting glaciated continental margins (e.g., the release of huge amounts of fresh water from ice sheets and glaciers during glacial terminations, and the rapid deposition of unconsolidated sediments on the adjacent shelf) are particularly favourable for the storage and/or flow of meltwater below the present sea floor. Adkins JF, McIntyre K, Schrag DP (2002) The salinity, temperature, and d18O of the glacial deep ocean. Science 298, 1769-1773. Chambers SR (1991) Solute distributions and stable isotope chemistry of interstitial waters from Prydz Bay, Antarctica. Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program 119, 375-392. DeFoor W, Person M, Larsen HC, Lizarralde D, Cohen D, Dugam B (2011) Ice sheet-derived submarine groundwater discharge on

  16. Saccharide Composition in Fine and Coarse Particulate Matter and Soils in Central Arizona and Use of Saccharides as Molecular Markers for Source Apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y.; Clements, A.; Fraser, M.

    2009-04-01

    were analyzed in size segregated soil and ambient PM samples at Higley; intra- and inter- comparisons were made between the ambient PM and three types of soil dust samples (agricultural soil, native soil, road dust) based on the particle size (fine vs. coarse), seasonality, and relative composition of 12 saccharide compounds. Based on the ambient concentrations of major saccharides and a number of other specific compounds (including elemental and organic carbon, ions, metals, alkanes, organic acids, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) that are simultaneously resolved in Higley PM samples, a Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model was performed to determine the key contributors to PM10 and PM2.5 levels. Six distinct factors were isolated, with two factors dominated by the enrichment of saccharide compounds. There was not consistency between the source profiles of these two saccharide rich source factors with the saccharide composition of the local size-segregated soil samples, which implies that there may be other major sources contributing to ambient PM saccharides. One possible alternative is that PBAPs that are injected directly into the atmosphere instead of residing in the surface soil and being re-entrained through soil erosion or agricultural processing. To our knowledge, this study is the first of its kind to compare the saccharide composition between the fine and coarse fraction of different soils types in two seasons, and to relate the contribution from soil dust to ambient PM using saccharide species. REFERENCE [1] AirData: Access to Air Pollution data. [cited 2009 Jan 11, 2009]; Available from: http://www.epa.gov/air/data/index.html [2] Allergy and Asthma in the Southwestern United States. [cited 2009 Jan 11, 2009]; Available from: http://allergy.peds.arizona.edu/southwest/swpollen.html [3] Cox, C.S., Wathes, C.M., 1995. Bioaerosols Handbook, Lewis Publishers, NY [4] Simoneit, B.R.T., Elias, V.O., et al., 2004. "Sugars - Dominant water-soluble organic

  17. Arthroscopic dorsal capsulo-ligamentous repair in the treatment of chronic scapho-lunate ligament tears.

    PubMed

    Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L; Mathoulin, Christophe L

    2013-05-01

    Introduction Scapholunate ligament injuries usually result due to a fall on the outstretched hand leading to scapholunate instability. The natural history of untreated scapholunate instability remains controversial and usually results in late arthritic changes- the so-called "SLAC" wrist. The advent of wrist arthroscopy helps in early diagnosis and treatment of these serious injuries. In selected cases with reducible scapholunate instability (Garcia-Elias stages 2, 3 and 4) we propose a new "all arthroscopic dorsal capsulo- ligamentous repair" with the added advantage of early rehabilitation and prevention of post-operative stiffness. Material and Methods We report the results of our series of 57 consecutive patients suffering from chronic wrist pain refractory to conservative measures. All patients underwent a thorough clinical examination in addition to a standard set of radiographs and MRI exam; and they were treated by an all-arthroscopic dorsal capsulo-ligamentous repair under loco-regional anesthesia on an ambulatory basis. All patients were available for follow-up at regular intervals during the post-operative period. At follow-up, the wrist ROM in all directions, the grip strength, DASH questionnaire and pain relief based on the VAS were recorded for both- the operated and contra-lateral sides. Results There were 34 males & 23 females with a mean age of 38.72 ± 11.33 years (range 17-63 years). The dominant side was involved in 52 cases. The mean time since injury was 9.42 ± 6.33 months (range 3-24 months) and the mean follow-up was 30.74 ± 7.05 months (range 18-43 months). The mean range of motion improved in all directions. The mean difference between the post- and pre-operative extension was 14.03° (SEM = 1.27°; p < 0.001); while the mean difference between the post-and pre-operative flexion was 11.14° (SEM = 1.3°; p < 0.0001) with flexion and radial deviation reaching 84.3% and 95.72% respectively of the

  18. New VLA Images Unlocking Galactic Mysteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    start the process of star formation. "Using the data from THINGS in combination with observations from NASA's space telescopes has allowed us to investigate how the processes leading to star formation differ in big spiral galaxies like our own and much smaller, dwarf galaxies," said Adam Leroy and Frank Bigiel of the Max-Planck Insitute for Astronomy at the Austin AAS meeting. Because atomic hydrogen emits radio waves at a specific frequency, astronomers can measure motions of the gas by noting the Doppler shift in frequency caused by those motions. "Because the THINGS images are highly detailed, we have been able to measure both the rotational motion of the galaxies and non-circular random motions within the galaxies," noted Erwin de Blok of the University of Cape Town, South Africa. Galaxy Dynamics in THINGS The motion measurements are providing new information about the mysterious, unseen "dark matter" in the galaxies. "The non-circular motions revealed by the THINGS observations, turn out to be too small to solve a long-standing problem in cosmology, namely the inability of state-of-the-art computer simulations to describe the distribution of dark matter in disk galaxies. It was thought that random motions could explain that inability, but our data show otherwise," de Blok explained. The THINGS images revealed what Elias Brinks of the University of Hertfordshire, UK, called a "stunning complexity of structures in the tenuous interstellar medium of the galaxies." These structures include large shells and "bubbles," presumably caused by multiple supernova explosions of massive stars. Analyzing the detail of these complex structures will help astronomers better understand the differences in star formation processes in the varied types of galaxies. Even such a simple question such as how big are the disks of gas in spiral galaxies had largely eluded astronomers previously. "The quality and sensitivity of the THINGS images has allowed us to see the actual edges of these

  19. Spirochete motility and morpholgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charon, Nyles

    2004-03-01

    . burgdorferi during chemotaxis. In translational motility, the bundles of periplasmic flagella rotate in opposite directions. When not translating, they rotate in the same direction, and the cells flex. We present evidence that asymmetrical rotation of the bundles during translation does not depend upon the chemotaxis signal transduction system. The histidine kinase CheA is known to be an essential component in the signaling pathway for bacterial chemotaxis. Mutants of cheA in flagellated bacteria continually rotate their flagella in one direction. B. burgdorferi has two copies of cheA. We reasoned that if chemotaxis were essential for asymmetrical rotation of the flagellar bundles, and if the flagellar motors at both cell ends were identical, inactivation of the two cheA genes should result in cells that constant flex. To test this hypothesis, the signaling pathway was completely blocked by construction of a double cheA mutant. This mutant was completely deficient in chemotaxis. Rather than flexing, it failed to reverse, and it continually translated only in one direction. The results indicate that asymmetrical rotation does not depend upon the chemotaxis system but rather upon differences between the two flagellar bundles. We propose that certain factors within the spirochete localize at flagellar motors at one end of the cell to effect this asymmetry (3). References: 1. Charon, N.W. and S.F. Goldstein. 2002. The genetics of motility and chemotaxis of a fascinating group of bacteria: the spirochetes. Ann. Rev. Genetics. 36: 47-73. 2. Motaleb M.A., L. Corum, J.L Bono, A.F. Elias, P. Rosa, D.S. Samuels, N.W. Charon. 2000. Borrelia burgdorferi periplasmic flagella have both skeletal and motility functions. Proc Natl Acad Sci. 2000 97:10899-10904. 3. Li, C. R. Bakker, M. Motaleb, F. Cabello, M.L. Sartakova, and N.W. Charon. 2002. Asymmetrical flagellar rotation in Borrelia burgdorferi non-chemotaxis mutants. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 99:6169-6174.

  20. Global snowline and mountain topography: a contrasted view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagnac, Jean-Daniel; Herman, Frédéric; Valla, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    topography and the rate of rock column uplift: a global perspective, Geomorphology, 122, 129-139, 10.1016/j.geomorph.2010.06.005, 2010. Porter, S. C.: Some geological implications of average Quaternary glacial conditions., Quaternary Research, 32, 245-261, 1989. Spotila, J. A., and Berger, A. L.: Exhumation at orogenic indentor corners under long-term glacial conditions: Example of the St. Elias orogen, Southern Alaska, Tectonophysics, 490, 241-256, doi:10.1016/j.tecto.2010.05.015, 2010.

  1. In situ measurement of the Icelandic Holuhraun/ Bárðarbunga volcanic plume in an early "young state" using a LOAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignelles, Damien; Roberts, Tjarda; Carboni, Elisa; Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Dagsson Waldhauserovà, Pavla; Berthet, Gwenael; Jegou, Fabrice; Baptiste Renard, Jean; Olafsson, Haraldur; Bergsson, Baldur; Yeo, Richard; Fannar Reynisson, Njall; Grainger, Roy; Pfeffer, Melissa; Lurton, Thibaut; Duverger, Vincent; Coute, Benoit

    2016-04-01

    analysis of IASI satellite remote sensing data, thus demonstrating in-situ validation of this recent satellite algorithm (Carboni et al. 2015). This experimentation shows that under such difficult field campaign conditions (strong wind, low temperatures, only car batteries for power supply, night time and active volcano close to the launch site) it is possible to launch meteorological balloons with novel payloads to directly sample in-situ the near-source plume, determine the plume altitude, identify dynamical phases of the plume and document the size distribution of particles inside a plume which is only a quarter of an hour old. Carboni, E., Grainger, R., Walker, J., Dudhia, A., Siddans, R.: A new scheme for sulphur dioxide retrieval from IASI measurements: application to the Eyjafjallajökull eruption of April and May 2010, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 11417-11434, 2012/doi:10.5194/acp-12-11417-2012, 2012. Gíslason, S.R., Stefánsdóttir, G., Pfeffer, M.A., Barsotti, S., Jóhannsson, Th., Galeczka, I., Bali, E., Sigmarsson, O., Stefánsson, A., Keller, N.S., Sigurdsson, Á., Bergsson, B., Galle, B., Jacobo, V.C., Arellano, S., Aiuppa, A., Jónasdóttir, E.B., Eiríksdóttir, E.S., Jakobsson, S., Guðfinnsson, G.H., alldórsson, S.A., Gunnarsson, H., Haddadi, B., Jónsdóttir, I., Thordarson, Th., Riishuus, M., ögnadóttir, Th., Dürig, T., Pedersen, G.B.M., Höskuldsson, Á., Gudmundsson, M.T.: Environmental pressure from the 2014-15 eruption of Bárðarbunga volcano, Iceland. Geochem. Persp. Let. 1, 84-93, 2015. Renard, J.B., Dulac, F., Berthet, G., Lurton, T., Vignelles, D., Jégou, F., Tonnelier, T., Thaury, C., Jeannot, M., Couté, B., Akiki, R., Verdier, N., Mallet, M., Gensdarmes, F., Charpentier, P., Duverger, V., Dupont, J.V., Mesmin, S., Elias, T., Crenn, V., Sciare, J., Giacomoni, J., Gobbi, M., Hamonou, E., Olafsson, H., Dagsson-Waldhauserova, P., Camy-Peyret, C., Mazel, C., Décamps, T., Piringer, M., Surcin, J., and Daugeron, D.: LOAC: a small aerosol optical

  2. "Missing Mass" Found in Recycled Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-05-01

    remains a mystery. "Still, this new information about the matter comprising galactic disks should help us work toward a better understanding of their formation and evolution," Bournaud concluded. Bournaud and Duc worked with Mederic Boquien, also of the AIM laboratory (CEA/CNRS); Elias Brinks of the University of Hertfordshire in the UK; Phillipe Amram of the Astronomical Observatory of Marseille-Provence; Ute Lisenfeld of the University of Granada, Spain; Barbel S. Koribalski of the Australia Telescope National Facility; Fabian Walter of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany; and Vassilis Charmandaris of the University of Crete, Greece. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. The California Institute of Technology leads the Galaxy Evolution Explorer mission and is responsible for science operations and data analysis. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech, manages the mission and built the science instrument, and also manages the Spitzer Space Telescope.

  3. Sleep on the right side-Get cancer on the left?

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Orjan; Johansson, Olle

    2010-06-01

    Breast cancer frequently occurs in the left breast among both women and men [R. Roychoudhuri, V. Putcha, H. Møller, Cancer and laterality: a study of the five major paired organs (UK), Cancer Causes Control 17 (2006) 655-662; M.T. Goodman, K.H. Tung, L.R. Wilkens, Comparative epidemiology of breast cancer among men and women in the US, 1996 to 2000, Cancer Causes Control 17 (2006) 127-136; C.I. Perkins, J. Hotes, B.A. Kohler, H.L. Howe, Association between breast cancer laterality and tumor location, United States, 1994-1998, Cancer Causes Control 15 (2004) 637-645; H.A. Weiss, S.S. Devesa, L.A. Brinton, Laterality of breast cancer in the United States, Cancer Causes Control 7 (1996) 539-543; A. Ekbom, H.O. Adami, D. Trichopoulos, M. Lambe, C.C. Hsieh, J. Pontén, Epidemiologic correlates of breast cancer laterality (Sweden), Cancer Causes Control 5 (1994) 510-516]. Moreover, recent results showed that the left side of the body is more prone to melanoma than the right side [D.H. Brewster, M.J. Horner, S. Rowan, P. Jelfs, E. de Vries, E. Pukkala, Left-sided excess of invasive cutaneous melanoma in six countries, Eur. J. Cancer 43 (2007) 2634-2637]. Current explanations for left-sided breast cancer include handedness [L. Titus-Ernstoff, P.A. Newcomb, K.M. Egan, et al., Left-handedness in relation to breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women, Epidemiology 11 (2000) 181-184; M.A. Kramer, S. Albrecht, R.A. Miller, Handedness and the laterality of breast cancer in women, Nurs. Res. 34 (1985) 333-337; M.K. Ramadhani, S.G. Elias, P.A. van Noord, D.E. Grobbee, P.H. Peeters, C.S. Uiterwaal, Innate left handedness and risk of breast cancer: case-cohort study, BMJ 331 (2005) 882-883], size difference, nursing preference, and brain structure. However, men are affected even more by left laterality than women, thus many of these explanations are unconvincing. Increasing rates of skin melanoma have been associated with immune-disruptive radiation from FM/TV transmitters [O

  4. FOREWORD: International Summer School for Advanced Studies 'Dynamics of open nuclear systems' (PREDEAL12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delion, D. S.; Zamfir, N. V.; Raduta, A. R.; Gulminelli, F.

    2013-02-01

    the status of the equation of state, hyperonic and quark matter and neutrino physics, as well as the applications of nuclear structure in astrophysics, were also on the School's agenda. There were many discussions and questions both during and after presentations. An open and friendly atmosphere characterized our School, although different opinions quite often divided the participants. Many discussions continued during coffee breaks and excursions organized in the beautiful surroundings. We hope that this proceedings volume will be useful for future reference to both young scientists and senior researchers working in various fields of nuclear physics. We cannot end without expressing our many thanks to the National Authority for Scientific Research and the Romanian Academy (Elias Foundation) for their financial support. We acknowledge the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering and Bioterra University for their important contribution in organizing the School. Guest Editors D S Delion, N V Zamfir, A R Raduta and F Gulminelli First Week International Summer School on Nuclear Physics: First Week Second Week International Summer School on Nuclear Physics: Second Week Sponsors Sponsor logoSponsor logoSponsor logoSponsor logoSponsor logo

  5. High resolution spectroscopy of old stars and young disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitner, Martin Allan, Jr.

    published results obtained using similar techniques, we find [left angle bracket]K K [right angle bracket] = 163.7 ± 0.7 km s -1 and [left angle bracket] q [right angle bracket] = 0.683 ± 0.012. The orbital light curve of SS Cyg shows an ellipsoidal variation diluted by light from the disk and white dwarf. From an analysis of the ellipsoidal variations we limit the orbital inclination to the range 45° <= i <= 56°. The derived masses of the K star and white dwarf are M K = 0.55 ± 0.13 [Special characters omitted.] and M wd = 0.81 ± 0.19[Special characters omitted.] , where the uncertainties are dominated by systematic errors in the orbital inclination. The K star in SS Cyg is 10% to 50% larger than an unevolved star with the same mass and thus does not follow the mass-radius relation for Zero-Age Main- Sequence stars; nor does it follow the ZAMS mass/spectral-type relation. Its mass and spectral type are, however, consistent with models in which the core hydrogen has been significantly depleted. In Chapters 4 and 5, we report the results of a search for pure rotational molecular hydrogen emission from the circumstellar environments of young stellar objects with disks using the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES) on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Gemini North Observatory. We searched for mid-infrared H 2 emission in the S(1), S(2), and S (4) transitions. Keck NIRSPEC observations of the H2 S(9) transition were included for some sources as an additional constraint on the gas temperature. We detected H 2 emission from 6 of 28 sources observed: AB Aur, DoAr 21, Elias 29, GSS 30 IRS 1, GV Tau N, and HL Tau. Four of the six targets with detected emission are class I sources that show evidence for surrounding material in an envelope in addition to a circumstellar disk. The detected emission lines are narrow (~10 km s -1 ), centered at the stellar velocity, and spatially unresolved at scales of 0.4 inches, which is consistent with origin from a disk

  6. a Passage to the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    a concluding Press Conference , during which the outcome of this unique event will be summarized by the participants and the organisers: Monday, November 20, 1995, 15:30 pm, at the ESO Headquarters, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching, Germany List of National First-Prize Winners Belgium: Mr. Freddy Allemeersch (Teacher), Mr. Pieter De Ceuninck, Mr. Jeroen Staelens (Onze-Lieve-Vrouwecollege, Brugge) Denmark: Mr. Joern C. Olsen, Mr. Henrik Struckmann, Mr. Uffe A. Hansen, Mr. Mogens Winther (Teacher) (Soenderborg Amtsgymnasium) Finland: Mr. Reima Eresmaa, Ms. Laura Elina Nykyri, Ms. Reetamaija Janhonen (Cygnaeues-Lukeo, Jyvaeskylae and Jyvaeskylaen Lyseon Lukeo) France: Mr. Rene Cavaroz (Teacher), Mr. Vincent Hardy, Mr. Antoine Lesuffleur (Lycee Chartier, Bayeux) Germany: Ms. Dorothee Barth, Mr. Walter Czech (Teacher), Mr. Uwe Kranz, Ms. Karin Wieland (Immanuel-Kant-Gymnasium, Leinfelden-Echterdingen, Baden-Wuerttemberg) Greece: Ms. Agni Ioannidi, Ms. Elena Katifori, Mr. Vassilis Samiotis, Mr. Vassillos Tzotzes (Teacher) (Second Varvakelo Experimental Lyceum, Athens) Ireland: Mr. Declan Maccuarta (Teacher), Mr. Colm Mcloughlin (St. Peter's College, Wexford, Co. Wexford) Italy: Mr. Pasquale Ciarletta, Ms. Francesca D'elia, Ms. Ada Fortugna (Teacher), Mr. Alfredo Pudano (Liceo Scientifico `Leonardo da Vinci', Reggio Calabria) The Netherlands: Mr. Alex De Beer, Mr. Klaas Huijbregts, Mr. Ruud Nellen (Norbertuscollege, Rosendaal) Spain: Mr. Aritz Atela Aio, Mr. Julen Sarasola Manich (Teacher), Mr. Jon Huertas Rodriquez (Txorierri Batxilergoko Institua, Derio Bizkaia) Sweden: Mr. Rahman Amanullah, Mr. Kjell L. Bonander (Teacher), Mr. Tomas Oppelstrup, Ms. Christin Wiedemann (Saltsjoebadens Samskola, Saltsjoebaden) United Kingdom: Mr. Michael Ching, Dr. Richard Field (Teacher) (Oundle School, Peterborough) National Committees Further information about the national contests may be obtained from the National Committees: Belgium: Dr. C. Sterken, Vrije Universiteit

  7. PREFACE: The IARU International Scientific Congress on Climate Change: Global Risks, Challenges and Decisions (10-12 March, Copenhagen, Denmark)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-01-01

    revitalization of ecosystem services Key Message 6: Meeting the Challenge To achieve the societal transformation required to meet the climate change challenge, we must overcome a number of significant constraints and seize critical opportunities These include reducing inertia in social and economic systems; building on a growing public desire for governments to act on climate change; removing implicit and explicit subsidies; reducing the influence of vested interests that increase emissions and reduce resilience; enabling the shifts from ineffective governance and weak institutions to innovative leadership in government, the private sector and civil society; and engaging society in the transition to norms and practices that foster sustainability The editors of the volume are all the session chairs: Professor Agus Sari Dr Aled Jones Science Manager Anders Viksø-Nielsen Dr Andreas Barkman Professor Anette Reenberg Professor Ann Henderson-Sellers Professor Anthony J McMichael Dr Anthony Patt Dr Bette Otto-Bliesner Dr Cameron Hepburn Dr Carlos Nobre Dr Carol Turley Dr Chris Hope Professor Chris Turney Professor Claus Felby Professor Coleen Vogel Professor Dale Jamieson Professor Daniel M Kammen Senior Scientist Detlef F Sprinz Professor Diana Ürge-Vorsatz Professor Dorthe Dahl-Jensen PhD Fatima Denton Director Generel Frances Seymour Dr Frank Jotzo Professor Harold Mooney Director Henrik Bindslev Mr Jamie Pittock Professor Jacquie Burgess Dr James E Hansen Professor Jiahua Pan Dr Jill Jäger Professor Jim Skea Professor Johan Rockström Dr John Christensen Professor John Mitchell Professor John R Porter Professor Joyeeta Gupta Professor Jørgen E Olesen Professor Karen O'Brien Dr Kazuhiko Takeuchi Dr Katrine Krogh Andersen Professor Keith Paustian Professor Ken Caldeira Professor Kevin Anderson Dr Koko Warner Professor Konrad Steffen Professor Liping Zhou Professor Louise Fresco Professor Maria Carmen Lemos Professor Mark Ashton Dr Mark Stafford-Smith Dr Martin Claussen Dr Martin

  8. EDITORIAL: Focus on Iron-Based Superconductors FOCUS ON IRON-BASED SUPERCONDUCTORS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Hideo; Ren, Zhi-An

    2009-02-01

    Elastic theory for the vortex-lattice melting in iron-based high-Tc superconductors Q-H Chen, Q-M Nie, J-P Lv and T-C Au Yeung Electronic properties of LaO1-xFxFeAs in the normal state probed by NMR/NQR H-J Grafe, G Lang, F Hammerath, D Paar, K Manthey, K Koch, H Rosner, N J Curro, G Behr, J Werner, N Leps, R Klingeler, H-H Klauss, F J Litterst and B Büchner AFe2As2 (A = Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu) and SrFe2-xTMxAs2 (TM = Mn, Co, Ni): crystal structure, charge doping, magnetism and superconductivity Deepa Kasinathan, Alim Ormeci, Katrin Koch, Ulrich Burkhardt, Walter Schnelle, Andreas Leithe-Jasper and Helge Rosner Impurity states in a family of antiferromagnetic iron arsenides Qiang Han and Z D Wang Coherence-incoherence crossover in the normal state of iron oxypnictides and importance of Hund's rule coupling K Haule and G Kotliar Electronic structure of heavily electron-doped BaFe1.7Co0.3As2 studied by angle-resolved photoemission Y Sekiba, T Sato, K Nakayama, K Terashima, P Richard, J H Bowen, H Ding, Y-M Xu, L J Li, G H Cao, Z-A Xu and T Takahashi Absorption and photoemission spectroscopy of rare-earth oxypnictides T Kroll, F Roth, A Koitzsch, R Kraus, D R Batchelor, J Werner, G Behr, B Büchner and M Knupfer Superconductivity in LnFePO (Ln = La, Pr and Nd) single crystals R E Baumbach, J J Hamlin, L Shu, D A Zocco, N M Crisosto and M B Maple Unconventional pairing originating from disconnected Fermi surfaces in the iron-based superconductor Kazuhiko Kuroki, Seiichiro Onari, Ryotaro Arita, Hidetomo Usui, Yukio Tanaka, Hiroshi Kontani and Hideo Aoki Near-degeneracy of several pairing channels in multiorbital models for the Fe pnictides S Graser, T A Maier, P J Hirschfeld and D J Scalapino Investigation of superconducting gap structure in TbFeAsO0.9F0.1 using point contact Andreev reflection K A Yates, K Morrison, J A Rodgers, G B S Penny, J-W G Bos, J P Attfield and L F Cohen Competition of magnetism and superconductivity in underdoped (Ba1-xKx)Fe2As2 Marianne Rotter, Marcus

  9. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    MoralIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università di Torino Valentina Giangreco Marotta PulettiUppsala University Valeria L GiliQueen Mary, University of London Luciano GirardelloUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Gian GiudiceCERN, Geneva Kevin Goldstein Institute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Joaquim Gomis Universitat de Barcelona Pietro Antonio GrassiUniversità del Piemonte Orientale, Alessandria Viviane GraßLudwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Gianluca Grignani Università di Perugia Luca Griguolo Università di Parma Johannes GrosseJagiellonian University, Krakow Umut Gursoy École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Norberto Gutierrez RodriguezUniversity of Oviedo Babak HaghighatPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn Troels Harmark Niels Bohr Institute, København Robert HaslhoferEidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Tae-Won HaPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn Alexander HauptImperial College London and Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Marc HenneauxUniversité Libre de Bruxelles Johannes HennLAPTH, Annecy-le-Vieux Shinji HiranoNiels Bohr Institute, København Stefan HoheneggerEidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Jan HomannLudwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Gabriele Honecker CERN, Geneva Joost HoogeveenInstituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam Mechthild HuebscherUniversidad Autónoma de Madrid Chris HullImperial College London Carmen-Liliana IonescuUniversity of Craiova Ella JasminUniversité Libre de Bruxelles Konstantin KanishchevInstitute of Theoretical Physics, University of Warsaw Stefanos Katmadas Utrecht University Alexandros KehagiasNational Technical University of Athens Christoph Keller Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Patrick Kerner Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Rebiai KhaledLaboratoire de Physique Mathématique et Physique Subatomique, Université Mentouri, Constantine Elias Kiritsis Centre de Physique Théorique,

  10. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Heller Jagiellonian University, Krakow Samuli Hemming University of Iceland Yasuaki Hikida DESY, Hamburg Christian Hillmann Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Potsdam Stephan Hoehne Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Gabriele Honecker CERN, Geneva Carlos Hoyos University of Wales, Swansea Mechthild Huebscher Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid Matthias Ihl University of Texas at Austin Emiliano Imeroni University of Wales, Swansea Nikos Irges University of Crete Negru Iulian University of Craiova Matthias Kaminski Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Stefanos Katmadas Universiteit Utrecht Shoichi Kawamoto Oxford University Christoph Keller Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Arjan Keurentjes Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Sadi Khodaee Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan, Iran Michael Kiermaier Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA Elias Kiritsis Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau and University of Crete Ingo KirschEidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Johanna Knapp CERN, Geneva Paul Koerber Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Simon Koers Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Anatoly Konechny Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh Peter Koroteev Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow Daniel KreflLudwig-Maximilians-Universität and Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Chethan KrishnanUniversité Libre de Bruxelles Stanislav Kuperstein Université Libre de Bruxelles Alberto Lerda Università del Piemonte Orientale, Alessandria Roman Linares Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Iztapalapa, México Maria A Lledo Universidad de Valencia Dieter Luest Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Joseph Lykken Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, IL Carlo Maccaferri Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Oscar Macia Universidad de Valencia Tristan Maillard Centre de

  11. EDITORIAL: Special issue on applied neurodynamics: from neural dynamics to neural engineering Special issue on applied neurodynamics: from neural dynamics to neural engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiel, Hillel J.; Thomas, Peter J.

    2011-12-01

    -LXIII (London: Royal Society) Ralph T C and Pryde G J 2010 Progress in Optics vol 54, ed E Wolf (New York: Elsevier) pp 209-79 (arXiv:1103.6071) Rashevsky N 1960 Mathematical Biophysics: Physico-Mathematical Foundations of Biology vol 1 3rd edn (New York: Dover) pp 375-462 (first edition 1938) Rinzel J and Ermentrout G B 1989 Analysis of neuronal excitability and oscillations Methods in Neuronal Modeling ed C Koch and I Segev (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press) pp 135-69 Rosin B, Nevet A, Elias S, Rivlin-Etzion M, Israel Z and Bergman H 2007 Physiology and pathophysiology of the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical networks Parkinsonism Relat. Disord. 13 S437-9 Spardy L E, Markin S N, Shevtsova N A, Prilutsky B I, Rybak I A and Rubin J E 2011a A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion: I. Rhythm generation J. Neural Eng. 8 065003 Spardy L E, Markin S N, Shevtsova N A, Prilutsky B I, Rybak I A and Rubin J E 2011b A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion: II. Phase asymmetry J. Neural Eng. 8 065004 Steane A 1998 Quantum computing Rep. Prog. Phys. 61 117-73 Strogatz S H 1994 Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos: with Applications to Physics, Biology, Chemistry, and Engineering (Cambridge, MA: Perseus) Thomas P J 2011 A lower bound for the first passage time density of the suprathreshold Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process J. Appl. Probab. 48 420-34 White J A, Rubinstein J T and Kay A R 2000 Channel noise in neurons Trends Neurosci. 23 131-7 Wilson H R and Cowan J D 1972 Excitatory and inhibitory interactions in localized populations of model neurons Biophys. J. 12 1-24 Wilson H R and Cowan J D 1973 A mathematical theory of the functional dynamics of cortical and thalamic nervous tissue Biol. Cybern. 13 55-80